WorldWideScience

Sample records for ultrasound signal detection

  1. Ultrasonic signal analysis according to laser ultrasound generation position for the detection of delamination in composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Kyung Min; Choi In Young; Kim, Seong Jong; Kang, Young June [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gil Dong [GP Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic should be inspected in the fabrication process to enhance quality by preventing defects, such as delamination and voids. Conventional ultrasonic evaluation methods cannot be applied during the fabrication process because they require contact measurement by a transducer. Thus, an optical method using a laser was employed in this study for non-contact ultrasonic evaluation. Ultrasonic signals were generated by a pulsed laser and received by using a laser interferometer. First, an ultrasonic signal was generated from the back side of a material sample with artificial internal defects in the composite. The ultrasonic signal directed through the interior of the specimen was then detected at the front side. After determining the locations of the internal defects, the defects were quantitatively evaluated from the front side of the composite by using ultrasonic signal generation and reception.

  2. Detection of tissue coagulation by decorrelation of ultrasonic echo signals in cavitation-enhanced high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Shin; Matsuura, Keiko; Takagi, Ryo; Yamamoto, Mariko; Umemura, Shin-Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    A noninvasive technique to monitor thermal lesion formation is necessary to ensure the accuracy and safety of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. The purpose of this study is to ultrasonically detect the tissue change due to thermal coagulation in the HIFU treatment enhanced by cavitation microbubbles. An ultrasound imaging probe transmitted plane waves at a center frequency of 4.5 MHz. Ultrasonic radio-frequency (RF) echo signals during HIFU exposure at a frequency of 1.2 MHz were acquired. Cross-correlation coefficients were calculated between in-phase and quadrature (IQ) data of two B-mode images with an interval time of 50 and 500 ms for the estimation of the region of cavitation and coagulation, respectively. Pathological examination of the coagulated tissue was also performed to compare with the corresponding ultrasonically detected coagulation region. The distribution of minimum hold cross-correlation coefficient between two sets of IQ data with 50-ms intervals was compared with a pulse inversion (PI) image. The regions with low cross-correlation coefficients approximately corresponded to those with high brightness in the PI image. The regions with low cross-correlation coefficients in 500-ms intervals showed a good agreement with those with significant change in histology. The results show that the regions of coagulation and cavitation could be ultrasonically detected as those with low cross-correlation coefficients between RF frames with certain intervals. This method will contribute to improve the safety and accuracy of the HIFU treatment enhanced by cavitation microbubbles.

  3. Ultrasound imaging using coded signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misaridis, Athanasios

    Modulated (or coded) excitation signals can potentially improve the quality and increase the frame rate in medical ultrasound scanners. The aim of this dissertation is to investigate systematically the applicability of modulated signals in medical ultrasound imaging and to suggest appropriate...... methods for coded imaging, with the goal of making better anatomic and flow images and three-dimensional images. On the first stage, it investigates techniques for doing high-resolution coded imaging with improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to conventional imaging. Subsequently it investigates how...... coded excitation can be used for increasing the frame rate. The work includes both simulated results using Field II, and experimental results based on measurements on phantoms as well as clinical images. Initially a mathematical foundation of signal modulation is given. Pulse compression based...

  4. Signal detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tholomier, M.

    1985-01-01

    In a scanning electron microscope, whatever is the measured signal, the same set is found: incident beam, sample, signal detection, signal amplification. The resulting signal is used to control the spot luminosity with the observer cathodoscope. This is synchronized with the beam scanning on the sample; on the cathodoscope, the image in secondary electrons, backscattered electrons,... of the sample surface is reconstituted. The best compromise must be found between a register time low enough to remove eventual variations (under the incident beam) of the nature of the observed phenomenon, and a good spatial resolution of the image and a signal-to-noise ratio high enough. The noise is one of the basic limitations of the scanning electron microscope performance. The whose measurement line must be optimized to reduce it [fr

  5. Unpowered wireless transmission of ultrasound signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H; Paramo, D; Deshmukh, S

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a wireless ultrasound sensing system that uses frequency conversion to convert the ultrasound signal to a microwave signal and transmit it directly without digitization. Constructed from a few passive microwave components, the sensor is able to sense, modulate, and transmit the full waveform of ultrasound signals wirelessly without requiring any local power source. The principle of operation of the unpowered wireless ultrasound sensor is described first, and this is followed by a detailed description of the implementation of the sensor and the sensor interrogation unit using commercially available antennas and microwave components. Validation of the sensing system using an ultrasound pitch–catch system and the power analysis model of the system are also presented

  6. Motion Detection in Ultrasound Image-Sequences Using Tensor Voting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inba, Masafumi; Yanagida, Hirotaka; Tamura, Yasutaka

    2008-05-01

    Motion detection in ultrasound image sequences using tensor voting is described. We have been developing an ultrasound imaging system adopting a combination of coded excitation and synthetic aperture focusing techniques. In our method, frame rate of the system at distance of 150 mm reaches 5000 frame/s. Sparse array and short duration coded ultrasound signals are used for high-speed data acquisition. However, many artifacts appear in the reconstructed image sequences because of the incompleteness of the transmitted code. To reduce the artifacts, we have examined the application of tensor voting to the imaging method which adopts both coded excitation and synthetic aperture techniques. In this study, the basis of applying tensor voting and the motion detection method to ultrasound images is derived. It was confirmed that velocity detection and feature enhancement are possible using tensor voting in the time and space of simulated ultrasound three-dimensional image sequences.

  7. MP3 compression of Doppler ultrasound signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poepping, Tamie L; Gill, Jeremy; Fenster, Aaron; Holdsworth, David W

    2003-01-01

    The effect of lossy, MP3 compression on spectral parameters derived from Doppler ultrasound (US) signals was investigated. Compression was tested on signals acquired from two sources: 1. phase quadrature and 2. stereo audio directional output. A total of 11, 10-s acquisitions of Doppler US signal were collected from each source at three sites in a flow phantom. Doppler signals were digitized at 44.1 kHz and compressed using four grades of MP3 compression (in kilobits per second, kbps; compression ratios in brackets): 1400 kbps (uncompressed), 128 kbps (11:1), 64 kbps (22:1) and 32 kbps (44:1). Doppler spectra were characterized by peak velocity, mean velocity, spectral width, integrated power and ratio of spectral power between negative and positive velocities. The results suggest that MP3 compression on digital Doppler US signals is feasible at 128 kbps, with a resulting 11:1 compression ratio, without compromising clinically relevant information. Higher compression ratios led to significant differences for both signal sources when compared with the uncompressed signals. Copyright 2003 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology

  8. Ultrasound call detection in capybara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selene S.C. Nogueira

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The vocal repertoire of some animal species has been considered a non-invasive tool to predict distress reactivity. In rats ultrasound emissions were reported as distress indicator. Capybaras[ vocal repertoire was reported recently and seems to have ultrasound calls, but this has not yet been confirmed. Thus, in order to check if a poor state of welfare was linked to ultrasound calls in the capybara vocal repertoire, the aim of this study was to track the presence of ultrasound emissions in 11 animals under three conditions: 1 unrestrained; 2 intermediately restrained, and 3 highly restrained. The ultrasound track identified frequencies in the range of 31.8±3.5 kHz in adults and 33.2±8.5 kHz in juveniles. These ultrasound frequencies occurred only when animals were highly restrained, physically restrained or injured during handling. We concluded that these calls with ultrasound components are related to pain and restraint because they did not occur when animals were free of restraint. Thus we suggest that this vocalization may be used as an additional tool to assess capybaras[ welfare.

  9. Signal Processing in Medical Ultrasound B-mode Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Tai Kyong

    2000-01-01

    Ultrasonic imaging is the most widely used modality among modern imaging device for medical diagnosis and the system performance has been improved dramatically since early 90's due to the rapid advances in DSP performance and VLSI technology that made it possible to employ more sophisticated algorithms. This paper describes 'main stream' digital signal processing functions along with the associated implementation considerations in modern medical ultrasound imaging systems. Topics covered include signal processing methods for resolution improvement, ultrasound imaging system architectures, roles and necessity of the applications of DSP and VLSI technology in the development of the medical ultrasound imaging systems, and array signal processing techniques for ultrasound focusing

  10. Ultrasound detection of nonpalpable mammographically occult malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, W.L.; Hermann, G.; Rausch, D.R.; Sherman, J.; Feig, S.A.; Bleiweiss, I.J.; Jaffer, S.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of occult malignancy with screening breast ultrasound. All ultrasound-guided core needle breast biopsies performed between January 1, 1999, and June 30, 2001, were retrospectively reviewed. Lesions were identified during screening breast ultrasound in high-risk women with no mammographic or palpable abnormality in either breast, a unilateral mammographic or palpable abnormality in the contralateral breast, or a unilateral mammographic or palpable abnormality in a different quadrant of the same breast. All ultrasound-detected lesions were histologically verified. Six hundred and fifty-two women with a mean age of 49 years underwent 698 biopsies during the study period. Three hundred and forty-nine of these lesions were detected at screening breast ultrasound. Out of 349, 11 (3.2%) had a mammographically and clinically occult malignancy. Nine cancers were found in women with no mammographic or palpable abnormality. Two cancers were found in the same breast as the mammographic or palpable abnormality. None were found in the breast contralateral to a palpable or mammographic abnormality. Screening breast ultrasound of high-risk women has a similar detection rate for occult carcinoma as screening mammography, but has a low positive predictive value in cases where biopsy is performed. (author)

  11. "Utilizing" signal detection theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Spencer K; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2014-09-01

    What do inferring what a person is thinking or feeling, judging a defendant's guilt, and navigating a dimly lit room have in common? They involve perceptual uncertainty (e.g., a scowling face might indicate anger or concentration, for which different responses are appropriate) and behavioral risk (e.g., a cost to making the wrong response). Signal detection theory describes these types of decisions. In this tutorial, we show how incorporating the economic concept of utility allows signal detection theory to serve as a model of optimal decision making, going beyond its common use as an analytic method. This utility approach to signal detection theory clarifies otherwise enigmatic influences of perceptual uncertainty on measures of decision-making performance (accuracy and optimality) and on behavior (an inverse relationship between bias magnitude and sensitivity optimizes utility). A "utilized" signal detection theory offers the possibility of expanding the phenomena that can be understood within a decision-making framework. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Ultrasound Imaging Methods for Breast Cancer Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozmen, N.

    2014-01-01

    The main focus of this thesis is on modeling acoustic wavefield propagation and implementing imaging algorithms for breast cancer detection using ultrasound. As a starting point, we use an integral equation formulation, which can be used to solve both the forward and inverse problems. This thesis

  13. colour-flow ultrasound in the detection of penetrating vascular

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine the sensitivity of colour-flow ultrasound in the detection of penetrating vascular injuries of ... Colour-flow ultrasound is sensitive in detecting vascular injuries and is suitable as a screening .... injury, ultrasound appears to be sensitive in detecting these lesions. However there is a risk of missing more central.

  14. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging for the Detection of Neural Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, Kevin R.

    performed while targeting three early inflammatory markers (P-selectin, VCAM-1, ICAM-1). Imaging protocols and outcome measures of previous TCEUS investigations of inflammation were replicated to aid in comparisons of outcomes. Signal intensity data was used to generate time intensity curves for qualitative and quantitative analysis of contrast agent temporal behavior. A proof of principle study established preclinical evidence to support the ability of TCEUS to detect acute neural inflammation. Substantial increases in signal intensities were observed while targeting inflammatory markers compared to controls. Further investigations consisted of examining molecular ultrasound sensitivity, and were accomplished by examining targeted contrast agent dosing parameters, and the ability of TCEUS to longitudinally evaluate neural inflammation. Qualitative analysis of TCEUS imaging performed with both administered doses revealed marked increases in signal intensities during acute inflammation, where inflammatory marker expression was presumably at its highest. This was in comparison to measures obtained in the absence of, and during, chronic inflammation. This research contributes much needed empirical evidence to the molecular ultrasound body of literature, and represents the first steps towards advancing this TCEUS application to clinical practice. Future studies are necessary to further these findings and effectively build upon this evidence. Increasing evidence of TCEUS use for the detection of neural inflammation will aid in its eventual clinical translation, where it will likely have a positive impact on patient care.

  15. Detection of signals in noise

    CERN Document Server

    Whalen, Anthony D; Declaris, Nicholas

    1971-01-01

    Detection of Signals in Noise serves as an introduction to the principles and applications of the statistical theory of signal detection. The book discusses probability and random processes; narrowband signals, their complex representation, and their properties described with the aid of the Hilbert transform; and Gaussian-derived processes. The text also describes the application of hypothesis testing for the detection of signals and the fundamentals required for statistical detection of signals in noise. Problem exercises, references, and a supplementary bibliography are included after each c

  16. Statistical theory of signal detection

    CERN Document Server

    Helstrom, Carl Wilhelm; Costrell, L; Kandiah, K

    1968-01-01

    Statistical Theory of Signal Detection, Second Edition provides an elementary introduction to the theory of statistical testing of hypotheses that is related to the detection of signals in radar and communications technology. This book presents a comprehensive survey of digital communication systems. Organized into 11 chapters, this edition begins with an overview of the theory of signal detection and the typical detection problem. This text then examines the goals of the detection system, which are defined through an analogy with the testing of statistical hypotheses. Other chapters consider

  17. Modeling binaural signal detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breebaart, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    With the advent of multimedia technology and powerful signal processing systems, audio processing and reproduction has gained renewed interest. Examples of products that have been developed are audio coding algorithms to efficiently store and transmit music and speech, or audio reproduction systems

  18. Low power laser generated ultrasound: Signal processing for time domain data acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleary, A; Thursby, G; McKee, C; Armstrong, I; Culshaw, B; Veres, I; Pierce, S G

    2011-01-01

    The use of low power modulated laser diode systems has previously been established as a suitable method for non-destructive laser generation of ultrasound. Using a quasi-continuous optical excitation amplified by an erbium-doped fibre amplifier (EDFA) allows flexible generation of ultrasonic waves, offering control of further parameters such as the frequency content or signal shape. In addition, pseudo-random binary sequences (PRBS) can be used to improve the detected impulse response. Here we compare two sequences, the m-sequence and the Golay code, and discuss the advantages and practical limits of their application with laser diode based optical excitation of ultrasound.

  19. Accurate step-FMCW ultrasound ranging and comparison with pulse-echo signaling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Shyam; Singh, Rahul S.; Lee, Michael; Cox, Brian P.; Culjat, Martin O.; Grundfest, Warren S.; Lee, Hua

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a method setup for high-frequency ultrasound ranging based on stepped frequency-modulated continuous waves (FMCW), potentially capable of producing a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared to traditional pulse-echo signaling. In current ultrasound systems, the use of higher frequencies (10-20 MHz) to enhance resolution lowers signal quality due to frequency-dependent attenuation. The proposed ultrasound signaling format, step-FMCW, is well-known in the radar community, and features lower peak power, wider dynamic range, lower noise figure and simpler electronics in comparison to pulse-echo systems. In pulse-echo ultrasound ranging, distances are calculated using the transmit times between a pulse and its subsequent echoes. In step-FMCW ultrasonic ranging, the phase and magnitude differences at stepped frequencies are used to sample the frequency domain. Thus, by taking the inverse Fourier transform, a comprehensive range profile is recovered that has increased immunity to noise over conventional ranging methods. Step-FMCW and pulse-echo waveforms were created using custom-built hardware consisting of an arbitrary waveform generator and dual-channel super heterodyne receiver, providing high SNR and in turn, accuracy in detection.

  20. Data fusion of ultrasound and GPR signals for analysis of historic walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar, A; Gosalbez, J; Safont, G; Vergara, L

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an application of ultrasounds and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) for analysis of historic walls. The objectives are to characterize the deformation of a historic wall under different levels of load weights and to obtain an enhanced image of the wall. A new method that fuses data from ultrasound and GPR traces is proposed which is based on order statistics digital filters. Application results are presented for non destructive testing (NDT) of two replicates of historic ashlars' masonry walls: the first one homogeneous and the second one containing controlled defects such as cracks and nooks. The walls are measured separately using ultrasounds and GPR at different load steps. Time and frequency parameters extracted from the signals and different B-Scans for each of the NDT techniques are obtained. After this, a new fused representation is obtained, which results demonstrate the improvement of characterization and defect detection in historic walls using data fusion.

  1. Signal anomaly detection and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenstern, V.M.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Gloeckler, O.

    1988-08-01

    As part of a comprehensive signal validation system, we have developed a signal anomaly detector, without specifically establishing the cause of the anomaly. A signal recorded from process instrumentation is said to have an anomaly, if during steady-state operation, the deviation in the level of the signal, its root-mean-square (RMS) value, or its statistical distribution changes by a preset value. This deviation could be an unacceptable increase or a decrease in the quantity being monitored. An anomaly in a signal may be characterized by wideband or single-frequency noise, bias error, pulse-type error, nonsymmetric behavior, or a change in the signal bandwidth. Various signatures can be easily computed from data samples and compared against specified threshold values. We want to point out that in real processes, pulses can appear with different time widths, and at different rates of change of the signal. Thus, in characterizing an anomaly as a pulse-type, the fastest pulse width is constrained by the signal sampling interval. For example, if a signal is sampled at 100 Hz, we will not be able to detect pulses occurring at kHz rates. Discussion with utility and Combustion Engineering personnel indicated that it is not practical to detect pulses having a narrow time width. 9 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs

  2. Detection of signals in noise

    CERN Document Server

    McDonough, Robert N

    1995-01-01

    The Second Edition is an updated revision to the authors highly successful and widely used introduction to the principles and application of the statistical theory of signal detection. This book emphasizes those theories that have been found to be particularly useful in practice including principles applied to detection problems encountered in digital communications, radar, and sonar.Detection processing based upon the fast Fourier transform

  3. Signal analysis for failure detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parpaglione, M.C.; Perez, L.V.; Rubio, D.A.; Czibener, D.; D'Attellis, C.E.; Brudny, P.I.; Ruzzante, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Several methods for analysis of acoustic emission signals are presented. They are mainly oriented to detection of changes in noisy signals and characterization of higher amplitude discrete pulses or bursts. The aim was to relate changes and events with failure, crack or wear in materials, being the final goal to obtain automatic means of detecting such changes and/or events. Performance evaluation was made using both simulated and laboratory test signals. The methods being presented are the following: 1. Application of the Hopfield Neural Network (NN) model for classifying faults in pipes and detecting wear of a bearing. 2. Application of the Kohonnen and Back Propagation Neural Network model for the same problem. 3. Application of Kalman filtering to determine time occurrence of bursts. 4. Application of a bank of Kalman filters (KF) for failure detection in pipes. 5. Study of amplitude distribution of signals for detecting changes in their shape. 6. Application of the entropy distance to measure differences between signals. (author). 10 refs, 11 figs

  4. EUROmediCAT signal detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Given, Joanne E; Loane, Maria; Luteijn, Johannes Michiel

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate congenital anomaly (CA)-medication exposure associations produced by the new EUROmediCAT signal detection system and determine which require further investigation. METHODS: Data from 15 EUROCAT registries (1995-2011) with medication exposures at the chemical substance (5th level...

  5. Role of ultrasound in detection of ectopic pregnancy: our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moshin, H.; Khan, M.N.; Jadun, C.K.; Tanveer-ul-Jaq

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy of ultrasound in detection of ectopic pregnancy. Design: It was an observational and prospective study. The study was conducted from January, 2000 in the Radiology Department of the Agha Khan University Hospital, Karachi. Subjects and Methods: Four hundred patients were referred for sonography with a query of ectopic pregnancy. Most of the patients had clinical symptoms of vaginal bleeding and lower abdominal pain with history of missed periods. For the evaluation biphasic ultrasound was performed that included suprapubic and trans vaginal ultrasound. After analyzing internal architecture prospective sonographic diagnosis was made. Results: The most common site of ectopic pregnancy was fallopian tubes. Positive diagnosis was made in 96.3% cases and negative diagnosis in 4.7% cases in our study. Conclusion: Efficacy of ultrasound was found to be 96.4% in the detection of ectopic pregnancy and hence plays a very important role in early diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy. (author)

  6. Advanced detection strategies for ultrasound contrast agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.G. Borsboom (Jerome)

    2005-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Ultrasound contrast agent was discovered serendipitously by Gramiak and Shah in I968 when they injected indocyanine green dye into the heart and observed increased echogenicity of the blood containing the dye. Small cavitation bubbles that were formed upon

  7. Massive hydrothorax with malpositioned central venous catheter – Ultrasound detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Hasija

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Radioimaging is the gold standard for confirmation of the position of central venous catheter as well as its related complications. Use of ultrasound has been proven in guiding central venous cannulations, and it can also be used in detecting related complications. We report a case of a 2 year old child with hydrothorax causing desaturation due to malpositioned central venous catheter diagnosed by ultrasound in the delay for getting a radiograph.

  8. Subgraph detection using graph signals

    KAUST Repository

    Chepuri, Sundeep Prabhakar

    2017-03-06

    In this paper we develop statistical detection theory for graph signals. In particular, given two graphs, namely, a background graph that represents an usual activity and an alternative graph that represents some unusual activity, we are interested in answering the following question: To which of the two graphs does the observed graph signal fit the best? To begin with, we assume both the graphs are known, and derive an optimal Neyman-Pearson detector. Next, we derive a suboptimal detector for the case when the alternative graph is not known. The developed theory is illustrated with numerical experiments.

  9. Subgraph detection using graph signals

    KAUST Repository

    Chepuri, Sundeep Prabhakar; Leus, Geert

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we develop statistical detection theory for graph signals. In particular, given two graphs, namely, a background graph that represents an usual activity and an alternative graph that represents some unusual activity, we are interested in answering the following question: To which of the two graphs does the observed graph signal fit the best? To begin with, we assume both the graphs are known, and derive an optimal Neyman-Pearson detector. Next, we derive a suboptimal detector for the case when the alternative graph is not known. The developed theory is illustrated with numerical experiments.

  10. Toward in vivo detection of hydrogen peroxide with ultrasound molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Emilia S.; Orozco, Jahir; Wu, Zhe; Malone, Christopher D.; Yi, Boemha; Gao, Wei; Eghtedari, Mohammad; Wang, Joseph; Mattrey, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new class of ultrasound molecular imaging agents that extend upon the design of micromotors that are designed to move through fluids by catalyzing hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and propelling forward by escaping oxygen microbubbles. Micromotor converters require 62 mm of H2O2 to move – 1000-fold higher than is expected in vivo. Here, we aim to prove that ultrasound can detect the expelled microbubbles, to determine the minimum H2O2 concentration needed for microbubble detection, explore alternate designs to detect the H2O2 produced by activated neutrophils and perform preliminary in vivo testing. Oxygen microbubbles were detected by ultrasound at 2.5 mm H2O2. Best results were achieved with a 400–500 nm spherical design with alternating surface coatings of catalase and PSS over a silica core. The lowest detection limit of 10–100 µm was achieved when assays were done in plasma. Using this design, we detected the H2O2 produced by freshly isolated PMA-activated neutrophils allowing their distinction from naïve neutrophils. Finally, we were also able to show that direct injection of these nanospheres into an abscess in vivo enhanced ultrasound signal only when they contained catalase, and only when injected into an abscess, likely because of the elevated levels of H2O2 produced by inflammatory mediators. PMID:23958028

  11. Ultrasound Detection of Superior Vena Cava Thrombus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Birch

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Superior vena cava (SVC syndrome is most commonly the insidious result of decreased vascular flow through the SVC due to malignancy, spontaneous thrombus, infections, and iatrogenic etiologies. Clinical suspicion usually leads to computed tomography to confirm the diagnosis. However, when a patient in respiratory distress requires emergent airway management, travel outside the emergency department is not ideal. With the growing implementation of point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS, clinicians may make critical diagnoses rapidly and safely. We present a case of SVC syndrome due to extensive thrombosis of the deep venous system cephalad to the SVC diagnosed by POCUS. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(6:715-718

  12. Evaluation of ultrasound techniques for brain injury detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Joel; Kasili, Paul M.; Norton, Stephen J.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1998-05-01

    In this work, we examine the physics underlying wave propagation in the head to evaluate various ultrasonic transducers for use in a brian injury detection device. The results of measurements of the attenuation coefficient and phase velocity for ultrasonic propagation in samples of brain tissue and skull bone from sheep are presented. The material properties are then used to investigate the propagation of ultrasonic pressure fields in the head. The ultrasound fields for three different transducers are calculated for propagation in a simulated brain/skull model. The model is constructed using speed-of-sound and mass density values of the two tissue types. The impact of the attenuation on the ultrasound fields is then examined. Finally, the relevant points drawn from these discussions are summarized. We hope to minimize the confounding effects of the skull by using sub-MHz ultrasound while maintaining the necessary temporal and spatial resolution to successfully detect injury in the brain.

  13. EUROmediCAT signal detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luteijn, Johannes Michiel; Morris, Joan K; Garne, Ester

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Information about medication safety in pregnancy is inadequate. We aimed to develop a signal detection methodology to routinely identify unusual associations between medications and congenital anomalies using data collected by 15 European congenital anomaly registries. METHODS: EUROmedi...... for 40 385 medication anomaly combinations in the data. Simes multiple testing procedure with a 50% false discovery rate (FDR) identified associations least likely to be due to chance and those associations with more than two cases with the exposure and the anomaly were selected for further investigation...

  14. Expert AE signal arrival detection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chlada, Milan; Převorovský, Zdeněk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 6, 3/4 (2011), s. 191-205 ISSN 1741-8410. [NDT in PROGRESS /4./. Praha, 05.11.2007-07.11.2007] R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FR-TI1/274; GA ČR GA101/07/1518 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : acoustic emission * signal arrival detection Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics http://www.inderscience.com/search/index.php?mainAction=search& action =record&rec_id=43215&prevQuery=&ps=10&m=or

  15. Detection of Doppler Microembolic Signals Using High Order Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maroun Geryes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Robust detection of the smallest circulating cerebral microemboli is an efficient way of preventing strokes, which is second cause of mortality worldwide. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound is widely considered the most convenient system for the detection of microemboli. The most common standard detection is achieved through the Doppler energy signal and depends on an empirically set constant threshold. On the other hand, in the past few years, higher order statistics have been an extensive field of research as they represent descriptive statistics that can be used to detect signal outliers. In this study, we propose new types of microembolic detectors based on the windowed calculation of the third moment skewness and fourth moment kurtosis of the energy signal. During energy embolus-free periods the distribution of the energy is not altered and the skewness and kurtosis signals do not exhibit any peak values. In the presence of emboli, the energy distribution is distorted and the skewness and kurtosis signals exhibit peaks, corresponding to the latter emboli. Applied on real signals, the detection of microemboli through the skewness and kurtosis signals outperformed the detection through standard methods. The sensitivities and specificities reached 78% and 91% and 80% and 90% for the skewness and kurtosis detectors, respectively.

  16. Ultrasound findings and histological features of ductal carcinoma in situ detected by ultrasound examination alone

    OpenAIRE

    Izumori, Ayumi; Takebe, Koji; Sato, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Background With the increasing use of high-resolution ultrasound (US) examination, many breast carcinomas that cannot be identified by mammography (MMG) alone have been detected. Many of these carcinomas are ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and small-sized invasive carcinomas. Until date, DCISs have often been described as palpable masses with calcifications on MMG, but what are the characteristics of DCISs that are detectable by US alone? Methods One hundred fifty cases with DCIS that we expe...

  17. Ultrasound-guided wire localization of lesions detected on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Wire localization for planned surgical treatment in the management of breast cancer is underutilized in our environment. The objective of this study is to assess the role of ultrasound-guided wire localization of breast masses detected on screening mammography and its impact on biopsy and breast ...

  18. Automated Breast Ultrasound Lesions Detection using Convolutional Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Moi Hoon; Pons, Gerard; Marti, Joan; Ganau, Sergi; Sentis, Melcior; Zwiggelaar, Reyer; Davison, Adrian K; Marti, Robert

    2017-08-07

    Breast lesion detection using ultrasound imaging is considered an important step of Computer-Aided Diagnosis systems. Over the past decade, researchers have demonstrated the possibilities to automate the initial lesion detection. However, the lack of a common dataset impedes research when comparing the performance of such algorithms. This paper proposes the use of deep learning approaches for breast ultrasound lesion detection and investigates three different methods: a Patch-based LeNet, a U-Net, and a transfer learning approach with a pretrained FCN-AlexNet. Their performance is compared against four state-of-the-art lesion detection algorithms (i.e. Radial Gradient Index, Multifractal Filtering, Rule-based Region Ranking and Deformable Part Models). In addition, this paper compares and contrasts two conventional ultrasound image datasets acquired from two different ultrasound systems. Dataset A comprises 306 (60 malignant and 246 benign) images and Dataset B comprises 163 (53 malignant and 110 benign) images. To overcome the lack of public datasets in this domain, Dataset B will be made available for research purposes. The results demonstrate an overall improvement by the deep learning approaches when assessed on both datasets in terms of True Positive Fraction, False Positives per image, and F-measure.

  19. Results of vardenafil mediated power Doppler ultrasound, contrast enhanced ultrasound and systematic random biopsies to detect prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Girolamo; Pagni, Riccardo; Mariani, Chiara; Minervini, Riccardo; Morelli, Andrea; Gori, Francesco; Ferdeghini, Ezio Maria; Paterni, Marco; Mauro, Eva; Guidi, Elisa; Armillotta, Nicola; Canale, Domenico; Vitti, Paolo; Caramella, Davide; Minervini, Andrea

    2011-06-01

    We evaluated the ability of the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor vardenafil to increase prostate microcirculation during power Doppler ultrasound. We also evaluated the results of contrast and vardenafil enhanced targeted biopsies compared to those of standard 12-core random biopsies to detect cancer. Between May 2008 and January 2010, 150 consecutive patients with prostate specific antigen more than 4 ng/ml at first diagnosis with negative digital rectal examination and transrectal ultrasound, and no clinical history of prostatitis underwent contrast enhanced power Doppler ultrasound (bolus injection of 2.4 ml SonoVue® contrast agent), followed by vardenafil enhanced power Doppler ultrasound (1 hour after oral administration of vardenafil 20 mg). All patients underwent standard 12-core transrectal ultrasound guided random prostate biopsy plus 1 further sampling from each suspected hypervascular lesion detected by contrast and vardenafil enhanced power Doppler ultrasound. Prostate cancer was detected in 44 patients (29.3%). Contrast and vardenafil enhanced power Doppler ultrasound detected suspicious, contrast enhanced and vardenafil enhanced areas in 112 (74.6%) and 110 patients (73.3%), and was diagnostic for cancer in 32 (28.5%) and 42 (38%), respectively. Analysis of standard technique, and contrast and vardenafil enhanced power Doppler ultrasound findings by biopsy core showed significantly higher detection using vardenafil vs contrast enhanced power Doppler ultrasound and standard technique (41.2% vs 22.7% and 8.1%, p power Doppler ultrasound was 10% and 11.7% (p not significant). Vardenafil enhanced power Doppler ultrasound enables excellent visualization of the microvasculature associated with cancer and can improve the detection rate compared to contrast enhanced power Doppler ultrasound and the random technique. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Bedside ultrasound reliability in locating catheter and detecting complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payman Moharamzadeh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Central venous catheterization is one of the most common medical procedures and is associated with such complications as misplacement and pneumothorax. Chest X-ray is among good ways for evaluation of these complications. However, due to patient’s excessive exposure to radiation, time consumption and low diagnostic value in detecting pneumothorax in the supine patient, the present study intends to examine bedside ultrasound diagnostic value in locating tip of the catheter and pneumothorax. Materials and methods: In the present cross-sectional study, all referred patients requiring central venous catheterization were examined. Central venous catheterization was performed by a trained emergency medicine specialist, and the location of catheter and the presence of pneumothorax were examined and compared using two modalities of ultrasound and x-ray (as the reference standard. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predicting values were reported. Results: A total of 200 non-trauma patients were included in the study (58% men. Cohen’s Kappa consistency coefficients for catheterization and diagnosis of pneumothorax were found as 0.49 (95% CI: 0.43-0.55, 0.89 (P<0.001, (95% CI: 97.8-100, respectively. Also, ultrasound sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing pneumothorax were 75% (95% CI: 35.6-95.5, and 100% (95% CI: 97.6-100, respectively. Conclusion: The present study results showed low diagnostic value of ultrasound in determining catheter location and in detecting pneumothorax. With knowledge of previous studies, the search still on this field.   Keywords: Central venous catheterization; complications; bedside ultrasound; radiography;

  1. Detection of Transient Signals in Doppler Spectra

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Signal processing is used to detect transient signals in the presence of noise. Two embodiments are disclosed. In both embodiments, the time series from a remote...

  2. Multiparametric ultrasound in the detection of prostate cancer: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postema, Arnoud; Mischi, Massimo; de la Rosette, Jean; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the advances and clinical results of the different ultrasound modalities and the progress in combining them into multiparametric UltraSound (mpUS). A systematic literature search on mpUS and the different ultrasound modalities included: greyscale ultrasound, computerized transrectal ultrasound, Doppler and power Doppler techniques, dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound and (shear wave) elastography. Limited research available on combining ultrasound modalities has presented improvement in diagnostic performance. The data of two studies suggest that even adding a lower performing ultrasound modality to a better performing modality using crude methods can already improve the sensitivity by 13-51 %. The different modalities detect different tumours. No study has tried to combine ultrasound modalities employing a system similar to the PIRADS system used for mpMRI or more advanced classifying algorithms. Available evidence confirms that combining different ultrasound modalities significantly improves diagnostic performance.

  3. Pulsed ultrasound modulated optical tomography with harmonic lock-in holography detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Haowen; Mather, Melissa L; Morgan, Stephen P

    2013-07-01

    A method that uses digital heterodyne holography reconstruction to extract scattered light modulated by a single-cycle ultrasound (US) burst is demonstrated and analyzed. An US burst is used to shift the pulsed laser frequency by a series of discrete harmonic frequencies which are then locked on a CCD. The analysis demonstrates that the unmodulated light's contribution to the detected signal can be canceled by appropriate selection of the pulse repetition frequency. It is also shown that the modulated signal can be maximized by selecting a pulse sequence which consists of a pulse followed by its inverted counterpart. The system is used to image a 12 mm thick chicken breast with 2 mm wide optically absorbing objects embedded at the midplane. Furthermore, the method can be revised to detect the nonlinear US modulated signal by locking at the second harmonic US frequency.

  4. The Role of Breast Ultrasound in Early Cancer Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huay-Ben Pan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonography (US is currently considered the first-line examination in the detection and characterization of breast lesions including the evaluation of breast cancer. Yet only few single-center cohort studies analyzing breast US in the framework of screening could be identified. In spite of mammography consider as the primary method for screening especially the noteworthy ability of microcalcifications detection. US is good in mass or mass- like lesion detection, especially in the dense breast population that proved by the study of ACRIN 6666. A lobular hypoechoic area; lesion with ductal extension and dilatation; and a hypoechoic nodular lesion with a dilated lactiferous duct leading to the retroareolar region, that were the common ultrasound findings in Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS and probably related to nuclear grade of cancer. Computer programs have been developed and approved for use in clinical practice, the application including CAD (computer aided/assisted detection/diagnosis, ABUS (automated breast US, elastography and microbubbles in contrast-enhanced ultrasound. Furthermore the standardized scanning; improving with computer technology implementation and familiar to the picture of DCIS is necessary for progress the competence of early breast cancer detection.

  5. Detection of a Surface-Breaking Crack by Using the Surface Wave of a Laser Ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seung-Kyu; Baik, Sung-Hoon; Jung, Hyun-Kyu; Joo, Young-Sang; Cha, Hyung-Ki; Kang, Young-June

    2006-01-01

    A laser ultrasonic system is a non-contact inspection device with a high spatial resolution and a wide-band spectrum. Also it provides absolute measurements of the moving distance and can be applied to the hard-to access locations with curved or rough surfaces like a nuclear power plant. Several laser ultrasonic techniques are applied for the detection of micro cracks in a nuclear power plant. Also, laser ultrasonic techniques are used to measure the grain size of materials and to detect cracks in railroads and aircrafts. Though the laser ultrasonic inspection system is widely applicable, it is comparatively expensive and it provides a low signal-to-noise ratio when compared to the conventional piezoelectric transducers. Many studies have been carried out to improve the system performance. One of the widely used measurement devices of a ultrasound is the Confocal Fabry-Perot Interferometer(CFPI) with a dynamic stabilizer. The dynamic stabilizer improves the stability of the CFPI by adaptively maintaining the optimum working status at the measuring time of the CFPI. In this paper, we have investigated the detection methods of the depth of a surface-breaking crack by using the surface wave of a laser ultrasound. We have fabricated a laser ultrasonic inspection system on an optical table by using a pulse laser, a CFPI with a dynamic stabilizer and a computer. The computer acquires the laser ultrasound by using a high speed A/D converter with a sampling rate of 1000 MHz. The dynamic stabilizer stabilizes the CFPI by adaptively maintaining it at an optimum status when the laser ultrasound is generated. The computer processes the ultrasonic signal in real time to extract the depth information of a surface-breaking crack. We extracted the depth information from the peak-to-valley values in the time domain and also from the center frequencies of the spectrum in the frequency domain

  6. Improving the signal-to-noise ratio in ultrasound-modulated optical tomography by a lock-in amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lili; Wu, Jingping; Lin, Guimin; Hu, Liangjun; Li, Hui

    2016-10-01

    With high spatial resolution of ultrasonic location and high sensitivity of optical detection, ultrasound-modulated optical tomography (UOT) is a promising noninvasive biological tissue imaging technology. In biological tissue, the ultrasound-modulated light signals are very weak and are overwhelmed by the strong unmodulated light signals. It is a difficulty and key to efficiently pick out the weak modulated light from strong unmodulated light in UOT. Under the effect of an ultrasonic field, the scattering light intensity presents a periodic variation as the ultrasonic frequency changes. So the modulated light signals would be escape from the high unmodulated light signals, when the modulated light signals and the ultrasonic signal are processed cross correlation operation by a lock-in amplifier and without a chopper. Experimental results indicated that the signal-to-noise ratio of UOT is significantly improved by a lock-in amplifier, and the higher the repetition frequency of pulsed ultrasonic wave, the better the signal-to-noise ratio of UOT.

  7. Signal processing for boiling noise detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledwidge, T.J.; Black, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The present paper deals with investigations of acoustic signals from a boiling experiment performed on the KNS I loop at KfK Karlsruhe. Signals have been analysed in frequency as well as in time domain. Signal characteristics successfully used to detect the boiling process have been found in time domain. (author). 6 refs, figs

  8. Process Dissociation and Mixture Signal Detection Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarlo, Lawrence T.

    2008-01-01

    The process dissociation procedure was developed in an attempt to separate different processes involved in memory tasks. The procedure naturally lends itself to a formulation within a class of mixture signal detection models. The dual process model is shown to be a special case. The mixture signal detection model is applied to data from a widely…

  9. Spectral integration in binaural signal detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breebaart, D.J.; Par, van de S.L.J.D.E.; Kohlrausch, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    For both monaural and binaural masking, the spectral content of the masker and of the signal to be detected are important stimulus properties influencing the detection process. It is generally accepted that the auditory system separates the incoming signals in several frequency bands. It is not

  10. Effect of microbubble ligation to cells on ultrasound signal enhancement: implications for targeted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankford, Miles; Behm, Carolyn Z; Yeh, James; Klibanov, Alexander L; Robinson, Peter; Lindner, Jonathan R

    2006-10-01

    Molecular imaging with contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU) relies on the detection of microbubbles retained in regions of disease. The aim of this study was to determine whether microbubble attachment to cells influences their acoustic signal generation and stability. Biotinylated microbubbles were attached to streptavidin-coated plates to derive density versus intensity relations during low- and high-power imaging. To assess damping from microbubble attachment to solid or cell surfaces, in vitro imaging was performed for microbubbles charge-coupled to methacrylate spheres and for vascular cell adhesion molecule-1-targeted microbubbles attached to endothelial cells. Signal enhancement on plates increased according to acoustic power and microbubble site density up to 300 mm. Microbubble signal was reduced by attachment to solid spheres during high- and low-power imaging but was minimally reduced by attachment to endothelial cells and only at low power. Attachment of targeted microbubbles to rigid surfaces results in damping and a reduction of their acoustic signal, which is not seen when microbubbles are attached to cells. A reliable concentration versus intensity relationship can be expected from microbubble attachment to 2-dimensional surfaces until a very high site density is reached.

  11. Use of modulated excitation signals in ultrasound. Part I: Basic concepts and expected benefits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misaridis, Thanassis; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2005-01-01

    This paper, the first from a series of three papers on the application of coded excitation signals in medical ultrasound, discusses the basic principles and ultrasound-related problems of pulse compression. The concepts of signal modulation and matched filtering are given, and a simple model...... of attenuation relates the matched filter response with the ambiguity function, known from radar. Based on this analysis and the properties of the ambiguity function, the selection of coded waveforms suitable for ultrasound imaging is discussed. It is shown that linear frequency modulation (FM) signals have...... that in the case of linear FM signals, a SNR improvement of 12 to 18 dB can be expected for large imaging depths in attenuating media, without any depth-dependent filter compensation. In contrast, nonlinear FM modulation and binary codes are shown to give a SNR improvement of only 4 to 9 dB when processed...

  12. Use of modulated excitation signals in ultrasound. Part II: Design and performance for medical imaging applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misaridis, Thanassis; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2005-01-01

    ultrasound presents design methods of linear FM signals and mismatched filters, in order to meet the higher demands on resolution in ultrasound imaging. It is shown that for the small time-bandwidth (TB) products available in ultrasound, the rectangular spectrum approximation is not valid, which reduces....... The method is evaluated first for resolution performance and axial sidelobes through simulations with the program Field II. A coded excitation ultrasound imaging system based on a commercial scanner and a 4 MHz probe driven by coded sequences is presented and used for the clinical evaluation of the coded...... excitation/compression scheme. The clinical images show a significant improvement in penetration depth and contrast, while they preserve both axial and lateral resolution. At the maximum acquisition depth of 15 cm, there is an improvement of more than 10 dB in the signal-to-noise ratio of the images...

  13. Ultrasound detection and identification of cosmetic fillers in the skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wortsman, X.; Wortsman, J.; Orlandi, C.

    2012-01-01

    Background While the incidence of cosmetic filler injections is rising world-wide, neither exact details of the procedure nor the agent used are always reported or remembered by the patients. Thus, although complications are reportedly rare, availability of a precise diagnostic tool to detect...... cutaneous filler deposits could help clarify the association between the procedure and the underlying pathology. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate cutaneous sonography in the detection and identification of cosmetic fillers deposits and, describe dermatological abnormalities found associated...... with the presence of those agents. Methods We used ultrasound in a porcine skin model to determine the sonographic characteristics of commonly available filler agents, and subsequently applied the analysis to detect and identify cosmetic fillers among patients referred for skin disorders. Results Fillers...

  14. Robust boundary detection of left ventricles on ultrasound images using ASM-level set method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaonan; Gao, Yuan; Li, Hong; Teng, Yueyang; Kang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Level set method has been widely used in medical image analysis, but it has difficulties when being used in the segmentation of left ventricular (LV) boundaries on echocardiography images because the boundaries are not very distinguish, and the signal-to-noise ratio of echocardiography images is not very high. In this paper, we introduce the Active Shape Model (ASM) into the traditional level set method to enforce shape constraints. It improves the accuracy of boundary detection and makes the evolution more efficient. The experiments conducted on the real cardiac ultrasound image sequences show a positive and promising result.

  15. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ultrasound is a useful procedure for monitoring the baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to produce a two-dimensional image of the baby while inside the mother's ...

  16. Detecting changes in ultrasound backscattered statistics by using Nakagami parameters: Comparisons of moment-based and maximum likelihood estimators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jen-Jen; Cheng, Jung-Yu; Huang, Li-Fei; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Wan, Yung-Liang; Tsui, Po-Hsiang

    2017-05-01

    The Nakagami distribution is an approximation useful to the statistics of ultrasound backscattered signals for tissue characterization. Various estimators may affect the Nakagami parameter in the detection of changes in backscattered statistics. In particular, the moment-based estimator (MBE) and maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) are two primary methods used to estimate the Nakagami parameters of ultrasound signals. This study explored the effects of the MBE and different MLE approximations on Nakagami parameter estimations. Ultrasound backscattered signals of different scatterer number densities were generated using a simulation model, and phantom experiments and measurements of human liver tissues were also conducted to acquire real backscattered echoes. Envelope signals were employed to estimate the Nakagami parameters by using the MBE, first- and second-order approximations of MLE (MLE 1 and MLE 2 , respectively), and Greenwood approximation (MLE gw ) for comparisons. The simulation results demonstrated that, compared with the MBE and MLE 1 , the MLE 2 and MLE gw enabled more stable parameter estimations with small sample sizes. Notably, the required data length of the envelope signal was 3.6 times the pulse length. The phantom and tissue measurement results also showed that the Nakagami parameters estimated using the MLE 2 and MLE gw could simultaneously differentiate various scatterer concentrations with lower standard deviations and reliably reflect physical meanings associated with the backscattered statistics. Therefore, the MLE 2 and MLE gw are suggested as estimators for the development of Nakagami-based methodologies for ultrasound tissue characterization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound accelerates tooth movement via activation of the BMP-2 signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Xue

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to determine the underlying mechanism of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS induced alveolar bone remodeling and the role of BMP-2 expression in a rat orthodontic tooth movement model. Orthodontic appliances were placed between the homonymy upper first molars and the upper central incisors in rats under general anesthesia, followed by daily 20-min LIPUS or sham LIPUS treatment beginning at day 0. Tooth movement distances and molecular changes were evaluated at each observation point. In vitro and in vivo studies were conducted to detect HGF (Hepatocyte growth factor/Runx2/BMP-2 signaling pathways and receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL expression by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. At day 3, LIPUS had no effect on the rat orthodontic tooth movement distance and BMP-2-induced alveolar bone remodeling. However, beginning at day 5 and for the following time points, LIPUS significantly increased orthodontic tooth movement distance and BMP-2 signaling pathway and RANKL expression compared with the control group. The qRT-PCR and Western blot data in vitro and in vivo to study BMP-2 expression were consistent with the immunohistochemistry observations. The present study demonstrates that LIPUS promotes alveolar bone remodeling by stimulating the HGF/Runx2/BMP-2 signaling pathway and RANKL expression in a rat orthodontic tooth movement model, and LIPUS increased BMP-2 expression via Runx2 regulation.

  18. Therapeutic Ultrasound Bypasses Canonical Syndecan-4 Signaling to Activate Rac1*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Claire M.; Morgan, Mark R.; Harrison, Andrew; Humphries, Martin J.; Bass, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    The application of pulsed, low intensity ultrasound is emerging as a potent therapy for the treatment of complex bone fractures and tissue damage. Ultrasonic stimuli accelerate fracture healing by up to 40% and enhance tendon and ligament healing by promoting cell proliferation, migration, and matrix synthesis through an unresolved mechanism. Ultrasound treatment also induces closure of nonunion fractures, at a success rate (85% of cases) similar to that of surgical intervention (68-96%) while avoiding the complications associated with surgery. The regulation of cell adhesion necessary for wound healing depends on cooperative engagement of the extracellular matrix receptors, integrin and syndecan, as exemplified by the wound healing defects observed in syndecan- and integrin-knock-out mice. This report distinguishes the influence of ultrasound on signals downstream of the prototypic fibronectin receptors, α5β1 integrin and syndecan-4, which cooperate to regulate Rac1 and RhoA. Ultrasonic stimulation fails to activate integrins or induce cell spreading on poor, electrostatic ligands. By contrast, ultrasound treatment overcomes the necessity of engagement or expression of syndecan-4 during the process of focal adhesion formation, which normally requires simultaneous engagement of both receptors. Ultrasound exerts an influence downstream of syndecan-4 and PKCα to specifically activate Rac1, itself a critical regulator of tissue repair, and to a lesser extent RhoA. The ability of ultrasound to bypass syndecan-4 signaling, which is known to facilitate efficient tissue repair, explains the reduction in healing times observed in ultrasound-treated patients. By substituting for one of the key axes of adhesion-dependent signaling, ultrasound therapy has considerable potential as a clinical technique. PMID:19147498

  19. Seizure detection algorithms based on EMG signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa

    Background: the currently used non-invasive seizure detection methods are not reliable. Muscle fibers are directly connected to the nerves, whereby electric signals are generated during activity. Therefore, an alarm system on electromyography (EMG) signals is a theoretical possibility. Objective...... on the amplitude of the signal. The other algorithm was based on information of the signal in the frequency domain, and it focused on synchronisation of the electrical activity in a single muscle during the seizure. Results: The amplitude-based algorithm reliably detected seizures in 2 of the patients, while...... the frequency-based algorithm was efficient for detecting the seizures in the third patient. Conclusion: Our results suggest that EMG signals could be used to develop an automatic seizuredetection system. However, different patients might require different types of algorithms /approaches....

  20. Augmentation of Muscle Blood Flow by Ultrasound Cavitation Is Mediated by ATP and Purinergic Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcik, J Todd; Davidson, Brian P; Xie, Aris; Wu, Melinda D; Yadava, Mrinal; Qi, Yue; Liang, Sherry; Chon, Chae Ryung; Ammi, Azzdine Y; Field, Joshua; Harmann, Leanne; Chilian, William M; Linden, Joel; Lindner, Jonathan R

    2017-03-28

    Augmentation of tissue blood flow by therapeutic ultrasound is thought to rely on convective shear. Microbubble contrast agents that undergo ultrasound-mediated cavitation markedly amplify these effects. We hypothesized that purinergic signaling is responsible for shear-dependent increases in muscle perfusion during therapeutic cavitation. Unilateral exposure of the proximal hindlimb of mice (with or without ischemia produced by iliac ligation) to therapeutic ultrasound (1.3 MHz, mechanical index 1.3) was performed for 10 minutes after intravenous injection of 2×10 8 lipid microbubbles. Microvascular perfusion was evaluated by low-power contrast ultrasound perfusion imaging. In vivo muscle ATP release and in vitro ATP release from endothelial cells or erythrocytes were assessed by a luciferin-luciferase assay. Purinergic signaling pathways were assessed by studying interventions that (1) accelerated ATP degradation; (2) inhibited P2Y receptors, adenosine receptors, or K ATP channels; or (3) inhibited downstream signaling pathways involving endothelial nitric oxide synthase or prostanoid production (indomethacin). Augmentation in muscle perfusion by ultrasound cavitation was assessed in a proof-of-concept clinical trial in 12 subjects with stable sickle cell disease. Therapeutic ultrasound cavitation increased muscle perfusion by 7-fold in normal mice, reversed tissue ischemia for up to 24 hours in the murine model of peripheral artery disease, and doubled muscle perfusion in patients with sickle cell disease. Augmentation in flow extended well beyond the region of ultrasound exposure. Ultrasound cavitation produced an ≈40-fold focal and sustained increase in ATP, the source of which included both endothelial cells and erythrocytes. Inhibitory studies indicated that ATP was a critical mediator of flow augmentation that acts primarily through either P2Y receptors or adenosine produced by ectonucleotidase activity. Combined indomethacin and inhibition of

  1. Pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound imaging to detect intracellular accumulation of magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Qu Min; Sokolov, Konstantin V; Emelianov, Stanislav Y; Ma, Li L; Johnston, Keith P; Romanovicz, Dwight K

    2011-01-01

    As applications of nanoparticles in medical imaging and biomedicine rapidly expand, the interactions of nanoparticles with living cells have become an area of active interest. For example, intracellular accumulation of nanoparticles-an important part of cell-nanoparticle interaction-has been well studied using plasmonic nanoparticles and optical or optics-based techniques due to the change in optical properties of the nanoparticle aggregates. However, magnetic nanoparticles, despite their wide range of clinical applications, do not exhibit plasmonic-resonant properties and therefore their intracellular aggregation cannot be detected by optics-based imaging techniques. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of a novel imaging technique-pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound (pMMUS)-to identify intracellular accumulation of endocytosed magnetic nanoparticles. In pMMUS imaging a focused, high intensity, pulsed magnetic field is used to excite the cells labeled with magnetic nanoparticles, and ultrasound imaging is then used to monitor the mechanical response of the tissue. We demonstrated previously that clusters of magnetic nanoparticles amplify the pMMUS signal in comparison to the signal from individual nanoparticles. Here we further demonstrate that pMMUS imaging can identify interaction between magnetic nanoparticles and living cells, i.e. intracellular accumulation of nanoparticles within the cells. The results of our study suggest that pMMUS imaging can not only detect the presence of magnetic nanoparticles but also provides information about their intracellular accumulation non-invasively and in real-time.

  2. Bedside Ultrasound in the Emergency Department to Detect Hydronephrosis for the Evaluation of Suspected Ureteric Colic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, R; Shakya, R M; Khan A, A

    2016-01-01

    Background Renal colic is a common emergency department presentation. Hydronephrosis is indirect sign of urinary obstruction which may be due to obstructing ureteric calculus and can be detected easily by bedside ultrasound with minimal training. Objective To compare the accuracy of detection of hydronephrosis performed by the emergency physician with that of radiologist's in suspected renal colic cases. Method This was a prospective observational study performed over a period of 6 months. Patients >8 years with provisional diagnosis of renal colic with both the bedside ultrasound and the formal ultrasound performed were included. Presence of hydronephrosis in both ultrasounds and size and location of ureteric stone if present in formal ultrasound was recorded. The accuracy of the emergency physician detection of hydronephrosis was determined using the scan reported by the radiologists as the "gold standard" as computed tomography was unavailable. Statistical analysis was executed using SPSS 17.0. Result Among the 111 included patients, 56.7% had ureteric stone detected in formal ultrasound. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of bedside ultrasound performed by emergency physician for detection of hydronephrosis with that of formal ultrasound performed by radiologist was 90.8%., 78.3%, 85.5% and 85.7% respectively. Bedside ultrasound and formal ultrasound both detected hydronephrosis more often in patients with larger stones and the difference was statistically significant (p=.000). Conclusion Bedside ultrasound can be potentially used as an important tool in detecting clinically significant hydronephrosis in emergency to evaluate suspected ureteric colic. Focused training in ultrasound could greatly improve the emergency management of these patients.

  3. Signal classification for acoustic neutrino detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neff, M.; Anton, G.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Graf, K.; Hößl, J.; Katz, U.; Lahmann, R.; Richardt, C.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on signal classification for deep-sea acoustic neutrino detection. In the deep sea, the background of transient signals is very diverse. Approaches like matched filtering are not sufficient to distinguish between neutrino-like signals and other transient signals with similar signature, which are forming the acoustic background for neutrino detection in the deep-sea environment. A classification system based on machine learning algorithms is analysed with the goal to find a robust and effective way to perform this task. For a well-trained model, a testing error on the level of 1% is achieved for strong classifiers like Random Forest and Boosting Trees using the extracted features of the signal as input and utilising dense clusters of sensors instead of single sensors.

  4. Importance of diastolic velocities in the detection of celiac and mesenteric artery disease by duplex ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Just, S; Schroeder, T V

    1997-01-01

    To assess the predictive value of ultrasound duplex scanning in the detection of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and celiac artery (CA) occlusive disease.......To assess the predictive value of ultrasound duplex scanning in the detection of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and celiac artery (CA) occlusive disease....

  5. Incidentally detection of non-palpable testicular nodules at scrotal ultrasound: What is new?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Valentino

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The increased use of ultrasound in patients with urological and andrological symptoms has given an higher detection of intra-testicular nodules. Most of these lesions are hypoechoic and their interpretation is often equivocal. Recently, new ultrasound techniques have been developed alongside of B-mode and color-Doppler ultrasound. Although not completely standardized, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS and tissue elastography (TE, added to traditional ultrasonography, can provide useful information about the correct interpretation of incidentally detected non-palpable testicular nodules. The purpose of this review article is to illustrate these new techniques in the patient management.

  6. Beacon signal in transcranial color coded ultrasound: A sign for brain death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Akif Topçuoğlu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A widely under-recognized brain-death confirming transcranial ultrasonography pattern resembling the red-blue beacon signal was demonstrated. Familiarity to this distinct and characteristic ultrasonic pattern seems to be important in the perspective of point-of-care neurological ultrasound use and knobology.

  7. Microphone detected ionacoustic signal from metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dioszeghy, T.; Szoekefalvi-Nagy, Z.; Biro, T.

    1986-12-01

    An experimental system for studying the radiation-induced acoustic signal generated by a modulated 2 MeV He + ion beam in metals is described. For detection, a closed cell on the rear side of the copper or aluminium sample, a half-inch condenser microphone, and a lock-in amplifier were employed. The signal was found to be proportional to beam current and particle energy, and inversely proportional to cell length. A decrease of the signal magnitude and an increase of the phase delay with increasing modulation frequency and sample thickness were also observed. (author)

  8. Automatic Smoker Detection from Telephone Speech Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poorjam, Amir Hossein; Hesaraki, Soheila; Safavi, Saeid

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes an automatic smoking habit detection from spontaneous telephone speech signals. In this method, each utterance is modeled using i-vector and non-negative factor analysis (NFA) frameworks, which yield low-dimensional representation of utterances by applying factor analysis...... method is evaluated on telephone speech signals of speakers whose smoking habits are known drawn from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 2008 and 2010 Speaker Recognition Evaluation databases. Experimental results over 1194 utterances show the effectiveness of the proposed approach...... for the automatic smoking habit detection task....

  9. Prospective Evaluation of Thoracic Ultrasound in the Detection of Pneumothorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, K. W.; Hamilton, D. R.; Kirkpatrick, A. W.; Billica, R. D.; Williams, D. R.; Diebel, L. N.; Sargysan, A. E.; Dulchavsky, S. A.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: Pneumothorax (PTX) occurs commonly in trauma patients and is confirmed by examination and radiography. Thoracic ultrasound (VIS) has been suggested as an alternative method for rapidly diagnosing PTX when X-ray is unavailable as in rural, military, or space flight settings; however, its accuracy and specificity are not known. Methods: We evaluated the accuracy of thoracic U/S detection of PTX compared to radiography in stable, emergency patients with a high suspicion of PTX at a Level-l trauma center over a 6-month period. Following University and NASA Institutional Review Board approval, informed consent was obtained from patients with penetrating or blunt chest trauma, or with a history consistent with PTX. Whenever possible, the presence or absence of the " lung sliding" sign or the "comet tail" artifact were determined by U/S in both hemithoraces by residents instructed in thoracic U/S before standard radiologic verification of PTX. Results were recorded on data sheets for comparison to standard radiography. Results: Thoracic VIS had a 94% sensitivity; two PTX could not be reliably diagnosed due to subcutaneous air; the true negative rate was 100%. In one patient, the VIS exam was positive while X ray did not confirm PTX; a follow-up film 1 hour later demonstrated a small PTX. The average time for bilateral thoracic VIS examination was 2 to 3 minutes. Conclusions: Thoracic ultrasound reliably diagnoses pneumothorax. Presence of the "lung sliding" sign conclusively excludes pneumothorax. Expansion of the FAST examination to include the thorax should be investigated.

  10. Working Group 3: Greenhouse signal detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, T.; Ellsaesser, H.; Groisman, P.Ya.; Grotch, S.; Jenkins, G.; Karoly, D.; Riches, M.; Santer, B.; Schoenwiese, C.; Vinnikov, K.; Zwiers, F.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative efforts to detect the greenhouse-gas signal (GHG) in nature are in their infancy. The reasons for this state of affairs are numerous. It is only in the last few years that GCMs have advanced to the point where their simulations of GHG signals might be marginally believable. Without reasonably good a priori predictions of expected GHG signals from the models, the detection problem is moot. The observational data sets describing changes in the global climate system over the last 50-100 years needed for adequate detection studies have also only come into existence in the last five years. Finally, no coherent, generally-agreed-on detection strategy has been developed by the scientific community interested in the GHG problem. The lack of adequate model predictions and observational sets are largely responsible for this latter condition. The rudimentary detection efforts that have been conducted have generally been based on recognizing the fingerprint of GHG signals in the oceans and atmosphere. GCM results for 1 x 2 x CO 2 equilibrium runs have been used to search for GHG effects induced in tropospheric air and ocean surface temperature fields since the early 1900s. No significant effect has been found

  11. Rejection of crosstalk and noise by a quasi balanced CFPI for remote ultrasound detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitinger, B; Berer, T; Hornhuber, C; Burgholzer, P, E-mail: bernhard.reitinger@recendt.at [Research Center for Non Destructive Testing GmbH (Recendt), Hafenstrasse 47-51, 4020 Linz (Austria)

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we show the benefits of a quasi balanced fringe hopping CFPI (confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer) with broadband CMRR (common mode rejection ratio) for remote ultrasound detection. Ultrasonic information in general lies in the phase modulation of laser light which in this case is demodulated by using the CFPI at a certain working point on a fringe. By hopping from the positive to the negative slope on the same fringe the detected ultrasonic signals are inverted. In contrary interference signals like crosstalk from the generation, ghosts, or noise correlated to pulse laser excitation are not influenced and hence get rejected by subtracting the signals from both slopes. Hence, a minimum of two measurements is needed for common mode rejection. The fringe hopping from the positive to the negative slope is done by changing the distance of the CFPI mirrors with a precise piezoelectric-stack and a fast high resolution digital controller. As only one photo-detector with a transimpedance-amplifier is needed a high CMRR can be accomplished which is not affected by the symmetry of the fringe but only by pulse to pulse energy fluctuations of the generation laser. We show that with fringe hopping and averaging the signal to noise ratio increases much faster than with averaging without fringe hopping. This is due to the correlation of the quasi-noise with the generation cycle.

  12. Implementation and optimization of ultrasound signal processing algorithms on mobile GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Woo Kyu; Lee, Wooyoul; Kim, Kyu Cheol; Yoo, Yangmo; Song, Tai-Kyong

    2014-03-01

    A general-purpose graphics processing unit (GPGPU) has been used for improving computing power in medical ultrasound imaging systems. Recently, a mobile GPU becomes powerful to deal with 3D games and videos at high frame rates on Full HD or HD resolution displays. This paper proposes the method to implement ultrasound signal processing on a mobile GPU available in the high-end smartphone (Galaxy S4, Samsung Electronics, Seoul, Korea) with programmable shaders on the OpenGL ES 2.0 platform. To maximize the performance of the mobile GPU, the optimization of shader design and load sharing between vertex and fragment shader was performed. The beamformed data were captured from a tissue mimicking phantom (Model 539 Multipurpose Phantom, ATS Laboratories, Inc., Bridgeport, CT, USA) by using a commercial ultrasound imaging system equipped with a research package (Ultrasonix Touch, Ultrasonix, Richmond, BC, Canada). The real-time performance is evaluated by frame rates while varying the range of signal processing blocks. The implementation method of ultrasound signal processing on OpenGL ES 2.0 was verified by analyzing PSNR with MATLAB gold standard that has the same signal path. CNR was also analyzed to verify the method. From the evaluations, the proposed mobile GPU-based processing method has no significant difference with the processing using MATLAB (i.e., PSNRe., 11.31). From the mobile GPU implementation, the frame rates of 57.6 Hz were achieved. The total execution time was 17.4 ms that was faster than the acquisition time (i.e., 34.4 ms). These results indicate that the mobile GPU-based processing method can support real-time ultrasound B-mode processing on the smartphone.

  13. Detection of Fatigue Damage by Using High Frequency Nonlinear Laser Ultrasonic Signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seung Kyu; Park, Nak Kyu; Baik, Sung Hoon; Cheong, Yong Moo; Cha, Byung Heon

    2012-01-01

    The detection of fatigue damage for the components of a nuclear power plant is one of key techniques to prevent a catastrophic accident and the subsequent severe losses. Specifically, it is preferred to detect at an early stage of the fatigue damage. If the fatigue damage that is in danger of growing into a fracture is accurately detected, an appropriate treatment could be carried out to improve the condition. Although most engineers and designers take precautions against fatigue, some breakdowns of nuclear power plant components still occur due to fatigue damage. It is considered that ultrasound testing technique is the most promising method to detect the fatigue damage in many nondestructive testing methods. Laser ultrasound has attracted attention as a noncontact testing technique. Especially, laser ultrasonic signal has wide band frequency spectrum which can provide more accurate information for a testing material. The conventional linear ultrasonic technique is sensitive to gross defects or opened cracks whereas it is less sensitive to evenly distributed micro-cracks or degradation. An alternative technique to overcome this limitation is nonlinear ultrasound. The principal difference between linear and nonlinear technique is that in the latter the existence and characteristics of defects are often related to an acoustic signal whose frequency differs from that of the input signal. This is related to the radiation and propagation of finite amplitude, especially high power, ultrasound and its interaction with discontinuities, such as cracks, interfaces and voids. Since material failure or degradation is usually preceded by some kind of nonlinear mechanical behavior before significant plastic deformation or material damage occurs. The presence of nonlinear terms in the wave equation causes intense acoustic waves to generate new waves at frequencies which are multiples of the initial sound wave frequency. The nonlinear effect can exert a strong effect on the

  14. Detection of cavernous transformation of the portal vein by contrast-enhanced ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Misun; Thimm, Matthew A; Guerrerio, Anthony L

    2018-06-01

    Cavernous transformation of the portal vein can be missed on color Doppler exam or arterial phase cross-sectional imaging due to their slow flow and delayed enhancement. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) offers many advantages over other imaging techniques and can be used to successfully detect cavernous transformations of the portal vein. A 10-month-old female was followed for repeat episodes of hematemesis. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance arteriogram (MRA) and portal venography were performed. Color Doppler exam of the portal vein was performed followed by administration of Lumason, a microbubble US contrast agent. Magnetic resonance arteriogram, CTA, and color Doppler exam at the time of initial presentation was unremarkable without obvious vascular malformation within the limits of motion degraded exam. At 8-month follow-up, esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a vascular malformation in the distal esophagus which was sclerosed. At 6 month after sclerosis of the lesion, portal venography revealed occlusion of the portal vein with extensive collateralization. Color Doppler revealed subtle hyperarterialization and periportal collaterals. CEUS following color Doppler exam demonstrated extensive enhancement of periportal collaterals. Repeat color Doppler after contrast administration demonstrated extensive Doppler signal in the collateral vessels, suggestive of cavernous transformation. We describe a case of cavernous transformation of the portal vein missed on initial color Doppler, CTA and MRA, but detected with contrast-enhanced ultrasound technique.

  15. “UTILIZING” SIGNAL DETECTION THEORY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Spencer K.; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2014-01-01

    What do inferring what a person is thinking or feeling, deciding to report a symptom to your doctor, judging a defendant’s guilt, and navigating a dimly lit room have in common? They involve perceptual uncertainty (e.g., a scowling face might indicate anger or concentration, which engender different appropriate responses), and behavioral risk (e.g., a cost to making the wrong response). Signal detection theory describes these types of decisions. In this tutorial we show how, by incorporating the economic concept of utility, signal detection theory serves as a model of optimal decision making, beyond its common use as an analytic method. This utility approach to signal detection theory highlights potentially enigmatic influences of perceptual uncertainty on measures of decision-making performance (accuracy and optimality) and on behavior (a functional relationship between bias and sensitivity). A “utilized” signal detection theory offers the possibility of expanding the phenomena that can be understood within a decision-making framework. PMID:25097061

  16. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... completed. Young children may need additional preparation. When scheduling an ultrasound for yourself or your child, ask ... of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Manage Cookies Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  17. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reflect off body structures. A computer receives the waves and uses them to create a picture. Unlike with an x-ray or CT scan, this test does not use ionizing radiation. The test is done in the ultrasound ...

  18. Detection of vascularity in wrist tenosynovitis: power doppler ultrasound compared with contrast-enhanced grey-scale ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauser, Andrea S; Franz, Magdalena; Arora, Rohit; Feuchtner, Gudrun M; Gruber, Johann; Schirmer, Michael; Jaschke, Werner R; Gabl, Markus F

    2010-01-01

    We sought to assess vascularity in wrist tenosynovitis by using power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS) and to compare detection of intra- and peritendinous vascularity with that of contrast-enhanced grey-scale ultrasound (CEUS). Twenty-six tendons of 24 patients (nine men, 15 women; mean age ± SD, 54.4 ± 11.8 years) with a clinical diagnosis of tenosynovitis were examined with B-mode ultrasonography, PDUS, and CEUS by using a second-generation contrast agent, SonoVue (Bracco Diagnostics, Milan, Italy) and a low-mechanical-index ultrasound technique. Thickness of synovitis, extent of vascularized pannus, intensity of peritendinous vascularisation, and detection of intratendinous vessels was incorporated in a 3-score grading system (grade 0 to 2). Interobserver variability was calculated. With CEUS, a significantly greater extent of vascularity could be detected than by using PDUS (P < 0.001). In terms of peri- and intratendinous vessels, CEUS was significantly more sensitive in the detection of vascularization compared with PDUS (P < 0.001). No significant correlation between synovial thickening and extent of vascularity could be found (P = 0.089 to 0.097). Interobserver reliability was calculated to be excellent when evaluating the grading score (κ = 0.811 to 1.00). CEUS is a promising tool to detect tendon vascularity with higher sensitivity than PDUS by improved detection of intra- and peritendinous vascularity.

  19. Power Doppler signal calibration between ultrasound machines by use of a capillary-flow phantom for pannus vascularity in rheumatoid finger joints: a basic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakano, Ryosuke; Kamishima, Tamotsu; Nishida, Mutsumi; Horie, Tatsunori

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound allows the detection and grading of inflammation in rheumatology. Despite these advantages of ultrasound in the management of rheumatoid patients, it is well known that there are significant machine-to-machine disagreements regarding signal quantification. In this study, we tried to calibrate the power Doppler (PD) signal of two models of ultrasound machines by using a capillary-flow phantom. After flow velocity analysis in the perfusion cartridge at various injection rates (0.1-0.5 ml/s), we measured the signal count in the perfusion cartridge at various injection rates and pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) by using PD, perfusing an ultrasound micro-bubble contrast agent diluted with normal saline simulating human blood. By use of the data from two models of ultrasound machines, Aplio 500 (Toshiba) and Avius (Hitachi Aloka), the quantitative PD (QPD) index [the summation of the colored pixels in a 1 cm × 1 cm rectangular region of interest (ROI)] was calculated via Image J (internet free software). We found a positive correlation between the injection rate and the flow velocity. In Aplio 500 and Avius, we found negative correlations between the PRF and the QPD index when the flow velocity was constant, and a positive correlation between flow velocity and the QPD index at constant PRF. The equation for the relationship of the PRF between Aplio 500 and Avius was: y = 0.023x + 0.36 [y = PRF of Avius (kHz), x = PRF of Aplio 500 (kHz)]. Our results suggested that the signal calibration of various models of ultrasound machines is possible by adjustment of the PRF setting.

  20. Does endoscopic ultrasound improve detection of locally recurrent anal squamous-cell cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Carrie Y; Weiser, Martin R; Paty, Philip B; Guillem, Jose G; Nash, Garrett M; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Patil, Sujata; Temple, Larissa K

    2015-02-01

    Evaluating patients for recurrent anal cancer after primary treatment can be difficult owing to distorted anatomy and scarring. Many institutions incorporate endoscopic ultrasound to improve detection, but the effectiveness is unknown. The aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of digital rectal examination and endoscopic ultrasound in detecting locally recurrent disease during routine follow-up of patients with anal cancer. This study is a retrospective, single-institution review. This study was conducted at an oncologic tertiary referral center. Included were 175 patients with nonmetastatic anal squamous-cell cancer, without persistent disease after primary chemoradiotherapy, who had at least 1 posttreatment ultrasound and examination by a colorectal surgeon. The primary outcomes measured were the first modality to detect local recurrence, concordance, crude cancer detection rate, sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value. Eight hundred fifty-five endoscopic ultrasounds and 873 digital rectal examinations were performed during 35 months median follow-up. Overall, ultrasound detected 7 (0.8%) mesorectal and 32 (3.7%) anal canal abnormalities; digital examination detected 69 (7.9%) anal canal abnormalities. Locally recurrent disease was found on biopsy in 8 patients, all detected first or only with digital examination. Four patients did not have an ultrasound at the time of diagnosis of recurrence. The concordance of ultrasound and digital examination in detecting recurrent disease was fair at 0.37 (SE, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.21-0.54), and there was no difference in crude cancer detection rate, sensitivity, specificity, and negative or positive predictive values. The heterogeneity of follow-up timing and examinations is not standardized in this study but is reflective of general practice. Endoscopic ultrasound did not provide any advantage over digital rectal examination in identifying locally recurrent anal cancer, and should not be recommended for

  1. Multigradient Field Active Contour for Multilayer Detection of Ultrasound Rectal Wall Image

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xiao, Di

    2001-01-01

    .... One of the aims is to apply this technique for multilayer boundary detection of ultrasound rectal wall image, which is important in colorectal clinical diagnosis for rectal tumor staging The core...

  2. In-Process Detection of Weld Defects Using Laser-Based Ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, G.D.; Kercel, S.W.; Kisner, R.A.; Klein, M.B.; Pouet, B.

    1999-01-01

    Laser-based ultrasonic (LBU) measurement shows great promise for on-line monitoring of weld quality in tailor-welded blanks. Tailor-welded blanks are steel blanks made from plates of differing thickness and/or properties butt-welded together; they are used in automobile manufacturing to produce body, frame, and closure panels. LBU uses a pulsed laser to generate the ultrasound and a continuous wave (CW) laser interferometer to detect the ultrasound at the point of interrogation to perform ultrasonic inspection. LBU enables in-process measurements since there is no sensor contact or near-contact with the workpiece. The authors are using laser-generated plate (Lamb) waves to propagate from one plate into the weld nugget as a means of detecting defects. This paper reports the results of the investigation of a number of inspection architectures based on processing of signals from selected plate waves, which are either reflected from or transmitted through the weld zone. Bayesian parameter estimation and wavelet analysis (both continuous and discrete) have shown that the LBU time-series signal is readily separable into components that provide distinguishing features which describe weld quality. The authors anticipate that, in an on-line industrial application, these measurements can be implemented just downstream from the weld cell. Then the weld quality data can be fed back to control critical weld parameters or alert the operator of a problem requiring maintenance. Internal weld defects and deviations from the desired surface profile can then be corrected before defective parts are produced

  3. Visual detectability of elastic contrast in real-time ultrasound images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Naomi R.; Bamber, Jeffery C.; Doyley, Marvin M.; Leach, Martin O.

    1997-04-01

    Elasticity imaging (EI) has recently been proposed as a technique for imaging the mechanical properties of soft tissue. However, dynamic features, known as compressibility and mobility, are already employed to distinguish between different tissue types in ultrasound breast examination. This method, which involves the subjective interpretation of tissue motion seen in real-time B-mode images during palpation, is hereafter referred to as differential motion imaging (DMI). The purpose of this study was to develop the methodology required to perform a series of perception experiments to measure elastic lesion detectability by means of DMI and to obtain preliminary results for elastic contrast thresholds for different lesion sizes. Simulated sequences of real-time B-scans of tissue moving in response to an applied force were generated. A two-alternative forced choice (2-AFC) experiment was conducted and the measured contrast thresholds were compared with published results for lesions detected by EI. Although the trained observer was found to be quite skilled at the task of differential motion perception, it would appear that lesion detectability is improved when motion information is detected by computer processing and converted to gray scale before presentation to the observer. In particular, for lesions containing fewer than eight speckle cells, a signal detection rate of 100% could not be achieved even when the elastic contrast was very high.

  4. The erroneous signals of detection theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimmer, Pete C; Ehlman, Sean M; McNamara, John M; Sih, Andrew

    2017-10-25

    Signal detection theory has influenced the behavioural sciences for over 50 years. The theory provides a simple equation that indicates numerous 'intuitive' results; e.g. prey should be more prone to take evasive action (in response to an ambiguous cue) if predators are more common. Here, we use analytical and computational models to show that, in numerous biological scenarios, the standard results of signal detection theory do not apply; more predators can result in prey being less responsive to such cues. The standard results need not apply when the probability of danger pertains not just to the present, but also to future decisions. We identify how responses to risk should depend on background mortality and autocorrelation, and that predictions in relation to animal welfare can also be reversed from the standard theory. © 2017 The Author(s).

  5. Ultrasound detection of placenta accreta in the first trimester of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi-Sharbaf, Fatemeh; Jamal, Ashraf; Mesdaghinia, Elaheh; Abedzadeh-Kalahroudi, Masoumeh; Niroomanesh, Shirin; Atoof, Fatemeh

    2014-06-01

    Placenta accreta is considered a life-threatening condition and the main cause of maternal mortality. Prenatal diagnosis of placenta accreta usually is made by clinical presentation, imaging studies like ultrasound and MRI in the second and third trimester. To determine accuracy of ultrasound findings for placenta accreta in the first trimester of pregnancy. In a longitudinal study 323 high risk patients for placenta accreta were assessed. The eligible women were examined by vaginal and abdominal ultrasound for gestational sac and placental localization and they were followed up until the end of pregnancy. The ultrasound findings were compared with histopathological examinations as a gold standard. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of ultrasound were estimated for the first trimester and compared with other 2 trimesters in the case of repeated ultrasound examination. Ultrasound examinations in the first trimester revealed that 28 cases had the findings in favor of placenta accreta which ultimately was confirmed in 7 cases. The ultrasound sensitivity and specificity for detecting placenta accreta in the first trimester was 41% [95% CI: 16.2-62.7] and 88% [95% CI: 88.2-94.6] respectively. Ultrasound screening for placenta accreta in the first trimester of pregnancy could not achieve the high sensitivity as second and third trimester of pregnancy.

  6. Subliminal stimulation and somatosensory signal detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrè, Elisa Raffaella; Sahani, Maneesh; Haggard, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Only a small fraction of sensory signals is consciously perceived. The brain's perceptual systems may include mechanisms of feedforward inhibition that protect the cortex from subliminal noise, thus reserving cortical capacity and conscious awareness for significant stimuli. Here we provide a new view of these mechanisms based on signal detection theory, and gain control. We demonstrated that subliminal somatosensory stimulation decreased sensitivity for the detection of a subsequent somatosensory input, largely due to increased false alarm rates. By delivering the subliminal somatosensory stimulus and the to-be-detected somatosensory stimulus to different digits of the same hand, we show that this effect spreads across the sensory surface. In addition, subliminal somatosensory stimulation tended to produce an increased probability of responding "yes", whether the somatosensory stimulus was present or not. Our results suggest that subliminal stimuli temporarily reduce input gain, avoiding excessive responses to further small inputs. This gain control may be automatic, and may precede discriminative classification of inputs into signals or noise. Crucially, we found that subliminal inputs influenced false alarm rates only on blocks where the to-be-detected stimuli were present, and not on pre-test control blocks where they were absent. Participants appeared to adjust their perceptual criterion according to a statistical distribution of stimuli in the current context, with the presence of supraliminal stimuli having an important role in the criterion-setting process. These findings clarify the cognitive mechanisms that reserve conscious perception for salient and important signals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. “UTILIZING” SIGNAL DETECTION THEORY

    OpenAIRE

    Lynn, Spencer K.; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2014-01-01

    What do inferring what a person is thinking or feeling, deciding to report a symptom to your doctor, judging a defendant’s guilt, and navigating a dimly lit room have in common? They involve perceptual uncertainty (e.g., a scowling face might indicate anger or concentration, which engender different appropriate responses), and behavioral risk (e.g., a cost to making the wrong response). Signal detection theory describes these types of decisions. In this tutorial we show how, by incorporating ...

  8. Sensing Methods for Detecting Analog Television Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Azizur; Song, Chunyi; Harada, Hiroshi

    This paper introduces a unified method of spectrum sensing for all existing analog television (TV) signals including NTSC, PAL and SECAM. We propose a correlation based method (CBM) with a single reference signal for sensing any analog TV signals. In addition we also propose an improved energy detection method. The CBM approach has been implemented in a hardware prototype specially designed for participating in Singapore TV white space (WS) test trial conducted by Infocomm Development Authority (IDA) of the Singapore government. Analytical and simulation results of the CBM method will be presented in the paper, as well as hardware testing results for sensing various analog TV signals. Both AWGN and fading channels will be considered. It is shown that the theoretical results closely match with those from simulations. Sensing performance of the hardware prototype will also be presented in fading environment by using a fading simulator. We present performance of the proposed techniques in terms of probability of false alarm, probability of detection, sensing time etc. We also present a comparative study of the various techniques.

  9. Optical detection of ultrasound from optically rough surfaces using a custom CMOS sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achamfuo-Yeboah, S O; Light, R A; Sharpies, S D

    2015-01-01

    The optical detection of ultrasound from optically rough surfaces is severely limited when using a conventional interferometric or optical beam deflection (OBD) setup because the detected light is speckled. This means that complicated and expensive setups are required to detect ultrasound optically on rough surfaces. We present a CMOS integrated circuit that can detect laser ultrasound in the presence of speckle. The detector circuit is based on the simple knife edge detector. It is self-adapting and is fast, inxepensive, compact and robust. The CMOS circuit is implemented as a widefield array of 32×32 pixels. At each pixel the received light is compared with an adjacent pixel in order to determine the local light gradient. The result of this comparison is stored and used to connect each pixel to the positive or negative gradient output as appropriate (similar to a balanced knife edge detector). The perturbation of the surface due to ultrasound preserves the speckle distribution whilst deflecting it. The spatial disturbance of the speckle pattern due to the ultrasound is detected by considering each pair of pixels as a knife edge detector. The sensor can adapt itself to match the received optical speckle pattern in less than 0.1 μs, and then detect the ultrasound within 0.5 μs of adaptation. This makes it possible to repeatedly detect ultrasound from optically rough surfaces very quickly. The detector is capable of independent operation controlled by a local microcontroller, or it may be connected to a computer for more sophisticated configuration and control. We present the theory of its operation and discuss results validating the concept and operation of the device. We also present preliminary results from an improved design which grants a higher bandwidth, allowing for optical detection of higher frequency ultrasound

  10. Noninvasive Label-Free Detection of Micrometastases in the Lymphatics with Ultrasound-Guided Photoacoustic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    imaging can be used to guide dissection. We have also successfully integrated a programmable ultrasound machine ( Verasonics Vantage ) and tunable pulsed...Mobile HE) with the programmable ultrasound machine ( Verasonics Vantage ). We have synchronized the signals to enable interleaved acquisition of US...transducer (L11-4v, Verasonics Inc.) and build a housing which effectively couples fiber optic light delivery. o What opportunities for training and

  11. Automated embolic signal detection using Deep Convolutional Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sombune, Praotasna; Phienphanich, Phongphan; Phuechpanpaisal, Sutanya; Muengtaweepongsa, Sombat; Ruamthanthong, Anuchit; Tantibundhit, Charturong

    2017-07-01

    This work investigated the potential of Deep Neural Network in detection of cerebral embolic signal (ES) from transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD). The resulting system is aimed to couple with TCD devices in diagnosing a risk of stroke in real-time with high accuracy. The Adaptive Gain Control (AGC) approach developed in our previous study is employed to capture suspected ESs in real-time. By using spectrograms of the same TCD signal dataset as that of our previous work as inputs and the same experimental setup, Deep Convolutional Neural Network (CNN), which can learn features while training, was investigated for its ability to bypass the traditional handcrafted feature extraction and selection process. Extracted feature vectors from the suspected ESs are later determined whether they are of an ES, artifact (AF) or normal (NR) interval. The effectiveness of the developed system was evaluated over 19 subjects going under procedures generating emboli. The CNN-based system could achieve in average of 83.0% sensitivity, 80.1% specificity, and 81.4% accuracy, with considerably much less time consumption in development. The certainly growing set of training samples and computational resources will contribute to high performance. Besides having potential use in various clinical ES monitoring settings, continuation of this promising study will benefit developments of wearable applications by leveraging learnable features to serve demographic differentials.

  12. Quantitative ultrasound imaging detects degenerative changes in articular cartilage surface and subchondral bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saarakkala, Simo; Laasanen, Mikko S; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Toeyraes, Juha

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that quantitative ultrasound imaging could sensitively diagnose degeneration of the articular surface and changes in the subchondral bone during the development of osteoarthrosis (OA). We have recently introduced a new parameter, ultrasound roughness index (URI), for the quantification of cartilage surface roughness, and successfully tested it with normal and experimentally degraded articular surfaces. In this in vitro study, the applicability of URI was tested in bovine cartilage samples with spontaneously developed tissue degeneration. Simultaneously, we studied the sensitivity of quantitative ultrasound imaging to detect degenerative changes in the cartilage-bone interface. For reference, histological degenerative grade of the cartilage samples was determined. Mechanical reference measurements were also conducted. Cartilage surface roughness (URI) was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in histologically degenerated samples with inferior mechanical properties. Ultrasound reflection at the cartilage-bone interface was also significantly (p < 0.05) increased in degenerated samples. Furthermore, it was quantitatively confirmed that ultrasound attenuation in the overlying cartilage significantly affects the measured ultrasound reflection values from the cartilage-bone interface. To conclude, the combined ultrasound measurement of the cartilage surface roughness and ultrasound reflection at the cartilage-bone interface complement each other, and may together enable more sensitive and quantitative diagnosis of early OA or follow up after surgical cartilage repair

  13. Multiplane wave imaging increases signal-to-noise ratio in ultrafast ultrasound imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiran, Elodie; Deffieux, Thomas; Correia, Mafalda; Maresca, David; Osmanski, Bruno-Felix; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael; Sieu, Lim-Anna; Bergel, Antoine; Cohen, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast imaging using plane or diverging waves has recently enabled new ultrasound imaging modes with improved sensitivity and very high frame rates. Some of these new imaging modalities include shear wave elastography, ultrafast Doppler, ultrafast contrast-enhanced imaging and functional ultrasound imaging. Even though ultrafast imaging already encounters clinical success, increasing even more its penetration depth and signal-to-noise ratio for dedicated applications would be valuable.Ultrafast imaging relies on the coherent compounding of backscattered echoes resulting from successive tilted plane waves emissions; this produces high-resolution ultrasound images with a trade-off between final frame rate, contrast and resolution. In this work, we introduce multiplane wave imaging, a new method that strongly improves ultrafast images signal-to-noise ratio by virtually increasing the emission signal amplitude without compromising the frame rate. This method relies on the successive transmissions of multiple plane waves with differently coded amplitudes and emission angles in a single transmit event. Data from each single plane wave of increased amplitude can then be obtained, by recombining the received data of successive events with the proper coefficients.The benefits of multiplane wave for B-mode, shear wave elastography and ultrafast Doppler imaging are experimentally demonstrated. Multiplane wave with 4 plane waves emissions yields a 5.8  ±  0.5 dB increase in signal-to-noise ratio and approximately 10 mm in penetration in a calibrated ultrasound phantom (0.7 d MHz −1 cm −1 ). In shear wave elastography, the same multiplane wave configuration yields a 2.07  ±  0.05 fold reduction of the particle velocity standard deviation and a two-fold reduction of the shear wave velocity maps standard deviation. In functional ultrasound imaging, the mapping of cerebral blood volume results in a 3 to 6 dB increase of the contrast-to-noise ratio in

  14. Detection and Classification of Whale Acoustic Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Yin

    This dissertation focuses on two vital challenges in relation to whale acoustic signals: detection and classification. In detection, we evaluated the influence of the uncertain ocean environment on the spectrogram-based detector, and derived the likelihood ratio of the proposed Short Time Fourier Transform detector. Experimental results showed that the proposed detector outperforms detectors based on the spectrogram. The proposed detector is more sensitive to environmental changes because it includes phase information. In classification, our focus is on finding a robust and sparse representation of whale vocalizations. Because whale vocalizations can be modeled as polynomial phase signals, we can represent the whale calls by their polynomial phase coefficients. In this dissertation, we used the Weyl transform to capture chirp rate information, and used a two dimensional feature set to represent whale vocalizations globally. Experimental results showed that our Weyl feature set outperforms chirplet coefficients and MFCC (Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficients) when applied to our collected data. Since whale vocalizations can be represented by polynomial phase coefficients, it is plausible that the signals lie on a manifold parameterized by these coefficients. We also studied the intrinsic structure of high dimensional whale data by exploiting its geometry. Experimental results showed that nonlinear mappings such as Laplacian Eigenmap and ISOMAP outperform linear mappings such as PCA and MDS, suggesting that the whale acoustic data is nonlinear. We also explored deep learning algorithms on whale acoustic data. We built each layer as convolutions with either a PCA filter bank (PCANet) or a DCT filter bank (DCTNet). With the DCT filter bank, each layer has different a time-frequency scale representation, and from this, one can extract different physical information. Experimental results showed that our PCANet and DCTNet achieve high classification rate on the whale

  15. BURAR: Detection and signal processing capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghica, Daniela; Radulian, Mircea; Popa, Mihaela

    2004-01-01

    Since July 2002, a new seismic monitoring station, the Bucovina Seismic Array (BURAR), has been installed in the northern part of Romania, in a joint effort of the Air Force Technical Applications Center, USA, and the National Institute for Earth Physics (NIEP), Romania. The array consists of 10 seismic sensors (9 short-period and one broad band) located in boreholes and distributed in a 5 x 5 km area. At present, the seismic data are continuously recorded by BURAR and transmitted in real-time to the Romanian National Data Centre (ROM N DC), at Bucharest and to the National Data Center of USA, in Florida. The statistical analysis for the seismic information gathered at ROM N DC by the BURAR in the August 2002 - December 2003 time interval points out a much better efficiency of the BURAR system in detecting teleseismic events and local events occurred in the N-NE part of Romanian territory, in comparison with the actual Romanian Telemetered Network. Furthermore, the BURAR monitoring system has proven to be an important source of reliable data for NIEP efforts in elaborating of the seismic bulletins. Signal processing capability of the system provides useful information in order to improve the location of the local seismic events, using the array beamforming facility. This method increases significantly the signal-to-noise ratio of the seismic signal by summing up the coherent signals from the array components. In this way, eventual source nucleation phases can be detected. At the same time, using the slowness and backazimuth estimations by f-k analysis, locations for the seismic events can be performed based only on the information recorded by the BURAR array, acting like a single seismic station recording system. Additionally, f-k analysis techniques are useful in the local site effects estimation and interpretation of the local geological structure. (authors)

  16. Detecting double compression of audio signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui; Shi, Yun Q.; Huang, Jiwu

    2010-01-01

    MP3 is the most popular audio format nowadays in our daily life, for example music downloaded from the Internet and file saved in the digital recorder are often in MP3 format. However, low bitrate MP3s are often transcoded to high bitrate since high bitrate ones are of high commercial value. Also audio recording in digital recorder can be doctored easily by pervasive audio editing software. This paper presents two methods for the detection of double MP3 compression. The methods are essential for finding out fake-quality MP3 and audio forensics. The proposed methods use support vector machine classifiers with feature vectors formed by the distributions of the first digits of the quantized MDCT (modified discrete cosine transform) coefficients. Extensive experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods. To the best of our knowledge, this piece of work is the first one to detect double compression of audio signal.

  17. Breast Microcalcification Detection Using Super-Resolution Ultrasound Image Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    tissues. These differences in mechanical properties result in ultrasound scattering. Because the sizes of breast microcalcifications are smaller than...2006). [4] Karssemeijer, N., Bluekens, A. M., Beijerinck, D., Deurenberg, J. J., Beekman, M., Visser, R., van Engen , R., Bartels- Kortland, A., and

  18. A procedure to detect flaws inside large size marble blocks by ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Bramanti, Mauro; Bozzi, Edoardo

    1999-01-01

    In stone and marble industry there is considerable interest in the possibility of using ultrasound diagnostic techniques for non-destructive testing of large size blocks in order to detect internal flaws such as faults, cracks and fissures. In this paper some preliminary measurements are reported in order to acquire basic knowledge of the fundamental properties of ultrasound, such as propagation velocity and attenuation, in the media here considered. We then outline a particular diagnostic pr...

  19. Detection of myasthenia gravis using electrooculography signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, T; Boulos, M I; Murray, B J; Krishnan, S; Katzberg, H; Umapathy, K

    2016-08-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune neuromuscular disorder resulting from skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue. An early common symptom is fatigable weakness of the extrinsic ocular muscles; if symptoms remain confined to the ocular muscles after a few years, this is classified as ocular myasthenia gravis (OMG). Diagnosis of MG when there are mild, isolated ocular symptoms can be difficult, and currently available diagnostic techniques are insensitive, non-specific or technically cumbersome. In addition, there are no accurate biomarkers to follow severity of ocular dysfunction in MG over time. Single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG) and repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS) offers a way of detecting and measuring ocular muscle dysfunction in MG, however, challenges of these methods include a poor signal to noise ratio in quantifying eye muscle weakness especially in mild cases. This paper presents one of the attempts to use the electric potentials from the eyes or electrooculography (EOG) signals but obtained from three different forms of sleep testing to differentiate MG patients from age- and gender-matched controls. We analyzed 8 MG patients and 8 control patients and demonstrated a difference in the average eye movements detected between the groups. A classification accuracy as high as 68.8% was achieved using a linear discriminant analysis based classifier.

  20. BURAR: Detection and signal processing capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghica, Daniela; Radulian, Mircea; Popa, Mihaela

    2004-01-01

    Since July 2002, a new seismic monitoring station, the Bucovina Seismic Array (BURAR), has been installed in the northern part of Romania, in a joint effort of the Air Force Technical Applications Center, USA, and the National Institute for Earth Physics (NIEP), Romania. The array consists of 10 seismic sensors (9 short-period and one broad band) located in boreholes and distributed in a 5 x 5 km 2 area. At present, the seismic data are continuously recorded by BURAR and transmitted in real-time to the Romanian National Data Centre (ROM N DC), in Bucharest and to the National Data Center of USA, in Florida. The statistical analysis for the seismic information gathered at ROM N DC by the BURAR in the August 2002 - December 2003 time interval points out a much better efficiency of the BURAR system in detecting teleseismic events and local events occurred in the N-NE part of Romanian territory, in comparison with the actual Romanian Telemetered Network. Furthermore, the BURAR monitoring system has proven to be an important source of reliable data for NIEP efforts in issuing the seismic bulletins. Signal processing capability of the system provides useful information in order to improve the location of the local seismic events, using the array beamforming procedure. This method increases significantly the signal-to-noise ratio by summing up the coherent signals from the array components. In this way, possible source nucleation phases can be detected. At the same time, using the slowness and back azimuth estimations by f-k analysis, locations for the seismic events can be established based only on the information recorded by the BURAR array, acting like a single seismic station recording system. (authors)

  1. Detecting Volcanic Ash Plumes with GNSS Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainville, N.; Larson, K. M.; Palo, S. E.; Mattia, M.; Rossi, M.; Coltelli, M.; Roesler, C.; Fee, D.

    2016-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers are commonly placed near volcanic sites to measure ground deformation. In addition to the carrier phase data used to measure ground position, these receivers also record Signal to Noise ratio (SNR) data. Larson (2013) showed that attenuations in SNR data strongly correlate with ash emissions at a series of eruptions of Redoubt Volcano. This finding has been confirmed at eruptions for Tongariro, Mt Etna, Mt Shindake, and Sakurajima. In each of these detections, very expensive geodetic quality GNSS receivers were used. If low-cost GNSS instruments could be used instead, a networked array could be deployed and optimized for plume detection and tomography. The outputs of this sensor array could then be used by both local volcanic observatories and Volcano Ash Advisory Centers. Here we will describe progress in developing such an array. The sensors we are working with are intended for navigation use, and thus lack the supporting power and communications equipment necessary for a networked system. Reliably providing those features is major challenge for the overall sensor design. We have built prototypes of our Volcano Ash Plume Receiver (VAPR), with solar panels, lithium-ion batteries and onboard data storage for preliminary testing. We will present results of our field tests of both receivers and antennas. A second critical need for our array is a reliable detection algorithm. We have tested our algorithm on data from recent eruptions and have incorporated the noise characteristics of the low-cost GNSS receiver. We have also developed a simulation capability so that the receivers can be deployed to optimize vent crossing GNSS signals.

  2. A clutter removal method for the Doppler ultrasound signal based on a nonlinear diffusion equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Peng; Xin Pengcheng; Bian Zhengzhong; Yu Gang

    2008-01-01

    Strong clutter components produced by stationary and slow-moving tissue structures render the lower frequency part of the spectrogram useless and degrade the accuracy of clinical ultrasound indices. An adaptive method based on the nonlinear forward-and-backward diffusion equation (FAB-DE) is proposed to remove strong clutter components from the contaminated Doppler signal. The clutter signal is extracted first by the FAB-DE accurately, in which the nonlinear diffusion coefficient function of the FAB-DE locally adjusts according to signal features and the diffusion adaptively switches between forward and backward mode. The present method has been validated by simulated and realistic pulse wave Doppler signals, and compared with the conventional high pass filter and the matching pursuit method. The simulation results, including spectrogram, mean velocity error, standard deviation of mean velocity and signal-to-clutter ratio of a decontaminated signal, demonstrate that the present FAB-DE method can remove clutter sufficiently and retain more low blood components simultaneously as compared with the other two methods. Results of the realistic Doppler blood signal, including spectrogram and low-frequency part of the spectrum, support the conclusion drawn from simulation cases

  3. Thrombin-Activatable Microbubbles as Potential Ultrasound Contrast Agents for the Detection of Acute Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Jacques; Vezeridis, Alexander M; Hoyt, Kenneth; Adams, Stephen R; Armstrong, Amanda M; Sirsi, Shashank R; Mattrey, Robert F

    2017-11-01

    Acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is the formation of a blood clot in the deep veins of the body that can lead to fatal pulmonary embolism. Acute DVT is difficult to distinguish from chronic DVT by ultrasound (US), the imaging modality of choice, and is therefore treated aggressively with anticoagulants, which can lead to internal bleeding. Here we demonstrate that conjugating perfluorobutane-filled (PFB-filled) microbubbles (MBs) with thrombin-sensitive activatable cell-penetrating peptides (ACPPs) could lead to the development of contrast agents that detect acute thrombosis with US imaging. Successful conjugation of ACPP to PFB-filled MBs was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Fluorescein-labeled ACPP was used to evaluate the efficiency of thrombin-triggered cleavage by measuring the mean fluorescence intensity of ACPP-labeled MBs (ACPP-MBs) before and after incubation at 37 °C with thrombin. Lastly, control MBs and ACPP-MBs were infused through a tube containing a clot, and US contrast enhancement was measured with or without the presence of a thrombin inhibitor after washing the clot with saline. With thrombin activity, 91.7 ± 14.2% of the signal was retained after ACPP-MB infusion and washing, whereas only 16.7 ± 4% of the signal was retained when infusing ACPP-MBs in the presence of hirudin, a potent thrombin inhibitor.

  4. Real-time 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound in detecting hemorrhage of blunt renal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui-Xue; Li, Ye-Kuo; Li, Ting; Wang, Sha-Sha; Yuan, Gui-Zhong; Zhou, Qun-Fang; Zheng, Hai-Rong; Yan, Fei

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic value of real-time 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound in the hemorrhage of blunt renal trauma. Eighteen healthy New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into 3 groups. Blunt renal trauma was performed on each group by using minitype striker. Ultrasonography, color Doppler flow imaging, and contrast-enhanced 2-dimensional and real-time 3-dimensional ultrasound were applied before and after the strike. The time to shock and blood pressure were subjected to statistical analysis. Then, a comparative study of ultrasound and pathology was carried out. All the struck kidneys were traumatic. In the ultrasonography, free fluid was found under the renal capsule. In the color Doppler flow imaging, active hemorrhage was not identified. In 2-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound, active hemorrhage of the damaged kidney was characterized. Real-time 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound showed a real-time and stereoscopic ongoing bleeding of the injured kidney. The wider the hemorrhage area in 4-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound was, the faster the blood pressure decreased. Real-time 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound is a promising noninvasive tool for stereoscopically and vividly detecting ongoing hemorrhage of blunt renal trauma in real time. © 2013.

  5. Designing Non-linear Frequency Modulated Signals For Medical Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a new method for designing non-linear frequency modulated (NLFM) waveforms for ultrasound imaging is proposed. The objective is to control the amplitude spectrum of the designed waveform and still keep a constant transmit amplitude, so that the transmitted energy is maximized....... The signal-to-noise-ratio can in this way be optimized. The waveform design is based on least squares optimization. A desired amplitude spectrum is chosen, hereafter the phase spectrum is chosen, so that the instantaneous frequency takes on the form of a third order polynomial. The finite energy waveform...

  6. Doppler ultrasound monitoring technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docker, M F

    1993-03-01

    Developments in the signal processing of Doppler ultrasound used for the detection of fetal heart rate (FHR) have improved the operation of cardiotocographs. These developments are reviewed and the advantages and disadvantages of the various Doppler and signal processing methods are compared.

  7. Fetal movement detection: comparison of the Toitu actograph with ultrasound from 20 weeks gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPietro, J A; Costigan, K A; Pressman, E K

    1999-01-01

    This study evaluates the validity of Doppler-detected fetal movement by a commercially available monitor and investigates whether characteristics of maternal body habitus and the intrauterine environment affect its performance. Fetal movement was evaluated in normal pregnancies using both ultrasound visualization and a fetal actocardiograph (Toitu MT320; Tofa Medical Inc., Malvern, PA). Data were collected for 32 min on 34 fetuses stratified by gestational age (20-25 weeks; 28-32 weeks; 35-39 weeks). Fetal and maternal characteristics were recorded. Comparisons between ultrasound-detected trunk and limb movements and actograph records were conducted based both on 10-s time intervals and on detection of individual movements. Time-based comparisons indicated agreement between ultrasound and actograph 94.7% of the time; this association rose to 98% when movements of less than 1 s duration were excluded. Individual movements observed on ultrasound were detected by the actograph 91% of the time, and 97% of the time when brief, isolated movements were excluded. The overall kappa value for agreement was 0.88. The actograph was reliable in detecting periods of quiescence as well as activity. These findings did not vary by gestational age. The number of movements detected by the actograph, but not the single-transducer ultrasound, significantly increased over gestation. Maternal age, parity, weight, height, or body mass index were not consistently associated with actograph validity. Characteristics of the uterine environment, including placenta location, fetal presentation, and amniotic fluid volume also did not affect results. The Toitu actograph accurately detects fetal movement and quiescence from as early as 20 weeks gestation and has utility in both clinical and research settings. Actographs are most useful for providing objective and quantifiable measures of fetal activity level, including number and duration of movements, while visualization through ultrasound is

  8. Predicting the outcome of pregnancy in threatened abortion using ultrasound in detecting the viability of foetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, R

    1992-06-01

    Between December 1990 and May 1991 in Malaysia, clinicians at the Sultanah Aminah Hospital in Johor Bahru screened 200 women with a diagnosis of threatened miscarriage with ultrasound to determine whether ultrasound could evaluate the viability of the fetus and thus the outcome of pregnancy in cases of threatened abortion. A fetal heartbeat was absent in 65% of cases with the remaining 35% of cases having a fetal heartbeat. Nonviability of the fetus or an abnormal or very early pregnancy may have accounted for an absent fetal heartbeat. The pregnancy of 46% of cases continued while 41% experienced spontaneous abortion. Just 6.2% of cases with a fetal heartbeat suffered from spontaneous abortion compared with 69.7% of those without a fetal heartbeat. 93.8% of cases with a fetal heartbeat continued their pregnancies compared with 30.3% of those without a fetal heartbeat. Inability of ultrasound to detect fetal heartbeats during early pregnancy probably accounted for the somewhat high percentage of those without a fetal heartbeat who continued their pregnancies. Among patients with a fetal heartbeat, the number of pregnancies that continued. Ultrasound detected 13% abnormal pregnancies (i.e., molar pregnancy or ectopic pregnancy). Surgery on these cases confirmed the ultrasound findings. These results showed that ultrasound should be used in every case of threatened miscarriage and that a fetal heartbeat does indicate the viability of the fetus.

  9. Ultrasound detection of pneumothorax compared with chest X-ray and computed tomography scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarsheth, Khanjan; Kurek, Stanley

    2011-04-01

    Pneumothorax after trauma can be a life threatening injury and its care requires expeditious and accurate diagnosis and possible intervention. We performed a prospective, single blinded study with convenience sampling at a Level I trauma center comparing thoracic ultrasound with chest X-ray and CT scan in the detection of traumatic pneumothorax. Trauma patients that received a thoracic ultrasound, chest X-ray, and chest CT scan were included in the study. The chest X-rays were read by a radiologist who was blinded to the thoracic ultrasound results. Then both were compared with CT scan results. One hundred and twenty-five patients had a thoracic ultrasound performed in the 24-month period. Forty-six patients were excluded from the study due to lack of either a chest X-ray or chest CT scan. Of the remaining 79 patients there were 22 positive pneumothorax found by CT and of those 18 (82%) were found on ultrasound and 7 (32%) were found on chest X-ray. The sensitivity of thoracic ultrasound was found to be 81.8 per cent and the specificity was found to be 100 per cent. The sensitivity of chest X-ray was found to be 31.8 per cent and again the specificity was found to be 100 per cent. The negative predictive value of thoracic ultrasound for pneumothorax was 0.934 and the negative predictive value for chest X-ray for pneumothorax was found to be 0.792. We advocate the use of chest ultrasound for detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients.

  10. Signal detection by active, noisy hair bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Maoiléidigh, Dáibhid; Salvi, Joshua D.; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2018-05-01

    Vertebrate ears employ hair bundles to transduce mechanical movements into electrical signals, but their performance is limited by noise. Hair bundles are substantially more sensitive to periodic stimulation when they are mechanically active, however, than when they are passive. We developed a model of active hair-bundle mechanics that predicts the conditions under which a bundle is most sensitive to periodic stimulation. The model relies only on the existence of mechanotransduction channels and an active adaptation mechanism that recloses the channels. For a frequency-detuned stimulus, a noisy hair bundle's phase-locked response and degree of entrainment as well as its detection bandwidth are maximized when the bundle exhibits low-amplitude spontaneous oscillations. The phase-locked response and entrainment of a bundle are predicted to peak as functions of the noise level. We confirmed several of these predictions experimentally by periodically forcing hair bundles held near the onset of self-oscillation. A hair bundle's active process amplifies the stimulus preferentially over the noise, allowing the bundle to detect periodic forces less than 1 pN in amplitude. Moreover, the addition of noise can improve a bundle's ability to detect the stimulus. Although, mechanical activity has not yet been observed in mammalian hair bundles, a related model predicts that active but quiescent bundles can oscillate spontaneously when they are loaded by a sufficiently massive object such as the tectorial membrane. Overall, this work indicates that auditory systems rely on active elements, composed of hair cells and their mechanical environment, that operate on the brink of self-oscillation.

  11. Point-of-care Ultrasound Detection of Endophthalmitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Tucker

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 59-year-old woman presented to the emergency department (ED with right eye pain. She had a history of cataract surgery in the right eye three months prior. The patient was seen at an outside ED eight days prior and reportedly had normal vision, normal eye pressures, with a large corneal ulcer and hypopyon in the anterior chamber. She was given subconjunctival injections of antibiotics and discharged with antibiotic drops. She was seen by a retina specialist the next day and had no evidence of endophthalmitis. On her second ED presentation, she had worsening right eye pain. Workup included normal intraocular pressures bilaterally and visual acuity with only light-perception in the affected eye. An ultrasound of her right eye was performed and is shown in figures 1 and 2. Significant findings: The patient’s ultrasound revealed an attached retina and a complex network of hyperechoic, mobile, membranous material in the posterior segment. Discussion: Endophthalmitis is a bacterial or fungal infection inside the vitreous and/or aqueous humors. The classic presentation is painful vision loss in a patient with recent ophthalmologic surgical intervention, an immunocompromised patient, or a septic patient. The specific bacteria or fungus causing the infection will vary depending on the reason for infection (post-surgical vs sepsis. Ultrasound findings typically include low amplitude mobile echoes, vitreous membranes, and thickening of the retina and choroid.1 Treatment for endophthalmitis includes direct, intraocular antibiotic injections by an ophthalmologist; hence, disposition for these patients would include admission for ophthalmology consultation. If there is a blood source of infection rather than a direct ocular inoculation, IV antibiotics should be initiated. Patients should also receive tetanus vaccination if tetanus status is outdated. In this case, the patient was diagnosed with endophthalmitis of the right eye

  12. An improved method based on wavelet coefficient correlation to filter noise in Doppler ultrasound blood flow signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Renzhi; Zu, Yunxiao; Shao, Lin

    2018-04-01

    The blood echo signal maintained through Medical ultrasound Doppler devices would always include vascular wall pulsation signal .The traditional method to de-noise wall signal is using high-pass filter, which will also remove the lowfrequency part of the blood flow signal. Some scholars put forward a method based on region selective reduction, which at first estimates of the wall pulsation signals and then removes the wall signal from the mixed signal. Apparently, this method uses the correlation between wavelet coefficients to distinguish blood signal from wall signal, but in fact it is a kind of wavelet threshold de-noising method, whose effect is not so much ideal. In order to maintain a better effect, this paper proposes an improved method based on wavelet coefficient correlation to separate blood signal and wall signal, and simulates the algorithm by computer to verify its validity.

  13. [Detection of surface EMG signal using active electrode].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qinghua; Peng, Chenglin; Wu, Baoming; Wang, He

    2003-09-01

    Research of surface electromyogram(EMG) signal is important in rehabilitation medicine, sport medicine and clinical diagnosis, accurate detection of signal is the base of quantitative analysis of surface EMG signal. In this article were discussed how to reduce possible noise in the detection of surface EMG. Considerations on the design of electrode unit were presented. Instrumentation amplifier AD620 was employed to design a bipolar active electrode for use in surface EMG detection. The experiments showed that active electrode could be used to improve signal/noise ratio, reduce noise and detect surface EMG signal effectively.

  14. Detecting Seismic Infrasound Signals on Balloon Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, S.; Komjathy, A.; Cutts, J. A.; Pauken, M.; Garcia, R.; Mimoun, D.; Jackson, J. M.; Kedar, S.; Smrekar, S. E.; Hall, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    The determination of the interior structure of a planet requires detailed seismic investigations - a process that entails the detection and characterization of seismic waves due to geological activities (e.g., earthquakes, volcanoes, etc.). For decades, this task has primarily been performed on Earth by an ever-expanding network of terrestrial seismic stations. However, on planets such as Venus, where the surface pressure and temperature can reach as high as 90 atmospheres and 450 degrees Celsius respectively, placing seismometers on the planet's surface poses a vexing technological challenge. However, the upper layers of the Venusian atmosphere are more benign and capable of hosting geophysical payloads for longer mission lifetimes. In order to achieve the aim of performing geophysical experiments from an atmospheric platform, JPL and its partners (ISAE-SUPAERO and California Institute of Technology) are in the process of developing technologies for detection of infrasonic waves generated by earthquakes from a balloon. The coupling of seismic energy into the atmosphere critically depends on the density differential between the surface of the planet and the atmosphere. Therefore, the successful demonstration of this technique on Earth would provide ample reason to expect success on Venus, where the atmospheric impedance is approximately 60 times that of Earth. In this presentation, we will share results from the first set of Earth-based balloon experiments performed in Pahrump, Nevada in June 2017. These tests involved the generation of artificial sources of known intensity using a seismic hammer and their detection using a complex network of sensors, including highly sensitive micro-barometers suspended from balloons, GPS receivers, geophones, microphones, and seismometers. This experiment was the first of its kind and was successful in detecting infrasonic waves from the earthquakes generated by the seismic hammer. We will present the first comprehensive analysis

  15. Agreement between gonioscopy and ultrasound biomicroscopy in detecting iridotrabecular apposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkana, Yaniv; Dorairaj, Syril K; Gerber, Yariv; Liebmann, Jeffrey M; Ritch, Robert

    2007-10-01

    To assess the agreement between findings obtained at dark-room gonioscopy and ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) in the diagnosis of iridotrabecular apposition in light and dark conditions. We enrolled patients with appositional angle closure at dark-room gonioscopy performed using a 1-mm slitlamp beam that did not cross the pupil. Ultrasound biomicroscopic images were acquired in normal room light and subsequently with all room lights off. Images were evaluated for the presence or absence of iris-cornea contact. The angle opening distance at 500 microm was calculated. Iridotrabecular apposition in at least 1 angle quadrant was demonstrated in all 18 eyes at dark-room gonioscopy, 17 eyes (94%) at dark-room UBM, and only 10 eyes (56%) at UBM in room light. Of 18 superior angles that were appositionally closed at dark-room gonioscopy, apposition was demonstrated on UBM images in 16 (89%) in a dark room but only 6 (33%) in room light. Angle opening distance was less during dark-room gonioscopy in all but the nasal quadrant. We found high agreement between gonioscopy and UBM when both are performed in a completely dark room. Our findings support the recommendation that, in routine clinical practice, gonioscopy be performed in a dark room to avoid misdiagnosis of treatable iridotrabecular apposition.

  16. Improved cancer detection in automated breast ultrasound by radiologists using Computer Aided Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelst, J.C.M. van, E-mail: Jan.vanZelst@radboudumc.nl [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Tan, T.; Platel, B. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Jong, M. de [Jeroen Bosch Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, ‘s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Steenbakkers, A. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Mourits, M. [Jeroen Bosch Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, ‘s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Grivegnee, A. [Jules Bordet Institute, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Borelli, C. [Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Karssemeijer, N.; Mann, R.M. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2017-04-15

    Objective: To investigate the effect of dedicated Computer Aided Detection (CAD) software for automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) on the performance of radiologists screening for breast cancer. Methods: 90 ABUS views of 90 patients were randomly selected from a multi-institutional archive of cases collected between 2010 and 2013. This dataset included normal cases (n = 40) with >1 year of follow up, benign (n = 30) lesions that were either biopsied or remained stable, and malignant lesions (n = 20). Six readers evaluated all cases with and without CAD in two sessions. CAD-software included conventional CAD-marks and an intelligent minimum intensity projection of the breast tissue. Readers reported using a likelihood-of-malignancy scale from 0 to 100. Alternative free-response ROC analysis was used to measure the performance. Results: Without CAD, the average area-under-the-curve (AUC) of the readers was 0.77 and significantly improved with CAD to 0.84 (p = 0.001). Sensitivity of all readers improved (range 5.2–10.6%) by using CAD but specificity decreased in four out of six readers (range 1.4–5.7%). No significant difference was observed in the AUC between experienced radiologists and residents both with and without CAD. Conclusions: Dedicated CAD-software for ABUS has the potential to improve the cancer detection rates of radiologists screening for breast cancer.

  17. Improved cancer detection in automated breast ultrasound by radiologists using Computer Aided Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelst, J.C.M. van; Tan, T.; Platel, B.; Jong, M. de; Steenbakkers, A.; Mourits, M.; Grivegnee, A.; Borelli, C.; Karssemeijer, N.; Mann, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of dedicated Computer Aided Detection (CAD) software for automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) on the performance of radiologists screening for breast cancer. Methods: 90 ABUS views of 90 patients were randomly selected from a multi-institutional archive of cases collected between 2010 and 2013. This dataset included normal cases (n = 40) with >1 year of follow up, benign (n = 30) lesions that were either biopsied or remained stable, and malignant lesions (n = 20). Six readers evaluated all cases with and without CAD in two sessions. CAD-software included conventional CAD-marks and an intelligent minimum intensity projection of the breast tissue. Readers reported using a likelihood-of-malignancy scale from 0 to 100. Alternative free-response ROC analysis was used to measure the performance. Results: Without CAD, the average area-under-the-curve (AUC) of the readers was 0.77 and significantly improved with CAD to 0.84 (p = 0.001). Sensitivity of all readers improved (range 5.2–10.6%) by using CAD but specificity decreased in four out of six readers (range 1.4–5.7%). No significant difference was observed in the AUC between experienced radiologists and residents both with and without CAD. Conclusions: Dedicated CAD-software for ABUS has the potential to improve the cancer detection rates of radiologists screening for breast cancer.

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Sonohysterography Ultrasound - ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and development of an embryo or fetus during pregnancy. See the Obstetrical Ultrasound page for more information . ... object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, ...

  20. Lung ultrasound accurately detects pneumothorax in a preterm newborn lamb model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Douglas A; Hooper, Stuart B; Binder-Heschl, Corinna; Kluckow, Martin; Gill, Andrew W; LaRosa, Domenic A; Inocencio, Ishmael M; Moxham, Alison; Rodgers, Karyn; Zahra, Valerie A; Davis, Peter G; Polglase, Graeme R

    2016-06-01

    Pneumothorax is a common emergency affecting extremely preterm. In adult studies, lung ultrasound has performed better than chest x-ray in the diagnosis of pneumothorax. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of lung ultrasound (LUS) examination to detect pneumothorax using a preterm animal model. This was a prospective, observational study using newborn Border-Leicester lambs at gestational age = 126 days (equivalent to gestational age = 26 weeks in humans) receiving mechanical ventilation from birth to 2 h of life. At the conclusion of the experiment, LUS was performed, the lambs were then euthanised and a post-mortem exam was immediately performed. We used previously published ultrasound techniques to identify pneumothorax. Test characteristics of LUS to detect pneumothorax were calculated, using the post-mortem exam as the 'gold standard' test. Nine lambs (18 lungs) were examined. Four lambs had a unilateral pneumothorax, all of which were identified by LUS with no false positives. This was the first study to use post-mortem findings to test the efficacy of LUS to detect pneumothorax in a newborn animal model. Lung ultrasound accurately detected pneumothorax, verified by post-mortem exam, in premature, newborn lambs. © 2016 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  1. System and Method for Multi-Wavelength Optical Signal Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlone, Thomas D. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The system and method for multi-wavelength optical signal detection enables the detection of optical signal levels significantly below those processed at the discrete circuit level by the use of mixed-signal processing methods implemented with integrated circuit technologies. The present invention is configured to detect and process small signals, which enables the reduction of the optical power required to stimulate detection networks, and lowers the required laser power to make specific measurements. The present invention provides an adaptation of active pixel networks combined with mixed-signal processing methods to provide an integer representation of the received signal as an output. The present invention also provides multi-wavelength laser detection circuits for use in various systems, such as a differential absorption light detection and ranging system.

  2. Emergency ultrasound in the detection of pediatric long-bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barata, Isabel; Spencer, Robert; Suppiah, Ara; Raio, Christopher; Ward, Mary Frances; Sama, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    Long-bone fractures represent one of the most commonly sustained injuries following trauma and account for nearly 4% of emergency department visits in the United States each year. These fractures are associated with a significant risk of bleeding and neurovascular compromise. Delays in their identification and treatment can lead to loss of limb and even death. Although emergency physicians currently rely predominantly on radiography for the examination of long-bone injuries, emergency ultrasound has several advantages over radiography and may be useful in the identification of long-bone fractures. Ultrasound is rapid, noninvasive, and cost-effective. Unlike radiography, ultrasound does not expose children to ionizing radiation, which has been linked to cancer. The goal of this study was to assess the agreement between emergency physicians' and radiologists' final assessments of suspected long-bone fractures using emergency ultrasound and radiography, respectively, in the pediatric population. This is a prospective study involving a convenience sample of pediatric patients (fracture. Suspected fractures were characterized by swelling, erythema, and localized pain. Patients who had a history of fracture, extremity deformity, orthopedic hardware in the traumatized area, or an open fracture were excluded from this study. Each investigator received limited, focused training in the use of ultrasonography for fracture identification and localization. This training consisted of a brief didactic session and video review of normal and fractured long-bones. A total of 53 subjects (mean age, 10.2 [SD, 3.8] years; 56.6% were male) were enrolled, which corresponded to 98 ultrasound examinations. Sixty-nine scans (70.4%) involved bones of the upper extremity, and 29 (29.6%) the lower extremity. Radiography identified a total of 43 fractures. The sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound in the detection of long-bone fractures were 95.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 82

  3. Detection of weak optical signals with a laser amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlovskii, A. V.

    2006-01-01

    Detection of weak and extremely weak light signals amplified by linear and four-wave mixing laser amplifiers is analyzed. Photoelectron distributions are found for different input photon statistics over a wide range of gain. Signal-to-noise ratios are calculated and analyzed for preamplification schemes using linear and four-wave mixing amplifiers. Calculations show that the high signal-to-noise ratio (much higher than unity), ensuring reliable detection of weak input signals, can be attained only with a four-wave mixing preamplification scheme. Qualitative dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio on the quantum statistical properties of both signal and idler waves is demonstrated

  4. Detection and Evaluation of Renal Injury in Burst Wave Lithotripsy Using Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Philip C; Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam D; Wang, Yak-Nam; Cunitz, Bryan W; Blomgren, Philip M; Johnson, Cynthia D; Park, Joshua S H; Bailey, Michael R; Lee, Donghoon; Harper, Jonathan D; Sorensen, Mathew D

    2017-08-01

    Burst wave lithotripsy (BWL) is a transcutaneous technique with potential to safely and effectively fragment renal stones. Preclinical investigations of BWL require the assessment of potential renal injury. This study evaluates the capabilities of real-time ultrasound and MRI to detect and evaluate BWL injury that was induced in porcine kidneys. Ten kidneys from five female farm pigs were treated with either a 170 or 335 kHz BWL transducer using variable treatment parameters and monitored in real-time with ultrasound. Eight kidneys were perfusion fixed and scanned with a 3-Tesla MRI scanner (T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and susceptibility-weighted imaging), followed by processing via an established histomorphometric technique for injury quantification. In addition, two kidneys were separately evaluated for histologic characterization of injury quality. Observed B-mode hyperechoes on ultrasound consistent with cavitation predicted the presence of BWL-induced renal injury with a sensitivity and specificity of 100% in comparison to the histomorphometric technique. Similarly, MRI detected renal injury with a sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 100% and was able to identify the scale of lesion volumes. The injuries purposefully generated with BWL were histologically similar to those formed by shock wave lithotripsy. BWL-induced renal injury can be detected with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity by real-time ultrasound and post-treatment ex vivo MRI. No injury occurred in this study without cavitation detected on ultrasound. Such capabilities for injury detection and lesion volume quantification on MRI can be used for preclinical testing of BWL.

  5. Study on the Micro Crack Detection in Joints by Using Ultrasound Infrared Thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hee Sang; Choi, Man Yong; Park, Jeong Hak; Lee, Seung Seok; Huh, Yong Hak; Lee, Bo Young; Jae Seong

    2012-01-01

    This study detected SCC defects of dissimilar metal welded(STS304 and SA106 Gr. b) pipes using the ultrasonic infrared thermography method and the lock-in image treatment method among infrared thermography method. The infrared excitement equipment has 250 Watt of output and 20 kHz of frequency. By using the ultrasound infrared thermography method, the internal defects of dissimilar metal weld joints of pipes used at nuclear power plants could get detected. By an actual PT test, it was observed that the cracks inside the pipe existed not as a single crack but rather as a multiple cracks within a certain area and generated a hot spot image of a broad area on the thermography image. In addition, UT technology could not easily defects detected by the width of 10 μm fine hair cracks. but, ultrasound infrared thermography technique was defect detected

  6. Comparison between maximum radial expansion of ultrasound contrast agents and experimental postexcitation signal results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Daniel A; O'Brien, William D

    2011-01-01

    Experimental postexcitation signal data of collapsing Definity microbubbles are compared with the Marmottant theoretical model for large amplitude oscillations of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs). After taking into account the insonifying pulse characteristics and size distribution of the population of UCAs, a good comparison between simulated results and previously measured experimental data is obtained by determining a threshold maximum radial expansion (Rmax) to indicate the onset of postexcitation. This threshold Rmax is found to range from 3.4 to 8.0 times the initial bubble radius, R0, depending on insonification frequency. These values are well above the typical free bubble inertial cavitation threshold commonly chosen at 2R0. The close agreement between the experiment and models suggests that lipid-shelled UCAs behave as unshelled bubbles during most of a large amplitude cavitation cycle, as proposed in the Marmottant equation.

  7. Value of Ultrasound in Detecting Urinary Tract Anomalies After First Febrile Urinary Tract Infection in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobrial, Emad E; Abdelaziz, Doaa M; Sheba, Maha F; Abdel-Azeem, Yasser S

    2016-05-01

    Background Urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection that affects part of the urinary tract. Ultrasound is a noninvasive test that can demonstrate the size and shape of kidneys, presence of dilatation of the ureters, and the existence of anatomic abnormalities. The aim of the study is to estimate the value of ultrasound in detecting urinary tract anomalies after first attack of UTI. Methods This study was conducted at the Nephrology Clinic, New Children's Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, from August 2012 to March 2013, and included 30 children who presented with first attack of acute febrile UTI. All patients were subjected to urine analysis, urine culture and sensitivity, serum creatinine, complete blood count, and imaging in the form of renal ultrasound, voiding cysto-urethrography, and renal scan. Results All the patients had fever with a mean of 38.96°C ± 0.44°C and the mean duration of illness was 6.23 ± 5.64 days. Nineteen patients (63.3%) had an ultrasound abnormality. The commonest abnormalities were kidney stones (15.8%). Only 2 patients who had abnormal ultrasound had also vesicoureteric reflux on cystourethrography. Sensitivity of ultrasound was 66.7%, specificity was 37.5%, positive predictive value was 21.1%, negative predictive value was 81.8%, and total accuracy was 43.33%. Conclusion We concluded that ultrasound alone was not of much value in diagnosing and putting a plan of first attack of febrile UTI. It is recommended that combined investigations are the best way to confirm diagnosis of urinary tract anomalies. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. High-Resolution Ultrasound-Switchable Fluorescence Imaging in Centimeter-Deep Tissue Phantoms with High Signal-To-Noise Ratio and High Sensitivity via Novel Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bingbing; Bandi, Venugopal; Wei, Ming-Yuan; Pei, Yanbo; D'Souza, Francis; Nguyen, Kytai T; Hong, Yi; Yuan, Baohong

    2016-01-01

    For many years, investigators have sought after high-resolution fluorescence imaging in centimeter-deep tissue because many interesting in vivo phenomena-such as the presence of immune system cells, tumor angiogenesis, and metastasis-may be located deep in tissue. Previously, we developed a new imaging technique to achieve high spatial resolution in sub-centimeter deep tissue phantoms named continuous-wave ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (CW-USF). The principle is to use a focused ultrasound wave to externally and locally switch on and off the fluorophore emission from a small volume (close to ultrasound focal volume). By making improvements in three aspects of this technique: excellent near-infrared USF contrast agents, a sensitive frequency-domain USF imaging system, and an effective signal processing algorithm, for the first time this study has achieved high spatial resolution (~ 900 μm) in 3-centimeter-deep tissue phantoms with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and high sensitivity (3.4 picomoles of fluorophore in a volume of 68 nanoliters can be detected). We have achieved these results in both tissue-mimic phantoms and porcine muscle tissues. We have also demonstrated multi-color USF to image and distinguish two fluorophores with different wavelengths, which might be very useful for simultaneously imaging of multiple targets and observing their interactions in the future. This work has opened the door for future studies of high-resolution centimeter-deep tissue fluorescence imaging.

  9. On the potential of ultrasound elastography for pressure ulcer early detection.

    OpenAIRE

    Deprez , Jean-François; Brusseau , Elisabeth; Fromageau , Jérémie; Cloutier , Guy; Basset , Olivier

    2011-01-01

    International audience; PURPOSE: Pressure ulcers are areas of soft tissue breakdown induced by a sustained mechanical stress that damages the skin and underlying tissues. They represent a considerable burden to the society in terms of health care and cost. Yet, techniques for prevention and detection of pressure ulcers still remain very limited. In this article, the authors investigated the potential of ultrasound elastography for pressure ulcer early detection. Elastography is an imaging tec...

  10. Estimation of urinary flow velocity in models of obstructed and unobstructed urethras by decorrelation of ultrasound radiofrequency signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arif, M.; Idzenga, T.; Mastrigt, R. van; Korte, C.L. de

    2014-01-01

    The feasibility of estimating urinary flow velocity from the decorrelation of radiofrequency (RF) signals was investigated in soft tissue-mimicking models of obstructed and unobstructed urethras. The decorrelation was studied in the near field, focal zone and far field of the ultrasound beam.

  11. A signal detection theory analysis of an unconscious perception effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, S J; Theios, J; Jenison, R

    1999-07-01

    The independent observation model (Macmillan & Creelman, 1991) is fitted to detection-identification data collected under conditions of heavy masking. The model accurately predicts a quantitative relationship between stimulus detection and stimulus identification over a wide range of detection performance. This model can also be used to offer a signal detection interpretation of the common finding of above-chance identification following a missed signal. While our finding is not a new one, the stimuli used in this experiment (redundant three-letter strings) differ slightly from those used in traditional signal detection work. Also, the stimuli were presented very briefly and heavily masked, conditions typical in the study of unconscious perception effects.

  12. Detection of an occult hepatocellular carcinoma using ultrasound with liver-specific microbubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, Christopher J.; Lim, Adrian K.P.; Blomley, Martin J.K.; Cosgrove, David O.; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D.; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw M.W.

    2002-01-01

    The radiological surveillance of cirrhosis to detect the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is problematic because no highly sensitive and specific imaging investigation is available. Ultrasound is typically the first modality used but is less accurate than other imaging modalities. We report the first case of a patient with cirrhosis in whom US imaging with liver-specific microbubbles detected an HCC prior to its detection by MR. The use of liver-specific microbubble US contrast agents is an exciting development in the detection of HCC in chronic liver disease and may help to rectify some of the shortcomings of US. (orig.)

  13. Detection of Noise in Composite Step Signal Pattern by Visualizing Signal Waveforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaman Verma

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Step Composite Signals is the combination of vital informative signals that are compressed and coded to produce a predefined test image on a display device. It carries the desired sequence of information from source to destination. This information may be transmitted as digital signal, video information or data signal required as an input for the destination module. For testing of display panels, Composite Test Signals are the most important attribute of test signal transmission system. In the current research paper we present an approach for the noise detection in Composite Step Signal by analysing Composite Step Signal waveforms. The analysis of the signal waveforms reveals that the noise affected components of the signal and subsequently noise reduction process is initiated which targets noisy signal component only. Thus the quality of signal is not compromised during noise reduction process.

  14. Quantitative Emboli Detection Using Nonlinear Ultrasound Technique, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a new and innovative method for the detection and classification of emboli flowing into the brain through Carotid arteries, specifically for...

  15. Signal Detection with Criterion Noise: Applications to Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Aaron S.; Diaz, Michael; Wee, Serena

    2009-01-01

    A tacit but fundamental assumption of the theory of signal detection is that criterion placement is a noise-free process. This article challenges that assumption on theoretical and empirical grounds and presents the noisy decision theory of signal detection (ND-TSD). Generalized equations for the isosensitivity function and for measures of…

  16. Detection of magnetic nanoparticles in tissue using magneto-motive ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Junghwan; Feldman, Marc D; Kim, Jeehyun; Condit, Chris; Emelianov, Stanislav; Milner, Thomas E

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the magneto-motive ultrasonic detection of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles as a marker of macrophage recruitment in tissue. The capability of ultrasound to detect SPIO nanoparticles (core diameter ∼20 nm) taken up by murine liver macrophages was investigated. Eight mice were sacrificed two days after the intravenous administration of four SPIO doses (1.5, 1.0, 0.5, and 0.1 mmol Fe/kg body weight). In the iron-laden livers, ultrasound Doppler measurements showed a frequency shift in response to an applied time-varying magnetic field. M-mode scan and colour power Doppler images of the iron-laden livers also demonstrated nanoparticle movement under focused magnetic field excitation. In the livers of two saline injected control mice, no movement was observed using any ultrasound imaging modes. The results of our experiments indicate that ultrasound imaging of magneto-motive excitation is a candidate imaging modality to identify tissue-based macrophages containing SPIO nanoparticles

  17. Signal anomaly detection using modified CUSUM [cumulative sum] method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenstern, V.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Benedetti, M.

    1988-01-01

    An important aspect of detection of anomalies in signals is the identification of changes in signal behavior caused by noise, jumps, changes in band-width, sudden pulses and signal bias. A methodology is developed to identify, isolate and characterize these anomalies using a modification of the cumulative sum (CUSUM) approach. The new algorithm performs anomaly detection at three levels and is implemented on a general purpose computer. 7 refs., 4 figs

  18. Optimizing ultrasound detection for sensitive 3D photoacoustic breast tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xia, W.

    2013-01-01

    The standard modality for breast cancer detection is X-ray imaging. Diagnosis is performed after the triple assessment of X-ray mammography assisted by ultrasonog- raphy and biopsy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is sometimes used in specific problem solving such as contradictory results are

  19. Detection and Localization of Random Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sporring, Jon; Olsen, Niels Holm; Nielsen, Mads

    2003-01-01

    filtering techniques. It is therefore interesting to extend the application to objects with many but small degrees of freedom in their geometry. These geometric variations deteriorate the linear correlation signal, both regarding its strength and localization with multiple peaks from a single object...

  20. Computerized detection of breast cancer on automated breast ultrasound imaging of women with dense breasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drukker, Karen; Sennett, Charlene A.; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Develop a computer-aided detection method and investigate its feasibility for detection of breast cancer in automated 3D ultrasound images of women with dense breasts. Methods: The HIPAA compliant study involved a dataset of volumetric ultrasound image data, “views,” acquired with an automated U-Systems Somo•V ® ABUS system for 185 asymptomatic women with dense breasts (BI-RADS Composition/Density 3 or 4). For each patient, three whole-breast views (3D image volumes) per breast were acquired. A total of 52 patients had breast cancer (61 cancers), diagnosed through any follow-up at most 365 days after the original screening mammogram. Thirty-one of these patients (32 cancers) had a screening-mammogram with a clinically assigned BI-RADS Assessment Category 1 or 2, i.e., were mammographically negative. All software used for analysis was developed in-house and involved 3 steps: (1) detection of initial tumor candidates, (2) characterization of candidates, and (3) elimination of false-positive candidates. Performance was assessed by calculating the cancer detection sensitivity as a function of the number of “marks” (detections) per view. Results: At a single mark per view, i.e., six marks per patient, the median detection sensitivity by cancer was 50.0% (16/32) ± 6% for patients with a screening mammogram-assigned BI-RADS category 1 or 2—similar to radiologists’ performance sensitivity (49.9%) for this dataset from a prior reader study—and 45.9% (28/61) ± 4% for all patients. Conclusions: Promising detection sensitivity was obtained for the computer on a 3D ultrasound dataset of women with dense breasts at a rate of false-positive detections that may be acceptable for clinical implementation

  1. Detection of Asymptomatic Renal Calcifications in Astronauts Using a Novel Ultrasound Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Kathleen; Sargsyan, Ashot; Reyes, David; Locke, James

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) specifically looking for asymptomatic renal calcifications that may be renal stones is typically not done in the terrestrial setting. Standard abdominal US without a renal focus may discover incidental, mineralized renal material (MRM); however punctate solid areas of MRM is less than 3 mm are usually considered subclinical. Detecting these early calcifications before they become symptomatic renal stones is critical to prevent adverse medical and mission outcomes during spaceflight.

  2. Continuous emotion detection using EEG signals and facial expressions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soleymani, Mohammad; Asghari-Esfeden, Sadjad; Pantic, Maja; Fu, Yun

    Emotions play an important role in how we select and consume multimedia. Recent advances on affect detection are focused on detecting emotions continuously. In this paper, for the first time, we continuously detect valence from electroencephalogram (EEG) signals and facial expressions in response to

  3. Toward multimodal signal detection of adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpaz, Rave; DuMouchel, William; Schuemie, Martijn; Bodenreider, Olivier; Friedman, Carol; Horvitz, Eric; Ripple, Anna; Sorbello, Alfred; White, Ryen W; Winnenburg, Rainer; Shah, Nigam H

    2017-12-01

    Improving mechanisms to detect adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is key to strengthening post-marketing drug safety surveillance. Signal detection is presently unimodal, relying on a single information source. Multimodal signal detection is based on jointly analyzing multiple information sources. Building on, and expanding the work done in prior studies, the aim of the article is to further research on multimodal signal detection, explore its potential benefits, and propose methods for its construction and evaluation. Four data sources are investigated; FDA's adverse event reporting system, insurance claims, the MEDLINE citation database, and the logs of major Web search engines. Published methods are used to generate and combine signals from each data source. Two distinct reference benchmarks corresponding to well-established and recently labeled ADRs respectively are used to evaluate the performance of multimodal signal detection in terms of area under the ROC curve (AUC) and lead-time-to-detection, with the latter relative to labeling revision dates. Limited to our reference benchmarks, multimodal signal detection provides AUC improvements ranging from 0.04 to 0.09 based on a widely used evaluation benchmark, and a comparative added lead-time of 7-22 months relative to labeling revision dates from a time-indexed benchmark. The results support the notion that utilizing and jointly analyzing multiple data sources may lead to improved signal detection. Given certain data and benchmark limitations, the early stage of development, and the complexity of ADRs, it is currently not possible to make definitive statements about the ultimate utility of the concept. Continued development of multimodal signal detection requires a deeper understanding the data sources used, additional benchmarks, and further research on methods to generate and synthesize signals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Accuracy of Daily Lung Ultrasound for the Detection of Pulmonary Edema Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Craig A; Co, Ivan; Pandey, Aditya S; Gregory Thompson, B; Rajajee, Venkatakrishna

    2016-04-01

    Early detection of pulmonary edema is vital to appropriate fluid management following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Lung ultrasound (LUS) has been shown to accurately identify pulmonary edema in patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF). Our objective was to determine the accuracy of daily screening LUS for the detection of pulmonary edema following SAH. Screening LUS was performed in conjunction with daily transcranial doppler for SAH patients within the delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) risk period in our neuroICU. We reviewed records of SAH patients admitted 7/2012-5/2014 who underwent bilateral LUS on at least 5 consecutive days. Ultrasound videos were reviewed by an investigator blinded to the final diagnosis. "B+ lines" were defined as ≥3 B-lines on LUS. Two other investigators blinded to ultrasound results determined whether pulmonary edema with ARF (PE-ARF) was present during the period of evaluation on the basis of independent chart review, with a fourth investigator performing adjudication in the event of disagreement. The diagnostic accuracy of B+ lines for the detection of PE-ARF and RPE was determined. Of 59 patients meeting criteria for inclusion, 21 (36%) had PE-ARF and 26 (44%) had B+ lines. Kappa for inter-rater agreement was 0.821 (p pulmonary edema following SAH and may assist with fluid titration during the risk period for DCI.

  5. Dynamic programming in parallel boundary detection with application to ultrasound intima-media segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuan; Cheng, Xinyao; Xu, Xiangyang; Song, Enmin

    2013-12-01

    Segmentation of carotid artery intima-media in longitudinal ultrasound images for measuring its thickness to predict cardiovascular diseases can be simplified as detecting two nearly parallel boundaries within a certain distance range, when plaque with irregular shapes is not considered. In this paper, we improve the implementation of two dynamic programming (DP) based approaches to parallel boundary detection, dual dynamic programming (DDP) and piecewise linear dual dynamic programming (PL-DDP). Then, a novel DP based approach, dual line detection (DLD), which translates the original 2-D curve position to a 4-D parameter space representing two line segments in a local image segment, is proposed to solve the problem while maintaining efficiency and rotation invariance. To apply the DLD to ultrasound intima-media segmentation, it is imbedded in a framework that employs an edge map obtained from multiplication of the responses of two edge detectors with different scales and a coupled snake model that simultaneously deforms the two contours for maintaining parallelism. The experimental results on synthetic images and carotid arteries of clinical ultrasound images indicate improved performance of the proposed DLD compared to DDP and PL-DDP, with respect to accuracy and efficiency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Sonic IR crack detection of aircraft turbine engine blades with multi-frequency ultrasound excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ding; Han, Xiaoyan; Newaz, Golam

    2014-01-01

    Effectively and accurately detecting cracks or defects in critical engine components, such as turbine engine blades, is very important for aircraft safety. Sonic Infrared (IR) Imaging is such a technology with great potential for these applications. This technology combines ultrasound excitation and IR imaging to identify cracks and flaws in targets. In general, failure of engine components, such as blades, begins with tiny cracks. Since the attenuation of the ultrasound wave propagation in turbine engine blades is small, the efficiency of crack detection in turbine engine blades can be quite high. The authors at Wayne State University have been developing the technology as a reliable tool for the future field use in aircraft engines and engine parts. One part of the development is to use finite element modeling to assist our understanding of effects of different parameters on crack heating while experimentally hard to achieve. The development has been focused with single frequency ultrasound excitation and some results have been presented in a previous conference. We are currently working on multi-frequency excitation models. The study will provide results and insights of the efficiency of different frequency excitation sources to foster the development of the technology for crack detection in aircraft engine components

  7. The diagnostic accuracy of endovaginal and transperineal ultrasound for detecting anal sphincter defects: The PREDICT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, A.-M., E-mail: annemarie.roos@gmail.com [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Mayday University Hospital, Croydon (United Kingdom); Abdool, Z. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa); Sultan, A.H.; Thakar, R. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Mayday University Hospital, Croydon (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    Aim: To determine the accuracy and predictive value of transperineal (TPU) and endovaginal ultrasound (EVU) in the detection of anal sphincter defects in women with obstetric anal sphincter injuries and/or postpartum symptoms of faecal incontinence. Materials and methods: One hundred and sixty-five women were recruited, four women were excluded as they were seen years after their last delivery. TPU and EVU, followed by endonanal ultrasound (EAU), were performed using the B and K Viking 2400 scanner. Sensitivity and specificity, as well as predictive values with 95% confidence intervals, for detecting anal sphincter defects were calculated for EVU and TPU, using EAU as the reference standard. Results: On EAU a defect was found in 42 (26%) women: 39 (93%) had an external (EAS) and 23 (55%) an internal anal sphincter (IAS) defect. Analysable images of one level of the EAS combined with an analysable IAS were available in 140 (87%) women for EVU and in 131 (81%) for TPU. The sensitivity and specificity for the detection of any defect was 48% (30-67%) and 85% (77-91%) for EVU and 64% (44-81%) and 85% (77-91%) for TPU, respectively. Conclusion: Although EAU using a rotating endoprobe is the validated reference standard in the identification of anal sphincter defects, it is not universally available. However while TPU and/or EVU with conventional ultrasound probes can be useful in identifying normality, for clinical purposes they are not sensitive enough to identify an underlying sphincter defect.

  8. The diagnostic accuracy of endovaginal and transperineal ultrasound for detecting anal sphincter defects: The PREDICT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, A.-M.; Abdool, Z.; Sultan, A.H.; Thakar, R.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To determine the accuracy and predictive value of transperineal (TPU) and endovaginal ultrasound (EVU) in the detection of anal sphincter defects in women with obstetric anal sphincter injuries and/or postpartum symptoms of faecal incontinence. Materials and methods: One hundred and sixty-five women were recruited, four women were excluded as they were seen years after their last delivery. TPU and EVU, followed by endonanal ultrasound (EAU), were performed using the B and K Viking 2400 scanner. Sensitivity and specificity, as well as predictive values with 95% confidence intervals, for detecting anal sphincter defects were calculated for EVU and TPU, using EAU as the reference standard. Results: On EAU a defect was found in 42 (26%) women: 39 (93%) had an external (EAS) and 23 (55%) an internal anal sphincter (IAS) defect. Analysable images of one level of the EAS combined with an analysable IAS were available in 140 (87%) women for EVU and in 131 (81%) for TPU. The sensitivity and specificity for the detection of any defect was 48% (30-67%) and 85% (77-91%) for EVU and 64% (44-81%) and 85% (77-91%) for TPU, respectively. Conclusion: Although EAU using a rotating endoprobe is the validated reference standard in the identification of anal sphincter defects, it is not universally available. However while TPU and/or EVU with conventional ultrasound probes can be useful in identifying normality, for clinical purposes they are not sensitive enough to identify an underlying sphincter defect.

  9. Multiparametric ultrasound in the detection of prostate cancer: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Postema, Arnoud; Mischi, Massimo; de la Rosette, Jean; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the advances and clinical results of the different ultrasound modalities and the progress in combining them into multiparametric UltraSound (mpUS). Methods A systematic literature search on mpUS and the different ultrasound modalities included: greyscale ultrasound, computerized transrectal ultrasound, Doppler and power Doppler techniques, dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound and (shear wave) elastography. Results Limited research available on combining ultrasound modal...

  10. Sensitive detection of nanomechanical motion using piezoresistive signal downmixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bargatin, I.; Myers, E.B.; Arlett, J.; Gudlewski, B.; Roukes, M.L.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a method of measuring rf-range resonance properties of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) with integrated piezoresistive strain detectors serving as signal downmixers. The technique takes advantage of the high strain sensitivity of semiconductor-based piezoresistors, while overcoming the problem of rf signal attenuation due to a high source impedance. Our technique also greatly reduces the effect of the cross-talk between the detector and actuator circuits. We achieve thermomechanical noise detection of cantilever resonance modes up to 71 MHz at room temperature, demonstrating that downmixed piezoresistive signal detection is a viable high-sensitivity method of displacement detection in high-frequency NEMS

  11. Sentinel node detection in melanomas using contrast-enhanced ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K. Rue; Klyver, H.; Chakera, A. Hougaard

    2009-01-01

    in humans. PURPOSE: To investigate the possible use of CEUS in detecting SN in patients with malignant melanomas (MM), and to improve the method by using different concentrations of contrast agent and various positions of the extremity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten patients with MM on an extremity and one...... healthy volunteer were included. One milliliter of a contrast agent (Sonovue; Bracco, Milan, Italy) was injected subcutaneously on both sides of the scar from the excised tumor. Contrast-enhanced lymph channels and lymph nodes (LNs) were searched for using low-mechanical-index CEUS and by stimulated...... tissue damage, as the contrast agent was not registered for subcutaneous administration. RESULTS: In one patient, two contrast-enhanced inguinal LNs were visualized by CEUS, corresponding to two inguinal SNs found by scintigraphic imaging. No contrast-enhanced lymph channels or LNs were visualized in any...

  12. Characterization of in vitro healthy and pathological human liver tissue periodicity using backscattered ultrasound signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Christiano Bittencourt; Pereira, Wagner Coelho de Albuquerque; Meziri, Mahmoud; Laugier, Pascal

    2006-05-01

    This work studied the periodicity of in vitro healthy and pathologic liver tissue, using backscattered ultrasound (US) signals. It utilized the mean scatterer spacing (MSS) as a parameter of tissue characterization, estimated by three methods: the spectral autocorrelation (SAC), the singular spectrum analysis (SSA) and the quadratic transformation method (SIMON). The liver samples were classified in terms of tissue status using the METAVIR scoring system. Twenty tissue samples were classified in four groups: F0, F1, F3 and F4 (five samples for each). The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (applied on group pairs) resulted as nonsignificant (p > 0.05) for two pairs only: F1/F3 (for SSA) and F3/F4 (for SAC). A discriminant analysis was applied using as parameters the MSS mean (MSS) and standard deviation (sigmaMSS), the estimates histogram mode (mMSS), and the speed of US (mc(foie)) in the medium, to evaluate the degree of discrimination among healthy and pathologic tissues. The better accuracy (Ac) with SAC (80%) was with parameter group (MSS, sigmaMSS, mc(foie)), achieving a sensitivity (Ss) of 92.3% and a specificity (Sp) of 57.1%. For SSA, the group with all four parameters showed an Ac of 75%, an Ss of 78.6% and an Sp of 66.70%. SIMON obtained the best Ac of all (85%) with group (MSS, mMSS, mc(foie)), an Ss of 100%, but with an Sp of 50%.

  13. Compensation for the signal processing characteristics of ultrasound B-mode scanners in adaptive speckle reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, D C; Bell, D S; Bamber, J C

    1993-01-01

    A systematic method to compensate for nonlinear amplification of individual ultrasound B-scanners has been investigated in order to optimise performance of an adaptive speckle reduction (ASR) filter for a wide range of clinical ultrasonic imaging equipment. Three potential methods have been investigated: (1) a method involving an appropriate selection of the speckle recognition feature was successful when the scanner signal processing executes simple logarithmic compressions; (2) an inverse transform (decompression) of the B-mode image was effective in correcting for the measured characteristics of image data compression when the algorithm was implemented in full floating point arithmetic; (3) characterising the behaviour of the statistical speckle recognition feature under conditions of speckle noise was found to be the method of choice for implementation of the adaptive speckle reduction algorithm in limited precision integer arithmetic. In this example, the statistical features of variance and mean were investigated. The third method may be implemented on commercially available fast image processing hardware and is also better suited for transfer into dedicated hardware to facilitate real-time adaptive speckle reduction. A systematic method is described for obtaining ASR calibration data from B-mode images of a speckle producing phantom.

  14. Understanding driver behavior at grade crossings through signal detection theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This report uses signal detection theory (SDT) to model motorists decisionmaking strategies at grade crossings in order to understand the factors that influence such decisions and to establish a framework for evaluating the impact of proposed coun...

  15. Understanding driver behavior at grade crossings through signal detection theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    This report uses signal detection theory (SDT) to model motorists decisionmaking strategies at grade crossings in order to understand the factors that influence such decisions and to establish a framework for evaluating the impact of proposed coun...

  16. Weak signal detection: A discrete window of opportunity for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    weak signal detection' as a potential opportunity to fill this void. Method: Combining futures and complexity theory, we reflect on two pilot case studies that involved the Archetype Extraction technique and the SenseMakerw CollectorTM tool.

  17. Ultrasound pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregnancy sonogram; Obstetric ultrasonography; Obstetric sonogram; Ultrasound - pregnancy; IUGR - ultrasound; Intrauterine growth - ultrasound; Polyhydramnios - ultrasound; Oligohydramnios - ultrasound; ...

  18. [INVITED] Surface plasmon cavities on optical fiber end-facets for biomolecule and ultrasound detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tian; He, Xiaolong; Zhou, Xin; Lei, Zeyu; Wang, Yalin; Yang, Jie; Cai, De; Chen, Sung-Liang; Wang, Xueding

    2018-05-01

    Integrating surface plasmon resonance (SPR) devices upon single-mode fiber (SMF) end facets renders label-free sensing systems that have a simple dip-and-read configuration, a small form factor, high compatibility with fiber-optic techniques, and invasive testing capability. Such devices are not only low cost replacement of current equipments in centralized laboratories, but also highly desirable for opening paths to new applications of label-free optical sensing technologies, such as point-of-care immunological tests and intravascular ultrasound imaging. In this paper, we explain the requirements and challenges for such devices from the perspectives of biomolecule and ultrasound detection applications. In such a context, we review our recent work on SMF end-facet SPR cavities. This include a glue-and-strip fabrication method to transfer a nano-patterned thin gold film to the SMF end-facet with high yield, high quality and high alignment precision, the designs of distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) and distributed feedback (DFB) SPR cavities that couple efficiently with the SMF guided mode and reach quality factors of over 100, and the preliminary results for biomolecule interaction sensing and ultrasound detection. The particular advantages and potential values of these devices have been discussed, in terms of sensitivity, data reliability, reproducibility, bandwidth, etc.

  19. Optical detection of ultrasound using an apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Phillip; Zhang, Zhen; Sun, Cheng; Balogun, Oluwaseyi

    2013-01-01

    Laser ultrasonics techniques are power approaches for non-contact generation and detection of high frequency ultrasound on a local scale. In these techniques, optical diffraction limits the spatial information that can be accessed from a measurement. In order to improve the lateral spatial resolution, we incorporate an apertureless near-field scanning optical microscope (aNSOM) into laser ultrasonics setup for local detection of laser generated ultrasound. The aNSOM technique relies on the measurement of a weak backscattered near-field light intensity resulting from the oblique illumination of a nanoscale probe-tip positioned close to a sample surface. We enhance the optical near-field intensity by coupling light to surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on the shaft of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever. The SPPs propagate down the AFM shaft, localize at the tip apex, and are backscattered to the far-field when the separation distance between the probe tip and the sample surface is comparable to the probe-tip radius. The backscattered near-field intensity is dynamically modulated when an ultrasonic wave arrives at the sample surface leading to a transient change in the tip-sample separation distance. We present experimental results detailing measurement of broadband and narrowband laser generated ultrasound in solids with frequencies reaching up to 180 MHz range.

  20. Validation of an ultrasound dilution technology for cardiac output measurement and shunt detection in infants and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Lars; Johansson, Sune; Perez-de-Sa, Valeria

    2014-02-01

    To validate cardiac output measurements by ultrasound dilution technology (COstatus monitor) against those obtained by a transit-time ultrasound technology with a perivascular flow probe and to investigate ultrasound dilution ability to estimate pulmonary to systemic blood flow ratio in children. Prospective observational clinical trial. Pediatric cardiac operating theater in a university hospital. In 21 children (6.1 ± 2.6 kg, mean ± SD) undergoing heart surgery, cardiac output was simultaneously recorded by ultrasound dilution (extracorporeal arteriovenous loop connected to existing arterial and central venous catheters) and a transit-time ultrasound probe applied to the ascending aorta, and when possible, the main pulmonary artery. The pulmonary to systemic blood flow ratio estimated from ultrasound dilution curve analysis was compared with that estimated from transit-time ultrasound technology. Bland-Altman analysis of the whole cohort (90 pairs, before and after surgery) showed a bias between transit-time ultrasound (1.01 ± 0.47 L/min) and ultrasound dilution technology (1.03 ± 0.51 L/min) of -0.02 L/min, limits of agreement -0.3 to 0.3 L/min, and percentage error of 31%. In children with no residual shunts, the bias was -0.04 L/min, limits of agreement -0.28 to 0.2 L/min, and percentage error 19%. The pooled co efficient of variation was for the whole cohort 3.5% (transit-time ultrasound) and 6.3% (ultrasound dilution), and in children without shunt, it was 2.9% (transit-time ultrasound) and 4% (ultrasound dilution), respectively. Ultrasound dilution identified the presence of shunts (pulmonary to systemic blood flow ≠ 1) with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 92%. Mean pulmonary to systemic blood flow ratio by transit-time ultrasound was 2.6 ± 1.0 and by ultrasound dilution 2.2 ± 0.7 (not significant). The COstatus monitor is a reliable technique to measure cardiac output in children with high sensitivity and specificity for detecting the

  1. Signal detection without finite-energy limits to quantum resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Aina, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    We show that there are extremely simple signal detection schemes where the finiteness of energy resources places no limit on the resolution. On the contrary, larger resolution can be obtained with lower energy. To this end the generator of the signal-dependent transformation encoding the signal information on the probe state must be different from the energy. We show that the larger the deviation of the probe state from being the minimum-uncertainty state, the better the resolution.

  2. The application of signal detection theory to optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helstrom, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    The role of measurements of noncommuting quantum observables is considered in the detection of signals and estimation of signal parameters by quantum receivers. The restoration of images focused on a photosensitive surface is discussed for data as numbers of photoelectrons ejected from various parts of the surface. The detection of an image formed on a photosensitive surface in the presence of background illumination for similar data is also considered.

  3. Signal Detection Framework Using Semantic Text Mining Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarsan, Sithu D.

    2009-01-01

    Signal detection is a challenging task for regulatory and intelligence agencies. Subject matter experts in those agencies analyze documents, generally containing narrative text in a time bound manner for signals by identification, evaluation and confirmation, leading to follow-up action e.g., recalling a defective product or public advisory for…

  4. Detecting breast microcalcifications using super-resolution and wave-equation ultrasound imaging: a numerical phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Simonetti, Francesco [IMPERIAL COLLEGE LONDON; Huthwaite, Peter [IMPERIAL COLLEGE LONDON; Rosenberg, Robert [UNM; Williamson, Michael [UNM

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound image resolution and quality need to be significantly improved for breast microcalcification detection. Super-resolution imaging with the factorization method has recently been developed as a promising tool to break through the resolution limit of conventional imaging. In addition, wave-equation reflection imaging has become an effective method to reduce image speckles by properly handling ultrasound scattering/diffraction from breast heterogeneities during image reconstruction. We explore the capabilities of a novel super-resolution ultrasound imaging method and a wave-equation reflection imaging scheme for detecting breast microcalcifications. Super-resolution imaging uses the singular value decomposition and a factorization scheme to achieve an image resolution that is not possible for conventional ultrasound imaging. Wave-equation reflection imaging employs a solution to the acoustic-wave equation in heterogeneous media to backpropagate ultrasound scattering/diffraction waves to scatters and form images of heterogeneities. We construct numerical breast phantoms using in vivo breast images, and use a finite-difference wave-equation scheme to generate ultrasound data scattered from inclusions that mimic microcalcifications. We demonstrate that microcalcifications can be detected at full spatial resolution using the super-resolution ultrasound imaging and wave-equation reflection imaging methods.

  5. Signal processing techniques for sodium boiling noise detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    At the Specialists' Meeting on Sodium Boiling Detection organized by the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) of the International Atomic Energy Agency at Chester in the United Kingdom in 1981 various methods of detecting sodium boiling were reported. But, it was not possible to make a comparative assessment of these methods because the signal condition in each experiment was different from others. That is why participants of this meeting recommended that a benchmark test should be carried out in order to evaluate and compare signal processing methods for boiling detection. Organization of the Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on signal processing techniques for sodium boiling noise detection was also recommended at the 16th meeting of the IWGFR. The CRP on Signal Processing Techniques for Sodium Boiling Noise Detection was set up in 1984. Eight laboratories from six countries have agreed to participate in this CRP. The overall objective of the programme was the development of reliable on-line signal processing techniques which could be used for the detection of sodium boiling in an LMFBR core. During the first stage of the programme a number of existing processing techniques used by different countries have been compared and evaluated. In the course of further work, an algorithm for implementation of this sodium boiling detection system in the nuclear reactor will be developed. It was also considered that the acoustic signal processing techniques developed for boiling detection could well make a useful contribution to other acoustic applications in the reactor. This publication consists of two parts. Part I is the final report of the co-ordinated research programme on signal processing techniques for sodium boiling noise detection. Part II contains two introductory papers and 20 papers presented at four research co-ordination meetings since 1985. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 22 papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  6. Radiologists' Performance for Detecting Lesions and the Interobserver Variability of Automated Whole Breast Ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo; Choi, Byung Gil; Choi, Jae Jung; Lee, Ji Hye; Song, Byung Joo; Choe, Byung Joo; Park, Sarah; Kim, Hyunbin

    2013-01-01

    To compare the detection performance of the automated whole breast ultrasound (AWUS) with that of the hand-held breast ultrasound (HHUS) and to evaluate the interobserver variability in the interpretation of the AWUS. AWUS was performed in 38 breast cancer patients. A total of 66 lesions were included: 38 breast cancers, 12 additional malignancies and 16 benign lesions. Three breast radiologists independently reviewed the AWUS data and analyzed the breast lesions according to the BI-RADS classification. The detection rate of malignancies was 98.0% for HHUS and 90.0%, 88.0% and 96.0% for the three readers of the AWUS. The sensitivity and the specificity were 98.0% and 62.5% in HHUS, 90.0% and 87.5% for reader 1, 88.0% and 81.3% for reader 2, and 96.0% and 93.8% for reader 3, in AWUS. There was no significant difference in the radiologists' detection performance, sensitivity and specificity (p > 0.05) between the two modalities. The interobserver agreement was fair to good for the ultrasonographic features, categorization, size, and the location of breast masses. AWUS is thought to be useful for detecting breast lesions. In comparison with HHUS, AWUS shows no significant difference in the detection rate, sensitivity and the specificity, with high degrees of interobserver agreement

  7. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound features of hepatocellular carcinoma not detected during the screening procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yi; Wang, Wen-Ping; Mao, Feng; Dietrich, Christoph

    2017-08-01

    Aim  The aim of this retrospective study is to report on the characteristics of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) of primarily not detected hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during the screening procedure of patients at risk. Methods  Sixty-four patients with a finally solitary and histologically proven HCC not detected HCC during the screening procedure were retrospectively analyzed. Most of HCC lesions (90.6 %, 58/64) measured < 20 mm in diameter. All HCC lesions were not detected during the initial screening procedure but suspected using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. The final gold standard was biopsy or surgery with histological examination. Results  On CEUS, 62/64 (96.8 %) of HCC were characterized as an obviously hyperenhanced lesion in arterial phase, and 41/64 (64.1 %) of HCC were characterized as hypoenhancing lesions in the portal venous and late phases. During the arterial phase of CEUS, 96.8 % of HCC displayed homogeneous hyperenhancement. Knowing the CEUS and magnetic resonance imaging findings, 45/64 (70.3 %) could have been detected using B-mode ultrasound (BMUS). Conclusion  BMUS as a screening procedure is generally accepted. Contrast-enhanced imaging modalities have improved detection and characterization of HCC. Homogeneous hyperenhancement during the arterial phase and mild washout are indicative for HCC in liver cirrhosis. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Radiologists' Performance for Detecting Lesions and the Interobserver Variability of Automated Whole Breast Ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo; Choi, Byung Gil; Choi, Jae Jung; Lee, Ji Hye [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Byung Joo; Choe, Byung Joo [Department of General Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sarah [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyunbin [CMC Clinical Research Coordinating Center, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    To compare the detection performance of the automated whole breast ultrasound (AWUS) with that of the hand-held breast ultrasound (HHUS) and to evaluate the interobserver variability in the interpretation of the AWUS. AWUS was performed in 38 breast cancer patients. A total of 66 lesions were included: 38 breast cancers, 12 additional malignancies and 16 benign lesions. Three breast radiologists independently reviewed the AWUS data and analyzed the breast lesions according to the BI-RADS classification. The detection rate of malignancies was 98.0% for HHUS and 90.0%, 88.0% and 96.0% for the three readers of the AWUS. The sensitivity and the specificity were 98.0% and 62.5% in HHUS, 90.0% and 87.5% for reader 1, 88.0% and 81.3% for reader 2, and 96.0% and 93.8% for reader 3, in AWUS. There was no significant difference in the radiologists' detection performance, sensitivity and specificity (p > 0.05) between the two modalities. The interobserver agreement was fair to good for the ultrasonographic features, categorization, size, and the location of breast masses. AWUS is thought to be useful for detecting breast lesions. In comparison with HHUS, AWUS shows no significant difference in the detection rate, sensitivity and the specificity, with high degrees of interobserver agreement.

  9. Fatigue crack detection on structural steel members by using ultrasound excited thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plum, Robin Marc

    2015-01-01

    In the field of non-destructive testing (NDT), ultrasound excited thermography has been recognised as a promising technique that was successfully applied to metals, fibre composites and many more engineering materials in order to detect cracks, delaminations and other types of internal flaws. Dating back to the late 1970s, the idea of high-frequency vibration excitation of structural members combined with monitoring the surface temperature by means of infrared thermography aims at the localised energy dissipation at defect regions and its thermal detection. The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the potential use of ultrasound excited thermography for detecting surface breaking fatigue cracks in thick-walled components relevant to steel construction. The presented research is motivated by a lack of fast and imaging crack detection methods in the field and the growing acceptance and technological progress of active thermography techniques. After introducing the concept of ultrasound excited thermography or vibrothermography, its current state of the art is described by means of a comprehensive literature review focusing on research activities towards crack detection on metals. Owing to the interdisciplinarity of the test method, all relevant technical subdisciplines from the excitation of plate vibrations via potential heat generation mechanisms and heat transfer to infrared thermography are outlined. The experimental work starts with the manufacture and fatigue loading of suitable plate specimens made from low-carbon steel S355, mostly in the high cycle fatigue regime, to generate throughthickness cracks with specified depths. Using a modified high-power ultrasonic welding generator, basic dependencies of the defect heating on frequency, coupling location and excitation duration are clarified at first. Besides of an estimation of realistic detection limits depending on the plate thickness, main issues such as the relation between vibration intensity and

  10. Fatigue crack detection on structural steel members by using ultrasound excited thermography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plum, Robin Marc

    2015-07-01

    In the field of non-destructive testing (NDT), ultrasound excited thermography has been recognised as a promising technique that was successfully applied to metals, fibre composites and many more engineering materials in order to detect cracks, delaminations and other types of internal flaws. Dating back to the late 1970s, the idea of high-frequency vibration excitation of structural members combined with monitoring the surface temperature by means of infrared thermography aims at the localised energy dissipation at defect regions and its thermal detection. The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the potential use of ultrasound excited thermography for detecting surface breaking fatigue cracks in thick-walled components relevant to steel construction. The presented research is motivated by a lack of fast and imaging crack detection methods in the field and the growing acceptance and technological progress of active thermography techniques. After introducing the concept of ultrasound excited thermography or vibrothermography, its current state of the art is described by means of a comprehensive literature review focusing on research activities towards crack detection on metals. Owing to the interdisciplinarity of the test method, all relevant technical subdisciplines from the excitation of plate vibrations via potential heat generation mechanisms and heat transfer to infrared thermography are outlined. The experimental work starts with the manufacture and fatigue loading of suitable plate specimens made from low-carbon steel S355, mostly in the high cycle fatigue regime, to generate throughthickness cracks with specified depths. Using a modified high-power ultrasonic welding generator, basic dependencies of the defect heating on frequency, coupling location and excitation duration are clarified at first. Besides of an estimation of realistic detection limits depending on the plate thickness, main issues such as the relation between vibration intensity and

  11. Control of treatment size in cavitation-enhanced high-intensity focused ultrasound using radio-frequency echo signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiyasu, Kentaro; Takagi, Ryo; Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2017-07-01

    In high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment, controlling the ultrasound dose at each focal target spot is important because it is a problem that the length of the coagulated region in front of the focal point deviates owing to the differences in absorption in each focal target spot and attenuation in the intervening tissues. In this study, the detected changes in the power spectra of HIFU echoes were used by controlling the HIFU duration in the “trigger HIFU” sequence with the aim to increase coagulation size through the enhancement of the ultrasonic heating by the cavitation induced by the preceding extremely high intensity short “trigger” pulse. The result shows that this method can be used to detect boiling bubbles and the following generated cavitation bubbles at their early stage. By automatically stopping HIFU exposure immediately after detecting the bubbles, overheating was prevented and the deviation of the length of the coagulated region was reduced.

  12. Smartphone application for emergency signal detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Isabel N; Leal, Carlos; Pinto, Luís; Bolito, Jason; Lemos, André

    2016-09-01

    Currently, a number of studies focus on the study and design of new healthcare technologies to improve elderly health and quality of life. Taking advantage of the popularity, portability, and inherent technology of smartphones, we present an emergency application for smartphones, designated as knock-to-panic (KTP). This innovative and novel system enables users to simply hit their devices in order to send an alarm signal to an emergency service. This application is a complete and autonomous emergency system, and can provide an economic, reliable, and unobtrusive method for elderly monitoring or safety protection. Moreover, the simple and fast activation of KTP makes it a viable and potentially superior alternative to traditional ambient assisted living emergency calls. Furthermore, KTP can be further extended to the general population as well and not just be limited for elderly persons. The proposed method is a threshold-based algorithm and is designed to require a low battery power consumption. The evaluation of the performance of the algorithm in collected data indicates that both sensitivity and specificity are above 90%. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Spectral Correlation of Multicarrier Modulated Signals and Its Application for Signal Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Haijian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectral correlation theory for cyclostationary time-series signals has been studied for decades. Explicit formulas of spectral correlation function for various types of analog-modulated and digital-modulated signals are already derived. In this paper, we investigate and exploit the cyclostationarity characteristics for two kinds of multicarrier modulated (MCM signals: conventional OFDM and filter bank based multicarrier (FBMC signals. The spectral correlation characterization of MCM signal can be described by a special linear periodic time-variant (LPTV system. Using this LPTV description, we have derived the explicit theoretical formulas of nonconjugate and conjugate cyclic autocorrelation function (CAF and spectral correlation function (SCF for OFDM and FBMC signals. According to theoretical spectral analysis, Cyclostationary Signatures (CS are artificially embedded into MCM signal and a low-complexity signature detector is, therefore, presented for detecting MCM signal. Theoretical analysis and simulation results demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of this CS detector compared to traditionary energy detector.

  14. Subsurface Event Detection and Classification Using Wireless Signal Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhannad T. Suleiman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Subsurface environment sensing and monitoring applications such as detection of water intrusion or a landslide, which could significantly change the physical properties of the host soil, can be accomplished using a novel concept, Wireless Signal Networks (WSiNs. The wireless signal networks take advantage of the variations of radio signal strength on the distributed underground sensor nodes of WSiNs to monitor and characterize the sensed area. To characterize subsurface environments for event detection and classification, this paper provides a detailed list and experimental data of soil properties on how radio propagation is affected by soil properties in subsurface communication environments. Experiments demonstrated that calibrated wireless signal strength variations can be used as indicators to sense changes in the subsurface environment. The concept of WSiNs for the subsurface event detection is evaluated with applications such as detection of water intrusion, relative density change, and relative motion using actual underground sensor nodes. To classify geo-events using the measured signal strength as a main indicator of geo-events, we propose a window-based minimum distance classifier based on Bayesian decision theory. The window-based classifier for wireless signal networks has two steps: event detection and event classification. With the event detection, the window-based classifier classifies geo-events on the event occurring regions that are called a classification window. The proposed window-based classification method is evaluated with a water leakage experiment in which the data has been measured in laboratory experiments. In these experiments, the proposed detection and classification method based on wireless signal network can detect and classify subsurface events.

  15. Subsurface event detection and classification using Wireless Signal Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Suk-Un; Ghazanfari, Ehsan; Cheng, Liang; Pamukcu, Sibel; Suleiman, Muhannad T

    2012-11-05

    Subsurface environment sensing and monitoring applications such as detection of water intrusion or a landslide, which could significantly change the physical properties of the host soil, can be accomplished using a novel concept, Wireless Signal Networks (WSiNs). The wireless signal networks take advantage of the variations of radio signal strength on the distributed underground sensor nodes of WSiNs to monitor and characterize the sensed area. To characterize subsurface environments for event detection and classification, this paper provides a detailed list and experimental data of soil properties on how radio propagation is affected by soil properties in subsurface communication environments. Experiments demonstrated that calibrated wireless signal strength variations can be used as indicators to sense changes in the subsurface environment. The concept of WSiNs for the subsurface event detection is evaluated with applications such as detection of water intrusion, relative density change, and relative motion using actual underground sensor nodes. To classify geo-events using the measured signal strength as a main indicator of geo-events, we propose a window-based minimum distance classifier based on Bayesian decision theory. The window-based classifier for wireless signal networks has two steps: event detection and event classification. With the event detection, the window-based classifier classifies geo-events on the event occurring regions that are called a classification window. The proposed window-based classification method is evaluated with a water leakage experiment in which the data has been measured in laboratory experiments. In these experiments, the proposed detection and classification method based on wireless signal network can detect and classify subsurface events.

  16. Echo detected EPR as a tool for detecting radiation-induced defect signals in pottery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoleo, Alfonso; Bortolussi, Claudia; Brustolon, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Archaeological fragments of pottery have been investigated by using CW-EPR and Echo Detected EPR (EDEPR). EDEPR allows to remove the CW-EPR dominant Fe(III) background spectrum, hiding much weaker signals potentially useful for dating purpose. EDEPR spectra attributed to a methyl radical and to feldspar defects have been recorded at room and low temperature for an Iron Age cooking ware (700 B.C.). A study on the dependence of EDEPR intensity over absorbed dose on a series of γ-irradiated brick samples (estimated age of 562 ± 140 B.C.) has confirmed the potential efficacy of the proposed method for spotting defect signals out of the strong iron background. - Highlights: → Fe(III) CW-EPR signals cover CW-EPR-detectable defects in ceramics. → Echo detected EPR gets rid of Fe(III) signals, disclosing defect signals. → Echo detected EPR detects defect signals even at relatively low doses.

  17. Signal Detection Theory-Based Information Processing for the Detection of Breast Cancer at Microwave Frequencies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nolte, Loren

    2002-01-01

    The hypothesis is that one can use signal detection theory to improve the performance in detecting tumors in the breast by using this theory to develop task-oriented information processing techniques...

  18. Ultrafast 2-dimensional image monitoring and array-based passive cavitation detection for ultrasound contrast agent destruction in a variably sized region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shanshan; Hu, Hong; Jiang, Hujie; Xu, Zhi'an; Wan, Mingxi

    2014-11-01

    A combined approach was proposed, based on programmable ultrasound equipment, to simultaneously monitor surviving microbubbles and detect cavitation activity during microbubble destruction in a variably sized region for use in ultrasound contrast agent (UCA)-enhanced therapeutic ultrasound applications. A variably sized focal region wherein the acoustic pressure was above the UCA fragmentation threshold was synthesized at frequencies of 3, 4, 5, and 6 MHz with a linear broadband imaging probe. The UCAs' temporal and spatial distribution during the microbubbles' destruction was monitored in a 2-dimensional imaging plane at 5 MHz and a frame rate of 400 Hz, and simultaneously, broadband noise emissions during the microbubbles' fragmentation were extracted by using the backscattered signals produced by the focused release bursts (ie, destruction pulses) themselves. Afterward, the temporal evolution of broadband noise emission, the surviving microbubbles in a region of interest (ROI), and the destruction area in a static UCA suspension were computed. Then the inertial cavitation dose, destruction rate of microbubbles in the ROI, and area of the destruction region were determined. It was found that an increasing pulse length and a decreasing transmit aperture and excitation frequency were correlated with an increased inertial cavitation dose, microbubble destruction rate, and destruction area. Furthermore, it was obvious that the microbubble destruction rate was significantly correlated with the inertial cavitation dose (P cavitation dose could be regulated by manipulating the transmission parameters. © 2014 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  19. Detection and Processing Techniques of FECG Signal for Fetal Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan MA

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fetal electrocardiogram (FECG signal contains potentially precise information that could assist clinicians in making more appropriate and timely decisions during labor. The ultimate reason for the interest in FECG signal analysis is in clinical diagnosis and biomedical applications. The extraction and detection of the FECG signal from composite abdominal signals with powerful and advance methodologies are becoming very important requirements in fetal monitoring. The purpose of this review paper is to illustrate the various methodologies and developed algorithms on FECG signal detection and analysis to provide efficient and effective ways of understanding the FECG signal and its nature for fetal monitoring. A comparative study has been carried out to show the performance and accuracy of various methods of FECG signal analysis for fetal monitoring. Finally, this paper further focused some of the hardware implementations using electrical signals for monitoring the fetal heart rate. This paper opens up a passage for researchers, physicians, and end users to advocate an excellent understanding of FECG signal and its analysis procedures for fetal heart rate monitoring system.

  20. Hot spots in energetic materials generated by infrared and ultrasound, detected by thermal imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Wei; You, Sizhu; Suslick, Kenneth S; Dlott, Dana D

    2014-02-01

    We have observed and characterized hot spot formation and hot-spot ignition of energetic materials (EM), where hot spots were created by ultrasonic or long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) exposure, and were detected by high-speed thermal microscopy. The microscope had 15-20 μm spatial resolution and 8.3 ms temporal resolution. LWIR was generated by a CO2 laser (tunable near 10.6 μm or 28.3 THz) and ultrasound by a 20 kHz acoustic horn. Both methods of energy input created spatially homogeneous energy fields, allowing hot spots to develop spontaneously due to the microstructure of the sample materials. We observed formation of hot spots which grew and caused the EM to ignite. The EM studied here consisted of composite solids with 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine crystals and polymer binders. EM simulants based on sucrose crystals in binders were also examined. The mechanisms of hot spot generation were different with LWIR and ultrasound. With LWIR, hot spots were most efficiently generated within the EM crystals at LWIR wavelengths having longer absorption depths of ∼25 μm, suggesting that hot spot generation mechanisms involved localized absorbing defects within the crystals, LWIR focusing in the crystals or LWIR interference in the crystals. With ultrasound, hot spots were primarily generated in regions of the polymer binder immediately adjacent to crystal surfaces, rather than inside the EM crystals.

  1. Value of liver elastography and abdominal ultrasound for detection of complications of allogeneic hemopoietic SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlas, T; Weber, J; Nehring, C; Kronenberger, R; Tenckhoff, H; Mössner, J; Niederwieser, D; Tröltzsch, M; Lange, T; Keim, V

    2014-06-01

    Hepatic complications contribute to morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hemopoietic SCT. Liver Doppler ultrasound and elastography represent promising methods for pretransplant risk assessment and early detection of complications. Ultrasound (liver and spleen size, liver perfusion) and elastography (transient elastography (TE); right liver lobe acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (r-ARFI); left liver lobe ARFI (l-ARFI)) were prospectively evaluated in patients with indications for allo-SCT. Measurements were performed before and repeatedly after SCT. Results were compared with the incidence of life-threatening complications and death during the first 150 days after SCT. Of 59 included patients, 16 suffered from major complications and 9 of them died within the follow-up period. At baseline, liver and spleen size, liver perfusion, TE and r-ARFI did not differ significantly between patients with and without severe complications. In contrast, l-ARFI was significantly elevated in patients who later developed severe complications (1.58±0.30 m/s vs 1.37±0.27 m/s, P=0.030). After SCT, l-ARFI values remained elevated and TE showed increasing liver stiffness in patients with complications. The value of conventional liver ultrasound for prediction of severe SCT complications is limited. Increased values for TE and l-ARFI are associated with severe SCT complications and demand further evaluation.

  2. Compressive Detection Using Sub-Nyquist Radars for Sparse Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the compression detection problem using sub-Nyquist radars, which is well suited to the scenario of high bandwidths in real-time processing because it would significantly reduce the computational burden and save power consumption and computation time. A compressive generalized likelihood ratio test (GLRT detector for sparse signals is proposed for sub-Nyquist radars without ever reconstructing the signal involved. The performance of the compressive GLRT detector is analyzed and the theoretical bounds are presented. The compressive GLRT detection performance of sub-Nyquist radars is also compared to the traditional GLRT detection performance of conventional radars, which employ traditional analog-to-digital conversion (ADC at Nyquist sampling rates. Simulation results demonstrate that the former can perform almost as well as the latter with a very small fraction of the number of measurements required by traditional detection in relatively high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR cases.

  3. A comparison of ultrasound and clinical examination in the detection of flexor tenosynovitis in early arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abouqal Redouane

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tenosynovitis is widely accepted to be common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and postulated to be the first manifestation of RA, but its true prevalence in early disease and in particular the hand has not been firmly established. The aims of this study were first to investigate the frequency and distribution of finger flexor tenosynovitis using ultrasound in early arthritis, second to compare clinical examination with ultrasound (US using the latter as the gold standard. Methods 33 consecutive patients who had who were initially diagnosed with polyarthritis and suspected of polyarthritis and clinical suspicion of inflammatory arthritis of the hands and wrists were assessed during consecutive, routine presentations to the rheumatology outpatient clinic. We scanned a total of 165 finger tendons and subsequent comparisons were made using clinical examination. Results Flexor tenosynovitis was found in 17 patients (51.5% on ultrasound compared with 16 (48.4% of all patients on clinical examination. Most commonly damaged joint involved on US was the second finger followed by the third, fifth, and fourth. Both modalities demonstrated more pathology on the second and third metacarpophalangeal (MCP compared with the fourth and fifth MCP. A joint-by-joint comparison of US and clinical examination demonstrated that although the sensitivity, specificities and positive predictive values of clinical examination were relatively high, negative predictive value of clinical examination was low (0.23. Conclusions Our study suggest that clinical examination can be a valuable tool for detecting flexor disease in view of its high specificity and positive predictive values, but a negative clinical examination does not exclude inflammation and an US should be considered. Further work is recommended to standardize definitions and image acquisition for peritendinous inflammation for ultrasound.

  4. The diagnostic accuracy of endovaginal and transperineal ultrasound for detecting anal sphincter defects: The PREDICT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, A-M; Abdool, Z; Sultan, A H; Thakar, R

    2011-07-01

    To determine the accuracy and predictive value of transperineal (TPU) and endovaginal ultrasound (EVU) in the detection of anal sphincter defects in women with obstetric anal sphincter injuries and/or postpartum symptoms of faecal incontinence. One hundred and sixty-five women were recruited, four women were excluded as they were seen years after their last delivery. TPU and EVU, followed by endonanal ultrasound (EAU), were performed using the B&K Viking 2400 scanner. Sensitivity and specificity, as well as predictive values with 95% confidence intervals, for detecting anal sphincter defects were calculated for EVU and TPU, using EAU as the reference standard. On EAU a defect was found in 42 (26%) women: 39 (93%) had an external (EAS) and 23 (55%) an internal anal sphincter (IAS) defect. Analysable images of one level of the EAS combined with an analysable IAS were available in 140 (87%) women for EVU and in 131 (81%) for TPU. The sensitivity and specificity for the detection of any defect was 48% (30-67%) and 85% (77-91%) for EVU and 64% (44-81%) and 85% (77-91%) for TPU, respectively. Although EAU using a rotating endoprobe is the validated reference standard in the identification of anal sphincter defects, it is not universally available. However while TPU and/or EVU with conventional ultrasound probes can be useful in identifying normality, for clinical purposes they are not sensitive enough to identify an underlying sphincter defect. Copyright © 2011 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Multiresolution edge detection using enhanced fuzzy c-means clustering for ultrasound image speckle reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsantis, Stavros [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Rion, GR 26504 (Greece); Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Karnabatidis, Dimitrios [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Rion, GR 26504 (Greece); Skouroliakou, Aikaterini [Department of Energy Technology Engineering, Technological Education Institute of Athens, Athens 12210 (Greece); Hazle, John D. [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Kagadis, George C., E-mail: gkagad@gmail.com, E-mail: George.Kagadis@med.upatras.gr, E-mail: GKagadis@mdanderson.org [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Rion, GR 26504, Greece and Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Speckle suppression in ultrasound (US) images of various anatomic structures via a novel speckle noise reduction algorithm. Methods: The proposed algorithm employs an enhanced fuzzy c-means (EFCM) clustering and multiresolution wavelet analysis to distinguish edges from speckle noise in US images. The edge detection procedure involves a coarse-to-fine strategy with spatial and interscale constraints so as to classify wavelet local maxima distribution at different frequency bands. As an outcome, an edge map across scales is derived whereas the wavelet coefficients that correspond to speckle are suppressed in the inverse wavelet transform acquiring the denoised US image. Results: A total of 34 thyroid, liver, and breast US examinations were performed on a Logiq 9 US system. Each of these images was subjected to the proposed EFCM algorithm and, for comparison, to commercial speckle reduction imaging (SRI) software and another well-known denoising approach, Pizurica's method. The quantification of the speckle suppression performance in the selected set of US images was carried out via Speckle Suppression Index (SSI) with results of 0.61, 0.71, and 0.73 for EFCM, SRI, and Pizurica's methods, respectively. Peak signal-to-noise ratios of 35.12, 33.95, and 29.78 and edge preservation indices of 0.94, 0.93, and 0.86 were found for the EFCM, SIR, and Pizurica's method, respectively, demonstrating that the proposed method achieves superior speckle reduction performance and edge preservation properties. Based on two independent radiologists’ qualitative evaluation the proposed method significantly improved image characteristics over standard baseline B mode images, and those processed with the Pizurica's method. Furthermore, it yielded results similar to those for SRI for breast and thyroid images significantly better results than SRI for liver imaging, thus improving diagnostic accuracy in both superficial and in-depth structures. Conclusions: A

  6. Multiresolution edge detection using enhanced fuzzy c-means clustering for ultrasound image speckle reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsantis, Stavros; Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Karnabatidis, Dimitrios; Skouroliakou, Aikaterini; Hazle, John D.; Kagadis, George C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Speckle suppression in ultrasound (US) images of various anatomic structures via a novel speckle noise reduction algorithm. Methods: The proposed algorithm employs an enhanced fuzzy c-means (EFCM) clustering and multiresolution wavelet analysis to distinguish edges from speckle noise in US images. The edge detection procedure involves a coarse-to-fine strategy with spatial and interscale constraints so as to classify wavelet local maxima distribution at different frequency bands. As an outcome, an edge map across scales is derived whereas the wavelet coefficients that correspond to speckle are suppressed in the inverse wavelet transform acquiring the denoised US image. Results: A total of 34 thyroid, liver, and breast US examinations were performed on a Logiq 9 US system. Each of these images was subjected to the proposed EFCM algorithm and, for comparison, to commercial speckle reduction imaging (SRI) software and another well-known denoising approach, Pizurica's method. The quantification of the speckle suppression performance in the selected set of US images was carried out via Speckle Suppression Index (SSI) with results of 0.61, 0.71, and 0.73 for EFCM, SRI, and Pizurica's methods, respectively. Peak signal-to-noise ratios of 35.12, 33.95, and 29.78 and edge preservation indices of 0.94, 0.93, and 0.86 were found for the EFCM, SIR, and Pizurica's method, respectively, demonstrating that the proposed method achieves superior speckle reduction performance and edge preservation properties. Based on two independent radiologists’ qualitative evaluation the proposed method significantly improved image characteristics over standard baseline B mode images, and those processed with the Pizurica's method. Furthermore, it yielded results similar to those for SRI for breast and thyroid images significantly better results than SRI for liver imaging, thus improving diagnostic accuracy in both superficial and in-depth structures. Conclusions: A

  7. MICROSLEEPS AND THEIR DETECTION FROM THE BIOLOGICAL SIGNALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Holub

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Microsleeps (MS are a frequently discussed topic due to their fatal consequences. Their detection is necessary for the purpose of sleep laboratories, where they provide an option for the quantifying rate of sleep deprivation level and objective evaluation of subjective sleepiness. Many studies are dealing with this topic for automotive usage to design a fatigue countermeasure device. We made a research of recent attitude to the development of the automated MS detection methods. We created an overview of several MS detection approaches based on the measurement of biological signals. We also summarized the changes in EEG, EOG and ECG signals, which have been published over the last few years. The reproducible changes in the entire EEG spectrum, primarily with the increased activity of delta and theta, were noticed during a transition to fatigue. There were observed changes of blinking rate and reduction of eye movements during the fatigue tasks. MS correspond with variations in the autonomic regulation of the cardiovascular function, which can be quantified by HRV parameters. The decrease in HR, VLF, and LF/HF before falling asleep was revealed. EEG signal, especially its slow wave activity, considered to be the most predictive and reliable for the level of alertness. In spite of the detection from EEG signal is the most common method, EOG based approaches can also be very efficient and more driver-friendly. Besides, the signal processing in the time domain can improve the detection accuracy of the short events like MS.

  8. Ultrasound of the hand is sufficient to detect subclinical inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis remission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Hilde Berner; Kvien, Tore K; Terslev, Lene

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ultrasound (US) is a sensitive method for detecting joint/tendon inflammation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Subclinical inflammation is often found in patients with RA in composite score remission. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether US of only......-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) and after 6 months (184 patients) and 12 months (152 patients) of follow-up. They were assessed by US (greyscale [GS] and power Doppler [PD] of 36 joints and 4 tendons, scored 0-3) as well as clinical and laboratory examinations, and different disease activity composite...

  9. Development Of Signal Detection For Radar Navigation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theingi Win Hlaing

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to evaluate the performance of target detection in the presence of sea clutter. Radar detection of a background of unwanted clutter due to echoes from sea clutter or land is a problem of interest in the radar field. Radar detector has been developed by assuming the radar clutter is Gaussian distributed. However as technology emerges the radar distribution is seen to deviates from the Gaussian assumption. Thus detectors designs based on Gaussian assumption are no longer optimum for detection in non-Gaussian nature. The theory of target detection in Gaussian distributed clutter has been well established and the closed form of the detection performances can be easily obtained. However that is not the case in non-Gaussian clutter distributions. The operation of radar detection is determined by radar detection theory with different types of Swerling target models such as Swerling I II III IV and V. By using MATLAB these signal detection techniques are developed.

  10. Transabdominal Ultrasound Colonography for Detection of Colorectal Neoplasms: Initial Clinical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Ya; Chen, Li-Da; Xu, Jian-Bo; Wu, Hui; Ye, Jin-Ning; Zhang, Xin-Hua; Xie, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Wei; Lu, Ming-De

    2017-10-01

    We investigated the feasibility of using ultrasound colonography (USC) to visualize the healthy colon and rectum and detect colorectal polyps. Eight healthy volunteers underwent USC after standard bowel preparation. The feasibility and image quality of USC in different segments were evaluated. Then, USC was conducted on eight patients with known colonic neoplasms using colonoscopy as the reference standard. For volunteers, USC examinations were successfully performed on four (50.0%) ascending, three (37.5%) transverse and eight (100%) descending colons, as well as all sigmoid colons and rectums. One of four (25.0%) ascending, two of eight (25.0%) descending and all sigmoid colons and rectums were well visualized and free of artifacts. For patients, colonoscopy revealed that eight patients had 17 neoplasms in the distal sigmoid colon and rectum, which included 3 lesions ≤5 mm, 3 lesions 6-9 mm and 11 lesions ≥10 mm. USC visualized 12 of 17 (70.6%) neoplasms. Lesion detection by USC was 0% (0/3), 33.3% (1/3) and 100% (11/11) for neoplasms ≤5, 6-9 mm and ≥10 mm in size. USC can visualize the sigmoid colon and rectum well and detect distal sigmoid and rectal neoplasms ≥10 mm in diameter. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ultrasound compared with computed tomography and pancreatic arteriography in the detection of endocrine tumours of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paeivaensalo, M.; Maekaeraeinen, H.; Siniluoto, T.; Staahlberg, M.; Jalovaara, P.; Oulu Univ. Central Hospital

    1989-01-01

    We have evaluated ultrasound, computed tomography and arteriographic findings in 15 patients with 17 endocrine pancreatic tumours having a mean diameter of 2.3 cm (range 1-7 cm). All patients underwent computed tomography, and all but one ultrasound and arteriography. Ultrasound was the initial investigation in 11 patients, and identified 10 of the 16 tumours present in 14 patients. Two tumours were found at ultrasound reexamination after having been identified by other radiological methods. Computed tomography revealed 8 out of 17 tumours, while arteriography identified 8 out of 16 tumours. Computed tomography was the initial investigation in 4 patients,and identified one tumour. In only 4 patients were tumours not detected by any of the imaging methods. The sensitivities of ultrasound, computed tomography and arteriography in the detection of pancreatic tumours were 62.5% (95% confidence interval 50.4-74.6%), 47.1% (95% confidence interval 35.0-59.2%), and 50.0% (95% confidence interval 37.5-62.5%), respectively. Ultrasound was thus more accurate than computed tomography or arteriography in detecting endocrine pancreatic tumours, and should be the initial radiological investigation. (orig.)

  12. Signal existence verification (SEV) for GPS low received power signal detection using the time-frequency approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Shau-Shiun; Sun, Chih-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    The detection of low received power of global positioning system (GPS) signals in the signal acquisition process is an important issue for GPS applications. Improving the miss-detection problem of low received power signal is crucial, especially for urban or indoor environments. This paper proposes a signal existence verification (SEV) process to detect and subsequently verify low received power GPS signals. The SEV process is based on the time-frequency representation of GPS signal, and it can capture the characteristic of GPS signal in the time-frequency plane to enhance the GPS signal acquisition performance. Several simulations and experiments are conducted to show the effectiveness of the proposed method for low received power signal detection. The contribution of this work is that the SEV process is an additional scheme to assist the GPS signal acquisition process in low received power signal detection, without changing the original signal acquisition or tracking algorithms.

  13. A new ultrasonic signal amplification method for detection of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant Shukla, Shiva; Resa López, Pablo; Sierra Sánchez, Carlos; Urréjola, José; Segura, Luis Elvira

    2012-10-01

    A new method is presented that increases the sensitivity of ultrasound-based techniques for detection of bacteria. The technique was developed for the detection of catalase-positive microorganisms. It uses a bubble trapping medium containing hydrogen peroxide that is mixed with the sample for microbiological evaluation. The enzyme catalase is present in catalase-positive bacteria, which induces a rapid hydrolysis of hydrogen peroxide, forming bubbles which remain in the medium. This reaction results in the amplification of the mechanical changes that the microorganisms produce in the medium. The effect can be detected by means of ultrasonic wave amplitude continuous measurement since the bubbles increase the ultrasonic attenuation significantly. It is shown that microorganism concentrations of the order of 105 cells ml-1 can be detected using this method. This allows an improvement of three orders of magnitude in the ultrasonic detection threshold of microorganisms in conventional culture media, and is competitive with modern rapid microbiological methods. It can also be used for the characterization of the enzymatic activity.

  14. A new ultrasonic signal amplification method for detection of bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Shiva Kant; López, Pablo Resa; Sánchez, Carlos Sierra; Segura, Luis Elvira; Urréjola, José

    2012-01-01

    A new method is presented that increases the sensitivity of ultrasound-based techniques for detection of bacteria. The technique was developed for the detection of catalase-positive microorganisms. It uses a bubble trapping medium containing hydrogen peroxide that is mixed with the sample for microbiological evaluation. The enzyme catalase is present in catalase-positive bacteria, which induces a rapid hydrolysis of hydrogen peroxide, forming bubbles which remain in the medium. This reaction results in the amplification of the mechanical changes that the microorganisms produce in the medium. The effect can be detected by means of ultrasonic wave amplitude continuous measurement since the bubbles increase the ultrasonic attenuation significantly. It is shown that microorganism concentrations of the order of 10 5 cells ml −1 can be detected using this method. This allows an improvement of three orders of magnitude in the ultrasonic detection threshold of microorganisms in conventional culture media, and is competitive with modern rapid microbiological methods. It can also be used for the characterization of the enzymatic activity. (paper)

  15. Ultrasound-induced DNA damage and signal transductions indicated by gammaH2AX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Yukihiro; Fujiwara, Yoshisada; Zhao, Qing-Li; Hassan, Mariame Ali; Ogawa, Ryohei; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Takasaki, Ichiro; Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Takeo; Kondo, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    Ultrasound (US) has been shown to induce cancer cell death via different forms including apoptosis. Here, we report the potential of low-intensity pulsed US (LIPUS) to induce genomic DNA damage and subsequent DNA damage response. Using the ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) as the positive control, we were able to observe the induction of DSBs (as neutral comet tails) and the subsequent formation of gammaH2AX-positive foci (by immunofluorescence detection) in human leukemia cells following exposure to LIPUS. The LIPUS-induced DNA damage arose most likely from the mechanical, but not sonochemical, effect of cavitation, based on our observation that the suppression of inertial cavitation abrogated the gammH2AX foci formation, whereas scavenging of free radical formation (e.g., hydroxyl radical) had no protective effect on it. Treatment with the specific kinase inhibitor of ATM or DNA-PKcs, which can phosphorylate H2AX Ser139, revealed that US-induced gammaH2AX was inhibited more effectively by the DNA-PK inhibitor than ATM kinase inhibitor. Notably, these inhibitor effects were opposite to those with radiation-induced gammH2AX. In conclusion, we report, for the first time that US can induce DNA damage and the DNA damage response as indicated by gammaH2AX was triggered by the cavitational mechanical effects. Thus, it is expected that the data shown here may provide a better understanding of the cellular responses to US.

  16. Stochastic model for detection of signals in noise

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Stanley A.; Levi, Dennis M.

    2009-01-01

    Fifty years ago Birdsall, Tanner, and colleagues made rapid progress in developing signal detection theory into a powerful psychophysical tool. One of their major insights was the utility of adding external noise to the signals of interest. These methods have been enhanced in recent years by the addition of multipass and classification-image methods for opening up the black box. There remain a number of as yet unresolved issues. In particular, Birdsall developed a theorem that large amounts o...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the examination process. To ensure a smooth experience, it often helps to explain the procedure to the ... on the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from ...

  18. Singularity detection by wavelet approach: application to electrocardiogram signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalil, Bushra; Beya, Ouadi; Fauvet, Eric; Laligant, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    In signal processing, the region of abrupt changes contains the most of the useful information about the nature of the signal. The region or the points where these changes occurred are often termed as singular point or singular region. The singularity is considered to be an important character of the signal, as it refers to the discontinuity and interruption present in the signal and the main purpose of the detection of such singular point is to identify the existence, location and size of those singularities. Electrocardiogram (ECG) signal is used to analyze the cardiovascular activity in the human body. However the presence of noise due to several reasons limits the doctor's decision and prevents accurate identification of different pathologies. In this work we attempt to analyze the ECG signal with energy based approach and some heuristic methods to segment and identify different signatures inside the signal. ECG signal has been initially denoised by empirical wavelet shrinkage approach based on Steins Unbiased Risk Estimate (SURE). At the second stage, the ECG signal has been analyzed by Mallat approach based on modulus maximas and Lipschitz exponent computation. The results from both approaches has been discussed and important aspects has been highlighted. In order to evaluate the algorithm, the analysis has been done on MIT-BIH Arrhythmia database; a set of ECG data records sampled at a rate of 360 Hz with 11 bit resolution over a 10mv range. The results have been examined and approved by medical doctors.

  19. Integrated Giant Magnetoresistance Technology for Approachable Weak Biomagnetic Signal Detections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui-Min; Hu, Liang; Fu, Xin

    2018-01-07

    With the extensive applications of biomagnetic signals derived from active biological tissue in both clinical diagnoses and human-computer-interaction, there is an increasing need for approachable weak biomagnetic sensing technology. The inherent merits of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) and its high integration with multiple technologies makes it possible to detect weak biomagnetic signals with micron-sized, non-cooled and low-cost sensors, considering that the magnetic field intensity attenuates rapidly with distance. This paper focuses on the state-of-art in integrated GMR technology for approachable biomagnetic sensing from the perspective of discipline fusion between them. The progress in integrated GMR to overcome the challenges in weak biomagnetic signal detection towards high resolution portable applications is addressed. The various strategies for 1/ f noise reduction and sensitivity enhancement in integrated GMR technology for sub-pT biomagnetic signal recording are discussed. In this paper, we review the developments of integrated GMR technology for in vivo/vitro biomagnetic source imaging and demonstrate how integrated GMR can be utilized for biomagnetic field detection. Since the field sensitivity of integrated GMR technology is being pushed to fT/Hz 0.5 with the focused efforts, it is believed that the potential of integrated GMR technology will make it preferred choice in weak biomagnetic signal detection in the future.

  20. Advanced radar detection schemes under mismatched signal models

    CERN Document Server

    Bandiera, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive detection of signals embedded in correlated Gaussian noise has been an active field of research in the last decades. This topic is important in many areas of signal processing such as, just to give some examples, radar, sonar, communications, and hyperspectral imaging. Most of the existing adaptive algorithms have been designed following the lead of the derivation of Kelly's detector which assumes perfect knowledge of the target steering vector. However, in realistic scenarios, mismatches are likely to occur due to both environmental and instrumental factors. When a mismatched signal

  1. Pipeline Defects Detection Using MFL Signals and Self Quotient Image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Ho; Choi, Doo Hyun; Rho, Yong Woo

    2010-01-01

    Defects positioning of underground gas pipelines using MFL(magnetic flux leakage) inspection which is one of non-destructive evaluation techniques is proposed in this paper. MFL signals acquired from MFL PIG(pipeline inspection gauge) have nonlinearity and distortion caused by various extemal disturbances. SQI(self quotient image), a compensation technique for nonlinearity and distortion of MFL signal, is used to correct positioning of pipeline defects. Through the experiments using artificial defects carved in the KOGAS pipeline simulation facility, it is found that the performance of proposed defect detection is greatly improved compared to that of the conventional DCT(discrete cosine transform) coefficients based detection

  2. System and method for detection of dispersed broadband signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, S.; Dunham, M.E.

    1999-06-08

    A system and method for detecting the presence of dispersed broadband signals in real time are disclosed. The present invention utilizes a bank of matched filters for detecting the received dispersed broadband signals. Each matched filter uses a respective robust time template that has been designed to approximate the dispersed broadband signals of interest, and each time template varies across a spectrum of possible dispersed broadband signal time templates. The received dispersed broadband signal x(t) is received by each of the matched filters, and if one or more matches occurs, then the received data is determined to have signal data of interest. This signal data can then be analyzed and/or transmitted to Earth for analysis, as desired. The system and method of the present invention will prove extremely useful in many fields, including satellite communications, plasma physics, and interstellar research. The varying time templates used in the bank of matched filters are determined as follows. The robust time domain template is assumed to take the form w(t)=A(t)cos[l brace]2[phi](t)[r brace]. Since the instantaneous frequency f(t) is known to be equal to the derivative of the phase [phi](t), the trajectory of a joint time-frequency representation of x(t) is used as an approximation of [phi][prime](t). 10 figs.

  3. Characteristics of breast cancers detected by ultrasound screening in women with negative mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Min-Sun; Han, Wonshik; Koo, Hye-Ryoung

    2011-01-01

    Screening ultrasound (US) can increase the detection of breast cancer. However, little is known about the clinicopathologic characteristics of breast cancers detected by screening US. A search of the database for patients with breast cancer yielded a dataset in 6837 women who underwent breast surgery at Seoul National University Hospital (Korea). Of 6837 women, 1047 were asymptomatic and had a non-palpable cancer. Two hundred fifty-four women with 256 cancers detected by US (US-detected cancer) and 793 women with 807 cancers detected by mammography (MG-detected cancer) were identified. The imaging, clinicopathologic, and molecular data were reviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were carried out. Women with US-detected cancer were younger and were more likely to undergo breast-conserving surgery and to have node-negative invasive cancer (P 2 cm in size, tumors that were ≤1 cm in size were 2.2-fold more likely to be US-detected cancers (P=0.02). Compared to the luminal A subtype tumors (estrogen receptor [ER]+, PR+, HER2-), luminal B subtype tumors (ER+, PR+, HER2+) were less likely to be in the US-detected cancer group (P<0.01). Women with dense breasts were more likely to have US-detected cancer (P<0.01) versus those with non-dense breasts. Screening US-detected cancers were less likely to be diagnosed as category 5 instead of category 4 (P<0.01). In conclusion, women with US-detected breast cancer are more likely to have small-sized invasive cancer and more likely associated with the luminal A subtype. (author)

  4. Generation and coherent detection of QPSK signal using a novel method of digital signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuan; Hu, Bingliang; He, Zhen-An; Xie, Wenjia; Gao, Xiaohui

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate an optical quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) signal transmitter and an optical receiver for demodulating optical QPSK signal with homodyne detection and digital signal processing (DSP). DSP on the homodyne detection scheme is employed without locking the phase of the local oscillator (LO). In this paper, we present an extracting one-dimensional array of down-sampling method for reducing unwanted samples of constellation diagram measurement. Such a novel scheme embodies the following major advantages over the other conventional optical QPSK signal detection methods. First, this homodyne detection scheme does not need strict requirement on LO in comparison with linear optical sampling, such as having a flat spectral density and phase over the spectral support of the source under test. Second, the LabVIEW software is directly used for recovering the QPSK signal constellation without employing complex DSP circuit. Third, this scheme is applicable to multilevel modulation formats such as M-ary PSK and quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) or higher speed signals by making minor changes.

  5. Cophylogenetic signal is detectable in pollination interactions across ecological scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Matthew C; Cagua, Edgar Fernando; Stouffer, Daniel B

    2017-10-01

    That evolutionary history can influence the way that species interact is a basic tenet of evolutionary ecology. However, when the role of evolution in determining ecological interactions is investigated, focus typically centers on just one side of the interaction. A cophylogenetic signal, the congruence of evolutionary history across both sides of an ecological interaction, extends these previous explorations and provides a more complete picture of how evolutionary patterns influence the way species interact. To date, cophylogenetic signal has most typically been studied in interactions that occur between fine taxonomic clades that show high intimacy. In this study, we took an alternative approach and made an exhaustive assessment of cophylogeny in pollination interactions. To do so, we assessed the strength of cophylogenetic signal at four distinct scales of pollination interaction: (1) across plant-pollinator associations globally, (2) in local pollination communities, (3) within the modular structure of those communities, and (4) in individual modules. We did so using a globally distributed dataset comprised of 54 pollination networks, over 4000 species, and over 12,000 interactions. Within these data, we detected cophylogenetic signal at all four scales. Cophylogenetic signal was found at the level of plant-pollinator interactions on a global scale and in the majority of pollination communities. At the scale defined by the modular structure within those communities, however, we observed a much weaker cophylogenetic signal. Cophylogenetic signal was detectable in a significant proportion of individual modules and most typically when within-module phylogenetic diversity was low. In sum, the detection of cophylogenetic signal in pollination interactions across scales provides a new dimension to the story of how past evolution shapes extant pollinator-angiosperm interactions. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  6. Optimization of Contrast-to-Tissue Ratio by Adaptation of Transmitted Ternary Signal in Ultrasound Pulse Inversion Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Ménigot

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound contrast imaging has provided more accurate medical diagnoses thanks to the development of innovating modalities like the pulse inversion imaging. However, this latter modality that improves the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR is not optimal, since the frequency is manually chosen jointly with the probe. However, an optimal choice of this command is possible, but it requires precise information about the transducer and the medium which can be experimentally difficult to obtain, even inaccessible. It turns out that the optimization can become more complex by taking into account the kind of generators, since the generators of electrical signals in a conventional ultrasound scanner can be unipolar, bipolar, or tripolar. Our aim was to seek the ternary command which maximized the CTR. By combining a genetic algorithm and a closed loop, the system automatically proposed the optimal ternary command. In simulation, the gain compared with the usual ternary signal could reach about 3.9 dB. Another interesting finding was that, in contrast to what is generally accepted, the optimal command was not a fixed-frequency signal but had harmonic components.

  7. RMOD: a tool for regulatory motif detection in signaling network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinki Kim

    Full Text Available Regulatory motifs are patterns of activation and inhibition that appear repeatedly in various signaling networks and that show specific regulatory properties. However, the network structures of regulatory motifs are highly diverse and complex, rendering their identification difficult. Here, we present a RMOD, a web-based system for the identification of regulatory motifs and their properties in signaling networks. RMOD finds various network structures of regulatory motifs by compressing the signaling network and detecting the compressed forms of regulatory motifs. To apply it into a large-scale signaling network, it adopts a new subgraph search algorithm using a novel data structure called path-tree, which is a tree structure composed of isomorphic graphs of query regulatory motifs. This algorithm was evaluated using various sizes of signaling networks generated from the integration of various human signaling pathways and it showed that the speed and scalability of this algorithm outperforms those of other algorithms. RMOD includes interactive analysis and auxiliary tools that make it possible to manipulate the whole processes from building signaling network and query regulatory motifs to analyzing regulatory motifs with graphical illustration and summarized descriptions. As a result, RMOD provides an integrated view of the regulatory motifs and mechanism underlying their regulatory motif activities within the signaling network. RMOD is freely accessible online at the following URL: http://pks.kaist.ac.kr/rmod.

  8. Bias and discriminability during emotional signal detection in melancholic depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyett, Matthew; Parker, Gordon; Breakspear, Michael

    2014-04-27

    Cognitive disturbances in depression are pernicious and so contribute strongly to the burden of the disorder. Cognitive function has been traditionally studied by challenging subjects with modality-specific psychometric tasks and analysing performance using standard analysis of variance. Whilst informative, such an approach may miss deeper perceptual and inferential mechanisms that potentially unify apparently divergent emotional and cognitive deficits. Here, we sought to elucidate basic psychophysical processes underlying the detection of emotionally salient signals across individuals with melancholic and non-melancholic depression. Sixty participants completed an Affective Go/No-Go (AGN) task across negative, positive and neutral target stimuli blocks. We employed hierarchical Bayesian signal detection theory (SDT) to model psychometric performance across three equal groups of those with melancholic depression, those with a non-melancholic depression and healthy controls. This approach estimated likely response profiles (bias) and perceptual sensitivity (discriminability). Differences in the means of these measures speak to differences in the emotional signal detection between individuals across the groups, while differences in the variance reflect the heterogeneity of the groups themselves. Melancholic participants showed significantly decreased sensitivity to positive emotional stimuli compared to those in the non-melancholic group, and also had a significantly lower discriminability than healthy controls during the detection of neutral signals. The melancholic group also showed significantly higher variability in bias to both positive and negative emotionally salient material. Disturbances of emotional signal detection in melancholic depression appear dependent on emotional context, being biased during the detection of positive stimuli, consistent with a noisier representation of neutral stimuli. The greater heterogeneity of the bias across the melancholic

  9. Fast optical signal not detected in awake behaving monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Vanduffel, Wim; Deng, Hong Ping; Ekstrom, Leeland; Boas, David A; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2009-04-01

    While the ability of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to measure cerebral hemodynamic evoked responses (slow optical signal) is well established, its ability to measure non-invasively the 'fast optical signal' is still controversial. Here, we aim to determine the feasibility of performing NIRS measurements of the 'fast optical signal' or Event-Related Optical Signals (EROS) under optimal experimental conditions in awake behaving macaque monkeys. These monkeys were implanted with a 'recording well' to expose the dura above the primary visual cortex (V1). A custom-made optical probe was inserted and fixed into the well. The close proximity of the probe to the brain maximized the sensitivity to changes in optical properties in the cortex. Motion artifacts were minimized by physical restraint of the head. Full-field contrast-reversing checkerboard stimuli were presented to monkeys trained to perform a visual fixation task. In separate sessions, two NIRS systems (CW4 and ISS FD oximeter), which previously showed the ability to measure the fast signal in human, were used. In some sessions EEG was acquired simultaneously with the optical signal. The increased sensitivity to cortical optical changes with our experimental setup was quantified with 3D Monte Carlo simulations on a segmented MRI monkey head. Averages of thousands of stimuli in the same animal, or grand averages across the two animals and across repeated sessions, did not lead to detection of the fast optical signal using either amplitude or phase of the optical signal. Hemodynamic responses and visual evoked potentials were instead always detected with single trials or averages of a few stimuli. Based on these negative results, despite the optimal experimental conditions, we doubt the usefulness of non-invasive fast optical signal measurements with NIRS.

  10. Ultrasound-guided core biopsy: an effective method of detecting axillary nodal metastases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Solon, Jacqueline G

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Axillary nodal status is an important prognostic predictor in patients with breast cancer. This study evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound-guided core biopsy (Ax US-CB) at detecting axillary nodal metastases in patients with primary breast cancer, thereby determining how often sentinel lymph node biopsy could be avoided in node positive patients. STUDY DESIGN: Records of patients presenting to a breast unit between January 2007 and June 2010 were reviewed retrospectively. Patients who underwent axillary ultrasonography with or without preoperative core biopsy were identified. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for ultrasonography and percutaneous biopsy were evaluated. RESULTS: Records of 718 patients were reviewed, with 445 fulfilling inclusion criteria. Forty-seven percent (n = 210\\/445) had nodal metastases, with 110 detected by Ax US-CB (sensitivity 52.4%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, negative predictive value 70.1%). Axillary ultrasonography without biopsy had sensitivity and specificity of 54.3% and 97%, respectively. Lymphovascular invasion was an independent predictor of nodal metastases (sensitivity 60.8%, specificity 80%). Ultrasound-guided core biopsy detected more than half of all nodal metastases, sparing more than one-quarter of all breast cancer patients an unnecessary sentinel lymph node biopsy. CONCLUSIONS: Axillary ultrasonography, when combined with core biopsy, is a valuable component of the management of patients with primary breast cancer. Its ability to definitively identify nodal metastases before surgical intervention can greatly facilitate a patient\\'s preoperative integrated treatment plan. In this regard, we believe our study adds considerably to the increasing data, which indicate the benefit of Ax US-CB in the preoperative detection of nodal metastases.

  11. An Alternative Method for Tilecal Signal Detection and Amplitude Estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Sotto-Maior Peralva, B; The ATLAS collaboration; Manhães de Andrade Filho, L; Manoel de Seixas, J

    2011-01-01

    The Barrel Hadronic calorimeter of ATLAS (Tilecal) is a detector used in the reconstruction of hadrons, jets, muons and missing transverse energy from the proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It comprises 10,000 channels in four readout partitions and each calorimeter cell is made of two readout channels for redundancy. The energy deposited by the particles produced in the collisions is read out by the several readout channels and its value is estimated by an optimal filtering algorithm, which reconstructs the amplitude and the time of the digitized signal pulse sampled every 25 ns. This work deals with signal detection and amplitude estimation for the Tilecal under low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions. It explores the applicability (at the cell level) of a Matched Filter (MF), which is known to be the optimal signal detector in terms of the SNR. Moreover, it investigates the impact of signal detection when summing both signals from the same cell before estimating the amplitude, ...

  12. Signal Detection using ICA: Application to Chat Room Topic Spotting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolenda, Thomas; Hansen, Lars Kai; Larsen, Jan

    2001-01-01

    signals with weak a priori assumptions in multimedia contexts. ICA of real world data is typically performed without knowledge of the number of non-trivial independent components, hence, it is of interest to test hypotheses concerning the number of components or simply to test whether a given set...... can detect meaningful context structures in a chat room log file....

  13. Aiding the Detection of QRS Complex in ECG Signals by Detecting S Peaks Independently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabherwal, Pooja; Singh, Latika; Agrawal, Monika

    2018-03-30

    In this paper, a novel algorithm for the accurate detection of QRS complex by combining the independent detection of R and S peaks, using fusion algorithm is proposed. R peak detection has been extensively studied and is being used to detect the QRS complex. Whereas, S peaks, which is also part of QRS complex can be independently detected to aid the detection of QRS complex. In this paper, we suggest a method to first estimate S peak from raw ECG signal and then use them to aid the detection of QRS complex. The amplitude of S peak in ECG signal is relatively weak than corresponding R peak, which is traditionally used for the detection of QRS complex, therefore, an appropriate digital filter is designed to enhance the S peaks. These enhanced S peaks are then detected by adaptive thresholding. The algorithm is validated on all the signals of MIT-BIH arrhythmia database and noise stress database taken from physionet.org. The algorithm performs reasonably well even for the signals highly corrupted by noise. The algorithm performance is confirmed by sensitivity and positive predictivity of 99.99% and the detection accuracy of 99.98% for QRS complex detection. The number of false positives and false negatives resulted while analysis has been drastically reduced to 80 and 42 against the 98 and 84 the best results reported so far.

  14. Automatic detection of service initiation signals used in bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eLoth

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Recognising the intention of others is important in all social interactions, especially in the service domain. Enabling a bartending robot to serve customers is particularly challenging as the system has to recognise the social signals produced by customers and respond appropriately. Detecting whether a customer would like to order is essential for the service encounter to succeed. This detection is particularly challenging in a noisy environment with multiple customers. Thus, a bartending robot has to be able to distinguish between customers intending to order, chatting with friends or just passing by. In order to study which signals customers use to initiate a service interaction in a bar, we recorded real-life customer-staff interactions in several German bars. These recordings were used to generate initial hypotheses about the signals customers produce when bidding for the attention of bar staff. Two experiments using snapshots and short video sequences then tested the validity of these hypothesised candidate signals. The results revealed that bar staff responded to a set of two non-verbal signals: first, customers position themselves directly at the bar counter and, secondly, they look at a member of staff. Both signals were necessary and, when occurring together, sufficient. The participants also showed a strong agreement about when these cues occurred in the videos. Finally, a signal detection analysis revealed that ignoring a potential order is deemed worse than erroneously inviting customers to order. We conclude that a these two easily recognisable actions are sufficient for recognising the intention of customers to initiate a service interaction, but other actions such as gestures and speech were not necessary, and b the use of reaction time experiments using natural materials is feasible and provides ecologically valid results.

  15. Automatic detection of service initiation signals used in bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Sebastian; Huth, Kerstin; De Ruiter, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    Recognizing the intention of others is important in all social interactions, especially in the service domain. Enabling a bartending robot to serve customers is particularly challenging as the system has to recognize the social signals produced by customers and respond appropriately. Detecting whether a customer would like to order is essential for the service encounter to succeed. This detection is particularly challenging in a noisy environment with multiple customers. Thus, a bartending robot has to be able to distinguish between customers intending to order, chatting with friends or just passing by. In order to study which signals customers use to initiate a service interaction in a bar, we recorded real-life customer-staff interactions in several German bars. These recordings were used to generate initial hypotheses about the signals customers produce when bidding for the attention of bar staff. Two experiments using snapshots and short video sequences then tested the validity of these hypothesized candidate signals. The results revealed that bar staff responded to a set of two non-verbal signals: first, customers position themselves directly at the bar counter and, secondly, they look at a member of staff. Both signals were necessary and, when occurring together, sufficient. The participants also showed a strong agreement about when these cues occurred in the videos. Finally, a signal detection analysis revealed that ignoring a potential order is deemed worse than erroneously inviting customers to order. We conclude that (a) these two easily recognizable actions are sufficient for recognizing the intention of customers to initiate a service interaction, but other actions such as gestures and speech were not necessary, and (b) the use of reaction time experiments using natural materials is feasible and provides ecologically valid results.

  16. Parametric roll resonance monitoring using signal-based detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galeazzi, Roberto; Blanke, Mogens; Falkenberg, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Extreme roll motion of ships can be caused by several phenomena, one of which is parametric roll resonance. Several incidents occurred unexpectedly around the millennium and caused vast fiscal losses on large container vessels. The phenomenon is now well understood and some consider parametric roll...... algorithms in real conditions, and to evaluate the frequency of parametric roll events on the selected vessels. Detection performance is scrutinised through the validation of the detected events using owners’ standard methods, and supported by available wave radar data. Further, a bivariate statistical...... analysis of the outcome of the signal-based detectors is performed to assess the real life false alarm probability. It is shown that detection robustness and very low false warning rates are obtained. The study concludes that small parametric roll events are occurring, and that the proposed signal...

  17. The role of trapped bubbles in kidney stone detection with the color Doppler ultrasound twinkling artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Julianna C.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Kreider, Wayne; Breshock, Michael; Williams, James C., Jr.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2018-01-01

    The color Doppler ultrasound twinkling artifact, which highlights kidney stones with rapidly changing color, has the potential to improve stone detection; however, its inconsistent appearance has limited its clinical utility. Recently, it was proposed stable crevice bubbles on the kidney stone surface cause twinkling; however, the hypothesis is not fully accepted because the bubbles have not been directly observed. In this paper, the micron or submicron-sized bubbles predicted by the crevice bubble hypothesis are enlarged in kidney stones of five primary compositions by exposure to acoustic rarefaction pulses or hypobaric static pressures in order to simultaneously capture their appearance by high-speed photography and ultrasound imaging. On filming stones that twinkle, consecutive rarefaction pulses from a lithotripter caused some bubbles to reproducibly grow from specific locations on the stone surface, suggesting the presence of pre-existing crevice bubbles. Hyperbaric and hypobaric static pressures were found to modify the twinkling artifact; however, the simple expectation that hyperbaric exposures reduce and hypobaric pressures increase twinkling by shrinking and enlarging bubbles, respectively, largely held for rough-surfaced stones but was inadequate for smoother stones. Twinkling was found to increase or decrease in response to elevated static pressure on smooth stones, perhaps because of the compression of internal voids. These results support the crevice bubble hypothesis of twinkling and suggest the kidney stone crevices that give rise to the twinkling phenomenon may be internal as well as external.

  18. Ultrasound-Detected Thyroid Nodule Prevalence and Radiation Dose from Fallout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, C. E.; Zhumadilov, Z.; Gusev, B. I.; Hartshorne, M. H.; Wiest, P. W.; Woodward, P. W.; Crooks, L. A.; Luckyanov, N. K.; Fillmore, C. M.; Carr, Z.; Abisheva, G.; Beck, H. L.; Bouville, A.; Langer, J.; Weinstock, R.; Gordeev, K. I.; Shinkarev, S.; Simon, S. L.

    2014-01-01

    Settlements near the Semipalatinsk Test Site (SNTS) in northeastern Kazakhstan were exposed to radioactive fallout during 1949–1962. Thyroid disease prevalence among 2994 residents of eight villages was ascertained by ultrasound screening. Malignancy was determined by cytopathology. Individual thyroid doses from external and internal radiation sources were reconstructed from fallout deposition patterns, residential histories and diet, including childhood milk consumption. Point estimates of individual external and internal dose averaged 0.04 Gy (range 0–0.65) and 0.31 Gy (0–9.6), respectively, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.46. Ultrasound-detected thyroid nodule prevalence was 18% and 39% among males and females, respectively. It was significantly and independently associated with both external and internal dose, the main study finding. The estimated relative biological effectiveness of internal compared to external radiation dose was 0.33, with 95% confidence bounds of 0.09–3.11. Prevalence of papillary cancer was 0.9% and was not significantly associated with radiation dose. In terms of excess relative risk per unit dose, our dose–response findings for nodule prevalence are comparable to those from populations exposed to medical X rays and to acute radiation from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings. PMID:18363427

  19. The role of trapped bubbles in kidney stone detection with the color Doppler ultrasound twinkling artifact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Julianna C; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Kreider, Wayne; Breshock, Michael; Williams, James C; Bailey, Michael R

    2018-01-09

    The color Doppler ultrasound twinkling artifact, which highlights kidney stones with rapidly changing color, has the potential to improve stone detection; however, its inconsistent appearance has limited its clinical utility. Recently, it was proposed stable crevice bubbles on the kidney stone surface cause twinkling; however, the hypothesis is not fully accepted because the bubbles have not been directly observed. In this paper, the micron or submicron-sized bubbles predicted by the crevice bubble hypothesis are enlarged in kidney stones of five primary compositions by exposure to acoustic rarefaction pulses or hypobaric static pressures in order to simultaneously capture their appearance by high-speed photography and ultrasound imaging. On filming stones that twinkle, consecutive rarefaction pulses from a lithotripter caused some bubbles to reproducibly grow from specific locations on the stone surface, suggesting the presence of pre-existing crevice bubbles. Hyperbaric and hypobaric static pressures were found to modify the twinkling artifact; however, the simple expectation that hyperbaric exposures reduce and hypobaric pressures increase twinkling by shrinking and enlarging bubbles, respectively, largely held for rough-surfaced stones but was inadequate for smoother stones. Twinkling was found to increase or decrease in response to elevated static pressure on smooth stones, perhaps because of the compression of internal voids. These results support the crevice bubble hypothesis of twinkling and suggest the kidney stone crevices that give rise to the twinkling phenomenon may be internal as well as external.

  20. Early detection and staging of spontaneous embryo resorption by ultrasound biomicroscopy in murine pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Luis E; Hildebrandt, Thomas B; Kühl, Anja A; Drews, Barbara

    2014-05-10

    Embryo resorption is a major problem in human medicine, agricultural animal production and in conservation breeding programs. Underlying mechanisms have been investigated in the well characterised mouse model. However, post mortem studies are limited by the rapid disintegration of embryonic structures. A method to reliably identify embryo resorption in alive animals has not been established yet. In our study we aim to detect embryos undergoing resorption in vivo at the earliest possible stage by ultra-high frequency ultrasound. In a longitudinal study, we monitored 30 pregnancies of wild type C57BI/6 mice using ultra-high frequency ultrasound (30-70 MHz), so called ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). We compared the sonoembryology of mouse conceptuses under spontaneous resorption and neighbouring healthy conceptuses and correlated the live ultrasound data with the respective histology. The process of embryo resorption comprised of four stages: first, the conceptus exhibited growth retardation, second, bradycardia and pericardial edema were observed, third, further development ceased and the embryo died, and finally embryo remnants were resorbed by maternal immune cells. In early gestation (day 7 and 8), growth retardation was characterized by a small embryonic cavity. The embryo and its membranes were ill defined or did not develop at all. The echodensity of the embryonic fluid increased and within one to two days, the embryo and its cavity disappeared and was transformed into echodense tissue surrounded by fluid filled caverns. In corresponding histologic preparations, fibrinoid material interspersed with maternal granulocytes and lacunae filled with maternal blood were observed. In later stages (day 9-11) resorption prone embryos were one day behind in their development compared to their normal siblings. The space between Reichert's membrane and inner yolk sac membrane was enlarged The growth retarded embryos exhibited bradycardia and ultimately cessation of heart

  1. Validation of a novel duplex ultrasound objective structured assessment of technical skills (DUOSATS) for arterial stenosis detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffer, U; Singh, P; Pandey, V A; Aslam, M; Standfield, N J

    2014-01-01

    Duplex ultrasound facilitates bedside diagnosis and hence timely patient care. Its uptake has been hampered by training and accreditation issues. We have developed an assessment tool for Duplex arterial stenosis measurement for both simulator and patient based training. A novel assessment tool: duplex ultrasound assessment of technical skills was developed. A modified duplex ultrasound assessment of technical skills was used for simulator training. Novice, intermediate experience and expert users of duplex ultrasound were invited to participate. Participants viewed an instructional video and were allowed ample time to familiarize with the equipment. Participants' attempts were recorded and independently assessed by four experts using the modified duplex ultrasound assessment of technical skills. 'Global' assessment was also done on a four point Likert scale. Content, construct and concurrent validity as well as reliability were evaluated. Content and construct validity as well as reliability were demonstrated. The simulator had good satisfaction rating from participants: median 4; range 3-5. Receiver operator characteristic analysis has established a cut point of 22/ 34 and 25/ 40 were most appropriate for simulator and patient based assessment respectively. We have validated a novel assessment tool for duplex arterial stenosis detection. Further work is underway to establish transference validity of simulator training to improved skill in scanning patients. We have developed and validated duplex ultrasound assessment of technical skills for simulator training.

  2. The singular value filter: a general filter design strategy for PCA-based signal separation in medical ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauldin, F William; Lin, Dan; Hossack, John A

    2011-11-01

    A general filtering method, called the singular value filter (SVF), is presented as a framework for principal component analysis (PCA) based filter design in medical ultrasound imaging. The SVF approach operates by projecting the original data onto a new set of bases determined from PCA using singular value decomposition (SVD). The shape of the SVF weighting function, which relates the singular value spectrum of the input data to the filtering coefficients assigned to each basis function, is designed in accordance with a signal model and statistical assumptions regarding the underlying source signals. In this paper, we applied SVF for the specific application of clutter artifact rejection in diagnostic ultrasound imaging. SVF was compared to a conventional PCA-based filtering technique, which we refer to as the blind source separation (BSS) method, as well as a simple frequency-based finite impulse response (FIR) filter used as a baseline for comparison. The performance of each filter was quantified in simulated lesion images as well as experimental cardiac ultrasound data. SVF was demonstrated in both simulation and experimental results, over a wide range of imaging conditions, to outperform the BSS and FIR filtering methods in terms of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and motion tracking performance. In experimental mouse heart data, SVF provided excellent artifact suppression with an average CNR improvement of 1.8 dB with over 40% reduction in displacement tracking error. It was further demonstrated from simulation and experimental results that SVF provided superior clutter rejection, as reflected in larger CNR values, when filtering was achieved using complex pulse-echo received data and non-binary filter coefficients.

  3. Multilevel electrochemical signal detections of metalloprotein heterolayers for bioelectronic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Yong-Ho; Yoo, Si-Youl; Lee, Taek [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Sogang University, 35 Baekbeom-ro(Sinsu-dong), Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hun Joo [Interdisciplinary Program of Integrated Biotechnology, Sogang University, 35 Baekbeomro(Sinsu-dong), Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Junhong [School of Integrative Engineering, Chung-Ang University, Heukseok-dong, Dongjak-gu, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jeong-Woo, E-mail: jwchoi@sogang.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Sogang University, 35 Baekbeom-ro(Sinsu-dong), Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Interdisciplinary Program of Integrated Biotechnology, Sogang University, 35 Baekbeomro(Sinsu-dong), Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-31

    In the present study, we investigated the simultaneous detection of multilevel electrochemical signals from various metalloprotein heterolayers for the bioelectronic devices. A layer-by-layer assembly method based on simple electrostatic interaction was introduced to form protein bilayers. The gold substrate was modified with poly (ethylene glycol) thiol acid as the precursor, which introduced negative charges to the surface. Based on the isoelectric point, net-charge controlled metalloproteins by pH adjustment were sequentially immobilized on this negatively charged substrate. The degree of protein immobilization on the gold substrate was confirmed by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, and the surface topology changes due to the protein immobilization were confirmed by atomic force microscopy. Redox signals in the protein layers were measured by cyclic voltammetry. As a result, various redox signals generated from different metalloproteins on a single electrode were monitored. This proposed method for the detection of multi-level electrochemical signals can be directly applied to bioelectronic devices that store multi-information in a single electrode. - Highlights: • We fabricated heterolayers composed of various metalloproteins. • Metalloproteins were immobilized by layer-by-layer assembly. • The degree of immobilization was controlled by the net charge of metalloproteins. • Various redox signals generated from heterolayers were well monitored.

  4. Laser-ultrasound spectroscopy apparatus and method with detection of shear resonances for measuring anisotropy, thickness, and other properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Daniel; Moreau, Andre; Dubois, Marc; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre; Bussiere, Jean; Lord, Martin; Padioleau, Christian

    2000-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting shear resonances includes structure and steps for applying a radiation pulse from a pulsed source of radiation to an object to generate elastic waves therein, optically detecting the elastic waves generated in the object, and analyzing the elastic waves optically detected in the object. These shear resonances, alone or in combination with other information, may be used in the present invention to improve thickness measurement accuracy and to determine geometrical, microstructural, and physical properties of the object. At least one shear resonance in the object is detected with the elastic waves optically detected in the object. Preferably, laser-ultrasound spectroscopy is utilized to detect the shear resonances.

  5. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound vs multidetector-computed tomography for detecting liver metastases in colorectal cancer: a prospective, blinded, patient-by-patient analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, S R; Jakobsen, A

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the sensitivity and specificity of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and multidetector-computed tomography (MDCT) in the detection of liver metastases in patients with colorectal cancer.......This study compared the sensitivity and specificity of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and multidetector-computed tomography (MDCT) in the detection of liver metastases in patients with colorectal cancer....

  6. Sound card based digital correlation detection of weak photoelectrical signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Guanghui; Wang Jiangcheng

    2005-01-01

    A simple and low-cost digital correlation method is proposed to investigate weak photoelectrical signals, using a high-speed photodiode as detector, which is directly connected to a programmably triggered sound card analogue-to-digital converter and a personal computer. Two testing experiments, autocorrelation detection of weak flickering signals from a computer monitor under background of noisy outdoor stray light and cross-correlation measurement of the surface velocity of a motional tape, are performed, showing that the results are reliable and the method is easy to implement

  7. Early detection of structual changes in random signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Yoshiteru; Yokota, Katsuhiro

    1981-01-01

    Early detection of structual changes in observed random signal is very important from the point of system diagnosis. In this paper, the following procedures are applied to this problem and the results are compared. (1) auto-regressive model to random signal to calculate the prediction error, i.e., the defference between observed and predicted values. (2) auto-regressive method to caluculate the sum of the prediction error. (3) a method is based on AIC (Akaike Information Criterion). Simulation is made of these procedures, indicating their merits and demerits as a diagostic tools. (author)

  8. Optical Coherence Tomography Analysis of Attenuated Plaques Detected by Intravascular Ultrasound in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kubo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recent intravascular ultrasound (IVUS studies have demonstrated that hypoechoic plaque with deep ultrasound attenuation despite absence of bright calcium is common in acute coronary syndrome. Such “attenuated plaque” may be an IVUS characteristic of unstable lesion. Methods. We used optical coherence tomography (OCT in 104 patients with unstable angina to compare lesion characteristics between IVUS-detected attenuated plaque and nonattenuated plaque. Results. IVUS-detected attenuated plaque was observed in 41 (39% patients. OCT-detected lipidic plaque (88% versus 49%, <0.001, thin-cap fibroatheroma (48% versus 16%, <0.001, plaque rupture (44% versus 11%, <0.001, and intracoronary thrombus (54% versus 17%, <0.001 were more often seen in IVUS-detected attenuated plaques compared with nonattenuated plaques. Conclusions. IVUS-detected attenuated plaque has many characteristics of unstable coronary lesion. The presence of attended plaque might be an important marker of lesion instability.

  9. Comparisons of lesion detectability in ultrasound images acquired using time-shift compensation and spatial compounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacefield, James C; Pilkington, Wayne C; Waag, Robert C

    2004-12-01

    The effects of aberration, time-shift compensation, and spatial compounding on the discrimination of positive-contrast lesions in ultrasound b-scan images are investigated using a two-dimensional (2-D) array system and tissue-mimicking phantoms. Images were acquired within an 8.8 x 12-mm2 field of view centered on one of four statistically similar 4-mm diameter spherical lesions. Each lesion was imaged in four planes offset by successive 45 degree rotations about the central scan line. Images of the lesions were acquired using conventional geometric focusing through a water path, geometric focusing through a 35-mm thick distributed aberration phantom, and time-shift compensated transmit and receive focusing through the aberration phantom. The views of each lesion were averaged to form sets of water path, aberrated, and time-shift compensated 4:1 compound images and 16:1 compound images. The contrast ratio and detectability index of each image were computed to assess lesion differentiation. In the presence of aberration representative of breast or abdominal wall tissue, time-shift compensation provided statistically significant improvements of contrast ratio but did not consistently affect the detectability index, and spatial compounding significantly increased the detectability index but did not alter the contrast ratio. Time-shift compensation and spatial compounding thus provide complementary benefits to lesion detection.

  10. Detection of rotator cuff tears: the value of MRI following ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutten, Matthieu J.C.M.; Spaargaren, Gert-Jan; Jager, Gerrit J.; Loon, Ton van; Waal Malefijt, Maarten C. de; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the need for additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following ultrasound (US) in patients with shoulder pain and/or disability and to compare the accuracy of both techniques for the detection of partial-thickness and full-thickness rotator cuff tears (RCT). In 4 years, 5,216 patients underwent US by experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. Retrospectively, patient records were evaluated if MRI and surgery were performed within 5 months of US. US and MRI findings were classified into intact cuff, partial-thickness and full-thickness RCT, and were correlated with surgical findings. Additional MR imaging was performed in 275 (5.2%) patients. Sixty-eight patients underwent surgery within 5 months. US and MRI correctly depicted 21 (95%) and 22 (100%) of the 22 full-thickness tears, and 8 (89%) and 6 (67%) of the 9 partial-thickness tears, respectively. The differences in performance of US and MRI were not statistically significant (p = 0.15). MRI following routine shoulder US was requested in only 5.2% of the patients. The additional value of MRI was in detecting intra-articular lesions. In patients who underwent surgery, US and MRI yielded comparably high sensitivity for detecting full-thickness RCT. US performed better in detecting partial-thickness tears, although the difference was not significant. (orig.)

  11. Detection of rotator cuff tears: the value of MRI following ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutten, Matthieu J.C.M.; Spaargaren, Gert-Jan; Jager, Gerrit J. [Jeroen Bosch Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, NL' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Loon, Ton van [Jeroen Bosch Ziekenhuis, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, NL' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Waal Malefijt, Maarten C. de [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kiemeney, Lambertus A.L.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and HTA, Geert Grooteplein Noord 21, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-02-15

    To evaluate the need for additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following ultrasound (US) in patients with shoulder pain and/or disability and to compare the accuracy of both techniques for the detection of partial-thickness and full-thickness rotator cuff tears (RCT). In 4 years, 5,216 patients underwent US by experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. Retrospectively, patient records were evaluated if MRI and surgery were performed within 5 months of US. US and MRI findings were classified into intact cuff, partial-thickness and full-thickness RCT, and were correlated with surgical findings. Additional MR imaging was performed in 275 (5.2%) patients. Sixty-eight patients underwent surgery within 5 months. US and MRI correctly depicted 21 (95%) and 22 (100%) of the 22 full-thickness tears, and 8 (89%) and 6 (67%) of the 9 partial-thickness tears, respectively. The differences in performance of US and MRI were not statistically significant (p = 0.15). MRI following routine shoulder US was requested in only 5.2% of the patients. The additional value of MRI was in detecting intra-articular lesions. In patients who underwent surgery, US and MRI yielded comparably high sensitivity for detecting full-thickness RCT. US performed better in detecting partial-thickness tears, although the difference was not significant. (orig.)

  12. Automatic detection of kidney in 3D pediatric ultrasound images using deep neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Pooneh R.; Mansoor, Awais; Biggs, Elijah; Jago, James; Linguraru, Marius George

    2018-02-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging is the routine and safe diagnostic modality for detecting pediatric urology problems, such as hydronephrosis in the kidney. Hydronephrosis is the swelling of one or both kidneys because of the build-up of urine. Early detection of hydronephrosis can lead to a substantial improvement in kidney health outcomes. Generally, US imaging is a challenging modality for the evaluation of pediatric kidneys with different shape, size, and texture characteristics. The aim of this study is to present an automatic detection method to help kidney analysis in pediatric 3DUS images. The method localizes the kidney based on its minimum volume oriented bounding box) using deep neural networks. Separate deep neural networks are trained to estimate the kidney position, orientation, and scale, making the method computationally efficient by avoiding full parameter training. The performance of the method was evaluated using a dataset of 45 kidneys (18 normal and 27 diseased kidneys diagnosed with hydronephrosis) through the leave-one-out cross validation method. Quantitative results show the proposed detection method could extract the kidney position, orientation, and scale ratio with root mean square values of 1.3 +/- 0.9 mm, 6.34 +/- 4.32 degrees, and 1.73 +/- 0.04, respectively. This method could be helpful in automating kidney segmentation for routine clinical evaluation.

  13. Hall Sensor Output Signal Fault-Detection & Safety Implementation Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee SangHun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently BLDC motors have been popular in various industrial applications and electric mobility. Recently BLDC motors have been popular in various industrial applications and electric mobility. In most brushless direct current (BLDC motor drives, there are three hall sensors as a position reference. Low resolution hall effect sensor is popularly used to estimate the rotor position because of its good comprehensive performance such as low cost, high reliability and sufficient precision. Various possible faults may happen in a hall effect sensor. This paper presents a fault-tolerant operation method that allows the control of a BLDC motor with one faulty hall sensor and presents the hall sensor output fault-tolerant control strategy. The situations considered are when the output from a hall sensor stays continuously at low or high levels, or a short-time pulse appears on a hall sensor signal. For fault detection, identification of a faulty signal and generating a substitute signal, this method only needs the information from the hall sensors. There are a few research work on hall effect sensor failure of BLDC motor. The conventional fault diagnosis methods are signal analysis, model based analysis and knowledge based analysis. The proposed method is signal based analysis using a compensation signal for reconfiguration and therefore fault diagnosis can be fast. The proposed method is validated to execute the simulation using PSIM.

  14. Intrauterine photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Christopher; Barkley, Joel; Smith, Barbara S.

    2018-04-01

    Intrauterine photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging are probe-based imaging modalities with translational potential for use in detecting endometrial diseases. This deep-tissue imaging probe design allows for the retrofitting of commercially available endometrial sampling curettes. The imaging probe presented here has a 2.92-mm diameter and approximate length of 26 cm, which allows for entry into the human endometrial cavity, making it possible to use photoacoustic imaging and high-resolution ultrasound to characterize the uterus. We demonstrate the imaging probes' ability to provide structural information of an excised pig uterus using ultrasound imaging and detect photoacoustic signals at a radial depth of 1 cm.

  15. The diagnostic test accuracy of ultrasound for the detection of lateral epicondylitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, S K; Smith, T O

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic test accuracy of ultrasound for the detection of lateral epicondylitis. An electronic search of databases registering published (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, Cochrane Library, ScienceDirect) and unpublished literature was conducted to January 2013. All diagnostic accuracy studies that compared the accuracy of ultrasound (index test) with a reference standard for lateral epicondylitis were included. The methodological quality of each of the studies was appraised using the QUADAS tool. When appropriate, the pooled sensitivity and specificity analysis was conducted. Ten studies investigating 711 participants and 1077 elbows were included in this review. Ultrasound had variable sensitivity and specificity (sensitivity: 64%-100%; specificity: 36%-100%). The available literature had modest methodological quality, and was limited in terms of sample sizes and blinding between index and reference test results. There is evidence to support the use of ultrasound in the detection of lateral epicondylitis. However, its accuracy appears to be highly dependent on numerous variables, such as operator experience, equipment and stage of pathology. Judgement should be used when considering the benefit of ultrasound for use in clinical practice. Further research assessing variables such a transducer frequency independently is specifically warranted. Level II. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Speed of sound and photoacoustic imaging with an optical camera based ultrasound detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuster, Robert; Paltauf, Guenther

    2017-07-01

    CCD camera based optical ultrasound detection is a promising alternative approach for high resolution 3D photoacoustic imaging (PAI). To fully exploit its potential and to achieve an image resolution SOS) in the image reconstruction algorithm. Hence, in the proposed work the idea and a first implementation are shown how speed of sound imaging can be added to a previously developed camera based PAI setup. The current setup provides SOS-maps with a spatial resolution of 2 mm and an accuracy of the obtained absolute SOS values of about 1%. The proposed dual-modality setup has the potential to provide highly resolved and perfectly co-registered 3D photoacoustic and SOS images.

  17. Ultrasound tagged near infrared spectroscopy does not detect hyperventilation-induced reduction in cerebral blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anton; Secher, Niels H.; Hirasawa, Ai

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Continuous non-invasive monitoring of cerebral blood flow (CBF) may be important during anaesthesia and several options are available. We evaluated the CerOx monitor that employs ultrasound tagged near infrared spectroscopy to estimate changes in a CBF index (CFI).Methods: Seven...... healthy males (age 21-26 years) hyperventilated and were administered phenylephrine to increase mean arterial pressure by 20-30 mmHg. Frontal lobe tissue oxygenation (ScO2) and CFI were obtained using the CerOx and mean blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCAvmean) was determined....... Administration of phenylephrine was not associated with any changes in MCAvmean, ICAf, ECAf, ScO2, SkBF, SskinO2, or CFI.Conclusion: The CerOx was able to detect a stable CBF during administration of phenylephrine. However, during hyperventilation MCAvmean and ICAf decreased while CFI increased, likely due...

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with measurements acquired as needed for any treatment planning. detect an abnormal growth within the prostate. help ... end of their bowel (rectum) removed during prior surgery are not good candidates for ultrasound of the ...

  19. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) , with measurements acquired as needed for any treatment planning. detect ... areas of the body while other areas, especially air-filled lungs, are poorly suited for ultrasound. For ...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids ovarian or uterine cancers A transvaginal ultrasound is usually performed to view ... detect: uterine anomalies uterine scars endometrial polyps fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some ...

  1. Signal processing for passive detection and classification of underwater acoustic signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kil Woo

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation examines signal processing for passive detection, classification and tracking of underwater acoustic signals for improving port security and the security of coastal and offshore operations. First, we consider the problem of passive acoustic detection of a diver in a shallow water environment. A frequency-domain multi-band matched-filter approach to swimmer detection is presented. The idea is to break the frequency contents of the hydrophone signals into multiple narrow frequency bands, followed by time averaged (about half of a second) energy calculation over each band. Then, spectra composed of such energy samples over the chosen frequency bands are correlated to form a decision variable. The frequency bands with highest Signal/Noise ratio are used for detection. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated for experimental data collected for a diver in the Hudson River. We also propose a new referenceless frequency-domain multi-band detector which, unlike other reference-based detectors, does not require a diver specific signature. Instead, our detector matches to a general feature of the diver spectrum in the high frequency range: the spectrum is roughly periodic in time and approximately flat when the diver exhales. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated by using experimental data collected from the Hudson River. Moreover, we present detection, classification and tracking of small vessel signals. Hydroacoustic sensors can be applied for the detection of noise generated by vessels, and this noise can be used for vessel detection, classification and tracking. This dissertation presents recent improvements aimed at the measurement and separation of ship DEMON (Detection of Envelope Modulation on Noise) acoustic signatures in busy harbor conditions. Ship signature measurements were conducted in the Hudson River and NY Harbor. The DEMON spectra demonstrated much better temporal stability compared with the full ship

  2. Novel Automatic Detection of Pleura and B-lines (Comet-Tail Artifacts) on In-Vivo Lung Ultrasound Scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moshavegh, Ramin; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel automatic method for detection of B-lines (comet-tail artifacts) in lung ultrasound scans. B-lines are the most commonly used artifacts for analyzing the pulmonary edema. They appear as laser-like vertical beams, which arise from the pleural line and spread down without...

  3. High-Frame-Rate Power Doppler Ultrasound Is More Sensitive than Conventional Power Doppler in Detecting Rheumatic Vascularisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van der Ven (Myrthe); J.J. Luime (Jolanda); van der Velden, L.L. (Levinia L.); J.G. Bosch (Hans); J.M.W. Hazes (Mieke); H.J. Vos (Rik)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractEarly recognition of joint inflammation will increase treatment efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Yet, conventional power Doppler (PD) ultrasound might not be sufficiently sensitive to detect minor inflammation. We investigated the sensitivity of high-frame rate Doppler, combined

  4. Comparison of CT scan and colour flow doppler ultrasound in detecting venous tumour thrombous in renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.R.; Anwar, K.

    2008-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma has marked tendency to spread into renal vein, inferior vena cava and right side of heart. Extension of tumour thrombus into these veins will alter the surgical approach. We have compared the CT scan with Colour flow Doppler ultrasound in detecting venous tumour thrombus in renal vein and inferior vena cava. This cross-sectional study included 30 adult patients presenting with renal tumour. Patients of either gender were included in the study. Non probability convenience sampling was used. All patients underwent colour flow Doppler ultrasound and CT scan with contrast to asses the renal vein and inferior vena cava. The results were confirmed by intra operative findings and histopathology. The data was analyzed using SPSS version 12. Out of 30 patients, 20 (66%) were males and 10 (34%) female. The tumour was predominantly on the right side (60%), as was renal venous tumour thrombus (44%). Inferior vena cava was involved in 4 cases predominantly due to right sided tumours. The sensitivity of Doppler ultrasound in detecting renal venous tumour thrombus (88% on right and 100% on left side) was higher than CT scan (63% on right and 60% on left side). Doppler ultrasound was also superior to CT scan in detecting vena caval thrombus. The overall sensitivity of Doppler sonography was higher than CT scan in detecting tumour extension into renal veins and inferior vena cava. Therefore, it can be used as a complementary tool in equivocal cases. (author)

  5. Limiter discriminator detection of M-ary FSK signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseka, John P.

    1990-10-01

    The performance of limiter discriminator detection of M-ary FSK signals is analyzed at arbitrary modulation indices. It is shown that the error rate performance of limiter discriminator detection can be significantly improved by increasing the modulation index above 1/M. The optimum modulation index that minimizes the overall error probability is determined for the cases M = 2, 4 and 8. The analysis is carried out for wideband and bandlimited channels with Gaussian and second-order Butterworth filters. It is shown that the optimum modulation index depends on the signal/noise ratio (SNR), in a wideband channel, and on both SNR and time-bandwidth product in a bandlimited channel. Finally, it is shown that the optimum sampling instance in presence of a nonzero phase IF filter can be approximately determined by using only the worst case symbol pattern.

  6. Confidence Measurement in the Light of Signal Detection Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien eMassoni

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We compare three alternative methods for eliciting retrospective confidence in the context of a simple perceptual task: the Simple Confidence Rating (a direct report on a numerical scale, the Quadratic Scoring Rule (a post-wagering procedure and the Matching Probability (a generalization of the no-loss gambling method. We systematically compare the results obtained with these three rules to the theoretical confidence levels that can be inferred from performance in the perceptual task using Signal Detection Theory. We find that the Matching Probability provides better results in that respect. We conclude that Matching Probability is particularly well suited for studies of confidence that use Signal Detection Theory as a theoretical framework.

  7. Signal modulation in cold-dark-matter detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freese, K.; Frieman, J.; Gould, A.

    1988-01-01

    If weakly interacting massive particles (WIMP's) are the dark matter in the galactic halo, they may be detected in low-background ionization detectors now operating or with low-temperature devices under development. In detecting WIMP's of low mass or WIMP's with spin-dependent nuclear interactions (e.g., photinos), a principal technical difficulty appears to be achieving very low thresholds (approx. < keV) in large (∼ kg) detectors with low background noise. We present an analytic treatment of WIMP detection and show that the seasonal modulation of the signal can be used to detect WIMP's even at low-signal-to-background levels and thus without the necessity of going to very-low-energy thresholds. As a result, the prospects for detecting a variety of cold-dark-matter candidates may be closer at hand than previously thought. We discuss in detail the detector characteristics required for a number of WIMP candidates, and carefully work out expected event rates for several present and proposed detectors

  8. The value of ultrasound with ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy compared to computed tomography in the detection of regional metastases in the clinically negative neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takes, Robert P.; Righi, Paul; Meeuwis, Cees A.; Manni, Johannes J.; Knegt, Paul; Marres, Henri A.M.; Spoelstra, Hubert A.A.; Boer, Maarten F. de; Mey, Andel G.L. van der; Bruaset, I.; Ball, Valerie; Weisberger, Edward; Radpour, Shokri; Kruyt, Rene H.; Joosten, Frank B.M.; Lameris, Johan S.; Oostayen, Jacques A. van; Kopecky, Kenyon; Caldemeyer, Karen; Henzen-Logmans, Sonja C.; Wiersma-van Tilburg, J.M.; Bosman, Fred T.; Krieken, J. Han J.M. van; Hermans, Jo; Baatenburg de Jong, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Head and neck oncologists have not reached consensus regarding the role of contemporary imaging techniques in the evaluation of the clinically negative neck in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The purpose of the present study was to compare the accuracy of ultrasound with guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (UGFNAB) and computed tomography (CT) in detecting lymph node metastasis in the clinically negative neck. Methods and Materials: Sixty-four neck sides of patients with HNSCC were examined preoperatively by ultrasound/UGFNAB and CT at one of five participating tertiary care medical centers. The findings were correlated with the results of histopathologic examination of the neck specimen. Results: Ultrasound with guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy was characterized by a sensitivity of 48%, specificity of 100%, and overall accuracy of 79%. Three cases had nondiagnostic aspirations using UGFNAB and were excluded. CT demonstrated a sensitivity of 54%, specificity of 92%, and overall accuracy of 77%. UGFNAB detected two additional metastases not visualized on CT, whereas CT detected no metastases not seen on UGFNAB. The results of UGFNAB were similar between the participating centers. Conclusions: Approximately one half of the clinically occult nodal metastases in our patient group were identified by both CT and UGFNAB. Overall, UGFNAB and CT demonstrated comparable accuracy. The sensitivity of CT was slightly better than UGFNAB, but the latter remained characterized by a superior specificity. The results of CT and UGFNAB did not appear to be supplementary. The choice of imaging modality for staging of the clinically negative neck depends on tumor site, T-stage, and experience and preference of the head and neck oncologist. If CT is required for staging of the primary tumor, additional staging of the neck by UGFNAB does not provide significant additional value

  9. Detecting failed elements on phased array ultrasound transducers using the Edinburgh Pipe Phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Scott; Pye, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    Aims Imaging faults with ultrasound transducers are common. Failed elements on linear and curvilinear array transducers can usually be detected with a simple image uniformity or ‘paperclip’ test. However, this method is less effective for phased array transducers, commonly used in cardiac imaging. The aim of this study was to assess whether the presence of failed elements could be detected through measurement of the resolution integral (R) using the Edinburgh Pipe Phantom. Methods A 128-element paediatric phased array transducer was studied. Failed elements were simulated using layered polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tape as an attenuator and measurements of resolution integral were carried out for several widths of attenuator. Results All widths of attenuator greater than 0.5 mm resulted in a significant reduction in resolution integral and low contrast penetration measurements compared to baseline (p tests to detect failed elements on phased array transducers. Particularly encouraging is the result for low contrast penetration as this is a quick and simple measurement to make and can be performed with many different test objects, thus enabling ‘in-the-field’ checks. PMID:27482276

  10. Segmentation of 3D ultrasound computer tomography reflection images using edge detection and surface fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, T.; Zapf, M.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2014-03-01

    An essential processing step for comparison of Ultrasound Computer Tomography images to other modalities, as well as for the use in further image processing, is to segment the breast from the background. In this work we present a (semi-) automated 3D segmentation method which is based on the detection of the breast boundary in coronal slice images and a subsequent surface fitting. The method was evaluated using a software phantom and in-vivo data. The fully automatically processed phantom results showed that a segmentation of approx. 10% of the slices of a dataset is sufficient to recover the overall breast shape. Application to 16 in-vivo datasets was performed successfully using semi-automated processing, i.e. using a graphical user interface for manual corrections of the automated breast boundary detection. The processing time for the segmentation of an in-vivo dataset could be significantly reduced by a factor of four compared to a fully manual segmentation. Comparison to manually segmented images identified a smoother surface for the semi-automated segmentation with an average of 11% of differing voxels and an average surface deviation of 2mm. Limitations of the edge detection may be overcome by future updates of the KIT USCT system, allowing a fully-automated usage of our segmentation approach.

  11. Nasal chemosensory cells use bitter taste signaling to detect irritants and bacterial signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tizzano, Marco; Gulbransen, Brian D; Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Clapp, Tod R; Herman, Jake P; Sibhatu, Hiruy M; Churchill, Mair E A; Silver, Wayne L; Kinnamon, Sue C; Finger, Thomas E

    2010-02-16

    The upper respiratory tract is continually assaulted with harmful dusts and xenobiotics carried on the incoming airstream. Detection of such irritants by the trigeminal nerve evokes protective reflexes, including sneezing, apnea, and local neurogenic inflammation of the mucosa. Although free intra-epithelial nerve endings can detect certain lipophilic irritants (e.g., mints, ammonia), the epithelium also houses a population of trigeminally innervated solitary chemosensory cells (SCCs) that express T2R bitter taste receptors along with their downstream signaling components. These SCCs have been postulated to enhance the chemoresponsive capabilities of the trigeminal irritant-detection system. Here we show that transduction by the intranasal solitary chemosensory cells is necessary to evoke trigeminally mediated reflex reactions to some irritants including acyl-homoserine lactone bacterial quorum-sensing molecules, which activate the downstream signaling effectors associated with bitter taste transduction. Isolated nasal chemosensory cells respond to the classic bitter ligand denatonium as well as to the bacterial signals by increasing intracellular Ca(2+). Furthermore, these same substances evoke changes in respiration indicative of trigeminal activation. Genetic ablation of either G alpha-gustducin or TrpM5, essential elements of the T2R transduction cascade, eliminates the trigeminal response. Because acyl-homoserine lactones serve as quorum-sensing molecules for gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, detection of these substances by airway chemoreceptors offers a means by which the airway epithelium may trigger an epithelial inflammatory response before the bacteria reach population densities capable of forming destructive biofilms.

  12. Laser-based ultrasonics by dual-probe interferometer detection and narrow-band ultrasound generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jin

    1993-01-01

    Despite the advantages of laser-based ultrasonic (LBU) systems, the overall sensitivity of LBU systems needs to be improved for practical applications. Progress is reported to achieve better LBU detection accuracy and sensitivity for applications with surface waves and Lamb waves. A novel dual-probe laser interferometer has been developed to measure the same signal at two points. The dual-probe interferometer is a modification of a conventional single-probe interferometer in that the reference beam is guided to a second detecting point on the specimen surface to form a differential measurement mode, which measure the difference of the displacements at the two points. This dual-probe interferometer is particularly useful for accurate measurements of the speed and attenuation of surface waves and Lamb waves. The dual-probe interferometer has been applied to obtain accurate measurements of the surface wave speed and attenuation on surfaces of increasing surface roughness. It has also been demonstrated that with an appropriate signal processing method, namely, the power cepstrum method, the dual-probe interferometer is applicable to measure the local surface wave speed even when the probe separation is so small that the two waveforms in the interferometer output signal overlap in the time domain. Narrow-band signal generation and detection improve the sensitivity of LBU systems. It is proposed to use a diffraction grating to form an array of illuminating strips which form a source of narrowband surface and Lamb waves. The line-array of thermoelastic sources generates narrow-band signals whose frequency and bandwidth can be easily controlled. The optimum line-array parameters, such as width, spacing and the number of lines in the array have been derived theoretically and verified experimentally. Narrow-band signal generation with optimum parameters has been demonstrated. The enhanced LBU system with dual-probe detection and narrowband signal generation has been

  13. Not all ultrasounds are created equal: general sonography versus musculoskeletal sonography in the detection of rotator cuff tears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Brandi; Twibill, Kristen; Lam, Patrick; Hackett, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Background This cross-sectional analytic diagnostic accuracy study was designed to compare the accuracy of ultrasound performed by general sonographers in local radiology practices with ultrasound performed by an experienced musculoskeletal sonographer for the detection of rotator cuff tears. Methods In total, 238 patients undergoing arthroscopy who had previously had an ultrasound performed by both a general sonographer and a specialist musculoskeletal sonographer made up the study cohort. Accuracy of diagnosis was compared with the findings at arthroscopy. Results When analyzed as all tears versus no tears, musculoskeletal sonography had an accuracy of 97%, a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 95%, whereas general sonography had an accuracy of 91%, a sensitivity of 91% and a specificity of 86%. When the partial tears were split with those ≥ 50% thickness in the tear group and those tear group, musculoskeletal sonography had an accuracy of 97%, a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 100% and general sonography had an accuracy of 85%, a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 87%. Conclusions Ultrasound in the hands of an experienced musculoskeletal sonographer is highly accurate for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears. General sonography has improved subsequent to earlier studies but remains inferior to an ultrasound performed by a musculoskeletal sonographer. PMID:27660657

  14. Optimal Noise Enhanced Signal Detection in a Unified Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Yang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new framework for variable detectors is formulated in order to solve different noise enhanced signal detection optimal problems, where six different disjoint sets of detector and discrete vector pairs are defined according to the two inequality-constraints on detection and false-alarm probabilities. Then theorems and algorithms constructed based on the new framework are presented to search the optimal noise enhanced solutions to maximize the relative improvements of the detection and the false-alarm probabilities, respectively. Further, the optimal noise enhanced solution of the maximum overall improvement is obtained based on the new framework and the relationship among the three maximums is presented. In addition, the sufficient conditions for improvability or non-improvability under the two certain constraints are given. Finally, numerous examples are presented to illustrate the theoretical results and the proofs of the main theorems are given in the Appendix.

  15. Ultrasound detection of abdominal lymph nodes in chronic liver diseases. A retrospective analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soresi, M.; Bonfissuto, G.; Magliarisi, C.; Riili, A.; Terranova, A.; Di Giovanni, G.; Bascone, F.; Carroccio, A.; Tripi, S.; Montalto, G. E-mail: gmontal@unipa.it

    2003-05-01

    AIM: To retrospectively evaluate the prevalence of lymph nodes of the hepato-duodenal ligament in a group of patients with chronic liver disease of various aetiologies and to investigate what clinical, aetiological and laboratory data may lead to their appearance. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One thousand and three patients (554 men, 449 women) were studied, including 557 with chronic hepatitis and 446 with liver cirrhosis. The presence of lymph nodes near the trunk of the portal vein, hepatic artery, celiac axis, superior mesenteric vein and pancreas head was investigated using ultrasound. RESULTS: Lymph nodes were detected in 394 out of the 1003 study patients (39.3%); their number ranged from one to four, with a diameter ranging between 0.8 and 4 cm. The highest prevalence was in the subgroup of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (87.5%), followed by patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV; 42%), patients with HCV and hepatitis B virus (HBV; 41.3%), autoimmune hepatitis (40%), and HBV alone (21.2%). In the alcoholic and idiopathic subgroups prevalence was 9.5%, while in the non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and haemochromatosis subgroups it was 0%. HCV RNA was present in 97 out of 103 lymph node-positive patients and in 141 out of 168 lymph node-negative HCV-negative patients (p<0.003). Lymphadenopathy frequency increased as the liver disease worsened ({chi}{sup 2} MH=74.3; p<0.0001). CONCLUSION: Despite the limitations of a retrospective study, our data indicate a high prevalence of lymphadenopathy in liver disease patients; ultrasound evidence of lymph nodes of the hepato-duodenal ligament in a given liver disease may most likely suggest a HCV or an autoimmune aetiology and a more severe histological picture.

  16. Gonioscopy and ultrasound biomicroscopy in the detection of angle closure in patients with shallow anterior chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shan-shan; Zou, Yan-hong; Li, Qian; Li, Li-na; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Xi-pu

    2014-12-01

    To assess the agreement between gonioscopy and ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) in detecting angle closure in Chinese patients with shallow anterior chamber. An observational comparative study of the two different examination methods was conducted. Patients with normal intraocular pressure and temporal peripheral anterior chamber depth less than a quarter of corneal thickness based on slit lamp examination were included in this study from December 2007 to May 2009 in the outpatient clinic of First Hospital of Tsinghua University. Gonioscopy was performed with a Goldman goniolens in dark room first and followed by full beam light and indentation. If the filtering trabecular meshwork was invisible or any peripheral anterior synechia was found, that quadrant of the angle was considered closed. UBM was first undertaken in a darkened room then repeated with normal room lighting. If iridotrabecular apposition was showed, that quadrant of the angle was considered closed. The status of angle closure of each quadrant with different methods was recorded. 85 eyes of 46 patients were included in this study. The agreement between gonioscopy and UBM was poor (Κgonioscopy and UBM was hardly affected by age or sex, while in dark condition, eyes with deeper anterior chamber (P=0.005) or plateau iris configuration tended to produce different results (P=0.075) in the 2 methods. Gonioscopy and UBM are both indispensable methods for detecting angle closure, neither can completely replace the other.

  17. Crack detection in oak flooring lamellae using ultrasound-excited thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlberg, Tobias; Thurley, Matthew; Popovic, Djordje; Hagman, Olle

    2018-01-01

    Today, a large number of people are manually grading and detecting defects in wooden lamellae in the parquet flooring industry. This paper investigates the possibility of using the ensemble methods random forests and boosting to automatically detect cracks using ultrasound-excited thermography and a variety of predictor variables. When friction occurs in thin cracks, they become warm and thus visible to a thermographic camera. Several image processing techniques have been used to suppress the noise and enhance probable cracks in the images. The most successful predictor variables captured the upper part of the heat distribution, such as the maximum temperature, kurtosis and percentile values 92-100 of the edge pixels. The texture in the images was captured by Completed Local Binary Pattern histograms and cracks were also segmented by background suppression and thresholding. The classification accuracy was significantly improved from previous research through added image processing, introduction of more predictors, and by using automated machine learning. The best ensemble methods reach an average classification accuracy of 0.8, which is very close to the authors' own manual attempt at separating the images (0.83).

  18. Renal damage detected by DMSA, despite normal renal ultrasound, in children with febrile UTI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, N C; Keays, M; Adams, C; Mizener, K; Pritzker, K; Smith, W; Traylor, J; Villanueva, C; Snodgrass, W T

    2015-06-01

    2011 American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines recommended renal-bladder ultrasound (RBUS) as the only evaluation after febrile urinary tract infection (FUTI) in infants aged 2-24 months. We determined the sensitivity, specificity, and false negative rate of RBUS to identify DMSA-detected renal damage in this age group as well as in older children. Consecutive patients referred to pediatric urology with a history of FUTI underwent DMSA ≥ 3 months after FUTI. Abnormal RBUS was defined as: Society of Fetal Urology hydronephrosis grades I-IV; hydroureter ≥ 7 mm; renal scar defined as focal parenchymal thinning; and/or size discrepancy ≥ 1 cm between kidneys. Abnormal DMSA was presence of any focal uptake defects and/or split renal function 24 months. RBUS had poor sensitivity (34%) and low positive predictive value (47%) to identify patients with renal damage. 99/149 (66%) children with renal damage on DMSA had normal RBUS. After FUTI, 66% of children with reduced renal function and/or renal cortical defects found by DMSA scintigraphy had a normal RBUS. Since abnormal DMSA may correlate with increased risk for VUR, recurrent FUTI and renal damage, our data suggest RBUS alone will fail to detect a significant proportion of patients at risk. The data suggest that imaging after FUTI should include acute RBUS and delayed DMSA, reserving VCUG for patients with abnormal DMSA and/or recurrent FUTI. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Signal Detection Theory Approach to Evaluating Oculometer Data Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorella, Kara; Lynn, William, III; Barry, John S.; Kelly, Lon; Shih, Ming-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Currently, data quality is described in terms of spatial and temporal accuracy and precision [Holmqvist et al. in press]. While this approach provides precise errors in pixels, or visual angle, often experiments are more concerned with whether subjects'points of gaze can be said to be reliable with respect to experimentally-relevant areas of interest. This paper proposes a method to characterize oculometer data quality using Signal Detection Theory (SDT) [Marcum 1947]. SDT classification results in four cases: Hit (correct report of a signal), Miss (failure to report a ), False Alarm (a signal falsely reported), Correct Reject (absence of a signal correctly reported). A technique is proposed where subjects' are directed to look at points in and outside of an AOI, and the resulting Points of Gaze (POG) are classified as Hits (points known to be internal to an AOI are classified as such), Misses (AOI points are not indicated as such), False Alarms (points external to AOIs are indicated as in the AOI), or Correct Rejects (points external to the AOI are indicated as such). SDT metrics describe performance in terms of discriminability, sensitivity, and specificity. This paper presentation will provide the procedure for conducting this assessment and an example of data collected for AOIs in a simulated flightdeck environment.

  20. Evaluation of signal processing for boiling noise detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, J.L.; Ledwidge, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    As part of the co-ordinated research programme on the detection of sodium boiling some further analysis has been performed on the data from the test loop in Karlsruhe and some preliminary analysis of the data from the BOR 60 experiment. The work on the Karlsruhe data is concerned with the search for a reliable method by which the quality of signal processing strategies may be compared. The results show that the three novel methods previously reported are all markedly superior to the mean square method which is used as a benchmark. The three novel methods are nth order differentiation in the frequency domain, the mean square prediction based on nth order conditional expectation and the nth order probability density function. A preliminary analysis on the data from the BOR 60 reactor shows that 4th order differentiation is adequate for the detection of signals derived from a pressure transducer and that the map of spurious trip probability (S) and the probability of missing an event (M) is consistent with the theoretical model proposed herein, and the suggested procedures for evaluating the quality of detection strategies. (author). 15 figs, 1 tab

  1. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction enhances delayed BMC delivery and attenuates post-infarction cardiac remodelling by inducing engraftment signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanmei; Zhang, Chuanxi; Shen, Shuxin; Guo, Shengcun; Zhong, Lintao; Li, Xinzhong; Chen, Guojun; Chen, Gangbin; He, Xiang; Huang, Chixiong; He, Nvqin; Liao, Wangjun; Liao, Yulin; Bin, Jianping

    2016-12-01

    Delayed administration of bone marrow cells (BMCs) at 2-4 weeks after successful reperfusion in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) does not improve cardiac function. The reduction in engraftment signals observed following this time interval might impair the effects of delayed BMC treatment. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) treatment could increase engraftment signals, enhance the delivery of delayed BMCs and subsequently attenuate post-infarction cardiac remodelling. A myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) model was induced in Wistar rats via left coronary ligation for 45 min followed by reperfusion. Western blotting revealed that engraftment signals peaked at 7 days post-I/R and were dramatically lower at 14 days post-I/R. The lower engraftment signals at 14 days post-I/R could be triggered by UTMD treatment at a mechanical index of 1.0-1.9. The troponin I levels in the 1.9 mechanical index group were higher than in the other groups. Simultaneous haematoxylin and eosin staining and fluorescence revealed that the number of engrafted BMCs in the ischaemic zone was greater in the group treated with both UTMD and delayed BMC transplantation than in the control groups (PBMC transplantation improved cardiac function and decreased cardiac fibrosis at 4 weeks after treatment, as compared with control groups (both PBMC transplantation increased capillary density, myocardial cell proliferation and c-kit + cell proliferation. These findings indicated that UTMD treatment could induce engraftment signals and enhance homing of delayed BMCs to ischaemic myocardium, attenuating post-infarction cardiac remodelling by promoting neovascularization, cardiomyogenesis and expansion of cardiac c-kit + cells. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  2. The dynamic behavior of microbubbles during long ultrasound tone-burst excitation: mechanistic insights into ultrasound-microbubble mediated therapeutics using high-speed imaging and cavitation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacella, John J.; Villanueva, Flordeliza S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US)-microbubble (MB) mediated therapies have been shown to restore perfusion and enhance drug/gene delivery. Due to the presumption that MBs do not persist during long US exposure under high acoustic pressures, most schemes utilize short US pulses when a high US pressure is employed. However, we recently observed an enhanced thrombolytic effect using long US pulses at high acoustic pressures. Therefore we explored the fate of MBs during long tone-burst exposures (5 ms) at various acoustic pressures and MB concentrations via direct high-speed optical observation and passive cavitation detection. MBs first underwent stable or inertial cavitation depending on the acoustic pressure, and then formed gas-filled clusters that continued to oscillate, break up, and form new clusters. Cavitation detection confirmed continued, albeit diminishing acoustic activity throughout the 5-ms US excitation. These data suggest that persisting cavitation activity during long tone-bursts may confer additional therapeutic effects. PMID:26603628

  3. Remote just-in-time telementored trauma ultrasound: a double-factorial randomized controlled trial examining fluid detection and remote knobology control through an ultrasound graphic user interface display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; McKee, Ian; McKee, Jessica L; Ma, Irene; McBeth, Paul B; Roberts, Derek J; Wurster, Charles L; Parfitt, Robbie; Ball, Chad G; Oberg, Scott; Sevcik, William; Hamilton, Douglas R

    2016-05-01

    Remote-telementored ultrasound involves novice examiners being remotely guided by experts using informatic-technologies. However, requiring a novice to perform ultrasound is a cognitively demanding task exacerbated by unfamiliarity with ultrasound-machine controls. We incorporated a randomized evaluation of using remote control of the ultrasound functionality (knobology) within a study in which the images generated by distant naive examiners were viewed on an ultrasound graphic user interface (GUI) display viewed on laptop computers by mentors in different cities. Fire-fighters in Edmonton (101) were remotely mentored from Calgary (n = 65), Nanaimo (n = 19), and Memphis (n = 17) to examine an ultrasound phantom randomized to contain free fluid or not. Remote mentors (2 surgeons, 1 internist, and 1 ED physician) were randomly assigned to use GUI knobology control during mentoring (GUIK+/GUIK-). Remote-telementored ultrasound was feasible in all cases. Overall accuracy for fluid detection was 97% (confidence interval = 91 to 99%) with 3 false negatives (FNs). Positive/negative likelihood ratios were infinity/0.0625. One FN occurred with the GUIK+ and 2 without (GUIK-). There were no statistical test performance differences in either group (GUIK+ and GUIK-). Ultrasound-naive 1st responders can be remotely mentored with high accuracy, although providing basic remote control of the knobology did not affect outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Residual signal feature extraction for gearbox planetary stage fault detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrimpas, Georgios Alexandros; Ursin, Thomas; Sweeney, Christian Walsted

    2017-01-01

    Faults in planetary gears and related bearings, e.g. planet bearings and planet carrier bearings, pose inherent difficulties on their accurate and consistent detection associated mainly to the low energy in slow rotating stages and the operating complexity of planetary gearboxes. In this work......, identification of the expected spectral signature for proper residual signal calculation and filtering of any frequency component not related to the planetary stage. Two field cases of planet carrier bearing defect and planet wheel spalling are presented and discussed, showing the efficiency of the followed...

  5. Photoacoustic detection and optical spectroscopy of high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in biologic tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alhamami, Mosa; Kolios, Michael C.; Tavakkoli, Jahan, E-mail: jtavakkoli@ryerson.ca [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The aims of this study are: (a) to investigate the capability of photoacoustic (PA) method in detecting high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatments in muscle tissuesin vitro; and (b) to determine the optical properties of HIFU-treated and native tissues in order to assist in the interpretation of the observed contrast in PA detection of HIFU treatments. Methods: A single-element, spherically concaved HIFU transducer with a centre frequency of 1 MHz was utilized to create thermal lesions in chicken breast tissuesin vitro. To investigate the detectability of HIFU treatments photoacoustically, PA detection was performed at 720 and 845 nm on seven HIFU-treated tissue samples. Within each tissue sample, PA signals were acquired from 22 locations equally divided between two regions of interest within two volumes in tissue – a HIFU-treated volume and an untreated volume. Optical spectroscopy was then carried out on 10 HIFU-treated chicken breast specimens in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm, in 1-nm increments, using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere attachment. The authors’ optical spectroscopy raw data (total transmittance and diffuse reflectance) were used to obtain the optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of HIFU-induced thermal lesions and native tissues by employing the inverse adding-doubling method. The aforementioned interaction coefficients were subsequently used to calculate the effective attenuation coefficient and light penetration depth of HIFU-treated and native tissues in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm. Results: HIFU-treated tissues produced greater PA signals than native tissues at 720 and 845 nm. At 720 nm, the averaged ratio of the peak-to-peak PA signal amplitude of HIFU-treated tissue to that of native tissue was 3.68 ± 0.25 (mean ± standard error of the mean). At 845 nm, the averaged ratio of the peak-to-peak PA signal amplitude of HIFU-treated tissue to that of native tissue was 3.75

  6. Detection of anomalous signals in temporally correlated data (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbein, J. O.

    2010-12-01

    Detection of transient tectonic signals in data obtained from large geodetic networks requires the ability to detect signals that are both temporally and spatially coherent. In this report I will describe a modification to an existing method that estimates both the coefficients of temporally correlated noise model and an efficient filter based on the noise model. This filter, when applied to the original time-series, effectively whitens (or flattens) the power spectrum. The filtered data provide the means to calculate running averages which are then used to detect deviations from the background trends. For large networks, time-series of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be easily constructed since, by filtering, each of the original time-series has been transformed into one that is closer to having a Gaussian distribution with a variance of 1.0. Anomalous intervals may be identified by counting the number of GPS sites for which the SNR exceeds a specified value. For example, during one time interval, if there were 5 out of 20 time-series with SNR>2, this would be considered anomalous; typically, one would expect at 95% confidence that there would be at least 1 out of 20 time-series with an SNR>2. For time intervals with an anomalously large number of high SNR, the spatial distribution of the SNR is mapped to identify the location of the anomalous signal(s) and their degree of spatial clustering. Estimating the filter that should be used to whiten the data requires modification of the existing methods that employ maximum likelihood estimation to determine the temporal covariance of the data. In these methods, it is assumed that the noise components in the data are a combination of white, flicker and random-walk processes and that they are derived from three different and independent sources. Instead, in this new method, the covariance matrix is constructed assuming that only one source is responsible for the noise and that source can be represented as a white

  7. Leak detection in pipelines through spectral analysis of pressure signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza A.L.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The development and test of a technique for leak detection in pipelines is presented. The technique is based on the spectral analysis of pressure signals measured in pipeline sections where the formation of stationary waves is favoured, allowing leakage detection during the start/stop of pumps. Experimental tests were performed in a 1250 m long pipeline for various operational conditions of the pipeline (liquid flow rate and leakage configuration. Pressure transients were obtained by four transducers connected to a PC computer. The obtained results show that the spectral analysis of pressure transients, together with the knowledge of reflection points provide a simple and efficient way of identifying leaks during the start/stop of pumps in pipelines.

  8. Is sequential cranial ultrasound reliable for detection of white matter injury in very preterm infants?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leijser, Lara M.; Steggerda, Sylke J.; Walther, Frans J.; Wezel-Meijler, Gerda van; Bruine, Francisca T. de; Grond, Jeroen van der

    2010-01-01

    Cranial ultrasound (cUS) may not be reliable for detection of diffuse white matter (WM) injury. Our aim was to assess in very preterm infants the reliability of a classification system for WM injury on sequential cUS throughout the neonatal period, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as reference standard. In 110 very preterm infants (gestational age <32 weeks), serial cUS during admission (median 8, range 4-22) and again around term equivalent age (TEA) and a single MRI around TEA were performed. cUS during admission were assessed for presence of WM changes, and contemporaneous cUS and MRI around TEA additionally for abnormality of lateral ventricles. Sequential cUS (from birth up to TEA) and MRI were classified as normal/mildly abnormal, moderately abnormal, or severely abnormal, based on a combination of findings of the WM and lateral ventricles. Predictive values of the cUS classification were calculated. Sequential cUS were classified as normal/mildly abnormal, moderately abnormal, and severely abnormal in, respectively, 22%, 65%, and 13% of infants and MRI in, respectively, 30%, 52%, and 18%. The positive predictive value of the cUS classification for the MRI classification was high for severely abnormal WM (0.79) but lower for normal/mildly abnormal (0.67) and moderately abnormal (0.64) WM. Sequential cUS during the neonatal period detects severely abnormal WM in very preterm infants but is less reliable for mildly and moderately abnormal WM. MRI around TEA seems needed to reliably detect WM injury in very preterm infants. (orig.)

  9. Target vessel detection by epicardial ultrasound in off-pump coronary bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Masato; Asai, Tohru; Kinoshita, Takeshi; Suzuki, Tomoaki; Shiraishi, Shoichiro

    2013-01-01

    The detection of embedded coronary arteries is difficult especially in off-pump coronary bypass surgery. From June 2010, we introduced high-frequency epicardial ultrasound (ECUS) to assess and evaluate embedded arteries during off-pump coronary bypass surgery. Between June 2010 and June 2011, a total of 89 consecutive patients underwent isolated coronary bypass surgery at our institution. The patients consisted of 72 men and 17 women with a mean age of 67.9 years. We routinely use the VeriQC system (MediStim, Oslo, Norway) to detect the target vessels in the operation. The patients were assigned to one of two groups, depending on whether ECUS was used in the operation (n = 10, ECUS group) or not (n = 79, non-ECUS group). We analyzed the impact of introducing the ECUS in terms of operative outcome. All patients underwent revascularization using the off-pump technique without emergent conversion to cardiopulmonary bypass during surgery. The total number of distal anastomoses was 299, and 12 target vessels could not be identified either visually or on palpation. Thus, the frequency of the embedded coronary arteries was 4.01% (12/299 cases). The preoperative profiles of the two groups were not significantly different. Operation time was significantly longer in the ECUS group (P = 0.02). There were no significant differences in postoperative outcome between the two groups. In the present study, in which the target coronary arteries could not be detected either visually or on palpation in 12 (4.01%) of 299 cases, the use of high-frequency ECUS allowed all patients to undergo off-pump coronary bypass surgery without conversion to cardiopulmonary bypass during the operation. High-frequency ECUS is therefore useful in off-pump coronary bypass surgery.

  10. How to detect a cuckoo egg : A signal-detection theory model for recognition and learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez-Girones, MA; Lotem, A

    This article presents a model of egg rejection in cases of brood parasitism. The model is developed in three stages in the framework of signal-detection theory. We first assume that the behavior of host females is adapted to the relevant parameters concerning the appearance of the eggs they lay. In

  11. A deafening flash! Visual interference of auditory signal detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassnidge, Christopher; Cecconi Marcotti, Claudia; Freeman, Elliot

    2017-03-01

    In some people, visual stimulation evokes auditory sensations. How prevalent and how perceptually real is this? 22% of our neurotypical adult participants responded 'Yes' when asked whether they heard faint sounds accompanying flash stimuli, and showed significantly better ability to discriminate visual 'Morse-code' sequences. This benefit might arise from an ability to recode visual signals as sounds, thus taking advantage of superior temporal acuity of audition. In support of this, those who showed better visual relative to auditory sequence discrimination also had poorer auditory detection in the presence of uninformative visual flashes, though this was independent of awareness of visually-evoked sounds. Thus a visually-evoked auditory representation may occur subliminally and disrupt detection of real auditory signals. The frequent natural correlation between visual and auditory stimuli might explain the surprising prevalence of this phenomenon. Overall, our results suggest that learned correspondences between strongly correlated modalities may provide a precursor for some synaesthetic abilities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Suggestibility and signal detection performance in hallucination-prone students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alganami, Fatimah; Varese, Filippo; Wagstaff, Graham F; Bentall, Richard P

    2017-03-01

    Auditory hallucinations are associated with signal detection biases. We examine the extent to which suggestions influence performance on a signal detection task (SDT) in highly hallucination-prone and low hallucination-prone students. We also explore the relationship between trait suggestibility, dissociation and hallucination proneness. In two experiments, students completed on-line measures of hallucination proneness (the revised Launay-Slade Hallucination Scale; LSHS-R), trait suggestibility (Inventory of Suggestibility) and dissociation (Dissociative Experiences Scale-II). Students in the upper and lower tertiles of the LSHS-R performed an auditory SDT. Prior to the task, suggestions were made pertaining to the number of expected targets (Experiment 1, N = 60: high vs. low suggestions; Experiment 2, N = 62, no suggestion vs. high suggestion vs. no voice suggestion). Correlational and regression analyses indicated that trait suggestibility and dissociation predicted hallucination proneness. Highly hallucination-prone students showed a higher SDT bias in both studies. In Experiment 1, both bias scores were significantly affected by suggestions to the same degree. In Experiment 2, highly hallucination-prone students were more reactive to the high suggestion condition than the controls. Suggestions may affect source-monitoring judgments, and this effect may be greater in those who have a predisposition towards hallucinatory experiences.

  13. Detection of transient cavitation in aqueous solutions exposed to microsecond pulses of ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmichael, A.J.; Mossoba, M.M.; Riesz, P.; Christman, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    Recent theoretical calculations have shown that small gas nuclei in water exposed to μs ultrasonic pulses above an intensity threshold may grow into transient cavities that collapse violently. The high temperatures and pressures thus generated lead to the formation of OH radicals and H atoms. These can be detected by spin trapping and ESR. This work was carried out in a special exposure apparatus in which the acoustic exposure field can be measured accurately. For continuous 1 MHz ultrasound, the spatial average temporal average (SATA) intensity threshold for radical production was found to be about 0.25 Watts/cm/sup 2/. The yields of OH radicals varied, however, when a response was recorded the yields were linear as a function of intensity and the plots intersected at a common threshold. Aqueous solutions were studied over a range of pulse widths from 1 ms to 5 μs and pulse repetition frequencies from 4-50 kHz at a SATA intensity of 1.5 Watts/cm/sup 2/. Even for the case of 5 μs and 4kHz a significant OH radical yield was observed. These results indicate that in aqueous solutions free radicals are produced under simulated diagnostic exposure conditions

  14. Update on Breast Cancer Detection Using Comb-Push Ultrasound Shear Elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Max; Bayat, Mahdi; Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Gregory, Adriana; Song, Pengfei; Whaley, Dana H; Pruthi, Sandhya; Chen, Shigao; Fatemi, Mostafa; Alizad, Azra

    2015-09-01

    In this work, tissue stiffness estimates are used to differentiate between benign and malignant breast masses in a group of pre-biopsy patients. The rationale is that breast masses are often stiffer than healthy tissue; furthermore, malignant masses are stiffer than benign masses. The comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE) method is used to noninvasively assess a tissue's mechanical properties. CUSE utilizes a sequence of simultaneous multiple laterally spaced acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitations and detection to reconstruct the region of interest (ROI) shear wave speed map, from which a tissue stiffness property can be quantified. In this study, the tissue stiffnesses of 73 breast masses were interrogated. The mean shear wave speeds for benign masses (3.42 ± 1.32 m/s) were lower than malignant breast masses (6.04 ± 1.25 m/s). These speed values correspond to higher stiffness in malignant breast masses (114.9 ± 40.6 kPa) than benign masses (39.4 ± 28.1 kPa and p 83 kPa is established as a cut-off value for differentiating between malignant and benign suspicious breast masses, with a receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) of 89.19% sensitivity, 88.69% specificity, and 0.911 for the area under the curve (AUC).

  15. Using the PLUM procedure of SPSS to fit unequal variance and generalized signal detection models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarlo, Lawrence T

    2003-02-01

    The recent addition of aprocedure in SPSS for the analysis of ordinal regression models offers a simple means for researchers to fit the unequal variance normal signal detection model and other extended signal detection models. The present article shows how to implement the analysis and how to interpret the SPSS output. Examples of fitting the unequal variance normal model and other generalized signal detection models are given. The approach offers a convenient means for applying signal detection theory to a variety of research.

  16. Electrical excitation and optical detection of ultrasounds in PZT based piezoelectric transducers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babilotte, P; Diallo, O; Hue, L-P Tran Hu; Feuillard, G [University Francois Rabelais de Tours, Laboratory Imaging and Brain, Team Ultrasonic Characterisation and Piezoelectricity, ENIVL, Rue de la Chocolaterie, 41034 BLOIS CEDEX (France); Kosec, M; Kuscer, D, E-mail: philippe.babilotte@univ-tours.fr [Josef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 LJUBLJANA (Slovenia)

    2011-01-01

    The displacement response of piezoelectric PZT thick films fabricated by means of electrophoretic deposition and laid down an alumina substrate is investigated using coherent optical detection. According to thickness properties determined by electrical impedance measurements, the film presents a resonance around 40 MHz. Other resonance peaks are observed that correspond to eigen modes of the film substrate couple structure. Uniformity of the response of the integrated structure is studied across the surface of the sample when excited by either a continuous or impulse electrical voltage. Results on the amplitude of the detected signal versus the frequency and the input excitation voltage are reported. The optical detection used in these experiments is complementary to conventional techniques of characterization of piezoelectric devices such as electrical impedance measurements and allows getting information on the displacement response of the device.

  17. Echographic detectability of optoacoustic signals from low-concentration PEG-coated gold nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conversano, Francesco; Soloperto, Giulia; Greco, Antonio; Ragusa, Andrea; Casciaro, Ernesto; Chiriacò, Fernanda; Demitri, Christian; Gigli, Giuseppe; Maffezzoli, Alfonso; Casciaro, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of gold nanorod (GNR)-enhanced optoacoustic imaging employing a conventional echographic device and to determine the most effective operative configuration in order to assure optoacoustic effectiveness, nanoparticle stability, and imaging procedure safety. The most suitable laser parameters were experimentally determined in order to assure nanoparticle stability during the optoacoustic imaging procedures. The selected configuration was then applied to a novel tissue-mimicking phantom, in which GNR solutions covering a wide range of low concentrations (25-200 pM) and different sample volumes (50-200 μL) were exposed to pulsed laser irradiation. GNR-emitted optoacoustic signals were acquired either by a couple of single-element ultrasound probes or by an echographic transducer. Off-line analysis included: (a) quantitative evaluation of the relationships between GNR concentration, sample volume, phantom geometry, and amplitude of optoacoustic signals propagating along different directions; (b) echographic detection of "optoacoustic spots," analyzing their intensity, spatial distribution, and clinical exploitability. MTT measurements performed on two different cell lines were also used to quantify biocompatibility of the synthesized GNRs in the adopted doses. Laser irradiation at 30 mJ/cm(2) for 20 seconds resulted in the best compromise among the requirements of effectiveness, safety, and nanoparticle stability. Amplitude of GNR-emitted optoacoustic pulses was proportional to both sample volume and concentration along each considered propagation direction for all the tested boundary conditions, providing an experimental confirmation of isotropic optoacoustic emission. Average intensity of echographically detected spots showed similar behavior, emphasizing the presence of an "ideal" GNR concentration (100 pM) that optimized optoacoustic effectiveness. The tested GNRs also exhibited high biocompatibility over the entire considered

  18. [Prostate cancer detection by assessing stiffness of different tissues using shear wave ultrasound elastog- raphy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glybochko, P V; Alyaev, Yu G; Amosov, A V; Krupinov, G E; Ganzha, T M; Vorobev, A V; Lumpov, I S; Semendyaev, R I

    2016-08-01

    Early detection of prostate cancer (PCa) remains a challenging issue. There are studies underway aimed to develop and implement new methods for prostate cancer screening by tumor imaging and obtaining tissue samples from suspicious areas for morphological examination. One of these new methods is shear wave ultrasound elastography (SWUE). The current literature is lacking sufficient coverage of informativeness and specificity of SWUE in the prostate cancer detection, there is no clear criteria for assessing tissue stiffness at different values of PSA and tumor grade, and in prostate hyperplasia and prostatitis. To evaluate the informativeness and specificity of SWUE compared with other diagnostic methods. SWUE has been used in the Clinic of Urology of Sechenov First MSMU since October 2015. During this period, 302 patients were examined using SWUE. SWUE was performed with Aixplorer ultrasound system (Super Sonic Imagine), which provides a single-stage SWUE imaging with both B-mode and real-time mode. The first group (prospective study) included 134 men aged 47 to 81 years with suspected prostate cancer scheduled to either initial or repeat prostate biopsy. PSA levels ranged from 4 to 24 ng/ml. The second group (retrospective study) comprised 120 men with confirmed prostate cancer and PSA levels between 4 and 90 ng/ml. The third group (the control group), comprised 48 healthy men whose PSA level did not exceed 3 ng/ml. All patients of the groups 1 and 2 underwent a standard comprehensive examination. Patients in group 1 were subsequently subjected to transrectal prostate biopsy guided by localization of areas with abnormal tissue stiffness. PCa was detected in 100 of 134 patients. 217 patients of groups 1 and 2 underwent radical prostatectomy. In 28 of them, the match between the cancer location and differentiation in the removed prostate and SWUE findings before surgery was examined. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of pelvic organs was performed in 63

  19. Comparison the percentage of detection of periarthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using clinical examination or ultrasound methods

    OpenAIRE

    Hadi Karimzadeh; Zahra Seyedbonakdar; Maryam Mousavi; Mehdi Karami

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to compare the percentage of detection of periarthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using clinical examination and ultrasound methods. Materials and Methods: This study is a cross-sectional study which was conducted in Al-Zahra Hospital (Isfahan, Iran) during 2014?2015. In our study, ninety patients were selected based on the American College of Rheumatology 2010 criteria. All patients were examined by a rheumatologist to find the existence of effusion, ...

  20. Sensitivity of Quantitative Signal Detection in Regards to Pharmacological Neuroenhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Gahr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacological neuroenhancement (PNE is a form of abuse and has not yet been addressed by methods of pharmacovigilance. In the present study, we tested if quantitative signal detection may be sensitive in regards to PNE. We evaluated the risk of drug abuse and dependence (DAAD related to substances that are known to be used for PNE and divided this group into agents with (methylphenidate and without a known abuse potential outside the field of PNE (atomoxetine, modafinil, acetylcholine esterase inhibitors, and memantine. Reporting odds ratios (RORs were calculated using a case/non-case approach based on global and country-specific drug safety data from the Uppsala Monitoring Centre (UMC. Both control substances (diazepam and lorazepam and methylphenidate were statistically associated with DAAD in all datasets (except methylphenidate in Italy. Modafinil was associated with DAAD in the total dataset (ROR, 2.7 (95% confidence interval (CI, 2.2–3.3, Germany (ROR, 4.6 (95% CI, 1.8–11.5, and the USA (ROR, 2.0 (95% CI, 1.6–2.5. Atomoxetine was associated with DAAD in the total dataset (ROR, 1.3 (95% CI, 1.2–1.5 and in the UK (ROR, 3.3 (95% CI, 1.8–6.1. Apart from memantine, which was associated with DAAD in Germany (ROR, 1.8 (95% CI, 1.0–3.2, no other antidementia drug was associated with DAAD. Quantitative signal detection is suitable to detect agents with a risk for DAAD. Its sensitivity regarding PNE is limited, although atomoxetine and modafinil, which do not have a known abuse potential outside PNE, and no antidementia drugs, whose use in PNE is presumably low, were associated with DAAD in our analysis.

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... specific content. Related Articles and Media Sonohysterography Ultrasound - Abdomen Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and ...

  4. Malformations detected by abdominal ultrasound in children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Rosana Cardoso Manique; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano Machado; Flores, José Antônio Monteiro; Golendziner, Eliete; Oliveira, Ceres Andréia Vieira de; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Zen, Paulo Ricardo Gazzola

    2012-12-01

    Extracardiac malformations may be present in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD), bringing greater risk of comorbidity and mortality. Verify frequency and types of abdominal abnormalities detected in children with and without CHD through abdominal ultrasound (AUS), compare the patients in relation to their dysmorphic/cytogenetic findings and perform an estimative of the cost-effectiveness of the screening through AUS. We conducted a cross-sectional study with a control cohort. The cases consisted of patients with CHD admitted for the first time in a pediatric intensive care unit; the controls consisted of children without CHD who underwent AUS at the hospital shortly thereafter a case. All patients with CHD underwent AUS, high-resolution karyotype and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for microdeletion 22q11.2. AUS identified clinically significant abnormalities in 12.2% of the cases and 5.2% of controls (p= 0.009), with a power of significance of 76.6%. Most malformations with clinical significance were renal anomalies (10.4% in cases and 4.9% in controls; p= 0.034). In Brazil, the cost of an AUS examination for the Unified Health System is US$ 21. Since clinically significant abnormalities were observed in one in every 8.2 CHD patients, the cost to identify an affected child was calculated as approximately US$ 176. Patients with CHD present a significant frequency of abdominal abnormalities detected by AUS, an inexpensive and noninvasive diagnostic method with good sensitivity. The cost of screening for these defects is considerably lower than the cost to treat the complications of late diagnoses of abdominal malformations such as renal disease.

  5. Contrast-enhanced Ultrasound for Detection of Crohn's Disease Activity: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Zbigniew; Białecki, Marcin; Białecka, Agnieszka; Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Kłopocka, Maria

    2016-03-01

    Reports on imaging of active Crohn's disease (aCD) using contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) are encouraging. However, the statistical power of most published papers is limited due to the small size of the patient groups included. This study was performed to verify the diagnostic value of CEUS in detecting aCD. A systematic literature search was performed by two independent reviewers for articles on the test characteristics of CEUS for the identification of aCD. The quality of the analysed studies was evaluated using a quality assessment tool for diagnostic accuracy studies (QUADAS-2). Pooling was performed using a diagnostic random-effect model and bivariate analysis. Eight articles were included in the final analysis, with a total of 332 patients. There was no significant publication bias. Significant heterogeneity was found regarding CEUS methodology and sonographic definitions of aCD. In a bivariate analysis, pooled sensitivity was 0.94 (95% CI 0.87-0.97) and pooled specificity was 0.79 (95% CI 0.67-0.88). Spearman correlation statistics presented no significant diagnostic threshold effect (r = 0.12, p > 0.9). Subgroup analysis showed that relative intestine wall enhancement had the highest diagnostic value (area under the curve 94%), while the presence of enhancement and analysis of the slope were less useful (area under the curve 91 and 90%, respectively). CEUS presents good sensitivity and moderate specificity in the detection of the aCD. Large-scale randomized trials with quantitative evaluation of CEUS images are necessary to promote this technique in clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Targeted Ultrasound for MR-Detected Lesions in Breast Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jung Hee; Han, Boo Kyung; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Ko, Kyung Ran; Choi, Nami

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the usefulness of targeted ultrasound (US) in the identification of additional suspicious lesions found by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in breast cancer patients and the changes in treatment based on the identification of the lesions by the use of targeted US. One-hundred forty nine patients who underwent breast MR imaging for a preoperative evaluation of breast cancer between January 2002 and July 2004 were included in the study. We searched all cases for any additional lesions that were found initially by MR imaging and investigated the performance of targeted US in identifying the lesions. We also investigated their pathological outcomes and changes in treatment as a result of lesion identification. Of the 149 patients with breast cancer, additional suspicious lesions were detected with MR imaging in 62 patients (42%). Of the 69 additional lesions found in those 62 patients, 26 (38%) were confirmed as cancers by histology. Thirty-eight lesions in 31 patients were examined with targeted US and were histologically revealed as cancers in 18 (47%), high risk lesions in two (5%), benign lesions in 15 (39%), and unidentified lesions in three (8%). The cancer rate was statistically higher in lesions with a US correlate than in lesions without a US correlate (p = 0.028). Of 31 patients, the surgical plan was altered in 27 (87%). The use of targeted US justified a change in treatment for 22 patients (81%) and misled five patients (19%) into having an unnecessary surgical excision. Targeted US can play a useful role in the evaluation of additional suspicious lesions detected by MR imaging in breast cancer patients, but is limited in lesions without a US correlate

  7. Multi-modality photoacoustic tomography, ultrasound, and light sheet microscopy for volumetric tumor margin detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangha, Gurneet S.; Hu, Bihe; Bolus, Daniel; Wang, Mei; Skidmore, Shelby J.; Sholl, Andrew B.; Brown, J. Quincy; Goergen, Craig J.

    2018-02-01

    Current methods for breast tumor margin detection are invasive, time consuming, and typically result in a reoperative rate of over 25%. This marks a clear clinical need to develop improved tools to intraoperatively differentiate negative versus positive tumor margins. Here, we utilize photoacoustic tomography (PAT), ultrasound (US), and inverted Selective Plane Illumination Microscopy (iSPIM) to assess breast tumor margins in eight human breast biopsies. Our PAT/US system consists of a tunable Nd:YAG laser (NT 300, EKSPLA) coupled with a 40MHz central frequency US probe (Vevo2100, FUJIFILM Visual Sonics). This system allows for the delivery of 10Hz, 5ns pulses with fluence of 40mJ/cm2 to the tissue with PAT and US axial resolutions of 125μm and 40μm, respectively. For this study, we used a linear stepper motor to acquire volumetric PAT/US images of the breast biopsies using 1100nm light to identify bloodrich "tumor" regions and 1210nm light to identify lipid-rich "healthy" regions. iSPIM (Applied Scientific Instrumentation) is an advanced microscopy technique with lateral resolution of 1.5μm and axial resolution of 7μm. We used 488nm laser excitation and acridine orange as a general comprehensive histology stain. Our results show that PAT/US can be used to identify lipid-rich regions, dense areas of arterioles and arteries, and other internal structures such as ducts. iSPIM images correlate well with histopathology slides and can verify nuclear features, cell type and density, stromal features, and microcalcifications. Together, this multimodality approach has the potential to improve tumor margin detection with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity.

  8. Improved automated lumen contour detection by novel multifrequency processing algorithm with current intravascular ultrasound system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Teruyoshi; Kim, Byeong-Keuk; Waseda, Katsuhisa; Sathyanarayana, Shashidhar; Li, Wenguang; Teo, Tat-Jin; Yock, Paul G; Fitzgerald, Peter J; Honda, Yasuhiro

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a new fully automated lumen border tracing system based on a novel multifrequency processing algorithm. We developed the multifrequency processing method to enhance arterial lumen detection by exploiting the differential scattering characteristics of blood and arterial tissue. The implementation of the method can be integrated into current intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) hardware. This study was performed in vivo with conventional 40-MHz IVUS catheters (Atlantis SR Pro™, Boston Scientific Corp, Natick, MA) in 43 clinical patients with coronary artery disease. A total of 522 frames were randomly selected, and lumen areas were measured after automatically tracing lumen borders with the new tracing system and a commercially available tracing system (TraceAssist™) referred to as the "conventional tracing system." The data assessed by the two automated systems were compared with the results of manual tracings by experienced IVUS analysts. New automated lumen measurements showed better agreement with manual lumen area tracings compared with those of the conventional tracing system (correlation coefficient: 0.819 vs. 0.509). When compared against manual tracings, the new algorithm also demonstrated improved systematic error (mean difference: 0.13 vs. -1.02 mm(2) ) and random variability (standard deviation of difference: 2.21 vs. 4.02 mm(2) ) compared with the conventional tracing system. This preliminary study showed that the novel fully automated tracing system based on the multifrequency processing algorithm can provide more accurate lumen border detection than current automated tracing systems and thus, offer a more reliable quantitative evaluation of lumen geometry. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Automatic bone detection and soft tissue aware ultrasound-CT registration for computer-aided orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wein, Wolfgang; Karamalis, Athanasios; Baumgartner, Adrian; Navab, Nassir

    2015-06-01

    The transfer of preoperative CT data into the tracking system coordinates within an operating room is of high interest for computer-aided orthopedic surgery. In this work, we introduce a solution for intra-operative ultrasound-CT registration of bones. We have developed methods for fully automatic real-time bone detection in ultrasound images and global automatic registration to CT. The bone detection algorithm uses a novel bone-specific feature descriptor and was thoroughly evaluated on both in-vivo and ex-vivo data. A global optimization strategy aligns the bone surface, followed by a soft tissue aware intensity-based registration to provide higher local registration accuracy. We evaluated the system on femur, tibia and fibula anatomy in a cadaver study with human legs, where magnetically tracked bone markers were implanted to yield ground truth information. An overall median system error of 3.7 mm was achieved on 11 datasets. Global and fully automatic registration of bones aquired with ultrasound to CT is feasible, with bone detection and tracking operating in real time for immediate feedback to the surgeon.

  10. Detection of early warning signals of forest mortality in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Kumar, M.; Katul, G. G.; Porporato, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    Massive forest mortality was observed in California during the most recent drought. Owing to complex interactions of physiological mechanisms under stress, prediction of climate-induced forest mortality using dynamic global vegetation models remains fraught with uncertainty. Given that forest ecosystems approaching mortality tend to exhibit reduction in resilience, we evaluate the time-varying resilience from time series of satellite images to detect early warning signals (EWSs) of mortality. Four metrics of EWSs are used: (1) low greenness, (2) high empirical autocorrelation of greenness, (3) high autocorrelation inferred using a Bayesian dynamic linear model considering the influence of seasonality and climate conditions, and (4) low recovery rate inferred from the drift term in the Langevin equation describing stochastic dynamics. Spatial accuracy and lead-time of these EWSs are evaluated by comparing the EWSs against observed mortality from aerial surveys conducted by the US Forest Service. Our results show that most forested areas in California that underwent mortality exhibit a EWS with a lead time of three months to two years ahead of observed mortality. Notably, EWS is also detected in some areas without mortality, suggesting reduced resilience during drought. Furthermore, the influence of the previous drought (2007-2009) may have propagated into the recent drought (2012-2016) through reduced resilience, hence contributing to the massive forest mortality observed recently. Methodologies developed in this study for detection of EWS will improve the near-term predictability of forest mortality, thus providing crucial information for forest and water resource management.

  11. Correntropy measures to detect daytime sleepiness from EEG signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melia, Umberto; Vallverdú, Montserrat; Caminal, Pere; Guaita, Marc; Montserrat, Josep M; Vilaseca, Isabel; Salamero, Manel; Gaig, Carles; Santamaria, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is one of the main symptoms of several sleep related disorders and has a great impact on patients’ lives. While many studies have been carried out in order to assess daytime sleepiness, automatic EDS detection still remains an open problem. In this work, a novel approach to this issue based on correntropy function analysis of EEG signals was proposed in order to detect patients suffering from EDS. Multichannel EEG signals were recorded during five Maintenance of Wakefulness Tests (MWT) and Multiple Sleep Latency Tests (MSLT) alternated throughout the day for patients suffering from sleep disordered breathing (SDB). A group of 20 patients with EDS was compared with a group of 20 patients without daytime sleepiness (WDS), by analyzing 60 s EEG windows in a waking state. Measures obtained from the cross-correntropy function (CCORR) and auto-correntropy function (ACORR) were calculated in the EEG frequency bands: δ, 0.1–4 Hz; θ, 4–8 Hz; α, 8–12 Hz; β, 12–30 Hz; total band TB, 0.1–45 Hz. These functions permitted the quantification of complex signal properties and the non-linear couplings between different areas of the scalp. Statistical differences between EDS and WDS groups were mainly found in the β band during MSLT events (p-value < 0.0001). The WDS group presented more complexity in the occipital zone than the EDS group, while a stronger nonlinear coupling between the occipital and frontal regions was detected in EDS patients than in the WDS group. At best, ACORR and CCORR measures yielded sensitivity and specificity above 80% and the area under ROC curve (AUC) was above 0.85 in classifying EDS and WDS patients. These performances represent an improvement with respect to classical EEG indices applied in the same database (sensitivity and specificity were never above 80% and AUC was under 0.75). (paper)

  12. Application of analyzer based X-ray imaging technique for detection of ultrasound induced cavitation bubbles from a physical therapy unit

    OpenAIRE

    Izadifar, Zahra; Belev, George; Babyn, Paul; Chapman, Dean

    2015-01-01

    Background The observation of ultrasound generated cavitation bubbles deep in tissue is very difficult. The development of an imaging method capable of investigating cavitation bubbles in tissue would improve the efficiency and application of ultrasound in the clinic. Among the previous imaging modalities capable of detecting cavitation bubbles in vivo, the acoustic detection technique has the positive aspect of in vivo application. However the size of the initial cavitation bubble and the am...

  13. Ultrasound detection of placenta accreta in the first trimester of pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemeh Rahimi-Sharbaf; Ashraf Jamal; Elaheh Mesdaghinia; Masoumeh Abedzadeh- Kalahroudi; Shirin Niroomanesh; Fatemeh Atoof

    2014-01-01

    Background: Placenta accreta is considered a life-threatening condition and the main cause of maternal mortality. Prenatal diagnosis of placenta accreta usually is made by clinical presentation, imaging studies like ultrasound and MRI in the second and third trimester. Objective: To determine accuracy of ultrasound findings for placenta accreta in the first trimester of pregnancy. Materials and Methods: In a longitudinal study 323 high risk patients for placenta accreta were assessed. The eli...

  14. Infrasonic detection performance in presence of nuisance signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbit, Maurice; Arrowsmith, Stephen; Che, Il-young; Le Pichon, Alexis; Nouvellet, Adrien; Park, Junghyun; Roueff, Francois

    2014-05-01

    The infrasound network of the International Monitoring System (IMS) consists of sixty stations deployed all over the World by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). The IMS has been designed to reliably detect, at least by two stations, an explosion greater than 1 kiloton located anywhere on the Earth [1]. Each station is an array of at least four microbarometers with an aperture of 1 to 3 km. The first important issue is to detect the presence of the signal of interest (SOI) embedded in noise. The detector is commonly based on the property that the SOI provides coherent observations on the sensors but not the noise. The statistic of test, called F-stat [2], [5], [6] , calculated in a time cell a few seconds, is commonly used for this purpose. In this paper, we assume that a coherent source is permanently present arriving from an unknown direction of arrivals (DOA). The typical case is the presence of microbaroms or the presence of wind. This source is seen as a nuisance signal (NS). In [4], [3] authors assume that a time cell without the SOI (CH0) is available, whereas a following time cell is considered as the cell under test (CUT). Therefore the DOA and the SNR of the NS can be estimated. If the signal-to-noise ration SNR of the NS is large enough, the distribution of the F-stat under the absence of SOI is known to be a non central Fisher. It follows that the threshold can be performed from a given value of the FAR. The major drawback to keep the NS is that the NS could hide the SOI, this phenomena is similar to the leakage which is a well-known phenomena in the Fourier analysis. An other approach consists to use the DOA estimate of the NS to mitigate the NS by spatial notch filter in the frequency domain. On this approach a new algorithm is provided. To illustrate, numerical results on synthetical and real data are presented, in term of Receiver Operating Characteristic ROC curves. REFERENCES [1] Christie D.R. and Campus P., The IMS

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from the area within the patient that is being examined to the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and ...

  16. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from the area within the patient that is being examined to the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and ...

  17. [Detection of small for gestational age fetuses during third trimester ultrasound. A monocentric observational study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyronnet, V; Kayem, G; Mandelbrot, L; Sibiude, J

    2016-09-01

    Fetus small for gestational age (SGA) screening rate is evaluated around 21,7 % in France. Recommendations were developed to improve the efficiency of ultrasound conducted in the third trimester (T3), because neonatal consequences can be significant. This study aims to evaluate screening of SGA during T3 ultrasound and to describe causes for failure and differences with the recommendations of CNGOF. All children born between 2011 and 2012 with a birth weight below the 3rd percentile were included in this observational, retrospective, monocentric study. We noted that the diagnosis of SGA was placed on file. Then, as recommended by the CNGOF, we calculated estimated fetal weight (EFW) with Hadlock 3 and Hadlock 4, and the corresponding percentiles, using the biometrics from the ultrasound report. We thus could evaluate a new screening rate with SGA fetus identified through this technique. A total of 142 patients were included. By calculating correctly all EFW and checking abdominal circumference percentiles, the screening rate of SGA fetuses with T3 ultrasound increased from 40 % to 50 % and the overall screening rate (clinical and ultrasound) from 54 % to 66 %. By following the recommendations we found a real improvement in fetal SGA screening rates to T3 ultrasound with a potential benefit for their care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Detecting malicious chaotic signals in wireless sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Ranjit Kumar; Kumari, Sangeeta

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, an e-epidemic Susceptible-Infected-Vaccinated (SIV) model has been proposed to analyze the effect of node immunization and worms attacking dynamics in wireless sensor network. A modified nonlinear incidence rate with cyrtoid type functional response has been considered using sleep and active mode approach. Detailed stability analysis and the sufficient criteria for the persistence of the model system have been established. We also established different types of bifurcation analysis for different equilibria at different critical points of the control parameters. We performed a detailed Hopf bifurcation analysis and determine the direction and stability of the bifurcating periodic solutions using center manifold theorem. Numerical simulations are carried out to confirm the theoretical results. The impact of the control parameters on the dynamics of the model system has been investigated and malicious chaotic signals are detected. Finally, we have analyzed the effect of time delay on the dynamics of the model system.

  19. Detecting Parkinson's disease from sustained phonation and speech signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evaldas Vaiciukynas

    Full Text Available This study investigates signals from sustained phonation and text-dependent speech modalities for Parkinson's disease screening. Phonation corresponds to the vowel /a/ voicing task and speech to the pronunciation of a short sentence in Lithuanian language. Signals were recorded through two channels simultaneously, namely, acoustic cardioid (AC and smart phone (SP microphones. Additional modalities were obtained by splitting speech recording into voiced and unvoiced parts. Information in each modality is summarized by 18 well-known audio feature sets. Random forest (RF is used as a machine learning algorithm, both for individual feature sets and for decision-level fusion. Detection performance is measured by the out-of-bag equal error rate (EER and the cost of log-likelihood-ratio. Essentia audio feature set was the best using the AC speech modality and YAAFE audio feature set was the best using the SP unvoiced modality, achieving EER of 20.30% and 25.57%, respectively. Fusion of all feature sets and modalities resulted in EER of 19.27% for the AC and 23.00% for the SP channel. Non-linear projection of a RF-based proximity matrix into the 2D space enriched medical decision support by visualization.

  20. Improvement of range spatial resolution of medical ultrasound imaging by element-domain signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hideyuki

    2017-07-01

    The range spatial resolution is an important factor determining the image quality in ultrasonic imaging. The range spatial resolution in ultrasonic imaging depends on the ultrasonic pulse length, which is determined by the mechanical response of the piezoelectric element in an ultrasonic probe. To improve the range spatial resolution without replacing the transducer element, in the present study, methods based on maximum likelihood (ML) estimation and multiple signal classification (MUSIC) were proposed. The proposed methods were applied to echo signals received by individual transducer elements in an ultrasonic probe. The basic experimental results showed that the axial half maximum of the echo from a string phantom was improved from 0.21 mm (conventional method) to 0.086 mm (ML) and 0.094 mm (MUSIC).

  1. Computerized Diagnostic Assistant for the Automatic Detection of Pneumothorax on Ultrasound: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane M. Summers, MD, RDMS

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bedside thoracic ultrasound (US can rapidly diagnose pneumothorax (PTX with improved accuracy over the physical examination and without the need for chest radiography (CXR; however, US is highly operator dependent. A computerized diagnostic assistant was developed by the United States Army Institute of Surgical Research to detect PTX on standard thoracic US images. This computer algorithm is designed to automatically detect sonographic signs of PTX by systematically analyzing B-mode US video clips for pleural sliding and M-mode still images for the seashore sign. This was a pilot study to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of the PTX detection computer algorithm when compared to an expert panel of US trained physicians. Methods: This was a retrospective study using archived thoracic US obtained on adult patients presenting to the emergency department (ED between 5/23/2011 and 8/6/2014. Emergency medicine residents, fellows, attending physicians, physician assistants, and medical students performed the US examinations and stored the images in the picture archive and communications system (PACS. The PACS was queried for all ED bedside US examinations with reported positive PTX during the study period along with a random sample of negatives. The computer algorithm then interpreted the images, and we compared the results to an independent, blinded expert panel of three physicians, each with experience reviewing over 10,000 US examinations. Results: Query of the PACS system revealed 146 bedside thoracic US examinations for analysis. Thirteen examinations were indeterminate and were excluded. There were 79 true negatives, 33 true positives, 9 false negatives, and 12 false positives. The test characteristics of the algorithm when compared to the expert panel were sensitivity 79% (95 % CI [63-89] and specificity 87% (95% CI [77-93]. For the 20 images scored as highest quality by the expert panel, the algorithm demonstrated 100% sensitivity

  2. Ultrasound Detection of Parathyroid Hyperplasia and Correlation with Clinical and Laboratory Findings in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo Valencia, Cesar Augusto; Santacruz Pacheco, David; Castillo Pinilla, Campo Elias; Chacon Cardona, Jose Arnoby

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there is any correlation between parathyroid hyperplasia, as detected by high-resolution ultrasound, and clinical and laboratory variables in patients with hyperparathyroidism secondary to stage-5 chronic kidney disease (CKD) on hemodialysis. Design: Descriptive. Location: RTS Ltda. Renal Unit in Caldas, Santa Sofia Hospital and Children's Hospital. Patients: All patients, 18 years of age, with stage- 5 CKD who were on dialysis therapy (hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis), and with PTH levels greater than 400 pg/ml. Methods: After giving their written consent to participate in the study, all patients underwent high-resolution thyroid and parathyroid ultrasound (Phillips Team Enviisor CHD -12 MHz transducer) performed by a medical specialist in radiology. Variables such as etiology, duration of the CKD, time on dialysis therapy, type of dialysis, presence of symptoms related to hyperparathyroidism (bone pain, fractures, pruritus), and laboratory variables like an intact PTH, calcium, phosphorus, calcium x phosphorus, and alkaline phosphatase were analyzed in order to determine if there was a significant correlation between the variables and the detection of parathyroid hyperplasia documented by high resolution ultrasound. Results: Of 403 patients evaluated, 92 met the inclusion criteria, 86 were scanned and 6 were excluded. In these patients, the most common cause of CKD was hypertensive nephrosclerosis. Thirty-seven patients were on peritoneal dialysis and 49 on hemodialysis, with an average time on dialysis of 61.4 +- 36.6 months. The average levels of PTH in pg/mL were 829,465 +- 473,631. The most prevalent clinical symptom was bone pain, found in 52.2% of patients. Ultrasound showed enlarged parathyroid glands in 30 patients (34.88%), with single-gland hyperplasia in 23 (26.74%), two-gland hyperplasia in 4 (4.65%) and three-gland hyperplasia in 3 (3.48%). The correlation between laboratory variables and the presence of

  3. Ultrasound extraction and thin layer chromatography-flame ionization detection analysis of the lipid fraction in marine mucilage samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecozzi, M; Amici, M; Romanelli, G; Pietrantonio, E; Deluca, A

    2002-07-19

    This paper reports an analytical procedure based on ultrasound to extract lipids in marine mucilage samples. The experimental conditions of the ultrasound procedure (solvent and time) were identified by a FT-IR study performed on different standard samples of lipids and of a standard humic sample, before and after the sonication treatment. This study showed that diethyl ether was a more suitable solvent than methanol for the ultrasonic extraction of lipids from environmental samples because it allowed to minimize the possible oxidative modifications of lipids due to the acoustic cavitation phenomena. The optimized conditions were applied to the extraction of total lipid amount in marine mucilage samples and TLC-flame ionization detection analysis was used to identify the relevant lipid sub-fractions present in samples.

  4. DETECT: a MATLAB toolbox for event detection and identification in time series, with applications to artifact detection in EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawhern, Vernon; Hairston, W David; Robbins, Kay

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in sensor and recording technology have allowed scientists to acquire very large time-series datasets. Researchers often analyze these datasets in the context of events, which are intervals of time where the properties of the signal change relative to a baseline signal. We have developed DETECT, a MATLAB toolbox for detecting event time intervals in long, multi-channel time series. Our primary goal is to produce a toolbox that is simple for researchers to use, allowing them to quickly train a model on multiple classes of events, assess the accuracy of the model, and determine how closely the results agree with their own manual identification of events without requiring extensive programming knowledge or machine learning experience. As an illustration, we discuss application of the DETECT toolbox for detecting signal artifacts found in continuous multi-channel EEG recordings and show the functionality of the tools found in the toolbox. We also discuss the application of DETECT for identifying irregular heartbeat waveforms found in electrocardiogram (ECG) data as an additional illustration.

  5. DETECT: a MATLAB toolbox for event detection and identification in time series, with applications to artifact detection in EEG signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon Lawhern

    Full Text Available Recent advances in sensor and recording technology have allowed scientists to acquire very large time-series datasets. Researchers often analyze these datasets in the context of events, which are intervals of time where the properties of the signal change relative to a baseline signal. We have developed DETECT, a MATLAB toolbox for detecting event time intervals in long, multi-channel time series. Our primary goal is to produce a toolbox that is simple for researchers to use, allowing them to quickly train a model on multiple classes of events, assess the accuracy of the model, and determine how closely the results agree with their own manual identification of events without requiring extensive programming knowledge or machine learning experience. As an illustration, we discuss application of the DETECT toolbox for detecting signal artifacts found in continuous multi-channel EEG recordings and show the functionality of the tools found in the toolbox. We also discuss the application of DETECT for identifying irregular heartbeat waveforms found in electrocardiogram (ECG data as an additional illustration.

  6. Non-rigid registration of 3D ultrasound for neurosurgery using automatic feature detection and matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Inês; Toews, Matthew; Luo, Jie; Unadkat, Prashin; Essayed, Walid; George, Elizabeth; Teodoro, Pedro; Carvalho, Herculano; Martins, Jorge; Golland, Polina; Pieper, Steve; Frisken, Sarah; Golby, Alexandra; Wells, William

    2018-06-04

    The brain undergoes significant structural change over the course of neurosurgery, including highly nonlinear deformation and resection. It can be informative to recover the spatial mapping between structures identified in preoperative surgical planning and the intraoperative state of the brain. We present a novel feature-based method for achieving robust, fully automatic deformable registration of intraoperative neurosurgical ultrasound images. A sparse set of local image feature correspondences is first estimated between ultrasound image pairs, after which rigid, affine and thin-plate spline models are used to estimate dense mappings throughout the image. Correspondences are derived from 3D features, distinctive generic image patterns that are automatically extracted from 3D ultrasound images and characterized in terms of their geometry (i.e., location, scale, and orientation) and a descriptor of local image appearance. Feature correspondences between ultrasound images are achieved based on a nearest-neighbor descriptor matching and probabilistic voting model similar to the Hough transform. Experiments demonstrate our method on intraoperative ultrasound images acquired before and after opening of the dura mater, during resection and after resection in nine clinical cases. A total of 1620 automatically extracted 3D feature correspondences were manually validated by eleven experts and used to guide the registration. Then, using manually labeled corresponding landmarks in the pre- and post-resection ultrasound images, we show that our feature-based registration reduces the mean target registration error from an initial value of 3.3 to 1.5 mm. This result demonstrates that the 3D features promise to offer a robust and accurate solution for 3D ultrasound registration and to correct for brain shift in image-guided neurosurgery.

  7. Detection of oscillatory components in noise signals and its application to fast detection of sodium boiling in LMFBR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrhardt, J.

    1975-09-01

    In general, the surveillance of technical plants is performed by observating the mean value of measured signals. In this method not all information included in these signals is used. On the other hand - for example in a reactor - disturbances are possible which generate small oscillatory components in the measured signals. In general, these oscillatory components do not influence the mean value of the signals and consequently do not activate the conventional control system; however they can be found by analysis of the signal's noise component. For the detection of these oscillatory signals the observation of the frequency spectra of the noise signals is particularly advantageous because they produce peaks at the oscillation frequencies. In this paper a new detection system for the fast detection of suddenly appearing peaks in the frequency spectra of noise signals is presented. The prototype of a compact detection unit was developed which continuously computes the power spectral density (PSD) of noise signals and simultaneously supervises the PSD for peaks in the relevant frequency range. The detection method is not affected by the frequency dependance of the PSD and is applicable to any noise signal. General criteria were developed to enable the determination of the optimal detection system and its sensitivity. The upper limits of false alarm rate and detection time were taken into account. The detection criteria are applicable to all noise signals with approximately normally distributed amplitudes. Theoretical results were confirmed in a number of experiments; special experimental and theoretical parameter studies were done for the optimal detection of sodium boiling in LMFBR's. Computations based on these results showed that local and integral sodium boiling can be detected in a wide core range of SNR 300 by observing fluctuations of the neutron flux. In this connection it is important to point out that no additional core instrumentation is necessary because the

  8. Combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging of cavitation events induced by short pulses of high-intensity ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gateau, Jérôme; Aubry, Jean-François; Pernot, Mathieu; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickaël

    2011-03-01

    The activation of natural gas nuclei to induce larger bubbles is possible using short ultrasonic excitations of high amplitude, and is required for ultrasound cavitation therapies. However, little is known about the distribution of nuclei in tissues. Therefore, the acoustic pressure level necessary to generate bubbles in a targeted zone and their exact location are currently difficult to predict. To monitor the initiation of cavitation activity, a novel all-ultrasound technique sensitive to single nucleation events is presented here. It is based on combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging over a large volume using the same multi-element probe. Bubble nucleation was induced using a focused transducer (660 kHz, f-number = 1) driven by a high-power electric burst (up to 300 W) of one to two cycles. Detection was performed with a linear array (4 to 7 MHz) aligned with the single-element focal point. In vitro experiments in gelatin gel and muscular tissue are presented. The synchronized passive detection enabled radio-frequency data to be recorded, comprising high-frequency coherent wave fronts as signatures of the acoustic emissions linked to the activation of the nuclei. Active change detection images were obtained by subtracting echoes collected in the unnucleated medium. These indicated the appearance of stable cavitating regions. Because of the ultrafast frame rate, active detection occurred as quickly as 330 μs after the high-amplitude excitation and the dynamics of the induced regions were studied individually.

  9. Operator auditory perception and spectral quantification of umbilical artery Doppler ultrasound signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Thuring

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: An experienced sonographer can by listening to the Doppler audio signals perceive various timbres that distinguish different types of umbilical artery flow despite an unchanged pulsatility index (PI. Our aim was to develop an objective measure of the Doppler audio signals recorded from fetoplacental circulation in a sheep model. METHODS: Various degrees of pathological flow velocity waveforms in the umbilical artery, similar to those in human complicated pregnancies, were induced by microsphere embolization of the placental bed (embolization model, 7 lamb fetuses, 370 Doppler recordings or by fetal hemodilution (anemia model, 4 lamb fetuses, 184 recordings. A subjective 11-step operator auditory scale (OAS was related to conventional Doppler parameters, PI and time average mean velocity (TAM, and to sound frequency analysis of Doppler signals (sound frequency with the maximum energy content [MAXpeak] and frequency band at maximum level minus 15 dB [MAXpeak-15 dB] over several heart cycles. RESULTS: WE FOUND A NEGATIVE CORRELATION BETWEEN THE OAS AND PI: median Rho -0.73 (range -0.35- -0.94 and -0.68 (range -0.57- -0.78 in the two lamb models, respectively. There was a positive correlation between OAS and TAM in both models: median Rho 0.80 (range 0.58-0.95 and 0.90 (range 0.78-0.95, respectively. A strong correlation was found between TAM and the results of sound spectrum analysis; in the embolization model the median r was 0.91 (range 0.88-0.97 for MAXpeak and 0.91 (range 0.82-0.98 for MAXpeak-15 dB. In the anemia model, the corresponding values were 0.92 (range 0.78-0.96 and 0.96 (range 0.89-0.98, respectively. CONCLUSION: Audio-spectrum analysis reflects the subjective perception of Doppler sound signals in the umbilical artery and has a strong correlation to TAM-velocity. This information might be of importance for clinical management of complicated pregnancies as an addition to conventional Doppler parameters.

  10. Computer-aided diagnostic system for detection of Hashimoto thyroiditis on ultrasound images from a Polish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, U Rajendra; Sree, S Vinitha; Krishnan, M Muthu Rama; Molinari, Filippo; Zieleźnik, Witold; Bardales, Ricardo H; Witkowska, Agnieszka; Suri, Jasjit S

    2014-02-01

    Computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) techniques aid physicians in better diagnosis of diseases by extracting objective and accurate diagnostic information from medical data. Hashimoto thyroiditis is the most common type of inflammation of the thyroid gland. The inflammation changes the structure of the thyroid tissue, and these changes are reflected as echogenic changes on ultrasound images. In this work, we propose a novel CAD system (a class of systems called ThyroScan) that extracts textural features from a thyroid sonogram and uses them to aid in the detection of Hashimoto thyroiditis. In this paradigm, we extracted grayscale features based on stationary wavelet transform from 232 normal and 294 Hashimoto thyroiditis-affected thyroid ultrasound images obtained from a Polish population. Significant features were selected using a Student t test. The resulting feature vectors were used to build and evaluate the following 4 classifiers using a 10-fold stratified cross-validation technique: support vector machine, decision tree, fuzzy classifier, and K-nearest neighbor. Using 7 significant features that characterized the textural changes in the images, the fuzzy classifier had the highest classification accuracy of 84.6%, sensitivity of 82.8%, specificity of 87.0%, and a positive predictive value of 88.9%. The proposed ThyroScan CAD system uses novel features to noninvasively detect the presence of Hashimoto thyroiditis on ultrasound images. Compared to manual interpretations of ultrasound images, the CAD system offers a more objective interpretation of the nature of the thyroid. The preliminary results presented in this work indicate the possibility of using such a CAD system in a clinical setting after evaluating it with larger databases in multicenter clinical trials.

  11. Detecting hepatic steatosis using ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging: an ex vivo animal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M; Ding, Xuan; Dutta, Debaditya; Kim, Kang; Singh, Vijay P

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis or fatty liver disease occurs when lipids accumulate within the liver and can lead to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, liver cancer and eventual liver failure requiring liver transplant. Conventional brightness mode (B-mode) ultrasound (US) is the most common noninvasive diagnostic imaging modality used to diagnose hepatic steatosis in clinics. However, it is mostly subjective or requires a reference organ such as the kidney or spleen with which to compare. This comparison can be problematic when the reference organ is diseased or absent. The current work presents an alternative approach to noninvasively detecting liver fat content using US-induced thermal strain imaging (US-TSI). This technique is based on the difference in the change in the speed of sound as a function of temperature between water- and lipid-based tissues. US-TSI was conducted using two system configurations including a mid-frequency scanner with a single linear array transducer (5–14 MHz) for both imaging and heating and a high-frequency (13–24 MHz) small animal imaging system combined with a separate custom-designed US heating transducer array. Fatty livers (n = 10) with high fat content (45.6 ± 11.7%) from an obese mouse model and control livers (n = 10) with low fat content (4.8 ± 2.9%) from wild-type mice were embedded in gelatin. Then, US imaging was performed before and after US induced heating. Heating time periods of ∼3 s and ∼9.2 s were used for the mid-frequency imaging and high-frequency imaging systems, respectively, to induce temperature changes of approximately 1.5 °C. The apparent echo shifts that were induced as a result of sound speed change were estimated using 2D phase-sensitive speckle tracking. Following US-TSI, histology was performed to stain lipids and measure percentage fat in the mouse livers. Thermal strain measurements in fatty livers (−0.065 ± 0.079%) were significantly (p < 0.05) higher than those measured in control livers (−0.124

  12. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to ... Ultrasound Imaging? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Prostate? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces pictures ...

  13. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound is effective for progressive-stage lumbar spondylolysis with MRI high-signal change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Yoshiji; Togawa, Daisuke; Mihara, Yuki; Murata, Hideyuki; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the treatment effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on progressive-stage spondylolysis. Spondylolysis is a stress fracture of the pars interarticularis. Based on the results of computed tomography, spondylolysis was classified into three categories: early, progressive, and terminal. Bone healing was prolonged or not obtained in progressive-stage spondylolysis. The progression of spondylolysis to nonunion has been associated with an increased incidence of spondylolisthesis. To prevent these clinical conditions, achieving bony healing of the spondylolysis site should be the goal of treatment. 15 consecutive pediatric patients with progressive-stage spondylolysis (defects) with MRI high-signal change were analyzed. Nine patients were treated conservative treatment including avoidance of any sport activity and the use of a brace during treatment (conventional). Six patients were treated using LIPUS everyday during treatment in addition to conservative treatment. Approximately every 1.5 months, bone healing was evaluated via CT. Cases that retained defects after 4.5 months were defined as nonunion. Two patients dropped out during the study period. A total of 13 patients (mean 14.6 ± 2.5 years) from the database met with 19 interarticularis defects. The bone union rate in LIPUS group was significantly higher than that in conventional group (66.7 vs. 10.0%, p = 0.020). The treatment period to bone union was 3.8 months and 2.7 ± 0.3 months in conventional and LIPUS groups. This study revealed that LIPUS treatment might be effective for bone union in patients with progressive-stage spondylolysis with MRI high-signal change. 4.

  14. The Accuracy of Point-of-Care Ultrasound in Detecting Small Bowel Obstruction in Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pourmand

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiological imaging plays an essential role in the evaluation of a patient with suspected small bowel obstruction (SBO. In a few studies, point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS has been utilized as a primary imaging modality in patients with suspected SBO. POCUS has been shown to be an accurate tool in the diagnosis of SBO with multiple research studies noting a consistent high sensitivity with a range of 94–100% and specificity of 81–100%. Specific sonographic findings that increase the likelihood of SBO include dilatation of small bowel loops > 25 mm, altered intestinal peristalsis, increased thickness of the bowel wall, and intraperitoneal fluid accumulation. Studies also reported that emergency physicians could apply this technique with limited and short-term ultrasound training. In this article, we aim to review the sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound examinations performed by emergency physicians in patients with suspected SBO.

  15. International law implications of the detection of extraterrestrial intelligent signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopal, Vladimir

    This paper first considers whether the present law of outer space, as it has been enshrined in five United Nations treaties and other legal documents concerning outer space, provides a satisfactory basis for SETI/CETI activities. In the author's opinion, these activities may serve "the common interest of all mankind in the progress of the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes," as recognized in the 1967 Outer Space Treaty. The use of the radio frequency spectrum for SETI/CETI purposes should be in conformity with the legal principles governing this valuable natural resource, as expressed in the International Telecommunication Convention and related documents, and with allocations of the relevant segments of the spectrum by the competent bodies of the International Telecommunication Union. In the second part the author examines the impact that the detection of extraterrestrial intelligent signals may have on the present body of space law. A possible role for the United Nations in this respect is also explored and a timely interest of the world body in discussing questions relating to this subject is recommended. Consideration of these questions could become a tool helping to concentrate the attention of the world community on problems of common concern and thus to strengthen international cooperation. However, the author believes that a law-making process that would aim at elaborating a special regulation of activities in this field would be premature at this stage. It should be initiated only when the boundary between possibilities and realities is crossed. Finally, the paper outlines some likely transformation in our space law thinking that would be the consequence of the detection of extraterrestrial intelligent signals. Elaboration of the principles and norms to govern relations between the international community of our own planet and other intelligent communities in the universe would add a new dimension to the present body of outer space

  16. MRI screening-detected breast lesions in high-risk young women: the value of targeted second-look ultrasound and imaging-guided biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, P; Dhillon, R; Bose, S; Bourke, A

    2016-10-01

    To analyse the value of targeted second-look ultrasound and imaging-guided biopsy in high-risk young women eligible for screening magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a tertiary referral centre in Perth, Western Australia. A retrospective analysis of eligible high-risk young women who underwent screening breast MRI and targeted second-look ultrasound between June 2012 and June 2014 was performed with review of data. Over a 2-year period, 139 women underwent high-risk screening MRI. Of these, 30 women (with a total of 45 lesions) were recalled for targeted second-look ultrasound. Thirty-four MRI-detected lesions were identified on targeted ultrasound with 19 of them proceeding to ultrasound-guided biopsy, while the remaining 15 lesions were considered benign on ultrasound, were not biopsied, and were stable on follow-up imaging 12 months later. One lesion proceeded to an MRI-guided biopsy to confirm a benign result. Of the 11 lesions not seen on ultrasound, nine underwent MRI biopsy, one proceeded directly to hook wire localisation and excision, and one did not return for biopsy and was lost to follow-up. The overall biopsy rate was 14.4%. The cancer detection rate was 1.4%. The results of this study indicate that targeted second-look ultrasound and ultrasound-guided biopsy is a cost-effective and time-efficient approach for MRI-detected lesions in young women at high risk of developing breast cancer. MRI-guided biopsy should be considered for ultrasonographically occult suspicious lesions as there is a low, but definite, risk of cancer. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Optical fiber sensor for the detection of laser-generated ultrasound in arterial tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Paul C.; Mills, Timothy N.

    1995-02-01

    Theoretical and experimental aspects of an extrinsic Fabry-Perot optical fiber ultrasound sensor for use in a photoacoustic-guided laser angioplasty system are described. The sensor has been characterized using laser generated thermoelastic waves as a source of wideband ultrasound. A system sensitivity of 25 mV/MPa and an acoustic noise floor of 2 Pa/Hz1/2 are reported using a transparent polymer film as the sensing element. The system demonstrates the required bandwidth for sensing thermoelastic waves containing frequency components up to 20 MHz.

  18. Power Doppler ultrasonography and synovitis: correlating ultrasound imaging with histopathological findings and evaluating the performance of ultrasound equipments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koski, J M; Saarakkala, S; Helle, M; Hakulinen, U; Heikkinen, J O; Hermunen, H

    2006-12-01

    To examine the validity of power Doppler ultrasound imaging to identify synovitis, using histopathology as gold standard, and to assess the performance of ultrasound equipments. 44 synovial sites in small and large joints, bursae and tendon sheaths were depicted with ultrasound. A synovial biopsy was performed on the site depicted and a synovial sample was taken for histopathological evaluation. The performance of three ultrasound devices was tested using flow phantoms. A positive Doppler signal was detected in 29 of 35 (83%) of the patients with active histological inflammation. In eight additional samples, histological examination showed other pathological synovial findings and a Doppler signal was detected in five of them. No significant correlation was found between the amount of Doppler signal and histological synovitis score (r = 0.239, p = NS). The amount of subsynovial infiltration of polymorphonuclear leucocytes and surface fibrin correlated significantly with the amount of power Doppler signal: r = 0.397 (pultrasound devices differed in showing the smallest detectable flow. A negative Doppler signal does not exclude the possibility of synovitis. A positive Doppler signal in the synovium is an indicator of an active synovial inflammation in patients. A Doppler signal does not correlate with the extent of the inflammation and it can also be seen in other synovial reactions. It is important that the quality measurements of ultrasound devices are reported, because the results should be evaluated against the quality of the device used.

  19. Automatic detection of atrial fibrillation in cardiac vibration signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueser, C; Diesel, J; Zink, M D H; Winter, S; Schauerte, P; Leonhardt, S

    2013-01-01

    We present a study on the feasibility of the automatic detection of atrial fibrillation (AF) from cardiac vibration signals (ballistocardiograms/BCGs) recorded by unobtrusive bedmounted sensors. The proposed system is intended as a screening and monitoring tool in home-healthcare applications and not as a replacement for ECG-based methods used in clinical environments. Based on BCG data recorded in a study with 10 AF patients, we evaluate and rank seven popular machine learning algorithms (naive Bayes, linear and quadratic discriminant analysis, support vector machines, random forests as well as bagged and boosted trees) for their performance in separating 30 s long BCG epochs into one of three classes: sinus rhythm, atrial fibrillation, and artifact. For each algorithm, feature subsets of a set of statistical time-frequency-domain and time-domain features were selected based on the mutual information between features and class labels as well as first- and second-order interactions among features. The classifiers were evaluated on a set of 856 epochs by means of 10-fold cross-validation. The best algorithm (random forests) achieved a Matthews correlation coefficient, mean sensitivity, and mean specificity of 0.921, 0.938, and 0.982, respectively.

  20. Directionality and signal amplification in cryogenic dark matter detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More, T.

    1996-05-01

    A mounting body of evidence suggests that most of the mass in our universe is not contained in stars, but rather exists in some non- luminous form. The evidence comes independently from astronomical observation, cosmological theory, and particle physics. All of this missing mass is collectively referred to as dark matter. In this thesis we discuss two ways to improve the performance of dark matter detectors based on the measurement of ballistic phonons. First, we address the issue of signal identification through solitons. Secondly, we discuss a method for lowering the detection threshold and improving the energy sensitivity: amplifying phonons through the evaporation of helium atoms from a superfluid film coating the target and the adsorption of the evaporated atoms onto a helium-free substrate. A phonon amplifier would also be of use in many other applications in which a few phonons are to be measured at low temperatures. Factors contributing to the low amplifier gains achieved thus far are described and proposals for avoiding them are analyzed and discussed. 101 refs., 30 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Evaluation of Advanced Signal Processing Techniques to Improve Detection and Identification of Embedded Defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Dwight A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Santos-Villalobos, Hector J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Baba, Justin S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    , or an improvement in contrast over conventional SAFT reconstructed images. This report documents our efforts in four fronts: 1) Comparative study between traditional SAFT and FBD SAFT for concrete specimen with and without Alkali-Silica Reaction (ASR) damage, 2) improvement of our Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) for thick reinforced concrete [5], 3) development of a universal framework for sharing, reconstruction, and visualization of ultrasound NDE datasets, and 4) application of machine learning techniques for automated detection of ASR inside concrete. Our comparative study between FBD and traditional SAFT reconstruction images shows a clear difference between images of ASR and non-ASR specimens. In particular, the left first harmonic shows an increased contrast and sensitivity to ASR damage. For MBIR, we show the superiority of model-based techniques over delay and sum techniques such as SAFT. Improvements include elimination of artifacts caused by direct arrival signals, and increased contrast and Signal to Noise Ratio. For the universal framework, we document a format for data storage based on the HDF5 file format, and also propose a modular Graphic User Interface (GUI) for easy customization of data conversion, reconstruction, and visualization routines. Finally, two techniques for ASR automated detection are presented. The first technique is based on an analysis of the frequency content using Hilbert Transform Indicator (HTI) and the second technique employees Artificial Neural Network (ANN) techniques for training and classification of ultrasound data as ASR or non-ASR damaged classes. The ANN technique shows great potential with classification accuracy above 95%. These approaches are extensible to the detection of additional reinforced, thick concrete defects and damage.

  2. Signal Detection, Target Tracking and Differential Geometry Applications to Statistical Inference

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rao, C

    1997-01-01

    Signal detection and target tracking. A novel method known as polynomial rooting approach is proposed to obtain estimates of frequencies, amplitudes and noise variance of two-dimensional exponential signals...

  3. Performance Analysis of Recurrence Matrix Statistics for the Detection of Deterministic Signals in Noise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michalowicz, Joseph V; Nichols, Jonathan M; Bucholtz, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the limitations to detecting deterministic signals in the presence of noise, especially additive, white Gaussian noise, is of importance for the design of LPI systems and anti-LPI signal defense...

  4. A Novel Approach of Sensitive Infrared Signal Detection for Space Applications

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop an innovative frequency up-conversion device that will efficiently convert the infrared signals into visible/near-infrared signals to enable detection of...

  5. Transverse comparisons between ultrasound and radionuclide parameters in children with presumed antenatally detected pelvi-ureteric junction obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duong, Hong Phuoc; Janssen, Francoise; Hall, Michelle; Ismaili, Khalid [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Department of Pediatric Nephrology, Hopital Universitaire des Enfants Reine Fabiola, Brussels (Belgium); Piepsz, Amy [Hopital Universitaire Saint-Pierre, Department of Radioisotopes, Ghent (Belgium); Khelif, Karim; Collier, Frank [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Department of Pediatric Urology, Hopital Universitaire des Enfants Reine Fabiola, Brussel (Belgium); Man, Kathia de [University Hospital Ghent, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium); Damry, Nash [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Department of Pediatric Radiology, Hopital Universitaire des Enfants Reine Fabiola, Brussel (Belgium)

    2015-05-01

    The main criteria used for deciding on surgery in children with presumed antenatally detected pelviureteric junction obstruction (PPUJO) are the level of hydronephrosis (ultrasonography), the level of differential renal function (DRF) and the quality of renal drainage after a furosemide challenge (renography), the importance of each factor being far from generally agreed. Can we predict, on the basis of ultrasound parameters, the patient in whom radionuclide renography can be avoided? We retrospectively analysed the medical charts of 81 consecutive children with presumed unilateral PPUJO detected antenatally. Ultrasound and renographic studies performed at the same time were compared. Anteroposterior pelvic diameter (APD) and calyceal size were both divided into three levels of dilatation. Parenchymal thickness was considered either normal or significantly decreased. Acquisition of renograms under furosemide stimulation provided quantification of DRF, quality of renal drainage and cortical transit. The percentages of patients with low DRF and poor drainage were significantly higher among those with major hydronephrosis, severe calyceal dilatation or parenchymal thinning. Moreover, impaired cortical transit, which is a major risk factor for functional decline, was seen more frequently among those with very severe calyceal dilatation. However, none of the structural parameters obtained by ultrasound examination was able to predict whether the level of renal function or the quality of drainage was normal or abnormal. Alternatively, an APD <30 mm, a calyceal dilatation of <10 mm and a normal parenchymal thickness were associated with a low probability of decreased renal function or poor renal drainage. In the management strategy of patients with prenatally detected PPUJO, nuclear medicine examinations may be postponed in those with an APD <30 mm, a calyceal dilatation of <10 mm and a normal parenchymal thickness. On the contrary, precise estimation of DRF and renal

  6. Machine Learning Techniques for Optical Performance Monitoring from Directly Detected PDM-QAM Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Jakob; Wass, Jesper; Piels, Molly

    2017-01-01

    Linear signal processing algorithms are effective in dealing with linear transmission channel and linear signal detection, while the nonlinear signal processing algorithms, from the machine learning community, are effective in dealing with nonlinear transmission channel and nonlinear signal...... detection. In this paper, a brief overview of the various machine learning methods and their application in optical communication is presented and discussed. Moreover, supervised machine learning methods, such as neural networks and support vector machine, are experimentally demonstrated for in-band optical...

  7. A Novel Voice Sensor for the Detection of Speech Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Ching Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to develop a novel voice sensor to detect human voices, the use of features which are more robust to noise is an important issue. Voice sensor is also called voice activity detection (VAD. Due to that the inherent nature of the formant structure only occurred on the speech spectrogram (well-known as voiceprint, Wu et al. were the first to use band-spectral entropy (BSE to describe the characteristics of voiceprints. However, the performance of VAD based on BSE feature was degraded in colored noise (or voiceprint-like noise environments. In order to solve this problem, we propose the two-dimensional part-band energy entropy (TD-PBEE parameter based on two variables: part-band partition number upon frequency index and long-term window size upon time index to further improve the BSE-based VAD algorithm. The two variables can efficiently represent the characteristics of voiceprints on each critical frequency band and use long-term information for noisy speech spectrograms, respectively. The TD-PBEE parameter can be regarded as a PBEE parameter over time. First, the strength of voiceprints can be partly enhanced by using four entropies applied to four part-bands. We can use the four part-band energy entropies for describing the voiceprints in detail. Due to the characteristics of non-stationary for speech and various noises, we will then use long-term information processing to refine the PBEE, so the voice-like noise can be distinguished from noisy speech through the concept of PBEE with long-term information. Our experiments show that the proposed feature extraction with the TD-PBEE parameter is quite insensitive to background noise. The proposed TD-PBEE-based VAD algorithm is evaluated for four types of noises and five signal-to-noise ratio (SNR levels. We find that the accuracy of the proposed TD-PBEE-based VAD algorithm averaged over all noises and all SNR levels is better than that of other considered VAD algorithms.

  8. Measures of metacognition on signal-detection theoretic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Adam B; Dienes, Zoltan; Seth, Anil K

    2013-12-01

    Analyzing metacognition, specifically knowledge of accuracy of internal perceptual, memorial, or other knowledge states, is vital for many strands of psychology, including determining the accuracy of feelings of knowing and discriminating conscious from unconscious cognition. Quantifying metacognitive sensitivity is however more challenging than quantifying basic stimulus sensitivity. Under popular signal-detection theory (SDT) models for stimulus classification tasks, approaches based on Type II receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves or Type II d-prime risk confounding metacognition with response biases in either the Type I (classification) or Type II (metacognitive) tasks. A new approach introduces meta-d': The Type I d-prime that would have led to the observed Type II data had the subject used all the Type I information. Here, we (a) further establish the inconsistency of the Type II d-prime and ROC approaches with new explicit analyses of the standard SDT model and (b) analyze, for the first time, the behavior of meta-d' under nontrivial scenarios, such as when metacognitive judgments utilize enhanced or degraded versions of the Type I evidence. Analytically, meta-d' values typically reflect the underlying model well and are stable under changes in decision criteria; however, in relatively extreme cases, meta-d' can become unstable. We explore bias and variance of in-sample measurements of meta-d' and supply MATLAB code for estimation in general cases. Our results support meta-d' as a useful measure of metacognition and provide rigorous methodology for its application. Our recommendations are useful for any researchers interested in assessing metacognitive accuracy. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. Echographic detectability of optoacoustic signals from low-concentration PEG-coated gold nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conversano F

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Conversano,1 Giulia Soloperto,1 Antonio Greco,1 Andrea Ragusa,1,2 Ernesto Casciaro,1 Fernanda Chiriacò,1 Christian Demitri,3 Giuseppe Gigli,2–5 Alfonso Maffezzoli,3 Sergio Casciaro11National Research Council, Institute of Clinical Physiology, Lecce, Italy; 2National Nanotechnology Laboratory of CNR-NANO, Lecce, Italy; 3University of Salento, Department of Engineering for Innovation, Lecce, Italy; 4Italian Institute of Technology – Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnology (CBN-IIT, Arnesano, Italy; 5University of Salento, Department of Mathematics and Physics ‘Ennio De Giorgi’, Lecce, ItalyPurpose: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of gold nanorod (GNR-enhanced optoacoustic imaging employing a conventional echographic device and to determine the most effective operative configuration in order to assure optoacoustic effectiveness, nanoparticle stability, and imaging procedure safety.Methods: The most suitable laser parameters were experimentally determined in order to assure nanoparticle stability during the optoacoustic imaging procedures. The selected configuration was then applied to a novel tissue-mimicking phantom, in which GNR solutions covering a wide range of low concentrations (25–200 pM and different sample volumes (50–200 µL were exposed to pulsed laser irradiation. GNR-emitted optoacoustic signals were acquired either by a couple of single-element ultrasound probes or by an echographic transducer. Off-line analysis included: (a quantitative evaluation of the relationships between GNR concentration, sample volume, phantom geometry, and amplitude of optoacoustic signals propagating along different directions; (b echographic detection of “optoacoustic spots,” analyzing their intensity, spatial distribution, and clinical exploitability. MTT measurements performed on two different cell lines were also used to quantify biocompatibility of the synthesized GNRs in the adopted doses.Results: Laser irradiation at

  10. Anticoagulant therapy for venous thromboembolism detected by Doppler ultrasound in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer receiving bevacizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suenaga M

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitsukuni Suenaga, Nobuyuki Mizunuma, Eiji Shinozaki, Satoshi Matsusaka, Masato Ozaka, Mariko Ogura, Keisho Chin, Toshiharu Yamaguchi Department of Gastroenterology, Cancer Institute Hospital of Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo, Japan Background: Doppler ultrasound imaging is useful for management of venous thromboembolism associated with a subclavicular implantable central venous access system in patients receiving bevacizumab (Bev. We investigated the efficacy and safety of our anticoagulant regimen based on Doppler findings.Methods: Patients aged ≤75 years with metastatic colorectal cancer, no history of thromboembolism, and no prior use of Bev received chemotherapy plus Bev. Doppler ultrasound imaging of the deep venous system to detect thrombosis was performed after the first course of Bev and repeated after the third course in patients with asymptomatic thrombosis. Indications for anticoagulant therapy in patients with asymptomatic thrombosis were as follows: enlarging thrombus (E, thrombus >40 mm in diameter (S, thrombus involving the superior vena cava (C, and decreased blood flow (V.Results: Among 79 patients enrolled in this study, asymptomatic thrombosis was detected in 56 patients (70.9% by Doppler ultrasound imaging after the first course of Bev and there was no thrombus in 23 patients (29.1%. Of these 56 patients, 11 (19.6% received anticoagulant therapy with warfarin, including eight after the first course and three after follow-up imaging. S + V was observed in four of 11 patients (36.4%, as well as V in two (18.2%, S + V + C in one (9.1%, E + S + V in one (9.1%, E + C in one (9.1%, E in one (9.1%, and C in one (9.1%. All patients resumed chemotherapy, including seven who resumed Bev. Improvement or stabilization of thrombi was achieved in ten patients (90.9%. Only one patient had symptomatic thromboembolism. Mild bleeding due to anticoagulant therapy occurred in six patients (54.5%, but there were no treatment

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Prostate ultrasound, also called transrectal ultrasound, provides ...

  12. Frequency hopping signal detection based on wavelet decomposition and Hilbert-Huang transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yang; Chen, Xihao; Zhu, Rui

    2017-07-01

    Frequency hopping (FH) signal is widely adopted by military communications as a kind of low probability interception signal. Therefore, it is very important to research the FH signal detection algorithm. The existing detection algorithm of FH signals based on the time-frequency analysis cannot satisfy the time and frequency resolution requirement at the same time due to the influence of window function. In order to solve this problem, an algorithm based on wavelet decomposition and Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) was proposed. The proposed algorithm removes the noise of the received signals by wavelet decomposition and detects the FH signals by Hilbert-Huang transform. Simulation results show the proposed algorithm takes into account both the time resolution and the frequency resolution. Correspondingly, the accuracy of FH signals detection can be improved.

  13. Detection of an embolized central venous catheter fragment with endobronchial ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Samjot Singh; Harris, Kassem; Alraiyes, Abdul H; Picone, Anthony L

    2018-01-01

    An 84-year-old woman underwent Convex-probe Endobronchial Ultrasound (CP-EBUS) for 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose avid subcarinal lymphadenopathy on Positron Emission Tomogram (PET) scan. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration of the subcarinal lymph node revealed squamous cell lung carcinoma. A small hyperechoic rounded density was noted inside the lumen of the azygous vein. Based on chest computed tomography findings and her clinical history, this was felt to be a broken fragment of a peripherally inserted central catheter, which was placed for intravenous antibiotics, a few months prior to this presentation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first ever CP-EBUS description of a broken fragment of central venous catheter. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. A canine case of partial heterotaxia detected by radiography and ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayanuma, H.; Suganuma, T.; Shida, T.; Sato, S.

    2000-01-01

    With radiography and ultrasound, reversed positioning of the fundus ventriculi and pylorus, a duodenum running on the left side, transposition of the kidneys, and normal thoracic organs were found in a 5-month-old miniature dachshund that presented with anorexia and weight loss. The case was diagnosed as partial heterotaxia. Gross observation revealed partial heterotaxia, polysplenia, abnormal lobulation of the liver, and absence of the greater omentum. These findings were consistent with those observed in asplenia-polysplenia syndrome in humans

  15. Early Detection of Prostate Cancer with New Nanoparticle Based UltrasoundContrast Agents Targeted to PSMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    in learning and careers in science, technology, and the humanities. What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish...Report.” Describe how results from the project made an impact, or are likely to make an impact, beyond the bounds of science, engineering , and the...Lipid Acyl Chain Length Improves Stability of Nano-sized Ultrasound Contrast Agents In Vitro. Biomedical Engineering Society 2017 meeting. Under review

  16. A new automated quantification algorithm for the detection and evaluation of focal liver lesions with contrast-enhanced ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatos, Ilias; Tsantis, Stavros; Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Skouroliakou, Aikaterini; Theotokas, Ioannis; Zoumpoulis, Pavlos; Hazle, John D; Kagadis, George C

    2015-07-01

    Detect and classify focal liver lesions (FLLs) from contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging by means of an automated quantification algorithm. The proposed algorithm employs a sophisticated segmentation method to detect and contour focal lesions from 52 CEUS video sequences (30 benign and 22 malignant). Lesion detection involves wavelet transform zero crossings utilization as an initialization step to the Markov random field model toward the lesion contour extraction. After FLL detection across frames, time intensity curve (TIC) is computed which provides the contrast agents' behavior at all vascular phases with respect to adjacent parenchyma for each patient. From each TIC, eight features were automatically calculated and employed into the support vector machines (SVMs) classification algorithm in the design of the image analysis model. With regard to FLLs detection accuracy, all lesions detected had an average overlap value of 0.89 ± 0.16 with manual segmentations for all CEUS frame-subsets included in the study. Highest classification accuracy from the SVM model was 90.3%, misdiagnosing three benign and two malignant FLLs with sensitivity and specificity values of 93.1% and 86.9%, respectively. The proposed quantification system that employs FLLs detection and classification algorithms may be of value to physicians as a second opinion tool for avoiding unnecessary invasive procedures.

  17. Efficacy of ultrasound elastography in detecting active myositis in children: can it replace MRI?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berko, Netanel S.; Levin, Terry L. [Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Bronx, NY (United States); Hay, Arielle [Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Rheumatology, Bronx, NY (United States); Miami Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Miami, FL (United States); Sterba, Yonit; Wahezi, Dawn [Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Rheumatology, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy is a rare yet potentially debilitating condition. MRI is used both for diagnosis and to assess response to treatment. No study has evaluated the performance of US elastography in the diagnosis of this condition in children. To assess the performance of compression-strain US elastography in detecting active myositis in children with clinically confirmed juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy and to compare its efficacy to MRI. Children with juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy underwent non-contrast MR imaging as well as compression-strain US elastography of the quadriceps muscles. Imaging findings from both modalities were compared to each other as well as to the clinical determination of active disease based on physical examination and laboratory data. Active myositis on MR was defined as increased muscle signal on T2-weighted images. Elastography images were defined as normal or abnormal based on a previously published numerical scale of muscle elastography in normal children. Muscle echogenicity was graded as normal or abnormal based on gray-scale sonographic images. Twenty-one studies were conducted in 18 pediatric patients (15 female, 3 male; age range 3-19 years). Active myositis was present on MRI in ten cases. There was a significant association between abnormal MRI and clinically active disease (P = 0.012). US elastography was abnormal in 4 of 10 cases with abnormal MRI and in 4 of 11 cases with normal MRI. There was no association between abnormal elastography and either MRI (P > 0.999) or clinically active disease (P > 0.999). Muscle echogenicity was normal in 11 patients; all 11 had normal elastography. Of the ten patients with increased muscle echogenicity, eight had abnormal elastography. There was a significant association between muscle echogenicity and US elastography (P < 0.001). The positive and negative predictive values for elastography in the determination of active myositis were 75% and 31

  18. Efficacy of ultrasound elastography in detecting active myositis in children: can it replace MRI?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berko, Netanel S; Hay, Arielle; Sterba, Yonit; Wahezi, Dawn; Levin, Terry L

    2015-09-01

    Juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy is a rare yet potentially debilitating condition. MRI is used both for diagnosis and to assess response to treatment. No study has evaluated the performance of US elastography in the diagnosis of this condition in children. To assess the performance of compression-strain US elastography in detecting active myositis in children with clinically confirmed juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy and to compare its efficacy to MRI. Children with juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy underwent non-contrast MR imaging as well as compression-strain US elastography of the quadriceps muscles. Imaging findings from both modalities were compared to each other as well as to the clinical determination of active disease based on physical examination and laboratory data. Active myositis on MR was defined as increased muscle signal on T2-weighted images. Elastography images were defined as normal or abnormal based on a previously published numerical scale of muscle elastography in normal children. Muscle echogenicity was graded as normal or abnormal based on gray-scale sonographic images. Twenty-one studies were conducted in 18 pediatric patients (15 female, 3 male; age range 3-19 years). Active myositis was present on MRI in ten cases. There was a significant association between abnormal MRI and clinically active disease (P = 0.012). US elastography was abnormal in 4 of 10 cases with abnormal MRI and in 4 of 11 cases with normal MRI. There was no association between abnormal elastography and either MRI (P > 0.999) or clinically active disease (P > 0.999). Muscle echogenicity was normal in 11 patients; all 11 had normal elastography. Of the ten patients with increased muscle echogenicity, eight had abnormal elastography. There was a significant association between muscle echogenicity and US elastography (P myositis were 75% and 31%, respectively, with a sensitivity of 40% and specificity of 67%. Compression-strain US

  19. Efficacy of ultrasound elastography in detecting active myositis in children: can it replace MRI?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berko, Netanel S.; Levin, Terry L.; Hay, Arielle; Sterba, Yonit; Wahezi, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy is a rare yet potentially debilitating condition. MRI is used both for diagnosis and to assess response to treatment. No study has evaluated the performance of US elastography in the diagnosis of this condition in children. To assess the performance of compression-strain US elastography in detecting active myositis in children with clinically confirmed juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy and to compare its efficacy to MRI. Children with juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy underwent non-contrast MR imaging as well as compression-strain US elastography of the quadriceps muscles. Imaging findings from both modalities were compared to each other as well as to the clinical determination of active disease based on physical examination and laboratory data. Active myositis on MR was defined as increased muscle signal on T2-weighted images. Elastography images were defined as normal or abnormal based on a previously published numerical scale of muscle elastography in normal children. Muscle echogenicity was graded as normal or abnormal based on gray-scale sonographic images. Twenty-one studies were conducted in 18 pediatric patients (15 female, 3 male; age range 3-19 years). Active myositis was present on MRI in ten cases. There was a significant association between abnormal MRI and clinically active disease (P = 0.012). US elastography was abnormal in 4 of 10 cases with abnormal MRI and in 4 of 11 cases with normal MRI. There was no association between abnormal elastography and either MRI (P > 0.999) or clinically active disease (P > 0.999). Muscle echogenicity was normal in 11 patients; all 11 had normal elastography. Of the ten patients with increased muscle echogenicity, eight had abnormal elastography. There was a significant association between muscle echogenicity and US elastography (P < 0.001). The positive and negative predictive values for elastography in the determination of active myositis were 75% and 31

  20. SonoNet: Real-Time Detection and Localisation of Fetal Standard Scan Planes in Freehand Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Christian F; Kamnitsas, Konstantinos; Matthew, Jacqueline; Fletcher, Tara P; Smith, Sandra; Koch, Lisa M; Kainz, Bernhard; Rueckert, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    Identifying and interpreting fetal standard scan planes during 2-D ultrasound mid-pregnancy examinations are highly complex tasks, which require years of training. Apart from guiding the probe to the correct location, it can be equally difficult for a non-expert to identify relevant structures within the image. Automatic image processing can provide tools to help experienced as well as inexperienced operators with these tasks. In this paper, we propose a novel method based on convolutional neural networks, which can automatically detect 13 fetal standard views in freehand 2-D ultrasound data as well as provide a localization of the fetal structures via a bounding box. An important contribution is that the network learns to localize the target anatomy using weak supervision based on image-level labels only. The network architecture is designed to operate in real-time while providing optimal output for the localization task. We present results for real-time annotation, retrospective frame retrieval from saved videos, and localization on a very large and challenging dataset consisting of images and video recordings of full clinical anomaly screenings. We found that the proposed method achieved an average F1-score of 0.798 in a realistic classification experiment modeling real-time detection, and obtained a 90.09% accuracy for retrospective frame retrieval. Moreover, an accuracy of 77.8% was achieved on the localization task.

  1. Detection test of wireless network signal strength and GPS positioning signal in underground pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Zhang, Yunwei; Chen, Ling

    2018-03-01

    In order to solve the problem of selecting positioning technology for inspection robot in underground pipeline environment, the wireless network signal strength and GPS positioning signal testing are carried out in the actual underground pipeline environment. Firstly, the strength variation of the 3G wireless network signal and Wi-Fi wireless signal provided by China Telecom and China Unicom ground base stations are tested, and the attenuation law of these wireless signals along the pipeline is analyzed quantitatively and described. Then, the receiving data of the GPS satellite signal in the pipeline are tested, and the attenuation of GPS satellite signal under underground pipeline is analyzed. The testing results may be reference for other related research which need to consider positioning in pipeline.

  2. The Precise Mechanisms of a High-Speed Ultrasound Gas Sensor and Detecting Human-Specific Lung Gas Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Toda

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose and develop a new real-time human respiration process analysis method using a high-time-sampling gas concentration sensor based on ultrasound. A unique point about our proposed gas concentration sensor is its 1 kHz gas concentration sampling speed. This figure could not have been attained by previously proposed gas concentration measurement methods such as InfraRed, semiconductor gas sensors, or GC-MS, because the gas analysis speeds were a maximum of a few hundred milliseconds. First, we describe the proposed new ultrasound sound speed measurement method and the signal processing, and present the measurement circuit diagram. Next, we analyse the human respiration gas variation patterns of five healthy subjects using a newly developed gas-mask-type respiration sensor. This reveals that the rapid gas exchange from H2O to CO2 contains air specific to the human being. In addition, we also measured medical symptoms in subjects suffering from asthma, hyperventilation and bronchial asthma. The millisecond level high-speed analysis of the human respiration process will be useful for the next generation of healthcare, rehabilitation and sports science technology.

  3. Improved detection and biopsy of solid liver lesions using pulse-inversion ultrasound scanning and contrast agent infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjoldbye, B.; Pedersen, Morten Høgholm; Struckmann, J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of pulse-inversion ultrasound (US) scanning (PIUS), combined with an IV contrast agent, to detect malignant liver lesions and its impact on patient management (resectability). Additionally, to determine the feasibility of US-guided biopsy of new...... PIUS-findings at the same session. A total of 30 patients with known or clinically suspected cancer underwent conventional B-mode scanning and PIUS with IV-administered contrast agent. The number of liver metastases in the right and the left liver lobe, respectively, was recorded. All patients...... findings were performed in 17 of 18 patients. All biopsies of additional findings confirmed malignancy. PIUS with an IV contrast agent increased the ability to detect liver metastases compared to conventional US scanning. The technique had a high impact on patient management. The results showed that PIUS...

  4. Detection of transient disturbing signals on PC boards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Korte

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows a possibility to visualize signal propagation in electronic circuits. Instead of using various galvanic measurement points all over the circuit, a test method is shown which measures the radiated field of the printed circuit board. By use of a 2-dimensional positionable field probe it is possible to get an overview over the signals running on the different parts of the PCB. In order to measure transient disturbing signals and distinguish them from normal device operation, problems of probe design and triggering need to be discussed.

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound or with a rectal examination, an ultrasound-guided biopsy can be performed. This procedure involves advancing ... of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored ...

  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging of the pelvis uses sound waves to produce pictures of the structures and ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... endometrial polyps fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or ... Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored ...

  9. Can Technical Analysis Signals Detect Price Reactions Around Earnings Announcement?: Evidence from Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Dedhy Sulistiawan; Jogiyanto Hartono

    2014-01-01

    This study examines whether technical analysis signals can detect price reactions before and after earnings announcement dates in Indonesian stock market. Earnings announcements produce reactions, both before and after the announcements. Informed investors may use private information before earnings announcements (Christophe, Ferri and Angel, 2004; Porter, 1992). Using technical analysis signals, this study expects that retail investors (uninformed investors) can detect preannouncements react...

  10. Enhancement of crack detection in stud bolts of nuclear reactor by ultrasonic signal processing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Oh, W.D.; Choi, S.W.; Park, M.H.

    2004-01-01

    'Full-text:' The stud bolts is one of the most critical parts for safety of reactor vessels in the nuclear power plants. However, in the application of ultrasonic technique for crack detection in stud bolt, some difficulties encountered are classification of crack signal from the signals reflected from threads part in stud bolt. In this study, shadow effect technique combined with new signal processing method is Investigated to enhance the detectability of small crack initiated from root of thread in stud bolt. The key idea of signal processing is based on the fact that the shape of waveforms from the threads is uniform since the shape of the threads in a bolt is same. If some cracks exist in the thread, the flaw signals are different to the reference signals. It is demonstrated that the small flaws are efficiently detected by novel ultrasonic technique combined with this new signal processing concept. (author)

  11. An attempt to detect the greenhouse-gas signal in a transient GCM simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, T.P.

    1990-01-01

    Results from the GISS model forced by transient greenhouse-gas (GHG) increases are used to demonstrate methods of detecting the theoretically predicted GHG signal. The signal predicted to occur in the surface temperature of the world's ocean since 1958 is not found in the observations but this is not surprising since the signal was small in the first place. The main result of the study is to demonstrate many of the key issues/difficulties that attend the detection problem

  12. Application of analyzer based X-ray imaging technique for detection of ultrasound induced cavitation bubbles from a physical therapy unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadifar, Zahra; Belev, George; Babyn, Paul; Chapman, Dean

    2015-10-19

    The observation of ultrasound generated cavitation bubbles deep in tissue is very difficult. The development of an imaging method capable of investigating cavitation bubbles in tissue would improve the efficiency and application of ultrasound in the clinic. Among the previous imaging modalities capable of detecting cavitation bubbles in vivo, the acoustic detection technique has the positive aspect of in vivo application. However the size of the initial cavitation bubble and the amplitude of the ultrasound that produced the cavitation bubbles, affect the timing and amplitude of the cavitation bubbles' emissions. The spatial distribution of cavitation bubbles, driven by 0.8835 MHz therapeutic ultrasound system at output power of 14 Watt, was studied in water using a synchrotron X-ray imaging technique, Analyzer Based Imaging (ABI). The cavitation bubble distribution was investigated by repeated application of the ultrasound and imaging the water tank. The spatial frequency of the cavitation bubble pattern was evaluated by Fourier analysis. Acoustic cavitation was imaged at four different locations through the acoustic beam in water at a fixed power level. The pattern of cavitation bubbles in water was detected by synchrotron X-ray ABI. The spatial distribution of cavitation bubbles driven by the therapeutic ultrasound system was observed using ABI X-ray imaging technique. It was observed that the cavitation bubbles appeared in a periodic pattern. The calculated distance between intervals revealed that the distance of frequent cavitation lines (intervals) is one-half of the acoustic wave length consistent with standing waves. This set of experiments demonstrates the utility of synchrotron ABI for visualizing cavitation bubbles formed in water by clinical ultrasound systems working at high frequency and output powers as low as a therapeutic system.

  13. Detection of subclinical atherosclerosis in asymptomatic subjects using ultrasound radiofrequency-tracking technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Niu

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic and systemic disease and its developmental process involves the synergism of multiple risk factors such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, obesity and smoking. The diagnosis of subclinical atherosclerosis is essential for strategic guidance towards suitable treatments and efficient prevention against acute cardiovascular events. This study employed ultrasound radiofrequency (RF tracking technology to characterize human carotid arteries in vivo in terms of intima-media thickness (IMT and artery stiffness, and evaluated the statistical correlation between carotid IMT and stiffness, and the number of risk factors for atherosclerosis.A total of 160 asymptomatic subjects were enrolled. Ultrasound RF-tracking technology was employed to acquire carotid IMT and stiffness parameters: maximum IMT ((MAXIMT, RF Quality IMT ((RFQIMT, distensibility coefficient (DC, compliance coefficient (CC, αindex, β index and local pulse wave velocity (PWVβ. The subjects were categorized in four groups in terms of the number of risk factors: 'zero', 'single', 'double', and 'multiple', and statistical analyses of carotid IMT and stiffness parameters were performed between these different groups.The subjects (n = 145 with (MAXIMT smaller than 1.0 mm matched the IMT criteria for non-atherosclerosis and were named as NA-subjects. Spearman's rho correlation analysis of the whole group and the NA-subjects both showed that (MAXIMT correlated positively with (RFQIMT, α, β, and PWVβ, and negatively with DC and CC (p<0.01. The analysis of covariance of NA-subjects showed significant differences between subjects with and without risk factors, and also showed significant differences between the 'zero', 'single', 'double', and 'multiple' groups.The carotid IMT and stiffness parameters obtained by the ultrasound RF-tracking technology were demonstrated to possess significant statistical correlation with the number of risk factors from 160

  14. Low intensity pulsed ultrasound enhanced mesenchymal stem cell recruitment through stromal derived factor-1 signaling in fracture healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Yuan Wei

    Full Text Available Low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS has been proven effective in promoting fracture healing but the underlying mechanisms are not fully depicted. We examined the effect of LIPUS on the recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and the pivotal role of stromal cell-derived factor-1/C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (SDF-1/CXCR4 pathway in response to LIPUS stimulation, which are essential factors in bone fracture healing. For in vitro study, isolated rat MSCs were divided into control or LIPUS group. LIPUS treatment was given 20 minutes/day at 37 °C for 3 days. Control group received sham LIPUS treatment. After treatment, intracellular CXCR4 mRNA, SDF-1 mRNA and secreted SDF-1 protein levels were quantified, and MSCs migration was evaluated with or without blocking SDF-1/CXCR4 pathway by AMD3100. For in vivo study, fractured 8-week-old young rats received intracardiac administration of MSCs were assigned to LIPUS treatment, LIPUS+AMD3100 treatment or vehicle control group. The migration of transplanted MSC to the fracture site was investigated by ex vivo fluorescent imaging. SDF-1 protein levels at fracture site and in serum were examined. Fracture healing parameters, including callus morphology, micro-architecture of the callus and biomechanical properties of the healing bone were investigated. The in vitro results showed that LIPUS upregulated SDF-1 and CXCR4 expressions in MSCs, and elevated SDF-1 protein level in the conditioned medium. MSCs migration was promoted by LIPUS and partially inhibited by AMD3100. In vivo study demonstrated that LIPUS promoted MSCs migration to the fracture site, which was associated with an increase of local and serum SDF-1 level, the changes in callus formation, and the improvement of callus microarchitecture and mechanical properties; whereas the blockade of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling attenuated the LIPUS effects on the fractured bones. These results suggested SDF-1 mediated MSCs migration might be one of the

  15. A Universal Fast Colorimetric Method for DNA Signal Detection with DNA Strand Displacement and Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA or gene signal detection is of great significance in many fields including medical examination, intracellular molecular monitoring, and gene disease signal diagnosis, but detection of DNA or gene signals in a low concentration with instant visual results remains a challenge. In this work, a universal fast and visual colorimetric detection method for DNA signals is proposed. Specifically, a DNA signal amplification “circuit” based on DNA strand displacement is firstly designed to amplify the target DNA signals, and then thiol modified hairpin DNA strands and gold nanoparticles are used to make signal detection results visualized in a colorimetric manner. If the target DNA signal exists, the gold nanoparticles aggregate and settle down with color changing from dark red to grey quickly; otherwise, the gold nanoparticles’ colloids remain stable in dark red. The proposed method provides a novel way to detect quickly DNA or gene signals in low concentrations with instant visual results. When applied in real-life, it may provide a universal colorimetric method for gene disease signal diagnosis.

  16. DETECTION OF POTENTIAL TRANSIT SIGNALS IN 16 QUARTERS OF KEPLER MISSION DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenenbaum, Peter; Jenkins, Jon M.; Seader, Shawn; Burke, Christopher J.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Rowe, Jason F.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Li, Jie; Quintana, Elisa V.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Thompson, Susan E.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Haas, Michael R.; Henze, Christopher E.; Hunter, Roger C.; Sanderfer, Dwight T.; Campbell, Jennifer R.; Girouard, Forrest R.

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a search for potential transit signals in 4 yr of photometry data acquired by the Kepler mission. The targets of the search include 111,800 stars which were observed for the entire interval and 85,522 stars which were observed for a subset of the interval. We found that 9743 targets contained at least one signal consistent with the signature of a transiting or eclipsing object where the criteria for detection are periodicity of the detected transits, adequate signal-to-noise ratio, and acceptance by a number of tests which reject false positive detections. When targets that had produced a signal were searched repeatedly, an additional 6542 signals were detected on 3223 target stars, for a total of 16,285 potential detections. Comparison of the set of detected signals with a set of known and vetted transit events in the Kepler field of view shows that the recovery rate for these signals is 96.9%. The ensemble properties of the detected signals are reviewed

  17. DETECTION OF POTENTIAL TRANSIT SIGNALS IN 16 QUARTERS OF KEPLER MISSION DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenenbaum, Peter; Jenkins, Jon M.; Seader, Shawn; Burke, Christopher J.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Rowe, Jason F.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Li, Jie; Quintana, Elisa V.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Thompson, Susan E.; Twicken, Joseph D. [SETI Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94305 (United States); Haas, Michael R.; Henze, Christopher E.; Hunter, Roger C.; Sanderfer, Dwight T. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94305 (United States); Campbell, Jennifer R.; Girouard, Forrest R., E-mail: peter.tenenbaum@nasa.gov [Orbital Sciences Corporation/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94305 (United States); and others

    2014-03-01

    We present the results of a search for potential transit signals in 4 yr of photometry data acquired by the Kepler mission. The targets of the search include 111,800 stars which were observed for the entire interval and 85,522 stars which were observed for a subset of the interval. We found that 9743 targets contained at least one signal consistent with the signature of a transiting or eclipsing object where the criteria for detection are periodicity of the detected transits, adequate signal-to-noise ratio, and acceptance by a number of tests which reject false positive detections. When targets that had produced a signal were searched repeatedly, an additional 6542 signals were detected on 3223 target stars, for a total of 16,285 potential detections. Comparison of the set of detected signals with a set of known and vetted transit events in the Kepler field of view shows that the recovery rate for these signals is 96.9%. The ensemble properties of the detected signals are reviewed.

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be guided by ultrasound, are used to sample cells from organs for laboratory testing help detect the ... in which needles are used to extract sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. Ultrasound ...

  19. Detecting effects of donepezil on visual selective attention using signal detection parameters in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foldi, Nancy S; White, Richard E C; Schaefer, Lynn A

    2005-05-01

    Attentional function is impaired in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Moreover, attention is mediated by acetylcholine. But, despite the widespread use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChE-I) to augment available acetylcholine in AD, measures of attentional function have not been used to assess the drug response. We hypothesized that as cholinergic augmentation impacts directly on the attentional system, higher-order measures of visual selective attention would be sensitive to effects of treatment using an AChE-I (donepezil hydrochloride). We also sought to determine whether these attentional measures were more sensitive to treatment than other measures of cognitive function. Seventeen patients with AD (8 untreated, 9 treated with donepezil) were contrasted on performance of a selective cancellation task. Two signal detection parameters were used as outcome measures: decision strategy (beta, beta) and discriminability (d-prime, d'). Standard screening and cognitive domain measures of vigilance, language, memory, and executive function were also contrasted. Treated patients judged stimuli more conservatively (p = 0.29) by correctly endorsing targets and rejecting false alarms. They also discriminated targets from distractors more easily (p = 0.58). The screening and neuropsychological measures failed to differentiate the groups. Higher-order attentional measures captured the effects of donepezil treatment in small groups of patients with AD. The results suggest that cholinergic availability may directly affect the attentional system, and that these selective attention measures are sensitive markers to detect treatment response. Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. The study on the factors for detection of renal stone on ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Hyun Sun; Jung, Hong Ryang; Lim, Cheong Hwan

    2006-01-01

    Renal stones are common and typically arise within the collecting system. The renal sinus are contains the collection system, the renal vessels, lymphatcs, fat, and fibrous tissue. Because of the compression of all the large echoes in signal processing, the echo from the renal stone generally cannot be distinguished from large echoes emanating from normal structures of the renal sinus. Use of ultrasonography has been difficult for detecting small renal stone without posterior shadowing and chemical composition of stone. The aim of study was measuring for posterior acoustic shadowing to a stone for various scan parameter and it examines a help in renal stone diagnosis. The stone was place on sponge examined in a water bath with a 3.5 MHz or 7.5 HMz transducer (LOGIQ 400, USA). First, tested a variety of gain. Second, tested a variety of dynamic range. Third, tested a variety of focal zone. Fourth, measuring of the echo level for low and high frequency for depth. 1) Average echo level was 98 for low total gain (10 dB) and was 142 for high total gain (40 dB). Posterior acoustic shadowing of renal stone was clear for low gain. 2) Average echo level was 129 for low dynamic range (42 dB) and was 101 for high dynamic range (72 dB). Posterior acoustic shadowing of renal stone was clear for high dynamic range. 3) When stone is in focal zone of transducer, definite posterior acoustic shadow is identified. 4) Stone was clear appeared for high frequency (7.5 MHz) than low frequency (3.5 MHz) and it is not distorted. The demonstration of an posterior acoustic shadow of renal stone dependents on several technical factors such as gain, dynamic range, focus, and frequency. This various factors are a help in renal stone diagnosis

  1. Direct modulation and detection link using polybinary signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, L.F.; Vegas Olmos, Juan José; Peucheret, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results on a spectral efficient optical fiber link by using a novel seven-level polybinary signaling at 14.32 Gbps achieving a potential 7.95 b/s/Hz with very little complexity and processing footprint.......This paper presents experimental results on a spectral efficient optical fiber link by using a novel seven-level polybinary signaling at 14.32 Gbps achieving a potential 7.95 b/s/Hz with very little complexity and processing footprint....

  2. Detectability of CO2 Flux Signals by a Space-Based Lidar Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerling, Dorit M.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Schaefer, Kevin; Doney, Scott; Michalak, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    Satellite observations of carbon dioxide (CO2) offer novel and distinctive opportunities for improving our quantitative understanding of the carbon cycle. Prospective observations include those from space-based lidar such as the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. Here we explore the ability of such a mission to detect regional changes in CO2 fluxes. We investigate these using three prototypical case studies, namely the thawing of permafrost in the Northern High Latitudes, the shifting of fossil fuel emissions from Europe to China, and changes in the source-sink characteristics of the Southern Ocean. These three scenarios were used to design signal detection studies to investigate the ability to detect the unfolding of these scenarios compared to a baseline scenario. Results indicate that the ASCENDS mission could detect the types of signals investigated in this study, with the caveat that the study is based on some simplifying assumptions. The permafrost thawing flux perturbation is readily detectable at a high level of significance. The fossil fuel emission detectability is directly related to the strength of the signal and the level of measurement noise. For a nominal (lower) fossil fuel emission signal, only the idealized noise-free instrument test case produces a clearly detectable signal, while experiments with more realistic noise levels capture the signal only in the higher (exaggerated) signal case. For the Southern Ocean scenario, differences due to the natural variability in the ENSO climatic mode are primarily detectable as a zonal increase.

  3. Varying ultrasound power level to distinguish surgical instruments and tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hongliang; Anuraj, Banani; Dupont, Pierre E

    2018-03-01

    We investigate a new framework of surgical instrument detection based on power-varying ultrasound images with simple and efficient pixel-wise intensity processing. Without using complicated feature extraction methods, we identified the instrument with an estimated optimal power level and by comparing pixel values of varying transducer power level images. The proposed framework exploits the physics of ultrasound imaging system by varying the transducer power level to effectively distinguish metallic surgical instruments from tissue. This power-varying image-guidance is motivated from our observations that ultrasound imaging at different power levels exhibit different contrast enhancement capabilities between tissue and instruments in ultrasound-guided robotic beating-heart surgery. Using lower transducer power levels (ranging from 40 to 75% of the rated lowest ultrasound power levels of the two tested ultrasound scanners) can effectively suppress the strong imaging artifacts from metallic instruments and thus, can be utilized together with the images from normal transducer power levels to enhance the separability between instrument and tissue, improving intraoperative instrument tracking accuracy from the acquired noisy ultrasound volumetric images. We performed experiments in phantoms and ex vivo hearts in water tank environments. The proposed multi-level power-varying ultrasound imaging approach can identify robotic instruments of high acoustic impedance from low-signal-to-noise-ratio ultrasound images by power adjustments.

  4. Processing of the quench detection signals in W7-X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birus, Dietrich; Schneider, Matthias; Rummel, Thomas; Fricke, Marko; Petry, Klaus; Ebersoldt, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    The Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) project uses superconductive coils for generation of the magnetic field to keep the plasma. One of the important safety systems is the protection against quench events. The quench detection system of W7-X protects the superconducting coils, the superconducting bus bar sections and the high temperature superconductor of the current leads against the damage because of a quench and against the high stress by a fast discharge of the magnet system. Therefore, the present design of the quench detection system (QDS) uses a two-stage safety concept for discharging the magnetic system. This paper describes the present design of the system assembly from the quench detection unit (QDU) for the detection of the quench to the quench detection interface (QDI) to implement the two-stage safety concept.

  5. Ultrasound-detected bone erosion is a relapse risk factor after discontinuation of biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis whose ultrasound power Doppler synovitis activity and clinical disease activity are well controlled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashiri, Shin-Ya; Fujikawa, Keita; Nishino, Ayako; Okada, Akitomo; Aramaki, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Toshimasa; Umeda, Masataka; Fukui, Shoichi; Suzuki, Takahisa; Koga, Tomohiro; Iwamoto, Naoki; Ichinose, Kunihiro; Tamai, Mami; Mizokami, Akinari; Nakamura, Hideki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Ueki, Yukitaka; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; Maeda, Takahiro; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2017-05-25

    In the present study, we explored the risk factors for relapse after discontinuation of biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (bDMARD) therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) whose ultrasound power Doppler (PD) synovitis activity and clinical disease activity were well controlled. In this observational study in clinical practice, the inclusion criteria were based on ultrasound disease activity and clinical disease activity, set as low or remission (Disease Activity Score in 28 joints based on erythrocyte sedimentation rate Ultrasound was performed in 22 joints of bilateral hands at discontinuation for evaluating synovitis severity and presence of bone erosion. Patients with a maximum PD score ≤1 in each joint were enrolled. Forty patients with RA were consecutively recruited (November 2010-March 2015) and discontinued bDMARD therapy. Variables at the initiation and discontinuation of bDMARD therapy that were predictive of relapse during the 12 months after discontinuation were assessed. The median patient age was 54.5 years, and the median disease duration was 3.5 years. Nineteen (47.5%) patients relapsed during the 12 months after the discontinuation of bDMARD therapy. Logistic regression analysis revealed that only the presence of bone erosion detected by ultrasound at discontinuation was predictive of relapse (OR 8.35, 95% CI 1.78-53.2, p = 0.006). No clinical characteristics or serologic biomarkers were significantly different between the relapse and nonrelapse patients. The ultrasound synovitis scores did not differ significantly between the groups. Our findings are the first evidence that ultrasound bone erosion may be a relapse risk factor after the discontinuation of bDMARD therapy in patients with RA whose PD synovitis activity and clinical disease activity are well controlled.

  6. Intrauterine photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Christopher; Barkley, Joel; Smith, Barbara

    2018-04-01

    Intrauterine photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging are probe-based imaging modalities with translational potential for use in detecting endometrial diseases. This deep-tissue imaging probe design allows for the retrofitting of commercially available endometrial sampling curettes. The imaging probe presented here has a 2.92-mm diameter and approximate length of 26 cm, which allows for entry into the human endometrial cavity, making it possible to use photoacoustic imaging and high-resolution ultrasound to characterize the uterus. We demonstrate the imaging probes' ability to provide structural information of an excised pig uterus using ultrasound imaging and detect photoacoustic signals at a radial depth of 1 cm. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  7. Detecting modulated signals in modulated noise: (II) neural thresholds in the songbird forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bee, Mark A; Buschermöhle, Michael; Klump, Georg M

    2007-10-01

    Sounds in the real world fluctuate in amplitude. The vertebrate auditory system exploits patterns of amplitude fluctuations to improve signal detection in noise. One experimental paradigm demonstrating these general effects has been used in psychophysical studies of 'comodulation detection difference' (CDD). The CDD effect refers to the fact that thresholds for detecting a modulated, narrowband noise signal are lower when the envelopes of flanking bands of modulated noise are comodulated with each other, but fluctuate independently of the signal compared with conditions in which the envelopes of the signal and flanking bands are all comodulated. Here, we report results from a study of the neural correlates of CDD in European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). We manipulated: (i) the envelope correlations between a narrowband noise signal and a masker comprised of six flanking bands of noise; (ii) the signal onset delay relative to masker onset; (iii) signal duration; and (iv) masker spectrum level. Masked detection thresholds were determined from neural responses using signal detection theory. Across conditions, the magnitude of neural CDD ranged between 2 and 8 dB, which is similar to that reported in a companion psychophysical study of starlings [U. Langemann & G.M. Klump (2007) Eur. J. Neurosci., 26, 1969-1978]. We found little evidence to suggest that neural CDD resulted from the across-channel processing of auditory grouping cues related to common envelope fluctuations and synchronous onsets between the signal and flanking bands. We discuss a within-channel model of peripheral processing that explains many of our results.

  8. Spatio-temporal encoding using narrow-band linear frequency modulated signals in synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a method for spatio-temporal encoding is presented for synthetic transmit aperture ultrasound imaging (STA). The purpose is to excite several transmitters at the same time in order to transmit more acoustic energy in every single transmission. When increasing the transmitted acousti...

  9. Variations of NMR signals by hyperpolarization and ultrasound; Variation von NMR-Signalen durch Hyperpolarisation und Ultraschall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelbertz, A.

    2006-07-01

    In this thesis it is described how p-NMR can be applied to metals with verlo low hydrogen concentrations and how a combination of ultrasound and NMR can lead to an improvement of the measureing method. As examples measurements on H{sub 2}O and ethanol are described. (HSI)

  10. Accuracy of multidetector row computed tomography for the detection of transplant vasculopathy: comparison with invasive coronary angiography and intravascular ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrascosa, P.; Capunay, C.; Carrascosa, J.; Perrone, S.; Deviggiano, A.; Lopez, E.M.; Lev, G.; Garcia, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for detection of luminal stenosis and cardiac allograft vasculopathy in comparison with coronary angiography (CA) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) respectively. Material and methods: Nineteen cardiac transplant patients scheduled for follow-up CA were included. MDCT coronary angiography was performed using a 16-row CT scanner within 7-14 days after CA and IVUS. Studies were analyzed by independent readers; two observers evaluated the CT datasets for the presence of coronary artery stenosis > 50% and allograft vasculopathy. Results: The sensitivity for detecting > 50% luminal stenosis was 80-88% and specificity, 98-99% and for detection of cardiac allograft vasculopathy, the sensitivity was 91-96% and specificity, 88-91%. Conclusion: In this preliminary series, our results indicate that MDCT coronary angiography was capable of detecting both significant coronary stenosis as well as diffuse intimal proliferation. This non-invasive procedure could be an alternative to CA and IVUS in the surveillance of heart transplant patients. (authors) [es

  11. Alternative vehicle detection technologies for traffic signal systems : technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Due to the well-documented problems associated with inductive loops, most jurisdictions have : replaced many intersection loops with video image vehicle detection systems (VIVDS). While VIVDS : have overcome some of the problems with loops such as tr...

  12. A Fast Detection Algorithm for the X-Ray Pulsar Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Liang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of the X-ray pulsar signal is important for the autonomous navigation system using X-ray pulsars. In the condition of short observation time and limited number of photons for detection, the noise does not obey the Gaussian distribution. This fact has been little considered extant. In this paper, the model of the X-ray pulsar signal is rebuilt as the nonhomogeneous Poisson distribution and, in the condition of a fixed false alarm rate, a fast detection algorithm based on maximizing the detection probability is proposed. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed detection algorithm.

  13. Development Of Signal Detection For Radar Navigation System

    OpenAIRE

    Theingi Win Hlaing; Hla Myo Tun; Zaw Min Naing; Win Khaing Moe

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to evaluate the performance of target detection in the presence of sea clutter. Radar detection of a background of unwanted clutter due to echoes from sea clutter or land is a problem of interest in the radar field. Radar detector has been developed by assuming the radar clutter is Gaussian distributed. However as technology emerges the radar distribution is seen to deviates from the Gaussian assumption. Thus detectors designs based on Gaussian assumption are no longer optimum...

  14. Detection of axillary lymph node metastases in breast carcinoma by technetium-99m sestamibi breast scintigraphy, ultrasound and conventional mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, W.W.M.; Yang, W.T.; Chan, Y.L.; Stewart, I.E.T.; Metreweli, C.; King, W.

    1996-01-01

    Axillary lymph node status is important in the staging of breast carcinoma. To evaluate the accuracy of technetium-99m sestamibi breast scintigraphy in detecting metastatic axillary lymph nodes as compared with other accepted imaging modalities, we performed 99m Tc-sestamibi breast scintigraphy, conventional mammography and ultrasound in 36 patients with primary untreated breast cardinoma. With histopathology as the gold standard, 99m Tc-sestamibi breast scintigraphy was found to yield true-positive results in 7 of 11 cases (64%) of axillary lymph nodes metastases and true-negative results in 18 of 20 cases (90%); it has an accuracy of 81%, a positive predictive value of 77.8% and a negative predicive value of 81.8%. (orig.)

  15. Comparison of the diagnostic value of FDG-PET/CT and axillary ultrasound for the detection of lymph node metastases in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riegger, Carolin; Heusner, Till A.; Koeninger, Angela; Kimmig, Rainer; Hartung, Verena; Bockisch, Andreas; Otterbach, Friedrich; Forsting, Michael; Antoch, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    Background. FDG-PET/CT is increasingly being used for breast cancer staging. Its diagnostic accuracy in comparison to ultrasound as the standard non-invasive imaging modality for the evaluation of axillary lymph nodes has yet not been evaluated. Purpose. To retrospectively compare the diagnostic value of full-dose, intravenously contrast-enhanced FDG-PET/CT and ultrasound for the detection of lymph node metastases in breast cancer patients. Material and Methods. Ninety patients (one patient with a bilateral carcinoma) (89 women, one man; mean age, 55.5 ± 16.6 years) suffering from primary breast cancer underwent whole-body FDG-PET/CT and axillary ultrasound. The ipsilateral axillary fossa (n = 91) was evaluated for metastatic spread. The sensitivity, specificity, the positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy of both methods were calculated. The sensitivity and accuracy were statistically compared using the McNemar Test (P <0.05). Analyses were made on a patient basis. The number of patients with extra-axillary locoregional lymph node metastases exclusively detected by FDG-PET/CT was evaluated. For axillary lymph node metastases histopathology served as the reference standard. Results. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of FDG-PET/CT for the detection of axillary lymph node metastases were 54%, 89%, 77%, 74%, and 75%, respectively. For ultrasound it was 38%, 78%, 54%, 65%, and 62%, respectively. FDG-PET/CT was significantly more accurate than ultrasound for the detection of axillary lymph node metastases (P = 0.019). There was no statistically significant difference between the sensitivity of both modalities (P = 0.0578). FDG-PET/CT detected extra-axillary locoregional lymph node metastases in seven patients (8%) that had not been detected by another imaging modality. Conclusion. Though more accurate compared to ultrasound for evaluating the axillary lymph node status FDG-PET/CT is only as sensitive as

  16. General theory of detection of signal induced in vibrating magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacyna, A.W.

    1980-01-01

    Assuming the point dipole approximation only and making use of the vectorial notation, signal (EMF) induced in a single-turn pick-up coil of the vibrating magnetometer are calculated for the case of any orientation of the coil, of vibration axis and of the magnetic moment of the sample. On the basis of formula obtained, three types of measurement geometries have been distinquished and for these the qualitative analysis is made. (author)

  17. Sources of Variability in the Detection of B-Lines, Using Lung Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivetta, Emanuele; Baldassa, Federico; Masellis, Serena; Bovaro, Federica; Lupia, Enrico; Maule, Milena M

    2018-06-01

    Lung ultrasound (LUS) is a largely employed diagnostic tool but an operational protocol for implementation has never been proposed. The lack of standardization clearly introduces variability in LUS results. We enrolled adult patients presenting for acute dyspnea with a clinical suspect of etiology related to heart failure. We calculated agreement among four providers in assessing B-lines. We varied probes, depth, evaluation time and scanning areas and we estimated the importance of each factors on B-lines assessment. Overall agreement among raters varied from a kappa of 0.70 to 0.81. The mean number of B-lines was 5.44 (95% confidence interval, CI, 4.1-6.8). This estimate did not suffer variation by the depth used (0.03, 95% CI -0.2-0.2, more B-lines, using 19 cm versus 10 cm). The use of a convex probe and expertise in LUS reduced the number of artifacts by 1.7 (95% CI 1.5-1.9) and 1.1 in comparison with a phased array probe and naive operators. Evaluation time increased estimates by 1.2 (95% CI 1-1.5) and 2.9 (95% CI 2.7-3.9) B-lines for 4" and 7" clips (reference was 2" clips). This study suggests that the probe, the evaluation time and the level of expertise might affect the results of quantitative assessment of B-lines. Copyright © 2018 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Photoplethysmographic signal waveform index for detection of increased arterial stiffness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilt, K; Meigas, K; Ferenets, R; Temitski, K; Viigimaa, M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to assess the validity of the photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveform index PPGAI for the estimation of increased arterial stiffness. For this purpose, PPG signals were recorded from 24 healthy subjects and from 20 type II diabetes patients. The recorded PPG signals were processed with the analysis algorithm developed and the waveform index PPGAI similar to the augmentation index (AIx) was calculated. As a reference, the aortic AIx was assessed and normalized for a heart rate of 75 bpm (AIx@75) by a SphygmoCor device. A strong correlation (r = 0.85) between the PPGAI and the aortic AIx@75 and a positive correlation of both indices with age were found. Age corrections for the indices PPGAI and AIx@75 as regression models from the signals of healthy subjects were constructed. Both indices revealed a significant difference between the groups of diabetes patients and healthy controls. However, the PPGAI provided the best statistical discrimination for the group of subjects with increased arterial stiffness. The waveform index PPGAI based on the inexpensive PPG technology can be considered as a perspective measure of increased arterial stiffness estimation in clinical screenings. (paper)

  19. A formal language to describe a wide class of failure detection and signal validation procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racz, A. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary). Atomic Energy Research Inst.

    1996-01-01

    In the present article we make the first step towards the implementation of a user-friendly, object-oriented system devoted to failure detection and signal validation purposes. After overviewing different signal modelling, residual making and hypothesis testing procedures, a mathematical tool is suggested to describe a general failure detection problem. Three different levels of the abstraction are distinguished; direct examination, preliminary decision support mechanism and indirect examination. Possible scenarios are introduced depending both on the objective properties of the investigated signal and the particular requirements prescribed by the expert himself. Finally it is showed how to build up systematically a complete, general failure detection procedure. (author).

  20. Spontaneous Alpha Power Lateralization Predicts Detection Performance in an Un-Cued Signal Detection Task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Boncompte

    Full Text Available Focusing one's attention by external guiding stimuli towards a specific area of the visual field produces systematical neural signatures. One of the most robust is the change in topological distribution of oscillatory alpha band activity across parieto-occipital cortices. In particular, decreases in alpha activity over contralateral and/or increases over ipsilateral scalp sites, respect to the side of the visual field where attention was focused. This evidence comes mainly from experiments where an explicit cue informs subjects where to focus their attention, thus facilitating detection of an upcoming target stimulus. However, recent theoretical models of attention have highlighted a stochastic or non-deterministic component related to visuospatial attentional allocation. In an attempt to evidence this component, here we analyzed alpha activity in a signal detection paradigm in the lack of informative cues; in the absence of preceding information about the location (and time of appearance of target stimuli. We believe that the unpredictability of this situation could be beneficial for unveiling this component. Interestingly, although total alpha power did not differ between Seen and Unseen conditions, we found a significant lateralization of alpha activity over parieto-occipital electrodes, which predicted behavioral performance. This effect had a smaller magnitude compared to paradigms in which attention is externally guided (cued. However we believe that further characterization of this spontaneous component of attention is of great importance in the study of visuospatial attentional dynamics. These results support the presence of a spontaneous component of visuospatial attentional allocation and they advance pre-stimulus alpha-band lateralization as one of its neural signatures.

  1. Detection of urinary leakage after radical retropubic prostatectomy by contrast enhanced ultrasound - do we still need conventional retrograde cystography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeppler, Gita M; Buchner, Alexander; Zaak, Dirk; Khoder, Wael; Staehler, Michael; Stief, Christian G; Reiser, Maximilian F; Clevert, Dirk-Andre

    2010-12-01

    To prospectively evaluate the accuracy of transvesical contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) as an alternative method for the detection of anastomotic leakage after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) in comparison with the current standard method of conventional retrograde cystography (CG). Forty-three patients underwent RRP for histologically proven localized prostate cancer. The vesico-urethral anastomosis was evaluated 8 days after RRP by CG and CEUS. Any peri-anastomotic leakage was assessed and determined in CG and CEUS as follows: no extravasation (EV), small leakage (≤0.5 cm), moderate leakage (>0.5 cm to ≤2 cm), large leakage (>2 cm diameter of EV seen). In total, 21 (49%) patients showed a watertight anastomosis. Ten (23%), two (4.7%) and ten (23%) patients showed a small, intermediate and large EV, respectively. In 31 cases (72%) there was 100% agreement of CG and CEUS for detection of no, moderate and large EV, respectively. In nine cases a small and in two cases a moderate EV was categorized as watertight anastomosis by CEUS. Only in one case did CG detect a small EV where a large EV was detected in CEUS. The agreement between both methods was 95% for detecting absence or large leakages. CEUS is a promising imaging modality that seems to be equivalent to CG for detecting the presence of a large anastomotic leakage that is clinically relevant for postoperative persistence of the indwelling catheter. CEUS could be a cheap and time-saving alternative to the CG without exposure of the patient to radiation. © 2010 THE AUTHORS. JOURNAL COMPILATION © 2010 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  2. Resonance detection of EEG signals using two-layer wavelet analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, H. M; Odeh, F.S.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the hybrid quadrature mirror filter (HQMF) algorithm applied to the electroencephalogram (EEG) signal during mental activity. The information contents of this signal, i.e., its medical diagnosis, lie in its power spectral density (PSD). The HQMF algorithm is a modified technique that is based on the shape and the details of the signal. If applied efficiently, the HQMF algorithm will produce much better results than conventional wavelet methods in detecting (diagnosing) the information of the EEG signal from its PSD. This technique is applicable not only to EEG signals, but is highly recommended to compression analysis and de noising techniques. (authors). 16 refs., 9 figs

  3. Balanced detection for self-mixing interferometry to improve signal-to-noise ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Changming; Norgia, Michele; Li, Kun

    2018-01-01

    We apply balanced detection to self-mixing interferometry for displacement and vibration measurement, using two photodiodes for implementing a differential acquisition. The method is based on the phase opposition of the self-mixing signal measured between the two laser diode facet outputs. The balanced signal obtained by enlarging the self-mixing signal, also by canceling of the common-due noises mainly due to disturbances on laser supply and transimpedance amplifier. Experimental results demonstrate the signal-to-noise ratio significantly improves, with almost twice signals enhancement and more than half noise decreasing. This method allows for more robust, longer-distance measurement systems, especially using fringe-counting.

  4. Improvement of detection limits of PIXE by substrate signal reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaulieu, S.; Nejedly, Z.; Campbell, J.L.; Edwards, G.C.; Dias, G.M.

    2002-01-01

    Limits of detection (LODs) for aerosol samples collected using PIXE International cascade impactors, were improved approximately 50% after reducing the cross-sectional area of the analytical beam based on results obtained from microscope photographs of aerosol deposits. Improvements in LODs were most noticeable for selected elements collected on the smaller stages of the impactor (stages 1-3)

  5. Joint Iterative Carrier Synchronization and Signal Detection Employing Expectation Maximization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibar, Darko; de Carvalho, Luis Henrique Hecker; Estaran Tolosa, Jose Manuel

    2014-01-01

    and nonlinear phase noise, compared to digital phase-locked loop (PLL) followed by hard decisions. Additionally, soft decision driven joint carrier synchronization and detection offers an improvement of 0.5 dB in terms of input power compared to hard decision digital PLL based carrier synchronization...

  6. Simultaneous detection of longitudinal and transverse bunch signals at ANKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kehrer, Benjamin; Blomley, Edmund; Brosi, Miriam; Bruendermann, Erik; Hiller, Nicole; Mueller, Anke-Susanne; Steinmann, Johannes; Schedler, Manuel; Schuh, Marcel; Schoenfeldt, Patrik; Smale, Nigel [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Schuetze, Paul [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The ANKA storage ring offers different operation modes including the short-bunch mode with bunch lengths tuned down to a few picoseconds. This can lead to the occurrence of microwave instabilities coupled to the emission of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the so-called 'bursts'. To study this CSR instability we use several turn-by-turn enabled detector systems to synchronously measure both the THz signal as well as bunch profiles. The different detectors are placed at different locations around the storage ring. Here we discuss the experimental setup and calibration of the various systems' synchronisation.

  7. Indirect fluorometric detection techniques on thin layer chromatography and effect of ultrasound on gel electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yinfa, Ma.

    1990-12-10

    Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) is a broadly applicable separation technique. It offers many advantages over high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), such as easily adapted for two-dimensional separation, for whole-column'' detection and for handling multiple samples, etc. However, due to its draggy development of detection techniques comparing with HPLC, TLC has not received the attention it deserves. Therefore, exploring new detection techniques is very important to the development of TLC. It is the principal of this dissertation to present a new detection method for TLC -- indirect fluorometric detection method. This detection technique is universal sensitive, nondestructive, and simple. This will be described in detail from Sections 1 through Section 5. Section 1 and 3 describe the indirect fluorometric detection of anions and nonelectrolytes in TLC. In Section 2, a detection method for cations based on fluorescence quenching of ethidium bromide is presented. In Section 4, a simple and interesting TLC experiment is designed, three different fluorescence detection principles are used for the determination of caffeine, saccharin and sodium benzoate in beverages. A laser-based indirect fluorometric detection technique in TLC is developed in Section 5. Section 6 is totally different from Sections 1 through 5. An ultrasonic effect on the separation of DNA fragments in agarose gel electrophoresis is investigated. 262 refs.

  8. Prehospital Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Tang Sun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound is a commonly used diagnostic tool in clinical conditions. With recent developments in technology, use of portable ultrasound devices has become feasible in prehospital settings. Many studies also proved the feasibility and accuracy of prehospital ultrasound. In this article, we focus on the use of prehospital ultrasound, with emphasis on trauma and chest ultrasound.

  9. Circuit Design for Sensor Detection Signal Conditioner Nitrate Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robeth Manurung

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate is one of macro nutrients very important for agriculture. The availability of nitrate in soil is limited because it is very easy to leaching by rain, therefore nitrate could be contaminated ground water by  over-process of fertilizer. This process could also produce inefficiency in agriculture if it happened continuesly without pre-analysis of farm field. The answer those problems, it is need to develop the ion sensor system to measure concentrations of nitrat in soil. The system is consist of nitrate ion sensor device, signal conditioning and data acquisition circuit. The design and fabrications of signal conditioning circuit which integrated into ion nitrate sensor system and will apply for agriculture. This sensor has been used amperometric with three electrodes configuration: working, reference  and auxiliarry; the ion senstive membrane has use conductive polymer. The screen printing technique has been choosen to fabricate electrodes and deposition technique for ion sensitive membrane is electropolymerization. The characterization of sensor has been conducted using nitrate standard solution with range of concentration between 1 µM–1 mM. The characterization has shown that sensor has a good response with cureent output between 2.8–4.71 µA, liniearity factor is 99.65% and time response 250 second.

  10. A multicenter hospital-based diagnosis study of automated breast ultrasound system in detecting breast cancer among Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Lin, Xi; Tan, Yanjuan; Zhu, Ying; Wang, Hui; Feng, Ruimei; Tang, Guoxue; Zhou, Xiang; Li, Anhua; Qiao, Youlin

    2018-04-01

    The automated breast ultrasound system (ABUS) is a potential method for breast cancer detection; however, its diagnostic performance remains unclear. We conducted a hospital-based multicenter diagnostic study to evaluate the clinical performance of the ABUS for breast cancer detection by comparing it to handheld ultrasound (HHUS) and mammography (MG). Eligible participants underwent HHUS and ABUS testing; women aged 40-69 years additionally underwent MG. Images were interpreted using the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS). Women in the BI-RADS categories 1-2 were considered negative. Women classified as BI-RADS 3 underwent magnetic resonance imaging to distinguish true- and false-negative results. Core aspiration or surgical biopsy was performed in women classified as BI-RADS 4-5, followed by a pathological diagnosis. Kappa values and agreement rates were calculated between ABUS, HHUS and MG. A total of 1,973 women were included in the final analysis. Of these, 1,353 (68.6%) and 620 (31.4%) were classified as BI-RADS categories 1-3 and 4-5, respectively. In the older age group, the agreement rate and Kappa value between the ABUS and HHUS were 94.0% and 0.860 (P<0.001), respectively; they were 89.2% and 0.735 (P<0.001) between the ABUS and MG, respectively. Regarding consistency between imaging and pathology results, 78.6% of women classified as BI-RADS 4-5 based on the ABUS were diagnosed with precancerous lesions or cancer; which was 7.2% higher than that of women based on HHUS. For BI-RADS 1-2, the false-negative rates of the ABUS and HHUS were almost identical and were much lower than those of MG. We observed a good diagnostic reliability for the ABUS. Considering its performance for breast cancer detection in women with high-density breasts and its lower operator dependence, the ABUS is a promising option for breast cancer detection in China.

  11. Wall lizards display conspicuous signals to conspecifics and reduce detection by avian predators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Visual signals are often under conflicting selection to be hidden from predators while being conspicuous to mates and rivals. Here, we investigated whether 3 different island populations of Aegean wall lizards (Podarcis erhardii) with variable coloration among diverse island habitats exhibit simultaneous camouflage and sexual signals. We examined whether signals appear better tuned to conspecific vision as opposed to that of avian predators, and whether background-matching camouflage and sexual signals are partitioned to specific body regions. This could facilitate both covert sexual signaling and camouflage according to the viewing perspectives of predators and conspecifics. We found that lizards typically appeared twice as conspicuous to conspecifics than to avian predators against the same visual background, largely due to lizards’ enhanced sensitivity to ultraviolet, suggesting that P. erhardii signals are tuned to conspecific vision to reduce detection by predators. Males were more conspicuous than females to both predators and conspecifics. In 2 populations, male backs were relatively more camouflaged to predators compared to signaling flanks, whereas in females, exposed and concealed surfaces were camouflaged to predators and generally did not differ in background matching. These findings indicate that lizard coloration evolves under the competing demands of natural and sexual selection to promote signals that are visible to conspecifics while being less perceptible to avian predators. They also elucidate how interactions between natural and sexual selection influence signal detectability and partitioning to different body regions, highlighting the importance of considering receiver vision, viewing perspectives, and signaling environments in studies of signal evolution. PMID:25419083

  12. Evaluating the impact of grade crossing safety factors through signal detection theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    The purpose of this effort was to apply signal detection theory to descriptively model the impact : of five grade crossing safety factors to understand their effect on driver decision making. The : safety factors consisted of: improving commercial mo...

  13. Movement and respiration detection using statistical properties of the FMCW radar signal

    KAUST Repository

    Kiuru, Tero; Metso, Mikko; Jardak, Seifallah; Pursula, Pekka; Hakli, Janne; Hirvonen, Mervi; Sepponen, Raimo

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a 24 GHz FMCW radar system for detection of movement and respiration using change in the statistical properties of the received radar signal, both amplitude and phase. We present the hardware and software segments of the radar

  14. Time-Frequency Analysis of Terahertz Radar Signals for Rapid Heart and Breath Rate Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Massar, Melody L

    2008-01-01

    We develop new time-frequency analytic techniques which facilitate the detection of a person's heart and breath rates from the Doppler shift the movement of their body induces in a terahertz radar signal...

  15. Detecting impact signal in mechanical fault diagnosis under chaotic and Gaussian background noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinfeng; Duan, Jie; Chen, Zhuo; Li, Huiyong; Xie, Julan; Chen, Hanwen

    2018-01-01

    In actual fault diagnosis, useful information is often submerged in heavy noise, and the feature information is difficult to extract. Traditional methods, such like stochastic resonance (SR), which using noise to enhance weak signals instead of suppressing noise, failed in chaotic background. Neural network, which use reference sequence to estimate and reconstruct the background noise, failed in white Gaussian noise. To solve these problems, a novel weak signal detection method aimed at the problem of detecting impact signal buried under heavy chaotic and Gaussian background noise is proposed. First, the proposed method obtains the virtual reference sequence by constructing the Hankel data matrix. Then an M-order optimal FIR filter is designed, which can minimize the output power of background noise and pass the weak periodic signal undistorted. Finally, detection and reconstruction of the weak periodic signal are achieved from the output SBNR (signal to background noise ratio). The simulation shows, compared with the stochastic resonance (SR) method, the proposed method can detect the weak periodic signal in chaotic noise background while stochastic resonance (SR) method cannot. Compared with the neural network method, (a) the proposed method does not need a reference sequence while neural network method needs one; (b) the proposed method can detect the weak periodic signal in white Gaussian noise background while the neural network method fails, in chaotic noise background, the proposed method can detect the weak periodic signal under a lower SBNR (about 8-17 dB lower) than the neural network method; (c) the proposed method can reconstruct the weak periodic signal precisely.

  16. Detection of non-stationary leak signals at NPP primary circuit by cross-correlation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimanskij, S.B.

    2007-01-01

    A leak-detection system employing high-temperature microphones has been developed for the RBMK and ATR (Japan) reactors. Further improvement of the system focused on using cross-correlation analysis of the spectral components of the signal to detect a small leak at an early stage of development. Since envelope processes are less affected by distortions than are wave processes, they give a higher-degree of correlation and can be used to detect leaks with lower signal-noise ratios. Many simulation tests performed at nuclear power plants have shown that the proposed methods can be used to detect and find the location of a small leak [ru

  17. Signal processing for solar array monitoring, fault detection, and optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Henry; Spanias, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Although the solar energy industry has experienced rapid growth recently, high-level management of photovoltaic (PV) arrays has remained an open problem. As sensing and monitoring technology continues to improve, there is an opportunity to deploy sensors in PV arrays in order to improve their management. In this book, we examine the potential role of sensing and monitoring technology in a PV context, focusing on the areas of fault detection, topology optimization, and performance evaluation/data visualization. First, several types of commonly occurring PV array faults are considered and detection algorithms are described. Next, the potential for dynamic optimization of an array's topology is discussed, with a focus on mitigation of fault conditions and optimization of power output under non-fault conditions. Finally, monitoring system design considerations such as type and accuracy of measurements, sampling rate, and communication protocols are considered. It is our hope that the benefits of monitoring presen...

  18. Electromagnetic Signal Feedback Control for Proximity Detection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Adam K.

    Coal is the most abundant fossil fuel in the United States and remains an essential source of energy. While more than half of coal production comes from surface mining, nearly twice as many workers are employed by underground operations. One of the key pieces of equipment used in underground coal mining is the continuous mining machine. These large and powerful machines are operated in confined spaces by remote control. Since 1984, 40 mine workers in the U. S. have been killed when struck or pinned by a continuous mining machine. It is estimated that a majority of these accidents could have been prevented with the application of proximity detection systems. While proximity detection systems can significantly increase safety around a continuous mining machine, there are some system limitations. Commercially available proximity warning systems for continuous mining machines use magnetic field generators to detect workers and establish safe work areas around the machines. Several environmental factors, however, can influence and distort the magnetic fields. To minimize these effects, a control system has been developed using electromagnetic field strength and generator current to stabilize and control field drift induced by internal and external environmental factors. A laboratory test set-up was built using a ferrite-core magnetic field generator to produce a stable magnetic field. Previous work based on a field-invariant magnetic flux density model, which generically describes the electromagnetic field, is expanded upon. The analytically established transferable shell-based flux density distribution model is used to experimentally validate the control system. By controlling the current input to the ferrite-core generator, a more reliable and consistent magnetic field is produced. Implementation of this technology will improve accuracy and performance of existing commercial proximity detection systems. These research results will help reduce the risk of traumatic

  19. Diagnostic and prognostic values of standard and dynamic ultrasound in early detection and treatment of developmental hip deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajić Miloš

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction A clinical examination of a newborn infant is indispensable, but certainly insufficient for a diagnosis of developmental deformity of the hip (DDH to be made. The use of the ultrasound in the diagnostics of DDH, beside the visualization and making the respective clinical findings objective, made possible verification (still without a distinction of the tissues of the two basic categories of the primary condition of a newborn baby hips. Objective The purpose of this study was to find out the optimal methodological procedure for the early detection of DDH in newborn infants and suckling. Method During 2002 and 2003, at the Neonatal Department of the Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics, Novi Sad, as well as at the Institute for Orthopedic Surgery "Banjica" Belgrade, there were 4016 newborn infants examined, i.e. 8032 hips clinically and by ultrasound. The standard Graf’s methodological procedure was applied completely, supplemented by the dynamic examination by pushing back and stretching femora along, that is by the techniques of Couture and Harcke. Results In order to categorize the condition of the hip of a newborn infant, the sonographic classification of R. Graaf, Th. Harcke and D. Pajić was used. The ultrasound analysis demonstrated a frequency of the sonotype Ia in 552 (13.08% of the newborn infants, the sonotype Ib in 2934 (73.00%, the sonotype IIa+ in 481 (11.97% and the pathological cases with sonotypes IIg 42 (1.04%, IId 17 (0.42%, IIIa 15 (0.37% and IV 5 (0.12%. The total number of unstable critical, discentering and discentered cases of DDH was 79 (1.95%. The incidence of DDH was three times more frequent in girls, mostly bilateral; when unilateral, it was more frequent in the left one. The results of the early treatment were uniformly excellent, but in two cases there was established osteochondritis of the first degree (Pavlik’s harness 1, Von Rosen’s splint 1. Conclusion It has been proven that the clinical

  20. Advanced Signal Processing for Thermal Flaw Detection; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VALLEY, MICHAEL T.; HANSCHE, BRUCE D.; PAEZ, THOMAS L.; URBINA, ANGEL; ASHBAUGH, DENNIS M.

    2001-01-01

    Dynamic thermography is a promising technology for inspecting metallic and composite structures used in high-consequence industries. However, the reliability and inspection sensitivity of this technology has historically been limited by the need for extensive operator experience and the use of human judgment and visual acuity to detect flaws in the large volume of infrared image data collected. To overcome these limitations new automated data analysis algorithms and software is needed. The primary objectives of this research effort were to develop a data processing methodology that is tied to the underlying physics, which reduces or removes the data interpretation requirements, and which eliminates the need to look at significant numbers of data frames to determine if a flaw is present. Considering the strengths and weakness of previous research efforts, this research elected to couple both the temporal and spatial attributes of the surface temperature. Of the possible algorithms investigated, the best performing was a radiance weighted root mean square Laplacian metric that included a multiplicative surface effect correction factor and a novel spatio-temporal parametric model for data smoothing. This metric demonstrated the potential for detecting flaws smaller than 0.075 inch in inspection areas on the order of one square foot. Included in this report is the development of a thermal imaging model, a weighted least squares thermal data smoothing algorithm, simulation and experimental flaw detection results, and an overview of the ATAC (Automated Thermal Analysis Code) software that was developed to analyze thermal inspection data

  1. Prescription-event monitoring: developments in signal detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Germano

    2007-01-01

    Prescription-event monitoring (PEM) is a non-interventional intensive method for post-marketing drug safety monitoring of newly licensed medicines. PEM studies are cohort studies where exposure is obtained from a centralised service and outcomes from simple questionnaires completed by general practitioners. Follow-up forms are sent for selected events. Because PEM captures all events and not only the suspected adverse drug reactions, PEM cohorts potentially differ in respect to the distribution of number of events per person depending on the nature of the drug under study. This variance can be related either with the condition for which the drug is prescribed (e.g. a condition causing high morbidity will have, in average, a higher number of events per person compared with a condition with lower morbidity) or with the drug effect itself. This paper describes an exploratory investigation of the distortion caused by product-related variations of the number of events to the interpretation of the proportional reporting ratio (PRR) values ("the higher the PRR, the greater the strength of the signal") computed using drug-cohort data. We studied this effect by assessing the agreement between the PRR based on events (event of interest vs all other events) and PRR based on cases (cases with the event of interest vs cases with any other events). PRR were calculated for all combinations reported to ten selected drugs against a comparator of 81 other drugs. Three of the ten drugs had a cohort with an apparent higher proportion of patients with lower number of events. The PRRs based on events were systematically higher than the PRR based on cases for the combinations reported to these three drugs. Additionally, when applying the threshold criteria for signal screening (n > or =3, PRR > or =1.5 and Chi-squared > or =4), the binary agreement was generally high but apparently lower for these three drugs. In conclusion, the distribution of events per patient in drug cohorts shall be

  2. Simultaneous ultrasound and photoacoustics based flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnyawali, Vaskar; Strohm, Eric M.; Tsai, Scott S. H.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2018-04-01

    We have developed a flow cytometer based on simultaneous detection of ultrasound and photoacoustic waves from individual particles/cells flowing in a microfluidic channel. Our polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based hydrodynamic 3-dimensional (3D) flow-focusing microfluidic device contains a cross-junction channel, a micro-needle (ID 100 μm and OD 200 μm) insert, and a 3D printed frame to hold and align a high frequency (center frequency 375 MHz) ultrasound transducer. The focused flow passes through a narrow focal zone with lateral and axial focal lengths of 6-8 μm and 15-20 μm, respectively. Both the lateral and axial alignments are achieved by screwing the transducer to the frame onto the PDMS device. Individual particles pass through an interrogation zone in the microfluidic channel with a collinearly aligned ultrasound transducer and a focused 532 nm wavelength laser beam. The particles are simultaneously insonified by high-frequency ultrasound and irradiated by a laser beam. The ultrasound backscatter and laser generated photoacoustic waves are detected for each passing particle. The backscattered ultrasound and photoacoustic signal are strongly dependent on the size, morphology, mechanical properties, and material properties of the flowing particles; these parameters can be extracted by analyzing unique features in the power spectrum of the signals. Frequencies less than 100 MHz do not have these unique spectral signatures. We show that we can reliably distinguish between different particles in a sample using the acoustic-based flow cytometer. This technique, when extended to biomedical applications, allows us to rapidly analyze the spectral signatures from individual single cells of a large cell population, with applications towards label-free detection and characterization of healthy and diseased cells.

  3. Mine detection using SF-GPR: A signal processing approach for resolution enhancement and clutter reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Brian; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne; Larsen, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Proper clutter reduction is essential for Ground Penetrating Radar data since low signal-to-clutter ratio prevent correct detection of mine objects. A signal processing approach for resolution enhancement and clutter reduction used on Stepped-Frequency Ground Penetrating Radar (SF-GPR) data is pr....... The clutter reduction method is based on basis function decomposition of the SF-GPR time-series from which the clutter and the signal are separated....

  4. Detection of Artificially Generated Seismic Signals using Balloon-borne Infrasound Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamoorthy, Siddharth; Komjathy, Attila; Pauken, Michael T.; Cutts, James A.; Garcia, Raphael F.; Mimoun, David; Cadu, Alexandre; Sournac, Anthony; Jackson, Jennifer M.; Lai, Voon Hui; Bowman, Daniel C.

    2018-01-01

    We conducted an experiment in Pahrump, Nevada, in June 2017, where artificial seismic signals were created using a seismic hammer, and the possibility of detecting them from their acoustic signature was examined. In this work, we analyze the pressure signals recorded by highly sensitive barometers deployed on the ground and on tethers suspended from balloons. Our signal processing results show that wind noise experienced by a barometer on a free‐flying balloon is lower compared to one on a mo...

  5. Evaluation of signal processing for boiling noise detection. Further analysis of BOR-60 reactor noise data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledwidge, T.J.; Black, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The present paper deals with investigations of acoustic signals from a boiling experiment performed on the BOR 60 reactor in the USSR. Signals have been analysed in frequency as well as in time domain. Signal characteristics successfully used to detect the boiling process have been found in time domain. A proposal for in-service boiling monitoring by acoustic means is described. (author). 3 refs, 16 figs

  6. Detecting signals of seasonal influenza severity through age dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Elizabeth C.; Viboud, Cécile; Simonsen, Lone

    2015-01-01

    stages of an outbreak. To address the limitations of traditional indicators, we propose a novel severity index based on influenza age dynamics estimated from routine physician diagnosis data that can be used retrospectively and for early warning. METHODS: We developed a quantitative 'ground truth......' severity benchmark that synthesizes multiple traditional severity indicators from publicly available influenza surveillance data in the United States. Observing that the age distribution of cases may signal severity early in an epidemic, we constructed novel retrospective and early warning severity indexes....... The retrospective index was well correlated with the severity benchmark and correctly identified the two most severe seasons. The early warning index performance varied, but it projected 2007-08 as relatively severe 10 weeks prior to the epidemic peak. Influenza severity varied significantly among states within...

  7. Heat Shock Proteins as Danger Signals for Cancer Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seigneuric, Renaud; Mjahed, Hajare; Gobbo, Jessica; Joly, Anne-Laure; Berthenet, Kevin; Shirley, Sarah; Garrido, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    First discovered in 1962, heat shock proteins (HSPs) are highly studied with about 35,500 publications on the subject to date. HSPs are highly conserved, function as molecular chaperones for a large panel of “client” proteins and have strong cytoprotective properties. Induced by many different stress signals, they promote cell survival in adverse conditions. Therefore, their roles have been investigated in several conditions and pathologies where HSPs accumulate, such as in cancer. Among the diverse mammalian HSPs, some members share several features that may qualify them as cancer biomarkers. This review focuses mainly on three inducible HSPs: HSP27, HPS70, and HSP90. Our survey of recent literature highlights some recurring weaknesses in studies of the HSPs, but also identifies findings that indicate that some HSPs have potential as cancer biomarkers for successful clinical applications.

  8. Criteria for assessing the quality of signal processing techniques for acoustic leak detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhakar, R.; Singh, O.P.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the criteria used in the first IAEA coordinated research programme to assess the quality of signal processing techniques for sodium boiling noise detection are highlighted. Signal processing techniques, using new features sensitive to boiling and a new approach for achieving higher reliability of detection, which were developed at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research are also presented. 10 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  9. Heterodyne detection of CPFSK signals with and without wavelength conversion up to 5 Gb/s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rune Johan Skullerud; Ebskamp, F.; Mikkelsen, Benny

    1993-01-01

    Detection of wavelength converted signals by a coherent continuous-phase frequency-shift-keying receiver is reported. The signals are wavelength converted over 35 nm, and record receiver sensitivities of -38.7 dBm at 4.0Gb/s and -35.6 dBm at 4.8Gb/s are obtained. Comparison between results...

  10. Diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound, computed tomography, and endoscopic retrograde choleangiopancreatography in the detection of obstructive jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasanen, P.A.; Partainen, K.; Pikkarainen, P.; Alhava, E.; Pirinen, A.; Janatuinen, E.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in the distinction between extrahepatic and intrahepatic causes of jaundice. The limit for the inclusion to the study was defined as a serum bilirubin concentration ≥40μmol/l. Altogether 187 jaundiced patients were studied. The sensitivities of US, CT and ERCP were 63%, 77%, and 87%, respectively. The differences between all these methods were statistically significant. The specificities and positive predictive values were high, reaching 96-99%, but the negative predictive values were low, ranging between 38% and 60%. Choledochal stone disease constituted the main etiology of false-negative studies in all investigations. Imaging procedures have a prominent role in the diagnostic study of the jaundiced patient, but it is obvious that their diagnostic accuracy may vary between institutions because of the variance in local experience and expertise and because of the differences in diseases causing jaundice. 37 refs., 5 tabs

  11. [Interest using 3D ultrasound and MRI fusion biopsy for prostate cancer detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marien, A; De Castro Abreu, A; Gill, I; Villers, A; Ukimura, O

    2017-09-01

    The strategic therapy for prostate cancer depends on histo-pronostics data, which could be upgraded by obtaining targeted biopsies (TB) with MRI (magnetic resonance imagery) fusion 3D ultrasound. To compare diagnostic yield of image fusion guided prostate biopsy using image fusion of multi-parametric MRI (mpMRI) with 3D-TRUS. Between January 2010 and April 2013, 179 consecutive patients underwent outpatient TRUS biopsy using the real-time 3D TRUS tracking system (Urostation™). These patients underwent MRI-TRUS fusion targeted biopsies (TB) with 3D volume data of the MRI elastically fused with 3D TRUS at the time of biopsy. A hundred and seventy-three patients had TBs with fusion. Mean biopsy core per patient were 11.1 (6-14) for SB and 2.4 (1-6) for TB. SBs were positive in 11% compared to 56% for TB (Pperform the higher level of MR/US fusion and should be use for active surveillance. 4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Accuracy of Medical Students in Detecting Pleural Effusion Using Lung Ultrasound as an Adjunct to the Physical Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Peter; Oleskevich, Sharon; Dyachenko, Alina; McCusker, Jane; Lewis, John

    2018-03-25

    This study compared the accuracy of medical students in identifying pleural effusion in hospitalized patients using the physical examination versus lung ultrasound (US). Fourth-year medical students (n = 14) received 20 hours of general practical US training (including 2 hours of specialized lung US training) plus theoretical and video documentation. The students used the physical examination alone versus the physical examination plus lung US to document the presence or absence of pleural effusion in the right and left hemithoraces of hospitalized patients (n = 11 patients; 22 hemithoraces examined 544 times in total). The reference standard for identification of pleural effusion was a lung US examination by 2 expert point-of-care sonographers. The odds of correctly identifying the presence versus absence of pleural effusion was 5 times greater with lung US as an adjunct to the physical examination compared to the physical examination alone (odds ratio [OR], 5.1 from multivariate logistic regression; 95% confidence interval, 3.3-8.0). The addition of lung US to the physical examination resulted in an increase in sensitivity from 48% to 90%, in specificity from 73% to 86%, and in accuracy from 60% to 88%. The benefits of using US were greater when pleural effusion was present versus absent (OR, 10.8 versus 2.4) and when examining older versus younger patients (OR, 10.2 versus 2.8). These results demonstrate that medical students' ability to detect the presence or absence of pleural effusion is superior when using lung US as an adjunct to the physical examination than when using the physical examination alone. © 2018 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  13. Detection of magnetic resonance signals using a magnetoresistive sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander; Xu, Shoujun; Hilty, Christian; Ledbetter, Micah P; Bouchard, Louis S

    2013-10-01

    A method and apparatus are described wherein a micro sample of a fluidic material may be assayed without sample contamination using NMR techniques, in combination with magnetoresistive sensors. The fluidic material to be assayed is first subject to pre-polarization, in one embodiment, by passage through a magnetic field. The magnetization of the fluidic material is then subject to an encoding process, in one embodiment an rf-induced inversion by passage through an adiabatic fast-passage module. Thereafter, the changes in magnetization are detected by a pair of solid-state magnetoresistive sensors arranged in gradiometer mode. Miniaturization is afforded by the close spacing of the various modules.

  14. Detection of Epileptic Seizures with Multi-modal Signal Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa

    convulsive seizures tested. Another study was performed, involving quantitative parameters in the time and frequency domain. The study showed, that there are several differences between tonic seizures and the tonic phase of GTC seizures and furthermore revealed differences of the epileptic (tonic and tonic...... phase of GTC) and simulated seizures. This was valuable information concerning a seizure detection algorithm, and the findings from this research provided evidence for a change in the definition of these seizures by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE). Our final study presents a novel...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a pelvic ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that ... and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures that represent the flow of blood through ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are ... Ultrasound page for more information . Ultrasound examinations can help diagnose symptoms experienced by women such as: pelvic ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal, vaginal (for women), and rectal (for men). These exams are frequently ... pelvic ultrasound: abdominal ( transabdominal ) vaginal ( transvaginal / endovaginal ) for women rectal ( transrectal ) for men A Doppler ultrasound exam ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ... Obstetrical Ultrasound page for more information . Ultrasound examinations can help diagnose symptoms experienced by women such as: ...

  19. Observer performance in detecting multiple radiographic signals: prediction and analysis using a generalized ROC approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz, C.E.; Starr, S.J.; Lusted, L.B.

    1975-01-01

    The theories of decision processes and signal detection provide a framework for the evaluation of observer performance. Some radiologic procedures involve a search for multiple similar lesions, as in gallstone or pneumoconiosis examinations. A model is presented which attempts to predict, from the conventional receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve describing the detectability of a single visual signal in a radiograph, observer performance in an experiment requiring detection of more than one such signal. An experiment is described which tests the validity of this model for the case of detecting the presence of zero, one, or two low-contrast radiographic images of a two-mm.-diameter lucite bead embedded in radiographic mottle. Results from six observers, including three radiologists, confirm the validity of the model and suggest that human observer performance for relatively complex detection tasks can be predicted from the results of simpler experiments

  20. Suitable or optimal noise benefits in signal detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shujun; Yang, Ting; Tang, Mingchun; Wang, Pin; Zhang, Xinzheng

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Six intervals of additive noises divided according to the two constraints. • Derivation of the suitable additive noise to meet the two constraints. • Formulation of the suitable noise for improvability or nonimprovability. • Optimal noises to minimize P FA , maximize P D and maximize the overall improvement. - Abstract: We present an effective way to generate the suitable or the optimal additive noises which can achieve the three goals of the noise enhanced detectability, i.e., the maximum detection probability (P D ), the minimum false alarm probability (P FA ) and the maximum overall improvement of P D and P FA , without increasing P FA and decreasing P D in a binary hypothesis testing problem. The mechanism of our method is that we divide the discrete vectors into six intervals and choose the useful or partial useful vectors from these intervals to form the additive noise according to different requirements. The form of the optimal noise is derived and proven as a randomization of no more than two discrete vectors in our way. Moreover, how to choose suitable and optimal noises from the six intervals are given. Finally, numerous examples are presented to illustrate the theoretical analysis, where the background noises are Gaussian, symmetric and asymmetric Gaussian mixture noise, respectively.

  1. Telemedicine Based Ultrasound for Detecting Neonatal Heart Disease in Babies at Remote Military or Native American Health Care Facilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sahn, David J; Kinney, James; Puntel, Robert

    2007-01-01

    ... & Science University in Portland will test the hypothesis that trained primary care practitioners or nurses can with telemedicine supervision perform cardiac ultrasound exams on neonates at risk...

  2. Telemedicine Based Ultrasound for Detecting Neonatal Heart Disease in Babies at Remote Military of Native American Health Care Facilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sahn, David J

    2006-01-01

    ... & Science University in Portland, will test the hypothesis that trained primary care practitioners or nurses can, with telemedicine supervision, perform cardiac ultrasound exams on neonates at risk...

  3. Telemedicine Based Ultrasound for Detecting Neonatal Heart Disease in Babies at Remote Military or Native American Health Care Facilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sahn, David J; Kinney, James; Puntel, Robert

    2008-01-01

    ... & Science University in Portland will test the hypothesis that trained primary care practitioners or nurses can with telemedicine supervision perform cardiac ultrasound exams on neonates at risk...

  4. Epidemiology of urolithiasis with emphasis on ultrasound detection: A retrospective analysis of 5371 cases in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study was conducted to determine the prevalence of urinary calculi in the indigenous population of Saudi Arabia and compare it with expatriates of different nationalities working in Saudi Arabia with emphasis on the anatomic location of the calculi and the role of ultrasound in the detection and management. The study included 5371 patients (both sexes, mean age 36.6 years examined by us from September 2004 to February 2008. The patients hailed from 30 countries, which included Bangladesh (42.3%, Pakistan (18.3%, Yemen (17.5%, India (6.5%, Sudan (3.4%, Saudi Arabia (2.8%, Egypt (2.3% and Eritrea (1.7%. All patients were referred for abdominal/renal ultrasonography. Urinary calculi were detected in 1029 patients. The distribution of calculi was as follows: Renal 73.3%, pelviureteric junction 2.3%, proximal, middle and distal thirds of the ureter 13%, vesicouretic junction 9.8%, vesical 1.1% and urethral 0.5%. The prevalence of urinary calculi according to ethnic origin in descending order of frequency was Egyptians (29.5%, Pakistani (24.9%, Indian (23.3%,Yemeni (20.5%, Sudanese (17.6%, Bangladeshi (16.2%, Eritrean (15.4% and Saudi Arabian (7.4%. Urinary calculi were found in 19.1% of the studied population. Approximately three-quarters of the calculi were located within the kidney. The nationalities with the highest prevalences were Egyptian, Pakistani and Indian.

  5. Model-based inversion for the characterization of crack-like defects detected by ultrasound in a cladded component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haiat, G.

    2004-03-01

    This work deals with the inversion of ultrasonic data. The industrial context of the study in the non destructive evaluation of the internal walls of French reactor pressure vessels. Those inspections aim at detecting and characterizing cracks. Ultrasonic data correspond to echographic responses obtained with a transducer acting in pulse echo mode. Cracks are detected by crack tip diffraction effect. The analysis of measured data can become difficult because of the presence of a cladding, which surface is irregular. Moreover, its constituting material differs from the one of the reactor vessel. A model-based inverse method uses simulation of propagation and of diffraction of ultrasound taking into account the irregular properties of the cladding surface, as well as the heterogeneous nature of the component. The method developed was implemented and tested on a set of representative cases. Its performances were evaluated by the analysis of experimental results. The precision obtained in the laboratory on experimental cases treated is conform with industrial expectations motivating this study. (author)

  6. The role of second-look ultrasound of BIRADS-3 mammary lesions detected by breast MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiaschetti, V., E-mail: fiaschettivaleria@tin.it [Department of Imaging Diagnostic, Molecular Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiation Therapy University Hospital ' Tor Vergata' , 81 Oxford street, 00133 Rome (Italy); Salimbeni, C.; Gaspari, E.; Dembele, G. Kabunda; Bolacchi, F.; Cossu, E.; Pistolese, C.A.; Perretta, T.; Simonetti, G. [Department of Imaging Diagnostic, Molecular Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiation Therapy University Hospital ' Tor Vergata' , 81 Oxford street, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To asses the value of second-look ultrasound (US) for identifying BIRADS 3 (Breast Imaging Reporting Data System) mammary lesions detected by breast Magnetic Resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods: From April 2008 to May 2009 330 breast MRI were performed of which 60 patients are classified as BIRADS 3. 84 lesions underwent second-look US and percutaneous vacuum biopsy Vacora system US-guided. Statistical analysis: lesions were stratified into two groups: visible on US (Group 1) and not visible on US (Group 2). The clinical impact of second-look US was studied in terms of negative predictive value (NPV). Results: The positive predictive value (PPV) of category 3 BIRADS MRI was found to be 89%. Second look-US results detected lesions in 51% of the MRI enhancing lesions. The second look-US showed a NPV of 97%. The NPV of second look-US was significantly greater than the NPV of MRI BIRADS 3 (97% vs 89%, p < 0.05). The logistic regression analysis showed a higher number of malignant lesions in group 1 than in group 2 (7vs 2, OR 3.7, p < 0.05). Conclusions: The second-look US permitted the correct management of subcentimetric MRI BIRADS 3 lesions not visible with conventional imaging tecniques.

  7. The role of second-look ultrasound of BIRADS-3 mammary lesions detected by breast MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiaschetti, V.; Salimbeni, C.; Gaspari, E.; Dembele, G. Kabunda; Bolacchi, F.; Cossu, E.; Pistolese, C.A.; Perretta, T.; Simonetti, G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To asses the value of second-look ultrasound (US) for identifying BIRADS 3 (Breast Imaging Reporting Data System) mammary lesions detected by breast Magnetic Resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods: From April 2008 to May 2009 330 breast MRI were performed of which 60 patients are classified as BIRADS 3. 84 lesions underwent second-look US and percutaneous vacuum biopsy Vacora system US-guided. Statistical analysis: lesions were stratified into two groups: visible on US (Group 1) and not visible on US (Group 2). The clinical impact of second-look US was studied in terms of negative predictive value (NPV). Results: The positive predictive value (PPV) of category 3 BIRADS MRI was found to be 89%. Second look-US results detected lesions in 51% of the MRI enhancing lesions. The second look-US showed a NPV of 97%. The NPV of second look-US was significantly greater than the NPV of MRI BIRADS 3 (97% vs 89%, p < 0.05). The logistic regression analysis showed a higher number of malignant lesions in group 1 than in group 2 (7vs 2, OR 3.7, p < 0.05). Conclusions: The second-look US permitted the correct management of subcentimetric MRI BIRADS 3 lesions not visible with conventional imaging tecniques.

  8. How reassuring is a normal breast ultrasound in assessment of a screen-detected mammographic abnormality? A review of interval cancers after assessment that included ultrasound evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, M.L. [Breastscreen WA, Perth (Australia); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth (Australia); Welman, C.J. [Breastscreen WA, Perth (Australia); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth (Australia); Department of Radiology, Fremantle Hospital and Health Service, Fremantle (Australia); Celliers, L.M., E-mail: liesl.celliers@health.wa.gov.au [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth (Australia); Department of Radiology, Fremantle Hospital and Health Service, Fremantle (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    Aim: To review factors resulting in a false-negative outcome or delayed cancer diagnosis in women recalled for further evaluation, including ultrasound, after an abnormal screening mammogram. Materials and methods: Of 646,692 screening mammograms performed between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2004, 34,533 women were recalled for further assessment. Nine hundred and sixty-four interval cancers were reported in this period. Forty-six of these women had been recalled for further assessment, which specifically included ultrasound evaluation in the preceding 24 months, and therefore, met the inclusion criteria for this study. Screening mammograms, further mammographic views, ultrasound scans, clinical findings, and histopathology results were retrospectively reviewed by two consultant breast radiologists. Results: The interval cancer developed in the contralateral breast (n = 9), ipsilateral breast, but different site (n = 6), and ipsilateral breast at the same site (n = 31) as the abnormality for which they had recently been recalled. In the latter group, 10 were retrospectively classified as a false-negative outcome, nine had a delay in obtaining a biopsy, and 12 had a delay due to a non-diagnostic initial biopsy. Various factors relating to these outcomes are discussed. Conclusion: Out of 34,533 women who attended for an assessment visit and the 46 women who subsequently developed an interval breast cancer, 15 were true interval cancers, 10 had a false-negative assessment outcome, and 21 had a delay to cancer diagnosis on the basis of a number of factors. When there is discrepancy between the imaging and histopathology results, a repeat biopsy rather than early follow-up would have avoided a delay in some cases. A normal ultrasound examination should not deter the radiologist from proceeding to stereotactic biopsy, if the index mammographic lesion is suspicious of malignancy.

  9. Adaptive endpoint detection of seismic signal based on auto-correlated function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Wanchun; Shi Ren

    2001-01-01

    Based on the analysis of auto-correlation function, the notion of the distance between auto-correlation function was quoted, and the characterization of the noise and the signal with noise were discussed by using the distance. Then, the method of auto- adaptable endpoint detection of seismic signal based on auto-correlated similarity was summed up. The steps of implementation and determining of the thresholds were presented in detail. The experimental results that were compared with the methods based on artificial detecting show that this method has higher sensitivity even in a low signal with noise ratio circumstance

  10. MMSE-based algorithm for joint signal detection, channel and noise variance estimation for OFDM systems

    CERN Document Server

    Savaux, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    This book presents an algorithm for the detection of an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in a cognitive radio context by means of a joint and iterative channel and noise estimation technique. Based on the minimum mean square criterion, it performs an accurate detection of a user in a frequency band, by achieving a quasi-optimal channel and noise variance estimation if the signal is present, and by estimating the noise level in the band if the signal is absent. Organized into three chapters, the first chapter provides the background against which the system model is pr

  11. Experimental high-frequency ultrasound can detect graft rejection after small bowel transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R; Liu, Q; Wu, E X; Pescovitz, M D; Collins, M H; Kopecky, K K; Grosfeld, J L

    1994-02-01

    Early diagnosis of graft rejection after small bowel transplantation (SBT) can allow prompt institution of vigorous immunosuppressive therapy, with resultant reversal of the rejection process. The current method for graft monitoring is random mucosal biopsy from a stomal site or through an endoscope. However, because early rejection often has a patchy distribution, it could be missed by random biopsy. We hypothesized that the pathological process of rejection would alter acoustic impedance of the tissue and thus change the ultrasonic patterns of the graft intestinal wall. If this hypothesis is correct, then high-frequency endoscopic ultrasound (US) could be used to monitor the entire transplanted bowel and guide the biopsy, with improved yields. This hypothesis was tested in a rat orthotopic SBT model. Sixty-two intestinal specimens (9 isografts, 12 allografts treated with cyclosporine A [CsA], 22 untreated allografts, and 19 intestines from normal rats) were collected for in vitro transluminal US imaging (30 MHz) and histopathologic study. The echo pattern of normal rat intestinal wall consisted of five echo layers that correlated spatially with the histological layers: the innermost hyperechoic layer 1, plus hypoechoic layer 2, corresponded to the mucosa; hyperechoic layer 3, the submucosa; anechoic layer 4, the muscularis propria; and hyperechoic layer 5, the serosa. The isografts and CsA-treated allografts were identical histologically and ultrasonically to normal intestine. However, the echo patterns of the untreated allografts had progressive loss of architectural stratification, with worsening rejection. The change began with patchy indistinctness and disruption of hyperechoic layers 1, 3 and 5, and progressed to total obliteration of the layers, with the intestinal wall becoming a nonstratified hypoechoic structure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. US-Cut: interactive algorithm for rapid detection and segmentation of liver tumors in ultrasound acquisitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Jan; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Chen, Xiaojun; Zoller, Wolfram G.; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Hann, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound (US) is the most commonly used liver imaging modality worldwide. It plays an important role in follow-up of cancer patients with liver metastases. We present an interactive segmentation approach for liver tumors in US acquisitions. Due to the low image quality and the low contrast between the tumors and the surrounding tissue in US images, the segmentation is very challenging. Thus, the clinical practice still relies on manual measurement and outlining of the tumors in the US images. We target this problem by applying an interactive segmentation algorithm to the US data, allowing the user to get real-time feedback of the segmentation results. The algorithm has been developed and tested hand-in-hand by physicians and computer scientists to make sure a future practical usage in a clinical setting is feasible. To cover typical acquisitions from the clinical routine, the approach has been evaluated with dozens of datasets where the tumors are hyperechoic (brighter), hypoechoic (darker) or isoechoic (similar) in comparison to the surrounding liver tissue. Due to the interactive real-time behavior of the approach, it was possible even in difficult cases to find satisfying segmentations of the tumors within seconds and without parameter settings, and the average tumor deviation was only 1.4mm compared with manual measurements. However, the long term goal is to ease the volumetric acquisition of liver tumors in order to evaluate for treatment response. Additional aim is the registration of intraoperative US images via the interactive segmentations to the patient's pre-interventional CT acquisitions.

  13. Blinded Comparison between an In-Air Reverberation Method and an Electronic Probe Tester in the Detection of Ultrasound Probe Faults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Nicholas J; Woolley, Darren J

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a blinded trial, comparing the results of a visual inspection of the in-air reverberation pattern with the results of an electronic probe tester in detecting ultrasound probe faults. Sixty-two probes were tested. A total of 28 faults were found, 3 only by in-air reverberation assessment and 2 only by the electronic probe tester. The electronic probe tester provided additional information regarding the location of the fault in 74% of the cases in which both methods detected a fault. It is possible to detect the majority of probe faults by visual inspection and in-air reverberation assessment. The latter provides an excellent first-line test, easily performed on a daily basis by equipment users. An electronic probe tester is required if detailed evaluation of faults is necessary. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. All rights reserved.

  14. Contrast enhanced ultrasound in liver imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Bang, Nanna

    2004-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents were originally introduced to enhance the Doppler signals when detecting vessels with low velocity flow or when imaging conditions were sub-optimal. Contrast agents showed additional properties, it was discovered that a parenchymal enhancement phase in the liver followed the enhancement of the blood pool. Contrast agents have made ultrasound scanning more accurate in detection and characterization of focal hepatic lesions and the sensitivity is now comparable with CT and MRI scanning. Further, analysis of the transit time of contrast agent through the liver seems to give information on possible hepatic involvement, not only from focal lesions but also from diffuse benign parenchymal disease. The first ultrasound contrast agents were easily destroyed by the energy from the sound waves but newer agents have proved to last for longer time and hereby enable real-time scanning and make contrast enhancement suitable for interventional procedures such as biopsies and tissue ablation. Also, in monitoring the effect of tumour treatment contrast agents have been useful. A brief overview is given on some possible applications and on different techniques using ultrasound contrast agents in liver imaging. At present, the use of an ultrasound contrast agent that allows real-time scanning with low mechanical index is to be preferred

  15. Detection of the Single-Session Complete Ablation Rate by Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound during Ultrasound-Guided Laser Ablation for Benign Thyroid Nodules: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the single-session complete ablation rate of ultrasound-guided percutaneous laser ablation (LA for benign thyroid nodules. LA was performed in 90 patients with 118 benign thyroid nodules. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS was used to evaluate complete nodule ablation one day after ablation. Thyroid nodule volumes, thyroid functions, clinical symptoms and complications were evaluated 1, 3, 6, 12, and 18 months after ablation. Results showed that all benign thyroid nodules successfully underwent LA. The single-session complete ablation rates for nodules with maximum diameters ≤2 cm, 2-3 cm and ≥3 cm were 93.4%, 70.3% and 61.1%, respectively. All nodule volumes significantly decreased than that one day after ablation (P0.05. Three patients had obvious pain during ablation; one (1.1% had recurrent laryngeal nerve injury, but the voice returned to normal within 6 months after treatment. Thus, ultrasound-guided LA can effectively inactivate benign thyroid nodules. LA is a potentially viable minimally invasive treatment that offers good cosmetic effects.

  16. Boiling anomaly detection by various signal characterization methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuma, M.; Kozma, R.; Kitamura, M.; Schoonewelle, H.; Hoogenboom, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    In order to detect anomalies in the early stage for complex dynamical systems like nuclear power plants, it is important to characterize various statistical features of the data acquired in normal operating condition. In this paper, concept of hierarchical anomaly monitoring method is outlined, which is based on the diversification principle. In addition to usual time and frequency domain analysis (FFT, APDF, MAR-SPRT), other analysis (wavelet, fractal, etc.) are performed. As soon as any inconsistency arises in the results of the analysis on the upper level, a thorough analysis is initiated. A comparison among these methods is performed and the efficiency of the diversification approach has been demonstrated through simulated boiling anomalies in nuclear reactors. (authors)

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: ...

  18. Delay Pressure Detection Method to Eliminate Pump Pressure Interference on the Downhole Mud Pressure Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of applying delay pressure detection method to eliminate mud pump pressure interference on the downhole mud pressure signals is studied. Two pressure sensors mounted on the mud pipe in some distance apart are provided to detect the downhole mud continuous pressure wave signals on the surface according to the delayed time produced by mud pressure wave transmitting between the two sensors. A mathematical model of delay pressure detection is built by analysis of transmission path between mud pump pressure interference and downhole mud pressure signals. Considering pressure signal transmission characteristics of the mud pipe, a mathematical model of ideal low-pass filter for limited frequency band signal is introduced to study the pole frequency impact on the signal reconstruction and the constraints of pressure sensor distance are obtained by pole frequencies analysis. Theoretical calculation and numerical simulation show that the method can effectively eliminate mud pump pressure interference and the downhole mud continuous pressure wave signals can be reconstructed successfully with a significant improvement in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR in the condition of satisfying the constraints of pressure sensor distance.

  19. Compressive Sensing of Roller Bearing Faults via Harmonic Detection from Under-Sampled Vibration Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Gang; Hou, Wei; Wang, Huaqing; Luo, Ganggang; Ma, Jianwei

    2015-10-09

    The Shannon sampling principle requires substantial amounts of data to ensure the accuracy of on-line monitoring of roller bearing fault signals. Challenges are often encountered as a result of the cumbersome data monitoring, thus a novel method focused on compressed vibration signals for detecting roller bearing faults is developed in this study. Considering that harmonics often represent the fault characteristic frequencies in vibration signals, a compressive sensing frame of characteristic harmonics is proposed to detect bearing faults. A compressed vibration signal is first acquired from a sensing matrix with information preserved through a well-designed sampling strategy. A reconstruction process of the under-sampled vibration signal is then pursued as attempts are conducted to detect the characteristic harmonics from sparse measurements through a compressive matching pursuit strategy. In the proposed method bearing fault features depend on the existence of characteristic harmonics, as typically detected directly from compressed data far before reconstruction completion. The process of sampling and detection may then be performed simultaneously without complete recovery of the under-sampled signals. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated by simulations and experiments.

  20. Detection of weak transitions in signal dynamics using recurrence time statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, J.B.; Cao Yinhe; Gu Lingyun; Harris, J.G.; Principe, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Signal detection in noisy and nonstationary environments is very challenging. In this Letter, we study why the two types of recurrence times [Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 (1999) 3178] may be very useful for detecting weak transitions in signal dynamics. We particularly emphasize that the recurrence times of the second type may be more powerful in detecting transitions with very low energy. These features are illustrated by studying a number of speech signals with fricatives and plosives. We have also shown that the recurrence times of the first type, nevertheless, has the distinguished feature of being more robust to the noise level and less sensitive to the parameter change of the algorithm. Since throughout our study, we have not explored any features unique to the speech signals, the results shown here may indicate that these tools may be useful in many different applications

  1. Dual-Process Theory and Signal-Detection Theory of Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wixted, John T.

    2007-01-01

    Two influential models of recognition memory, the unequal-variance signal-detection model and a dual-process threshold/detection model, accurately describe the receiver operating characteristic, but only the latter model can provide estimates of recollection and familiarity. Such estimates often accord with those provided by the remember-know…

  2. Detection and processing of phase modulated optical signals at 40 Gbit/s and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Yan

    the amplitude regeneration capability based on FWM in a highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF). The first reported experimental demonstration of amplitude equalization of 40 Gbit/s RZ-DPSK signals using a 500 m long HNLF is presented. Using four possible phase levels to carry the information, DQPSK allows generation......This thesis addresses demodulation in direct detection systems and signal processing of high speed phase modulated signals in future all-optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) communication systems where differential phase shift keying (DPSK) or differential quadrature phase shift keying...... (DQPSK) are used to transport information. All-optical network functionalities -such as optical labeling, wavelength conversion and signal regeneration- are experimentally investigated. Direct detection of phase modulated signals requires phase-to-intensity modulation conversion in a demodulator...

  3. Detection of Artificially Generated Seismic Signals Using Balloon-Borne Infrasound Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Siddharth; Komjathy, Attila; Pauken, Michael T.; Cutts, James A.; Garcia, Raphael F.; Mimoun, David; Cadu, Alexandre; Sournac, Anthony; Jackson, Jennifer M.; Lai, Voon Hui; Bowman, Daniel C.

    2018-04-01

    We conducted an experiment in Pahrump, Nevada, in June 2017, where artificial seismic signals were created using a seismic hammer, and the possibility of detecting them from their acoustic signature was examined. In this work, we analyze the pressure signals recorded by highly sensitive barometers deployed on the ground and on tethers suspended from balloons. Our signal processing results show that wind noise experienced by a barometer on a free-flying balloon is lower compared to one on a moored balloon. This has never been experimentally demonstrated in the lower troposphere. While seismoacoustic signals were not recorded on the hot air balloon platform owing to operational challenges, we demonstrate the detection of seismoacoustic signals on our moored balloon platform. Our results have important implications for performing seismology in harsh surface environments such as Venus through atmospheric remote sensing.

  4. Feasibility of detecting cracks in rail track at long range using guided wave ultrasound

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Loveday, PW

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 7 4 7 4 α α α α α α α α α α α α α α α α α (2) 16 time signals FFT & Zero Array processing )()()()( 1 ωωωωα RSVRSR ⋅⋅⋅⋅= − Assemble Mode Shape Matrix, R Plot xexg δ⋅)( Transducer Sensitivities, S Input Signal (toneburst) )(ωVR... and the rows indicate the transducer used to receive the signal.                                                       = 4 4 3 2 1 3 4 3 2 1 2 4 3 2 1 1 4 3 2 1 TxTxTxTx VR VR VR VR VR VR VR...

  5. Signal processing techniques for damage detection with piezoelectric wafer active sensors and embedded ultrasonic structural radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lingyu; Bao, Jingjing; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2004-07-01

    Embedded ultrasonic structural radar (EUSR) algorithm is developed for using piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS) array to detect defects within a large area of a thin-plate specimen. Signal processing techniques are used to extract the time of flight of the wave packages, and thereby to determine the location of the defects with the EUSR algorithm. In our research, the transient tone-burst wave propagation signals are generated and collected by the embedded PWAS. Then, with signal processing, the frequency contents of the signals and the time of flight of individual frequencies are determined. This paper starts with an introduction of embedded ultrasonic structural radar algorithm. Then we will describe the signal processing methods used to extract the time of flight of the wave packages. The signal processing methods being used include the wavelet denoising, the cross correlation, and Hilbert transform. Though hardware device can provide averaging function to eliminate the noise coming from the signal collection process, wavelet denoising is included to ensure better signal quality for the application in real severe environment. For better recognition of time of flight, cross correlation method is used. Hilbert transform is applied to the signals after cross correlation in order to extract the envelope of the signals. Signal processing and EUSR are both implemented by developing a graphical user-friendly interface program in LabView. We conclude with a description of our vision for applying EUSR signal analysis to structural health monitoring and embedded nondestructive evaluation. To this end, we envisage an automatic damage detection application utilizing embedded PWAS, EUSR, and advanced signal processing.

  6. Modelling of polysomnographic respiratory measurements for artefact detection and signal restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathnayake, S I; Abeyratne, U R; Hukins, C; Duce, B

    2008-01-01

    Polysomnography (PSG), which incorporates measures of sleep with measures of EEG arousal, air flow, respiratory movement and oxygenation, is universally regarded as the reference standard in diagnosing sleep-related respiratory diseases such as obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. Over 15 channels of physiological signals are measured from a subject undergoing a typical overnight PSG session. The signals often suffer from data losses, interferences and artefacts. In a typical sleep scoring session, artefact-corrupted signal segments are visually detected and removed from further consideration. This is a highly time-consuming process, and subjective judgement is required for the job. During typical sleep scoring sessions, the target is the detection of segments of diagnostic interest, and signal restoration is not utilized for distorted segments. In this paper, we propose a novel framework for artefact detection and signal restoration based on the redundancy among respiratory flow signals. We focus on the air flow (thermistor sensors) and nasal pressure signals which are clinically significant in detecting respiratory disturbances. The method treats the respiratory system and other organs that provide respiratory-related inputs/outputs to it (e.g., cardiovascular, brain) as a possibly nonlinear coupled-dynamical system, and uses the celebrated Takens embedding theorem as the theoretical basis for signal prediction. Nonlinear prediction across time (self-prediction) and signals (cross-prediction) provides us with a mechanism to detect artefacts as unexplained deviations. In addition to detection, the proposed method carries the potential to correct certain classes of artefacts and restore the signal. In this study, we categorize commonly occurring artefacts and distortions in air flow and nasal pressure measurements into several groups and explore the efficacy of the proposed technique in detecting/recovering them. The results we obtained from a database of clinical

  7. Small Displacement Detection of Biological Signals Using the Cyclic Frequency Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new signal processing method called the Cyclic Frequency method is proposed for small displacement detection of vital signals such as heart rate and respiration using the CW radar method. We have presented experimental results of small displacement detection to confirm the validity of the method. The displacement amplitude 2.5 mm can be detected with a propagation frequency of 24.15 GHz. We may increase the propagation frequency for smaller displacement amplitude or target velocity.

  8. The detection of cavitation in hydraulic machines by use of ultrasonic signal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, P; Odermatt, P; Etterlin, M; Lerch, T; Frei, M; Farhat, M

    2014-01-01

    This presentation describes an experimental approach for the detection of cavitation in hydraulic machines by use of ultrasonic signal analysis. Instead of using the high frequency pulses (typically 1MHz) only for transit time measurement different other signal characteristics are extracted from the individual signals and its correlation function with reference signals in order to gain knowledge of the water conditions. As the pulse repetition rate is high (typically 100Hz), statistical parameters can be extracted of the signals. The idea is to find patterns in the parameters by a classifier that can distinguish between the different water states. This classification scheme has been applied to different cavitation sections: a sphere in a water flow in circular tube at the HSLU in Lucerne, a NACA profile in a cavitation tunnel and a Francis model test turbine both at LMH in Lausanne. From the signal raw data several statistical parameters in the time and frequency domain as well as from the correlation function with reference signals have been determined. As classifiers two methods were used: neural feed forward networks and decision trees. For both classification methods realizations with lowest complexity as possible are of special interest. It is shown that three signal characteristics, two from the signal itself and one from the correlation function are in many cases sufficient for the detection capability. The final goal is to combine these results with operating point, vibration, acoustic emission and dynamic pressure information such that a distinction between dangerous and not dangerous cavitation is possible

  9. Doppler Ultrasound Detection of Preclinical Changes in Foot Arteries in Early Stage of Type 2 Diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leoniuk, Jolanta; Łukasiewicz, Adam; Szorc, Małgorzata; Sackiewicz, Izabela; Janica, Jacek; Łebkowska, Urszula

    2014-01-01

    There are few reports regarding the changes within the vessels in the initial stage of type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to estimate the hemodynamic and morphological parameters in foot arteries in type 2 diabetes subjects and to compare these parameters to those obtained in a control group of healthy volunteers. Ultrasound B-mode, color Doppler and pulse wave Doppler imaging of foot arteries was conducted in 37 diabetic patients and 36 non-diabetic subjects to determine their morphological (total vascular diameter and flow lumen diameter) and functional parameters (spectral analysis). In diabetic patients, the overall vascular diameter and wall thickness were statistically significantly larger when compared to the control group in the right dorsalis pedis artery (P=0.01; P=0.001), left dorsalis pedis artery (P=0.007; P=0.006), right posterior tibial artery (P=0.005; P=0.0005), and left posterior tibial artery (P=0.007; P=0.0002). No significant differences were observed in both groups in flow lumen diameters and blood flow parameters (PSV, EDV, PI, RI). In the diabetic group, the level of HbA1c positively correlated with flow resistance index in the right dorsalis pedis artery (r=0.38; P=0.02), right posterior tibial artery (r=0.38; P=0.02) and left posterior tibial artery (r=0.42; P=0.009). The pulsatility index within the dorsalis pedis artery decreased with increased trophic skin changes (r=–0.431, P=0.009). In the diabetic group, overall artery diameters larger than and flow lumina comparable to the control group suggest vessel wall thickening occurring in the early stage of diabetes. Doppler flow parameters are comparable in both groups. In the diabetic group, the level of HbA1c positively correlated with flow resistance index and negative correlation was observed between the intensity of trophic skin changes and the pulsatility index

  10. A novel ultrasound-based vascular calcification score (CALCS) to detect subclinical atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flore, R; Zocco, M A; Ainora, M E; Fonnesu, C; Nesci, A; Gasbarrini, A; Ponziani, F R

    2018-02-01

    To quantify non-coronary vascular calcifications (VC) in asymptomatic patients at low-intermediate cardiovascular risk by a new color Doppler ultrasound (DUS)-based score (the carotid, aortic, lower limbs calcium score, CALCs), and to correlate this score with classical parameters associated with cardiovascular risk [carotid intima media thickness (IMT), and arterial stiffness (AS)]. All consecutive asymptomatic patients who underwent a screening DUS of non-coronary circulation were evaluated and patients at low-intermediate cardiovascular risk were selected according to Framingham risk score (FRS). Among them, we enrolled 70 patients with US evidence of VC and 71 age, sex and FRS matched controls. The presence of VC was correlated with classical markers of cardiovascular risk, such as AS and intima-media thickness (IMT). AS, expressed as pulse wave velocity (PWV) and arterial distensibility, carotid IMT and CALCs were measured for both groups. AS and c-IMT were assessed by a new Radio-Frequency (RF) DUS-based method. CALCs was generated by our previously described B-mode DUS-based method according to number/size of VC in 11 non-coronary segments (range 0-33). Patients with VC presented higher AS and IMT values than controls (PWV 8.34±0.98 m/s vs. 6.74±0.68 m/s, p<0.0001; arterial distensibility 267±12 mm vs. 315±65 mm, p=0.001; IMT 687±132 mm vs. 572±91 mm, p<0.0001). Mean CALCs of patients with VC was 8.41±7.78. CALCs were significantly correlated with c-IMT (p<0.0001; r=0.3), PWV (p<0.0001; r=0.4) and arterial distensibility (p=0.002; r=-0.1). DUS-based CALCs is highly correlated with other validated markers of subclinical atherosclerosis, such as c-IMT and AS. Our results demonstrated the ability of CALCs to identify individual predictive factors beyond the traditional risk factors by quantifying an interesting and novel step of the atherogenic process. Future studies on larger series and with adequate follow up are necessary to confirm these results and

  11. An energy kurtosis demodulation technique for signal denoising and bearing fault detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wilson; Lee, Hewen

    2013-01-01

    Rolling element bearings are commonly used in rotary machinery. Reliable bearing fault detection techniques are very useful in industries for predictive maintenance operations. Bearing fault detection still remains a very challenging task especially when defects occur on rotating bearing components because the fault-related features are non-stationary in nature. In this work, an energy kurtosis demodulation (EKD) technique is proposed for bearing fault detection especially for non-stationary signature analysis. The proposed EKD technique firstly denoises the signal by using a maximum kurtosis deconvolution filter to counteract the effect of signal transmission path so as to highlight defect-associated impulses. Next, the denoised signal is modulated over several frequency bands; a novel signature integration strategy is proposed to enhance feature characteristics. The effectiveness of the proposed EKD fault detection technique is verified by a series of experimental tests corresponding to different bearing conditions. (paper)

  12. Adaptive Fourier decomposition based R-peak detection for noisy ECG Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ze Wang; Chi Man Wong; Feng Wan

    2017-07-01

    An adaptive Fourier decomposition (AFD) based R-peak detection method is proposed for noisy ECG signals. Although lots of QRS detection methods have been proposed in literature, most detection methods require high signal quality. The proposed method extracts the R waves from the energy domain using the AFD and determines the R-peak locations based on the key decomposition parameters, achieving the denoising and the R-peak detection at the same time. Validated by clinical ECG signals in the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia Database, the proposed method shows better performance than the Pan-Tompkin (PT) algorithm in both situations of a native PT and the PT with a denoising process.

  13. Signal Detection of Imipenem Compared to Other Drugs from Korea Adverse Event Reporting System Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyounghoon; Soukavong, Mick; Kim, Jungmee; Kwon, Kyoung Eun; Jin, Xue Mei; Lee, Joongyub; Yang, Bo Ram; Park, Byung Joo

    2017-05-01

    To detect signals of adverse drug events after imipenem treatment using the Korea Institute of Drug Safety & Risk Management-Korea adverse event reporting system database (KIDS-KD). We performed data mining using KIDS-KD, which was constructed using spontaneously reported adverse event (AE) reports between December 1988 and June 2014. We detected signals calculated the proportional reporting ratio, reporting odds ratio, and information component of imipenem. We defined a signal as any AE that satisfied all three indices. The signals were compared with drug labels of nine countries. There were 807582 spontaneous AEs reports in the KIDS-KD. Among those, the number of antibiotics related AEs was 192510; 3382 reports were associated with imipenem. The most common imipenem-associated AE was the drug eruption; 353 times. We calculated the signal by comparing with all other antibiotics and drugs; 58 and 53 signals satisfied the three methods. We compared the drug labelling information of nine countries, including the USA, the UK, Japan, Italy, Switzerland, Germany, France, Canada, and South Korea, and discovered that the following signals were currently not included in drug labels: hypokalemia, cardiac arrest, cardiac failure, Parkinson's syndrome, myocardial infarction, and prostate enlargement. Hypokalemia was an additional signal compared with all other antibiotics, and the other signals were not different compared with all other antibiotics and all other drugs. We detected new signals that were not listed on the drug labels of nine countries. However, further pharmacoepidemiologic research is needed to evaluate the causality of these signals. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2017

  14. Two-phase xenon detector with gas amplification and electroluminescent signal detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimov, D.Yu.; Burenkov, A.A.; Grishkin, Yu.L.; Kovalenko, A.G.; Lebedenko, V.N.; Stekhanov, V.N.

    2008-01-01

    An optical technique for detecting ionization electrons produced during ionization of the liquid phase has been experimentally tested in two-phase (liquid-gas) xenon. The effects of gas and electroluminescent amplifications at the wire anode are simultaneously used for detection. This method allows construction of a supersensitive detector of small ionization signals-down to those corresponding to the detection of single electrons [ru

  15. Evaluation of bistable systems versus matched filters in detecting bipolar pulse signals

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Fabing; Abbott, Derek; Gao, Qisheng

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a thorough evaluation of a bistable system versus a matched filter in detecting bipolar pulse signals. The detectability of the bistable system can be optimized by adding noise, i.e. the stochastic resonance (SR) phenomenon. This SR effect is also demonstrated by approximate statistical detection theory of the bistable system and corresponding numerical simulations. Furthermore, the performance comparison results between the bistable system and the matched filter show that...

  16. Comparison the percentage of detection of periarthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using clinical examination or ultrasound methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Karimzadeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to compare the percentage of detection of periarthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using clinical examination and ultrasound methods. Materials and Methods: This study is a cross-sectional study which was conducted in Al-Zahra Hospital (Isfahan, Iran during 2014–2015. In our study, ninety patients were selected based on the American College of Rheumatology 2010 criteria. All patients were examined by a rheumatologist to find the existence of effusion, and the data were filled in the checklist. The ultrasonography for detecting effusion in periarticular structures was done by an expert radiologist with two methods, including high-resolution ultrasonography and power Doppler. The percentage of effusion existence found by physical examination was compared by sonography, and the Chi-square and t-tests were used for data analysis. Results: The percentage of effusion found in areas with physical examination by rheumatologist was lower than the frequency distribution of effusions found by sonography (8.3% VS 14.2% (P < 0.001. In sonography, rotator cuff tendonitis is the most common periarthritis. Other findings in sonography were biceps tendinitis (10 cases, wrist tendonitis (13 cases, olecranon bursitis (9 cases, golfers elbow (4 cases, tennis elbow (4 cases, trochanteric bursitis (6 cases, anserine bursitis (6 cases, prepatellar bursitis (11 cases, and ankle tendonitis (7 cases. Tenderness on physical examination was found in 15% of the cases, and the evidence of periarthritis was found in 21/7% through sonography (P < 0.001 and 34% through Doppler sonography (P < 0.001. Conclusion: The percentage of periarthritis detection by ultrasonography and power Doppler sonography was higher than clinical examination. Hence, the ultrasonography is more accurate than physical examination.

  17. Comparison the percentage of detection of periarthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using clinical examination or ultrasound methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Hadi; Seyedbonakdar, Zahra; Mousavi, Maryam; Karami, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the percentage of detection of periarthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using clinical examination and ultrasound methods. This study is a cross-sectional study which was conducted in Al-Zahra Hospital (Isfahan, Iran) during 2014-2015. In our study, ninety patients were selected based on the American College of Rheumatology 2010 criteria. All patients were examined by a rheumatologist to find the existence of effusion, and the data were filled in the checklist. The ultrasonography for detecting effusion in periarticular structures was done by an expert radiologist with two methods, including high-resolution ultrasonography and power Doppler. The percentage of effusion existence found by physical examination was compared by sonography, and the Chi-square and t -tests were used for data analysis. The percentage of effusion found in areas with physical examination by rheumatologist was lower than the frequency distribution of effusions found by sonography (8.3% VS 14.2%) ( P tendinitis (10 cases), wrist tendonitis (13 cases), olecranon bursitis (9 cases), golfers elbow (4 cases), tennis elbow (4 cases), trochanteric bursitis (6 cases), anserine bursitis (6 cases), prepatellar bursitis (11 cases), and ankle tendonitis (7 cases). Tenderness on physical examination was found in 15% of the cases, and the evidence of periarthritis was found in 21/7% through sonography ( P < 0.001) and 34% through Doppler sonography ( P < 0.001). The percentage of periarthritis detection by ultrasonography and power Doppler sonography was higher than clinical examination. Hence, the ultrasonography is more accurate than physical examination.

  18. Use of transfer learning to detect diffuse degenerative hepatic diseases from ultrasound images in dogs: A methodological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzato, T; Bonsembiante, F; Aresu, L; Gelain, M E; Burti, S; Zotti, A

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this methodological study was to develop a deep convolutional neural network (DNN) to detect degenerative hepatic disease from ultrasound images of the liver in dogs and to compare the diagnostic accuracy of the newly developed DNN with that of serum biochemistry and cytology on the same samples, using histopathology as a standard. Dogs with suspected hepatic disease that had no prior history of neoplastic disease, no hepatic nodular pathology, no ascites and ultrasonography performed 24h prior to death were included in the study (n=52). Ultrasonography and serum biochemistry were performed as part of the routine clinical evaluation. On the basis of histopathology, dogs were categorised as 'normal' (n=8), or having 'vascular abnormalities'(n=8), or 'inflammatory'(n=0), 'neoplastic' (n=4) or 'degenerative'(n=32) disease; dogs with 'neoplastic' disease were excluded from further analysis. On cytological evaluation, dogs were categorised as 'normal' (n=11), or having 'inflammatory' (n=0), 'neoplastic' (n=4) or 'degenerative' (n=37) disease. Dogs were categorised as having 'degenerative' (n=32) or 'non-degenerative' (n=16) liver disease for analysis due to the limited sample size. The DNN was developed using a transfer learning methodology on a pre-trained neural network that was retrained and fine-tuned to our data set. The resultant DNN had a high diagnostic accuracy for degenerative liver disease (area under the curve 0.91; sensitivity 100%; specificity 82.8%). Cytology and serum biochemical markers (alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase) had poor diagnostic accuracy in the detection of degenerative liver disease. The DNN outperformed all the other non-invasive diagnostic tests in the detection of degenerative liver disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... needles are used to sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. image the breasts and ... of organs, tissues, and vessels or to detect abnormal masses, such as tumors. In an ultrasound examination, ...

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Angioplasty and ...

  1. Renal ultrasound to detect hydronephrosis: A need for routine imaging after radical hysterectomy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazewinkel, Menke H.; Gietelink, Lieke; van der Velden, Jacobus; Burger, Matthé P. M.; Stoker, Jaap; Roovers, Jan-Paul W. R.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Hydronephrosis can be a side effect of radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer. The incidence of clinically relevant hydronephrosis has not been studied in a large sample and the benefit of early detection of hydronephrosis is not clear. Objective. To assess the incidence of

  2. Fault detection of a spur gear using vibration signal with multivariable statistical parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songpon Klinchaeam

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a condition monitoring technique of a spur gear fault detection using vibration signal analysis based on time domain. Vibration signals were acquired from gearboxes and used to simulate various faults on spur gear tooth. In this study, vibration signals were applied to monitor a normal and various fault conditions of a spur gear such as normal, scuffing defect, crack defect and broken tooth. The statistical parameters of vibration signal were used to compare and evaluate the value of fault condition. This technique can be applied to set alarm limit of the signal condition based on statistical parameter such as variance, kurtosis, rms and crest factor. These parameters can be used to set as a boundary decision of signal condition. From the results, the vibration signal analysis with single statistical parameter is unclear to predict fault of the spur gears. The using at least two statistical parameters can be clearly used to separate in every case of fault detection. The boundary decision of statistical parameter with the 99.7% certainty ( 3   from 300 referenced dataset and detected the testing condition with 99.7% ( 3   accuracy and had an error of less than 0.3 % using 50 testing dataset.

  3. Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Enhances Nerve Growth Factor-Induced Neurite Outgrowth through Mechanotransduction-Mediated ERK1/2-CREB-Trx-1 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lu; Feng, Yi; Hu, Hong; Shi, Aiwei; Zhang, Lei; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-12-01

    Enhancing the action of nerve growth factor (NGF) is a potential therapeutic approach to neural regeneration. To facilitate neural regeneration, we investigated whether combining low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and NGF could promote neurite outgrowth, an essential process in neural regeneration. In the present study, PC12 cells were subjected to a combination of LIPUS (1 MHz, 30 or 50 mW/cm 2 , 20% duty cycle and 100-Hz pulse repetition frequency, 10 min every other day) and NGF (50 ng/mL) treatment, and then neurite outgrowth was compared. Our findings indicated that the combined treatment with LIPUS (50 mW/cm 2 ) and NGF (50 ng/mL) promotes neurite outgrowth that is comparable to that achieved by NGF (100 ng/mL) treatment alone. LIPUS significantly increased NGF-induced neurite length, but not neurite branching. These effects were attributed to the enhancing effects of LIPUS on NGF-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and CREB and the expression of thioredoxin (Trx-1). Furthermore, blockage of stretch-activated ion channels with Gd 3+ suppressed the stimulating effects of LIPUS on NGF-induced neurite outgrowth and the downstream signaling activation. Taken together, our findings suggest that LIPUS enhances NGF-induced neurite outgrowth through mechanotransduction-mediated signaling of the ERK1/2-CREB-Trx-1 pathway. The combination of LIPUS and NGF could potentially be used for the treatment of nerve injury and neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Epileptic seizure detection in EEG signal with GModPCA and support vector machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Abeg Kumar; Banka, Haider

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders caused by recurrent seizures. Electroencephalograms (EEGs) record neural activity and can detect epilepsy. Visual inspection of an EEG signal for epileptic seizure detection is a time-consuming process and may lead to human error; therefore, recently, a number of automated seizure detection frameworks were proposed to replace these traditional methods. Feature extraction and classification are two important steps in these procedures. Feature extraction focuses on finding the informative features that could be used for classification and correct decision-making. Therefore, proposing effective feature extraction techniques for seizure detection is of great significance. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is a dimensionality reduction technique used in different fields of pattern recognition including EEG signal classification. Global modular PCA (GModPCA) is a variation of PCA. In this paper, an effective framework with GModPCA and Support Vector Machine (SVM) is presented for epileptic seizure detection in EEG signals. The feature extraction is performed with GModPCA, whereas SVM trained with radial basis function kernel performed the classification between seizure and nonseizure EEG signals. Seven different experimental cases were conducted on the benchmark epilepsy EEG dataset. The system performance was evaluated using 10-fold cross-validation. In addition, we prove analytically that GModPCA has less time and space complexities as compared to PCA. The experimental results show that EEG signals have strong inter-sub-pattern correlations. GModPCA and SVM have been able to achieve 100% accuracy for the classification between normal and epileptic signals. Along with this, seven different experimental cases were tested. The classification results of the proposed approach were better than were compared the results of some of the existing methods proposed in literature. It is also found that the time and space

  5. A web-based quantitative signal detection system on adverse drug reaction in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chanjuan; Xia, Jielai; Deng, Jianxiong; Chen, Wenge; Wang, Suzhen; Jiang, Jing; Chen, Guanquan

    2009-07-01

    To establish a web-based quantitative signal detection system for adverse drug reactions (ADRs) based on spontaneous reporting to the Guangdong province drug-monitoring database in China. Using Microsoft Visual Basic and Active Server Pages programming languages and SQL Server 2000, a web-based system with three software modules was programmed to perform data preparation and association detection, and to generate reports. Information component (IC), the internationally recognized measure of disproportionality for quantitative signal detection, was integrated into the system, and its capacity for signal detection was tested with ADR reports collected from 1 January 2002 to 30 June 2007 in Guangdong. A total of 2,496 associations including known signals were mined from the test database. Signals (e.g., cefradine-induced hematuria) were found early by using the IC analysis. In addition, 291 drug-ADR associations were alerted for the first time in the second quarter of 2007. The system can be used for the detection of significant associations from the Guangdong drug-monitoring database and could be an extremely useful adjunct to the expert assessment of very large numbers of spontaneously reported ADRs for the first time in China.

  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on ... Abdomen Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding ... Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... endometrial polyps fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or ... Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored ...

  8. Detection of attenuated plaque in stable angina with 64-multidetector computed tomography: a comparison with intravascular ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinzaki, Masahiro; Okabe, Teruo; Endo, Ayaka; Kawamura, Akio; Koga, Seiko; Yamada, Minoru; Fukuda, Keiichi; Kuribayashi, Sachio

    2012-01-01

    To clarify multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) findings of attenuated plaque detected by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). One hundred and fifty-four patients with stable angina underwent MDCT before IVUS. The attenuated plaque was identified in the targeted artery with IVUS, and the same artery was analyzed with MDCT for the presence of a high density area (HDA) >130 Hounsfield units (HU), and a low density area (LDA) HDA in attenuated plaque was compared with that in calcified plaque. Ten attenuated plaques and 15 calcified plaques were identified in 9 of 154 patients (males=9, 66.2 ± 9.5 years). Eight of the 10 attenuated plaques and all 15 calcified plaques were accompanied with a HDA on MDCT. The HDA ranged from 174 to 667 HU (mean 389.0 ± 148.3 HU) in the 8 attenuated plaques, and from 545 to 1,205 HU (mean 920.9 ± 215.9 HU) in 15 calcified plaques. There was a significant difference in CT density of the HDA between the attenuated and calcified plaque (PHDA. MDCT has the ability to demonstrate attenuated plaque as the combination of HDA (approximately 400 HU on average) and LDA HDA can be differentiated from calcified plaque by its lower CT density value.

  9. Radiofrequency ablation of renal tumours: diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced ultrasound for early detection of residual tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeffel, Christine; Pousset, Maud; Elie, Caroline; Timsit, Marc-Olivier; Mejean, Arnaud; Merran, Samuel; Tranquart, Francois; Khairoune, Ahmed; Helenon, Olivier; Correas, Jean-Michel; Joly, Dominique; Richard, Stephane

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in the early detection of residual tumour after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of renal tumours. Patients referred to our institution for RFA of renal tumours prospectively underwent CEUS and computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before, within 1 day and 6 weeks after treatment. Identification of residual tumour was assessed by three blinded radiologists. Reference standard was CT/MRI performed at least 1 year after RFA. A total of 66 renal tumours in 43 patients (median age 62 years; range 44-71.5) were studied. Inter-reader agreement (κ value) was 0.84 for CEUS. Prevalence of residual disease was 19%. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV), respectively, were as follows: 64% [confidence interval (CI) 39-84], 98% [CI 91-100], 82% [CI 52-95] and 92% [CI 83-97] on 24-h CEUS; 79% [CI 52-92], 100% [CI 94-100], 100% [CI 74-100] and 95% [CI 87-100] on 6-week CEUS; 79% [CI 52-92], 95% [CI 86-98], 79% [CI 52-92] and 95% [CI 86-98] on 24-h CT/MRI; and 100% [CI 72-100], 98% [CI 90-100], 91% [CI 62-98] and 100% [CI 93-100] on 6-week CT/MRI. CEUS has high specificity for the early diagnosis of residual tumour after renal RFA. (orig.)

  10. Chaos weak signal detecting algorithm and its application in the ultrasonic Doppler bloodstream speed measuring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H Y; Lv, J T; Zhang, S Q; Zhang, L G; Li, J

    2005-01-01

    At the present time, the ultrasonic Doppler measuring means has been extensively used in the human body's bloodstream speed measuring. The ultrasonic Doppler measuring means can achieve the measuring of liquid flux by detecting Doppler frequency shift of ultrasonic in the process of liquid spread. However, the detected sound wave is a weak signal that is flooded in the strong noise signal. The traditional measuring method depends on signal-to-noise ratio. Under the very low signal-to-noise ratio or the strong noise signal background, the signal frequency is not measured. This article studied on chaotic movement of Duffing oscillator and intermittent chaotic characteristic on chaotic oscillator of Duffing equation. In the light of the range of the bloodstream speed of human body and the principle of Doppler shift, the paper determines the frequency shift range. An oscillator array including many oscillators is designed according to it. The reflected ultrasonic frequency information can be ascertained accurately by the intermittent chaos quality of the oscillator. The signal-to-noise ratio of -26.5 dB is obtained by the result of the experiment. Compared with the tradition the frequency method compare, the dependence to signal-to-noise ratio is lowered consumedly. The measuring precision of the bloodstream speed is heightened

  11. Application of signal processing techniques for islanding detection of distributed generation in distribution network: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, Safdar; Mokhlis, Hazlie; Arof, Hamzah; Laghari, J.A.; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Pros & cons of conventional islanding detection techniques (IDTs) are discussed. • Signal processing techniques (SPTs) ability in detecting islanding is discussed. • SPTs ability in improving performance of passive techniques are discussed. • Fourier, s-transform, wavelet, HHT & tt-transform based IDTs are reviewed. • Intelligent classifiers (ANN, ANFIS, Fuzzy, SVM) application in SPT are discussed. - Abstract: High penetration of distributed generation resources (DGR) in distribution network provides many benefits in terms of high power quality, efficiency, and low carbon emissions in power system. However, efficient islanding detection and immediate disconnection of DGR is critical in order to avoid equipment damage, grid protection interference, and personnel safety hazards. Islanding detection techniques are mainly classified into remote, passive, active, and hybrid techniques. From these, passive techniques are more advantageous due to lower power quality degradation, lower cost, and widespread usage by power utilities. However, the main limitations of these techniques are that they possess a large non detection zones and require threshold setting. Various signal processing techniques and intelligent classifiers have been used to overcome the limitations of passive islanding. Signal processing techniques, in particular, are adopted due to their versatility, stability, cost effectiveness, and ease of modification. This paper presents a comprehensive overview of signal processing techniques used to improve common passive islanding detection techniques. A performance comparison between the signal processing based islanding detection techniques with existing techniques are also provided. Finally, this paper outlines the relative advantages and limitations of the signal processing techniques in order to provide basic guidelines for researchers and field engineers in determining the best method for their system

  12. Unsupervised Event Characterization and Detection in Multichannel Signals: An EEG application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Mur

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a new unsupervised method to automatically characterize and detect events in multichannel signals. This method is used to identify artifacts in electroencephalogram (EEG recordings of brain activity. The proposed algorithm has been evaluated and compared with a supervised method. To this end an example of the performance of the algorithm to detect artifacts is shown. The results show that although both methods obtain similar classification, the proposed method allows detecting events without training data and can also be applied in signals whose events are unknown a priori. Furthermore, the proposed method provides an optimal window whereby an optimal detection and characterization of events is found. The detection of events can be applied in real-time.

  13. A comparison of signal detection theory to the objective threshold/strategic model of unconscious perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Steven J; Fisk, Gary D

    2011-08-01

    A key problem in unconscious perception research is ruling out the possibility that weak conscious awareness of stimuli might explain the results. In the present study, signal detection theory was compared with the objective threshold/strategic model as explanations of results for detection and identification sensitivity in a commonly used unconscious perception task. In the task, 64 undergraduate participants detected and identified one of four briefly displayed, visually masked letters. Identification was significantly above baseline (i.e., proportion correct > .25) at the highest detection confidence rating. This result is most consistent with signal detection theory's continuum of sensory states and serves as a possible index of conscious perception. However, there was limited support for the other model in the form of a predicted "looker's inhibition" effect, which produced identification performance that was significantly below baseline. One additional result, an interaction between the target stimulus and type of mask, raised concerns for the generality of unconscious perception effects.

  14. Early detection of breast cancer: benefits and risks of supplemental breast ultrasound in asymptomatic women with mammographically dense breast tissue. A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nothacker, Monika; Duda, Volker; Hahn, Markus; Warm, Mathias; Degenhardt, Friedrich; Madjar, Helmut; Weinbrenner, Susanne; Albert, Ute-Susann

    2009-01-01

    Mammographic screening alone will miss a certain fraction of malignancies, as evidenced by retrospective reviews of mammograms following a subsequent screening. Mammographic breast density is a marker for increased breast cancer risk and is associated with a higher risk of interval breast cancer, i.e. cancer detected between screening tests. The purpose of this review is to estimate risks and benefits of supplemental breast ultrasound in women with negative mammographic screening with dense breast tissue. A systematic search and review of studies involving mammography and breast ultrasound for screening of breast cancer was conducted. The search was performed for the period 1/2000-8/2008 within the data source of PubMed, DARE, and Cochrane databases. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were determined prospectively, and the Oxford evidence classification system for diagnostic studies was used for evidence level. The parameters biopsy rate, positive predictive value (PPV) for biopsy, cancer yield for breast ultrasound alone, and carcinoma detection rate by breast density were extracted or constructed. The systematic search identified no randomized controlled trials or systematic reviews, six cohort studies of intermediate level of evidence (3b) were found. Only two of the studies included adequate follow-up of subjects with negative or benign findings. Supplemental breast ultrasound after negative mammographic screening permitted diagnosis of primarily invasive carcinomas in 0.32% of women in breast density type categories 2-4 of the American College of Radiology (ACR); mean tumor size for those identified was 9.9 mm, 90% with negative lymph node status. Most detected cancers occurred in mammographically dense breast ACR types 3 and 4. Biopsy rates were in the range 2.3%-4.7%, with PPV of 8.4-13.7% for those biopsied due to positive ultrasound, or about one third of the PPV of biopsies due to mammography. Limitations: The study populations included wide age ranges, and

  15. Identification of threshold prostate specific antigen levels to optimize the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer by magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound fusion guided biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakir, Nabeel A; George, Arvin K; Siddiqui, M Minhaj; Rothwax, Jason T; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Stamatakis, Lambros; Su, Daniel; Okoro, Chinonyerem; Raskolnikov, Dima; Walton-Diaz, Annerleim; Simon, Richard; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L; Merino, Maria J; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A

    2014-12-01

    Prostate specific antigen sensitivity increases with lower threshold values but with a corresponding decrease in specificity. Magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsy detects prostate cancer more efficiently and of higher grade than standard 12-core transrectal ultrasound biopsy but the optimal population for its use is not well defined. We evaluated the performance of magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsy vs 12-core biopsy across a prostate specific antigen continuum. We reviewed the records of all patients enrolled in a prospective trial who underwent 12-core transrectal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsies from August 2007 through February 2014. Patients were stratified by each of 4 prostate specific antigen cutoffs. The greatest Gleason score using either biopsy method was compared in and across groups as well as across the population prostate specific antigen range. Clinically significant prostate cancer was defined as Gleason 7 (4 + 3) or greater. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. A total of 1,003 targeted and 12-core transrectal ultrasound biopsies were performed, of which 564 diagnosed prostate cancer for a 56.2% detection rate. Targeted biopsy led to significantly more upgrading to clinically significant disease compared to 12-core biopsy. This trend increased more with increasing prostate specific antigen, specifically in patients with prostate specific antigen 4 to 10 and greater than 10 ng/ml. Prostate specific antigen 5.2 ng/ml or greater captured 90% of upgrading by targeted biopsy, corresponding to 64% of patients who underwent multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and subsequent fusion biopsy. Conversely a greater proportion of clinically insignificant disease was detected by 12-core vs targeted biopsy overall. These differences persisted when controlling for potential confounders on multivariate analysis. Prostate cancer upgrading with targeted biopsy increases

  16. Weak signal transmission in complex networks and its application in detecting connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoming; Liu, Zonghua; Li, Baowen

    2009-10-01

    We present a network model of coupled oscillators to study how a weak signal is transmitted in complex networks. Through both theoretical analysis and numerical simulations, we find that the response of other nodes to the weak signal decays exponentially with their topological distance to the signal source and the coupling strength between two neighboring nodes can be figured out by the responses. This finding can be conveniently used to detect the topology of unknown network, such as the degree distribution, clustering coefficient and community structure, etc., by repeatedly choosing different nodes as the signal source. Through four typical networks, i.e., the regular one dimensional, small world, random, and scale-free networks, we show that the features of network can be approximately given by investigating many fewer nodes than the network size, thus our approach to detect the topology of unknown network may be efficient in practical situations with large network size.

  17. A method for detecting nonlinear determinism in normal and epileptic brain EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghdadi, Amir H; Fazel-Rezai, Reza; Aghakhani, Yahya

    2007-01-01

    A robust method of detecting determinism for short time series is proposed and applied to both healthy and epileptic EEG signals. The method provides a robust measure of determinism through characterizing the trajectories of the signal components which are obtained through singular value decomposition. Robustness of the method is shown by calculating proposed index of determinism at different levels of white and colored noise added to a simulated chaotic signal. The method is shown to be able to detect determinism at considerably high levels of additive noise. The method is then applied to both intracranial and scalp EEG recordings collected in different data sets for healthy and epileptic brain signals. The results show that for all of the studied EEG data sets there is enough evidence of determinism. The determinism is more significant for intracranial EEG recordings particularly during seizure activity.

  18. A novel time-domain signal processing algorithm for real time ventricular fibrillation detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte, G E; Scarone, N C; Liscovsky, P O; Rotter, P

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an application of a novel algorithm for real time detection of ECG pathologies, especially ventricular fibrillation. It is based on segmentation and labeling process of an oversampled signal. After this treatment, analyzing sequence of segments, global signal behaviours are obtained in the same way like a human being does. The entire process can be seen as a morphological filtering after a smart data sampling. The algorithm does not require any ECG digital signal pre-processing, and the computational cost is low, so it can be embedded into the sensors for wearable and permanent applications. The proposed algorithms could be the input signal description to expert systems or to artificial intelligence software in order to detect other pathologies.

  19. A novel time-domain signal processing algorithm for real time ventricular fibrillation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monte, G. E.; Scarone, N. C.; Liscovsky, P. O.; Rotter S/N, P.

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents an application of a novel algorithm for real time detection of ECG pathologies, especially ventricular fibrillation. It is based on segmentation and labeling process of an oversampled signal. After this treatment, analyzing sequence of segments, global signal behaviours are obtained in the same way like a human being does. The entire process can be seen as a morphological filtering after a smart data sampling. The algorithm does not require any ECG digital signal pre-processing, and the computational cost is low, so it can be embedded into the sensors for wearable and permanent applications. The proposed algorithms could be the input signal description to expert systems or to artificial intelligence software in order to detect other pathologies.

  20. A new algorithm for epilepsy seizure onset detection and spread estimation from EEG signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero-Rincón, Antonio; Pereyra, Marcelo; D'Giano, Carlos; Batatia, Hadj; Risk, Marcelo

    2016-04-01

    Appropriate diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy is a main public health issue. Patients suffering from this disease often exhibit different physical characterizations, which result from the synchronous and excessive discharge of a group of neurons in the cerebral cortex. Extracting this information using EEG signals is an important problem in biomedical signal processing. In this work we propose a new algorithm for seizure onset detection and spread estimation in epilepsy patients. The algorithm is based on a multilevel 1-D wavelet decomposition that captures the physiological brain frequency signals coupled with a generalized gaussian model. Preliminary experiments with signals from 30 epilepsy crisis and 11 subjects, suggest that the proposed methodology is a powerful tool for detecting the onset of epilepsy seizures with his spread across the brain.

  1. The Automated Breast Volume Scanner (ABVS: initial experiences in lesion detection compared with conventional handheld B-mode ultrasound: a pilot study of 50 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojcinski S

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Sebastian Wojcinski1, Andre Farrokh1, Ursula Hille2, Jakub Wiskirchen3, Samuel Gyapong1, Amr A Soliman1,4, Friedrich Degenhardt1, Peter Hillemanns21Department of OB/GYN, Franziskus Hospital, Bielefeld, Germany; 2Department of OB/GYN, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany; 3Department of Radiology, Franziskus Hospital, Bielefeld, Germany; 4Department of OB/GYN, Faculty of Medicine, University of Alexandria, Alexandria, EgyptAbstract: The idea of an automated whole breast ultrasound was developed three decades ago. We present our initial experiences with the latest technical advance in this technique, the automated breast volume scanner (ABVS ACUSON S2000TM. Volume data sets were collected from 50 patients and a database containing 23 women with no detectable lesions in conventional ultrasound (BI-RADS®-US 1, 13 women with clearly benign lesions (BI-RADS®-US 2, and 14 women with known breast cancer (BI-RADS®-US 5 was created. An independent examiner evaluated the ABVS data on a separate workstation without any prior knowledge of the patients’ histories. The diagnostic accuracy for the experimental ABVS was 66.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 52.9–79.1. The independent examiner detected all breast cancers in the volume data resulting in a calculated sensitivity of 100% in the described setting (95% CI: 73.2%–100%. After the ABVS examination, there were a high number of requests for second-look ultrasounds in 47% (95% CI: 30.9–63.5 of the healthy women (with either a clearly benign lesion or no breast lesions at all in conventional handheld ultrasound. Therefore, the specificity remained at 52.8% (95% CI: 35.7–69.2. When comparing the concordance of the ABVS with the gold standard (conventional handheld ultrasound, Cohen’s Kappa value as an estimation of the inter-rater reliability was κ = 0.37, indicating fair agreement. In conclusion, the ABVS must still be regarded as an experimental technique for breast ultrasound, which

  2. Transrectal ultrasound in detecting prostate cancer compared with serum total prostate-specific antigen levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamsel, S.; Killi, R.; Demirpolat, G.; Hekimgil, M.; Soydan, S.; Altay, B.

    2008-01-01

    We carried out a retrospective study to review the efficiency of grey-scale transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) in detecting prostate cancer compared with the data in recent published work, including alternative imaging methods of the prostate gland. Our study group consisted of 830 patients who underwent TRUS-guided biopsy of the prostate between May 2000 and June 2004. The relation between abnormal TRUS findings and serum total prostate-specific antigen (tPSA) levels was evaluated in patients with prostate cancer who were divided into three different groups according to serum tPSA levels. Group I included patients with tPSA levels of 4-9.9 ng/mL, group II included tPSA levels of 10-19.9 ng/mL and group III included patients with tPSA levels of 20 ng/mL or more. In general, TRUS detected 185 (64%) of 291 cancers with a specificity of 89%, a PPV of 76% and an accuracy of 80%. TRUS findings enabled the correct identification of 22 (56%) of the 39 cancers in group I, 28 (30%) of the 93 cancers in group II and 135 (85%) of the 159 cancers in group III. In conclusion, TRUS alone has a limited potential to identify prostate cancer, especially in patients with tPSA levels lower than 20 ng/mL. Therefore, increased numbers of systematically placed biopsy cores must be taken or alternative imaging methods are required to direct TRUS-guided biopsy for improving prostate cancer detection.

  3. Movement and respiration detection using statistical properties of the FMCW radar signal

    KAUST Repository

    Kiuru, Tero

    2016-07-26

    This paper presents a 24 GHz FMCW radar system for detection of movement and respiration using change in the statistical properties of the received radar signal, both amplitude and phase. We present the hardware and software segments of the radar system as well as algorithms with measurement results for two distinct use-cases: 1. FMCW radar as a respiration monitor and 2. a dual-use of the same radar system for smart lighting and intrusion detection. By using change in statistical properties of the signal for detection, several system parameters can be relaxed, including, for example, pulse repetition rate, power consumption, computational load, processor speed, and memory space. We will also demonstrate, that the capability to switch between received signal strength and phase difference enables dual-use cases with one requiring extreme sensitivity to movement and the other robustness against small sources of interference. © 2016 IEEE.

  4. Extraction of ECG signal with adaptive filter for hearth abnormalities detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnip, Mardi; Saragih, Rijois. I. E.; Dharma, Abdi; Esti Kusumandari, Dwi; Turnip, Arjon; Sitanggang, Delima; Aisyah, Siti

    2018-04-01

    This paper demonstrates an adaptive filter method for extraction ofelectrocardiogram (ECG) feature in hearth abnormalities detection. In particular, electrocardiogram (ECG) is a recording of the heart's electrical activity by capturing a tracingof cardiac electrical impulse as it moves from the atrium to the ventricles. The applied algorithm is to evaluate and analyze ECG signals for abnormalities detection based on P, Q, R and S peaks. In the first phase, the real-time ECG data is acquired and pre-processed. In the second phase, the procured ECG signal is subjected to feature extraction process. The extracted features detect abnormal peaks present in the waveform. Thus the normal and abnormal ECG signal could be differentiated based on the features extracted.

  5. Detection of the ODMR signal of a nitrogen vacancy centre in nanodiamond in propagating surface plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Baiaty, Zahraa; Cumming, Benjamin P.; Gan, Xiaosong; Gu, Min

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate that the optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) signal of a nitrogen vacancy (NV) centre can be coupled to propagating surface plasmons for the detection of the NV centre spin states, and of external magnetic fields. By coupling the spin dependent luminescence signal of a NV centre in a nanodiamond (ND) to a chemically synthesized silver nanowire, we demonstrate the readout of the ODMR signal as a reduction in the surface plasmon polariton intensity, with improved contrast in comparison to the emission from the NV centre. Furthermore, on the application of a permanent magnetic field from zero to 13 G, we demonstrate that the Zeeman splitting of the magnetic spin states of the nitrogen vacancy centre ground states can also be detected in the coupled surface plasmons. This is an important step in the development of a compact on-chip information processing system utilizing the nitrogen vacancy in nanodiamond as an on-chip source with efficient magnetometry sensing properties.

  6. Detection of directional eye movements based on the electrooculogram signals through an artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkaymaz, Hande; Ozer, Mahmut; Orak, İlhami Muharrem

    2015-01-01

    The electrooculogram signals are very important at extracting information about detection of directional eye movements. Therefore, in this study, we propose a new intelligent detection model involving an artificial neural network for the eye movements based on the electrooculogram signals. In addition to conventional eye movements, our model also involves the detection of tic and blinking of an eye. We extract only two features from the electrooculogram signals, and use them as inputs for a feed-forwarded artificial neural network. We develop a new approach to compute these two features, which we call it as a movement range. The results suggest that the proposed model have a potential to become a new tool to determine the directional eye movements accurately

  7. A deconvolution method for deriving the transit time spectrum for ultrasound propagation through cancellous bone replica models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langton, Christian M; Wille, Marie-Luise; Flegg, Mark B

    2014-04-01

    The acceptance of broadband ultrasound attenuation for the assessment of osteoporosis suffers from a limited understanding of ultrasound wave propagation through cancellous bone. It has recently been proposed that the ultrasound wave propagation can be described by a concept of parallel sonic rays. This concept approximates the detected transmission signal to be the superposition of all sonic rays that travel directly from transmitting to receiving transducer. The transit time of each ray is defined by the proportion of bone and marrow propagated. An ultrasound transit time spectrum describes the proportion of sonic rays having a particular transit time, effectively describing lateral inhomogeneity of transit times over the surface of the receiving ultrasound transducer. The aim of this study was to provide a proof of concept that a transit time spectrum may be derived from digital deconvolution of input and output ultrasound signals. We have applied the active-set method deconvolution algorithm to determine the ultrasound transit time spectra in the three orthogonal directions of four cancellous bone replica samples and have compared experimental data with the prediction from the computer simulation. The agreement between experimental and predicted ultrasound transit time spectrum analyses derived from Bland-Altman analysis ranged from 92% to 99%, thereby supporting the concept of parallel sonic rays for ultrasound propagation in cancellous bone. In addition to further validation of the parallel sonic ray concept, this technique offers the opportunity to consider quantitative characterisation of the material and structural properties of cancellous bone, not previously available utilising ultrasound.

  8. Stochastic Resonance in an Underdamped System with Pinning Potential for Weak Signal Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibin Zhang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic resonance (SR has been proved to be an effective approach for weak sensor signal detection. This study presents a new weak signal detection method based on a SR in an underdamped system, which consists of a pinning potential model. The model was firstly discovered from magnetic domain wall (DW in ferromagnetic strips. We analyze the principle of the proposed underdamped pinning SR (UPSR system, the detailed numerical simulation and system performance. We also propose the strategy of selecting the proper damping factor and other system parameters to match a weak signal, input noise and to generate the highest output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR. Finally, we have verified its effectiveness with both simulated and experimental input signals. Results indicate that the UPSR performs better in weak signal detection than the conventional SR (CSR with merits of higher output SNR, better anti-noise and frequency response capability. Besides, the system can be designed accurately and efficiently owing to the sensibility of parameters and potential diversity. The features also weaken the limitation of small parameters on SR system.

  9. Stochastic Resonance in an Underdamped System with Pinning Potential for Weak Signal Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-08-28

    Stochastic resonance (SR) has been proved to be an effective approach for weak sensor signal detection. This study presents a new weak signal detection method based on a SR in an underdamped system, which consists of a pinning potential model. The model was firstly discovered from magnetic domain wall (DW) in ferromagnetic strips. We analyze the principle of the proposed underdamped pinning SR (UPSR) system, the detailed numerical simulation and system performance. We also propose the strategy of selecting the proper damping factor and other system parameters to match a weak signal, input noise and to generate the highest output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Finally, we have verified its effectiveness with both simulated and experimental input signals. Results indicate that the UPSR performs better in weak signal detection than the conventional SR (CSR) with merits of higher output SNR, better anti-noise and frequency response capability. Besides, the system can be designed accurately and efficiently owing to the sensibility of parameters and potential diversity. The features also weaken the limitation of small parameters on SR system.

  10. Effect of sample storage time on detection of hybridization signals in Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Cássio; Muller, Katia; Sato, Sandra; Albuquerque Junior, Rubens Ferreira

    2012-04-01

    Long-term sample storage can affect the intensity of the hybridization signals provided by molecular diagnostic methods that use chemiluminescent detection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different storage times on the hybridization signals of 13 bacterial species detected by the Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization method using whole-genomic DNA probes. Ninety-six subgingival biofilm samples were collected from 36 healthy subjects, and the intensity of hybridization signals was evaluated at 4 different time periods: (1) immediately after collecting (n = 24) and (2) after storage at -20 °C for 6 months (n = 24), (3) for 12 months (n = 24), and (4) for 24 months (n = 24). The intensity of hybridization signals obtained from groups 1 and 2 were significantly higher than in the other groups (p  0.05). The Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization method was suitable to detect hybridization signals from all groups evaluated, and the intensity of signals decreased significantly after long periods of sample storage.

  11. Onset Detection in Surface Electromyographic Signals: A Systematic Comparison of Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Flachenecker

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Various methods to determine the onset of the electromyographic activity which occurs in response to a stimulus have been discussed in the literature over the last decade. Due to the stochastic characteristic of the surface electromyogram (SEMG, onset detection is a challenging task, especially in weak SEMG responses. The performance of the onset detection methods were tested, mostly by comparing their automated onset estimations to the manually determined onsets found by well-trained SEMG examiners. But a systematic comparison between methods, which reveals the benefits and the drawbacks of each method compared to the other ones and shows the specific dependence of the detection accuracy on signal parameters, is still lacking. In this paper, several classical threshold-based approaches as well as some statistically optimized algorithms were tested on large samples of simulated SEMG data with well-known signal parameters. Rating between methods is performed by comparing their performance to that of a statistically optimal maximum likelihood estimator which serves as reference method. In addition, performance was evaluated on real SEMG data obtained in a reaction time experiment. Results indicate that detection behavior strongly depends on SEMG parameters, such as onset rise time, signal-to-noise ratio or background activity level. It is shown that some of the threshold-based signal-power-estimation procedures are very sensitive to signal parameters, whereas statistically optimized algorithms are generally more robust.

  12. Methods for detection and characterization of signals in noisy data with the Hilbert-Huang transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroeer, Alexander; Cannizzo, John K.; Camp, Jordan B.; Gagarin, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    The Hilbert-Huang transform is a novel, adaptive approach to time series analysis that does not make assumptions about the data form. Its adaptive, local character allows the decomposition of nonstationary signals with high time-frequency resolution but also renders it susceptible to degradation from noise. We show that complementing the Hilbert-Huang transform with techniques such as zero-phase filtering, kernel density estimation and Fourier analysis allows it to be used effectively to detect and characterize signals with low signal-to-noise ratios.

  13. Random Sequence for Optimal Low-Power Laser Generated Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangi, D.; Virga, A.; Gulino, M. S.

    2017-08-01

    Low-power laser generated ultrasounds are lately gaining importance in the research world, thanks to the possibility of investigating a mechanical component structural integrity through a non-contact and Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) procedure. The ultrasounds are, however, very low in amplitude, making it necessary to use pre-processing and post-processing operations on the signals to detect them. The cross-correlation technique is used in this work, meaning that a random signal must be used as laser input. For this purpose, a highly random and simple-to-create code called T sequence, capable of enhancing the ultrasound detectability, is introduced (not previously available at the state of the art). Several important parameters which characterize the T sequence can influence the process: the number of pulses Npulses , the pulse duration δ and the distance between pulses dpulses . A Finite Element FE model of a 3 mm steel disk has been initially developed to analytically study the longitudinal ultrasound generation mechanism and the obtainable outputs. Later, experimental tests have shown that the T sequence is highly flexible for ultrasound detection purposes, making it optimal to use high Npulses and δ but low dpulses . In the end, apart from describing all phenomena that arise in the low-power laser generation process, the results of this study are also important for setting up an effective NDT procedure using this technology.

  14. Lightweight MAC-Spoof Detection Exploiting Received Signal Power and Median Filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papini, Davide

    2011-01-01

    this kind of attack based on signal power monitoring. The main contribution of our work is the introduction of a median l- ter that enables the detection of the attack by looking at the variance of the signal power. We take into account two types of references for the samples, time and number of frames......IEEE 802.11 networks are subject to MAC-spoof attacks. An attacker can easily steal the identity of a legitimate station, even Access Points, thus enabling him to take full control over network basic mech- anisms or even access restricted resources. In this paper we propose a method to detect...

  15. High sensitivity fiber optic angular displacement sensor and its application for detection of ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, João Marcos Salvi; Kitano, Cláudio; Pacheco, Gefeson Mendes; Tittmann, Bernhard Rainer

    2012-07-10

    In this paper, we report on the development of an intensity-modulated fiber-optic sensor for angular displacement measurement. This sensor was designed to present high sensitivity, linear response, and wide bandwidth and, furthermore, to be simple and low cost. The sensor comprises two optical fibers, a positive lens, a reflective surface, an optical source, and a photodetector. A mathematical model was developed to determine and simulate the static characteristic curve of the sensor and to compare different sensor configurations regarding the core radii of the optical fibers. The simulation results showed that the sensor configurations tested are highly sensitive to small angle variation (in the range of microradians) with nonlinearity less than or equal to 1%. The normalized sensitivity ranges from (0.25×V(max)) to (2.40×V(max)) mV/μrad (where V(max) is the peak voltage of the static characteristic curve), and the linear range is from 194 to 1840 μrad. The unnormalized sensitivity for a reflective surface with reflectivity of 100% was measured as 7.7 mV/μrad. The simulations were compared with experimental results to validate the mathematical model and to define the most suitable configuration for ultrasonic detection. The sensor was tested on the characterization of a piezoelectric transducer and as part of a laser ultrasonics setup. The velocities of the longitudinal, shear, and surface waves were measured on aluminum samples as 6.43, 3.17, and 2.96 mm/μs, respectively, with an error smaller than 1.3%. The sensor, an alternative to piezoelectric or interferometric detectors, proved to be suitable for detection of ultrasonic waves and to perform time-of-flight measurements and nondestructive inspection.

  16. Fission signal detection using helium-4 gas fast neutron scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, J. M., E-mail: lewisj@ufl.edu; Kelley, R. P.; Jordan, K. A. [Nuclear Engineering Program, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Murer, D. [Arktis Radiation Detectors Ltd., 8045 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-07-07

    We demonstrate the unambiguous detection of the fission neutron signal produced in natural uranium during active neutron interrogation using a deuterium-deuterium fusion neutron generator and a high pressure {sup 4}He gas fast neutron scintillation detector. The energy deposition by individual neutrons is quantified, and energy discrimination is used to differentiate the induced fission neutrons from the mono-energetic interrogation neutrons. The detector can discriminate between different incident neutron energies using pulse height discrimination of the slow scintillation component of the elastic scattering interaction between a neutron and the {sup 4}He atom. Energy histograms resulting from this data show the buildup of a detected fission neutron signal at higher energies. The detector is shown here to detect a unique fission neutron signal from a natural uranium sample during active interrogation with a (d, d) neutron generator. This signal path has a direct application to the detection of shielded nuclear material in cargo and air containers. It allows for continuous interrogation and detection while greatly minimizing the potential for false alarms.

  17. Automatic Threshold Determination for a Local Approach of Change Detection in Long-Term Signal Recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hewson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available CUSUM (cumulative sum is a well-known method that can be used to detect changes in a signal when the parameters of this signal are known. This paper presents an adaptation of the CUSUM-based change detection algorithms to long-term signal recordings where the various hypotheses contained in the signal are unknown. The starting point of the work was the dynamic cumulative sum (DCS algorithm, previously developed for application to long-term electromyography (EMG recordings. DCS has been improved in two ways. The first was a new procedure to estimate the distribution parameters to ensure the respect of the detectability property. The second was the definition of two separate, automatically determined thresholds. One of them (lower threshold acted to stop the estimation process, the other one (upper threshold was applied to the detection function. The automatic determination of the thresholds was based on the Kullback-Leibler distance which gives information about the distance between the detected segments (events. Tests on simulated data demonstrated the efficiency of these improvements of the DCS algorithm.

  18. Study and Evaluation of Ultrasound System for Detecting the Height of Corn Canopy