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Sample records for ultrasound velocity uv

  1. Vector blood velocity estimation in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gran, Fredrik; Udesen, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    Two methods for making vector velocity estimation in medical ultrasound are presented. All of the techniques can find both the axial and transverse velocity in the image and can be used for displaying both the correct velocity magnitude and direction. The first method uses a transverse oscillation...... in the ultrasound field to find the transverse velocity. In-vivo examples from the carotid artery are shown, where complex turbulent flow is found in certain parts of the cardiac cycle. The second approach uses directional beam forming along the flow direction to estimate the velocity magnitude. Using a correlation...... search can also yield the direction, and the full velocity vector is thereby found. An examples from a flow rig is shown....

  2. Algorithms for estimating blood velocities using ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2000-01-01

    Ultrasound has been used intensively for the last 15 years for studying the hemodynamics of the human body. Systems for determining both the velocity distribution at one point of interest (spectral systems) and for displaying a map of velocity in real time have been constructed. A number of schemes...... have been developed for performing the estimation, and the various approaches are described. The current systems only display the velocity along the ultrasound beam direction and a velocity transverse to the beam is not detected. This is a major problem in these systems, since most blood vessels...... are parallel to the skin surface. Angling the transducer will often disturb the flow, and new techniques for finding transverse velocities are needed. The various approaches for determining transverse velocities will be explained. This includes techniques using two-dimensional correlation (speckle tracking...

  3. Ultrasound systems for blood velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1998-01-01

    Medical ultrasound scanners can be used both for displayinggray-scale images of the anatomy and for visualizing theblood flow dynamically in the body.The systems can interrogate the flow at a single position in the bodyand there find the velocity distribution over time. They can also show adynamic...

  4. Velocity Estimation in Medical Ultrasound [Life Sciences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Holbek, Simon

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the application of signal processing in medical ultrasound velocity estimation. Special emphasis is on the relation among acquisition methods, signal processing, and estimators employed. The description spans from current clinical systems for one-and two-dimensional (1-D an...

  5. Estimation of blood velocities using ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    imaging, and, finally, some of the more recent experimental techniques. The authors shows that the Doppler shift, usually considered the way velocity is detected, actually, plays a minor role in pulsed systems. Rather, it is the shift of position of signals between pulses that is used in velocity...

  6. Spectral velocity estimation in ultrasound using sparse data sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2006-01-01

    Velocity distributions in blood vessels can be displayed using ultrasound scanners by making a Fourier transform of the received signal and then showing spectra in an M-mode display. It is desired to show a B-mode image for orientation, and data for this have to be acquired interleaved with the f......Velocity distributions in blood vessels can be displayed using ultrasound scanners by making a Fourier transform of the received signal and then showing spectra in an M-mode display. It is desired to show a B-mode image for orientation, and data for this have to be acquired interleaved...... with the flow data. This either halves the effective pulse repetition frequency fprf or gaps appear in the spectrum from B-mode emissions. This paper presents a techniques for maintaining the highest possible fprf and at the same time show a B-mode image. The power spectrum can be calculated from the Fourier...

  7. Blood velocity estimation using ultrasound and spectral iterative adaptive approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundson, Erik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-01-01

    -mode images are interleaved with the Doppler emissions. Furthermore, the techniques are shown, using both simplified and more realistic Field II simulations as well as in vivo data, to outperform current state-of-the-art techniques, allowing for accurate estimation of the blood velocity spectrum using only 30......This paper proposes two novel iterative data-adaptive spectral estimation techniques for blood velocity estimation using medical ultrasound scanners. The techniques make no assumption on the sampling pattern of the emissions or the depth samples, allowing for duplex mode transmissions where B...

  8. An Iterative Adaptive Approach for Blood Velocity Estimation Using Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundson, Erik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel iterative data-adaptive spectral estimation technique for blood velocity estimation using medical ultrasound scanners. The technique makes no assumption on the sampling pattern of the slow-time or the fast-time samples, allowing for duplex mode transmissions where B......-mode images are interleaved with the Doppler emissions. Furthermore, the technique is shown, using both simplified and more realistic Field II simulations, to outperform current state-of-the-art techniques, allowing for accurate estimation of the blood velocity spectrum using only 30% of the transmissions......, thereby allowing for the examination of two separate vessel regions while retaining an adequate updating rate of the B-mode images. In addition, the proposed method also allows for more flexible transmission patterns, as well as exhibits fewer spectral artifacts as compared to earlier techniques....

  9. In-vivo studies of new vector velocity and adaptive spectral estimators in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    2010-01-01

    New ultrasound techniques for blood flow estimation have been investigated in-vivo. These are vector velocity estimators (Transverse Oscillation, Synthetic Transmit Aperture, Directional Beamforming and Plane Wave Excitation) and adaptive spectral estimators (Blood spectral Power Capon and Blood...

  10. Principle and performance of the transverse oscillation vector velocity technique in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Udesen, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    Medical ultrasound systems measure the blood velocity by tracking the blood cells motion along the ultrasound field. The is done by pulsing in the same direction a number of times and then find e.q. the shift in phase between consecutive pulses. Properly normalized this is directly proportional...... a double oscillating field. A special estimator is then used for finding both the axial and lateral velocity component, so that both magnitude and phase can be calculated. The method for generating double oscillating ultrasound fields and the special estimator are described and its performance revealed...

  11. Three dimensional (3d) transverse oscillation vector velocity ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    as to traverse a field of view, and receive circuitry (306) configured to receive a two dimensional set of echoes produced in response to the ultrasound signal traversing structure in the field of view, wherein the structure includes flowing structures such as flowing blood cells, organ cells etc. A beamformer...

  12. Carotid near-occlusion frequently has high peak systolic velocity on Doppler ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khangure, Simon R.; Machnowska, Matylda; Fox, Allan J.; Hojjat, Seyed-Parsa; Aviv, Richard I. [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Department of Medical Imaging, Neuroradiology Division, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Neuroimaging, Toronto (Canada); Benhabib, Hadas [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Department of Medical Imaging, Neuroradiology Division, Toronto, ON (Canada); Groenlund, Christer [Umeaa University, Department of Radiation Sciences, Biomedical Engineering, Umeaa (Sweden); Herod, Wendy [Department of Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada); Maggisano, Robert [Department of Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Division of Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Toronto (Canada); Sjoeberg, Anders [Umeaa University, Department of Radiation Sciences, Biomedical Engineering, Umeaa (Sweden); Umeaa University, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Umeaa (Sweden); Wester, Per [Umeaa University, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeaa (Sweden); Karolinska Institutet Danderyds Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences, Stockholm (Sweden); Hopyan, Julia [University of Toronto, Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, Toronto (Canada); Johansson, Elias [Umeaa University, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Umeaa (Sweden); Umeaa University, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeaa (Sweden)

    2018-01-15

    Carotid near-occlusion is a tight atherosclerotic stenosis of the internal carotid artery (ICA) resulting in decrease in diameter of the vessel lumen distal to the stenosis. Near-occlusions can be classified as with or without full collapse, and may have high peak systolic velocity (PSV) across the stenosis, mimicking conventional > 50% carotid artery stenosis. We aimed to determine how frequently near-occlusions have high PSV in the stenosis and determine how accurately carotid Doppler ultrasound can distinguish high-velocity near-occlusion from conventional stenosis. Included patients had near-occlusion or conventional stenosis with carotid ultrasound and CT angiogram (CTA) performed within 30 days of each other. CTA examinations were analyzed by two blinded expert readers. Velocities in the internal and common carotid arteries were recorded. Mean velocity, pulsatility index, and ratios were calculated, giving 12 Doppler parameters for analysis. Of 136 patients, 82 had conventional stenosis and 54 had near-occlusion on CTA. Of near-occlusions, 40 (74%) had high PSV (≥ 125 cm/s) across the stenosis. Ten Doppler parameters significantly differed between conventional stenosis and high-velocity near-occlusion groups. However, no parameter was highly sensitive and specific to separate the groups. Near-occlusions frequently have high PSV across the stenosis, particularly those without full collapse. Carotid Doppler ultrasound does not seem able to distinguish conventional stenosis from high-velocity near-occlusion. These findings question the use of ultrasound alone for preoperative imaging evaluation. (orig.)

  13. Magnetic field dependence of ultrasound velocity in high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, M.J.; Goshorn, D.P.; Bhattacharya, S.; Johnston, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    The magnetic field dependence of ultrasound velocity in the superconductor La 1.8 Sr 0.2 CuO 4-y is studied. The sound velocity anomaly near T c is shown to be unambiguously related to superconductivity. Below T c , the sound velocity is found to be sensitive to the dynamics of a pinned flux lattice. A combination of sound velocity and magnetization measurements suggests three regimes of pinning behavior. A generic pinning ''phase diagram'' is obtained in the superconducting state. An anomalous peak effect in the magnetization is also observed at intermediate field strengths

  14. A new approach for estimation of the axial velocity using ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2000-01-01

    for the data segment. The benefit of this method is an estimate of the mean axial velocity which is independent of the center frequency of the propagating ultrasound pulse. The estimate will only depend on fs and fprf. Results of the estimation method is presented based on both simple generated RF harmonic...

  15. In-vivo evaluation of three ultrasound vector velocity techniques with MR angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Udesen, Jesper; Oddershede, Niels

    2008-01-01

    In conventional Doppler ultrasound (US) the blood velocity is only estimated along the US beam direction. The estimate is angle corrected assuming laminar flow parallel to the vessel boundaries. As the now in the vascular system never is purely laminar, the velocities estimated with conventional...... additionally constructed and mean differences for the three comparisons were: DB/MRA = 0.17 ml; STA/MRA = 0.07 ml; TO/MRA = 0.24 ml. The three US vector velocity techniques yield quantitative insight in to flow dynamics and can potentially give the clinician a powerful tool in cardiovascular disease assessment....

  16. In-vivo studies of new vector velocity and adaptive spectral estimators in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    In this PhD project new ultrasound techniques for blood flow measurements have been investigated in-vivo. The focus has mainly been on vector velocity techniques and four different approaches have been examined: Transverse Oscillation, Synthetic Transmit Aperture, Directional Beamforming and Plane...... in conventional Doppler ultrasound. That is angle dependency, reduced temporal resolution and low frame rate. Transverse Oscillation, Synthetic Transmit Aperture and Directional Beamforming can estimate the blood velocity angle independently. The three methods were validated in-vivo against magnetic resonance...... phase contrast angiography when measuring stroke volumes in simple vessel geometry on 11 volunteers. Using linear regression and Bland-Altman analyses good agreements were found, indicating that vector velocity methods can be used for quantitative blood flow measurements. Plane Wave Excitation can...

  17. Coded excitation and sub-band processing for blood velocity estmation in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Udesen, Jesper; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of broadband coded excitation and subband processing for blood velocity estimation in medical ultrasound. In conventional blood velocity estimation a long (narrow-band) pulse is emitted and the blood velocity is estimated using an auto-correlation based approach....... However, the axial resolution of the narrow-band pulse is too poor for brightness-mode (B-mode) imaging. Therefore, a separate transmission sequence is used for updating the B-mode image, which lowers the overall frame-rate of the system. By using broad-band excitation signals, the backscattered received...... signal can be divided into a number of narrow frequency bands. The blood velocity can be estimated in each of the bands and the velocity estimates can be averaged to form an improved estimate. Furthermore, since the excitation signal is broadband, no secondary B-mode sequence is required, and the frame...

  18. Development of a Duplex Ultrasound Simulator and Preliminary Validation of Velocity Measurements in Carotid Artery Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierler, R Eugene; Leotta, Daniel F; Sansom, Kurt; Aliseda, Alberto; Anderson, Mark D; Sheehan, Florence H

    2016-07-01

    Duplex ultrasound scanning with B-mode imaging and both color Doppler and Doppler spectral waveforms is relied upon for diagnosis of vascular pathology and selection of patients for further evaluation and treatment. In most duplex ultrasound applications, classification of disease severity is based primarily on alterations in blood flow velocities, particularly the peak systolic velocity (PSV) obtained from Doppler spectral waveforms. We developed a duplex ultrasound simulator for training and assessment of scanning skills. Duplex ultrasound cases were prepared from 2-dimensional (2D) images of normal and stenotic carotid arteries by reconstructing the common carotid, internal carotid, and external carotid arteries in 3 dimensions and computationally simulating blood flow velocity fields within the lumen. The simulator displays a 2D B-mode image corresponding to transducer position on a mannequin, overlaid by color coding of velocity data. A spectral waveform is generated according to examiner-defined settings (depth and size of the Doppler sample volume, beam steering, Doppler beam angle, and pulse repetition frequency or scale). The accuracy of the simulator was assessed by comparing the PSV measured from the spectral waveforms with the true PSV which was derived from the computational flow model based on the size and location of the sample volume within the artery. Three expert examiners made a total of 36 carotid artery PSV measurements based on the simulated cases. The PSV measured by the examiners deviated from true PSV by 8% ± 5% (N = 36). The deviation in PSV did not differ significantly between artery segments, normal and stenotic arteries, or examiners. To our knowledge, this is the first simulation of duplex ultrasound that can create and display real-time color Doppler images and Doppler spectral waveforms. The results demonstrate that an examiner can measure PSV from the spectral waveforms using the settings on the simulator with a mean absolute error

  19. A framework for simulating ultrasound imaging based on first order nonlinear pressure–velocity relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Yigang; Fan, Rui; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    An ultrasound imaging framework modeled with the first order nonlinear pressure–velocity relations (NPVR) based simulation and implemented by a half-time staggered solution and pseudospectral method is presented in this paper. The framework is capable of simulating linear and nonlinear ultrasound...... propagation and reflections in a heterogeneous medium with different sound speeds and densities. It can be initialized with arbitrary focus, excitation and apodization for multiple individual channels in both 2D and 3D spatial fields. The simulated channel data can be generated using this framework......, and ultrasound image can be obtained by beamforming the simulated channel data. Various results simulated by different algorithms are illustrated for comparisons. The root mean square (RMS) errors for each compared pulses are calculated. The linear propagation is validated by an angular spectrum approach (ASA...

  20. Estimation of blood velocity vectors using transverse ultrasound beam focusing and cross-correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Lacasa, Isabel Rodriguez

    1999-01-01

    program. Simulations are shown for a parabolic velocity profile for flow-to-beam angles of 30, 45, 60, and 90 degrees using a 64 elements linear array with a center frequency of 3 MHz, a pitch of 0.3 mm, and an element height of 5 mm. The peak velocity in the parabolic flow was 0.5 m/s, and the pulse...... repetition frequency was 3.5 kHz. Using four pulse-echo lines, the parabolic flow profile was found with a standard deviation of 0.028 m/s at 60 degrees and 0.092 m/s at 90 degrees (transverse to the ultrasound beam), corresponding to accuracies of 5.6% and 18.4%. Using ten lines gave standard deviations...

  1. Bactericidal, structural and morphological properties of ZnO2 nanoparticles synthesized under UV or ultrasound irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colonia, R; Solís, J L; Gómez, M

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles of ZnO 2 were synthesized by a sol–gel method using Zn(CH 3 COO) 2 and H 2 O 2 in an aqueous solution exposed to either ultraviolet (UV) or ultrasound irradiation. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy showed that the nanostructures consisted of spherical blackberry-like clusters. Nanoparticles fabricated by using UV irradiation had smaller sizes and narrower size distributions than nanoparticles prepared by using ultrasound. Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis), Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) were used as test microorganisms, and the antibacterial activity of the ZnO 2 nanoparticles was studied by use of the well diffusion agar bacteriological test. ZnO 2 nanoparticles synthetized using UV had the best antibacterial properties. The inhibition zone was largest for B. subtilis but was present also for S. aureus and E. coli. (paper)

  2. Experimental and clinical trial of measuring urinary velocity with the pitot tube and a transrectal ultrasound guided video urodynamic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Yukio; Nose, Yorihito; Ohba, Kenkichi

    2003-01-01

    The pitot tube is a common device to measure flow velocity. If the pitot tube is used as an urodynamic catheter, urinary velocity and urethral pressure may be measured simultaneously. However, to our knowledge, urodynamic studies with the pitot tube have not been reported. We experimentally and clinically evaluated the feasibility of the pitot tube to measure urinary velocity with a transrectal ultrasound guided video urodynamic system. We carried out a basal experiment measuring flow velocity in model urethras of 4.5-8.0 mm in inner diameter with a 12-Fr pitot tube. In a clinical trial, 79 patients underwent transrectal ultrasound guided video urodynamic studies with the 12-Fr pitot tube. Urinary velocity was calculated from dynamic pressure (Pd) with the pitot tube formula and the correcting equation according to the results of the basal experiment. Velocity measured by the pitot tube was proportional to the average velocity in model urethras and the coefficients were determined by diameters of model urethras. We obtained a formula to calculate urinary velocity from the basal experiment. The urinary velocity could be obtained in 32 of 79 patients. Qmax was 8.1 +/- 4.3 mL/s (mean +/- SD; range, 18.4-1.3 mL/s), urethral diameter was 7.3 +/- 3.0 mm (mean +/- SD; range, 18.7-4.3 mm) and urinary velocity was 69.4 +/- 43.6 (mean +/- SD; range, 181.3-0 cm/s) at maximum flow rate. The correlation coefficient of Qmax measured by a flowmeter versus Qdv flow rate calculated with urethral diameter and velocity was 0.41 without significant difference. The use of the pitot tube as an urodynamic catheter to a transrectal ultrasound-guided video urodynamic system can measure urethral pressure, diameter and urinary velocity simultaneously. However, a thinner pitot tube and further clinical trials are needed to obtain more accurate results.

  3. Estimation of urinary flow velocity in models of obstructed and unobstructed urethras by decorrelation of ultrasound radiofrequency signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arif, M.; Idzenga, T.; Mastrigt, R. van; Korte, C.L. de

    2014-01-01

    The feasibility of estimating urinary flow velocity from the decorrelation of radiofrequency (RF) signals was investigated in soft tissue-mimicking models of obstructed and unobstructed urethras. The decorrelation was studied in the near field, focal zone and far field of the ultrasound beam.

  4. Comparison of shear wave velocity measurements assessed with two different ultrasound systems in an ex-vivo tendon strain phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosskopf, Andrea B; Bachmann, Elias; Snedeker, Jess G; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Buck, Florian M

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the reliability of SW velocity measurements of two different ultrasound systems and their correlation with the tangent traction modulus in a non-static tendon strain model. A bovine tendon was fixed in a custom-made stretching device. Force was applied increasing from 0 up to 18 Newton. During each strain state the tangent traction modulus was determined by the stretcher device, and SW velocity (m/s) measurements using a Siemens S3000 and a Supersonic Aixplorer US machine were done for shear modulus (kPa) calculation. A strong significant positive correlation was found between SW velocity assessed by the two ultrasound systems and the tangent traction modulus (r = 0.827-0.954, p Aixplorer 0.25 ± 0.3 m/s (p = 0.034). Mean difference of SW velocity between the two US-systems was 0.37 ± 0.3 m/s (p = 0.012). In conclusion, SW velocities are highly dependent on mechanical forces in the tendon tissue, but for controlled mechanical loads appear to yield reproducible and comparable measurements using different US systems.

  5. Ultrasound propagation in steel piping at electric power plant using clamp-on ultrasonic pulse doppler velocity-profile flowmeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tezuka, Kenichi; Mori, Michitsugu; Wada, Sanehiro; Aritomi, Masanori; Kikura, Hiroshige

    2008-01-01

    Venturi nozzles are widely used to measure the flow rates of reactor feedwater. This flow rate of nuclear reactor feedwater is an important factor in the operation of nuclear power reactors. Some other types of flowmeters have been proposed to improve measurement accuracy. The ultrasonic pulse Doppler velocity-profile flowmeter is expected to be a candidate method because it can measure the flow profiles across the pipe cross sections. For the accurate estimation of the flow velocity, the incidence angle of ultrasonic entering the fluid should be carefully estimated by the theoretical approach. However, the evaluation of the ultrasound propagation is not straightforward for the several reasons such as temperature gradient in the wedge or mode conversion at the interface between the wedge and pipe. In recent years, the simulation code for ultrasound propagation has come into use in the nuclear field for nondestructive testing. This article analyzes and discusses ultrasound propagation in steel piping and water, using the 3D-FEM simulation code and the Kirchhoff method, as it relates to the flow profile measurements in power plants with the ultrasonic pulse Doppler velocity-profile flowmeter. (author)

  6. Importance of diastolic velocities in the detection of celiac and mesenteric artery disease by duplex ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Just, S; Schroeder, T V

    1997-01-01

    To assess the predictive value of ultrasound duplex scanning in the detection of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and celiac artery (CA) occlusive disease.......To assess the predictive value of ultrasound duplex scanning in the detection of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and celiac artery (CA) occlusive disease....

  7. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ultrasound is a useful procedure for monitoring the baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to produce a two-dimensional image of the baby while inside the mother's ...

  8. Fast Blood Vector Velocity Imaging using ultrasound: In-vivo examples of complex blood flow in the vascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Udesen, Jesper; Gran, Fredrik

    2008-01-01

    Conventional ultrasound methods for acquiring color flow images of the blood motion are restricted by a relatively low frame rate and angle dependent velocity estimates. The Plane Wave Excitation (PWE) method has been proposed to solve these limitations. The frame rate can be increased, and the 2-D...... vector velocity of the blood motion can be estimated. The transmitted pulse is not focused, and a full speckle image of the blood can be acquired for each emission. A 13 bit Barker code is transmitted simultaneously from each transducer element. The 2-D vector velocity of the blood is found using 2-D...... speckle tracking between segments in consecutive speckle images. The flow patterns of six bifurcations and two veins were investigated in-vivo. It was shown: 1) that a stable vortex in the carotid bulb was present opposed to other examined bifurcations, 2) that retrograde flow was present...

  9. Maceration of Extra Virgin Olive Oil with Common Aromatic Plants Using Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction: An UV-Vis Spectroscopic Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozren Jović

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis, garden sage (Salvia officinalis, summer savory (Satureja hortensis, laurel (Laurus nobilis, and other aromatic plants were put in olive oil and exposed to ultrasounds for different duration. Filtrated oils were dissolved in cyclohexane, and UV-Vis measurements were carried out. Absorbance values corresponding to chlorophylls, carotenoids, flavonoids (370 nm, and polyphenols (around 300 nm were measured. In addition, for some samples, total phenols were determined using Folin-Denis reagent and compared with the similar maceration procedure in water solvent (instead of olive oil. Maceration without ultrasound in olive oil for each plant was also compared with ultrasound-assisted extraction. The results show that significant amount of aromatic content can be extracted in olive oil by applying ultrasounds for only few minutes, especially for Salvia officinalis powder. The use of UV-Vis measurements is simple but enough to examine the extent of phenol content extraction through such maceration procedure.

  10. Comparative analysis of contrast between hepatic vein and hepatic parenchyma with controlled velocity of ultrasound in normal and fatty liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Eun Joo; Choi, Byung Jin; Han, Joon Koo; Cha, Joo Hee; Kim, Seung Hyup; Lee, Dong Hyuk

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the contrast between hepatic vein and hepatic parenchyma with controlled velocities of ultrasound in normal and fatty liver. 31 patient with normal liver and 39 patients with moderate degree of fatty liver were studies with sonography with controlled velocities of ultrasound (1,580 m/sec, 1,540 m/sec, 1,500 m/sec, 1,460 m/sec). Sonographic images were captured with picture grabbing (Sono-PACS) and were recalled with visual C++(Microsoft Redmond. WA, USA). The contrast between hepatic vein and parenchyma was measured and analyzed on each sonographic image. The number of patients with the highest contrast between hepatic vein and hepatic parenchyma among the 31 patients with normal liver were 5 (16.1%) with 1,580 m/sec, 12 (38.8%) with 1,540 m/sec, 9 (29.0%) with 1,500 m/sec, and 5 (16.1%) with 1,460 m/sec. The number of patients with highest contrast between hepatic vein and hepatic parenchyma among the 39 patients with fatty liver were 3 (7.7%) with 1,580 m/sec, 7 (17.9%) with 1,540 m/sec, 12 (30.8%) with 1,500 m/sec and 17 (43.6%) with 1,460 m/sec. The velocity of ultrasound for the highest contrast between hepatic vein and hepatic parenchyma in normal liver was 1,540 m/sec, and 1,460 m/sec in fatty liver.

  11. Influence of coupling substances in the measurement of ultrasound velocity in stone materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuzio, Beatrice; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Fort, Rafael; Masini, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasonic (US) testing is widely applied in many fields (i.e. aviation, petrochemical, power engineering, construction and metallurgical industries). In the field of built cultural heritage and science conservation, US testing can provide the quality of the historic building materials (physic-mechanical properties), their heterogeneity/homogeinity and anisotropy, in terms of materials characterization, but also how deterioration processes can affect their quality (either after natural decay or simulation ageing tests in the laboratory). Moreover, US testing is a useful technique in evaluating the effectiveness of conservation and restoration techniques such as assessing the compatibility among original and restoration materials, identification of original quarries, and the success or not in the increase of a material cohesion when applying consolidating products. In order to obtain precise, real and reliable measurements, coupling substances between the material surface and the ultrasonic sensors are frequently used, to provide a proper contact between the transducer and the material, to assure the perfect transmission of the ultrasonic wave. Various coupling agents can be applied for this purpose. According to Wesolowski (2012), the choice of the coupling agent significantly affects the measurement of propagation velocity in material samples and, as a consequence, the US test results. In this paper, the effect of six coupling agents (medical gel used for ultrasonography, gel + parafilm, plasticine, honey, glicerine and a plastic material provided for ultrasound measurement by Panametrics) on ultrasonic measurements conducted on specific building materials is investigated on two different types of building stones (granite and dolostone from the area of Madrid, traditionally used in the construction of the built heritage, 4 stone specimens for each rock variety, 20 x 6 x 8 cm). Direct and indirect modes measuring were performed, the first one with the transducers

  12. In-vivo Examples of Flow Patterns With The Fast Vector Velocity Ultrasound Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Udesen, Jesper; Gran, Fredrik

    2009-01-01

    and using a 100 CPU linux cluster for post processing, PWE can achieve a frame of 100 Hz where one vector velocity sequence of approximately 3 sec, takes 10 h to store and 48 h to process. In this paper a case study is presented of in-vivo vector velocity estimates in different complex vessel geometries...

  13. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... completed. Young children may need additional preparation. When scheduling an ultrasound for yourself or your child, ask ... of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Manage Cookies Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  14. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reflect off body structures. A computer receives the waves and uses them to create a picture. Unlike with an x-ray or CT scan, this test does not use ionizing radiation. The test is done in the ultrasound ...

  15. A pilot study using Tissue Velocity Ultrasound Imaging (TVI to assess muscle activity pattern in patients with chronic trapezius myalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brodin Lars-Åke

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Different research techniques indicate alterations in muscle tissue and in neuromuscular control of aching muscles in patients with chronic localized pain. Ultrasound can be used for analysis of muscle tissue dynamics in clinical practice. Aim This study introduces a new muscle tissue sensitive ultrasound technique in order to provide a new methodology for providing a description of local muscle changes. This method is applied to investigate trapezius muscle tissue response – especially with respect to specific regional deformation and deformation rates – during concentric shoulder elevation in patients with chronic trapezius myalgia and healthy controls before and after pain provocation. Methods Patients with trapezius myalgia and healthy controls were analyzed using an ultrasound system equipped with tissue velocity imaging (TVI. The patients performed a standardized 3-cm concentric shoulder elevation before and after pain provocation/exercise at a standardized elevation tempo (30 bpm. A standardized region of interest (ROI, an ellipsis with a size that captures the upper and lower fascia of the trapezius muscle (4 cm width at rest, was placed in the first frame of the loop registration of the elevation. The ROI was re-anchored frame by frame following the same anatomical landmark in the basal fascia during all frames of the concentric phase. In cardiac measurement, tissue velocities are measured in the axial projection towards and against the probe where red colour represents shortening and red lengthening. In the case of measuring the trapezius muscle, tissue deformation measurements are made orthogonally, thus, indirectly. Based on the assumption of muscle volume incompressibility, blue represents tissue contraction and red relaxation. Within the ROI, two variables were calculated as a function of time: deformation and deformation rate. Hereafter, max, mean, and quadratic mean values (RMS of each variable were

  16. Superoxide radical and UV irradiation in ultrasound assisted oxidative desulfurization (UAOD): A potential alternative for greener fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ngo Yeung

    This study is aimed at improving the current ultrasound assisted oxidative desulfurization (UAOD) process by utilizing superoxide radical as oxidant. Research was also conducted to investigate the feasibility of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation-assisted desulfurization. These modifications can enhance the process with the following achievements: (1) Meet the upcoming sulfur standards on various fuels including diesel fuel oils and residual oils; (2) More efficient oxidant with significantly lower consumption in accordance with stoichiometry; (3) Energy saving by 90%; (4) Greater selectivity in petroleum composition. Currently, the UAOD process and subsequent modifications developed in University of Southern California by Professor Yen's research group have demonstrated high desulfurization efficiencies towards various fuels with the application of 30% wt. hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. The UAOD process has demonstrated more than 50% desulfurization of refractory organic sulfur compounds with the use of Venturella type catalysts. Application of quaternary ammonium fluoride as phase transfer catalyst has significantly improved the desulfurization efficiency to 95%. Recent modifications incorporating ionic liquids have shown that the modified UAOD process can produce ultra-low sulfur, or near-zero sulfur diesels under mild conditions with 70°C and atmospheric pressure. Nevertheless, the UAOD process is considered not to be particularly efficient with respect to oxidant and energy consumption. Batch studies have demonstrated that the UAOD process requires 100 fold more oxidant than the stoichiometic requirement to achieve high desulfurization yield. The expected high costs of purchasing, shipping and storage of the oxidant would reduce the practicability of the process. The excess use of oxidant is not economically desirable, and it also causes environmental and safety issues. Post treatments would be necessary to stabilize the unspent oxidant residual to prevent the waste

  17. Photoreactivation and dark repair of environmental E. coli strains following 24 kHz continuous ultrasound and UV-C irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jasjeet; Karthikeyan, Raghupathy; Pillai, Suresh D

    2016-07-02

    In this study, effects of 24 kHz continuous ultrasound and UV-C on inactivation and potential repair of environmental E. coli strains were studied through a culture based method and a metabolic activity assay. Three environmental E. coli strains isolated from fecal samples of feral hog and deer and treated wastewater effluent were studied and compared with a laboratory E. coli strain (ATCC® 10798). Metabolic activity of E. coli cells during the inactivation and repair period was assessed using the AlamarBlue® assay. Transmission electron microscopy assays were also performed to evaluate morphological damage of bacterial cell wall. After 24 h of photoreactivation period, laboratory E. coli strain (ATCC® 10798) reactivated by 30% and 42% in contrast to E. coli isolate from treated wastewater effluent, which reactivated by 53% and 82% after ultrasound and UV-C treatment, respectively. Possible shearing and reduction in cell size of E. coli strains exposed to ultrasound was revealed by transmission electron micrographs. Metabolic activity of E. coli strains was greatly reduced due to morphological damage to cell membrane caused by 24 kHz continuous ultrasound. Based upon experimental data and TEM micrographs, it could be concluded that ultrasound irradiation has potential in advanced water treatment and water reuse applications.

  18. Local velocity measurements in lead-bismuth and sodium flows using the ultrasound doppler velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckert, S.; Gerbeth, G.

    2003-01-01

    We will present measurements of the velocity profiles in liquid sodium and eutectic lead-bismuth by means of the Ultrasonic Doppler Velocimetry (UDV). A sodium flow in a rectangular duct exposed to an external, transverse magnetic field has been examined. To demonstrate the capability of UDV the transformation of the well-known turbulent, piston-like profile to an M-shaped velocity profile for growing magnetic field strength was observed. The significance of artifacts such as caused by the existence of reflecting interfaces in the measuring domain will be discussed. In the sodium case, the measurements were performed through the channel wall. An integrated ultrasonic sensor with acoustic wave-guide has been developed to overcome the limitation of ultrasonic transducers to temperatures lower than 200 .deg. C. This sensor can presently be applied at maximum temperatures up to 800 .deg. C. Stable and robust measurements have been performed in various PbBi flows in our laboratory at FZR as well as at the THESYS loop of the KALLA laboratory of the ForschungsZentrum Karlsruhe (FZK). We will also present experimental results obtained in a PbBi bubbly flow at 250...300 .deg. C. Argon bubbles were injected through a single orifice in a cylindrical container filled with stagnant PbBi. Velocity profiles were measured in the bubble plume. Mean values of the liquid as well as the bubble velocity were extracted from the data and will be presented as function of the gas flow rate

  19. Blood flow velocity in the Popliteal Vein using Transverse Oscillation Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechsgaard, Thor; Lindskov Hansen, Kristoffer; Brandt, Andreas Hjelm

    2016-01-01

    . Transverse Oscillation US (TOUS), a non-invasive angle independent method, has been implemented on a commercial scanner. TOUS’s advantage compared to SDUS is a more elaborate visualization of complex flow. The aim of this study was to evaluate, whether TOUS perform equal to SDUS for recording velocities...

  20. Evaluation of Portal Venous Velocity with Doppler Ultrasound in Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulusan, Serife; Yakar, Tolga; Koc, Zafer [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Adana (Turkmenistan)

    2011-08-15

    We examined the relationship between portal venous velocity and hepatic-abdominal fat in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), using spectral Doppler ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this prospective study, 35 patients with NAFLD and 29 normal healthy adults (control group) underwent portal Doppler US. The severity of hepatic steatosis in patients with NAFLD was assessed by MRI through chemical shift imaging, using a modification of the Dixon method. Abdominal (intra-abdominal and subcutaneous) fat was measured by MRI. The difference in portal venous velocity between the patients with NAFLD and the control group was significant (p < 0.0001). There was no correlation between the degree of abdominal or hepatic fat and portal venous velocity (p > 0.05). There were strong correlations between the hepatic fat fraction and subcutaneous adiposity (p < 0.0001), intraperitoneal fat accumulation (p 0.017), and retroperitoneal fat accumulation (p < 0.0001). Our findings suggest that patients with NAFLD have lower portal venous velocities than normal healthy subjects.

  1. Simulation of ultrasound interaction with tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edee, M.K.A.; Ogulu, A.

    1995-08-01

    We model the effect of an ultrasound beam on a water phantom by considering water as an incompressible Newtonian viscous fluid. The two-dimensional flow velocities (u,v) induced in the water phantom, mimic displacement in living tissues for a phantom of unit width. The displacements depend on the ultrasound signal which is emitted and the model also predicts the nature of the signal received. 13 refs, 3 figs

  2. Fenton Process Coupled to Ultrasound and UV Light Irradiation for the Oxidation of a Model Pollutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E. Barrera-Salgado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fenton process coupled to photosonolysis (UV light and Us, using Fe2O3 catalyst supported on Al2O3, was used to oxidize a model pollutant like acid green 50 textile dye (AG50. Dye degradation was followed by AG50 concentration decay analyses. It was observed that parameters like iron content on a fixed amount of catalyst supporting material, catalyst annealing temperature, initial dye concentration, and the solution pH influence the overall treatment efficiency. High removal efficiencies of the model pollutant are achieved. The stability and reusability tests of the Fe2O3 catalyst show that the catalyst can be used up to three cycles achieving high discoloration. Thus, this catalyst is highly efficient for the degradation of AG50 in the Fenton process.

  3. Effect of therapeutic ultrasound intensity on subcutaneous tissue temperature and ulnar nerve conduction velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, J F

    1985-02-01

    Twenty subjects completed 5 min. periods of sonation, at each of six US intensities, over the ulnar nerve in the proximal forearm. All posttreatment NCV's differed significantly from the respective pretreatment velocities. The immediate posttreatment NCV associated with placebo US was significantly (p less than 0.01) less than that observed immediately pretreatment (2.81 m/s), while the five clinical US intensities produced significantly increased immediate posttreatment velocities: 0.5 w/cm2 (2.23 m/s) at (p less than 0.05), and 1.0 w/cm2 (2.78 m/s), 1.5 w/cm2 (3.15 m/s), 2.0 w/cm2 (4.47 m/s) and 2.5 w/cm2 (2.97 m/s) at (p less than 0.01). The posttreatment velocities associated with the five clinical intensities were all significantly greater (p less than 0.01) than that associated with placebo US. Subcutaneous tissue temperatures were directly related to the intensity of US. Not until US intensity had reached 1.5 w/cm2 did the heating effect of US negate the cooling effect of the US transmission gel, to produce significantly increased subcutaneous tissue temperatures after 5 min. sonation. The decreased ulnar motor NCV's associated with placebo US are attributed to the cooling effect of the US transmission gel. The increased ulnar motor NCV's associated with the clinical intensities of US are attributed to the deep heating effect of US. The breakdown of this linear relationship at 2.5 w/cm2 intensity suggests that at this point heating on the nerve and/or the mechanical effects of US were of sufficient magnitude so as to limit the increase in conduction velocity. Sonation over an area of approximately 4.5 times the soundhead for 5 min., along the proximal forearm, at clinical intensities did not have a bipositive effect on motor NCV.

  4. Density, ultrasound velocity, acoustic impedance, reflection and absorption coefficient determination of liquids via multiple reflection method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoche, S; Hussein, M A; Becker, T

    2015-03-01

    The accuracy of density, reflection coefficient, and acoustic impedance determination via multiple reflection method was validated experimentally. The ternary system water-maltose-ethanol was used to execute a systematic, temperature dependent study over a wide range of densities and viscosities aiming an application as inline sensor in beverage industries. The validation results of the presented method and setup show root mean square errors of: 1.201E-3 g cm(-3) (±0.12%) density, 0.515E-3 (0.15%) reflection coefficient and 1.851E+3 kg s(-1) m(-2) (0.12%) specific acoustic impedance. The results of the diffraction corrected absorption showed an average standard deviation of only 0.12%. It was found that the absorption change shows a good correlation to concentration variations and may be useful for laboratory analysis of sufficiently pure liquids. The main part of the observed errors can be explained by the observed noise, temperature variation and the low signal resolution of 50 MHz. In particular, the poor signal-to-noise ratio of the second reflector echo was found to be a main accuracy limitation. Concerning the investigation of liquids the unstable properties of the reference material PMMA, due to hygroscopicity, were identified to be an additional, unpredictable source of uncertainty. While dimensional changes can be considered by adequate methodology, the impact of the time and temperature dependent water absorption on relevant reference properties like the buffer's sound velocity and density could not be considered and may explain part of the observed deviations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Intracranial artery velocity measurement using 4D PC MRI at 3 T: comparison with transcranial ultrasound techniques and 2D PC MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meckel, Stephan; Leitner, Lorenz; Schubert, Tilman; Bonati, Leo H.; Lyrer, Philippe; Santini, Francesco; Stalder, Aurelien F.; Markl, Michael; Wetzel, Stephan G.

    2013-01-01

    4D phase contrast MR imaging (4D PC MRI) has been introduced for spatiotemporal evaluation of intracranial hemodynamics in various cerebrovascular diseases. However, it still lacks validation with standards of reference. Our goal was to compare blood flow quantification derived from 4D PC MRI with transcranial ultrasound and 2D PC MRI. Velocity measurements within large intracranial arteries [internal carotid artery (ICA), basilar artery (BA), and middle cerebral artery (MCA)] were obtained in 20 young healthy volunteers with 4D and 2D PC MRI, transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD), and transcranial color-coded duplex sonography (TCCD). Maximum velocities at peak systole (PSV) and end diastole (EDV) were compared using regression analysis and Bland-Altman plots. Correlation of 4D PC MRI measured velocities was higher in comparison with TCD (r = 0.49-0.66) than with TCCD (0.35-0.44) and 2D PC MRI (0.52-0.60). In mid-BA and ICA C7 segment, a significant correlation was found with TCD (0.68-0.81 and 0.65-0.71, respectively). No significant correlation was found in carotid siphon. On average over all volunteers, PSVs and EDVs in MCA were minimally underestimated compared with TCD/TCCD. Minimal overestimation of velocities was found compared to TCD in mid-BA and ICA C7 segment. 4D PC MRI appears as valid alternative for intracranial velocity measurement consistent with previous reference standards, foremost with TCD. Spatiotemporal averaging effects might contribute to vessel size-dependent mild underestimation of velocities in smaller (MCA), and overestimation in larger-sized (BA and ICA) arteries, respectively. Complete spatiotemporal flow analysis may be advantageous in anatomically complex regions (e.g. carotid siphon) relative to restrictions of ultrasound techniques. (orig.)

  6. Examples of Vector Velocity Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter M.; Pedersen, Mads M.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.

    2011-01-01

    To measure blood flow velocity in vessels with conventional ultrasound, the velocity is estimated along the direction of the emitted ultrasound wave. It is therefore impossible to obtain accurate information on blood flow velocity and direction, when the angle between blood flow and ultrasound wa...

  7. Non-invasive Estimation of Pressure Changes using 2-D Vector Velocity Ultrasound: An Experimental Study with In-Vivo Examples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Møller, Niclas Dechau

    2018-01-01

    and at the aortic valve of two healthy volunteers. Ultrasound measurements were performed using the experimental scanner SARUS, in combination with an 8MHz linear array transducer for experimental scans and a carotid scan, whereas a 3.5MHz phased array probe was employed for a scan of an aortic valve. Measured 2-D......A non-invasive method for estimating intravascular pressure changes using 2-D vector velocity is presented. The method was first validated on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) data, and with catheter measurements on phantoms. Hereafter, the method was tested in-vivo at the carotid bifurcation...

  8. Doppler ultrasound for detection of renal transplant artery stenosis - Threshold peak systolic velocity needs to be higher in a low-risk or surveillance population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, U.; Khaw, K.K.; Hughes, N.C.

    2003-01-01

    AIMS: To establish the ideal threshold arterial velocity for the diagnosis of renal transplant artery stenosis in a surveillance population with a low pre-test probability of stenosis. METHODS: Retrospective review of Doppler ultrasound, angiographic and clinical outcome data of patients transplanted over a 3-year period. Data used to calculate sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) for various threshold peak systolic velocity values. RESULTS: Of 144 patients transplanted, full data were available in 117 cases. Five cases had renal transplant artery stenosis--incidence 4.2% [stenosis identified at a mean of 6.5 months (range 2-10 months)]. All five cases had a significant arterial pressure gradient across the narrowing and underwent angioplasty. Threshold peak systolic velocity of ≥2.5 m/s is not ideal [specificity=79% (CI 65-82%), PPV=18% (CI 6-32%), NPV=100% (CI 94-100%)], subjecting many patients to unnecessary angiography--8/117 (6%) in our population. Comparable values if the threshold is set at ≥3.0 m/s are 93% (CI 77-96%), 33% (CI 7-44%) and 99% (CI 93-100%), respectively. The clinical outcome of all patients was satisfactory, with no unexplained graft failures or loss. CONCLUSIONS: In a surveillance population with a low pre-test probability of stenosis, absolute renal artery velocity ≥2.5 m/s is a limited surrogate marker for significant renal artery stenosis. The false-positive rate is high, and ≥3.0 m/s is a better choice which will halve the number of patients enduring unnecessary angiography. Close clinical follow-up of patients in the 2.5-3.0 m/s range, with repeat Doppler ultrasound if necessary, will identify the test false-negatives

  9. Acoustic radiation- and streaming-induced microparticle velocities determined by microparticle image velocimetry in an ultrasound symmetry plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Rune; Augustsson, Per; Laurell, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present microparticle image velocimetry measurements of suspended microparticles of diameters from 0.6 to 10μm undergoing acoustophoresis in an ultrasound symmetry plane in a microchannel. The motion of the smallest particles is dominated by the Stokes drag from the induced acoustic streaming...

  10. Ultrasound pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregnancy sonogram; Obstetric ultrasonography; Obstetric sonogram; Ultrasound - pregnancy; IUGR - ultrasound; Intrauterine growth - ultrasound; Polyhydramnios - ultrasound; Oligohydramnios - ultrasound; ...

  11. Non-invasive high-intensity focused ultrasound for UV-induced hyperpigmentation in Fitzpatrick skin types III and IV: a prospective, randomized, controlled, evaluator-blinded trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachiramon, Vasanop; Jurairattanaporn, Natthachat; Harnchoowong, Sarawin; Chayavichitsilp, Pamela

    2018-02-01

    Skin hyperpigmentation is a frequently encountered problem, particularly in darker skin types. Unfortunately, standard treatments for this condition have shown disappointing results. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is commonly indicated for skin laxity, but recently was used to treat UV-induced hyperpigmentation in animal models. This study is aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of high-intensity focused ultrasound for UVB-induced hyperpigmentation in human subjects. A randomized, evaluator-blinded pilot study was conducted on 20 subjects. Each subject was induced three hyperpigmentary spots by local broadband UVB. After 2 weeks, each spot was randomly allocated to control, low-energy, and high-energy HIFU. Subjects were instructed to follow up weekly for a duration of 1 month. Lightness index measurements, mean improvement scores, subjects' satisfaction, pain scores, and side effects were evaluated. All 20 subjects completed the study. Fourteen subjects had Fitzpatrick (FPT) skin type III and six subjects had FPT skin type IV. Twelve subjects showed greater improvement at control sites while eight subjects showed greater improvement at HIFU-treated sites. In FPT skin type III, HIFU appeared to be inferior to control in both lightness index and mean improvement scores, but in FPT skin type IV, HIFU had greater lightness index improvement and higher improvement scores than control. Side effects were more frequent in high-energy-treated areas. Focused ultrasound may be offered in some patients with hyperpigmentary conditions. More research is needed to determine proper energy settings for optimal outcome.

  12. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...

  13. A Study on the Measurement of Ultrasound Velocity to Evaluate Degradation of Low Voltage Cables for Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Cho; Kang, Suk Chull; Goo, Cheol Soo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Ho; Park, Jae Seok; Joo, Geum Jong; Park, Chi Seung [KAITEC, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-08-15

    Several kinds of low voltage cables have been used in nuclear power plants for the supply of electric power, supervision, and the propagation of control signals. These low voltage tables must be inspected for safe and stable operation of nuclear power plants. In particular, the degradation diagnosis to estimate the integrity of low voltage rabies has recently been emphasized according to the long use of nuclear power plants. In order to evaluate their degradation, the surrounding temperature, hardness of insulation material, elongation at breaking point (EAB), etc. have been used. However, the measurement of temperature or hardness is not useful because of the absence of quantitative criteria; the inspection of a sample requires turning off of the power plant power; and, the electrical inspection method is not sufficiently sensitive from the initial through the middle stage of degradation. In this research, based on the theory that the ultrasonic velocity changes with relation to the degradation of the material, we measured the ultrasonic velocity as low voltage cables were degraded. To this end, an ultrasonic degradation diagnosis device was developed and used to measure the ultrasonic velocity with the clothing on the cable, and it was confirmed that the ultrasonic velocity changes according to the degradation of low voltage cables. The low voltage cables used in nuclear power plants were degraded at an accelerated rate, and EAB was measured in a tensile test conducted after the measurement of ultrasonic velocity. With the increasing degradation degree, the ultrasonic velocity decreased, whose potential as a useful parameter for the quantitative degradation evaluation was thus confirmed

  14. SU-D-210-07: The Dependence On Acoustic Velocity of Medium On the Needle Template and Electronic Grid Alignment in Ultrasound QA for Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, P; Kapoor, R; Curran, B [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); HH McGuire VA Hospital, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To analyze the impact on acoustic velocity (AV) of two different media (water and milk) using the needle template/electronic grid alignment test. Water, easily available, makes a good material to test the alignment of the template and grid although water’s AV (1498 m/s at 25°C) is significantly different from tissue (1540 m/s). Milk, with an AV much closer (1548 m/s) to prostate tissue, may be a good substitute for water in ultrasound quality assurance testing. Methods: Tests were performed using a Hitachi ultrasound unit with a mechanical arrangement designed to position needles parallel to the transducer. In this work, two materials – distilled water and homogenized whole milk (AVs of 1498 and 1548 m/s at 25°C) were used in a phantom to test ultrasound needle/grid alignment. The images were obtained with both materials and analyzed for their placement accuracy. Results: The needle template/electronic grid alignment tests showed displacement errors between measured and calculated values. The measurements showed displacements of 2.3mm (water) and 0.4mm (milk), and 1.6mm (water) and 0.3mm (milk) at depths of 7cm and 5cm respectively from true needle positions. The calculated results showed a displacement of 2.36 mm (water); 0.435mm (milk), and 1.66mm (water) and 0.31mm (milk) at a depth of 7cm and 5cm respectively. The displacements in the X and Y directions were also calculated. At depths of 7cm and 5cm, the (ΔX,ΔY) displacements in water were (0.829mm, 2.21mm) and (0.273mm, 1.634mm) and for milk were (0.15mm, 0.44mm) and (0.05mm, 0.302mm) respectively. Conclusion: The measured and calculated values were in good agreement for all tests. They show that milk provides superior results when performing needle template and electronic grid alignment tests for ultrasound units used in prostate brachytherapy.

  15. Magnetic phase diagram of Ba3CoSb2O9 as determined by ultrasound velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirion, G.; Lapointe-Major, M.; Poirier, M.; Quilliam, J. A.; Dun, Z. L.; Zhou, H. D.

    2015-07-01

    Using high-resolution sound velocity measurements we have obtained a very precise magnetic phase diagram of Ba3CoSb2O9 , a material that is considered to be an archetype of the spin-1/2 triangular-lattice antiferromagnet. Results obtained for the field parallel to the basal plane (up to 18 T) show three phase transitions, consistent with predictions based on simple two-dimensional isotropic Heisenberg models and previous experimental investigations. The phase diagram obtained for the field perpendicular to the basal plane clearly reveals an easy-plane character of this compound and, in particular, our measurements show a single first-order phase transition at Hc 1=12.0 T which can be attributed to a spin flop between an umbrella-type configuration and a coplanar V -type order where spins lie in a plane perpendicular to the a b plane. At low temperatures, softening of the lattice within some of the ordered phases is also observed and may be a result of residual spin fluctuations.

  16. Introduction to vector velocity imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Udesen, Jesper; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    Current ultrasound scanners can only estimate the velocity along the ultrasound beam and this gives rise to the cos() factor on all velocity estimates. This is a major limitation as most vessels are close to perpendicular to the beam. Also the angle varies as a function of space and time making ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... specific content. Related Articles and Media Sonohysterography Ultrasound - Abdomen Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and ...

  20. Angle independent velocity spectrum determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    An ultrasound imaging system (100) includes a transducer array (102) that emits an ultrasound beam and produces at least one transverse pulse-echo field that oscillates in a direction transverse to the emitted ultrasound beam and that receive echoes produced in response thereto and a spectral vel...... velocity estimator (110) that determines a velocity spectrum for flowing structure, which flows at an angle of 90 degrees and flows at angles less than 90 degrees with respect to the emitted ultrasound beam, based on the received echoes....

  1. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to ... Ultrasound Imaging? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Prostate? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces pictures ...

  2. Demonstration of a Vector Velocity Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Møller; Pedersen, Mads M.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.

    2011-01-01

    With conventional Doppler ultrasound it is not possible to estimate direction and velocity of blood flow, when the angle of insonation exceeds 60–70°. Transverse oscillation is an angle independent vector velocity technique which is now implemented on a conventional ultrasound scanner. In this pa......With conventional Doppler ultrasound it is not possible to estimate direction and velocity of blood flow, when the angle of insonation exceeds 60–70°. Transverse oscillation is an angle independent vector velocity technique which is now implemented on a conventional ultrasound scanner...

  3. Evaluation of non destructive testing to characterize the resistance of the prefabricated system of columns and floor tiles for single family homes of a level: permeability meter, determination of wave velocity by ultrasound, Schmidt sclerometer and metal detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada Chacon, Dannell

    2014-01-01

    Non destructive testing are determined to be correlated with resistance to compression and flexion of elements belonging to prefabricated system of columns and floor tiles for single family homes of a level. The characteristics of the non destructive testing are described, such as: measurer of permeability, Schmidt sclerometer, determination of wave velocity by ultrasound and metal detector. The columns and floor tiles are elaborated with 2 mixtures of different resistances at 28 days. The first more than 30 MPa and the second less than 25 MPa are sampled together with the control cylinders necessary to obtain the actual resistance according to ASTM C39. Last resistance testings to compression and Schmidt sclerometer are realized to control cylinders to 1, 2, and 4 weeks after being cast. Non destructive testings (permeability meter Torrent, Schmidt sclerometer and determination of wave velocity by ultrasound) are performed in columns and floor tiles to 1, 2, and 4 weeks after being cast. Last resistance testings to flexion is obtained by means of destructive tests of the columns and floor tiles sampled. The correlation of the data obtained is determined to derive values of compression resistance from non destructive testing [es

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Prostate ultrasound, also called transrectal ultrasound, provides ...

  5. Development and Validation of a HPLC-UV Method for the Evaluation of Ellagic Acid in Liquid Extracts of Eugenia uniflora L. (Myrtaceae Leaves and Its Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Isaac Dias Assunção

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple HPLC-UV method has been developed and validated for the quantification of ellagic acid (EA in ethanol extracts of Eugenia uniflora L. (Myrtaceae leaves. The ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE optimization was performed using a Box Behnken design (33 combined with response surface methodology to study the effects of the ethanol concentration (%, w/w, extraction time (minutes, and temperature (°C on the EA concentration. The optimized results showed that the highest extraction yield of EA by UAE was 26.0 μg mL−1 when using 44% (w/w ethanol as the solvent, 22 minutes as the extraction time, and 59°C as the extraction temperature. The concentration of EA in relation to the predicted value was 93.7%  ±  0.4. UAE showed a strong potential for EA extraction.

  6. Development and Validation of a HPLC-UV Method for the Evaluation of Ellagic Acid in Liquid Extracts of Eugenia uniflora L. (Myrtaceae) Leaves and Its Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assunção, Paulo Isaac Dias; da Conceição, Edemilson Cardoso; Borges, Leonardo Luiz; de Paula, Joelma Abadia Marciano

    2017-01-01

    A simple HPLC-UV method has been developed and validated for the quantification of ellagic acid (EA) in ethanol extracts of Eugenia uniflora L. (Myrtaceae) leaves. The ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) optimization was performed using a Box Behnken design (3 3 ) combined with response surface methodology to study the effects of the ethanol concentration (%, w/w), extraction time (minutes), and temperature (°C) on the EA concentration. The optimized results showed that the highest extraction yield of EA by UAE was 26.0  μ g mL -1 when using 44% (w/w) ethanol as the solvent, 22 minutes as the extraction time, and 59°C as the extraction temperature. The concentration of EA in relation to the predicted value was 93.7%  ±  0.4. UAE showed a strong potential for EA extraction.

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound or with a rectal examination, an ultrasound-guided biopsy can be performed. This procedure involves advancing ... of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging of the pelvis uses sound waves to produce pictures of the structures and ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  9. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... endometrial polyps fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or ... Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored ...

  11. Ionic liquid ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of the aqueous phase for preconcentration of heavy metals ions prior to determination by LC-UV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Justyna

    2018-05-15

    Ionic liquid ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of the aqueous phase was used for preconcentration of Ni 2+ , Co 2+ , Cd 2+ , Cu 2+ , Pb 2+ in natural water samples prior to liquid chromatography with UV detection. In the proposed method, the ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate was used as a complexing agent and the phosphonium ionic liquid trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium bis[(2,4,4-trimethyl)pentyl]phosphinate (Cyphos IL 104) was used as an extractant. Ultrasound energy was used to disperse the extractant in the aqueous phase. After microextraction, the ionic liquid and aqueous phases were separated by centrifugation. Then the aqueous phase was frozen and the lighter than water ionic liquid phase containing metal ions complexes with pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate was separated and dissolved in a small volume of methanol prior to injection into the liquid chromatograph. Several parameters including the volume of extractant, the pH of the sample, the concentration of complexing agent, the time of ultrasound energy treatment, the time and speed of centrifugation and the effect of ionic strength were optimized. Under the optimized conditions (10 µL of Cyphos IL 104, pH = 5, 0.3% w/v ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate, 60 s of ultrasound use, 5 min/5000 rpm (2516×g) of centrifugation, 2.0 mg of NaCl), preconcentration factors were 211, 210, 209, 207 and 211 for Ni 2+ , Co 2+ , Cd 2+ , Cu 2+ and Pb 2+ respectively. Linearity was observed in the ranges 0.2-75.0 µg L -1 for Pb 2+ , Cd 2+ , Co 2+ and 0.5-100.0 µg L -1 for Cu 2+ , Ni 2+ . The limits of detection were 0.03 µg L -1 for Ni 2+ , 0.03 µg L -1 for Co 2+ , 0.03 µg L -1 for Cd 2+ , 0.02 µg L -1 for Cu 2+ , 0.02 µg L -1 for Pb 2+ , respectively. The accuracy of this method was evaluated by preconcentration and determination of Ni 2+ , Co 2+ , Cd 2+ , Cu 2+ , Pb 2+ in certified reference materials (TMRAIN-04 and NIST 1643e

  12. Prehospital Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Tang Sun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound is a commonly used diagnostic tool in clinical conditions. With recent developments in technology, use of portable ultrasound devices has become feasible in prehospital settings. Many studies also proved the feasibility and accuracy of prehospital ultrasound. In this article, we focus on the use of prehospital ultrasound, with emphasis on trauma and chest ultrasound.

  13. Rapid ultrasound-assisted magnetic microextraction of gallic acid from urine, plasma and water samples by HKUST-1-MOF-Fe3O4-GA-MIP-NPs: UV-vis detection and optimization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfaram, Arash; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Dashtian, Kheibar

    2017-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles (NPs)) HKUST-1 metal organic framework (MOF) composite as a support was used for surface imprinting of gallic acid imprinted polymer (HKUST-1-MOF-Fe 3 O 4 -GA-MIP) using vinyltrimethoxysilane (VTMOS) as the cross-linker. Subsequently, HKUST-1-MOF-Fe 3 O 4 -NPs-GA-MIP characterized by FT-IR, XRD and FE-SEM analysis and applied for fast and selective and sensitive ultrasound assisted dispersive magnetic solid phase microextraction of gallic acid (GA) by UV-Vis (UA-DMSPME-UV-Vis) detection method. Plackett-Burman design (PBD) and central composite design (CCD) according to desirability function (DF) indicate the significant variables among the extraction factors vortex (mixing) time (min), sonication time (min), temperature (°C), eluent volume (L), pH and HKUST-1-MOF-Fe 3 O 4 -NPs-GA-MIP mass (mg) and their contribution on the response. Optimum conditions and values correspond to pH, HKUST-1-MOF-Fe 3 O 4 -NPs-GA-MIP mass, sonication time and the eluent volume were set as follow 3.0, 1.6mg, 4.0min and 180μL, respectively. The average recovery (ER%) of GA was 98.13% with desirability of 0.997, while the present method has best operational performance like wide linear range 8-6000ngmL -1 with a Limit of detection (LOD) of 1.377ngmL -1 , limit of quantification (LOQ) 4.591ngmL -1 and precision (<3.50% RSD). The recovery of GA in urine, human plasma and water samples within the range of 92.3-100.6% that strongly support high applicability of present method for real samples analysis, which candidate this method as promise for further application. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... a pelvic ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that ... and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures that represent the flow of blood through ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are ... Ultrasound page for more information . Ultrasound examinations can help diagnose symptoms experienced by women such as: pelvic ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal, vaginal (for women), and rectal (for men). These exams are frequently ... pelvic ultrasound: abdominal ( transabdominal ) vaginal ( transvaginal / endovaginal ) for women rectal ( transrectal ) for men A Doppler ultrasound exam ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ... Obstetrical Ultrasound page for more information . Ultrasound examinations can help diagnose symptoms experienced by women such as: ...

  18. To assess the intimal thickness, flow velocities, and luminal diameter of carotid arteries using high-resolution B-mode ultrasound doppler imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemuru, Madhuri; Jabbar, Afzal; Chandra, Suman

    2004-04-01

    Carotid imaging is a Gold Standard test that provides useful information about the structure and functions of carotid arteries. Spectral imaging helps to evaluate the vessel and hemodynamic changes. High resolution B-mode imaging has emerged as one of the methods of choice for determining the anatomic extent of atherosclerosis and its progression and for assessing cardiovascular risks. The measurements made with Doppler correlate well with pathologic measurements. Recent prospective studies have clearly demonstrated that these measurements of carotid intimal thickness are potent predictors of Myocardial Infarction and Stroke. This method appears very attractive as it is non-invasive, extremely safe, well accepted by the patient and relatively inexpensive. It can be performed serially and has the advantage of visualizing the arterial wall in contrast to angiographic techniques which provide only an outline of the arterial lumen. Recently, there has been an interest in the clinical use of this technique in making difficult clinical decisions like deciding on preventive therapies. 30 subjects aged 21-60 years and 30 subjects aged 61-85 years of both sexes are selected after doing a baseline study to exclude Hypertension, Diabetes, Obesity and Hyperlipidemia. The carotid arteries were examined for intimal thickening, blood flow velocities and luminal diameter. With aging there is a narrowing of the carotid vessels and significant increase in intimal thickening with a consequent increase in the blood flow velocities. Inter-observer, intra-observer and instrument variations are seen and there is no significant change in the values when the distal flow pattern is considered for measurements. Aging produces major cardiovascular changes including decreased elasticity and compliance of great arteries leading to structural and functional alterations in heart and vessels. With aging there is increased intimal thickness and increased pulse wave velocity which is clearly

  19. Ultrasound assisted synthesis of morphology tunable rGO:ZnO hybrid nanostructures and their optical and UV-A light driven photocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thangaraj, Pandiyarajan, E-mail: rtpandiyarajan@gmail.com [Advanced Ceramics and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Materials Engineering, University of Concepcion (Chile); Ramalinga Viswanathan, Mangalaraja, E-mail: mangal@udec.cl [Advanced Ceramics and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Materials Engineering, University of Concepcion (Chile); Balasubramanian, Karthikeyan [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli 620015 (India); Mansilla, Héctor D. [Departament of Organic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Sciences, University of Concepcion (Chile); Contreras, David [Departament of Analytical and Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Sciences, Center for Biotechnology, University of Concepcion (Chile); Sepulveda-Guzman, Selene [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, UANL, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, FIME, Ave. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P.66455 San Nicolás de los Garza, N.L. (Mexico); Gracia-Pinilla, M.A. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ciencias Físico-Matemáticas, Av. Universidad, Cd. Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, NL (Mexico); Centro de Investigación en Innovación y Desarrollo en Ingeniería y Tecnología, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, PIIT, Apodaca, Nuevo León 66600 (Mexico)

    2017-06-15

    Controlling size and shape of hybrid nanostructures is technologically important because of the strong effect of nanostructure dimension and morphology on optoelectronic, biosensors and catalytic properties. Here, we have demonstrated a simple strategy for simultaneous control of morphology, defect engineering and photocatalytic activities of reduced graphene oxide:zinc oxide (rGO:ZnO) hybrid nanostructures which were prepared by using low frequency (42 kHz) ultrasound. By varying the solvents, the morphology of ZnO gradually evolved from spherical shape to a star like nature and the ZnO nanoparticles decorated on reduced graphene oxide were clearly observed in the TEM analysis. Absorption, photoluminescence, Raman and FTIR spectra clearly indicated the formation of rGO:ZnO hybrid nanostructures. Thermal analysis revealed that the hybrid nanostructures exhibited a good thermal stability. The synergistic integration of the unique morphology and size imparts the rGO:ZnO hybrid nanostructures with remarkably enhanced photocatalytic efficiency when compared with bare ZnO. The enhanced photocatalytic behaviour of the rGO:ZnO composite has been discussed in details herein. Simple and facile synthesis route demonstrated the potential for the utilization of rGO:ZnO hybrid nanostructures with unique properties for environmental engineering applications.

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: ...

  1. EarthFinder: A Precise Radial Velocity Survey Probe Mission of our Nearest Stellar Neighbors for Earth-Mass Habitable Zone Analogs Using High-Resolution UV-Vis-NIR Echelle Spectroscopy on a Space Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plavchan, Peter; EarthFinder Team

    2018-01-01

    We are investigating the science case for a 1.0-1.4 meter space telescope to survey the closest, brightest FGKM main sequence stars to search for Habitable Zone (HZ) Earth analogs using the precise radial velocity (PRV) technique at a precision of 1-10 cm/s. Our baseline instrument concept uses two diffraction-limited spectrographs operating in the 0.4-1.0 microns and 1.0-2.4 microns spectral regions each with a spectral resolution of R=150,000~200,000, with the possibility of a third UV arm. Because the instrument utilizes a diffraction-limited input beam, the spectrograph would be extremely compact, less than 50 cm on a side, and illumination can be stabilized with the coupling of starlight into single mode fibers. With two octaves of wavelength coverage and a cadence unimpeded by any diurnal, seasonal, and atmospheric effects, EarthFinder will offer a unique platform for recovering stellar activity signals from starspots, plages, granulation, etc. to detect exoplanets at velocity semi-amplitudes currently not obtainable from the ground. Variable telluric absorption and emission lines may potentially preclude achieving PRV measurements at or below 10 cm/s in the visible and advantage compared to an annual ~3-6 month observing season from the ground for mitigating stellar activity and detecting the orbital periods of HZ Earth-mass analogs (e.g. ~6-months to ~2 years). Finally, we are compiling a list of ancillary science cases for the observatory, ranging from asteroseismology to the direct measurement of the expansion of the Universe.

  2. Prediction of trabecular bone qualitative properties using scanning quantitative ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yi-Xian; Lin, Wei; Mittra, Erik; Xia, Yi; Cheng, Jiqi; Judex, Stefan; Rubin, Clint; Müller, Ralph

    2013-11-01

    Microgravity induced bone loss represents a critical health problem in astronauts, particularly occurred in weight-supporting skeleton, which leads to osteopenia and increase of fracture risk. Lack of suitable evaluation modality makes it difficult for monitoring skeletal status in long term space mission and increases potential risk of complication. Such disuse osteopenia and osteoporosis compromise trabecular bone density, and architectural and mechanical properties. While X-ray based imaging would not be practical in space, quantitative ultrasound may provide advantages to characterize bone density and strength through wave propagation in complex trabecular structure. This study used a scanning confocal acoustic diagnostic and navigation system (SCAN) to evaluate trabecular bone quality in 60 cubic trabecular samples harvested from adult sheep. Ultrasound image based SCAN measurements in structural and strength properties were validated by μCT and compressive mechanical testing. This result indicated a moderately strong negative correlations observed between broadband ultrasonic attenuation (BUA) and μCT-determined bone volume fraction (BV/TV, R2=0.53). Strong correlations were observed between ultrasound velocity (UV) and bone's mechanical strength and structural parameters, i.e., bulk Young's modulus (R2=0.67) and BV/TV (R2=0.85). The predictions for bone density and mechanical strength were significantly improved by using a linear combination of both BUA and UV, yielding R2=0.92 for BV/TV and R2=0.71 for bulk Young's modulus. These results imply that quantitative ultrasound can characterize trabecular structural and mechanical properties through measurements of particular ultrasound parameters, and potentially provide an excellent estimation for bone's structural integrity.

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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  7. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... pictures of a man’s prostate gland and to help diagnose symptoms such as difficulty urinating or an ... Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Prostate ultrasound, ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal ( transabdominal ) vaginal ( transvaginal / endovaginal ) ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal, vaginal (for women), and rectal (for men). These exams ... are three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal ( transabdominal ) vaginal ( transvaginal / endovaginal ) for women rectal ( transrectal ) for men ...

  11. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... the procedure? In women, a pelvic ultrasound is most often performed to evaluate the: uterus cervix ovaries ... page How is the procedure performed? Transabdominal: For most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face- ...

  12. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... is used to evaluate the: bladder seminal vesicles prostate Transrectal ultrasound, a special study usually done to provide detailed evaluation of the prostate gland, involves inserting a specialized ultrasound transducer into ...

  13. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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  14. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Ultrasound is widely available, easy-to-use ... procedures such as needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids ovarian or uterine cancers A transvaginal ultrasound is usually performed to view the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) and the ovaries. Transvaginal ultrasound also evaluates the myometrium (muscular walls ...

  17. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... those sound waves to create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in ... abnormal masses, such as tumors. In an ultrasound examination, a transducer both sends the sound waves into ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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  20. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging uses no ionizing radiation. Ultrasound scanning ... radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn ... sexes without x-ray exposure. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ...

  2. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to guide ...

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... help to distract the child and make the time pass quickly. The ultrasound exam room may have ...

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ... bowel (rectum) removed during prior surgery are not good candidates for ultrasound of the prostate gland because ...

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Imaging? Ultrasound waves are disrupted by air or gas; therefore ultrasound is not an ideal imaging technique ... page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ... Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to guide procedures such as needle ...

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound exams in which the transducer ... in the sperm or urine following the procedure. After an ultrasound examination, you should be able to ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... investigation of the uterine cavity . Three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound permits evaluation of the uterus and ovaries ... abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or sonohysterography for patients with infertility. In ...

  9. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... and produces pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound ... from the probe through the gel into the body. The transducer collects the sounds that bounce back ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... and produces pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound ... from the probe through the gel into the body. The transducer collects the sounds that bounce back ...

  11. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Sonohysterography Ultrasound - ...

  12. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heartbeat can be seen as an ongoing ultrasound movie. Ultrasound devices also use Doppler, a special application ... the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by ...

  13. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Sonohysterography Ultrasound - ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... menstrual problems Ultrasound exams also help identify: palpable masses such as ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids ovarian ... In children, pelvic ultrasound can help evaluate: pelvic masses pelvic pain ambiguous genitalia and anomalies of pelvic ...

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive, and does not use ionizing radiation. This procedure requires little to no special preparation. ... create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face-up on an examination table that can be ... region of the prostate. A biopsy will add time to the procedure. If a Doppler ultrasound study ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound: abdominal, vaginal (for women), and rectal (for men). These exams are frequently used to evaluate the ... vaginal ( transvaginal / endovaginal ) for women rectal ( transrectal ) for men A Doppler ultrasound exam may be part of ...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound waves are ...

  1. New technology - demonstration of a vector velocity technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Hansen, Peter; Pedersen, Mads M; Hansen, Kristoffer L

    2011-01-01

    With conventional Doppler ultrasound it is not possible to estimate direction and velocity of blood flow, when the angle of insonation exceeds 60-70°. Transverse oscillation is an angle independent vector velocity technique which is now implemented on a conventional ultrasound scanner. In this pa...

  2. An improved estimation and focusing scheme for vector velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Munk, Peter

    1999-01-01

    to reduce spatial velocity dispersion. Examples of different velocity vector conditions are shown using the Field II simulation program. A relative accuracy of 10.1 % is obtained for the lateral velocity estimates for a parabolic velocity profile for a flow perpendicular to the ultrasound beam and a signal...

  3. Performance of a vector velocity estimator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1998-01-01

    tracking can be found in the literature, but no method with a satisfactory performance has been found that can be used in a commercial implementation. A method for estimation of the velocity vector is presented. Here an oscillation transverse to the ultrasound beam is generated, so that a transverse motion...... in an autocorrelation approach that yields both the axial and the lateral velocity, and thus the velocity vector. The method has the advantage that a standard array transducer and a modified digital beamformer, like those used in modern ultrasound scanners, is sufficient to obtain the information needed. The signal...

  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  5. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... inserted into a man's rectum to view the prostate. Transvaginal ultrasound. The transducer is inserted into a ... Stenting Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Biopsies - Overview Images related to General Ultrasound Videos ...

  6. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging uses sound waves to produce ... the limitations of General Ultrasound Imaging? What is General Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and ...

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... be able to give a clearer picture of soft tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may be repeated as often as is necessary if medically indicated. Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be able to give a clearer picture of soft tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may be repeated as often as is necessary if medically indicated. Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging of the pelvis uses sound waves to ...

  10. Interventional ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanSonnenberg, E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 12 chapters and several case studies. Some of the chapter titles are: The Interplay of Ultrasound and Computed Tomography in the Planning and Execution of Interventional Procedures: Ulltrasound Guided Biopsy; Interventioal Genitourinary Sonography; Diagnosis and Treatment of Pericardial Effusion Using Ultrasonic Guidance; and New Ultrasound-Guided Interventional Procedures--Cholecystostomy, Pancreatography, Gastrostomy

  11. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging ...

  12. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of ...

  13. Ultrasound stethoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C. Vourvouri (Eleni)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis we repmi the many evaluation studies with the hand-held ultrasound device in the assessment of different cardiac pathologies and in different clinical settings. The reason for using the tetm "ultrasound stethoscopy" is that these devices are augmenting our

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not use any ionizing radiation. Ultrasound scanning gives a clear picture of soft tissues that do not show up well on ...

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable or changed over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Ultrasound is widely available, easy-to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging uses ...

  16. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to guide ...

  17. A new estimator for vector velocity estimation [medical ultrasonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2001-01-01

    A new estimator for determining the two-dimensional velocity vector using a pulsed ultrasound field is derived. The estimator uses a transversely modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation...... be introduced, and the velocity estimation is done at a fixed depth in tissue to reduce the influence of a spatial velocity spread. Examples for different velocity vectors and field conditions are shown using both simple and more complex field simulations. A relative accuracy of 10.1% is obtained...

  18. Fetal Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... isn't recommended simply to determine a baby's sex. Similarly, fetal ultrasound isn't recommended solely for the purpose of producing keepsake videos or pictures. If your health care provider doesn' ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  20. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  1. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... nodule felt by a physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time ...

  2. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ... well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may be repeated as often as ...

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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  4. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ... the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and receive the returning sound waves), ...

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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  6. Prostate Ultrasound

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  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... use different transducers (with different capabilities) during a single exam. The transducer sends out high-frequency sound ... modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  9. Prostate Ultrasound

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  10. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... is located directly in front of the rectum, so the ultrasound exam is performed transrectally in order ... A follow-up examination may also be necessary so that any change in a known abnormality can ...

  12. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... the rectal wall is relatively insensitive to the pain in the region of the prostate. A biopsy ... needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ...

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... diagnose symptoms such as difficulty urinating or an elevated blood test result. It’s also used to investigate ... physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and submarines. The ultrasound image is immediately visible ... principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships and fishermen. When a sound wave strikes an ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... areas of the body while other areas, especially air-filled lungs, are poorly suited for ultrasound. For ... make secure contact with the body and eliminate air pockets between the transducer and the skin that ...

  16. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... a follow-up exam is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or ... of soft tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... a follow-up exam is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or ... of soft tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound is the preferred ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... is smaller than the standard speculum used when performing a Pap test . A protective cover is placed ... of soft tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound is the preferred ...

  19. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on ... to do the scanning. The transducer is a small hand-held device that resembles a microphone, attached ...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on ... the child prior to the exam. Bringing books, small toys, music or games can help to distract ...

  1. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... less than 20 minutes. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound ... in the region of the prostate. A biopsy will add time to the procedure. Rarely, a small ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound images are reviewed. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? For ... in the region of the prostate. A biopsy will add time to the procedure. If a Doppler ...

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... arteries and veins in the abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or ... diagnose symptoms experienced by women such as: pelvic pain abnormal vaginal bleeding other menstrual problems Ultrasound exams ...

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... gel. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable or changed ...

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... and development of an embryo or fetus during pregnancy. See the Obstetrical Ultrasound page for more information . ... move through vessels. The movement of blood cells causes a change in pitch of the reflected sound ...

  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body organs such ... and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a ...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not ... barium exams, CT scanning , and MRI are the methods of choice in such a setting. Large patients ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... move through vessels. The movement of blood cells causes a change in pitch of the reflected sound ...

  9. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... gel. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  11. Ultrasound imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, P.N.T.

    1983-01-01

    Ultrasound is a form of energy which consists of mechanical vibrations the frequencies of which are so high that they are above the range of human hearing. The lower frequency limit of the ultrasonic spectrum may generally be taken to be about 20 kHz. Most biomedical applications of ultrasound employ frequencies in the range 1-15 MHz. At these frequencies, the wavelength is in the range 1.5 - 0.1 mm in soft tissues, and narrow beams of ultrasound can be generated which propagate through such tissues without excessive attenuation. This chapter begins with brief reviews of the physics of diagnostic ultrasound pulse-echo imaging methods and Doppler imaging methods. The remainder of the chapter is a resume of the applications of ultrasonic imaging to physiological measurement

  12. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ... Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ...

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ... Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... frequently used to evaluate the reproductive and urinary systems. Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive and does not use ... and evaluate a variety of urinary and reproductive system disorders in both sexes without x-ray exposure. ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... be asked to drink water prior to the examination to fill your bladder. Leave jewelry at home ... those sound waves to create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in ...

  16. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page ... to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ...

  17. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... with measurements acquired as needed for any treatment planning. detect an abnormal growth within the prostate. help ... end of their bowel (rectum) removed during prior surgery are not good candidates for ultrasound of the ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... tip of the transducer is smaller than the standard speculum used when performing a Pap test . A ... both sexes without x-ray exposure. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects ...

  19. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... prostate gland and to help diagnose symptoms such as difficulty urinating or an elevated blood test result. ... image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no ...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... in the abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body organs ... or uterine cancers A transvaginal ultrasound is usually performed to view ...

  1. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... is enlarged, also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) , with measurements acquired as needed for any treatment ... caption Related Articles and Media Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) (Enlargement of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... uterine cavity . Three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound permits evaluation of the uterus and ovaries in planes that ... a special study usually done to provide detailed evaluation of the prostate gland, involves inserting a specialized ...

  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... the examination process. To ensure a smooth experience, it often helps to explain the procedure to the ... on the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... difficulty urinating or an elevated blood test result. It’s also used to investigate a nodule found during ... difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to guide procedures such ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ... and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on ...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... sexes without x-ray exposure. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ... and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... rectum. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A transrectal ultrasound of the ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body organs such as the ... tumors other disorders of the urinary bladder In children, pelvic ultrasound can help evaluate: pelvic masses pelvic ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... uterus). Sonohysterography allows for a more in-depth investigation of the uterine cavity . Three-dimensional (3-D) ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not ...

  11. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... is Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? What are some common uses of the procedure? How should I prepare? What does the equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will I ...

  12. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... quickly. The ultrasound exam room may have a television. Feel free to ask for your child's favorite ... display screen that looks like a computer or television monitor. The image is created based on the ...

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms experienced by women such as: pelvic pain abnormal vaginal bleeding other menstrual problems Ultrasound exams also ... endometrial polyps fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... The ultrasound exam room may have a television. Feel free to ask for your child's favorite channel. ... performed over an area of tenderness, you may feel pressure or minor pain from the transducer. Once ...

  17. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) , with measurements acquired as needed for any treatment planning. detect ... areas of the body while other areas, especially air-filled lungs, are poorly suited for ultrasound. For ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids ovarian or uterine cancers A transvaginal ultrasound is usually performed to view ... detect: uterine anomalies uterine scars endometrial polyps fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some ...

  19. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... rectum. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A transrectal ultrasound of the ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? In women, a pelvic ultrasound ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and ... standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... various body organs such as the liver or kidneys. top of page What are some common uses ... women, a pelvic ultrasound exam can help identify: kidney stones bladder tumors other disorders of the urinary ...

  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... the ovaries. Transvaginal ultrasound also evaluates the myometrium (muscular walls of the uterus). Sonohysterography allows for a ... and evaluate a variety of urinary and reproductive system disorders in both sexes without x-ray exposure. ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and ... work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships ...

  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and ... work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships ...

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... is at high risk for cancer. In this case, a biopsy is performed and an ultrasound probe ... will share the results with you. In some cases, the radiologist may discuss results with you at ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... ovaries. Transvaginal ultrasound also evaluates the myometrium (muscular walls of the uterus). Sonohysterography allows for a more ... needle insertion) is usually minimal because the rectal wall is relatively insensitive to the pain in the ...

  9. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate gland and to help diagnose symptoms such ... also called transrectal ultrasound, provides images of a man's prostate gland and surrounding tissue. The exam typically ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... pain ambiguous genitalia and anomalies of pelvic organs early or delayed puberty in girls Pelvic ultrasound is ... sensitive to motion, and an active or crying child can prolong the examination process. To ensure a ...

  11. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a transducer that ... the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound ...

  12. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the transducer is pressed against the skin, it directs small pulses of inaudible, high-frequency sound waves ...

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... gel. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the transducer is pressed against the skin, it directs small pulses of inaudible, high-frequency sound waves ...

  14. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... used to screen for brain conditions associated with prematurity, such as bleeding or brain tissue damage as ... or crying child will slow the examination process. Large patients are more difficult to image by ultrasound, ...

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... guide biopsy of breast cancer ( see the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose a variety of heart ... Articles and Media Angioplasty and Vascular Stenting Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Biopsies - Overview ...

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of an ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that ... kidneys. There are three types of Doppler ultrasound: Color Doppler uses a computer to convert Doppler measurements ...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging uses sound waves to produce pictures of the inside of ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  18. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... those sound waves to create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in ... ultrasound study may be part of an ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called color Doppler ultrasonography, is ...

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of General Ultrasound Imaging? What is General Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and ... be heard with every heartbeat. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Ultrasound ...

  20. Therapeutic ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crum, Lawrence A

    2004-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in medicine is now quite commonplace, especially with the recent introduction of small, portable and relatively inexpensive, hand-held diagnostic imaging devices. Moreover, ultrasound has expanded beyond the imaging realm, with methods and applications extending to novel therapeutic and surgical uses. These applications broadly include: tissue ablation, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, site-specific and ultrasound mediated drug activity, extracorporeal lithotripsy, and the enhancement of natural physiological functions such as wound healing and tissue regeneration. A particularly attractive aspect of this technology is that diagnostic and therapeutic systems can be combined to produce totally non-invasive, imageguided therapy. This general lecture will review a number of these exciting new applications of ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors as well as the introduction of acoustic hemostasis, especially in organs which are difficult to treat using conventional medical and surgical techniques. (amum lecture)

  1. Validation of Transverse Oscillation Vector Velocity Estimation In-Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Udesen, Jesper; Thomsen, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    Conventional Doppler methods for blood velocity estimation only estimate the velocity component along the ultrasound (US) beam direction. This implies that a Doppler angle under examination close to 90deg results in unreliable information about the true blood direction and blood velocity. The novel...... the presented angle independent 2-D vector velocity method. The results give reason to believe that the TO method can be a useful alternative to conventional Doppler systems bringing forth new information to the US examination of blood flow....

  2. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the prostate. help diagnose the cause of a man's infertility. A transrectal ultrasound of the prostate gland is typically used to help diagnose symptoms such as: a nodule felt by a physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated ...

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on ... with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. ... Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body tissue through which the sound travels. A small amount of gel is put on the skin to allow the sound waves to travel from the transducer to the examined area within the body and then back again. Ultrasound ...

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body tissue through which the sound travels. A small amount of gel is put on the skin to allow the sound waves to travel from the transducer to the examined area within the body and then back again. Ultrasound ...

  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound exams are also used to monitor the health and development of an embryo or fetus during pregnancy. See the ... can help to identify and evaluate a variety of urinary and reproductive system disorders in both sexes without x-ray exposure. ...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and creates graphs ... Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally ... known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  9. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms such as difficulty urinating or an elevated blood test result. It’s also used to investigate a nodule ... exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in which needles are used to extract a sample of cells from organs for laboratory testing. Doppler ultrasound images can help the physician to see and evaluate: blockages to blood flow (such as clots) narrowing of vessels tumors ...

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to guide procedures such as needle biopsies , in which a needle is used to sample cells (tissue) from an abnormal area in the ...

  12. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no radiation exposure to the ... tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may ...

  13. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no radiation exposure to the ... tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from the area within the patient that is being examined to the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and ...

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from the area within the patient that is being examined to the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... by a computer, which in turn creates a real-time picture on the monitor. One or more frames ...

  17. Obstetrical ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    The use of diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics may provide fuel for legal action. While most legal implications of this relatively new imaging modality are purely speculative, some have already given rise to legal action. Several situations will likely provide a basis for the courts to find against the physician. The failure to perform a sonogram when clinically indicated will most likely be the strongest plaintiff argument. Other major concerns include the use and availability of state-of-the-art equipment, as well as interpretation of the scans by a trained physician. Obstetrical ultrasound is usually performed by a radiologist or obstetrician. However, many physicians performing these examinations have had little or no formal training in the field. While this is now being remedied by the respective board examines who require a certain amount of training, it may not be enough. When ultrasound-related cases reach the courts, the involved physicians will most likely be regarded as experts in the field and, therefore, will be held to a very high standard of care. This would be difficult to achieve without formal training. At the present time, the American Board of Radiology requires more training time in ultrasound than the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology

  18. Vector velocity estimation using directional beam forming and cross-correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    The two-dimensional velocity vector using a pulsed ultrasound field can be determined with the invention. The method uses a focused ultrasound field along the velocity direction for probing the moving medium under investigation. Several pulses are emitted and the focused received fields along...

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page How is the procedure performed? For most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face- ... Ultrasound examinations are painless and easily tolerated by most patients. Ultrasound exams in which the transducer is ...

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  1. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Conventional ultrasound displays the images in thin, flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ...

  2. Ultrasound guided supraclavicular block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanumanthaiah, Deepak

    2013-09-01

    Ultrasound guided regional anaesthesia is becoming increasingly popular. The supraclavicular block has been transformed by ultrasound guidance into a potentially safe superficial block. We reviewed the techniques of performing supraclavicular block with special focus on ultrasound guidance.

  3. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... D images. A Doppler ultrasound study may be part of an ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called ... terms of the distance traveled per unit of time, rather than as a color picture. It can ...

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Conventional ultrasound displays the images in thin, ...

  5. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and treat medical conditions. Conventional ultrasound displays the images in thin, flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3- ...

  6. Vascular ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, D B; Ricci, M A

    1998-04-01

    Surgeon-interpreted diagnostic ultrasound has become the preferred screening test and often the definitive test for the diagnosis of arterial stenosis, aneurysm, and venous thrombosis. As a modality for surveillance, its noninvasive quality makes it particularly appealing as the test of choice to screen patients for abdominal aortic aneurysms or to perform follow-up examinations on those patients with a carotid endartectomy or in situ bypass grafts. The increasing reliance on intraoperative duplex imaging of vascular procedures demands that the surgeon learn the skills to perform the studies without a technologist or radiologist to interpret the examination.

  7. Modification of the ultrasound induced activity by the presence of an electrode in a sono-reactor working at two low frequencies (20 and 40 kHz). Part II: Mapping flow velocities by particle image velocimetry (PIV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandroyan, A; Doche, M L; Hihn, J Y; Viennet, R; Bailly, Y; Simonin, L

    2009-01-01

    Sonoelectrochemical experiments differ from sonochemical ones by the introduction of electrodes in the sonicated reaction vessel. The aim of the study is to characterize the changes in the ultrasonic activity induced by the presence of an electrode located in front of the transducer. The scope of our investigations concerns two low frequency vibration modes: 20 and 40 kHz. For this purpose, two laser visualization techniques have been used. The first part of the study, described in a previous paper (Part I), deals with the laser tomography technique which provides an accurate picture of the reactor active zones, related to numerous cavitation events. The second part of the paper (Part II) will describe the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique used to measure the velocity vector field in the fluid portion between the horn and the electrode. As for the previous study, two parameters were studied: the electrical power supplied to the transducer and the electrode/transducer distance. The velocity vector fields show a main flow in the reactor axis. This flow seems to correspond to the conical cavitation bubbles structure which is observed on the laser tomography pictures. When an electrode is introduced into the reactor, two additional symmetric transversal flows can be quantified on both sides of the electrode.

  8. Synergistic effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment combined with UV irradiation for secondary effluent disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xin; Li, Zifu; Xie, Lanlan; Zhao, Yuan; Wang, Tingting

    2013-11-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) disinfection efficiency is often affected by suspended solids (SS). Given their high concentration or large particle size, SS can scatter UV light and provide shielding for bacteria. Thus, ultrasound is often employed as a pre-treatment process to improve UV disinfection. This work investigated the synergistic effect of ultrasound combined with UV for secondary effluent disinfection. Bench-scale experiments were conducted in using samples obtained from secondary sedimentation tanks. These tanks belonged to three wastewater treatment plants in Beijing that use different kinds of biological treatment methods. Several parameters may contribute to the changes in the efficiency of ultrasound and UV disinfection. Thus, the frequency and energy density of ultrasound, as well as the SS, were investigated. Results demonstrated that samples which have relatively higher SS concentrations or higher percentages of larger particles have less disinfection efficiency using UV disinfection alone. However, the presence of ultrasound could improve the disinfection efficiency because it has synergistic effect. Changes in the particle size distribution and SS concentration notably affected the efficiency of UV disinfection. The efficiency of Escherichia coli elimination can be decreased by 1.2 log units as the SS concentration increases from 16.9 mg/l to 25.4 mg/l at a UV energy density of 40 mJ/cm(2). UV disinfection alone reduced the E. coli population by 3.4 log units. However, the synergistic disinfection of ultrasound and UV could reach 5.4 log units during the reduction of E. coli at a 40 kHz frequency and an energy density of 2.64 kJ/l. The additional synergistic effect is 1.1 log units. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. 3D Flow reconstruction using ultrasound PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelma, C.; Mari, J. M.; Foin, N.; Tang, M.-X.; Krams, R.; Caro, C. G.; Weinberg, P. D.; Westerweel, J.

    2011-04-01

    Ultrasound particle image velocimetry (PIV) can be used to obtain velocity fields in non-transparent geometries and/or fluids. In the current study, we use this technique to document the flow in a curved tube, using ultrasound contrast bubbles as flow tracer particles. The performance of the technique is first tested in a straight tube, with both steady laminar and pulsatile flows. Both experiments confirm that the technique is capable of reliable measurements. A number of adaptations are introduced that improve the accuracy and applicability of ultrasound PIV. Firstly, due to the method of ultrasound image acquisition, a correction is required for the estimation of velocities from tracer displacements. This correction accounts for the fact that columns in the image are recorded at slightly different instances. The second improvement uses a slice-by-slice scanning approach to obtain three-dimensional velocity data. This approach is here demonstrated in a strongly curved tube. The resulting flow profiles and wall shear stress distribution shows a distinct asymmetry. To meaningfully interpret these three-dimensional results, knowledge of the measurement thickness is required. Our third contribution is a method to determine this quantity, using the correlation peak heights. The latter method can also provide the third (out-of-plane) component if the measurement thickness is known, so that all three velocity components are available using a single probe.

  10. Ultrasound-enhanced bioscouring of greige cotton: regression analysis of process factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ultrasound-enhanced bioscouring process factors for greige cotton fabric are examined using custom experimental design utilizing statistical principles. An equation is presented which predicts bioscouring performance based upon percent reflectance values obtained from UV-Vis measurements of rutheniu...

  11. Ultrasound in Space Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Sargsyan, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of ultrasound as a diagnostic tool in microgravity environments. The goals of research in ultrasound usage in space environments are: (1) Determine accuracy of ultrasound in novel clinical conditions. (2) Determine optimal training methodologies, (3) Determine microgravity associated changes and (4) Develop intuitive ultrasound catalog to enhance autonomous medical care. Also uses of Ultrasound technology in terrestrial applications are reviewed.

  12. Efeito das dimensões da seção transversal e da frequência do transdutor na velocidade de propagação de ondas de ultra-som na madeira Effect of the transversal section dimensions and transducer frequency on ultrasound wave propagation velocity in wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Julio Trinca

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Diversas pesquisas vêm sendo realizadas com o uso da velocidade de propagação de ondas de ultra-som como parâmetro para estimar propriedades mecânicas da madeira. Tendo em vista que essa velocidade pode ser influenciada pela forma da peça ensaiada, bem como pela frequência do transdutor utilizado no ensaio, conhecer essas fontes de influência é fator importante para a obtenção de resultados confiáveis. Durante estudo mais amplo sobre a influência da dimensão do corpo-de-prova em ensaios destrutivos de compressão paralela às fibras, os corpos-de-prova de 0,03 x 0,03 x 0,09 m e de 0,05 x 0,05 x 0,15 m foram também utilizados para avaliar a variação da velocidade de propagação de ondas de ultrassom em razão da dimensão da peça ensaiada. Para a avaliação da influência da frequência, os ensaios foram realizados com transdutores de onda longitudinal (compressão de 25 kHz, 45 kHz, 80 kHz, 100 kHz, 500 kHz e 1 MHz, em 119 corpos-de-prova de Pinus elliottii e 244 de Eucalyptus grandis. Os resultados indicaram que, em ambas as espécies, a seção transversal exerceu influência na propagação da onda de ultrassom e que a velocidade longitudinal foi fortemente afetada pela frequência do transdutor para frequências abaixo de 500 kHz, corroborando a importância de sempre se adotarem, nos ensaios, relações de comprimento de percurso/comprimento de onda superiores a 3,0.Several works use the ultrasound wave propagation velocity as the main parameter to determine the mechanical properties of wood. Since this velocity can be influenced by the specimen's dimension or by the transducer's frequency, this influence must be known to obtain reliable results. During research on the influence of specimen dimension on destructive testing of the compression parallel to the grain, 0.03 x 0.03 x 0.09 m and 0.05 x 0.05 x 0.15 m specimens were tested to evaluate the variation in wave propagation velocity as a function of specimen dimension

  13. Spectral Velocity Estimation in the Transverse Direction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2013-01-01

    A method for estimating the velocity spectrum for a fully transverse flow at a beam-to-flow angle of 90is described. The approach is based on the transverse oscillation (TO) method, where an oscillation across the ultrasound beam is made during receive processing. A fourth-order estimator based...... on the correlation of the received signal is derived. A Fourier transform of the correlation signal yields the velocity spectrum. Performing the estimation for short data segments gives the velocity spectrum as a function of time as for ordinary spectrograms, and it also works for a beam-to-flow angle of 90...... estimation scheme can reliably find the spectrum at 90, where a traditional estimator yields zero velocity. Measurements have been conducted with the SARUS experimental scanner and a BK 8820e convex array transducer (BK Medical, Herlev, Denmark). A CompuFlow 1000 (Shelley Automation, Inc, Toronto, Canada...

  14. Índice UV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Información general sobre el Índice UV que proporciona un pronóstico del riesgo esperado de sobreexposición a la radiación ultravioleta (UV) del sol. El índice UV va acompañado de recomendaciones para protegerse del sol.

  15. uv dye lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abakumov, G.A.; Fadeev, V.V.; Khokhlov, R.V.; Simonov, A.P.

    1975-01-01

    The most important property of visible dye lasers, that is, continuous wavelength tuning, stimulated the search for dyes capable to lase in uv. They were found in 1968. Now the need for tunable uv lasers for applications in spectroscopy, photochemistry, isotope separation, remote air and sea probing, etc. is clearly seen. A review of some recent advances in uv dye lasers is reviewed

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... size, shape and consistency (whether the object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is ... ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move through vessels. The movement of ...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... procedure? Ultrasound examinations can help to diagnose a variety of conditions and to assess organ damage following ... the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose a variety of heart conditions, including valve problems and congestive ...

  18. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 3-D) ultrasound that formats the sound wave data into 3-D images. A Doppler ultrasound study ... at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 ...

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... 3-D) ultrasound that formats the sound wave data into 3-D images. A Doppler ultrasound study ... to do the scanning. The transducer is a small hand-held device that resembles a microphone, attached ...

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... in infections With knowledge about the speed and volume of blood flow gained from a Doppler ultrasound ... the body while other areas, especially air-filled lungs, are poorly suited for ultrasound. top of page ...

  1. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... color picture. It can also convert blood flow information into a distinctive sound that can be heard ...

  2. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... care physician, or to the physician or other healthcare provider who requested the exam. Usually, the referring ...

  3. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 ...

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Most ultrasound scanning is noninvasive (no needles ... procedures such as needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known ...

  5. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... move through vessels. The movement of blood cells causes a change in pitch of the reflected sound ...

  6. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  7. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a ...

  8. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... need to be returned to the transducer for analysis. Ultrasound has difficulty penetrating bone and, therefore, can ... ultrasound procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric ...

  9. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body organs such as the ...

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... sonography is performed using the same transducer. Rarely, young children may need to be sedated in order ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no ... structure and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... testing. image the breasts and guide biopsy of breast cancer ( see the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose ... Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn ...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn ... needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ...

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound ... computer or television monitor. The image is created based on the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time ...

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... more extensive exams may take up to an hour. When the examination is complete, you may be ...

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Imaging? Ultrasound waves are disrupted by air or gas; therefore ultrasound is not an ideal imaging technique ... with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes ...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... may produce minimal discomfort. If a Doppler ultrasound study is performed, you may actually hear pulse-like sounds that change in pitch as the blood flow is monitored and measured. Most ultrasound examinations ...

  18. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Angioplasty and ...

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... about this beforehand and be made aware of food and drink restrictions that may be needed prior ...

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive, and does not use ionizing radiation. This procedure requires little to no special preparation. ... create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  1. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), comprising physicians with expertise ...

  2. Medical Ultrasound Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Explains the basic principles of ultrasound using everyday physics. Topics include the generation of ultrasound, basic interactions with material, and the measurement of blood flow using the Doppler effect. (Author/MM)

  3. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the transducer is pressed against the skin, it directs small pulses of inaudible, high-frequency sound waves ...

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of General Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound waves are ...

  5. Clinical diagnostic ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, E.; Morley, P.

    1986-01-01

    This textbook on diagnostic ultrasound covers the main systems, with emphasis being placed on the clinical application of diagnostic ultrasound in everyday practice. It provides not only a textbook for postgraduates (particularly FRCR candidates), but also a reference work for practitioners of clinical ultrasound and clinicians generally

  6. Comets in UV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shustov, B.; Sachkov, M.; Gómez de Castro, A. I.; Vallejo, J. C.; Kanev, E.; Dorofeeva, V.

    2018-04-01

    Comets are important "eyewitnesses" of Solar System formation and evolution. Important tests to determine the chemical composition and to study the physical processes in cometary nuclei and coma need data in the UV range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Comprehensive and complete studies require additional ground-based observations and in situ experiments. We briefly review observations of comets in the ultraviolet (UV) and discuss the prospects of UV observations of comets and exocomets with space-borne instruments. A special reference is made to the World Space Observatory-Ultraviolet (WSO-UV) project.

  7. UV exposure in cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehrle, Matthias; Soballa, Martin; Korn, Manfred

    2003-08-01

    There is increasing knowledge about the hazards of solar and ultraviolet (UV) radiation to humans. Although people spend a significant time in cars, data on UV exposure during traveling are lacking. The aim of this study was to obtain basic information on personal UV exposure in cars. UV transmission of car glass samples, windscreen, side and back windows and sunroof, was determined. UV exposure of passengers was evaluated in seven German middle-class cars, fitted with three different types of car windows. UV doses were measured with open or closed windows/sunroof of Mercedes-Benz E 220 T, E 320, and S 500, and in an open convertible car (Mercedes-Benz CLK). Bacillus subtilis spore film dosimeters (Viospor) were attached to the front, vertex, cheeks, upper arms, forearms and thighs of 'adult' and 'child' dummies. UV wavelengths longer than >335 nm were transmitted through car windows, and UV irradiation >380 nm was transmitted through compound glass windscreens. There was some variation in the spectral transmission of side windows according to the type of glass. On the arms, UV exposure was 3-4% of ambient radiation when the car windows were shut, and 25-31% of ambient radiation when the windows were open. In the open convertible car, the relative personal doses reached 62% of ambient radiation. The car glass types examined offer substantial protection against short-wave UV radiation. Professional drivers should keep car windows closed on sunny days to reduce occupational UV exposure. In individuals with polymorphic light eruption, produced by long-wave UVA, additional protection by plastic films, clothes or sunscreens appears necessary.

  8. Multiparametric Quantitative Ultrasound Imaging in Assessment of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Perlman, Alan; Kalache, Safa; Berman, Nathaniel; Seshan, Surya; Salvatore, Steven; Smith, Lindsey; Wehrli, Natasha; Waldron, Levi; Kodali, Hanish; Chevalier, James

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the value of multiparametric quantitative ultrasound imaging in assessing chronic kidney disease (CKD) using kidney biopsy pathologic findings as reference standards. We prospectively measured multiparametric quantitative ultrasound markers with grayscale, spectral Doppler, and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in 25 patients with CKD before kidney biopsy and 10 healthy volunteers. Based on all pathologic (glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy, arteriosclerosis, and edema) scores, the patients with CKD were classified into mild (no grade 3 and quantitative ultrasound parameters included kidney length, cortical thickness, pixel intensity, parenchymal shear wave velocity, intrarenal artery peak systolic velocity (PSV), end-diastolic velocity (EDV), and resistive index. We tested the difference in quantitative ultrasound parameters among mild CKD, moderate to severe CKD, and healthy controls using analysis of variance, analyzed correlations of quantitative ultrasound parameters with pathologic scores and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) using Pearson correlation coefficients, and examined the diagnostic performance of quantitative ultrasound parameters in determining moderate CKD and an estimated GFR of less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. There were significant differences in cortical thickness, pixel intensity, PSV, and EDV among the 3 groups (all P quantitative ultrasound parameters, the top areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for PSV and EDV were 0.88 and 0.97, respectively, for determining pathologic moderate to severe CKD, and 0.76 and 0.86 for estimated GFR of less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . Moderate to good correlations were found for PSV, EDV, and pixel intensity with pathologic scores and estimated GFR. The PSV, EDV, and pixel intensity are valuable in determining moderate to severe CKD. The value of shear wave velocity in

  9. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound and cerebral angiography - alternative or complementary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bockenheimer, S.; Lorey, N.

    1985-01-01

    Transcranial Doppler ultrasound is a noninvasive method of recording the flow velocity of larger intracranial vessels. The impact on diagnosis of cerebravascular occlusive disease is not yet evaluated. We present 15 patients, age range 39-73 years, who suffered from completed stroke. The findings of transcranial Doppler ultrasound and of cerebral angiography are presented. The value of both methods in treatment strategy is discussed. (orig.) [de

  10. Motion Detection in Ultrasound Image-Sequences Using Tensor Voting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inba, Masafumi; Yanagida, Hirotaka; Tamura, Yasutaka

    2008-05-01

    Motion detection in ultrasound image sequences using tensor voting is described. We have been developing an ultrasound imaging system adopting a combination of coded excitation and synthetic aperture focusing techniques. In our method, frame rate of the system at distance of 150 mm reaches 5000 frame/s. Sparse array and short duration coded ultrasound signals are used for high-speed data acquisition. However, many artifacts appear in the reconstructed image sequences because of the incompleteness of the transmitted code. To reduce the artifacts, we have examined the application of tensor voting to the imaging method which adopts both coded excitation and synthetic aperture techniques. In this study, the basis of applying tensor voting and the motion detection method to ultrasound images is derived. It was confirmed that velocity detection and feature enhancement are possible using tensor voting in the time and space of simulated ultrasound three-dimensional image sequences.

  11. UV-induced effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liebsch, M.; Spielmann, H.; Pape, W.; Krul, C.; Deguercy, A.; Eskes, C.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Regulatory requirements: According to the current Notes for Guidance of the Scientific Committee on Cosmetic Products and Non-Food Products (SCCNFP), cosmetic ingredients and mixtures of ingredients absorbing UV light (in particular UV filter chemicals used, for example, to ensure the light

  12. Vector Velocity Imaging Using Cross-Correlation and Virtual Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holfort, Iben Kraglund; Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2006-01-01

    . Using the RASMUS experimental ultrasound scanner, measurements have been carried out in a water tank using a 7~MHz transducer. A 6~mm tube contained the flow and a Danfoss, MAG~3000, magnetic flow meter measured the volume flow. The tube has a parabolic flow profile with a peak velocity of 0.29~m...

  13. Velocity Estimation of the Main Portal Vein with Transverse Oscillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Andreas Hjelm; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates if Transverse Oscillation (TO) can provide reliable and accurate peak velocity estimates of blood flow the main portal vein. TO was evaluated against the recommended and most widely used technique for portal flow estimation, Spectral Doppler Ultrasound (SDU). The main portal...

  14. Controlling the acoustic streaming by pulsed ultrasounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyos, Mauricio; Castro, Angélica

    2013-01-01

    We propose a technique based on pulsed ultrasounds for controlling, reducing to a minimum observable value the acoustic streaming in closed ultrasonic standing wave fluidic resonators. By modifying the number of pulses and the repetition time it is possible to reduce the velocity of the acoustic streaming with respect to the velocity generated by the continuous ultrasound mode of operation. The acoustic streaming is observed at the nodal plane where a suspension of 800nm latex particles was focused by primary radiation force. A mixture of 800nm and 15μm latex particles has been also used for showing that the acoustic streaming is hardly reduced while primary and secondary forces continue to operate. The parameter we call "pulse mode factor" i.e. the time of applied ultrasound divided by the duty cycle, is found to be the adequate parameter that controls the acoustic streaming. We demonstrate that pulsed ultrasound is more efficient for controlling the acoustic streaming than the variation of the amplitude of the standing waves. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Nerve conduction velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003927.htm Nerve conduction velocity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see ...

  16. The velocity of sound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    The paper reviews the work carried out on the velocity of sound in liquid alkali metals. The experimental methods to determine the velocity measurements are described. Tables are presented of reported data on the velocity of sound in lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium. A formula is given for alkali metals, in which the sound velocity is a function of shear viscosity, atomic mass and atomic volume. (U.K.)

  17. Vector velocity ultrasound—a new ultrasound technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lönn, Lars; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Olesen, Jacob Bjerring

    2018-01-01

    • Vector fow techniques, with their many advantages over conventional Doppler techniques, are powerful alternatives for blood fow evaluation. • Vector fow imaging can visualise complex fow; refne the classic fow parameters; and introduce new fow parameters and insonation windows. • These factors...

  18. Contrast enhanced ultrasound in liver imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Bang, Nanna

    2004-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents were originally introduced to enhance the Doppler signals when detecting vessels with low velocity flow or when imaging conditions were sub-optimal. Contrast agents showed additional properties, it was discovered that a parenchymal enhancement phase in the liver followed the enhancement of the blood pool. Contrast agents have made ultrasound scanning more accurate in detection and characterization of focal hepatic lesions and the sensitivity is now comparable with CT and MRI scanning. Further, analysis of the transit time of contrast agent through the liver seems to give information on possible hepatic involvement, not only from focal lesions but also from diffuse benign parenchymal disease. The first ultrasound contrast agents were easily destroyed by the energy from the sound waves but newer agents have proved to last for longer time and hereby enable real-time scanning and make contrast enhancement suitable for interventional procedures such as biopsies and tissue ablation. Also, in monitoring the effect of tumour treatment contrast agents have been useful. A brief overview is given on some possible applications and on different techniques using ultrasound contrast agents in liver imaging. At present, the use of an ultrasound contrast agent that allows real-time scanning with low mechanical index is to be preferred

  19. Improved heating efficiency with High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound using a new ultrasound source excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Timothy A

    2009-01-01

    High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) is quickly becoming one of the best methods to thermally ablate tissue noninvasively. Unlike RF or Laser ablation, the tissue can be destroyed without inserting any probes into the body minimizing the risk of secondary complications such as infections. In this study, the heating efficiency of HIFU sources is improved by altering the excitation of the ultrasound source to take advantage of nonlinear propagation. For ultrasound, the phase velocity of the ultrasound wave depends on the amplitude of the wave resulting in the generation of higher harmonics. These higher harmonics are more efficiently converted into heat in the body due to the frequency dependence of the ultrasound absorption in tissue. In our study, the generation of the higher harmonics by nonlinear propagation is enhanced by transmitting an ultrasound wave with both the fundamental and a higher harmonic component included. Computer simulations demonstrated up to a 300% increase in temperature increase compared to transmitting at only the fundamental for the same acoustic power transmitted by the source.

  20. Ultrasound Vector Flow Imaging: Part II: Parallel Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Yu, Alfred C. H.

    2016-01-01

    The paper gives a review of the current state-of-theart in ultrasound parallel acquisition systems for flow imaging using spherical and plane waves emissions. The imaging methods are explained along with the advantages of using these very fast and sensitive velocity estimators. These experimental...... ultrasound imaging for studying brain function in animals. The paper explains the underlying acquisition and estimation methods for fast 2-D and 3-D velocity imaging and gives a number of examples. Future challenges and the potentials of parallel acquisition systems for flow imaging are also discussed....

  1. TEACHING PHYSICS: An experiment to demonstrate the principles and processes involved in medical Doppler ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, D. G. H.

    2000-09-01

    Doppler ultrasound is widely used in medicine for measuring blood velocity. This paper describes an experiment illustrating the principles of medical Doppler ultrasound. It is designed with A-level/undergraduate physics students in mind. Ultrasound is transmitted in air and reflected from a moving target. The return signal is processed using a series of modules, so that students can discover for themselves how each stage in the instrument works. They can also obtain a quantitative value of the speed of the target.

  2. UV disinfection of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skipperud, E.; Johansen; Myhrstad, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    UV radiation has been found to have advantages over chloration for the disinfection of water. New regulations for dietary conditions on Norwegian ships introduced in 1974 led to increased use of UV disinfection, and this has in the following years spread to waterworks. The present article is based on a study to determine possible limitation. The nature of the injuries to the microorganisms is first discussed, together with repair mechanisms. A table is given showing the energy required for 90 and 100 percent inactivation of a number of microorganisms. Some other factors affecting UV inactivation are briefly mentioned. (JIW)

  3. In Vivo Validation of a Blood Vector Velocity Estimator with MR Angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Udesen, Jesper; Thomsen, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Conventional Doppler methods for blood velocity estimation only estimate the velocity component along the ultrasound beam direction. This implies that a Doppler angle under examination close to 90° results in unreliable information about the true blood direction and blood velocity. The novel method...... indicate that reliable vector velocity estimates can be obtained in vivo using the presented angle-independent 2-D vector velocity method. The TO method can be a useful alternative to conventional Doppler systems by avoiding the angle artifact, thus giving quantitative velocity information....

  4. Preliminary evaluation of vector flow and spectral velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Møller; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Haugaard, Per

    Spectral estimation is considered as the golden standard in ultrasound velocity estimation. For spectral velocity estimation the blood flow angle is set by the ultrasound operator. Vector flow provides temporal and spatial estimates of the blood flow angle and velocity. A comparison of vector flow...... line covering the vessel diameter. A commercial ultrasound scanner (ProFocus 2202, BK Medical, Denmark) and a 7.6 MHz linear transducer was used (8670, BK Medical). The mean vector blood flow angle estimations were calculated {52(18);55(23);60(16)}°. For comparison the fixed angles for spectral...... estimation were obtained {52;56;52}°. The mean vector velocity estimates at PS {76(15);95(17);77(16)}cm/s and at end diastole (ED) {17(6);18(6);24(6)}cm/s were calculated. For comparison spectral velocity estimates at PS {77;110;76}cm/s and ED {18;18;20}cm/s were obtained. The mean vector angle estimates...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... child's abdominal ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that ... and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures that represent the flow of blood through ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of the ... abdomen using ultrasound. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of the ... abdomen using ultrasound. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of ... 30 minutes. top of page What will my child experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound examinations ...

  9. The Indian ultrasound paradox

    OpenAIRE

    Akbulut-Yuksel, Mevlude; Rosenblum, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The liberalization of the Indian economy in the 1990s made prenatal ultrasound technology affordable and available to a large fraction of the population. As a result, ultrasound use amongst pregnant women rose dramatically in many parts of India. This paper provides evidence on the consequences of the expansion of prenatal ultrasound use on sex-selection. We exploit state-by-cohort variation in ultrasound use in India as a unique quasi-experiment. We find that sex-selective abortion of female...

  10. Focused ultrasound in ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverman RH

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ronald H Silverman1,2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Columbia University Medical Center, 2F.L. Lizzi Center for Biomedical Engineering, Riverside Research, New York, NY, USA Abstract: The use of focused ultrasound to obtain diagnostically significant information about the eye goes back to the 1950s. This review describes the historical and technological development of ophthalmic ultrasound and its clinical application and impact. Ultrasound, like light, can be focused, which is crucial for formation of high-resolution, diagnostically useful images. Focused, single-element, mechanically scanned transducers are most common in ophthalmology. Specially designed transducers have been used to generate focused, high-intensity ultrasound that through thermal effects has been used to treat glaucoma (via cilio-destruction, tumors, and other pathologies. Linear and annular transducer arrays offer synthetic focusing in which precise timing of the excitation of independently addressable array elements allows formation of a converging wavefront to create a focus at one or more programmable depths. Most recently, linear array-based plane-wave ultrasound, in which the array emits an unfocused wavefront and focusing is performed solely on received data, has been demonstrated for imaging ocular anatomy and blood flow. While the history of ophthalmic ultrasound extends back over half-a-century, new and powerful technologic advances continue to be made, offering the prospect of novel diagnostic capabilities. Keywords: ophthalmic ultrasound, ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU, ultrafast imaging, Doppler imaging 

  11. Automatic Ultrasound Scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moshavegh, Ramin

    on the user adjustments on the scanner interface to optimize the scan settings. This explains the huge interest in the subject of this PhD project entitled “AUTOMATIC ULTRASOUND SCANNING”. The key goals of the project have been to develop automated techniques to minimize the unnecessary settings...... on the scanners, and to improve the computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) in ultrasound by introducing new quantitative measures. Thus, four major issues concerning automation of the medical ultrasound are addressed in this PhD project. They touch upon gain adjustments in ultrasound, automatic synthetic aperture image...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  13. Point of Care Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Goudie, Adrian; Chiorean, Liliana

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, the use of portable ultrasound scanners has enhanced the concept of point of care ultrasound (PoC-US), namely, "ultrasound performed at the bedside and interpreted directly by the treating clinician." PoC-US is not a replacement for comprehensive ultrasound, but rather allows...... and critical care medicine, cardiology, anesthesiology, rheumatology, obstetrics, neonatology, gynecology, gastroenterology and many other applications. In the future, PoC-US will be more diverse than ever and be included in medical student training....

  14. Ultrasound skin tightening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkis, Kira; Alam, Murad

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound skin tightening is a noninvasive, nonablative method that allows for energy deposition into the deep dermal and subcutaneous tissue while avoiding epidermal heating. Ultrasound coagulation is confined to arrays of 1-mm(3) zones that include the superficial musculoaponeurotic system and connective tissue. This technology gained approval from the Food and Drug Administration as the first energy-based skin "lifting" device, specifically for lifting lax tissue on the neck, submentum, and eyebrows. Ultrasound has the unique advantage of direct visualization of treated structures during treatment. Ultrasound is a safe and efficacious treatment for mild skin tightening and lifting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Efficient focusing scheme for transverse velocity estimation using cross-correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2001-01-01

    simulations with Field II. A 64-elements, 5 MHz linear array was used. A parabolic velocity profile with a peak velocity of 0.5 m/s was considered for different angles between the flow and the ultrasound beam and for different emit foci. At 60 degrees the relative standard deviation was 0.58 % for a transmit...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Children's (pediatric) abdominal ultrasound imaging produces pictures ...

  17. Educational ultrasound nondestructive testing laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genis, Vladimir; Zagorski, Michael

    2008-09-01

    The ultrasound nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of materials course was developed for applied engineering technology students at Drexel University's Goodwin College of Professional Studies. This three-credit, hands-on laboratory course consists of two parts: the first part with an emphasis on the foundations of NDE, and the second part during which ultrasound NDE techniques are utilized in the evaluation of parts and materials. NDE applications are presented and applied through real-life problems, including calibration and use of the latest ultrasonic testing instrumentation. The students learn engineering and physical principles of measurements of sound velocity in different materials, attenuation coefficients, material thickness, and location and dimensions of discontinuities in various materials, such as holes, cracks, and flaws. The work in the laboratory enhances the fundamentals taught during classroom sessions. This course will ultimately result in improvements in the educational process ["The greater expectations," national panel report, http://www.greaterexpectations.org (last viewed February, 2008); R. M. Felder and R. Brent "The intellectual development of Science and Engineering Students. Part 2: Teaching to promote growth," J. Eng. Educ. 93, 279-291 (2004)] since industry is becoming increasingly reliant on the effective application of NDE technology and the demand on NDE specialists is increasing. NDE curriculum was designed to fulfill levels I and II NDE in theory and training requirements, according to American Society for Nondestructive Testing, OH, Recommended Practice No. SNT-TC-1A (2006).

  18. Wastewater disinfection by combination of ultrasound and ultraviolet irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naddeo, V., E-mail: vnaddeo@unisa.it [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Salerno, Via Ponte don Melillo, 1, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Landi, M.; Belgiorno, V. [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Salerno, Via Ponte don Melillo, 1, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Napoli, R.M.A. [Department of Environmental Science, University of Napoli Parthenope, Via Amm. F. Acton, 38, 80133 Napoli (Italy)

    2009-09-15

    Reclamation and reuse of wastewater is one of the most effective ways to alleviate water resource scarcity. In many countries very stringent limit for chlorination by-products such as trihalomethanes has been set for wastewater reuse. Accordingly, the use of alternative oxidation/disinfection systems should be evaluated as possible alternative to chlorine. Recently ultrasound (US) was found to be effective as pre-treatment for wastewater disinfection by UV irradiation. The aim of this work is to investigate the wastewater advanced treatment by simultaneous combination of UV and US in terms of bacteria inactivation (Total coliform and Escherichia coli) at pilot-scale. The pilot plant was composed of two reactors: US-UV reactor and UV reactor. The influence of different reaction times, respective US and UV dose and synergistic effect was tested and discussed for two different kinds of municipal wastewater. An important enhancement of UV disinfection ability has been observed in presence of US, especially with wastewater characterized by low transmittance. In particular the inactivation was greater for T. coliform than for E. coli. Furthermore, the results obtained showed also that the fouling formation on the lamps was slower in US-UV reactor than in UV reactor both with and without solar radiation.

  19. Wastewater disinfection by combination of ultrasound and ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naddeo, V.; Landi, M.; Belgiorno, V.; Napoli, R.M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Reclamation and reuse of wastewater is one of the most effective ways to alleviate water resource scarcity. In many countries very stringent limit for chlorination by-products such as trihalomethanes has been set for wastewater reuse. Accordingly, the use of alternative oxidation/disinfection systems should be evaluated as possible alternative to chlorine. Recently ultrasound (US) was found to be effective as pre-treatment for wastewater disinfection by UV irradiation. The aim of this work is to investigate the wastewater advanced treatment by simultaneous combination of UV and US in terms of bacteria inactivation (Total coliform and Escherichia coli) at pilot-scale. The pilot plant was composed of two reactors: US-UV reactor and UV reactor. The influence of different reaction times, respective US and UV dose and synergistic effect was tested and discussed for two different kinds of municipal wastewater. An important enhancement of UV disinfection ability has been observed in presence of US, especially with wastewater characterized by low transmittance. In particular the inactivation was greater for T. coliform than for E. coli. Furthermore, the results obtained showed also that the fouling formation on the lamps was slower in US-UV reactor than in UV reactor both with and without solar radiation.

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging ...

  1. Medical ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    The paper gives an introduction to current medical ultrasound imaging systems. The basics of anatomic and blood flow imaging are described. The properties of medical ultrasound and its focusing are described, and the various methods for two- and three-dimensional imaging of the human anatomy...

  2. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to image by ultrasound because greater amounts of tissue attenuate (weaken) the sound waves as they pass deeper into the body and need to be returned to the transducer for analysis. Ultrasound has difficulty penetrating bone and, therefore, can only see the outer surface ...

  3. Ultrasound: Bladder (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If You Have Questions Print en español Ultrasonido: vejiga What It Is A bladder ultrasound is a safe and painless test that ... Exam: Voiding Cystourethrogram (VCUG) Ultrasound: Renal (Kidneys, Ureters, Bladder) Urinary ... only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All ...

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the ...

  5. Carotid stenosis measurement on colour Doppler ultrasound: Agreement of ECST, NASCET and CCA methods applied to ultrasound with intra-arterial angiographic stenosis measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Lewis, Steff

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Carotid stenosis is usually determined on Doppler ultrasound from velocity readings. We wondered if angiography-style stenosis measurements applied to ultrasound images improved accuracy over velocity readings alone, and if so, which measure correlated best with angiography. Materials and methods: We studied prospectively patients undergoing colour Doppler ultrasound (CDU) for TIA or minor stroke. Those with 50%+ symptomatic internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis had intra-arterial angiography (IAA). We measured peak systolic ICA velocity, and from the ultrasound image, the minimal residual lumen, the original lumen (ECST), ICA diameter distal (NASCET) and CCA diameter proximal (CCA method) to the stenosis. The IAAs were measured by ECST, NASCET and CCA methods also, blind to CDU. Results: Amongst 164 patients (328 arteries), on CDU the ECST, NASCET and CCA stenosis measures were similarly related to each other (ECST = 0.54 NASCET + 46) as on IAA (ECST = 0.6 NASCET + 40). Agreement between CDU- and IAA-measured stenosis was similar for ECST (r = 0.51), and CCA (r = 0.48) methods, and slightly worse for NASCET (r = 0.41). Adding IAA-style stenosis to the peak systolic ICA velocity did not improve agreement with IAA over peak systolic velocity alone. Conclusion: Angiography-style stenosis measures have similar inter-relationships when applied to CDU, but do not improve accuracy of ultrasound over peak systolic ICA velocity alone

  6. Water velocity meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, C. W.; Smith, D. L.

    1970-01-01

    Simple, inexpensive drag sphere velocity meter with a zero to 6 ft/sec range measures steady-state flow. When combined with appropriate data acquisition system, it is suited to applications where large numbers of simultaneous measurements are needed for current mapping or velocity profile determination.

  7. Changes in cerebral artery blood flow velocity after intermittent cerebrospinal fluid drainage.

    OpenAIRE

    Kempley, S T; Gamsu, H R

    1993-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound was used to measure blood flow velocity in the anterior cerebral artery of six premature infants with posthaemorrhagic hydrocephalus, before and after intermittent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage, on 23 occasions. There was a significant increase in mean blood flow velocity after the drainage procedures (+5.6 cm/s, 95% confidence interval +2.9 to +8.3 cm/s), which was accompanied by a decrease in velocity waveform pulsatility. CSF pressure also fell significantly. In pat...

  8. A dual-phantom system for validation of velocity measurements in stenosis models under steady flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, James R; Easson, William J; Hoskins, Peter R

    2009-09-01

    A dual-phantom system is developed for validation of velocity measurements in stenosis models. Pairs of phantoms with identical geometry and flow conditions are manufactured, one for ultrasound and one for particle image velocimetry (PIV). The PIV model is made from silicone rubber, and a new PIV fluid is made that matches the refractive index of 1.41 of silicone. Dynamic scaling was performed to correct for the increased viscosity of the PIV fluid compared with that of the ultrasound blood mimic. The degree of stenosis in the models pairs agreed to less than 1%. The velocities in the laminar flow region up to the peak velocity location agreed to within 15%, and the difference could be explained by errors in ultrasound velocity estimation. At low flow rates and in mild stenoses, good agreement was observed in the distal flow fields, excepting the maximum velocities. At high flow rates, there was considerable difference in velocities in the poststenosis flow field (maximum centreline differences of 30%), which would seem to represent real differences in hydrodynamic behavior between the two models. Sources of error included: variation of viscosity because of temperature (random error, which could account for differences of up to 7%); ultrasound velocity estimation errors (systematic errors); and geometry effects in each model, particularly because of imperfect connectors and corners (systematic errors, potentially affecting the inlet length and flow stability). The current system is best placed to investigate measurement errors in the laminar flow region rather than the poststenosis turbulent flow region.

  9. UV Deprivation Influences Social UV Preference in Juvenile Sticklebacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricarda Modarressie

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Social aggregations occur in many different animal taxa and mainly result from non-random assortment. Investigating factors that shape and maintain the composition of social aggregations are among others a main topic for understanding ecological speciation processes. Aggregation decisions are mediated by olfactory and visual cues, which in many animals are extended into the UV part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Here, we were interested in developmental plasticity of social preferences with respect to UV radiation in aquatic organisms. Specifically, we tested whether different lighting environments with respect to UV wavelengths during early life stages influence the shoaling preference in juvenile threespine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus. Family (full-sibling groups were split and reared under UV-lacking (UV- and UV-present (UV+ lighting conditions. Subsequent shoal choice experiments, in which test fish from both rearing conditions could simultaneously choose between a shoal seen behind a UV-blocking (UV- and a shoal seen behind a UV-transmitting (UV+ filter, revealed a significant effect of lighting condition during rearing on association preference. Test fish that had been deprived of UV spent significantly more time near the UV- shoal compared to the test fish reared under full-spectrum lighting conditions. The results are discussed with respect to plasticity of the visual system and environmental lighting conditions.

  10. UV spectroscopy. Ch. 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, Eugene S.

    1991-01-01

    The use of synchrotron radiation (SR) in the ultraviolet (UV) region by biophysics and biophysical chemists continues to increase as access improves and as awareness of its unique combination of properties grows. SR is continuously tunable, intense (even in the UV region), and pulsed. Pulse characteristics are comparable to those of picosecond lasers, but have the advantage of being independent of wavelength. Drawbacks are the continuous, but slow, decay of intensity arising from loss of particles in the ring, and the intrinsic limitation in pulse repetition rate. The particular combination of features that makes SR a superior light source depends upon the application. Spectroscopic techniques based on absorption and some techniques based on emission exploit its intensity and continuous tunability; time resolved techniques make use of its pulse characteristics. This chapter is a status report on two of the major biological applications of UV SR, circular dichroism and time-resolved fluorescence, covering mainly the published literature of the last five years. For the present purpose, the term UV is understood to include the vacuum ultraviolet region to 100 nm. (author). 83 refs.; 4 figs.; 6 tabs

  11. Ultrasound in Enzyme Activation and Inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawson, Raymond; Gamage, Mala; Terefe, Netsanet Shiferaw; Knoerzer, Kai

    As discussed in previous chapters, most effects due to ultrasound arise from cavitation events, in particular, collapsing cavitation bubbles. These collapsing bubbles generate very high localized temperatures and pressure shockwaves along with micro-streaming that is associated with high shear forces. These effects can be used to accelerate the transport of substrates and reaction products to and from enzymes, and to enhance mass transfer in enzyme reactor systems, and thus improve efficiency. However, the high velocity streaming, together with the formation of hydroxy radicals and heat generation during collapsing of bubbles, may also potentially affect the biocatalyst stability, and this can be a limiting factor in combined ultrasound/enzymatic applications. Typically, enzymes can be readily denatured by slight changes in environmental conditions, including temperature, pressure, shear stress, pH and ionic strength.

  12. Velocity Feedback Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu Choi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Transient response such as ringing in a control system can be reduced or removed by velocity feedback. It is a useful control technique that should be covered in the relevant engineering laboratory courses. We developed velocity feedback experiments using two different low cost technologies, viz., operational amplifiers and microcontrollers. These experiments can be easily integrated into laboratory courses on feedback control systems or microcontroller applications. The intent of developing these experiments was to illustrate the ringing problem and to offer effective, low cost solutions for removing such problem. In this paper the pedagogical approach for these velocity feedback experiments was described. The advantages and disadvantages of the two different implementation of velocity feedback were discussed also.

  13. The critical ionization velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raadu, M.A.

    1980-06-01

    The critical ionization velocity effect was first proposed in the context of space plasmas. This effect occurs for a neutral gas moving through a magnetized plasma and leads to rapid ionization and braking of the relative motion when a marginal velocity, 'the critical velocity', is exceeded. Laboratory experiments have clearly established the significance of the critical velocity and have provided evidence for an underlying mechanism which relies on the combined action of electron impact ionization and a collective plasma interaction heating electrons. There is experimental support for such a mechanism based on the heating of electrons by the modified two-stream instability as part of a feedback process. Several applications to space plasmas have been proposed and the possibility of space experiments has been discussed. (author)

  14. High Velocity Gas Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  15. Ultrasound propagation in dense aerogels filled with liquid 4He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, K; Ohmori, K; Abe, S; Kanamori, K; Nakanishi, K

    2012-01-01

    Longitudinal ultrasound propagation was studied in dense aerogels filled with liquid 4 He. Sound velocity and attenuation were measured at the frequency of 6 MHz in both normal and superfluid phases. Pressure dependence of velocity and attenuation were also studied. Studied aerogels had porosities about 85%. They had two different types of structure, tangled strand structure and aggregated particles structure. The pore size distributions were narrow. Reduction of superfluid transition temperature mainly depended on not porosity but mean pore size. The structure of gel played an important role in sound velocity and attenuation.

  16. MP3 compression of Doppler ultrasound signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poepping, Tamie L; Gill, Jeremy; Fenster, Aaron; Holdsworth, David W

    2003-01-01

    The effect of lossy, MP3 compression on spectral parameters derived from Doppler ultrasound (US) signals was investigated. Compression was tested on signals acquired from two sources: 1. phase quadrature and 2. stereo audio directional output. A total of 11, 10-s acquisitions of Doppler US signal were collected from each source at three sites in a flow phantom. Doppler signals were digitized at 44.1 kHz and compressed using four grades of MP3 compression (in kilobits per second, kbps; compression ratios in brackets): 1400 kbps (uncompressed), 128 kbps (11:1), 64 kbps (22:1) and 32 kbps (44:1). Doppler spectra were characterized by peak velocity, mean velocity, spectral width, integrated power and ratio of spectral power between negative and positive velocities. The results suggest that MP3 compression on digital Doppler US signals is feasible at 128 kbps, with a resulting 11:1 compression ratio, without compromising clinically relevant information. Higher compression ratios led to significant differences for both signal sources when compared with the uncompressed signals. Copyright 2003 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is used to help diagnose the causes of pain, swelling and infection in the body’s internal organs ... used to help physicians evaluate symptoms such as: pain swelling infection Ultrasound is a useful way of ...

  18. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  19. Stone fragmentation by ultrasound

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    In the present work, enhancement of the kidney stone fragmentation by using ultrasound is studied. The cavi- ... ment system like radiation pressure balance, the power is given by ... Thus the bubble size has direct relationship with its life and.

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ... the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and receive the returning sound waves), ...

  1. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ovaries , and unborn child ( fetus ) in pregnant patients eyes thyroid and parathyroid glands scrotum (testicles) brain in ... Any portions that are not wiped off will dry quickly. The ultrasound gel does not usually stain ...

  2. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... General ultrasound procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  3. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... use different transducers (with different capabilities) during a single exam. The transducer sends out high-frequency sound ... modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... types of Doppler ultrasound: Color Doppler uses a computer to convert Doppler measurements into an array of ...

  5. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... areas of the body while other areas, especially air-filled lungs, are poorly suited for ultrasound. top ... make secure contact with the body and eliminate air pockets between the transducer and the skin that ...

  6. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... image the breasts and guide biopsy of breast cancer ( see the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose ... are sometimes the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable ...

  7. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... a follow-up exam is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or ... of soft tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound is the preferred ...

  8. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on ... to do the scanning. The transducer is a small hand-held device that resembles a microphone, attached ...

  9. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Any portions that are not wiped off will dry quickly. The ultrasound gel does not usually stain ... are sometimes the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable ...

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... arteries and veins in the abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or ... used to help physicians evaluate symptoms such as: pain swelling infection Ultrasound is a useful way of ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... baby in pregnant women and the brain and hips in infants. It’s also used to help guide ... and parathyroid glands scrotum (testicles) brain in infants hips in infants spine in infants Ultrasound is also ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... organs and to examine a baby in pregnant women and the brain and hips in infants. It’s ... modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not ... barium exams, CT scanning , and MRI are the methods of choice in such a setting. Large patients ...

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ... Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ...

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the transducer for analysis. Ultrasound has difficulty penetrating bone and, therefore, can only see the outer surface ... children or adults). For visualizing internal structure of bones or certain joints, other imaging modalities such as ...

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the probe through ... a single exam. The transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) ...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... in infections With knowledge about the speed and volume of blood flow gained from a Doppler ultrasound ... Some exams may use different transducers (with different capabilities) during a single exam. The transducer sends out ...

  18. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... biopsies , in which needles are used to sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. image ... ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move through vessels. The movement of ...

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... heartbeat. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Ultrasound examinations can help to ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  1. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... terms of the distance traveled per unit of time, rather than as a color picture. It can ...

  2. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X- ... use high frequency sound waves to produce an image and do not expose the individual to radiation. ...

  3. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... spleen pancreas kidneys bladder uterus , ovaries , and unborn child ( fetus ) in pregnant patients eyes thyroid and parathyroid glands scrotum (testicles) brain in infants hips in infants spine in infants Ultrasound is also used to: guide ...

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spleen pancreas kidneys bladder uterus , ovaries , and unborn child ( fetus ) in pregnant patients eyes thyroid and parathyroid glands scrotum (testicles) brain in infants hips in infants spine in infants Ultrasound is also used to: guide ...

  5. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ... time, rather than as a color picture. It can also convert blood flow information into a distinctive ...

  6. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and be made aware of food and drink restrictions that may be needed prior to sedation. Once ... modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  7. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... is General Ultrasound Imaging? What are some common uses of the procedure? How should I prepare? What does the equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will I ...

  8. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Angioplasty and Vascular Stenting ...

  9. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... as needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects ... possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a ...

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Videos related to General Ultrasound Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... needles are used to sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. image the breasts and ... of organs, tissues, and vessels or to detect abnormal masses, such as tumors. In an ultrasound examination, ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Angioplasty and ...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No Please type your comment or suggestion ... General ultrasound procedure View full size with caption Pediatric ...

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... heartbeat. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Ultrasound examinations can help to ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... kidneys. There are three types of Doppler ultrasound: Color Doppler uses a computer to convert Doppler measurements into an array of colors to show the speed and direction of blood ...

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and ... standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the ...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... biopsies , in which needles are used to sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. image the breasts and guide biopsy of breast cancer ( see the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose ...

  18. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... fitting clothing for your ultrasound exam. You may need to remove all clothing and jewelry in the ... using the same transducer. Rarely, young children may need to be sedated in order to hold still ...

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... various body organs such as the liver or kidneys. There are three types of Doppler ultrasound: Color ... and its major branches liver gallbladder spleen pancreas kidneys bladder uterus , ovaries , and unborn child ( fetus ) in ...

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and ... work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships ...

  1. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... organs and to examine a baby in pregnant women and the brain and hips in infants. It’s ... Transvaginal ultrasound. The transducer is inserted into a woman's vagina to view the uterus and ovaries. top ...

  2. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face-up on an examination table that can be ... in a known abnormality can be monitored over time. Follow-up examinations are sometimes the best way ...

  3. [Basics of emergency ultrasound].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellhaas, S; Breitkreutz, R

    2012-09-05

    Focused ultrasound is a key methodology of critical care medicine. By referencing few ultrasound differential diagnosis, it is possible to identifying in real-time the reason of the critical state of a patient. Therefore typical focused ultrasound protocols were developed. The well known Focused Assessment with Sonography for trauma (FAST) was incorporated into the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) for shock room. Focused echocardiographic evaluation in life support (FEEL) has been designed to be conformed with the universal Advanced Life Support (ALS) algorithm and to identify treatable conditions such as acute right ventricular pressure overload in pulmonary embolism, hypovolemia, or pericardial effusion/tamponade. Using lung ultrasound one can differentiate pulmonary edema, pleural effusion or pneumothorax.

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a transducer that ... the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound ...

  5. Biobased Nanoparticles for Broadband UV Protection with Photostabilized UV Filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayden, D.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412640694; Imhof, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/145641600; Velikov, K. P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/239483472

    2016-01-01

    Sunscreens rely on multiple compounds to provide effective and safe protection against UV radiation. UV filters in sunscreens, in particular, provide broadband UV protection but are heavily linked to adverse health effects due to the generation of carcinogenic skin-damaging reactive oxygen species

  6. [Ultrasound findings in rhabdomyolysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Galván-Talamantes, Yazmin; Meza-Ayala, Cynthia Margarita; Cruz-Santana, Julio Alberto; Bonilla-Reséndiz, Luis Ignacio

    Rhabdomyolysis is defined as skeletal muscle necrosis. Ultrasound assessment has recently become a useful tool for the diagnosis and monitoring of muscle diseases, including rhabdomyolysis. A case is presented on the ultrasound findings in a patient with rhabdomyolysis. To highlight the importance of ultrasound as an essential part in the diagnosis in rhabdomyolysis, to describe the ultrasound findings, and review the literature. A 30 year-old with post-traumatic rhabdomyolysis of both thighs. Ultrasound was performed using a Philips Sparq model with a high-frequency linear transducer (5-10MHz), in low-dimensional scanning mode (2D), in longitudinal and transverse sections at the level of both thighs. The images obtained showed disorganisation of the orientation of the muscle fibres, ground glass image, thickening of the muscular fascia, and the presence of anechoic areas. Ultrasound is a useful tool in the evaluation of rhabdomyolysis. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of Different Working Modes of Ultrasound on Structural Characteristics of Zein and ACE Inhibitory Activity of Hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Ren

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound was used as a new technology to pretreat protein prior to proteolysis to improve enzymolysis efficiency. The effects of different working modes of ultrasound on the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory activity of zein hydrolysates and the structural characteristics of zein were investigated. The solubility, surface hydrophobicity (H0, ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis spectra, intrinsic fluorescence spectra, and circular dichroism (CD spectra of zein pretreated with ultrasound were determined. All ultrasound pretreatments significantly improved the ACE inhibitory activity of zein hydrolysates (p<0.05. The highest ACE inhibitory activity, representing an increase of 99.21% over the control, was obtained with dual sweeping frequency ultrasound of 33±2 and 68±2 kHz. The effects of single sweeping frequency and dual fixed frequency ultrasound were stronger than those of single fixed frequency ultrasound for improving the ACE inhibitory activity of zein. Structural changes in zein were induced by ultrasound, as confirmed by changes in the solubility, H0, UV-Vis spectra, intrinsic fluorescence spectra, and CD spectra of zein, and these were consistent with the corresponding ACE inhibitory activities of zein hydrolysates. Thus, ultrasound working mode and frequency have significant effects on the structure of zein and the ACE inhibitory activity of zein hydrolysates.

  8. Estimation of velocity vector angles using the directional cross-correlation method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2006-01-01

    and then select the angle with the highest normalized correlation between directional signals. The approach is investigated using Field II simulations and data from the experimental ultrasound scanner RASMUS and a circulating flow rig with a parabolic flow having a peak velocity of 0.3 m/s. A 7 MHz linear array......A method for determining both velocity magnitude and angle in any direction is suggested. The method uses focusing along the velocity direction and cross-correlation for finding the correct velocity magnitude. The angle is found from beamforming directional signals in a number of directions...... transducer is used with a normal transmission of a focused ultrasound field. In the simulations the relative standard deviation of the velocity magnitude is between 0.7% and 7.7% for flow angles between 45 deg and 90 deg. The study showed that angle estimation by directional beamforming can be estimated...

  9. Spectral velocity estimation using autocorrelation functions for sparse data sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of velocities of blood or tissue is displayed using ultrasound scanners by finding the power spectrum of the received signal. This is currently done by making a Fourier transform of the received signal and then showing spectra in an M-mode display. It is desired to show a B......-mode image for orientation, and data for this has to acquired interleaved with the flow data. The power spectrum can be calculated from the Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function Ry (k), where its span of lags k is given by the number of emission N in the data segment for velocity estimation...

  10. Standardization of UV LED measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppeldauer, G. P.; Larason, T. C.; Yoon, H. W.

    2015-09-01

    Traditionally used source spectral-distribution or detector spectral-response based standards cannot be applied for accurate UV LED measurements. Since the CIE standardized rectangular-shape spectral response function for UV measurements cannot be realized with small spectral mismatch when using filtered detectors, the UV measurement errors can be several times ten percent or larger. The UV LEDs produce broadband radiation and both their peaks or spectral bandwidths can change significantly. The detectors used for the measurement of these LEDs also have different spectral bandwidths. In the discussed example, where LEDs with 365 nm peak are applied for fluorescent crack-recognition using liquid penetrant (non-destructive) inspection, the broadband radiometric LED (signal) measurement procedure is standardized. A UV LED irradiance-source was calibrated against an FEL lamp standard to determine its spectral irradiance. The spectral irradiance responsivity of a reference UV meter was also calibrated. The output signal of the reference UV meter was calculated from the spectral irradiance of the UV source and the spectral irradiance responsivity of the reference UV meter. From the output signal, both the integrated irradiance (in the reference plane of the reference meter) and the integrated responsivity of the reference meter were determined. Test UV meters calibrated for integrated responsivity against the reference UV meter, can be used to determine the integrated irradiance from a field UV source. The obtained 5 % (k=2) measurement uncertainty can be decreased when meters with spectral response close to a constant value are selected.

  11. Health hazards of UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthes, R.

    1994-01-01

    The author describes the effects and health risks of UV exposure. This includes UV effects on the DNS, the eyes, the immune system, and the skin. Finally, recommendations are given for protection against excessive UV exposure on the basis of the IRPA/INIRC guidelines. (orig.) [de

  12. Transverse effects in UV FELs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small, D.W.; Wong, R.K.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-01-01

    In an ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL), the electron beam size can be approximately the same as the optical mode size. The performance of a UV FEL is studied including the effect of emittance, betatron focusing, and external focusing of the electron beam on the transverse optical mode. The results are applied to the Industrial Laser Consortium's UV FEL

  13. Chemical and UV Mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Jeffrey L

    2016-01-01

    The ability to create mutations is an important step towards understanding bacterial physiology and virulence. While targeted approaches are invaluable, the ability to produce genome-wide random mutations can lead to crucial discoveries. Transposon mutagenesis is a useful approach, but many interesting mutations can be missed by these insertions that interrupt coding and noncoding sequences due to the integration of an entire transposon. Chemical mutagenesis and UV-based random mutagenesis are alternate approaches to isolate mutations of interest with the potential of only single nucleotide changes. Once a standard method, difficulty in identifying mutation sites had decreased the popularity of this technique. However, thanks to the recent emergence of economical whole-genome sequencing, this approach to making mutations can once again become a viable option. Therefore, this chapter provides an overview protocol for random mutagenesis using UV light or DNA-damaging chemicals.

  14. UV curable materials development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, B.G.

    1996-12-01

    Adhesives, coatings, and inks were selected for evaluation based on literature search and possible production applications. A differential photocalorimeter was used to measure degree of cure and allow prediction of optimum processing conditions. UV cure equipment were characterized and the ability to size equipment to specific materials cure needs established. Adhesion tests procedures were developed for the adhesives and solvent resistance testing procedures developed for the coatings and inks.

  15. Modified circular velocity law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djeghloul, Nazim

    2018-05-01

    A modified circular velocity law is presented for a test body orbiting around a spherically symmetric mass. This law exhibits a distance scale parameter and allows to recover both usual Newtonian behaviour for lower distances and a constant velocity limit at large scale. Application to the Galaxy predicts the known behaviour and also leads to a galactic mass in accordance with the measured visible stellar mass so that additional dark matter inside the Galaxy can be avoided. It is also shown that this circular velocity law can be embedded in a geometrical description of spacetime within the standard general relativity framework upon relaxing the usual asymptotic flatness condition. This formulation allows to redefine the introduced Newtonian scale limit in term of the central mass exclusively. Moreover, a satisfactory answer to the galactic escape speed problem can be provided indicating the possibility that one can also get rid of dark matter halo outside the Galaxy.

  16. UV Radiation and the Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Scott

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available UV radiation (UV is classified as a “complete carcinogen” because it is both a mutagen and a non-specific damaging agent and has properties of both a tumor initiator and a tumor promoter. In environmental abundance, UV is the most important modifiable risk factor for skin cancer and many other environmentally-influenced skin disorders. However, UV also benefits human health by mediating natural synthesis of vitamin D and endorphins in the skin, therefore UV has complex and mixed effects on human health. Nonetheless, excessive exposure to UV carries profound health risks, including atrophy, pigmentary changes, wrinkling and malignancy. UV is epidemiologically and molecularly linked to the three most common types of skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma, which together affect more than a million Americans annually. Genetic factors also influence risk of UV-mediated skin disease. Polymorphisms of the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R gene, in particular, correlate with fairness of skin, UV sensitivity, and enhanced cancer risk. We are interested in developing UV-protective approaches based on a detailed understanding of molecular events that occur after UV exposure, focusing particularly on epidermal melanization and the role of the MC1R in genome maintenance.

  17. The Prescribed Velocity Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    The- velocity level in a room ventilated by jet ventilation is strongly influenced by the supply conditions. The momentum flow in the supply jets controls the air movement in the room and, therefore, it is very important that the inlet conditions and the numerical method can generate a satisfactory...

  18. Multidisc neutron velocity selector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosta, L.; Zsigmond, Gy.; Farago, B.; Mezei, F.; Ban, K.; Perendi, J.

    1987-12-01

    The prototype of a velocity selector for neutron monochromatization in the 4-20 A wavelength range is presented. The theoretical background of the multidisc rotor system is given together with a description of the mechanical construction and electronic driving system. The first tests and neutron measurements prove easy handling and excellent parameters. (author) 6 refs.; 7 figs.; 2 tabs

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... radiation. Ultrasound scanning gives a clear picture of soft tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... size, shape and consistency (whether the object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is ... ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move through vessels. The movement of ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Children's (pediatric) ... uterus Abdominal ultrasound images can be used to help diagnose appendicitis in children. Except for traumatic injury, ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... children. Except for traumatic injury, appendicitis is the most common reason for emergency abdominal surgery. Ultrasound imaging ... of page How is the procedure performed? For most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face- ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... placement and fluid drainage for diagnosis and/or relief of patient discomfort. Doppler ultrasound images can help ... tenderness, your child may feel pressure or minor pain from the procedure. If a Doppler ultrasound study ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Most ultrasound scanning is noninvasive (no needles ... cord and hip joints in newborns and infants. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... abdomen is a safe, noninvasive test that uses sound waves to produce a clear picture of the ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... be guided by ultrasound, are used to sample cells from organs for laboratory testing help detect the ... in which needles are used to extract sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. Ultrasound ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no ... structure and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... safe and accurate placement and fluid drainage for diagnosis and/or relief of patient discomfort. Doppler ultrasound ... joints in newborns and infants. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... vomiting in young infants Because ultrasound provides real-time images, images that are renewed continuously, it also ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Imaging? Ultrasound waves are disrupted by air or gas; therefore ultrasound is not an ideal imaging technique ... with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ... kidneys bladder testicles ovaries uterus Abdominal ultrasound images can be used to help diagnose appendicitis in children. ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and produces pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound ... from the probe through the gel into the body. The transducer collects the sounds that bounce back ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... imaging produces pictures of the internal organs and blood vessels located within a child's abdomen. A Doppler ultrasound study may be part of a child's abdominal ultrasound ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable or changed ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the transducer is pressed against the skin, it directs small pulses of inaudible, high-frequency sound waves ...

  17. uvsI mutants defective in UV mutagenesis define a fourth epistatic group of uvs genes in Aspergillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, S K; Kafer, E

    1993-01-01

    Three UV-sensitive mutations of A. nidulans, uvsI, uvsJ and uvsA, were tested for epistatic relationships with members of the previously established groups, here called the "UvsF", "UvsC", and "UvsB" groups. uvsI mutants are defective for spontaneous and induced reversion of certain point mutations and differ also for other properties from previously analyzed uvs types. They are very sensitive to the killing effects of UV-light and 4-NQO (4-nitro-quinoline-N-oxide) but not to MMS (methylmethane sulfonate). When double- and single-mutant uvs strains were compared for sensitivity to these three agents, synergistic or additive effects were found for uvsI with all members of the three groups. The uvsI gene may therefore represent a fourth epistatic group, possibly involved in mutagenic repair. On the other hand, uvsJ was clearly epistatic with members of the UvsF group and fitted well into this group also by phenotype. The uvsA gene was tentatively assigned to the UvsC group. uvsA showed epistatic interactions with uvsC in all tests, and like UvsC-group mutants is UV-sensitive mainly in dividing cells. However, the uvsA mutation does not cause the defects in recombination and UV mutagenesis typical for this group.

  18. Modeling of ultrasound transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David

    This Ph.D. dissertation addresses ultrasound transducer modeling for medical ultrasound imaging and combines the modeling with the ultrasound simulation program Field II. The project firstly presents two new models for spatial impulse responses (SIR)s to a rectangular elevation focused transducer...... (REFT) and to a convex rectangular elevation focused transducer (CREFT). These models are solvable on an analog time scale and give exact smooth solutions to the Rayleigh integral. The REFT model exhibits a root mean square (RMS) error relative to Field II predictions of 0.41 % at 3400 MHz, and 1.......37 % at 100MHz. The CREFT model exhibits a RMS deviation of 0.01 % relative to the exact numerical solution on a CREFT transducer. A convex non-elevation focused, a REFT, and a linear flat transducer are shown to be covered with the CREFT model as well. Pressure pulses calculated with a one...

  19. Mechanics of ultrasound elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography enables in vivo measurement of the mechanical properties of living soft tissues in a non-destructive and non-invasive manner and has attracted considerable interest for clinical use in recent years. Continuum mechanics plays an essential role in understanding and improving ultrasound-based elastography methods and is the main focus of this review. In particular, the mechanics theories involved in both static and dynamic elastography methods are surveyed. They may help understand the challenges in and opportunities for the practical applications of various ultrasound elastography methods to characterize the linear elastic, viscoelastic, anisotropic elastic and hyperelastic properties of both bulk and thin-walled soft materials, especially the in vivo characterization of biological soft tissues. PMID:28413350

  20. Portable Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    di Ianni, Tommaso

    This PhD project investigates hardware strategies and imaging methods for hand-held ultrasound systems. The overall idea is to use a wireless ultrasound probe linked to general-purpose mobile devices for the processing and visualization. The approach has the potential to reduce the upfront costs...... beamforming strategies are simulated from a system-level perspective. The quality of the B-mode image is evaluated and the minimum specifications are derived for the design of a portable probe with integrated electronics in-handle. The system is based on a synthetic aperture sequential beamforming approach...... that allows to significantly reduce the data rate between the probe and processing unit. The second part investigates the feasibility of vector flow imaging in a hand-held ultrasound system. Vector flow imaging overcomes the limitations of conventional imaging methods in terms of flow angle compensation...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... waves from passing into your body. The sonographer (ultrasound technologist) or radiologist then places the transducer on the skin in various locations, sweeping over the area of interest or angling the ... ultrasound images are reviewed. An ultrasound examination is usually ...

  2. Developing an emergency ultrasound app

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Kim Thestrup; Subhi, Yousif; Aagaard, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    Focused emergency ultrasound is rapidly evolving as a clinical skill for bedside examination by physicians at all levels of education. Ultrasound is highly operator-dependent and relevant training is essential to ensure appropriate use. When supplementing hands-on focused ultrasound courses, e-le...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging? What are some common uses of the procedure? How should we prepare for an ultrasound exam? What does the ultrasound equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will my ...

  4. The OMERACT Ultrasound Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terslev, Lene; Iagnocco, Annamaria; Bruyn, George A W

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an update from the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Ultrasound Working Group on the progress for defining ultrasound (US) minimal disease activity threshold at joint level in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and for standardization of US application in juvenile idiopathic......) and power Doppler (PD). Synovial effusion (SE) was scored a binary variable. For JIA, a Delphi approach and subsequent validation in static images and patient-based exercises were used to developed preliminary definitions for synovitis and a scoring system. RESULTS: For minimal disease activity, 7% HC had...

  5. Uvs Nuur, Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The Uvs Nuur Basin in Mongolia and the Russian Federation is the northernmost of the enclosed basins of Central Asia. It takes its name from Uvs Nuur Lake, a large, shallow and very saline lake, very important for migrating birds. Inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2003, the site is made up of twelve protected areas representing major biomes of eastern Eurasia. The steppe ecosystem supports a rich diversity of birds and the desert is home to a number of rare gerbil, jerboas and the marbled polecat. The mountains are an important refuge for the endangered snow leopard, mountain sheep, and the Asiatic ibex. The image covers an area of 46 x 47.8 km, was acquired on September 4, 2001, and is located near 50.3 degrees north latitude, 90.7 degrees east longitude. The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  6. Multidisk neutron velocity selectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammouda, B.

    1992-01-01

    Helical multidisk velocity selectors used for neutron scattering applications have been analyzed and tested experimentally. Design and performance considerations are discussed along with simple explanation of the basic concept. A simple progression is used for the inter-disk spacing in the 'Rosta' design. Ray tracing computer investigations are presented in order to assess the 'coverage' (how many absorbing layers are stacked along the path of 'wrong' wavelength neutrons) and the relative number of neutrons absorbed in each disk (and therefore the relative amount of gamma radiation emitted from each disk). We discuss whether a multidisk velocity selector can be operated in the 'reverse' configuration (i.e. the selector is turned by 180 0 around a vertical axis with the rotor spun in the reverse direction). Experimental tests and calibration of a multidisk selector are reported together with evidence that a multidisk selector can be operated in the 'reverse' configuration. (orig.)

  7. Evaluation of ultrasound techniques for brain injury detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Joel; Kasili, Paul M.; Norton, Stephen J.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1998-05-01

    In this work, we examine the physics underlying wave propagation in the head to evaluate various ultrasonic transducers for use in a brian injury detection device. The results of measurements of the attenuation coefficient and phase velocity for ultrasonic propagation in samples of brain tissue and skull bone from sheep are presented. The material properties are then used to investigate the propagation of ultrasonic pressure fields in the head. The ultrasound fields for three different transducers are calculated for propagation in a simulated brain/skull model. The model is constructed using speed-of-sound and mass density values of the two tissue types. The impact of the attenuation on the ultrasound fields is then examined. Finally, the relevant points drawn from these discussions are summarized. We hope to minimize the confounding effects of the skull by using sub-MHz ultrasound while maintaining the necessary temporal and spatial resolution to successfully detect injury in the brain.

  8. CUVE - Cubesat UV Experiment: Unveil Venus' UV Absorber with Cubesat UV Mapping Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottini, V.; Aslam, S.; D'Aversa, E.; Glaze, L.; Gorius, N.; Hewagama, T.; Ignatiev, N.; Piccioni, G.

    2017-09-01

    Our Venus mission concept Cubesat UV Experiment (CUVE) is one of ten proposals selected for funding by the NASA PSDS3 Program - Planetary Science Deep Space SmallSat Studies. CUVE concept is to insert a CubeSat spacecraft into a Venusian orbit and perform remote sensing of the UV spectral region using a high spectral resolution point spectrometer to resolve UV molecular bands, observe nightglow, and characterize the unidentified main UV absorber. The UV spectrometer is complemented by an imaging UV camera with multiple bands in the UV absorber main band range for contextual imaging. CUVE Science Objectives are: the nature of the "Unknown" UV-absorber; the abundances and distributions of SO2 and SO at and above Venus's cloud tops and their correlation with the UV absorber; the atmospheric dynamics at the cloud tops, structure of upper clouds and wind measurements from cloud-tracking; the nightglow emissions: NO, CO, O2. This mission will therefore be an excellent platform to study Venus' cloud top atmospheric properties where the UV absorption drives the planet's energy balance. CUVE would complement past, current and future Venus missions with conventional spacecraft, and address critical science questions cost effectively.

  9. The Lunula: An ultrasound imaging approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon; Ahn, Joong Mo

    2001-01-01

    The lunula is the white, half-moon-shaped area seen on some, but not all nails. Usually the lunula is the topographic marker of the distal part of the nail matrix, and known to have the ability of nail production. Ultrasonographic imaging of the lunula has not been reported before. This study was undertaken to demonstrate normal ultrasonographic features of the lunula. Ultrasonographic examination of the lunula was performed in the right thumb of 20 healthy volunteers (10M, 10F, mean age 30, range 26-36 years) with a real-time, high-resolution ultrasound unit (Sequoia 512, Acuson, Mountain view, CA, USA) with 8-15 MHz linear transducers. Gray scale color, and special Doppler imagings were performed with longitudinal scanning. The lunula was not seen inspection in three of the 20 volunteers. The mean size of the lunula in the other 17 volumteen was 3.31 ± 1.24 mm (range 2-6.2 mm). Gray scale ultrasound imaging showed the lunula; ovoid shaped hypo-echoic zone in proximal fingernail in 18 of 20 volunteers (mean size, 6.74 ± 0.98 mm, range 5-8.8 mm). In two of 20 volunteers, the lunula was indistinct on gray scale ultrasound examination. However, all lunula were identifiable on color Doppler imaging by detecting vascularity within the lunula. Spectral wave pattern of the lunula was a bi-directional pulsatile wave. Peak velocity was within 5-15 m/sec (mean 8 m/sec). The lunula is identifiable on ultrasound examination as a hyper-vascular, ovoid shaped, hypo-echoic zone in proximal fingernail. This normal structure should not be misinterpreted as an abnormal sub-ungual lesion.

  10. A procedure to detect flaws inside large size marble blocks by ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Bramanti, Mauro; Bozzi, Edoardo

    1999-01-01

    In stone and marble industry there is considerable interest in the possibility of using ultrasound diagnostic techniques for non-destructive testing of large size blocks in order to detect internal flaws such as faults, cracks and fissures. In this paper some preliminary measurements are reported in order to acquire basic knowledge of the fundamental properties of ultrasound, such as propagation velocity and attenuation, in the media here considered. We then outline a particular diagnostic pr...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ... of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Most ultrasound scanning is ... with your doctor, the medical facility staff and/or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that allows the physician to see and evaluate blood flow through arteries and veins in the abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body organs such as the liver or kidneys. There are three types of Doppler ultrasound: Color Doppler uses a computer ...

  13. Ultrasound in chemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baig, S.; Farooq, R.; Malik, A.H.

    2009-01-01

    The use of ultrasound to promote chemical reactions or sono chemistry is a field of chemistry which involves the process of acoustic cavitations i.e. the collapse of microscopic bubbles in liquid. There are two essential components for the application of sono chemistry, a liquid medium and a source of high-energy vibrations. The liquid medium is necessary because sono chemistry is driven by acoustic cavitations that can only occur in liquids. The source of the vibrational energy is the transducer. The chemical effects of ultrasound include the enhancement of reaction rates at ambient temperatures and striking advancements in stoichiometric and catalytic reactions In some cases, ultrasonic irradiation can increase reactivities by nearly million fold. The ultrasound has large number of applications not only in emending old chemical processes but also in developing new synthetic strategies. Ultrasound enhances all chemical and physical processes e.g., crystallization, vitamin synthesis, preparation of catalysts, dissolution of chemicals, organometallic reactions, electrochemical processes, etc. High-power ultrasonics is a new powerful technology that is not only safe and environmentally friendly in its application but is also efficient and economical. It can be applied to existing processes to eliminate the need for chemicals and/or heat application in a variety of industrial processes. (author)

  14. Intraoperative ultrasound in neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasco, J.; Manzanares, R.; Fernandez, L.; Hernando, A.; Ramos, M. del Mar; Garcia, R.

    1996-01-01

    The present work is a review of the major indications for intraoperative ultrasound in the field of neurosurgery, stressing the exploratory method and describing what we consider to be the most illustrative cases. We attempt to provide a thorough view of this constantly developing technique which, despite its great practical usefulness, may be being underemployed. (Author) 47 refs

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body tissue through which the sound travels. A small amount of gel is put on the skin to allow the sound waves to travel from the transducer to the examined area within the body and then back again. Ultrasound ...

  16. [Ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guliev, B G

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed to the evaluation of the effectiveness and results of ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PNL) for the treatment of patients with large stones in renal pelvis. The results of PNL in 138 patients who underwent surgery for kidney stones from 2011 to 2013 were analyzed. Seventy patients (Group 1) underwent surgery with combined ultrasound and radiological guidance, and 68 patients (Group 2)--only with ultrasound guidance. The study included patients with large renal pelvic stones larger than 2.2 cm, requiring the formation of a single laparoscopic approach. Using the comparative analysis, the timing of surgery, the number of intra- and postoperative complications, blood loss and length of stay were evaluated. Percutaneous access was successfully performed in all patients. Postoperative complications (exacerbation of chronic pyelonephritis, gross hematuria) were observed in 14.3% of patients in Group 1 and in 14.7% of patients in Group 2. Bleeding requiring blood transfusion, and injuries of adjacent organs were not registered. Efficacy of PNL in the Group 1 was 95.7%; 3 (4.3%) patients required additional interventions. In Group 2, the effectiveness of PNL was 94.1%, 4 (5.9%) patients additionally underwent extracorporeal lithotripsy. There were no significant differences in the effectiveness of PNL, the volume of blood loss and duration of hospitalization. Ultrasound guided PNL can be performed in large pelvic stones and sufficient expansion of renal cavities, thus reducing radiation exposure of patients and medical staff.

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to General Ultrasound Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ... links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo.org , ACR ...

  18. Doppler ultrasound monitoring technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docker, M F

    1993-03-01

    Developments in the signal processing of Doppler ultrasound used for the detection of fetal heart rate (FHR) have improved the operation of cardiotocographs. These developments are reviewed and the advantages and disadvantages of the various Doppler and signal processing methods are compared.

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or kidneys. There are three types of Doppler ultrasound: Color Doppler uses a computer to convert Doppler measurements into an array of colors to show the speed and direction of blood flow through a blood vessel. Power Doppler is a newer technique that is more ...

  1. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no radiation exposure to the ... tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for ...

  2. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from the area within the patient that is being examined to the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and ...

  3. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... used to help physicians evaluate symptoms such as: pain swelling infection Ultrasound is a useful way of examining many of the body's internal organs, including but not limited to the: heart and blood vessels, including the abdominal aorta and its major branches liver gallbladder spleen ...

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... by a computer, which in turn creates a real-time picture on the monitor. One or more frames ...

  5. Poststenotic flow disturbance in the dog aorta as measured with pulsed Doppler ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, N; Fulenwider, J T; Mabon, R F; Giddens, D P

    1986-08-01

    Blood flow velocity was measured in the dog aorta distal to mechanically induced constrictions of various degrees of severity employing an 8-MHz pulsed Doppler ultrasound velocimeter and a phase-lock loop frequency tracking method for extracting velocity from the Doppler quadrature signals. The data were analyzed to construct ensemble average velocity waveforms and random velocity disturbances. In any individual animal the effect of increasing the degree of stenosis beyond approximately 25 percent area reduction was to produce increasing levels of random velocity disturbance. However, variability among animals was such that the sensitivity of random behavior to the degree of stenosis was degraded to the point that it appears difficult to employ Doppler ultrasound measurements of random disturbances to discriminate among stenoses with area reductions less than approximately 75 percent. On the other hand, coherent vortex structures in velocity waveforms consistently occurred distal to mild constrictions (25-50 percent area reduction). Comparison of the phase-lock loop Doppler ultrasound data with simultaneous measurements using invasive hot-film anemometry, which possesses excellent frequency response, demonstrates that the ultrasound method can reliably detect those flow phenomena in such cases. Thus, the identification of coherent, rather than random, flow disturbances may offer improved diagnostic capability for noninvasively detecting arteriosclerotic plaques at relatively early stages of development.

  6. Improved Vector Velocity Estimation using Directional Transverse Oscillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2015-01-01

    A method for estimating vector velocities using transverse oscillation (TO) combined with directional beamforming is presented. Directional Transverse Oscillation (DTO) is selfcalibrating, which increase the estimation accuracy and finds the lateral oscillation period automatically. A normal...... focused field is emitted and the received signals are beamformed in the lateral direction transverse to the ultrasound beam. A lateral oscillation is obtained by having a receive apodization waveform with two separate peaks. The IQ data are obtained by making a Hilbert transform of the directional signal...... transducer with a focal point at 105.6 mm (F#=5) for Vector Flow Imaging (VFI). A 6 mm radius tube in a circulating flow rig was scanned and the parabolic volume flow of 112.7 l/h (peak velocity 0.55 m/s) measured by a Danfoss Magnetic flow meter for reference. Velocity estimates for DTO are found for 32...

  7. A novel velocity estimator using multiple frequency carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhuo; Jakobsson, Andreas; Nikolov, Svetoslav

    2004-01-01

    . In this paper, we propose a nonlinear least squares (NLS) estimator. Typically, NLS estimators are computationally cumbersome, in general requiring the minimization of a multidimensional and often multimodal cost function. Here, by noting that the unknown velocity will result in a common known frequency......Most modern ultrasound scanners use the so-called pulsed-wave Doppler technique to estimate the blood velocities. Among the narrowband-based methods, the autocorrelation estimator and the Fourier-based method are the most commonly used approaches. Due to the low level of the blood echo, the signal......-to-noise ratio is low, and some averaging in depth is applied to improve the estimate. Further, due to velocity gradients in space and time, the spectrum may get smeared. An alternative approach is to use a pulse with multiple frequency carriers, and do some form of averaging in the frequency domain. However...

  8. Musculoskeletal ultrasound in rheumatology in Korea: targeted ultrasound initiative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Taeyoung; Wakefield, Richard J; Emery, Paul

    2016-04-01

    In collaboration with the Targeted Ultrasound Initiative (TUI), to conduct the first study in Korea to investigate current practices in ultrasound use among Korean rheumatologists. We translated the TUI Global Survey into Korean and added questions to better understand the specific challenges facing rheumatologists in Korea. To target as many rheumatologists in Korea as possible, we created an on-line version of this survey, which was conducted from March to April 2013. Rheumatologists are in charge of ultrasound in many Korean hospitals. Rheumatologists in hospitals and private clinics use ultrasound to examine between one and five patients daily; they use ultrasound for diagnosis more than monitoring and receive compensation of about US$30-50 per patient. There are marked differences in the rates of ultrasound usage between rheumatologists who work in private practice compared with tertiary hospitals. Korean rheumatologists not currently using ultrasound in their practice appear eager to do so. This survey provides important insights into the current status of ultrasound in rheumatology in Korea and highlights several priorities; specifically, greater provision of formal training, standardization of reporting and accrual of greater experience among ultrasound users. If these needs are addressed, all rheumatology departments in Korea are likely to use ultrasound or have access to it in the future. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Skin Cancer and UV Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarbuk Anita

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of skin cancer is increasing by epidemic proportions. Basal cell cancer remains the most common skin neoplasm, and simple excision is generally curative. On the other hand, aggressive local growth and metastasis are common features of malignant melanoma, which accounts for 75% of all deaths associated with skin cancer. The primary cause of skin cancer is long exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UV-R crossed with the amount of skin pigmentation and family genetics. It is believed that in childhood and adolescence, 80% of UV-R gets absorbed while in the remaining, 20 % gets absorbed later in the lifetime. This suggests that proper and early photoprotection may reduce the risk of subsequent occurrence of skin cancer. Reducing the exposure time to sunlight, using sunscreens and protective textiles are the three ways of UV protection. Most people think that all the clothing will protect them, but it does not provide full sun screening properties. Literature sources claim that only 1/3 of the spring and summer collections tested give off proper UV protection. This is very important during the summer months, when UV index is the highest. Fabric UV protection ability highly depends on large number of factors such as type of fiber, fabric surface, construction, porosity, density, moisture content, type and concentration of dyestuff, fluorescent whitening agents, UV-B protective agents (UV absorbers, as well as nanoparticles, if applied. For all of these reasons, in the present paper, the results of UV protecting ability according to AS/NZS 4399:1996 will be discussed to show that standard clothing materials are not always adequate to prevent effect of UV-R to the human skin; and to suggest the possibilities for its improvement for this purpose enhancing light conversion and scattering. Additionally, the discrepancy in UV protection was investigated in distilled water as well as Adriatic Sea water.

  10. A CCD fitted to the UV Prime spectrograph: Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulade, O.

    1986-10-01

    A CCD camera was fitted to the 3.6 m French-Canadian telescope in Hawai. Performance of the system and observations of elliptic galaxies (stellar content and galactic evolution in a cluster) and quasars (absorption lines in spectra) are reported. In spite of its resolution being only average, the extremely rapid optics of the UV spectrograph gives good signal to noise ratios enabling redshifts and velocity scatter to be calculated with an accuracy better than 30 km/sec [fr

  11. UV imaging in pharmaceutical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    UV imaging provides spatially and temporally resolved absorbance measurements, which are highly useful in pharmaceutical analysis. Commercial UV imaging instrumentation was originally developed as a detector for separation sciences, but the main use is in the area of in vitro dissolution...

  12. Microbubble embedded with upconversion nanoparticles as a bimodal contrast agent for fluorescence and ultrasound imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Birui; Lin, Min; You, Minli; Xu, Feng; Lu, Tianjian; Zong, Yujin; Wan, Mingxi; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Bimodal imaging offers additional imaging signal thus finds wide spread application in clinical diagnostic imaging. Fluorescence/ultrasound bimodal imaging contrast agent using fluorescent dyes or quantum dots for fluorescence signal has emerged as a promising method, which however requires visible light or UV irradiation resulting in photobleaching, photoblinking, auto-fluorescence and limited tissue penetration depth. To surmount these problems, we developed a novel bimodal contrast agent using layer-by-layer assembly of upconversion nanoparticles onto the surface of microbubbles. The resulting microbubbles with average size of 2 μm provide enhanced ultrasound echo for ultrasound imaging and upconversion emission upon near infrared irradiation for fluorescence imaging. The developed bimodal contrast agent holds great potential to be applied in ultrasound target technique for targeted diseases diagnostics and therapy. (paper)

  13. Synthesis and Photochemistry of 1-Iodocyclohexene:Influence of Ultrasound on Ionic vs. Radical Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Blasko

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous application of UV light and ultrasonic irradiation to a reaction mixture containing 1-iodocyclohexene is reported. The irradiation of 1-iodocyclohexene in methanol was carried out with or without addition of zinc. The effect of ultrasound or mechanical stirring on this solid-liquid system was also compared. The irradiation of 1-iodocyclohexene in methanol in the presence of zinc increases the yield of the nucleophilic trapping product, compared with the yield after irradiation in the absence of zinc. The photodegradation of 1-iodocyclohexene was slightly accelerated after addition of zinc. A rapid formation of radical product was accompanied by substantial decrease of 1-iodocyclohexene after application of ultrasound and irradiation without the zinc. The ultrasound significantly affects the photobehaviour of this reaction, predominantly its radical route. The joint application of ultrasound and zinc contributes positively to the production of radical and ionic products. The sonochemical stirring is more effective than mechanical stirring.

  14. Effects of ethamsylate on cerebral blood flow velocity in premature babies.

    OpenAIRE

    Rennie, J M; Lam, P K

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow velocity and cardiac output were measured with ultrasound before and 30 minutes after the administration of ethamsylate in a double blind placebo controlled study of 19 very low birthweight infants. No differences were found before or after treatment in either group.

  15. Use of Doppler ultrasound for non-invasive urodynamic diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Ozawa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: A totally non-invasive transperineal urodynamic technique using Doppler ultrasonography has been developed. Methods: Since normal urine does not have blood cells, urine was thought not to produce the Doppler effects. However, basic studies confirmed that the decrease of pressure at high velocity (Bernouilli effect caused dissolved gas to form microbubbles, which are detected by Doppler ultrasonography. Subjects sat and the probe was advanced via remote control to achieve gentle contact with the perineal skin. The digital uroflow data signals and the color Doppler ultrasound video images were processed on a personal computer. The flow-velocity curves from two sites; the distal prostatic urethra just above the external sphincter (V1 and the sphincteric urethra (V2 were plotted against time. The parameters of both the pressure-flow studies and the Doppler ultrasound urodynamic studies were compared in men who had various degrees of obstruction. Results: Functional cross-sectional area at prostatic urethra (A1, calculated by Q max /V1, was lower in the group of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO vs. control group. Velocity ratio (VR, which was calculated by V1/V2, was the parameter having the best correlation with BOO index, though A1 had a similar correlation. This method is viable to diagnose the degree of BOO. Conclusions: The development of non-invasive Doppler ultrasound videourodynamics (Doppler UDS will dramatically expand the information on voiding function.

  16. The mechanisms of UV mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikehata, Hironobu; Ono, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light induces specific mutations in the cellular and skin genome such as UV-signature and triplet mutations, the mechanism of which has been thought to involve translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) over UV-induced DNA base damage. Two models have been proposed: ''error-free'' bypass of deaminated cytosine-containing cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) by DNA polymerase η, and error-prone bypass of CPDs and other UV-induced photolesions by combinations of TLS and replicative DNA polymerases-the latter model has also been known as the two-step model, in which the cooperation of two (or more) DNA polymerases as misinserters and (mis)extenders is assumed. Daylight UV induces a characteristic UV-specific mutation, a UV-signature mutation occurring preferentially at methyl-CpG sites, which is also observed frequently after exposure to either UVB or UVA, but not to UVC. The wavelengths relevant to the mutation are so consistent with the composition of daylight UV that the mutation is called solar-UV signature, highlighting the importance of this type of mutation for creatures with the cytosine-methylated genome that are exposed to the sun in the natural environment. UVA has also been suggested to induce oxidative types of mutation, which would be caused by oxidative DNA damage produced through the oxidative stress after the irradiation. Indeed, UVA produces oxidative DNA damage not only in cells but also in skin, which, however, does not seem sufficient to induce mutations in the normal skin genome. In contrast, it has been demonstrated that UVA exclusively induces the solar-UV signature mutations in vivo through CPD formation. (author)

  17. Deep UV LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung; Amano, Hiroshi; Schowalter, Leo

    2014-06-01

    Deep ultraviolet (DUV) photons interact strongly with a broad range of chemical and biological molecules; compact DUV light sources could enable a wide range of applications in chemi/bio-sensing, sterilization, agriculture, and industrial curing. The much shorter wavelength also results in useful characteristics related to optical diffraction (for lithography) and scattering (non-line-of-sight communication). The family of III-N (AlGaInN) compound semiconductors offers a tunable energy gap from infrared to DUV. While InGaN-based blue light emitters have been the primary focus for the obvious application of solid state lighting, there is a growing interest in the development of efficient UV and DUV light-emitting devices. In the past few years we have witnessed an increasing investment from both government and industry sectors to further the state of DUV light-emitting devices. The contributions in Semiconductor Science and Technology 's special issue on DUV devices provide an up-to-date snapshot covering many relevant topics in this field. Given the expected importance of bulk AlN substrate in DUV technology, we are pleased to include a review article by Hartmann et al on the growth of AlN bulk crystal by physical vapour transport. The issue of polarization field within the deep ultraviolet LEDs is examined in the article by Braut et al. Several commercial companies provide useful updates in their development of DUV emitters, including Nichia (Fujioka et al ), Nitride Semiconductors (Muramoto et al ) and Sensor Electronic Technology (Shatalov et al ). We believe these articles will provide an excellent overview of the state of technology. The growth of AlGaN heterostructures by molecular beam epitaxy, in contrast to the common organo-metallic vapour phase epitaxy, is discussed by Ivanov et al. Since hexagonal boron nitride (BN) has received much attention as both a UV and a two-dimensional electronic material, we believe it serves readers well to include the

  18. Ultrasound cleaning of microfilters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Jens; Bjørnø, Irina; Jensen, Leif Bjørnø

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to develop, design, and manufacture a high-power ultrasound transducer module to be used for preventing the blocking of plastic-based microfilters by organic materials, and possibly to prolong the lifetime of the filters in industry using the cavitation on the surface...... suitable for cleaning of microfilters without damaging the filter structure. The filter surface was studied using an optical microscope before and after the experiment. When high-power ultrasound (max. 75 W/cm2) was applied to the surface of some microfilters, no visible damage was found, while others...... of the filter. A numerical, FE- and BE-based model for calculation of the response of ultrasonic transducers of various geometries formed the basis for the design of such transducers. During laboratory experiments frequency and output power have been varied in order to find the optimal transducer design...

  19. Musculoskeletal infections: ultrasound appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chau, C.L.F. [Department of Radiology, North District Hospital, NTEC, Fanling, NT, Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: c8681@yahoo.com; Griffith, J.F. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Prince of Wales Hospital, NTEC, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China)

    2005-02-01

    Musculoskeletal infections are commonly encountered in clinical practice. This review will discuss the ultrasound appearances of a variety of musculoskeletal infections such as cellulitis, infective tenosynovitis, pyomyositis, soft-tissue abscesses, septic arthritis, acute and chronic osteomyelitis, and post-operative infection. The peculiar sonographic features of less common musculoskeletal infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, and rice body formation in atypical mycobacterial tenosynovitis, and bursitis will also be presented.

  20. Musculoskeletal infections: ultrasound appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chau, C.L.F.; Griffith, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    Musculoskeletal infections are commonly encountered in clinical practice. This review will discuss the ultrasound appearances of a variety of musculoskeletal infections such as cellulitis, infective tenosynovitis, pyomyositis, soft-tissue abscesses, septic arthritis, acute and chronic osteomyelitis, and post-operative infection. The peculiar sonographic features of less common musculoskeletal infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, and rice body formation in atypical mycobacterial tenosynovitis, and bursitis will also be presented

  1. Ultrasound Imaging Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    texture mapping hardware," IEEE Tranactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine, Submitted. [14] C.R. Castro Pareja , J.M. Jagadeesh and R. Shekhar...modulation in real-time three-dimensional sparse synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging systems "* Carlos R. Castro Pareja , Masters of Science, The Ohio...C.R. Castro Pareja , "An architecture for real-time image registration," M.S. Thesis, The Ohio State University, March 2002. 14. C.R. Castro Pareja , R

  2. Ultrasound in environmental engineering. Papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiehm, A; Neis, U [eds.

    1999-07-01

    This book presents recent research and state-of-the-art information on the scientific basis, modes of use, and engineering developments of ultrasound application in the field of environmental protection. The information is loosely grouped into the following themes: ultrasound and sonochemistry, design of sonoreactors, applications in water, waste water and sludge treatment: aggregation of suspended particles, degradation of hazardous pollutants, disinfection, disintegration of biosolids. Ultrasound is generated and applied at frequencies from 20 kHz to several MHz. Reactor design, applied intensity, duration of sonication, and physico-chemical parameters of the sonicated media influence ultrasound effects. Thus, ultrasound, at a first glance, is a complex and probably confusing matter. This book has been compiled from presentations held at the first workshop 'Ultrasound in Environmental Engineering' on March 22nd and 23rd, 1999, at the Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg in cooperation with the German Association for the Water Environment (ATV) and the DECHEMA e.V. (orig.)

  3. [Diagnostic ultrasound in pneumothorax].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, É; Pichereau, C; Bourcier, S; Galbois, A; Lejour, G; Baudel, J-L; Ait-Oufella, H; Guidet, B

    2016-10-01

    For a long time the lung has been regarded as inaccessible to ultrasound. However, recent clinical studies have shown that this organ can be examined by this technique, which appears, in some situations, to be superior to thoracic radiography. The examination does not require special equipment and is possible using a combination of simple qualitative signs: lung sliding, the presence of B lines and the demonstration of the lung point. The lung sliding corresponds to the artefact produced by the movement of the two pleural layers, one against the other. The B lines indicate the presence of an interstitial syndrome. The presence of lung sliding and/or B lines has a negative predictive value of 100% and formally excludes a pneumothorax in the area where the probe has been applied. The presence of the lung point is pathognomonic of pneumothorax but the sensitivity is no more than 60%. Ultrasound is therefore a rapid and simple means of excluding a pneumothorax (lung sliding or B lines) and of confirming a pneumothorax when the lung point is visible. The question that remains is whether ultrasound can totally replace radiography in the management of this disorder. Copyright © 2015 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. UV Photography Shows Hidden Sun Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mcat1=de12", ]; for (var c = 0; c UV photography shows hidden sun damage A UV photograph gives ... developing skin cancer and prematurely aged skin. Normal photography UV photography 18 months of age: This boy's ...

  5. Sun, UV Radiation and Your Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sunglasses Sun Smart UV Safety Infographic The Sun, UV Radiation and Your Eyes Leer en Español: El ... Aug. 28, 2014 Keep an Eye on Ultraviolet (UV) Safety Eye medical doctors (ophthalmologists) caution us that ...

  6. Ly α and UV Sizes of Green Pea Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Huan; Wang, Junxian [CAS Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Department of Astronomy, University of Science and Technology of China (China); Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; Jiang, Tianxing [Arizona State University, School of Earth and Space Exploration (United States); Leitherer, Claus [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Wofford, Aida, E-mail: huan.y@asu.edu [National Autonomous University of Mexico, Institute of Astronomy (Mexico)

    2017-03-20

    Green Peas are nearby analogs of high-redshift Ly α -emitting galaxies (LAEs). To probe their Ly α escape, we study the spatial profiles of Ly α and UV continuum emission of 24 Green Pea galaxies using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope . We extract the spatial profiles of Ly α emission from their 2D COS spectra, and of the UV continuum from both 2D spectra and NUV images. The Ly α emission shows more extended spatial profiles than the UV continuum, in most Green Peas. The deconvolved full width at half maximum of the Ly α spatial profile is about 2–4 times that of the UV continuum, in most cases. Because Green Peas are analogs of high z LAEs, our results suggest that most high- z LAEs probably have larger Ly α sizes than UV sizes. We also compare the spatial profiles of Ly α photons at blueshifted and redshifted velocities in eight Green Peas with sufficient data quality, and find that the blue wing of the Ly α line has a larger spatial extent than the red wing in four Green Peas with comparatively weak blue Ly α line wings. We show that Green Peas and MUSE z = 3–6 LAEs have similar Ly α and UV continuum sizes, which probably suggests that starbursts in both low- z and high- z LAEs drive similar gas outflows illuminated by Ly α light. Five Lyman continuum (LyC) leakers in this sample have similar Ly α to UV continuum size ratios (∼1.4–4.3) to the other Green Peas, indicating that their LyC emissions escape through ionized holes in the interstellar medium.

  7. UV-induced skin damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichihashi, M.; Ueda, M.; Budiyanto, A.; Bito, T.; Oka, M.; Fukunaga, M.; Tsuru, K.; Horikawa, T.

    2003-01-01

    Solar radiation induces acute and chronic reactions in human and animal skin. Chronic repeated exposures are the primary cause of benign and malignant skin tumors, including malignant melanoma. Among types of solar radiation, ultraviolet B (290-320 nm) radiation is highly mutagenic and carcinogenic in animal experiments compared to ultraviolet A (320-400 nm) radiation. Epidemiological studies suggest that solar UV radiation is responsible for skin tumor development via gene mutations and immunosuppression, and possibly for photoaging. In this review, recent understanding of DNA damage caused by direct UV radiation and by indirect stress via reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA repair mechanisms, particularly nucleotide excision repair of human cells, are discussed. In addition, mutations induced by solar UV radiation in p53, ras and patched genes of non-melanoma skin cancer cells, and the role of ROS as both a promoter in UV-carcinogenesis and an inducer of UV-apoptosis, are described based primarily on the findings reported during the last decade. Furthermore, the effect of UV on immunological reaction in the skin is discussed. Finally, possible prevention of UV-induced skin cancer by feeding or topical use of antioxidants, such as polyphenols, vitamin C, and vitamin E, is discussed

  8. UV survival of human mycoplasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Shigeji; Ito, Shoko; Watanabe, Takehiko

    1979-01-01

    The inactivation by ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation of mycoplasma cells of five human strains was monitored by investigating the colony-forming ability. The survival curves of five strains tested indicated that the cells of Mycoplasma buccale only are single and homogenously susceptible to UV light. The effect of the repair inhibitor, caffeine, on the colony-forming ability of UV-irradiated cells was investigated with M. buccale because of its homogeneous susceptibility to UV light. The colony formation of irradiated cells was markedly depressed by post-irradiation treatment with caffeine at concentration that had little or no effect on the colony formation of unirradiated cells. The colony-forming units (CFU) of UV-irradiated cells which were kept in broth without caffeine in the dark increased without a lag as the time in the dark increased. The colony-forming ability of the irradiated cells completely recovered after 3 hr in the dark. However, when irradiated cells were kept in the presence of caffeine, no increase in their CFU was observed. The mode of action of caffeine on UV-irradiated cells closely resembles that described for other organisms which possess dark reactivation systems for UV-induced damage in deoxyribonucleic acid. Thus, the results obtained provide evidence for the existence of a dark repair function in M. buccale. (author)

  9. Physics of Ultrasound. Chapter 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacefield, J. C. [University of Western Ontario, London (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    Ultrasound is the most commonly used diagnostic imaging modality, accounting for approximately 25% of all imaging examinations performed worldwide at the beginning of the 21st century. The success of ultrasound may be attributed to a number of attractive characteristics, including the relatively low cost and portability of an ultrasound scanner, the non-ionizing nature of ultrasound waves, the ability to produce real time images of blood flow and moving structures such as the beating heart, and the intrinsic contrast among soft tissue structures that is achieved without the need for an injected contrast agent. The latter characteristic enables ultrasound to be used for a wide range of medical applications, which historically have primarily included cardiac and vascular imaging, imaging of the abdominal organs and, most famously, in utero imaging of the developing fetus. Ongoing technological improvements continue to expand the use of ultrasound for many applications, including cancer imaging, musculoskeletal imaging, ophthalmology and others. The term ultrasound refers specifically to acoustic waves at frequencies greater than the maximum frequency audible to humans, which is nominally 20 kHz. Diagnostic imaging is generally performed using ultrasound in the frequency range of 2–15 MHz. The choice of frequency is dictated by a trade off between spatial resolution and penetration depth, since higher frequency waves can be focused more tightly but are attenuated more rapidly by tissue. The information contained in an ultrasonic image is influenced by the physical processes underlying propagation, reflection and attenuation of ultrasound waves in tissue.

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  11. Ultrasound diagnostics of thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharchenko, Vladimir P.; Kotlyarov, Peter M.; Mogutov, Mikhail S.; Sencha, Alexander N.; Patrunov, Yury N.; Belyaev, Denis V.; Alexandrov, Yury K.

    2010-01-01

    This book is based on the authors' extensive practical experience in the use of modern ultrasound, and other radiological methods, in the diagnosis of thyroid diseases. The authors have analyzed more than 100,000 ultrasound examinations performed between 1995 and 2008 in patients with thyroid and parathyroid disease, as well as many thousands of diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound-guided minimally invasive procedures. The opening chapters include discussion of current ultrasound techniques, pitfalls, and the specifics of ultrasound examination of the thyroid in children. Detailed attention is then devoted to findings in the normal thyroid and in the presence of diffuse and focal changes. Further chapters focus on such topics as ultrasound examination after thyroid surgery and ultrasound diagnosis of parathyroid disease, recurrent goiter, and neck masses. Ultrasound-guided minimally invasive techniques, such as fine-needle aspiration biopsy, percutaneous laser ablation, and ethanol and glucocorticoid injections, are considered in depth. This up-to-date and richly illustrated book will interest and assist specialists in ultrasound diagnostics, radiologists, endocrinologists, and neck surgeons. (orig.)

  12. Aerosol effects on UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koepke, P.; Reuder, J.; Schwander, H.

    2000-01-01

    The reduction of erythemally weighted UV-irradiance (given as UV index, UVI) due to aerosols is analyzed by variation of the tropospheric particles in a wide, but realistic range. Varied are amount and composition of the particles and relative humidity and thickness of the mixing layer. The reduction of UVI increases with aerosol optical depth and the UV change is around 10% for a change aerosol optical depth from 0.25 to 0.1 and 0.4 respectively. Since both aerosol absorption and scattering are of relevance, the aerosol effect depends besides total aerosol amount on relative amount of soot and on relative humidity

  13. Quantitative Ultrasound Measurements at the Heel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugschies, M.; Brixen, K.; Hermann, P.

    2015-01-01

    Calcaneal quantitative ultrasound can be used to predict osteoporotic fracture risk, but its ability to monitor therapy is unclear possibly because of its limited precision. We developed a quantitative ultrasound device (foot ultrasound scanner) that measures the speed of sound at the heel...... with the foot ultrasound scanner reduced precision errors by half (p quantitative ultrasound measurements is feasible. (E-mail: m.daugschies@rad.uni-kiel.de) (C) 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology....

  14. Ultrasonic transverse velocity calibration of standard blocks for use in non-destructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C E R; Braz, D S; Maggi, L E; Felix, R P B Costa

    2015-01-01

    Standard blocks are employed in the verification of the equipment used in Ultrasound Non-Destructive Testing. To assure the metrology reliability of all the measurement process, it is necessary to calibrate or certify these Standard blocks. In this work, the transverse wave velocity and main dimensions were assessed according to the specifications ISO Standards. For transverse wave velocity measurement, a 5 MHz transverse wave transducer, a waveform generator, an oscilloscope and a computer with a program developed in LabVIEW TM were used. Concerning the transverse wave velocity calibration, only two Standard blocks of the 4 tested is in accordance with the standard

  15. The effect of austenitizing conditions in the ductile iron hardening process on longitudinal ultrasonic wave velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. Orłowicz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of a research on the effect of austenitizing temperature and time adopted in the hardening operation on the ultrasonic wave velocity in ductile iron. It has been found that with increasing austenitizing temperature and with the passage of the austenitizing time, a monotonic decrease of the ultrasonic longitudinal wave velocity value occurred. Implementation of ultrasonic testing of results obtained in the course of the cast iron hardening process both in production and as-cast conditions, requires development of a test methodology that must take into account the influence of base material structure (degree of nodularization, graphite precipitation count on the ultrasound wave velocity.

  16. High-velocity winds from a dwarf nova during outburst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, F. A.; Mason, K. O.

    1982-01-01

    An ultraviolet spectrum of the dwarf nova TW Vir during an optical outburst shows shortward-shifted absorption features with edge velocities as high as 4800 km/s, about the escape velocity of a white dwarf. A comparison of this spectrum with the UV spectra of other cataclysmic variables suggests that mass loss is evident only for systems with relatively high luminosities (more than about 10 solar luminosities) and low inclination angles with respect to the observer's line of sight. The mass loss rate for cataclysmic variables is of order 10 to the -11th solar mass per yr; this is from 0.01 to 0.001 of the mass accretion rate onto the compact star in the binary. The mass loss may occur by a mechanism similar to that invoked for early-type stars, i.e., radiation absorbed in the lines accelerates the accreting gas to the high velocities observed.

  17. Deterioration of edible oils during food processing by ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemat, F; Grondin, I; Shum Cheong Sing, A; Smadja, J

    2004-01-01

    During food emulsification and processing of sunflower oil (most used edible oil), a metallic and rancid odour has been detected only for insonated oil and foods. Some off-flavour compounds (hexanal and hept-2-enal) resulting from the sono-degradation of sunflower oil have been identified. A wide variety of analytical techniques (GC determination of fatty acids, UV spectroscopy, free fatty acids and GC/MS) were used to follow the quality of insonated sunflower oil and emulsion. Different edible oils (olive, sunflower, soybean, em leader ) show significant changes in their composition (chemical and flavour) due to ultrasound treatment.

  18. High Frame-Rate Blood Vector Velocity Imaging Using Plane Waves: Simulations and Preliminary Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Gran, Fredrik; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    2008-01-01

    ) The ultrasound is not focused during the transmissions of the ultrasound signals; 2) A 13-bit Barker code is transmitted simultaneously from each transducer element; and 3) The 2-D vector velocity of the blood is estimated using 2-D cross-correlation. A parameter study was performed using the Field II program......, and performance of the method was investigated when a virtual blood vessel was scanned by a linear array transducer. An improved parameter set for the method was identified from the parameter study, and a flow rig measurement was performed using the same improved setup as in the simulations. Finally, the common...... carotid artery of a healthy male was scanned with a scan sequence that satisfies the limits set by the Food and Drug Administration. Vector velocity images were obtained with a frame-rate of 100 Hz where 40 speckle images are used for each vector velocity image. It was found that the blood flow...

  19. UV/EB curable psa's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glotfelter, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    The author describe both water-based and 100% solids UV/EB curable PSA's (Pressure Sensitive Adhesives) and their properties. A new acrylate monomer, ethoxylated nonyl phenol acrylate, has great utility in the formulation of water-based PSA's

  20. Effect of modulated ultrasound parameters on ultrasound-induced thrombolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltani, Azita; Volz, Kim R; Hansmann, Doulas R

    2008-01-01

    The potential of ultrasound to enhance enzyme-mediated thrombolysis by application of constant operating parameters (COP) has been widely demonstrated. In this study, the effect of ultrasound with modulated operating parameters (MOP) on enzyme-mediated thrombolysis was investigated. The MOP protocol was applied to an in vitro model of thrombolysis. The results were compared to a COP with the equivalent soft tissue thermal index (TIS) over the duration of ultrasound exposure of 30 min (p -2 ± 0.01 μm and 1.99 x 10 -2 ± 0.004 μm, respectively (p < 0.74). No signatures of inertial or stable cavitation were observed for either acoustic protocol. In conclusion, due to mechanisms other than cavitation, application of ultrasound with modulated operating parameters has the potential to significantly enhance the relative lysis enhancement compared to application of ultrasound with constant operating parameters.

  1. Development of an optimal velocity selection method with velocity obstacle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Geuk; Oh, Jun Ho [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    The Velocity obstacle (VO) method is one of the most well-known methods for local path planning, allowing consideration of dynamic obstacles and unexpected obstacles. Typical VO methods separate a velocity map into a collision area and a collision-free area. A robot can avoid collisions by selecting its velocity from within the collision-free area. However, if there are numerous obstacles near a robot, the robot will have very few velocity candidates. In this paper, a method for choosing optimal velocity components using the concept of pass-time and vertical clearance is proposed for the efficient movement of a robot. The pass-time is the time required for a robot to pass by an obstacle. By generating a latticized available velocity map for a robot, each velocity component can be evaluated using a cost function that considers the pass-time and other aspects. From the output of the cost function, even a velocity component that will cause a collision in the future can be chosen as a final velocity if the pass-time is sufficiently long enough.

  2. Atmospheric freeze drying assisted by power ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santacatalina, J V; Cárcel, J A; Garcia-Perez, J V; Mulet, A; Simal, S

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric freeze drying (AFD) is considered an alternative to vacuum freeze drying to keep the quality of fresh product. AFD allows continuous drying reducing fix and operating costs, but presents, as main disadvantage, a long drying time required. The application of power ultrasound (US) can accelerate AFD process. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the application of power ultrasound to improve atmospheric freeze drying of carrot. For that purpose, AFD experiments were carried out with carrot cubes (10 mm side) at constant air velocity (2 ms −1 ), temperature (−10°C) and relative humidity (10%) with (20.5 kWm −3 ,USAFD) and without (AFD) ultrasonic application. A diffusion model was used in order to quantify the influence of US in drying kinetics. To evaluate the quality of dry products, rehydration capacity and textural properties were determined. The US application during AFD of carrot involved the increase of drying rate. The effective moisture diffusivity identified in USAFD was 73% higher than in AFD experiments. On the other hand, the rehydration capacity was higher in USAFD than in AFD and the hardness of dried samples did not show significant (p<0.05) differences. Therefore, US application during AFD significantly (p<0.05) sped-up the drying process preserving the quality properties of the dry product.

  3. Ultrasound Contrast Agent Microbubble Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overvelde, M.L.J.; Vos, Henk; de Jong, N.; Versluis, Michel; Paradossi, Gaio; Pellegretti, Paolo; Trucco, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents are traditionally used in ultrasound-assisted organ perfusion imaging. Recently the use of coated microbubbles has been proposed for molecular imaging applications where the bubbles are covered with a layer of targeting ligands to bind specifically to their target cells.

  4. A Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seong Woo

    1999-01-01

    The ability to see the internal organs of the human body in a noninvasive way is a powerful diagnostic tool of modern medicine. Among these imaging modalities such as X-ray, MRI, and ultrasound. MRI and ultrasound are presenting much less risk of undesirable damage of both patient and examiner. In fact, no deleterious effects have been reported as a result of clinical examination by using MRI and ultrasound diagnostic equipment. As a result, their market volume has been rapidly increased. MRI has a good resolution. but there are a few disadvantages such as high price. non-real-time imaging capability. and expensive diagnostic cost. On the other hand, the ultrasound imaging system has inherently poor resolution as compared with X-ray and MRI. In spite of its poor resolution, the ultrasound diagnostic equipment is lower in price and has an ability of real-time imaging as compared with the others. As a result, the ultrasound imaging system has become general and essential modality for imaging the internal organs of human body. In this review various researches and developments to enhance the resolution of the ultrasound images are explained and future trends of the ultrasound imaging technology are described

  5. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shpak, O.; Verweij, M.; de Jong, N.; Versluis, Michel; Escoffre, J.M.; Bouakaz, A.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to

  6. Ultrasound-induced radical polymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, M.W.A.; Kemmere, M.F.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.

    2004-01-01

    Sonochemistry comprises all chemical effects that are induced by ultrasound. Most of these effects are caused by cavitations, ie, the collapse of microscopic bubbles in a liquid. The chemical effects of ultrasound include the formation of radicals and the enhancement of reaction rates at ambient

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... within your child’s abdomen. Ultrasound does not use ionizing radiation, has no known harmful effects, and is particularly ... create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... of vomiting in young infants Because ultrasound provides real-time images, images that are renewed continuously, it also ...

  9. Synthetic Aperture Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Gammelmark, Kim Løkke

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes the use of synthetic aperture (SA) imaging in medical ultrasound. SA imaging is a radical break with today's commercial systems, where the image is acquired sequentially one image line at a time. This puts a strict limit on the frame rate and the possibility of acquiring...... a sufficient amount of data for high precision flow estimation. These constrictions can be lifted by employing SA imaging. Here data is acquired simultaneously from all directions over a number of emissions, and the full image can be reconstructed from this data. The talk will demonstrate the many benefits...

  10. Deconvolution of ultrasound images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1992-01-01

    Based on physical models, it is indicated that the received pressure field in ultrasound B-mode images can be described by a convolution between a tissue reflection signal and the emitted pressure field. This result is used in a description of current image formation and in formulating a new...... processing scheme. The suggested estimator can take into account the dispersive attenuation, the temporal and spatial variation of the pulse, and the change in reflection strength and signal-to-noise ratio. Details of the algorithm and the estimation of parameters to be used are given. The performance...

  11. Ultrasound appearance of knuckle pads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Ben, R. [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham (United States). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Dehghanpisheh, K.; Chatham, W.W.; Alarcon, G.S. [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham (United States). Dept. of Medicine; Lee, D.H.; Oakes, J. [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham (United States). Dept. of Surgery

    2006-11-15

    We describe the ultrasound appearance of knuckle pads. Retrospective analysis of imaging in a series of five patients initially referred for evaluation of periarticular soft-tissue swelling of the hands involving the dorsum of the PIP and MP joints. Two patients had associated Dupuytren's contractures. Ultrasound and radiographs of the hands in all patients were reviewed and correlated with clinical history and physical exams. Radiographs in four patients demonstrated dorsal soft-tissue thickening. Ultrasound exams showed increased dorsal subcutaneous thickening, with either diffuse or focal hypoechoic areas corresponding to the areas of soft-tissue fullness identified on physical exam. No erosions or synovial proliferation were identified either by radiographs or ultrasound of the underlying joints. Knuckle pads can sometimes be difficult to distinguish from synovitis on physical examination. Musculoskeletal ultrasound can quickly identify these superficial lesions and exclude underlying synovial proliferation.

  12. Crystallization of glycine with ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Louhi-Kultanen, Marjatta; Karjalainen, Milja; Rantanen, Jukka

    2006-01-01

    Sonocrystallization has proved to be an efficient tool to influence the external appearance and structure of a crystalline product obtained by various crystallization methods. The present work focuses on high intensity sonocrystallization of glycine by varying amplitude of ultrasound with an ultr...... ultrasound power. This study also showed, the higher the ultrasound amplitude the smaller the crystals obtained.......Sonocrystallization has proved to be an efficient tool to influence the external appearance and structure of a crystalline product obtained by various crystallization methods. The present work focuses on high intensity sonocrystallization of glycine by varying amplitude of ultrasound...... with an ultrasound frequency of 20kHz at two temperature ranges 40-50 and 20-30 degrees C in a jacketed 250-ml cooling crystallizer equipped with a stirrer. The polymorph composition of the obtained crystals was analyzed with a temperature variable X-ray powder diffractometer (XRPD). XRPD results showed that...

  13. Prostate ultrasound: back in business!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisan, Nicolae; Andras, Iulia; Radu, Corina; Andras, David; Coman, Radu-Tudor; Tucan, Paul; Pisla, Doina; Crisan, Dana; Coman, Ioan

    2017-11-29

    The use of grey scale prostate ultrasound decreased after the implementation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis and evaluation of prostate cancer. The new developments, such as multiparametric ultrasound and MRI-ultrasound fusion technology, renewed the interest for this imaging method in the assessment of prostate cancer. The purpose of this paper was to review the current role of prostate ultrasound in the setting of these new applications. A thorough reevaluation of the selection criteria of the patients is required to assess which patients would benefit from multiparametric ultrasound, who wouldbenefit from multiparametric MRI or the combination of both to assist prostate biopsy in order to ensure the balance between overdiagnosis and underdiagnosis of prostate cancer.

  14. Control rod velocity limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cearley, J.E.; Carruth, J.C.; Dixon, R.C.; Spencer, S.S.; Zuloaga, J.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a velocity control arrangement for a reciprocable, vertically oriented control rod for use in a nuclear reactor in a fluid medium, the control rod including a drive hub secured to and extending from one end therefrom. The control device comprises: a toroidally shaped control member spaced from and coaxially positioned around the hub and secured thereto by a plurality of spaced radial webs thereby providing an annular passage for fluid intermediate the hub and the toroidal member spaced therefrom in coaxial position. The side of the control member toward the control rod has a smooth generally conical surface. The side of the control member away from the control rod is formed with a concave surface constituting a single annular groove. The device also comprises inner and outer annular vanes radially spaced from one another and spaced from the side of the control member away from the control rod and positioned coaxially around and spaced from the hub and secured thereto by spaced radial webs thereby providing an annular passage for fluid intermediate the hub and the vanes. The vanes are angled toward the control member, the outer edge of the inner vane being closer to the control member and the inner edge of the outer vane being closer to the control member. When the control rod moves in the fluid in the direction toward the drive hub the vanes direct a flow of fluid turbulence which provides greater resistance to movement of the control rod in the direction toward the drive hub than in the other direction

  15. Velocity Dispersions Across Bulge Types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabricius, Maximilian; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Saglia, Roberto; Drory, Niv; Fisher, David

    2010-01-01

    We present first results from a long-slit spectroscopic survey of bulge kinematics in local spiral galaxies. Our optical spectra were obtained at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with the LRS spectrograph and have a velocity resolution of 45 km/s (σ*), which allows us to resolve the velocity dispersions in the bulge regions of most objects in our sample. We find that the velocity dispersion profiles in morphological classical bulge galaxies are always centrally peaked while the velocity dispersion of morphologically disk-like bulges stays relatively flat towards the center--once strongly barred galaxies are discarded.

  16. DNA damage caused by UV- and near UV-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Takeo

    1986-01-01

    Much work with mutants deficient in DNA repair has been performed concerning UV-induced DNA damage under the condition where there is no artificial stimulation. In an attempt to infer the effects of solar wavelengths, the outcome of the work is discussed in terms of cellular radiation sensitivity, unscheduled DNA synthesis, and mutation induction, leading to the conclusion that some DNA damage occurs even by irradiation of the shorter wavelength light (270 - 315 nm) and is repaired by excision repair. It has been thought to date that pyrimidine dimer (PD) plays the most important role in UV-induced DNA damage, followed by (6 - 4) photoproducts. As for DNA damage induced by near UV irradiation, the yield of DNA single-strand breaks and of DNA-protein crosslinking, other than PD, is considered. The DNA-protein crosslinking has proved to be induced by irradiation at any wavelength of UV ranging from 260 to 425 nm. Near UV irradiation causes the inhibition of cell proliferation to take place. (Namekawa, K.)

  17. On linear relationship between shock velocity and particle velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dandache, H.

    1986-11-01

    We attempt to derive the linear relationship between shock velocity U s and particle velocity U p from thermodynamic considerations, taking into account an ideal gas equation of state and a Mie-Grueneisen equation of state for solids. 23 refs

  18. Protozoa manipulation by ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yancy Milena Porras Rodríguez

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Microorganism manipulation, considered as controlled motion and positioning, is one of the most important activities in microbiology and medicine. To achieve this goal there are some techniques such as those which and optical forces, among others. These techniques are usually sophisticated, and some of them can induce irreversible alterations on the microorganisms which prevents their use in another tests. Thus, there is justified the study of technological alternatives to manipulate microorganisms in an easy and cost-effective way. This work shows the interaction between protozoa and air microbubbles when they are under the influence of an ultrasonic field of 5.8 mW. At the microbubbles resonant frequencies, microorganisms were attracted toward the bubbles' frontier remaining there while the ultrasonic field was applied. Once the ultrasound disappears, protozoa recover their freedom of movement. The observed effects could be used as the actuation principle of devices capable to trap, hold and release microorganisms of high mobility without any apparent damage. Microbubbles are generated by electrolysis which take place on the surface of an electrode array, while the ultrasound is originated by means of a piezoelectric transducer. As microorganisms there were employed those present in stagnated water, and were observed through an stereomicroscope. Key words: manipulator; protozoa; ultrasonic; transducer; piezoelectric.

  19. Physiotherapy ultrasound calibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gledhill, M.

    1996-01-01

    Calibration of physiotherapy ultrasound equipment has long been a problem. Numerous surveys around the world over the past 20 years have all found that only a low percentage of the units tested had an output within 30% of that indicatd. In New Zealand, a survey carried out by the NRL in 1985 found that only 24% had an output, at the maximum setting, within + or - 20% of that indicated. The present performance Standard for new equipment (NZS 3200.2.5:1992) requires that the measured output should not deviate from that indicated by more than + or - 30 %. This may be tightened to + or - 20% in the next few years. Any calibration is only as good as the calibration equipment. Some force balances can be tested with small weights to simulate the force exerted by an ultrasound beam, but with others this is not possible. For such balances, testing may only be feasible with a calibrated source which could be used like a transfer standard. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs

  20. Two-components UV-therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pullmann, H.; Steigleder, G.K.

    1980-01-01

    20 patients with generalized psoriasis were treated with an apparatus containing UV-A- and UV-B-fluorescence tubes to be switched separately. The therapy was started with an UV-A-dose of 12 J/cm 2 daily. After the first week of treatment UV-B in increasing doses was applicated additionally. Clearance was achieved in 80 percent. (orig.) [de