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Sample records for umtra uranium mill

  1. UMTRA [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action] Project site management manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    The purpose of this manual is to summarize the organizational interfaces and the technical approach used to manage the planning, design development, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance, engineering, and remedial action required to stabilize and control the designated Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites. This manual describes the Project's objective, participants' roles and responsibilities, technical approach for accomplishing the objective, and planning and managerial controls to be used in performing the site work. The narrative follows the flow of activities depicted in Figure 1.1, which provides the typical sequence of key Project activities. A list of acronyms used is presented at the end of the manual. The comparable manual for UMTRA Project vicinity properties is the ''Vicinity Properties Management and Implementation Manual'' (VPMIM) (UMTRA-DOE/AL-050601). Together, the two manuals cover the remedial action activities associated with UMTRA Project sites. The UMTRA Project's objective is to stabilize and control the uranium mill tailings, vicinity property materials, and other residual radioactive materials at the designated sites (Figure 1.2) in a safe and environmentally sound manner in order to minimize radiation health hazards to the public. 26 figs., 6 tabs

  2. UMTRA -- The US Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lightner, R.; Cormier, C.; Bierley, D.

    1995-01-01

    In the late 1970s, the United States (US) established the first comprehensive regulatory structure for the management, disposal, and long-term care of wastes produced from its domestic uranium processing industry. This regulatory framework was established through the passage of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, often referred to as UMTRCA. This legislation created the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project and assigned the US Department of Energy (DOE) the lead in conducting the required remedial action at 24 designated inactive uranium ore processing sites. With the majority of these 22 sites complete, the DOE's UMTRA Project has established a distinguished reputation for safely and effectively remediating these low-level waste sites in a complex regulatory and socioeconomic environment. This paper describes the past accomplishments and current status of the UMTRA Project and discusses the DOE's plans for addressing ground water contamination associated with these sites and its commitment to continuing the long-term care and management of these disposal cells

  3. Environmental management audit, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) has established, as part of the internal oversight responsibilities within Department of Energy (DOE), a program within the Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), to conduct environmental audits at DOE's operating facilities. This document contains the results of the Environmental Management Audit of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. This Environmental Management Audit was conducted by the DOE's Office of Environmental Audit from October 26 through November 6, 1992. The audit's objective is to advise the Secretary as to the adequacy of UMTRA's environmental programs, and management organization in ensuring environmental protection and compliance with Federal, state, and DOE environmental requirements. This Environmental Management Audit's scope was comprehensive and covered all areas of environmental management with the exception of environmental programs pertaining to the implementation of the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which is the responsibility of the DOE Headquarters Office of NEPA Oversight

  4. Programmatic Environmental Report for remedial actions at UMTRA [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action] Project vicinity properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-03-01

    This Environmental Report (ER) examines the environmental consequences of implementing a remedial action that would remove radioactive uranium mill tailings and associated contaminated materials from 394 vicinity properties near 14 inactive uranium processing sites included in the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project pursuant to Public Law 95--604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. Vicinity properties are those properties in the vicinity of the UMTRA Project inactive mill sites, either public or private, that are believed to be contaminated by residual radioactive material originating from one of the 14 inactive uranium processing sites, and which have been designated under Section 102(a)(1) of UMTRCA. The principal hazard associated with the contaminated properties results from the production of radon, a radioactive decay product of the radium contained in the tailings. Radon, a radioactive gas, can diffuse through the contaminated material and be released into the atmosphere where it and its radioactive decay products may be inhaled by humans. A second radiation exposure pathway results from the emission of gamma radiation from uranium decay products contained in the tailings. Gamma radiation emitted from contaminated material delivers an external exposure to the whole body. If the concentration of radon and its decay products is high enough and the exposure time long enough, or if the exposure to direct gamma radiation is long enough, cancers (i.e., excess health effects) may develop in persons living and working at the vicinity properties. 3 refs., 7 tabs

  5. Critical management issues for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Themelis, J.G.; Krishnan, K.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (PL95-604) authorized the Secretary of Energy to enter into cooperative agreements with certain states and Indian Tribes to clean up 24 inactive uranium mill tailing sites and associated vicinity properties. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project includes the three Federal agencies (EPA, DOE, and NRC), eleven state, Indian Tribes, and at least four major contractors. The UMTRA Project extends over a period of ten years. The standards for the Project require a design life of 1000 years with a minimum performance period of 200 years. This paper discusses the critical management issues in dealing with the UMTRA Project and identifies the development of solutions for many of those issues. The highlights to date are promulgation of EPA standards, continued support from Congress and participating states and Indian Tribes, significant leadership shown at all levels, establishment of credibility with the public, and continued motivation of the team. The challenge for tomorrow is making certain NRC will license the sites and maintaining the high level of coordination exhibited to date to assure Project completion on schedule

  6. Project licensing plan for UMTRA [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action] sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Licensing Plan is to establish how a disposal site will be licensed, and to provide responsibilities of participatory agencies as legislated by the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 (Public Law 95-604). This Plan has been developed to ensure that the objectives of licensing are met by identifying the necessary institutional controls, participatory agency responsibilities, and key milestones in the licensing process. The Plan contains the legislative basis for and a description of the licensing process (''Process'') for UMTRA sites. This is followed by a discussion of agency responsibilities, and milestones in the Process. The Plan concludes with a generic timeline of this Process. As discussed in Section 2.1, a custodial maintenance and surveillance plan will constitute the basis for a site license. The details of maintenance and surveillance are discussed in the Project Maintenance and Surveillance Plan (AL-350124.0000). 5 refs., 4 figs

  7. The ultrasonic ranging and data system for radiological surveys in the UMTRA [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action] Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, C.A.; Berven, B.A.; Blair, M.S.; Dickerson, K.S.; Pickering, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The Ultrasonic Ranging and Data System (USRADS) was developed to allow radiation exposure data and positional information to be collected, stored and analyzed in a more efficient manner than currently employed on the (Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) project. USRADS is a portable unit which employs ultrasonics, radio frequency transmissions, and a personal computer. Operational experience indicates that the system results in increased information about the property with decreased data analysis and transcription effort and only slightly more field effort. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Waste minimization opportunities at the U.S. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, Rifle, Colorado, site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, G.L.; Arp, S.; Hempill, H.

    1993-01-01

    At two uranium mill sites in Rifle, Colorado, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is removing uranium mill tailings and contaminated subgrade soils. This remediation activity will result in the production of groundwater contaminated with uranium, heavy metals, ammonia, sulfates, and total dissolved solids (TDS). The initial remediation plan called for a wastewater treatment plant for removal of the uranium, heavy metals, and ammonia, with disposal of the treated water, which still includes the sulfates and TDSS, to the Colorado River. The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination (NPDES) permit issued by the Colorado Department of Health for the two Rifle sites contained more restrictive discharge limits than originally anticipated. During the detailed review of alternate treatment systems to meet these more restrictive limits, the proposed construction procedures were reviewed emphasizing the methods to minimize groundwater production to reduce the size of the water treatment facility, or to eliminate it entirely. It was determined that with changes to the excavation procedures and use of the contaminated groundwater for use in dust suppression at the disposal site, discharge to the river could be eliminated completely

  9. 1992 Colorado Economic Impact Study for the US Department of Energy and Colorado Department of Health Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The findings of the 1992 Colorado Economic Impact Study (CEIS) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project are outlined below. All dollar amounts used in the study are in year-of-expenditure dollars. The total funding requirement for the State of Colorado for the UMTRA Project is estimated to be $66.8 million, or 10 percent of the remedial action costs for the UMTRA Project in Colorado. The UMTRA Project will generate $487.5 million in gross labor income in Colorado between 1983 and 1996. This includes $54.4 million in state and local tax revenues and $41.2 million in federal individual income tax revenues. The net economic benefit of the UMTRA Project to Colorado is $355.1 million. For every dollar the State of Colorado invests in the UMTRA Project, it will realize $5.32 in gross labor income. The employment impact to the Western Slope region is significant. The UMTRA Project will create a total employment impact of 13,749 fulltime equivalents (FTES) spread over. a period of 13 years in seven site areas. Nearly 100 percent of the labor will be drawn from the local communities. The State of Colorado's Western Slope is anticipated to be minimally impacted by the phaseout of the UMTRA Project. Unlike industries that shut down operations without warning, the UMTRA Project workers, local government, and businesses know the schedule for completion and can consider and prepare for the impact of UMTRA Project conclusion. Further, because the majority of the work force is local, there has not been a significant investment in each community's infrastructure. Any small increases in the infrastructure will not be abandoned at the end of the UMTRA Project due to a marked increase in migration out of the local community

  10. Cleanup protocols when encountering thorium-230 at U.S. DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.L.; Hylko, J.M.; Cornish, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    The passage of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, established the regulatory framework, under which the US EPA charged with developing standards for the cleanup and disposal of tailings at 24 designated inactive uranium processing sites located in 10 states. 40 CFR 192.12 requires that the concentration of Ra-226 in land averaged over any area of 100 square meters shall not exceed the background level by more than 5 pCi/g, averaged over the first 15 cm of soil below the surface, 15 pCi/g, averaged over 15-cm-thick layers of soils more than 15 cm below the surface. However, Th-230 is not specifically addressed by the EPA in 40 CFR 192.12, which naturally decays with a half-life of 77,000 years to form Ra-226. Consequently, the cleanup of the initial Ra-226 contamination according to the standards will not necessarily mitigate against the eventual ingrowth of residual Ra-226 with time, due to the radioactive decay of residual Th-230. Therefore, to direct the excavation of residual Th-230, four generic protocols are being used at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites, as follows: Determining the allowable remaining concentration of Th-230 in surface and subsurface soils; Encountering Th-230 contamination in the unsaturated subsurface soil; Encountering Th-230 contamination in the saturated zone; and Verification sampling. The four generic protocols, developed in conjunction with the supplemental standards provision, ensure protection of the general public by reducing exposures to levels that are As Low As Reasonably Achievable, while considering practical measures necessary to excavate Th-230 under conditions encountered at the UMTRA Project site

  11. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Gunnison, Colorado. [UMTRA Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachrach, A.; Hoopes, J.; Morycz, D. (Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., Pasadena, CA (USA)); Bone, M.; Cox, S.; Jones, D.; Lechel, D.; Meyer, C.; Nelson, M.; Peel, R.; Portillo, R.; Rogers, L.; Taber, B.; Zelle, P. (Weston (Roy F.), Inc., Washington, DC (USA)); Rice, G. (Sergent, Hauskins and Beckwith (USA))

    1984-12-01

    This document assesses and compares the environmental impacts of various alternatives for remedial action at the Gunnison uranium of mill tailings site located 0.5 miles south of Gunnison, Colorado. The site covers 56 acres and contains 35 acres of tailings, 2 of the original mill buildings and a water tower. The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control of Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), Public Law 95-604, authorizes the US Department of Energy to clean up the site to reduce the potential health impacts associated with the residual radioactive materials remaining at the site and at associated (vicinity) properties off the site. The US Environmental Protection Agency promulgated standards for the remedial actions (40 CFR 192). Remedial actions must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the occurrence of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Four alternatives have been addressed in this document. The first alternative is to consolidate the tailings and associated contaminated soils into a recontoured pile on the southern portion of the existing site. A radon barrier of silty clay would be constructed over the pile and various erosion control measures would be taken to assure the long-term integrity of the pile. Two other alternatives which involve moving the tailings to new locations are assessed in this document. These alternatives generally involve greater short-term impacts and are more costly but would result in the tailings being stabilized in a location farther from the city of Gunnison. The no action alternative is also assessed.

  12. Public information experience in the uranium mill tailings remedial action (UMTRA) project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, H.R.; Skinner, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    To enhance public perception of the UMTRA Project remedial actions at some 23 sites in the US, an information program has been designed to demonstrate the small risk associated with the work in each community. An unusual aspect of this information program has involved a specific effort to educate listeners concerning the Health Physics terminology being used. The information program has been successful in reducing the level of public anxiety associated with UMTRA remedial action at the first Project site, and is currently being applied at several new sites

  13. Use of a permeable biological reaction barrier for groundwater remediation at a uranium mill tailings remedial action (UMTRA) site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thombre, M.S.; Thomson, B.M.; Barton, L.L.

    1997-01-01

    Previous work at the University of New Mexico and elsewhere has shown that sulfate reducing bacteria are capable of reducing uranium from the soluble +6 oxidation state to the insoluble +4 oxidation state. This chemistry forms the basis of a proposed groundwater remediation strategy in which microbial reduction would be used to immobilize soluble uranium. One such system would consist of a subsurface permeable barrier which would stimulate microbial growth resulting in the reduction of sulfate and nitrate and immobilization of metals while permitting the unhindered flow of ground water through it. This research investigated some of the engineering considerations associated with a microbial reducing barrier such as identifying an appropriate biological substrate, estimating the rate of substrate utilization, and identifying the final fate of the contaminants concentrated in the barrier matrix. The performance of batch reactors and column systems that treated simulated plume water was evaluated using cellulose, wheat straw, alfalfa hay, sawdust, and soluble starch as substrates. The concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, and U(VI) were monitored over time. Precipitates from each system were collected and the precipitated U(IV) was determined to be crystalline UO 2 (s) by X-ray Diffraction. The results of this study support the proposed use of cellulosic substrates as candidate barrier materials

  14. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1993 Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1993, surface remedial action was complete at 10 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites. In 1993 the UMTRA Project office revised the UMTRA Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, as required by the US DOE. Because the UMTRA Project sites are in different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

  15. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1993 Environmental Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1993, surface remedial action was complete at 10 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites. In 1993 the UMTRA Project office revised the UMTRA Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, as required by the US DOE. Because the UMTRA Project sites are in different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments

  16. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action fiscal year 1992 roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is funded and managed as two separate projects: Surface remediation (UMTRA-S) and Groundwater compliance (UMTRA-G). Surface remediation is a Major System Acquisition and has been completed at 10 sites, 7 sites are under construction, and 7 sites are in the planning stage. The planning stages of the UMTRA-G Project, a major project, began in April 1991. A programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) has been started. Site characterization work and baseline risk assessment will begin FY 1993. Thus, the UMTRA-S Project is a mature and ongoing program with the roles of various organizations well defined, while the UMTRA-G Project is still being formulated and the interfaces between the DOE, states and tribes, and the EPA are being established. The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) directed that all projects under its authority develop roadmaps for their activities. The UMTRA Project Roadmap was developed by the UMTRA Project Office with input from the TAC, RAC, the GJPO, and assistance from SAIC. A single roadmap has been prepared for both the UMTRA-S and UMTRA-G Projects. This was deemed appropriate due to the close relationship between the projects and to the fact that the same Government and contractor personnel are preparing the roadmaps. Roadmap development is a planning process that focuses on issue identification, root-cause analysis, and issues resolution. The methodology is divided into three phases: assessment, analysis, and issues resolution

  17. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project surface project management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This Project Management Plan describes the planning, systems, and organization that shall be used to manage the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA). US DOE is authorized to stabilize and control surface tailings and ground water contamination at 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials

  18. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project environmental protection implementation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP is updated annually. This version covers the time period of 9 November 1994, through 8 November 1995. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies

  19. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project environmental protection implementation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP is updated annually. This version covers the time period of 9 November 1994, through 8 November 1995. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies.

  20. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project is to eliminate, reduce, or address to acceptable levels the potential health and environmental consequences of milling activities. One of the first steps in the UMTRA Ground Water Project is the preparation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). This report contains the comments and responses received on the draft PEIS

  1. UMTRA Project value engineering plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    The objective of value engineering (VE) on the Uranium MILL Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is to ensure that remedial action at the UMTRA Project sites is performed to meet the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for inactive uranium mill tailings sites at the lowest cost, while maintaining a high quality of work. Through review of designs and consideration of reasonable, less expensive alternatives, VE can be an effective cost reduction tool and a means to improve the design. The UMTRA Project products are the design and construction of stabilized tailings embankments

  2. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1994 environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1994, surface remedial action was complete at 14 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites: Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; Durango, Colorado; Grand Junction, Colorado; Green River Utah, Lakeview, Oregon; Lowman, Idaho; Mexican Hat, Utah; Riverton, Wyoming; Salt Lake City, Utah; Falls City, Texas; Shiprock, New Mexico; Spook, Wyoming, Tuba City, Arizona; and Monument Valley, Arizona. Surface remedial action was ongoing at 5 sites: Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico; Naturita, Colorado; Gunnison, Colorado; and Rifle, Colorado (2 sites). Remedial action has not begun at the 5 remaining UMTRA Project sites that are in the planning stage. Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota; Maybell, Colorado; and Slick Rock, Colorado (2 sites). The ground water compliance phase of the UMTRA Project started in 1991. Because the UMTRA Project sites are.` different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

  3. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1994 environmental report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1994, surface remedial action was complete at 14 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites: Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; Durango, Colorado; Grand Junction, Colorado; Green River Utah, Lakeview, Oregon; Lowman, Idaho; Mexican Hat, Utah; Riverton, Wyoming; Salt Lake City, Utah; Falls City, Texas; Shiprock, New Mexico; Spook, Wyoming, Tuba City, Arizona; and Monument Valley, Arizona. Surface remedial action was ongoing at 5 sites: Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico; Naturita, Colorado; Gunnison, Colorado; and Rifle, Colorado (2 sites). Remedial action has not begun at the 5 remaining UMTRA Project sites that are in the planning stage. Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota; Maybell, Colorado; and Slick Rock, Colorado (2 sites). The ground water compliance phase of the UMTRA Project started in 1991. Because the UMTRA Project sites are.' different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments

  4. Uranium Mill Tailings Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at the Fifth Symposium on Uranium Mill Tailings Management. Advances made with regard to uranium mill tailings management, environmental effects, regulations, and reclamation are reviewed. Topics considered include tailings management and design (e.g., the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, environmental standards for uranium mill tailings disposal), surface stabilization (e.g., the long-term stability of tailings, long-term rock durability), radiological aspects (e.g. the radioactive composition of airborne particulates), contaminant migration (e.g., chemical transport beneath a uranium mill tailings pile, the interaction of acidic leachate with soils), radon control and covers (e.g., radon emanation characteristics, designing surface covers for inactive uranium mill tailings), and seepage and liners (e.g., hydrologic observations, liner requirements)

  5. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollmer, A.T.

    1993-10-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP covers the time period of November 9, 1993, through November 8, 1994. It will be updated annually. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies. Contents of this report are: (1) general description of the UMTRA project environmental protection program; (2) notifications; (3) planning and reporting; (4) special programs; (5) environmental monitoring programs; (6) quality assurance and data verification; and (7) references

  6. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollmer, A.T.

    1993-10-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP covers the time period of November 9, 1993, through November 8, 1994. It will be updated annually. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies. Contents of this report are: (1) general description of the UMTRA project environmental protection program; (2) notifications; (3) planning and reporting; (4) special programs; (5) environmental monitoring programs; (6) quality assurance and data verification; and (7) references.

  7. Public participation in UMTRA Project program management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majors, M.J.; Ulland, L.M.

    1993-01-01

    Innovative techniques for overcoming barriers to public participation on the US Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project have led to improved communications with stakeholders at project sites and improved communications within the project. On the UMTRA Project, it's been shown that an effective public participation program is an essential element to successful project implementation

  8. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Green River, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This document evaluates potential impacts to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell on the site in 1989 by the US DOE's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination in this risk assessment

  9. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Green River, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This document evaluates potential impacts to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell on the site in 1989 by the US DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination in this risk assessment.

  10. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. 1995 Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 23 1. 1, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, the DOE prepares an annual report to document the activities of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring program. This monitoring must comply with appropriate laws, regulations, and standards, and it must identify apparent and meaningful trends in monitoring results. The results of all monitoring activities must be communicated to the public. The UMTRA Project has prepared annual environmental reports to the public since 1989.

  11. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. 1995 Environmental Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 23 1. 1, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, the DOE prepares an annual report to document the activities of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring program. This monitoring must comply with appropriate laws, regulations, and standards, and it must identify apparent and meaningful trends in monitoring results. The results of all monitoring activities must be communicated to the public. The UMTRA Project has prepared annual environmental reports to the public since 1989

  12. Uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floeter, W.

    1976-01-01

    In this report uranium mining and milling are reviewed. The fuel cycle, different types of uranium geological deposits, blending of ores, open cast and underground mining, the mining cost and radiation protection in mines are treated in the first part of this report. In the second part, the milling of uranium ores is treated, including process technology, acid and alkaline leaching, process design for physical and chemical treatment of the ores, and the cost. Each chapter is clarified by added figures, diagrams, tables, and flowsheets. (HK) [de

  13. Annual status report on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    This fourteenth annual status report for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office summarizes activities of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Surface (UMTRA-Surface) and Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater (UMTRA-Groundwater) Projects undertaken during fiscal year (FY) 1992 by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies. Project goals for FY 1993 are also presented. An annual report of this type was a statutory requirement through January 1, 1986, pursuant to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law (PL) 95-604. The DOE will continue to submit annual reports to DOE-Headquarters, the states, tribes, and local representatives through Project completion in order to inform the public of the yearly Project status. The purpose of the remedial action is to stabilize and control the tailings and other residual radioactive material (RRM) located on the inactive uranium processing sites in a safe and environmentally sound manner, and to minimize or eliminate potential health hazards. Commercial and residential properties near designated processing sites that are contaminated with material from the sites, herein referred to as ''vicinity properties (VP),'' are also eligible for remedial action. Included in the UMTRA Project are 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated VPs located in 10 states, and the VPs associated with the Edgemont, South Dakota, uranium mill currently owned by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) (Figure A.1, Appendix A)

  14. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1993 (July 1, 1992, through June 30, 1993). To capture employment benefits, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. An estimated 52 percent of the employees working on the UMTRA Project responded to this information request. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized

  15. Scoping session of the programmatic environmental impact statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This document is about the scoping session which was held at the Community Center in Falls City, Texas. The purpose was to obtain public comment on the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA), specifically on the ground water project. Presentations made by the manager for the entire UMTRA program, manager of the site and ground water program, comments made by two residents of Fall City are included in this document

  16. Scoping session of the programmatic environmental impact statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-12-31

    This document is about the scoping session which was held at the Community Center in Falls City, Texas. The purpose was to obtain public comment on the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA), specifically on the ground water project. Presentations made by the manager for the entire UMTRA program, manager of the site and ground water program, comments made by two residents of Fall City are included in this document.

  17. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Vicinity Property Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, L.E.; Potter, R.F.; Arpke, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    The Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Grand Junction Project Vicinity Property Program is a $165 million program for the removal and disposal of uranium mill tailings that were used in the construction of approximately 4,000 residences, commercial buildings, and institutional facilities in the City of Grand Junction and surrounding Mesa County, Colorado. This paper discusses the UMTRA Vicinity Property Program and the economic benefits of this program for the City of Grand Junction and Mesa County, Colorado. The Bureau of Reclamation Economic Assessment Model (BREAM) was used to estimate the increases in employment and increases in personal income in Mesa County that result from the Vicinity Property Program. The effects of program-related changes in income and taxable expenditures on local and state tax revenue are also presented

  18. Completion of the uranium mill tailings remedial project and cleanup of the former mill site at Grand Junction, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rael, G.J.; Cox, S.W.; Artiglia, E.W.

    2000-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project has successfully completed the cleanup of 22 former uranium mill sites, more than 5400 vicinity properties, and has constructed 18 entombment cells. The Project has recently received the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission's approval and certification for the last two disposal sites, with these sites being placed under the general license for long term custodial care of residual radioactive material. The UMTRA site located at Grand Junction, Colorado is a good example of the technical, political, economic, and public relations challenges that were overcome in achieving success. The UMTRA Team discussed, negotiated, planned, and eventually acted on this uranium mill tailings problem and brought the project to a successful conclusion for the community. From the early 1940s through the 1970s, uranium ore was mined in significant quantities under United States federal contracts for the government's national defence programmes, i.e. the Manhattan Engineering District and Atomic Energy Commission programmes. The problem started as the need for uranium decreased in the late 1960s, resulting in mills shutting down, leaving behind large quantities of process waste tailings and contaminated mill buildings. The former Climax Uranium Company mill site in Grand Junction was one of the largest of these sites. (author)

  19. Uranium mill tailings remedial action project real estate management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This plan summarizes the real estate requirements of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Action (UMTRA) Project, identifies the roles and responsibilities of project participants involved in real estate activities, and describes the approaches used for completing these requirements. This document is intended to serve as a practical guide for all project participants. It is intended to be consistent with all formal agreements, but if a conflict is identified, the formal agreements will take precedence

  20. Uranium mill tailings remedial action project real estate management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This plan summarizes the real estate requirements of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Action (UMTRA) Project, identifies the roles and responsibilities of project participants involved in real estate activities, and describes the approaches used for completing these requirements. This document is intended to serve as a practical guide for all project participants. It is intended to be consistent with all formal agreements, but if a conflict is identified, the formal agreements will take precedence.

  1. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Lowman, Idaho: Remedial action selection report for the Lowman UMTRA project site, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, M.L.; Nagel, J.

    1991-09-01

    The inactive uranium mill tailings site near Lowman, Idaho, was designated as one of 24 abandoned uranium tailings sites to be remediated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). The UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE's remedial action plan and certify that the remedial action complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The remedial action plan (RAP), which includes this remedial action selection report (RAS), has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities that are proposed by the DOE to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of residual radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Lowman, Idaho. Second, this document and the remainder of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Idaho, and the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement (No. DE-FC04-85AL20535) between the DOE and the State of Idaho

  2. Uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaren, L.H.

    1982-11-01

    This bibliography contains information on uranium mill tailings included in the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base from January 1981 through October 1982. The abstracts are grouped by subject category as shown in the table of contents. Entries in the subject index also facilitate access by subject, e.g., Mill Tailings/Radiation Hazards. Within each category the arrangement is by report number for reports, followed by nonreports in reverse chronological order. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number. (335 abstracts)

  3. Uranium mill tailings management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Facilities for the disposal of uranium mill tailings will invariably be subjected to geomorphological and climatological influences in the long-term. Proceedings of a workshop discuss how the principles of geomorphology can be applied to the siting, design, construction, decommissioning and rehabilitation of disposal facilities in order to provide for long-term containment and stability of tailings. The characteristics of tailings and their behaviour after disposal influence the potential impacts which might occur in the long-term. Proceedings of another workshop examine the technologies for uranium ore processing and tailings conditioning with a view to identifying improvements that could be made in such characteristics

  4. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, Surface Project Management Plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) authorizes the US Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial action at 24 designated inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties (VP) containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials. The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project is to minimize or eliminate radiation health hazards to the public and the environment at the 24 sites and related VPs. This document describes the management organization, system, and methods used to manage the design, construction, and other activities required to clean up the designated sites and associated VPs, in accordance with the UMTRCA

  5. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, Surface Project Management Plan. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-01

    Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) authorizes the US Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial action at 24 designated inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties (VP) containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials. The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project is to minimize or eliminate radiation health hazards to the public and the environment at the 24 sites and related VPs. This document describes the management organization, system, and methods used to manage the design, construction, and other activities required to clean up the designated sites and associated VPs, in accordance with the UMTRCA.

  6. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action 1993 Roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The 1993 Roadmap for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project office is a tool to assess and resolve issues. The US Department of Energy (DOE) UMTRA Project Office uses the nine-step roadmapping process as a basis for Surface and Groundwater Project planning. This is the second year the Roadmap document has been used to identify key issues and assumptions, develop logic diagrams, and outline milestones. This document is a key element of the DOE planning process. A multi-interest group used the nine-step process to focus on issues, root cause analysis and resolutions. This core group updated and incorporated comments on the basic assumptions, then used these assumptions to identify issues. The list of assumptions was categorized into the following areas: institutional, regulatory compliance, project management, human resource requirements, and other site-specific assumptions. The group identified 10 issues in the analysis phase. All of the issues are ranked according to importance. The number one issue from the 1992 Roadmap, ''Lack of sufficient human resources,'' remained the number one issue in 1993. The issues and their ranking are as follows: Lack of sufficient human resources; increasing regulatory requirements; unresolved groundwater issues; extension of UMTRCA through September 30, 1998; lack of post-UMTRA and post-cell closure policies; unpredictable amounts and timing of Federal funding; lack of regulatory compliance agreements; problem with states providing their share of remedial action costs; different interests and priorities among participants; and technology development/transfer. The issues are outlined and analyzed in detail in Section 8.0, with a schedule for resolution of these issues in Section 9.0

  7. Denitrification in groundwater at uranium mill tailings sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goering, Timothy J.; Groffman, Armando; Thomson, Bruce

    1992-01-01

    Nitrates are a major contaminant in groundwater at many Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites. Microbial denitrification, the transformation of nitrate to nitrogen gas, may be occurring in groundwater at several UMTRA sites. Denitrification is a biologically mediated process whereby facultative anaerobes use nitrate for respiration under anaerobic conditions. Denitrifying bacteria are ubiquitous in soils, sediments, and water. Denitrification requires nitrate, organic carbon, oxygen-limiting conditions, and trace nutrients, especially phosphorus. The lack of organic carbon is the most common limiting factor for denitrification. Denitrification occurs under a limited range of temperature and pH. The uranium milling processes used at UMTRA sites provided a readily available source of carbon and nitrates for denitrifying bacteria. At the Maybell, Colorado, site, the denitrifying organisms Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium and Acinetobacter were identified in core samples of materials from beneath the tailings. In addition, microcosm experiments simulating aquifer conditions beneath the tailings pile showed an average 40 percent decrease in nitrate concentrations over 13 days. At the New Rifle, Colorado, site, aquifer conditions appear favorable for denitrification. Nitrate and organic carbon are readily available in the groundwater, and redox conditions beneath and downgradient of the tailings pile are relatively anoxic. Downgradient from the tailings, total nitrogen is being removed from the groundwater system at a greater rate than the geochemically conservative anion, chloride. This removal may be due to denitrification and adsorption of ammonium onto clay and silt particles. (author)

  8. Denitrification in groundwater at uranium mill tailings sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goering, Timothy J [Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Groffman, Armando [Roy F. Weston, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thomson, Bruce [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-07-01

    Nitrates are a major contaminant in groundwater at many Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites. Microbial denitrification, the transformation of nitrate to nitrogen gas, may be occurring in groundwater at several UMTRA sites. Denitrification is a biologically mediated process whereby facultative anaerobes use nitrate for respiration under anaerobic conditions. Denitrifying bacteria are ubiquitous in soils, sediments, and water. Denitrification requires nitrate, organic carbon, oxygen-limiting conditions, and trace nutrients, especially phosphorus. The lack of organic carbon is the most common limiting factor for denitrification. Denitrification occurs under a limited range of temperature and pH. The uranium milling processes used at UMTRA sites provided a readily available source of carbon and nitrates for denitrifying bacteria. At the Maybell, Colorado, site, the denitrifying organisms Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium and Acinetobacter were identified in core samples of materials from beneath the tailings. In addition, microcosm experiments simulating aquifer conditions beneath the tailings pile showed an average 40 percent decrease in nitrate concentrations over 13 days. At the New Rifle, Colorado, site, aquifer conditions appear favorable for denitrification. Nitrate and organic carbon are readily available in the groundwater, and redox conditions beneath and downgradient of the tailings pile are relatively anoxic. Downgradient from the tailings, total nitrogen is being removed from the groundwater system at a greater rate than the geochemically conservative anion, chloride. This removal may be due to denitrification and adsorption of ammonium onto clay and silt particles. (author)

  9. Licensing plan for UMTRA project disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office developed a plan to define UMTRA Project licensing program objectives and establish a process enabling the DOE to document completion of remedial actions in compliance with 40 CFR 1 92 and the requirements of the NRC general license. This document supersedes the January 1987 Project Licensing Plan (DOE, 1987). The plan summarizes the legislative and regulatory basis for licensing, identifies participating agencies and their roles and responsibilities, defines key activities and milestones in the licensing process, and details the coordination of these activities. This plan provides an overview of the UMTRA Project from the end of remedial actions through the NRC's acceptance of a disposal site under the general license. The licensing process integrates large phases of the UMTRA Project. Other programmatic UMTRA Project documents listed in Section 6.0 provide supporting information

  10. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    This Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year (FY) 1995 (1 July 1994 through 30 June 1995). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock, Colorado. Economic data were requested from the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) and the US Department of Energy (DOE). The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized

  11. Bioassay for uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschaeche, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    Uranium mill tailings are composed of fine sand that contains, among other things, some uranium (U/sup 238/ primarily), and all of the uranium daughters starting with /sup 230/Th that are left behind after the usable uranium is removed in the milling process. Millions of pounds of tailings are and continue to be generated at uranium mills around the United States. Discrete uranium mill tailings piles exist near the mills. In addition, the tailings materials were used in communities situated near mill sites for such purposes as building materials, foundations for buildings, pipe runs, sand boxes, gardens, etc. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) is a U.S. Department of Energy Program designed with the intention of removing or stabilizing the mill tailings piles and the tailings used to communities so that individuals are not exposed above the EPA limits established for such tailings materials. This paper discusses the bioassay programs that are established for workers who remove tailings from the communities in which they are placed

  12. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Tuba City, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This document evaluates potential public health or environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell on the site in 1990 by the US Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine what remedial actions are necessary for contaminated ground water at the site

  13. Uranium mill tailings stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, J.N.; Koehmstedt, P.L.; Esterl, D.J.; Freeman, H.D.

    1980-02-01

    Uranium mill tailings pose a potential radiation health hazard to the public. Therefore, stabilization or disposal of these tailings in a safe and environmentally sound way is needed to minimize radon exhalation and other environmental hazards. One of the most promising concepts for stabilizing U tailings is the use of asphalt emulsion to contain radon and other hazardous materials within uranium tailings. This approach is being investigated at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Results of these studies indicate that a radon flux reduction of greater than 99% can be obtained using either a poured-on/sprayed-on seal (3.0 to 7.0 mm thick) or an admixture seal (2.5 to 12.7 cm thick) containing about 18 wt % residual asphalt. A field test was carried out in June 1979 at the Grand Junction tailings pile in order to demonstrate the sealing process. A reduction in radon flux ranging from 4.5 to greater than 99% (76% average) was achieved using a 15.2-cm (6-in.) admix seal with a sprayed-on top coat. A hydrostatic stabilizer was used to apply the admix. Following compaction, a spray coat seal was applied over the admix as the final step in construction of a radon seal. Overburden was applied to provide a protective soil layer over the seal. Included in part of the overburden was a herbicide to prevent root penetration

  14. Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    Public concern regarding the potential human health and environmental effects from uranium mill tailings led Congress to pass the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (Public Law 95-604) in 1978. In the UMTRCA, Congress acknowledged the potentially harmful health effects associated with uranium mill tailings at 24 abandoned uranium mill processing sites needing remedial action. Uranium processing activities at most of the 24 mill processing sites resulted in the formation of contaminated ground water beneath and, in some cases, downgradient of the sites. This contaminated ground water often has elevated levels of hazardous constituents such as uranium and nitrate. The purpose of the Ground Water Project is to protect human health and the environment by meeting EPA-proposed standards in areas where ground water has been contaminated with constituents from UMTRA Project sites. A major first step in the UMTRA Ground Water Project is the preparation of this Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). This document analyzes potential impacts of the alternatives, including the proposed action. These alternatives are programmatic in that they are plans for conducting the UMTRA Ground Water Project. The alternatives do not address site-specific ground water compliance. This PEIS is a planning document that will provide a framework for conducting the Ground Water Project; assess the potential programmatic and environmental impacts of conducting the UMTRA Ground Water Project; provide a method for determining the site-specific ground water compliance strategies; and provide data and information that can be used to prepare site-specific environmental impacts analyses documents more efficiently

  15. Uranium milling costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, R.B.

    1980-01-01

    Basic process flowsheets are reviewed for conventional milling of US ores. Capital costs are presented for various mill capacities for one of the basic processes. Operating costs are shown for various mill capacities for all of the basic process flowsheets. The number of mills using, or planning to use, a particular process is reviewed. A summary of the estimated average milling costs for all operating US mills is shown

  16. UMTRA Project-Level Cost Reduction/Productivity Improvement Program manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    Mission of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Cost Reduction/Productivity Improvement Program (CR/PIP) is to contribute to the UMTRA Project's environmental restoration mission by providing the means to achieve and recognize continuous improvements and cost savings. This manual includes program definition, description of UMTRA project organizational responsibilities and interfaces with existing project functions, guidance to contractors, and definition of project-level functions

  17. Uranium-mill appraisal program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everett, R.J.; Cain, C.L.

    1982-08-01

    The results of special team appraisals at NRC-licensed uranium mills in the period May to November 1981 are reported. Since the Three Mile Island accident, NRC management has instituted a program of special team appraisals of radiation protection programs at certain NRC-licensed facilities. These appraisals were designed to identify weaknesses and strengths in NRC-licensed programs, including those areas not covered by explicit regulatory requirements. The regulatory requirements related to occupational radiation protection and environmental monitoring at uranium mills have been extensively upgraded in the past few years. In addition, there was some NRC staff concern with respect to the effectiveness of NRC licensing and inspection programs. In response to this concern and to changes in mill requirements, the NRC staff recommended that team appraisals be conducted at mills to determine the adequacy of mill programs, the effectiveness of the new requirements, and mill management implementation of programs and requirements. This report describes the appraisal scope and methodology as well as summary findings and conclusions. Significant weaknesses identified during the mill appraisals are discussed as well as recommendations for improvements in uranium mill programs and mill licensing and inspection

  18. 77 FR 14837 - Bioassay at Uranium Mills

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0057] Bioassay at Uranium Mills AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory..., ``Bioassay at Uranium Mills.'' This guide describes a bioassay program acceptable to the NRC staff for uranium mills and applicable portions of uranium conversion facilities where the possibility of exposure...

  19. Overview of uranium mill tailings remedial action project of the United States of America 1995-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edge, R.

    1997-01-01

    From the early 1940's through the 1960's the United States federal government contracted for processed uranium ore for national defense research, weapons development and commercial nuclear energy. When these contracts were terminated, the mills ceased operation leaving large uranium tailings on the former mill sites. The purpose of the Uranium Remedial Action Project (UMTRA) is to minimize or eliminate potential health hazards resulting from exposure of the public to the tailings at these abandons sites. There are 24 inactive uranium mill tailings sites, in 10 states and an Indian reservation lands, included for clean up under the auspices of UMTRA. Presently the last 2 sites are under remediation. This paper addresses the progress of the project over the last two years. (author)

  20. UMTRA Project Office quality assurance program plan. Revision 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project was established to accomplish remedial actions at inactive uranium mill tailings sites. The UMTRA Project's mission is to stabilize and control the residual radioactive materials at designated sites in a safe and environmentally sound manner so as to minimize or eliminate radiation health hazards to the public. Because these efforts may involve possible risks to public health and safety, a quality assurance (QA) program that conforms to the applicable criteria has been established to control the quality of the work. This document, the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP), brings into one document the essential criteria to be applied on a selective basis, depending upon the nature of the activity being conducted, and describes how those criteria shall be applied to the UMTRA Project. QA requirements contained in this QAPP shall apply to all personnel, processes, and activities, including planning, scheduling, and cost control, performed by the UMTRA Project Office and its contractors

  1. EPA's role in uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    EPA's role and actions in regulating uranium mining and milling are reviewed and updated. Special emphasis is given to EPA's current activities under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978

  2. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Riverton, Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This Risk Assessment evaluated potential impacts to public health or the environment caused by ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. In the first phase of the U.S. Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, the tailing and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell near the Gas Hills Plant in 1990. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document to evaluate potential health and environmental risks for the Riverton site under the Ground Water Project; it will help determine whether remedial actions are needed for contaminated ground water at the site

  3. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Riverton, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This Risk Assessment evaluated potential impacts to public health or the environment caused by ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. In the first phase of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, the tailing and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell near the Gas Hills Plant in 1990. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document to evaluate potential health and environmental risks for the Riverton site under the Ground Water Project; it will help determine whether remedial actions are needed for contaminated ground water at the site.

  4. Uranium mill tailings and radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanchey, L.A.

    1981-01-01

    The major health hazard from uranium mill tailings is presumed to be respiratory cancer resulting from the inhalation of radon daughter products. A review of studies on inhalation of radon and its daughters indicates that the hazard from the tailings is extremely small. If the assumptions used in the studies are correct, one or two people per year in the US may develop cancer as a result of radon exhaled from all the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program sites. The remedial action should reduce the hazard from the tailings by a factor of about 100

  5. Uranium mill tailings and radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanchey, L A

    1981-04-01

    The major health hazard from uranium mill tailings is presumed to be respiratory cancer resulting from the inhalation of radon daughter products. A review of studies on inhalation of radon and its daughters indicates that the hazard from the tailings is extremely small. If the assumptions used in the studies are correct, one or two people per year in the United States may develop cancer as a result of radon exhaled from all the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action program sites. The remedial action should reduce the hazard from the tailings by a factor of about 100.

  6. Uranium mill tailings and radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanchey, L A

    1981-01-01

    The major health hazard from uranium mill tailings is presumed to be respiratory cancer resulting from the inhalation of radon daughter products. A review of studies on inhalation of radon and its daughters indicates that the hazard from the tailings is extremely small. If the assumptions used in the studies are correct, one or two people per year in the US may develop cancer as a result of radon exhaled from all the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program sites. The remedial action should reduce the hazard from the tailings by a factor of about 100.

  7. Uranium Mill Tailings remedial action project waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this plan is to establish a waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness (WM/PPA) program for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The program satisfies DOE requirements mandated by DOE Order 5400.1. This plan establishes planning objectives and strategies for conserving resources and reducing the quantity and toxicity of wastes and other environmental releases

  8. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Slick Rock, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, evaluates potential public health and environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former North Continent (NC) and Union Carbide (UC) uranium mill processing sites. The tailings at these sites will be placed in a disposal cell at the proposed Burro Canyon, Colorado, site. The US Department of Energy (DOE) anticipates the start of the first phase remedial action by the spring of 1995 under the direction of the DOE's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project will evaluate ground water contamination. This baseline risk assessment is the first site-specific document for these sites under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine the compliance strategy for contaminated ground water at the site. In addition, surface water and sediment are qualitatively evaluated in this report

  9. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Slick Rock, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-11-01

    This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, evaluates potential public health and environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former North Continent (NC) and Union Carbide (UC) uranium mill processing sites. The tailings at these sites will be placed in a disposal cell at the proposed Burro Canyon, Colorado, site. The US Department of Energy (DOE) anticipates the start of the first phase remedial action by the spring of 1995 under the direction of the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project will evaluate ground water contamination. This baseline risk assessment is the first site-specific document for these sites under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine the compliance strategy for contaminated ground water at the site. In addition, surface water and sediment are qualitatively evaluated in this report.

  10. UMTRA project technical assistance contractor quality assurance implementation plan for surface and ground water, Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    This document contains the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) Quality Assurance Implementation Plan (QAIP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The QAIP outlines the primary requirements for integrating quality functions for TAC technical activities applied to the surface and ground water phases of the UMTRA Project. The QA program is designed to use monitoring, audit, and surveillance activities as management tools to ensure that UMTRA Project activities are carried out in amanner to protect public health and safety, promote the success of the UMTRA Project, and meet or exceed contract requirements

  11. ERD UMTRA Project quality assurance program plan, Revision 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This document is the revised Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) dated September, 1995 for the Environmental Restoration Division (ERD) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA). Quality Assurance requirements for the ERD UMTRA Project are based on the criteria outlined in DOE Order 5700.6C or applicable sections of 10 CFR 830.120. QA requirements contained in this QAPP shall apply to all personnel, processes, and activities, including planning, scheduling, and cost control, performed by the ERD UMTRA Project and its contractors

  12. Colorado's prospectus on uranium milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazle, A.J.; Franz, G.A.; Gamewell, R.

    1982-01-01

    The first part of this paper will discuss Colorado's control of uranium mill tailings under Titles I and II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978. Colorado has a legacy of nine inactive mill sites requiring reclamation under Title I, and two presently active plus a number of new mill proposals which must be regulated in accordance with Title II. Past failures in siting and control on the part of federal jurisdictions have left the state with a heavy legacy requiring extensive effort to address impacts to the state's environment and population. The second part of this paper will discuss the remedial action programme authorized under Public Law 92-314 for Mesa Country, where lack of federal control led to the dispersal of several hundred thousand tons of uranium mill tailings on thousands of properties, including hundreds of homes, schools and other structures. Successful completion of the State efforts under both programmes will depend on a high level of funding and on the maintenance of adequate regulatory standards. (author)

  13. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site Salt Lake City, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Salt Lake City, Utah, evaluates potential public health or environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium ore processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell located at Clive, Utah, in 1987 by the US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate residual ground water contamination at the former uranium processing site, known as the Vitro processing site. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine the appropriate remedial action for contaminated ground water at the site.

  14. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site Salt Lake City, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Salt Lake City, Utah, evaluates potential public health or environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium ore processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell located at Clive, Utah, in 1987 by the US Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate residual ground water contamination at the former uranium processing site, known as the Vitro processing site. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine the appropriate remedial action for contaminated ground water at the site

  15. Annual status report on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-01

    This eleventh annual status report summarizes activities of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project undertaken during Fiscal Year (FY) 1989 by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies. Project goals for FY 1990 are also presented. An annual report of this type was a statutory requirement through January 1, 1986, pursuant to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law (PL) 95--604. The DOE will continue to submit an annual report through project completion in order to inform the public of yearly project status. Title I of the UMTRCA authorizes the DOE, in cooperation with affected states and Indian tribes within whose boundaries designated uranium processing sites are located, to provide a program of assessment and remedial action at such sites. The purpose of the remedial action is to stabilize and control the tailings and other residual radioactive materials located on the inactive uranium processing sites in a safe and environmentally sound manner and to minimize or eliminate potential radiation health hazards. Commercial and residential properties in the vicinity of designated processing sites that are contaminated with material from the sites, herein referred to as vicinity properties,'' are also eligible for remedial action. Included in the UMTRA Project are 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties located in 10 states, and the vicinity properties associated with Edgemont, South Dakota, an inactive uranium mill currently owned by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA).

  16. Annual status report on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    This eleventh annual status report summarizes activities of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project undertaken during Fiscal Year (FY) 1989 by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies. Project goals for FY 1990 are also presented. An annual report of this type was a statutory requirement through January 1, 1986, pursuant to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law (PL) 95--604. The DOE will continue to submit an annual report through project completion in order to inform the public of yearly project status. Title I of the UMTRCA authorizes the DOE, in cooperation with affected states and Indian tribes within whose boundaries designated uranium processing sites are located, to provide a program of assessment and remedial action at such sites. The purpose of the remedial action is to stabilize and control the tailings and other residual radioactive materials located on the inactive uranium processing sites in a safe and environmentally sound manner and to minimize or eliminate potential radiation health hazards. Commercial and residential properties in the vicinity of designated processing sites that are contaminated with material from the sites, herein referred to as ''vicinity properties,'' are also eligible for remedial action. Included in the UMTRA Project are 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties located in 10 states, and the vicinity properties associated with Edgemont, South Dakota, an inactive uranium mill currently owned by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

  17. Current uranium mill licensing issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarano, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    The problems encountered to insure environmentally safe mining and milling of uranium ores are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the management of tailings resulting from milling operations. It is pointed out that although the concentration of radioactivity in the tailings is relatively low, control measures are necessary because of the large quantities involved and because of the long half-life of the parent radionuclides present. The major concerns with mill tailings are radon release to the atmosphere and isolation of the tailings from the human environment. Since it is anticipated that the amount of tailings created by the year 2000 will be more than an order of magnitude greater than the quantities that have been generated during the past 30 years, it is recommended that all mill tailings storage areas be located remote from public contact and in areas such that disruption and dispersion by natural forces and seepage of toxic materials into ground water systems are reduced to the maximum extent achievable. Technical issues that receive attention during the NRC licensing process for uranium mills and the preparation of environmental impact statements are discussed briefly

  18. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Green River, Utah. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase 1) and the Ground Water Project (phase 2). For the UMTRA Project site located near Green River, Utah, the Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1988 to 1989. The tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials were removed from their original locations and placed into a disposal cell on the site. The disposal cell is designed to minimize radiation emissions and minimize further contamination of ground water beneath the site. The UMTRA Project's second phase, the Ground Water Project, evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and determines a strategy for ground water compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. For the Green River site, the risk assessment helps determine whether human health risks result from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium processing. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Green River site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine what is necessary, if anything, to protect human health and the environment while complying with EPA standards

  19. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Green River, Utah. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase 1) and the Ground Water Project (phase 2). For the UMTRA Project site located near Green River, Utah, the Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1988 to 1989. The tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials were removed from their original locations and placed into a disposal cell on the site. The disposal cell is designed to minimize radiation emissions and minimize further contamination of ground water beneath the site. The UMTRA Project`s second phase, the Ground Water Project, evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and determines a strategy for ground water compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. For the Green River site, the risk assessment helps determine whether human health risks result from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium processing. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Green River site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine what is necessary, if anything, to protect human health and the environment while complying with EPA standards.

  20. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, fiscal year 1995 annual report to stakeholders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    In 1978, Congress authorized the DOE to assess and clean up contamination at 24 designated former uranium processing sites. The DOE is also responsible for cleaning up properties in the vicinity of the sites where wind and water erosion deposited tailings or people removed them from the site for use in construction or landscaping projects. Cleanup is being undertaken in cooperation with state governments and Indian tribes within whose boundaries the sites are located. It is being conducted in two phases: the surface project and the ground water project. This report addresses specifics about both phases of the UMTRA Project. DOE's UMTRA Project is the world's largest materials management project ever undertaken to reduce or eliminate risk to the general public from exposure to potentially hazardous and radioactive materials. With an estimated cost at completion of nearly $2 billion for both phases of the UMTRA Project, and with the responsibility for encapsulating and isolating almost one-fourth of all the uranium mill tailings generated across the entire US (more than 44 million cubic yards), the UMTRA Project and its people have achieved a long record of safely and effectively completing its mission. It continually enhances its national reputation through its diligent process and cost efficiency as well as its international recognition for its technological innovation

  1. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project fiscal year 1997 annual report to stakeholders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The fiscal year (FY) 1997 annual report is the 19th report on the status of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. In 1978, Congress directed the DOE to assess and clean up contamination at 24 designated former uranium processing sites. The DOE is also responsible for cleaning up properties in the vicinity of the sites where wind and water erosion deposited tailings or people removed them from the site for use in construction or landscaping. Cleanup has been undertaken in cooperation with state governments and Indian tribes within whose boundaries the sites are located. It is being conducted in two phases: the surface project and the groundwater project. This report addresses specifics about the UMTRA surface project

  2. Fiscal year 1996 annual report to stakeholders, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This is the Fiscal Year (FY) 1996 annual report on the status of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. In 1978, Congress directed the DOE to assess and clean up contamination at 24 designated former uranium processing sites. The DOE is also responsible for cleaning up properties in the vicinity of the sites where wind and water erosion deposited tailings or people removed them from the site for use in construction of landscaping. Cleanup is being undertaken in cooperation with state governments and Indian tribes within whose boundaries the sites are located. It is being conducted in two phases: the surface project and the ground water project. This report addresses specifics about the surface phase of the UMTRA Project

  3. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Gunnison, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Groundwater Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site Near Gunnison, Colorado evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating groundwater contamination. This is the second risk assessment of groundwater contamination at this site. The first risk assessment was performed primarily to evaluate existing domestic wells. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated monitor wells at the processing site. It will be used to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site after the tailings are relocated. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first step is to evaluate groundwater data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the main contaminants in the groundwater are cadmium, cobalt, iron, manganese, sulfate, uranium, and some of the products of radioactive decay of uranium

  4. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Gunnison, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Groundwater Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site Near Gunnison, Colorado evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating groundwater contamination. This is the second risk assessment of groundwater contamination at this site. The first risk assessment was performed primarily to evaluate existing domestic wells. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated monitor wells at the processing site. It will be used to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site after the tailings are relocated. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first step is to evaluate groundwater data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the main contaminants in the groundwater are cadmium, cobalt, iron, manganese, sulfate, uranium, and some of the products of radioactive decay of uranium.

  5. Determination of aerosol size distributions at uranium mill tailings remedial action project sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, G.J.; Reif, R.H.; Hoover, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an ongoing program, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, to stabilize piles of uranium mill tailings in order to reduce the potential radiological hazards to the public. Protection of workers and the general public against airborne radioactivity during remedial action is a top priority at the UMTRA Project. The primary occupational radionuclides of concern are 230 Th, 226 Ra, 210 Pb, 210 Po, and the short-lived decay products of 222 Rn with 230 Th causing the majority of the committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) from inhaling uranium mill tailings. Prior to this study, a default particle size of 1.0 μm activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) was assumed for airborne radioactive tailings dust. Because of recent changes in DOE requirements, all DOE operations are now required to use the CEDE methodology, instead of the annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE) methodology, to evaluate internal radiation exposures. Under the transition from AEDE to CEDE, with a 1.0 μm AMAD particle size, lower bioassay action levels would be required for the UMTRA Project. This translates into an expanded internal dosimetry program where significantly more bioassay monitoring would be required at the UMTRA Project sites. However, for situations where the particle size distribution is known to differ significantly from 1.0 μm AMAD, the DOE allows for corrections to be made to both the estimated dose to workers and the derived air concentration (DAC) values. For particle sizes larger than 1.0 μm AMAD, the calculated CEDE from inhaling tailings would be relatively lower

  6. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    For the UMTRA Project site located near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania (the Canonsburg site), the Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1983 to 1985, and involved removing the uranium processing mill tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials from their original locations and placing them in a disposal cell located on the former Canonsburg uranium mill site. This disposal cell is designed to minimize radiation emissions and further contamination of ground water beneath the site. The Ground Water Project will evaluate the nature and the extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing at the former Canonsburg uranium mill site, and will determine a ground water strategy for complying with the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. For the Canonsburg site, an evaluation was made to determine whether exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium processing could affect people's health. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Canonsburg site. The results of this report and further site characterization of the Canonsburg site will be used to determine how to protect public health and the environment, and how to comply with the EPA standards

  7. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    For the UMTRA Project site located near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania (the Canonsburg site), the Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1983 to 1985, and involved removing the uranium processing mill tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials from their original locations and placing them in a disposal cell located on the former Canonsburg uranium mill site. This disposal cell is designed to minimize radiation emissions and further contamination of ground water beneath the site. The Ground Water Project will evaluate the nature and the extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing at the former Canonsburg uranium mill site, and will determine a ground water strategy for complying with the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. For the Canonsburg site, an evaluation was made to determine whether exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium processing could affect people`s health. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Canonsburg site. The results of this report and further site characterization of the Canonsburg site will be used to determine how to protect public health and the environment, and how to comply with the EPA standards.

  8. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Annual status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project FY 1984 major accomplishments are summarized. Twenty-five percent of the processing site remedial actions at Canonsburg, PA, were completed. Remedial action on 118 vicinity properties at four designated locations were initiated and survey and inclusion activities on a total of 420 vicinity properties were completed. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Salt Lake City, UT, and the Environmental Assessment (EA) for Shiprock, NM were published, and the preliminary draft EIS for Durango, CO, was prepared. Remedial Action Plans (RAPs) for Salt Lake City, UT, and Shiprock, NM were completed, and draft RAPs for Gunnison, CO, and Riverton, WY were prepared. Cooperative agreements with Oregon, Wyoming, and South Dakota were executed, and the Utah cooperative agreement was modified to assign the construction management responsibility to the state. An Interagency Agreement with TVA for disposal of the Edgemont vicinity property material was executed

  9. Architecture and environmental restoration: Remediating uranium mill tailings from buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teply, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) manages the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Program in Grand Junction, Colorado. This program is a congressionally mandated clean up of by-product waste that resulted from the extraction of yellow cake from uranium ore. The by-product waste, a fine sand commonly called open-quotes mill tailingclose quotes is contaminated with low-level radioactivity. These mill tailings were available to the community for use as construction material from approximately 1952 to 1966; their use as bedding material for concrete slabs, utilities, backfill materials, concrete sand, and mortar created unique remediation problems that required innovative solutions. This paper describes how design personnel approach the remediation of structures, the evaluation of the buildings, and the factors that must be considered in completing the remediation design. This paper will not address the health risks of the tailings in an inhabited space, the remediation of exterior areas, or the process of determining where the tailings exist in the building

  10. Hazardous and mixed waste management at UMTRA sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampill, H.G.

    1988-01-01

    During the early stages of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, there were some serious questions regarding the ownership of and consequently the responsibility for disposal of hazardous wastes at UMTRA sites. In addition to State and Indian Tribe waste disposal regulations, UMTRA must also conform to guidelines established by the NRC, OSHA, EPA, and DOT. Because of the differing regulatory thrusts of these agencies, UMTRA has to be vigilant in order to ensure that the disposal of each parcel of waste material is in compliance with all regulations. Mixed-waste disposal presents a particularly difficult problem. No single agency is willing to lay claim to the regulation of mixed-wastes, and no conventional waste disposal facility is willing to accept it. Consequently, the disposal of each lot of mixed-waste at UMTRA sites must be handled on a case by case basis. A recently published position paper which spells out UMTRA policy on waste materials indicates that wastes found at UMTRA sites are either residual radioactive wastes, or mixed-wastes, or for the disposal of hazardous waste is determined by the time the original material arrived. If it arrived prior to the termination of the AEC uranium supply contract, its disposal is the responsibility of UMTRA. If it arrived after the end of the contract, the responsibility for disposal lies with the former operator

  11. UMTRA project office federal employee occupational safety and health program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This document establishes the Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health (FEOSH) Program for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office. This program will ensure compliance with applicable requirements of DOE Order 3790.1B and DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) Order 3790.lA. FEOSH Program responsibilities delegated by the DOE-AL to the UMTRA Project Office by AL Order 3790.1A also are assigned. The UMTRA Project Office has developed the UMTRA Project Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES ampersand H) Plan (DOE, 1992), which establishes the basic programmatic ES ampersand H requirements for all participants on the UMTRA Project. The ES ampersand H plan is designed primarily to cover remedial action activities at UMTRA sites and defines the ES ampersand H responsibilities of both the UMTRA Project Office and its contractors. The UMTRA FEOSH Program described herein is a subset of the overall UMTRA ES ampersand H program and covers only federal employees working on the UMTRA Project

  12. The UMTRA PEIS: A strategy for groundwater remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burt, C.; Ulland, L.; Weston, R.F.; Metzler, D.

    1993-01-01

    A programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) was initiated in 1992 for the uranium mill tailings remedial action (UMTRA) program. The PEIS kicked off the groundwater restoration phase of UMTRA, a project involving remediation of 24 sites in ten states and tribal lands contaminated with tailings from uranium mining and milling operations. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) agreed, in early 1992, that a PEIS was an appropriate strategy to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) for this second, groundwater phase of the project. This decision recognized that although a parallel effort was being undertaken in preparing a PEIS for DOE's Environmental Restoration/Waste Management (ER/WM) program, characteristics and the maturity of the UMTRA project made it more appropriate to prepare a separate PEIS. The ER/WM PEIS is intended to examine environmental restoration and waste management issues from a very broad perspective. For UMTRA, with surface remediation completed or well under way at 18 of the 24 sites, a more focused programmatic approach for groundwater restoration is more effective than including the UMTRA project within the ER/WM environmental impact statements. A separate document allows a more focused and detailed analysis necessary to efficiently tier site-specific environmental assessments for groundwater restoration at each of the 24 UMTRA former processing sites

  13. UMTRA project list of reportable occurrences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    This UMTRA Project List of Reportable occurrences is provided to facilitate efficient categorization of reportable occurrences. These guidelines have been established in compliance with DOE minimum reporting requirements under DOE Order 5000.3B. Occurrences are arranged into nine groups relating to US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project operations for active sites. These nine groupings are provided for reference to determined whether an occurrence meets reporting requirement criteria in accordance with the minimum reporting requirements. Event groups and significance categories that cannot or will not occur, and that do not apply to UMTRA Project operations, are omitted. Occurrence categorization shall be as follows: Group 1. Facility Condition; Group 2. Environmental; Group 3. Personnel Safety; Group 4. Personnel Radiation Protection; Group 5. Safeguards and Security; Group 6. Transportation; Group 7. Value Basis Reporting; Group 8. Facility Status; and Group 9. Cross-Category Items.

  14. UMTRA project list of reportable occurrences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    This UMTRA Project List of Reportable occurrences is provided to facilitate efficient categorization of reportable occurrences. These guidelines have been established in compliance with DOE minimum reporting requirements under DOE Order 5000.3B. Occurrences are arranged into nine groups relating to US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project operations for active sites. These nine groupings are provided for reference to determined whether an occurrence meets reporting requirement criteria in accordance with the minimum reporting requirements. Event groups and significance categories that cannot or will not occur, and that do not apply to UMTRA Project operations, are omitted. Occurrence categorization shall be as follows: Group 1. Facility Condition; Group 2. Environmental; Group 3. Personnel Safety; Group 4. Personnel Radiation Protection; Group 5. Safeguards and Security; Group 6. Transportation; Group 7. Value Basis Reporting; Group 8. Facility Status; and Group 9. Cross-Category Items

  15. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Salt Lake City, Utah. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of two phases: the first is the Surface Project, and the second is the Ground Water Project. For the UMTRA Project site known as the Vitro site, near Salt Lake City, Utah, Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1985 to 1987. The UMTRA Project`s second phase, the Ground Water Project, evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and determines a strategy for ground water compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. A risk assessment is the process of describing a source of contamination and showing how that contamination may reach people and the environment. The amount of contamination people or the environment may be exposed to is calculated and used to characterize the possible health or environmental effects that may result from this exposure. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Vitro site. The results of this report and further site characterization of the Vitro site will be used to determine what is necessary, if anything, to protect human health and the environment while complying with EPA standards.

  16. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Salt Lake City, Utah. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of two phases: the first is the Surface Project, and the second is the Ground Water Project. For the UMTRA Project site known as the Vitro site, near Salt Lake City, Utah, Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1985 to 1987. The UMTRA Project's second phase, the Ground Water Project, evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and determines a strategy for ground water compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. A risk assessment is the process of describing a source of contamination and showing how that contamination may reach people and the environment. The amount of contamination people or the environment may be exposed to is calculated and used to characterize the possible health or environmental effects that may result from this exposure. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Vitro site. The results of this report and further site characterization of the Vitro site will be used to determine what is necessary, if anything, to protect human health and the environment while complying with EPA standards

  17. Planning risk communication for UMTRA project groundwater restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hundertmark, Charles [Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. and University of Phoenix (United States); Hoopes, Jack [Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. (United States); Flowers, Len [Roy F. Weston Company (United States); Jackson, David G [U.S. Department of Energy (United States)

    1992-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is entering a new phase in which groundwater contamination will become a growing focus as surface remedial action draws toward completion. Planning for risk communication associated with the groundwater project will be a major factor in the successful initiation of the program. (author)

  18. UMTRA water sampling and analysis plan, Green River, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papusch, R.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) is to provide a basis for groundwater and surface water sampling at the Green River Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. This WSAP identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the monitoring locations

  19. Planning risk communication for UMTRA project groundwater restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hundertmark, Charles; Hoopes, Jack; Flowers, Len; Jackson, David G.

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is entering a new phase in which groundwater contamination will become a growing focus as surface remedial action draws toward completion. Planning for risk communication associated with the groundwater project will be a major factor in the successful initiation of the program. (author)

  20. Radiological survey activities: uranium mill tailings remedial action project procedures manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, C.A.; Berven, B.A.; Carter, T.E.

    1986-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) was assigned the responsibility for conducting remedial action at 24 sites, which are located in one eastern and nine western states. The DOE's responsibilities are being met through its Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office (UMTRA-PO) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The purpose of this Procedures Manual is to provide a standardized set of procedures that document in an auditable manner the activities performed by the Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) group in the Dosimetry and Biophysical Transport Section (DABTS) of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), in its role as the Inclusion Survey Contractor (ISC). Members of the RASA group assigned to the UMTRA Project are headquartered in the ORNL/RASA office in Grand Junction, Colorado, and report to the ORNL/RASA Project Manager. The Procedures Manual ensures that the organizational, administrative, and technical activities of the RASA/UMTRA group conform properly to those of the ISC as described in the Vicinity Properties Management and Implementation Manual and the Summary Protocol. This manual also ensures that the techniques and procedures used by the RASA/UMTRA group and contractor personnel meet the requirements of applicable governmental, scientific, and industrial standards

  1. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Grand Junction, Colorado. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This risk assessment evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial activities at the site were conducted from 1989 to 1993. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated ground water that flows beneath the processing site toward the Colorado River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentrations of most contaminants are used to assess risk. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to determine what remedial action may be needed for contaminated ground water at the site

  2. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Cane Valley, Arizona. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site in Cane Valley near Monument Valley, Arizona. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has relocated and stabilized this site's tailings and other contaminated material in a disposal cell at Mexican Hat, Utah. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project that evaluates potential health and environmental risks. It will help determine the approach required to address contaminated ground water at the site

  3. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Cane Valley, Arizona. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site in Cane Valley near Monument Valley, Arizona. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has relocated and stabilized this site`s tailings and other contaminated material in a disposal cell at Mexican Hat, Utah. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project that evaluates potential health and environmental risks. It will help determine the approach required to address contaminated ground water at the site.

  4. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Grand Junction, Colorado. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This risk assessment evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial activities at the site were conducted from 1989 to 1993. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated ground water that flows beneath the processing site toward the Colorado River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentrations of most contaminants are used to assess risk. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to determine what remedial action may be needed for contaminated ground water at the site.

  5. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impacts to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination from past activities at the former uranium processing site in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. The US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has placed contaminated material from this site in an on-site disposal cell. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the UMTRA Ground Water Project. Currently, no domestic or drinking water well tap into contaminated ground water of the two distinct ground water units: the unconsolidated materials and the bedrock. Because there is no access, no current health or environmental risks are associated with the direct use of the contaminated ground water. However, humans and ecological organisms could be exposed to contaminated ground water if a domestic well were to be installed in the unconsolidated materials in that part of the site being considered for public use (Area C). The first step is evaluating ground water data collected from monitor wells at the site. For the Canonsburg site, this evaluation showed the contaminants in ground water exceeding background in the unconsolidated materials in Area C are ammonia, boron, calcium, manganese, molybdenum, potassium, strontium, and uranium

  6. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impacts to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination from past activities at the former uranium processing site in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. The US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has placed contaminated material from this site in an on-site disposal cell. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the UMTRA Ground Water Project. Currently, no domestic or drinking water well tap into contaminated ground water of the two distinct ground water units: the unconsolidated materials and the bedrock. Because there is no access, no current health or environmental risks are associated with the direct use of the contaminated ground water. However, humans and ecological organisms could be exposed to contaminated ground water if a domestic well were to be installed in the unconsolidated materials in that part of the site being considered for public use (Area C). The first step is evaluating ground water data collected from monitor wells at the site. For the Canonsburg site, this evaluation showed the contaminants in ground water exceeding background in the unconsolidated materials in Area C are ammonia, boron, calcium, manganese, molybdenum, potassium, strontium, and uranium.

  7. Draft programmatic environmental impact statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for performing remedial action to bring surface and ground water contaminant levels at 24 inactive uranium processing sites into compliance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards. DOE is accomplishing this through the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface and Ground Water Projects. Remedial action will be conducted with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the full participation of affected states and Indian tribes. Uranium processing activities at most of 24 the inactive mill sites resulted in the contamination of ground water beneath and, in some cases, downgradient of the sites. This contaminated ground water often has elevated levels of constituents such as uranium and nitrate. The purpose of the UMTRA Ground Water Project is to eliminate, or reduce to acceptable levels, the potential health and the environmental consequences of milling activities by meeting the EPA standards in areas where ground water has been contaminated. The first step in the UMTRA Ground Water Project is the preparation of this programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS). This document analyzes potential impacts of four programmatic alternatives, including the proposed action. The alternatives do not address site-specific ground water compliance strategies. Rather, the PEIS is a planning document that provides a framework for conducting the Ground Water Project; assesses the potential programmatic impacts of conducting the Ground Water Project; provides a method for determining the site-specific ground water compliance strategies; and provides data and information that can be used to prepare site-specific environmental impacts analyses more efficiently

  8. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Slick Rock, Colorado. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    Two UMTRA (Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action) Project sites are near Slick Rock, Colorado: the North Continent site and the Union Carbide site. Currently, no one uses the contaminated ground water at either site for domestic or agricultural purposes. However, there may be future land development. This risk assessment evaluates possible future health problems associated with exposure to contaminated ground water. Since some health problems could occur, it is recommended that the contaminated ground water not be used as drinking water

  9. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Slick Rock, Colorado. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    Two UMTRA (Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action) Project sites are near Slick Rock, Colorado: the North Continent site and the Union Carbide site. Currently, no one uses the contaminated ground water at either site for domestic or agricultural purposes. However, there may be future land development. This risk assessment evaluates possible future health problems associated with exposure to contaminated ground water. Since some health problems could occur, it is recommended that the contaminated ground water not be used as drinking water.

  10. Site Observational Work Plan for the UMTRA Project Site at Shiprock, New Mexico. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Site is one of the first documents for developing an approach for achieving ground water compliance at the site. This SOWP applies Shiprock site information to a regulatory compliance framework, which identifies strategies for meeting ground water compliance at the site. The compliance framework was developed in the UMTRA ground water programmatic environmental impact statement

  11. Supplement to the UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    The Ambrosia Lake Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site is in McKinley County, New Mexico. As part of UMTRA surface remediation, residual radioactive materials were consolidated on the site in a disposal cell that was completed July 1995. The need for ground water monitoring was evaluated and found not to be necessary beyond the completion of the remedial action because the ground water in the uppermost aquifer is classified as limited use

  12. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Gunnison, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    This report evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating groundwater contamination. This is the second risk assessment of groundwater contamination at this site. The first risk assessment was performed primarily to evaluate existing domestic wells to determine the potential for immediate human health and environmental impacts. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated groundwater that flows beneath the processing site towards the Gunnison River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentration of most contaminants are used in this risk assessment. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site after the tailings are relocated. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first step is to evaluate groundwater data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the main contaminants in the groundwater are cadmium, cobalt, iron, manganese, sulfate, uranium, and some of the products of radioactive decay of uranium

  13. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Riverton, Wyoming. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of two phases: the Surface Project and the Ground Water Project. At the UMTRA Project site near Riverton, Wyoming, Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1988 to 1990. Tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials were taken from the Riverton site to a disposal cell in the Gas Hills area, about 60 road miles (100 kilometers) to the east. The surface cleanup reduces radon and other radiation emissions and minimizes further ground water contamination. The UMTRA Project`s second phase, the Ground Water Project, will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination at the Riverton site that has resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. Such evaluations are used at each site to determine a strategy for complying with UMTRA ground water standards established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and if human health risks could result from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could hypothetically occur if drinking water were pumped from a well drilled in an area where ground water contamination might have occurred. Human health and environmental risks may also result if people, plants, or animals are exposed to surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water.

  14. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Riverton, Wyoming. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of two phases: the Surface Project and the Ground Water Project. At the UMTRA Project site near Riverton, Wyoming, Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1988 to 1990. Tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials were taken from the Riverton site to a disposal cell in the Gas Hills area, about 60 road miles (100 kilometers) to the east. The surface cleanup reduces radon and other radiation emissions and minimizes further ground water contamination. The UMTRA Project's second phase, the Ground Water Project, will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination at the Riverton site that has resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. Such evaluations are used at each site to determine a strategy for complying with UMTRA ground water standards established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and if human health risks could result from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could hypothetically occur if drinking water were pumped from a well drilled in an area where ground water contamination might have occurred. Human health and environmental risks may also result if people, plants, or animals are exposed to surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water

  15. Uranium mill tailings remedial action technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, J.N.; Gee, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    The uranium milling process involves the hydrometallurgical extraction of uranium from ores and the resultant generation of large quantities of waste referred to as tailings. Uranium mill tailings have been identified as requiring remediation because they contain residual radioactive material that is not removed in the milling process. Potential radiation exposure can result from direct contact with the tailings, from radon gas emitted by the tailings, and from radioactive contamination of groundwater. As a result, the technology developed under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Uranium Recovery Program have focused on radon control, groundwater contamination and the long-term protection of the containment system. This paper briefly summarizes the UMTRAP and NRC remedial action technology development. 33 references, 9 figures, 5 tables

  16. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994. To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized. This study assesses benefits associated with the Grand Junction, Gunnison, Naturita, and Rifle UMTRA Projects sites for the 1-year period under study. Work at the Naturita site was initiated in April 1994 and involved demolition of buildings at the processing site. Actual start-up of remediation of Naturita is planned to begin in the spring of 1995. Work at the Slick Rock and Maybell sites is expected to begin in 1995. The only current economic benefits associated with these sites are related to UMTRA Project support work

  17. Settlement of uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, P.K.; Guros, F.B.; Keshian, B.

    1988-01-01

    Two test embankments were constructed on top of an old tailings deposit near Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico to determine settlement characteristics of hydraulically- deposited uranium mill tailings. Before construction of the embankments, properties of in-situ tailings and foundation soils were determined using data from boreholes, piezocone soundings, and laboratory tests. These properties were used to estimate post-construction settlement of a planned disposal embankment to be constructed on the tailings. However, excessive uncertainty existed in the following: field settlement rates of saturated and unsaturated tailings, degree of preconsolidation of the upper 15 feet of tailings, and the ability of an underlying silty sand foundation layer to facilitate drainage. Thus, assurance could not be provided that differential settlements of the radon barrier and erosion protection layers would be within allowable limits should the planned disposal embankment be constructed in a single-stage

  18. Environmental planning in uranium milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertello, L.F.

    1987-01-01

    Effluents from uranium milling in the Achala region in the province of Cordoba are studied. Liquids from lixiviation-recovery and from precipitation-washing of yellow-cake were analyzed. Separation of both liquids before treatment and disposal is recommended. Data of the hydric environment are presented specially for volumes of flow. The disposal criteria established by the provincial authorities are presented, and discussed. Calculations to define the effects on the environment of two types of effluents (the leaching effluent without treatment and the same after treating it) on two points of the rivers net, are given and the results discussed. A disposal policy for a treated effluent of mean composition is presented, based on two different amounts for the two phases of the river flux; the possible effects on two points of the net were also calculated. In the author's opinion, such policy will result in a disposal without a sensible damage in the receptor. (Author) [es

  19. UMTRA project technical assistance contractor quality assurance implementation plan for surface and ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) Quality Assurance Implementation Plan (QAIP) outlines the primary requirements for integrating quality functions for TAC technical activities applied to the surface and ground water phases of the UMTRA Project. The QAIP is subordinate to the latest issue of the UMTRA Project TAC Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP). The QAIP addresses technical aspects of the TAC UMTRA Project surface and ground water programs. The QAIP is authorized and approved by the TAC Project Manager and QA manager. The QA program is designed to use monitoring, audit, and surveillance functions as management tools to ensure that all Project organization activities are carried out in a manner that will protect public health and safety, promote the success of the UMTRA Project and meet or exceed contract requirements

  20. Environmental design of a uranium mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan, C.H.; Ring, R.J.; McNaughton, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    In the frame work of the Cleaner Technology Project for Uranium Mining and Milling, Australian Nuclear and Technology Organization (ANSTO), Environment Division of ANSTO has carried out a programme of research which seeks to identify, investigate and develop cleaner technologies that have the potential to minimize the environmental impact of uranium mining and milling. This paper describes three design options of a new uranium mill that can meet environmental, technical and economical objectives. The feasibility of such an approach was examined in the laboratory and in a pilot plant study. (author)

  1. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Safety Advancement Field Effort (SAFE) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    In 1992, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project experienced several health and safety related incidents at active remediation project sites. As a result, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) directed the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to establish a program increasing the DOE`s overall presence at operational remediation sites to identify and minimize risks in operations to the fullest extent possible (Attachments A and B). In response, the TAC, in cooperation with the DOE and the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), developed the Safety Advancement Field Effort (SAFE) Program.

  2. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Safety Advancement Field Effort (SAFE) Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    In 1992, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project experienced several health and safety related incidents at active remediation project sites. As a result, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) directed the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to establish a program increasing the DOE's overall presence at operational remediation sites to identify and minimize risks in operations to the fullest extent possible (Attachments A and B). In response, the TAC, in cooperation with the DOE and the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), developed the Safety Advancement Field Effort (SAFE) Program

  3. Evaluation of the mill tailings disposal site at the Zirovski vrh uranium mine in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begus, T.; Kocevar, M.; Brencic, M.; Likar, B.; Logar, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Uranium mine Zirovski vrh in Slovenia was closed due to economic reasons. After that extensive work on decommission was done. The results of the comparison between three potential sites for mill tailings are presented. The results of the probabilistic approach to the factors of safety and confidence, seismic hazard analysis, hydrogeological models and in the economic evaluation are given. For the common evaluation they were interpreted in the way of UMTRA decision matrix. On the basis of the engineering judgement calculations for the recent status and the status after 1000 years was performed. (author)

  4. Public participation in UMTRA Project Program Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majors, M.J.; Ulland, L.M.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up radioactive soil and ore residue from 24 inactive uranium processing sites under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. In early 1993, the DOE adopted new guidelines strongly encouraging public participation. This guidance commits to providing the public with opportunities to participate in the decision-making process for program planning, design, and implementation. Rooted in the conviction that an effective public participation program will enable citizens to take part in policy decisions, the full adoption of the guidance by the UMTRA project can also help DOE make better decisions, provide a means to build consensus, and assist in building credibility. This transition to open communication parallels the climate of corporate America in which increases in productivity are often the result of workers and management teaming together to solve problems. While these guidelines have been embraced by public affairs staff from headquarters to the field offices, barriers still exist that inhibit substantive public involvement. The challenge for the UMTRA project is to overcome these barriers to ensure that public participation is an integral part of the way business is conducted. This paper discusses lessons learned by the UMTRA project in its efforts to address barriers to public participation and the project's plans for full compliance with the DOE guidelines

  5. Health risks from uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews the risk to public health and the environment from uranium mill tailings. The steps taken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to reduce this risk from tailing are summarized

  6. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley uranium mill tailings site Cane Valley, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the Monument Valley UMTRA Project site near Cane Valley, Arizona, was completed in 1994. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Adverse ecological and agricultural effects may also result from exposure to contaminated ground water. For example, livestock should not be watered with contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site investigations will be used to determine a compliance strategy to comply with the UMTRA ground water standards

  7. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley uranium mill tailings site Cane Valley, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the Monument Valley UMTRA Project site near Cane Valley, Arizona, was completed in 1994. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Adverse ecological and agricultural effects may also result from exposure to contaminated ground water. For example, livestock should not be watered with contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site investigations will be used to determine a compliance strategy to comply with the UMTRA ground water standards.

  8. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    This risk assessment evaluates the possibility of health and environmental risks from contaminated ground water at the uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado. The former uranium processing site's contaminated soil and material were removed and placed at a disposal site located in Body Canyon, Colorado, during 1986--1991 by the US Departments of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating the nature and extent of ground water contamination at the site. This risk assessment follows an approach similar to that used by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The first step is to determine what site-related contaminants are found in ground water samples. The next step in the risk assessment is to determine how much of these contaminants people might ingest if they got their drinking water from a well on the site. In accordance with standard practice for this type of risk assessment, the highest contaminant concentrations from the most contaminated wells are used. The risk assessment then explains the possible health problems that could result from this amount of contamination

  9. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    This risk assessment evaluates the possibility of health and environmental risks from contaminated ground water at the uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado. The former uranium processing site`s contaminated soil and material were removed and placed at a disposal site located in Body Canyon, Colorado, during 1986--1991 by the US Departments of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating the nature and extent of ground water contamination at the site. This risk assessment follows an approach similar to that used by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The first step is to determine what site-related contaminants are found in ground water samples. The next step in the risk assessment is to determine how much of these contaminants people might ingest if they got their drinking water from a well on the site. In accordance with standard practice for this type of risk assessment, the highest contaminant concentrations from the most contaminated wells are used. The risk assessment then explains the possible health problems that could result from this amount of contamination.

  10. Baseline risk assessment for groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Monument Valley, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site near Monument Valley, Arizona. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being relocated and stabilized in a disposal cell at Mexican Hat, Utah, through the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The tailings removal is planned for completion by spring 1994. After the tailings are removed, groundwater contamination at the site will continue to be evaluated. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Groundwater Project. It will be used to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site

  11. Radiological health aspects of uranium milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

    1983-05-01

    This report describes the operation of conventional and unconventional uranium milling processes, the potential for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation at the mill, methods for radiological safety, methods of evaluating occupational radiation exposures, and current government regulations for protecting workers and ensuring that standards for radiation protection are adhered to. In addition, a survey of current radiological health practices is summarized

  12. Airborne effluent control at uranium mills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, M.B.

    1976-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has made an engineering cost--environmental benefit study of radioactive waste treatment systems for decreasing the amount of radioactive materials released from uranium ore processing mills. This paper summarizes the results of the study which pertain to the control and/or abatement of airborne radioactive materials from the mill processes. The tailings area is not included. Present practices in the uranium milling industry, with particular emphasis on effluent control and waste management, have been surveyed. A questionnaire was distributed to each active mill in the United States. Replies were received from about 75 percent of the mill operators. Visits were made to six operating uranium mills that were selected because they represented the different processes in use today and the newest, most modern in mill designs. Discussions were held with members of the Region IV Office of NRC and the Grand Junction Office of ERDA. Nuclear Science Abstracts, as well as other sources, were searched for literature pertinent to uranium mill processes, effluent control, and waste management

  13. Radiological health aspects of uranium milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

    1983-05-01

    This report describes the operation of conventional and unconventional uranium milling processes, the potential for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation at the mill, methods for radiological safety, methods of evaluating occupational radiation exposures, and current government regulations for protecting workers and ensuring that standards for radiation protection are adhered to. In addition, a survey of current radiological health practices is summarized.

  14. Biogeochemical aspects of uranium mineralization, mining, milling, and remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kate M.; Gallegos, Tanya J.; Landa, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    mobilization from them. The second paper (Landa, 1999) includes coverage of research carried out under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program (UMTRA). The third paper (Landa, 2004) reflects the increased focus of researchers on biotic effects in UMT environs. This paper expands the focus to U mining, milling, and remedial actions, and includes extensive coverage of the increasingly important alkaline in situ recovery and groundwater restoration.

  15. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase I), and the Ground Water Project (phase II). For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado (the Naturita site), phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado, about 13 road miles (mi) (21 kilometers [km]) to the northwest. No uranium mill tailings are involved because the tailings were removed from the Naturita site and placed at Coke Oven, Colorado, during 1977 to 1979. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health or the environment; and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water, or surface water that has received contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment is conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  16. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase I), and the Ground Water Project (phase II). For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado (the Naturita site), phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation's Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado, about 13 road miles (mi) (21 kilometers [km]) to the northwest. No uranium mill tailings are involved because the tailings were removed from the Naturita site and placed at Coke Oven, Colorado, during 1977 to 1979. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health or the environment; and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water, or surface water that has received contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment is conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment

  17. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Shiprock, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    This report evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell on the site in 1986 by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating groundwater contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Groundwater Project. This risk assessment follows the approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first step is to evaluate groundwater data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the main contaminants in the floodplain groundwater are arsenic, magnesium, manganese, nitrate, sodium, sulfate, and uranium. The complete list of contaminants associated with the terrace groundwater could not be determined due to the lack of the background groundwater quality data. However, uranium, nitrate, and sulfate are evaluated since these chemicals are clearly associated with uranium processing and are highly elevated compared to regional waters. It also could not be determined if the groundwater occurring in the terrace is a usable water resource, since it appears to have originated largely from past milling operations. The next step in the risk assessment is to estimate how much of these contaminants people would be exposed to if a drinking well were installed in the contaminated groundwater or if there were exposure to surface expressions of contaminated water. Potential exposures to surface water include incidental contact with contaminated water or sediments by children playing on the floodplain and consumption of meat and milk from domestic animals grazed and watered on the floodplain

  18. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Lakeview, Oregon. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the UMTRA Project site near Lakeview, Oregon, was completed in 1989. The mill operated from February 1958 to November 1960. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Ecological risks to plants or animals may result from exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the ecological environment.

  19. Predicting radon flux from uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, H.D.; Hartley, J.N.

    1983-11-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) office, is developing technology for the design of radon barriers for uranium mill tailings piles. To properly design a radon cover for a particular tailings pile, the radon flux emanating from the bare tailings must be known. The tailings characteristics required to calculate the radon flux include radium-226 content, emanating power, bulk density, and radon diffusivity. This paper presents theoretical and practical aspects of estimating the radon flux from an uranium tailings pile. Results of field measurements to verify the calculation methodology are also discussed. 24 references, 4 figures, 4 tables

  20. Reclamation of uranium mining and milling disturbances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, E.E.; Schuman, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    Since 1945 the history of uranium mining and milling in the US has been a story of wide fluctuations in market prices and in mining and milling capacity. The late 1960's and the 1970's saw a sizeable reduction in the production of yellowcake because of an earlier over-supply, a leveling off of the military demand, and a failure of the nuclear electric power industry to create the anticipated commercial demand. The decline in the domestic production of yellowcake has continued through the early 1980's to the present. Today, there are five operating uranium mills in the US: one in Wyoming, two in Utah, one in New Mexico, and one in Texas. Of these five mills, three are operating on a reduced schedule, as little as three days a month. A significant portion of the current US production of uranium goes overseas to fulfill Japanese, French, and other European contracts. There is still a sizeable reclamation job to be accomplished on old uranium wastes, both tailings impoundments and overburden embankments. Before the Uranium Mill Tailings Control Act of 1978 (PL 95-604), reclamation was frequently omitted altogether, or else done in a haphazard fashion. We do not know the total area of unreclaimed, radioactive, uranium overburden wastes in the western US, but the area is large, probably several thousand hectares. Fortunately, these overburden wastes are almost entirely located in remote areas. Mill tailings are more difficult to reclaim than overburden, and tailings represent a more serious health hazards. There are approximately 25 million metric tons of unreclaimed uranium mill tailings, with variable health hazards, located in the US

  1. The progress in the researches for uranium mill tailings cleaning treatment and no-waste uranium ore milling processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jintang

    1990-01-01

    The production of uranium mill tailings and their risk assessment are described. The moethods of uranium mill tailings disposal and management are criticized and the necessity of the researches for uranium mill tailings cleaning treatment and no-wasle uranium ore milling process are demonstrated. The progress for these researches in China and other countries with uranium production is reviewed, and the corresponding conclusions are reported

  2. Uranium mill tailings conditioning technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreesen, D.R.; Cokal, E.J.; Wangen, L.E.; Williams, J.M.; O'Brien, P.D.; Thode, E.F.

    1982-01-01

    Conditioning of uranium mill tailings involves the physicochemical alteration of tailings to remove or immobilize mobile radionuclides and toxic trace elements before disposal in a repository. The principal immobilization approach under investigation is sintering tailings at high temperatures (1100-1200 deg. C) to radically alter the structure of tailings. This thermal stabilization at 1200 deg. C reduced radon emanation power for tailings sands by factors of 20 to 200 and for tailings fines by factors of 300 to 1100. Substantial reductions in the leachability of most contaminants have been found for thermally conditioned tailings. Obvious mineral transformations occur, including an increase in amorphous material, the conversion of gypsum to anhydrite and its subsequent decomposition, the disappearance of clay minerals, and some decrease in quartz content. A conceptual thermal stabilization process has been developed wherein obsolete coal-fired rotary cement kilns perform the sintering. An economic analysis of this conceptual process has shown that thermal stabilization can be competitive at certain tailings sites with other remedial actions requiring the excavation, transportation, and burial of tailings in a repository. An analysis of the long-term radiological hazard posed by untreated tailings and by tailings conditioned by radionuclide removal has illustrated the necessity of extracting both 226 Ra and 230 Th to achieve long-term hazard reductions. Sulphuric acid extraction of residual mineral values and important radionuclides from tailings has been investigated. Concentrated H 2 SO 4 can extract up to 80% of the 226 Ra, 70% of the Ba, and 90% of the 230 Th from tailings in a single stage extraction. An economic analysis of a sulphuric acid leach process was made to determine whether the value of minerals recovered from tailings would offset the leaching cost. For one relatively mineral-rich tailings pile, the U and V values would more than pay for the

  3. Quality assurance program plan for the Radiological Survey Activities Program - Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, S.J.; Berven, B.A.; Little, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is responsible for surveying designated sites in the vicinity of 24 inactive mill sites involved in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP). The purpose of these surveys is to provide a recommendation to DOE whether to include or exclude the site from UMTRAP based on whether the onsite residual radioactive material (if any) originated from the former mill sites, and radiation levels onsite are in excess of appropriate Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria. This report describes the quality assurance program plan for the RASA program in conducting all activities related to the UMTRA project. All quality assurance provisions given by the DOE, DOE/UMTRA, and ORNL organizations are integrated into this plan. Specifically, this report identifies the policies and procedures followed in accomplishing the RASA/UMTRAP QA program, identifies those organizational units involved in the implementation of these procedures, and outlines the respective responsibilities of those groups

  4. Quality assurance program plan for the radiological survey activities program: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, S.J.; Berven, B.A.; Little, C.A.

    1986-08-01

    The Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is responsible for surveying designated sites in the vicinity of 24 inactive mill sites involved in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP). The purpose of these surveys is to provide a recommendation to DOE whether to include or exclude the site from UMTRAP based on whether the onsite residual radioactive material (if any) originated from the former mill sites, and radiation levels onsite are in excess of appropriate Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria. This report describes the quality assurance program plan for the RASA program in conducting all activities related to the UMTRA project. All quality assurance provisions given by the DOE, DOE/UMTRA, and ORNL organizations are integrated into this plan. Specifically, this report identifies the policies and procedures followed in accomplishing the RASA/UMTRAP QA program, identifies those organizational units involved in the implementation of these procedures, and outlines the respective responsibilities of those groups

  5. Quality Assurance Program Plan for the radiological survey activities program --- Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, R.R.; Little, C.A.

    1991-08-01

    The Pollutant Assessments Group (PAG) at the Grand Junction Office (GJO), Colorado, of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is responsible for surveying designated sites in the vicinity of 24 inactive mill sites involved in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP). The purpose of these surveys is to provide a recommendation to DOE whether to include or exclude these sites from UMTRAP based on whether the on-site residual radioactive material (if any) originated from the former mill sites, and radiation levels on-site are in excess of appropriate Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria. This report describes the Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) for the PAG in conducting all activities related to UMTRAP. All quality assurance provisions given by the DOE, DOE/UMTRA and ORNL organizations are integrated into this plan. Specifically, this report identifies the policies and procedures followed in accomplishing the PAG/UMTRA QA program, identifies those organizational units involved in the implementation of these procedures, and outlines the respective responsibilities of those groups. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Mineralogy and geochemistry of uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagel, M.; Somot, S.

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated three main types of uranium mill tailings: (1) acid mill tailings (Mounana, Gabon), (2) neutralized acid mill tailings (Ecarpiere and Jouac, France) and (3) alkaline mill tailings (Lodeve, France). We have focused especially on radium behaviour which is of major environmental concern in these tailings, but other metals were also studied. It is shown that in type 1 , trapping of 226 Ra by anglesite and barite is dominant whereas in types 2 and 3, 226 Ra is mainly or significantly scavenged by Fe- Mn oxyhydroxides. This study points out the importance of keeping conditions in which these oxyhydroxides will be stable for the long-term. Uranium would be also released during acidification of the tailings. This shows the importance to know more about the behavior of Ra during the crystallization of oxyhydroxides and during tailings diagenesis. Therefore, it is very important to study the sorption of Ra by clay minerals or late authigeneous minerals such as barite. (author)

  7. 1992 North Dakota Economic Impact Study for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The goal of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project in North Dakota is to improve the environment and reduce the negative health effects associated with residual radioactive material (RRM) from the inactive processing sites at Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota. A secondary benefit of the UMTRA Project is economic gain. The 1992 North Dakota Economic Impact Study (NDEIS) analyzes the impact of the remedial actions at the inactive Belfield and Bowman processing sites and their associated vicinity properties. This analysis is based on the assumption that the state of North Dakota will provide 10 percent of the funding required for remediation. For every dollar the state of North Dakota invests in the Belfield and Bowman onsite portion of the UMTRA Project, it will realize $5.04 in gross labor income (i.e., gross labor income divided by the state's total funding requirement). For every dollar the state of North Dakota invests, it will realize a net return of $3.04 (i.e., net benefit divided by the state's total funding requirement). This reflects only labor expenditure and employment impact. ff state and local non-labor tax benefits were considered in the net economic benefit, North Dakota could receive significantly more than $3.04 for each dollar it invests. The UMTRA Project work at Belfield and Bowman will benefit the state of North Dakota. Benefits include a reduction in the negative health effects caused by low-level RRM, an improvement in the environment, and increased economic growth

  8. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Mexican Hat, Utah -- Monument Valley, Arizona, sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    The final audit report for remedial action at the Mexican Hat, Utah, Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/audits, quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and QA remedial action close-out inspections performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC); on-site construction reviews (OSCR) performed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); and a surveillance performed by the Navajo Nation. This report refers to remedial action activities performed at the Mexican Hat, Utah--Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites

  9. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Tuba City, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    Planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Tuba City, Arizona, are described in the following sections of this water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP). This plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the stations routinely monitored at the site. The ground water data are used for site characterization and risk assessment. The regulatory basis for routine ground water monitoring at UMTRA Project sites is derived from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) and the final EPA standards of 1995 (60 FR 2854). Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), and the most effective technical approach for the site

  10. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase 1) and the Ground Water Project (Phase 2). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment

  11. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase 1) and the Ground Water Project (Phase 2). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  12. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites, Slick Rock, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the processing sites and on vicinity properties (VPs) associated with the sites. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards for the UMTRCA that contained measures to control the contaminated materials and to protect the ground water from further degradation. The sites contain concrete foundations of mill buildings, tailings piles, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive tailings materials. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designated site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the processing sites on land administered by the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Remediation would be performed by the DOE's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

  13. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites, Slick Rock, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the processing sites and on vicinity properties (VPs) associated with the sites. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards for the UMTRCA that contained measures to control the contaminated materials and to protect the ground water from further degradation. The sites contain concrete foundations of mill buildings, tailings piles, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive tailings materials. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designated site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the processing sites on land administered by the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Remediation would be performed by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project.

  14. Economics, funding and the influence of politics on the UMTRA Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamp, S.

    1993-01-01

    This presentation discusses the factors contributing to the cost of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Action Project and the political process involved in the funding. Topics covered include the following: Funding estimate and growth of estimate; Management actions during process; how the political process worked; cost of completed sites; economic benefit analysis of the project to Colorado; cost reduction program for the UMTRA project

  15. Mitigation and monitoring plan for impacted wetlands at the Gunnison UMTRA Project site, Gunnison, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) administers the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The UMTRA Project is the result of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act(UMTRA) which was passed in response to the public's concern over the potential public health hazards related to uranium mill tailings and associated contaminated material at abandoned or otherwise uncontrolled inactive processing sites throughout the United States. The Gunnison, Colorado abandoned uranium mill site is one of the sites slated for cleanup by the DOE under authority of UMTRA. The contaminated material at this site will be transported to a disposal site on US Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land east of Gunnison. Remedial action activities will temporarily disturb 0.8 acre and permanently eliminate 5.1 acres of wetlands. This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for the 5.9 acres of impacted wetlands. In conjunction with the mitigation of the permanently impacted wetlands through the enhancement of wetland and adjacent riparian areas, impacts to wildlife as a result of this project will also be mitigated. However, wildlife mitigation is not the focus of this document and is covered in relevant BLM permits for this project. This plan proposes the enhancement of a 3:1 ratio of impacted wetlands in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency guidelines, plus the enhancement of riparian areas for wildlife mitigation. Included in this mitigation plan is a monitoring plan to ensure that the proposed measures are working and being maintained

  16. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA project site Rifle, Colorado. Rev. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This final audit report summarizes the assessments performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration Division (ERD) and its Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) of remedial action compliance with approved plans, specifications, standards, and 40 CFR Part 192 at the Rifle, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. Remedial action construction was directed by the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC)

  17. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan -- Shiprock, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    Water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) is required for each U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site to provide a basis for ground water and surface water sampling at disposal and former processing sites. This WSAP identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the monitoring stations at the Navaho Reservation in Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project site. The purposes of the water sampling at Shiprock for fiscal year (FY) 1994 are to (1) collect water quality data at new monitoring locations in order to build a defensible statistical data base, (2) monitor plume movement on the terrace and floodplain, and (3) monitor the impact of alluvial ground water discharge into the San Juan River. The third activity is important because the community of Shiprock withdraws water from the San Juan River directly across from the contaminated alluvial floodplain below the abandoned uranium mill tailings processing site

  18. The U.S. regulatory framework for long-term management of uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smythe, C.; Bierley, D.; Bradshaw, M.

    1995-01-01

    The US established the regulatory structure for the management, disposal, and long-term care of uranium mill tailings in 1978 with the passage of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (Pub. L. 95-604). This legislation has governed the cleanup and disposal of uranium tailings at both inactive and active sites. The passage of the UMTRCA established a federal regulatory program for the cleanup and disposal of uranium mill tailings in the US. This program involves the DOE, the NRC, the EPA, various states and tribal governments, private licensees, and the general public. The DOE has completed surface remediation at 14 sites, with the remaining sites either under construction or in planning. The DOE's UMTRA Project has been very successful in dealing with public and agency demands, particularly regarding disposal site selection and transportation issues. The active sites are also being cleaned up, but at a slower pace than the inactive sites, with the first site tentatively scheduled for completion in 1996

  19. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Shiprock, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    This baseline risk assessment at the former uranium mill tailings site near Shiprock, New Mexico, evaluates the potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an on-site disposal cell in 1986 through the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. There are no domestic or drinking water wells in the contaminated ground water of the two distinct ground water units: the contaminated ground water in the San Juan River floodplain alluvium below the site and the contaminated ground water in the terrace alluvium area where the disposal cell is located. Because no one is drinking the affected ground water, there are currently no health or environmental risks directly associated with the contaminated ground water. However, there is a potential for humans, domestic animals, and wildlife to the exposed to surface expressions of ground water in the seeps and pools in the area of the San Juan River floodplain below the site. For these reasons, this risk assessment evaluates potential exposure to contaminated surface water and seeps as well as potential future use of contaminated ground water

  20. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Shiprock, New Mexico. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    This baseline risk assessment at the former uranium mill tailings site near Shiprock, New Mexico, evaluates the potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an on-site disposal cell in 1986 through the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. There are no domestic or drinking water wells in the contaminated ground water of the two distinct ground water units: the contaminated ground water in the San Juan River floodplain alluvium below the site and the contaminated ground water in the terrace alluvium area where the disposal cell is located. Because no one is drinking the affected ground water, there are currently no health or environmental risks directly associated with the contaminated ground water. However, there is a potential for humans, domestic animals, and wildlife to the exposed to surface expressions of ground water in the seeps and pools in the area of the San Juan River floodplain below the site. For these reasons, this risk assessment evaluates potential exposure to contaminated surface water and seeps as well as potential future use of contaminated ground water.

  1. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado State fiscal year 1994. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994 (1 July 1993 through 30 June 1994). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. Information on wages, taxes, and subcontract expenditures in combination with estimates and economic multipliers is used to estimate the dollar economic benefits to Colorado during the state fiscal year. Finally, the fiscal year 1994 estimates are compared to fiscal year 1993 employment and economic information

  2. Domestic uranium mining and milling industry 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration to provide the Secretary of Energy with basic data and analyses for ninth annual determination of the viability of the domestic uranium mining and milling industry. A viability determination is required annually, for the years 1983 through 1992, by Section 170B of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Authorization Act of 1983, Public Law 97-415, which amend the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. Topics include: evolution of the U.S. uranium industry; nuclear power requirements and uranium industry projections; and attributes of industry viability

  3. Evaluation of impacts and mitigation assessments for the UMTRA Project: Gunnison and Durango pilot studies. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beranich, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    This report evaluates the impacts assessment and proposed mitigations provided in environmental documents concerning the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The projected impacts and proposed mitigations identified in UMTRA Project environmental documents were evaluated for two UMTRA Project sites. These sites are Gunnison and Durango, which are representative of currently active and inactive UMTRA Project sites, respectively. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation was prepared for the remedial action at Durango and Gunnison as well as for the provision of an alternate water supply system at Gunnison. Additionally, environmental analysis was completed for mill site demolition Gunnison, and for a new road related to the Durango remedial action. The results in this report pertain only to the impact assessments prepared by the Regulatory Compliance staff as a part of the NEPA compliance requirements. Similarly, the mitigative measures documented are those that were identified during the NEPA process

  4. Policy and procedures for classification of Class III groundwater at UMTRA Project sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has recently proposed groundwater regulations for the US Department of Energy's )DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. These regulations allow the application of supplemental standards at UMTRA Project sites in specific situations. The designation of groundwater as Class III permits the application of supplemental standards. This document discusses a final UMTRA Project policy and procedures for identifying Class III groundwater, including identification of a review area, definition of water quality, quantification of aquifer yield, and identification of methods reasonably employed for public water supply systems. These items, either individually or collectively, need to be investigated in order to determine if groundwaters at UMTRA Project sites are Class III. This document provides a framework for the DOE to determine Class III groundwaters

  5. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Gunnison, Colorado. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    This report evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating groundwater contamination. This is the second risk assessment of groundwater contamination at this site. The first risk assessment was performed primarily to evaluate existing domestic wells to determine the potential for immediate human health and environmental impacts. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated groundwater that flows beneath the processing site towards the Gunnison River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentration of most contaminants are used in this risk assessment. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site after the tailings are relocated. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first step is to evaluate groundwater data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the main contaminants in the groundwater are cadmium, cobalt, iron, manganese, sulfate, uranium, and some of the products of radioactive decay of uranium.

  6. Decommissioning of the Zirovski Vrh Uranium Mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabukovec, I.; Logar, Z.; Arh, S.

    1996-01-01

    First of the inventions, which will ensure the beginning of the permanent closure of uranium ore exploitation and prevent the consequences of mining in the Zirovski Vrh Uranium Mine, abandoned according to the law from July 1992, will be soon realized. After obtaining the location permit for dismantling the equipment, foundations and installations in four main buildings of the uranium mill, current procedures are carried out in order to obtain the permission for performing the mentioned activities and to make contracts with acting organizations. Those buildings contain sources of radiation, which were considered within the legal procedures and design of technical documentation. Instructions for decontamination and protection against radiation, both issued with those projects, highly contribute to the Slovenian experience in the field of practical management of radiation sources. Additional requirement, which enters difference between decommissioning of similar mills worldwide and the one mentioned, is preservation of buildings in order to change their purpose. (author)

  7. Optimization of uranium mill tailings disposal practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, Allan C.B.; Rowe, William D.

    1984-01-01

    So far as we have been to discern, no uranium mill tailings pile has yet been properly stabilized for long-term disposal. And although considerable effort is now being directed at developing practical solutions and at establishing standards for permanent disposal, the difficulties in application are diverse. They arise from the variety of environments in which milling is conducted, the significant costs associated with disposing of the large volumes of materials involved, the diverse nature of the hazards to be protected against, and uncertainties in both performance of controls and in how to determine societal responsibilities for management of the long term hazards to human populations from uranium tailings. There are 24 uranium tailings piles in the United States which no longer have responsible owners, and must now be disposed of by the U.S. Government in order to protect public health

  8. Environmental impact of uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dory, A.B.

    1981-08-01

    The author introduces the subject with an overview of the regulatory requirments and philosophy applied to uranium mines and mills. The special attention given to tailings management is highlighted, and a discussion of the basic environmental concerns is concluded with an itemizing of the main tasks facing the AECB. The extent of the environmental impact of uranium mining, milling and waste management is illustrated with specific details pertaining to mines in the Elliot Lake area. The author concludes that the impact on the ground and surface water system is not alarming, and the impact on air quality is not significant beyond a few hundred metres from the mining facilities. The publicly perceived impact is discussed, followed by a rationale for the continued licensing of new uranium mining operations complete with tailings management facilities

  9. Elemental characterization of Tummalapalle uranium mill tailing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patra, A.C.; Sahoo, S.K.; Thakur, V.K.; Dubey, J.S.; Jha, S.K.; Tripathi, R.M.; Sharma, D.B.

    2018-01-01

    Elements are present in environmental matrices at varying concentrations. Their levels may increase due to anthropogenic activities like transportation, industrial activities, agriculture, urbanization and human activities. Trace elements can be classified as potentially toxic (eg. cadmium, arsenic, mercury, lead, nickel), probably essential (eg. cobalt, vanadium) and essential (eg. iron, zinc, copper, selenium, manganese). Due to the expansion of the Indian Nuclear Power Programme, new uranium mining sites are coming up. Mining and milling produce large quantities of low active mill tailings contained in engineered Tailings Ponds. The tailings are amenable for interaction with the geochemical forces and can act as potential sources of contamination. Thus it is necessary to ascertain the concentrations of elements that are present therein. In this paper we aim to characterize the uranium tailings generated from Tummalapalle uranium mining facility in Kadappa district, Andhra Pradesh, India

  10. Health concerns in uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archer, V.E.

    1981-01-01

    Mortality of uranium miners from both lung cancer and other respiratory diseases is strongly dependent on exposure to radon daughters, cigarette smoking and height. Lung cancer among 15 different mining groups (uranium, iron, lead, zinc) was analyzed to determine what factors influence incidence and the induction-latent period. At low exposure or exposure rates, alpha radiation is more efficient in inducing lung cancer, producing an upward convex exposure-response curve. The induction-latent period is shortened by increased age at start of mining, by cigarette smoking and by high exposure rates. Instead of extrapolating downward from high exposures to estimate risk at low levels, it is suggested that it might be more appropriate to use cancer rates associated with background radiation as the lowest point on the exposure-response curve. Although health risks are much greater in uranium mines than mills, there is some health risk in the mills from long-lived radioactive materials

  11. UMTRA project technical assistance contractor quality assurance implementation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Technical Assistance contractor (TAC) Quality Assurance Implementation Plan (QAIP) outlines the primary requirements for integrating quality functions for TAC technical activities applied to the surface and ground water phases of the UMTRA Project. The QAIP is subordinate to the latest issue of the UMTRA Project TAC Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) (DOE, 1993a), which was developed using US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5700.6C quality assurance (QA) criteria. The QAIP addresses technical aspects of the TAC UMTRA Project surface and ground water programs. All QA issues in the QAIP shall comply with requirements contained in the TAC QAPP (DOE, 1933a). Because industry standards for data acquisition and data control are not addressed in DOE Order 5700.6C, the QAIP has been formatted to the 14 US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) QA requirements. DOE Order 5700.6C criteria that are not contained in the CERCLA requirements are added to the QAIP as additional requirements in Sections 15.0 through 18.0. Project documents that contain CERCLA requirements and 5700.6 criteria shall be referenced in this document to avoid duplication. Referenced documents are not included in this QAIP but are available through the UMTRA Project Document Control Center

  12. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Gunnison, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    To achieve compliance with the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater protection standards the US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to meet background concentrations or the EPA maximum concentration limits (MCLS) for hazardous constituents in groundwater in the uppermost aquifer at the point of compliance (POC) at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site near Gunnison, Colorado. The proposed remedial action will ensure protection of human health and the environment. A summary of the principal features of the water resources protection strategy for the Gunnison disposal site is included in this report

  13. Domestic uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    A field hearing was held in Riverton, Wyoming on the erosion of the state's uranium industry as production and capital investment have declined and inventories have continued to rise because of a shift to foreign suppliers. The result has been serious unemployment in Wyoming and a decline in uranium mines from 5400 in 1980 to the present 1200. The seven witnesses spoke for the mining industry and state and federal government. Among the issues raised were mining regulations and the cancellation of nuclear rejects which have impacted the health of the industry. Additional statements and a report supplied for the record follow their testimony

  14. Environmental Audit, Rifle, Gunnison and Grand Junction UMTRA Project Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    This report documents the results of the comprehensive baseline Environmental Audit completed for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites at Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. Included in the Audit were the actual abandoned mill sites, associated transportation and disposal cell facilities, and representative examples of the more than 4,000 known vicinity properties. Sites investigated include: Climax Mill Site, Truck/Train Haul Route, Cotter Transfer Station, Cheney Disposal Cell, Rifle Mill Sites (Old and New Rifle), Gunnison Mill Site, Vicinity Properties, and Estes Gulch and Proposed Landfill Site No. 1 Disposal Cells. The UMTRA Audit was a comprehensive baseline audit which considered all environmental programs and the activities associated with ongoing and planned remediation at the UMTRA sites listed above. Compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) was not considered during this investigation. The Audit Team looked at the following technical disciplines: air, surface water/drinking water, groundwater, soil/sediment/biota, waste management, toxic and chemical materials, quality assurance, radiation, inactive waste sites, and environmental management. 6 figs., 12 tabs

  15. Environmental Audit, Rifle, Gunnison and Grand Junction UMTRA Project Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-08-01

    This report documents the results of the comprehensive baseline Environmental Audit completed for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites at Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. Included in the Audit were the actual abandoned mill sites, associated transportation and disposal cell facilities, and representative examples of the more than 4,000 known vicinity properties. Sites investigated include: Climax Mill Site, Truck/Train Haul Route, Cotter Transfer Station, Cheney Disposal Cell, Rifle Mill Sites (Old and New Rifle), Gunnison Mill Site, Vicinity Properties, and Estes Gulch and Proposed Landfill Site No. 1 Disposal Cells. The UMTRA Audit was a comprehensive baseline audit which considered all environmental programs and the activities associated with ongoing and planned remediation at the UMTRA sites listed above. Compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) was not considered during this investigation. The Audit Team looked at the following technical disciplines: air, surface water/drinking water, groundwater, soil/sediment/biota, waste management, toxic and chemical materials, quality assurance, radiation, inactive waste sites, and environmental management. 6 figs., 12 tabs.

  16. Baseline risk assessment for groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Monument Valley, Arizona. Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site near Monument Valley, Arizona. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being relocated and stabilized in a disposal cell at Mexican Hat, Utah, through the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The tailings removal is planned for completion by spring 1994. After the tailings are removed, groundwater contamination at the site will continue to be evaluated. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Groundwater Project. It will be used to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site.

  17. Development of uranium milling and conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Shingo; Hirono, Shuichiro.

    1983-11-01

    The development and improvement of uranium milling and refining producing uranium tetrafluoride from ores by the wet process, without producing yellowcake as an intermediate product, have been carried out for over ten years with a small pilot plant (50 t-ore/day). In the past several years, a process for converting uranium tetrafluoride into hexafluoride has been developed successfully. To develop the process further, the construction of an integrated milling and conversion pilot plant (200 t-U/year) started in 1979 and was completed in 1981. This new plant has two systems of solvent extraction using tri-noctylamine: one of the systems treats the pregnant solution (uranyl sulphate) by heap-leaching followed by ion exchange, and the other treats the uranyl sulphate solution by dissolving imported yellowcake. The uranium loading solvents from the two systems are stripped with hydrochloric acid solution to obtain the concentrated uranium solution containing 100 g-U/1. Uranyl sulphate solution from the stripping circuit is reduced to a uranous sulphate solution by the electrolytic method. In a reduction cell, uranyl sulphate solution and dilute sulphuric acid are used respectively as catholyte and anolyte, and a cation exchange membrane is used to prevent re-oxidation of the uranous sulphate. In the following hydrofluorination step, uranium tetrafluoride, UF 4 .1-1.2H 2 O (particle size: 50-100μ), is produced continuously as the precipitate in an improved reaction vessel, and this makes it possible to simplify the procedures of liquid-solid separation, drying and granulation. The uranium tetrafluoride is dehydrated by heating to 350 0 C in an inert gas flow. The complete conversion from UF 4 into UF 6 is achieved by a fluidized-bed reactor and a high value of utilization efficiency of fluorine, over 99.9 percent, is attained at about 400 0 C. (author)

  18. Environmental impact of uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dory, A.B.

    1981-08-01

    The Atomic Energy Control Board is now involved from the early planning stages in the development of uranium mine/mill facilities. As a result, new facilities (including tailings management areas) are designed and developed to meet a high standard. The impact of the mines and tailings areas in the Elliot Lake area on ground and surface waters and air quality is discussed in detail

  19. UMTRA Ground Water Project management action process document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    A critical U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mission is to plan, implement, and complete DOE Environmental Restoration (ER) programs at facilities that were operated by or in support of the former Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). These facilities include the 24 inactive processing sites the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (42 USC Section 7901 et seq.) identified as Title I sites, which had operated from the late 1940s through the 1970s. In UMTRCA, Congress acknowledged the potentially harmful health effects associated with uranium mill tailings and directed the DOE to stabilize, dispose of, and control the tailings in a safe and environmentally sound manner. The UMTRA Surface Project deals with buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the processing sites and any associated vicinity properties (VP). Surface remediation at the processing sites will be completed in 1997 when the Naturita, Colorado, site is scheduled to be finished. The UMTRA Ground Water Project was authorized in an amendment to the UMTRCA (42 USC Section 7922(a)), when Congress directed DOE to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards. The UMTRA Ground Water Project addresses any contamination derived from the milling operation that is determined to be present at levels above the EPA standards

  20. Reclamation plans at uranium mill tailings sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abt, S.R.; Nelson, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    Long-term stability of waste impoundments is of concern because of the long time periods over which various types of waste may remain active. Over the past decade much technology has been developed specifically for reclamation of uranium mill tailings impoundments. Aspects of this technology will be discussed here and is presented as also being directly applicable to reclamation of industrial waste impoundments in general. The paper discusses Title I and Title II sites which represent two different generations in uranium tailings impoundment construction. The comparison between the two represent differences in philosophies as well as in impoundment type. Reclamation of uranium mill tailings impoundments in the U.S. is controlled by Federal legislation, which has set forth the regulatory framework for reclamation plan approval. Title I requirements govern government owned inactive sites and Title II requirements govern active tailings impoundments or those operated by private industries. While the Title I and Title II designation may result in a slightly different regulatory process, reclamation of uranium tailings sites has the same. Differences between Title I and Title II reclamation plans to achieve surface stability relate primarily to the embankment and surface covers. The differences in the cover designs result from site-specific conditions, rather than from differences in engineering approaches or the regulatory process. This paper discusses the site-specific conditions that affect the selection of cover designs, and provides a comparative example to illustrate the effect of this condition

  1. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Shiprock, New Mexico. Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This report evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell on the site in 1986 by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating groundwater contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Groundwater Project. This risk assessment follows the approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first step is to evaluate groundwater data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the main contaminants in the floodplain groundwater are arsenic, magnesium, manganese, nitrate, sodium, sulfate, and uranium. The complete list of contaminants associated with the terrace groundwater could not be determined due to the lack of the background groundwater quality data. However, uranium, nitrate, and sulfate are evaluated since these chemicals are clearly associated with uranium processing and are highly elevated compared to regional waters. It also could not be determined if the groundwater occurring in the terrace is a usable water resource, since it appears to have originated largely from past milling operations. The next step in the risk assessment is to estimate how much of these contaminants people would be exposed to if a drinking well were installed in the contaminated groundwater or if there were exposure to surface expressions of contaminated water. Potential exposures to surface water include incidental contact with contaminated water or sediments by children playing on the floodplain and consumption of meat and milk from domestic animals grazed and watered on the floodplain.

  2. Geotechnical and water resource aspects of uranium mill tailings pile reclamation projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, J.A.; Tackston, J.W.; Portillo, R.

    1986-01-01

    Design and construction work is currently in progress at more than twenty sites associated with the UMTRA Project - this involves final reclamation of the uranium mill tailings piles so that they are stable for at least 200 years and for up to 1000 years. Remedial action construction plans for the tailings piles involve detailed consideration of the present and possible future ground water and surface-water impacts of the pile. Since the stabilized pile is ultimately a major geotechnical structure, detailed consideration of the long-term resistance to erosion and containment of radioactive material is also required. A case history illustrates how the critical design criteria governing the remedial action activities at the various piles are applied to the pile at the Lakeview site to provide for long-term protection of the water resource and public health and safety

  3. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project: Cost Reduction and Productivity Improvement Program Project Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    The purpose of the Cost Reduction/Productivity Improvement Program Plan is to formalize and improve upon existing efforts to control costs which have been underway since project inception. This program plan has been coordinated with the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) and the DOE Field Office, Albuquerque (AL). It incorporates prior Uranium Mill Tallings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office guidance issued on the subject. The opportunities for reducing cosh and improving productivity are endless. The CR/PIP has these primary objectives: Improve productivity and quality; heighten the general cost consciousness of project participants, at all levels of their organizations; identify and implement specific innovative employee ideas that extend beyond what is required through existing processes and procedures; emphasize efforts that create additional value for the money spent by maintaining the project Total Estimated Cost (TEC) at the lowest possible level

  4. Systematic approach to designing surface covers for uranium-mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beedlow, P.A.; Cadwell, L.L.; McShane, M.C.

    1982-01-01

    The wide range of environmental conditions present at uranium mill tailings sites precludes the use of a single type of surface cover. Surface covers must be designed on a site-specific basis. To facilitate site specific designs the UMTRA program is developing guidelines for designing surface covers. This paper presents a systematic approach to designing surface covers for tailings that can be applied under any site condition. The approach consists of three phases: (1) An assessment during which the degree of surface protection is determined. (2) A preliminary design that facilitates interaction with those designing other containment system elements. (3) A final design where the cost and effectiveness of the surface cover are determined. The types of information required to apply this approach are discussed

  5. Radium, uranium and metals in acidic or alkaline uranium mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somot, St.

    1997-01-01

    Uranium mill study sites have been chosen in function of their different characteristics: deposits age, treatment nature (alkaline or acid), mill origin. The realization of specific drilling allowed the simultaneous study of the interstitial water and the solid fraction of samples, cut at determined deep. A radiation imbalance between 230 Th and 226 Ra is observed in the acid treatment residues. The trace elements concentration spectrum is directly bound to the nature of the ore. Diamagnetic evolutions are observed in residues. The uranium concentrations are higher in carbonated waters than in calcic sulfated waters. The selective sequential lixiviation showed that the 226 Ra activity of the interstitial water is controlled by the Gypsum in acid treatment residues. In other hand in the alkaline treatment waters, the carbonates occur. The Ra retention is largely bound to the Fe and Mn oxy-hydroxides. (A.L.B.)

  6. The use of geochemical barriers for reducing contaminants emanating from uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groffman, A.R.; Longmire, P.; Mukhopadhyay, B.; Downs, W.

    1991-01-01

    A problem facing the Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Action (UMTRA) Project is the contamination of local ground water by leachate emanating form the tailings piles. These fluids have a low pH and contain heavy metals and trace elements such as arsenic, molybdenum, nitrate, selenium, and uranium. In order to meet ground water standards low hydraulic conductivity covers are installed over the tailings embankment. in some cases it may be necessary to install a geochemical barrier down gradient from the tailings embankment in order to remove the hazardous constituents. By using geochemical barriers to reduce undesirable species form a contaminant plume, fluids emanating form beneath a repository can in effect be scrubbed before entering the water table. Materials containing adsorbing clays, iron oxyhydroxides and zeolites, and reducing materials such as coal and peat, are being used effectively to attenuate contaminants form uranium mill tailings. Experiments to directly determine attenuation capacities of selected buffer/adsorption materials were conducted in the laboratory. Batch leach tests were conducted in lieu of column tests when the hydraulic conductivity of materials was too low to use in columns and shales

  7. Management of wastes from uranium mines and mills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, K.T.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium mining and milling operations have not given rise to much concern about their hazards, and with advancing technologies for mill processing and waste management, the situation will continue to improve. However, the disposal of large quantities of waste produced in mining and milling does have an environmental impact, owing to the long half-lives and the ready availability of the toxic radionuclides Ra-226 and Rn-222. This article deals with the management of wastes from uranium mines and mills

  8. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    The Grand Junction site has been reevaluated in order to revise the October 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Grand Junction, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.9 million tons of tailings at the Grand Junction site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The eight alternative actions presented herein range from millsite and off-site decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from about $10,200,000 for stabilization in-place to about $39,500,000 for disposal in the DeBeque area, at a distance of about 35 mi, using transportation by rail. If transportation to DeBeque were by truck, the cost estimated to be about $41,900,000. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Grand Junction tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and (c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $200/lb by heap leach and $150/lb by conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery appears not to be economically attractive

  9. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-07-01

    The Grand Junction site has been reevaluated in order to revise the October 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Grand Junction, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.9 million tons of tailings at the Grand Junction site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The eight alternative actions presented herein range from millsite and off-site decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from about $10,200,000 for stabilization in-place to about $39,500,000 for disposal in the DeBeque area, at a distance of about 35 mi, using transportation by rail. If transportation to DeBeque were by truck, the cost estimated to be about $41,900,000. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Grand Junction tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and (c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $200/lb by heap leach and $150/lb by conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery appears not to be economically attractive.

  10. Technical considerations for the implementation of subsurface microbial barriers for restoration of groundwater at UMTRA sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, M.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Action (UMTRA) Program is responsible for the assessment and remedial action at the 24 former uranium mill tailings sites located in the United States. The surface remediation phase, which has primarily focused on containment and stabilization of the abandoned uranium mill tailings piles, is nearing completion. Attention has now turned to the groundwater restoration phase. One alternative under consideration for groundwater restoration at UMTRA sites is the use of in-situ permeable reactive subsurface barriers. In this type of a system, contaminated groundwater will be allowed to flow naturally through a barrier filled with material which will remove hazardous constituents from the water by physical, chemical or microbial processes while allowing passage of the pore water. The subject of this report is a reactive barrier which would remove uranium and other contaminants of concern from groundwater by microbial action (i.e., a microbial barrier). The purpose of this report is to assess the current state of this technology and to determine issues that must be addressed in order to use this technology at UMTRA sites. The report focuses on six contaminants of concern at UMTRA sites including uranium, arsenic, selenium, molybdenum, cadmium and chromium. In the first section of this report, the fundamental chemical and biological processes that must occur in a microbial barrier to control the migration of contaminants are described. The second section contains a literature review of research which has been conducted on the use of microorganisms to immobilize heavy metals. The third section addresses areas which need further development before a microbial barrier can be implemented at an UMTRA site

  11. Technical considerations for the implementation of subsurface microbial barriers for restoration of groundwater at UMTRA sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, M.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Action (UMTRA) Program is responsible for the assessment and remedial action at the 24 former uranium mill tailings sites located in the United States. The surface remediation phase, which has primarily focused on containment and stabilization of the abandoned uranium mill tailings piles, is nearing completion. Attention has now turned to the groundwater restoration phase. One alternative under consideration for groundwater restoration at UMTRA sites is the use of in-situ permeable reactive subsurface barriers. In this type of a system, contaminated groundwater will be allowed to flow naturally through a barrier filled with material which will remove hazardous constituents from the water by physical, chemical or microbial processes while allowing passage of the pore water. The subject of this report is a reactive barrier which would remove uranium and other contaminants of concern from groundwater by microbial action (i.e., a microbial barrier). The purpose of this report is to assess the current state of this technology and to determine issues that must be addressed in order to use this technology at UMTRA sites. The report focuses on six contaminants of concern at UMTRA sites including uranium, arsenic, selenium, molybdenum, cadmium and chromium. In the first section of this report, the fundamental chemical and biological processes that must occur in a microbial barrier to control the migration of contaminants are described. The second section contains a literature review of research which has been conducted on the use of microorganisms to immobilize heavy metals. The third section addresses areas which need further development before a microbial barrier can be implemented at an UMTRA site.

  12. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    As required by the Romer-Twining Agreement of 1990, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this annual economic impact study for the state of Colorado. This report assesses the economic impacts related to the DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project in Colorado during the state fiscal year (FY) between 1 July 1994 and 30 June 1995. To estimate net economic benefit, employment, salaries and wages, and other related economic benefits are discussed, quantified, and then compared to the state's 10 percent share of the remedial action costs. Actual data obtained from sites currently undergoing remedial action were used as the basis for analyses. If data were not available, estimates were used to derive economic indicators. This study describes the types of employment associated with the UMTRA Project and estimates of the numbers of people employed by UMTRA Project subcontractors in Colorado during state FY 1995. Employment totals are reported in estimated average annual jobs; however, the actual number of workers at the site fluctuates depending on weather and on the status of remedial action activities. In addition, the actual number of people employed on the Project during the year may be higher than the average annual employment reported due to the temporary nature of some of the jobs

  13. Quality assurance project plan for the UMTRA technical assistance contractor hydrochemistry facility. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) hydrochemistry facility is used to perform a limited but important set of services for the UMTRA Project. Routine services include support of field-based hydrological and geochemical operations and water sampling activities. Less commonly, the hydrology and geochemistry staff undertake special studies and site characterization studies at this facility. It is also used to train hydrologists, geochemists, and groundwater sampling crews. A review of this Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) shall be accomplished once each calendar year. This review will be targeted to be accomplished not sooner than 6 months and not later than 18 months after the last review

  14. UMTRA ground water sampling techniques: Comparison of the traditional and low flow methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    This report describes the potential changes in water quality data that may occur with the conversion from MBV (multiple bore volume) to LF (low flow) sampling and provides two examples of how such a change might impact Project decisions. The existing scientific literature on LF sampling is reviewed and the new LF data from three UMTRA Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project sites are evaluated seeking answers to the questions posed above. Several possible approaches, that the UMTRA Project may take to address issues unanswered by the literature are presented and compared, and a recommendation is offered for the future direction of the LF conversion effort

  15. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment. Human health risk may result from exposure to ground water contaminated from uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur from drinking water obtained from a well placed in the areas of contamination. Furthermore, environmental risk may result from plant or animal exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water

  16. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment. Human health risk may result from exposure to ground water contaminated from uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur from drinking water obtained from a well placed in the areas of contamination. Furthermore, environmental risk may result from plant or animal exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water.

  17. Grouting of uranium mill tailings piles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boegly, W.J. Jr.; Tamura, T.; Williams, J.D.

    1984-03-01

    A program of remedial action was initiated for a number of inactive uranium mill tailings piles. These piles result from mining and processing of uranium ores to meet the nation's defense and nuclear power needs and represent a potential hazard to health and the environment. Possible remedial actions include the application of covers to reduce radon emissions and airborne transport of the tailings, liners to prevent groundwater contamination by leachates from the piles, physical or chemical stabilization of the tailings, or moving the piles to remote locations. Conventional installation of liners would require excavation of the piles to emplace the liner; however, utilization of grouting techniques, such as those used in civil engineering to stabilize soils, might be a potential method of producing a liner without excavation. Laboratory studies on groutability of uranium mill tailings were conducted using samples from three abandoned piles and employing a number of particulate and chemical grouts. These studies indicate that it is possible to alter the permeability of the tailings from ambient values of 10 -3 cm/s to values approaching 10 -7 cm/s using silicate grouts and to 10 -8 cm/s using acrylamide and acrylate grouts. An evaluation of grouting techniques, equipment required, and costs associated with grouting were also conducted and are presented. 10 references, 1 table

  18. Health concerns in uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archer, V.E.

    1981-01-01

    Mortality of uranium miners form both lung cancer and other respiratory diseases is strongly dependent on exposure to radon daughters, cigarette smoking and height. Lung cancer among 15 different mining groups (uranium, iron, led, zinc) was analyzed to determine what factors influence incidence and the induction-latent period. At low exposure or exposure rates, alpha radiation is more efficient in inducing lung cancer, producing an upward convex exposure-response curve. The induction-latent period is shortened by increased age at start of mining, by cigarette smoking and by high exposure rates. For a follow-up period of 20 to 25 years, the incidence increases with age at start of mining, with magnitude of exposure and with amount of cigarette smoking. Instead of extrapolating downward from high exposures to estimate risk at low levels, it is suggested that it might be more appropriate to use cancer rates associated with background radiation as the lowest point on the exposure-response curve. Although health risks are much greater in uranium mines than mills, there is some health risk in the mills from long-lived radioactive materials

  19. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Grand Junction, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site Near Grand Junction, Colorado evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial activities at the site were conducted from 1989 to 1993. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated ground water that flows beneath the processing site toward the Colorado River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentrations of most contaminants are used to assess risk. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to determine what remedial action may be needed for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the EPA. the first step is to evaluate ground water data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the contaminants of potential concern in the ground water are arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, fluoride, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, sulfate, uranium, vanadium, zinc, and radium-226. The next step in the risk assessment is to estimate how much of these contaminants people would be exposed to if they drank from a well installed in the contaminated ground water at the former processing site

  20. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Grand Junction, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site Near Grand Junction, Colorado evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial activities at the site were conducted from 1989 to 1993. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated ground water that flows beneath the processing site toward the Colorado River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentrations of most contaminants are used to assess risk. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to determine what remedial action may be needed for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the EPA. the first step is to evaluate ground water data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the contaminants of potential concern in the ground water are arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, fluoride, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, sulfate, uranium, vanadium, zinc, and radium-226. The next step in the risk assessment is to estimate how much of these contaminants people would be exposed to if they drank from a well installed in the contaminated ground water at the former processing site.

  1. Update of NRC uranium mill licensing activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.B.

    1978-01-01

    Increased vigilance must be given to controlling emissions from active milling operations, particularly windblown tailings, to assure that the soon-to-be-effective EPA Fuel Cycle Standard is met. Comprehensive environmental monitoring programs will have to be developed to confirm that, in fact, the limit is met. Just as was the case last year, tailings management and disposal is still the major item of concern relating to uranium milling operations. As stated earlier, the NRC feels that below-grade disposal is the preferred method of tailings disposal in that it provides the greatest assurances of long-term isolation. In any event, tailings must be disposed of in such a way that no active care is required of disposal sites, to avoid committing future generations to a significant, lingering obligation to care for wastes generated to produce benefits which they will only indirectly receive, if at all. While the primary means of providing long-term isolation of tailings must be by physical barriers, as a prudent, supplementary measure of control, we are concluding in the GEIS on Uranium Milling that ownership of disposal sites by a Government agency is desirable. We expect a low level of continued surveillance at disposal sites with small expense involved. We are concluding that requiring operators to contribute on the order of $100,000 per disposal site to cover ongoing expenses would be the most apropriate means of conforming to the principle that the waste generator should pay full costs of waste disposal. We feel such an arrangement would be fair, simple, and efficient, favoring it over complicated schemes involving such things as taxes on product or tailings generated and continued management of ear-marked funds. Legislation is now pending in the Congress which would give NRC direct regulatory control over mill tailings and put into place the authorities needed to implement the long-term control and funding arrangements discussed above

  2. Radiation exposure of uranium mill workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, Giridhar; Saha, S.C.

    1982-01-01

    The uranium mill workers at Jaduguda were covered by a regular film badge service from 1969 onwards. Since the log normal plot is useful in interpreting occupational exposure, a statistical analysis of the radiation exposure data was attempted. Exposure data for each year has been plotted as cumulative percentage and worker's population with exposure levels in different class intervals. The plot for each of the year under investigation shows an occupational exposure distribution more or less consistent with the log normal distribution function. The analysis shows that more than 98% of radiation workers received less than 200 mrem (2 mSv). (author)

  3. Containment systems for uranium-mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, J.N.; Buelt, J.L.

    1982-11-01

    Cover and liner systems for uranium mill tailings in the United States must satisfy stringent requirements regarding long-term stability, radon control, and radionuclide and hazardous chemical migration. The cover and liner technology discussed in this paper involves: (1) single and multilayer earthen cover systems; (2) asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems; and (3) asphalt, clay, and synthetic liner systems. These systems have been field tested at the Grand Junction, Colorado, tailings pile, where they have been shown to effectively reduce radon releases and radionuclide and chemical migration

  4. Chapter 2: uranium mines and mills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connell, W.J.

    1983-03-01

    This chapter will be included in a larger ASCE Committee Report. Uranium mining production is split between underground and open pit mines. Mills are sized to produce yellowcake concentrate from hundreds to thousands of tons of ore per day. Miner's health and safety, and environmental protection are key concerns in design. Standards are set by the US Mine Safety and Health Administration, the EPA, NRC, DOT, the states, and national standards organizations. International guidance and standards are extensive and based on mining experience in many nations

  5. Radon emanation characteristics of uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielson, K.K.; Freeman, H.D.; Hartley, J.N.; Mauch, M.L.; Rogers, V.C.

    1982-01-01

    Radon emanation from uranium mill tailings was examined with respect to the mechanisms of emanation and the physical properties of the tailings which affect emanation. Radon emanation coefficients were measured at ambient moisture on 135 samples from the 1981 field test site at the Grand Junction tailings pile. These coefficients showed a similar trend with moisture to those observed previously with uranium ores, and averaged 0.10 + or - 0.02 at dryness and 0.38 + or - 0.04 for all samples having greater than five weight-percent moisture. Small differences were noted between the maximum values of the coefficients for the sand and slime fractions of the tailings. Separate measurements on tailings from the Vitro tailings pile exhibited much lower emanation coefficients for moist samples, and similar coefficients for dry samples. Alternative emanation measurement techniques were examined and procedures are recommended for use in future work

  6. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Monument Valley, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    The Monument Valley Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Cane Valley is a former uranium mill that has undergone surface remediation in the form of tailings and contaminated materials removal. Contaminated materials from the Monument Valley (Arizona) UMTRA Project site have been transported to the Mexican Hat (Utah) UMTRA Project site for consolidation with the Mexican Hat tailings. Tailings removal was completed in February 1994. Three geologic units at the site contain water: the unconsolidated eolian and alluvial deposits (alluvial aquifer), the Shinarump Conglomerate (Shinarump Member), and the De Chelly Sandstone. Water quality analyses indicate the contaminant plume has migrated north of the site and is mainly in the alluvial aquifer. An upward hydraulic gradient in the De Chelly Sandstone provides some protection to that aquifer. This water sampling and analysis plan recommends sampling domestic wells, monitor wells, and surface water in April and September 1994. The purpose of sampling is to continue periodic monitoring for the surface program, evaluate changes to water quality for site characterization, and provide data for the baseline risk assessment. Samples taken in April will be representative of high ground water levels and samples taken in September will be representative of low ground water levels. Filtered and nonfiltered samples will be analyzed for plume indicator parameters and baseline risk assessment parameters

  7. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Environmental Line Management Audit Action Plan. Final report. Audit, October 26, 1992--November 6, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This Action Plan contains responses, planned actions, and estimated costs for addressing the findings discovered in the Environmental Management Audit conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA), October 26 through November 6, 1992. This document should be read in conjunction with the Audit Report to ensure the findings addressed in this document are fully understood. The scope of the UMTRA Environmental Management Audit was comprehensive and encompassed all areas of environmental management except environmental programs pertaining to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance. The Audit Report listed 18 findings: 11 were identified as compliance findings, and the remaining 7 were best management practice findings. Root cause analysis was performed on all the findings. The results of the analysis as well as planned corrective actions are summarized in Section 5.0. All planned actions were prioritized using the Tiger Team Assessment Corrective Action Plan system. Based on assigned priorities, all planned actions were costed by fiscal year. This Action Plan contains a description of the organizational and management structures to be used to implement the Action Plan, a brief discussion of root cause analysis and funding, followed by the responses and planned actions for each finding. A member of the UMTRA Project Office (PO) has been assigned responsibility for tracking the progress on each of the findings. The UMTRA PO staff wrote and/or approved all of the corrective actions recorded in this Action Plan

  8. Biota of uranium mill tailings near the Black Hills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Rumble

    1982-01-01

    Reclamation" often implies the enhancement of the land as wildlife habitat or for other productive uses. However, there are situations where revegetation to stabilize erosion is the only desired goal. Uranium mining and mill sites may fall into this later category. Data pertaining to plant and animal components on revegetated uranium mill tailings was collected....

  9. Recycling and reuse of wastewater from uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Lechang; Gao Jie; Zhang Xueli; Wei Guangzhi; Zhang Guopu

    2010-01-01

    Uranium mining/milling process, and the sources, recycling/reuse approach and treatment methods of process wastewater are introduced. The wastewater sources of uranium mining and milling include effluent, raffinate, tailings water, mine discharge, resin form converted solution, and precipitation mother liquor. Wastewater can be recycled/reused for leachant, eluent, stripping solution,washing solution and tailings slurry. (authors)

  10. Training manual for uranium mill workers on health protection from uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, N.; Brodsky, A.

    1986-01-01

    This report provides information for uranium mill workers to help them understand the radiation safety aspects of working with uranium as it is processed from ore to yellowcake at the mills. The report is designed to supplement the radiation safety training provided by uranium mills to their workers. It is written in an easily readable style so that new employees with no previous experience working with uranium or radiation can obtain a basic understanding of the nature of radiation and the particular safety requirements of working with uranium. The report should be helpful to mill operators by providing training material to support their radiation safety training programs

  11. UMTRA Surface Project management action process document. Final report: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    A critical mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the planning, implementation, and completion of environmental restoration (ER) programs at facilities that were operated by or in support of the former Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) from the late 1940s into the 1970s. Among these facilities are the 24 former uranium mill sites designed in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 (42 USC section 7901 et seq.) Title 1 of the UMTRCA authorized the DOE to undertake remedial actions at these designated sites and associated vicinity properties (VP), which contain uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials (RRM) derived from the processing sites. Title 2 of the UMTRCA addresses uranium mill sites that were licensed at the time the UMTRCA was enacted. Cleanup of these Title 2 sites is the responsibility of the licensees. The cleanup of the Title 1 sites has been split into two separate projects: the Surface Project, which deals with the mill buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the sites and VPs; and the Ground Water Project, which is limited to the contaminated ground water at the sites. This management action process (MAP) document discusses the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project only; a separate MAP document has been prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project

  12. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project, and the Ground Water Project. For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado, phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado. The surface cleanup will reduce radon and other radiation emissions from the former uranium processing site and prevent further site-related contamination of ground water. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health and the environment, and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water or surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment was conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  13. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project, and the Ground Water Project. For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado, phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation's Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado. The surface cleanup will reduce radon and other radiation emissions from the former uranium processing site and prevent further site-related contamination of ground water. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health and the environment, and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water or surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment was conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment

  14. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    The Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites are located near the small town of Slick Rock, in San Miguel County, Colorado. There are two designated UMTRA sites at Slick Rock, the Union Carbide (UC) site and the North Continent (NC) site. Both sites are adjacent to the Dolores River. The UC site is approximately 1 mile (mi) [2 kilometers (km)] downstream of the NC site. Contaminated materials cover an estimated 55 acres (ac) [22 hectares (ha)] at the UC site and 12 ac (4.9 ha) at the NC site. The sites contain former mill building concrete foundations, tailings piles, demolition debris, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive materials. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 620, 000 cubic yards (yd 3 ) [470,000 cubic meters (m 3 )]. In addition to the contamination at the two processing site areas, four vicinity properties were contaminated. Contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into groundwater

  15. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Falls City, Texas: Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination of the uranium mill tailings site near Falls City, Texas, evaluates potential impact to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former Susquehanna Western, Inc. (SWI), uranium mill processing site. This document fulfills the following objectives: determine if the site presents immediate or potential future health risks, determine the need for interim institutional controls, serve as a key input to project planning and prioritization, and recommend future data collection efforts to more fully characterize risk. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has begun its evaluation of ground water contamination at the Falls City site. This risk assessment is one of the first documents specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. The first step is to evaluate ground water data collected from monitor wells at or near the site. Evaluation of these data show the main contaminants in the Dilworth ground water are cadmium, cobalt, fluoride, iron, nickel, sulfate, and uranium. The data also show high levels of arsenic and manganese occur naturally in some areas.

  16. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Falls City, Texas: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination of the uranium mill tailings site near Falls City, Texas, evaluates potential impact to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former Susquehanna Western, Inc. (SWI), uranium mill processing site. This document fulfills the following objectives: determine if the site presents immediate or potential future health risks, determine the need for interim institutional controls, serve as a key input to project planning and prioritization, and recommend future data collection efforts to more fully characterize risk. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has begun its evaluation of ground water contamination at the Falls City site. This risk assessment is one of the first documents specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. The first step is to evaluate ground water data collected from monitor wells at or near the site. Evaluation of these data show the main contaminants in the Dilworth ground water are cadmium, cobalt, fluoride, iron, nickel, sulfate, and uranium. The data also show high levels of arsenic and manganese occur naturally in some areas

  17. Radiation hazards of uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.M.

    1975-09-01

    This paper examines each of the radiological problems that arise in these processes and explains their scientific background. The major operational requirement is to ensure that exposure of miners over their working lives to radon and its daughter products does not lead to an unacceptable increase in their chance of contracting lung cancer. Studies on the incidence of lung cancer amongst underground uranium miners indicate that this risk will be small if lifetime exposures are kept below about 120 'working level months', even amongst underground miners who smoke cigarettes. The risk is much smaller again for miners who do not smoke cigarettes. Other hazards that must be controlled are exposure of miners and mill workers to external radiation and to dusts containing long-lived radioactive alpha emitting isotopes. Finally, the solid waste products from the mill (the tailings) which contain most of the naturally occurring radioactivity, must be properly impounded and after closure of the mill, stabilized to ensure long-term containment. Access by the public to the stabilized tailings must be controlled and habitation within the controlled area prohibited. (author)

  18. Site selection and general layout of heap leaching uranium mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunmao; Rongfeng

    2011-01-01

    The site selection and general layout of uranium mill is an important work in the design and consultation stage of uranium mining and metallurgy's engineering construction. Based on the design practices, the principles and methods for the site selection and general layout of heap leaching uranium mill are analyzed and studied. Some problems which should be paid much attention to in the design are discussed in hopes of providing a useful reference for the design and consultation of similar projects. (authors)

  19. Evaluation of health risks associated with proposed ground water standards at selected inactive uranium mill-tailings sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Medeiros, W.H.; Meinhold, A.; Morris, S.C.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Nagy, J.; Lackey, K.

    1989-04-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed ground water standards applicable to all inactive uranium mill-tailings sites. The proposed standards include maximum concentration limits (MCL) for currently regulated drinking water contaminants, as well as the addition of standards for molybdenum, uranium, nitrate, and radium-226 plus radium-228. The proposed standards define the point of compliance to be everywhere downgradient of the tailings pile, and require ground water remediation to drinking water standards if MCLs are exceeded. This document presents a preliminary description of the Phase 2 efforts. The potential risks and hazards at Gunnison, Colorado and Lakeview, Oregon were estimated to demonstrate the need for a risk assessment and the usefulness of a cost-benefit approach in setting supplemental standards and determining the need for and level of restoration at UMTRA sites. 8 refs., 12 tabs

  20. Evaluation of health risks associated with proposed ground water standards at selected inactive uranium mill-tailings sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Medeiros, W.H.; Meinhold, A.; Morris, S.C.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Nagy, J.; Lackey, K.

    1989-04-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed ground water standards applicable to all inactive uranium mill-tailings sites. The proposed standards include maximum concentration limits (MCL) for currently regulated drinking water contaminants, as well as the addition of standards for molybdenum, uranium, nitrate, and radium-226 plus radium-228. The proposed standards define the point of compliance to be everywhere downgradient of the tailings pile, and require ground water remediation to drinking water standards if MCLs are exceeded. This document presents a preliminary description of the Phase 2 efforts. The potential risks and hazards at Gunnison, Colorado and Lakeview, Oregon were estimated to demonstrate the need for a risk assessment and the usefulness of a cost-benefit approach in setting supplemental standards and determining the need for and level of restoration at UMTRA sites. 8 refs., 12 tabs.

  1. UMTRA Project environmental, health, and safety plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    The basic health and safety requirements established in this plan are designed to provide guidelines to be applied at all Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites. Specific restrictions are given where necessary. However, an attempt has been made to provide guidelines which are generic in nature, and will allow for evaluation of site-specific conditions. Health and safety personnel are expected to exercise professional judgment when interpreting these guidelines to ensure the health and safety of project personnel and the general population. This UMTRA Project Environmental, Health, and Safety (EH ampersand S) Plan specifies the basic Federal health and safety standards and special DOE requirements applicable to this program. In addition, responsibilities in carrying out this plan are delineated. Some guidance on program requirements and radiation control and monitoring is also included. An Environmental, Health, and Safety Plan shall be developed as part of the remedial action plan for each mill site and associated disposal site. Special conditions at the site which may present potential health hazards will be described, and special areas that should should be addressed by the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) will be indicated. Site-specific EH ampersand S concerns will be addressed by special contract conditions in RAC subcontracts. 2 tabs

  2. Recommendations for computer modeling codes to support the UMTRA groundwater restoration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Khan, M.A. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Action (UMTRA) Project is responsible for the assessment and remedial action at the 24 former uranium mill tailings sites located in the US. The surface restoration phase, which includes containment and stabilization of the abandoned uranium mill tailings piles, has a specific termination date and is nearing completion. Therefore, attention has now turned to the groundwater restoration phase, which began in 1991. Regulated constituents in groundwater whose concentrations or activities exceed maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) or background levels at one or more sites include, but are not limited to, uranium, selenium, arsenic, molybdenum, nitrate, gross alpha, radium-226 and radium-228. The purpose of this report is to recommend computer codes that can be used to assist the UMTRA groundwater restoration effort. The report includes a survey of applicable codes in each of the following areas: (1) groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling codes, (2) hydrogeochemical modeling codes, (3) pump and treat optimization codes, and (4) decision support tools. Following the survey of the applicable codes, specific codes that can best meet the needs of the UMTRA groundwater restoration program in each of the four areas are recommended.

  3. Recommendations for computer modeling codes to support the UMTRA groundwater restoration project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, M.D.; Khan, M.A.

    1996-04-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Action (UMTRA) Project is responsible for the assessment and remedial action at the 24 former uranium mill tailings sites located in the US. The surface restoration phase, which includes containment and stabilization of the abandoned uranium mill tailings piles, has a specific termination date and is nearing completion. Therefore, attention has now turned to the groundwater restoration phase, which began in 1991. Regulated constituents in groundwater whose concentrations or activities exceed maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) or background levels at one or more sites include, but are not limited to, uranium, selenium, arsenic, molybdenum, nitrate, gross alpha, radium-226 and radium-228. The purpose of this report is to recommend computer codes that can be used to assist the UMTRA groundwater restoration effort. The report includes a survey of applicable codes in each of the following areas: (1) groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling codes, (2) hydrogeochemical modeling codes, (3) pump and treat optimization codes, and (4) decision support tools. Following the survey of the applicable codes, specific codes that can best meet the needs of the UMTRA groundwater restoration program in each of the four areas are recommended

  4. Decommissioning and disposal of foreign uranium mine and mill facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Yingjie; Xue Jianxin; Yuan Baixiang; Xu Lechang

    2012-01-01

    Disposal techniques in decommissioning of foreign uranium mine and mill facilities are systematically discussed, including covering of uranium tailing impoundment, drainaging and consolidation of uranium tailing, and treatment of mining waste water and polluted groundwater, and the costs associated with disposal are analyzed. The necessity of strengthening the decommissioning disposal technology research and international exchanges and cooperation is emphasized. (authors)

  5. Development of the UMTRA Project Groundwater Environmental Impact Statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burt, C.; Ulland, L.; Metzler, D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the development and preparation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Groundwater Restoration Project. The initiation of the scoping process and preparation of the PEIS began when the Notice of Intent (NOI) to prepare the PEIS was published in the Federal Register on November 18, 1992. However, planning for the PEIS began well before the publication of the NOI, with various aspects of the PEIS, such as the initial formulation of the alternatives and the format of the scoping process, being developed early on. During this preliminary planning phase, it became clear that the preparation of this PEIS posed some significant challenges while at the same time provided for significant opportunities. This paper will briefly summarize the UMTRA Project, discuss the major sections in the PEIS, and describe the challenges and opportunities that developed during the preparation of the PEIS

  6. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Maybell, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) describes planned water sampling activities and provides the regulatory and technical basis for ground water sampling in 1994 at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Maybell, Colorado. The WSAP identifies and justifies sampling locations, analytical parameters, and sampling frequencies at the site. The ground water data will be used for site characterization and risk assessment. The regulatory basis for the ground water and surface water monitoring activities is derived from the EPA regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1993) and the proposed EPA standards of 1987 (52 FR 36000). Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (TAD) (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site. This WSAP also includes a summary and the results of water sampling activities from 1989 through 1992 (no sampling was performed in 1993)

  7. UMTRA consent form acquisition: a survey of nonrespondents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonsalves, L.L.; Carpenter, D.; Borak, T.B.; Kearney, P.

    1986-01-01

    The Radiological Survey Activities group of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is the Inclusion Survey Contractor (ISC) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) project in Grand Junction, Colorado. The ISC is responsible for performing any required radiological surveys and data analyses for the recommendation of inclusion or exclusion of designated properties in the UMTRA project. One of the responsibilities of the ISC is to obtain consent from the property owners to conduct radiological surveys. In Grand Junction, Colorado 30-40% of the owners of designated properties have not responded to the consent-for-access requests sent by certified mail. A questionnaire was designed to identify and study this nonresponse through personal interviews with 100 randomly selected nonrespondents. A profile of the population of nonrespondents, reasons for nonresponse, as well as suggestions to encourage response were identified and analyzed

  8. UMTRA consent form acquisition: a survey of nonrespondents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonsalves, L.L.; Borak, T.B.; Kearney, P.; Carpenter, D.

    1986-01-01

    The Radiological Survey Activities group of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is the Inclusion Survey Contractor (ISC) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) project in Grand Junction, Colorado. The ISC is responsible for performing any required radiological surveys and data analyses for the recommendation of inclusion or exclusion of designated properties in the UMTRA project. One of the responsibilities of the ISC is to obtain consent from the property owners to conduct radiological surveys. In Grand Junction, Colorado 30 to 40% of the owners of designated properties have not responded to the consent-for-access requests sent by certified mail. A questionnaire was designed to identify and study this nonresponse through personal interviews with 100 randomly selected nonrespondents. A profile of the population of nonrespondents, reasons for nonresponse, as well as suggestions to encourage response were identified and analyzed

  9. Outdoor radon monitoring plan for the UMTRA Project sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-02-01

    This document describes the monitoring schedules and methods used to measure ambient radon concentrations around Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites. Radon monitoring at both processing sites and disposal sites is performed primarily for two reasons. The first, and foremost, of these is to provide a means to keep the off-site radon concentrations during the construction activities As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). The second purpose is to provide a basis for comparison with the EPA standards developed for the UMTRA Project. Radon monitoring data are also used to demonstrate compliance with ambient concentration standards and for public information due to concern about potential radiation releases during construction. 1 fig., 1 tab

  10. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Durango, Colorado. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    Planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Durango, Colorado, are described in this water sampling and analysis plan. The plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the routine monitoring stations at the site. The ground water data are used to characterize the site ground water compliance strategies and to monitor contaminants of potential concern identified in the baseline risk assessment (DOE, 1995a). Regulatory basis for routine ground water monitoring at UMTRA Project sites is derived from the US EPA regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) and EPA standards of 1995 (60 FR 2854). Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (TAD) (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site

  11. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the slick rock Uranium Mill Tailings sites Slick Rock, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (42 USC section 7901 et seq.), hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the sites and on vicinity properties (VPs) associated with the sites. Contaminated materials cover an estimated 55 acres of the Union Carbide (UC) processing site and 12 ac of the North Continent (NC) processing site. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 61 8,300 cubic yards. In addition to the contamination in the two processing site areas, four VPs were found to contain contamination. As a result of the tailings being exposed to the environment, contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into shallow ground water. Surface water has not been affected. The closest residence is approximately 0.3 air mi from either site. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designated site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the sites on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Remediation would be performed by the DOE's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. All solid contaminated materials would be buried under 5 feet (ft) of rock and soil materials. The proposed disposal site area is currently used by ranchers for cattle grazing over a 7-month period. The closest residence to the proposed disposal site is 2 air mi. An estimated 44 ac of land would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future use

  12. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the slick rock Uranium Mill Tailings sites Slick Rock, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (42 USC {section} 7901 et seq.), hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the sites and on vicinity properties (VPs) associated with the sites. Contaminated materials cover an estimated 55 acres of the Union Carbide (UC) processing site and 12 ac of the North Continent (NC) processing site. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 61 8,300 cubic yards. In addition to the contamination in the two processing site areas, four VPs were found to contain contamination. As a result of the tailings being exposed to the environment, contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into shallow ground water. Surface water has not been affected. The closest residence is approximately 0.3 air mi from either site. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designated site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the sites on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Remediation would be performed by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. All solid contaminated materials would be buried under 5 feet (ft) of rock and soil materials. The proposed disposal site area is currently used by ranchers for cattle grazing over a 7-month period. The closest residence to the proposed disposal site is 2 air mi. An estimated 44 ac of land would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future use.

  13. Annual report on the U.S. Department of Energy's Cultural Resource Activities at Colorado UMTRA Project Sites for October 1993 through September 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    This report summarizes the results of cultural resource activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in Colorado for the period of October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1994. The UMTRA Project is a cooperative (state and federal) program mandated by the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act, Public Law 95-604 (42 USC section 7901 et seq.). This law requires the timely cleanup of 24 inactive uranium mill tailings sites throughout the United States. Nine of these inactive uranium mill tailings sites are in Colorado at Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock. On December 6, 1984, the DOE, Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) entered into a programmatic memorandum of agreement (PMOA) (DOE, 1984). This PMOA specifies requirements for the DOE's fulfillment of its obligations under various state and federal regulations for the protection and preservation of cultural resources. This report fulfills the requirement for the DOE to provide the state of Colorado with an annual report on the cultural resource activities performed for all of the UMTRA Project sites in Colorado. This report is organized by UMTRA Project site. For each site, the general remedial action activities and cultural resource activities performed during the period of record are summarized. When known, the DOE's plans for future cultural resource activities at the site are summarized

  14. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project is to eliminate, reduce, or address to acceptable levels the potential health and environmental consequences of milling activities by meeting Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards. One of the first steps in the UMTRA Ground Water Project is the preparation of this Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). The EPA standards allow the use of different strategies for achieving compliance with the standards. This document analyzes the potential impacts of four alternatives for conducting the Ground Water Project. Each of the four alternatives evaluated in the PEIS is based on a different mix of strategies to meet EPA ground water standards. The PEIS is intended to serve as a programmatic planning document that provides an objective basis for determining site-specific ground water compliance strategies and data and information that can be used to prepare site-specific environmental impact analyses more efficiently. DOE will prepare appropriate further National Environmental Policy Act documentation before making site-specific decisions to implement the Ground Water Project. Affected States, Tribes, local government agencies, and members of the public have been involved in the process of preparing this PEIS; DOE encourages their continued participation in the site-specific decision making process

  15. Health physics program for the Edgemont Uranium Mill decommissioning project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polehn, J.L.; Wallace, R.G.; Reed, R.P.; Wilson, G.T.

    1986-01-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is actively involved in decommissioning a uranium mill located near the town of Edgemont, South Dakota. The Edgemont Mill Decommissioning Project, which is unique in many respects, will involve dismantlement of the old inactive mill building and excavation and transportation of several million tons of uranium mill tailings to a permanent disposal site. To ensure that workers are adequately protected from radiation exposure during decommissioning operations, a health physics program appropriate for the decommissioning situation was developed. The Edgemont Mill Decommissioning Project Health Physics Manual (HPM) gives the programmatic requirements for worker radiation protection. The requirements of the HPM are implemented by means of detailed onsite operating procedures. The Edgemont project health physics program was developed using currently available regulations and guidance for an operating uranium mill with appropriate modifications for decommissioning. This paper discusses the development, implementation, and documentation of that program

  16. 77 FR 35431 - Final Alternative Soils Standards for the Uravan, CO, Uranium Mill

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ..., Uranium Mill AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of Uranium milling alternative... amend their agreements to regulate uranium mill tailings (11e.(2) byproduct material). Six Agreement... transferring the Uravan uranium mill site to the U.S. Department of Energy. The NRC staff found no deficiencies...

  17. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-02-01

    This radiologic characterization of tho two inactive uranium millsites at Rifle, Colorado, was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (Bendix) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Grand Junction Projects Office, in accord with a Statement of Work prepared by the DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Technical Assistance Contractor, Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc. (Jacobs). The purpose of this project is to define the extent of radioactive contamination at the Rifle sites that exceeds US Environmental Protection Agency, (EPA) standards for UMTRA sites. The data presented in this report are required for characterization of the areas adjacent to the tailings piles and for the subsequent design of cleanup activities. An orientation visit to the study area was conducted on 31 July--1 August 1984, in conjunction with Jacobs, to determine the approximate extent of contaminated area surrounding tho piles. During that visit, survey control points were located and baselines were defined from which survey grids would later be established; drilling requirements were assessed; and radiologic and geochemical data were collected for use in planning the radiologic fieldwork. The information gained from this visit was used by Jacobs, with cooperation by Bendix, to determine the scope of work required for the radiologic characterization of the Rifle sites. Fieldwork at Rifle was conducted from 1 October through 16 November 1984

  18. Thermal stabilization of uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreesen, D.R.; Williams, J.M.; Cokal, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    The sintering of tailings at high temperatures (1200 0 C) has shown promise as a conditioning approach that greatly reduces the 222 Rn emanation of uranium mill tailings. The structure of thermally stabilized tailings has been appreciably altered producing a material that will have minimal management requirements and will be applicable to on-site processing and disposal. The mineralogy of untreated tailings is presented to define the structure of the original materials. Quartz predominates in most tailings samples; however, appreciable quantities of gypsum, clay, illite, or albites are found in some tailings. Samples from the Durango and Shiprock sites have plagioclase-type aluminosilicates and non-aluminum silicates as major components. The iron-rich vanadium tailings from the Salt Lake City site contain appreciable quantities of α-hematite and chloroapatite. The reduction in radon emanation power and changes in mineralogy as a function of sintering temperature are presented

  19. Tree growth studies on uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, D.R.; Turcotte, M.

    1982-01-01

    Coniferous trees planted in 1974 and deciduous species that have volunteered since 1970 on uranium mill tailings that had been stabilized to varying degrees using limestone and vegetation were evaluated. Their survival and growth rates were compared with those from other investigations. Competition for light appears to be a major contributor to mortality. Differences in soil moisture conditions under a tree stand as compared to those under a grass sward are potentially significant enough to affect the tailings hydrology and effluent contamination. Recommendations include planting seeds of deciduous species or deciduous and coniferous seedlings on strips of freshly disturbed tailings. The disturbed strips would provide reduced competition for the initial year and assist in tree survival. The planting of block stands of coniferous or deciduous trees would be useful for evaluating the hydrological impact of the trees as compared to the present grass sward

  20. Environmental impact of uranium mining and milling in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levins, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    Australia has almost twenty per cent of the Western World's low-cost uranium reserves, located mostly in the Alligator Rivers region of the Northern Territory. At present, only one uranium mill is operating in Australia, but a number of new mills are planned for the early 1980s. Details are given of Australian uranium mining and milling proposals and the measures taken to minimize their environmental impact. Major factors affecting environmental impact are discussed, including treatment of liquid wastes, water management, control of radon and other airborne releases, and disposal of tailings. (auth)

  1. DOE`s approach to groundwater compliance on the UMTRA project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzler, D. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Gibb, J.P. [Geraghty and Miller, Inc. (United States); Glover, W.A. [Roy F. Weston, Inc. (United States)

    1993-03-01

    Compliance with the mandate of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites requires implementation of a groundwater remedial action plan that meets the requirements of Subpart B of the US Environmental Protection Agency`s proposed groundwater protection standards (40 CFR 192). The UMTRA Groundwater Project will ensure that unacceptable current risk or potential risk to the public health, safety and the environment resulting from the groundwater contamination attributable to the UMTRA sites, is mitigated in a timely and cost-efficient manner. For each UMTRA processing site and vicinity property where contamination exists, a groundwater remedial action plan must be developed that identifies hazardous constituents and establishes acceptable concentration limits for the hazardous constituents as either (a) alternate concentration limits (ACL), (b) maximum concentration limits (MCLs), (c) supplemental standards, or (d) background groundwater quality levels. Project optimization is a strategy that will aggressively work within the current regulatory framework using all available options to meet regulatory requirements. This strategy is outlined within.

  2. Site Observational Work Plan for the UMTRA project site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    Ground water compliance for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites, including the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, site, is governed by the Uranium Mills Tailings Radiation Control Act (42 USC section 7901 et seq.) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Health and Environmental Protection Standards for Uranium and Thorium Mill Tailings (40 CFR Part 192; 60 FR 2854). The EPA standards describe specific conditions for which the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) may apply for supplemental standards for contaminated ground water rather than meeting background levels or numerical standards. To achieve compliance with Subpart A of the EPA standards the residual radioactive materials are currently being consolidated on the site by the DOE in a disposal cell, isolating them from direct human or ecological contact and further dispersion into the environment. Completion of the disposal cell is scheduled for early 1995. An environmental assessment and a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) were completed in 1987. Concurrence with the UMTRA Surface Project Ambrosia Lake remedial action plan (RAP) was granted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and state of New Mexico in 1990. The DOE deferred compliance with Subpart B of the EPA standards in the Surface Project RAP. This site observational work plan (SOWP) is the first document to address ground water compliance under Subpart B at the Ambrosia Lake site. The Ambrosia Lake UMTRA Project site is within the Grants Mineral Belt and was one of numerous uranium mills supplied by many local mines. Ground water contamination at the site occurred as a result of uranium mill operations. Contamination of ground water resulted from discharge of waste water, infiltration of water through the tailings pile, hydraulic placement of mill tailings in nearby mines, and water pumped from mine shafts

  3. Domestic uranium mining and milling industry 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Section 170B of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended by Public Law 97-415, requires that the Secretary of Energy submit to Congress an annual assessment of the viability of the domestic uranium mining and milling industry. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the Department of Energy (DOE) was assigned the responsibility to develop the criteria for use in estimating the viability of the industry. These criteria include four major attributes of industry viability - resource capability, supply response capability, financial capability, and import commitment dependency. Having established these criteria, the Secretary of Energy is required to monitor the industry and make an annual assessment of its viability for 1983 through 1992. The first six assessments were issued in the years 1984 through 1989 based on information available for 1983 through 1988, respectively. The current report provides the data and analyses, based on the information available through the end of the calendar year 1989, supporting the seventh annual assessment of the uranium industry's viability. It presents information on the four major attributes. Data on past and present industry behavior, as well as projections of the future status of the industry (assuming current market conditions), were used to examine the industry's ability to respond, over a 10-year period, to two hypothetical supply disruption scenarios. 20 figs., 23 tabs

  4. Implementation plan for the programmatic environmental impact statement for the Department of Energy UMTRA Ground Water Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    Under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up contamination to protect human health and the environment at 24 inactive uranium processing sites located in 10 states. Five of the sites are either on or near Native American lands. The UMTRA Project is divided into two projects: Surface and Ground Water. On November 18, 1992, the DOE issued a notice of intent (57 FR 54374, 1992) to prepare a programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) for the UMTRA Ground Water Project. The PEIS will result in a record of decision that will determine how the UMTRA Ground Water Project will address ground water contamination resulting from milling operations at the UMTRA Project processing sites. DOE regulations (10 CFR section 1021.312) require that an implementation plan be prepared to provide guidance for preparing a PEIS and to record the results of the scoping process. This implementation plan describes and records the results of the PEIS scoping process; summarizes comments received and their disposition; describes the purpose of and need for agency action, the proposed action, and alternatives; lists alternatives considered and eliminated from review; identifies cooperating agencies, their roles, and responsibilities; provides a draft PEIS outline, which includes the planned PEIS scope and content (Attachment A); and provides a schedule for the PEIS process. This plan will be placed in the UMTRA Project libraries listed in Attachment B. The PEIS will identify and evaluate the potential impacts associated with alternatives for conducting the UMTRA Ground Water Project. The PEIS will not assess site-specific impacts; site-specific impacts must be analyzed in separate National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents that will tier off the PEIS. This tiering process will streamline the preparation of site-specific NEPA documents

  5. Probabilistic calculation of dose commitment from uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    The report discusses in a general way considerations of uncertainty in relation to probabilistic modelling. An example of a probabilistic calculation applied to the behaviour of uranium mill tailings is given

  6. Management, stabilisation and environmental impact of uranium mill tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    These proceedings deal with the sources of radioactivity arising from uranium mill wastes, the environmental aspects, the management and stabilisation of radioactive wastes and the policies and regulatory aspects.

  7. Management, stabilisation and environmental impact of uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    These proceedings deal with the sources of radioactivity arising from uranium mill wastes, the environmental aspects, the management and stabilisation of radioactive wastes and the policies and regularoty aspects

  8. Environmental Development Plan: uranium mining, milling, and conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-08-01

    This Environmental Development Plan (EDP) identifies the planning and management requirements and schedules needed to evaluate and assess the environmental, health, and safety (EH and S) aspects of the uranium mining, milling, and conversion technologies. The plan represents the collective perceptions of EH and S concerns and requirements and knowledge of ongoing research programs of most of the Federal agencies involved in significant EH and S R and D program management, standards setting, or regulatory activities associated with uranium mining, milling, and conversion

  9. Uranium mill tailings management practices in Saskatchewan, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifton, A.W.; Barsi, R.G.; Melis, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    Uranium was discovered in Saskatchewan in 1934. The first major mill began operating at Beaverlodge in 1953; two other mills began production in the same area in 1955 and 1957. Waste management measures were limited at the early mills. A new generation of mills was brought into production beginning in 1975 utilizing engineered waste management systems. The paper presents a brief description of the geography and physical environment of northern Saskatchewan, Canada; reviews milling operations and waste managements systems; describes the evolution of waste management systems; and, comments on environmental control measures regulating the industry

  10. Comparative evaluation of liner materials for inactive uranium-mill-tailings piles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelt, J.L.; Barnes, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    Under the funding of the Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has completed the initial accelerated testing phase of eight candidate liner materials. The tests were designed to comparatively evaluate the long term effectiveness of liner materials as a radionuclide and hazardous chemical leachate barrier. The eight materials tested were selected from a technical review of published literature and industrial specialists. Conditions were then identified that would accelerate the aging processes expected in a uranium tailings environment for 1000 years. High calcium leachates were forced through thin layers of clay liners to accelerate the ion exchange rate of sodium and calcium. Asphalt and synthetic materials were accelerated by exposure to elevate temperatures, high concentrations of oxygen, and increased strengths of aqueous oxidizing agents. By comparing the changes of permeability with time of exposure, the most acceptable materials were then identified. These materials are a catalytically airblown asphalt membrane and natural soil amended with sodium bentonite. Both materials showed an increased resistance to leachate penetration throughout the exposure period with final permeabilities less than 10 -7 cm/s. In addition, the asphalt membrane and sodium bentonite are among the least expensive materials to install at a disposal site. Therefore based on their economic and technical merits, these two materials are being evaluated further in field tests at Grand Junction, Colorado

  11. Hydrologic site characterization - the UMTRA project approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binkman, J.E.; Hoopes, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Standards (40 CFR 192) require site characterization of the hydrogeologic regime at and around each Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. Also, ''judgements on the possible need for remedial or protective actions for groundwater aquifers should be guided by relevant considerations described in EPA's hazardous waste management system (47 CFR 32274).'' To address those two sets of rules and regulations, a generic approach is being developed. Fourteen primary issues were determined. These issues can be grouped into those that can be determined by documentation of available information and present conditions, those that require extensive field investigations and those that require some form of predictive modeling. To address the various issues requires an integrated effort of hydrogeologists, environmental engineers or scientists and health physicists. In this paper, the approach to the resolution of these fourteen issues is described briefly

  12. Jaduguda uranium mill : rich experiences for future challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beri, K.K.

    1991-01-01

    India's only uranium milling plant at Jaduguda was commissioned in 1967-68 utilising low grade uranium ore. The flowsheet of the mill and controlling parameters were based on studies done on laboratory and pilot plant scale tests at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay. The mill has worked upto expectation except in few areas where modifications had to be done for smooth production. Apart from this improvements in operating practices have been done based on experience gained in operating the mill, incorporating the recent technological advances. In the recent past, the mill was expanded to increase the installed capacity by 40% and was commissioned in October 1987. The expanded mill has given the desired capacity and is working smoothly. The present paper deals with the experience gained in running the plant for the last 20 years and changes incorporated (author). 4 figs

  13. Use of the piezocone on UMTRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBee, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The piezocone has been widely used on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA) during the characterization phase of the site remedial actions. It has proven to be a cost-effective method of acquiring detailed information about the stratigraphy of the tailings pile and in situ material properties. It has been especially in light of the extreme variability, both vertically and horizontally, of the tailings materials. At the Maybell, Colorado site, the cross-sections drawn using the piezocone logs were analyzed using a consolidation computer program (CONSOL). The CONSOL program calculates the total and time-rate of primary settlement for one-dimensional layered soil masses. Results from the CONSOL analysis showed that the preliminary calculations, which were based on the gross stratigraphy of the pile, overestimated the time of settlement of the in-place tailings after loading. This overestimate was due to the longer drainage paths determined from the gross stratigraphy. The results of the CONSOL analysis at Maybell compared well with the results from a test fill on another UMTRA site with similar conditions. Also, the analyses based on the piezocone data eliminated the need for design recommendations such as preloading soft areas of the pile or lengthening the construction schedule, thereby reducing the cost estimate for the remedial section at this site

  14. 76 FR 70170 - Proposed Alternative Soils Standards for the Uravan, Colorado Uranium Mill

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ..., Colorado Uranium Mill AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Uranium milling alternative standards... Agreements to regulate uranium mill tailings (11e.(2) byproduct material). Six Agreement States have this... in Colorado are acceptable. Discussion The Uravan site began operations in 1912 as a radium mill and...

  15. Uranium mill tailings backfill management. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, B.M.; Heggen, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Backfilling, the disposal of spent uranium mill tailings in empty mine stopes, has been practiced in the Grants Mineral Belt of New Mexico for nearly 20 years. The principal objective of backfilling is the prevention of roof collapse and hydraulic connection with overlying aquifers, increasing mine dewatering requirements. Backfilling is accomplished by gravity feed of a slurry of sand-fraction tailings and treated mine water into the slope. The effects of backfilling on surface discharge of mine wastewater are negligible due to the small fraction of the total flow represented by slurry decant. Furthermore, quality of the decant is not significantly below that of other mine waters. Groundwater effects of backfilling may be classified as short-term (while the mine is operational) and long-term (after dewatering operations have been terminated). Short-term effects are insignificant because of rapid and continuous flow to the mine sump. Long-term effects on aquifer water quality are predicted to be minimal due to (1) the small amount of slurry liquor present after drainage, (2) the precipitation of SO 4 and CO 3 phases, and (3) the reestablishment of reducing conditions and subsequent precipitation of major contaminants including U, As, Mo, Se, and V. 28 references, 19 figures, 9 tables

  16. Radiation health and safety aspects in uranium milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, B.C.

    1982-01-01

    This presentation deals mainly with radiation levels associated with the uranium milling operations, including yellowcake production. The regulation of uranium mills has not received much attention in the past because radiation levels have been generally low, and uranium milling has been substantially free of occupational illness. More attention is being directed towards minimizing exposures, and the Canadian Atomic Energy Control Board is working on new regulations which will reflect the recommendations of various hearings and the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Emphasis is now being placed on improving monitoring methods. At the beginning of 1982 a gamma dosimetry program will be put into effect for all uranium mine and mill workers. An improved method is also being sought to determine radon daughter exposures more accurately. It is expected that a better knowledge of monitoring and assessing thoron daughter levels in mine and mill facilities will be obtained soon. This radiation contribution will be included when calculating a combined radiation exposure factor for individual workers. Programs are underway to better monitor and assess uranium dust inhalation. Initial studies indicate that the present precautions taken to avoid dust inhalation at the mills are effective. A more complete study will be undertaken in 1982

  17. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-10-01

    This programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) was prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This PElS provides an analysis of the potential impacts of the alternatives and ground water compliance strategies as well as potential cumulative impacts. On November 8, 1978, Congress enacted the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law, codified at 42 USC §7901 et seq. Congress found that uranium mill tailings " ... may pose a potential and significant radiation health hazard to the public, and that every reasonable effort should be made to provide for stabilization, disposal, and control in a safe, and environmentally sound manner of such tailings in order to prevent or minimize other environmental hazards from such tailings." Congress authorized the Secretary of Energy to designate inactive uranium processing sites for remedial action by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Congress also directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to set the standards to be followed by the DOE for this process of stabilization, disposal, and control. On January 5, 1983, EPA published standards (40 CFR Part 192) for the disposal and cleanup of residual radioactive materials. On September 3, 1985, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit set aside and remanded to EPA the ground water provisions of the standards. The EPA proposed new standards to replace remanded sections and changed other sections of 40 CFR Part 192. These proposed standards were published in the Federal Register on September 24, 1987 (52 FR 36000). Section 108 of the UMTRCA requires that DOE comply with EPA's proposed standards in the absence of final standards. The Ground Water Project was planned under the proposed standards. On January 11, 1995, EPA published the final rule, with which the DOE must now comply. The PElS and the Ground Water Project are

  18. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) was prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This PElS provides an analysis of the potential impacts of the alternatives and ground water compliance strategies as well as potential cumulative impacts. On November 8, 1978, Congress enacted the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law, codified at 42 USC §7901 et seq. Congress found that uranium mill tailings ' ... may pose a potential and significant radiation health hazard to the public, and that every reasonable effort should be made to provide for stabilization, disposal, and control in a safe, and environmentally sound manner of such tailings in order to prevent or minimize other environmental hazards from such tailings.' Congress authorized the Secretary of Energy to designate inactive uranium processing sites for remedial action by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Congress also directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to set the standards to be followed by the DOE for this process of stabilization, disposal, and control. On January 5, 1983, EPA published standards (40 CFR Part 192) for the disposal and cleanup of residual radioactive materials. On September 3, 1985, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit set aside and remanded to EPA the ground water provisions of the standards. The EPA proposed new standards to replace remanded sections and changed other sections of 40 CFR Part 192. These proposed standards were published in the Federal Register on September 24, 1987 (52 FR 36000). Section 108 of the UMTRCA requires that DOE comply with EPA's proposed standards in the absence of final standards. The Ground Water Project was planned under the proposed standards. On January 11, 1995, EPA published the final rule, with which the DOE must now comply. The PElS and the Ground Water Project are in

  19. Descriptive documentation for New Mexico uranium milling model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonem, G.; Livevano, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The New Mexico Uranium Milling Model is a linear programming model. It can demonstrate how cost minimizing management can reduce the costs of milling uranium subject to a series of environmental, resource, and technological constraints. For example, if 15,000 tons were the targeted level of milling output, the model would provide the minimum cost of this production level, given certain levels of environmental, fuel, water, and technological constraints. The model was developed to allow state policymakers to assess the uranium industry from various standpoints. Through the use of the model, state policymakers can determine the effects of air and water discharge standards and limited capital availability on: milling costs of production; uses of electricity, fuel, and water; and levels of air and water emissions. The model covers the following: process technologies which are acid leach and carbonate leach; raw materials mix; air and water discharges; residual treatment process; and plant types

  20. Uranium ore mill at Dolni Rozinka: 40 years of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toman, F.; Jezova, V.

    2007-01-01

    Uranium ore mined in the Rozna deposit is treated at a chemical treatment plant (a mill) situated in the close vicinity of the Rozna mine. In the mill, uranium is extracted from the crushed and ground-up ore by alkaline leaching. Uranium is then recovered from the solution by sorption on ion exchange resin; the next steps are precipitation and drying. Alkaline leaching is applied at the atmospheric pressure and the temperature of 80 deg C; the recovery factor is moving around 93%. The final product of the milling is uranium concentrate, ammonium diuranate (NH 4 ) 2 U 2 O 7 ), a so-called 'yellow cake' which is treated into a fuel for nuclear power plants in conversion facilities abroad. The milling is carried on under the condition of the closed cycle of technology water. Due to the positive annual precipitation balance, the over balance of technology water in tailings pond has to be purified before discharging into a river. Evaporation and membrane processes (electrodialysis and reverse osmosis) are used to purify the water. The mill at Dolni Rozinka has been in operation since 1968. It has processed 13.2 million tons of uranium ore which is about 14000 tons of uranium and purified more than 6 million m 3 of the over balanced technology water during 40 years. From the organizational point of view, the mine and the chemical treatment plant form the branch plant GEAM, which is a part of the state enterprise DIAMO. (author)

  1. An assessment of plant biointrusion at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project rock-covered disposal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    This study is one of a number of special studies that have been conducted regarding various aspects of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. This special study was proposed following routine surveillance and maintenance surveys and observations reported in a special study of vegetative covers (DOE, 1988), in which plants were observed growing up through the rock erosion layer at recently completed disposal cells. Some of the plants observed were deep-rooted woody species, and questions concerning root intrusion into disposal cells and the need to control plant growth were raised. The special study discussed in this report was designed to address some of the ramifications of plant growth on disposal cells that have rock covers. The NRC has chosen rock covers over vegetative covers in the arid western United States because licenses cannot substantiate that the vegetative covers ''will be significantly greater than 30 percent and preferably 70 percent,'' which is the amount of ''vegetation required to reduce flow to a point of stability.'' The potential impacts of vegetation growing in rock covers are not addressed by the NRC (1990). The objectives, then, of this study were to determine the species of plants growing on two rock-covered disposal cells, study the rooting pattern of plants on these cells, and identify possible impacts of plant root penetration on these and other UMTRA Project rock-covered cells

  2. Radiation protection in uranium mining and milling industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghavayya, M.

    2005-01-01

    The first phase of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle is exploration for uranium and the next is mining and milling of uranium ore. This phase is mostly characterised by low levels of radioactivity and radiation exposure of the workers involved. Yet it is a paradoxical truth that incidence of cancer among the work force, especially miners, due to occupational radiation exposure (from radon and decay products) has been proved only in uranium mines in the entire Nuclear Fuel Cycle. Of course such incidence occurred before the detrimental effect of radiation exposure was realised and understood. Therefore it is important to familiarise oneself with the radiation hazards prevalent in the uranium mining and milling facilities so as to take appropriate remedial measures for the protection of not only the workers but also the public at large. There are both open cast and underground uranium mines around the world. Radiation hazards are considerably less significant in open cast mines than in underground mines unless the ore grade is very high. By default therefore the discussion which ensues relates mainly to radiation hazards in underground uranium mines and associated milling operations. The discussion gives a brief outline of typical uranium mine and mining and milling operations. This is followed by a description of the radiation hazards therein and protection measures that are to be taken to minimise radiation exposure. (author)

  3. Releases of radioactivity from uranium mills and effluent treatment costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witherspoon, J.P.; Sears, M.B.; Blanco, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    Airborne releases of radioactive materials from uranium milling to the environment consist of ore dust, yellowcake dust, tailings dust, and radon gas while the mill is active. After a mill has ceased operations, tailings may be stabilized to minimize or prevent airborne releases of radioactive particulates. However, radon gas will continue to be released in amounts inversely proportional to the degree of stabilization treatment (and expense). Liquid waste disposal is by evaporation and natural seepage to the ground beneath the tailings impoundment area. The release of radioactive materials (and potential radiation exposures) determines the majority of costs associated with minimizing the environmental impact of uranium milling. Radwaste treatments to reduce estimated radiation doses to individuals to 3 to 5% of those received with current milling practices are equivalent to $0.66 per pounds of U 3 O 8 and 0.032 mill per kWhr of electricity. This cost would cover a high efficiency reverse jet bag filter and high energy venturi scrubbers for dusts, neutralization of liquids, and an asphalt-lined tailings basin with a clay core dam to reduce seepage. In addition, this increased cost would cover stabilization of tailings, after mill closure, with a 1-in. asphalt membrane topped by 2 ft of earth and 0.5 ft of crushed rock to provide protection against future leaching and wind erosion. The cost of reducing the radiological hazards associated with uranium milling to this degree would contribute about 0.4% to the current total cost of nuclear power

  4. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Falls City, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    Produced by the US Department of Energy (DOE), this site observational work plan (SOWP) will be used to determine site-specific activities to comply with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards at this Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. The purpose of the SOWP is to recommend a site-specific ground water compliance strategy at the Falls City UMTRA Project site. The Falls City SOWP presents a comprehensive summary of site hydrogeological data, delineates a conceptual model of the aquifer system, and discusses the origins of milling-related ground water contamination. It also defines the magnitude of ground water contamination, potential environmental and health risks associated with ground water contamination and data gaps, and targets a proposed compliance strategy

  5. Effect of freezing and thawing on UMTRA covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rager, R.; Smith, G.; Brody, R.

    1988-01-01

    The proposed US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater standards (40 CFR 192) require that Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project remedial action designs meet low numerical limits for contaminants contained in water or vapor exiting the embankments. To meet the standards, a cover of compacted fine-grained soil is placed over UMTRA Project embankments. One of the functions of this cover is to limit infiltration. The hydraulic conductivity of this infiltration barrier must be low in order to reduce seepage from the cell to the extent necessary to comply with the proposed EPA groundwater standards. Analyses of infiltration barriers covered with rock erosion protection show that the infiltration barriers may become saturated. Accordingly, it is necessary to assure that freezing and thawing of the infiltration barrier materials do not affect the performance of the embankment. A study has been conducted to determine if the hydraulic conductivity of fine-grained clayey soils used or proposed for use in radon/infiltration barriers is affected by repeated freezing and thawing cycles. In addition, a procedure for determining the depth of frost penetration has been developed. Laboratory freeze-thaw tests were undertaken in order to determine if the saturated hydraulic conductivity of clay soils used in UMTRA Project radon/infiltration barriers was affected. The results indicate that an increase of an order of magnitude or more in saturated hydraulic conductivity may occur during repeated freeze-thaw cycles

  6. Current practices and options for confinement of uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    At the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment, which took place in Stockholm from 4 to 6 June 1972, national governments were asked to explore, with the International Atomic Energy Agency and other appropriate international organizations, international co-operation on radioactive waste matters including those of mining and tailings disposal. Since that time the IAEA has been active in the field of uranium and thorium mill tailings management. As part of this activity, the present report describes current practices and options for confinement of uranium mill tailings. It is addressed to technical and administrative personnel who are involved in planning and implementing national and industrial programmes on the management of such tailings. In 1974 and 1975 the IAEA convened meetings of experts to review matters of interest and importance in the management of uranium and thorium mine and mill tailings. These activities led to the publication in 1976 of Management of Wastes from the Mining and Milling of Uranium and Thorium Ores, a Code of Practice and Guide to the Code, IAEA Safety Series No. 44. As a continuation of this activity, the IAEA is here dealing more specifically with the design and siting considerations for the management of uranium mill tailings

  7. Mortality patterns among a retrospective cohort of uranium mill workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waxweiler, R.J.; Archer, V.E.; Roscoe, R.J.; Watanabe, A.; Thun, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    The long-term health effects associated with the milling of uranium ore are of interest particularly because of exposures to uranium and thorium-230. Excess risks of pulmonary and lymphatic malignancies have been suggested by previous epdiemiologic studies of persons milling or smelting uranium ores, and nephrotoxic effects of uranium have been reported in both man and animals. To test these three previously reported associations and to assess all cause-specific mortality patterns among uranium mill workers, we carried out a retrospective cohort study of 2002 uranium millers employed in any of seven mills at least one year before 1972. Ninety-eight percent (98%) followup of the cohort through 1977 resulted in 533 deaths observed versus 605 expected from US White male mortality rates. Mortality from most causes was lower than expected. Significant excess risks were found only for nonmalignant respiratory disease and miscellaneous accidents but not for any of the three diseases of a priori interest. However, nonsignificant excesses were found for lymphatic malignancies after 20 years latency and for death due to chronic nephritis among short-term workers

  8. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Ambrosia Lake Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site is within the Grants Mineral Belt and was one of numerous uranium mills supplied by many local mines. Ground water contamination at the site occurred as a result of uranium mill operations. The potential for impacts to human health and the environment from contaminated ground water currently does not exist. No domestic or livestock wells accessing ground water from the uppermost aquifer have been identified within a 5 mile radius from the site. Therefore, no current exposure pathways to humans, livestock, or wildlife exist, nor are any foreseen. The proposed ground water compliance strategy under consideration for application at the Ambrosia Lake site is to perform no remediation, based on the application of supplemental standards because the ground water has ''limited use.''

  9. Mathematical simulation of contaminant distribution in and around the uranium mill tailing piles, Riverton, Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narasimhan, T.N.; Tokunaga, T.; White, A.F.; Smith, A.R.

    1983-02-01

    As part of the Research and Development phase of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) program, the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has set itself the goal of explaining the physico-chemical evolution of the Riverton site on the basis of the already collected field data at the site (Tokunaga and Narasimhan, 1982, Smith and Moed, 1982; White et al., 1984). The predictive aspects as well as addressing the question of critical quantity of field data have to be considered during the design phase of the project as a joint effort between the LBL team and the construction engineers. At the present time, LBL is in the process of completing the Research and Development phase of the work. As of this writing, the development of an appropriate set of mathematical models has been completed. The computations of the soil-water regime at the upper tailings surface, involving climatological factors is nearing completion. Computations of chemical transport are still in progress. This paper is devoted to a description of the key mathematical issues, the mathematical models that are needed to address these issues and a discussion of the model results pertaining to the soil water regime at the tailings-atmosphere interface. 11 references, 3 figures

  10. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Lakeview, Oregon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Lake view, Oregon evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site

  11. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Lakeview, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Lake view, Oregon evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site.

  12. Uranium mill decommissioning - an update on the Edgemont experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, Th.K.; Chart, E.J.; Cummings, G.W.; Tappan, J.T.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the Edgemont Uranium Mill Decommissioning Project. An estimated 5.4 million tons of contaminated material including approximately 2.5 million tons of uranium mill tailings will be moved to a disposal site approved by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The decommissioning activities will be carried out by Silver King Mines, Inc., under a management services contract to the Tennessee Valley Authority. The primary advantages of the disposal site chosen are the short distance from the existing site and the approximately 650 feet of relatively dense impermeable shales above the shallowest known aquifer. Three large ore stockpiles containing about 100,000 pounds of uranium have been moved from the mill site to a proposed mine site. The decommissioning project will be carried out by using the existing labor force to the maximum extent possible thus preventing a population influx and the accompanying socioeconomic input to the city of Edgemont, SD

  13. Review of environmental aspects of uranium mill operations: industry's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beverly, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    Problems faced by uranium mill operators in complying with new environmental regulations and guidelines are discussed. It is pointed out that valid data must be available in order to evaluate impacts on the environment, to determine background radiation levels, to measure the effectiveness of control techniques, and to determine compliance with standards and regulations. Specific problem areas facing mill operators today and some of the unresolved questions include: sampling methods and equipment for radon in ambient air, measurements of radon and radon daughter exposures of people, radon emanation rate meaurements applicable to monitoring mill tailings, the calibration of γ counters, measurements of population doses, regulations concerning mill tailings reclamation nd stabilization, and the comparative value of in-vivo counting and uranium urinary excretion measurements for monitoring personnel

  14. Accelerated aging tests of liners for uranium mill tailings disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, S.M.; Buelt, J.L.; Hale, V.Q.

    1981-11-01

    This document describes the results of accelerated aging tests to determine the long-term effectiveness of selected impoundment liner materials in a uranium mill tailings environment. The study was sponsored by the US Department of Energy under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. The study was designed to evaluate the need for, and the performance of, several candidate liners for isolating mill tailings leachate in conformance with proposed Environmental Protection Agency and Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements. The liners were subjected to conditions known to accelerate the degradation mechanisms of the various liners. Also, a test environment was maintained that modeled the expected conditions at a mill tailings impoundment, including ground subsidence and the weight loading of tailings on the liners. A comparison of installation costs was also performed for the candidate liners. The laboratory testing and cost information prompted the selection of a catalytic airblown asphalt membrane and a sodium bentonite-amended soil for fiscal year 1981 field testing

  15. Underground Milling of High-Grade Uranium Ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, C., E-mail: chuck.edwards@amec.com [AMEC Americas Limited, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    There are many safety and technical issues involved in the mining and progressing of high grade uranium ores such as those exploited in Northern Canada at present. With more of this type of mine due to commence production in the near future, operators have been looking at ways to better manage the situation. The paper describes underground milling of high-grade uranium ore as a means of optimising production costs and managing safety issues. In addition the paper presents some examples of possible process flowsheets and plant layouts that could be applicable to such operations. Finally an assessment of potential benefits from underground milling from a variety of viewpoints is provided. (author)

  16. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project: technical approach document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, PL95-604, grants the Secretary of Energy authority and responsibility to perform such actions as are necessary to minimize radiation health hazards and other environmental hazards from inactive uranium mill sites. These cleanup actions are to be performed in compliance with the EPA standards (40 CFR Part 192) which became final on March 7, 1983. This document describes the general technical approaches and design criteria that are adopted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in order to implement Remedial Action Plans (RAPs) and final designs that comply with EPA standards

  17. Biogeochemistry of uranium mill wastes program overview and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreesen, D.R.

    1981-05-01

    The major findings and conclusions are summarized for research on uranium mill tailings for the US Department of Energy and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. An overview of results and interpretations is presented for investigations of 222 Rn emissions, revegetation of tailings and mine spoils, and trace element enrichment, mobility, and bioavailability. A brief discussion addresses the implications of these findings in relation to tailings disposal technology and proposed uranium recovery processes

  18. UMTRA project disposal cell cover biointrusion sensitivity assessment, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    This study provides an analysis of potential changes that may take place in a Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal cell cover system as a result of plant biointrusion. Potential changes are evaluated by performing a sensitivity analysis of the relative impact of root penetrations on radon flux out of the cell cover and/or water infiltration into the cell cover. Data used in this analysis consist of existing information on vegetation growth on selected cell cover systems and information available from published studies and/or other available project research. Consistent with the scope of this paper, no new site-specific data were collected from UMTRA Project sites. Further, this paper does not focus on the issue of plant transport of radon gas or other contaminants out of the disposal cell cover though it is acknowledged that such transport has the potential to be a significant pathway for contaminants to reach the environment during portions of the design life of a disposal cell where plant growth occurs. Rather, this study was performed to evaluate the effects of physical penetration and soil drying caused by plant roots that have and are expected to continue to grow in UMTRA Project disposal cell covers. An understanding of the biological and related physical processes that take place within the cover systems of the UMTRA Project disposal cells helps the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determine if the presence of a plant community on these cells is detrimental, beneficial, or of mixed value in terms of the cover system's designed function. Results of this investigation provide information relevant to the formulation of a vegetation control policy

  19. Restoration activities in uranium mining and milling facilities in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Quiros, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    From the end of the 80's up to now, several tasks have been carried out in Spain on restoration in the field of uranium mining and milling, significant among them being Andujar Uranium Mill (FUA) closure and La Haba closure. Also, a study has been carried out on restoration of inoperative and abandoned uranium mine sites. At present, detailed plans are being worked out for the project on the closure of the Elefante plant. All activities have been developed in the common framework of national standards and regulations which are generally in compliance with the standards, regulations and recommendations of international organizations. This paper describes briefly the standards and the criteria applied to the restoration tasks at various sites of the uranium mining and milling facilities in Spain. The restoration activities have different characteristics La Haba facility is an isolated and conventional facility to produce uranium concentrate; in the case of old and abandoned uranium mines the intervention criteria is more relevant than the activities to be carried out; the closure (the first phase of licensing) and restoration activities of Elefante plant have to be developed taking into account that it is sited within the area of Quercus plant which is currently in operation. (author)

  20. Uranium Mill and ISL Facility Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — An Excel database on NRC and Agreement State licensed mills providing status, locational/operational/restoration data, maps, and environmental reports including...

  1. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Lakeview, Oregon. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    Surface cleanup at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Lakeview, Oregon was completed in 1989. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Ecological risks to plants or animals may result from exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the ecological environment

  2. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Lakeview, Oregon. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    Surface cleanup at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Lakeview, Oregon was completed in 1989. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Ecological risks to plants or animals may result from exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the ecological environment.

  3. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Falls City, Texas. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    Planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Falls City, Texas, are described in this water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP). The following plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, and sampling frequency for the routine monitoring stations at the site. The ground water data are used for site characterization and risk assessment. The regulatory basis for routine ground water monitoring at UMTRA Project sites is derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations in 40 CFR Part 192. Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (TAD) (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site. The Falls City site is in Karnes County, Texas, approximately 8 miles [13 kilometers southwest of the town of Falls City and 46 mi (74 km) southeast of San Antonio, Texas. Before surface remedial action, the tailings site consisted of two parcels. Parcel A consisted of the mill site, one mill building, five tailings piles, and one tailings pond south of Farm-to-Market (FM) Road 1344 and west of FM 791. A sixth tailings pile designated Parcel B was north of FM 791 and east of FM 1344

  4. Removal of radioactivity and mineral values from uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.M.; Cokal, E.J.; Dreesen, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    One possible approach to remedial action on uranium mill tailings involves the removal of the components that are responsible for the environmental concern (notably radon releases) posed by these materials. Removing mineral values at the same time can defray much of the cost. This paper presents laboratory results on sulfuric acid leachings and their effectiveness in accomplishing these aims. 9 figures, 4 tables

  5. Management of radioactive wastes from uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.M.

    1983-11-01

    Basic goals for the disposal of uranium mill tailings and criteria for judgement of the acceptability of waste management practices are considered. The discussion covers the nature of tailings and their radiological hazards, both local and remote, individual and collective, as well as health codes and engineering implications

  6. Procedure of uranium mine and mill facilities decommissioning work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Renjie

    1995-01-01

    The procedure of decommissioning work of uranium mine and mill facilities includes three stages: preparation, on-the-spot construction and acceptance after being completed. The first stage, preparation, is discussed in detail, and it is presented to take the measures of strengthening leadership and improving leading body to conduct the decommissioning work best

  7. Environmental impact of uranium mining and milling: an American view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momeni, M.H.

    1981-01-01

    The radiation dose rates to man from uranium milling activities are discussed. The sources of radiation, the radioisotopes involved, and the environmental exposure pathways are described. Risks of cancer to exposed individuals are presented and recommendations made for mitigation of contamination

  8. Identification of geobacter populations in the uranium mill tailings Shiprock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radeva, G.; Selenska-Pobell, S.

    2006-01-01

    Geobacter - specific primers were used for construction of a 16S rDNA library for a water sample collected from uranium mill tailings near Shiprock (Sh853) in the USA . Most of the retrieved sequences were affiliated with different Geobacter species, however sequences related to other δ -Proteobacteria were identified as well. (authors)

  9. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project Site at Grand Junction, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this initial site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Grand Junction, Colorado. This SOWP is one of the first UMTRA Ground Water Project documents developed to select a compliance strategy that meets the UMTRA ground water standards (40 CFR Part 192, as amended by 60 FR 2854) for the Grand Junction site. This SOWP applies information about the Grand Junction site to the compliance strategy selection framework developed in the UMTRA Ground Water Project draft programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS). This risk-based, decision-making framework identifies the decision logic for selecting compliance strategies that could be used to meet the ground water standards. The DOE goal is to use the observational method to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. Based on an evaluation of the site characterization and risk assessment data available for the preparation of this SOWP, DOE proposes that the most likely compliance strategy for the Grand Junction site is no remediation based on the application of supplemental standards. This proposed strategy is based on a conceptual site model that indicates site-related contamination is confined to a limited-use aquifer as defined in the ground water standards

  10. Humeca Uranium Mill. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's final environmental statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-04-01

    The Humeca Uranium Mill is a carbonate-leach uranium ore refining plant with a capacity of about 500 tons of ore per day. Although the present licensing action does not extend to mining, the statement considers the environmental impact of the combined mining and milling project to be conducted by Rio Algom Corporation. The environmental impact, including adverse and beneficial environmental effects of the Rio Algom Uranium Mill, is as follows. (1) Temporary (about 10 years) reassignment of use of about 120 acres of land out of the total 2,573 acres controlled by Rio Algom Corporation. (2) The removal of an estimated 8.4 million pounds of uranium concentrates as a natural resource. This material will eventually be used to produce approximately 6.09 x 10 6 megawatt-days of electricity. (3) Removal and diversion of approximately 100 gallons per minute of local groundwater. (4) Stimulation of the local economy through payment of taxes and direct employment of about 200 persons in San Juan County over the next 10 years. Rio Algom estimates they will pay out over $11 million in salaries over this period of time. (5) The creation of stabilized tailings piles covering about 45 acres involving approximately 1,850,000 tons of solids containing solidified waste chemical and radioactive uranium and its daughter products. (6) Discharge of small quantities of chemicals and radioactive materials (that are not expected to produce discernible effects) into the local environs

  11. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA project site at Shiprock, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Site is the initial document for developing site-specific activities to achieve regulatory compliance in the UMTRA Ground Water Project. The regulatory framework used to select the proposed ground water compliance strategies is presented along with a discussion of the relationship of this SOWP to other UMTRA Ground Water Project programmatic documents. The Shiprock site consists of two, interconnected hydrogeologic systems: the terrace system and the floodplain system. Separate compliance strategies are proposed for these two systems. The compliance strategy for the terrace aquifer is no remediation with the application of supplemental standards based on classification of the terrace aquifer as having Class III (limited-use) ground water. The compliance strategy for the floodplain aquifer is active remediation using a subsurface biological barrier. These strategies were selected by applying site-specific data to the compliance framework developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) (DOE, 1994a). The site conceptual model indicates that milling-related contamination has impacted the ground water in the terrace and floodplain aquifers. Ground water occurs in both aquifers in alluvium and in fractures in the underlying Cretaceous age Mancos Shale. A mound of ground water related to fluids from the milling operations is thought to exist in the terrace aquifer below the area where settling ponds were in use during the mill operations. Most of the water occurring in the floodplain aquifer is from recharge from the San Juan River

  12. Cleaning up commingled uranium mill tailings: is Federal assistance necessary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    GAO was asked to determine whether Federal assistance should be given to operating mill owners that have processed uranium for sale to both government and industry and, thus, generated residual radioactive wastes. The wastes generated for both government and commercial use are called commingled uranium mill tailings. GAO recommends that the Congress provide assistance to active mill owners to share in the cost of cleaning up that portion of the tailings which were produced under Federal contract. Further, GAO believes that the Congress should also consider having the Federal government assist those mills who acted in good faith in meeting all legal requirements pertaining to controlling the mill tailings that were generated for commercial purposes and for which the Federal government is now requiring retroactive remedial action. At the same time, the Congress should make sure that this action establishes no precedent for the Federal government assuming the financial responsibility of cleaning up other non-Federal nuclear facilities and wastes, including those mill tailings generated after the date when the Federal government notified industry that the failings should be controlled

  13. Molecular analysis of the bacterial diversity in uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geissler, A.

    2003-04-01

    A culture-independent molecular approach has been applied to investigate the bacterial diversity in three uranium contaminated sites. The three analysed soil samples have been collected from the uranium waste pile Haberland near Johanngeorgenstadt (Germany), from the uranium mill tailings in Gunnison, Colorado (USA) and from the uranium mill tailings in Shiprock, New Mexico (USA). The 16S rDNA fragments which has been isolated through direct lysis of the whole-DNA were amplified by the use of the universal primers 16S 43f and 16S 1404r and cloned. With restriction fragment length polymorphismus (RFLP) were the clones screened and one representative of all RFLP types that occurred more than once in the clone library was sequenced and analysed. In spite of the contamination a considerable diversity and significant differences in the composition of the natural bacterial communities in these three sites have been found. In the sample collected from the waste pile Haberland near Johanngeorgenstadt α-Proteobacteria and representatives of the Holophaga/Acidobacterium were numerically predominant. The distribution of bacteria in the sample collected from uranium mill tailings Gunnison was very similar to those found in the Haberland waste pile, but there were found besides α-Proteobacteria and representatives of Holophaga/Acidobacterium a lot of γ-Proteobacteria. The structure of the bacterial community in the sample collected from the uranium mill tailings Shiprock was significantly different. Only some representatives of the Holophaga/Acidobacterium and α-Proteobacteria were represented. Large populations of Bacilli, γ-Proteobacteria and green non sulfur bacteria were dominant in this sample. (orig.)

  14. Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of selecting a ground water compliance strategy for the Gunnison, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. This Environmental Assessment (EA) discusses two alternatives and the effects associated with each. The two alternatives are (1) natural flushing coupled with institutional controls and continued monitoring and (2) no action. The compliance strategy must meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards defined in Title 40 ''Code of Federal Regulations'' Part 192, Subpart B, in areas where ground water beneath and around the site is contaminated as a result of past milling operations. It has been determined that contamination in the ground water at the Gunnison site consists of soluble residual radioactive material (RRM) as defined in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA)

  15. Uranium mills and mines environmental restoration in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Estevez, C.; Lozano Martinez, F.

    2000-01-01

    ENRESA and ENUSA have dismantled and restored a uranium mill in Andujar (Andalucia), a uranium facility based on open pit mining and plant in La Haba (Extremadura) and 19 old uranium mines in Andalucia and Extremadura. The Andujar Uranium Mill was operated from 1959 to 1981 and has been restorated between 1991 and 1994. The site included the tailings pile and the processing plant. The Haba Uranium Site included the Plant (operating from 1976 to 1999), four open-pit mines (operating from 1966 to 1990), the heaps leaching and the tailings dam and has been restorated between 1992 and 1997. The 19 abandoned uranium mines were developed by underground mining with the exception of two sites, which were operated by open pit mining. Mining operations started around 1959 and were shutdown in 1981. There was a great diversity among the mines, in terms of site conditions. Whereas in some sites there was little trace of the mining works, in other sites large excavations, mining debris piles, abandoned shafs and galeries and remaining surface structures and equipment were encountered. (author)

  16. Uranium mill tailings and risk estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, S.

    1984-04-01

    Work done in estimating projected health effects for persons exposed to mill tailings at vicinity properties is described. The effect of the reassessment of exposures at Hiroshima and Nagasaki on the risk estimates for gamma radiation is discussed. A presentation of current results in the epidemiological study of Hanford workers is included. 2 references

  17. Lucky Mc Uranium Mill. Draft environmental statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    The Environmental Impact Statement addressed the following: the existing environment; operations; environmental impacts; environmental effects of accidents; monitoring programs and other mitigating measures; unavoidable adverse environmental impacts; relationship between short-term uses of the environment and long-term productivity; irreversible and irretrievable commitments of resources; alternatives; and NRC benefit-cost summary for the Lucky Mc Mill

  18. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project Site at Riverton, Wyoming. Revision 3/95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    Ground water compliance for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites, including the Riverton, Wyoming, site, is governed by the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act and the US Environmental Protection Agency's Health and Environmental Protection Standards for Uranium and Thorium Mill Tailings. The compliance strategy proposed for this site is natural flushing in conjunction with institutional controls. The essential premise of natural flushing is that ground water movement and natural attenuation processes will reduce the detected contamination to background levels or alternate concentration limits that do not pose a risk to human health or the environment within 100 years. This document contains the following sections. Section 2.0 of this SOWP describes the requirements for meeting standards at UMTRA Project sites. Section 3.0 provides site-specific data and the related conceptual model. Section 4.0 provides the justification for the recommended ground water compliance strategy for the Riverton site. Section 5.0 provides the justification and process for collection and assessment of additional required data. Section 6.0 provides a list of the references cited. The appendixes include data on monitor wells and lithography, ground water, surface water, and sediment quality

  19. Asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium mill tailings. 1979 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, J.N.; Koehmstedt, P.L.; Esterl, D.J.; Freeman, H.D.

    1980-06-01

    Uranium mill tailings are a source of low-level radiation and radioactive materials that may be released into the environment. Stabilization or disposal of these tailings in a safe and environmentally sound way is necessary to minimize radon exhalation and other radioactive releases. One of the most promising concepts for stabilizing uranium tailings is being investigated at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory: the use of asphalt emulsion to contain radon and other potentially hazardous materials in uranium tailings. Results of these studies indicate that radon flux from uranium tailings can be reduced by greater than 99% by covering the tailings with an asphalt emulsion that is poured on or sprayed on (3.0 to 7.0 mm thick), or mixed with some of the tailings and compacted to form an admixture seal (2.5 to 15.2 cm) containing 18 wt % residual asphalt

  20. Domestic uranium mining and milling industry: 1986 viability assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report presents the fourth annual assessment of the domestic uranium mining and milling industry's resource capability, supply response capability, financial capability, and import commitment dependency. The data and analysis in support of this assessment and the report itself have been developed pursuant to Public Law 97-415, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Authorization Act of 1982. The report provides information on recent uranium supply, demand, and marketing conditions, as well as projections of the domestic uranium industry's ability to continue to supply the needs of the domestic nuclear power industry through the year 2000. Industry capability is assessed under a variety of assumed conditions with respect to hypothetical disruptions of uranium imports. 13 refs., 26 figs., 37 tabs

  1. Domestic uranium mining and milling industry. 1984 viability assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the second annual assessment of the domestic uranium mining and milling industry's resource capability, supply response capability, financial capability, and import commitment dependency. The data and analysis in support of this assessment and the report itself have been developed pursuant to requirements set forth in Section 23(b) of Public Law 97-415, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Authorization Act, which was enacted on January 4, 1983. The report provides information on recent uranium supply, demand, and marketing conditions and projections of the domestic uranium industry's ability to continue to supply the needs of the domestic nuclear power industry through the year 2000. Industry capability is assessed under a variety of assumed conditions with respect to hypothetical disruptions of uranium imports

  2. Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magee, J.

    1980-01-01

    The long-term environmental effects of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 address the public health hazards of radioactive wastes and recognize the significance of this issue to public acceptance of nuclear energy. Title I of the Act deals with stabilizing and controlling mill tailings at inactive sites and classifies the sites by priority. It represents a major Federal commitment. Title II changes and strengthens Nuclear Regulatory Commission authority, but it will have little overall impact. It is not possible to assess the Act's effect because there is no way to know if current technology will be adequate for the length of time required. 76 references

  3. Review of fugitive dust control for uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C.T.; Elmore, M.R.; Hartley, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    An immediate concern associated with the disposal of uranium mill tailings is that wind erosion of the tailings from an impoundment area will subsequently deposit tailings on surrounding areas. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), under contract to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is investigating the current technology for fugitive dust control. Different methods of fugitive dust control, including chemical, physical, and vegetative, have been used or tested on mill tailings piles. This report presents the results of a literature review and discussions with manufacturers and users of available stabilization materials and techniques

  4. Interior drains for open pit disposal of uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staub, W.P.

    1978-01-01

    A conceptualized interior drainage system is presented for reducing the environmental impact on natural groundwater by disposal of uranium mill tailings in the mined-out open pit. The evaporation/seepage ratio can be increased through the use of interior drains, long-term monitoring of groundwater quality can be eliminated, and the open pit will not require an extensive liner. Other advantages not related to groundwater are: control of fugitive dust and radon emanation during mill operations and timely reclamation after the impoundment is filled with tailings

  5. Review of fugitive dust control for uranium mill tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, C.T.; Elmore, M.R.; Hartley, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    An immediate concern associated with the disposal of uranium mill tailings is that wind erosion of the tailings from an impoundment area will subsequently deposit tailings on surrounding areas. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), under contract to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is investigating the current technology for fugitive dust control. Different methods of fugitive dust control, including chemical, physical, and vegetative, have been used or tested on mill tailings piles. This report presents the results of a literature review and discussions with manufacturers and users of available stabilization materials and techniques.

  6. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Mexican Hat, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    The Mexican Hat, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site is a former uranium mill that is undergoing surface remediation in the form of on-site tailings stabilization. Contaminated surface materials from the Monument Valley, Arizona, UMTRA Project site have been transported to the Mexican Hat site and are being consolidated with the Mexican Hat tailings. The scheduled completion of the tailings disposal cell is August 1995. Water is found in two geologic units at the site: the Halgaito Shale Formation and the Honaker Trail Formation. The tailings rest on the Halgaito Shale, and water contained in that unit is a result of milling activities and, to a lesser extent, water released from the tailings from compaction during remedial action construction of the disposal cell. Water in the Halgaito Shale flows through fractures and discharges at seeps along nearby arroyos. Flow from the seeps will diminish as water drains from the unit. Ground water in the lower unit, the Honaker Trail Formation, is protected from contamination by an upward hydraulic gradient. There are no nearby water supply wells because of widespread poor background ground water quality and quantity, and the San Juan River shows no impacts from the site. This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) recommends sampling six seeps and one upgradient monitor well compared in the Honaker Trail Formation. Samples will be taken in April 1994 (representative of high group water levels) and September 1994 (representative of low ground water levels). Analyses will be performed on filtered samples for plume indicator parameters

  7. International developments in uranium mining and mill site remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quarch, H.; Kuhlmann, J.; Daroussin, J.L.; Poyser, R.W.

    1993-01-01

    At the end of production, mine sites, mill sites, tailings ponds, heap leaching residues in uranium mining districts world-wide have to be remediated in a responsible and sustainable manner in order to minimize long term environmental impacts. Current practice, regulatory environments and rehabilitation objectives in some of the most important uranium producing countries are briefly characterized as well as applicable radioprotection and geotechnical criteria. Important local and regional variables are outlined which determine optimal site specific solutions. Examples from Europe and North America are shown. Monitoring and control requirements as well as areas of current and necessary research and development are identified

  8. UMTRA Surface Project management action process document: Final. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    Title 1 of the UMTRCA authorized the DOE to undertake remedial actions at these designed sites and associated vicinity properties (VP), which contain uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials (RRM) derived from the processing sites. Title 2 of the UMTRCA addresses uranium mill sites that were licensed at the time the UMTRCA was enacted. Cleanup of these Title 2 sites is the responsibility of the licensees. The cleanup of the Title 1 sites has been split into two separate projects: the Surface Project, which deals with the mill buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the sites and VPs; and the Ground Water Project, which is limited to the contaminated ground water at the sites. This management action process (MAP) document discusses the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project. Since its inception through March 1996, the Surface Project (hereinafter called the Project) has cleaned up 16 of the 24 designated processing sites and approximately 5,000 VPs, reducing the risk to human health and the environment posed by the uranium mill tailings. Two of the 24 sites, Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota, will not be remediated at the request of the state, reducing the total number of sites to 22. By the start of FY1998, the remaining 6 processing sites and associated VPs will be cleaned up. The remedial action activities to be funded in FY1998 by the FY1998 budget request are remediation of the remaining Grand Junction, Colorado, VPs; closure of the Cheney disposal cell in Grand Junction, Colorado; and preparation of the completion reports for 4 completed sites

  9. UMTRA Surface Project management action process document: Final. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    Title 1 of the UMTRCA authorized the DOE to undertake remedial actions at these designed sites and associated vicinity properties (VP), which contain uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials (RRM) derived from the processing sites. Title 2 of the UMTRCA addresses uranium mill sites that were licensed at the time the UMTRCA was enacted. Cleanup of these Title 2 sites is the responsibility of the licensees. The cleanup of the Title 1 sites has been split into two separate projects: the Surface Project, which deals with the mill buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the sites and VPs; and the Ground Water Project, which is limited to the contaminated ground water at the sites. This management action process (MAP) document discusses the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project. Since its inception through March 1996, the Surface Project (hereinafter called the Project) has cleaned up 16 of the 24 designated processing sites and approximately 5,000 VPs, reducing the risk to human health and the environment posed by the uranium mill tailings. Two of the 24 sites, Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota, will not be remediated at the request of the state, reducing the total number of sites to 22. By the start of FY1998, the remaining 6 processing sites and associated VPs will be cleaned up. The remedial action activities to be funded in FY1998 by the FY1998 budget request are remediation of the remaining Grand Junction, Colorado, VPs; closure of the Cheney disposal cell in Grand Junction, Colorado; and preparation of the completion reports for 4 completed sites.

  10. Development of the Ranger uranium milling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baily, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    The development and operation of the Ranger uranium project is described. In 1969 Ranger discovered a uranium-bearing ore deposit in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory of Australia. Extensive testwork on drill core samples proved the viability of the extraction of the uranium and a process flowsheet and plant design criteria were developed based on a conventional crushing, grinding, acid leach, C.C.D., solvent extraction circuit. Detailed design concentrated on plant layout, materials of construction, equipment vendor selection and process control. These factors required special attention because of the remote location of the mine and the high cost and difficulty in obtaining trained labour for such sites. Environmental considerations were key factors in design. The mine is located adjacent to a national park and has an average rainfall of 1,600 mm. No water or liquid effluents are to be released from the project area and thus water management is a key factor. Tailings are ponded in an impervious earth-rockfill dam

  11. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Riverton, Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Riverton, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Site is the first document for the UMTRA Ground Water Project to address site-specific activities to meet compliance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed ground water standards (52 FR 36000 (1987)). In support of the activities the regulatory framework and drivers are presented along with a discussion of the relationship of this SOWP to other UMTRA Ground Water Project programmatic documents. A combination of the two compliance strategies that will be recommended for this site are no remediation with the application of alternate concentration levels (ACL) and natural flushing in conjunction with institutional controls. ACLs are to be applied to constituents that occur at concentrations above background levels but which are essential nutrients and occur within nutritional ranges and/or have very low toxicity and high dietary intake rates compared to the levels detected in the ground water. The essential premise of natural flushing is that ground water movement and natural attenuation processes will reduce the detected contamination to background levels within 1 00 years. These two recommended compliance strategies were evaluated by applying Riverton site-specific data to the compliance framework developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement. There are three aquifers beneath the site: a surficial unconfined aquifer, a middle semiconfined aquifer, and a deeper confined aquifer. The milling-related contamination at the site has affected both the surficial and semiconfined aquifers, although the leaky shale aquifers separating these units limits the downward migration of contamination into the semiconfined aquifer. A shale aquitard separates the semiconfined aquifer from the underlying confined aquifer which has not been contaminated by milling-related constituents

  12. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Gunnison, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    Diffusion coefficients for radon gas in earthen materials are required to design suitable radon-barrier covers for uranium tailings impoundments and other materials that emit radon gas. Many early measurements of radon diffusion coefficients relied on the differences in steady-state radon fluxes measured from radon source before and after installation of a cover layer of the material being tested. More recent measurements have utilized the small-sample transient (SST) technique for greater control on moistures and densities of the test soils, greater measurement precision, and reduced testing time and costs. Several of the project sites for the US Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Program contain radiologically contaminated subsurface material composed predominantly of cobbles, gravels andsands. Since remedial action designs require radon diffusion coefficients for the source materials as well as the cover materials, these cobbly and gravelly materials also must be tested. This report contains the following information: a description of the test materials used and the methods developed to conduct the SST radon diffusion measurements on cobbly soils; the protocol for conducting radon diffusion tests oncobbly soils; the results of measurements on the test samples; and modifications to the FITS computer code for analyzing the time-dependent radon diffusion data

  13. Sandia's activities in uranium mill tailings remedial action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhauser, S.

    1980-01-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 requires that remedial action be taken at over 20 inactive uranium mill tailings sites in the United States. Standards promulgated by the EPA under this act are to be the operative standards for this activity. Proposed standards must still undergo internal review, public comment, and receive Nuclear Regulatory Commission concurrence before being finalized. Briefly reviewed, the standards deal separately with new disposal sites (Part A) and cleanup of soil and contaminated structures at existing locations (Part B). In several cases, the present sites are felt to be too close to human habitations or to be otherwise unacceptably located. These tailings will probably be relocated. New disposal sites for relocated tailings must satisfy certain standards. The salient features of these standards are summarized

  14. Ecological aspects of microorganisms inhabiting uranium mill tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C.L.; Landa, E.R.; Updegraff, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    Numbers and types of microorganisms in uranium mill tailings were determined using culturing techniques. Arthrobacter were found to be the predominant microorganism inhabiting the sandy tailings, whereas Bacillus and fungi predominated in the slime tailings. Sulfate-reducing bacteria, capable of leaching radium, were isolated in low numbers from tailings samples but were isolated in significantly high numbers from topsoil in contact with the tailings. The results are placed in the context of the magnitude of uranium mill tailings in the United States, the hazards posed by the tailings, and how such hazards could be enhanced or diminished by microbial activities. Patterns in the composition of the microbial population are evaluated with respect to the ecological variables that influence microbial growth. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  15. Nuclear-fuel-cycle education: Module 2. Exploration, reserve estimation, mining, milling, conversion, and properties of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookins, D.G.

    1981-12-01

    In this module geological and geochemical data pertinent to locating, mining, and milling of uranium are examined. Chapters are devoted to: uranium source characteristics; uranium ore exploration methods; uranium reserve estimation for sandstone deposits; mining; milling; conversion processes for uranium; and properties of uranium, thorium, plutonium and their oxides and carbides

  16. Reformation and utilization of complicated topography for a uranium mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Taoan; Zhou Xinghuo; Lv Junwen

    2004-01-01

    It is successful for how to reform and utilized complicated topography in the design of general plan and transport for technological reformation of a uranium mill. The unfavorable factors of complicated topography are turned into favorable ones. The general plan is designed compactly and the land is economized. The transport is designed simply and directly. the leaching liquid flows by gravity so that the power is economical

  17. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Annual status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-12-01

    The FY 1983 project accomplishments are: completed the Remedial Action Plan and Phase I engineering design for the Canonsburg processing site; completed remedial action on an additional 52 vicinity properties and the inclusion of an additional 303 properties in the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; executed cooperative agreements with four states and the Navajo Nation; published the draft environmental impact statement for Salt Lake City site; and issued the approved Project Plan

  18. Milling uranium silicide powder for dispersion nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, E.; Silva, D.G.; Souza, J.A.B.; Durazzo, M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Riella, H.G. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Full text: Uranium silicide (U3Si2) is presently considered the best fuel qualified so far in terms of uranium loading and performance. Stability of the U3Si2 fuel with uranium density of 4.8 g/cm3 was confirmed by burnup stability tests performed during the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. This fuel was chosen to compose the first core of the new Brazilian Multipurpose Research Reactor (RMB), planned to be constructed in the next years. This new reactor will consume bigger quantities of U3Si2 powder, when compared with the small consumption of the IEA-R1 research reactor of IPEN-CNEN/SP, the unique MTR type research reactor operating in the country. At the present time, the milling operation of U3Si2 ingots is made manually. In order to increase the powder production capacity, the manual milling must be replaced by an automated procedure. This paper describes a new milling machine and procedure developed to produce U3Si2 powder with higher efficiency. (author)

  19. Long-term stabilization of uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voorhees, L.D.; Sale, M.J.; Webb, J.W.; Mulholland, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    The primary hazard associated with uranium mill tailings is exposure to a radioactive gas, radon-222, the concentration of which has been correlated with the occurrence of lung cancer. Previous studies on radon attenuation conclude that the placement of earthen cover materials over the tailings is the most effective technique for reducing radioactive emissions and dispersal of tailings. The success of such a plan, however, is dependent on ensuring the long-term integrity of these cover materials. Soil erosion from water and wind is the major natural cause of destabilizing earthen cover materials. Field data related to the control of soil loss are limited and only indirectly apply to the problem of isolation of uranium mill tailings over very long time periods (up to 80,000 a). However, sufficient information is available to determine benefits that will result from the changes in specific design variables and to evaluate the need for different design strategies among potential disposal sites. The three major options available for stabilization of uranium mill tailings are: rock cover, soil and revegetation, or a combination of both on different portions of the tailings cover. The optimal choice among these alternatives depends on site-specific characteristics such as climate and local geomorphology and soils, and on design variables such as embankment, heights and slopes, modification of upstream drainage, and revegetation practices. Generally, geomorphic evidence suggests that use of soil and vegetation alone will not be adequate to reduce erosion on slopes greater than about 5 to 9%

  20. Source terms for airborne radioactivity arising from uranium mill wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Riordan, M.C.; Downing, A.L.

    1978-01-01

    One of the problems in assessing the radiological impact of uranium milling is to determine the rates of release to the air of material from the various sources of radioactivity. Such source terms are required for modelling the transport of radioactive material in the atmosphere. Activity arises from various point and area sources in the mill itself and from the mill tailings. The state of the tailings changes in time from slurry to solid. A layer of water may be maintained over the solids during the life of the mine, and the tailings may be covered with inert material on abandonment. Releases may be both gaseous and particulate. This paper indicates ways in which radon emanation and the suspension of long-lived particulate activity might be quantified, and areas requiring further exploration are identified

  1. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA project site at Grand Junction, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This site observational work plan (SOWP) is one of the first Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project documents developed to select a compliance strategy that meets the UMTRA ground water standards for the Grand Junction site. This SOWP applies information about the Grand Junction site to the compliance strategy selection framework developed in the UMTRA Ground Water Project draft programmatic environmental impact statement. This risk-based, decision-making framework identifies the decision logic for selecting compliance strategies that could be used to meet the ground water standards. The US Department of Energy (DOE) goal is to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. Based on an evaluation of the site characterization and risk assessment data available for the preparation of this SOWP, DOE proposes that the most likely compliance strategy for the Grand Junction site is no remediation with the application of supplemental standards. This proposed strategy is based on a conceptual site model that indicates site-related contamination is confined to a limited-use aquifer as defined in the ground water standards. The conceptual model demonstrates that the uranium processing-related contamination at the site has affected the unconfined alluvial aquifer, but not the deeper confined aquifer

  2. DECHEM: A remedial planning tool for metallic contaminants in soil at UMTRA Project sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    The DECHEM (DEcontamination of CHEMicals) method was developed for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project to guide characterization and remedial planning for metals contamination in soils. This is necessary because non-radiological hazardous constituents may be more mobile than radium-226 (Ra-226), and hence may migrate more deeply into subpile soils (beneath tailings that are to be relocated) or into adjacent contaminated soils at UMTRA Project sites. The result is that remedial action to the Ra-226 excavation limit, as specified in the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards, may not adequately remove hazardous non-radiological contamination. Unmitigated, these contaminants in soil may cause health risks because of their presence in resuspended particles, their uptake by crops or fodder their seepage into aquifers used for drinking water or other possible exposure pathways. The DECHEM method was developed in response to the need for advanced planning for the remediation of chemical contaminants at UMTRA Project sites, and includes the following elements: Establishment of acceptable exposure rates for humans to chemicals, based on EPA guidelines or other toxicological literature. Modeling of chemical migration through environmental pathways from a remediated UMTRA Project site to humans. Determination of allowable residual concentrations (i.e., cleanup guidelines) for chemicals in soils that results in doses to humans that are below established acceptable exposure rates. The initial development and application of the DECHEM method has focused upon hazardous metallic contaminants such as arsenic, lead, molybdenum, and selenium, which are known to occur in elevated concentrations at some UMTRA Project sites

  3. Environmental problems relating to uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, F.B.

    1979-01-01

    The regulations of the mining and milling of uranium as they relate to the environment are discussed. The industry is primarily under the jurisdiction of the federal government and administered by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This authority can in some instances be relegated to the states. Certain areas of jurisdiction have been given over to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) by the courts. The Safe Drinking Water Act is discussed as it relates to in situ leach mining. The role of the Department of Interior in the regulating of uranium mining, as described in the Federal Land Policy Management Act of 1976, is discussed. The requirement for environmental impact statements prior to licensing by the NRC or the individual states is also discussed. Air quality and radioactive waste disposal as they relate to uranium mining are also discussed

  4. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Durango, Colorado: Attachment 4, Water resources protection strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    To achieve compliance with the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater protection standards (Subpart A of 40 CFR 192), the US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to meet background concentrations or the EPA maximum concentration limits (MCLS) for hazardous constituents in groundwater in the uppermost aquifer (Cliff House/Menefee aquifer) at the point of compliance (POC) at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site in Bodo Canyon near Durango, Colorado (DOE, 1989). Details of hydrologic site characterization at the disposal site are provided in Attachment 3, Groundwater Hydrology Report. The principal features of the water resources protection strategy for the Bodo Canyon disposal site are presented in this document

  5. Control and prevention of seepage from uranium mill waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    This paper constitutes an analysis of the technologies which are available for the prevention of movement of waste waters out of uranium mill waste disposal facilities via sub-surface routes. Hydrogeologic criteria for potential uranium mill waste disposal sites and mathematical modeling of contaminant migration in ground water are presented. Methods for prevention of seepage from uranium mill waste disposal facilities are investigated: liners, clay seals, synthetic polymeric membranes (PVC, polyethylene, chlorinated polyethylene, hypalon, butyl rubber, neoprene, elasticized polyolefin)

  6. Continued care of uranium mill sites: some economic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, W.; Sawyer, J.W. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A critique of recently enacted legislation authorizing the New Mexico Environmental Improvement Agency to regulate uranium mills in the state is presented. Under this new legislation, the Agency is authorized to require payment of up to 10 cents per pound of yellowcake from each licensed mill in the state until a total of $1 million has been deposited by that mill. The continued care fund thus created will provide for maintenance in perpetuity of mill sites after being decommissioned. Arguments are presented, based on calculations for a typical 5,000 ton per day mill, that even the maximum amount is not likely to generate sufficient income to support an adequate maintenance program. The matter is further aggravated by the rate of inflation which will increase costs beyond the coverage provided by a fixed funding system. To correct this situation, it is proposed that (1) the fund should generate an income stream sufficient to meet all maintenance costs based on currently available information on costs, interest, and inflation rates, and (2) the terms of the continued care contribution should be readily alterable as new information becomes available. The latter condition should be coupled with removal of the upper statutory limit now established for the fund

  7. Analysis of uranium urinalysis and in vivo measurement results from eleven participating uranium mills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitz, H.B.; Simpson, J.C.; Aldridge, T.L.

    1984-05-01

    Uranium urinalysis and in vivo examination results obtained from workers at eleven uranium mills between 1978 and 1980 were evaluated. The main purpose was to determine the degree of the mills' compliance with bioassay monitoring recommendations given in the draft NRC Regulatory Guide 8.22 (USNRC 1978). The effect of anticipated changes in the draft regulatory guidance, as expressed to PNL in May 1982, was also studied. Statistical analyses of the data showed that the bioassay results did not reliably meet the limited performance criteria given in the draft regulatory guide. Furthermore, quality control measurements of uranium in urine indicated that detection limits at α = β = 0.05 ranged from 13 μg/l to 29 μg/l, whereas the draft regulatory guidance suggests 5 μg/l as the detection limit. Recommendations for monitoring frequencies given in the draft guide were not followed consistently from mill to mill. The results of these statistical analyses indicate a need to include performance criteria for accuracy, precision, and confidence in revisions of the draft Regulatory Guide 8.22. Revised guidance should also emphasize the need for each mill to continually test the laboratory performing urinalyses by submitting quality control samples (i.e., blank and spiked urine samples as open and blind test) to insure that the performance criteria are being met. Recommendations for a bioassay audit program are also given. 25 references, 15 figures, 17 tables

  8. Summary of the engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    The Grand Junction site has been reevaluated in order to revise the october 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Grand Junction, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.9 million tons of tailings at the Grand Junction site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The eight alternative actions presented herein range from millsite and off-site decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Option II through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from about $10,200,000 for stabilization in-place to about $39,500,000 for disposal in the DeBeque area, at a distance of about 35 mi, using transportation by rail. If transportation to DeBeque were by truck, the cost is estimated to be about $41,900,000. Three prinicpal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Grand Junction tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and (c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $200/lb by heap leach and $150/lb by conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery appears not to be economically attractive

  9. Evaluation of environmental impacts of uranium mining and milling operations in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, M.; Lopez Romero, A.

    1996-01-01

    Uranium mining and production activities have been carried out by ENUSA since 1973. This report describes the evaluation of environmental aspects connected with uranium mining and milling. (author). 7 figs, 3 tabs

  10. The effect of desiccation on UMTRA Project radon barrier materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    The proposed US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater standards (40 CFR 192) require that Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project remedial action designs meet low numerical limits for contaminants contained in water or vapors exiting the disposal cell embankments. To meet the standards, a cover of compacted, fine-grained soil is placed over UMTRA Project embankments. One of the functions of this cover is to limit infiltration into the disposal cell . The hydraulic conductivity of this infiltration barrier must be low in order to reduce the resultant seepage from the base of the cell to the extent necessary to comply with the proposed EPA groundwater standards. Another function of this cover is to limit the emission of radon gas. The air permeability of the cover must be low in order to reduce radon emissions to comply with EPA standards. Fine-grained soils exposed to evaporation will dry. Continued exposure will cause shrinking that, if allowed to continue, will eventually result in the development of cracks. The results of the cracking could be an increase in the hydraulic conductivity and an increase in the air permeability. This could then allow additional infiltration and increased radon emissions. Cracking of the radon barrier has been noted at one UMTRA Project location. The potential for cracking of the radon barrier during construction has been addressed by requiring moistening of previously compacted surfaces prior to placing additional lifts. The efficacy of these treatments has not been verified. The potential for cracking after construction of the cover is completed has also not been examined. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential for cracking of the radon barrier both during construction and after completion of the cover. The effect of shrinkage cracking on the performance of the radon barrier will also be examined

  11. Uptake of uranium by aquatic plants growing in fresh water ecosystem around uranium mill tailings pond at Jaduguda, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, V.N., E-mail: jhavn1971@gmail.com; Tripathi, R.M., E-mail: tripathirm@yahoo.com; Sethy, N.K., E-mail: sethybarc@rediffmail.com; Sahoo, S.K., E-mail: sksbarc@gmail.com

    2016-01-01

    Concentration of uranium was determined in aquatic plants and substrate (sediment or water) of fresh water ecosystem on and around uranium mill tailings pond at Jaduguda, India. Aquatic plant/substrate concentration ratios (CRs) of uranium were estimated for different sites on and around the uranium mill tailings disposal area. These sites include upstream and downstream side of surface water sources carrying the treated tailings effluent, a small pond inside tailings disposal area and residual water of this area. Three types of plant groups were investigated namely algae (filamentous and non-filamentous), other free floating & water submerged and sediment rooted plants. Wide variability in concentration ratio was observed for different groups of plants studied. The filamentous algae uranium concentration was significantly correlated with that of water (r = 0.86, p < 0.003). For sediment rooted plants significant correlation was found between uranium concentration in plant and the substrate (r = 0.88, p < 0.001). Both for other free floating species and sediment rooted plants, uranium concentration was significantly correlated with Mn, Fe, and Ni concentration of plants (p < 0.01). Filamentous algae, Jussiaea and Pistia owing to their high bioproductivity, biomass, uranium accumulation and concentration ratio can be useful for prospecting phytoremediation of stream carrying treated or untreated uranium mill tailings effluent. - Highlights: • Uranium mill tailings pond. • Jaduguda, India. • Fresh water plants. • Uranium uptake. • Relationship of uranium with stable elements.

  12. Study of the Utah uranium-milling industry. Volume I. A policy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turley, R.E.

    1980-05-01

    This is the first volume of a two volume study of the Utah Uranium Milling Industry. The study was precipitated by a 1977 report issued by the Western Interstate Nuclear Board entitled Policy Recommendations on Financing Stabilization. Perpetual Surveillance and Maintenance of Uranium Mill Tailings. Volume I of this study is a policy analysis or technology assessment of the uranium milling industry in the state of Utah; specifically, the study addresses issues that deal with the perpetual surveillance, monitoring, and maintenance of uranium tailings piles at the end of uranium milling operations, i.e., following shutdown and decommissioning. Volume II of this report serves somewhat as an appendix. It represents a full description of the uranium industry in the state of Utah, including its history and statements regarding its future. The topics covered in volume I are as follows: today's uranium industry in Utah; management of the industry's characteristic nuclear radiation; uranium mill licensing and regulation; state licensing and regulation of uranium mills; forecast of future milling operations; policy needs relative to perpetual surveillance, monitoring, and maintenance of tailings; policy needs relative to perpetual oversight; economic aspects; state revenue from uranium; and summary with conclusions and recommendations. Appendices, figures and tables are also presented

  13. Long-term stabilization of uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voorhees, L.D.; Sale, M.J.; Webb, J.W.; Mulholland, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    The primary hazard associated with uranium mill tailings is exposure to a radioactive gas, radon-222, the concentration of which has been correlated with the occurrence of lung cancer. Previous studies on radon attenuation conclude that the placement of earthen cover materials over the tailings is the most effective technique for reducing radioactive emissions and dispersal of tailings. The success of such a plan, however, is dependent on ensuring the long-term integrity of these cover materials. Soil erosion from water and wind is the major natural cause of destabilizing earthen cover materials. Field data related to the control of soil loss are limited and only indirectly apply to the problem of isolation of uranium mill tailings over very long time periods (up to 80,000 a). However, sufficient information is available to determine benefits that will result from changes in specific design variables and to evaluate the need for different design strategies among potential disposal sites. The three major options available for stabilization of uranium mill tailings are (1) rock cover, (2) soil and revegetation, or (3) a combination of both on different portions of the tailings cover. The optimal choice among these alternatives depends on site-specific characteristics such as climate and local geomorphology and soils, and on design variables such as embankment heights and slopes, modification of upstream drainage, and revegetation practices. Generally, geomorphic evidence suggests that use of soil and vegetation alone will not be adequate to reduce erosion on slopes greater than about 5 to 9%. For these steeper slopes, the use of rock talus or riprap will be necessary to maximize the probability of long-term stability. The use of vegetation to control erosion on the flatter portions of the site may be practicable in regions of the USA with sufficient rainfall and suitable soil types, but revegetation practices must be carefully evaluated to ensure that long

  14. Uranium mill tailings storage, use, and disposal problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, D.W.

    1977-01-01

    Solid and liquid residues (tailings) containing substantial quantities of naturally occurring radionuclides are produced and stored at all US uranium mill sites. These radioactive wastes are a potential health hazard with the degree of hazard depending largely on the tailings management practices at the individual sites. The principal pathways of potential radiation exposure to man are discussed. A description is presented of some past and current tailings storage practices together with a description of some of the possible problems associated with various stabilization and disposal options. 16 figures

  15. Application of controlled release technology to uranium mill tailings stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, F.G.; Cataldo, D.A.; Cline, J.F.; Skiens, W.E.

    1981-01-01

    A trifluralin (herbicide) releasing device was developed with a theoretical effective lifetime in excess of 100 years. When placed in a layer in soil, the PCD system will prevent root penetration through that layer without harming the overlying vegetation. Equilibrium concentrations of trifluralin in soil can be adjusted (along with the theoretical life of the device) to suit specific needs. The present system was designed specifically to protect the asphalt layer or clay/aggregate barriers on uranium mill tailings piles; PCD devices composed of pellets could also be implanted over burial sites for radioactive and/or toxic materials, preventing translocation of those materials to plant shoots, and thence into the biosphere

  16. Application of nanofiltration to the treatment of uranium mill effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macnaughton, S.J.; McCulloch, J.K.; Marshall, K.; Ring, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Nanofiltration is widely used in water treatment due to the lower energy requirements and higher yields than reverse osmosis. Separation characteristics are dependent on both the molecular size and charge of the dissolved species in the feed solution as well as membrane properties. In this investigation the potential of nanofiltration to remove dissolved species from uranium mill effluent has been studied. The background behind the application is discussed and the results of the first testwork programme are presented. An initial screening of seventeen commercially available membranes was completed and it was found that uranium rejections of greater than 75% were consistently achieved. Selected membranes also showed potential for the separation of radium, sulfate and manganese. (author)

  17. Hydro-geochemical studies of uranium mill tailing piles at Riverton, Wyoming and Maybell, Colorado. Annual report for FY 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narasimhan, T.N.; Galbraith, R.M.; White, A.; Smith, A.; Schmidt, H.; Moed, B.; Tokunaga, T.

    1982-05-01

    The present study is the beginning phase of an effort to develop an understanding of the physico-chemical interactions that occur within two typical inactive uranium mill tailing piles under the jurisdiction of the UMTRA Program. These sites are located at Riverton, Wyoming and at Maybell, Colorado. The understanding is to be gained through integrated hydrological-geochemical-radiometric studies. Investigated are: (a) the release of contaminants to the interstitial fluid; and (b) the vertical transport of the contaminants either upward to the surface or downward to the water table. This investigation would determine the important contaminants, ascertain the influence of chemical/osmotic potentials (if any) on fluid movement, and investigate the possibility of temporal cycles in the upward/downward movement of fluids with seasonal changes in the moisture content of the piles. The field work carried out during fiscal 1981 extended from June to September. During this period, exploratory drilling was completed at six locations on the Riverton and Maybell piles. Over 141 Shelby tube samples were collected, which represent relatively undisturbed core samples of the tailings material. In order to gain a maximum advantage of the short time available before the onset of the winter, it was decided to concentrate the rest of the data collection at the Riverton site, where the water table is shallow

  18. Innovations over old plant techniques in Jaduguda Uranium Mill expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddique, S; Verma, R P; Beri, K K [Uranium Corporation of India Limited, Jaduguda Mines, Singhbhum (India)

    1994-06-01

    India`s first Uranium Mines and Mills was commissioned at Jaduguda in 1968. The plant`s flowsheet was developed at BARC after extensive tests, for extraction of uranium as yellow cake from the ore. The designed capacity of the process plant was initially 1000 MT/day of ore treatment supplied from nearby mines. Subsequently, due to growing demand of uranium fuel, opening of Bhatin mines and setting up of three plants for recovery of uranium mineral from copper tailings of Hindustan Copper Ltd. was perceived. The capacity of the Jaduguda Plant was increased to 1400 MT/day in 1987 to meet this requirement. A new mine at Narwapahar is under development which will necessitate augmentation of the capacity of the Jaduguda plant by 700 MT/day. Major changes are contemplated in equipment selection for the expansion besides incorporation of a high degree of automation based on microprocessor technology which are discussed in this paper. (author). 4 refs., 5 figs.

  19. In situ testing to determination field-saturated hydraulic conductivity of UMTRA Project disposal cell covers, liners, and foundation areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    This special study was conducted to prepare a guidance document for selecting in situ hydraulic conductivity (K) tests, comparing in situ testing methods, and evaluating the results of such tests. This report may be used as a practical decision-making tool by the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project staff to determine which testing method will most efficiently achieve the field-saturated K results needed for long-term planning. A detailed section on near-surface test methods discusses each method which may be applicable to characterization of UMTRA disposal cell covers, liners and foundation materials. These potentially applicable test methods include the sealed double-ring infiltrometer (SDRI), the air-entry permeameter (AEP), the guelph permeameter, the two-stage borehole technique (TSB), the pressure infiltrometer, and the disk permeameter. Analytical solutions for these methods are provided, and limitations of these solutions are discussed, and a description of testing equipment design and installation are provided

  20. Annual report to the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer on the US Department of Energy's cultural resource activities at Colorado UMTRA Project sites, January--December 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    This report is a summary of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) cultural resource investigations for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in Colorado. This report is intended to fulfill the DOE's obligation for an annual report as stated in the Programmatic Memorandum of Agreement executed between the DOE, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer in December 1984. Summaries of the cultural resource surveys and identified resources are provided for the UMTRA Project sites in the vicinities of Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock. This report covers all UMTRA Project cultural resource activities in Colorado from January through December 1991

  1. 76 FR 59173 - Standard Format and Content of License Applications for Conventional Uranium Mills

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2008-0302] Standard Format and Content of License Applications for Conventional Uranium Mills AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft regulatory guide..., ``Standard Format and Content of License Applications for Conventional Uranium Mills.'' DG- 3024 was a...

  2. Radiation protection on uranium mine and mill in China: past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xianjie; Wang Tingxue

    2009-01-01

    The future development of radiation protection on uranium mine and mill in China is discribed based on the history and existing state in China and the state of arts of radiation protection on uranium mine and mill in the world. (authors)

  3. Analysis of infiltration through a clay radon barrier at an UMTRA disposal cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    An infiltration study was initiated in January 1988 to assess the percent saturation in, and infiltration through, clay radon barriers of typical Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal cells. Predicting infiltration through the radon barrier is necessary to evaluate whether the disposal cell will comply with the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater protection standards (40 CFR 192). The groundwater standards require demonstrating that tailings seepage will not cause background concentrations or maximum concentration limits (MCLs) to be exceeded at the downgradient edge of the disposal facility (the point of compliance, or POC). This demonstration generally consists of incorporating the predicted seepage flux and the concentration of the specific hazardous constituents into a contaminant transport model, and predicting the resultant concentrations at the POC. The infiltration study consisted of a field investigation to evaluate moisture conditions in the radon barrier of the completed Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project disposal cell and previously completed UMTRA Project disposal cells at Clive, Utah, and Burrell, Pennsylvania. Coring was conducted to measure percent saturation profiles in the radon barriers at these disposal cells. In addition, a detailed investigation of the Shiprock radon barrier was conducted to establish the effects of meteorological stresses on moisture conditions in the filter layer and radon barrier. The Shiprock infiltration study was also intended to characterize hydraulic gradients and operational unsaturated hydraulic conductivities in the radon barrier

  4. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    Surface remedial action was completed at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Canonsburg and Burrell Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in southwestern Pennsylvania in 1985 and 1987, respectively. The Burrell disposal site, included in the UMTRA Project as a vicinity property, was remediated in conjunction with the remedial action at Canonsburg. On 27 May 1994, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) accepted the DOE final Long-Term Surveillance Plan (LTSP) (DOE, 1993) for Burrell thus establishing the site under the general license in 10 CFR section 40.27 (1994). In accordance with the DOE guidance document for long-term surveillance (DOE, 1995), all NRC/DOE interaction on the Burrell site's long-term care now is conducted with the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office in Grand Junction, Colorado, and is no longer the responsibility of the DOE UMTRA Project Team in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Therefore, the planned sampling activities described in this water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) are limited to the Canonsburg site. This WSAP identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for routine monitoring at the Canonsburg site for calendar years 1995 and 1996. Currently, the analytical data further the site characterization and demonstrate that the disposal cell's initial performance is in accordance with design requirements

  5. Uranium milling: Volume 1, Summary and text: Generic environmental impact statement: Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-04-01

    This generic environmental impact statement on uranium milling has been prepared in accordance with a notice of intent published by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The purpose of the statement is to assess the potential environmental impacts of uranium milling operations, in a programmatic context, including the management of uranium mill tailings, and to provide an opportunity for public participation in decisions on any proposed changes in NRC regulations based on this assessment. The principal objectives of the statement are to assess the nature and extent of the environmental impacts of uranium milling in the United states from local, regional, and national perspectives on both short- and long-term bases, to determine what regulatory actions are needed; to provide information on which to determine what regulatory requirements for management and disposal of mill tailings and mill decommissioning should be; and to support any rule makings that may be determined to be necessary. 39 figs., 130 tabs

  6. Liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelt, J.L.

    1983-09-01

    The Liner Evaluation for Uranium Mill Tailings Program was conducted to evaluate the need for and performance of prospective lining materials for the long-term management of inactive uranium mill tailings piles. On the basis of program results, two materials have been identified: natural foundation soil amended with 10% sodium bentonite; catalytic airblown asphalt membrane. The study showed that, for most situations, calcareous soils typical of Western US sites adequately buffer tailings leachates and prevent groundwater contamination without additional liner materials or amendments. Although mathematical modeling of disposal sites is recommended on a site-specific basis, there appears to be no reason to expect significant infiltration through the cover for most Western sites. The major water source through the tailings would be groundwater movement at sites with shallow groundwater tables. Even so column leaching studies showed that contaminant source terms were reduced to near maximum contaminant levels (MCL's) for drinking water within one or two pore volumes; thus, a limited source term for groundwater contamination exists. At sites where significant groundwater movement or infiltration is expected and the tailings leachates are alkaline, however, the sodium bentonite or asphalt membrane may be necessary

  7. Measurement and calculation of radon releases from uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The mining and milling of uranium ores produces large quantities of radioactive wastes. Although relatively small in magnitude compared to tailings from metal mining and extraction processes, the present worldwide production of such tailings exceeds 20 million tonnes annually. There is thus a need to ensure that the environmental and health risks from these materials are reduced to an acceptable level. This report has been written as a complement to another publication entitled Current Practices for the Management and Confinement of Uranium Mill Tailings, IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 335, which provides a general overview of all the important factors in the siting, design and construction of tailings impoundments, and in the overall management of tailings with due consideration give to questions of the release of pollutants from tailings piles. The present report provides a comprehensive overview of the release, control and monitoring of radon, including computational methods. The report was first drafted in 1989 and was then reviewed at an Advisory Group meeting in 1990. 42 refs, 9 figs, 3 tabs

  8. Uranium mill tailings neutralization: contaminant complexation and tailings leaching studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opitz, B.E.; Dodson, M.E.; Serne, R.J.

    1985-05-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to compare the effectiveness of limestone (CaCO 3 ) and hydrated lime [Ca(OH) 2 ] for improving waste water quality through the neutralization of acidic uranium mill tailings liquor. The experiments were designed to also assess the effects of three proposed mechanisms - carbonate complexation, elevated pH, and colloidal particle adsorption - on the solubility of toxic contaminants found in a typical uranium mill waste solution. Of special interest were the effects each of these possible mechanisms had on the solution concentrations of trace metals such as Cd, Co, Mo, Zn, and U after neutralization. Results indicated that the neutralization of acidic tailings to a pH of 7.3 using hydrated lime provided the highest overall waste water quality. Both the presence of a carbonate source or elevating solution pH beyond pH = 7.3 resulted in a lowering of previously achieved water quality, while adsorption of contaminants onto colloidal particles was not found to affect the solution concentration of any constituent investigated. 24 refs., 8 figs., 19 tabs

  9. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Tuba City, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The requirements for ground water compliance for Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites, including the Tuba City, Arizona, site, are found in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act; Subparts B and C of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Health and Environmental Protection Standards for Uranium and Thorium Mill Tailings (40 CFR 192 (1994)), and the associated proposed 1987 standards (52 FR 36000). During the surface remedial action, an estimated 1,400,000 cubic yards (yd 3 ) (1,100,000 cubic meters [m 3 ]) of uranium mill tailings and other contaminated materials were consolidated and stabilized in place in an unlined disposal cell covering 50 acres (20 hectares). The surface remedial action was completed in April 1990. Ground water beneath the Tuba City site was contaminated by subsurface migration of water from uranium ore processing activities. The main source of contaminants was water from the tailings piles that began in 1956 when the mill opened and ended in 1966 when the mill closed. 800,000 tons (725,000 tonnes) of uranium ore were processed onsite over a 10-year period. The wet tailings remaining after processing were placed as a slurry in three piles at the site. Water from these tailings then seeped into the ground and migrated downward to the ground water. The Tuba City site is currently in a post-stabilization, prelicensing status. The site is expected to remain in this status until licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for long-term surveillance and maintenance. The preliminary ground water compliance strategy at the Tuba City site is active remediation-specific technology to be evaluated is in situ bioremediation. This selection was made because of the potential ability of bioremediation to reduce concentrations to lower levels than a conventional extraction system and to minimize disturbance of the water resource

  10. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project Site at Tuba City, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The requirements for ground water compliance for Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites, including the Tuba City, Arizona, site, are found in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act; Subparts B and C of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Health and Environmental Protection Standards for Uranium and Thorium Mill Tailings (40 CFR 192 (1994)), and the associated proposed 1987 standards (52 FR 36000). During the surface remedial action, an estimated 1,400,000 cubic yards (yd 3 ) (1,100,000 cubic meters [m 3 ]) of uranium mill tailings and other contaminated materials were consolidated and stabilized in place in an unlined disposal cell covering 50 acres (20 hectares). The surface remedial action was completed in April 1990. Ground water beneath the Tuba City site was contaminated by subsurface migration of water from uranium ore processing activities. The main source of contaminants was water from the tailings piles that began in 1956 when the mill opened and ended in 1966 when the mill closed. A total of 800,000 tons (725,000 tonnes) of uranium ore were processed onsite over a 10-year period. Two processes were used to refine the ore: an acid leach process and a sodium carbonate alkaline process. Water from these tailings then seeped into the ground and migrated downward to the ground water. The Tuba City site is currently in a post-stabilization, prelicensing status. The preliminary ground water compliance strategy at the Tuba City site is active remediation. The specific technology to be evaluated is in situ bioremediation. This selection was made because of the potential ability of bioremediation to reduce concentrations to lower levels than a conventional extraction system and to minimize disturbance of the water resource

  11. Radiation pathways and potential health impacts from inactive uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    Radiation exposure pathways and potential health impacts were estimated as part of the evaluation of radioactive uranium mill tailings at the sites of inactive mills in eight western states. The purpose of this report is to describe in detail the methodology used in performing the pathway analysis and health effects estimations. In addition, specific parameters are presented for each of the 22 uranium mill sites that were evaluated. A computer program, RADAD, developed as part of this program, is described and listed

  12. A guide to ventilation requirements for uranium mines and mills. Regulatory guide G-221

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of G-221 is to help persons address the requirements for the submission of ventilation-related information when applying for a Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) licence to site and construct, operate or decommission a uranium mine or mill. This guide is also intended to help applicants for a uranium mine or mill licence understand their operational and maintenance obligations with respect to ventilation systems, and to help CNSC staff evaluate the adequacy of applications for uranium mine and mill licences. This guide is relevant to any application for a CNSC licence to prepare a site for and construct, operate or decommission a uranium mine or mill. In addition to summarizing the ventilation-related obligations or uranium mine and mill licensee, the guide describes and discusses the ventilation-related information that licence applicants should typically submit to meet regulatory requirements. The guide pertains to any ventilation of uranium mines and mills for the purpose of assuring the radiation safety of workers and on-site personnel. This ventilation may be associated with any underground or surface area or premise that is licensable by the CNSC as part of a uranium mine or mill. These areas and premises typically include mine workings, mill buildings, and other areas or premises involving or potentially affected by radiation or radioactive materials. Some examples of the latter include offices, effluent treatment plants, cafeterias, lunch rooms and personnel change-rooms. (author)

  13. Geochemical behavior of uranium mill tailings leachate in the subsurface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookins, D.G.

    1993-01-01

    Leachate generated from surface disposal of acidic uranium mill tailings at Maybell, CO has impacted groundwater quality within the underlying mineralized Browns Park Formation. The extent of groundwater contamination, however, is located directly beneath the tailings impoundment. The milling process consisted of sulfuric acid extraction of uranium from the feed ore by a complex chemical leaching and precipitation process. Tailings leachate at the site contains elevated concentrations of Al, As, Cd, Mo, Ni, NO 3 , Se, U, and other solutes. From column leach tests, the concentrations of contaminants within tailings pore fluid are SO 4 >NH 4 >NO 3 >U>Se>Ni>As>Cd at pH 4.0. The carbonate buffering capacity of the tailings subsoil has decreased because of calcite dissolution in the presence of acidic leachate. Groundwater quality data, mineralogical and microbiological studies, and geochemical modeling suggest that As, NO 3 , Se, U and other solutes are being removed from solution through precipitation, adsorption, and denitrification processes under reducing conditions. Presence of hydrogen sulfide, liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons, dissolved organic, and abundant pyrite within the Browns Park Formations have maintained reducing conditions subjacent to the tailings impoundment. Groundwater is in close equilibrium with coffinite and uraninite, the primary U(IV) minerals extracted from the Browns Parks Formation. Denitrifying bacteria identified in this study catalyze redox reactions involving NO 3 . Subsequently, contaminant distributions of NO 3 decrease 1000 times beneath the tailings impoundment. Applying geochemical and biochemical processes occurring at Maybell provides an excellent model for in situ aquifer restoration programs considered at other uranium tailings and heavy-metal-mixed waste contaminated sites. (author) 4 figs., 4 tabs., 27 refs

  14. In situ remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwyer, B.P.; Marozas, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    In an effort to develop cost-efficient techniques for remediating uranium contaminated groundwater at DOE Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites nationwide, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) deployed a pilot scale research project at an UMTRA site in Durango, CO. Implementation included design, construction, and subsequent monitoring of an in situ passive reactive barrier to remove Uranium from the tailings pile effluent. A reactive subsurface barrier is produced by emplacing a reactant material (in this experiment various forms of metallic iron) in the flow path of the contaminated groundwater. Conceptually the iron media reduces and/or adsorbs uranium in situ to acceptable regulatory levels. In addition, other metals such as Se, Mo, and As have been removed by the reductive/adsorptive process. The primary objective of the experiment was to eliminate the need for surface treatment of tailing pile effluent. Experimental design, and laboratory and field results are discussed with regard to other potential contaminated groundwater treatment applications

  15. Evaluation of flexible membrane liners as long-term barriers for uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    The National Uranium Tailings Program has commissioned a study to evaluate flexible membrane liners (geomembranes) as long-term barriers for Canadian uranium mill tailings. This study reviews the common liner type and addresses flexible liners (polymeric membranes and asphalt) in detail. Liner fabrication, design, installation, and performance are reviewed. Conceptual designs are presented for basins to accommodate 20 years accumulation of uranium tailings from mills in Elliot Lake and southeastern Athabasca. Nine polymeric and three asphalt liner types have been considered with respect to the physical and chemical environment in the uranium producing areas of Canada. All materials indicate good chemical resistance to uranium wastes but are subject to installation problems

  16. Guide to the bioassay of uranium at uranium mine-mill facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    As a result of occupational exposure, uranium may be taken into the body by inhalation, ingestion or absorption through skin wounds. The organs at risk are the lung, kidney, and bones. Analysis of urine samples for uranium is recommended on a regular monthly basis, before and after a rest period, and it is suggested that a worker be removed from a working area if a level above 300 μg/l is found before a rest period, or 150 μg/l after a rest period. Background information on the development of a bioassay program is given, and a recommended program for uranium mine and mill facilities is included. (L.L.)

  17. Scope of work-supplemental standards-related fieldwork - Salt Lake City UMTRA Project Site, Salt Lake City, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This scope of work governs the field effort to conduct transient in situ (hereafter referred to by the trademark name HydroPunch reg-sign) investigative subsurface logging and ground water sampling, and perform well point installation services at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Salt Lake City, Utah. The HydroPunch reg-sign and well point services subcontractor (the Subcontractor) shall provide services as stated herein to be used to investigate the subsurface, collect and analyze ground water samples, and install shallow well points

  18. Bioremediation of ground water contaminants at a uranium mill tailings site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, L.L.; Nuttall, H.E.; Thomson, B.M.; Lutze, W.

    1995-01-01

    Ground water contaminated with uranium from milling operations must be remediated to reduce the migration of soluble toxic compounds. At the mill tailings site near Tuba City, Arizona (USA) the approach is to employ bioremediation for in situ immobilization of uranium by bacterial reduction of uranyl, U(VI), compounds to uraninite, U(IV). In this initial phase of remediation, details are provided to indicate the magnitude of the contamination problem and to present preliminary evidence supporting the proposition that bacterial immobilization of uranium is possible. Additionally, consideration is given to contaminating cations and anions that may be at toxic levels in ground water at this uranium mill tailing site and detoxification strategies using bacteria are addressed. A model concept is employed so that results obtained at the Tuba City site could contribute to bioremediation of ground water at other uranium mill tailings sites

  19. Processes for extracting radium from uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nirdosh, I.; Baird, M.H.; Muthuswami, S.V.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a process for the extraction of radium from uranium mill tailings solids including the steps of contacting the tailings with a liquid leaching agent, leaching the tailings therewith and subsequently separating the leachate liquid and the leached solids. The improvement described here is wherein the leaching agent comprises: (a) a complexing agent in an amount of from 2 to 10 times the stoichiometric amount needed to complex the metal ions to be removed thereby from the tailings; and (b) a reducing agent reducing the hydrolysable ions of the metal ions to be removed to their lower oxidation states, the reduction agent being present in an amount from 2 to 10 times the stoichiometric amount needed for reducing the hydrolysable metals present in the tailings

  20. Identification of poorly crystalline scorodite in uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, R.; Rowson, J.; Hughes, K.; Rinas, C.; Warner, J.

    2010-01-01

    The McClean Lake mill, located in northern Saskatchewan, processes a variety of uranium ore bodies to produce yellowcake. A by-product of this process is an acidic waste solution enriched in arsenic, referred to as raffinate. The raffinate waste stream is treated in the tailings preparation circuit, where arsenic is precipitated as a poorly crystalline scorodite phase. Raffinate neutralization studies have successfully identified poorly crystalline scorodite using XRD, SEM, EM, XANES and EXAFS methods, but to date, scorodite has not been successfully identified within the whole tailing solids. During the summer of 2008, a drilling program sampled the in situ tailings within the McClean Lake tailings management facility. Samples from this drilling campaign were sent to the Canadian Light Source Inc. for EXAFS analysis. The sample spectra positively identify a poorly crystalline scorodite phase within the McClean tailings management facility. (author)

  1. Occupational safety and health program for a model uranium mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, H.T.

    1981-01-01

    The basic purpose of this paper is to suggest procedures and practices to insure that no employee working in a uranium milling operation receives exposure to radioactive, toxic, or other materials or agents that might produce a permanent, deleterious effect upon his physical health and well-being. This program is also designed to insure that each employee can carry out his assigned duties without risk to his health or to that of his fellow workers. The total program is envisioned as a balanced combination of occupational hygiene and radiation monitoring. This includes surveying, air sampling, personnel dosimetry, bioassay, medical surveillance, epidemiology, and training - all backed by a thoroughly tested and evaluated set of emergency procedures. The program, as presented, is keyed to the results of monitoring, surveying, air sampling, medical surveillance, and epidemiology - it being obvious that no problem can result when no hazard can be identified

  2. Long-term ecological behaviour of abandoned uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalin, Margarete

    1984-12-01

    Semi-aquatic and terrestrial areas on abandoned or inactive uranium mill tailings in Ontario were studied in order to identify the growth characteristics of the naturally invading species dominating these areas. Semi-aquatic areas of tailings sites have been invaded by cattails. These species formed wetland communities which varied in size, but all were essentially monocultures of Typha latifolia, T. angustifolia, or of the hybrids T. glauca. Sedges, Scripus cyperinus (wool-grass) and Phragmites australis (reed-grass), were found in transition zones between the cattail stand and the dry section of the tailings site. The expansion of the cattail stands appeared to be controlled by the hydrological conditions on the site, rather than the chemical characteristics of the tailings

  3. Guidelines for cleanup of uranium tailings from inactive mills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, W.A.; Haywood, F.F.; Jacobs, D.G.

    1975-01-01

    Recent experiences in Grand Junction, Colorado, have indicated the significance of uranium tailings as sources of nonoccupational exposure and suggest that current methods for perpetual care and isolation of the large areas covered by tailings piles at inactive mill locations may be inadequate for minimizing human exposure. This paper presents the rationale and the procedures used in reviewing the adequacy of proposed criteria for remedial action at these sites. Exposures due to aquatic, terrestrial, airborne, and direct contamination pathways were compared to determine the most important radionuclides in the pile and their pathways to man. It is shown that the most hazardous components of the tailings are 226 Ra and 230 Th. The long half-lives of these radionuclides require the consideration of continuous occupancy of the vacated site at some future time, even if the immediately projected land use does not anticipate maximum exposure

  4. Health and safety regulation of uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dory, A.B.

    1980-07-01

    The Canadian Atomic Energy Control Board licenses all nuclear facilities in Canada, including uranium mines and mills. The protection of health, safety and the environment is one of the requirements of each licence. A limit of 4 Working Level Months exposure to radon and radon daughters annually has been set, and guidelines for weekly or more frequent workplace monitoring have been established. Personal monitoring devices are being tested, and thermoluminescent dosimeters are to be introduced. The Board reviews its licensees' ventilation plans continuously. The staged licensing process involves the granting of the following documents: 1) ore removal; 2) underground exploration permit; 3) site and construction approval; 4) mining facility operating licence; 5) shut-down approval. Compliance with regulations and licence conditions is monitored mainly by inspectors appointed by provincial agencies, with Board staff exercising auditing fuctions. The Board involves the workers directly with their own health and safety by sending their unions copies of all relevant documents and inviting comments

  5. UMTRA Project remedial action planning and disposal cell design to comply with the proposed EPA [Environmental Protection Agency] standards (40 CFR Part 192)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project involves stabilizing 24 inactive uranium mill tailings piles in 10 states. Remedial work must meet standards established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Remedial action must be designed and constructed to prevent dispersion of the tailings and other contaminated materials, and must prevent the inadvertent use of the tailings by man. This report is prepared primarily for distribution to parties involved in the UMTRA Project, including the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and states and tribes. It is intended to record the work done by the DOE since publication of the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards, and to show how the DOE has attempted to respond and react in a positive way to the new requirements that result from the proposed standards. This report discusses the groundwater compliance strategies now being defined and implemented by the DOE, and details the changes in disposal cell designs that result from studies to evaluate ways to facilitate compliance with the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards. This report also serves to record the technical advances, planning, and progress made on the UMTRA Project since the appearance of the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards. The report serves to establish, document, and disseminate technical approaches and engineering and groundwater information to people who may be interested or involved in similar or related projects. 24 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs

  6. Annual report on the U.S. Department of Energy's cultural resource activities at Colorado UMTRA Project sites for October 1995--September 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of cultural resource activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in Colorado for the period of October 1, 1995 through September 30, 1996. The inactive uranium mill tailings sites in Colorado are at Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock. On December 6, 1984, the DOE, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) entered into a programmatic memorandum of understanding (PMOU). This PMOU requires the DOE to fulfillment of its obligations under various state and federal regulations for the protection and preservation of cultural resources. This report provides the state of Colorado with an annual report on the cultural resource activities performed for all UMTRA Project sites in Colorado. Due to the completion of surface activities at the UMTRA Project sites, this will be the last annual report to the state of Colorado. Cultural resources activities subsequent to this report will be reported to the state through site-specific correspondence

  7. Water balance modelling of a uranium mill effluent management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plagnes, Valérie; Schmid, Brad; Mitchell, Brett; Judd-Henrey, Ian

    2017-06-01

    A water balance model was developed to forecast the management strategy of a uranium mill effluent system, located in northern Saskatchewan, Canada. Mining and milling operations, such as pit dewatering or treated effluent release, can potentially influence the hydrology and the water quality downstream of the operations. This study presents the methodology used to predict water volumes and water quality discharging downstream in surface water bodies. A compartment model representing the three subsequent lakes included in the management system was set up using the software GoldSim®. The water balance allows predicting lake volumes at the daily time step. A mass balance model developed for conservative elements was also developed and allows validating the proportions of inputs and outputs issued from the water balance model. This model was then used as predictive tool to evaluate the impact of different scenarios of effluents management on volumes and chemistry of surface water for short and longer time periods. An additional significant benefit of this model is that it can be used as an input for geochemical modelling to predict the concentrations of all constituents of concern in the receiving surface water.

  8. Several issues on the decommissioning of uranium mining/milling facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Lechang; Xu Jianxin; Gao Shangxiong

    2007-01-01

    Several issues on the decommissioning of uranium mining/milling facilities are discussed at the national and international level of decommissioning, including radiation, monitoring, dose evaluation, covering, water treatment and stabilization of uranium tailings impoundment, etc. Some suggestions are made: drawing international lessons on decommissioning of uranium mining/milling facilities; enhancing monitoring and database construction in decommissioning management; stressing utilization of measured dose data; using the experience of other countries for reference on covering designs for uranium tailings impoundment and water treatment; strengthening decommissioning management, etc. (authors)

  9. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Lakeview, Oregon: Volume 1, Text and appendices A through D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernoff, A.R.

    1992-07-01

    The Lakeview inactive uranium processing site is in Lake County, Oregon, approximately one mile northwest of the town of Lakeview, sixteen miles north of the California-Oregon border, and 96 miles east of Klamath Falls. The total designated site covers an area of 258 acres consisting of a tailings pile (30 acres). seven evaporation ponds (69 acres), the mill buildings, and related structures. The mill buildings and other structures have been decontaminated and are currently being used by Goose Lake Lumber Company. The tailings pile at the processing site was originally stabilized by Atlantic Richfield with an earthen cover 18--24 inches thick. The average depth of the tailings, including the cover, varied from six to eight feet. There were estimated to be 662,000 cubic yards of tailings, windblown contaminated materials, and vicinity property materials. During remedial action under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, approximately 264,000 cubic yards of additional contaminated materials were identified from excavations required to remove thorium- and arsenic-contaminated soils. The remedial action for the Lakeview site consisted of the cleanup, relocation, consolidation, and stabilization of all residual radioactive materials and thorium- and arsenic-contaminated materials in a partially below-grade disposal cell at a location approximately seven miles northwest of the tailings site, identified as the Collins Ranch site. A cover, including a radon/infiltration barrier and rock layer for protection from erosion, was Placed on top of the tailings. A rock-soil matrix covers the topslope and provides a growth medium for vegetation. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will retain the license and surveillance and maintenance responsibilities for the final restricted site of 13 acres

  10. Technical approach for the management of UMTRA ground water investigation-derived wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    During characterization, remediation, or monitoring activities of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, ground water samples are collected to assess the extent and amount of waterborne contamination that might have come from the mill tailings. This sampling sometimes occurs in contaminated areas where ground water quality has been degraded. Ground water sampling activities may result in field-generated wastes that must be disposed of in a manner protective of human health and the environment. During ground water sampling, appropriate measures must be taken to dispose of presampling purge water and well development water that is pumped to flush out any newly constructed wells. Additionally, pumping tests may produce thousands of gallons of potentially contaminated ground water that must be properly managed. In addition to the liquid wastes, there is the potential for bringing contaminated soils to the ground surface during the drilling and installation of water wells in areas where the subsurface soils may be contaminated. These soils must be properly managed as well. This paper addresses the general technical approach that the UMTRA Project will follow in managing field-generated wastes from well drilling, development, sampling, and testing. It will provide guidance for the preparation of Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) for the management and disposal of field-generated wastes from ground water monitoring and remediation activities

  11. Environmental conditions of two abandoned uranium mill tailings sites in northern Saskatchewan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalin, M.

    Two abandoned uranium mill tailings sites near Uranium City, Saskatchewan, have been studied in an attempt to follow the natural rehabilitation processes. The Gunnar site is a largely terrestrial environment while the Lorado mill tailings were discharged mainly into Nero Lake. This report describes the ecological conditions of both sites, potential long-term environmental degradation, and possible measures to assist the recovery of both areas

  12. Issues on management, stabilization and environmental impacts of uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    Management and stabilization of uranium mill tailings has been controversial for over two decades. There are two basic issues: the nature of the risk to the public from tailings and what must be done to mitigate that risk. This paper provides an overview of the issues and sets some goals to be accomplished at the 1978 NEA Seminar on Management, Stabilization and Environmental Impacts of Uranium Mill Tailings that could be helpful in resolving the issues

  13. Research on the characterization and conditioning of uranium mill tailings. III. Summary of uranium mill tailings conditioning research and implications regarding remedial actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreesen, D.R.; Cokal, E.J.; Thode, E.F.; Williams, J.M.

    1983-06-01

    This report summarizes the findings of research on uranium mill tailings conditioning technology development performed for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP). Hazards and risks posed by tailings piles are discussed in relation to the goal of conditioning the tailings to reduce these hazards. The results of our efforts regarding characterization of tailings, removal of radionuclides, mineral recovery, thermal stabilization, and engineering/economic analysis of conditioning are presented. The implications of these results for remedial action plans are discussed and conclusions regarding the applicability of these technologies are also presented

  14. Work plan for monitor well installation water and sediment sample collection aquifer testing and topographic surveying at the Riverton, Wyoming, UMTRA Project Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    Investigations conducted during preparation of the site observational work plan (SOWP) at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site support a proposed natural flushing ground water compliance strategy, with institutional controls. However, additional site-specific data are needed to reduce uncertainties in order to confirm the applicability and feasibility of this proposed compliance strategy option. This proposed strategy will be analyzed in the site-specific environmental assessment. The purpose of this work plan is to summarize the data collection objectives to fill those data needs, describe the data collection activities that will be undertaken to meet those objectives, and elaborate on the data quality objectives which define the procedures that will be followed to ensure that the quality of these data meet UMTRA Project needs

  15. 226Ra bioavailability of plants at urgeirica uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madruga, M.J.; Brogueira, A.

    2002-01-01

    Large amounts of solid wastes (tailings) resulting from the exploitation and treatment of uranium ore at the Urgeirica mine (north of Portugal) have been accumulated in dams (tailing ponds). To reduce the dispersion of natural radionuclides into the environment some dams were revegetated with eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globolus) and pines (Pinus pinea). Besides, some shrubs (Cytisus s.p.) are growing at some of the dams. The objective of this study is to determine the 226 Ra bioavailability from uranium mill tailings through the quantification of the total and available fraction of radium in the solid wastes and to estimate its transfer to the plants growing on the tailing piles. Plants and solid waste samples were randomly collected at dams. Activity concentration of 226 Ra in plants (aerial part and roots) and solid wastes were measured by gamma spectrometry. The exchangeable fraction of radium in solid wastes was quantified using one single step extraction with 1 mol dm -3 ammonium acetate (pH=7) or 1 mol dm -3 calcium chloride solutions. The results obtained for the 226 Ra uptake by plants show that 226 Ra concentration ratios for eucalyptus and pines decrease at low 226 Ra concentration in the solid wastes and appear relatively constant at higher radium concentrations. For shrubs, the concentration ratios increase at higher 226 Ra solid waste concentrations approaching a saturation value. Percentage values of 16.0±8.3 and 12.9±8.9, for the fraction of radium extracted from the solid wastes, using 1 mol dm -3 ammonium acetate or calcium chloride solutions respectively, were obtained. The 226 Ra concentration ratios determined on the basis of exchangeable radium are one order of magnitude higher than those based on total radium. It can be concluded that, within the standard error values, more consistent 226 Ra concentration ratios were obtained when calculated on the basis of available radium than when total radium was considered, for all the dams. (author)

  16. Predicting the long term stabilisation of uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trojacek, J.

    2004-01-01

    The long-term stabilization and remediation of uranium mill tailings ponds is an important task for DIAMO. After uranium mining was stopped, DIAMO has to remediate more then 400 ha of tailings ponds at three locations. It is currently planned to cover the surface with low permeability materials with a slope of approx. 3% to protect the interior of the disposal facility from infiltrating rainwater. This entails to cover the free surface of these ponds with several hundred thousand tons of inert material. As a result of this load, the porewater from the tailings is expelled and the body of the impounded materials consolidates. Consolidation of tailings proceeds irregularly, depending on the internal structure of the tailings layers and on the progress of loading. The surface needs to be recontoured for a long time into the future. The topic of the DIAMO project is to predict and optimise the final surface contour of the tailings pond body, and to determine the time schedule and locations for recontouring work. The K1 tailings pond in Dolni Rozinka (Southern Moravia) is a typical example for such task. The average thickness of the tailings layer is around 25 m and the average porewater contents varies from 25 up to 40%. In the years 1998-99 a PHARE pilot project was undertaken that aimed to predict the quantity and quality of drainage and infiltration waters as a function of time. A new investigation programme (field, laboratory and modelling) has been implemented. The range of material properties and distribution of types of tailings was established. Orientation calculations of the tailings consolidation were made for fine slime zone. The results have shown that significant subsidence of the surface is to be expected after loading with inert material for the construction of an interim cover. (author)

  17. Moisture content analysis of covered uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, D.W.; Beedlow, P.A.; Cadwell, L.L.

    1981-12-01

    The use of vegetation and rock covers to stabilize uranium mill tailings cover systems is being investigated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. A modeling study of moisture movement through the tailings and cover layers was initiated to determine the effect of the stabilizing techniques. The cover system was simulated under climatic conditions occurring at Grand Junction, Colorado. The cover consisted of a layer of wet clay/gravel mix followed by a capillary barrier of washed rock and a surface layer of fill soil. Vegetation and rock were used to stabilize the surface layer. The simulation yielded moisture content and moisture storage values for the tailings and cover system along with information about moisture losses due to evaporation, transpiration, and drainage. The study demonstrates that different surface stabilization treatments lead to different degrees of moisture retention in the covered tailings pile. The evapotranspiration from vegetation can result in a relatively stable moisture content. Rock covers, however, may cause drainage to occur because they reduce evaporation and lead to a subsequent increase in moisture content. It is important to consider these effects when designing a surface stabilization treatment. Drainage may contribute to a groundwater pollution problem. A surface treatment that allows the cover system to dry out can increase the risk of atmospheric contamination through elevated radon emission rates

  18. Immobilization of radium in uranium mine and mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutwick, G.D.; Mosher, J.; Tizzard, R.

    1982-01-01

    Radium has been coprecipitated from solution as the arsenate in which ferric iron, barium, copper and lead are the macro ions. The order of efficiency of the macro ions in removing radium was found to be Ba > Fe > Pb > Cu at a pH of 6. It is expected that at higher pH's i.e., greater than 8, ferric iron will change positions. This change in position will be caused by the formation of ferrate ion hence increasing the solubility of ferric arsenate. The removal of radium from solution by ion exchangers consisting of the arsenates of ferric iron, barium, copper and lead was successful. As the pH is increased from 4 to 10 the efficiency of these exchangers in removing radium increases. The columns removed over 99 percent of the radium at pH's of 5.6 and higher. The order of efficiency of the exchangers in removing radium is not well defined. Thorium has been precipitated as the arsenate over the pH range of 2 to 9.6. This reaction suggests the possibility of using arsenate to remove thorium from uranium mill plant streams and as a reagent to keep thorium in the tailings ponds

  19. Wind erosion research at an uranium mill tailings site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1977-07-01

    A uranium mill tailings pile at Grants, New Mexico, was selected for wind erosion research since the configuration provides flat area containing fine sand and made up of larger particles. The wind erosion experiment is discussed. Experimental equipment consists of meteorological instrumentation to automatically activate air samplers as a function of wind speed increments and direction, particle cascade impactors to measure airborne respirable concentrations as a function of particle size, inertial impaction devices to measure nonrespirable fluxes of airborne particles, a virtual particle cascade impactor to measure airborne concentrations of toxic trace elements, and soil depth gauges to measure changes in surface soil elevations as a function of time. Both radioactive particles as well as toxic trace element concentrations are measured. Radioactive particles are measured with both particle cascade impactors as well as high-volume air samplers. In contrast, toxic trace element airborne concentrations are measured only with a two-stage virtual particle cascade impactor. Fluxes of nonrespirable airborne particles are measured with inertial impaction devices. At particle cascade impactor sites, a rotating cyclone preseparator collects nonrespirable particles. In addition at all sites, fluxes of nonrespirable particles are measured using an open cavity inertial impaction device

  20. Miscellaneous radioactive materials detected during uranium mill tailings surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, M.J.

    1993-10-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management directed the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pollutant Assessments Group in the conduct of radiological surveys on properties in Monticello, Utah, associated with the Mendaciously millsite National Priority List site. During these surveys, various radioactive materials were detected that were unrelated to the Monticello millsite. The existence and descriptions of these materials were recorded in survey reports and are condensed in this report. The radioactive materials detected are either naturally occurring radioactive material, such as rock and mineral collections, uranium ore, and radioactive coal or manmade radioactive material consisting of tailings from other millsites, mining equipment, radium dials, mill building scraps, building materials, such as brick and cinderblock, and other miscellaneous sources. Awareness of the miscellaneous and naturally occurring material is essential to allow DOE to forecast the additional costs and schedule changes associated with remediation activities. Also, material that may pose a health hazard to the public should be revealed to other regulatory agencies for consideration

  1. Integrated assessmet of the impacts associated with uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parzyck, D.C.; Baes, C.F. III; Berry, L.G.

    1979-07-01

    The occupational health and safety impacts are assessed for domestic underground mining, open pit mining, and milling. Public health impacts are calculated for a population of 53,000 located within 88 km (55 miles) of a typical southwestern uranium mill. The collective annual dose would be 6.5 man-lung rem/year, 89% of which is from 222 Rn emitted from mill tailings. The dose to the United States population is estimated to be 6 x 10 4 man-lung rem from combined mining and milling operations. This may be comparedd with 5.7 x 10 5 man-lung rem from domestic use of natural gas and 4.4 x 10 7 man-lung rem from building interiors. Unavoidable adverse environmental impacts appear to be severe in a 250 ha area surrounding a mill site but negligible in the entire potentially impacted area (500,000 ha). The contemporary uranium resource and supply industry and its institutional settings are described in relation to the socio-economic impacts likely to emerge from high levels of uranium mining and milling. Radon and radon daughter monitoring techniques associated with uranium mining and milling are discussed

  2. Integrated assessmet of the impacts associated with uranium mining and milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parzyck, D.C.; Baes, C.F. III; Berry, L.G.

    1979-07-01

    The occupational health and safety impacts are assessed for domestic underground mining, open pit mining, and milling. Public health impacts are calculated for a population of 53,000 located within 88 km (55 miles) of a typical southwestern uranium mill. The collective annual dose would be 6.5 man-lung rem/year, 89% of which is from /sup 222/Rn emitted from mill tailings. The dose to the United States population is estimated to be 6 x 10/sup 4/ man-lung rem from combined mining and milling operations. This may be comparedd with 5.7 x 10/sup 5/ man-lung rem from domestic use of natural gas and 4.4 x 10/sup 7/ man-lung rem from building interiors. Unavoidable adverse environmental impacts appear to be severe in a 250 ha area surrounding a mill site but negligible in the entire potentially impacted area (500,000 ha). The contemporary uranium resource and supply industry and its institutional settings are described in relation to the socio-economic impacts likely to emerge from high levels of uranium mining and milling. Radon and radon daughter monitoring techniques associated with uranium mining and milling are discussed.

  3. An overview of the regulation of uranium mining, milling, refining and fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smythe, W.D.

    1980-07-01

    The mining, milling, refining and fabrication of uranium into nuclear fuel are activities that have in common the handling of natural uranium. The occupational and environmental hazards resulting from these activities vary widely. Uranium presents a radiological hazard throughout, but the principal culprit is radium which creates an occupational hazard in the mine and mill and an environmental hazard in the waste products produced in both the mill and the refinery. The chemicals used in both these latter processes also present hazards. Fuel fabrication presents the least potential for occupational and environmental hazards. The Canadian Atomic Energy Control Board licenses eight plants, and one plant for the extraction of uranium from phosphoric acid. The licensing process is characterised by approval in stages, the placing of the burden of proof on the applicant, inspection at all stages, and joint review by all regulatory agencies involved

  4. The paradox of uranium development: A Polanyian analysis of social movements surrounding the Pinon Ridge Uranium Mill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Stephanie A.

    Renewal of nuclear energy development has been proposed as one viable solution for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and impacts of climate change. This discussion became concrete as the first uranium mill proposed since the end of the Cold War, the Pinon Ridge Uranium Mill, received state permits in January 2011 to process uranium in southwest Colorado's Paradox Valley. Though environmental contamination from previous uranium activity caused one local community to be bulldozed to the ground, local support for renewed uranium activity emerges among local residents in communities like Nucla, Naturita, and Bedrock, Colorado. Regionally, however, a coalition of organized, oppositionbased grassroots groups fights the decision to permit the mill. Combined, these events allow social scientists a natural laboratory through which to view social repercussions of nuclear energy development. In this dissertation, I use a Polanyian theoretical framework to analyze social, political-economic, and environmental contexts of social movements surrounding PR Mill. My overarching research problem is: How might Polanyian double movement theory be applied to and made empirically testable within the social and environmental context of uranium development? I intended this analysis to inform energy policy debates regarding renewable energy. In Chapter 1, I found various forms of social dislocation lead to two divergent social movement outcomes. Economic social dislocation led to strong mill support among most local residents, according to archival, in-depth interview, and survey data. On the other hand, residents in regional communities experienced two other types of social dislocation -- another kind of economic dislocation, related to concern over boom-bust economies, and environmental health dislocations related to uranium exposure, creating conditions for a regional movement in opposition to PR Mill. In Chapter 2, I focus on regulations and find that two divergent social movements

  5. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    For the UMTRA Project site located near Durango, Colorado (the Durango site), the Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1986 to 1991. An evaluation was made to determine whether exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium processing could affect people's health. Exposure could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. In addition, environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water, or surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Durango site. The results of this report and further site characterization of the Durango site will be used to determine what is necessary to protect public health and the environment, and to comply with the EPA standards

  6. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    For the UMTRA Project site located near Durango, Colorado (the Durango site), the Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1986 to 1991. An evaluation was made to determine whether exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium processing could affect people`s health. Exposure could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. In addition, environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water, or surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Durango site. The results of this report and further site characterization of the Durango site will be used to determine what is necessary to protect public health and the environment, and to comply with the EPA standards.

  7. Health effects of uranium mining and milling for commercial nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branagan, E.F. Jr.; Gotchy, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Radiological health effects potentially associated with uranium mining and milling have been estimated on both a regional and continental basis. Estimates of radon releases from mining were taken from testimony presented in licensing hearings during 1978. Estimates of the health effects from milling were derived from a draft NRC document titled Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Uranium Milling. Health effects per annual fuel requirement (AFR) were presented on both a cumulative and continuous basis. In general, potential health effects to the general public because of both the mining and milling of one AFR are a very small fraction of the health effects caused by background radiation, on either a cumulative basis or a continuous basis. On a cumulative basis (from 1978 to the year 3000), potential health effects due to milling are about an order of magnitude less than those due to mining

  8. Implications of an assessment of potential organic contamination of ground water at an inactive uranium mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, J.B.

    1986-01-01

    Laws and regulations concerning remedial actions at inactive uranium mills explicitly recognize radiological and nonradiological hazards and may implicitly recognize the potential presence of hazardous wastes at these mill sites. Ground-water studies at the sites have placed an increasing emphasis on screening for priority pollutants. The Grand Junction, Colorado, mill site was deemed to have a high potential for the presence of organic compounds in ground water, and was chosen as a prototype for assessing the presence of organic compounds in ground water at inactive sites. Lessons learned from the assessment of organics at the Grand Junction site were used to develop a screening procedure for other inactive mill sites

  9. Uptake of uranium by aquatic plants growing in fresh water ecosystem around uranium mill tailings pond at Jaduguda, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, V N; Tripathi, R M; Sethy, N K; Sahoo, S K

    2016-01-01

    Concentration of uranium was determined in aquatic plants and substrate (sediment or water) of fresh water ecosystem on and around uranium mill tailings pond at Jaduguda, India. Aquatic plant/substrate concentration ratios (CRs) of uranium were estimated for different sites on and around the uranium mill tailings disposal area. These sites include upstream and downstream side of surface water sources carrying the treated tailings effluent, a small pond inside tailings disposal area and residual water of this area. Three types of plant groups were investigated namely algae (filamentous and non-filamentous), other free floating & water submerged and sediment rooted plants. Wide variability in concentration ratio was observed for different groups of plants studied. The filamentous algae uranium concentration was significantly correlated with that of water (r=0.86, puranium concentration in plant and the substrate (r=0.88, puranium concentration was significantly correlated with Mn, Fe, and Ni concentration of plants (puranium accumulation and concentration ratio can be useful for prospecting phytoremediation of stream carrying treated or untreated uranium mill tailings effluent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A review and assessment of variable density ground water flow effects on plume formation at UMTRA project sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    A standard assumption when evaluating the migration of plumes in ground water is that the impacted ground water has the same density as the native ground water. Thus density is assumed to be constant, and does not influence plume migration. This assumption is valid only for water with relatively low total dissolved solids (TDS) or a low difference in TDS between water introduced from milling processes and native ground water. Analyses in the literature suggest that relatively minor density differences can significantly affect plume migration. Density differences as small as 0.3 percent are known to cause noticeable effects on the plume migration path. The primary effect of density on plume migration is deeper migration than would be expected in the arid environments typically present at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites, where little or no natural recharge is available to drive the plume into the aquifer. It is also possible that at some UMTRA Project sites, a synergistic affect occurred during milling operations, where the mounding created by tailings drainage (which created a downward vertical gradient) and the density contrast between the process water and native ground water acted together, driving constituents deeper into the aquifer than either process would alone. Numerical experiments were performed with the U.S. Geological Survey saturated unsaturated transport (SUTRA) model. This is a finite-element model capable of simulating the effects of variable fluid density on ground water flow and solute transport. The simulated aquifer parameters generally are representative of the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project site where some of the highest TDS water from processing has been observed

  11. Radon emanation from backfilled mill tailings in underground uranium mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Patitapaban; Mishra, Devi Prasad; Panigrahi, Durga Charan; Jha, Vivekananda; Patnaik, R Lokeswara; Sethy, Narendra Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Coarser mill tailings used as backfill to stabilize the stoped out areas in underground uranium mines is a potential source of radon contamination. This paper presents the quantitative assessment of radon emanation from the backfilled tailings in Jaduguda mine, India using a cylindrical accumulator. Some of the important parameters such as (226)Ra activity concentration, bulk density, bulk porosity, moisture content and radon emanation factor of the tailings affecting radon emanation were determined in the laboratory. The study revealed that the radon emanation rate of the tailings varied in the range of 0.12-7.03 Bq m(-2) s(-1) with geometric mean of 1.01 Bq m(-2) s(-1) and geometric standard deviation of 3.39. An increase in radon emanation rate was noticed up to a moisture saturation of 0.09 in the tailings, after which the emanation rate gradually started declining with saturation due to low diffusion coefficient of radon in the saturated tailings. Radon emanation factor of the tailings varied in the range of 0.08-0.23 with the mean value of 0.21. The emanation factor of the tailings with moisture saturation level over 0.09 was found to be about three times higher than that of the absolutely dry tailings. The empirical relationship obtained between (222)Rn emanation rate and (226)Ra activity concentration of the tailings indicated a significant positive linear correlation (r = 0.95, p < 0.001). This relationship may be useful for quick prediction of radon emanation rate from the backfill material of similar nature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Restoration of the Nabarlek uranium mine and mill site, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waggitt, P.

    2000-01-01

    The Nabarlek Uranium Mine site is located in northern Australia, about 300 km east of Darwin. The mine operated from 1979 until 1989, at which time the plant was mothballed pending the discovery of a new ore body. In 1994 the Supervising Authorities determined that the facility should be decommissioned and the site rehabilitated, with all site work to be completed by 31 December 1995. The site was dismantled and rehabilitated. These were tasks that presented particular challenges due to the remoteness of the site, the extremes of the climate and the need to meet the requirements of regulators and the traditional landowners. The rehabilitation was assisted by the fact that tailings had been placed directly from the mill into the pit. Contaminated sediments from evaporation ponds, small amounts of process residues, contaminated scrap and other wastes were also contained in the pit at a suitable depth. The final landform was established taking into account the pre-mining landform, the preferred final land use and the need to allow for the erosive forces present in the environment. Radiological conditions were required to meet standards set by the Supervising Authorities in consultation with other stakeholders, including representatives of the traditional landowners. The paper explains how the challenges were overcome at all stages of the process and describes the outcomes to date of post-closure research and monitoring. Particular emphasis is given to radiological issues. The status of the site is currently being assessed for final close-out certification in respect of ecological as well as radiological issues. To date the programme is considered to have been successful. (author)

  13. Cost of radon-barrier systems for uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, E.G.; Hartley, J.N.

    1982-08-01

    This report deals specifically with the cost of three types of radon barrier systems, earthen covers, asphalt emulsion covers, and multilayer covers, which could meet standards proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency to stabilize uranium mill tailings located primarily in the western US. In addition, the report includes a sensitivity analysis of various factors which significantly effect the overall cost of the three systems. These analyses were based on a generic disposal site. Four different 3m thick earthen covers were tested and cost an average of $27/m 2 . The least expensive earthen cover cost was about $21/m 2 . The asphalt cover system (6 to 7 cm of asphalt topped with 0.6m of overburden) cost about $28/m 2 . The four multilayer covers averaged $57/m 2 , but materials handling problems encountered during the test inflated this cost above what was anticipated and significant cost reductions should be possible. The least expensive multilayer cover cost $43/m 2 . Based on the results of the Grand Junction field test we estimated the cost of covering the tailings from three high priority sites, Durango, Shiprock, and Salt Lake City (Vitro). The cost of a 3m earthen cover ranged from $18 to 33/m 2 for the seven disposal sites (two or three at each location) studied. The cost of asphalt cover systems were $23 to 28/m 2 and the multilayer cover costs were between $31 to 36/m 2 . The earthen cover costs are less than the Grand Junction field test cost primarily because cover material is available at or near most of the disposal sites selected. Earthen material was imported from 6 to 10 miles for the field test. Assuming more efficienct utilization of materials significantly reduced the cost of the multilayer covers

  14. Geochemical modeling of uranium mill tailings: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S.R.; Felmy, A.R.; Serne, R.J.; Gee, G.W.

    1983-08-01

    Liner failure was not found to be a problem when various acidic tailings solutions leached through liner materials for periods up to 3 y. On the contrary, materials that contained over 30% clay showed a decrease in permeability with time in the laboratory columns. The decreases in permeability noted above are attributed to pore plugging resulting from the precipitation of minerals and solids. This precipitation takes place due to the increase in pH of the tailings solution brought about by the buffering capacity of the soil. Geochemical modeling predicts, and x-ray characterization confirms, that precipitation of solids from solution is occurring in the acidic tailings solution/liner interactions studied. X-ray diffraction identified gypsum and alunite group minerals, such as jarosite, as having precipitated after acidic tailings solutions reacted with clay liners. The geochemical modeling and experimental work described above were used to construct an equilibrium conceptual model consisting of minerals and solid phases. This model was developed to represent a soil column. A computer program was used as a tool to solve the system of mathematical equations imposed by the conceptual chemical model. The combined conceptual model and computer program were used to predict aqueous phase compositions of effluent solutions from permeability cells packed with geologic materials and percolated with uranium mill tailings solutions. An initial conclusion drawn from these studies is that the laboratory experiments and geochemical modeling predictions were capable of simulating field observations. The same mineralogical changes and contaminant reductions observed in the laboratory studies were found at a drained evaporation pond (Lucky Mc in Wyoming) with a 10-year history of acid attack. 24 references, 5 figures 5 tables

  15. System for the hydrogeologic analysis of uranium mill waste disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osiensky, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    Most of the uranium mill wastes generated before 1977 are stored in unlined tailings ponds. Seepage from some of these ponds has been of sufficient severity that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has required the installation of withdrawal wells to remove the contaminated groundwater. Uranium mill waste disposal facilities typically are located in complex hydrogeologic environments. This research was initiated in 1980 to analyze hydrogeologic data collected at seven disposal sites in the US that have experienced problems with groundwater contamination. The characteristics of seepage migration are site specific and are controlled by the hydrogeologic environment in the vicinity of each tailings pond. Careful monitoring of most seepage plumes was not initiated until approximately 1977. These efforts were accelerated as a consequence of the uranium Mill Tailings Act of 1979. Some of the data collected at uranium mill waste disposal sites in the past are incomplete and some were collected by methods that are outdated. Data frequently were collected in sequences which disrupted the continuity of the hydrogeologic analysis and decreased the effectiveness of the data collection programs. Evaluation of data collection programs for seven uranium mill waste disposal sites in the US has led to the development and presentation herein of a system for the hydrogeologic analysis of disposal sites

  16. Evaluation of chemical stabilizers and windscreens for wind erosion control of uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmore, M.R.; Hartley, J.N.

    1984-08-01

    Potential wind erosion of uranium mill tailings is a concern for the surface disposal of tailings at uranium mills. Wind-blown tailings may subsequently be redeposited on areas outside the impoundment. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is investigating techniques for fugitive dust control at uranium mill tailings piles. Laboratory tests, including wind tunnel studies, were conducted to evaluate the relative effectiveness of 43 chemical stabilizers. Seventeen of the more promising stabilizers were applied to test plots on a uranium tailings pile at the American Nuclear Corporation-Gas Hills Project mill site in central Wyoming. The durabilities of these materials under actual site conditions were evaluated over time. In addition, field testing of commercially available windscreens was conducted. Test panels were constructed of eight different materials at the Wyoming test site to compare their durability. A second test site was established near PNL to evaluate the effectiveness of windscreens at reducing wind velocity, and thereby reduce the potential for wind erosion of mill tailings. Results of the laboratory land field tests of the chemical stabilizers and windscreens are presented, along with costs versus effectiveness of these techniques for control of wind erosion at mill tailings piles. 12 references, 4 figures, 6 tables

  17. Environmental activities in uranium mining and milling. A Joint NEA/IAEA report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This report on 'Environmental Activities in Uranium Mining and Milling' presents an overview of environmental activities related to uranium production. The profile of activities and concerns are based on survey responses from 29 countries and a review of relevant activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. It also provides an overview of the reported interests of specialists working in the field, including environmental impact assessment, emissions to air and water, work environment, radiation safety, waste handling and disposal, mine and mill decommissioning and site restoration, and the regulation of these activities. The report reflects the increasing awareness in all countries of the need for environmental protection. For several years large programmes have been underway in several countries to clean up wastes from closed mines and mills. Many of these sites, particularly the older ones, were brought into production, operated and closed when little was known about environmental effects. At the time, little concern was given to the resulting environmental impacts. Currently, planning for and conducting uranium mine closure and mill decommissioning, together with site clean-up and restoration, are of almost universal concern. Mine closure and mill decommissioning activities have been or are being conducted in most of the countries with a history of uranium production. Information about several mine closures and mill decommissioning projects is included in this report

  18. Forage uptake of uranium series radionuclides in the vicinity of the anaconda uranium mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rayno, D.R.; Momeni, M.H.; Sabau, C.

    1980-01-01

    Radiochemical analysis was performed on samples of soil and eight species of common vegetation growing on the Anaconda uranium mill site, located in New Mexico. The concentrations of the long-lived radionuclides U-238, U-234, Th-230, Ra-226, and Pb-210 in these forage plants were determined. The sampling procedures and analytical laboratory methods used are described. The highest radionuclide concentration found in a forage species was 130 pCi of Ra-226 per gram dry weight for grass growing on the main tailings pile at Anaconda, where the surface soil activity of Ra-226 was 236 pCi/g. A comparison of shoots activity with that of roots and soil was used to determine a distribution index and uptake coefficient for each species. The distribution index, the ratio of root activity to shoot activity, ranged from 0.30 (Th-230) in galleta grass (Hilaria jamesii) to 38.0 (Ra-226) in Indian ricegrass (Oryzopsis hymenoides). In nearly all instances, the roots contained higher radionuclide concentrations. The uptake coefficient, the ratio of vegetation activity to soil activity, ranged from 0.69 (U-238) in Indian ricegrass roots to 0.01 (U-238) in four-wing saltbush (Atriplex canescans) shoots. The range of radionuclide concentrations in plants growing on the Anaconda mill site is compared to that in vegetation from a control site 20 km away

  19. Radiation protection of workers from uranium mines and of the public living nearby uranium mining and milling facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, Mikhail; Romanov, Vladimir; Shandala, Nataliya; Gneusheva, Galina; Titov, Alex; Novikova, Natalia; Smith, Graham

    2008-01-01

    As part of the program of nuclear power development, the Russia Federation plans to increase uranium production and to improve supply from existing uranium mining and milling facilities. Moreover, development of new uranium ore deposits is also envisaged. A corollary of these developments is the placing of a high priority on environmental and human health protection Special attention should be paid to assurance of health protection both of workers and of the public living nearby such facilities. This paper reviews the status and development of understanding of facilities in the Russian Federation from a regulatory perspective. (author)

  20. Uranium and thorium leached from uranium mill tailing of Guangdong province (CN)) and its implication for radiological risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.; Liu, J.; Zhu, L.; Qi, J. Y.; Chen, Y. H.; Xiao, T. F.; Fu, S. M.; Wang, C. L.; Li, J. W.

    2012-01-01

    The paper focused on the leaching behaviour of uranium (U) and thorium (Th) from uranium mill tailing collected from the Uranium Mill Plant in Northern Guangdong Province (CN)). Distilled water (pH 6) and sulphuric acid solution (pH 4 and 3) were used as solvent for the leaching over 22 weeks. It was found that the cumulative leach fraction from the mill tailing was 0.1, 0.1 and 0.7 % for U release, and overall 0.01 % for Th release, using distilled water, sulphuric acid solution of pH 4 and pH 3 as leaching agents, respectively. The results indicate that (1) the release of U and Th in uranium mill tailing is a slow and long-term process; (2) surface dissolution is the main mechanism for the release of U and Th when sulphuric acid solution of pH 3 is employed as the leaching agent; (3) both U and Th are released by diffusion when using sulphuric acid solution of pH 4 as the leaching agent and (4) U is released by surface dissolution, while Th is released by diffusion when using distilled water as the leaching agent. The implication for radiological risk in the real environment was also discussed. (authors)

  1. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Grand Junction, Colorado. Revision 1, Version 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan describes the planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the Grand Junction US DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site (GRJ-01) in Grand Junction, Colorado, and at the Cheney Disposal Site (GRJ-03) near Grand Junction. The plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for the routine monitoring stations at the sites. Regulatory basis is in the US EPA regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) and EPA ground water quality standards of 1995 (60 FR 2854). This plan summarizes results of past water sampling activities, details water sampling activities planned for the next 2 years, and projects sampling activities for the next 5 years

  2. Guidance document for preparing water sampling and analysis plans for UMTRA Project sites. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    A water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) is prepared for each Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site to provide the rationale for routine ground water sampling at disposal sites and former processing sites. The WSAP identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the routine ground water monitoring stations at each site. This guidance document has been prepared by the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Its purpose is to provide a consistent technical approach for sampling and monitoring activities performed under the WSAP and to provide a consistent format for the WSAP documents. It is designed for use by the TAC in preparing WSAPs and by the DOE, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, state and tribal agencies, other regulatory agencies, and the public in evaluating the content of WSAPS

  3. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    Surface remedial action is scheduled to begin at the Belfield and Bowman Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in the spring of 1996. Water sampling was conducted in 1993 at both the Belfield processing site and the Bowman processing/disposal site. Results of the sampling at both sites indicate that ground water conditions have remained relatively stable over time. Water sampling activities are not scheduled for 1994 because ground water conditions at the two sites are relatively stable, the 1993 sampling was comprehensive, and surface remediation activities are not scheduled to start until 1996. The next water sampling event is scheduled before the start of remedial activities and will include sampling selected monitor wells at both sites and several domestic wells in the vicinity

  4. Guidance for implementing the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has issued a general license for the custody and long-term care of US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project permanent disposal sites. The purpose of this general license is to ensure that the UMTRA disposal sites will be cared for in such a manner as to protect the public health and safety and the environment upon completion of remedial actions. The general license will be in effect for a disposal site when NRC accepts the disposal site long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) that meets the requirements of 10 CFR 40.27. The site LTSP describes in detail the long-term surveillance program, including any monitoring, maintenance, and emergency measures necessary to fulfill the conditions of the general license. This guidance document provides (1) instructions for preparing the disposal site LTSPs and (2) instructions for carrying out the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program, including any monitoring that may be required. The information provided in this document also is in accordance with the regulatory requirements set forth in 40 CFR 192. On January 5, 1985, the US Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals remanded the groundwater standards, 40 CFR 192.02. Proposed groundwater standards were issued for comment on September 24, 1987 (52 FR 3600). When the groundwater standards become final, this document will be revised, as appropriate. This document also will be updated in response to any changes to 10 CFR 40, or in response to changes in the manner in which the long-term care of the licensed disposal sites is carried out

  5. Environmental analysis and data report prepared for the environmental assessment of remedial action at the Lowman uranium mill tailings site near Lowman, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This document contains information and data gathered in support of the preparation of the environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed remedial action at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Lowman, Idaho. The Lowman EA was prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which requires Federal agencies to assess the effects of their actions on the environment. It examines the short-term and the long-term effects of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) proposed remedial action for the Lowman site as well as the no action alternative. The DOE will use the information and analyses presented in the EA to determine whether the proposed action would have a significant impact on the environment. If the impacts are determined to be significant, an environmental impact statement will be prepared. If the impacts are not judged to be significant, the DOE may issue a Finding of No Significant Impact and implement the proposed action. The information and data presented in this environmental analyses and data report are for background purposes only and are not required as part of the NEPA decision-making process

  6. Environmental analysis and data report prepared for the environmental assessment of remedial action at the inactive uranium mill tailings site near Falls City, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    This document contains information and data gathered in support of the preparation of the environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed remedial action at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Falls City, Texas. The Falls City EA was prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which requires Federal agencies to assess the impacts of their actions on the environment. It examines the short- and long-term effects of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) remedial action for the Falls City site as well as the no action alternative. The DOE will use the information and analyses presented in the EA to determine whether the proposed action would have a significant impact on the environment. If the impacts are determined to be significant, an environmental impact statement (EIS) will be prepared. If the impacts are not determined to be significant, the DOE may issue a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and implement the proposed action. The information and data presented in this report are for background purposes only and are not required as part of the NEPA decision-making process

  7. Consolidation theory and its applicability to the dewatering and covering of uranium-mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, T.E.

    1982-11-01

    This report is a review and evaluation of soil consolidation theories applicable for evaluating settlement during dewatering and subsequent covering of uranium-mill tailings. Such theories may be used to predict both consolidation and water flow related effects in uranium-mill tailings during drainage, following sluicing into burial pits. A consolidation theory to be useful must consider the effect of time-dependent loads, nonhomogeneous soil mass, nonlinear variation of soil properties with the stress-state parameters, large strain, and saturated and unsaturated flow. Constitutive relations linking the stress-deformation-state variables with void ratio should be adopted for predicting both consolidation and fluid-flow interaction in unsaturated uranium-mill tailings

  8. Impacts of new environmental and safety regulations on uranium mining, milling and waste management in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongping; Zheng Yuhui; Shi Xiangjun

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear power progress has triggered the development and innovation of nuclear fuel industries in China. At present the Chinese government has put more emphasis on industrial readjustment and technical innovation in uranium mining and milling in order to fuel the nuclear power development, satisfy environmental protection and improve economic efficiency of the industry. The current organizations and approval procedure for establishing regulations and the implementation and consequences of the regulations, technical polices and development strategies concerning uranium mining, milling, treatment of waste ores and mill tailings, and reduction of the workers' suffered exposure dose etc. in China are discussed and the economic, health and environmental impacts of the uranium mining and metallurgy with reformation achievement and the introduction of advanced technologies such as the in-situ leaching and heap leaching mining technologies are assessed in this paper. (author)

  9. Scientific basis for risk assessment and management of uranium mill tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    A National Research Council study panel, convened by the Board on Radioactive Waste Management, has examined the scientific basis for risk assessment and management of uranium mill tailings and issued this final report containing a number of recommendations. Chapter 1 provides a brief introduction to the problem. Chapter 2 examines the processes of uranium extraction and the mechanisms by which radionuclides and toxic chemicals contained in the ore can enter the environment. Chapter 3 is devoted to a review of the evidence on health risks associated with radon and its decay products. Chapter 4 provides a consideration of conventional and possible new technical alternatives for tailings management. Chapter 5 explores a number of issues of comparative risk, provides a brief history of uranium mill tailings regulation, and concludes with a discussion of choices that must be made in mill tailing risk management. 211 refs., 30 figs., 27 tabs.

  10. Scientific basis for risk assessment and management of uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    A National Research Council study panel, convened by the Board on Radioactive Waste Management, has examined the scientific basis for risk assessment and management of uranium mill tailings and issued this final report containing a number of recommendations. Chapter 1 provides a brief introduction to the problem. Chapter 2 examines the processes of uranium extraction and the mechanisms by which radionuclides and toxic chemicals contained in the ore can enter the environment. Chapter 3 is devoted to a review of the evidence on health risks associated with radon and its decay products. Chapter 4 provides a consideration of conventional and possible new technical alternatives for tailings management. Chapter 5 explores a number of issues of comparative risk, provides a brief history of uranium mill tailings regulation, and concludes with a discussion of choices that must be made in mill tailing risk management. 211 refs., 30 figs., 27 tabs

  11. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Gunnison, Colorado: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan summarizes the results of previous water sampling activities and the plan for future water sampling activities, in accordance with the Guidance Document for Preparing Sampling and Analysis Plans for UMTRA Sites. A buffer zone monitoring plan for the Dos Rios Subdivision is included as an appendix. The buffer zone monitoring plan was developed to ensure continued protection to the public from residual contamination. The buffer zone is beyond the area depicted as contaminated ground water due to former milling operations. Surface remedial action at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site began in 1992; completion is expected in 1995. Ground water and surface water will be sampled semiannually at the Gunnison processing site and disposal site. Results of previous water sampling at the Gunnison processing site indicate that ground water in the alluvium is contaminated by the former uranium processing activities. Background ground water conditions have been established in the uppermost aquifer at the Gunnison disposal site. The monitor well locations provide a representative distribution of sampling points to characterize ground water quality and ground water flow conditions in the vicinity of the sites. The list of analytes has been modified with time to reflect constituents that are related to uranium processing activities and the parameters needed for geochemical evaluation

  12. Supplement to the UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Maybell, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) supplement supports the regulatory and technical basis for water sampling at the Maybell, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site, as defined in the 1994 WSAP document for Maybell (DOE, 1994a). Further, this supplement serves to confirm our present understanding of the site relative to the hydrogeology and contaminant distribution as well as our intention to continue to use the sampling strategy as presented in the 1994 WSAP document for Maybell. Ground water and surface water monitoring activities are derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) and 60 CFR 2854 (1 995). Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site. Additional site-specific documents relevant to the Maybell site are the Maybell Baseline Risk Assessment (currently in progress), the Maybell Remedial Action Plan (RAP) (DOE, 1994b), and the Maybell Environmental Assessment (DOE, 1995)

  13. Status of the ground water flow model for the UMTRA Project, Shiprock, New Mexico, site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    A two-dimensional numerical model was constructed for the alluvial aquifer in the area of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Shiprock, New Mexico, site. This model was used to investigate the effects of various hydrologic parameters on the evolution of the ground water flow field. Results of the model are useful for defining uncertainties in the site conceptual model and suggesting data collection efforts to reduce these uncertainties. The computer code MODFLOW was used to simulate the two-dimensional flow of ground water in the alluvium. The escarpment was represented as a no-flow boundary. The San Juan River was represented with the MODFLOW river package. A uniform hydraulic conductivity distribution with the value estimated by the UMTRA Project Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) and a uniform recharge distribution was used. Infiltration from the flowing artesian well was represented using the well package. The ground water flow model was calibrated to ground water levels observed in April 1993. Inspection of hydrographs shows that these levels are representative of typical conditions at the site

  14. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Monument Valley, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Monument Valley, Arizona, US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action(UMTRA) Project site is one of the first site-specific documents developed to achieve ground water compliance at the site. This SOWP applies information about the Monument Valley site to a regulatory compliance framework that identifies strategies that could be used to meet ground water compliance. The compliance framework was developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement (DOE, 1996). The DOE`s goal is to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. The compliance strategy that emerges in the final version of the SOWP will be evaluated in the site-specific environmental assessment to determine potential environmental impacts and provide stakeholders a forum for review and comment. When the compliance strategy is acceptable, it will be detailed in a remedial action plan that will be subject to review by the state and/or tribe and concurrence by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Information for the preparation of this SOWP indicates active remediation is the most likely compliance strategy for the Monument Valley site. Additional data are needed to determine the most effective remediation technology.

  15. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Spook, Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    The Spook, Wyoming, site observational work plan proposes site-specific activities to achieve compliance with Subpart B of 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) of the final US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water protection standards 60 FR 2854 (1995) at this Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. This draft SOWP presents a comprehensive summary of existing site characterization data, a conceptual site model of the nature and extent of ground water contamination, exposure pathways, and potential impact to human health and the environment. Section 2.0 describes the requirements for meeting ground water standards at UMTRA Project sites. Section 3.0 defines past and current conditions, describes potential environmental and human health risks, and provides site-specific data that supports the selection of a proposed ground water compliance strategy. Section 4.0 provides the justification for selecting the proposed ground water compliance strategy based on the framework defined in the ground water programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS)

  16. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Monument Valley, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Monument Valley, Arizona, US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site is one of the first site-specific documents developed to achieve ground water compliance at the site. This SOWP applies information about the Monument Valley site to a regulatory compliance framework that identifies strategies that could be used to meet ground water compliance. The compliance framework was developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement (DOE, 1995). The DOE`s goal is to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. The compliance strategy that emerges in the final version of the SOWP will assess potential environmental impacts and provide stakeholder a forum for review and comment. When the compliance strategy is acceptable, it will be detailed in a remedial action plan that will be subject to review by the state and/or tribe and concurrence by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Information available for the preparation of this SOWP indicates active remediation is the most likely compliance strategy for the Monument Valley site. Additional data are needed to determine the most effective remediation technology.

  17. Supplement to the UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Monument Valley, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) supplement supports the regulatory and technical basis for water sampling at the Riverton, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site, as defined in the 1994 WSAP document for Riverton (DOE, 1994). Further, the supplement serves to confirm the Project's present understanding of the site relative to the hydrogeology and contaminant distribution as well as the intent to continue to use the sampling strategy as presented in the 1994 WSAP document for Riverton. Ground water and surface water monitoring activities are derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 and 60 FR 2854. Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site. Additional site-specific documents relevant to the Riverton site are the Riverton Baseline Risk Assessment (BLRA) (DOE, 1995a) and the Riverton Site Observational Work Plan (SOWP) (DOE, 1995b)

  18. Supplement to the UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Mexican Hat, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) supplement supports the regulatory and technical basis for water sampling at the Mexican Hat, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site, as defined in the 1994 WSAP document for Mexican Hat (DOE, 1994). Further, the supplement serves to confirm our present understanding of the site relative to the hydrogeology and contaminant distribution as well as our intention to continue to use the sampling strategy as presented in the 1994 WSAP document for Mexican Hat. Ground water and surface water monitoring activities are derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1991) and 60 FR 2854 (1995). Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site. Additional site-specific documents relevant to the Mexican Hat site are the Mexican Hat Long-Term Surveillance Plan (currently in progress), and the Mexican Hat Site Observational Work Plan (currently in progress)

  19. Final report of the UMTRA independent technical review of TAC audit programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This report details the findings of an Independent Technical Review (ITR) of practices and procedures for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project audit program. The audit program is conducted by Jacobs Engineering Group Inc., the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) for the UMTRA Project. The purpose of the ITR was to ensure that the TAC audit program is effective and is conducted efficiently. The ITR was conducted from May 16-20, 1994. A review team observed audit practices in the field, reviewed the TAC audit program's documentation, and discussed the program with TAC staff and management. The format of this report has been developed around EPA guidelines; they comprise most of the major section headings. Each section begins by identifying the criteria that the TAC program is measured against, then describing the approach used by the ITR team to measure each TAC audit program against the criteria. An assessment of each type of audit is then summarized for each component in the following order: Radiological audit summary; Health and safety audit summary; Environmental audit summary; Quality assurance audit summary

  20. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Monument Valley, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Monument Valley, Arizona, US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action(UMTRA) Project site is one of the first site-specific documents developed to achieve ground water compliance at the site. This SOWP applies information about the Monument Valley site to a regulatory compliance framework that identifies strategies that could be used to meet ground water compliance. The compliance framework was developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement (DOE, 1996). The DOE's goal is to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. The compliance strategy that emerges in the final version of the SOWP will be evaluated in the site-specific environmental assessment to determine potential environmental impacts and provide stakeholders a forum for review and comment. When the compliance strategy is acceptable, it will be detailed in a remedial action plan that will be subject to review by the state and/or tribe and concurrence by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Information for the preparation of this SOWP indicates active remediation is the most likely compliance strategy for the Monument Valley site. Additional data are needed to determine the most effective remediation technology

  1. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Monument Valley, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Monument Valley, Arizona, US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site is one of the first site-specific documents developed to achieve ground water compliance at the site. This SOWP applies information about the Monument Valley site to a regulatory compliance framework that identifies strategies that could be used to meet ground water compliance. The compliance framework was developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement (DOE, 1995). The DOE's goal is to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. The compliance strategy that emerges in the final version of the SOWP will assess potential environmental impacts and provide stakeholder a forum for review and comment. When the compliance strategy is acceptable, it will be detailed in a remedial action plan that will be subject to review by the state and/or tribe and concurrence by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Information available for the preparation of this SOWP indicates active remediation is the most likely compliance strategy for the Monument Valley site. Additional data are needed to determine the most effective remediation technology

  2. Groundwater leaching of neutralized and untreated acid-leached uranium-mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gee, G.W.; Begej, C.W.; Campbell, A.C.; Sauter, N.N.; Opitz, B.E.; Sherwood, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    Tailings neutralization was examined to determine the effect of neutralization on contaminant release. Column leaching of acid extracted uranium mill tailings from Exxon Highland Mill, Wyoming, Pathfinder Gas Hills Mill, Wyoming, and the Dawn Midnite Mill, Washington, resulted in the flushing of high concentrations of salts in the first four pore volumes of leachate, followed by a steady decrease to the original groundwater salt concentrations. Neutralization decreased the concentration of salts and radionuclides leaching from the tailings and decreased the volume of solution required to return the solution to the groundwater pH and EC. Radium-226 and uranium-238 leached quickly from the tailings in the initial pore volumes of both neutralized and unneutralized tailings, and then decreased significantly. 6 figures, 5 tables

  3. 40 CFR 23.8 - Timing of Administrator's action under Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978. 23.8 Section 23.8 Protection of Environment... Administrator's action under Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978. Unless the Administrator...

  4. Predicting arsenic concentrations in porewaters of buried uranium mill tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langmuir, D.; Mahoney, J.; MacDonald, A.; Rowson, J.

    1999-10-01

    The proposed JEB Tailings Management Facility (TMF) to be emplaced below the groundwater table in northern Saskatchewan, Canada, will contain uranium mill tailings from McClean Lake, Midwest and Cigar Lake ore bodies, which are high in arsenic (up to 10%) and nickel (up to 5%). A serious concern is the possibility that high arsenic and nickel concentrations may be released from the buried tailings, contaminating adjacent groundwaters and a nearby lake. Laboratory tests and geochemical modeling were performed to examine ways to reduce the arsenic and nickel concentrations in TMF porewaters so as to minimize such contamination from tailings buried for 50 years and longer. The tests were designed to mimic conditions in the mill neutralization circuit (3 hr tests at 25 C), and in the TMF after burial (5--49 day aging tests). The aging tests were run at 50, 25 and 4 C (the temperature in the TMF). In order to optimize the removal of arsenic by adsorption and precipitation, ferric sulfate was added to tailings raffinates having Fe/As ratios of less than 3--5. The acid raffinates were then neutralized by addition of slaked lime to nominal pH values of 7, 8, or 9. Analysis and modeling of the test results showed that with slaked lime addition to acid tailings raffinates, relatively amorphous scorodite (ferric arsenate) precipitates near pH 1, and is the dominant form of arsenate in slake limed tailings solids except those high in Ni and As and low in Fe, in which cabrerite-annabergite (Ni, Mg, Fe(II) arsenate) may also precipitate near pH 5--6. In addition to the arsenate precipitates, smaller amounts of arsenate are also adsorbed onto tailings solids. The aging tests showed that after burial of the tailings, arsenic concentrations may increase with time from the breakdown of the arsenate phases (chiefly scorodite). However, the tests indicate that the rate of change decreases and approaches zero after 72 hrs at 25 C, and may equal zero at all times in the TMF at 4 C

  5. Recycling and disposal of FUSRAP materials from the Ashland 2 site at a licensed uranium mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, B.; Conboy, D.; Rehmann, M.; Roberts, H.

    1999-01-01

    During World War II the Manhattan Engineering District (MED) used facilities near Buffalo, N.Y. to extract natural uranium from ores. Some of the byproduct material left from the ores (MED byproduct), containing low levels of uranium, thorium, and radium, was deposited on a disposal site known as Ashland 2, located in Tonawanda, NY. On behalf of the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE, or the Corps), ICF Kaiser Engineers (ICFKE) was tasked to provide the best value clean-up results that meet all of the criteria established in the Record of Decision for the site. International Uranium (USA) Corporation (IUC), the operator of the White Mesa Uranium Mill, a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed mill near Blanding, Utah, was selected to perform uranium extraction on the excavated materials, therefore giving the best value as it provided beneficial use of the material consistent with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) intent to encourage recycling and recovery, while also providing the most cost-effective means of disposal. Challenges overcome to complete this project included (1) identifying the best-value location to accept the material; (2) meeting regulatory requirements with IUC obtaining an NRC license amendment to accept and process the material as an alternate feed; (3) excavating and preparing the material for shipment, then shipping the material to the Mill for uranium recovery; and (4) processing the material, followed by disposal of tailings from the process in the Mill's licensed uranium tailings facility. Excavation from Ashland 2 and processing of the Ashland 2 material at the White Mesa Mill resulted in a cleaner environment at Tonawanda, a cost avoidance of up to $16 million, beneficial recovery of source material, and environmentally protective disposal of byproduct material. (author)

  6. Uranium mining and milling sites in Argentina: environmental radiological monitoring (1980-1994)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomben, A.M.; Gomez, J.C.; Oliveira, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    Environmental radiological monitoring in the vicinity of uranium mining and milling plants in Argentina is performed on a routine basis, in order to assess the possibility of significant environmental contamination due to uranium mill wastes and mill tailings of plants still operating or those where the exploitation have concluded. Dissolved natural uranium and 226 Ra concentrations in surface waters are measured in samples taken from rivers near the mills, according to a special monitoring plan set up for each facility. In addition, 222 Rn emanation rates from ore tailings are measured at times. In this paper the environmental radiological monitoring program results obtained for the 1980-1994 period are shown. From the data analyses it can be concluded that there are not significant differences for the concentrations of the radionuclides of interest, between the surface water samples taken from river location above and below the plants discharge points. Besides, no significant exposure results for the population living in the surrounding areas due to the uranium mining and milling plants operation or their wastes. (author). 2 refs., 5 figs

  7. Radiological and environmental studies at uranium mills: a comparison of theoretical and experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momeni, M.H.; Kisieleski, W.E.; Yuan, Y.; Roberts, C.J.

    1978-01-01

    Evaluation of radiological risk of uranium milling is based on identification and quantification of sources of release and consideration of dynamic coupling among the meteorological, physiographical, hydrological environments and the affected individuals. Dispersion pathways of radionuclides are through air, soil, and water, each demanding locally tailored procedures for estimation of the rate of release of radioactivity and the pattern of biological uptake and exposure. The Uranium Dispersion and Dosimetry Code (UDAD), a comprehensive method for estimating the concentrations of the released radionuclides, dose rates, doses, and radiological health effects, is described. Predicted concentrations and exposure rates are compared with experimental data obtained from field research at active mills and abandoned tailings

  8. Safe management of wastes from the mining and milling of uranium and thorium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Wastes from the mining and milling of uranium and thorium ores pose potential environmental and public health problems because of their radioactivity and chemical composition. This document consists of two parts: a Code of Practice (Part I) and a Guide to the Code (Part II). The Code sets forth the requirements for the safe and responsible handling of the wastes resulting from the mining and milling of uranium and thorium ores, while the Guide presents further guidance in the use of the Code together with some discussion of the technology and concepts involved

  9. Closeout of uranium mines and mills: A review of current practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    The present report is a first step in gathering information on the assessment and control of the long term (over a few centuries) impact of uranium mining and milling waste. Its intention is to outline several examples of worldwide experience. It contains summaries of current closeout practices which have not previously been presented in a singly publication. It is expected to provide necessary information to Member States to formulate meaningful decisions for adequately controlling impacts resulting from uranium mines and mills waste materials. The information contained herein may also be valuable as background material for developing relevant guidance in this subject area, for example within the IAEA Safety Standards Programme. Refs, figs, tabs

  10. Remediation of uranium mill tailings wastes in Australia: a critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mudd, G.M.

    2000-01-01

    Australia has been an active participant in the global uranium mining industry since its inception in the 1940s. By the late 1950s five major mining and milling projects were operating, several small mines supplied custom ores. All of these projects were closed by the early 1960s, except for Rum Jungle which continued under government subsidy. Most sites have had lasting Environmental impacts. The advances in nuclear power in the 1960s saw increasing demand for uranium and Australia again explored with remarkable success in the Northern Territory, South Australia and Western Australia. After several government inquiries in the 1970s, Ranger, Nabarlek and Olympic Dam were operating by the mid 1980s. The principal risks from uranium mill tailings wastes arise from their radioactive nature and often their chemical toxicities. A critical review of the rehabilitation of abandoned uranium mines and mill tailings as a comparison for current projects is presented. It is concluded that the management of uranium mill tailings wastes is a complex task, requiring a sound multi-disciplinary approach. The problems include groundwater contamination, erosion, radon emanation and gamma radiation. evidence to data from the remediation of old and modern sites does not demonstrate effective long-term closure and safety

  11. Research on the characterization and conditioning of uranium mill tailings. II. Thermal stabilization of uranium mill tailings: technical and economic evaluation. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreesen, D.R.; Cokal, E.J.; Thode, E.F.; Wangen, L.E.; Williams, J.M.

    1983-06-01

    A method of conditioning uranium mill tailings has been devised to greatly reduce radon emanation and contaminant leachability by using high-temperature treatments, i.e., thermal stabilization. The thermally stabilized products appear resistant to weathering as measured by the effects of grinding and water leaching. The technical feasibility of the process has been partially verified in pilot-scale experiments. A conceptual thermal stabilization process has been designed and the economics of the process show that the thermal stabilization of tailings can be cost competitive compared with relocation of tailings during remedial action. The alteration of morphology, structure, and composition during thermal treatment would indicate that this stabilization method may be a long-lasting solution to uranium mill tailings disposal problems

  12. Measurements of 234U, 238U and 230Th in excreta of uranium-mill crushermen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.R.; Jackson, P.O.; Brodacynski, G.G.; Scherpelz, R.I.

    1982-07-01

    Uranium and thorium levels in excreta of uranium mill crushermen who are routinely exposed to airborne uranium ore dust were measured. The purpose was to determine whether 230 Th was preferentially retained over either 234 U or 238 U in the body. Urine and fecal samples were obtained from fourteen active crushermen with long histories of exposure to uranium ore dust, plus four retired crushermen and three control individuals for comparison. Radiochemical procedures were used to separate out the uranium and thorium fractions, which were then electroplated on stainless steel discs and assayed by alpha spectrometry. Significantly greater activity levels of 234 U and 238 U were measured in both urine and fecal samples obtained from uranium mill crushermen, indicating that uranium in the inhaled ore dust was cleared from the body with a shorter biological half-time than the daughter product 230 Th. The measurements also indicated that uranium and thorium separate in vivo and have distinctly different metabolic pathways and transfer rates in the body. The appropriateness of current ICRP retention and clearance parameters for 230 Th in ore dust is questioned

  13. Management of waste from uranium mining and milling in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harries, J.; Levins, D.; Ring, B.; Zuk, W.

    1997-01-01

    Australia has a long history of uranium mining. Most of the early production came from Rum Jungle in the Northern Territory and Mary Kathleen in Queensland. The second generation of uranium mines (Ranger, Nabarlek and Olympic Dam) came on line in the 1970s and 1980s at a time of increased environmental awareness and public scrutiny. The waste management practices at these mines are in accordance with best practicable technology for the uranium mining industry. This paper describes Australia's experience in managing the front end of the fuel cycle; uranium mining and ore processing. (orig.)

  14. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Annual status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    The purpose, scope, history, requirements, and management organization of the UMTRA Program are summarized in the Introduction. The remainder of the report describes progress made during the past year (F 1980) and discusses future plants and activities. Early emphasis has been on the four highest-priority sites because of their proximity to population centers. These sites are: (1) Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; (2) Salt Lake City, Utah; (3) Durango, Colorado; and (4) Shiprock, New Mexico (Navajo Reservation). To date, twenty-five vicinity properties near the Canonsburg site and two such properties near the Salt Lake City site have been designated for remedial action. A research effort was undertaken at a major vicinity property, the Mountain States Supply Company in Salt Lake City, to study the effects of heating-and-ventilating-system modification on indoor radon-daughter concentrations. A cooperative agreement was executed between DOE and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. A similar agreement with the State of Utah is expected to be executed in early FY 1981. Further, it is expected that additional cooperative agreements will be negotiated during FY 1981 with the States of Colorado and Wyoming and the Navajo Nation. It is expected that the processing site at Canonsburg, PA (the Canonsburg Industrial Park) will be acquired during FY 1981. Draft Environmental Impact Statements for the four highest-priority sites will be completed during FY 1981.

  15. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Annual status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    The purpose, scope, history, requirements, and management organization of the UMTRA Program are summarized in the Introduction. The remainder of the report describes progress made during the past year (F 1980) and discusses future plants and activities. Early emphasis has been on the four highest-priority sites because of their proximity to population centers. These sites are: (1) Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; (2) Salt Lake City, Utah; (3) Durango, Colorado; and (4) Shiprock, New Mexico (Navajo Reservation). To date, twenty-five vicinity properties near the Canonsburg site and two such properties near the Salt Lake City site have been designated for remedial action. A research effort was undertaken at a major vicinity property, the Mountain States Supply Company in Salt Lake City, to study the effects of heating-and-ventilating-system modification on indoor radon-daughter concentrations. A cooperative agreement was executed between DOE and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. A similar agreement with the State of Utah is expected to be executed in early FY 1981. Further, it is expected that additional cooperative agreements will be negotiated during FY 1981 with the States of Colorado and Wyoming and the Navajo Nation. It is expected that the processing site at Canonsburg, PA (the Canonsburg Industrial Park) will be acquired during FY 1981. Draft Environmental Impact Statements for the four highest-priority sites will be completed during FY 1981

  16. Uranium mill tailings regulation and the generic environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, V.C.

    1980-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: the history of the Canadian uranium industry; the Canadian management of uranium mining wastes; Canadian federal and provincial effluent guidelines for radium-226; tailings and mine water management; backfill; liquid effluents from tailings storage; barium chloride treatment; mine water (Fay Mine); mine water (Dubyna Mine); and revegetation. 22 refs

  17. Licensing of uranium mine and mill waste management systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamney, L.G.

    1986-09-01

    Systems for the management of wastes arising from uranium mining facilities are subject to regulatory control by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). This paper describes the primary objectives, principles, requirements and guidelines which the AECB uses in the regulation of waste management activities at uranium mining facilities, and provides an understanding of the licensing process used by the AECB

  18. Screening of plant species as ground cover on uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venu Babu, P.; Eapen, S.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of construction of dams or holding areas for uranium mill tailings is relatively new in India and to date there is only one such facility being maintained by Uranium Corporation of India Limited (UCIL) at Jaduguda in Jharkhand. Due to the residual nature of radionuclides, chiefly uranium and its daughter products, special emphasis is given to the engineering aspects of the mill tailings ponds so as to ensure safety to general public for at least 200 years. Once a mill tailings pond reaches to its full capacity, creation of barrier layers over the mill tailings to prevent seepage of rain water and also erosion of mill tailings due to wind and water are advocated and a number of procedures are followed worldwide. Taking the extraordinary period of public safety to be assured, providing soil covers along with contouring and appropriate slopes over which vegetation is grown is gaining popularity. The vegetation not only reduces the impact of rain water hitting the soil cover, thereby reducing the soil erosion, but also lowers the moisture in the soil cover by extensive evapotranspiration, ensuring long term hydrological separation of the mill tailings underneath. Based on set criteria, applicable to the field scenario of mill tailings, a screening experiment was conducted under pot culture conditions to evaluate the survival and growth of different plant species. The plants after germination and hardening were transplanted into beakers containing mill tailings and periodical measurements on appropriate morphological characteristics such as plant height, length of twiners, number of tillers and number of leaves were recorded and evaluated. Of the twenty species tested in mill tailings, significant differences were noticed in the vigour of growth and several plant species could indeed establish well completing their life cycle including flowering and seed setting. Further, several leguminous species could also produce root nodules. It appears that the

  19. Effluent controls and environmental monitoring programs for uranium milling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maixner, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    Controls will reduce gaseous, particulate, and liquid discharges. Monitoring programs are used to determine effectiveness. The controls and programs discussed are used at Cotter Corporation's Canon City Mill in Colorado. 3 refs

  20. Geochemical investigations by the U.S. Geological Survey on uranium mining, milling, and environmental restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, Edward R.; Cravotta, Charles A.; Naftz, David L.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Zielinski, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    Recent research by the U.S. Geological Survey has characterized contaminant sources and identified important geochemical processes that influence transport of radionuclides from uranium mining and milling wastes. 1) Selective extraction studies indicated that alkaline earth sulfates and hydrous ferric oxides are important hosts of 226Ra in uranium mill tailings. The action of sulfate-reducing and ironreducing bacteria on these phases was shown to enhance release of radium, and this adverse result may temper decisions to dispose of uranium mill tailings in anaerobic environments. 2) Field studies have shown that although surface-applied sewage sludge/wood chip amendments aid in revegetating pyritic spoil, the nitrogen in sludge leachate can enhance pyrite oxidation, acidification of groundwater, and the consequent mobilization of metals and radionuclides. 3) In a U.S. Environmental Protection Agencyfunded study, three permeable reactive barriers consisting of phosphate-rich material, zero-valent iron, or amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide have been installed at an abandoned uranium upgrader facility near Fry Canyon, UT. Preliminary results indicate that each of the permeable reactive barriers is removing the majority of the uranium from the groundwater. 4) Studies on the geochemistry of rare earth elements as analogues for actinides such as uranium and thorium in acid mine drainage environments indicate high mobility under acid-weathering conditions but measurable attenuation associated with iron and aluminum colloid formation. Mass balances from field and laboratory studies are being used to quantify the amount of attenuation. 5) A field study in Colorado demonstrated the use of 234U/238U isotopic ratio measurements to evaluate contamination of shallow groundwater with uranium mill effluent.

  1. Sustainability of uranium mining and milling: toward quantifying resources and eco-efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudd, Gavin M; Diesendorf, Mark

    2008-04-01

    The mining of uranium has long been a controversial public issue, and a renewed debate has emerged on the potential for nuclear power to help mitigate against climate change. The central thesis of pro-nuclear advocates is the lower carbon intensity of nuclear energy compared to fossil fuels, although there remains very little detailed analysis of the true carbon costs of nuclear energy. In this paper, we compile and analyze a range of data on uranium mining and milling, including uranium resources as well as sustainability metrics such as energy and water consumption and carbon emissions with respect to uranium production-arguably the first time for modern projects. The extent of economically recoverable uranium resources is clearly linked to exploration, technology, and economics but also inextricably to environmental costs such as energy/water/chemicals consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, and social issues. Overall, the data clearly show the sensitivity of sustainability assessments to the ore grade of the uranium deposit being mined and that significant gaps remain in complete sustainability reporting and accounting. This paper is a case study of the energy, water, and carbon costs of uranium mining and milling within the context of the nuclear energy chain.

  2. Radon releases from Australian uranium mining and milling projects: assessing the UNSCEAR approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudd, Gavin M

    2008-02-01

    The release of radon gas and progeny from the mining and milling of uranium-bearing ores has long been recognised as a potential radiological health hazard. The standards for exposure to radon and progeny have decreased over time as the understanding of their health risk has improved. In recent years there has been debate on the long-term releases (10,000 years) of radon from uranium mining and milling sites, focusing on abandoned, operational and rehabilitated sites. The primary purpose has been estimates of the radiation exposure of both local and global populations. Although there has been an increasing number of radon release studies over recent years in the USA, Australia, Canada and elsewhere, a systematic evaluation of this work has yet to be published in the international literature. This paper presents a detailed compilation and analysis of Australian studies. In order to quantify radon sources, a review of data on uranium mining and milling wastes in Australia, as they influence radon releases, is presented. An extensive compilation of the available radon release data is then assembled for the various projects, including a comparison to predictions of radon behaviour where available. An analysis of cumulative radon releases is then developed and compared to the UNSCEAR approach. The implications for the various assessments of long-term releases of radon are discussed, including aspects such as the need for ongoing monitoring of rehabilitation at uranium mining and milling sites and life-cycle accounting.

  3. Radon releases from Australian uranium mining and milling projects: assessing the UNSCEAR approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mudd, Gavin M.

    2008-01-01

    The release of radon gas and progeny from the mining and milling of uranium-bearing ores has long been recognised as a potential radiological health hazard. The standards for exposure to radon and progeny have decreased over time as the understanding of their health risk has improved. In recent years there has been debate on the long-term releases (10,000 years) of radon from uranium mining and milling sites, focusing on abandoned, operational and rehabilitated sites. The primary purpose has been estimates of the radiation exposure of both local and global populations. Although there has been an increasing number of radon release studies over recent years in the USA, Australia, Canada and elsewhere, a systematic evaluation of this work has yet to be published in the international literature. This paper presents a detailed compilation and analysis of Australian studies. In order to quantify radon sources, a review of data on uranium mining and milling wastes in Australia, as they influence radon releases, is presented. An extensive compilation of the available radon release data is then assembled for the various projects, including a comparison to predictions of radon behaviour where available. An analysis of cumulative radon releases is then developed and compared to the UNSCEAR approach. The implications for the various assessments of long-term releases of radon are discussed, including aspects such as the need for ongoing monitoring of rehabilitation at uranium mining and milling sites and life-cycle accounting

  4. Isolation of uranium mill tailings and their component radionuclides from the biosphere; some earth science perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, Edward

    1980-01-01

    Uranium mining and milling is an expanding activity in the. Western United States. Although the milling process yields a uranium concentrate, the large volume of tailings remaining contains about 85 percent of the radioactivity originally associated with the ore. By virtue of the physical and chemical processing of the ore and the redistribution of the contained radionuclides at the Earth's surface, these tailings constitute a technologically enhanced source of natural radiation exposure. Sources of potential human radiation exposure from uranium mill tailings include the emanation of radon gas, the transport of particles by wind and water, and the transport of soluble radionuclides, seeping from disposal areas, by ground water. Due to the 77,000 year half-life of thorium-230, the parent of radium-226, the environmental effects associated with radionuclides contained in these railings must be conceived of within the framework of geologic processes operating over geologic time. The magnitude of erosion of cover materials and tailings and the extent of geochemical mobilization of the contained radionuclides to the atmosphere and hydrosphere should be considered in the evaluation of the potential, long-term consequences of all proposed uranium mill tailings management plans.

  5. Key programmatic steps and activities for implementing the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) was enacted based upon findings by Congress ''that uranium mill tailings located at active and inactive hazard to the public, and that protection of the public health, safety and welfare, and the regulations of interstate commerce, require that every reasonable effort be made to provide for the stabilization, disposal, and control in a safe and environmentally sound manner of such tailings in order to prevent or minimize radon diffusion into the environment and to prevent or minimize other environmental hazards from such tailings.'' A general understanding of the steps leading to elimination of the hazards associated with designated uranium mill tailings sites, and the parties involved in that effort, are presented in this document. A representative schedule is also presented in this document to show both program sequence and activity interdependence. Those activities that have the most potential to influence program duration, because of the significant amount of additional time that may be required, include identification and selection of a suitable site, field data collection delays due to weather, actual acquisition of the designated or alternate disposal site, construction delays due to weather, and site licensing. This document provides an understanding of the steps, the sequence, the parties involved, and a representative duration of activities leading to remedial action and cleanup at the designated inactive uranium mill tailings sites. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  6. Uranium mill tailings remediation in the USA. A history and lessons learned - 59407

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rima, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Since the 1940's uranium ores have been processed at various locations in the United States to extract and produce uranium and other concentrated materials, first for government (weapons) research and production, and then for nuclear power production. The tailings residue from the uranium milling process contained radioactive (primarily Ra-226) and hazardous chemicals. Large volumes of tailings were produced during the milling process. In the early history of this process the tailings were not recognized as hazardous and were released to the general public for a wide variety of uses, resulting in significant spread of contamination in the vicinity of many operating mills. In the late 1960's and early 1970's laws were enacted at the state and federal level to begin to deal with the legacy of this contamination. Over the course of the next several decades various regulatory agencies were responsible for remediating these sites. Different approaches were used, different end points and definitions of clean were used, and very large sums of public funding were spent on remediating these sites. Rarely was the cost commensurate with the risk reduction obtained through remediation. This paper will present an overview of the history of the uranium mill tailings regulatory and remediation program in the United States, the cost of the program compared to risk reduction, successes and failures, and important lessons learned that should be applied to future efforts in this area. (author)

  7. Environmental control technology for mining and milling low-grade uranium resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weakley, S.A.; Blahnik, D.E.; Long, L.W.; Bloomster, C.H.

    1981-04-01

    This study examined the type and level of wastes that would be generated in the mining and milling of U 3 O 8 from four potential domestic sources of uranium. The estimated costs of the technology to control these wastes to different degrees of stringency are presented

  8. Mining and milling of uranium ore: Indian scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhasin, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    The occurrence of uranium minerals in Singhbhum Thrust belt of Eastern India has been known since 1937. In 1950, a team of geologists of the Atomic Minerals Division was assigned to closely examine this 160 km long belt. Since then, several occurrences of uranium have been found and a few of them have sufficient grade and tonnage for commercial exploitation. In 1967, the Government of India formed Uranium Corporation of India Ltd., under the administrative control of the Department of Atomic Energy, with the specific objective of mining and processing of uranium ore and produce uranium concentrates. At present the Corporation operates three underground uranium mines, one ore processing plant with expanded capacity, and two uranium recovery plants. Continuing investigations by the Atomic Mineral Division has discovered several new deposits and favourable areas. The most notable is the large Domiasiat deposit of the sandstone type found in the State of Meghalaya. This deposit is now being considered for commercial exploitation using the in-situ leaching technology. (author)

  9. Non-radiological contaminants from uranium mining and milling at Ranger, Jabiru, Northern Territory, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noller, B N

    1991-10-01

    Protection from the hazards from radioactivity is of prime importance in the management of uranium mine and mill wastes. Such wastes also contain non-radiological contaminants (heavy metals, acids and neutralising agents) which give rise to potential long-term health and environmental hazards and short-term hazards to the aquatic ecosystem, e.g. as a result of release of waste water. This study seeks to identify non-radiological contaminants (elements) transferred to waste water at the Ranger uranium mine/mill complex at Jabiru, which are likely to hazardous to the aquatic environment.The two principal sources of contaminants are: (i) ore and waste rock mobilised from mining; and (ii) process reagents used in the milling and mineral extraction process. These substances may or may not already be present in the natural environment but may lead to deleterious effects on the aquatic environment if increased above threshold levels.Rhenium, derived from the ore body, was found to be significantly enriched in waste water from Ranger, indicating its suitability as an indicator element for water originating from the mining and milling process, but only uranium, likewise derived from the ore, and magnesium, manganese and sulfur (as sulfate) from the milling process were found to be significant environmental contaminants.

  10. Correlation analysis of first phase monitoring results for uranium mill workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, M.W.

    1983-05-01

    This report describes the determination of the existence and extent of correlations in data obtained during the first phase study of urinalysis, personal air sampling and lung burden measurements of uranium mill workers. It was shown that uranium excretions in urine as determined from spot urine samples at the end of the shift were correlated with intakes calculated from personal air sampling data at the 90 percent confidence level. When there are large variations in the rate of urine production, the time rate or uranium elimination was shown to be a more reliable indicator of uranium excretion than the uranium concentration in urine. Based on correlations between phantom and subject lung burden measurements in the presence of changing background radiation levels, a comparative lung burden measurement technique was developed. The sensitivity and accuracy of the method represent a significant improvement and the method is as applicable to females as to males

  11. Final environmental statement related to the United Nuclear Corporation, Morton Ranch, Wyoming Uranium Mill (Converse County, Wyoming)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-02-01

    Impacts from Morton Ranch Uranium Mill will result in: alterations of up to 270 acres occupied by the mill facilities; increase in the existing background radiation levels; socioeconomic effects on Glenrock and Douglas, Wyoming. Solid waste material (tailings solids) from the mill will be deposited onsite in exhausted surface mine pits. Any license issued for the Morton Ranch mill will be subject to conditions for the protection of the environment.

  12. Final environmental statement related to the United Nuclear Corporation, Morton Ranch, Wyoming Uranium Mill (Converse County, Wyoming)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    Impacts from Morton Ranch Uranium Mill will result in: alterations of up to 270 acres occupied by the mill facilities; increase in the existing background radiation levels; socioeconomic effects on Glenrock and Douglas, Wyoming. Solid waste material (tailings solids) from the mill will be deposited onsite in exhausted surface mine pits. Any license issued for the Morton Ranch mill will be subject to conditions for the protection of the environment

  13. Remedial Action Plan and Site design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Revision 1. Remedial action selection report, Attachment 2, geology report, Attachment 3, ground water hydrology report, Attachment 4, water resources protection strategy. Final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites are located near the small community of Slick Rock, in San Miguel County, Colorado. There are two designated Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites at Slick Rock: the Union Carbide site and the North Continent site. Both sites are adjacent to the Dolores River. The sites contain former mill building concrete foundations, tailings piles, demolition debris, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive materials. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 621,000 cubic yards (475,000 cubic meters). In addition to the contamination at the two processing site areas, 13 vicinity properties were contaminated. Contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into ground water. Pursuant to the requirements of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (42 USC {section}7901 et seq.), the proposed remedial action plan (RAP) will satisfy the final US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards in 40 CFR Part 192 (60 FR 2854) for cleanup, stabilization, and control of the residual radioactive material (RRM) (tailings and other contaminated materials) at the disposal site at Burro Canyon. The requirements for control of the RRM (Subpart A) will be satisfied by the construction of an engineered disposal cell. The proposed remedial action will consist of relocating the uranium mill tailings, contaminated vicinity property materials, demolition debris, and windblown/weaterborne materials to a permanent repository at the Burro Canyon disposal site. The site is approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the mill sites on land recently transferred to the DOE by the Bureau of Land Management.

  14. Remedial Action Plan and Site design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Revision 1. Remedial action selection report, Attachment 2, geology report, Attachment 3, ground water hydrology report, Attachment 4, water resources protection strategy. Final

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites are located near the small community of Slick Rock, in San Miguel County, Colorado. There are two designated Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites at Slick Rock: the Union Carbide site and the North Continent site. Both sites are adjacent to the Dolores River. The sites contain former mill building concrete foundations, tailings piles, demolition debris, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive materials. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 621,000 cubic yards (475,000 cubic meters). In addition to the contamination at the two processing site areas, 13 vicinity properties were contaminated. Contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into ground water. Pursuant to the requirements of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (42 USC section 7901 et seq.), the proposed remedial action plan (RAP) will satisfy the final US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards in 40 CFR Part 192 (60 FR 2854) for cleanup, stabilization, and control of the residual radioactive material (RRM) (tailings and other contaminated materials) at the disposal site at Burro Canyon. The requirements for control of the RRM (Subpart A) will be satisfied by the construction of an engineered disposal cell. The proposed remedial action will consist of relocating the uranium mill tailings, contaminated vicinity property materials, demolition debris, and windblown/weaterborne materials to a permanent repository at the Burro Canyon disposal site. The site is approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the mill sites on land recently transferred to the DOE by the Bureau of Land Management

  15. Assessment of environmental aspects of uranium mining and milling. Final report, 12 February--7 July 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, A.K.; Meeks, H.C.; Pomeroy, S.E.; Hale, V.Q.

    1976-12-01

    This research program was initiated with the basic objective of making a preliminary assessment of the potential environmental impacts associated with the mining and milling of domestic uranium ores. All forms of pollution except radiation were considered. The program included a review of the characteristics and locations of domestic uranium ore reserves and a review of the conventional methods for mining and milling these ores. Potential environmental impacts associated with the entire cycle from exploration and mining to recovery and production of yellowcake are identified and discussed. Land reclamation aspects are also discussed. The methods currently used for production of yellowcake were divided into four categories - open pit mining-acid leach process, underground mining-acid leach process, underground mining-alkaline leach process, and in-situ mining. These are discussed from the standpoint of typical active mills which were visited during the program. Flowsheets showing specific environmental impacts for each category are provided

  16. National/international R and D programs on uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, P.E.

    1981-05-01

    The mining and milling of uranium ores results in the production of large quantities of wastes containing low concentrations of radionuclides such as uranium, thorium, radium, radon and their daughter products. The current concern of the regulatory authorities is with the extent of the problems and the disposal methods that must be required now to ensure that an acceptable level of protection is maintained in the long term. This concern is the subject of a number of R and D programs. In Canada, the Technical Planning Group on Uranium Tailings was established to review ongoing activities and to plan a research program on the management of wastes after the mine and mill have shut down. The Group has completed its review and a report containing its conclusions and recommendations for a proposed national R and D program has been prepared. Included is a proposal for a centralized organizational structure for the coordination and managment of the total program which is to be supported jointly by the federal government, two (Ontario, Saskatchewan) provincial governments, and uranium producers. At the international level, the Nuclear Energy Agency originated, in 1979, a program to study the extent of the long-term problems of uranium mill tailings, and to develop an internationally acceptable methodology for making rational decisions regarding their long-term management taking into account the ICRP principles and system of dose limitation

  17. Management of wastes containing radioactivity from mining and milling of uranium ores in Northern Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costello, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The procedures and controls to achieve safe management of wastes containing radioactivity during the mining and processing of uranium ores are mainly site specific depending on the nature, location and distribution of the ore and gangue material. Waste rock and below-ore-grade material containing low levels of radioactivity require disposal at the mine site. In open cut mining the material is generally stockpiled above ground, with revegetation and collection of run-off water. Some material may be used to backfill open cuts. Management of these wastes requires a thorough investigation of ground water hydrology and surface soil characteristics to control dissipation of radioactive material. Dust containing radon and radioactive particulate is produced during ore milling, and dusts of ore concentrate are generated during calcination and packaging of the yellowcake product. These dusts are managed by ventilation and filtration systems, working conditions, and discharges to atmosphere will be according to the Australian Code of Practice on Radiation Protection during Mining and Milling of Uranium Ores. The chemical waste stream from leaching and processing of the uranium ores contains the majority of the radioactivity resulting from radium and its decay products. Neutralised effluent is discharged into holding ponds for settling of solids. This paper describes the nature of wastes containing radioactivity resulting from the mining and milling of uranium, and illustrates modern engineering practices and monitoring procedures to manage the wastes, as described in the Environmental Impact statement produced by Ranger Uranium Mines Proprietary Limited for public hearings

  18. Management of wastes containing radioactivity from mining and milling uranium ores in Northern Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costello, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The procedures and controls to achieve safe management of wastes containing radioactivity during the mining and processing of uranium ores are mainly site-specific depending on the nature, location and distribution of the ore and gangue material. Waste rock and below-ore-grade material containing low levels of radioactivity require disposal at the mine site. In open-cut mining the material is generally stockpiled above ground, with revegetation and collection of run-off water. Some material may be used to backfill open cuts. Management of these wastes requires a thorough investigation of groundwater hydrology and surface soil characteristics to control dissipation of radioactive material. Dust containing radon and radioactive particulate is produced during ore milling, and dusts of ore concentrate are generated during calcination and packaging of the yellowcake product. These dusts are managed by ventilation and filtration systems; working conditions and discharges to atmosphere will be according to the Australian Code of Practice on Radiation Protection during Mining and Milling of Uranium Ores. The chemical waste stream from leaching and processing of the uranium ores contains most of the radioactivity resulting from radium and its decay products. Neutralized effluent is discharged into holding ponds for settling solids. The paper describes the nature of wastes containing radioactivity resulting from the mining and milling of uranium, and illustrates modern engineering practices and monitoring procedures to manage the wastes, as described in the Environmental Impact Statement produced by Ranger Uranium Mines Pty Ltd (RUM) for public hearings. (author)

  19. UMTRA Project Site Observational Work Plan, Mexican Hat, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    Surface cleanup activities at the Mexican Hat UMTRA processing site are nearing completion. Ground Water contamination at the Mexican Hat site is a result of uranium milling operations. The extent of residual process water has been identified, and it is limited to the uppermost aquifer in the vicinity of the site. Deeper aquifers are not affected because of an upward hydraulic gradient and the presence of a confining unit (the deeper aquifers are protected by hydrogeologic isolation). The uppermost unit is returning to its pre-milling, mainly unsaturated state. The unit that contains the contaminated water is not a ground water resource because it qualifies as Class III (limited use) based on limited yield. Ground water in the uppermost unit is currently not used and is not anticipated to be used as a ground water resource. The nearby San Juan River and a converted oil exploration well provide all of the water needs for the area. There are no current threats to human health or livestock; and, because the zone of contamination does not represent a ground water resource, none are anticipated in the future. There are, however, seeps where contaminated water is exposed at land surface. The seeps create potential exposure pathways for plants and wildlife. It is not known at this time if there is a risk to the environment. Additional investigations are needed and are described in this document to confirm the presence or absence of potential environmental risks. Additional hydrogeologic investigations are not required. The proposed ground water compliance strategy for the site is no remediation, because the ground water in the uppermost aquifer (which is also the zone of contamination) qualifies for supplemental standards based on Class III, limited yield, and because there are no threats to human health. Domestic and agricultural water is pumped from a deeper aquifer that is isolated from the contaminated zone

  20. Study and application on lean resin converting in uranium mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Shaoxi; Huang Qijin; Zhu Shuguang; Yi Faqing; Du Wenjie

    2012-01-01

    The field test about sulphuric acid used to convert lean resin was finished. The results indicated sulphuric acid could replace chlorin in lean resin and could be reclaimed to desorption procedure. The consumption of NaCl decreased, the chlorin concentration of tailing decreased too. Both of uranium loss and waste water volume were reduced. The uranium concentration of tailing decreased and energy saving and emission reduction can be achieved. (authors)

  1. Alternative management techniques for the uranium mill tailings site at Salt Lake City, UT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, V.C.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Haywood, F.F.; Gantner, G.K.

    1976-01-01

    The concentrations of 226 Ra and other uranium-chain radionuclides present in tailings piles at uranium-milling sites are on the order of 10 3 times higher than those usually found in soil-surface minerals. The public radiation exposure attributable to these sites is primarily due to inhalation of 222 Rn progeny. This paper presents the radiological assessment of the uranium-milling site at Salt Lake City, Utah. Adverse health effects are estimated from present and projected public radiation exposures. Three alternative remedial action measures can be used to reduce radiation exposures: (1) decontamination of offsite areas contaminated by tailings materials; (2) covering the tailings with contamination-free material; and (3) removal of the tailings to a more remote location. These three measures are examined in terms of costs incurred and serious health effects avoided

  2. 1981 radon barrier field test at Grand Junction uranium mill tailings pile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, J.N.; Gee, G.W.; Baker, E.G.; Freeman, H.D.

    1983-04-01

    Technologies to reduce radon released from uranium mill tailings are being investigated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) Technology development program. These technologies include: (1) earthen cover systems, (2) multilayer cover systems, and (3) asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems. During the summer of 1981, a field test was initiated at the Grand Junction, Colorado, uranium tailings pile to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of each radon barrier system. Test plots cover about 1.2 ha (3 acres). The field test has demonstrated the effectiveness of all three cover systems in reducing radon release to near background levels ( 2 s - 1 ). In conjunction with the field tests, column tests (1.8 m diameter) were initiated with cover systems similar to those in the larger field test plots. The column tests allow a direct comparison of the two test procedures and also provide detailed information on radon transport

  3. Estimated dose to man from uranium milling via the terrestrial food-chain pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rayno, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    One of the major pathways of radiological exposure to man from uranium milling operations is through the terrestrial food chain. Studies by various investigators have shown the extent of uptake and distribution of U-238, U-234, Th-230, Ra-226, Pb-210, and Po-210 in plants and animals. These long-lived natural radioisotopes, all nuclides of the uranium decay series, are found in concentrated amounts in uranium mill tailings. Data from these investigations are used to estimate the dose to man from consumption of beef and milk contaminated by the tailings. This dose estimate from this technologically enhanced source is compared with that from average normal dietary intake of these radionuclides from natural sources.

  4. Canadian uranium mines and mills evolution of regulatory expectations and requirements for effluent treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeClair, J.; Ashley, F.

    2006-01-01

    The regulation of uranium mining in Canada has changed over time as our understanding and concern for impacts on both human and non-human biota has evolved. Since the mid-1970s and early 1980s, new uranium mine and mill developments have been the subject of environmental assessments to assess and determine the significance of environmental effects throughout the project life cycle including the post-decommissioning phase. Water treatment systems have subsequently been improved to limit potential effects by reducing the concentration of radiological and non-radiological contaminants in the effluent discharge and the total loadings to the environment. This paper examines current regulatory requirements and expectations and how these impact uranium mining/milling practices. It also reviews current water management and effluent treatment practices and performance. Finally, it examines the issues and challenges for existing effluent treatment systems and identifies factors to be considered in optimizing current facilities and future facility designs. (author)

  5. Estimated dose to man from uranium milling via the terrestrial food-chain pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rayno, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    One of the major pathways of radiological exposure to man from uranium milling operations is through the terrestrial food chain. Studies by various investigators have shown the extent of uptake and distribution of U-238, U-234, Th-230, Ra-226, Pb-210, and Po-210 in plants and animals. These long-lived natural radioisotopes, all nuclides of the uranium decay series, are found in concentrated amounts in uranium mill tailings. Data from these investigations are used to estimate the dose to man from consumption of beef and milk contaminated by the tailings. This dose estimate from this technologically enhanced source is compared with that from average normal dietary intake of these radionuclides from natural sources

  6. Estimated dose to man from uranium milling via the beef/milk food-chain pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rayno, D R

    1983-12-01

    One of the major pathways of radiological exposure to man from uranium milling operations is through the beef/milk food chain. Studies by various investigators have shown the extent of uptake and distribution of 238U, 234U, 230Th, 226Ra, 210Pb, and 210Po in plants and cattle. These long-lived natural radioisotopes, all nuclides of the uranium decay series, are found in concentrated amounts in uranium mill tailings. In this paper, data from these investigations are used to estimate the dose to man from consumption of beef and milk from cattle that have fed on forage contaminated with the tailings. The estimated doses from this technologically enhanced source are compared with those resulting from average dietary intake of these radionuclides from natural sources.

  7. Uranium mining and milling work force characteristics in the western US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapp, D.A.

    1980-12-01

    This report presents the results of a survey of the socioeconomic characteristics associated with 11 uranium mine and mill operations in 5 Western States. Comparisons are made with the socioeconomic characteristics of construction and operating crews for coal mines and utility plants in eight Western States. Worker productivity also is compared with that in similar types of coal and uranium mining operations. We found that there existed no significant differences between the socioeconomic characteristics of construction and operating crews and the secondary employment impacts associated with uranium mines and mills when compared with those associated with coal mines and utility plants requiring similar skills at comparable locations. In addition, our survey includes a comparison of several characteristics associated with the households of basic and nonbasic work forces and concludes that significant changes have occurred in the last 5 yr. Accordingly, we recommend additional monitoring and updating of data used in several economic forecasting models to avoid unwarranted delays in achieving national energy goals

  8. Geophysical surveys at the UMTRA project Shiprock, New Mexico site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wightman, E.; Smith, B.; Newlin, B.

    1996-03-01

    Geophysical surveys were performed at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Shiprock site in New Mexico during February 1996. The surveys were designed to locate areas of ground water contamination, consisting largely of sulfate and nitrate salts and uranium. Electrical geophysical methods were used to locate areas of sulfate and nitrate concentrations since these products, when present in ground water, increase its electrical conductivity. These contaminants also increase the density of water, making the water with the highest concentrations of these salts sink to the bottom of the water column. At the Shiprock site, where alluvium is underlain by the impervious Mancos Shale, the saline water will tend to rest in depressions on the shale surface. Seismic refraction surveys were conducted on the floodplain. The site comprises two areas, the terrace and the floodplain, separated by a steep scarp of some 70 feet (ft) (20 meters [m]). Measurements of electrical conductivity were taken over these two areas, searching for possible pockets of saline ground water resting on top of the bedrock. Conductivity surveys were also run to identify fractures within the bedrock that may act as conduits for ground water movement. Several areas of higher than normal conductivity were found on the terrace, including halos of higher conductivities on three sides of the tailings cell. The conductivity measurements searching for fractures found only a small number of minor fracture-like anomalies. These are not considered important. On the floodplain, both conductivity and seismic refraction measurements were taken. The conductivity measurements clearly show areas of high conductivity interpreted to result from ground water contamination. The seismic refraction measurements identified bedrock depressions that may contain denser, and more saline ground water lenses. Generally, the areas of high conductivity coincide with the bedrock depressions

  9. Romanian regulatory framework for uranium mining and milling (present and future)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodna, A.L.; Dumitrescu, N.

    2002-01-01

    In Romania, all operations in the nuclear field, including uranium mining and milling, are regulated by Law no. 111/1996 (republished in 1998), regarding the safe conduct of nuclear activities. These activities can be performed only on the basis of an authorization released by the national regulatory authority, i.e. the National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control. The specific requirements which must be carried out by the owner of an operating licence for a uranium mining and milling operation are stipulated by the Republican Nuclear Safety Norms for Geological Research, Mining and Milling of Nuclear Raw Materials. These regulatory requirements have been in force since 1975. The regulatory norms include provisions that the effective dose limit for workers should not exceed 50 mSv/year and also that liquid effluents released into surface waters must have a content of natural radioactive elements that meets the standards for drinking water. The norms do not contain provisions concerning the conditions under which the mining sites and the uranium processing facilities can be shut down and decommissioned. The norms also do not contain requirements regarding either the rehabilitation of environments affected by abandoned mining and milling activities, nor criteria for the release of the rehabilitated sites for alternative uses. To implement the provisions of Council Directive 96/29 EURATOM in Romania, new Fundamental Radiological Protection Norms have been approved and will soon be published in the 'Monitorul Official' (Official Gazette of Romania). One of the main provisions of these norms is the reduction of the effective dose limit for the workers to 20 mSv/year. Changes in the Republican Nuclear Safety Norms for Geological Research, Mining and Milling of Nuclear Raw Materials, are also planned; these changes will be consistent with the Fundamental Radiological Protection Norms. To cover existing gaps, the new norms for uranium mining and milling will include

  10. Converting the Caetité Mill Process to Enhance Uranium Recovery and Expand Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomiero, L. A.; Scassiotti Filho, W.; Veras, A., E-mail: gomiero@inb.gov.br [Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil S/A — INB, Caetité, BA (Brazil); Cunha, J. W. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear-IEN/CNEN, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Morais, C. A. [Centro do Desenvolvimento da Tec. Nuclear-CDTN/CNEN, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    The Caetité uranium mill was commissioned in 2000 to produce about 340 t U per year from an uranium ore averaging 0.29% U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. This production is sufficient to supply the two operating nuclear power plants in the country. As the Brazilian government has recently confirmed its plan to start building another ones from 2009, the uranium production will have to expand its capacity in the next two years. This paper describes the changes in the milling process that are being evaluated in order to not only increase the production but also the uranium recovery, to fulfil the increasing local demand. The heap leaching process will be changed to conventional tank agitated leaching of ground ore slurry in sulphuric acid medium. Batch and pilot plant essays have shown that the uranium recovery can increase from the 77% historical average to about 93%. As the use of sodium chloride as the stripping agent has presented detrimental effects in the extraction and stripping process, two alternatives are being evaluated for the uranium recovery from the PLS: (a) uranium peroxide precipitation at controlled pH from a PLS that was firstly neutralized and filtered. Batch essays have shown good results with a final calcined precipitate averaging 99% U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. Conversely the results obtained at the first pilot plant essay has shown that the precipitation conditions of the continuous process calls for further evaluation. The pilot plant is being improved and another essay will be carried out. (b) uranium extraction with a tertiary amine followed by stripping with concentrated sulphuric acid solution. Efforts are being made to recover the excess sulphuric acid from the pregnant stripping solution to enhance the economic viability of the process and to avoid the formation of a large quantity of gypsum in the pre-neutralization step before the uranium peroxide precipitation. (author)

  11. Proceedings of Workshop on Uranium Production Environmental Restoration: An exchange between the United States and Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    Scientists, engineers, elected officials, and industry regulators from the United, States and Germany met in Albuquerque, New Mexico, August 16--20, 1993, in the first joint international workshop to discuss uranium tailings remediation. Entitled ``Workshop on Uranium Production Environmental Restoration: An Exchange between the US and Germany,`` the meeting was hosted by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The goal of the workshop was to further understanding and communication on the uranium tailings cleanup projects in the US and Germany. Many communities around the world are faced with an environmental legacy -- enormous quantities of hazardous and low-level radioactive materials from the production of uranium used for energy and nuclear weapons. In 1978, the US Congress passed the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act. Title I of the law established a program to assess the tailings at inactive uranium processing sites and provide a means for joint federal and state funding of the cleanup efforts at sites where all or substantially all of the uranium was produced for sale to a federal agency. The UMTRA Project is responsible for the cleanup of 24 sites in 10 states. Germany is facing nearly identical uranium cleanup problems and has established a cleanup project. At the workshop, participants had an opportunity to interact with a broad cross section of the environmental restoration and waste disposal community, discuss common concerns and problems, and develop a broader understanding of the issues. Abstracts are catalogued individually for the data base.

  12. Proceedings of Workshop on Uranium Production Environmental Restoration: An exchange between the United States and Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Scientists, engineers, elected officials, and industry regulators from the United, States and Germany met in Albuquerque, New Mexico, August 16--20, 1993, in the first joint international workshop to discuss uranium tailings remediation. Entitled ''Workshop on Uranium Production Environmental Restoration: An Exchange between the US and Germany,'' the meeting was hosted by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The goal of the workshop was to further understanding and communication on the uranium tailings cleanup projects in the US and Germany. Many communities around the world are faced with an environmental legacy -- enormous quantities of hazardous and low-level radioactive materials from the production of uranium used for energy and nuclear weapons. In 1978, the US Congress passed the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act. Title I of the law established a program to assess the tailings at inactive uranium processing sites and provide a means for joint federal and state funding of the cleanup efforts at sites where all or substantially all of the uranium was produced for sale to a federal agency. The UMTRA Project is responsible for the cleanup of 24 sites in 10 states. Germany is facing nearly identical uranium cleanup problems and has established a cleanup project. At the workshop, participants had an opportunity to interact with a broad cross section of the environmental restoration and waste disposal community, discuss common concerns and problems, and develop a broader understanding of the issues. Abstracts are catalogued individually for the data base

  13. In-situ grouting of uranium-mill-tailings piles: an assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, T.; Boegly, W.J. Jr.

    1983-05-01

    Passage in 1978 of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) initiated a program of remedial action for 22 existing mill tailings piles generated in the period 1940 to 1970 as part of the nation's defense and nuclear power programs. The presence of these piles poses potential health and environmental contamination concerns. Possible remedial actions proposed include multilayer covers over the piles to reduce water infiltration, reduce radon gas releases, and reduce airborne transport of tailings fines. In addition, suggested remedial actions include (1) the use of liners to prevent groundwater contamination by leachates from the piles and (2) chemical stabilization of the tailings to retain the radioactive and nonradioactive sources of contamination. Lining of the piles would normally be applicable only to piles that are to be moved from their present location such that the liner could be placed between the tailings and the groundwater. However, by using civil engineering techniques developed for grouting rocks and soils for strength and water control, it may be possible to produce an in situ liner for piles that are not to be relocated. The Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office requested that ORNL assess the potential application of grouting as a remedial action. This report examines the types of grouts, the equipment available, and the costs, and assesses the possibility of applying grouting technology as a remedial action alternative for uranium mill tailings piles

  14. In-situ grouting of uranium-mill-tailings piles: an assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, T.; Boegly, W.J. Jr.

    1983-05-01

    Passage in 1978 of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) initiated a program of remedial action for 22 existing mill tailings piles generated in the period 1940 to 1970 as part of the nation's defense and nuclear power programs. The presence of these piles poses potential health and environmental contamination concerns. Possible remedial actions proposed include multilayer covers over the piles to reduce water infiltration, reduce radon gas releases, and reduce airborne transport of tailings fines. In addition, suggested remedial actions include (1) the use of liners to prevent groundwater contamination by leachates from the piles and (2) chemical stabilization of the tailings to retain the radioactive and nonradioactive sources of contamination. Lining of the piles would normally be applicable only to piles that are to be moved from their present location such that the liner could be placed between the tailings and the groundwater. However, by using civil engineering techniques developed for grouting rocks and soils for strength and water control, it may be possible to produce an in situ liner for piles that are not to be relocated. The Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office requested that ORNL assess the potential application of grouting as a remedial action. This report examines the types of grouts, the equipment available, and the costs, and assesses the possibility of applying grouting technology as a remedial action alternative for uranium mill tailings piles.

  15. Management and control of radioactive wastes from uranium-milling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, R.H.; Deal, L.J.; Haywood, F.F.; Goldsmith, W.A.

    1977-01-01

    Of the 39 privately owned mills that produced and sold uranium to the U.S. Government during 1948 to 1971, 22 have closed down either due to exhaustion of reserves or lack of market. On the inactive mill sites there remains 24 million metric tons of tailings containing 14,000 curies of radium. Success in stabilization has been variable. In the past, theoretical models have had to be used in estimation of the environmental effects of uranium milling for lack of a sufficient factual base. ERDA in cooperation with the Environmental Protection Agency and the states involved is undertaking a comprehensive radiological assessment at each site. The results of this assessment should provide valuable basic information on the environmental impact of uranium ore processing. The current studies reveal that the inactive sites are a cause of small public exposure to radiation, primarily from radon-222 from the tailings piles. This paper reviews radioactivity management in uranium ore processing to control spread of radioactive materials, including methods used for stabilization to prevent wind and water erosion. Recent measurements of radioactivity levels in soils, ground and surface waters, and in air near tailings piles are summarized, and public health implications are evaluated. Guidelines have been developed for land decontamination, and procedures evaluated for long-term management of contaminated material to minimize future human exposure. Alternative methods for long-term tailings stabilization, their costs and benefits in terms of serious health effects avoided are presented

  16. Studies of red soils as capping the uranium mill tailing impoundments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Zhijian; Chen Zhangru; Liu Zhengyi; Chen Guoliang

    2001-01-01

    Capping is one of the important technical engineering measures to assure the long term stabilization and isolation of uranium mill tailings. This paper reports in situ surveys of radon emanations before and after tailings slurries were capped with local red soils at the uranium mill tailings. The data obtained by soil-gas surveys reveal that radon emanation decreased with an increase in capping thickness. The dry density of the capping materials also plays an important role in preventing radon emanation. The measurement results show that utilizing high densities of red soils as capping materials can significantly decrease the required thickness of the capping. The analytical results from borehole red soil samples show that uranium, thorium, and radium contents are consistent with the regional environmental radioactivity level. The studies of the mineralogical composition indicate that the local red soils are rich in clay minerals, e.g. kaolinite, illite and mica vermiculite mixed-layer minerals, which would play an active role in preventing radionuclide release to the surrounding environment. A conceptual model for remediation of south China's uranium mill tailing has been developed

  17. Remedial action and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established health and environmental protection regulations to correct and prevent groundwater contamination resulting from processing activities at inactive uranium milling sites (EPA, 1987). According to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 Public Law (PL) 95-604 (PL 95-604), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for assessing the inactive uranium processing sites. The DOE has determined that for Slick Rock, this assessment shall include hydrogeologic site characterization for two separate uranium processing sites, the Union Carbide (UC) site and the North Continent (NC) site, and for the proposed Burro Canyon disposal site

  18. Summary of the engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings. Vitro site, Salt Lake City, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    This report is a summary of a parent report (issued under separate cover) entitled Engineering Assessment of Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings for Vitro Site, Salt Lake City, Utah. Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Vitro site in order to revise the April 1976 assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Salt Lake City, Utah. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.9 million tons of tailings at the Vitro site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite and off-site decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option 1), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites, and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through IV). Cost estimates for the four options range from about $36,400,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $91,000,000 for disposal at a distance of about 85 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Vitro tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $200/lb by heap leach and $130/lb by conventional plant processes. Spot market price for uranium was $28.00 in November 1980. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery appears to be economically unattractive at present

  19. Radioactive wastes of uranium mining and milling: Radiological consequences for human population and natural environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazykina, T.G.; Kryshev, I.I.

    2002-01-01

    The sources of wastes and levels of radioactive contamination are considered in the areas of uranium ore mining and milling. Assessments of doses to the population are made using the methodology of multiple sources and pathways of exposure, including calculations of inhalation dose and doses from consumption of contaminated agricultural and natural products, as well as external exposure from the radioactive cloud and soil. On the local (0-100 km) spatial scale, the dose from uranium mining and processing is, on average, about 0.7 man Sv (GWa) -1 . The most significant pathway of the population exposure is inhalation of radon. The impact of uranium ore mining and processing on natural flora and fauna is determined by specific characteristics of the production at uranium mining enterprises and has both radiation and non-radiation components. The estimates of external and internal exposures to the natural biota in the vicinity of hydro-metallurgical works and tailing dumps are presented. (author)

  20. Physico chemical characterization of mill tailings and speciation studies of uranium a Jaduguda, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarjan Singh; Jha, V.N.; Sethy, N.K.; Rout, S.; Ravi, P.M.; Jha, S.K.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2018-01-01

    After recovery of economically viable portion of the ore remaining solid slurry or tailings from uranium ore processing industry is discharged into an engineered system called tailings pond. Among the radio-nuclides quantitative content of residual uranium is highest in the tailings pond and various environmental interactions such as precipitation, change in pH, redox potential, microbial activities, organic associations has a potential to fix (precipitate) or solubilise it. The chemical fractionation of 'U' in mill tailings of both operational and non operational tailing ponds of Jaduguda uranium mining and ore processing site has been part of present study. Also, the role of various physicochemical parameters (pH, Eh, TC etc) on the mobility of uranium has been investigated

  1. Treatment of uranium mining and milling wastewater using biological adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsezos, M.

    1983-01-01

    Selected samples of waste microbial biomass originating from various industrial fermentation processes and biological treatment plants have been screened for biosorbent properties in conjunction with uranium, thorium and radium in aqueous solutions. Biosorption isotherms were used for the evaluation of biosorptive uptake capacity of the biomass. The biomass was also compared to synthetic adsorbents such as activated carbon. Determined uranium, thorium and radium biosorption isotherms were independent of the initial solution concentrations. Solution pH affected uptake. Rhizopus arrhizus at pH 4 exhibited the highest uranium and thorium biosorptive uptake capacity in excess of 180 Mg/g. It removed about 2.5 and 3.3 times more uranium than the ion exchange resin and activated carbon tested. Penicillium chrysogenum adsorbed 50000 pCi/g radium at pH 7 and at an equilibrium radium concentration of 1000 pCi/L. The most effective biomass types studied exhibited removals in excess of 99% of the radium in solution

  2. UMTRA water sampling technical (peer) review. Responses to observations, comments, and recommendations submitted by C. Warren Ankerberg (Geraghty ampersand Miller, Inc.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    At the request of the Office of Independent Technical Review for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, an independent technical review (peer review) was conducted during the period of September 15-17, 1992. The review was conducted by C. Warren Ankerberg (Geraghty ampersand Miller, Inc., Tampa, Florida) and Don Messinger (Roy F. Weston, Inc., West Chester, Pennsylvania). The peer review included a review of written documentation [water sampling standard operating procedures (SOP)], an inspection of technical reports and other deliverables, a review of staff qualifications and training, and a field visit to evaluate the compliance of field procedures with SOPs. The approach of the peer reviewers was to verify that the program meets the following criteria: Reported results are traceable to and consistent with recorded data. The basic assumptions and acceptance criteria are valid. Data are traceable to their origin and to reported analytical results. The procedures employed are consistent both internally and externally with written SOPs and regulatory guidelines. Inferences and conclusions are soundly based. The procedures and/or reports generated present work that satisfies the local, state and/or Federal regulatory requirements as applicable. The approach is consistent with industry standards and/or state-of-the-art technology, as practical. The data generated by activities are legally defensible and technically sound. UMTRA staff are adequately trained and qualified for the work. This document is a response to the observations, comments, and recommendations submitted by C. Warren Ankerberg following his review. The format of this document is to present the findings and recommendations verbatim from Mr. Ankerberg's report, followed by responses from the UMTRA Project staff. Included in the responses from the UMTRA Project staff are recommended changes in SOPs and strategies for implementing the changes

  3. Uranium milling, project M-25. Volume I. summary and text. Final generic environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    The Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement (GEIS) on Uranium Milling focuses primarily upon the matter of mill tailings disposal. It evaluates both the costs and benefits of alternative tailings disposal modes and draws conclusions about criteria which should be incorporated into regulations. Both institutional and technical controls are evaluated. Health impacts considered were both short and long term. Restatement and resolution of all public comments received on the draft (GEIS) are presented. There are three volumes: Volume I is the main text and Volumes II and III are supporting appendices

  4. Study on environmental impact assessment of uranium mining and milling base planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaochao; Song Liquan

    2008-01-01

    Environmental impact assessment (EIA) of project planning is part of strategic EIA, which provides full consideration and evaluation of the potential environmental impact on tiered basis in the process of plan implementation. With account being taken of EIA of uranium mining/milling base and the current situation of mining/milling industry, this paper determined environmental protection objectives of EIA, screened assessment indexes and identified weighting factors. Based on the characteristics of mines planned, restrictive score values are estimated each for EIA weighting factor. Finally some suggestions were made for adjusting the plan. (authors)

  5. Assessment of the radiological impact of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Grand Junction, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haywood, F.F.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Jacobs, D.G.; Perdue, P.T.; Ellis, B.S.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1980-04-01

    Results of a radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill site at Grand Junction, Colorado, made in May and June 1976, are presented along with descriptions of techniques and equipment used to obtain the data and an assessment of increased risk of health effects attributable to radiation and radionuclides from the tailings. An estimate of potential health effects of exposure to gamma rays around a former mill building and to radon daughters produced by radon dispersed from the tailings has been made for occupants of the site

  6. Testing and evaluation of existing techniques for identifying uptakes and measuring retention of uranium in mill workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    Preliminary tests and evaluations of existing bio-analytical techniques for identifying uptakes and measuring retention of uranium in mill workers were made at two uranium mills. Urinalysis tests were found to be more reliable indicators of uranium uptakes than personal air sampling. Static air samples were not found to be good indicators of personal uptakes. In vivo measurements of uranium in lung were successfully carried out in the presence of high and fluctuating background radiation. Interference from external contamination was common during end of shift measurements. A full scale study to evaluate model parameters for the uptake, retention and elimination of uranium should include, in addition to the above techniques, particle size determination of airborne uranium, solubility in simulated lung fluid, uranium analysis in faeces and bone and minute volume measurements for each subject

  7. Radionuclides in the terrestrial ecosystem near a Canadian uranium mill -- Part 2: Small mammal food chains and bioavailability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, P.A.

    2000-06-01

    Food chain transfer through the soil-vegetation-small mammal food chain was measured by concentration ratios (CRs) for uranium, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Pb, and {sup 210}Po at three sites near the Key Lake uranium mill in northern Saskatchewan. Plant/soil CRs, animal carcass/GI tract CRs, and animal/soil CRs were depressed at sites impacted by mill and tailings dusts relative to a nearby control site. Thus, radionuclides associated with large particulates in tailings and/or ore dusts may be less bioavailable to terrestrial plants and animals than natural sources of radioactive dust. These results show that reliance on default food chain transfer parameters, obtained from uncontaminated terrestrial ecosystems, may overpredict impacts at uranium mine and mill sites. Given the omnivorous diet of small mammals and birds, animal/soil CRs are recommended as the most cost-effective and robust means of predicting animal concentrations from environmental monitoring data at uranium mill facilities.

  8. Radionuclides in the terrestrial ecosystem near a Canadian uranium mill -- Part 2: Small mammal food chains and bioavailability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, P.A.

    2000-01-01

    Food chain transfer through the soil-vegetation-small mammal food chain was measured by concentration ratios (CRs) for uranium, 226 Ra, 210 Pb, and 210 Po at three sites near the Key Lake uranium mill in northern Saskatchewan. Plant/soil CRs, animal carcass/GI tract CRs, and animal/soil CRs were depressed at sites impacted by mill and tailings dusts relative to a nearby control site. Thus, radionuclides associated with large particulates in tailings and/or ore dusts may be less bioavailable to terrestrial plants and animals than natural sources of radioactive dust. These results show that reliance on default food chain transfer parameters, obtained from uncontaminated terrestrial ecosystems, may overpredict impacts at uranium mine and mill sites. Given the omnivorous diet of small mammals and birds, animal/soil CRs are recommended as the most cost-effective and robust means of predicting animal concentrations from environmental monitoring data at uranium mill facilities

  9. Environmental restoration in regions of uranium mining and milling in Ukraine: Progress, problems and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudy, C.

    1997-01-01

    Uranium exploration activities in Ukraine were initiated in 1946. So far 21 uranium reserves have been identified in the Southern regions of Ukraine. Industrial scale mining has been undertaken in two main areas -ZhovtiVody (Dnipropetrovsk region) and more recently - near the city of Kirovograd. Uranium milling capabilities were created in ZhovtiVody and Dniprodzerzhinsk. At Dniprodzerzhinsk Prydniprovsky Chemical Plant uranium milling started in the late 40's, initially using ores from the countries of Central Europe. Lack of relevant environmental standards and appropriate technologies for uranium extraction contributed to contamination of both industrial and residential areas. As a result, about 1340 ha of industrial areas were contaminated and ecologically affected. Extensive utilization of waste rock pile for road and building construction in the 50's and 60's resulted in contamination of residential areas in the region. To provide a comprehensive solution to the radioecological problems of the ZhovtiVody area a State Programme of Actions up to the year 2005 was adopted by the Ukrainian government in 1995. A timely methodological and information support for national activities on environmental restoration in Ukraine was provided by IAEA regional project RER/9/022. In April 1996 under the framework of the RER/9/022 project, seminar on environmental restoration in regions of uranium mining and milling took place in the town of Zhovti Vody, that allowed involvement of local experts and organizations into the project activities directly. The proposed paper is based on the vast amount of data accumulated in Ukraine during RER/9/022 covering the period 1993-1996. Severe lack of finance adversely affected all activities within the nuclear sector, environmental restoration implementation being the most affected. In such circumstances RER/9/022 remained as one of the most valuable contributing factors in the development of regulations, guidance and practices in the

  10. Handbook for the design, selection, and construction of a rock cover for retired uranium-mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, G.B.

    1982-09-01

    As part of a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) study to assess the long-term protection of retired uranium mill tailings, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing a Handbook to guide the design, selection, and construction of a rock cover (riprap) for decommissioned and reclaimed uranium-mill tailings. The rock cover is designed for long-term protection of mill tailings from wind and water erosion. The purpose of the Handbook is twofold. First, it can be used as a manual by the uranium mill operators for designing, selecting, and constructing a rock cover. Second, the Handbook can be used as a guide to help the NRC evaluate the decommissioning and reclamation plans submitted to them by mill operators. Although the Handbook is not site-specific, it is structured to allow the design of a rock cover for any NRC-licensed tailings impoundment

  11. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whillans, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    Events in the Canadian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine and mill expansions and exploration activity are described, as well as changes in governmental policy. Although demand for uranium is weak at the moment, the industry feels optimistic about the future. (LL)

  12. The determination of radium-226 in uranium ores and mill products by alpha energy spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, J.B.; Armstrong, V.C.

    1975-12-01

    A reliable routine procedure for determining 226 Ra by alpha energy spectrometry is described. Radium is isolated as sulphate from the sample matrix by co-precipitation with a small mass of barium and analysed using a ruggedized silicon surface barrier detector. The method is capable of providing high accuracy over a large 226 Ra concentration range and is applicable to materials such as uranium ores, uranium mill products and effluent streams. Samples resulting from nitric acid leach experiments with Elliot Lake ores were examined using the procedure. The distribution of 223 Ra, 224 Ra and 226 Ra between the leach products, (residue and leach liquor), is discussed. (author)

  13. Ground and surface water in New Mexico: are they protected against uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, K.K.

    1978-01-01

    Inadequate funds to allow New Mexico to collect data on the effects of uranium mining and milling on ground and surface water resources and vigorous opposition by the uranium companies have made the Environmental Protection Agency reluctant to adopt the state's request for control of discharges. The state is unable to monitor for the presence of toxic materials and questions have been raised over EPA's jurisdiction over groundwater. Federal and state water pollution regulations are reviewed and weaknesses noted, particularly the effect of terrain and the limitations on regulation of navigable waters

  14. From Rum Jungle to Wismut - Reducing the environmental impact of uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuk, W.M.; Jeffree, R.A.; Levins, D.M.; Lowson, R.T.; Ritchie, A.I.M.

    1994-01-01

    Australia has a long history of uranium mining. In the early days, little attention was given to environmental matters and considerable pollution occurred. ANSTO has been involved in rehabilitation of a number of the early uranium mining sites, from Rum Jungle in Australia's Northern Territory to Wismut in Germany, and is working with current producers to minimise the environmental impact of their operations. ANSTO's expertise in amelioration of acid mine drainage, radon measurements and control, treatment of mill wastes, management of tailings, monitoring of seepage plumes, mathematical modelling of pollutant transport and biological impacts in a tropical environment are summarized. 17 refs., 3 figs

  15. Draft environment statement related to operation of Moab uranium mill (Grand County, Utah)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    This draft environmental impact statement was prepared by the staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and issued by the Commission's Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards. The proposed action is the continuation of Source Material License SUA-917 issued to Atlas Corporation for the operation of the Atlas Uranium Mill in Grand County, Utah, near Moab (Docket No. 40-3453). This authorizes a 600-ton (450-MT) per day acid leach circuit (for recovery of vanadium as well as uranium) and a 600-ton (450-MT) per day alkaline leach circuit

  16. Radioecological investigations of uranium mill tailings systems: Final report for the period September 1, 1979 through April 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whicker, F.W.; Ibrahim, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    This document is the final report on studies of the integrity and transport of uranium and radioactive progeny in active and reclaimed uranium mill tailings. The overall program was designed to provide basic information on the radioecology of 238 U, 230 Th, 226 Ra, 210 Pb and 210 Po, responses of plants and animals to the landscape disruptions associated with uranium production, and guidance for impact analysis, mitigation and regulation of the uranium industry. The studies reported were conducted at the Shirley Basin Uranium Mine, which is operated by the Pathfinder Mines Corporation. The mine/mill operation, located in southeastern Wyoming, is typical in terms of the ore body, mill process, and ecological setting of many uranium production centers in the western United States. The research was motivated originally by the general lack of knowledge on the transport of uranium and its radioactive daughter products through the environment, particularly through food chains in the immediate environs of uranium production operations. The work was also motivated by the relatively high contribution of uranium mining and milling to the radiation exposure of the general population from the nuclear fuel cycle

  17. Asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium mill tailings. 1980 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, J.N.; Koehmstedt, P.L; Esterl, D.J.; Freeman, H.D.; Buelt, J.L.; Nelson, D.A.; Elmore, M.R.

    1981-05-01

    Studies of asphalt emulsion sealants conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory have demonstrated that the sealants are effective in containing radon and other potentially hazardous material within uranium tailings. The laboratory and field studies have further demonstrated that radon exhalation from uranium tailings piles can be reduced by greater than 99% to near background levels. Field tests at the tailings pile in Grand Junction, Colorado, confirmed that an 8-cm admix seal containing 22 wt% asphalt could be effectively applied with a cold-mix paver. Other techniques were successfully tested, including a soil stabilizer and a hot, rubberized asphalt seal that was applied with a distributor truck. After the seals were applied and compacted, overburden was applied over the seal to protect the seal from ultraviolet degradation

  18. Po-210 distribution in uranium-mill circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKlveen, J.W.; Hubele, N.D.; McDowell, W.J.; Case, G.N.

    1983-01-01

    Greater than 99% of all incoming Po-210 reports to the tailing piles for both the acid and the alkaline leach uranium circuits. Leached Po-210 may be carried along on small particles rather than dissolved in solution. There does not appear to be any radiologically significant buildup or accumulation in the acid leach circuit, but there are noteworthy amounts in the molybdenum recovery solution

  19. Mitigation and Monitoring Plan for impacted wetlands at the Gunnison UMTRA Project site, Gunnison, Colorado. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-01

    The Gunnison, Colorado, abandoned uranium mill site is one site being cleaned up by the DOE under UMTRCA authority. This site`s contaminated material is being transported to a disposal site on US Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land east of Gunnison. Remedial action activities have temporarily disturbed 0.8 acre (ac) (0.3 hectares [ha]) of wetlands and permanently eliminated 4.3 ac (1.7 ha). As required by the Clean Water Act, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) prepared a Section 404 Permit that addresses the loss of wetlands as a result of remedial action at the Gunnison UMTRA Project site. The 404 permit includes this report as an attachment and it describes the wetland mitigation and monitoring plan. The DOE formulated this plan in consultation with the BLM and the USACE. This report represents a revised version of the mitigation and monitoring plan (DOE, 1992b).

  20. Mitigation and Monitoring Plan for impacted wetlands at the Gunnison UMTRA Project site, Gunnison, Colorado. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    The Gunnison, Colorado, abandoned uranium mill site is one site being cleaned up by the DOE under UMTRCA authority. This site's contaminated material is being transported to a disposal site on US Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land east of Gunnison. Remedial action activities have temporarily disturbed 0.8 acre (ac) (0.3 hectares [ha]) of wetlands and permanently eliminated 4.3 ac (1.7 ha). As required by the Clean Water Act, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) prepared a Section 404 Permit that addresses the loss of wetlands as a result of remedial action at the Gunnison UMTRA Project site. The 404 permit includes this report as an attachment and it describes the wetland mitigation and monitoring plan. The DOE formulated this plan in consultation with the BLM and the USACE. This report represents a revised version of the mitigation and monitoring plan (DOE, 1992b)