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Sample records for ultrasonic implant site

  1. Ultrasonic implant site preparation using piezosurgery: a multicenter case series study analyzing 3,579 implants with a 1- to 3-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercellotti, Tomaso; Stacchi, Claudio; Russo, Crescenzo; Rebaudi, Alberto; Vincenzi, Giampaolo; Pratella, Umberto; Baldi, Domenico; Mozzati, Marco; Monagheddu, Chiara; Sentineri, Rosario; Cuneo, Tommaso; Di Alberti, Luca; Carossa, Stefano; Schierano, Gianmario

    2014-01-01

    This multicenter case series introduces an innovative ultrasonic implant site preparation (UISP) technique as an alternative to the use of traditional rotary instruments. A total of 3,579 implants were inserted in 1,885 subjects, and the sites were prepared using a specific ultrasonic device with a 1- to 3-year follow-up. No surgical complications related to the UISP protocol were reported for any of the implant sites. Seventy-eight implants (59 maxillary, 19 mandibular) failed within 5 months of insertion, for an overall osseointegration percentage of 97.82% (97.14% maxilla, 98.75% mandible). Three maxillary implants failed after 3 years of loading, with an overall implant survival rate of 97.74% (96.99% maxilla, 98.75% mandible).

  2. Rehabilitation with 4 zygomatic implants with a new surgical protocol using ultrasonic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozzati, Marco; Mortellaro, Carmen; Arata, Valentina; Gallesio, Giorgia; Previgliano, Valter

    2015-05-01

    When the residual bone crest cannot allow the placement of standard implants, the treatment for complete arch rehabilitation of severely atrophic maxillae can be performed with 4 zygomatic implants (ZIs) and immediate function with predictable results in terms of aesthetics, function, and comfort for the patient. However, even if ZIs' rehabilitations showed a good success rate, this surgery is difficult and need a skillful operator. Complications in this kind of rehabilitation are not uncommon; the main difficulties can be related to the reduced surgical visibility and instrument control in a critical anatomic area. All the surgical protocols described in the literature used drilling techniques. Furthermore, the use of ultrasonic instruments in implant surgery compared with drilling instruments have shown advantages in many aspects of surgical procedures, tissues management, enhancement of control, surgical visualization, and healing. The aim of this study was to report on the preliminary experience using ultrasound technique for ZIs surgery in terms of safety and technical improvement. Ten consecutive patients with severely atrophic maxilla have been treated with 4 ZIs and immediate complete arch acrylic resin provisional prostheses. The patients were followed up from 30 to 32 months evaluating implant success, prosthetic success, and patient satisfaction with a questionnaire. No implants were lost during the study period, with a 100% implant and prosthetic success rate. Within the limitations of this preliminary study, these data indicate that ultrasonic implant site preparation for ZIs can be a good alternative to the drilling technique and an improvement for the surgeon.

  3. Three-Dimensional Implant Positioning with a Piezosurgery Implant Site Preparation Technique and an Intraoral Surgical Navigation System: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Gerardo; Taraschi, Valerio; Vercellotti, Tomaso; Ben-Nissan, Besim; Marchetti, Claudio

    This case report describes new implant site preparation techniques joining the benefits of using an intraoral navigation system to optimize three-dimensional implant site positioning in combination with an ultrasonic osteotomy. A report of five patients is presented, and the implant positions as planned in the navigation software with the postoperative scan image were compared. The preliminary results are useful, although further clinical studies with larger populations are needed to confirm these findings.

  4. Compensating for Tissue Changes in an Ultrasonic Power Link for Implanted Medical Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vihvelin, Hugo; Leadbetter, Jeff; Bance, Manohar; Brown, Jeremy A; Adamson, Robert B A

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonic power transfer using piezoelectric devices is a promising wireless power transfer technology for biomedical implants. However, for sub-dermal implants where the separation between the transmitter and receiver is on the order of several acoustic wavelengths, the ultrasonic power transfer efficiency (PTE) is highly sensitive to the distance between the transmitter and receiver. This sensitivity can cause large swings in efficiency and presents a serious limitation on battery life and overall performance. A practical ultrasonic transcutaneous energy transfer (UTET) system design must accommodate different implant depths and unpredictable acoustic changes caused by tissue growth, hydration, ambient temperature, and movement. This paper describes a method used to compensate for acoustic separation distance by varying the transmit (Tx) frequency in a UTET system. In a benchtop UTET system we experimentally show that without compensation, power transfer efficiency can range from 9% to 25% as a 5 mm porcine tissue sample is manipulated to simulate in situ implant conditions. Using an active frequency compensation method, we show that the power transfer efficiency can be kept uniformly high, ranging from 20% to 27%. The frequency compensation strategy we propose is low-power, non-invasive, and uses only transmit-side measurements, making it suitable for active implanted medical device applications.

  5. Characterization of Heat Treated Titanium-Based Implants by Nondestructive Eddy Current and Ultrasonic Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Ilven; Ekinci, Sinasi; Oktay, Enver

    2014-06-01

    This study presents nondestructive characterization of microstructure and mechanical properties of heat treated Ti, Ti-Cu, and Ti-6Al-4V titanium-based alloys and 17-4 PH stainless steel alloy for biomedical implant applications. Ti, Ti-Cu, and 17-4 PH stainless steel based implants were produced by powder metallurgy. Ti-6Al-4V alloy was investigated as bulk wrought specimens. Effects of sintering temperature, aging, and grain size on mechanical properties were investigated by nondestructive and destructive tests comparatively. Ultrasonic velocity in specimens was measured by using pulse-echo and transmission methods. Electrical conductivity of specimens was determined by eddy current tests. Determination of Young's modulus and strength is important in biomedical implants. Young's modulus of specimens was calculated by using ultrasonic velocities. Calculated Young's modulus values were compared and correlated with experimental values.

  6. Picosecond ultrasonics study of the modification of interfacial bonding by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tas, G.; Loomis, J.J.; Maris, H.J.; Bailes, A.A. III; Seiberling, L.E.

    1998-01-01

    We report on experiments in which picosecond ultrasonic techniques are used to investigate the modification of interfacial bonding that results from ion implantation. The bonding is studied through measurements of the acoustic reflection coefficient at the interface. This method is nondestructive and can be used to create a map of the variation of the bonding over the area of the interface. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  7. Design and Optimization of Ultrasonic Wireless Power Transmission Links for Millimeter-Sized Biomedical Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Miao; Kiani, Mehdi

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasound has been recently proposed as an alternative modality for efficient wireless power transmission (WPT) to biomedical implants with millimeter (mm) dimensions. This paper presents the theory and design methodology of ultrasonic WPT links that involve mm-sized receivers (Rx). For given load (R L ) and powering distance (d), the optimal geometries of transmitter (Tx) and Rx ultrasonic transducers, including their diameter and thickness, as well as the optimal operation frequency (f c ) are found through a recursive design procedure to maximize the power transmission efficiency (PTE). First, a range of realistic f c s is found based on the Rx thickness constrain. For a chosen f c within the range, the diameter and thickness of the Rx transducer are then swept together to maximize PTE. Then, the diameter and thickness of the Tx transducer are optimized to maximize PTE. Finally, this procedure is repeated for different f c s to find the optimal f c and its corresponding transducer geometries that maximize PTE. A design example of ultrasonic link has been presented and optimized for WPT to a 1 mm 3 implant, including a disk-shaped piezoelectric transducer on a silicon die. In simulations, a PTE of 2.11% at f c of 1.8 MHz was achieved for R L of 2.5 [Formula: see text] at [Formula: see text]. In order to validate our simulations, an ultrasonic link was optimized for a 1 mm 3 piezoelectric transducer mounted on a printed circuit board (PCB), which led to simulated and measured PTEs of 0.65% and 0.66% at f c of 1.1 MHz for R L of 2.5 [Formula: see text] at [Formula: see text], respectively.

  8. Optimal resonance configuration for ultrasonic wireless power transmission to millimeter-sized biomedical implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao Meng; Kiani, Mehdi

    2016-08-01

    In order to achieve efficient wireless power transmission (WPT) to biomedical implants with millimeter (mm) dimensions, ultrasonic WPT links have recently been proposed. Operating both transmitter (Tx) and receiver (Rx) ultrasonic transducers at their resonance frequency (fr) is key in improving power transmission efficiency (PTE). In this paper, different resonance configurations for Tx and Rx transducers, including series and parallel resonance, have been studied to help the designers of ultrasonic WPT links to choose the optimal resonance configuration for Tx and Rx that maximizes PTE. The geometries for disk-shaped transducers of four different sets of links, operating at series-series, series-parallel, parallel-series, and parallel-parallel resonance configurations in Tx and Rx, have been found through finite-element method (FEM) simulation tools for operation at fr of 1.4 MHz. Our simulation results suggest that operating the Tx transducer with parallel resonance increases PTE, while the resonance configuration of the mm-sized Rx transducer highly depends on the load resistance, Rl. For applications that involve large Rl in the order of tens of kΩ, a parallel resonance for a mm-sized Rx leads to higher PTE, while series resonance is preferred for Rl in the order of several kΩ and below.

  9. Survival of dental implants placed in sites of previously failed implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrcanovic, Bruno R; Kisch, Jenö; Albrektsson, Tomas; Wennerberg, Ann

    2017-11-01

    To assess the survival of dental implants placed in sites of previously failed implants and to explore the possible factors that might affect the outcome of this reimplantation procedure. Patients that had failed dental implants, which were replaced with the same implant type at the same site, were included. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the patients and implants; survival analysis was also performed. The effect of systemic, environmental, and local factors on the survival of the reoperated implants was evaluated. 175 of 10,096 implants in 98 patients were replaced by another implant at the same location (159, 14, and 2 implants at second, third, and fourth surgeries, respectively). Newly replaced implants were generally of similar diameter but of shorter length compared to the previously placed fixtures. A statistically significant greater percentage of lost implants were placed in sites with low bone quantity. There was a statistically significant difference (P = 0.032) in the survival rates between implants that were inserted for the first time (94%) and implants that replaced the ones lost (73%). There was a statistically higher failure rate of the reoperated implants for patients taking antidepressants and antithrombotic agents. Dental implants replacing failed implants had lower survival rates than the rates reported for the previous attempts of implant placement. It is suggested that a site-specific negative effect may possibly be associated with this phenomenon, as well as the intake of antidepressants and antithrombotic agents. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Brief ultrasonication improves detection of biofilm-formative bacteria around a metal implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naomi; Bauer, Thomas W; Tuohy, Marion J; Fujishiro, Takaaki; Procop, Gary W

    2007-04-01

    Biofilms are complex microenvironments produced by microorganisms on surfaces. Ultrasonication disrupts biofilms and may make the microorganism or its DNA available for detection. We determined whether ultrasonication could affect our ability to detect bacteria adherent to a metal substrate. A biofilm-formative Staphylococcus aureus strain was used for an in vitro implant infection model (biofilm-formative condition). We used quantitative culture and real time-polymerase chain reaction to determine the influence of different durations of ultrasound on bacterial adherence and viability. Sonication for 1 minute increased the yield of bacteria. Sonication longer than 5 minutes led to fewer bacterial colonies by conventional culture but not by polymerase chain reaction. This suggests short periods of sonication help release bacteria from the metal substrate by disrupting the biofilm, but longer periods of sonication lyse bacteria prohibiting their detection in microbiologic cultures. A relatively short duration of sonication may be desirable for maximizing detection of biofilm-formative bacteria around implants by culture or polymerase chain reaction.

  11. Improving Impedance of Implantable Microwire Multi-Electrode Arrays by Ultrasonic Electroplating of Durable Platinum Black

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Sharanya Arcot; Rolston, John D.; Guo, Liang; Potter, Steve M.

    2010-01-01

    Implantable microelectrode arrays (MEAs) have been a boon for neural stimulation and recording experiments. Commercially available MEAs have high impedances, due to their low surface area and small tip diameters, which are suitable for recording single unit activity. Lowering the electrode impedance, but preserving the small diameter, would provide a number of advantages, including reduced stimulation voltages, reduced stimulation artifacts and improved signal-to-noise ratio. Impedance reductions can be achieved by electroplating the MEAs with platinum (Pt) black, which increases the surface area but has little effect on the physical extent of the electrodes. However, because of the low durability of Pt black plating, this method has not been popular for chronic use. Sonicoplating (i.e. electroplating under ultrasonic agitation) has been shown to improve the durability of Pt black on the base metals of macro-electrodes used for cyclic voltammetry. This method has not previously been characterized for MEAs used in chronic neural implants. We show here that sonicoplating can lower the impedances of microwire multi-electrode arrays (MMEA) by an order of magnitude or more (depending on the time and voltage of electroplating), with better durability compared to pulsed plating or traditional DC methods. We also show the improved stimulation and recording performance that can be achieved in an in vivo implantation study with the sonicoplated low-impedance MMEAs, compared to high-impedance unplated electrodes. PMID:20485478

  12. A 3-DOF SOI MEMS ultrasonic energy harvester for implanted devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, A G; Moheimani, S O R; Behrens, S

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the design and testing of a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) energy harvester that is designed to harvest electrical energy from an external source of ultrasonic waves. This mechanism is potentially suited to applications including the powering of implanted devices for biomedical applications. The harvester employs a novel 3-degree of freedom design, with electrical energy being generated from displacements of a proof mass via electrostatic transducers. A silicon-on-insulator MEMS process was used to fabricate the device, with experimental characterization showing that the harvester can generate 24.7 nW, 19.8 nW, and 14.5 nW of electrical power respectively through its x-, y-, and z-axis vibrational modes

  13. Novel implant design improves implant survival in multirooted extraction sites: a preclinical pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan-Gildor, Adi; Machtei, Eli E; Gabay, Eran; Frankenthal, Shai; Levin, Liran; Suzuki, Marcelo; Coelho, Paulo G; Zigdon-Giladi, Hadar

    2014-10-01

    The primary aim is to evaluate clinical, radiographic, and histologic parameters of novel implants with "three roots" design that were inserted into fresh multirooted extraction sockets. A secondary aim is to compare this new implant to standard root-form dental implants. Immediate implantation of novel or standard design 6 × 6-mm implants was performed bilaterally into multirooted sockets in mandibles of mini-pigs. Twelve weeks later, clinical, radiographic, stability, histomorphometric, and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) analyses were performed. Survival rates were significantly higher in the test implants compared with control (92.8% versus 33.3%, respectively; P micro-CT analyses demonstrated bone fill in the inner part of the test implants. Moreover, bone-to-implant contact was higher in the test implants (55.50% ± 3.68% versus 42.47% ± 9.89%). Contrary to the clinical, radiographic, and histomorphometric results, resonance frequency analysis measurements were greater in the control group (77.74 ± 3.21 implant stability quotient [ISQ]) compared with the test group (31.09 ± 0.28 ISQ), P = 0.008. The novel design implants resulted in significantly greater survival rate in multirooted extraction sites. Further studies will be required to validate these findings.

  14. Double site-bond percolation model for biomaterial implants

    OpenAIRE

    Mely, H.; Mathiot, J. -F.

    2011-01-01

    9 figures - 10 pages; We present a double site-bond percolation model to account, on the one hand, for the vascularization and/or resorption of biomaterial implant in bones, and on the other hand, for its mechanical continuity. The transformation of the implant into osseous material, and the dynamical formation/destruction of this osseous material is accounted for by creation and destruction of links and sites in two, entangled, networks. We identify the relevant parameters to describe the im...

  15. He bubble sites in implanted copper alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, D.; Eliezer, D.

    1996-01-01

    Structural materials in fusion reactors will be exposed to helium implantation over a broad range of energies. The deformation and partial exfoliation of surface layers due to hydrogen isotopes and helium contribute to the total erosion of the first wall. For this reason, one of the most important criteria in the choice of materials for the first wall of fusion reactors is the material's damage resistance. Recent advances in developing nuclear fusion reactors reveal that efficient heat removal from plasma-facing components is very important. Copper and copper alloys are considered an attractive choice for transporting such a high heat flux without thermal damage as they have high thermal conductivity. In the present study the authors report on the structural changes in a copper alloy, due to the helium implantation on the very near surface area, observed by transmission electron microscopy

  16. Lattice site of helium implanted in Si and diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, W.R.

    1993-01-01

    Single crystals of silicon and diamond were implanted at 300K with 70 keV 3 He. Ion channeling analyses were executed by application of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and nuclear reaction analysis. Helium exhibits a non-random lattice site in the channeling angular distributions for silicon and diamond. A major fraction of the implanted He was qualitatively identified to be near to the tetrahedral interstice in both materials

  17. Temperature rise during removal of fractured components out of the implant body: an in vitro study comparing two ultrasonic devices and five implant types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisberger, Eric W; Bakker, Sjoerd J G; Cune, Marco S

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasonic instrumentation under magnification may facilitate mobilization of screw remnants but may induce heat trauma to surrounding bone. An increase of 5°C is considered detrimental to osseointegration. The objective of this investigation was to examine the rise in temperature of the outer implant body after 30 s of ultrasonic instrumentation to the inner part, in relation to implant type, type of ultrasonic equipment, and the use of coolants in vitro. Two ultrasonic devices (Satelec Suprasson T Max and Electro Medical Systems (EMS) miniMaster) were used on five different implant types that were provided with a thermo couple (Astra 3.5 mm, bone level Regular CrossFit (RC) 4.1 mm, bone level Narrow CrossFit (NC) 3.3 mm, Straumann tissue level regular body regular neck 3.3 mm, and Straumann tissue level wide body regular neck 4.8 mm), either with or without cooling during 30 s. Temperature rise at this point in time is the primary outcome measure. In addition, the mean maximum rise in temperature (all implants combined) was assessed and statistically compared among devices, implant systems, and cooling mode (independent t-tests, ANOVA, and post hoc analysis). The Satelec device without cooling induces the highest temperature change of up to 13°C, particularly in both bone level implants (p < 0.05) but appears safe for approximately 10 s of continuous instrumentation, after which a cooling down period is rational. Cooling is effective for both devices. However, when the Satelec device is used with coolant for a longer period of time, a rise in temperature must be anticipated after cessation of instrumentation, and post-operational cooling is advised. The in vitro setup used in this experiment implies that care should be taken when translating the observations to clinical recommendations, but it is carefully suggested that the EMS device causes limited rise in temperature, even without coolant.

  18. Site location and optical properties of Eu implanted sapphire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, C.; Wemans, A.; Maneira, M.J.P.; Kozanecki, A.; Silva, R.C. da; Alves, E.

    2005-01-01

    Synthetic colourless transparent (0 0 0 1) sapphire crystals were implanted at room temperature with 100 keV europium ions to fluences up to 1 x 10 16 cm -2 . Surface damage is observed at low fluences, as seen by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry under channelling conditions. Optical absorption measurements revealed a variety of structures, most probably related to F-type defects characteristic of implantation damage. Thermal treatments in air or in vacuum up to 1000 deg. C do not produce noticeable changes both in the matrix or the europium profiles. However, the complete recovery of the implantation damage and some redistribution of the europium ions is achieved after annealing at 1300 deg. C in air. Detailed lattice site location studies performed for various axial directions allowed to assess the damage recovery and the incorporation of the Eu ions into well defined crystallographic sites, possibly in an oxide phase also inferred from optical absorption measurements

  19. Immediate placement of implants into infected sites: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Martins, Maximiliano Delany; Wennerberg, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, before placing dental implants, the compromised teeth are removed and the extraction sockets are left to heal for several months. To preserve the alveolar bone level from the collapse caused by healing and to reduce treatment time in situations in which tooth extraction precedes implant placement, some clinicians began to install the implant immediately into the postextraction socket without waiting for the site to heal. The purpose of this study was to review the literature regarding treatment outcomes of immediate implant placement into sites exhibiting pathology after clinical procedures to perform the decontamination of the implant's site. The following questions were raised: Does the presence of periodontal or endodontic infection affect immediate implant placement success? What is suggested to address the infection in the socket prior to immediate placement? An electronic search in PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD, USA) was undertaken in March 2013. The titles and abstracts from these results were read to identify studies within the selection criteria. Eligibility criteria included both animal and human studies, and excluded any review and case reports articles. The publication's intervention had to have been implant placement into a site classified as having an infection (periapical, endodontic, perioendodontic, and periodontal). The search strategy initially yielded 706 references. Thirty-two studies were identified within the selection criteria, from which nine were case reports and review articles and were excluded. Additional hand-searching of the reference lists of selected studies yielded five additional papers. The high survival rate obtained in several studies supports the hypothesis that implants may be successfully osseointegrated when placed immediately after extraction of teeth presenting endodontic and periodontal lesions, provided that appropriate clinical procedures are performed before the implant

  20. Long term results of ultrasonically guided implantation of 125-I seeds combined with external irradiation in localized prostatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iversen, P; Rasmussen, F; Holm, H H [Depts. of Urology and Ultrasound, Herlev Hospital, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1991-01-01

    Transperineal 125-iodine seed implantation guided by transrectal ultrasonography and subsequent external beam irradiation was employed in the treatment of 32 patients with localized prostatic carcinoma (16 poorly differentiated). Follow-up is currently 35-98 months with a median of 65 months. Distant metastases have developed in 18 patients, of whom 11 have died from prostatic cancer. Median change in prostatic volume was a reduction of 35%. Re-biopsy or transurethral resection of the prostate was performed in 25 patients after 1-4 years, revealing still malignant histology in 10 (40%), of whom 8 have developed distant metastases or died from prostatic cancer. Fourteen patients suffered from late complications of which surgical intervention was indicated in five cases. Nine patients are presently free of progression and prostate specific antigen is bigger than 0.5 ng/ml in 8 of these. The future role of ultrasonically guided implantation in the management of prostatic cancer is discussed. (au).

  1. Striated Muscle as Implantation Site for Transplanted Pancreatic Islets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Espes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Islet transplantation is an attractive treatment for selected patients with brittle type 1 diabetes. In the clinical setting, intraportal transplantation predominates. However, due to extensive early islet cell death, the quantity of islets needed to restore glucose homeostasis requires in general a minimum of two donors. Moreover, the deterioration of islet function over time results in few insulin-independent patients after five-year followup. Specific obstacles to the success of islet transplantation include site-specific concerns for the liver such as the instant blood mediated inflammatory reaction, islet lipotoxicity, low oxygen tension, and poor revascularization, impediments that have led to the developing interest for alternative implantation sites over recent years. Within preclinical settings, several alternative sites have now been investigated and proven favorable in various aspects. Muscle is considered a very promising site and has physiologically properties and technical advantages that could make it optimal for islet transplantation.

  2. Changes in implant stability using different site preparation techniques: twist drills versus piezosurgery. A single-blinded, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacchi, Claudio; Vercellotti, Tomaso; Torelli, Lucio; Furlan, Fabio; Di Lenarda, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to longitudinally monitor stability changes of implants inserted using traditional rotary instruments or piezoelectric inserts, and to follow their variations during the first 90 days of healing. A randomized, controlled trial was conducted on 20 patients. Each patient received two identical, adjacent implants in the upper premolar area: the test site was prepared with piezosurgery, and the control site was prepared using twist drills. Resonance frequency analysis measurements were taken by a blinded operator on the day of surgery and after 7, 14, 21, 28, 42, 56, and 90 days. At 90 days, 39 out of 40 implants were osseointegrated (one failure in the control group). Both groups showed an initial decrease in mean implant stability quotient (ISQ) values: a shift in implant stability to increasing ISQ values occurred after 14 days in the test group and after 21 days in the control group. The lowest mean ISQ value was recorded at 14 days for test implants (97.3% of the primary stability) and at 21 days for the control implants (90.8% of the primary stability). ISQ variations with respect to primary stability differed significantly between the two groups during the entire period of observation: from day 14 to day 42, in particular, the differences were extremely significant (p < .0001). All 39 implants were in function successfully at the visit scheduled 1 year after insertion. The findings from this study suggest that ultrasonic implant site preparation results in a limited decrease of ISQ values and in an earlier shifting from a decreasing to an increasing stability pattern, when compared with the traditional drilling technique. From a clinical point of view, implants inserted with the piezoelectric technique demonstrated a short-term clinical success similar to those inserted using twist drills. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Application of ultra-sons to on-site spent fuel assemblies metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondard, C.; Saglio, R.; Vouillot, M.; Delaroche, P.; Vaubert, Y.; Van Craeynest, J.C.

    1983-12-01

    Fuel assemblies inspection on the site of a power reactor, between two irradiation campaigns, allows to estimate the behaviour of prototype fuel assemblies and to permit their refueling for the continuation of the irradiation; the utilization of non-destructive, reliable and high-performance techniques, is of a great interest in the application. For, this reason, the C.E.A. has been led to carry out new techniques allowing the visual examination and the dimensional inspection of spent fuel assemblies of 900 MWe French pressurized water reactors, with a transportable Fuel Examination Module (MEC) on every reactor site. This module includes a television camera, and uses for the first time as ''position sensor'' the properties offered by a set of ultrasonic transducers. The main principle of the design, of the operation way of the module, of the measuring methods, and, of the data acquisition and processing, are presented [fr

  4. Implantation sites of Ce and Gd in diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Bharuth-Ram, K; Hofsäss, H C; Ronning, C; Dietrich, M

    2002-01-01

    The implantation sites of rare earth (RE) probes /sup 141/Ce (t/sub 1 /2/=32 d) and /sup 149/Gd (t/sub 1/2/=9.28 d) in diamond have been investigated using the emission channeling (EC) technique. Parent isotopes /sup 141/Cs and /sup 149/Dy were implanted into type IIa, diamond samples at an energy of 60 keV at the online isotope separator ISOLDE at CERN. /sup 141/Cs decays through the chain /sup 141/Cs-/sup 141/Ba-/sup 141/La-/sup 141/Ce-/sup 141/ Pr. EC measurements were made on the 102 keV conversion electrons emitted in the decay of /sup 141/Pr to its ground state. The decay of /sup 149 /Dy follows the chain /sup 149/Dy-/sup 149/Tb-/sup 149/Gd-/sup 149 /Eu-/sup 149/Sm. EC measurements were made on the 101 keV electrons emitted in the decay of /sup 149/Eu. Two-dimensional channeling patterns of the conversion electrons were obtained along and axial directions by raster scans with a Si surface barrier detector. Comparison of the observed patterns with simulated spectra show that in diamond 45-50% of the RE...

  5. Biologic Agents for Periodontal Regeneration and Implant Site Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Suárez-López del Amo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The advancement of molecular mediators or biologic agents has increased tremendously during the last decade in periodontology and dental implantology. Implant site development and reconstruction of the lost periodontium represent main fields in which these molecular mediators have been employed and investigated. Different growth factors trigger different reactions in the tissues of the periodontium at various cellular levels. Proliferation, migration, and differentiation constitute the main target areas of these molecular mediators. It was the purpose of this comprehensive review to describe the origin and rationale, evidence, and the most current understanding of the following biologic agents: Recombinant Human Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-BB (rhPDGF-BB, Enamel Matrix Derivate (EMD, Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP and Platelet-Rich Fibrin (PRF, Recombinant Human Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 (rhFGF-2, Bone Morphogenic Proteins (BMPs, BMP-2 and BMP-7, Teriparatide PTH, and Growth Differential Factor-5 (GDF-5.

  6. Site ultrasonic measurement on RPV stud-bolt loading under hot transient of Qinshan NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Jiadi; Dou Yikang; Zhu Shiming

    1994-08-01

    It expounds that the key of solving thermal transient sealing problem is to obtain the thermal increment of stud-bolt loading. This loading, as a primary stress loading, is directly related to the bolt fatigue life and transient loading spectrum for vessel analysis. The fundamental works and main results of ultrasonic measurement on RPV stud-bolt loading on Qinshan site are also presented. The measuring capability has exceeded 1 m in length and temperature of 280 degree C, therefore, it is possible to be used in the field of NPP. The paper is the continuation of research work for sealing analysis and tests on the RPV (see SMiRT-9, 10)

  7. Immediate loading of subcrestally placed dental implants in anterior and premolar sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningsen, Anders; Smeets, Ralf; Köppen, Kai; Sehner, Susanne; Kornmann, Frank; Gröbe, Alexander; Heiland, Max; Gerlach, Till

    2017-11-01

    Immediate loading of dental implants has been evolving into an appropriate procedure for the treatment of partially edentulous jaws. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical success and radiological outcome of immediately and delayed loaded dental implants in anterior and premolar sites. In this retrospective study, data of 163 individuals requiring tooth removal with subsequent implant placement in anterior and premolar sites were analyzed. Implants were immediately loaded by provisional acrylic resin bridges or loaded with delay. Implants were followed up annually for up to 9 years including intraoral radiographs. A total of 285 implants in 163 patients were placed. 218 implants were immediately loaded and 67 implants with delay. Fifteen implants failed during the follow-up period resulting in survival rates of 94.5% for immediate loading and 95.5% for delayed loading. After an initial decrease of 0.3 mm in the first 12 months the marginal bone level remained stable. No statistically significant differences were found in marginal bone loss between immediately and delayed loaded implants (P = 0.518, 95% CI). Within the limits of this study, immediate loading of immediately subcrestally placed dental implants in anterior and premolar sites is a reliable treatment option for dental rehabilitation. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Novel Cranial Implants of Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia as Acoustic Windows for Ultrasonic Brain Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Mario I; Penilla, Elias H; Leija, Lorenzo; Vera, Arturo; Garay, Javier E; Aguilar, Guillermo

    2017-11-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound can induce changes in tissues by means of thermal and nonthermal effects. It is proposed for treatment of some brain pathologies such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's diseases, and cancer. However, cranium highly absorbs ultrasound reducing transmission efficiency. There are clinical applications of transcranial focused ultrasound and implantable ultrasound transducers proposed to address this problem. In this paper, biocompatible materials are proposed for replacing part of the cranium (cranial implants) based on low porosity polycrystalline 8 mol% yttria-stabilized-zirconia (8YSZ) ceramics as acoustic windows for brain therapy. In order to assess the viability of 8YSZ implants to effectively transmit ultrasound, various 8YSZ ceramics with different porosity are tested; their acoustic properties are measured; and the results are validated using finite element models simulating wave propagation to brain tissue through 8YSZ windows. The ultrasound attenuation is found to be linearly dependent on ceramics' porosity. Results for the nearly pore-free case indicate that 8YSZ is highly effective in transmitting ultrasound, with overall maximum transmission efficiency of ≈81%, compared to near total absorption of cranial bone. These results suggest that 8YSZ polycrystals could be suitable acoustic windows for ultrasound brain therapy at 1 MHz. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Ultrasonically guided 125iodine seed implantation with external radiation in management of localized prostatic carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Bak, M; Juul, N

    1989-01-01

    Thirty-three patients with localized prostatic carcinoma (16 poorly differentiated) were treated with transperineal 125Iodine seed implantation (160 Gy) guided by transrectal ultrasonography and subsequent external beam irradiation (47.4 Gy). The observation time was six to sixty-eight months...... with a median follow-up of thirty-five months. Median change in prostatic volume was a reduction of 35 percent. Re-biopsy or transurethral resection of the prostate was performed in 25 patients after one to two years, revealing still malignant histology in 12 (48%). Development of distant metastases occurred...

  10. The immediate placement of dental implants into extraction sites with periapical lesions: a retrospective chart review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Christopher Lincoln; Diehl, David; Bell, Brian Michael; Bell, Robert E

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the success of dental implants placed immediately into extraction sites in the presence of chronic periapical pathology. The charts of 655 patients who had implants immediately placed into fresh extraction sites were reviewed for the presence or absence of periapical radiolucencies. A total of 922 implants were included. Of the 922 implants, 285 were immediately placed into sockets that had chronic periapical infections. The remaining 637 implants, without signs of periapical pathology, were used as the control group. Success of the implants was defined as successful osseointegration, successful restoration, and absence of evidence of bone loss or peri-implantitis. Other variables such as age, gender, smoking, diabetes, bisphosphonate use, lucencies of adjacent teeth, and implant stability at the time of placement were also evaluated. Of the 922 implants, 285 were placed into sockets with periapical radiolucencies. The success rate of implants placed in the study group was 97.5%, whereas the success rate of the control group was 98.7%. The difference was not found to be statistically significant. The mean follow-up was 19.75 months, with a maximum of 93 months and a minimum of 3 months. A statistically higher failure rate was found for implants placed adjacent to retained teeth with periapical pathology. The placement of implants in sockets affected by chronic periapical pathology can be considered a safe and viable treatment option. There is a risk of implant failure when placing implants adjacent to teeth with periapical radiolucencies. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Stability of implants placed in fresh sockets versus healed alveolar sites: Early findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, Sergio Alexandre; da Silva Neto, Ulisses Tavares; Rossetti, Paulo Henrique Orlato; Watinaga, Sidney Eiji; Giro, Gabriela; Shibli, Jamil Awad

    2016-05-01

    The present study measured implant stability quotient (ISQ) values at three different time points after surgical procedures to compare whether the stability values differed between implants placed in fresh extraction sockets versus healed alveolar sites. To measure implant stability, resonance frequency analysis (RFA) was performed in 77 patients (53 women, 24 men) with a total of 120 dental implants. These implants were divided into two groups: Group 1 included 60 implants in healed alveolar sites (22 in the maxilla, 38 in the mandible), and Group 2 included 60 implants in fresh sockets (41 in the maxilla, 19 in the mandible). Implant stability was measured immediately at implant placement (baseline), 90, and 150 days later. Statistical analysis was made using a multivariate regression linear model at implant level (α = 0.05). Overall, the means and standard deviations of the ISQ values were 62.7 ± 7.14 (95% confidence interval [CI], 39-88) at baseline, 70.0 ± 6.22 (95% CI, 46-88) at 90 days, and 73.4 ± 5.84 (95% CI, 58-88) at 150 days. In Group 1, the ISQs ranged between 64.3 ± 6.20 and 75.0 ± 5.69, while in Group 2, presented lower values that ranged between 61.2 ± 8.09 and 71.9 ± 5.99 (P = 0.002). Anatomic location and times periods were the only identified variables with an influence on ISQ values at implant level (P sockets and in healed sites exhibited similar evolutions in ISQ values and thus osseointegration; however, the implants in the healed alveolar sites exhibited superior values at all time points. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Effect of fluence on the lattice site of implanted Er and implantation induced strain in GaN

    CERN Document Server

    Wahl, U; Decoster, S; Vantomme, A; Correi, J G

    2009-01-01

    A GaN thin film was implanted with 5 × 1014 cm−2 of 60 keV stable 166Er, followed by the implantation of 2 × 1013 cm−2 radioactive 167Tm (t1/2 = 9.3 d) and an annealing sequence up to 900 °C. The emission channeling (EC) technique was applied to assess the lattice location of Er following the Tm decay from the conversion electrons emitted by 167mEr, which showed that more than 50% of 167mEr occupies substitutional Ga sites. The results are briefly compared to a 167mEr lattice location experiment in a GaN sample not pre-implanted with 166Er. In addition, high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) was used to characterize the perpendicular strain in the high-fluence implanted film. The HRXRD experiments showed that the Er implantation resulted in an increase of the c-axis lattice constant of the GaN film around 0.5–0.7%. The presence of significant disorder within the implanted region was corroborated by the fact that the EC patterns for off-normal directions exhibit a pronounced angular broadening of t...

  13. Electric field gradient calculation at atomic site of In implanted ZnO samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, Y.; Cruz, C. M.; Leyva, A.; Pinnera; Van Espen, P.; Perez, C.

    2011-01-01

    The electric field gradient (EFG) calculated for 111 In→ 111 Cd implanted ZnO samples is reported. The study was made for ideal hexagonal ZnO structures and super-cells considering the In implantation environment at the cation site using the 'WIEN2k' code within the GGA(+U) approximation. The obtained EFG values are in good agreement with the experimental reports for ideal ZnO and 111 In→ 111 Cd implanted structures; measured by perturbed angular correlation (PAC) and Moessbauer spectroscopy. The attribution of substitutional incorporation of 111 In at the ZnO cation site after annealing was confirmed. (Author)

  14. Immediate Loading of Tapered Implants Placed in Postextraction Sockets and Healed Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chang-Hun; Mangano, Francesco; Mortellaro, Carmen; Park, Kwang-Bum

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the survival, stability, and complications of immediately loaded implants placed in postextraction sockets and healed sites. Over a 2-year period, all patients presenting with partial or complete edentulism of the maxilla and/or mandible (healed site group, at least 4 months of healing after tooth extraction) or in need of replacement of nonrecoverable failing teeth (postextraction group) were considered for inclusion in this study. Tapered implants featuring a nanostructured calcium-incorporated surface were placed and loaded immediately. The prosthetic restorations comprised single crowns, fixed partial dentures, and fixed full arches. Primary outcomes were implant survival, stability, and complications. Implant stability was assessed at placement and at each follow-up evaluation (1 week, 3 months, and 1 year after placement): implants with an insertion torque (IT) sockets of 17 patients, and 32 implants were placed in healed sites of 22 patients. There were no statistically significant differences in ISQ values between the 2 groups, at each assessment. In total, 60 implants (96.8%) had an IT ≥45 and an ISQ ≥70 at placement and at each follow-up control: all these implants were successfully loaded. Only 2 implants (1 in a postextraction socket and 1 in a healed site, 3.2%) could not achieve an IT ≥45 N·cm and/or an ISQ ≥70 at placement or over time: accordingly, these were considered failed for stability, as they could not be subjected to immediate loading. One of these 2 implants, in a healed site of a posterior maxilla, had to be removed, yielding an overall 1-year implant survival rate of 98.4%. No complications were reported. No significant differences were reported between the 2 groups with respect to implant failures and complications. Immediately loaded implants placed in postextraction sockets and healed sites had similar high survival and stability, with no reported complications. Further long

  15. Distortion of digital panoramic radiographs used for implant site assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayyan Abdulhamid Kayal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study is conducted to determine the amount of distortion of digital panoramic radiographs. Materials and Methods: Panoramic radiographs of all patients who received dental implants in the years 2012 and 2013 were selected from the records at the faculty of dentistry, King Abdulaziz University. Radiographs were analyzed using the R4 Kodak Software for linear measurements of implants length and width. The measurements were compared to the actual size of the implant, and the amount of distortion was calculated. Results: A total of 169 implants were analyzed. Horizontally, there was a statistically significant increase of 0.4 mm in width in the radiographic measurement compared to the actual size in the incisor region. Vertically, the sample overall exhibited a decrease by 0.4 mm compared to the actual size. Incisors had the highest difference with a decrease of 1.7 mm in the radiographic measurements compared to actual size. The highest distortion was found in the incisor region for both diameter and length (1.1 and 0.86, respectively. Conclusion: Digital panoramic radiographs show minimal to no distortion. The highest distortion is found in the anterior area.

  16. Dopant site location in dual-implanted GaP using (111) planar channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parikh, N.R.; Kao, C.T.; Lee, D.R.; Muse, J.; Swanson, M.L.; Venkatasubramanian, R.; Timmons, M.

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that dual implantation can efficiently introduce group IV dopant onto selected sub-lattice sites in III--V compound semiconductors, thus enhancing electrical activation. The authors have studied this phenomenon in GaP using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) to determine the lattice location of Sn atoms. The authors used single crystals of GaP (100) which had been implanted at 400 degrees C with 120 Sn + following previously implanted 69 Ga + or 31 P + . Energies were selected for equivalent projected ranges, and all species were implanted with doses of 1 x 10 15 atoms/cm 2 . Asymmetry in the angular scan of the {111} planar channel was then used to determine the sub-lattice location of the implanted Sn. RBS results indicated that for all implants Sn atoms were substituting Ga and P sites equally. However, Hall effect measurements gave p type conduction for GaP implanted with Sn alone, while those with prior implants of Ga or P resulted in n-type conduction. RBS and Hall effect results are explained by a vacancy complex model

  17. Reasons for mini-implants failure: choosing installation site should be valued!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Consolaro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mini-implant loss is often associated with physical and mechanical aspects that result from choosing an inappropriate placement site. It is worth highlighting that: a Interdental alveolar bone crests are flexible and deformable. For this reason, they may not offer the ideal absolute anchorage. The more cervical the structures, the more delicate they are, thus offering less physical support for mini-implant placement; b Alveolar bone crests of triangular shape are more deformable, whereas those of rectangular shape are more flexible; c The bases of the alveolar processes of the maxilla and the mandible are not flexible, for this reason, they are more likely to receive mini-implants; d The more cervical a mini-implant is placed, the higher the risk of loss; the more apical a mini-implant is placed, the better its prognosis will be; e 3D evaluations play a major role in planning the use of mini-implants. Based on the aforementioned considerations, the hypotheses about mini-implant loss are as follows: 1 Deflection of maxillary and mandibular alveolar processes when mini-implants are more cervically placed; 2 Mini-implants placed too near the periodontal ligament, with normal intra-alveolar tooth movement; 3 Low bone density, low thickness and low alveolar bone volume; 4 Low alveolar cortical bone thickness; 5 Excessive pressure inducing trabecular bone microfracture; 6 Sites of higher anatomical weakness in the mandible and the maxilla; 7 Thicker gingival tissue not considered when choosing the mini-implant.

  18. Emission Channeling Studies of the Lattice Site of Oversized Alkali Atoms Implanted in Metals

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % IS340 \\\\ \\\\ As alkali atoms have the largest atomic radius of all elements, the determination of their lattice configuration following implantation into metals forms a critical test for the various models predicting the lattice site of implanted impurity atoms. The site determination of these large atoms will especially be a crucial check for the most recent model that relates the substitutional fraction of oversized elements to their solution enthalpy. Recent exploratory $^{213}$Fr and $^{221}$Fr $\\alpha$-emission channeling experiments at ISOLDE-CERN and hyperfine interaction measurements on Fr implanted in Fe gave an indication for anomalously large substitutional fractions. To investigate further the behaviour of Fr and other alkali atoms like Cs and Rb thoroughly, more on-line emission channeling experiments are needed. We propose a number of shifts for each element, where the temperature of the implanted metals will be varied between 50$^\\circ$ and 700$^\\circ$~K. Temperature dependent measurements wi...

  19. Effects of a Short Drilling Implant Protocol on Osteotomy Site Temperature and Drill Torque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihali, Sorin G; Canjau, Silvana; Cernescu, Anghel; Bortun, Cristina M; Wang, Hom-Lay; Bratu, Emanuel

    2018-02-01

    To establish a protocol for reducing the drilling sequence during implant site preparation based on temperature and insertion torque. The traditional conventional drilling sequence (used several drills with 0.6-mm increment each time) was compared with the proposed short drilling protocol (only used 2 drills: initial and final drill). One hundred drilling osteotomies were performed in bovine and porcine bones. Sets of 2 osteotomy sites were created in 5 bone densities using 2 types of drilling protocols. Thermographic pictures were captured throughout all drilling procedures and analyzed using ThermaCAM Researcher Professional 2.10. Torque values were determined during drilling by measuring electrical input and drill speed. There were statistically significant differences in bone temperature between the conventional and short drilling protocols during implant site preparation (analysis of variance P = 0.0008). However, there were no significant differences between the 2 types of drilling protocols for both implant diameters. Implant site preparation time was significantly reduced when using the short drilling protocol compared with the conventional drilling protocol (P drilling protocol proposed herein may represent a safe approach for implant site preparation.

  20. The visibility of mandibular canal on orthoradial and oblique CBCT slices at molar implant sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkhader, Mustafa; Jarab, Fadi; Shaweesh, Ashraf; Hudieb, Malik

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare visibility of the mandibular canal on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)-based orthoradial and oblique slices at molar implant sites. CBCT images for 132 mandibular molar implant sites were selected for the study. After generating orthoradial and oblique slices, two observers evaluated the visibility of the mandibular canal using three-point scoring scale (1-3, good to excellent). Wilcoxon signed-rank test compared the visibility scores of the two slices. Both orthoradial and oblique slices obtained from CBCT had only very good to excellent mandibular canal visibility scores. At 114 mandibular molar implant sites, the visibility score was equal on both orthoradial and oblique slices. Although the visibility score was higher on orthoradial slices for 12 implant sites, the visibility score was higher for six implant sites on oblique slices and the difference was not significant. Therefore, the visibility of the mandibular canal was excellent and comparable on most of orthoradial and oblique slices obtained from CBCT images

  1. Reliability of a CAD/CAM Surgical Guide for Implant Placement: An In Vitro Comparison of Surgeons' Experience Levels and Implant Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Su-Jung; Leesungbok, Richard; Cui, Taixing; Lee, Suk Won; Ahn, Su-Jin

    This in vitro study evaluated the reliability of a surgical guide with regard to different levels of operator surgical experience and implant site. A stereolithographic surgical guide for epoxy resin mandibles with three edentulous molar sites was produced using a computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) system. Two surgeons with and two surgeons without implant surgery experience placed implants in a model either using or not using the CAD/CAM surgical guide. Four groups were created: inexperienced surgeon without the guide (group 1); experienced surgeon without the guide (group 2); inexperienced surgeon with the guide (group 3); and experienced surgeon with the guide (group 4). Planned implants and placed implants were superimposed using digital software, and deviation parameters were calculated. There were no significant differences in any of the deviation parameters between the groups when using the surgical guide. With respect to the implant sites, there were no significant differences among the groups in any parameter. Use of the CAD/CAM surgical guide reduced discrepancies among operators performing implant surgery regardless of their level of experience. Whether or not the guide was used, differences in the anterior-posterior implant site in the molar area did not affect the accuracy of implant placement.

  2. [Remediation efficiency of lead-contaminated soil at an industrial site by ultrasonic-assisted chemical extraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-jie; Huang, Jin-lou; Liu, Zhi-qiang; Yue, Xi

    2013-09-01

    This research chose five lead-contaminated sites of a lead-acid battery factory to analyze the speciation distribution and concentration of lead. Under the same conditions (0.1 mol x L(-1) EDTA,30 min, 25 degrees C), the removal effect of heavy metal was compared between ultrasonic-assisted chemical extraction (UCE) and conventional chemical extraction ( CCE), and the variation of lead speciation was further explored. The results showed that the lead removal efficiency of UCE was significantly better than CCE. The lead removal efficiency of WS, A, B, C and BZ was 10.06%, 48.29%, 48.69%, 53.28% and 36.26% under CCE. While the removal efficiency of the UCE was 22.42%, 69.31%, 71.00%, 74.49% and 71.58%, with the average efficiency higher by 22%. By comparing the speciation distribution of the two washing methods, it was found that the acid extractable content maintained or decreased after UCE, whereas it showed an increasing trend after CCE. The reduction effect of the reducible was as high as 98% by UCE. UCE also showed a more efficient reduction effect of the organic matter-sulfite bounded form and the residual form. Hence, it is feasible to improve the washing efficiency of heavy metal contained in soil by conducting the cleaning process with the help of ultrasonic wave, which is a simple and fast mean to remove lead from contaminated sites.

  3. Ultrasonic Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyeong Jun; Kuk, Jeong Han

    2002-02-15

    This book introduces ultrasonic testing, which tells of outline of ultrasonic testing, principle of ultrasonic testing, prosperities of ultrasonic waves, radiographic test and ultrasonic test, basic theory on ultrasonic testing, mode conversion, transmission and diffraction, ultrasonic flaw detection and probe, standard test piece and reference test piece, like KS(JIS) ASME and ASTM, classification and properties of ultrasonic testing, straight beam method, angle beam method, ASME SEC.V.Art.5 ASTMA 388 and KS B 0817 Korean industrial standard.

  4. Correlation Between Resonance Frequency Analysis and Bone Quality Assessments at Dental Implant Recipient Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Min-Wen; Fu, Earl; Lin, Fu-Gong; Chang, Wei-Jeng; Hsieh, Yao-Dung; Shen, E-Chin

    To evaluate whether primary implant stability could be used to predict bone quality, the association between the implant stability quotient (ISQ) value and the bone type at the implant site was evaluated. Ninety-five implant sites in 50 patients were included. Bone type (categorized by Lekholm and Zarb) at the implant site was initially assessed using presurgical dental radiography. During the preparation of the implant site, a bone core specimen was carefully obtained. The bone type was assessed by tactile sensation during the drilling operation, according to the Misch criteria. The primary stability of the inserted implant was evaluated by resonance frequency analysis (RFA). The ISQ value was recorded. The bone core specimen was then examined by stereomicroscopy or microcomputed tomography (micro-CT), and the bone type was determined by the surface characteristics of the specimen, based on Lekholm and Zarb classification. Agreement between the bone quality assessed by the four methods (ie, presurgical radiography, tactile sensation, stereomicroscopy, and micro-CT) was tested by Cohen's kappa statistics, whereas the association between the ISQ value and the bone type was evaluated by the generalized linear regression model. The mean ISQ score was 72.6, and the score was significantly influenced by the maxillary or mandibular arch (P = .001). The bone type at the implant sites varied according to the assessment method. However, a significant influence of the arch was repeatedly noted when using radiography or tactile sensation. Among the four bone-quality assessment methods, a weak agreement existed only between stereomicroscopy and micro-CT, especially in the maxilla (κ = 0.469). A negative association between the ISQ value and the bone type assessed by stereomicroscopy or by micro-CT was significant in the maxilla, but not in the mandible, after adjustments for sex, age, and right/left side (P = .013 and P = .027 for stereomicroscopy and micro-CT, respectively

  5. Lattice site occupation of insoluble impurity atoms in aluminium after implantation and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloska, M.K.

    1987-03-01

    Several elements, whose atoms are oversized and insoluble in aluminium, were implanted in aluminium single crystals at different temperatures. The substitutional fraction and the lattice site location were determined using the ion-channeling technique. The substitutional fractions obtained by in situ analyses are strongly dependent on the implantation temperature. At implantation and analysis temperatures below the temperature of stage III the substitutional fraction is significant larger than at temperatures above. With increasing heat of solution the substitutional fraction decreases for all implantation temperatures. The nonsubstitutional component consists of impurity atom-vacancy complexes. These complexes are formed in the cooling phase of the cascade. At temperatures above the temperature of stage III additional free mobile vacancies were captured by the impurity atoms. The capture radius is correlated with the heat of solution and the size mismatch energy. The results constitute for the first time an experimental confirmation of molecular dynamics calculations of cascade evolution. (orig./BHO)

  6. Origin of the lattice sites occupied by implanted Co in Si

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Daniel; Wahl, Ulrich; Martins Correia, Joao; Da Costa Pereira, Lino Miguel; Amorim, Lígia; Castro Ribeiro Da Silva, Manuel; Esteves De Araujo, Araujo Joao Pedro

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the lattice location of implanted 61Co in silicon. By means of emission channeling, three different lattice sites have been identified: ideal substitutional sites, displaced bond-centered sites and displaced tetrahedral interstitial sites. To assess the origin of the observed lattice sites we have compared our results to emission channeling studies on 59Fe and 65Ni and to Mössbauer spectroscopy experiments on 57Co, present in literature. The possible interpretation of several 57Co Mössbauer lines is discussed in the light of our new results on the 61Co lattice location. The conclusions are relevant for the microscopic understanding of some gettering techniques.

  7. Prosthetic considerations for orthodontic implant site development in the adult patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Alexandra I; Nkenke, Emeka; Blatz, Markus B; Geiselhöringer, Hans; Holst, Stefan

    2009-11-01

    Proper site development is a key factor for long-term clinical success of dental implants. Whereas surgical and restorative techniques have been refined to ensure predictable functional and esthetic outcome, individual clinical prerequisites do not always allow proper placement of implants when prosthetic and material properties are considered. Orthodontic tooth movement may be a viable and nonsurgical site development treatment option. With the introduction and advancements of minimal invasive and less visible orthodontic appliances, a growing number of adult patients are willing to obtain orthodontic treatment. The spectrum of modern appliances is broad and ranges from clear aligners to lingual brackets. Skeletal anchorage devices such as orthodontic mini-implants often eliminate unpopular external anchorage devices (ie, headgear) in adult patients, This article discusses the selection of an appropriate pretreatment approach by taking patient-specific criteria into account.

  8. Experimental Analysis of Temperature Differences During Implant Site Preparation: Continuous Drilling Technique Versus Intermittent Drilling Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fiore, Adolfo; Sivolella, Stefano; Stocco, Elena; Favero, Vittorio; Stellini, Edoardo

    2018-02-01

    Implant site preparation through drilling procedures may cause bone thermonecrosis. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate, using a thermal probe, overheating at implant sites during osteotomies through 2 different drilling methods (continuous drilling technique versus intermittent drilling technique) using irrigation at different temperatures. Five implant sites 13 mm in length were performed on 16 blocks (fresh bovine ribs), for a total of 80 implant sites. The PT-100 thermal probe was positioned 5 mm from each site. Two physiological refrigerant solutions were used: one at 23.7°C and one at 6.0°C. Four experimental groups were considered: group A (continuous drilling with physiological solution at 23.7°C), group B (intermittent drilling with physiological solution at 23.7°C), group C (continuous drilling with physiological solution at 6.0°C), and group D (intermittent drilling with physiological solution at 6.0°C). The Wilcoxon rank-sum test (2-tailed) was used to compare groups. While there was no difference between group A and group B (W = 86; P = .45), statistically significant differences were observed between experimental groups A and C (W = 0; P =.0001), B and D (W = 45; P =.0005), and C and D (W = 41; P = .003). Implant site preparation did not affect the overheating of the bone. Statistically significant differences were found with the refrigerant solutions. Using both irrigating solutions, bone temperature did not exceed 47°C.

  9. Hair Barrette Induced Cochlear Implant Receiver Stimulator Site Infection with Extrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trung N. Le

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cochlear implant infections and extrusion are uncommon but potentially devastating complications. Recent literature suggests conservative management can be employed. Local measures inclusive of aggressive surgical debridement with vascularized flaps and parenteral antibiotics represent a viable option and often permit device salvage. However, explantation should be considered if there is evidence of systemic, intracranial, or intractable infection. Method. A Case report and literature review. Case Report. This case illustrates a complicated local wound infection associated with cochlear implantation due to transcutaneous adherence of a ferrous hair barrette to a cochlear implant magnet. Reconstruction of computed tomography (CT data with 3D volume rendering significantly improved the value of the images and facilitated patient counseling as well as operative planning. Conclusion. Cochlear implant infections can be associated with foreign bodies. CT images are beneficial in the evaluation of cochlear implant complications. 3D CT images provide a comprehensive view of the site of interest, displaying the relationship of the hardware to the skull and soft tissues, while minimizing associated artifacts. Cochlear implant patients should consider use of nonmetallic hair devices.

  10. Analysis of hemodynamic characteristics in anastomotic sites of femoral artery implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, H.W. [Graduate School, Soongsil University, Seoul (Korea); Suh, S.H. [SoongsSil University, Seoul (Korea); Yoo, S.S. [Hankuk Aviation University, Kyonggi-do (Korea); Kim, D.I.; Lee, B.B. [Samsung Medical Center (Korea)

    1998-11-01

    The objective of the present study is to obtain information on the hemodynamic characteristics in the anastomotic sites of femoral artery through the vascular implantation. Three dimensional steady and physiological blood flows in the femoral artery are simulated using the finite volume method. The geometrical shape of the anastomotic sites is made based on the vascular anatomy of a white rabbit. Wall shear stress distributions in the anastomotic sites for the physiological flow are compared with those for steady flow. Blood flow phenomena in the anastomotic sites of the femoral artery are discussed extensively. (author). 9 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  11. The site of action of intrahypothalamic estrogen implants in feminine sexual behavior: an autoradiographic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, P.G.; Krieger, M.S.; Barfield, R.J.; McEwen, B.S.; Pfaff, D.W.

    1982-11-01

    Estrogenic stimulation of the ventromedial hypothalamus is sufficient to prime progesterone-facilitated estrous behavior in ovariectomized rats. To determine precisely the site(s) of estrogenic stimulation and the locus of its priming action on estrous behavior, we used steroid autoradiographic methods to assess the diffusion of (/sup 3/H)estradiol ((/sup 3/H)E/sub 2/) from behaviorally effective implants diluted 1:300 with cholesterol. Ovariectomized rats received (/sup 3/H)E/sub 2/-cholesterol implants aimed at the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMN). Females were tested twice for feminine sexual behavior after stereotaxic surgery. They received progesterone on the day of behavioral testing. Animals were killed on the day after the second behavior test, cannulae were removed, and the brains were frozen rapidly and processed for autoradiography. Five of eight females with bilateral implants aimed at the VMN exhibited female sexual behavior in at least one of the two tests. Of these, four also showed proceptive behavior. Histological examination of brain sections indicated that behaviorally effective implants were located in, or adjacent to, the central portions of VMN. Implants from nonreceptive animals were located at the extreme anterior or posterior aspects of the VMN. The data collected are consistent with the view that estrogen acts within a sharply defined region of the VMN to prime estrons behavior.

  12. The site of action of intrahypothalamic estrogen implants in feminine sexual behavior: an autoradiographic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, P.G.; Krieger, M.S.; Barfield, R.J.; McEwen, B.S.; Pfaff, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    Estrogenic stimulation of the ventromedial hypothalamus is sufficient to prime progesterone-facilitated estrous behavior in ovariectomized rats. To determine precisely the site(s) of estrogenic stimulation and the locus of its priming action on estrous behavior, we used steroid autoradiographic methods to assess the diffusion of [ 3 H]estradiol ([ 3 H]E 2 ) from behaviorally effective implants diluted 1:300 with cholesterol. Ovariectomized rats received [ 3 H]E 2 -cholesterol implants aimed at the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMN). Females were tested twice for feminine sexual behavior after stereotaxic surgery. They received progesterone on the day of behavioral testing. Animals were killed on the day after the second behavior test, cannulae were removed, and the brains were frozen rapidly and processed for autoradiography. Five of eight females with bilateral implants aimed at the VMN exhibited female sexual behavior in at least one of the two tests. Of these, four also showed proceptive behavior. Histological examination of brain sections indicated that behaviorally effective implants were located in, or adjacent to, the central portions of VMN. Implants from nonreceptive animals were located at the extreme anterior or posterior aspects of the VMN. The data collected are consistent with the view that estrogen acts within a sharply defined region of the VMN to prime estrons behavior

  13. On-Site Evaluation of Large Components Using Saft and Tofd Ultrasonic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, M.; Rieder, H.; Dillhöfer, A.

    2011-06-01

    This contribution addresses ultrasonic inspection and evaluation of welds in large components. An approach has been developed in order to enhance the reliability of welded ship propellers. The Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) has been modified with regard to the curved surfaces and the sound attenuation of cast Ni-Al bronzes. For weld inspection in steels the Time-of-Flight Diffraction technique (TOFD) can provide additional information for specific defect orientations. Both techniques have been combined in view of the determination of defect sizes and shapes in longitudinal welds of pipes with diameters of up to 48 inches. Details on the inspection and evaluation concepts as well as experimental results are presented.

  14. Direct observation of the lattice sites of implanted manganese in silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Daniel; Wahl, Ulrich; Martins Correia, Joao; Amorim, Lígia; Decoster, Stefan; Castro Ribeiro Da Silva, Manuel; Da Costa Pereira, Lino Miguel; Esteves De Araujo, Araujo Joao Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Mn-doped Si has attracted significant interest in the context of dilute magnetic semiconductors. We investigated the lattice location of implanted Mn in silicon of different doping types (n, n+ and p+) in the highly dilute regime. Three different lattice sites were identified by means of emission channeling experiments: ideal substitutional sites; sites displaced from bond-centered towards substitutional sites and sites displaced from anti-bonding towards tetrahedral interstitial sites. For all doping types investigated, the substitutional fraction remained below ∼ 30%. We discuss the origin of the observed lattice sites as well as the implications of such structures on the understanding of Mn-doped Si systems.

  15. Conventional drilling versus piezosurgery for implant site preparation: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendyk, Daniel Isaac; Oliveira, Natacha Kalline; Pannuti, Claudio Mendes; Naclério-Homem, Maria da Graça; Wennerberg, Ann; Zindel Deboni, Maria Cristina

    2018-03-27

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the evidence of a correlation between the stability of dental implants placed by piezosurgery, compared with implants placed by conventional drilling. An electronic search in MEDLINE, SCOPUS and the Cochrane Library was undertaken until August 2016 and was supplemented by manual searches and by unpublished studies at OpenGray. Only randomized controlled clinical trials that reported implant site preparation with piezosurgery and with conventional drilling were considered eligible for inclusion in this review. Meta-analyses were performed to evaluate the impact of piezosurgery on implant stability. Of 456 references electronically retrieved, 3 were included in the qualitative analysis and quantitative synthesis. The pooled estimates suggest that there is no significant difference between piezosurgery and conventional drilling at baseline (WMD: 2.20; 95% CI: -5.09, 9,49; p = 0.55). At 90 days, the pooled estimates revealed a statistically significant difference (WMD: 3.63; 95% CI: 0.58, 6.67, p = 0.02) favouring piezosurgery. Implant stability is slightly improved when osteotomy was performed by a piezoelectric device. More randomized controlled clinical trials are needed to verify these findings.

  16. Utilization of 3D/Dental software for precise implant site selection: clinical reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraut, R A

    1992-01-01

    Preoperative planning is an essential aspect of endosteal implant placement. Three-dimensional imaging allows the surgeon and restorative dentist to accurately visualize potential implant receptor sites relative to adjacent vital structures. This information is correlated with the planned occlusion, and transferred to the patient by means of a surgical prosthetic guide, which is developed on the diagnostic cast. The steps involved in planning and placing implants in an atrophic mandible in the first case illustrates the value of three-dimensional scanning in treating patients with limited bone volume. The second case presented with a mandibular bilateral distal extension partial denture, which was ultimately replaced with two implant-supported fixed prostheses. The use of three-dimensional imaging showed the location of the inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle which allowed utilization of all of the bone above it without encroaching on the nerve. The third case illustrates an edentulous maxilla where visualization of the osseous contour allowed for implant placement at an optimal angulation to provide support for the planned prosthesis.

  17. Fe and Cu in Si: Lattice sites and trapping at implantation-related defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, U.; Correia, J.G.; Rita, E.; Araujo, J.P.; Soares, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    We have used the emission channeling technique in order to study the lattice sites of radioactive 59 Fe and 67 Cu following 60 keV ion implantation into Si single crystals at fluences around 10 12 -10 14 cm -2 . We find that in the room temperature as-implanted state in high-resistivity Si both Fe and Cu occupy mainly lattice sites displaced around 0.05 nm (0.5 A) from substitutional positions. Both are released from these positions during annealing at temperatures between 300 deg. C and 600 deg. C. Fe is then found mainly on near-tetrahedral interstitial sites and further annealing causes it to be increasingly incorporated on ideal substitutional sites, on which it is stable to around 800 deg. C. We have strong indications that during annealing around 600 deg. C, along with the dominance of interstitial Fe, a redistribution towards the surface takes place, suggesting that the subsequent formation of ideal substitutional Fe may be related to the trapping of Fe at R p /2, half of its implanted depth. Possible R p /2 trapping might also have taken place in our Cu experiments but appears to be less efficient since Cu tended to escape to the bulk of the samples

  18. Lattice site location and annealing behaviour of Ca and Sr implanted GaN

    CERN Document Server

    De Vries, Bart; Wahl, Ulrich; Correia, J G; Araújo, João Pedro; Lojkowski, W; Kolesnikov, D

    2006-01-01

    We report on the lattice location of ion-implanted Ca and Sr in thin films of single-crystalline wurtzite GaN. Using the emission channeling technique the angular distributions of $\\beta\\!^{-}$−particles emitted by the radioactive isotopes $^{45}$Ca(t$_{ 1/2}$=163.8 d) and $^{89}$Sr(t$_{ 1/2}$=50.53 d) were monitored with a position-sensitive detector following 60 keV room-temperature implantation. Our experiments give direct evidence that $\\sim$90% of Ca and > 60% of Sr atoms were occupying substitutional Ga sites with root mean square displacements of the order of 0.15–0.30 Å, i.e., larger than the expected thermal vibration amplitude of 0.074 Å. Annealing the Ca implanted samples at 1100–1350 °C in high-pressure N$_{2}$ atmosphere resulted in a better incorporation into the substitutional Ga site. The Sr implanted sample showed a small decrease in rms displacements for vacuum annealing up to 900 °C, while the substitutional fraction remained nearly constant. The annealing behavior of the rms disp...

  19. Diagnostic efficacy of a modified low-dose acquisition protocol for the preoperative evaluation of mini-implant sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadinada, Aditya; Marczak, Alana; Yadav, Sumit [University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine, Farmington (United States)

    2017-09-15

    The objective of this study was to compare the outcomes of surgical mini-implant placement when potential mini-implant sites were scanned using a lower-dose 180° acquisition protocol versus a conventional 360° acquisition protocol. Ten dentate human skulls were used to provide sites for potential mini-implant placement. The sites were randomly divided into 2 groups: 360° and 180° cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquisition protocols. A small-volume 180° CBCT scan and a 360° CBCT scan of each site were acquired using a Morita Accuitomo-170 CBCT machine and then a mini-implant was placed. A follow-up 360° CBCT scan was done as a gold standard to evaluate the location of the mini-implant and root perforation. Two raters evaluated the scans. Ninety-eight percent of the mini-implants placed did not perforate any root structure. Two percent of the sites had an appearance suggestive of perforation. On a Likert scale, both raters agreed that their subjective evaluation of the diagnostic quality of the protocols, ability to make and read measurements of the sites, and preferences for the specified diagnostic task were comparable. The Cohen kappa showed high inter-rater and intra-rater agreement. In this ex vivo study, we found that the 180° rotational acquisition was as effective as the conventional 360° rotational acquisition for the preoperative evaluation of potential mini-implant sites.

  20. Lattice sites and stability of implanted Er in FZ and CZ Si

    CERN Document Server

    Wahl, U; Langouche, G; Vantomme, A

    1998-01-01

    We report on the lattice location of $^{167}$Er in Si measured by conversion electron emission channeling. In both FZ and CZ Si, a high fraction of Er (>65%) occupies near-tetrahedral interstitial (T) sites directly following 60 keV room temperature implantation at doses of 6 $\\times 10^{12}$ cm$^{-2}$. For higher doses, the as-implanted near-T fractions of Er visible by emission channeling are smaller, due to the beginning of amorphization. Following the recovery of implantation damage at 600°C, more than 70% of Er is found on near-T sites in both FZ and CZ Si. In FZ Si, Er exhibits a remarkable thermal stability and only prolonged annealing for several hours reduces the near-T fraction. On the other hand, annealing of CZ Si at 900°C for more than 10 minutes results in the majority of Er probes in sites of very low symmetry or disordered surroundings.

  1. Histologic Assessment of Drug-Eluting Grafts Related to Implantation Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Christophe Tille

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Drug-eluting vascular prostheses represent a new direction in vascular surgery to reduce early thrombosis and late intimal hyperplasia for small calibre grafts. Subcutaneous implantation in rats is a rapid and cost-effective screening model to assess the drug-elution effect and could, to some extent, be useful to forecast results for vascular prostheses. We compared biological and histological responses to scaffolds in different implantation sites. Polycaprolactone (PCL, paclitaxel-loaded PCL (PCL-PTX and dexamethasone-loaded PCL (PCL-DXM electrospun scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously and in an infrarenal abdominal aortic model in rats for up to 12 weeks. At the conclusion of the study, a histological analysis was performed. Cellular graft invasion revealed differences in the progression of cellular infiltration between PCL-PTX and PCL/PCL-DXM groups in both models. Cell infiltration increased over time in the aortic model compared to the subcutaneous model for all groups. Cell counting revealed major differences in fibroblast, macrophage and giant cell graft colonisation in all groups and models over time. Macrophages and giant cells increased in the PCL aortic model; whereas in the subcutaneous model these cell types increased only after three weeks or even decreased in the drug-eluting PCL groups. Other major findings were observed only in the aortic replacement such as extracellular matrix deposition and neo-angiogenesis. The subcutaneous implant model can be used for screening, especially when drug-eluting effects are studied. However, major histological differences were observed in cell type reaction and depth of cell penetration compared to the aortic model. Our results demonstrate that the implantation site is a critical determinant of the biological response.

  2. Readability of Patient Education Materials From the Web Sites of Orthopedic Implant Manufacturers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Meghan M; Yi, Paul H; Hussein, Khalil I; Cross, Michael B; Della Valle, Craig J

    2017-12-01

    Prior studies indicate that orthopedic patient education materials are written at a level that is too high for the average patient. The purpose of this study was to assess the readability of online patient education materials provided by orthopedic implant manufacturers. All patient education articles available in 2013 from the web sites of the 5 largest orthopedic implant manufacturers were identified. Each article was evaluated with the Flesch-Kincaid (FK) readability test. The number of articles with readability ≤ the eighth-grade level (average reading ability of US adults) and the sixth-grade level (recommended level for patient education materials) was determined. Mean readability levels of each company's articles were compared using analysis of variance (significance set at P articles were reviewed from the 5 largest implant manufacturers. The mean overall FK grade level was 10.9 (range, 3.8-16.1). Only 58 articles (10%) were written ≤ the eighth-grade level, and only 13 (2.2%) were ≤ the sixth-grade level. The mean FK grade level was significantly different among groups (Smith & Nephew = 12.0, Stryker = 11.6, Biomet = 11.3, DePuy = 10.6, Zimmer = 10.1; P education materials from implant manufacturers are written at a level too high to be comprehended by the average patient. Future efforts should be made to improve the readability of orthopedic patient education materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Recruitment of host's progenitor cells to sites of human amniotic fluid stem cells implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabella, Teodelinda; Poggi, Alessandro; Scaranari, Monica; Mogni, Massimo; Lituania, Mario; Baldo, Chiara; Cancedda, Ranieri; Gentili, Chiara

    2011-06-01

    The amniotic fluid is a new source of multipotent stem cells with a therapeutic potential for human diseases. Cultured at low cell density, human amniotic fluid stem cells (hAFSCs) were still able to generate colony-forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) after 60 doublings, thus confirming their staminal nature. Moreover, after extensive in vitro cell expansion hAFSCs maintained a stable karyotype. The expression of genes, such as SSEA-4, SOX2 and OCT3/4 was confirmed at early and later culture stage. Also, hAFSCs showed bright expression of mesenchymal lineage markers and immunoregulatory properties. hAFSCs, seeded onto hydroxyapatite scaffolds and subcutaneously implanted in nude mice, played a pivotal role in mounting a response resulting in the recruitment of host's progenitor cells forming tissues of mesodermal origin such as fat, muscle, fibrous tissue and immature bone. Implanted hAFSCs migrated from the scaffold to the skin overlying implant site but not to other organs. Given their in vivo: (i) recruitment of host progenitor cells, (ii) homing towards injured sites and (iii) multipotentiality in tissue repair, hAFSCs are a very appealing reserve of stem cells potentially useful for clinical application in regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ultrasonic and hydrothermal mediated synthesis routes for functionalized Mg-Al LDH: Comparison study on surface morphology, basic site strength, cyclic sorption efficiency and effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeh, Collins I; Tomatis, Marco; Yang, Xiaogang; He, Jun; Sun, Chenggong

    2018-01-01

    Amine functionalized layered double hydroxide (LDHs) adsorbents prepared using three different routes: co-precipitation, sono-chemical and ultrasonic-assisted high pressure hydrothermal. The prepared adsorbent samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Scanning electron microscope-Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. The performance of the prepared adsorbents was tested in a controlled thermal-swing adsorption process to measure its adsorption capacity, regeneration and cyclic efficiencies subsequently. The characterisation results were compared with those obtained using the conventional preparation routes but taking into account of the impact of sonochemical and hydrothermal pre-treatment on textural properties, adsorption capacity, regeneration and cyclic efficiencies. Textural results depicts a surge in surface area of the adsorbent synthesised by hydrothermal route (311m 2 /g) from 25 to 171m 2 /g for conventional and ultrasonic routes respectively. Additionally, it has been revealed from the present study that adsorbents prepared using ultrasonic-assisted hydrothermal route exhibit a better CO 2 uptake capacity than that prepared using sonochemical and conventional routes. Thus, the ultrasonic-assisted hydrothermal treatment can effectively promote the adsorption capacity of the adsorbent. This is probably due to the decrease of moderate (M-O) and weak (OH - groups) basic sites with subsequent surge in the number of strong basic sites (O 2- ) resulting from the hydrothermal process. Moreover, the cyclic adsorption efficiency of the ultrasonic mediated process was found to be 76% compared with 60% for conventional and 53% for hydrothermal routes, respectively. According to the kinetic model analysis, adsorption mechanism is mostly dominated by physisorption before amine

  5. Predictability of bone density at posterior mandibular implant sites using cone-beam computed tomography intensity values

    OpenAIRE

    Alkhader, Mustafa; Hudieb, Malik; Khader, Yousef

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the predictability of bone density at posterior mandibular implant sites using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) intensity values. Materials and Methods: CBCT cross-sectional images for 436 posterior mandibular implant sites were selected for the study. Using Invivo software (Anatomage, San Jose, California, USA), two observers classified the bone density into three categories: low, intermediate, and high, and CBCT intensity values were g...

  6. Cross-species transcriptomic approach reveals genes in hamster implantation sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Wei; Herington, Jennifer; Galindo, Cristi L; Ding, Tianbing; Brown, Naoko; Reese, Jeff; Paria, Bibhash C

    2014-12-01

    The mouse model has greatly contributed to understanding molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of progesterone (P4) plus estrogen (E)-dependent blastocyst implantation process. However, little is known about contributory molecular mechanisms of the P4-only-dependent blastocyst implantation process that occurs in species such as hamsters, guineapigs, rabbits, pigs, rhesus monkeys, and perhaps humans. We used the hamster as a model of P4-only-dependent blastocyst implantation and carried out cross-species microarray (CSM) analyses to reveal differentially expressed genes at the blastocyst implantation site (BIS), in order to advance the understanding of molecular mechanisms of implantation. Upregulation of 112 genes and downregulation of 77 genes at the BIS were identified using a mouse microarray platform, while use of the human microarray revealed 62 up- and 38 down-regulated genes at the BIS. Excitingly, a sizable number of genes (30 up- and 11 down-regulated genes) were identified as a shared pool by both CSMs. Real-time RT-PCR and in situ hybridization validated the expression patterns of several up- and down-regulated genes identified by both CSMs at the hamster and mouse BIS to demonstrate the merit of CSM findings across species, in addition to revealing genes specific to hamsters. Functional annotation analysis found that genes involved in the spliceosome, proteasome, and ubiquination pathways are enriched at the hamster BIS, while genes associated with tight junction, SAPK/JNK signaling, and PPARα/RXRα signalings are repressed at the BIS. Overall, this study provides a pool of genes and evidence of their participation in up- and down-regulated cellular functions/pathways at the hamster BIS. © 2014 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  7. Dental implants inserted in fresh extraction sockets versus healed sites: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Albrektsson, Tomas; Wennerberg, Ann

    2015-01-01

    To test the null hypothesis of no difference in the implant failure rates, postoperative infection and marginal bone loss for the insertion of dental implants in fresh extraction sockets compared to the insertion in healed sites, against the alternative hypothesis of a difference. Main search terms used in combination: dental implant, oral implant, resh extraction socket, immediate placement, immediate insertion, immediate implant. An electronic search was undertaken in July/2014, in PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register plus hand-searching. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, either randomized or not. The search strategy resulted in 73 publications, with 8,241 implants inserted in sockets (330 failures, 4.00%), and 19,410 in healed sites (599 failures, 3.09%). It is suggested that the insertion of implants in fresh extraction sockets affects the failure rates (RR 1.58, 95% CI 1.27-1.95, P<0.0001). The difference was not statistically significant when studies evaluating implants inserted in maxillae or in mandibles were pooled, or when the studies using implants to rehabilitate patients with full-arch prostheses were pooled; however, it was significant for the studies that rehabilitated patients with implant-supported single crowns and for the controlled studies. There was no apparent significant effect on the occurrence of postoperative infection or on the magnitude of marginal bone loss. The results should be interpreted with caution due to the potential for biases and to the presence of uncontrolled confounding factors in the included studies, most of them not randomized. The question whether immediate implants are more at risk for failure than implants placed in mature bone has received increasing attention in the last years. As the philosophies of treatment alter over time, a periodic review of the different concepts is necessary to refine techniques and eliminate unnecessary procedures. This would form a basis

  8. A radiographic study on the prevalence of knife-edge residual alveolar ridge at proposed dental implant sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlFaleh, Wafaa

    2009-01-01

    Dental implants are widely used in restoration of completely or partially edentulous dental arches. Before placement of endosseous implants in the jaws, both the quantity and quality of the residual ridge must be assessed radiographically. Remodeling activity after tooth extraction is localized primarily at the crestal area of the residual ridges, resulting in reduction of the height of bone and creation of various three-dimensional shapes of the residual ridges. When bone resorption at the lingual and buccal aspects is greater than that at the crestal area, a knife-edge type of residual ridge develops. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of the knife-edge morphology of the residual alveolar bone at proposed implant sites in partially or completely edentulous patients. Computed tomography (CT) cross-sectional images of the upper and lower jaws were assessed at the proposed sites before implant placement. Images of 258 proposed implant sites belonging to 30 patients were assessed radiographically. In 120 proposed implant sites out of 258 (46.5%), the residual alveolar ridge had a knife-edge configuration, the majority belonging to completely edentulous patients who lost their teeth more than ten years previously. High prevalence of knife-edge ridge was found, therefore, replacement of missing teeth by immediate implant is recommended to prevent atrophy or knife-edge morphology of the residual ridge. (author)

  9. Etonogestrel implant migration to the vasculature, chest wall, and distant body sites: cases from a pharmacovigilance database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sarah; Niak, Ali; Gada, Neha; Brinker, Allen; Jones, S Christopher

    2017-12-01

    To describe clinical outcomes of etonogestrel implant patients with migration to the vasculature, chest wall and other distant body sites spontaneously reported to the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database. We performed a standardized Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) query in the FAERS database (through November 15, 2015), with reports coded with one or more MedDRA preferred terms that indicate complications with device placement or migration of the device from the original site of insertion to the vasculature, chest wall and other distant body sites. We excluded any cases previously described in the medical literature. We identified 38 cases of pronounced etonogestrel implant migration. Migration locations included the lung/pulmonary artery (n=9), chest wall (n=1), vasculature at locations other than the lung/pulmonary artery (n=14) and extravascular migrations (n=14) to other body sites (e.g., the axilla and clavicle/neck line/shoulder). The majority of cases were asymptomatic and detected when the patient desired implant removal; however, seven cases reported symptoms such as pain, discomfort and dyspnea in association with implant migration. Three cases also describe pulmonary fibrosis and skin reactions as a result of implant migration to the vasculature, chest wall and other distant body sites. Sixteen cases reported surgical removal in an operating room setting. Our FAERS case series demonstrates etonogestrel implant migration to the vasculature, chest wall and other body sites distant from the site of original insertion. As noted by the sponsor in current prescribing information, a key determinant in the risk for etonogestrel contraceptive implant migration appears to be improper insertion technique. Although migration of etonogestrel implants to the vasculature is rare, awareness of migration and education on proper insertion technique may reduce the risk. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Surgical site infection in orthopedic implants and its common bacteria with their sensitivities to antibiotics, in open reduction internal fixation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, M.Q.; Zardad, M.S.; Khan, A.; Ahmed, S.; Awan, A. S.; Mohammad, T.

    2017-01-01

    Surgical site infection in orthopaedic implants is a major problem, causing long hospital stay, cost to the patient and is a burden on health care facilities. It increases rate of non-union, osteomyelitis, implant failure, sepsis, multiorgan dysfunction and even death. Surgical site infection is defined as pain, erythema, swelling and discharge from wound site. Surgical site infection in orthopaedic implants is more challenging to the treating orthopaedic surgeon as the causative organism is protected by a biofilm over the implant's surface. Antibiotics cannot cross this film to reach the bacteria's, causing infection. Method: This descriptive case series study includes 132 patients of both genders with ages between 13 years to 60 years conducted at Orthopaedic Unit, Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad from 1st October 2015 to 31st March 2016. Patients with close fractures of long bones were included in the study to determine the frequency of surgical site infection in orthopaedic implants and the type of bacteria involved and their sensitivity to various antibiotics. All implants were of stainless steel. The implants used were Dynamic hip screws, Dynamic compression screws, plates, k-wires, Interlocking nails, SIGN nails, Austin Moore prosthesis and tension band wires. Pre-op and post-op antibiotics used were combination of Sulbactum and Cefoperazone which was given 1 hour before surgery and continued for 72 hours after surgery. Patients were followed up to 4 weeks. Pus was taken on culture stick, from those who developed infection. Results were entered in the pro forma. Results: A total of 132 patients of long bone fractures, who were treated with open reduction and internal fixation, were studied. Only 7 patients developed infection. Staphylococcus Aureus was isolated from all 7 patients. Staphylococcus aureus was sensitive to Linezolid, Fusidic Acid, and vancomycin. Cotrimoxazole, tetracycline, Gentamycin and Clindamycin were partially effective. Conclusion

  11. Long-term results of ultrasonically guided implantation of 125-I seeds combined with external irradiation in localized prostatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Rasmussen, F; Holm, H H

    1991-01-01

    Transperineal 125-iodine seed implantation guided by transrectal ultrasonography and subsequent external beam irradiation was employed in the treatment of 32 patients with localized prostatic carcinoma (16 poorly differentiated). Follow-up is currently 35-98 months with a median of 65 months....... Distant metastases have developed in 18 patients, of whom 11 have died from prostatic cancer. Median change in prostatic volume was a reduction of 35%. Re-biopsy or transurethral resection of the prostate was performed in 25 patients after 1-4 years, revealing still malignant histology in 10 (40......%), of whom 8 have developed distant metastases or died from prostatic cancer. Fourteen patients suffered from late complications of which surgical intervention was indicated in five cases. Nine patients are presently free of progression and prostate specific antigen is less than 0.5 ng/ml in 8 of these...

  12. Long-term results of ultrasonically guided implantation of 125-I seeds combined with external irradiation in localized prostatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Rasmussen, F; Holm, H H

    1991-01-01

    %), of whom 8 have developed distant metastases or died from prostatic cancer. Fourteen patients suffered from late complications of which surgical intervention was indicated in five cases. Nine patients are presently free of progression and prostate specific antigen is less than 0.5 ng/ml in 8 of these......Transperineal 125-iodine seed implantation guided by transrectal ultrasonography and subsequent external beam irradiation was employed in the treatment of 32 patients with localized prostatic carcinoma (16 poorly differentiated). Follow-up is currently 35-98 months with a median of 65 months....... Distant metastases have developed in 18 patients, of whom 11 have died from prostatic cancer. Median change in prostatic volume was a reduction of 35%. Re-biopsy or transurethral resection of the prostate was performed in 25 patients after 1-4 years, revealing still malignant histology in 10 (40...

  13. [Abscess at the implant site following apical parodontitis. Hardware-related complications of deep brain stimulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sixel-Döring, F; Trenkwalder, C; Kappus, C; Hellwig, D

    2006-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an important treatment option for advanced stages of idiopathic Parkinson's disease, leading to significant improvement of motor symptoms in suited patients. Hardware-related complications such as technical malfunction, skin erosion, and infections however cause patient discomfort and additional expense. The patient presented here suffered a putrid infection of the impulse generator site following only local dental treatment of apical parodontitis. Therefore, prophylactic systemic antibiotic treatment is recommended for patients with implanted deep brain stimulation devices in case of operations, dental procedures, or infectious disease.

  14. Peri-implant and Paracrestal Inflammatory Biomarkers at Failing Versus Surviving Implant Sites in a Beagle Dog Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Javier; Aragón, Fernando; Blanco, Leticia A; Guadilla, Yasmina; García-Cenador, Begona; López-Valverde, Antonio

    This study sought to quantify three biochemical mediators of inflammation (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], superoxide anion [SOA], and myeloperoxidase [MPO]) by analyzing crestal (peri-implants) and paracrestal gingival biopsy samples obtained from an experimental study on beagle dogs treated with implants inserted immediately into fresh sockets with circumferential defects. In 10 beagle dogs, 4 roughened titanium implants (3.8 mm wide × 8 mm high) were placed in the distal sockets of the third and fourth premolars, where a circumferential defect (5 mm wide and 5 mm deep) had been previously created by trephination. After varying follow-up periods, ranging from 80 to 190 days, the dogs were explored clinically to assess implant survival, peri-implant pocket depth, and implant stability. The levels of three biochemical mediators of inflammation (MPO, TNF-α, and SOA) were investigated using the crestal and paracrestal gingival biopsy samples with ELISA tests. It was found that 37.5% of the implants were either absent or mobile. Higher levels of the inflammatory mediators were found in the crestal samples than in the paracrestal samples. The final implant stability values were significantly correlated with the final probing depth (r = -0.83, P < .01), but neither of the clinical measures were significantly correlated with any biochemical marker. The risk of implant failure was significantly proportional to the level of MPO (odds ratio: 1.1) and TNF-α (odds ratio: 1.1) in both the crestal and paracrestal regions. All the inflammatory mediators studied were higher in the crestal areas than in the paracrestal regions, but only the values of MPO and TNF-α were significant predictors of implant failure.

  15. Influence of n$^{+}$ and p$^{+}$ doping on the lattice sites of implanted Fe in Si

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Daniel José; Correia, João Guilherme; Araújo, João Pedro

    2013-01-01

    We report on the lattice location of implanted $^{59}$Fe in n$^{+}$ and p$^{+}$ type Si by means of emission channeling. We found clear evidence that the preferred lattice location of Fe changes with the doping of the material. While in n$^{+}$ type Si Fe prefers displaced bond-centered (BC) sites for annealing temperatures up to 600°C, changing to ideal substitutional sites above 700°C, in p$^{+}$ type Si, Fe prefers to be in displaced tetrahedral interstitial positions after all annealing steps. The dominant lattice sites of Fe in n$^{+}$ type Si therefore seem to be well characterized for all annealing temperatures by the incorporation of Fe into vacancy-related complexes, either into single vacancies which leads to Fe on ideal substitutional sites, or multiple vacancies, which leads to its incorporation near BC sites. In contrast, in p$^{+}$ type Si, the major fraction of Fe is clearly interstitial (near-T or ideal T) for all annealing temperatures. The formation and possible lattice sites of Fe in FeB...

  16. Ultrasonic signature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borloo, E.; Crutzen, S.

    1974-12-01

    The unique and tamperproof identification technique developed at Ispra is based on ultrasonic Non-Destructive-Techniques. Reading fingerprints with ultrasonic requires high reproducibility of standard apparatus and transducers. The present report gives an exhaustive description of the ultrasonic technique developed for identification purposes. Different applications of the method are described

  17. Ultrasonic testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Sung Jin [Sungkwunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hyun Jo [Wonkwang Univ., Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-15

    For the proper performance of ultrasonic testing of steel welded joints, and anisotropic material it is necessary to have sound understanding on the underlying physics. To provide such an understanding, it is beneficial to have simulation tools for ultrasonic testing. In order to address such a need, we develop effective approaches to simulate angle beam ultrasonic testing with a personal computer. The simulation is performed using ultrasonic measurement models based on the computationally efficient multi-Gaussian beams. This reach will describe the developed ultrasonic testing models together with the experimental verification of their accuracy.

  18. An update on implant placement and provisionalization in extraction, edentulous, and sinus-grafted sites. A clinical report on 3200 sites over 8 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrungaro, Paul S

    2008-06-01

    Provisionalization of dental implants at placement has become more prominent in the field of implantology over the past several years, especially in the esthetic zone. The benefits of this treatment option include immediate tooth replacement, formation and maintenance of esthetic soft-tissue contours, containment for bone-grafting and tissue-regenerative procedures, and an improved sense of the patient's perception of the implant process. The blending together of the surgical and prosthetic/esthetic phase has never been more important as implant systems, abutment options, and surgical techniques have helped optimize procedures that can be accomplished at the surgical visit. This article reviews the guidelines for surgical success first described by the author in 2003 and expands upon those results. This article highlights the results of more than 3200 immediately restored implants placed in edentulous, fresh extraction sockets, and sinus-grafted sites, over an 8-year period, and presents a case for each area of placement.

  19. Feasibility of subcutaneously implanted magnetic microarrays for site specific drug and gene targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Babincová

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic nanoparticles play a crucial role as a drug carriers in the human body. The wedge like magnetic arrays creatinga strongly non-homogeneous magnetic field are considered as a useful way to focus magnetic nanoparticles functionalizedwith various drugs or genes to desired sites. The goal of this study is to develop a numerical model of drug targetingusing subcutaneously implanted magnetic microarrays. The Finite Element Method is applied to solve partial differentialequations describing electromagnetic field (Maxwell equations and motion of these particles in a given magnetic field isobtained solving set of ordinary differential equations expressed by Newton law of motion. The results are encouragingshowing the potential to target drug to the tumour cell locally, without unwanted side effects.

  20. Surgical site infections following transcatheter apical aortic valve implantation: incidence and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baillot Richard

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The present study was undertaken to examine the incidence and management of surgical site infection (SSI in patients submitted to transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TA-TAVI. Methods From April 2007 to December 2011, 154 patients underwent TA-TAVI with an Edwards Sapien bioprosthesis (ES at the Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et Pneumologie de Québec (IUCPQ as part of a multidisciplinary program to prospectively evaluate percutaneous aortic valve implantation. Patient demographics, perioperative variables, and postoperative complications were recorded in a prospective registry. Results Five (3.2% patients in the cohort presented with an SSI during the study period. The infections were all hospital-acquired (HAI and were considered as organ/space SSI’s based on Center for Disease Control criteria (CDC. Within the first few weeks of the initial procedure, these patients presented with an abscess or chronic draining sinus in the left thoracotomy incision and were re-operated. The infection spread to the apex of the left ventricle in all cases where pledgeted mattress sutures could be seen during debridement. Patients received multiple antibiotic regimens without success until the wound was surgically debrided and covered with viable tissue. The greater omentum was used in three patients and the pectoralis major muscle in the other two. None of the patients died or had a recurrent infection. Three of the patients were infected with Staphylococcus epidermidis, one with Staphylococcus aureus, and one with Enterobacter cloacae. Patients with surgical site infections were significantly more obese with higher BMI (31.4±3.1 vs 26.2±4.4 p=0.0099 than the other patients in the cohort. Conclusions While TA-TAVI is a minimally invasive technique, SSIs, which are associated with obesity, remain a concern. Debridement and rib resection followed by wound coverage with the greater omentum and/or the pectoralis major

  1. Surgical site infections following transcatheter apical aortic valve implantation: incidence and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillot, Richard; Fréchette, Éric; Cloutier, Daniel; Rodès-Cabau, Josep; Doyle, Daniel; Charbonneau, Éric; Mohammadi, Siamak; Dumont, Éric

    2012-11-13

    The present study was undertaken to examine the incidence and management of surgical site infection (SSI) in patients submitted to transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TA-TAVI). From April 2007 to December 2011, 154 patients underwent TA-TAVI with an Edwards Sapien bioprosthesis (ES) at the Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et Pneumologie de Québec (IUCPQ) as part of a multidisciplinary program to prospectively evaluate percutaneous aortic valve implantation. Patient demographics, perioperative variables, and postoperative complications were recorded in a prospective registry. Five (3.2%) patients in the cohort presented with an SSI during the study period. The infections were all hospital-acquired (HAI) and were considered as organ/space SSI's based on Center for Disease Control criteria (CDC). Within the first few weeks of the initial procedure, these patients presented with an abscess or chronic draining sinus in the left thoracotomy incision and were re-operated. The infection spread to the apex of the left ventricle in all cases where pledgeted mattress sutures could be seen during debridement. Patients received multiple antibiotic regimens without success until the wound was surgically debrided and covered with viable tissue. The greater omentum was used in three patients and the pectoralis major muscle in the other two. None of the patients died or had a recurrent infection. Three of the patients were infected with Staphylococcus epidermidis, one with Staphylococcus aureus, and one with Enterobacter cloacae. Patients with surgical site infections were significantly more obese with higher BMI (31.4±3.1 vs 26.2±4.4 p=0.0099) than the other patients in the cohort. While TA-TAVI is a minimally invasive technique, SSIs, which are associated with obesity, remain a concern. Debridement and rib resection followed by wound coverage with the greater omentum and/or the pectoralis major muscle were used successfully in these patients.

  2. Predictability of bone density at posterior mandibular implant sites using cone-beam computed tomography intensity values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhader, Mustafa; Hudieb, Malik; Khader, Yousef

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the predictability of bone density at posterior mandibular implant sites using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) intensity values. CBCT cross-sectional images for 436 posterior mandibular implant sites were selected for the study. Using Invivo software (Anatomage, San Jose, California, USA), two observers classified the bone density into three categories: low, intermediate, and high, and CBCT intensity values were generated. Based on the consensus of the two observers, 15.6% of sites were of low bone density, 47.9% were of intermediate density, and 36.5% were of high density. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis showed that CBCT intensity values had a high predictive power for predicting high density sites (area under the curve [AUC] =0.94, P < 0.005) and intermediate density sites (AUC = 0.81, P < 0.005). The best cut-off value for intensity to predict intermediate density sites was 218 (sensitivity = 0.77 and specificity = 0.76) and the best cut-off value for intensity to predict high density sites was 403 (sensitivity = 0.93 and specificity = 0.77). CBCT intensity values are considered useful for predicting bone density at posterior mandibular implant sites.

  3. Effect of connective tissue grafting on peri-implant tissue in single immediate implant sites : A RCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuiderveld, Elise G; Meijer, Henny J A; den Hartog, Laurens; Vissink, Arjan; Raghoebar, Gerry M

    AimTo assess the effect of connective tissue grafting on the mid-buccal mucosal level (MBML) of immediately placed and provisionalized single implants in the maxillofacial aesthetic zone. Materials and methodsSixty patients with a failing tooth were provided with an immediately placed and

  4. Estimation of soft- and hard-tissue thickness at implant sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anchorage control is a critical consideration when planning treatment for patients with dental and skeletal malocclusions. To obtain sufficient stability of implants, the thickness of the soft tissue and the cortical-bone in the placement site must be considered; so as to provide an anatomical map in order to assist the clinician in the placement of the implants. Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the thickness of soft- and hard-tissue. Materials and Methods: To measure soft tissue and cortical-bone thicknesses, 12 maxillary cross-sectional specimens were obtained from the cadavers, which were made at three maxillary mid-palatal suture areas: The interdental area between the first and second premolars (Group 1, the second premolar and the first molar (Group 2, and the first and second molars (Group 3. Sectioned samples along with reference rulers were digitally scanned. Scanned images were calibrated and measurements were made with image-analysis software. We measured the thickness of soft and hard-tissues at five sectional areas parallel to the buccopalatal cementoenamel junction (CEJ line at 2-mm intervals and also thickness of soft tissue at the six landmarks including the incisive papilla (IP on the palate. The line perpendicular to the occlusal plane was made and measurement was taken at 4-mm intervals from the closest five points to IP. Results: (1 Group 1:6 mm from CEJ in buccal side and 2 mm from CEJ in palatal side. (2 Group 2:8 mm from CEJ in buccal side and 4 mm from CEJ in palatal side. (3 Group 3:8 mm from CEJ in buccal side and 8 mm from CEJ in palatal side. Conclusions: The best site for placement of implant is with thinnest soft tissue and thickest hard tissue, which is in the middle from CEJ in buccal side and closest from CEJ in palatal side in Group 1 and faraway from CEJ in buccal side and closest from CEJ in palatal side in Group 2 and faraway from CEJ in buccal side and faraway from CEJ in palatal

  5. Ultrasonic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, E G

    1962-01-01

    Ultrasonic Physics, Second Edition, provides an introduction to the fundamental principles of ultrasonic physics. The book opens with a discussion of the sources of ultrasound. This is followed by separate chapters on the properties and detection of ultrasonic radiation; measurement of propagation constants, i.e., the velocity and absorption, of ultrasound; ultrasound propagation in gases, liquids, and solids; and ultrasound propagation in aerosols, suspensions, and emulsions. The final chapter covers miscellaneous physical and physico-chemical actions, including dispersion and coagulation of

  6. The temporal course of mucoperiosteal flap revascularization at guided bone regeneration treated implant sites: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milstein, D.M.J.; Mathura, K.R.; Lindeboom, J.A.H.; Ramsoekh, D.; Lindeboom, R.; Ince, C.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To investigate post-operative capillary density regeneration in healing mucoperiosteal flaps at guided bone regeneration-treated implant sites. Material and Methods: A non-invasive post-operative investigation was performed in 10 patients using orthogonal polarization spectral (OPS) imaging

  7. The temporal course of mucoperiosteal flap revascularization at guided bone regeneration-treated implant sites: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milstein, Dan M. J.; Mathura, Keshen R.; Lindeboom, Jerôme A. H.; Ramsoekh, Dewkoemar; Lindeboom, Robert; Ince, Can

    2009-01-01

    P>Aims To investigate post-operative capillary density regeneration in healing mucoperiosteal flaps at guided bone regeneration-treated implant sites. Material and Methods A non-invasive post-operative investigation was performed in 10 patients using orthogonal polarization spectral (OPS) imaging

  8. Three-Dimensional High-Frequency Ultrasonography for Early Detection and Characterization of Embryo Implantation Site Development in the Mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary C Peavey

    Full Text Available Ultrasonography is a powerful tool to non-invasively monitor in real time the development of the human fetus in utero. Although genetically engineered mice have served as valuable in vivo models to study both embryo implantation and pregnancy progression, such studies usually require sacrifice of parous mice for subsequent phenotypic analysis. To address this issue, we used three-dimensional (3-D reconstruction in silico of high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS imaging data for early detection and characterization of murine embryo implantation sites and their development in utero. With HFUS imaging followed by 3-D reconstruction, we were able to precisely quantify embryo implantation site number and embryonic developmental progression in pregnant C57BL6J/129S mice from as early as 5.5 days post coitus (d.p.c. through to 9.5 d.p.c. using a VisualSonics Vevo 2100 (MS550S transducer. In addition to measurements of implantation site number, location, volume and spacing, embryo viability via cardiac activity monitoring was also achieved. A total of 12 dams were imaged with HFUS with approximately 100 embryos examined per embryonic day. For the post-implantation period (5.5 to 8.5 d.p.c., 3-D reconstruction of the gravid uterus in mesh or solid overlay format enabled visual representation in silico of implantation site location, number, spacing distances, and site volume within each uterine horn. Therefore, this short technical report describes the feasibility of using 3-D HFUS imaging for early detection and analysis of post-implantation events in the pregnant mouse with the ability to longitudinally monitor the development of these early pregnancy events in a non-invasive manner. As genetically engineered mice continue to be used to characterize female reproductive phenotypes, we believe this reliable and non-invasive method to detect, quantify, and characterize early implantation events will prove to be an invaluable investigative tool for the study of

  9. Interdisciplinary treatment for a compensated Class II partially edentulous malocclusion: Orthodontic creation of a posterior implant site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Grace; Chang, Chris; Roberts, W Eugene

    2018-03-01

    A 36-year-old woman with good periodontal health sought treatment for a compensated Class II partially edentulous malocclusion associated with a steep mandibular plane (SN-MP, 45°), 9 missing teeth, a 3-mm midline discrepancy, and compromised posterior occlusal function. She had multiple carious lesions, a failing fixed prostheses in the mandibular right quadrant replacing the right first molar, and a severely atrophic edentulous ridge in the area around the mandibular left first and second molars. After restoration of the caries, the mandibular left third molar served as anchorage to correct the mandibular arch crowding. The mandibular left second premolar was retracted with a light force of 2 oz (about 28.3 cN) on the buccal and lingual surfaces to create an implant site between the premolars. Modest lateral root resorption was noted on the distal surface of the mandibular left second premolar after about 7 mm of distal translation in 7 months. Six months later, implants were placed in the mandibular left and right quadrants; the spaces were retained with the fixed appliance for 5 months and a removable retainer for 1 month. Poor cooperation resulted in relapse of the mandibular left second premolar back into the implant site, and it was necessary to reopen the space. When the mandibular left fixture was uncovered, a 3-mm deep osseous defect on the distobuccal surface was found; it was an area of relatively immature bundle bone, because the distal aspect of the space was reopened after the relapse. Subsequent bone grafting resulted in good osseous support of the implant-supported prosthesis. The relatively thin band of attached gingiva on the implant at the mandibular right first molar healed with a recessed contour that was susceptible to food impaction. A free gingival graft restored soft tissue form and function. This severe malocclusion with a discrepancy index value of 28 was treated to an excellent outcome in 38 months of interdisciplinary treatment

  10. Single-Tooth Morse Taper Connection Implant Placed in Grafted Site of the Anterior Maxilla: Clinical and Radiographic Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Guido Mangano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to achieve aesthetically pleasing soft tissue contours in a severely compromised tooth in the anterior region of the maxilla. For a right-maxillary central incisor with localized advanced chronic periodontitis a tooth extraction followed by reconstructive procedures and delayed implant placement was proposed and accepted by the patient. Guided bone regeneration (GBR technique was employed, with a biphasic calcium-phosphate (BCP block graft placed in the extraction socket in conjunction with granules of the same material and a resorbable barrier membrane. After 6 months of healing, an implant was installed. The acrylic provisional restoration remained in situ for 3 months and then was substituted with the definitive crown. This ridge reconstruction technique enabled preserving both hard and soft tissues and counteracting vertical and horizontal bone resorption after tooth extraction and allowed for an ideal three-dimensional implant placement. Localized severe alveolar bone resorption of the anterior maxilla associated with chronic periodontal disease can be successfully treated by means of ridge reconstruction with GBR and delayed implant insertion; the placement of an early-loaded, Morse taper connection implant in the grafted site was effective to create an excellent clinical aesthetic result and to maintain it along time.

  11. Benefits of mineralized bone cortical allograft for immediate implant placement in extraction sites: an in vivo study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orti, Valérie; Bousquet, Philippe; Tramini, Paul; Gaitan, Cesar; Mertens, Brenda; Cuisinier, Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of using a mineralized bone cortical allograft (MBCA), with or without a resorbable collagenous membrane derived from bovine pericardium, on alveolar bone remodeling after immediate implant placement in a dog model. Six mongrel dogs were included. The test and control sites were randomly selected. Four biradicular premolars were extracted from the mandible. In control sites, implants without an allograft or membrane were placed immediately in the fresh extraction sockets. In the test sites, an MBCA was placed to fill the gap between the bone socket wall and implant, with or without a resorbable collagenous membrane. Specimens were collected after 1 and 3 months. The amount of residual particles and new bone quality were evaluated by histomorphometry. Few residual graft particles were observed to be closely embedded in the new bone without any contact with the implant surface. The allograft combined with a resorbable collagen membrane limited the resorption of the buccal wall in height and width. The histological quality of the new bone was equivalent to that of the original bone. The MBCA improved the quality of new bone formation, with few residual particles observed at 3 months. The preliminary results of this animal study indicate a real benefit in obtaining new bone as well as in enhancing osseointegration due to the high resorbability of cortical allograft particles, in comparison to the results of xenografts or other biomaterials (mineralized or demineralized cancellous allografts) that have been presented in the literature. Furthermore, the use of an MBCA combined with a collagen membrane in extraction and immediate implant placement limited the extent of post-extraction resorption.

  12. The relationship of silicone breast implants and cancer at other sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, Louise A

    2007-12-01

    Although most attention regarding the effects of silicone breast implants on cancer risk has focused on breast cancer, there have also been concerns regarding effects on other cancers. This includes malignancies that could occur as a result of foreign-body carcinogenesis (sarcomas) or immune alterations (hematopoietic malignancies), or cancers suggested as possibly elevated on the basis of previous epidemiologic studies (cancers of the cervix, vulva, lung, and brain). Searches of the English language literature on the topic of silicone breast implants and cancer risk were conducted and reviewed to determine relationships that might have etiologic relevance. Epidemiologic studies provide no support for an increased risk of either sarcoma or multiple myeloma among breast implant recipients, disputing clinical and laboratory findings suggesting such a link. Although a number of epidemiologic studies have demonstrated elevated risks of cervical, vulvar, and lung cancers among breast implant patients, it is likely that these excesses relate more to lifestyle characteristics (e.g., cigarette smoking, sexual behavior) than to the effects of the implants. Brain cancer excesses, suggested in one study, have not been confirmed in either an update of the mortality experience in this study or on the basis of other investigations. At present, there is no convincing evidence that breast implants alter the risk of nonbreast malignancies. Breast implant patients should continue to be monitored for longer term risks and to assess whether cancer risk is influenced by various patient and implant characteristics.

  13. Primary implant stability in augmented sinuslift-sites after completed bone regeneration: a randomized controlled clinical study comparing four subantrally inserted biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Angelo Troedhan; Izabela Schlichting; Andreas Kurrek; Marcel Wainwright

    2014-01-01

    Implant-Insertion-Torque-Value (ITV) proved to be a significant clinical parameter to predict long term implant success-rates and to decide upon immediate loading. The study evaluated ITVs, when four different and commonly used biomaterials were used in sinuslift-procedures compared to natural subantral bone in two-stage-implant-procedures. The tHUCSL-INTRALIFT-method was chosen for sinuslifting in 155 sinuslift-sites for its minimal invasive transcrestal approach and scalable augmentation vo...

  14. Pyrosequencing of supra- and subgingival biofilms from inflamed peri-implant and periodontal sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaumann, Simone; Staufenbiel, Ingmar; Scherer, Ralph; Schilhabel, Markus; Winkel, Andreas; Stumpp, Sascha Nico; Eberhard, Jörg; Stiesch, Meike

    2014-12-17

    To investigate the microbial composition of biofilms at inflamed peri-implant and periodontal tissues in the same subject, using 16S rRNA sequencing. Supra- and submucosal, and supra- and subgingival plaque samples were collected from 7 subjects suffering from diseased peri-implant and periodontal tissues. Bacterial DNA was isolated and 16S rRNA genes were amplified, sequenced and aligned for the identification of bacterial genera. 43734 chimera-depleted, denoised sequences were identified, corresponding to 1 phylum, 8 classes, 10 orders, 44 families and 150 genera. The most abundant families or genera found in supramucosal or supragingival plaque were Streptoccocaceae, Rothia and Porphyromonas. In submucosal plaque, the most abundant family or genera found were Rothia, Streptococcaceae and Porphyromonas on implants. The most abundant subgingival bacteria on teeth were Prevotella, Streptococcaceae, and TG5. The number of sequences found for the genera Tannerella and Aggregatibacter on implants differed significantly between supra- and submucosal locations before multiple testing. The analyses demonstrated no significant differences between microbiomes on implants and teeth in supra- or submucosal and supra- or subgingival biofilms. Diseased peri-implant and periodontal tissues in the same subject share similiar bacterial genera and based on the analysis of taxa on a genus level biofilm compositions may not account for the potentially distinct pathologies at implants or teeth.

  15. Ultrasonic inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satittada, Gannaga

    1984-01-01

    Ultrasonic inspection is one of the most widely used methods for nondestructive inspection. The beam of high-frequency sound wave, ultrasonic wave, is introduced into the material. It travels through the material with some attendant loss of energy and can be reflected at interfaces. The reflected beam is detected and analyzed. Ultrasonic inspection is used to detect flaws in metal parts as well as in welded, brazed and bonded joints during research work and developing production and service. It is also used to detect and locate porosity, pipe, and flakes. In addition, it can be used for the measurement of metal thickness. Ultrasonic inspection is therefore used for quality control and material inspection in all major industries

  16. Clinical analysis of the stability of dental implants after preparation of the site by conventional drilling or piezosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Neto, Ulisses Tavares; Joly, Julio Cesar; Gehrke, Sergio Alexandre

    2014-02-01

    We used resonance frequency analysis to evaluate the implant stability quotient (ISQ) of dental implants that were installed in sites prepared by either conventional drilling or piezoelectric tips. We studied 30 patients with bilateral edentulous areas in the maxillary premolar region who were randomised to have the implant inserted with conventional drilling, or with piezoelectric surgery. The stability of each implant was measured by resonance frequency analysis immediately after placement to assess the immediate stability (time 1) and again at 90 days (time 2) and 150 days (time 3). In the conventional group the mean (SD) ISQ for time 1 was 69.1 (6.1) (95% CI 52.4-77.3); for time 2, 70.7 (5.7) (95% CI 60.4-82.8); and for time 3, 71.7 (4.5) (95% CI 64.2-79.2). In the piezosurgery group the corresponding values were: 77.5 (4.6) (95% CI 71.1-84.3) for time 1, 77.0 (4.2) (95% CI, 69.7-85.2) for time 2, and 79.1 (3.1) (95% CI 74.5-87.3) for time 3. The results showed significant increases in the ISQ values for the piezosurgery group at each time point (p=0.04). The stability of implants placed using the piezoelectric method was greater than that of implants placed using the conventional technique. Copyright © 2013 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Trp53 deficient mice predisposed to preterm birth display region-specific lipid alterations at the embryo implantation site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanekoff, Ingela; Cha, Jeeyeon; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Dey, Sudhansu K.; Laskin, Julia; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.

    2016-09-13

    Here we demonstrate that conditional deletion of mouse uterine Trp53 (p53d/d), molecularly linked to mTORC1 activation and causally linked to premature uterine senescence and preterm birth, results in aberrant lipid signatures within the heterogeneous cell types of embryo implantation sites on day 8 of pregnancy. In situ nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (nano-DESI MSI) was used to characterize the molecular speciation of free fatty acids, monoacylglycerols, unmodified and oxidized phosphatidylcholine (PC/Ox-PC), and diacylglycerol (DG) species within implantation sites of p53d/d mice and floxed littermates. Implantation sites from p53d/d mice exhibited distinct spatially resolved changes demonstrating accumulation of DG species, depletion of Ox-PC species, and increase in species with more unsaturated acyl chains, including arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acid. Understanding abnormal changes in the abundance and localization of individual lipid species early in the progression to premature birth is important for discovering novel targets for treatments and diagnosis.

  18. Ultrasonic mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueneke, B.

    1982-01-01

    608 women are examined by means of ultrasonic mammography during the period of 1 year. 432 patients were examined with the compound method with the U.I. Octoson, a water tank scanner, and 176 patients with the real time method with a directly connected linear-array-scanner. The following results were obtained at the end of the examination period: In the ultrasonic and also in the X-ray mammogram tumour diameters can be determined with an error rate of +- 30%. In the diagnosing of carcinomas, a significant dependence of the exactness on the sice of the tumour is found for the combination of the five methods tested (clinical examination, X-ray mammography, ultrasonic mammography, thermography, cytology). Classifying the individual methods with regard to their exactness, X-ray mammography ranks in front of ultrasonic mammography. Mastopathic changes in the breast can be screened by means of ultrasonic mammography. The structure of the changes can be determined more exactly than with an X-ray picture which is due to the possibility of differentiating solid and cystic structures. In diagnosing fibro-adenomas and establishing diagnoses on young women with dense gland bodies, ultrasonic mammography is superior to radiology both in the ability of screening a finding of a fibro-adenoma (US=88%, X-ray=75%) and in the possibility of classifying it as ''more benign than malignant''. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Method of localization and implantation of the lumpectomy site for high dose rate brachytherapy after conservative surgery for T1 and T2 breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera, F.; Chisela, F.; Engel, J.; Venkatesan, V.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes our technique of localization and implantation of the lumpectomy site of patients with T1 and T2 breast cancer. Our method was developed as part of our Phase I/II pilot study of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy alone after conservative surgery for early breast cancer. Methods and Materials: In March 1992, we started a pilot study of HDR brachytherapy to the lumpectomy site as the sole radiotherapy after conservative surgery for clinical T1 or T2 invasive breast cancer. Initially, the protocol required intraoperative placement of the interstitial needles at the time of definitive surgery to the breast. The protocol was then generalized to allow the implantation of the lumpectomy site after definitive surgery to the breast, either at the time of subsequent axillary nodal dissection or postoperatively. To date, five patients have been implanted intraoperatively at the time of definitive breast surgery. Twelve patients were implanted after definitive breast surgery, with 7 patients being done at the time of axillary nodal dissection and 5 patients postoperatively. We devised a method of accurately localizing and implanting the lumpectomy site after definitive breast surgery. The method relies on the previous placement of surgical clips by the referring surgeon to mark the lumpectomy site. For each patient, a breast mold is made with radio-opaque angiocatheters taped onto the mold in the supero-inferior direction. A planning CT scan is then obtained through the lumpectomy site. The volume of the lumpectomy site, the number of implant planes necessary, and the orientation of the implants are then determined from the CT scan. The angiocatheters provide a reference grid on the CT films to locate the entry and exit points of the interstitial needles on the plastic mold. The entry and exit points for reference needles are then transferred onto the patient's skin enabling implantation of the lumpectomy site. Needle positions with respect to

  20. Cell-laden hydrogel/titanium microhybrids: Site-specific cell delivery to metallic implants for improved integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Geraldine; Ozcelik, Hayriye; Haesler, Lisa; Cihova, Martina; Ciftci, Sait; Dupret-Bories, Agnes; Debry, Christian; Stelzle, Martin; Lavalle, Philippe; Vrana, Nihal Engin

    2016-03-01

    Porous titanium implants are widely used in dental, orthopaedic and otorhinolaryngology fields to improve implant integration to host tissue. A possible step further to improve the integration with the host is the incorporation of autologous cells in porous titanium structures via cell-laden hydrogels. Fast gelling hydrogels have advantageous properties for in situ applications such as localisation of specific cells and growth factors at a target area without dispersion. The ability to control the cell types in different regions of an implant is important in applications where the target tissue (i) has structural heterogeneity (multiple cell types with a defined spatial configuration with respect to each other); (ii) has physical property gradients essential for its function (such as in the case of osteochondral tissue transition). Due to their near immediate gelation, such gels can also be used for site-specific modification of porous titanium structures, particularly for implants which would face different tissues at different locations. Herein, we describe a step by step design of a model system: the model cell-laden gel-containing porous titanium implants in the form of titanium microbead/hydrogel (maleimide-dextran or maleimide-PVA based) microhybrids. These systems enable the determination of the effect of titanium presence on gel properties and encapsulated cell behaviour as a miniaturized version of full-scale implants, providing a system compatible with conventional analysis methods. We used a fibroblast/vascular endothelial cell co-cultures as our model system and by utilising single microbeads we have quantified the effect of gel microenvironment (degradability, presence of RGD peptides within gel formulation) on cell behaviour and the effect of the titanium presence on cell behaviour and gel formation. Titanium presence slightly changed gel properties without hindering gel formation or affecting cell viability. Cells showed a preference to move towards

  1. Direct observation and mechanism for enhanced field emission sites in platinum ion implanted/post-annealed ultrananocrystalline diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panda, Kalpataru, E-mail: panda@afm.eei.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: phy.kalpa@gmail.com; Inami, Eiichi; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sankaran, Kamatchi J.; Tai, Nyan Hwa [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Lin, I-Nan, E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui 251, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-20

    Enhanced electron field emission (EFE) properties for ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films upon platinum (Pt) ion implantation and subsequent post-annealing processes is reported, viz., low turn-on field of 4.17 V/μm with high EFE current density of 5.08 mA/cm{sup 2} at an applied field of 7.0 V/μm. Current imaging tunneling spectroscopy (CITS) mode in scanning tunneling spectroscopy directly revealed the increased electron emission sites density for Pt ion implanted/post-annealed UNCD films than the pristine one. The high resolution CITS mapping and local current–voltage characteristic curves demonstrated that the electrons are dominantly emitted from the diamond grain boundaries and Pt nanoparticles.

  2. Direct observation and mechanism for enhanced field emission sites in platinum ion implanted/post-annealed ultrananocrystalline diamond films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panda, Kalpataru; Inami, Eiichi; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Sankaran, Kamatchi J.; Tai, Nyan Hwa; Lin, I-Nan

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced electron field emission (EFE) properties for ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films upon platinum (Pt) ion implantation and subsequent post-annealing processes is reported, viz., low turn-on field of 4.17 V/μm with high EFE current density of 5.08 mA/cm 2 at an applied field of 7.0 V/μm. Current imaging tunneling spectroscopy (CITS) mode in scanning tunneling spectroscopy directly revealed the increased electron emission sites density for Pt ion implanted/post-annealed UNCD films than the pristine one. The high resolution CITS mapping and local current–voltage characteristic curves demonstrated that the electrons are dominantly emitted from the diamond grain boundaries and Pt nanoparticles.

  3. IMPLANTABLE RESONATORS – A TECHNIQUE FOR REPEATED MEASUREMENT OF OXYGEN AT MULTIPLE DEEP SITES WITH IN VIVO EPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongbin; Hou, Huagang; Sucheta, Artur; Williams, Benjamin B.; Lariviere, Jean P.; Khan, Nadeem; Lesniewski, Piotr N.; Swartz, Harold M.

    2013-01-01

    EPR oximetry using implantable resonators allow measurements at much deeper sites than are possible with surface resonators (> 80 mm vs. 10 mm) and have greater sensitivity at any depth. We report here the development of an improvement of the technique that now enables us to obtain the information from multiple sites and at a variety of depths. The measurements from the various sites are resolved using a simple magnetic field gradient. In the rat brain multi-probe implanted resonators measured pO2 at several sites simultaneously for over 6 months to record under normoxic, hypoxic and hyperoxic conditions. This technique also facilitates measurements in moving parts of the animal such as the heart, because the orientation of the paramagnetic material relative to the sensitive small loop is not altered by the motion. The measured response is very fast, enabling measurements in real time of physiological and pathological changes such as experimental cardiac ischemia in the mouse heart. The technique also is quite useful for following changes in tumor pO2, including applications with simultaneous measurements in tumors and adjacent normal tissues. PMID:20204802

  4. Ultrasonic neuromodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naor, Omer; Krupa, Steve; Shoham, Shy

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasonic waves can be non-invasively steered and focused into mm-scale regions across the human body and brain, and their application in generating controlled artificial modulation of neuronal activity could therefore potentially have profound implications for neural science and engineering. Ultrasonic neuro-modulation phenomena were experimentally observed and studied for nearly a century, with recent discoveries on direct neural excitation and suppression sparking a new wave of investigations in models ranging from rodents to humans. In this paper we review the physics, engineering and scientific aspects of ultrasonic fields, their control in both space and time, and their effect on neuronal activity, including a survey of both the field’s foundational history and of recent findings. We describe key constraints encountered in this field, as well as key engineering systems developed to surmount them. In closing, the state of the art is discussed, with an emphasis on emerging research and clinical directions.

  5. Ultrasonic flowmeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittekind, W.D.

    1979-01-01

    A prototype ultrasonic flowmeter was assembled and tested. The theoretical basis of this prototype ultrasonic flowmeter is reviewed; the equipment requirements for a portable unit are discussed; the individual electronic modules contained in the prototype are described; the operating procedures and configuration are explained; and the data from preliminary calibrations are presented. The calibration data confirm that the prototype operates according to theoretical predictions and can indeed provide nonintrusive flow measurements to predicted accuracies for pipes larger than two inches, under single phase stable flow conditions

  6. Surviving a Site Audit: Tips for Good Clinical Practice in an Implant Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther); S.M. Zielinski (Stephanie)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAbstract The number of clinical trials involving implants for trauma and orthopedic surgery is increasing. The International Conference of Harmonization-Good Clinical Practice (ICH-GCP) guideline has been developed in order to assure that the rights, safety, and well-being of trial

  7. Effect of variable scanning protocolson the pre-implant site evaluation of the mandible in reformatted computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of variable scanning protocols of computed tomography for evaluation of pre-implant site of the mandible through the comparison of the reformatted cross-sectional images of helical CT scans obtained with various imaging parameters versus those of conventional CT scans. A dry mandible was imaged using conventional nonoverlapped CT scans with 1 mm slice thickness and helical CT scans with 1 mm slice thickness and pitches of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0. All helical images were reconstructed at reconstruction interval of 1 mm. DentaScan reformatted images were obtained to allow standardized visualization of cross-sectional images of the mandible. The reformatted images were reviewed and measured separately by 4 dental radiologists. The image qualities of continuity of cortical outline, trabecular bone structure and visibility of the mandibular canal were evaluated and the distance between anatomic structures were measured by 4 dental radiologists. On image qualities of continuity of cortical outline, trabecular bone structure and visibility of the mandibular canal and in horizontal measurement, there was no statistically significant difference among conventional and helical scans with pitches of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0. In vertical measurement, there was no statistically significant difference among the conventional and all imaging parameters of helical CT scans with pitches of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0. The images of helical CT scans with 1 mm slice thickness and pitches of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 are as good as those of conventional CT scans with 1 mm slice thickness for evaluation of pre-dental implant site of the mandible. Considering the radiation dose and patient comfort, helical CT scans with 1 mm slice thickness and pitch of 2.0 is recommended for evaluation of pre-implant site of the mandible.

  8. Maintenance of marginal bone support and soft tissue esthetics at immediately provisionalized OsseoSpeed implants placed into extraction sites: 2-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noelken, Robert; Neffe, Bettina Anna; Kunkel, Martin; Wagner, Wilfried

    2014-02-01

    proof of principle for the preservation of marginal bone height at immediately placed and provisionalized OsseoSpeed implants after a follow-up of at least 12 months. Even implant sites with facial bony deficiencies can be successfully treated with a favorable esthetic outcome using the immediate implant insertion, immediate reconstruction, and immediate provisionalization technique. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Mn fraction substitutional site and defects induced magnetism in Mn-implanted 6H-SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouziane, K., E-mail: Khalid.bouziane@uir.ac.ma [Pôle Energies Renouvelables et Etudes Pétrolières, Université Internationale de Rabat, 11000 – Salé el Jadida, Technopolis (Morocco); Al Azri, M.; Elzain, M. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 36, Al-Khodh 123 (Oman); Chérif, S.M. [LSPM (CNRS-UPR 3407), Université Paris, 13-Nord, 99, Avenue Jean Baptiste Clément, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Mamor, M. [Equipe MSISM, Faculté Poly-Disciplinaire, B.P. 4162 Safi, Université Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech (Morocco); Declémy, A. [Institut P’, CNRS – Université de Poitiers – ENSMA, UPR 3346, SP2MI – Téléport 2, 11 boulevard Marie et Pierre Curie, BP 30179, F-86962 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Thomé, L. [CSNSM-Orsay, Bât. 108, Université d’Orsay, F-91405 Orsay (France)

    2015-05-25

    Highlights: • Shallow Mn-implanted 6H-SiC crystal. • Correlation between Mn-substitutional site concentration and magnetism. • Correlation between defects nature surrounding Mn site and magnetism. • Correlation of magnetism in Mn-doped SiC to Mn at Si sites and vacancy-related defect. - Abstract: n-type 6H-SiC (0 0 0 1) single crystal substrates were implanted with three fluences of manganese (Mn{sup +}) ions: 5 × 10{sup 15}, 1 × 10{sup 16} and 5 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} with implantation energy of 80 keV at 365 °C to stimulate dynamic annealing. The samples were characterized using Rutherford backscattering channeling spectroscopy (RBS/C), high-resolution X-ray diffraction technique (HRXRD), and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) techniques. Two main defect regions have been identified using RBS/C spectra fitted with the McChasy code combined to SRIM simulations. Intermediate defects depth region is associated with vacancies (D{sub V}) and deeper defect (D{sub N}) essentially related to the Si and C interstitial defects. The defect concentration and the maximum perpendicular strain exhibit similar increasing trend with the Mn{sup +} fluence. Furthermore, the amount of Mn atoms at Si substitutional sites and the corresponding magnetic moment per Mn atom were found to increase with increasing Mn fluence from 0.7 μ{sub B} to 1.7 μ{sub B} and then collapsing to 0.2 μ{sub B}. Moreover, a strong correlation has been found between the magnetic moment and the combination of both large D{sub V}/D{sub N} ratio and high Mn at Si sites. These results are corroborated by our ab initio calculations considering the most stable configurations showing that besides the amount of Mn substituting Si sites, local vacancy-rich environment is playing a crucial role in enhancing the magnetism.

  10. The reliability of cone-beam computed tomography to assess bone density at dental implant recipient sites: a histomorphometric analysis by micro-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-García, Raúl; Monje, Florencio

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to objectively assess the reliability of the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) as a tool to pre-operatively determine radiographic bone density (RBD) by the density values provided by the system, analyzing its relationship with histomorphometric bone density expressed as bone volumetric fraction (BV/TV) assessed by micro-CT of bone biopsies at the site of insertion of dental implants in the maxillary bones. Thirty-nine bone biopsies of the maxillary bones at the sites of 39 dental implants from 31 edentulous healthy patients were analyzed. The NobelGuide™ software was used for implant planning, which also allowed fabrication of individual stereolithographic surgical guides. The analysis of CBCT images allowed pre-operative determination of mean density values of implant recipient sites along the major axis of the planned implants (axial RBD). Stereolithographic surgical guides were used to guide implant insertion and also to extract cylindrical bone biopsies from the core of the exact implant site. Further analysis of several osseous micro-structural variables including BV/TV was performed by micro-CT of the extracted bone biopsies. Mean axial RBD was 478 ± 212 (range: 144-953). A statistically significant difference (P = 0.02) was observed among density values of the cortical bone of the upper maxilla and mandible. A high positive Pearson's correlation coefficient (r = 0.858, P micro-CT at the site of dental implants in the maxillary bones. Pre-operative estimation of density values by CBCT is a reliable tool to objectively determine bone density. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Corrosion of magnesium alloy AZ31 screws is dependent on the implantation site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willbold, E. [Laboratory for Biomechanics and Biomaterials, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Anna-von-Borries-Strasse 1-7, D - 30625 Hannover (Germany); Kaya, A.A. [Mugla University, Engineering Faculty, Metallurgy and Materials Engineering Department, Mugla (Turkey); Kaya, R.A. [MedicalPark Hospital, Kueltuer Sok No:1, 34160 Bahcelievler, Istanbul (Turkey); Beckmann, F. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Max-Planck-Str.1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Witte, F., E-mail: witte.frank@mh-hannover.de [Laboratory for Biomechanics and Biomaterials, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Anna-von-Borries-Strasse 1-7, D - 30625 Hannover (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    The corrosion of biodegradable materials is a crucial issue in implant development. Among other materials, magnesium and magnesium based alloys are one of the most promising candidates. Since the corrosion of biodegradable materials depends on different physiological parameters like pH or ion concentrations, the corrosion might be different in different biological environments. To investigate this issue, we produced screws from magnesium alloy AZ31 and implanted them into the hip bone of 14 sheep. After 3 and 6 months, the screws were explanted and analyzed with synchrotron-radiation based micro-computed tomography and hard tissue histology. We found considerable differences in the corrosion behavior of the magnesium screws with respect to its original tissue location. However, we could detect a normal immunological tissue response.

  12. Effect of a preoperative decontamination protocol on surgical site infections in patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgery with hardware implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebko, Serge P; Green, David M; Awad, Samir S

    2015-05-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs), commonly caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, specifically when hardware is implanted in the patient. Previously, we have demonstrated that a preoperative decontamination protocol using chlorhexidine gluconate washcloths and intranasal antiseptic ointment is effective in eradicating MRSA in the nose and on the skin of patients. To examine the effect of a decontamination protocol on SSIs in patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgery with hardware implantation. A prospective database of patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgery with hardware implantation at the Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Houston, Texas, was analyzed from October 1, 2012, to December 31, 2013. Cohort groups before and after the intervention were compared. Starting in May 2013, during their preoperative visit, all of the patients watched an educational video about MRSA decontamination and were given chlorhexidine washcloths and oral rinse and nasal povidone-iodine solution to be used the night before and the morning of scheduled surgery. Thirty-day SSI rates were collected according to the definitions of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance. Data on demographics, comorbidities such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and coronary artery disease, tobacco use, alcohol use, and body mass index were also collected. Univariate analysis was performed between the 2 groups of patients. Multivariate analysis was used to identify independent predictors of SSI. A total of 709 patients were analyzed (344 controls and 365 patients who were decolonized). Both groups were well matched with no significant differences in age, body mass index, sex, or comorbidities. All of the patients (100%) completed the MRSA decontamination protocol. The SSI rate in the intervention group was significantly lower (1.1%; 4 of

  13. Electromagnetic interference from welding and motors on implantable cardioverter-defibrillators as tested in the electrically hostile work site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetter, J G; Benditt, D G; Stanton, M S

    1996-08-01

    This study was designed to determine the susceptibility of an implanted cardioverter-defibrillator to electromagnetic interference in an electrically hostile work site environment, with the ultimate goal of allowing the patient to return to work. Normal operation of an implanted cardioverter-defibrillator depends on reliable sensing of the heart's electrical activity. Consequently, there is concern that external electromagnetic interference from external sources in the work place, especially welding equipment or motor-generator systems, may be sensed and produce inappropriate shocks or abnormal reed switch operation, temporarily suspending detection of ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation. The effects of electromagnetic interference on the operation of one type of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (Medtronic models 7217 and 7219) was measured by using internal event counter monitoring in 10 patients operating arc welders at up to 900 A or working near 200-hp motors and 1 patient close to a locomotive starter drawing up to 400 A. The electromagnetic interference produced two sources of potential interference on the sensing circuit or reed switch operation, respectively: 1) electrical fields with measured frequencies up to 50 MHz produced by the high currents during welding electrode activation, and 2) magnetic fields produced by the current in the welding electrode and cable. The defibrillator sensitivity was programmed to the highest (most sensitive) value: 0.15 mV (model 7219) or 0.3 mV (model 7217). The ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation therapies were temporarily turned off but the detection circuits left on. None of the implanted defibrillators tested were affected by oversensing of the electric field as verified by telemetry from the detection circuits. The magnetic field from 225-A welding current produced a flux density of 1.2 G; this density was not adequate to close the reed switch, which requires approximately 10 G

  14. Implant site development by orthodontic forced eruption of nontreatable teeth: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokn, Amir Reza; Saffarpour, Anna; Sadrimanesh, Rouzbeh; Iranparvar, Kaveh; Saffarpour, Aida; Mahmoudzadeh, Majid; Soolari, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Loss of bone and soft tissue attachment are common sequelae of periodontitis that may jeopardize the aesthetic outcome and compromise the functional and aesthetic outcomes of treatment. The following case report describes one of the most predictable techniques of vertical ridge augmentation, which is orthodontic extrusion or forced eruption of hopeless teeth. A 34-year-old woman who presented with severe attachment loss and deep pockets was diagnosed with generalized aggressive periodontitis. The mobile maxillary incisors were consequently extracted and were replaced with dental implants. However, prior to extraction, orthodontic extrusion of the hopeless incisors was performed to correct vertical ridge defects. Following extrusion and extraction of the maxillary incisors, to prevent soft tissue collapse and to preserve the papillae during socket healing, the crowns of the extracted teeth were used as pontics on a removable partial provisional denture. After 8 weeks, the implants were placed, and an immediate functional restoration was delivered. After 4 months of healing, a fixed definitive partial prosthesis was fabricated and delivered. After periodontal treatment, over a 2-year period, the progression of aggressive periodontitis was controlled. The mean vertical movement of marginal bone was 3.6 mm. The use of the crowns of extracted teeth appears to be an effective method to maintain papillae. Orthodontic extrusion is a predictable method for the correction of vertical ridge defects. Orthodontic treatment does not aggravate or hasten the progression of aggressive periodontitis.

  15. Morphologic features of puncture sites after exoseal vascular closure device implantation: Changes on follow-up computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Hwa Seong; Jang, Joo Yeon; Kim, Tae Un; Lee, Jun Woo; Park, Jung Hwan; Choo, Ki Seok; Cho, Mong; Yoon, Ki Tae; Hong, Young Ki; Jeon, Ung Bae

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the morphologic changes in transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) puncture sites implanted with an ExoSeal vascular closure device (VCD) using follow-up computed tomography (CT). 16 patients who used ExoSeal VCD after TACE were enrolled. Using CT images, the diameters and anterior wall thicknesses of the puncture sites in the common femoral artery (CFA) were compared with those of the contralateral CFA before TACE, at 1 month after every TACE session, and at the final follow-up period. The rates of complications were also evaluated. There were no puncture- or VCD-related complications. Follow-up CT images of the CFA's of patients who used ExoSeal VCDs showed eccentric vascular wall thickening with soft-tissue densities considered to be hemostatic plugs. Final follow-up CT images (mean, 616 days; range, 95–1106 days) revealed partial or complete resorption of the hemostatic plugs. The CFA puncture site diameters did not differ statistically from those of the contralateral CFA on the final follow-up CT (p > 0.05), regardless of the number of VCDs used. Follow-up CT images of patients who used ExoSeal VCDs showed no significant vascular stenosis or significant vessel wall thickening

  16. Morphologic features of puncture sites after exoseal vascular closure device implantation: Changes on follow-up computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Hwa Seong; Jang, Joo Yeon; Kim, Tae Un; Lee, Jun Woo; Park, Jung Hwan; Choo, Ki Seok; Cho, Mong; Yoon, Ki Tae; Hong, Young Ki; Jeon, Ung Bae [Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    The study aimed to evaluate the morphologic changes in transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) puncture sites implanted with an ExoSeal vascular closure device (VCD) using follow-up computed tomography (CT). 16 patients who used ExoSeal VCD after TACE were enrolled. Using CT images, the diameters and anterior wall thicknesses of the puncture sites in the common femoral artery (CFA) were compared with those of the contralateral CFA before TACE, at 1 month after every TACE session, and at the final follow-up period. The rates of complications were also evaluated. There were no puncture- or VCD-related complications. Follow-up CT images of the CFA's of patients who used ExoSeal VCDs showed eccentric vascular wall thickening with soft-tissue densities considered to be hemostatic plugs. Final follow-up CT images (mean, 616 days; range, 95–1106 days) revealed partial or complete resorption of the hemostatic plugs. The CFA puncture site diameters did not differ statistically from those of the contralateral CFA on the final follow-up CT (p > 0.05), regardless of the number of VCDs used. Follow-up CT images of patients who used ExoSeal VCDs showed no significant vascular stenosis or significant vessel wall thickening.

  17. Ultrasonic hydrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, Carl A.

    1984-01-01

    The disclosed ultrasonic hydrometer determines the specific gravity (density) of the electrolyte of a wet battery, such as a lead-acid battery. The hydrometer utilizes a transducer that when excited emits an ultrasonic impulse that traverses through the electrolyte back and forth between spaced sonic surfaces. The transducer detects the returning impulse, and means measures the time "t" between the initial and returning impulses. Considering the distance "d" between the spaced sonic surfaces and the measured time "t", the sonic velocity "V" is calculated with the equation "V=2d/t". The hydrometer also utilizes a thermocouple to measure the electrolyte temperature. A hydrometer database correlates three variable parameters including sonic velocity in and temperature and specific gravity of the electrolyte, for temperature values between 0.degree. and 40.degree. C. and for specific gravity values between 1.05 and 1.30. Upon knowing two parameters (the calculated sonic velocity and the measured temperature), the third parameter (specific gravity) can be uniquely found in the database. The hydrometer utilizes a microprocessor for data storage and manipulation. The disclosed modified battery has a hollow spacer nub on the battery side wall, the sonic surfaces being on the inside of the nub and the electrolyte filling between the surfaces to the exclusion of intervening structure. An accessible pad exposed on the nub wall opposite one sonic surface allows the reliable placement thereagainst of the transducer.

  18. Accuracy of computerized tomography for the evaluation of mandibular sites prior to implant placement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sforza, Nicola Marco; Franchini, Federico; Lamma, Achille

    2007-01-01

    of all software for axial CT measurement (control group), and again in its function of site-specific multiplanar reconstruction (test group). The results showed that the position of the mandible in relation to the CT gantry can influence the precision of the linear measurements. The error ranged from 2...

  19. Piezosurgery applied to implant dentistry: clinical and biological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Cassiano Costa Silva; Gealh, Walter Cristiano; Meorin-Nogueira, Lamis; Garcia-Júnior, Idelmo Rangel; Okamoto, Roberta

    2014-07-01

    Piezosurgery is a new and modern technique of bone surgery in implantology. Selective cutting is possible for different ultrasonic frequencies acting only in hard tissues (mineralized), saving vital anatomical structures. With the piezoelectric osteotomy technique, receptor site preparation for implants, autogenous bone graft acquistition (particles and blocks), osteotomy for alveolar bone crest expansion, maxillary sinus lifting, and dental implant removal can be performed accurately and safely, providing excellent clinical and biological results, especially for osteocyte viability. The aim of this review was, through literature review, to present clinical applications of piezosurgery in implant dentistry and outline their advantages and disadvantages over conventional surgical systems. Moreover, this study addressed the biological aspects related to piezosurgery that differentiate it from those of bone tissue approaches. Overall, piezosurgery enables critical operations in simple and fully executable procedures; and effectively, areas that are difficult to access have less risk of soft tissue and neurovascular tissue damage via piezosurgery.

  20. Evaluation of accuracy in implant site preparation performed in single- or multi-step drilling procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marheineke, Nadine; Scherer, Uta; Rücker, Martin; von See, Constantin; Rahlf, Björn; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Stoetzer, Marcus

    2018-06-01

    Dental implant failure and insufficient osseointegration are proven results of mechanical and thermal damage during the surgery process. We herein performed a comparative study of a less invasive single-step drilling preparation protocol and a conventional multiple drilling sequence. Accuracy of drilling holes was precisely analyzed and the influence of different levels of expertise of the handlers and additional use of drill template guidance was evaluated. Six experimental groups, deployed in an osseous study model, were representing template-guided and freehanded drilling actions in a stepwise drilling procedure in comparison to a single-drill protocol. Each experimental condition was studied by the drilling actions of respectively three persons without surgical knowledge as well as three highly experienced oral surgeons. Drilling actions were performed and diameters were recorded with a precision measuring instrument. Less experienced operators were able to significantly increase the drilling accuracy using a guiding template, especially when multi-step preparations are performed. Improved accuracy without template guidance was observed when experienced operators were executing single-step versus multi-step technique. Single-step drilling protocols have shown to produce more accurate results than multi-step procedures. The outcome of any protocol can be further improved by use of guiding templates. Operator experience can be a contributing factor. Single-step preparations are less invasive and are promoting osseointegration. Even highly experienced surgeons are achieving higher levels of accuracy by combining this technique with template guidance. Hereby template guidance enables a reduction of hands-on time and side effects during surgery and lead to a more predictable clinical diameter.

  1. Metastatic spread from squamous cell carcinoma of the hypopharynx to the totally implantable venous access port insertion site: Case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangla, Ankit; Agarwal, Nikki; Mullane, Michael Russell

    2017-12-01

    The totally implantable venous access port plays a crucial role in delivering chemotherapy in the outpatient setting. Here, we report the first case of a patient with hypopharyngeal tumor who developed chest wall metastasis over the totally implantable venous access port inserted in the internal jugular vein. Our patient, a 58-year-old man with a hypopharyngeal tumor presented with a lump over the totally implantable venous access port site. The port was removed and the lump was biopsied. The CT studies showed that the tumor had spread along the catheter from the hypopharynx to the chest wall. The pathology from the biopsy showed squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The patient had poor performance status and opted for hospice care. We present a novel case of metastasis over the totally implantable venous access port implanted in a patient with a hypopharyngeal tumor. We also reviewed relevant literature comparing the data from percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube site metastasis with our patient and other similar case reports. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Across-site patterns of electrically evoked compound action potential amplitude-growth functions in multichannel cochlear implant recipients and the effects of the interphase gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schvartz-Leyzac, Kara C; Pfingst, Bryan E

    2016-11-01

    Electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP) measures of peak amplitude, and amplitude-growth function (AGF) slope have been shown to reflect characteristics of cochlear health (primarily spiral ganglion density) in anesthetized cochlear-implanted guinea pigs. Likewise, the effect of increasing the interphase gap (IPG) in each of these measures also reflects SGN density in the implanted guinea pig. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that suprathreshold ECAP measures, and also how they change as the IPG is increased, have the potential to be clinically applicable in human subjects. However, further work is first needed in order to determine the characteristics of these measures in humans who use cochlear implants. The current study examined across-site patterns of suprathreshold ECAP measures in 10 bilaterally-implanted, adult cochlear implant users. Results showed that both peak amplitude and slope of the AGF varied significantly from electrode to electrode in ear-specific patterns across the subjects' electrode arrays. As expected, increasing the IPG on average increased the peak amplitude and slope. Across ears, there was a significant, negative correlation between the slope of the ECAP AGF and the duration of hearing loss. Across-site patterns of ECAP peak amplitude and AGF slopes were also compared with common ground impedance values and significant correlations were observed in some cases, depending on the subject and condition. The results of this study, coupled with previous studies in animals, suggest that it is feasible to measure the change in suprathreshold ECAP measures as the IPG increases on most electrodes. Further work is needed to investigate the relationship between these measures and cochlear implant outcomes, and determine how these measures might be used when programming a cochlear-implant processor. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Tapered, Double-Lead Threads Single Implants Placed in Fresh Extraction Sockets and Healed Sites of the Posterior Jaws: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial with 1 to 3 Years of Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchi, Alessandro; Vignudelli, Elisabetta; Franco, Simonetta; Levrini, Luca; Castellani, Dario; Pagliani, Luca; Rea, Massimiliano; Modena, Claudio; Sandri, Giulio; Longhi, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the survival, success, and complication rates of tapered double-lead threads single implants, placed in fresh extraction sockets and healed sites of the posterior jaws. The enrolled patients were randomly divided into 2 groups: in the test group (TG), all implants were inserted at the time of tooth extraction; in the control group (CG), all implants were placed 3 months after extraction. The implants were followed for a period of 1 to 3 years after loading. The main outcomes were implant survival, complications, and implant-crown success. Ninety-two patients had 97 installed implants (49 in the TG, 48 in the CG). Only two implants failed, in the TG; the survival rates were therefore 95.9% (47/49) and 100% (48/48) for TG and CG, respectively. In the surviving implants, no complications were reported, for an implant-crown success of 100%. Although a significant difference was found in the levels of primary stability between TG and CG, single implants placed in fresh extraction sockets and healed sites of the posterior jaws had similar survival and complication rates. Crestal bone levels and peri-implant bone resorption showed similar values. A longer follow-up period is however required, to confirm these positive outcomes.

  4. Effect of surgical drill guide and irrigans temperature on thermal bone changes during drilling implant sites - thermographic analysis on bovine ribs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Aleksa; Lazić, Zoran; Mišić, Tijana; Šćepanović, Miodrag; Todorović, Aleksandar; Thakare, Kaustubh; Janjić, Bojan; Vlahović, Zoran; Glišić, Mirko

    2016-08-01

    During drilling implant sites, mechanical energy is converted into thermal one resulting in transient rise in temperature of surrounding bone. The temperature of 47°C exeeding one minute impairs osseointegration, compromises mechanical properties of the local bone and could cause early implant failure. This in vitro study aimed to assess the effect of surgical drill guide and temperature of irrigans on thermal changes of the local bone during drilling implant sites, and to test the influence of irrigans temperature on the temperature of surgical drill guide. A total of 48 specimens obtained from bovine ribs were randomly allocated to four experimental conditions according to the 2 x 2 factorial design: drill guide (with or without) and saline (at 25°C or 5°C). Real-time infrared thermography was used as a method for temperature measurement. The primary outcome was bone temperature change during drilling implant sites measured at 3 osteotomy depths, whereas the second one was change in the temperature of the drill guide. Data were analyzed by Brunner and Langer nonparametric analysis and Wilcoxon test. The effect of drill guide on the changes of bone temperature was significant at the entrance of osteotomy, whereas the effect of saline temperature was significant at all osteotomy levels (p 0.05). Guided surgery and irrigation with saline at 25°C were associated with the highest bone temperature increase. Increase in drill guide temperature was significantly higher when saline at 25°C was used (p < 0.001). Guided implant site preparation generates higher temperature of the local bone than conventional drilling, not exceeding the threshold for thermal bone necrosis. Although saline at room temperature provides sufficient heat control during drilling, cooled saline is more effective regardless the use of surgical drill guide.

  5. Effect of surgical drill guide and irrigans temperature on thermal bone changes during drilling implant sites - thermographic analysis on bovine ribs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Aleksa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. During drilling implant sites, mechanical energy is converted into thermal one resulting in transient rise in temperature of surrounding bone. The temperature of 47°C exeeding one minute impairs osseointegration, compromises mechanical properties of the local bone and could cause early implant failure. This in vitro study aimed to assess the effect of surgical drill guide and temperature of irrigans on thermal changes of the local bone during drilling implant sites, and to test the influence of irrigans temperature on the temperature of surgical drill guide. Methods. A total of 48 specimens obtained from bovine ribs were randomly allocated to four experimental conditions according to the 2 x 2 factorial design: drill guide (with or without and saline (at 25°C or 5°C. Real-time infrared thermography was used as a method for temperature measurement. The primary outcome was bone temperature change during drilling implant sites measured at 3 osteotomy depths, whereas the second one was change in the temperature of the drill guide. Data were analyzed by Brunner and Langer nonparametric analysis and Wilcoxon test. Results. The effect of drill guide on the changes of bone temperature was significant at the entrance of osteotomy, whereas the effect of saline temperature was significant at all osteotomy levels (p 0.05. Guided surgery and irrigation with saline at 25°C were associated with the highest bone temperature increase. Increase in drill guide temperature was significantly higher when saline at 25°C was used (p < 0.001. Conclusion. Guided implant site preparation generates higher temperature of the local bone than conventional drilling, not exceeding the threshold for thermal bone necrosis. Although saline at room temperature provides sufficient heat control during drilling, cooled saline is more effective regardless the use of surgical drill guide.

  6. The Codacs™ direct acoustic cochlear implant actuator: exploring alternative stimulation sites and their stimulation efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossöhmichen, Martin; Salcher, Rolf; Kreipe, Hans-Heinrich; Lenarz, Thomas; Maier, Hannes

    2015-01-01

    This work assesses the efficiency of the Codacs system actuator (Cochlear Ltd., Sydney Australia) in different inner ear stimulation modalities. Originally the actuator was intended for direct perilymph stimulation after stapedotomy using a piston prosthesis. A possible alternative application is the stimulation of middle ear structures or the round window (RW). Here the perilymph stimulation with a K-piston through a stapes footplate (SFP) fenestration (N = 10) as well as stimulation of the stapes head (SH) with a Bell prosthesis (N = 9), SFP stimulation with an Omega/Aerial prosthesis (N = 8) and reverse RW stimulation (N = 10) were performed in cadaveric human temporal bones (TBs). Codacs actuator output is expressed as equivalent sound pressure level (eq. SPL) using RW and SFP displacement responses, measured by Laser Doppler velocimetry as reference. The axial actuator coupling force in stimulation of stapes and RW was adjusted to ~5 mN. The Bell prosthesis and Omega/Aerial prosthesis stimulation generated similar mean eq. SPLs (Bell: 127.5-141.8 eq. dB SPL; Omega/Aerial: 123.6-143.9 eq. dB SPL), being significantly more efficient than K-piston perilymph stimulation (108.6-131.6 eq. dB SPL) and RW stimulation (108.3-128.2 eq. dB SPL). Our results demonstrate that SH, SFP and RW are adequate alternative stimulation sites for the Codacs actuator using coupling prostheses and an axial coupling force of ~5 mN. Based on the eq. SPLs, all investigated methods were adequate for in vivo hearing aid applications, provided that experimental conditions including constant coupling force will be implemented.

  7. The Codacs™ direct acoustic cochlear implant actuator: exploring alternative stimulation sites and their stimulation efficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Grossöhmichen

    Full Text Available This work assesses the efficiency of the Codacs system actuator (Cochlear Ltd., Sydney Australia in different inner ear stimulation modalities. Originally the actuator was intended for direct perilymph stimulation after stapedotomy using a piston prosthesis. A possible alternative application is the stimulation of middle ear structures or the round window (RW. Here the perilymph stimulation with a K-piston through a stapes footplate (SFP fenestration (N = 10 as well as stimulation of the stapes head (SH with a Bell prosthesis (N = 9, SFP stimulation with an Omega/Aerial prosthesis (N = 8 and reverse RW stimulation (N = 10 were performed in cadaveric human temporal bones (TBs. Codacs actuator output is expressed as equivalent sound pressure level (eq. SPL using RW and SFP displacement responses, measured by Laser Doppler velocimetry as reference. The axial actuator coupling force in stimulation of stapes and RW was adjusted to ~5 mN. The Bell prosthesis and Omega/Aerial prosthesis stimulation generated similar mean eq. SPLs (Bell: 127.5-141.8 eq. dB SPL; Omega/Aerial: 123.6-143.9 eq. dB SPL, being significantly more efficient than K-piston perilymph stimulation (108.6-131.6 eq. dB SPL and RW stimulation (108.3-128.2 eq. dB SPL. Our results demonstrate that SH, SFP and RW are adequate alternative stimulation sites for the Codacs actuator using coupling prostheses and an axial coupling force of ~5 mN. Based on the eq. SPLs, all investigated methods were adequate for in vivo hearing aid applications, provided that experimental conditions including constant coupling force will be implemented.

  8. Evaluation of linear measurements of implant sites based o head orientation during acquisition: An ex vivo study using cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabban, Hanadi; Mahdian, Mina; Dhingra, Ajay; Lurie, Alan G.; Tadinada, Aditya [University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine, Farmington (United States)

    2015-06-15

    This study evaluated the effect of various head orientations during cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image acquisition on linear measurements of potential implant sites. Six dry human skulls with a total of 28 implant sites were evaluated for seven different head orientations. The scans were acquired using a Hitachi CB-MercuRay CBCT machine. The scanned volumes were reconstructed. Horizontal and vertical measurements were made and were compared to measurements made after simulating the head position to corrected head angulations. Data was analyzed using a two-way ANOVA test. Statistical analysis revealed a significant interaction between the mean errors in vertical measurements with a marked difference observed at the extension head position (P<0.05). Statistical analysis failed to yield any significant interaction between the mean errors in horizontal measurements at various head positions. Head orientation could significantly affect the vertical measurements in CBCT scans. The main head position influencing the measurements is extension.

  9. Bone Texture Fractal Dimension Analysis of Ultrasound-Treated Bone around Implant Site: A Double-Blind Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaf Akram Abdulhameed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the efficacy of bone texture fractal dimension (FD analysis method in predicting implant stability from intraoral periapical radiographs using two implant protocols. Materials and Methods. A double-blind clinical trial was conducted on 22 subjects who needed dental implants. The participants were randomized into two groups, the control group with standard implant protocol treatment and the intervention group with added low-intensity power ultrasound treatment (LIPUS besides the standard implant protocol. The FD values of bone density were carried out on the mesial and distal sides of the implant on digital intraoral radiographs using the box-counting method. Both resonance frequency (RF and fractal dimension (FD were assessed in three time intervals: after surgery and before and after loading. Results. FD on both the mesial and distal sides serve as very good-to-excellent tests with high validity (ROC area exceeding 0.8 in predicting high implant stability (ISQ ≥ 70. The mesial side measurements were consistently better than the distal side among the intervention groups. The optimum cutoff value for the FD-mesial side that predicts a highly stable implant (ISQ ≥ 70 is ≥1.505. At this optimum cutoff value, the mesial side FD is associated with a perfect sensitivity (100% and fairly high specificity (86.5%. Conclusion. The FD analysis could be recommended as an adjunctive quantitative method in prediction of the implant stability with very high sensitivity and specificity. This trial is registered with ISRCTN72648040.

  10. Volumetric changes and peri-implant health at implant sites with or without soft tissue grafting in the esthetic zone, a retrospective case-control study with a 5-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienz, Stefan P; Jung, Ronald E; Sapata, Vitor M; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Hüsler, Jürg; Thoma, Daniel S

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the volumetric changes and peri-implant health at implant sites with and without previous soft tissue grafting over a 5-year observation period. In 18 partially edentulous patients, dental implants were placed in the esthetic zone (15-25) with simultaneous guided bone regeneration, followed by submerged healing. During the healing phase, eight patients (test) received a subepithelial connective tissue graft, whereas 10 patients (control) did not receive any soft tissue augmentation. Subsequently, abutment connection was performed and final reconstructions were inserted. Impressions were taken 1 week after crown insertion and at 5 years. Obtained casts were scanned and superimposed for volumetric and linear measurements. The mean distance (MD) in the mid-buccal area between the two surfaces and the differences in buccal marginal mucosal level (bMML change ) and in ridge width (RW change ) were evaluated. Peri-implant health was assessed using probing pocket depth (PPD) values, plaque index (PlI) and bleeding on probing (BOP). At a median follow-up time of 60.5 months a median MD of -0.38 mm (Min: -0.94; Max: -0.03) (test) and of -0.51 mm (Min: -0.76; Max: 0.05) (control) was calculated. The level of the margo mucosae (bMML change ) demonstrated a median loss of -0.42 mm (Min: -1.1; Max: -0.01) (test) and of -0.33 mm (Min: -1.02; Max: 0.00) (control). The median RW change ranged between -0.44 mm and -0.73 mm (test) and between -0.49 mm and -0.54 mm (control). Mean PPD values slightly increased, whereas PlI and BOP remained stable over time in both groups. None of the comparisons between the groups revealed statistically significant differences (P > 0.35). A small sample size must be considered, however. Limited by a retrospective case-control study design, implant sites with and without soft tissue grafting on the buccal side revealed only minimal volumetric and linear changes and stability of peri-implant parameters over 5 years. © 2017

  11. Primary implant stability in augmented sinuslift-sites after completed bone regeneration: a randomized controlled clinical study comparing four subantrally inserted biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troedhan, Angelo; Schlichting, Izabela; Kurrek, Andreas; Wainwright, Marcel

    2014-07-30

    Implant-Insertion-Torque-Value (ITV) proved to be a significant clinical parameter to predict long term implant success-rates and to decide upon immediate loading. The study evaluated ITVs, when four different and commonly used biomaterials were used in sinuslift-procedures compared to natural subantral bone in two-stage-implant-procedures. The tHUCSL-INTRALIFT-method was chosen for sinuslifting in 155 sinuslift-sites for its minimal invasive transcrestal approach and scalable augmentation volume. Four different biomaterials were inserted randomly (easy-graft CRYSTAL n = 38, easy-graft CLASSIC n = 41, NanoBone n = 42, BioOss n = 34), 2 ccm in each case. After a mean healing period of 8,92 months uniform tapered screw Q2-implants were inserted and Drill-Torque-Values (DTV) and ITV were recorded and compared to a group of 36 subantral sites without need of sinuslifting. DTV/ITV were processed for statistics by ANOVA-tests. Mean DTV/ITV obtained in Ncm were: Control Group 10,2/22,2, Bio-Oss 12,7/26,2, NanoBone 17,5/33,3, easy-graft CLASSIC 20,3/45,9, easy-graft CRYSTAL 23,8/56,6 Ncm, significance-level of differences throughout p < 0,05. Within the limits of this study the results suggest self-hardening solid-block-like bone-graft-materials to achieve significantly better DTV/ITV than loose granulate biomaterials for its suspected improvement of vascularization and mineralization of the subantral scaffold by full immobilization of the augmentation site towards pressure changes in the human sinus at normal breathing.

  12. Ultrasonic horn design for ultrasonic machining technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naď M.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Many of industrial applications and production technologies are based on the application of ultrasound. In many cases, the phenomenon of ultrasound is also applied in technological processes of the machining of materials. The main element of equipments that use the effects of ultrasound for machining technology is the ultrasonic horn – so called sonotrode. The performance of ultrasonic equipment, respectively ultrasonic machining technologies depends on properly designed of sonotrode shape. The dynamical properties of different geometrical shapes of ultrasonic horns are presented in this paper. Dependence of fundamental modal properties (natural frequencies, mode shapes of various sonotrode shapes for various geometrical parameters is analyzed. Modal analyses of the models are determined by the numerical simulation using finite element method (FEM design procedures. The mutual comparisons of the comparable parameters of the various sonotrode shapes are presented.

  13. Rapid orthodontic treatment after the ridge-splitting technique--a combined surgical-orthodontic approach for implant site development: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Francesco; Mirabella, A Davide; Borlizzi, Diego

    2012-08-01

    This article presents a clinical case of bilateral partial edentulism in the posterior mandible with severe horizontal and moderate vertical bone atrophy. A new technique using rapid orthodontics after ridge splitting is presented. The split-crest technique was carried out using piezosurgical instruments in the first molar and second premolar areas to widen the bone crest and open a channel for tooth movement. Immediately after, orthodontic appliances were used to move the first premolars distally and the second molars mesially into the surgical site. The rationale was to facilitate and accelerate orthodontic movement of the teeth, which is otherwise difficult in a cortical knife-edged ridge. The bone defect was filled with the alveolar bone of the adjacent teeth that were moved into the surgically opened path. Adequate bone volume for implant placement was generated in the first premolar area. Implants were then inserted, and the patient was rehabilitated.

  14. Bone quality evaluation at dental implant site using multislice CT, micro-CT, and cone beam CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, Azin; Ibrahim, Norliza; Hassan, Bassam; van der Stelt, Paul; Wismeijer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The first purpose of this study was to analyze the correlation between bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and calibrated radiographic bone density Hounsfield units (HU) in human jaws, derived from micro-CT and multislice computed tomography (MSCT), respectively. The second aim was to assess the accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in evaluating trabecular bone density and microstructure using MSCT and micro-CT, respectively, as reference gold standards. Twenty partially edentulous human mandibular cadavers were scanned by three types of CT modalities: MSCT (Philips, Best, the Netherlands), CBCT (3D Accuitomo 170, J Morita, Kyoto, Japan), and micro-CT (SkyScan 1173, Kontich, Belgium). Image analysis was performed using Amira (v4.1, Visage Imaging Inc., Carlsbad, CA, USA), 3Diagnosis (v5.3.1, 3diemme, Cantu, Italy), Geomagic (studio(®) 2012, Morrisville, NC, USA), and CTAn (v1.11, SkyScan). MSCT, CBCT, and micro-CT scans of each mandible were matched to select the exact region of interest (ROI). MSCT HU, micro-CT BV/TV, and CBCT gray value and bone volume fraction of each ROI were derived. Statistical analysis was performed to assess the correlations between corresponding measurement parameters. Strong correlations were observed between CBCT and MSCT density (r = 0.89) and between CBCT and micro-CT BV/TV measurements (r = 0.82). Excellent correlation was observed between MSCT HU and micro-CT BV/TV (r = 0.91). However, significant differences were found between all comparisons pairs (P micro-CT BV/TV (P = 0.147). An excellent correlation exists between bone volume fraction and bone density as assessed on micro-CT and MSCT, respectively. This suggests that bone density measurements could be used to estimate bone microstructural parameters. A strong correlation also was found between CBCT gray values and BV/TV and their gold standards, suggesting the potential of this modality in bone quality assessment at implant site. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by

  15. Electromagnetic ultrasonic guided waves

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Songling; Li, Weibin; Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces the fundamental theory of electromagnetic ultrasonic guided waves, together with its applications. It includes the dispersion characteristics and matching theory of guided waves; the mechanism of production and theoretical model of electromagnetic ultrasonic guided waves; the effect mechanism between guided waves and defects; the simulation method for the entire process of electromagnetic ultrasonic guided wave propagation; electromagnetic ultrasonic thickness measurement; pipeline axial guided wave defect detection; and electromagnetic ultrasonic guided wave detection of gas pipeline cracks. This theory and findings on applications draw on the author’s intensive research over the past eight years. The book can be used for nondestructive testing technology and as an engineering reference work. The specific implementation of the electromagnetic ultrasonic guided wave system presented here will also be of value for other nondestructive test developers.

  16. Ultrasonic testing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrie, W.E.

    1978-01-01

    The ultrasonic transmitter made of polarized ferroelectric ceramic material (lead zirconate titanate) is arranged in a strip carrier which allows it to be introduced between the fuel elements of a fuel subassembly in a water cooled nuclear reactor. The ultrasonic transmitter is insulated relative to the carrier. The echo of the ra dal ultrasonic pulse is recorded which changes as faulty water filled fuel elements are detected. (RW) [de

  17. An alternative method to record rising temperatures during dental implant site preparation: a preliminary study using bovine bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenica Laurito

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Overheating is constantly mentioned as a risk factor for bone necrosis that could compromise the dental implant primary stability. Uncontrolled thermal injury can result in a fibrous tissue, interpositioned at the implant-bone interface, compromising the long-term prognosis. The methods used to record temperature rise include either direct recording by thermocouple instruments or indirect estimating by infrared thermography. This preliminary study was carried out using bovine bone and a different method of temperatures rising estimation is presented. Two different types of drills were tested using fluoroptic thermometer and the effectiveness of this alternative temperature recording method was evaluated.

  18. Ultrasonic flow meter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lötters, Joost Conrad; Snijders, G.J.; Volker, A.W.F.

    2014-01-01

    The invention relates to an ultrasonic flow meter comprising a flow tube for the fluid whose flow rate is to be determined. The flow meter comprises a transmitting element for emitting ultrasonic waves, which is provided on the outer jacket of the flow tube. A receiving element, which is provided on

  19. Ultrasonic decontamination robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patenaude, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    An ultrasonic decontamination robot removes radioactive contamination from the internal surface of the inlet and outlet headers, divider plate, tube sheet, and lower portions of tubes of a nuclear power plant steam generator. A programmable microprocessor controller guides the movement of a robotic arm mounted in the header manway. An ultrasonic transducer having a solvent delivery subsystem through which ultrasonic action is achieved is moved by the arm over the surfaces. A solvent recovery suction tube is positioned within the header to remove solvent therefrom while avoiding interference with the main robotic arm. The solvent composition, temperature, pressure, viscosity, and purity are controlled to optimize the ultrasonic scrubbing action. The ultrasonic transducer is controlled at a power density, frequency, and on-off mode cycle such as to optimize scrubbing action within the range of transducer-to-surface distance and solvent layer thickness selected for the particular conditions encountered. Both solvent and transducer control actions are optimized by the programmable microprocessor. (author)

  20. Single-tooth implant restorations in the esthetic zone--contemporary concepts for optimization and maintenance of soft tissue esthetics in the replacement of failing teeth in compromised sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankoo, Tidu

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, implant dentistry has undergone a profound shift in emphasis. The focus evolved first from a surgically driven approach to a prosthetically driven approach and now to a more biologically driven approach with the goal of optimizing and maintaining esthetics. While traditional implant protocols are well established for management of implants placed in healed edentulous sites, the data available offer little clarity on the factors and procedures for long-term esthetic success, particularly in terms of maintained stable soft tissue outcomes around implant restorations in the esthetic zone. Unfortunately, the 90%+ success rates indicated in most studies of dental implant systems today do not represent the success of the esthetic outcome. This has created a demand--certainly among clinicians in private practice focused on the ongoing maintenance of esthetic outcomes--for clear treatment protocols to achieve esthetic results that are not only predictable and consistent but that can withstand the test of time.

  1. Implantation of autogenous meniscal fragments wrapped with a fascia sheath enhances fibrocartilage regeneration in vivo in a large harvest site defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yasukazu; Yasuda, Kazunori; Kondo, Eiji; Katsura, Taro; Tanabe, Yoshie; Kimura, Masashi; Tohyama, Harukazu

    2010-04-01

    Concerning meniscal tissue regeneration, many investigators have studied the development of a tissue-engineered meniscus. However, the utility still remains unknown. Implantation of autogenous meniscal fragments wrapped with a fascia sheath into the donor site meniscal defect may significantly enhance fibrocartilage regeneration in vivo in the defect. Controlled laboratory study. Seventy-five mature rabbits were used in this study. In each animal, an anterior one-third of the right medial meniscus was resected. Then, the animals were divided into the following 3 groups of 25 rabbits each: In group 1, no treatment was applied to the meniscal defect. In group 2, the defect was covered with a fascia sheath. In group 3, after the resected meniscus was fragmented into small pieces, the fragments were grafted into the defect. Then, the defect with the meniscal fragments was covered with a fascia sheath. In each group, 5 rabbits were used for histological evaluation at 3, 6, and 12 weeks after surgery, and 5 rabbits were used for biomechanical evaluation at 6 and 12 weeks after surgery. Histologically, large round cells in group 3 were scattered in the core portion of the meniscus-shaped tissue, and the matrix around these cells was positively stained by safranin O and toluisin blue at 12 weeks. The histological score of group 3 was significantly higher than that of group 1 and group 2. Biomechanically, the maximal load and stiffness of group 3 were significantly greater than those of groups 1 and 2. This study clearly demonstrated that implantation of autogenous meniscal fragments wrapped with a fascia sheath into the donor site meniscal defect significantly enhanced fibrocartilage regeneration in vivo in the defect at 12 weeks after implantation in the rabbit. This study proposed a novel strategy to treat a large defect after a meniscectomy.

  2. Effect of ultra-low doses, ASIR and MBIR on density and noise levels of MDCT images of dental implant sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widmann, Gerlig; Schullian, Peter [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Al-Shawaf, Reema; Al-Sadhan, Ra' ed; Al-Ekrish, Asma' a A. [King Saud University, Department of Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Dentistry, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Hoermann, Romed [Medical University of Innsbruck, Division of Clinical and Functional Anatomy, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2017-05-15

    Differences in noise and density values in MDCT images obtained using ultra-low doses with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR may possibly affect implant site density analysis. The aim of this study was to compare density and noise measurements recorded from dental implant sites using ultra-low doses combined with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR. Cadavers were scanned using a standard protocol and four low-dose protocols. Scans were reconstructed using FBP, ASIR-50, ASIR-100, and MBIR, and either a bone or standard reconstruction kernel. Density (mean Hounsfield units [HUs]) of alveolar bone and noise levels (mean standard deviation of HUs) was recorded from all datasets and measurements were compared by paired t tests and two-way ANOVA with repeated measures. Significant differences in density and noise were found between the reference dose/FBP protocol and almost all test combinations. Maximum mean differences in HU were 178.35 (bone kernel) and 273.74 (standard kernel), and in noise, were 243.73 (bone kernel) and 153.88 (standard kernel). Decreasing radiation dose increased density and noise regardless of reconstruction technique and kernel. The effect of reconstruction technique on density and noise depends on the reconstruction kernel used. (orig.)

  3. Effect of ultra-low doses, ASIR and MBIR on density and noise levels of MDCT images of dental implant sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widmann, Gerlig; Schullian, Peter; Al-Shawaf, Reema; Al-Sadhan, Ra'ed; Al-Ekrish, Asma'a A.; Hoermann, Romed

    2017-01-01

    Differences in noise and density values in MDCT images obtained using ultra-low doses with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR may possibly affect implant site density analysis. The aim of this study was to compare density and noise measurements recorded from dental implant sites using ultra-low doses combined with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR. Cadavers were scanned using a standard protocol and four low-dose protocols. Scans were reconstructed using FBP, ASIR-50, ASIR-100, and MBIR, and either a bone or standard reconstruction kernel. Density (mean Hounsfield units [HUs]) of alveolar bone and noise levels (mean standard deviation of HUs) was recorded from all datasets and measurements were compared by paired t tests and two-way ANOVA with repeated measures. Significant differences in density and noise were found between the reference dose/FBP protocol and almost all test combinations. Maximum mean differences in HU were 178.35 (bone kernel) and 273.74 (standard kernel), and in noise, were 243.73 (bone kernel) and 153.88 (standard kernel). Decreasing radiation dose increased density and noise regardless of reconstruction technique and kernel. The effect of reconstruction technique on density and noise depends on the reconstruction kernel used. (orig.)

  4. Ultrasonic colour Doppler imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evans, David H; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonic colour Doppler is an imaging technique that combines anatomical information derived using ultrasonic pulse-echo techniques with velocity information derived using ultrasonic Doppler techniques to generate colour-coded maps of tissue velocity superimposed on grey-scale images of tissue...... anatomy. The most common use of the technique is to image the movement of blood through the heart, arteries and veins, but it may also be used to image the motion of solid tissues such as the heart walls. Colour Doppler imaging is now provided on almost all commercial ultrasound machines, and has been...

  5. Ultrasonic testing X gammagraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello Campos, A.M. de

    1989-01-01

    The experience of 10 years for substituting gammagraphy tests by ultrasonic tests is related. A comparative evaluation of data obtained from both techniques applied to welded butt joints is presented. (author)

  6. Ultrasonic grinding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Shuji.

    1990-01-01

    An ultrasonic generator and a liquid supply nozzle are opposed to an object to be ground and a pump is started in this state to supply an organic solvent. Matters to be decontaminated which adheres to the surface of the object to be ground and are difficult to be removed by a mere mechanical removing method can be eliminated previously by the surface active effect of the organic solvent such as ethanol prior to the oscillation of the ultrasonic generator. Subsequently, when the ultrasonic generator is oscillated, scales in the floated state can be removed simply. Further, since the organic solvent can penetrate to provide the surface active effect even in such a narrow portion that the top end of the ultrasonic generator is difficult to the intruded at the surface of the object to be ground, the decontaminating treatment can be applied also to such a narrow portion. (T.M.)

  7. Ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearnaley, Geoffrey

    1975-01-01

    First, ion implantation in semiconductors is discussed: ion penetration, annealing of damage, gettering, ion implanted semiconductor devices, equipement requirements for ion implantation. The importance of channeling for ion implantation is studied. Then, some applications of ion implantation in metals are presented: study of the corrosion of metals and alloys; influence or ion implantation on the surface-friction and wear properties of metals; hyperfine interactions in implanted metals

  8. Fundamentals of Medical Ultrasonics

    CERN Document Server

    Postema, Michiel

    2011-01-01

    This book sets out the physical and engineering principles of acoustics and ultrasound as used for medical applications. It covers the basics of linear acoustics, wave propagation, non-linear acoustics, acoustic properties of tissue, transducer components, and ultrasonic imaging modes, as well as the most common diagnostic and therapeutic applications. It offers students and professionals in medical physics and engineering a detailed overview of the technical aspects of medical ultrasonic imaging, whilst serving as a reference for clinical and research staff.

  9. Assessing ultrasonic examination results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, V.; Vogt, M.

    1977-01-01

    Amongst nondestructive examination methods, the ultrasonic examination plays an important role. The reason why its scope of application is so wide is because the sound conducting capacity is the only property the material of a test specimen has to have. As the fields are so manifold, only main aspects can be described briefly. The list of references, however, is very extensive and gives plenty of information of all the problems concerning the assessment of ultrasonic examination results. (orig./RW) [de

  10. Analyzing Dental Implant Sites From Cone Beam Computed Tomography Scans on a Tablet Computer: A Comparative Study Between iPad and 3 Display Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Alejandro; Jalali, Elnaz; Dhingra, Ajay; Lurie, Alan; Yadav, Sumit; Tadinada, Aditya

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare a medical-grade PACS (picture archiving and communication system) monitor, a consumer-grade monitor, a laptop computer, and a tablet computer for linear measurements of height and width for specific implant sites in the posterior maxilla and mandible, along with visualization of the associated anatomical structures. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans were evaluated. The images were reviewed using PACS-LCD monitor, consumer-grade LCD monitor using CB-Works software, a 13″ MacBook Pro, and an iPad 4 using OsiriX DICOM reader software. The operators had to identify anatomical structures in each display using a 2-point scale. User experience between PACS and iPad was also evaluated by means of a questionnaire. The measurements were very similar for each device. P-values were all greater than 0.05, indicating no significant difference between the monitors for each measurement. The intraoperator reliability was very high. The user experience was similar in each category with the most significant difference regarding the portability where the PACS display received the lowest score and the iPad received the highest score. The iPad with retina display was comparable with the medical-grade monitor, producing similar measurements and image visualization, and thus providing an inexpensive, portable, and reliable screen to analyze CBCT images in the operating room during the implant surgery.

  11. Ultrasonic viewing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Juro.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the safety of reactor operation by enabling to detect the states and positions of fuel assemblies over a wide range with a set of ultrasonic viewing device comprising a rotatable ultrasonic transmitter-receiver and a reflector mounted with an adjustable angle. Constitution: A driving portion for a ultrasonic viewing device is provided to a rotary plug closing the opening of a reactor vessel and a guide pipe suspending below the coolant level is provided to the driving portion. An ultrasonic transmitter-receiver is provided at the end of the holder tube in the guide pipe. A reflector is provided at the upper position of the reactor core so as to correspond to the ultrasonic transmitter-receiver. The ultrasonic transmitter-receiver, positioned by the driving portion, performs horizontal movement for scanning the entire surface of the top of the reactor core, as well as vertical movement covering the gap between the upper mechanism on the reactor and the reactor core, whereby the confirmation for the separation of the control rod and the detection for the states of the reactor core can be conducted by the reflection waves from the reflector. (Moriyama, K.)

  12. ULTRASONIC ASSEMBLY [REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PORAV Viorica

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper exposes the possibility of machine producesers to optimize the costs of clothes assembling. Ultrasonic systems being frequently utilized have many advantages on semi products of synthetic textile and technical textile. First of all, sewing – cutting process can be accomplished under high speeds and rate of losses can be minimized. Cutting seal applications are frequently used for underwear and sportswear. Slicing and unit cutting machines, as well as portable sealing machines are available for labeling sector. Products such as bag, pocket and cover can be sewed in a seamless manner for promotion purposes. All objects in terms of accessories are obtained in same standard. Our quilting machines are preferred in worldwide due to its threadless, high quality sealing. An alternative to the classic sewing assembly, with thread and needles is ultrasonic seaming. In ultrasonic welding, there are no connective bolts, nails, soldering materials, or adhesives necessary to bind the materials together. Ultrasonic is defined as acoustic frequencies above the range audible to the human ear. Ultrasonic frequencies are administered to the fabric from the sonotrode of bonding machine. The high frequency and powerful energy produced, when is release in one special environment, the ultrasound heating this environment. The ability to ultrasonic weld textiles and films depend on their thermoplastic contents and the desired end results. The paper defines the weld ability of more common textiles and films. The welding refers to all types of bonding and sealing, as in point bonding of fabric, or continuous sealing of film.

  13. Dosimetric perturbations due to an implanted cardiac pacemaker in MammoSite{sup Registered-Sign} treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Wonmo; Kim, Siyong; Kim, Jung-in; Lee, Jae-gi; Shin, Young-Joo; Jung, Jae-Yong; Ye, Sung-Joon [Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799, South Korea and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida 32224 (United States); Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799, South Korea and Department of Radiation Oncology, Kangbuk Samsung Medical Center, Seoul 110-746 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul 110-744, South Korea and Department of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University, Seoul 139-707 (Korea, Republic of); Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of) and Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate dose perturbations for pacemaker-implanted patients in partial breast irradiation using high dose rate (HDR) balloon brachytherapy. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed to calculate dose distributions involving a pacemaker in Ir-192 HDR balloon brachytherapy. Dose perturbations by varying balloon-to-pacemaker distances (BPD = 50 or 100 mm) and concentrations of iodine contrast medium (2.5%, 5.0%, 7.5%, and 10.0% by volume) in the balloon were investigated for separate parts of the pacemaker (i.e., battery and substrate). Relative measurements using an ion-chamber were also performed to confirm MC results. Results: The MC and measured results in homogeneous media without a pacemaker agreed with published data within 2% from the balloon surface to 100 mm BPD. Further their dose distributions with a pacemaker were in a comparable agreement. The MC results showed that doses over the battery were increased by a factor of 3, compared to doses without a pacemaker. However, there was no significant dose perturbation in the middle of substrate but up to 70% dose increase in the substrate interface with the titanium capsule. The attenuation by iodine contrast medium lessened doses delivered to the pacemaker by up to 9%. Conclusions: Due to inhomogeneity of pacemaker and contrast medium as well as low-energy photons in Ir-192 HDR balloon brachytherapy, the actual dose received in a pacemaker is different from the homogeneous medium-based dose and the external beam-based dose. Therefore, the dose perturbations should be considered for pacemaker-implanted patients when evaluating a safe clinical distance between the balloon and pacemaker.

  14. Why are mini-implants lost: the value of the implantation technique!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Fabio Lourenço; Consolaro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The use of mini-implants have made a major contribution to orthodontic treatment. Demand has aroused scientific curiosity about implant placement procedures and techniques. However, the reasons for instability have not yet been made totally clear. The aim of this article is to establish a relationship between implant placement technique and mini-implant success rates by means of examining the following hypotheses: 1) Sites of poor alveolar bone and little space between roots lead to inadequate implant placement; 2) Different sites require mini-implants of different sizes! Implant size should respect alveolar bone diameter; 3) Properly determining mini-implant placement site provides ease for implant placement and contributes to stability; 4) The more precise the lancing procedures, the better the implant placement technique; 5) Self-drilling does not mean higher pressures; 6) Knowing where implant placement should end decreases the risk of complications and mini-implant loss.

  15. Why are mini-implants lost: The value of the implantation technique!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Lourenço Romano

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of mini-implants have made a major contribution to orthodontic treatment. Demand has aroused scientific curiosity about implant placement procedures and techniques. However, the reasons for instability have not yet been made totally clear. The aim of this article is to establish a relationship between implant placement technique and mini-implant success rates by means of examining the following hypotheses: 1 Sites of poor alveolar bone and little space between roots lead to inadequate implant placement; 2 Different sites require mini-implants of different sizes! Implant size should respect alveolar bone diameter; 3 Properly determining mini-implant placement site provides ease for implant placement and contributes to stability; 4 The more precise the lancing procedures, the better the implant placement technique; 5 Self-drilling does not mean higher pressures; 6 Knowing where implant placement should end decreases the risk of complications and mini-implant loss.

  16. Performance demonstration experience for reactor pressure vessel shell ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zado, V.

    1998-01-01

    The most ultrasonic testing techniques used by many vendors for pressurized water reactor (PWR) examinations were based on American Society of Mechanical Engineers 'Boiler and Pressurized Vessel Code' (ASME B and PV Code) Sections XI and V. The Addenda of ASME B and PV Code Section XI, Edition 1989 introduced Appendix VIII - 'Performance Demonstration for Ultrasonic Examination Systems'. In an effort to increase confidence in performance of ultrasonic testing of the operating nuclear power plants in United States, the ultrasonic testing performance demonstration examination of reactor vessel welds is performed in accordance with Performance Demonstration Initiative (PDI) program which is based on ASME Code Section XI, Appendix VIII requirements. This article provides information regarding extensive qualification preparation works performed prior EPRI guided performance demonstration exam of reactor vessel shell welds accomplished in January 1997 for the scope of Appendix VIII, Supplements IV and VI. Additionally, an overview of the procedures based on requirements of ASME Code Section XI and V in comparison to procedure prepared for Appendix VIII examination is given and discussed. The samples of ultrasonic signals obtained from artificial flaws implanted in vessel material are presented and results of ultrasonic testing are compared to actual flaw sizes. (author)

  17. Basics of clinical diagnosis in implant dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Rathee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Implant-based prosthetic rehabilitation requires an understanding of associated anatomical structures. The ultimate predictability of an implant site is determined by the existing anatomy as related to dentition and the associated hard and soft tissues. Meticulous clinical assessment helps in determining the suitability of the potential site for implant placement. The purpose of this article is to present the clinical assessment for dental implants' placement to modulate peri-implant tissue characteristics in individual clinical need.

  18. Effect of ultra-low doses, ASIR and MBIR on density and noise levels of MDCT images of dental implant sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmann, Gerlig; Al-Shawaf, Reema; Schullian, Peter; Al-Sadhan, Ra'ed; Hörmann, Romed; Al-Ekrish, Asma'a A

    2017-05-01

    Differences in noise and density values in MDCT images obtained using ultra-low doses with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR may possibly affect implant site density analysis. The aim of this study was to compare density and noise measurements recorded from dental implant sites using ultra-low doses combined with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR. Cadavers were scanned using a standard protocol and four low-dose protocols. Scans were reconstructed using FBP, ASIR-50, ASIR-100, and MBIR, and either a bone or standard reconstruction kernel. Density (mean Hounsfield units [HUs]) of alveolar bone and noise levels (mean standard deviation of HUs) was recorded from all datasets and measurements were compared by paired t tests and two-way ANOVA with repeated measures. Significant differences in density and noise were found between the reference dose/FBP protocol and almost all test combinations. Maximum mean differences in HU were 178.35 (bone kernel) and 273.74 (standard kernel), and in noise, were 243.73 (bone kernel) and 153.88 (standard kernel). Decreasing radiation dose increased density and noise regardless of reconstruction technique and kernel. The effect of reconstruction technique on density and noise depends on the reconstruction kernel used. • Ultra-low-dose MDCT protocols allowed more than 90 % reductions in dose. • Decreasing the dose generally increased density and noise. • Effect of IRT on density and noise varies with reconstruction kernel. • Accuracy of low-dose protocols for interpretation of bony anatomy not known. • Effect of low doses on accuracy of computer-aided design models unknown.

  19. Development of automatic ultrasonic testing system and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Sang Hong; Matsuura, Toshihiko; Iwata, Ryusuke; Nakagawa, Michio; Horikawa, Kohsuke; Kim, You Chul

    1997-01-01

    The radiographic testing (RT) has been usually applied to a nondestructive testing, which is carried out on purpose to detect internal defects at welded joints of a penstock. In the case that RT could not be applied to, the ultrasonic testing (UT) was performed. UT was generally carried out by manual scanning and the inspections data were recorded by the inspector in a site. So, as a weak point, there was no objective inspection records correspond to films of RT. It was expected that the automatic ultrasonic testing system by which automatic scanning and automatic recording are possible was developed. In this respect, the automatic ultrasonic testing system was developed. Using newly developed the automatic ultrasonic testing system, test results to the circumferential welded joints of the penstock at a site were shown in this paper.

  20. Ultrasonic dip seal maintenance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poindexter, A.M.; Ricks, H.E.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a system for removing impurities from the surfaces of liquid dip seals and for wetting the metal surfaces of liquid dip seals in nuclear components. The system comprises an ultrasonic transducer that transmits ultrasonic vibrations along an ultrasonic probe to the metal and liquid surfaces of the dip seal thereby loosening and removing those impurities

  1. Artificial Intelligence Assists Ultrasonic Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Lloyd A.; Willenberg, James D.

    1992-01-01

    Subtle indications of flaws extracted from ultrasonic waveforms. Ultrasonic-inspection system uses artificial intelligence to help in identification of hidden flaws in electron-beam-welded castings. System involves application of flaw-classification logic to analysis of ultrasonic waveforms.

  2. Ultrasonic relaxations in borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Angelo, G.; Tripodo, G.; Carini, G.; Cosio, E.; Bartolotta, A.; Di Marco, G.

    2004-01-01

    The attenuation and velocity of ultrasonic waves of frequencies in the range from 10 to 70 MHz have been measured in M 2 O-B 2 O 3 borate glasses (M: Li or Ag) as a function of temperature between 15 and 350 K. The velocity of sound waves decreases with increasing temperature in all the glasses, the decrease as the temperature is increased is larger in glasses containing silver than in those with lithium. A broad relaxation peak characterises the attenuation behaviour of the lithium and silver borate glasses at temperatures below 100 K and is paralleled by a corresponding dispersive behaviour of the sound velocity. Above 100 K, the ultrasonic velocity shows a nearly linear behaviour regulated by the vibrational anharmonicity, which decreases with increasing content of modifier oxide and is smaller in lithium than in silver borates. These results suggest that the relaxation of structural defects and the anharmonicity of borate glasses are strongly affected by two parameters: the number of bridging bonds per network forming ion and the polarising power of network modifier ions which occupy sites in the existing interstices

  3. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  4. Ultrasonic nondestructive materials characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, R. E., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A brief review of ultrasonic wave propagation in solid materials is presented with consideration of the altered behavior in anisotropic and nonlinear elastic materials in comparison with isotropic and linear elastic materials. Some experimental results are described in which ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements give insight into materials microstructure and associated mechanical properties. Recent developments with laser beam non-contact generation and detection of ultrasound are presented. The results of several years of experimental measurements using high-power ultrasound are discussed, which provide substantial evidence of the inability of presently accepted theories to fully explain the interaction of ultrasound with solid materials. Finally, a special synchrotron X-ray topographic system is described which affords the possibility of observing direct interaction of ultrasonic waves with the microstructural features of real crystalline solid materials for the first time.

  5. Ultrasonic colour Doppler imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evans, David H.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonic colour Doppler is an imaging technique that combines anatomical information derived using ultrasonic pulse-echo techniques with velocity information derived using ultrasonic Doppler techniques to generate colour-coded maps of tissue velocity superimposed on grey-scale images of tissue...... anatomy. The most common use of the technique is to image the movement of blood through the heart, arteries and veins, but it may also be used to image the motion of solid tissues such as the heart walls. Colour Doppler imaging is now provided on almost all commercial ultrasound machines, and has been...... vectors. This review briefly introduces the principles behind colour Doppler imaging and describes some clinical applications. It then describes the basic components of conventional colour Doppler systems and the methods used to derive velocity information from the ultrasound signal. Next, a number of new...

  6. Ultrasonic tests. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebbels, K.

    1980-01-01

    After a basic treatment of ultrasonic wave propagation, of the state-of-the-art methods and the technical background in the preceeding part, advanced ultrasonic NDT techniques are presented here. The discussion of new development includes - manipulation systems, - automation of ultrasonic testing methods, documentation and evaluation. In the middle of this part the main problem areas will be discussed: - detection of defects (e.g. in coarse grained structures and welds), - classification of defects (e.g. discrimination between crack-like and volumetric faults), - sizing of defects. Research in the field of acoustical holography, development of probes and phased arrays, electromagnetic acoustic transducers and signal enhancement are the main contributing parts to the report. (orig./RW)

  7. Lattice sites, charge states and spin–lattice relaxation of Fe ions in {sup 57}Mn{sup +} implanted GaN and AlN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masenda, H., E-mail: hilary.masenda@wits.ac.za [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Naidoo, D. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Bharuth-Ram, K. [Physics Department, Durban University of Technology, Durban 4000 (South Africa); iThemba LABS, PO Box 725, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Gunnlaugsson, H.P. [PH Department, ISOLDE/CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Johnston, K. [PH Department, ISOLDE/CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Mantovan, R. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Via Olivetti 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Mølholt, T.E. [PH Department, ISOLDE/CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Ncube, M. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Shayestehaminzadeh, S. [Materials Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Kopernikusstr. 10, 5274 Aachen (Germany); Gíslason, H.P. [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3, 107 Reykjavík (Iceland); Langouche, G. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Ólafsson, S. [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3, 107 Reykjavík (Iceland); Weyer, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark)

    2016-03-01

    The lattice sites, valence states, resulting magnetic behaviour and spin–lattice relaxation of Fe ions in GaN and AlN were investigated by emission Mössbauer spectroscopy following the implantation of radioactive {sup 57}Mn{sup +} ions at ISOLDE/CERN. Angle dependent measurements performed at room temperature on the 14.4 keV γ-rays from the {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer state (populated from the {sup 57}Mn β{sup −} decay) reveal that the majority of the Fe ions are in the 2+ valence state nearly substituting the Ga and Al cations, and/or associated with vacancy type defects. Emission Mössbauer spectroscopy experiments conducted over a temperature range of 100–800 K show the presence of magnetically split sextets in the “wings” of the spectra for both materials. The temperature dependence of the sextets relates these spectral features to paramagnetic Fe{sup 3+} with rather slow spin–lattice relaxation rates which follow a T{sup 2} temperature dependence characteristic of a two-phonon Raman process. - Highlights: • The majority of the Fe ions are in the 2+ state, located on near substitutional sites associated with vacancy type defects. • A significant fraction of the Fe ions are in the paramagnetic Fe{sup 3+} state. • Spin–lattice relaxation of Fe{sup 3+} in both GaN and AlN follows a two-phonon Raman process.

  8. Lattice sites, charge states and spin–lattice relaxation of Fe ions in "5"7Mn"+ implanted GaN and AlN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masenda, H.; Naidoo, D.; Bharuth-Ram, K.; Gunnlaugsson, H.P.; Johnston, K.; Mantovan, R.; Mølholt, T.E.; Ncube, M.; Shayestehaminzadeh, S.; Gíslason, H.P.; Langouche, G.; Ólafsson, S.; Weyer, G.

    2016-01-01

    The lattice sites, valence states, resulting magnetic behaviour and spin–lattice relaxation of Fe ions in GaN and AlN were investigated by emission Mössbauer spectroscopy following the implantation of radioactive "5"7Mn"+ ions at ISOLDE/CERN. Angle dependent measurements performed at room temperature on the 14.4 keV γ-rays from the "5"7Fe Mössbauer state (populated from the "5"7Mn β"− decay) reveal that the majority of the Fe ions are in the 2+ valence state nearly substituting the Ga and Al cations, and/or associated with vacancy type defects. Emission Mössbauer spectroscopy experiments conducted over a temperature range of 100–800 K show the presence of magnetically split sextets in the “wings” of the spectra for both materials. The temperature dependence of the sextets relates these spectral features to paramagnetic Fe"3"+ with rather slow spin–lattice relaxation rates which follow a T"2 temperature dependence characteristic of a two-phonon Raman process. - Highlights: • The majority of the Fe ions are in the 2+ state, located on near substitutional sites associated with vacancy type defects. • A significant fraction of the Fe ions are in the paramagnetic Fe"3"+ state. • Spin–lattice relaxation of Fe"3"+ in both GaN and AlN follows a two-phonon Raman process.

  9. Thermal evaluation by infrared measurement of implant site preparation between single and gradual drilling in artificial bone blocks of different densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhlhenrich, S C; Abouridouane, M; Heussen, N; Hölzle, F; Klocke, F; Modabber, A

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of bone density and drilling protocol on heat generation during implant bed preparation. Ten single and 10 gradual implant sites with diameters of 2.8, 3.5, and 4.2mm were prepared in four artificial bone blocks (density types I-IV; D1-D4). Drilling was done at constant speed (1500rpm) and with external irrigation (50ml/min); vertical speed was set at 2mm/s. An infrared camera was used for temperature measurements. Significantly higher temperatures for single drilling were found between 2.8-mm drills in D1 (P=0.0014) and D4 (P<0.0001) and between 3.5-mm drills in D3 (P=0.0087) and D4 (P<0.0001), as well as between 4.2-mm drills in D1 (P<0.0001) and D4 (P=0.0014). Low bone density led to a thermal decrease after single drilling and a thermal increase after gradual drilling. Burs with a large diameter always showed a higher temperature generation. In comparisons between 2.8- and 4.2-mm diameters for both single and gradual drills, significant differences (P<0.001) were noted for bone types II, III, and IV. Single drilling could generate more heat than traditional sequential drilling, and bone density, as well as drill diameter, influenced thermal increases. Particularly in lower-density bone, conventional sequential drilling seems to raise the temperature less. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials for the management of limited vertical height in the posterior region: short implants (5 to 8 mm) vs longer implants (> 8 mm) in vertically augmented sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Ah; Lee, Chun-Teh; Fu, Martin M; Elmisalati, Waiel; Chuang, Sung-Kiang

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to undertake a systematic review with meta-analysis on randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to compare the rates of survival, success, and complications of short implants to those of longer implants in the posterior regions. Electronic literature searches were conducted through the MEDLINE (PubMed) and EMBASE databases to locate all relevant articles published between January 1, 1990, and April 30, 2013. Eligible studies were selected based on inclusion criteria, and quality assessments were conducted. After data extraction, meta-analyses were performed. In total, 539 dental implants (265 short implants [length 5 to 8 mm] and 274 control implants [length > 8 mm]) from four RCTs were included. The fixed prostheses of multiple short and control implants were all splinted. The mean follow-up period was 2.1 years. The 1-year and 5-year cumulative survival rates (CSR) were 98.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 97.8% to 99.5%) and 93.6% (95% CI, 89.8% to 97.5%), respectively, for the short implant group and 98.0% (95% CI, 96.9% to 99.1%) and 90.3% (95% CI, 85.2% to 95.4%), respectively, for the control implant group. The CSRs of the two groups did not demonstrate a statistically significant difference. There were also no statistically significant differences in success rates, failure rates, or complications between the two groups. Placement of short dental implants could be a predictable alternative to longer implants to reduce surgical complications and patient morbidity in situations where vertical augmentation procedures are needed. However, only four studies with potential risk of bias were selected in this meta-analysis. Within the limitations of this meta-analysis, these results should be confirmed with robust methodology and RCTs with longer follow-up duration.

  11. An ultrasonic waveguide for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, R.D.; Gillespie, A.B.; Deighton, M.O.; Pike, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    The value of ultrasonic techniques in nuclear plants is well established. However, in most cases nuclear power plants present an extremely hostile environment for an ultrasonic transducer. The paper presents a novel technique for introducing an ultrasound into hostile liquid environments using a new form of ultrasonic waveguide. Using this approach, a standard transducer arrangement is sited in a hospitable area and conveys the ultrasound along the guide to the required beam-emission collection position. The design of a single-mode ultrasonic waveguide is described. The ultrasound is conveyed along a stainless steel strip of rectangular cross-section. The transference of energy between the strip and the liquid is achieved through a highly efficient mode-conversion process. This process overcomes the usual problems of mis-match of acoustic impedances of stainless steel and liquids, and also produces a highly collimated beam of ultrasound. Tests of a 10-m-long waveguide using these techniques are described, achieving signal-to-noise ratios in the region of 40 dB. (author)

  12. Effects of elevated ambient temperature on embryo implantation in rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-03-22

    Mar 22, 2012 ... ambient temperature leads to a delayed implantation and reduced number of implantation sites in. Sprague ... rates decrease after exposure to stress. One of the ..... implantation initiation time, support the previous findings.

  13. Ultrasonic weld testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-12-01

    The study was broken down into two phases. Phase I consisted of a laboratory investigation of test specimens to determine the reliability of the ultrasonic equipment and testing procedure. Phase II was a field study where the knowledge, skills and ab...

  14. Ultrasonic leak detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, R.V.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning ultrasonic microphone was used to detect the presence and locate the sources of hydraulic noises in piping systems in a reactor environment. The intensity changes of the noises correspond to changes of flow conditions within the system caused by throttled valves, flow rate changes, and leaks. (author)

  15. Management of peri-implantitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayachandran Prathapachandran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peri-implantitis is a site-specific infectious disease that causes an inflammatory process in soft tissues, and bone loss around an osseointegrated implant in function. The etiology of the implant infection is conditioned by the status of the tissue surrounding the implant, implant design, degree of roughness, external morphology, and excessive mechanical load. The microorganisms most commonly associated with implant failure are spirochetes and mobile forms of Gram-negative anaerobes, unless the origin is the result of simple mechanical overload. Diagnosis is based on changes of color in the gingiva, bleeding and probing depth of peri-implant pockets, suppuration, X-ray, and gradual loss of bone height around the tooth. Treatment will differ depending upon whether it is a case of peri-implant mucositis or peri-implantitis. The management of implant infection should be focused on the control of infection, the detoxification of the implant surface, and regeneration of the alveolar bone. This review article deals with the various treatment options in the management of peri-implantitis. The article also gives a brief description of the etiopathogenesis, clinical features, and diagnosis of peri-implantitis.

  16. Ultrasonic Bat Deterrent Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzie, Kevin; Rominger, Kathryn M.

    2017-12-14

    The project objective was to advance the development and testing of an Near commercial bat-deterrent system with a goal to increase the current GE deterrent system effectiveness to over 50% with broad species applicability. Additionally, the research supported by this program has provided insights into bat behavior and ultrasonic deterrent design that had not previously been explored. Prior research and development had demonstrated the effectiveness of a commercial-grade, air-powered, ultrasonic bat deterrent to be between 30-50% depending upon the species of bat. However, the previous research provided limited insight into the behavioral responses of bats in the presence of ultrasonic deterrent sound fields that could be utilized to improve effectiveness. A unique bat flight room was utilized to observe the behavioral characteristics of bats in the presence of ultrasonic sound fields. Behavioral testing in the bat flight facility demonstrated that ultrasonic sounds similar to those produced by the GE deterrent influenced the activities and behaviors, primarily those associated with foraging, of the species exposed. The study also indicated that continuous and pulsing ultrasonic signals had a similar effect on the bats, and confirmed that as ultrasonic sounds attenuate, their influence on the bats’ activities and behavior decreases. Ground testing at Wolf Ridge Wind, LLC and Shawnee National Forest assessed both continuous and pulsing deterrent signals emitted from the GE deterrent system and further enhanced the behavioral understanding of bats in the presence of the deterrent. With these data and observations, the existing 4-nozzle continuous, or steady, emission ultrasonic system was redesigned to a 6-nozzle system that could emit a pulsing signal covering a larger air space around a turbine. Twelve GE 1.6-100 turbines were outfitted with the deterrent system and a formal three-month field study was performed using daily carcass searches beneath the 12

  17. Downregulation of miR-29a/b/c in placenta accreta inhibits apoptosis of implantation site intermediate trophoblast cells by targeting MCL1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yongzhong; Bian, Yuehong; Xu, Xiaofei; Wang, Xietong; Zuo, Changting; Meng, Jinlai; Li, Hongyan; Zhao, Shigang; Ning, Yunnan; Cao, Yongzhi; Huang, Tao; Yan, Junhao; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2016-12-01

    Placenta accreta is defined as abnormal adhesion of placental villi to the uterine myometrium. Although this condition has become more common as a result of the increasing rate of cesarean sections, the underlying causative mechanism(s) remain elusive. Because microRNA-29a/b/c (miR-29a/b/c) have been shown to play important roles in placental development, this study evaluated the roles of these microRNAs in placenta accreta. Expression of miR-29a/b/c and myeloid cell leukemia-1 (MCL1) were quantified in patient tissues and HTR8/SVneo trophoblast cells using the real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Western blotting was used to analyze expression of the MCL1 protein in HTR8/SVneo trophoblast cells with altered expression of miR-29a/b/c. To determine their role in apoptosis, miR-29a/b/c were overexpressed in HTR-8/SVneo cells, and levels of apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. Luciferase activity assays were used to determine whether MCL1 is a target gene of miR-29a/b/c. Expression of miR-29a/b/c was significantly lower in creta sites compared to noncreta sites (p = 0.018, 0.041, and 0.022, respectively), but expression of MCL1 was upregulated in creta sites (p = 0.039). MCL1 expression was significantly downregulated in HTR-8/SVneo cells overexpressing miR-29a/b/c (p = 0.002, 0.008, and 0.013, respectively). Luciferase activity assays revealed that miR-29a/b/c directly target the 3' untranslated region of MCL1 in 293T cells. Over-expression of miR-29a/b/c induced apoptosis in the HTR-8/SVneo trophoblast cell line. Moreover, histopathological evaluation revealed that the number of implantation site intermediate trophoblast (ISIT) cells was increased in creta sites and that these cells were positive for MCL1. Our results demonstrate that in placenta accreta, miR-29a/b/c inhibits apoptosis of ISIT cells by targeting MCL1. These findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis of placenta accreta. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  18. A capacitive ultrasonic transducer based on parametric resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surappa, Sushruta; Satir, Sarp; Levent Degertekin, F

    2017-07-24

    A capacitive ultrasonic transducer based on a parametric resonator structure is described and experimentally demonstrated. The transducer structure, which we call capacitive parametric ultrasonic transducer (CPUT), uses a parallel plate capacitor with a movable membrane as part of a degenerate parametric series RLC resonator circuit with a resonance frequency of f o . When the capacitor plate is driven with an incident harmonic ultrasonic wave at the pump frequency of 2f o with sufficient amplitude, the RLC circuit becomes unstable and ultrasonic energy can be efficiently converted to an electrical signal at f o frequency in the RLC circuit. An important characteristic of the CPUT is that unlike other electrostatic transducers, it does not require DC bias or permanent charging to be used as a receiver. We describe the operation of the CPUT using an analytical model and numerical simulations, which shows drive amplitude dependent operation regimes including parametric resonance when a certain threshold is exceeded. We verify these predictions by experiments with a micromachined membrane based capacitor structure in immersion where ultrasonic waves incident at 4.28 MHz parametrically drive a signal with significant amplitude in the 2.14 MHz RLC circuit. With its unique features, the CPUT can be particularly advantageous for applications such as wireless power transfer for biomedical implants and acoustic sensing.

  19. A capacitive ultrasonic transducer based on parametric resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surappa, Sushruta; Satir, Sarp; Levent Degertekin, F.

    2017-07-01

    A capacitive ultrasonic transducer based on a parametric resonator structure is described and experimentally demonstrated. The transducer structure, which we call capacitive parametric ultrasonic transducer (CPUT), uses a parallel plate capacitor with a movable membrane as part of a degenerate parametric series RLC resonator circuit with a resonance frequency of fo. When the capacitor plate is driven with an incident harmonic ultrasonic wave at the pump frequency of 2fo with sufficient amplitude, the RLC circuit becomes unstable and ultrasonic energy can be efficiently converted to an electrical signal at fo frequency in the RLC circuit. An important characteristic of the CPUT is that unlike other electrostatic transducers, it does not require DC bias or permanent charging to be used as a receiver. We describe the operation of the CPUT using an analytical model and numerical simulations, which shows drive amplitude dependent operation regimes including parametric resonance when a certain threshold is exceeded. We verify these predictions by experiments with a micromachined membrane based capacitor structure in immersion where ultrasonic waves incident at 4.28 MHz parametrically drive a signal with significant amplitude in the 2.14 MHz RLC circuit. With its unique features, the CPUT can be particularly advantageous for applications such as wireless power transfer for biomedical implants and acoustic sensing.

  20. The effect of load on heat production, thermal effects and expenditure of time during implant site preparation - an experimental ex vivo comparison between piezosurgery and conventional drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzle, Florian; Frenkel, Carsten; Riemann, Max; Knipfer, Christian; Stockmann, Philipp; Nkenke, Emeka

    2014-02-01

    Piezoelectric surgery (PS) is meant to be a gentle osteotomy method. The aim of this study was to compare piezosurgical vs. conventional drilling methods for implant site preparation (ISP) - focusing on load-dependent thermal effect on hard tissue and the expenditure of ISP time. Three hundred and sixty ISP were performed on ex vivo pig heads using piezosurgery, spiral burs (SB) and trephine burs (TB). The load applied was increased from 0 to 1000 g in 100-g intervals. Temperature within the bone was measured with a thermocouple, and duration was recorded with a stop watch. Thermal effects were histomorphometrically analysed. Twelve ISPs per technique were performed at the lateral wall of the maxillary sinus. PS yields the highest mean temperatures (48.6 ± 3.4°C) and thermal effects (200.7 ± 44.4 μm), both at 900-1000 g. Duration is reduced with a plus of load and significantly longer in either case for PS (P < 0.05). There is a correlation of the applied load with all other examined factors for PS and TB. Temperature and histological effects decrease for SB beyond 500 g. PS yields significantly higher temperatures and thermal tissue alterations on load levels higher than 500 g and is significantly slower for ISP compared to SB and TB. For ISP with PS, a maximum load of 400 g should be maintained. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Surgical Templates for Dental Implant Positioning; Current ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    prosthodontics; however, designing an implant‑supported prosthesis with function .... template where a provisional fixed restoration bridges the implant site. Pesun and ... in single implant therapy or short‑span implant‑supported prostheses.

  2. [Mapping mini-implant anatomic sites in the area of the maxillary first molar with the aid of the NewTom 3G® system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrache, Marius; Grenard, Annabelle

    2010-12-01

    The goal of our study was to construct a map of the implant sites in the region of the attached gingiva around the maxillary first molars that would be appropriate locations for placement of miniscrews to serve as orthodontic anchorage. We conducted 58 radiographic examinations with the NewTom 3G(®) cone beam technique. For each interdental space, between upper second bicuspids and first molars (5/6) and between upper first and second molars (6/7), we studied the mesio-distal width and depth of bucco-lingual bone at two different levels, L1 and L2, that corresponded to the lower and upper limits of the attached gingiva in the general population. The widths of the interdental spaces varied very little between L1 and L2 and their variances were comparable. At the level of the 5/6 space, the interdental widths displayed a Gaussian distribution, which made it possible for us to determine the confidence intervals at the two borders of attached gingiva as a function of age: IC(99%) of L1 = [2.045 ; 3.462] from 12 to 17 years or [1.594 ; 2.519] from 18 to 24 or [1.613 ; 2.5] from 25 to 48 years and IC(99%) of L2 = [2.37 ; 3.69] from 12 to 17 years or [1.5 ; 2.613] from 18 to 24 or [1.546 ; 2.619] from 25 to 48 ans. The interdental depths increased in an apical direction and their variance diminished. Even if the adequacy of the Gaussian law is less reliable in the sagittal plane, we find a greater consistency in depths in the spaces around 5/6 that allows us to establish very precise confidence levels: IC(99%) of L1 = [9.213; 10.575] and IC(99%) of L2 = [10.295; 11.593]. The mesial areas of the first molars constitute safe zones for implantation of miniscrews with a maximum of 2-2.3 mm for 12 to 17 years old or 1.5-1.6 mm for 18 to 48 year olds and of a maximum of 9-10 mm in length whether the attached gingival level is strong or feeble. The distal areas of the first molars, because of their great variability, require an individualized radiographic study before any mini

  3. Ultrasonic calibration assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Ultrasonic transducers for in-service inspection of nuclear reactor vessels have several problems associated with them which this invention seeks to overcome. The first is that of calibration or referencing a zero start point for the vertical axis of transducer movement to locate a weld defect. The second is that of verifying the positioning (vertically or at a predetermined angle). Thirdly there is the problem of ascertaining the speed per unit distance in the operating medium of the transducer beam prior to the actual inspection. The apparatus described is a calibration assembly which includes a fixed, generally spherical body having a surface for reflecting an ultrasonic beam from one of the transducers which can be moved until the reflection from the spherical body is the highest amplitude return signal indicating radial alignment from the body. (U.K.)

  4. Microcomputer-controlled ultrasonic data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, W.A. Jr.

    1978-11-01

    The large volume of ultrasonic data generated by computer-aided test procedures has necessitated the development of a mobile, high-speed data acquisition and storage system. This approach offers the decided advantage of on-site data collection and remote data processing. It also utilizes standard, commercially available ultrasonic instrumentation. This system is controlled by an Intel 8080A microprocessor. The MCS80-SDK microcomputer board was chosen, and magnetic tape is used as the storage medium. A detailed description is provided of both the hardware and software developed to interface the magnetic tape storage subsystem to Biomation 8100 and Biomation 805 waveform recorders. A boxcar integrator acquisition system is also described for use when signal averaging becomes necessary. Both assembly language and machine language listings are provided for the software

  5. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An ultrasonic stir welding system includes a welding head assembly having a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. During a welding operation, ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod as it rotates about its longitudinal axis. The ultrasonic pulses are applied in such a way that they propagate parallel to the longitudinal axis of the rod.

  6. Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... implant, including: • How long a person has been deaf, •The number of surviving auditory nerve fibers, and • ... Implant, Severe Sensoryneurial Hearing Loss Get Involved Professional Development Practice Management ENT Careers Marketplace Privacy Policy Terms ...

  7. Two-stage implant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, M E

    1999-06-01

    Since the advent of osseointegration approximately 20 years ago, there has been a great deal of scientific data developed on two-stage integrated implant systems. Although these implants were originally designed primarily for fixed prostheses in the mandibular arch, they have been used in partially dentate patients, in patients needing overdentures, and in single-tooth restorations. In addition, this implant system has been placed in extraction sites, in bone-grafted areas, and in maxillary sinus elevations. Often, the documentation of these procedures has lagged. In addition, most of the reports use survival criteria to describe results, often providing overly optimistic data. It can be said that the literature describes a true adhesion of the epithelium to the implant similar to adhesion to teeth, that two-stage implants appear to have direct contact somewhere between 50% and 70% of the implant surface, that the microbial flora of the two-stage implant system closely resembles that of the natural tooth, and that the microbiology of periodontitis appears to be closely related to peri-implantitis. In evaluations of the data from implant placement in all of the above-noted situations by means of meta-analysis, it appears that there is a strong case that two-stage dental implants are successful, usually showing a confidence interval of over 90%. It also appears that the mandibular implants are more successful than maxillary implants. Studies also show that overdenture therapy is valid, and that single-tooth implants and implants placed in partially dentate mouths have a success rate that is quite good, although not quite as high as in the fully edentulous dentition. It would also appear that the potential causes of failure in the two-stage dental implant systems are peri-implantitis, placement of implants in poor-quality bone, and improper loading of implants. There are now data addressing modifications of the implant surface to alter the percentage of

  8. Ultrasonic attenuation in superconducting zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auluck, S.

    1978-01-01

    The differences in the Zn ultrasonic attenuation data of different workers are analyzed. The superconducting energy gaps deduced from our analysis of the ultrasonic-attenuation data of Cleavelin and Marshall are consistent with the gaps deduced from the knowledge of the Fermi surface and the electron-phonon mass enhancement factor

  9. Lumber defect detection by ultrasonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. A. McDonald

    1978-01-01

    Ultrasonics, the technology of high-frequency sound, has been developed as a viable means for locating most defects In lumber for use in digital form in decision-making computers. Ultrasonics has the potential for locating surface and internal defects in lumber of all species, green or dry, and rough sawn or surfaced.

  10. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baikie, B.L.; Wagg, A.R.; Whittle, M.J.; Yapp, D.

    1976-01-01

    The ultrasonic examination of austenitic stainless steel weld metal has always been regarded as a difficult proposition because of the large and variable ultrasonic attenuations and back scattering obtained from apparently similar weld deposits. The work to be described shows how the existence of a fibre texture within each weld deposit (as a result of epitaxial growth through successive weld beads) produces a systematic variation in the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient and the velocity of sound, depending upon the angle between the ultrasonic beam and the fibre axis. Development work has shown that it is possible to adjust the welding parameters to ensure that the crystallographic texture within each weld is compatible with improved ultrasonic transmission. The application of the results to the inspection of a specific weld in type 316 weld metal is described

  11. Ultrasonic variables affecting inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lautzenheiser, C.E.; Whiting, A.R.; McElroy, J.T.

    1977-01-01

    There are many variables which affect the detection of the effects and reproducibility of results when utilizing ultrasonic techniques. The most important variable is the procedure, as this document specifies, to a great extent, the controls that are exercised over the other variables. The most important variable is personnel with regards to training, qualification, integrity, data recording, and data analysis. Although the data is very limited, these data indicate that, if the procedure is carefully controlled, reliability of defect detection and reproducibility of results are both approximately 90 percent for reliability of detection, this applies to relatively small defects as reliability increases substantially as defect size increases above the recording limit. (author)

  12. Advanced ultrasonic inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghia, S.

    1990-08-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) continuous monitoring and periodical inspections by advanced ultrasonic have been applied to evaluate defect evolution within a PWR reduced scale (1:5) pressure vessel subjected to cyclic mechanical fatigue test. This experimental activity has been carried out in the frame of the Primary Circuit Component Life Prediction programme. In the time period covered by this report actions were performed as following: (1) Ultrasonic examination by multifrequency acoustic holography to evaluate defect evolution subsequently repair and heat treatment of the R2 vessel carried out in March 1988. For the purpose, measurements were performed both at 0 and 200 bar of internal pressure. As uniformity of the procedures adopted, for calibration and testing, made the results comparable with the previous ones no evidence for significant growing of the examined defects has been found. (2) Acoustic emission monitoring has then been carried out during fatigue test from 416000 to 565000 fatigue cycles. Analysis of a large amount of data has been performed paying particular attention to the distinction between friction phenomena and crack growth in order to obtain a correct diagnosis of flaw evolution. The signal duration distribution and the correlation of AE appearance time versus load cycle phase were considered to characterise stick-slip processes. A general intensification of AE activity has been recorded during this last period of monitoring and previous known AE sources were confirmed together with the appearance of new AE sources some of them correlable with real defects

  13. System for ultrasonic examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, S.A.; Kristensen, W.D.

    1987-01-01

    A computerized system for the recording of flaw images by ultrasonic examination according to the pulse-echo method includes at least one ultrasonic probe which can be moved in steps over the surface of an object along a rectilinear scanning path. Digital signals containing information on the successive positions of the sound beam, on echo amplitudes, and on the lengths of sound paths to reflectors inside the object, are processed and used for the accumulated storage of circular patterns of echo amplitude data in a matrix memory associated with a sectional plane through the object. A video screen terminal controls the system and transforms the accumulated data into displays of sectional flaw images of greatly improved precision and sharpness of definition. A gradual transfer of filtered data from a number of parallel sectional planes to three further matrix memories associated with projection planes at right angles to each other permits presentation in three dimensions of equally improved projection flaw images. (author) 2 figs

  14. The Antifouling of ACLW-CAR Based on Ultrasonic Cleaner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guohua; Liu, Shixuan; Qin, Qingliang

    2017-10-01

    Equipped with ACLW-CAR, the buoy provided effective technical platform for on-site rapid monitoring of the chlorophyll and turbidity. Performance index and usage in the ocean buoy of ACLW-CAR was introduced. Ultrasonic cleaning method in seawater was developed for preventing ACLW-CAR from biofouling. Marine chlorophyll and turbidity data can serve for oceanographic research and marine resource exploitation.

  15. Transferring manual ultrasonic inspection procedures - results of a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, M.; Taylor, T.; Kadenko, I.

    2002-01-01

    Results of a manual ultrasonic pilot study for NDE specialists at RBMK nuclear reactor sites are presented. Probabilities of detection and false calls, using two different grading criteria, are estimated. Analyses of performance parameters lead to conclusions regarding attributes for improved test discrimination capabilities. (orig.)

  16. Imaging techniques for ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    These seminar proceedings contain 16 lectures on the following topics: 1. From imaging to quantification - ultrasound methods in medical diagnostics; 2. SAFT, TOFD, Phased Array - classical applications and recent developments in ultrasonic imaging; 3. Innovative ultrasonic imaging methods in research and application; 4. Industrial ultrasonic testing of fibre-reinforced structures of complex geometry; 5. Visualisation of crack tips in the inspection of wheel set shafts with longitudinal boreholes as a means of avoiding unnecessary wheel set changes; 6. Areal analysis of the propagation of Lamb waves on curved, anisotropic structures; 7. High-resolution representation in immersion technique testing; 8. Variants in generating images from phased array measurement data - practical examples involving copper, carbon-fibre reinforced plastic and other materials; 9. GIUM - an unconventional method of microstructure imaging using ultrasonic stimulation and laser vibrometry scanning; 10. Innovative air-ultrasonic testing concepts for improved imaging; 11. Use of imaging methods for improving the quality of test results from nondestructive testing; 12. Modelling and visualisation of EMUS stimulation for transducer optimisation; 13. Use of SAFT in the manufacture of energy conversion machines; 14. Ultrasonic imaging tests for improved defect characterisation during weld seam inspection on longitudinally welded large-diameter pipes; 15. SAFT reconstruction for testing austenitic weld seams and dissimilar metal weld seams for transverse cracks; 16. Imaging-based optimisation method for quantitative ultrasonic testing of anisotropic inhomogeneous austenitic welded joints with determination and utilisation of their elastic properties. One contribution has been abstracted separately. [de

  17. Irradiation Testing of Ultrasonic Transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daw, J.; Rempe, J.; Palmer, J.; Tittmann, B.; Reinhardt, B.; Kohse, G.; Ramuhalli, P.; Montgomery, R.; Chien, H.T.; Villard, J.F.

    2013-06-01

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high accuracy and resolution in-pile measurement of numerous parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of single, small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of existing knowledge of ultrasonic transducer material survivability under irradiation conditions. To address this need, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project to evaluate promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer performance in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 10 21 n/cm 2 (E> 0.1 MeV). This test will be an instrumented lead test; and real-time transducer performance data will be collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. By characterizing magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer survivability during irradiation, test results will enable the development of novel radiation tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material and Test Reactors (MTRs). The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers. (authors)

  18. Wireless Power Transfer Strategies for Implantable Bioelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Kush; Jegadeesan, Rangarajan; Guo, Yong-Xin; Thakor, Nitish V

    2017-01-01

    Neural implants have emerged over the last decade as highly effective solutions for the treatment of dysfunctions and disorders of the nervous system. These implants establish a direct, often bidirectional, interface to the nervous system, both sensing neural signals and providing therapeutic treatments. As a result of the technological progress and successful clinical demonstrations, completely implantable solutions have become a reality and are now commercially available for the treatment of various functional disorders. Central to this development is the wireless power transfer (WPT) that has enabled implantable medical devices (IMDs) to function for extended durations in mobile subjects. In this review, we present the theory, link design, and challenges, along with their probable solutions for the traditional near-field resonant inductively coupled WPT, capacitively coupled short-ranged WPT, and more recently developed ultrasonic, mid-field, and far-field coupled WPT technologies for implantable applications. A comparison of various power transfer methods based on their power budgets and WPT range follows. Power requirements of specific implants like cochlear, retinal, cortical, and peripheral are also considered and currently available IMD solutions are discussed. Patient's safety concerns with respect to electrical, biological, physical, electromagnetic interference, and cyber security from an implanted neurotech device are also explored in this review. Finally, we discuss and anticipate future developments that will enhance the capabilities of current-day wirelessly powered implants and make them more efficient and integrable with other electronic components in IMDs.

  19. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of performing ultrasonic stir welding uses a welding head assembly to include a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. In the method, the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis during a welding operation. During the welding operation, a series of on-off ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod such that they propagate parallel to the rod's longitudinal axis. At least a pulse rate associated with the on-off ultrasonic pulses is controlled.

  20. Fundamentals of ultrasonic phased arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Schmerr, Lester W

    2014-01-01

    This book describes in detail the physical and mathematical foundations of ultrasonic phased array measurements.?The book uses linear systems theory to develop a comprehensive model of the signals and images that can be formed with phased arrays. Engineers working in the field of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) will find in this approach a wealth of information on how to design, optimize and interpret ultrasonic inspections with phased arrays. The fundamentals and models described in the book will also be of significant interest to other fields, including the medical ultrasound and

  1. Computer automation of ultrasonic testing. [inspection of ultrasonic welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, B. G. W.; Kerlin, E. E.; Gardner, A. H.; Dunmyer, D.; Wells, T. G.; Robinson, A. R.; Kunselman, J. S.; Walker, T. C.

    1974-01-01

    Report describes a prototype computer-automated ultrasonic system developed for the inspection of weldments. This system can be operated in three modes: manual, automatic, and computer-controlled. In the computer-controlled mode, the system will automatically acquire, process, analyze, store, and display ultrasonic inspection data in real-time. Flaw size (in cross-section), location (depth), and type (porosity-like or crack-like) can be automatically discerned and displayed. The results and pertinent parameters are recorded.

  2. Wireless cardiac action potential transmission with ultrasonically inserted silicon microprobes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, C J; Ramkumar, A; Lal, A; Gilmour, R F Jr

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the integration of ultrasonically inserted horn-shaped cardiac probes with wireless transmission of 3D cardiac action potential measurement for applications in ex vivo preparations such as monitoring the onset of ventricular fibrillation. Ultrasonically inserted silicon horn probes permit reduced penetration force during insertion, allowing silicon, a brittle material, to penetrate cardiac tissue. The probes also allow recording from multiple sites that are lithographically defined. An application-specific integrated circuit has been designed with a 40 dB amplifying stage and a frequency modulating oscillator at 95 MHz to wirelessly transmit the recorded action potentials. This ultrasonically inserted microprobe wireless system demonstrates the initial results in wireless monitoring of 3D action potential propagation, and the extraction of parameters of interest including the action potential duration and diastolic interval

  3. Ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.

    1986-01-01

    It is the purpose of the present paper to give a review of surface alloy processing by ion implantation. However, rather than covering this vast subject as a whole, the survey is confined to a presentation of the microstructures that can be found in metal surfaces after ion implantation. The presentation is limited to alloys processed by ion implantation proper, that is to processes in which the alloy compositions are altered significantly by direct injection of the implanted ions. The review is introduced by a presentation of the processes taking place during development of the fundamental event in ion implantation - the collision cascade, followed by a summary of the various microstructures which can be formed after ion implantation into metals. This is compared with the variability of microstructures that can be achieved by rapid solidification processing. The microstructures are subsequently discussed in the light of the processes which, as the implantations proceed, take place during and immediately after formation of the individual collision cascades. These collision cascades define the volumes inside which individual ions are slowed down in the implanted targets. They are not only centres for vigorous agitation but also the sources for formation of excess concentrations of point defects, which will influence development of particular microstructures. A final section presents a selection of specific structures which have been observed in different alloy systems. (orig./GSCH)

  4. The potential of the horizontal ramus of the mandible as a donor site for block and particular grafts in pre-implant surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soehardi, A.; Meijer, G.J.; Strooband, V.F.; Koning, M.J.J. de; Stoelinga, P.J.W.

    2009-01-01

    The results on 32 consecutive patients, who underwent bone grafting prior to implant surgery, are presented. The grafts were taken from the horizontal part of the mandible, including the full height of the buccal cortico-cancellous plate and were used to reconstruct alveolar defects or to augment

  5. Apparatus for ultrasonic nebulization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, K.W.; Haas, W.J. Jr.; Fassel, V.A.

    1978-01-01

    An improved apparatus is described for ultrasonic nebulization of liquid samples or suspensions in which the piezoelectric transducer is protected from chemical attack and erosion. The transducer is protected by being bonded to the inner surface of a glass plate which forms one end wall of a first hollow body provided with apparatus for circulating a fluid for cooling and stabilizing the transducer. The glass plate, which is one-half wavelength in thickness to provide an acoustically coupled outer nebulizing surface, seals an opening in a second hollow body which encloses an aerosol mixing chamber. The second body includes apparatus for delivering the sample solution to the nebulizing surface, a gas inlet for providing a flow of carrier gas for transporting the aerosol of the nebulized sample and an aerosol outlet

  6. High resolution ultrasonic densitometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dress, W.B.

    1983-01-01

    The velocity of torsional stress pulses in an ultrasonic waveguide of non-circular cross section is affected by the temperature and density of the surrounding medium. Measurement of the transit times of acoustic echoes from the ends of a sensor section are interpreted as level, density, and temperature of the fluid environment surrounding that section. This paper examines methods of making these measurements to obtain high resolution, temperature-corrected absolute and relative density and level determinations of the fluid. Possible applications include on-line process monitoring, a hand-held density probe for battery charge state indication, and precise inventory control for such diverse fluids as uranium salt solutions in accountability storage and gasoline in service station storage tanks

  7. Ultrasonic imaging in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribay, G.; Paris, O.; Rambach, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The third and final protection barrier confining nuclear reactors is usually a concrete containment structure. Monitoring the structural integrity of these barriers is critical in ensuring the safety of nuclear power plants. The Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) in France in collaboration with the French Atomic commission (CEA/LIST) has developed an ultrasonic phased-array technique capable of inspecting thick concrete walls. The non-destructive method is dedicated to detect cracks and bulk defects. Given the thickness of the structure (1.2 m) undergoing inspection and the heterogeneity of the concrete, the optimal frequency lies in the 50-300 kHz range. At these frequencies, the ultrasonic beam profiles are widespread (non-directive) with poor signal-to-noise ratio. Previous studies have shown the potential of using phased-array techniques (i.e., beam focusing and beam steering) in order to improve detection resolution and sizing accuracy. In this paper we present experimental studies performed with array up to 16 transducers working at 200 kHz. Experiments are carried out on representative concrete blocks containing artificial defects. One is a reinforced mock-up representative of the first reinforcing mesh of wall containment. Experimental results show that in spite of the reinforcement, artificial defects deep as half a meter can be detected. Reconstructed images resulting from phased array acquisitions on an artificial crack embedded in a concrete block are also presented and discussed. The presented method allows detecting oriented defects in concrete with improved signal to noise ratio and sensibility. A simulation model of the interaction of ultrasound with a heterogeneous medium like concrete is briefly commented. (authors)

  8. Case studies in ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, V.; Satheesh, C.; Varde, P.V.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic testing is widely used Non Destructive Testing (NDT) method and forms the essential part of In-service inspection programme of nuclear reactors. Main application of ultrasonic testing is for volumetric scanning of weld joints followed by thickness gauging of pipelines and pressure vessels. Research reactor Dhruva has completed the first In Service Inspection programme in which about 325 weld joints have been volumetrically scanned, in addition to thickness gauging of 300 meters of pipe lines of various sizes and about 24 nos of pressure vessels. Ultrasonic testing is also used for level measurements, distance measurements and cleaning and decontamination of tools. Two case studies are brought out in this paper in which ultrasonic testing is used successfully for identification of butterfly valve opening status and extent of choking in pipe lines in Dhruva reactor systems

  9. Ultrasonic Technology in Duress Alarms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Martha A.

    2000-01-01

    Provides the pros and cons of the most commonly used technologies in personal duress alarm systems in the school environment. Discussed are radio frequency devices, infrared systems, and ultrasonic technology. (GR)

  10. Ultrasonic extensometer measures bolt preload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, C. M., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Extensometer using ultrasonic pulse reflections to measure elongations in tightened belts and studs is much more accurate than conventional torque wrenches in application of specified preload to bolts and other threaded fasteners.

  11. Neutrophil Responses to Sterile Implant Materials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Jhunjhunwala

    Full Text Available In vivo implantation of sterile materials and devices results in a foreign body immune response leading to fibrosis of implanted material. Neutrophils, one of the first immune cells to be recruited to implantation sites, have been suggested to contribute to the establishment of the inflammatory microenvironment that initiates the fibrotic response. However, the precise numbers and roles of neutrophils in response to implanted devices remains unclear. Using a mouse model of peritoneal microcapsule implantation, we show 30-500 fold increased neutrophil presence in the peritoneal exudates in response to implants. We demonstrate that these neutrophils secrete increased amounts of a variety of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Further, we observe that they participate in the foreign body response through the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs on implant surfaces. Our results provide new insight into neutrophil function during a foreign body response to peritoneal implants which has implications for the development of biologically compatible medical devices.

  12. Modification of TiO(2) nanotube surfaces by electro-spray deposition of amoxicillin combined with PLGA for bactericidal effects at surgical implantation sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Moon, Seung-Kyun; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2013-01-01

    To fabricate the antibiotic-releasing coatings on TiO(2) nanotube surfaces for wide applications of implant and bone plate in medical and dental surgery, the optimal deposition time of amoxicillin/PLGA solution simultaneously performing non-toxicity and a high bactericidal effect for preventing early implant failures was found. FE-SEM, ESD and FT-IR were used for confirming deposition of amoxicillin/PLGA on the TiO(2) surface. Also, the elution of amoxicillin/PLGA in a TiO(2) nanotube surface was measured by a UV-VIS spectrophotometer. The bactericidal effect of amoxicillin on the TiO(2) nanotube surface was evaluated by using Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The cytotoxicity and cell proliferation were observed by WST assay using MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells. The results indicated that the TiO(2) nanotube surface controlled by electro-spray deposition time with amoxicillin/PLGA solution could provide a high bactericidal effect against S. aureus by the bactericidal effect of amoxicillin, as well as good osteoblast cell proliferation at the TiO(2) nanotube surface without toxicity. This study used electro-spray deposition (ESD) methodology to obtain amoxicillin deposition in nanotube structures of TiO(2) and found the optimal deposition time of amoxicillin/PLGA solution simultaneously performing non-toxicity and a high bactericidal effect for preventing early implant failures.

  13. Carmustine Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... works by slowing or stopping the growth of cancer cells in your body. ... are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while receiving carmustine implant, call your doctor. Carmustine may harm the fetus.

  14. Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIDCD A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense ... Hearing Aids Retinitis Pigmentosa - National Eye Institute Telecommunications Relay Services Usher Syndrome Your Baby's Hearing Screening News ...

  15. Detailed simulation of ultrasonic inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaplin, K.R.; Douglas, S.R.; Dunford, D.

    1997-01-01

    Simulation of ultrasonic inspection of engineering components have been performed at the Chalk River Laboratories of AECL for over 10 years. The computer model, called EWE for Elastic Wave Equations, solves the Elastic Wave Equations using a novel finite difference scheme. It simulates the propagation of an ultrasonic wave from the transducer to a flaw, the scatter of waves from the flaw, and measurement of signals at a receive transducer. Regions of different materials, water and steel for example, can be simulated. In addition, regions with slightly different material properties from the parent material can be investigated. The two major types of output are displays of the ultrasonic waves inside the component and the corresponding A-scans. EPRI and other organizations have used ultrasonic models for: defining acceptable ultrasonic inspection procedures, designing and evaluating inspection techniques, and for quantifying inspection reliability. The EWE model has been applied to the inspection of large pipes in a nuclear plant, gas pipeline welds and steam generator tubes. Most recent work has dealt with the ultrasonic inspection of pressure tubes in CANDU reactors. Pressure tube inspections can reliably detect and size defects; however, there are improvements that can be made. For example, knowing the sharpness of a flaw-tip is crucial for fitness for service assessments. Computer modelling of the ultrasonic inspection of flaws with different root radius has suggested inspection techniques that provide flaw tip radius information. A preliminary investigation of these methods has been made in the laboratory. The basis for the model will be reviewed at the presentation. Then the results of computer simulations will be displayed on a PC using an interactive program that analyzes simulated A-scans. This software tool gives inspection staff direct access to the results of computer simulations. (author)

  16. Ultrasonic measurements and technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Kočiš, Štefan

    1996-01-01

    An impulse for writing this book has originated from the effort to sum­ marize and publicise the acquired results of a research team at the De­ partment of Automation of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and In­ formatics, Slovak Technical University in Bratislava. The research team has been involved for a long time with control problems for machine production mechanisms and, in recent (approximately 15) years, its effort was aimed mostly at the control of electrical servosystems of robots. Within this scope, the members of the authors' staff solved the State Re­ search Task Ultrasonic sensing of the position of a robot hand, which was coordinated by the Institute of Technical Cybernetics of the Slovak Academy of Sciences in Bratislava. The problem was solved in a complex way, i.e. from a conceptual de­ sign of the measurement, through the measurement and evaluation sys­ tem, up to connection to the control system of a robot. Compensation of the atmospheric influence on the precision of measurement,...

  17. Ultrasonic-testing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, Paul.

    1973-01-01

    Description is given of a device adapted to the detection, by means of ultrasonic waves, of all the flaws and defects included in workpieces when only one face of the latter is accessible. A beam is directed towards the rear-face of the workpiece (e.g. a plate) on which it is reflected. The image thus reflected is fed into a receiver. The latter is under the control of the displacement of that image; simultaneously a transducer checks the condition of the mirror at the places where the beam is reflected. Whenever a flow or defect comes between, a silent zone is formed. By recording the silent zones with respect to the positions of several emitters, it is possible to locates a flaw and to define the outline thereof. The apparatus comprises several ''emitter-receiver'' groups intersecting over the emitter used in order to check the good conditions of the mirror. The invention can be used for searching and identifying flaws and defects in buildings which have to be of top quality (e.g., cofferdams, nuclear devices, shipbuilding yards, aeronautics) [fr

  18. Ultrasonic monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLain, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    The ultrasonic monitoring system is used in LMFBR's, BWR's or PWR's. A remotely controlled, movable instrument carrier may be used which contains the piezo-electric transducer and is connected to the main control console by a transmission cable. An excitation pulse coming from a pulse generator is used to excite the transducer with a maximum of energy, independent of the length of the transmission line. Pulse width and pulse amplitude can be set without any direct interference into the transducer. For this purpose, a resistor whose impedance has been matched to that of the transmission line is connected to the input of the transmission line. Moreover, a capacitor for generation of the excitation pulse is coupled with the transmission line by means of a four-layer switching diode and is discharged. For termination of the excitation and the control pulses, respectively, another four-layer switching diode connected parallel to the capacitor quickly discharges the capacitor. The capacitor and the capacitance of the line constitute a voltage divider. In this way it is possible to change the length of the transmission line and, to safeguard the generation of a pulse of the desired amplitude, only vary the capacitance of the capacitor. (DG/RF) [de

  19. Effect of implant position, angulation, and attachment height on peri-implant bone stress associated with mandibular two-implant overdentures: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hae Ryong; Pae, Ahran; Kim, Yooseok; Paek, Janghyun; Kim, Hyeong-Seob; Kwon, Kung-Rock

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the level and distribution of peri-implant bone stresses associated with mandibular two-implant overdentures with different implant positions. Mathematical models of mandibles and overdentures were designed using finite element analysis software. Two intraosseous implants and ball attachment systems were placed in the interforaminal region. The overdenture, which was supported by the two implants, was designed to withstand bilateral and unilateral vertical masticatory loads (total 100 N). In all, eight types of models, which differed according to assigned implant positions, height of attachments, and angulation, were tested: MI (model with implants positioned in the lateral incisor sites), MC (implants in canine sites), MP (implants in premolar sites), MI-Hi (greater height of attachments), MC-M (canine implants placed with mesial inclination), MC-D (canine implants placed with distal inclination), MC-B (canine implants placed with buccal inclination), and MC-L (canine implants placed with lingual inclination). Peri-implant bone stress levels associated with overdentures retained by lateral incisor implants resulted in the lowest stress levels and the highest efficiency in distributing peri-implant stress. MI-Hi showed increased stress levels and decreased efficiency in stress distribution. As the implants were inclined, stress levels increased and the efficiency of stress distribution decreased. Among the inclined models, MC-B showed the lowest stress level and best efficiency in stress distribution. The lowest stress and the best stability of implants in mandibular two-implant overdentures were obtained when implants were inserted in lateral incisor areas with shorter attachments and were placed parallel to the long axes of the teeth.

  20. Ultrasonic propulsion of kidney stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Philip C; Bailey, Michael R; Harper, Jonathan D

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasonic propulsion is a novel technique that uses short bursts of focused ultrasonic pulses to reposition stones transcutaneously within the renal collecting system and ureter. The purpose of this review is to discuss the initial testing of effectiveness and safety, directions for refinement of technique and technology, and opinions on clinical application. Preclinical studies with a range of probes, interfaces, and outputs have demonstrated feasibility and consistent safety of ultrasonic propulsion with room for increased outputs and refinement toward specific applications. Ultrasonic propulsion was used painlessly and without adverse events to reposition stones in 14 of 15 human study participants without restrictions on patient size, stone size, or stone location. The initial feasibility study showed applicability in a range of clinically relevant situations, including facilitating passage of residual fragments following ureteroscopy or shock wave lithotripsy, moving a large stone at the ureteropelvic junction with relief of pain, and differentiating large stones from a collection of small fragments. Ultrasonic propulsion shows promise as an office-based system for transcutaneously repositioning kidney stones. Potential applications include facilitating expulsion of residual fragments following ureteroscopy or shock wave lithotripsy, repositioning stones prior to treatment, and repositioning obstructing ureteropelvic junction stones into the kidney to alleviate acute renal colic.

  1. Implantation, recoil implantation, and sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, R.

    1984-01-01

    The implantation and sputtering mechanisms which are relevant to ion bombardment of surfaces are described. These are: collision, thermal, electronic and photon-induced sputtering. 135 refs.; 36 figs.; 9 tabs

  2. Sequential provisional implant prosthodontics therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinner, Ira D; Markovits, Stanley; Jansen, Curtis E; Reid, Patrick E; Schnader, Yale E; Shapiro, Herbert J

    2012-01-01

    The fabrication and long-term use of first- and second-stage provisional implant prostheses is critical to create a favorable prognosis for function and esthetics of a fixed-implant supported prosthesis. The fixed metal and acrylic resin cemented first-stage prosthesis, as reviewed in Part I, is needed for prevention of adjacent and opposing tooth movement, pressure on the implant site as well as protection to avoid micromovement of the freshly placed implant body. The second-stage prosthesis, reviewed in Part II, should be used following implant uncovering and abutment installation. The patient wears this provisional prosthesis until maturation of the bone and healing of soft tissues. The second-stage provisional prosthesis is also a fail-safe mechanism for possible early implant failures and also can be used with late failures and/or for the necessity to repair the definitive prosthesis. In addition, the screw-retained provisional prosthesis is used if and when an implant requires removal or other implants are to be placed as in a sequential approach. The creation and use of both first- and second-stage provisional prostheses involve a restorative dentist, dental technician, surgeon, and patient to work as a team. If the dentist alone cannot do diagnosis and treatment planning, surgery, and laboratory techniques, he or she needs help by employing the expertise of a surgeon and a laboratory technician. This team approach is essential for optimum results.

  3. Piezoelectric surgery in implant dentistry: clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Masako Ferreira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pizosurgery has therapeutic characteristics in osteotomies, such as extremely precise, selective and millimetric cuts and a clear operating field. Piezoelectricity uses ultrasonic frequencies, which cause the points specially designed for osteotomy to vibrate. The points of the instrument oscillate, allowing effective osteotomy with minimal or no injury to the adjacent soft tissues, membranes and nerve tissues. This article presents the various applications of piezoelectricity in oral implant surgery such as: removal of autogenous bone; bone window during elevation of the sinus membrane and removal of fractured implants. The cavitational effect caused by the vibration of the point and the spray of physiological solution, provided a field free of bleeding and easy to visualize. The study showed that the piezoelectric surgery is a new surgical procedurethat presents advantages for bone cutting in many situations in implant dentistry, with great advantages in comparison with conventional instrumentation. Operating time is longer when compared with that of conventional cutters.

  4. Ultrasonic stir welding process and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An ultrasonic stir welding device provides a method and apparatus for elevating the temperature of a work piece utilizing at least one ultrasonic heater. Instead of relying on a rotating shoulder to provide heat to a workpiece an ultrasonic heater is utilized to provide ultrasonic energy to the workpiece. A rotating pin driven by a motor assembly performs the weld on the workpiece. A handheld version can be constructed as well as a fixedly mounted embodiment.

  5. The effects of ultrasonic solidification on aluminum

    OpenAIRE

    Đorđević Slavko 1

    2003-01-01

    The effect of ultrasound on characteristics of solidified aluminum was shown. An ultrasonic head and ultrasonic system for modification was designed and applied to the crystallizing aluminum melt. The ultrasonic generator allows power of 50-500 W, amplitude of oscillations 10-100 um.m and the operating frequency of 25 kHz. Ultrasonic modification was done by ultrasound introduced from above into the melt. Microstructure photographs show decreasing of the grain size more than five times.

  6. The effects of ultrasonic solidification on aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Slavko 1

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ultrasound on characteristics of solidified aluminum was shown. An ultrasonic head and ultrasonic system for modification was designed and applied to the crystallizing aluminum melt. The ultrasonic generator allows power of 50-500 W, amplitude of oscillations 10-100 um.m and the operating frequency of 25 kHz. Ultrasonic modification was done by ultrasound introduced from above into the melt. Microstructure photographs show decreasing of the grain size more than five times.

  7. 21 CFR 872.4850 - Ultrasonic scaler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4850 Ultrasonic scaler. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic scaler is a device intended for use during dental cleaning and periodontal (gum) therapy to remove calculus deposits from teeth by application of an ultrasonic vibrating scaler tip to the teeth. (b...

  8. Pitch-catch only ultrasonic fluid densitometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, M.S.; Harris, R.V.

    1999-03-23

    The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses a material wedge and pitch-catch only ultrasonic transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface. 6 figs.

  9. Innovative ultrasonics for power plant commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, R.V.; Alikhan, S.

    1983-05-01

    During the commissioning of a nuclear power plant, the usual role of ultrasonics is associated with nondestructive testing of welds. There is, however, a variety of undesirable conditions associated with the fluids carried through the various reactor systems which may be just as important to station operation. A variety of unusual ultrasonic techniques has been developed for testing fluid systems at the Point Lepreau Generating Station. This paper uses the experience gained at the Point Lepreau reactor to illustrate the valuable information which can be gained from these measurements, such as: fluid level in pipes and headers; fluid level in pressure vessels; detection, and sizing of debris in pipes; in situ measurement and verification of orifice condition; detection and location of cavitation, water hammer, valve leakage; quantitative measurement of gate movement within the body of an inservice valve; determination of valve position; detection and imaging of flow separation; detection and location of leaks in concrete containment structures; verification of design flows; balancing of loop flows; and detection of low flow. The application of these techniques at other reactor sites is also discussed

  10. Ultrasonic techniques for fluids characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Povey, Malcolm J W

    1997-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive and practical guide to the use of ultrasonic techniques for the characterization of fluids. Focusing on ultrasonic velocimetry, the author covers the basic topics and techniques necessaryfor successful ultrasound measurements on emulsions, dispersions, multiphase media, and viscoelastic/viscoplastic materials. Advanced techniques such as scattering, particle sizing, and automation are also presented. As a handbook for industrial and scientific use, Ultrasonic Techniques for Fluids Characterization is an indispensable guide to chemists and chemical engineers using ultrasound for research or process monitoring in the chemical, food processing, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, biotechnology,and fuels industries. Key Features * Appeals to anyone using ultrasound to study fluids * Provides the first detailed description of the ultrasound profiling technique for dispersions * Describes new techniques for measuring phase transitions and nucleation, such as water/ice and oil/fat * Presents the l...

  11. Ultrasonic inspection development at HEDL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, C.K.; Mech, S.J.; Michaels, T.E.; Dixon, N.E.

    1978-01-01

    Ultrasonic testing methods and equipment are being developed to support preservice and in-service inspection of selected FFTF welds. A digital computer system is employed in the analysis of both simulated FFTF pipe sections and plate specimens containing fatigue cracks. It is anticipated that test evaluation standards containing fatigue cracks will partially eliminate questions formerly associated with weld test calibration producers by providing natural cracks which follow grain boundaries and stress patterns resembling piping situ conditions. Studies have revealed that commercial transducers may satisfy LMFBR ultrasonic pipe inspection applications: The test system evaluation included transducers and wedge coupling and fluid coupling materials which exhibited acceptable performance at temperatures to 2300C. Results are presented that demonstrate the feasibility of ultrasonic inspection of components immersed in sodium at temperatures to 2600C. (UK)

  12. Ultrasonic wave propagation in powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Lashi, R. S.; Povey, M. J. W.; Watson, N. J.

    2018-05-01

    Powder clumps (cakes) has a significant effect on the flowability and stability of powders. Powder caking is mainly caused by moisture migration due to wetting and environmental (temperature and humidity) changes. The process of moisture migration caking involves creating liquid bridges between the particles during condensation which subsequently harden to form solid bridges. Therefore, an effective and reliable technique is required to quantitatively and non-invasively monitor caking kinetics and effective stiffness. This paper describes two ultrasonic instruments (ultrasonic velocity pulse and airborne ultrasound systems) that have been used to monitor the caking phenomenon. Also, it discusses the relationship between the ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements and tracking caking kinetics and the effective stiffness of powders.

  13. Study of hydrogen implanted in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugeat, J.P.; Chami, A.C.; Danielou, R.; Ligeon, E.

    1976-01-01

    An aluminium sample was implanted with deuterium and hydrogen at 5keV and 10keV respectively. The 1 H( 11 B,α) 8 Be* and D( 3 He,p) 4 He reactions were used for the analysis of H and D respectively. The implanted deuterium was shown to be as a whole in a tetrahedral site as far as the implantation temperature is lower than 175K, beyond that temperature the deuterium is randomly located. When the implantation temperature increases from 33K up to 275K the tetrahedral siting remains during annealing. The migration temperatures of hydrogen (or temperature of transition from the tetrahedral siting to a random distribution) experimentally observed during annealing (300K) and for increased implantation temperatures, show that the tetrahedral site is associated with a monovacancy migrating at 300K, the diffusion temperature of hydrogen being lower than 180K [fr

  14. Osseointegration of dental implants in 3D-printed synthetic onlay grafts customized according to bone metabolic activity in recipient site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamimi, Faleh; Torres, Jesus; Al-Abedalla, Khadijeh; Lopez-Cabarcos, Enrique; Alkhraisat, Mohammad H; Bassett, David C; Gbureck, Uwe; Barralet, Jake E

    2014-07-01

    Onlay grafts made of monolithic microporous monetite bioresorbable bioceramics have the capacity to conduct bone augmentation. However, there is heterogeneity in the graft behaviour in vivo that seems to correlate with the host anatomy. In this study, we sought to investigate the metabolic activity of the regenerated bone in monolithic monetite onlays by using positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) in rats. This information was used to optimize the design of monetite onlays with different macroporous architecture that were then fabricated using a 3D-printing technique. In vivo, bone augmentation was attempted with these customized onlays in rabbits. PET-CT findings demonstrated that bone metabolism in the calvarial bone showed higher activity in the inferior and lateral areas of the onlays. Histological observations revealed higher bone volume (up to 47%), less heterogeneity and more implant osseointegration (up to 38%) in the augmented bone with the customized monetite onlays. Our results demonstrated for the first time that it is possible to achieve osseointegration of dental implants in bone augmented with 3D-printed synthetic onlays. It was also observed that designing the macropore geometry according to the bone metabolic activity was a key parameter in increasing the volume of bone augmented within monetite onlays. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. On line ultrasonic integrated backscatter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landini, L.; Picano, E.; Mazzarisi, A.; Santarelli, F.; Benassi, A.; De Pieri, G.

    1988-01-01

    A new equipment for on-line evaluation of index based on two-dimensional integrated backscatter from ultrasonic images is described. The new equipment is fully integrated into a B-mode ultrasonic apparatus which provides a simultaneous display of conventional information together with parameters of tissue characterization. The system has been tested with a backscattering model of microbubbles in polysaccharide solution, characterized by a physiological exponential time decay. An exponential fitting to the experimental data was performed which yielded r=0.95

  16. Ultrasonically assisted drilling of rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailova, N. V.; Onawumi, P. Y.; Roy, A.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2018-05-01

    Conventional drilling of rocks can generate significant damage in the drilled material; a material layer is often split off a back surface of a sample during drilling, negatively affecting its strength. To improve finish quality, ultrasonically assisted drilling (UAD) was employed in two rocks - sandstone and marble. Damage areas in both materials were reduced in UAD when compared to conventional drilling. Reductions in a thrust force and a torque reduction were observed only for UAD in marble; ultrasonic assistance in sandstone drilling did not result in improvements in this regard.

  17. Very high temperature ultrasonic thermometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorzik, E.

    1983-01-01

    An ultrasonic thermometer comprises an electric pulse transducer head, a pulse transmission line, a notched sensor wire attached to and extending along the axis of said transmission line and a sheath enclosing the transmission line and the sensor wire, a portion of the interior face of the sheath being covered by a stuffing material along at least the length of the notched part of the sensor wire, such that contact between the sensor wire and the stuffing material does not substantially give rise to reflection of an ultrasonic pulse at the point of contact. (author)

  18. Hip Implant Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Implants and Prosthetics Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants Hip Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Hip implants are medical devices intended to restore mobility ...

  19. Breast reconstruction - implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast implants surgery; Mastectomy - breast reconstruction with implants; Breast cancer - breast reconstruction with implants ... harder to find a tumor if your breast cancer comes back. Getting breast implants does not take as long as breast reconstruction ...

  20. Measurement of a 3D Ultrasonic Wavefield Using Pulsed Laser Holographic Microscopy for Ultrasonic Nondestructive Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In ultrasonic array imaging, 3D ultrasonic wavefields are normally recorded by an ultrasonic piezo array transducer. Its performance is limited by the configuration and size of the array transducer. In this paper, a method based on digital holographic interferometry is proposed to record the 3D ultrasonic wavefields instead of the array transducer, and the measurement system consisting of a pulsed laser, ultrasonic excitation, and synchronization and control circuit is designed. A consecutive sequence of holograms of ultrasonic wavefields are recorded by the system. The interferograms are calculated from the recorded holograms at different time sequence. The amplitudes and phases of the transient ultrasonic wavefields are recovered from the interferograms by phase unwrapping. The consecutive sequence of transient ultrasonic wavefields are stacked together to generate 3D ultrasonic wavefields. Simulation and experiments are carried out to verify the proposed technique, and preliminary results are presented.

  1. Evaluation of possible prognostic factors for the success, survival, and failure of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geckili, Onur; Bilhan, Hakan; Geckili, Esma; Cilingir, Altug; Mumcu, Emre; Bural, Canan

    2014-02-01

    To analyze the prognostic factors that are associated with the success, survival, and failure rates of dental implants. Data including implant sizes, insertion time, implant location, and prosthetic treatment of 1656 implants have been collected, and the association of these factors with success, survival, and failure of implants was analyzed. The success rate was lower for short and maxillary implants. The failure rate of maxillary implants exceeded that of mandibular implants, and the failure rate of implants that were placed in the maxillary anterior region was significantly higher than other regions. The failure rates of implants that were placed 5 years ago or more were higher than those that were placed later. Anterior maxilla is more critical for implant loss than other sites. Implants in the anterior mandible show better success compared with other locations, and longer implants show better success rates. The learning curve of the clinician influences survival and success rates of dental implants.

  2. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baikie, B.L.; Wagg, A.R.; Whittle, M.J.; Yapp, D.

    1976-01-01

    Optical and X-ray metallography combined with ultrasonic testing by compression waves was used for inspection of stainless steel weld metal produced by three different welding techniques. X-ray diffraction showed that each weld possessed a characteristic fibre textured structure which was shown by optical microscopy to be parallel to columnar grain boundaries. Metallographic evidence suggested that the development of fibre texture is due to the mechanism of competitive growth. From observations made as a result of optical metallographic examination the orientation of the fibre axis could be predicted if the weld geometry and welding procedure were known. Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements as a continuous function of grain orientation, made on cylinders machined from weld samples, showed that attenuation was strongly orientation dependent. It was concluded that the sensitivity of ultrasonic inspection to small defects is unlikely to be as high for austenitic welds as for ferritic even when transmission is improved by modifying the welding procedure to improve the ultrasonic transmission. (U.K.)

  3. Atmospheric contamination during ultrasonic scaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, MF; Menso, L; Steinfort, J; van Winkelhoff, AJ; van der Weijden, GA

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the microbial atmospheric contamination during initial periodontal treatment using a piezoelectric ultrasonic scaler in combination with either high-volume evacuation (HVE) or conventional dental suction (CDS). Methods: The study included 17

  4. Automated evaluation of ultrasonic indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansch, M.K.T.; Stegemann, D.

    1994-01-01

    Future requirements of reliability and reproducibility in quality assurance demand computer evaluation of defect indications. The ultrasonic method with its large field of applications and a high potential for automation provides all preconditions for fully automated inspection. The survey proposes several desirable hardware improvements, data acquisition requirements and software configurations. (orig.) [de

  5. Ultrasonic flowmeters. Progress report II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittekind, W.D.

    1980-01-01

    This progress report presents results of in-plant testing of the prototype ultrasonic flowmeter and describes modifications to the prototype as a result of these tests. The modified prototype, designated MOD-I, is described in detail including the principle of operation, equipment used and the results of both laboratory and in-plant demonstrations

  6. Calculations for Piezoelectric Ultrasonic Transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers implies a solution of a boundary value problem, for a boay which consists of different materials, including a piezoelectric part. The problem is dynamic at frequencies, where a typical wavelength is somewhat less than the size of the body. Radiation...

  7. Bone reactions at implants subjected to experimental peri-implantitis and static load. A study in the dog

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, K; Berglundh, T; Lindhe, J

    2002-01-01

    during a 12-week interval, the screws were reactivated. Thus, the model included 3 different experimental sites of each surface group: group M+L (mucositis+load); group P (peri-implantitis); group P+L (peri-implantitis+load). Fluorochrome labels were injected and standardized radiographs obtained....... The animals were sacrificed and block biopsies of all implant sites dissected and prepared for histological analysis. RESULTS: It was demonstrated that the lateral static load failed to induce peri-implant bone loss at implants with mucositis and failed to enhance the bone loss at implants with experimental...... peri-implantitis. The proportion of bone labels and the bone density in the interface zone were significantly higher in group P+L than in group P. CONCLUSION: It is suggested that a lateral static load with controlled forces may not be detrimental to implants exhibiting mucositis or peri-implantitis....

  8. Cross-sectional imaging with rotational panoramic X-ray machine for preoperative assessment of dental implant site. Comparisons of imaging properties with conventional film tomography and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makihara, Masahiro; Nishikawa, Keiichi; Kuroyanagi, Kinya

    2001-01-01

    To clarify the validity of cross-sectional imaging with rotational panoramic x-ray machine for preoperative assessment of the dental implant site, the imaging properties were compared with those of spiral tomography and multi-planer reconstruction (MPR) manipulation of x-ray computed tomography. Cross-sectional imaging of the maxilla and mandible of an edentulous dry skull was performed by each technique at an image layer thickness of 1 mm. Steel spheres were used to identify cross-sectional planes and measure distance. Six oral radiologists scored the image clarity of structures with 5-grade rating scales and measured the distance between images of 2 steel spheres. Each measured distance was divided by the magnification factor. The actual distance was also measured on the skull. The score and the distance were statistically compared. The Spearman's rank correlation coefficients for the score and the absolute values of the difference in distances measured by different observers were calculated as test units to compare inter-observer agreements statistically. The same observation and measurement were repeated to compare intra-observer agreement. Image clarity of the linear tomography available with a panoramic machine was comparable to spiral tomography and superior to MPR, except for the cortical bone on the lingual side. The inter- and intra-observer agreements were comparable. The accuracy for measurement of distance, the inter- and intra-observer agreements were also comparable to the spiral tomography and superior to those of MPR. Therefore, it is concluded that cross-sectional imaging with a rotational panoramic x-ray machine is useful for preoperative assessment of the dental implant site. (author)

  9. Piezosurgery in implant dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stübinger, Stefan; Stricker, Andres; Berg, Britt-Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Piezosurgery, or the use of piezoelectric devices, is being applied increasingly in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The main advantages of this technique are precise and selective cuttings, the avoidance of thermal damage, and the preservation of soft-tissue structures. Through the application of piezoelectric surgery, implant-site preparation, bone grafting, sinus-floor elevation, edentulous ridge splitting or the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve are very technically feasible. This clinical overview gives a short summary of the current literature and outlines the advantages and disadvantages of piezoelectric bone surgery in implant dentistry. Overall, piezoelectric surgery is superior to other methods that utilize mechanical instruments. Handling of delicate or compromised hard- and soft-tissue conditions can be performed with less risk for the patient. With respect to current and future innovative surgical concepts, piezoelectric surgery offers a wide range of new possibilities to perform customized and minimally invasive osteotomies. PMID:26635486

  10. Laser annealing of ion implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, C.W.; Narayan, J.; Young, R.T.

    1978-11-01

    The physical and electrical properties of ion implanted silicon annealed with high powered ruby laser radiation are summarized. Results show that pulsed laser annealing can lead to a complete removal of extended defects in the implanted region accompanied by incorporation of dopants into lattice sites even when their concentration far exceeds the solid solubility limit

  11. Surface modifications of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, C M

    2008-06-01

    Dental implant surface technologies have been evolving rapidly to enhance a more rapid bone formation on their surface and hold a potential to increase the predictability of expedited implant therapy. While implant outcomes have become highly predictable, there are sites and conditions that result in elevated implant loss. This paper reviews the impact of macro-retentive features which includes approaches to surface oxide modification, thread design, press-fit and sintered-bead technologies to increase predictability of outcomes. Implant designs that lead to controlled lateral compression of the bone can improve primary stability as long as the stress does not exceed the localized yield strength of the cortical bone. Some implant designs have reduced crestal bone loss by use of multiple cutting threads that are closely spaced, smoothed on the tip but designed to create a hoop-stress stability of the implant as it is completely seated in the osteotomy. Following the placement of the implant, there is a predictable sequence of bone turnover and replacement at the interface that allows the newly formed bone to adapt to microscopic roughness on the implant surface, and on some surfaces, a nanotopography (<10(-9) m scale) that has been shown to preferably influence the formation of bone. Newly emerging studies show that bone cells are exquisitely sensitive to these topographical features and will upregulate the expression of bone related genes for new bone formation when grown on these surfaces. We live in an exciting time of rapid changes in the modalities we can offer patients for tooth replacement therapy. Given this, it is our responsibility to be critical when claims are made, incorporate into our practice what is proven and worthwhile, and to continue to support and provide the best patient care possible.

  12. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Neha; Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-09-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration.

  13. Ultrasonic Linear Motor with Two Independent Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muneishi, Takeshi; Tomikawa, Yoshiro

    2004-09-01

    We propose a new structure of an ultrasonic linear motor in order to solve the problems of high-power ultrasonic linear motors that drive the XY-stage for electron beam equipment and to expand the application fields of the motor. We pay special attention to the following three points: (1) the vibration in two directions of the ultrasonic linear motor should not influence mutually each other, (2) the vibration in two directions should be divided into the stage traveling direction and the pressing direction of the ultrasonic linear motor, and (3) the rigidity of the stage traveling direction of the ultrasonic linear motor should be increased. As a result, the supporting method of ultrasonic linear motors is simplified. The efficiency of the motor is improved and temperature rise is reduced. The stage position drift is also improved.

  14. Effect of Ultrasonic Frequency on Lactic Acid Fermentation Promotion by Ultrasonic Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Tadayuki; Ohdaira, Etsuzo; Masuzawa, Nobuyoshi

    2004-05-01

    The authors have been researching the promotion of lactic acid fermentation by ultrasonic irradiation. In the past research, it was proven that ultrasonic irradiation is effective in the process of fermentation, and the production of yoghurt and kefir was promoted. In this study, the effect of the ultrasonic frequency in this fermentation process was examined. In the frequency range of this study, it was found that the action of fermentation promotion was exponentially proportionate to the irradiated ultrasonic frequency.

  15. High-resolution ultrasonic spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Buckin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution ultrasonic spectroscopy (HR-US is an analytical technique for direct and non-destructive monitoring of molecular and micro-structural transformations in liquids and semi-solid materials. It is based on precision measurements of ultrasonic velocity and attenuation in analysed samples. The application areas of HR-US in research, product development, and quality and process control include analysis of conformational transitions of polymers, ligand binding, molecular self-assembly and aggregation, crystallisation, gelation, characterisation of phase transitions and phase diagrams, and monitoring of chemical and biochemical reactions. The technique does not require optical markers or optical transparency. The HR-US measurements can be performed in small sample volumes (down to droplet size, over broad temperature range, at ambient and elevated pressures, and in various measuring regimes such as automatic temperature ramps, titrations and measurements in flow.

  16. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomlinson, J R; Wagg, A R; Whittle, M J [N.D.T. Applications Centre, CEGB, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1980-11-01

    The metallurgical structure of austenitic welds is described and contrasted with that found in ferritic welds. It is shown that this structure imparts a marked elastic anisotropy in the ultrasonic propagation parameters. Measurements of variations in the apparent attenuation of sound and deviations in the beam direction are described. The measurements are interpreted in terms of the measured velocity anisotropy. Two applications of the fundamental work are described. In the first it is shown how, by using short pulse compression wave probes, and with major modification of the welding procedure, a stainless steel fillet weld in an AGR boiler can be inspected. In the second application, alternative designs of a transition butt weld have been compared for ease of ultrasonic inspection. The effects of two different welding processes on such an inspection are described. Finally, the paper examines the prospects for future development of inspection and defect-sizing techniques for austenitic welds. (author)

  17. Microcomputer-controlled ultrasonic data acquisition system. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, W.A. Jr.

    1978-11-01

    The large volume of ultrasonic data generated by computer-aided test procedures has necessitated the development of a mobile, high-speed data acquisition and storage system. This approach offers the decided advantage of on-site data collection and remote data processing. It also utilizes standard, commercially available ultrasonic instrumentation. This system is controlled by an Intel 8080A microprocessor. The MCS80-SDK microcomputer board was chosen, and magnetic tape is used as the storage medium. A detailed description is provided of both the hardware and software developed to interface the magnetic tape storage subsystem to Biomation 8100 and Biomation 805 waveform recorders. A boxcar integrator acquisition system is also described for use when signal averaging becomes necessary. Both assembly language and machine language listings are provided for the software.

  18. Proposed new ultrasonic test bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxfield, B.W.

    1978-01-01

    Within the last four or five years, a great deal of progress has been made both here and in a number of other laboratories in developing techniques that will enable considerably more information to be obtained from the ultrasonic examination of an object. Some of these recent developments relate to information contained within the diffracted beam which does not return along the incident path. An ultrasonic examination based upon an evaluation of diffracted energy must use at least two transducers, one for transmission and the other for reception. Current indications are that even more reliable test results will be achieved using a receiving transducer that can scan a significant portion of the diffracted field including that portion which is back-reflected. In general, this scan can be interpreted most accurately if it follows a path related to the surface shape. If more than one region within the object is to be interrogated, then the transmitting transducer must also be scanned, again along a path related to the surface shape. The large quantity of information obtained as the result of such an examination must be subjected to sophisticated computer analysis in order to be displayed in a meaningful and intelligible manner. Although one motivation for building such an instrument is to explore new ultrasonic test procedures that are evolving from current laboratory research, this is neither the sole motivation nor the only use for this instrument. Such a mechanical and electronic device would permit conventional ultrasonic tests to be performed on parts of complex geometry without the expensive and time-consuming special fixturing that is currently required. May possible test geometries could be explored in practice prior to the construction of a specialized test apparatus. Hence, it would be necessary to design much, if any, flexibility into the special test apparatus

  19. Ultrasonic sizing of fatigue cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, D.J.

    1983-12-01

    Surface and buried fatigue cracks in steel plates have been sized using immersion probes as transmitters-receivers, angled to produce shear waves in the steel. Sizes have been estimated by identifying the ultrasonic waves diffracted from the crack tip and by measuring the time taken for a signal to travel to and from the crack tip. The effects of compression normal to a fatigue crack and of crack front curvature are discussed. Another diffraction technique, developed by UKAEA, Harwell, is reviewed

  20. Ultrasonic characterization of yogurt fermentation process

    OpenAIRE

    IZBAIM , DRIS; FAIZ , BOUAZZA; MOUDDEN , ALI; MALAININE , MOHAMED; ABOUDAOUD , Idriss

    2012-01-01

    International audience; The objective of this work is to characterize the fermentation of yogurt based on an ultrasonic technique. Conventionally, the acidity of the yogurt is measured by a pH meter to determine the progress of fermentation. However, the pH meter should be cleaned and calibrated for each measurement and, therefore, this method is not practical. In this regard, ultrasonic techniques are fast, non-invasive and inexpensive. The measurement of ultrasonic parameters such as amplit...

  1. Experimental investigation of ultrasonic velocity anisotropy in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/pram/077/02/0345-0355. Keywords. Magnetic fluids; ultrasonic wave; sound velocity; anisotropy. Abstract. Magnetic field-induced dispersion of ultrasonic velocity in a Mn0.7Zn0.3Fe2O4 fluid (applied magnetic field is perpendicular to the ultrasonic propagation vector) is ...

  2. Current status of grafts and implants in rhinoplasty: Part II. Homologous grafts and allogenic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjadian, Ali; Naghshineh, Nima; Rubinstein, Roee

    2010-03-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Understand the challenges in restoring volume and structural integrity in rhinoplasty. 2. Identify the appropriate uses of various homologous grafts and allogenic implants in reconstruction, including: (a) freeze-dried acellular allogenic cadaveric dermis grafts, (b) irradiated cartilage grafts, (c) hydroxyapatite mineral matrix, (d) silicone implants, (e) high-density polyethylene implants, (f) polytetrafluoroethylene implants, and (g) injectable filler materials. 3. Identify the advantages and disadvantages of each of these biomaterials. 4. Understand the specific techniques that may aid in the use these grafts or implants. This review specifically addresses the use of homologous grafts and allogenic implants in rhinoplasty. It is important to stress that autologous materials remain the preferred graft material for use in rhinoplasty, owing to their high biocompatibility and low risk of infection and extrusion. However, concerns of donor-site morbidity, graft availability, and graft resorption have motivated the development and use of homologous and allogenic implants.

  3. Automated ultrasonic inspection using PULSDAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naybour, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    PULSDAT (Portable Ultrasonic Data Acquisition Tool) is a system for recording the data from single probe automated ultrasonic inspections. It is one of a range of instruments and software developed by Nuclear Electric to carry out a wide variety of high quality ultrasonic inspections. These vary from simple semi-automated inspections through to multi-probe, highly automated ones. PULSDAT runs under the control of MIPS software, and collects data which is compatible with the GUIDE data display system. PULSDAT is therefore fully compatible with Nuclear Electric's multi-probe inspection systems and utilises all the reliability and quality assurance of the software. It is a rugged, portable system that can be used in areas of difficult access. The paper discusses the benefits of automated inspection and gives an outline of the main features of PULSDAT. Since April 1990 PULSDAT has been used in several applications within Nuclear Electric and this paper presents two examples: the first is a ferritic set-through nozzle and the second is an austenitic fillet weld. (Author)

  4. Implantation, recoil implantation, and sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, R.

    1984-01-01

    Underlying ion-beam modification of surfaces is the more basic subject of particle-surface interaction. The ideas can be grouped into forward and backward features, i.e. those affecting the interior of the target and those leading to particle expulsion. Forward effects include the stopping of the incident particles and the deposition of energy, both governed by integral equations which are easily set up but difficult to solve. Closely related is recoil implantation where emphasis is placed not on the stopping of the incident particles but on their interaction with target atoms with resulting implantation of these atoms. Backward effects, all of which are denoted as sputtering, are in general either of collisional, thermal, electronic, or exfoliational origin. (Auth.)

  5. Recent progress in online ultrasonic process monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Szu-Sheng L.; Chen, Tzu-Fang; Ramos-Franca, Demartonne; Nguyen, Ky T.; Jen, Cheng-Kuei; Ihara, Ikuo; Derdouri, A.; Garcia-Rejon, Andres

    1998-03-01

    On-line ultrasonic monitoring of polymer co-extrusion and gas-assisted injection molding are presented. During the co- extrusion of high density polyethylene and Santoprene ultrasonic sensors consisting of piezoelectric transducers and clad ultrasonic buffer rods are used to detect the interface between these two polymers and the stability of the extrusion. The same ultrasonic sensor also measures the surface temperature of the extruded polymer. The results indicate that temperature measurements using ultrasound have a faster response time than those obtained by conventional thermocouple. In gas-assisted injection molding the polymer and gas flow front positions are monitored simultaneously. This information may be used to control the plunger movement.

  6. Internal ultrasonic inspection of flexible pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltzersen, O. (IKU Petroleumsforskning A/S, Trondheim (Norway) Norwegian Inst. of Tech., Trondheim (Norway). Div. of Petroleum Engineering and Applied Geophysics); Waag, T.I. (IKU Petroleumsforskning A/S, Trondheim (Norway))

    1993-10-01

    Methods for internal ultrasonic inspection of flexible pipe have been investigated through experiments with a short sample of Coflexip pipe. Ultrasonic backscatter methods using normal and non-normal incidence have been used for qualitative high contrast ultrasonic imaging of the inner surface of the pipe. Analysis of the internal cross-section has been performed based on the use of a non-contact ultrasonic caliper, and processing procedures which enable calculation of, and compensation for, eccentricity of the tool in the pipe. The methods developed can be used to quantitatively estimate the thickness of the internal carcass, and perform high resolution topographic mapping of the inner surface. (Author)

  7. Under sodium ultrasonic imaging system for PFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patankar, V.H.; Lalwani, S.K.; Agashe, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Under Sodium UltraSonic Scanner (USUSS) has been developed to detect the growth and protrusion of fuel sub-assemblies of PFBR, submerged in liquid sodium by using the ultrasonic imaging technique during reactor shut-down when liquid sodium is at 180 ℃. The imaging is carried out prior to every Fuel handling operation. Electronics Division, BARC has designed and developed an 8-Channel Ultrasonic Imaging System (UIS) which consists of 4 downward viewing and 4 side viewing ultrasonic transducers alongwith pulser-receiver, signal processing electronics hardware and software. An automated mechanical scanner developed by IGCAR houses sodium immersible transducers to image the fuel sub assemblies. The system has been successfully tested with dummy protruding and grown FSAs, submerged under liquid sodium. Such ultrasonic imaging systems are not available to India from international market. The USUSS developed indigenously has all the features available in similar systems developed by other countries. After every imaging campaign, the mechanical scanner containing ultrasonic transducers is stored in the Argon filled storage-pit. Before every campaign of USUSS, it is necessary to check the healthiness of the sodium immersible and contaminated ultrasonic transducers, as the under-sodium scanner is decontaminated once in five years. For this purpose, a novel Non Contact Ultrasonic Inspection System (NCUIS) has been designed and developed by Electronics Division, BARC to check the functionality of the high-temperature and contaminated transducers of USUSS, using air-coupled ultrasonic technique. (author)

  8. Stresses in ultrasonically assisted bone cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, K; Mitrofanov, A V; Silberschmidt, V V; Baeker, M

    2009-01-01

    Bone cutting is a frequently used procedure in the orthopaedic surgery. Modern cutting techniques, such as ultrasonic assisted drilling, enable surgeons to perform precision operations in facial and spinal surgeries. Advanced understanding of the mechanics of bone cutting assisted by ultrasonic vibration is required to minimise bone fractures and to optimise the technique performance. The paper presents results of finite element simulations on ultrasonic and conventional bone cutting analysing the effects of ultrasonic vibration on cutting forces and stress distribution. The developed model is used to study the effects of cutting and vibration parameters (e.g. amplitude and frequency) on the stress distributions in the cutting region.

  9. The function profile of compressed-air and ultrasonic nebulizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsin-Lin; Lin, Yung-Zen; Wu, Wei-Fong; Huang, Fu-Yuan

    2003-01-01

    In order to study the detailed function of two kinds of nebulizers commonly used in clinical asthma treatment, compressed-air and ultrasonic, this study was conducted. At the beginning, various flow rates were adjusted, paired with different volumes of solutions in the container. The changes of temperature, pH, and osmolality during the course of nebulization were examined. Normal saline, terbutaline, and fenoterol solutions were used as the nebulized solutions. The study was performed in an environment in ambient temperature around 20 degrees C and relative humidity around 70%. The results showed a minimal 6 L/min flow rate was required to nebulize the solution when using the compressed-air nebulizer. The dead volume was about 0.8 ml for compressed-air and 8.5 ml for the ultrasonic nebulizer. When using the compressed-air nebulizer, the temperature, both in the solution and at the mouthpiece site, dropped gradually. On the contrary, the temperatures at both sites increased a little bit when using the ultrasonic nebulizer. The pH values of pure terbutaline and fenoterol nebulized solutions were acidic (3.58 and 3.00 respectively). The osmolality of terbutaline and fenoterol nebulized solutions were isotonic. The osmolality increased gradually during the course of nebulization, to a greater extent in the compressed-air nebulizer. In conclusion, both types of nebulizers have their special features. The ultrasonic nebulizer displays less extent in change of temperature and osmolality during nebulization and is expected to be a better device in treating asthmatic patients in terms of lesser effect on cooling and changing the osmolality of airway mucosa.

  10. Miniscrew implant applications in contemporary orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Po Chang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The need for orthodontic treatment modalities that provide maximal anchorage control but with minimal patient compliance requirements has led to the development of implant-assisted orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics. Skeletal anchorage with miniscrew implants has no patient compliance requirements and has been widely incorporated in orthodontic practice. Miniscrew implants are now routinely used as anchorage devices in orthodontic treatment. This review summarizes recent data regarding the interpretation of bone data (i.e., bone quantity and quality obtained by preoperative diagnostic computed tomography (CT or by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT prior to miniscrew implant placement. Such data are essential when selecting appropriate sites for miniscrew implant placement. Bone characteristics that are indications and contraindications for treatment with miniscrew implants are discussed. Additionally, bicortical orthodontic skeletal anchorage, risks associated with miniscrew implant failure, and miniscrew implants for nonsurgical correction of occlusal cant or vertical excess are reviewed. Finally, implant stability is compared between titanium alloy and stainless steel miniscrew implants.

  11. Noninvasive method for retrieval of broken dental implant abutment screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadish Reddy Gooty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental implants made of titanium for replacement of missing teeth are widely used because of ease of technical procedure and high success rate, but are not free of complications and may fail. Fracturing of the prosthetic screw continues to be a problem in restorative practice and great challenge to remove the fractured screw conservatively. This case report describes and demonstrates the technique of using an ultrasonic scaler in the removal of the fracture screw fragment as a noninvasive method without damaging the hex of implants.

  12. Configuration and mobility of hydrogen implanted in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugeat, J.P.; Chami, A.C.; Ligeon, E.

    1976-01-01

    Localization methods through channeling and nuclear reaction analysis using low energy ion beam were applied to the study of deuterium and hydrogen implanted in aluminium single crystals. It was shown that implanted hydrogen occupies a tetrahedral site in the lattice as far as the implantation temperature is lower than 175K. This fact is interpreted by considering an interaction between hydrogen and monovacancies created during the implantation [fr

  13. Long time follow up of implant therapy and treatment of peri-implantitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos-Jansåker, Ann-Marie

    2007-01-01

    Dental implants have become an often used alternative to replace missing teeth, resulting in an increasing percentage of the adult population with implant supported prosthesis. Although favourable long-term results of implant therapy have been reported, infections occur. Until recently few reports included data on peri-implant infections, possibly underestimating this complication of implant treatment. It is possible that some infections around implants develop slowly and that with time peri-implantitis will be a common complication to implant therapy as an increasing number of patients have had their implants for a long time (>10 years). Data on treatment of peri-implant lesions are scarce leaving the clinician with limited guidance regarding choice of treatment. The aim of this thesis was to study the frequency of implant loss and presence of peri-implant lesions in a group of patients supplied with Brånemark implants 9-14 years ago, and to relate these events to patient and site specific characteristics. Moreover three surgical treatment modalities for peri-implantitis were evaluated. The thesis is based on six studies; Studies I-III included 218 patients and 1057 implants followed for 9-14 years evaluating prevalence of, and factors related to implant loss (Paper I) and prevalence of peri-implant infections and related factors (Paper I-III). Study IV is a review describing different treatment modalities of peri-implant infections. Study V is a prospective cohort study involving 36 patients and 65 implants, evaluating the use of a bone substitute with or without the use of a resorbable membrane. Study VI is a case series with 12 patients and 16 implants, evaluating a bone substitute in combination with a resorbable membrane and submerged healing. This thesis demonstrated that: After 9-14 years the survival rates of dental implants are high (95.7%). Implant loss seems to cluster within patients and are related to periodontitis evidenced as bone loss on

  14. Survival of Implants in Immediate Extraction Sockets of Anterior Teeth: Early Clinical Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabir, Mohammad; Alam, Mohammad Nazish

    2015-06-01

    The aims and objectives of this study were placement of implants in freshly extracted sockets of anterior teeth and to evaluate the implant stability, peri-implant radiolucency and gingival inflammation around implant over a short period of 30 months. A total of 12 patients (8 male and 4 female), ranging in the age from 20 to 50 years, from March 2007 to June 2007, were evaluated for immediate implant placement into 22 fresh extraction sockets. Only maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth/roots (central incisors, lateral incisors and canines) were considered for replacement with implants. One piece implant with integrated abutment and integrated surface, non-submerged, threaded and tapered at apical 5 mm, sand-blasted and acid etched surfaced implants (HI-TEC TRX-OP Implants of Life Care Company) were used. The mobility was not present in any of the implants at all the follow up visits. There were 2 implants at 6 month, 1 implant at 12 month, 1 implant at 18 month visits, showing peri-implant radiolucency at some sites at bone to implant contact site. Severe gingival inflammation was not observed in any of the implant site. At every follow-up visit, every implant met the criteria of success and none was found to be failed over a 30 months duration i.e. 100% success rate was achieved by implants in immediate extraction socket. The success rate of implant survival in this study was found 100%. These implants have fulfilled all the criteria of implant success and based on the defined criteria, the success rate of implants placed in immediate extraction sockets of anterior teeth compared favorably with the conventional implants. The early results of the present study showed that high survival rates with the implants in immediate extraction sockets can be achieved.

  15. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, ... to find out more. Wisdom Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can damage neighboring ...

  16. Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Karimi

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available People with profound hearing loss are not able to use some kinds of conventional amplifiers due to the nature of their loss . In these people, hearing sense is stimulated only when the auditory nerve is activated via electrical stimulation. This stimulation is possible through cochlear implant. In fact, for the deaf people who have good mental health and can not use surgical and medical treatment and also can not benefit from air and bone conduction hearing aids, this device is used if they have normal central auditory system. The basic parts of the device included: Microphone, speech processor, transmitter, stimulator and receiver, and electrode array.

  17. Periotest values of implants placed in sockets augmented with calcium phosphosilicate putty graft: a comparative analysis against implants placed in naturally healed sockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahesh, Lanka; Narayan, Tv; Kostakis, Georgios; Shukla, Sagrika

    2014-03-01

    To measure implant stability using periotest values of implants placed in sockets augmented with calcium phospho-silicate putty (CPS Putty) as compared with implant stability in naturally healed sockets. Twenty two sockets were implanted with CPS Putty immediately after extraction. The sockets were re-entered after a healing period at 5 to 6 months (average 5.3 months) for implant placement. Periotest values were recorded during implant insertion to assess primary stability. These were compared with the Periotest values of 26 implants placed in 22 patients, with naturally healed sockets. Periotest values were significantly lower in the grafted group, indicating better implant stability in sites grafted with CPS putty. Implant stability seems to be significantly higher in sockets augmented using CPS putty when compared to nongrafted sites. This suggests that socket grafting with CPS putty may enhance the quality of available bone for implantation.

  18. Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device implantations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

    2013-01-01

    Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) treatment, including permanent pacemakers (PMs), cardiac resynchronization therapy devices with defibrillators (CRT-Ds) or without (CRT-Ps), and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), are associated with increased patient...

  19. Revisiting the stability of mini-implants used for orthodontic anchorage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Chen Jane Yao

    2015-11-01

    Conclusion: This study revealed that once the dental surgeon becomes familiar with the procedure, the stability of orthodontic mini-implants depends on the type of mini-implant, age of the patient, implantation site, and the healing time of the mini-implant. Miniplates are a more feasible anchorage system when miniscrews fail repeatedly.

  20. Ultrasonic Abrasive Removal Of EDM Recast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Johnny L.; Jacobson, Marlowe S.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic abrasive process removes layer of recast material generated during electrical-discharge machining (EDM) of damper pocket on turbine blade. Form-fitted tool vibrated ultrasonically in damper pocket from which material removed. Vibrations activate abrasive in pocket. Amount of material removed controlled precisely.

  1. Defect detection and sizing in ultrasonic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moysan, J.; Benoist, P.; Chapuis, N.; Magnin, I.

    1991-01-01

    This paper introduces imaging processing developed with the SPARTACUS system in the field of ultrasonic testing. The aim of the imaging processing is to detect and to separate defects echoes from background noise. Image segmentation and particularities of ultrasonic images are the base of studied methods. 4 figs.; 6 refs [fr

  2. Reproducibility of the results in ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalaye, M.; Launay, J.P.; Thomas, A.

    1980-12-01

    This memorandum reports on the conclusions of the tests carried out in order to evaluate the reproducibility of ultrasonic tests made on welded joints. FRAMATOME have started a study to assess the dispersion of results afforded by the test line and to characterize its behaviour. The tests covered sensors and ultrasonic generators said to be identical to each other (same commercial batch) [fr

  3. Backward ray tracing for ultrasonic imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breeuwer, R.

    1990-01-01

    Focused ultrasonic beams frequently pass one or more media interfaces, strongly affecting the ultrasonic beamshape and focusing. A computer program, based on backward ray tracing was developed to compute the shape of a corrected focusing mirror. This shape is verified with another program; then the

  4. Beat-Frequency/Microsphere Medical Ultrasonic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.; Pretlow, Robert A., III

    1995-01-01

    Medical ultrasonic imaging system designed to provide quantitative data on various flows of blood in chambers, blood vessels, muscles, and tissues of heart. Sensitive enough to yield readings on flows of blood in heart even when microspheres used as ultrasonic contrast agents injected far from heart and diluted by circulation of blood elsewhere in body.

  5. Evaluation of the safety and efficiency of novel metallic ultrasonic scaler tip on titanium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seung-Ho; Shon, Won-Jun; Bae, Kwang-Shik; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Lee, Woo-Cheol; Park, Young-Seok

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficiency of novel ultrasonic scaler tips, conventional stainless-steel tips, and plastic tips on titanium surfaces. Mechanical instrumentation was carried out using conventional ultrasonic scalers (EMS, Nyon, Switzerland) with novel metallic implant tip (BS), a plastic-headed tip (ES), a plastic tip (PS) and a conventional stainless-steel tip (CS) on 10 polished commercially pure titanium disks (Grade II) per group. Arithmetic mean roughness (R(a) ) and maximum height roughness (R(y) ) of titanium samples were measured and dissipated power of the scaler tip in the tip-surface junction was estimated to investigate the scaling efficiency. The instrumented surface morphology of samples was viewed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and surface profile of the each sample was investigated using contact mode with a commercial atomic force microscope (AFM). There were no significant differences in surface roughness (R(a) and R(y) ) among BS, ES, and PS group. However, CS group showed significant higher surface roughness (R(a) and R(y) ). The efficiency of CS tip is twice as much higher than that of BS tip, the efficiency of BS tip is 20 times higher than that of PS tip, and the efficiency of BS tip is 90 times higher than that of ES tip. Novel metallic copper alloy ultrasonic scaler tips may minimally influence the titanium surface, similar to plastic tip. Therefore, they can be a suitable instrument for implant maintenance therapy. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Integrate models of ultrasonics examination for NDT expertise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calmon, P.; Lhemery, A.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Raillon, R.

    1996-01-01

    For several years, the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) has developed a system called CIVA for multiple-technique NDE data acquisition and processing. Modeling tools for ultrasonic non-destructive testing have been developed and implemented within this allowing direct comparison between measured and predicted results. These models are not only devoted to laboratory uses bus also must be usable by ultrasonic operators without special training in simulation techniques. Therefore, emphasis has been on finding the best compromise between as accurate as possible quantitative predictions and ease, simplicity and speed, crucial requirements in the industrial context. This approach has led us to develop approximate models for the different phenomena involved in ultrasonic inspections: radiation, transmission through interfaces, propagation, scattering by defects and boundaries, reception etc. Two main models have been implemented, covering the most commonly encountered NDT configurations. At first, these two models are shortly described. Then, two examples of their applications are shown. Based on the same underlying theories, specific modeling tools are proposed to industrial partners to answer special requirements. To illustrate this, an example is given of a software used a tool to help experts's interpretation during on-site french PWR vessel inspections. Other models can be implemented in CIVA when some assumptions made in the previous models Champ-Sons and Mephisto are not fulfilled, e. g., when less-conventional testing configurations are concerned. We briefly presents as an example a modeling study of echoes arising from cladded steel surfaces achieved in the laboratory. (authors)

  7. Ultrasonic characterization of microstructure in powder metal alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittmann, B. R.; Ahlberg, L. A.; Fertig, K.

    1986-01-01

    The ultrasonic wave propagation characteristics were measured for IN-100, a powder metallurgy alloy used for aircraft engine components. This material was as a model system for testing the feasibility of characterizing the microstructure of a variety of inhomogeneous media including powder metals, ceramics, castings and components. The data were obtained for a frequency range from about 2 to 20 MHz and were statistically averaged over numerous volume elements of the samples. Micrographical examination provided size and number distributions for grain and pore structure. The results showed that the predominant source for the ultrasonic attenuation and backscatter was a dense (approx. 100/cubic mm) distribution of small micropores (approx. 10 micron radius). Two samples with different micropore densities were studied in detail to test the feasibility of calculating from observed microstructural parameters the frequency dependence of the microstructural backscatter in the regime for which the wavelength is much larger than the size of the individual scattering centers. Excellent agreement was found between predicted and observed values so as to demonstrate the feasibility of solving the forward problem. The results suggest a way towards the nondestructive detection and characterization of anomalous distributions of micropores when conventional ultrasonic imaging is difficult. The findings are potentially significant toward the application of the early detection of porosity during the materials fabrication process and after manufacturing of potential sites for stress induced void coalescence leading to crack initiation and subsequent failure.

  8. Mechanism and kinetics of parathion degradation under ultrasonic irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Juanjuan, E-mail: yao_juanjuan@yahoo.cn [State Key laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, Tongji University, Shanghai, 200092 (China); Gao Naiyun; Li Cong; Li Lei; Xu Bin [State Key laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, Tongji University, Shanghai, 200092 (China)

    2010-03-15

    The parathion degradation under ultrasonic irradiation in aqueous solution was investigated. The results indicate that at the conditions in question, degradation rate of parathion decreased with increasing initial concentration and decreasing power. The optimal frequency for parathion degradation was 600 kHz. The free radical reactions predominate in the sonochemical degradation of parathion and the reaction zones are predominately at the bubble interface and, to a much lesser extent, in bulk solution. The gas/liquid interfacial regions are the real effective reaction sites for sonochemical degradation of parathion. The reaction can be well described as a gas/liquid heterogeneous reaction which obeys a kinetic model based on Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. The main pathways of parathion degradation by ultrasonic irradiation were also proposed by qualitative and quantitative analysis of organic and inorganic byproducts. It is indicated that the N{sub 2} in air takes part in the parathion degradation through the formation of {center_dot}NO{sub 2} under ultrasonic irradiation. Parathion is decomposed into paraoxon and 4-nitrophenol in the first step via two different pathways, respectively, which is in agreement with the theoretical molecular orbital (MO) calculations.

  9. Non-destructive evaluation of concrete using ultrasonic pulse velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, I.

    2008-06-01

    Ultrasonic pulse velocity is one of the most popular non-destructive techniques used in the assessment of concrete properties. This thesis investigates the relationship between using ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) and the conventional compressive strength tests to determine concrete uniformity. The specimens used in the studies were made of concrete with a paste content of 18% and the constituents of the specimens varied in different water-cement ratios (w/c). The UPV measurement and compressive strength tests were carried out at the concrete age of 2, 7, 15 and 28 days. The UPV and the compressive strength of concrete increase with age, but the growth rate varies with mixture proportion. A relationship curve is drawn between UPV and compressive strength for concrete having different w/c from 0.35 to 0.7. Tests were also performed using Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity Method (UPVM) in detecting discontinuity and determining its depth during the early age of concrete. The test results indicate that the UPVM can be used to assess the in-situ properties of concrete or for quality control on site. The accuracy of the UPVM in detecting discontinuities ranges from 55.75 to 98.70% for ages 3 to 28 (full strength) respectively. (au)

  10. The Dynamic Performance of Flexural Ultrasonic Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Feeney

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Flexural ultrasonic transducers are principally used as proximity sensors and for industrial metrology. Their operation relies on a piezoelectric ceramic to generate a flexing of a metallic membrane, which delivers the ultrasound signal. The performance of flexural ultrasonic transducers has been largely limited to excitation through a short voltage burst signal at a designated mechanical resonance frequency. However, a steady-state amplitude response is not generated instantaneously in a flexural ultrasonic transducer from a drive excitation signal, and differences in the drive characteristics between transmitting and receiving transducers can affect the measured response. This research investigates the dynamic performance of flexural ultrasonic transducers using acoustic microphone measurements and laser Doppler vibrometry, supported by a detailed mechanical analog model, in a process which has not before been applied to the flexural ultrasonic transducer. These techniques are employed to gain insights into the physics of their vibration behaviour, vital for the optimisation of industrial ultrasound systems.

  11. Plasma Sterilizer with Ultrasonic Cavitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnyj, V.V.; Klosovsky, A.V.; Panasko, T.A.; Shvets, O.M.; Semenova, O.T.; Taran, V.S.; Tereshin, V.I.

    2006-01-01

    A sterilizer consists of ozone generator based on a barrier glow discharge with the flat electrodes covered with dielectric with a high-voltage pulsed power supply of up to 250 W (1). The sterilization camera is equipped with ultrasonic source with the power of 100 W. The experiments on the inactivation of bacteria of the Bacillus Cereus type were carried out in the distilled water saturated by ozone. Ozone concentration in the aqueous solution was 6 mg/liter with ozone concentration at the output of ozone generator 30 mg/liter. The complete inactivation of spores took 15 min

  12. Hydrogen-isotope motion in scandium studied by ultrasonic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leisure, R.G.; Schwarz, R.B.; Migliori, A.; Torgeson, D.R.; Svare, I.

    1993-01-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy has been used to investigate ultrasonic attenuation in single crystals of Sc, ScH 0.25 , and ScD 0.18 over the temperature range of 10--300 K for frequencies near 1 MHz. Ultrasonic-attenuation peaks were observed in the samples containing H or D with the maximum attenuation occurring near 25 K for ScH 0.25 and near 50 K for ScD 0.18 . The general features of the data suggest that the motion reflected in the ultrasonic attenuation is closely related to the low-temperature motion seen in nulcear-magnetic-resonance spin-lattice-relaxation measurements. The ultrasonic results were fit with a two-level-system (TLS) model involving tunneling between highly asymmetric sites. The relaxation of the TLS was found to consist of two parts: a weakly temperature-dependent part, probably due to coupling to electrons; and a much more strongly temperature-dependent part, attributed to multiple-phonon processes. The strongly temperature-dependent part was almost two orders of magnitude faster in ScH 0.25 than in ScD 0.18 , in accordance with the idea that tunneling is involved in the motion. Surprisingly, the weakly temperature-dependent part was found to be about the same for the two isotopes. The asymmetries primarily responsible for coupling the TLS to the ultrasound are attributed to interactions between hydrogen ions that lie on adjacent c axes. The results are consistent with an isotope-independent strength for the coupling of the TLS to the ultrasound

  13. Ultrasonic imaging of projected components of PFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sylvia, J.I., E-mail: sylvia@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India); Jeyan, M.R.; Anbucheliyan, M.; Asokane, C.; Babu, V. Rajan; Babu, B.; Rajan, K.K.; Velusamy, K.; Jayakumar, T. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Under sodium ultrasonic scanner in PFBR is for detecting protruding objects. ► Feasibility study for detecting Absorber rods and its drive mechanisms. ► Developed in-house PC based ultrasonic imaging system. ► Different case studies were carried out on simulated ARDM's. ► Implemented the experimental results to PFBR application. -- Abstract: The 500 MWe, sodium cooled, Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is under advanced stage of construction at Kalpakkam in India. Opacity of sodium restricts visual inspection of components immersed in sodium by optical means. Ultrasonic wave passes through sodium hence ultrasonic techniques using under sodium ultrasonic scanners are developed to obtain under sodium images. The main objective of such an Under Sodium Ultrasonic Scanner (USUSS) for Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is to detect and ensure that no core Sub Assembly (SA) or Absorber Rod or its Drive Mechanism is protruded in the above core plenum before starting the fuel handling operation. Hence, it is necessary to detect and locate the object, if it is protruding the above core plenum. To study the feasibility of detecting the absorber rods and their drive mechanisms using direct ultrasonic imaging technique, experiments were carried out for different orientations and profiles of the projected components in a 5 m diameter water tank. The in-house developed PC based ultrasonic scanning system is used for acquisition and analysis of data. The pseudo three dimensional color images obtained are discussed and the results are applicable for PFBR. This paper gives the details of the features of the absorber rods and their drive mechanisms, their orientation in the reactor core, experimental setup, PC based ultrasonic scanning system, ultrasonic images and the discussion on the results.

  14. 21 CFR 882.1925 - Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block. 882... Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic scanner calibration test block is a block of material with known properties used to calibrate ultrasonic scanning devices (e.g., the...

  15. Dynamics of ultrasonic additive manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehr, Adam; Dapino, Marcelo J

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a solid-state technology for joining similar and dissimilar metal foils near room temperature by scrubbing them together with ultrasonic vibrations under pressure. Structural dynamics of the welding assembly and work piece influence how energy is transferred during the process and ultimately, part quality. To understand the effect of structural dynamics during UAM, a linear time-invariant model is proposed to relate the inputs of shear force and electric current to resultant welder velocity and voltage. Measured frequency response and operating performance of the welder under no load is used to identify model parameters. Using this model and in-situ measurements, shear force and welder efficiency are estimated to be near 2000N and 80% when welding Al 6061-H18 weld foil, respectively. Shear force and welder efficiency have never been estimated before in UAM. The influence of processing conditions, i.e., welder amplitude, normal force, and weld speed, on shear force and welder efficiency are investigated. Welder velocity was found to strongly influence the shear force magnitude and efficiency while normal force and weld speed showed little to no influence. The proposed model is used to describe high frequency harmonic content in the velocity response of the welder during welding operations and coupling of the UAM build with the welder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Deconvolution algorithms applied in ultrasonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrot, P.

    1993-12-01

    In a complete system of acquisition and processing of ultrasonic signals, it is often necessary at one stage to use some processing tools to get rid of the influence of the different elements of that system. By that means, the final quality of the signals in terms of resolution is improved. There are two main characteristics of ultrasonic signals which make this task difficult. Firstly, the signals generated by transducers are very often non-minimum phase. The classical deconvolution algorithms are unable to deal with such characteristics. Secondly, depending on the medium, the shape of the propagating pulse is evolving. The spatial invariance assumption often used in classical deconvolution algorithms is rarely valid. Many classical algorithms, parametric and non-parametric, have been investigated: the Wiener-type, the adaptive predictive techniques, the Oldenburg technique in the frequency domain, the minimum variance deconvolution. All the algorithms have been firstly tested on simulated data. One specific experimental set-up has also been analysed. Simulated and real data has been produced. This set-up demonstrated the interest in applying deconvolution, in terms of the achieved resolution. (author). 32 figs., 29 refs

  17. Ultrasonic Characterization of Aerospace Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckey, Cara; Johnston, Patrick; Haldren, Harold; Perey, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Composite materials have seen an increased use in aerospace in recent years and it is expected that this trend will continue due to the benefits of reduced weight, increased strength, and other factors. Ongoing work at NASA involves the investigation of the large-scale use of composites for spacecraft structures (SLS components, Orion Composite Crew Module, etc). NASA is also involved in work to enable the use of composites in advanced aircraft structures through the Advanced Composites Project (ACP). In both areas (space and aeronautics) there is a need for new nondestructive evaluation and materials characterization techniques that are appropriate for characterizing composite materials. This paper will present an overview of NASA's needs for characterizing aerospace composites, including a description of planned and ongoing work under ACP for the detection of composite defects such as fiber waviness, reduced bond strength, delamination damage, and microcracking. The research approaches include investigation of angle array, guided wave, and phase sensitive ultrasonic methods. The use of ultrasonic simulation tools for optimizing and developing methods will also be discussed.

  18. Ultrasonic inspection of inpile tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, D.M.; Bossi, H.

    1985-01-01

    The in-service inspection (ISI) of inpile tubes can be performed accurately and safely with a semiautomatic ultrasonic inspection system. The ultrasonic technique uses a set of multiple transducers to detect and size cracks, voids, and laminations radially and circumferentially. Welds are also inspected for defects. The system is designed to inspect stainless steel and Inconel tubes ranging from 53.8 mm (2.12 in.) to 101.6 mm (4 in.) inner diameter with wall thickness on the order of 5 mm. The inspection head contains seven transducers mounted in a surface-following device. Six angle-beam transducers generate shear waves in the tubes. Two of the six are oriented to detect circumferential cracks, and two detect axial cracks. Although each of these four transducers is used in the pulse-echo mode, they are oriented in aligned sets so pitch-catch operation is possible if desired. The remaining angle-beam transducers are angulated to detect flaws that are off axial or circumferential orientation. The seventh transducer is used for longitudinal inspection and detects and sizes laminar-type defects

  19. Calculations for piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, H.

    1986-05-01

    Analysis of piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers implies a solution of a boundary value problem, for a body which consists of different materials, including a piezoelectric part. The problem is dynamic at frequencies, where a typical wavelength is somewhat less than the size of the body. Radiation losses as well as internal losses may be important. Due to the complexity of the problem, a closed form solution is the exception rather than the rule. For this reason, it is necessary to use approximate methods for the analysis. Equivalent circuits, the Rayleigh-Ritz method, Mindlin plate theory and in particular the finite element method are considered. The finite element method is utilized for analysis of axisymmetric transducers. An explicit, fully piezoelectric, triangular ring element, with linear variations in displacement and electric potential is given. The influence of a fluid half-space is also given, in the form of a complex stiffness matrix. A special stacking procedure, for analysis of the backing has been developed. This procedure gives a saving, which is similar to that of the fast fourier transform algorithm, and is also wellsuited for analysis of finite and infinite waveguides. Results obtained by the finite element method are shown and compared with measurements and exact solutions. Good agreement is obtained. It is concluded that the finite element method can be a valueable tool in analysis and design of ultrasonic transducers. (author)

  20. Insight into PreImplantation Factor (PIF* mechanism for embryo protection and development: target oxidative stress and protein misfolding (PDI and HSP through essential RIKP [corrected] binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eytan R Barnea

    Full Text Available Endogenous PIF, upon which embryo development is dependent, is secreted only by viable mammalian embryos, and absent in non-viable ones. Synthetic PIF (sPIF administration promotes singly cultured embryos development and protects against their demise caused by embryo-toxic serum. To identify and characterize critical sPIF-embryo protein interactions novel biochemical and bio-analytical methods were specifically devised.FITC-PIF uptake/binding by cultured murine and equine embryos was examined and compared with scrambled FITC-PIF (control. Murine embryo (d10 lysates were fractionated by reversed-phase HPLC, fractions printed onto microarray slides and probed with Biotin-PIF, IDE and Kv1.3 antibodies, using fluorescence detection. sPIF-based affinity column was developed to extract and identify PIF-protein interactions from lysates using peptide mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS. In silico evaluation examined binding of PIF to critical targets, using mutation analysis.PIF directly targets viable cultured embryos as compared with control peptide, which failed to bind. Multistep Biotin-PIF targets were confirmed by single-step PIF-affinity column based isolation. PIF binds protein disulfide isomerases a prolyl-4-hydroxylase β-subunit, (PDI, PDIA4, PDIA6-like containing the antioxidant thioredoxin domain. PIF also binds protective heat shock proteins (70&90, co-chaperone, BAG-3. Remarkably, PIF targets a common RIKP [corrected] site in PDI and HSP proteins. Further, single PIF amino acid mutation significantly reduced peptide-protein target bonding. PIF binds promiscuous tubulins, neuron backbones and ACTA-1,2 visceral proteins. Significant anti-IDE, while limited anti-Kv1.3b antibody-binding to Biotin-PIF positive lysates HPLC fractions were documented.Collectively, data identifies PIF shared targets on PDI and HSP in the embryo. Such are known to play a critical role in protecting against oxidative stress and protein misfolding. PIF-affinity-column is a

  1. Retrograde peri-implantitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Jumshad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Retrograde peri-implantitis constitutes an important cause for implant failure. Retrograde peri-implantitis may sometimes prove difficult to identify and hence institution of early treatment may not be possible. This paper presents a report of four cases of (the implant placed developing to retrograde peri-implantitis. Three of these implants were successfully restored to their fully functional state while one was lost due to extensive damage. The paper highlights the importance of recognizing the etiopathogenic mechanisms, preoperative assessment, and a strong postoperative maintenance protocol to avoid retrograde peri-implant inflammation.

  2. Design and measurement of a piezoresistive ultrasonic sensor based on MEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jiaqi; He Changde; Yuan Kejing; Xue Chenyang; Zhang Wendong; Lian Deqin

    2013-01-01

    A kind of piezoresistive ultrasonic sensor based on MEMS is proposed, which is composed of a membrane and two side beams. A simplified mathematical model has been established to analyze the mechanical properties of the sensor. On the basis of the theoretical analysis, the structural size and layout location of the piezoresistors are determined by simulation analysis. The boron-implanted piezoresistors located on membrane and side beams form a Wheatstone bridge to detect acoustic signal. The membrane-beam microstructure is fabricated integrally by MEMS manufacturing technology. Finally, this paper presents the experimental characterization of the ultrasonic sensor, validating the theoretical model used and the simulated model. The sensitivity reaches −116.2 dB (0 dB reference = 1 V/μbar, 31 kHz), resonant frequency is 39.6 kHz, direction angle is 55°. (semiconductor devices)

  3. Quality control of disinfection in ultrasonic baths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoene, H. [Technical University Dresden (Germany). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering; Jatzwauk, L. [University Hospital of the Technical University Dresden (Germany). Abt. Krankenhaushygiene

    2002-07-01

    Numerous investigations under laboratory conditions confirmed the microbicidal efficacy of ultrasonication. Morphological destruction was shown on bacteria and fungi as well as on different virus species. Ultrasonic treatment seems to increase the effect of different antibiotics and disinfectants. Reasons for this synergism are largely unknown and uninvestigated, but the active principle seems to bee the dispersing effect of ultrasonication in combination with the destruction of cell wall or cell membrane. Unfortunately no validation of test conditions exists for most of these investigations, regarding intensity and frequency of ultrasonic waves, temperature of liquid medium and measurement of cavitation which is an essential part of physical and chemical effects in ultrasonic baths. In contrast to most laboratory experiments sound density of ultrasound for treatment of medical instruments is below 1 W/cm{sup 2} because instruments will be destroyed under stronger ultrasonic conditions. The frequency is below 50 KHz. This paper describes bactericidal and fungicidal effects of low- intensity-ultrasonication and its synergistical support to chemical disinfection. (orig.)

  4. Radiation-Force Assisted Targeting Facilitates Ultrasonic Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukui Zhao

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic molecular imaging employs contrast agents, such as microbubbles, nanoparticles, or liposomes, coated with ligands specific for receptors expressed on cells at sites of angiogenesis, inflammation, or thrombus. Concentration of these highly echogenic contrast agents at a target site enhances the ultrasound signal received from that site, promoting ultrasonic detection and analysis of disease states. In this article, we show that acoustic radiation force can be used to displace targeted contrast agents to a vessel wall, greatly increasing the number of agents binding to available surface receptors. We provide a theoretical evaluation of the magnitude of acoustic radiation force and show that it is possible to displace micron-sized agents physiologically relevant distances. Following this, we show in a series of experiments that acoustic radiation force can enhance the binding of targeted agents: The number of biotinylated microbubbles adherent to a synthetic vessel coated with avidin increases as much as 20-fold when acoustic radiation force is applied; the adhesion of contrast agents targeted to αvβ3 expressed on human umbilical vein endothelial cells increases 27-fold within a mimetic vessel when radiation force is applied; and finally, the image signal-to-noise ratio in a phantom vessel increases up to 25 dB using a combination of radiation force and a targeted contrast agent, over use of a targeted contrast agent alone.

  5. Individual titanium zygomatic implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekhoroshev, M. V.; Ryabov, K. N.; Avdeev, E. V.

    2018-03-01

    Custom individual implants for the reconstruction of craniofacial defects have gained importance due to better qualitative characteristics over their generic counterparts – plates, which should be bent according to patient needs. The Additive Manufacturing of individual implants allows reducing cost and improving quality of implants. In this paper, the authors describe design of zygomatic implant models based on computed tomography (CT) data. The fabrication of the implants will be carried out with 3D printing by selective laser melting machine SLM 280HL.

  6. Ultrasonic decontamination of nuclear fuel. Feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, A.; Libal, A.; Norbaeck, J.; Wegemar, B.

    1995-05-01

    Ultrasonic decontamination of nuclear fuel is an expeditious way to reduce radiation exposures resulting in a minimal volume of waste. The fuel assemblies are set up in the fuel preparation machine one at a time and treated without prior disassemblage. By decontaminating 20% of the BWR fuel assemblies annually, there is a potential to reduce the collective dose by approximately 40-50%. Including also improved reactivity of the fuel, this amounts to an economic benefit of about 4 MSEK per reactor and year. The costs for performing the decontamination can be economically justified if the plants do not plan for short outages each year. The decontamination method could also be used for the purpose of removing tramp Uranium following a fuel failure or minor core accident. An additional benefit is removal of loosely adherent crud. The waste produced will be handled in a closed filtering circuit. The method is suggested to be verified in a test on discharged burnt-up fuel at site. The next step will be to develop the method further in order to be able to remove also tenacious crud. 12 refs, 4 tabs

  7. Location of unaccessible implant surface areas during debridement in simulated peri-implantitis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger-Ronay, Valerie; Merlini, Andrea; Wiedemeier, Daniel B; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Attin, Thomas; Sahrmann, Philipp

    2017-11-28

    An in vitro model for peri-implantitis treatment was used to identify areas that are clinically difficult to clean by analyzing the pattern of residual stain after debridement with commonly employed instruments. Original data from two previous publications, which simulated surgical (SA) and non-surgical (NSA) implant debridement on two different implant systems respectively, were reanalyzed regarding the localization pattern of residual stains after instrumentation. Two blinded examiners evaluated standardized photographs of 360 initially ink-stained dental implants, which were cleaned at variable defect angulations (30, 60, or 90°), using different instrument types (Gracey curette, ultrasonic scaler or air powder abrasive device) and treatment approaches (SA or NSA). Predefined implant surface areas were graded for residual stain using scores ranging from one (stain-covered) to six (clean). Score differences between respective implant areas were tested for significance by pairwise comparisons using Wilcoxon-rank-sum-tests with a significance level α = 5%. Best scores were found at the machined surface areas (SA: 5.58 ± 0.43, NSA: 4.76 ± 1.09), followed by the tips of the threads (SA: 4.29 ± 0.44, NSA: 4.43 ± 0.61), and areas between threads (SA: 3.79 ± 0.89, NSA: 2.42 ± 1.11). Apically facing threads were most difficult to clean (SA: 1.70 ± 0.92, NSA: 2.42 ± 1.11). Here, air powder abrasives provided the best results. Machined surfaces at the implant shoulder were well accessible and showed least amounts of residual stain. Apically facing thread surfaces constituted the area with most residual stain regardless of treatment approach.

  8. Ultrasonic tests on materials with protective coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whaley, H.L.

    1977-01-01

    Protective coatings are applied to some nuclear components such as reactor vessels to inhibit surface corrosion. Since in-service ultrasonic inspection is required for such components, a study was performed to determine whether the use of protective coatings can affect ultrasonic tests. Two 2 in. thick steel plates were uniformly machined, sandblasted, and used as bases for two types of protective coatings. The type and thickness of the coating and the presence of contamination, such as fingerprints or mild oxidation under the paint, were the independent variables associated with the coating. Tests were run to determine the effects of the protective coatings on ultrasonic tests conducted on the steel plates. Significant variations in ultrasonic test sensitivity occurred as a function of the type and thickness of protective coating, couplant (material that conducts the ultrasound from the transducer into the test part, normally water or some type of oil), transducer wear plate, and ultrasonic test frequency. Ultrasonic tests can be strongly affected by a protective coating on the component to be inspected. As compared to the test sensitivity for an uncoated reference sample, the sensitivity may be dramatically shifted up or down on the coated surface. In certain coating thickness ranges, the sensitivity can fluctuate widely with small changes in coating thickness. If a coating is chosen properly, however, components with protective coatings can be tested ultrasonically with valid results. These results are for the case of ultrasonic input on the coated surface. It is not expected that an ultrasonic test conducted from the front surface would be appreciably affected by a coating on the rear surface

  9. Computer simulation of ultrasonic waves in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thibault, G.A.; Chaplin, K.

    1992-01-01

    A computer model that simulates the propagation of ultrasonic waves has been developed at AECL Research, Chalk River Laboratories. This program is called EWE, short for Elastic Wave Equations, the mathematics governing the propagation of ultrasonic waves. This report contains a brief summary of the use of ultrasonic waves in non-destructive testing techniques, a discussion of the EWE simulation code explaining the implementation of the equations and the types of output received from the model, and an example simulation showing the abilities of the model. (author). 2 refs., 2 figs

  10. Ultrasonic characterization of vegetable oil product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidek Hj Abd Aziz; Chow Sai Pew; Abdul Halim Shaari; Nor Azizah Shaari

    1992-01-01

    The ultrasonic wave velocity and attenuation of a number vegetable oil products were measured using an ultrasonic pulse echo overlap technique from room temperature up to 90 0 C. Among the liquid samples studied were refined bleach deodorized (RED) palm oil, palm olein, coconut oil, corn oil and soya bean oil. The velocity of sound in vegetable oil products varies from about 1200 to 200 ms-1 and decrease linearly as the temperature increases. The ultrasonic properties of the oil are much dependent on their viscosity, density, relaxation effect and vibrational anharmonicity

  11. On-line ultrasonic gas entrainment monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, C.K.; Pedersen, H.N.

    1978-01-01

    Apparatus employing ultrasonic energy for detecting and measuring the quantity of gas bubbles present in liquids being transported through pipes is described. An ultrasonic transducer is positioned along the longitudinal axis of a fluid duct, oriented to transmit acoustic energy radially of the duct around the circumference of the enclosure walls. The back-reflected energy is received centrally of the duct and interpreted as a measure of gas entrainment. One embodiment employs a conical reflector to direct the transmitted acoustic energy radially of the duct and redirect the reflected energy back to the transducer for reception. A modified embodiment employs a cylindrical ultrasonic transducer for this purpose

  12. Fundamentals and applications of ultrasonic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Cheeke, J David N

    2002-01-01

    Ultrasonics. A subject with applications across all the basic sciences, engineering, medicine, and oceanography, yet even the broader topic of acoustics is now rarely offered at undergraduate levels. Ultrasonics is addressed primarily at the doctoral level, and texts appropriate for beginning graduate students or newcomers to the field are virtually nonexistent.Fundamentals and Applications of Ultrasonic Waves fills that void. Designed specifically for senior undergraduates, beginning graduate students, and those just entering the field, it begins with the fundamentals, but goes well beyond th

  13. Compact and air-transportable ultrasonic turbine disc bore inspection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, R.E.; Leon-Salamanca, T.

    1990-01-01

    A compact, lightweight, air-transportable ultrasonic inspection system for bore and keyway regions of shrunk-on turbine discs has been developed. The system utilizes a proprietary ultrasound liquid coupling technique in conjunction with a single pair of gimballed search units to achieve rapid and thorough coverage of bores and keyways in both heavy nuclear and standard fossil discs of nearly any size and having any conceivable web surface contour. Search unit positioning and angulation parameter settings are established in near real-time through a computation algorithm based on a compact vector ray tracing protocol. Modular construction and the use of lightweight, stiff materials throughout facilitates air shipment of the system and its rapid deployment at continental and overseas field sites. Mechanical and ultrasonic features of the system are described. Development and application of the computation algorithm to the ultrasonic inspection of heavy discs at an overseas power station is discussed

  14. Physical state of implanted W in copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borders, J.A.; Cullis, A.G.; Poate, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and 4 He ion channeling measurements were combined to investigate the physical state of implanted W in copper. For 60 0 K implantations of 2 x 10 15 W cm -2 , W is found to be 100 percent substitutional and is still 90 percent substitutional for a dose of 10 16 W cm -2 . Implantation of 10 17 W cm -2 produces a thin disordered surface layer of W and Cu with the W occupying no regular lattice site. On annealing to 600 0 C, W precipitates are formed with dimensions of a few hundred A and certain preferred orientations in the Cu lattice. (auth)

  15. An ultrasonic system for weed detection in cereal crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andújar, Dionisio; Weis, Martin; Gerhards, Roland

    2012-12-13

    Site-specific weed management requires sensing of the actual weed infestation levels in agricultural fields to adapt the management accordingly. However, sophisticated sensor systems are not yet in wider practical use, since they are not easily available for the farmers and their handling as well as the management practice requires additional efforts. A new sensor-based weed detection method is presented in this paper and its applicability to cereal crops is evaluated. An ultrasonic distance sensor for the determination of plant heights was used for weed detection. It was hypothesised that the weed infested zones have a higher amount of biomass than non-infested areas and that this can be determined by plant height measurements. Ultrasonic distance measurements were taken in a winter wheat field infested by grass weeds and broad-leaved weeds. A total of 80 and 40 circular-shaped samples of different weed densities and compositions were assessed at two different dates. The sensor was pointed directly to the ground for height determination. In the following, weeds were counted and then removed from the sample locations. Grass weeds and broad-leaved weeds were separately removed. Differences between weed infested and weed-free measurements were determined. Dry-matter of weeds and crop was assessed and evaluated together with the sensor measurements. RGB images were taken prior and after weed removal to determine the coverage percentages of weeds and crop per sampling point. Image processing steps included EGI (excess green index) computation and thresholding to separate plants and background. The relationship between ultrasonic readings and the corresponding coverage of the crop and weeds were assessed using multiple regression analysis. Results revealed a height difference between infested and non-infested sample locations. Density and biomass of weeds present in the sample influenced the ultrasonic readings. The possibilities of weed group discrimination were

  16. Piezosurgery in implant dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stübinger S

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Stefan Stübinger,1 Andres Stricker,2 Britt-Isabelle Berg3,4 1Hightech Research Center of Cranio-maxillofacial Surgery, University of Basel, Allschwil, Switzerland; 2Private Practice, Konstanz, Germany; 3Department of Cranio-maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 4Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Piezosurgery, or the use of piezoelectric devices, is being applied increasingly in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The main advantages of this technique are precise and selective cuttings, the avoidance of thermal damage, and the preservation of soft-tissue structures. Through the application of piezoelectric surgery, implant-site preparation, bone grafting, sinus-floor elevation, edentulous ridge splitting or the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve are very technically feasible. This clinical overview gives a short summary of the current literature and outlines the advantages and disadvantages of piezoelectric bone surgery in implant dentistry. Overall, piezoelectric surgery is superior to other methods that utilize mechanical instruments. Handling of delicate or compromised hard- and soft-tissue conditions can be performed with less risk for the patient. With respect to current and future innovative surgical concepts, piezoelectric surgery offers a wide range of new possibilities to perform customized and minimally invasive osteotomies. Keywords: implantology, piezoelectric device, piezosurgery, maxillary sinus elevation, bone grafting, osteotomy, edentulous ridge splitting

  17. Track type ultrasonic inspection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajiyama, Shigeru; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Takahisa, Kazuo.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention concerns an improvement of a scanning device disposed near an object to be inspected such as a nuclear pressure vessel and having an ultrasonic probe, mounted thereon that travel along a running track. Specifically, one of wheel supports on both sides is attached being secured to the scanning device. The other of the supports is capable of fixing and releasing, as well as providing and releasing pressure to and from wheels upon mounting and detachment. This enables to provide a structure capable of pressing the wheels of the running device to the plane of the track and release thereof. Accordingly, it is possible to improve the running performance, reduce the size and weight and shorten the time for mounting and detachment of the running inspection device. (I.S.)

  18. Cracks assessment using ultrasonic technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Maria Pia; Tomasella, Marcelo [OLDELVAL S.A. Oleoductos del Valle, Rio Negro (Argentina). Pipeline Integrity Dept.

    2005-07-01

    The goal of Oldelval Integrity Program is to prevent ruptures and leaks, developing strategies for a better handling of the integrity of our pipelines. In order to achieve it we have studied and modeled each process that involved in the integrity pipeline. Those processes are mainly based on defects reported by an internal inspection tool and supplied with field inspection and monitoring data. Years of evaluation, study and the continuous effort overturned towards a phenomenon that worries to the industry, as it is the SCC. Since 1998 up to 2004 SCC was included in the integrity program with some preventive maintenance programs. The accomplishment of the inspection based on ultrasound tools, is the culmination of years of evaluation and investigations supported by field digs and materials susceptibility. This paper describes Oldelval's results with ultrasonic crack detection tool, and how it can be reliably to detect SCC. (author)

  19. Integrated Ultrasonic-Photonic Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barretto, Elaine Cristina Saraiva

    in channel waveguides and Mach-Zehnder interferometers. Numerical models are developed based on the finite element method, and applied to several scenarios, such as optimization of the geometrical parameters of waveguides, use of slow light in photonic crystal waveguides and use of Lamb waves in membranized......This thesis deals with the modeling, design, fabrication and characterization of integrated ultrasonic-photonic devices, with particular focus on the use of standard semiconductor materials such as GaAs and silicon. The devices are based on the use of guided acoustic waves to modulate the light...... investigated. Comparisons are made with the numerical and experimental results, and they validate the obtained response of the acoustic and photonic components of the device. Finally, a new design for an optical frequency shifter is proposed, posing several advantages over existing devices in terms of size...

  20. Ultrasonic Histotripsy for Tissue Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahk, K. J.; Dhar, D. K.; Malago, M.; Saffari, N.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation has been considered and investigated as a promising and alternative method to liver transplantation for treating liver-based metabolic disorder in newborns over the past two decades. Although some clinical trials have been conducted and shown clinical benefits and outcomes, it is difficult to deliver and achieve a desired level of integration and transplantation of hepatocytes in the liver parenchyma. To overcome this problem, this work introduces an alternative method to a portal-infused-hepatocyte cell transplantation. To improve the level of engraftment of transplantable hepatocytes, these are injected directly into cavities generated by ultrasonic histotripsy. Histotripsy is an extracorporeal noninvasive technique which has been recently developed using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for inducing tissue fractionation with no coagulative necrosis. The exact mechanisms for the tissue fractionation are not well understood yet; but the possible mechanisms are thought to be a combination of nonlinear wave propagation effect, explosive bubble growth and ultrasonic atomization. The main objectives of this work are to demonstrate the feasibility of this new cell therapy and evaluate and distinguish between the different types of cavitation activity for either a thermally or a mechanically induced lesion. In the present work, numerical studies on the bubble dynamics (the Gilmore-Akulichev bubble model coupled with the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov equation) and both ex- and in vivo liver experiments are conducted with histological analysis (haematoxylin and eosin stain). The numerical and the experimental results suggest that (a) the acoustic emissions emitted during the thermal ablation and the histotripsy exposure can be distinguished both numerically and experimentally and (b) the proposed cell therapy may potentially form an effective and safe clinical treatment for replacing and correcting disordered hepatocytes, although the

  1. Ultrasonic Histotripsy for Tissue Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahk, K J; Saffari, N; Dhar, D K; Malago, M

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation has been considered and investigated as a promising and alternative method to liver transplantation for treating liver-based metabolic disorder in newborns over the past two decades. Although some clinical trials have been conducted and shown clinical benefits and outcomes, it is difficult to deliver and achieve a desired level of integration and transplantation of hepatocytes in the liver parenchyma. To overcome this problem, this work introduces an alternative method to a portal-infused-hepatocyte cell transplantation. To improve the level of engraftment of transplantable hepatocytes, these are injected directly into cavities generated by ultrasonic histotripsy. Histotripsy is an extracorporeal noninvasive technique which has been recently developed using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for inducing tissue fractionation with no coagulative necrosis. The exact mechanisms for the tissue fractionation are not well understood yet; but the possible mechanisms are thought to be a combination of nonlinear wave propagation effect, explosive bubble growth and ultrasonic atomization. The main objectives of this work are to demonstrate the feasibility of this new cell therapy and evaluate and distinguish between the different types of cavitation activity for either a thermally or a mechanically induced lesion. In the present work, numerical studies on the bubble dynamics (the Gilmore-Akulichev bubble model coupled with the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov equation) and both ex- and in vivo liver experiments are conducted with histological analysis (haematoxylin and eosin stain). The numerical and the experimental results suggest that (a) the acoustic emissions emitted during the thermal ablation and the histotripsy exposure can be distinguished both numerically and experimentally and (b) the proposed cell therapy may potentially form an effective and safe clinical treatment for replacing and correcting disordered hepatocytes, although the

  2. Ultrasonically-assisted Thermal Stir Welding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A welding head assembly has a work piece disposed between its containment plates' opposing surfaces with the work piece being maintained in a plastic state thereof at least in a vicinity of the welding head assembly's stir rod as the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis. The welding head assembly and the work piece experience relative movement there between in a direction perpendicular to the rod's longitudinal axis as the work piece is subjected to a compressive force applied by the containment plates. A first source coupled to the first containment plate applies a first ultrasonic wave thereto such that the first ultrasonic wave propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement. A second source coupled to the second containment plate applies a second ultrasonic wave thereto such that the second ultrasonic wave propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement.propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement.

  3. Ultrasonic determination of the size of defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zetterwall, T.

    1989-01-01

    The paper presents results from a study of ultrasonic testing of materials. The main topic has been the determination of the size, length and deep, of cracks or defects in stainless steel plates. (K.A.E)

  4. Advanced ultrasonic technology for natural gas measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-15

    In recent years, due to rising environmental and safety concerns, increasing commodity prices, and operational inefficiencies, a paradigm shift has been taking place with respect to gas measurement. The price of natural gas depends on the location, time of the year, and type of consumer. There is wide uncertainty associated with an orifice meter. This paper presents the use of advanced ultrasonic technology for the measurement of natural gas. For many years, multi-path ultrasonic meters with intelligent sensor technology have been used for gas measurement. This paper gives the various applications of ultrasonic technology along with their advantages and a draws a comparison with orifice meters. From the study it can be concluded that extensive advances in the use of ultrasonic technology for gas measurement have widened the areas of application and that varying frequencies combined with sealed transducer designs make it possible to measure atmospheric and sour gas in custody transfer process control and flaring accurately.

  5. Ultrasonic assisted hot metal powder compaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedini, Rezvan; Abdullah, Amir; Alizadeh, Yunes

    2017-09-01

    Hot pressing of metal powders is used in production of parts with similar properties to wrought materials. During hot pressing processes, particle rearrangement, plastic deformation, creep, and diffusion are of the most effective powder densification mechanisms. Applying ultrasonic vibration is thought to result in great rates of densification and therefore higher efficiency of the process is expected. This paper deals with the effects of power ultrasonic on the densification of AA1100 aluminum powder under constant applied stress. The effects of particle size and process temperature on the densification behavior are discussed. The results show that applying ultrasonic vibration leads to an improved homogeneity and a higher relative density. Also, it is found that the effect of ultrasonic vibration is greater for finer particles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Hand Gesture Recognition Using Ultrasonic Waves

    KAUST Repository

    AlSharif, Mohammed Hussain

    2016-01-01

    estimation of the moving hand and received signal strength (RSS). These two factors are estimated using two simple methods; channel impulse response (CIR) and cross correlation (CC) of the reflected ultrasonic signal from the gesturing hand. A customized

  7. Ultrasonic Morphological Analyzers for Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lizzi, Frederic

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this research is to improve ultrasonic classification of breast lesions and guide decisions regarding biopsy requirements, especially for small lesions and those in young, dense breasts...

  8. Rail inspection using noncontact laser ultrasonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Nak Hyeon; Sohn, Hoon; Han, Soon Woo

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a noncontact laser ultrasonic system is proposed for rail defect detection. An Nd Yag pulse laser is used for generation of ultrasonic waves, and the corresponding ultrasonic responses are measured by a laser Doppler vibrometer. For the detection of rail surface damages, the shape of the excitation laser beam is transformed into a line. On the other hand, a point source laser beam is used for the inspection of defects inside a rail head. Then, the interactions of propagating ultrasonic waves with defects are examined using actual rail specimens. Amplitude attenuation was mainly observed for a surface crack, and reflections were most noticeable from an internal damage. Finally, opportunities and challenges associated with real time rail inspection from a high speed train are discussed

  9. Nondestructive control of materials by ultrasonic tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercier, Noelle.

    1974-01-01

    A bibliographic study of nondestructive control methods of solids by ultrasonic tests, and of the ultrasonic emission of a transducer of finite dimension, is first presented. The principle of two of these methods is verified experimentally; they should permit the measurement of various physical parameters of solids, and the detection of local inhomogeneities. The first method calls upon the analysis of the ultrasonic signal (amplitude and phase), after it has crossed a constant thickness of a metallic specimen. This analysis reveals variations of attenuation and of ultrasonic propagation velocity within the specimen. A good spatial resolution is obtained by using 1mm-diameter probes. The second method leads, thanks to a test rig equipped with broad frequency band electrostatic transducers, to the knowledge of the attenuation law of the specimens as a function of frequency (present range: 5 to 15MHz); from this a classification of these specimens as regards their granulometry is deduced [fr

  10. Ultrasonic testing of materials at level 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    Ultrasonic inspection is a nondestructive method in which high frequency sound waves are introduced into the material being inspected. Ultrasonic testing has a superior penetrating power to radiography and can detect flaws deep in the test specimen (say up to about 6 to 7 meters of steel). It is quite sensitive to small flaws and allows the precise determination of the location and size of the flaws. Basic ultrasonic test methods such as the through transmission method and the resonance method, sensors and testing techniques are described. Pulse echo type flaw detectors and their applications for inspection of welds are surveyed. Ultrasonic standards, calibration of the equipment and evaluation methods are presented. Examples of practical applications in welding, casting and forging processes are given. Figs and tabs

  11. Improvement of Ultrasonic Distance Measuring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Yu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly introduces a kind of ultrasonic distance measuring system with AT89C51 single chip as the core component. The paper expounds the principle of ultrasonic sensor and ultrasonic ranging, hardware circuit and software program, and the results of experiment and analysis.The hardware circuit based on SCM, the software design adopts the advanced microcontroller programming language.The amplitude of the received signal and the time of ultrasonic propagation are regulated by closed loop control. [1,2]The double closed loop control technology for amplitude and time improves the measuring accuracy of the instrument. The experimental results show that greatly improves the measurement accuracy of the system.

  12. Ultrasonic Generation and Optimization for EMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jian, X.; Dixon, Steve; Edwards, Rachel S.

    2005-01-01

    A model for transient ultrasonic wave generation by EMATs in non-magnetic metals is presented. It combines analytical solutions currently available and FEM to calculate ultrasonic bulk and Rayleigh waves generated by the EMAT. Analytical solutions are used as they can be calculated quickly on a standard mathematical computer package. Calculations agree well with the experimental measurement. The model can be used to optimize EMAT design, and has explained some of the results from our previous published measurements

  13. Extrinsic Fabry-Perot ultrasonic detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, J. J.; Berthold, John W., III

    1996-10-01

    We characterized the performance of a commercial fiber optic extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer for use as an ultrasonic sensor, and compared the performance with a standard lead zirconate titanate (PZT) detector. The interferometer was unstabilized. The results showed that the fiber sensor was about 12 times less sensitive than the PZT detector. Ultrasonic frequency response near 100 kHz was demonstrated. We describe the design of the fiber sensor, the details of the tests performed, and potential applications.

  14. An advanced system for automated ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dressler, K.

    1989-01-01

    As the main component of the AUP system, an ALOK ultrasonic unit has been chosen as it allows for testing of large component areas both search for defects and description of defect geometries. All data required for fault analysis can be obtained by one measuring run. For inspection of primary circuit components in nuclear power stations, the manipulator control and the ultrasonic probe are installed behind the first sufficient shielding. (orig./HP) [de

  15. Ultrasonic flow measurements for irrigation process monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziani, Elmostafa; Bennouna, Mustapha; Boissier, Raymond

    2004-02-01

    This paper presents the state of the art of the general principle of liquid flow measurements by ultrasonic method, and problems of flow measurements. We present an ultrasonic flowmeter designed according to smart sensors concept, for the measurement of irrigation water flowing through pipelines or open channels, using the ultrasonic transit time approach. The new flowmeter works on the principle of measuring time delay differences between sound pulses transmitted upstream and downstream in the flowing liquid. The speed of sound in the flowing medium is eliminated as a variable because the flowrate calculations are based on the reciprocals of the transmission times. The transit time difference is digitally measured by means of a suitable, microprocessor controlled logic. This type of ultrasonic flowmeter will be widely used in industry and water management, it is well studied in this work, followed by some experimental results. For pressurized channels, we use one pair of ultrasonic transducer arranged in proper positions and directions of the pipe, in this case, to determine the liquid velocity, a real time on-line analysis taking account the geometries of the hydraulic system, is applied to the obtained ultrasonic data. In the open channels, we use a single or two pairs of ultrasonic emitter-receiver according to the desired performances. Finally, the goals of this work consist in integrating the smart sensor into irrigation systems monitoring in order to evaluate potential advantages and demonstrate their performance, on the other hand, to understand and use ultrasonic approach for determining flow characteristics and improving flow measurements by reducing errors caused by disturbances of the flow profiles.

  16. Fundamentals and Applications of Ultrasonic Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Cheeke, J David N

    2012-01-01

    Designed specifically for newcomers to the field, this fully updated second edition begins with fundamentals and quickly advances beyond general wave concepts into an in-depth treatment of ultrasonic waves in isotropic media. Focusing on the physics of acoustic waves, their propagation, technology, and applications, this accessible overview of ultrasonics includes accounts of viscoelasticity and multiple scattering. It examines new technologies, including atomic force acoustic microscopy, lasers, micro-acoustics, and nanotechnology. In addition, it highlights both direct and indirect applicati

  17. Longitudinal ultrasonic waves dispersion in bars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez Antola, R.

    2001-01-01

    The exhibition intends to review some aspects of the propagation of the longitudinal ultrasonic pulses shortly in bars of traverse section uniform.Aspects they are part of the denominated geometric dispersion of the pulses.This phenomenon It can present like an additional complication in the ultrasonic essay of low frequency of thin pieces in structures and machines but takes place former ex professed in some applications of the wave guides been accustomed to in the prosecution of signs

  18. 3D simulation of an audible ultrasonic electrolarynx using difference waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Patrick; Zara, Jason

    2014-01-01

    A total laryngectomy removes the vocal folds which are fundamental in forming voiced sounds that make speech possible. Although implanted prosthetics are commonly used in developed countries, simple handheld vibrating electrolarynxes are still common worldwide. These devices are easy to use but suffer from many drawbacks including dedication of a hand, mechanical sounding voice, and sound leakage. To address some of these drawbacks, we introduce a novel electrolarynx that uses vibro-acoustic interference of dual ultrasonic waves to generate an audible fundamental frequency. A 3D simulation of the principles of the device is presented in this paper.

  19. Reliability of implant surgical guides based on soft-tissue models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maney, Pooja; Simmons, David E; Palaiologou, Archontia; Kee, Edwin

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of implant surgical guides fabricated on diagnostic casts. Guides were fabricated with radiopaque rods representing implant positions. Cone beam computerized tomograms were taken with guides in place. Accuracy was evaluated using software to simulate implant placement. Twenty-two sites (47%) were considered accurate (13 of 24 maxillary and 9 of 23 mandibular sites). Soft-tissue models do not always provide sufficient accuracy for fabricating implant surgical guides.

  20. Influence of Implant Positions and Occlusal Forces on Peri-Implant Bone Stress in Mandibular Two-Implant Overdentures: A 3-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Arenal, Angel; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Ignacio; deLlanos-Lanchares, Hector; Brizuela-Velasco, Aritza; Dds, Elena Martin-Fernandez; Ellacuria-Echebarria, Joseba

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the bone stress around implants in mandibular 2-implant overdentures depending on the implant location and different loading conditions. Four 3-dimensional finite element models simulating a mandibular 2-implant overdenture and a Locator attachment system were designed. The implants were located at the lateral incisor, canine, second premolar, and crossed-implant levels. A 150 N unilateral and bilateral vertical load of different location was applied, as was 40 N when combined with midline load. Data for von Mises stress were produced numerically, color coded, and compared between the models for peri-implant bone and loading conditions. With unilateral loading, in all 4 models much higher peri-implant bone stress values were recorded on the load side compared with the no-load side, while with bilateral occlusal loading, the stress distribution was similar on both sides. In all models, the posterior unilateral load showed the highest stress, which decreased as the load was applied more mesially. In general, the best biomechanical environment in the peri-implant bone was found in the model with implants at premolar level. In the crossed-implant model, the load side greatly altered the biomechanical environment. Overall, the overdenture with implants at second premolar level should be the chosen design, regardless of where the load is applied. The occlusal loading application site influences the bone stress around the implant. Bilateral occlusal loading distributes the peri-implant bone stress symmetrically, while unilateral loading increases it greatly on the load side, no matter where the implants are located.

  1. Ultrasonic Characterization of Superhard Material: Osmium Diboride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadawa, P K

    2012-01-01

    Higher order elastic constants have been calculated in hexagonal structured superhard material OsB 2 at room temperature following the interaction potential model. The temperature variation of the ultrasonic velocities is evaluated along different angles with unique axis of the crystal using the second order elastic constants. The ultrasonic velocity decreases with the temperature along particular orientation with the unique axis. Temperature variation of the thermal relaxation time and Debye average velocities are also calculated along the same orientation. The temperature dependency of the ultrasonic properties is discussed in correlation with elastic, thermal and electrical properties. It has been found that the thermal conductivity is the main contributor to the behaviour of ultrasonic attenuation as a function of temperature and the responsible cause of attenuation is phonon-phonon interaction. The mechanical properties of OsB 2 at low temperature are better than at high temperature, because at low temperature it has low ultrasonic velocity and ultrasonic attenuation. Superhard material OsB 2 has many industrial applications, such as abrasives, cutting tools and hard coatings.

  2. Rutherford backscatter measurements on tellurium and cadmium implanted gallium arsenide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, E.C.

    1979-10-01

    The primary aim of the work described in this thesis was to examine implanted layers of the dopant impurities cadmium and tellurium in gallium arsenide and to experimentally assess their potential for producing electrically active layers. 1.5 MeV Rutherford backscattering measurements of lattice disorder and atom site location have been used to assess post implantation thermal annealing and elevated temperature implantations to site the dopant impurities on either gallium or arsenic lattice positions in an otherwise undisordered lattice. Pyrolitically deposited silicon dioxide was used as an encapsulant to prevent thermal dissociation of the gallium arsenide during annealing. It has been shown that high doses of cadmium and tellurium can be implanted without forming amorphous lattice disorder by heating the gallium arsenide during implantation to relatively low temperatures. Atom site location measurements have shown that a large fraction of a tellurium dose implanted at 180 0 C is located on or near lattice sites. Channeled backscatter measurements have shown that there is residual disorder or lattice strain in gallium arsenide implanted at elevated temperatures. The extent of this disorder has been shown to depend on the implanted dose and implantation temperature. The channeling effect has been used to measure annealing of the disorder. (author)

  3. Development of automatic ultrasonic testing equipment for reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Kee Ok; Park, Dae Yung; Park, Moon Hoh; Koo, Kil Mo; Park, Kwang Heui; Kang, Sang Sin; Bang, Heui Song; Noh, Heui Choong; Kong, Woon Sik

    1994-08-01

    The selected weld areas of reactor pressure vessel and adjacent piping are examined by remote mechanized ultrasonic testing(MUT) equipment. Since the MUT equipment was purchased from Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in April 1985, we have performed 15 inservice inspections and 5 preservice inspections. However, the reliability of examination was recently decreased rapidly as the problems which results from the old age of equipment and the frequent movement to plant site to site have occurred frequently. Therefore, the 3-axis control system hardware in occurring many problems among the equipments of mechanized ultrasonic testing (MUT) was designed and developed to cover the examination areas of nozzle-shell weld as specified in ASME Code Section XI and to improve the examination reliability. The new 3-axis control system hardware with the performance of this project was developed to be compatible with the old one and it was used as dual system or spare parts of the old system. Furthermore, the established technologies are expected to be applied to the similar control systems in nuclear power plant. 17 figs, 2 pix, 2 tabs, 10 refs. (Author)

  4. Development of automatic ultrasonic testing equipment for reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Kee Ok; Park, Dae Yung; Park, Moon Hoh; Koo, Kil Mo; Park, Kwang Heui; Kang, Sang Sin; Bang, Heui Song; Noh, Heui Choong; Kong, Woon Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-08-01

    The selected weld areas of reactor pressure vessel and adjacent piping are examined by remote mechanized ultrasonic testing(MUT) equipment. Since the MUT equipment was purchased from Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in April 1985, we have performed 15 inservice inspections and 5 preservice inspections. However, the reliability of examination was recently decreased rapidly as the problems which results from the old age of equipment and the frequent movement to plant site to site have occurred frequently. Therefore, the 3-axis control system hardware in occurring many problems among the equipments of mechanized ultrasonic testing (MUT) was designed and developed to cover the examination areas of nozzle-shell weld as specified in ASME Code Section XI and to improve the examination reliability. The new 3-axis control system hardware with the performance of this project was developed to be compatible with the old one and it was used as dual system or spare parts of the old system. Furthermore, the established technologies are expected to be applied to the similar control systems in nuclear power plant. 17 figs, 2 pix, 2 tabs, 10 refs. (Author).

  5. Impact of Different Surgeons on Dental Implant Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Kisch, Jenö; Albrektsson, Tomas; Wennerberg, Ann

    To assess the influence of several factors on the prevalence of dental implant failure, with special consideration of the placement of implants by different dental surgeons. This retrospective study is based on 2,670 patients who received 10,096 implants at one specialist clinic. Only the data of patients and implants treated by surgeons who had inserted a minimum of 200 implants at the clinic were included. Kaplan-Meier curves were stratified with respect to the individual surgeon. A generalized estimating equation (GEE) method was used to account for the fact that repeated observations (several implants) were placed in a single patient. The factors bone quantity, bone quality, implant location, implant surface, and implant system were analyzed with descriptive statistics separately for each individual surgeon. A total of 10 surgeons were eligible. The differences between the survival curves of each individual were statistically significant. The multivariate GEE model showed the following variables to be statistically significant: surgeon, bruxism, intake of antidepressants, location, implant length, and implant system. The surgeon with the highest absolute number of failures was also the one who inserted the most implants in sites of poor bone and used turned implants in most cases, whereas the surgeon with the lowest absolute number of failures used mainly modern implants. Separate survival analyses of turned and modern implants stratified for the individual surgeon showed statistically significant differences in cumulative survival. Different levels of failure incidence could be observed between the surgeons, occasionally reaching significant levels. Although a direct causal relationship could not be ascertained, the results of the present study suggest that the surgeons' technique, skills, and/or judgment may negatively influence implant survival rates.

  6. Chimeric Peptides as Implant Functionalization Agents for Titanium Alloy Implants with Antimicrobial Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucesoy, Deniz T.; Hnilova, Marketa; Boone, Kyle; Arnold, Paul M.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Tamerler, Candan

    2015-04-01

    open up new possibilities to modify the implant site and tailor it to a desirable bioactivity.

  7. Remediation of Diesel Fuel Contaminated Sandy Soil using Ultrasonic Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wulandari P.S.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic cleaning has been used in industry for some time, but the application of ultrasonic cleaning in contaminated soil is just recently received considerable attention, it is a very new technique, especially in Indonesia. An ultrasonic cleaner works mostly by energy released from the collapse of millions of microscopic cavitations near the dirty surface. This paper investigates the use of ultrasonic wave to enhance remediation of diesel fuel contaminated sandy soil considering the ultrasonic power, soil particle size, soil density, water flow rate, and duration of ultrasonic waves application.

  8. Implantable Medical Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Implantable Medical Devices Updated:Sep 16,2016 For Rhythm Control ... a Heart Attack Introduction Medications Surgical Procedures Implantable Medical Devices • Life After a Heart Attack • Heart Attack ...

  9. Intercavitary implants dosage calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehder, B.P.

    The use of spacial geometry peculiar to each treatment for the attainment of intercavitary and intersticial implants dosage calculation is presented. The study is made in patients with intercavitary implants by applying a modified Manchester technique [pt

  10. Implantable electronic medical devices

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Implantable Electronic Medical Devices provides a thorough review of the application of implantable devices, illustrating the techniques currently being used together with overviews of the latest commercially available medical devices. This book provides an overview of the design of medical devices and is a reference on existing medical devices. The book groups devices with similar functionality into distinct chapters, looking at the latest design ideas and techniques in each area, including retinal implants, glucose biosensors, cochlear implants, pacemakers, electrical stimulation t

  11. Ultrasonic imaging in liquid sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubeigt, E. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DTN/STCP/LIET, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Laboratoire de Mecanique et d' Acoustique, CNRS UPR 7051, 13402 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Mensah, S.; Chaix, J.F.; Rakotonarivo, S. [Laboratoire de Mecanique et d' Acoustique, CNRS UPR 7051, 13402 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Gobillot, G. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DTN/STCP/LIET, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2015-07-01

    The fourth generation of nuclear reactor can use liquid sodium as the core coolant. When the reactor is operating, sodium temperatures can reach up to 600 deg. C. During maintenance periods, when the reactor is shut down, the coolant temperature is reduced to 200 deg. C. Because molten sodium is optically opaque, ultrasonic imaging techniques are developed for maintenance activities. Under-sodium imaging aims at i) checking the health of immersed structures. It should also allow ii) to assess component degradation or damage as cracks and shape defects as well as iii) the detection of lost objects. The under-sodium imaging system has to sustain high temperature (up to 300 deg. C) and hostility of the sodium environment. Furthermore, specific constraints such as transducers characteristics or the limited sensor mobility in the reactor vessel have to be considered. This work focuses on developing a methodology for detecting damages such as crack defects with ultrasound devices. Surface-breaking cracks or deep cracks are sought in the weld area, as welds are more subject to defects. Traditional methods enabled us to detect emerging cracks of submillimeter size with sodium-compatible high-temperature transducer. The presented approach relies on making use of prior knowledge about the environment through the implementation of differential imaging and time-reversal techniques. Indeed, this approach allows to detect a change by comparison with a reference measurement and by focusing back to any change in the environment. It is a means of analysis and understanding of the physical phenomena making it possible to design more effective inspection strategies. Difference between the measured signals reveals the acoustic field scattered by a perturbation (a crack for instance), which may occur between periodical measurements. The imaging method relies on the adequate combination of two computed ultrasonic fields, one forward and one adjoint. The adjoint field, which carries the

  12. Ultrasonic imaging in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubeigt, E.; Mensah, S.; Chaix, J.F.; Rakotonarivo, S.; Gobillot, G.

    2015-01-01

    The fourth generation of nuclear reactor can use liquid sodium as the core coolant. When the reactor is operating, sodium temperatures can reach up to 600 deg. C. During maintenance periods, when the reactor is shut down, the coolant temperature is reduced to 200 deg. C. Because molten sodium is optically opaque, ultrasonic imaging techniques are developed for maintenance activities. Under-sodium imaging aims at i) checking the health of immersed structures. It should also allow ii) to assess component degradation or damage as cracks and shape defects as well as iii) the detection of lost objects. The under-sodium imaging system has to sustain high temperature (up to 300 deg. C) and hostility of the sodium environment. Furthermore, specific constraints such as transducers characteristics or the limited sensor mobility in the reactor vessel have to be considered. This work focuses on developing a methodology for detecting damages such as crack defects with ultrasound devices. Surface-breaking cracks or deep cracks are sought in the weld area, as welds are more subject to defects. Traditional methods enabled us to detect emerging cracks of submillimeter size with sodium-compatible high-temperature transducer. The presented approach relies on making use of prior knowledge about the environment through the implementation of differential imaging and time-reversal techniques. Indeed, this approach allows to detect a change by comparison with a reference measurement and by focusing back to any change in the environment. It is a means of analysis and understanding of the physical phenomena making it possible to design more effective inspection strategies. Difference between the measured signals reveals the acoustic field scattered by a perturbation (a crack for instance), which may occur between periodical measurements. The imaging method relies on the adequate combination of two computed ultrasonic fields, one forward and one adjoint. The adjoint field, which carries the

  13. Anchoring submersible ultrasonic receivers in river channels with stable substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettoli, Phillip William; Scholten, G.D.; Hubbs, D.

    2010-01-01

    We developed an anchoring system for submersible ultrasonic receivers (SURs) that we placed on the bottom of the riverine reaches of three main-stem reservoirs in the upper Tennessee River. Each anchor consisted of a steel tube (8.9 x 35.6 cm) welded vertically to a round plate of steel (5.1 x 40.6 cm). All seven SURs and their 57-kg anchors were successfully deployed and retrieved three times over 547 d by a dive team employing surface air-breathing equipment and a davit-equipped boat. All of the anchors and their SURs remained stationary over two consecutive winters on the hard-bottom, thalweg sites where they were deployed. The SUR and its anchor at the most downriver site experienced flows that exceeded 2,100 m(3)/s and mean water column velocities of about 0.9 m/s.

  14. Mechanisation of ultrasonic testing in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, W.

    1979-01-01

    Mechanical ultrasonic testing devices should meet the following requirements: Remote-controlled or automatic guidance of the US test systems at the test site according to given test parameters; exact positioning of the test system at the test site; high start-up accuracy and reproducibility; access to test regions that are hardly accessible or inaccessible for manual inspection; reduction of the radiation exposure of the operating personnel, and short assembling and testing time. The manipulators developed according to these requirements permit meandering test courses of the US test system on the pressure vessel surface or circular or semicircular courses around the nozzles or pipes in order to test welds and pipe joints. Every movement of the test system is taken up by a transmitting apparatus. (orig./HP) [de

  15. Hand Gesture Recognition Using Ultrasonic Waves

    KAUST Repository

    AlSharif, Mohammed Hussain

    2016-04-01

    Gesturing is a natural way of communication between people and is used in our everyday conversations. Hand gesture recognition systems are used in many applications in a wide variety of fields, such as mobile phone applications, smart TVs, video gaming, etc. With the advances in human-computer interaction technology, gesture recognition is becoming an active research area. There are two types of devices to detect gestures; contact based devices and contactless devices. Using ultrasonic waves for determining gestures is one of the ways that is employed in contactless devices. Hand gesture recognition utilizing ultrasonic waves will be the focus of this thesis work. This thesis presents a new method for detecting and classifying a predefined set of hand gestures using a single ultrasonic transmitter and a single ultrasonic receiver. This method uses a linear frequency modulated ultrasonic signal. The ultrasonic signal is designed to meet the project requirements such as the update rate, the range of detection, etc. Also, it needs to overcome hardware limitations such as the limited output power, transmitter, and receiver bandwidth, etc. The method can be adapted to other hardware setups. Gestures are identified based on two main features; range estimation of the moving hand and received signal strength (RSS). These two factors are estimated using two simple methods; channel impulse response (CIR) and cross correlation (CC) of the reflected ultrasonic signal from the gesturing hand. A customized simple hardware setup was used to classify a set of hand gestures with high accuracy. The detection and classification were done using methods of low computational cost. This makes the proposed method to have a great potential for the implementation in many devices including laptops and mobile phones. The predefined set of gestures can be used for many control applications.

  16. Group D. Initiator paper. Implants--peri-implant (hard and soft tissue) interactions in health and disease: the impact of explosion of implant manufacturers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovski, Saso

    2015-01-01

    1. The best-documented implants have a threaded solid screw-type design and are manufactured from commercially pure (grade IV) titanium. There is good evidence to support implants ≥ 6 mm in length, and ≥ 3 mm in diameter. 2. Integrity of the seal between the abutment and the implant is important for several reasons, including minimization of mechanical and biological complications and maintaining marginal bone levels. Although the ideal design features of the implant-abutment connection have not been determined, an internal connection, micro-grooves at the implant collar, and horizontal offset of the implant-abutment junction (platform switch) appear to impart favorable properties. 3. Implants with moderately rough implant surfaces provide advantages over machined surfaces in terms of the speed and extent of osseointegration. While the favorable performances of both minimally and moderately rough surfaces are supported by long-term data, moderately rough surfaces provide superior outcomes in compromised sites, such as the posterior maxilla. 4. Although plaque is critical in the progression of peri-implantitis, the disease has a multi-factorial aetiology, and may be influenced by poor integrity of the abutment/implant connection. Iatrogenic factors, such as the introduction of a foreign body. (e.g., cement) below the mucosal margin, can be important contributors. 5. Clinicians should exercise caution when using a particular implant system, ensuring that the implant design is appropriate and supported by scientific evidence. Central to this is access to and participation in quality education on the impact that implant characteristics can have on clinical outcomes. Caution should be exercised in utilizing non-genuine restorative componentry that may lead to a poor implant-abutment fit and subsequent technical and biological complications.

  17. Ultrasonic monitoring of pitting corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, A. J. C.; Cegla, F. B.; Bazaz, H.; Lozev, M.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to corrosive substances in high temperature environments can cause damage accumulation in structural steels, particularly in the chemical and petrochemical industries. The interaction mechanisms are complex and varied; however initial damage propagation often manifests itself in the form of localized areas of increased material loss. Recent development of an ultrasonic wall thickness monitoring sensor capable of withstanding temperatures in excess of 500°C has allowed permanent monitoring within such hostile environments, providing information on how the shape of a pulse which has reflected from a corroding surface can change over time. Reconstructing localized corrosion depth and position may be possible by tracking such changes in reflected pulse shape, providing extra information on the state of the backwall and whether process conditions should be altered to increase plant life. This paper aims to experimentally investigate the effect certain localized features have on reflected pulse shape by `growing' artificial defects into the backwall while wall thickness is monitored using the sensor. The size and complexity of the three dimensional scattering problem lead to the development of a semi-analytical simulation based on the distributed point source method (DPSM) which is capable of simulating pulse reflection from complex surfaces measuring approximately 17×10λ Comparison to experimental results show that amplitude changes are predicted to within approximately 1dB and that pulse shape changes are accurately modelled. All experiments were carried out at room temperature, measurements at high temperature will be studied in the future.

  18. Optimization of Ultrasonic Fabric Cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hand, T.E.

    1998-05-13

    The fundamental purpose of this project was to research and develop a process that would reduce the cost and improve the environmental efficiency of the present dry-cleaning industry. This second phase of research (see report KCP-94-1006 for information gathered during the first phase) was intended to allow the optimal integration of all factors of ultrasonic fabric cleaning. For this phase, Garment Care performed an extensive literature search and gathered data from other researchers worldwide. The Garment Care-AlliedSignal team developed the requirements for a prototype cleaning tank for studies and acquired that tank and the additional equipment required to use it properly. Garment Care and AlliedSignal acquired the transducers and generators from Surftran Martin-Walter in Sterling Heights, Michigan. Amway's Kelly Haley developed the test protocol, supplied hundreds of test swatches, gathered the data on the swatches before and after the tests, assisted with the cleaning tests, and prepared the final analysis of the results. AlliedSignal personnel, in conjunction with Amway and Garment Care staff, performed all the tests. Additional planning is under way for future testing by outside research facilities. The final results indicated repeatable performance and good results for single layered fabric swatches. Swatches that were cleaned as a ''sandwich,'' that is, three or more layers.

  19. Metallic artifact in MRI after removal of orthopedic implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagheri, Mohammad Hadi; Hosseini, Mehrdad Mohammad; Emami, Mohammad Jafar; Foroughi, Amin Aiboulhassani

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the metallic artifacts in MRI of the orthopedic patients after removal of metallic implants. Subjects and methods: From March to August 2009, 40 orthopedic patients operated for removal of orthopedic metallic implants were studied by post-operative MRI from the site of removal of implants. A grading scale of 0–3 was assigned for artifact in MR images whereby 0 was considered no artifact; and I–III were considered mild, moderate, and severe metallic artifacts, respectively. These grading records were correlated with other variables including the type, size, number, and composition of metallic devices; and the site and duration of orthopedic devices stay in the body. Results: Metallic susceptibly artifacts were detected in MRI of 18 of 40 cases (45%). Screws and pins in removed hardware were the most important factors for causing artifacts in MRI. The artifacts were found more frequently in the patients who had more screws and pins in the removed implants. Gender, age, site of implantation of the device, length of the hardware, composition of the metallic implants (stainless steel versus titanium), and duration of implantation of the hardware exerted no effect in producing metallic artifacts after removal of implants. Short TE sequences of MRI (such as T1 weighted) showed fewer artifacts. Conclusion: Susceptibility of metallic artifacts is a frequent phenomenon in MRI of patients upon removal of metallic orthopedic implants.

  20. Metallic artifact in MRI after removal of orthopedic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Mohammad Hadi; Hosseini, Mehrdad Mohammad; Emami, Mohammad Jafar; Foroughi, Amin Aiboulhassani

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the metallic artifacts in MRI of the orthopedic patients after removal of metallic implants. From March to August 2009, 40 orthopedic patients operated for removal of orthopedic metallic implants were studied by post-operative MRI from the site of removal of implants. A grading scale of 0-3 was assigned for artifact in MR images whereby 0 was considered no artifact; and I-III were considered mild, moderate, and severe metallic artifacts, respectively. These grading records were correlated with other variables including the type, size, number, and composition of metallic devices; and the site and duration of orthopedic devices stay in the body. Metallic susceptibly artifacts were detected in MRI of 18 of 40 cases (45%). Screws and pins in removed hardware were the most important factors for causing artifacts in MRI. The artifacts were found more frequently in the patients who had more screws and pins in the removed implants. Gender, age, site of implantation of the device, length of the hardware, composition of the metallic implants (stainless steel versus titanium), and duration of implantation of the hardware exerted no effect in producing metallic artifacts after removal of implants. Short TE sequences of MRI (such as T1 weighted) showed fewer artifacts. Susceptibility of metallic artifacts is a frequent phenomenon in MRI of patients upon removal of metallic orthopedic implants. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The digital ultrasonic test unit for automatic equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, T.; Matsuyama, H.

    1976-01-01

    The operations and features of the ultrasonic test unit used and the digital data processing techniques employed are described. This unit is used for a few hundred multi-channel automatic ultrasonic test equipment

  2. Ultrasonic-assisted manufacturing processes: Variational model and numerical simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Siddiq, Amir; El Sayed, Tamer

    2012-01-01

    We present a computational study of ultrasonic assisted manufacturing processes including sheet metal forming, upsetting, and wire drawing. A fully variational porous plasticity model is modified to include ultrasonic softening effects

  3. P-Scan provides accuracy and repeatability in ultrasonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keys, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    The P-Scan (Projection image scanning technique) is an automated ultrasonic inspection technique, developed to overcome the problems with accuracy and repeatability experienced with manual ultrasonic systems. The equipment and its applications are described. (author)

  4. Method and apparatus to characterize ultrasonically reflective contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretlow, Robert A., III (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for characterizing the time and frequency response of an ultrasonically reflective contrast agent is disclosed. An ultrasonically reflective contrast agent is injected, under constant pressure, into a fluid flowing through a pump flow circuit. The fluid and the ultrasonically reflective contrast agent are uniformly mixed in a mixing chamber, and the uniform mixture is passed through a contrast agent chamber. The contrast agent chamber is acoustically and axially interposed between an ultrasonic transducer chamber and an acoustic isolation chamber. A pulse of ultrasonic energy is transmitted into the contrast agent chamber from the ultrasonic transducer chamber. An echo waveform is received from the ultrasonically reflective contrast agent, and it is analyzed to determine the time and frequency response of the ultrasonically reflective contrast agent.

  5. Automated electronic intruder simulator for evaluation of ultrasonic intrusion detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    An automated electronic intruder simulator for testing ultrasonic intrusion detectors is described. This simulator is primarily intended for use in environmental chambers to determine the effects of temperature and humidity on the operation of ultrasonic intrusion detectors

  6. Development and Application of an Ultrasonic Gas Flowmeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Won Ho; Jeong, Hee Don; Park, Sang Gug; Jhang, Kyung Young

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the development and the field application of the ultrasonic gas flowmeter for accurate measurement of the volumetric flow rate of gases in a harsh environmental conditions in iron and steel making company. This ultrasonic flowmeter is especially suited for measuring LDG, COG, BFG gases produced in iron and steel making process. This is a transit time type ultrasonic flowmeter. We have developed the transmitting and receiving algorithm of ultrasonic wave and the ultrasonic signal processing algorithm to develope a transit time type ultrasonic flowmeter. We have evaluated the performance of ultrasonic flowmeter by the calibration system with Venturi type standard flowmeter. We has confirmed its reliability by extensive field tests for a year in POSCO, iron and steel making company. Now we have developed the commercial model of ultrasonic flowmeter and applied to the POSCO gas line

  7. Study on electrical impedance matching for broadband ultrasonic transducer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Geon Woo [University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Bok [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Center for Safety Measurement, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Kwang Sae [Elache Co., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Ultrasonic transducers with high resolution and resonant frequency are required to detect small defects (less than hundreds of μm) by ultrasonic testing. The resonance frequency and resolution of an ultrasonic transducer are closely related to the thickness of piezo-electric materials, backing materials, and the electric impedance matching technique. Among these factors, electrical impedance matching plays an important role because it can reduce the loss and reflection of ultrasonic energy differences in electrical impedance between an ultrasonic transducer and an ultrasonic defects detecting system. An LC matching circuit is the most frequently used electric matching method. It is necessary for the electrical impedance of an ultrasonic transducer to correspond to approximately 50 Ω to compensate the difference in electrical impedance between both connections. In this study, a 15 MHz immersion ultrasonic transducer was fabricated and an LC electrical impedance circuit was applied to that for having broad-band frequency characteristic.

  8. Ultrasonic extraction of flavonoids and phenolics from loquat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-06-08

    Jun 8, 2011 ... ultrasonic pharmaceutical managing machine (Sinobest electronic. Co. Ltd., Jining, Shangdong ... During the ultrasonic treatment, the temperature ..... essential oil extraction by a hydrodistillation process using a 2(4) complete ...

  9. Electrocautery causes more ischemic peritoneal tissue damage than ultrasonic dissection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, R.P.G ten; Wilbers, J.; Goor, H. van

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Minimizing peritoneal tissue injury during abdominal surgery has the benefit of reducing postoperative inflammatory response, pain, and adhesion formation. Ultrasonic dissection seems to reduce tissue damage. This study aimed to compare electrocautery and ultrasonic dissection in terms

  10. Studies on Section XI ultrasonic repeatability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamison, T.D.; McDearman, W.R.

    1981-05-01

    A block representative of a nuclear component has been welded containing intentional defects. Acoustic emission data taken during the welding correlate well with ultrasonic data. Repetitive ultrasonic examinations have been performed by skilled operators using a procedure based on that desribed in ASME Section XI. These examinations were performed by different examination teams using different ultrasonic equipment in such a manner that the effects on the repeatability of the ultrasonic test method caused by the operator and by the use of different equipment could be estimated. It was tentatively concluded that when considering a large number of inspections: (1) there is no significant difference in indication sizing between operators, and (2) there is a significant difference in amplitude and defect sizing when instruments having different, Code acceptable operating characteristics are used. It was determined that the Section XI sizing parameters follow a bivariate normal distribution. Data derived from ultrasonically and physically sizing indications in nuclear components during farication show that the Section XI technique tends to overestimate the size of the reflectors

  11. Further Investigations on Simultaneous Ultrasonic Coal Flotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safak Gokhan Ozkan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the flotation performance of a representative hard coal slime sample (d80 particle size of minus 0.2 mm obtained from the Prosper-Haniel coal preparation plant located in Bottrop, Germany. Flotation was carried out with a newly designed flotation cell refurbished from an old ultrasonic cleaning bath (2.5 L volume equipped with a single frequency (35 kHz and two different power levels (80–160 W and a sub-aeration-type flotation machine operating at a stable impeller speed (1200 rpm and air rate (2.5 L/min. The reagent combination for conventional and simultaneous ultrasonic coal flotation tests was Ekofol-440 at variable dosages (40–300 g/t with controlling water temperature (20–25 °C at natural pH (6.5–7.0. The batch coal flotation results were analyzed by comparing the combustible recovery (% and separation efficiency (% values, taking mass yield and ash concentrations of the froths and tailings into account. It was found that simultaneous ultrasonic coal flotation increased yield and recovery values of the floated products with lower ash values than the conventional flotation despite using similar reagent dosages. Furthermore, particle size distribution of the ultrasonically treated and untreated coals was measured. Finely distributed coal particles seemed to be agglomerated during the ultrasonic treatment, while ash-forming slimes were removed by hydrodynamic cavitation.

  12. Standard practice for leaks using ultrasonics

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 Practice A, Pressurization—This practice covers procedures for calibration of ultrasonic instruments, location, and estimated measurements of gas leakage to atmosphere by the airborne ultrasonic technique. 1.2 In general practice this should be limited to leaks detected by two classifications of instruments, Class I and Class II. Class I instruments should have a minimum detectable leak rate of 6.7 × 10−7 mol/s (1.5 × 10−2 std. cm3/s at 0°C) or more for the pressure method of gas leakage to atmosphere. Class II instruments should have a minimal detectable leak rate of 6.7 × 10−6 mol/s (1.5 × 10−1 std. cm3/s at 0°C) or more for the pressure method of gas leakage to atmosphere. Refer to Guide E432 for additional information. 1.3 Practice B, Ultrasonic Transmitter—For object under test not capable of being pressurized but capable of having ultrasonic tone placed/injected into the test area to act as an ultrasonic leak trace source. 1.3.1 This practice is limited to leaks producing leakage o...

  13. Ultrasonic imaging in LMFBRs using digital techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fothergill, J.R.; McKnight, J.A.; Barrett, L.M.

    Ultrasonic technology for providing images of components immersed in the opaque sodium of LMFBRs is being developed at RNL. For many years the application has been restricted by the unavailability of convenient ultrasonic sources and receivers capable of withstanding the reactor environment. Until recently, for example, important ultrasonic instrument design, such as for future sweep arms, had to be based on waveguided ultrasonics. RNL have developed an economic immersible transducer that can be deployed during reactor shut-down, when many demands for ultrasonic imaging are made. The transducer design is not suited at present to the sophisticated techniques of phased arrays; consequently image formation must depend on the physical scanning of a target using one or more transducers in pulse-echo mode. The difficulties of access into a fast reactor impose further restrictions. Some applications may involve easy scanning sequences, thus the sweep arm requires only a rotation to provide a map of the reactor core area. For a more detailed examination of the same area, however, special engineering solutions are needed to provide a more satisfactory scanning sequence. A compromise solution involving the rotating shield movement is being used for a PFR experiment to examine a limited area of the core. (author)

  14. Uncertainty estimation of ultrasonic thickness measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yassir Yassen, Abdul Razak Daud; Mohammad Pauzi Ismail; Abdul Aziz Jemain

    2009-01-01

    The most important factor that should be taken into consideration when selecting ultrasonic thickness measurement technique is its reliability. Only when the uncertainty of a measurement results is known, it may be judged if the result is adequate for intended purpose. The objective of this study is to model the ultrasonic thickness measurement function, to identify the most contributing input uncertainty components, and to estimate the uncertainty of the ultrasonic thickness measurement results. We assumed that there are five error sources significantly contribute to the final error, these sources are calibration velocity, transit time, zero offset, measurement repeatability and resolution, by applying the propagation of uncertainty law to the model function, a combined uncertainty of the ultrasonic thickness measurement was obtained. In this study the modeling function of ultrasonic thickness measurement was derived. By using this model the estimation of the uncertainty of the final output result was found to be reliable. It was also found that the most contributing input uncertainty components are calibration velocity, transit time linearity and zero offset. (author)

  15. Trends in cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2004-01-01

    More than 60,000 people worldwide use cochlear implants as a means to restore functional hearing. Although individual performance variability is still high, an average implant user can talk on the phone in a quiet environment. Cochlear-implant research has also matured as a field, as evidenced by the exponential growth in both the patient population and scientific publication. The present report examines current issues related to audiologic, clinical, engineering, anatomic, and physiologic aspects of cochlear implants, focusing on their psychophysical, speech, music, and cognitive performance. This report also forecasts clinical and research trends related to presurgical evaluation, fitting protocols, signal processing, and postsurgical rehabilitation in cochlear implants. Finally, a future landscape in amplification is presented that requires a unique, yet complementary, contribution from hearing aids, middle ear implants, and cochlear implants to achieve a total solution to the entire spectrum of hearing loss treatment and management.

  16. Benefits and Risks of Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Implants and Prosthetics Cochlear Implants Benefits and Risks of Cochlear Implants Share Tweet Linkedin ... the Use of Cochlear Implants What are the Benefits of Cochlear Implants? For people with implants: Hearing ...

  17. Erbium implantation in Strontium Titanate

    CERN Document Server

    Araújo, J P; Alves, E; Correia, J G; Monteiro, T; Soares, J; Santos, L

    2002-01-01

    We report on the lattice location of Er in SrTiO$_{3}$ single crystals using the emission channeling technique. The angular distribution of conversion electrons emitted from $^{167m}$Er(T$_{1/2}$=2.27 s) was monitored with a position-sensitive detector following the room-temperature 60 keV implantation of the precursor isotope $^{167}$Tm(T$_{1/2}$=9.25 d) to a dose of 2$\\times$ 10$^{12}$ at./cm$^{2}$. The results for the sample annealed in vacuum at 610°C for 15 min provide direct evidence that Er occupies both Sr and Ti substitutional lattice sites. In addition, thermal recovery of lattice damage was also studied with RBS/C for SrTiO$_{3}$ implanted to doses of 5$\\times$ 10$^{14}$ and 5 $\\times$ 10$^{15}$ Er/cm$^{2}$. We further comment on preliminary photoluminescence results from these samples.

  18. Evaluation of vaginal implant transmitters in elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce K. Johnson; Terrance McCoy; Christopher O. Kochanny; Rachel C. Cook

    2006-01-01

    The effects of vaginal implant transmitters for tissue damage after 11 wk in 13 captive adult elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) and subsequent reproductive performance in 38 free-ranging elk were evaluated. Vaginal implant transmitters are designed to be shed at parturition and are used to locate birth sites of wild ungulates; however, potential adverse...

  19. Targeted drug delivery to magnetic implants for therapeutic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yellen, Benjamin B.; Forbes, Zachary G.; Halverson, Derek S.; Fridman, Gregory; Barbee, Kenneth A.; Chorny, Michael; Levy, Robert; Friedman, Gary

    2005-01-01

    A new method for locally targeted drug delivery is proposed that employs magnetic implants placed directly in the cardiovascular system to attract injected magnetic carriers. Theoretical simulations and experimental results support the assumption that using magnetic implants in combination with externally applied magnetic field will optimize the delivery of magnetic drug to selected sites within a subject

  20. Ultrasonic scanner for stainless steel weld inspections. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupperman, D. S.; Reimann, K. J.

    1978-09-01

    The large grain size and anisotropic nature of stainless steel weld metal make conventional ultrasonic testing very difficult. A technique is evaluated for minimizing the coherent ultrasonic noise in stainless steel weld metal. The method involves digitizing conventional ''A-scan'' traces and averaging them with a minicomputer. Results are presented for an ultrasonic scanner which interrogates a small volume of the weld metal while averaging the coherent ultrasonic noise.

  1. Training methods in non-destructive examination with ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walte, F.

    1986-01-01

    German concept for inspection of LWR, leak before break, basic safety; General inspection methods; Ultrasonic inspection - basic principle, generation of ultrasound, bulk and surface waves, piezo electric and electromagnetic transducers, energy balance, scattering and adsorption, divergence; Ultra techniques in compliance with KTA-rules - pulse-echo, tandem, throughtransmission; Valuation of ultrasonic indications; Pre- and in-service inspection; Practical part - ultrasonic equipment, ultrasonic piezo electric transducers, wall thickness measurement, crack depth measurement with potential drop technique. (orig.)

  2. Ultrasonic Cleaning of Nuclear Steam Generator by Micro Bubble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Woo Tae [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Tae; Yoon, Sang Jung [Sae-An Engineering Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, we present ultrasonic cleaning technology for a nuclear steam generator using micro bubble. We could extend the boundary of ultrasonic cleaning by using micro bubbles in water. Ultrasonic energy measured was increased about 5 times after the generation of micro bubbles in water. Furthermore, ultrasound energy was measured to be strong enough to create cavitation even though the ultrasound sensor was about 2 meters away from the ultrasonic transducer

  3. Metals for bone implants. Part 1. Powder metallurgy and implant rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andani, Mohsen Taheri; Shayesteh Moghaddam, Narges; Haberland, Christoph; Dean, David; Miller, Michael J; Elahinia, Mohammad

    2014-10-01

    New metal alloys and metal fabrication strategies are likely to benefit future skeletal implant strategies. These metals and fabrication strategies were looked at from the point of view of standard-of-care implants for the mandible. These implants are used as part of the treatment for segmental resection due to oropharyngeal cancer, injury or correction of deformity due to pathology or congenital defect. The focus of this two-part review is the issues associated with the failure of existing mandibular implants that are due to mismatched material properties. Potential directions for future research are also studied. To mitigate these issues, the use of low-stiffness metallic alloys has been highlighted. To this end, the development, processing and biocompatibility of superelastic NiTi as well as resorbable magnesium-based alloys are discussed. Additionally, engineered porosity is reviewed as it can be an effective way of matching the stiffness of an implant with the surrounding tissue. These porosities and the overall geometry of the implant can be optimized for strain transduction and with a tailored stiffness profile. Rendering patient-specific, site-specific, morphology-specific and function-specific implants can now be achieved using these and other metals with bone-like material properties by additive manufacturing. The biocompatibility of implants prepared from superelastic and resorbable alloys is also reviewed. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ultrasonic testing of austenitic welds and its dependency on the welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabatabaeipour, S.M.; Honarvar, F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the ultrasonic testing of austenitic welds prepared by two different welding processes. The tests were carried out by the ultrasonic Time-of-Flight Diffraction (ToFD) technique. Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) and Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) are the welding processes used for preparing the specimens. Identical artificial defects were implanted in both welds during the welding process. Both specimens were examined by the ToFD technique under similar conditions. Metallographic images were also obtained from the cross sectional plane of both the SMA and GTA welds. These images show that the grain orientation in the two welded specimens are different. D-scan images obtained by the ToFD technique from these welds indicates that inspecting the specimens prepared by the SMAW process is easier than the one made by the GTAW process. The results also show that the D-scan images cannot reveal the small vertical drilled holes implanted in the specimens. (author)

  5. Contact-free ultrasonic testing: applications to metrology and NDT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Brun, A.

    1988-01-01

    In some cases classical ultrasonic testing is impossible because of adverse environment (high temperature, ionizing radiations, etc). Ultrasonic waves are created by laser impact and detected by electromagneto-acoustic transducers or laser interferometry. Association of ultrasonics generation by photoacoustic effect and reception by heterodyne interferometer is promising for the future [fr

  6. Experiences in using ultrasonic holography with numerical and optical reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, V.; Wosnitza, M.

    1978-01-01

    At present, ultrasonic holography can resolve and image faults of 1 mm and more and with distances of one ultrasonic wavelength. The main field of application is for thick-walled structural components. Depending on the expected orientation, test probe arrangements as in standard ultrasonic testing are chosen. (orig./RW) [de

  7. The potential of high resolution ultrasonic in-situ methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, K.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the framework of geomechanical assessment of final repository underground openings the knowledge of geophysical rock parameters are of importance. Ultrasonic methods proved to be good geophysical tools to provide appropriate high resolution parameters for the characterisation of rock. In this context the detection and characterisation of rock heterogeneities at different scales, including the Excavation Damaged/disturbed Zone (EDZ/EdZ) features, play an important role. Especially, kinematic and dynamic parameters derived from ultrasonic measurements can be linked very close to rock mechanic investigations and interpretations. BGR uses high resolution ultrasonic methods, starting with emitted frequencies of about 1 kHz (seismic) and going up to about 100 kHz. The method development is going on and appropriate research and investigations are performed since many years at different European radioactive waste disposal related underground research laboratories in different potential host rocks. The most frequented are: Mont Terri Rock Laboratory, Switzerland (Opalinus Clay, OPA), Underground Research Laboratory Meuse/Haute- Marne, France (Callovo-Oxfordian, COX), Underground Research Facility Mol, Belgium (Boom Clay, BC), Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, Sweden (granites), Rock Laboratory Grimsel, Switzerland (granites) and Asse salt mine, Germany (rock salt). The methods can be grouped into borehole based methods and noninvasive methods like refraction and reflection methods, which are performed in general from the drift wall. Additionally, as a combination of these both methods a sort of vertical seismic profiling (VSP) is applied. The best qualified method, or a combination of methods, have to be chosen according to the scientific questions and the local site conditions. The degree of spatial resolution of zones of interest or any kind of anomaly depends strongly on the distance of these objects to the ultrasonic

  8. Numerical shaping of the ultrasonic wavelet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonis, M.

    1991-01-01

    Improving the performance and the quality of ultrasonic testing requires the numerical control of the shape of the driving signal applied to the piezoelectric transducer. This allows precise shaping of the ultrasonic field wavelet and corrections for the physical defects of the transducer, which are mainly due to the damper or the lens. It also does away with the need for an accurate electric matching. It then becomes feasible to characterize, a priori, the ultrasonic wavelet by means of temporal and/or spectral specifications and to use, subsequently, an adaptative algorithm to calculate the corresponding driving wavelet. Moreover, the versatility resulting from the numerical control of this wavelet allows it to be changed in real time during a test

  9. Method of noncontacting ultrasonic process monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Gabriel V.; Walter, John B.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    1992-01-01

    A method of monitoring a material during processing comprising the steps of (a) shining a detection light on the surface of a material; (b) generating ultrasonic waves at the surface of the material to cause a change in frequency of the detection light; (c) detecting a change in the frequency of the detection light at the surface of the material; (d) detecting said ultrasonic waves at the surface point of detection of the material; (e) measuring a change in the time elapsed from generating the ultrasonic waves at the surface of the material and return to the surface point of detection of the material, to determine the transit time; and (f) comparing the transit time to predetermined values to determine properties such as, density and the elastic quality of the material.

  10. Determine bond strength by ultrasonic measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, C.M.

    1978-01-01

    Application of ultrasonic methods for the evaluation and measurement of bond strength has been the object of numerous investigations in the last fifteen years. Some investigators have reported good success (in limited application) while others have experienced dismal failure. One problem common to all investigations was the difficulty in extracting and isolating the many components which comprise the ultrasonic signal reflected from a bonded interface. Part of this problem was due to manually extracting individual parameters from large volumes of raw data. However, with the vast technology now available in the field of signal analysis and computerized data processing, it is feasible to isolate and analyze individual parameters within the ultrasonic signal for great volumes of raw data

  11. Ultrasonic filtration of industrial chemical solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosma, T.

    1974-01-01

    The practical results obtained as a result of filtering industrial chemical solutions under continuous flow conditions with the aid of an ultrasonic filter are presented. The main part of the assembly consists of an ultrasonic generator with an output power of about 400 W and the filtration assembly, in which there is a magnetostrictive amplifier constructed for 20.5 kHz. In addition to ensuring a continuous flow of filtered solution, ultrasonic filters can be replaced or cleaned at intervals of time that are 8-10 times greater than in the case of mechanical filters. They yield considerably better results as far as the size of the filtered particles is concerned. The parameters on which filtration quality depends are also presented.

  12. Ultrasonic grinding of optical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Michael; Bechtold, Michael; Fess, Edward; Stephan, Thomas; Bechtold, Rob

    2017-10-01

    Hard ceramic optical materials such as sapphire, ALON, Spinel, PCA, or Silicon Carbide can present a significant challenge in manufacturing precision optical components due to their tough mechanical properties. These are also the same mechanical properties that make them desirable materials when used in harsh environments. Slow processing speeds, premature tool wear, and poor surface quality are common results of the tough mechanical properties of these materials. Often, as a preparatory stage for polishing, the finish of the ground surface greatly influences the polishing process and the resulting finished product. To overcome these challenges, OptiPro Systems has developed an ultrasonic assisted grinding technology, OptiSonic, which has been designed for the precision optics and ceramics industry. OptiSonic utilizes a custom tool holder designed to produce oscillations, in microns of amplitude, in line with the rotating spindle. A software package, IntelliSonic, is integral to the function of this platform. IntelliSonic can automatically characterize tooling during setup to identify and select the ideal resonant peak which to operate at. Then, while grinding, IntelliSonic continuously adjusts the output frequency for optimal grinding efficiency while in contact with the part. This helps maintain a highly consistent process under changing load conditions for a more precise surface. Utilizing a variety of instruments, tests have proven to show a reduction in force between tool and part by up to 50%, while increasing the surface quality and reducing tool wear. This paper will present the challenges associated with these materials and solutions created to overcome them.

  13. Ultrasonic sludge pretreatment under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Ngoc Tuan; Julcour-Lebigue, Carine; Delmas, Henri

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this work was to optimize the ultrasound (US) pretreatment of sludge. Three types of sewage sludge were examined: mixed, secondary and secondary after partial methanisation ("digested" sludge). Thereby, several main process parameters were varied separately or simultaneously: stirrer speed, total solid content of sludge (TS), thermal operating conditions (adiabatic vs. isothermal), ultrasonic power input (PUS), specific energy input (ES), and for the first time external pressure. This parametric study was mainly performed for the mixed sludge. Five different TS concentrations of sludge (12-36 g/L) were tested for different values of ES (7000-75,000 kJ/kgTS) and 28 g/L was found as the optimum value according to the solubilized chemical oxygen demand in the liquid phase (SCOD). PUS of 75-150 W was investigated under controlled temperature and the "high power input - short duration" procedure was the most effective at a given ES. The temperature increase in adiabatic US application significantly improved SCOD compared to isothermal conditions. With PUS of 150 W, the effect of external pressure was investigated in the range of 1-16 bar under isothermal and adiabatic conditions for two types of sludge: an optimum pressure of about 2 bar was found regardless of temperature conditions and ES values. Under isothermal conditions, the resulting improvement of sludge disintegration efficacy as compared to atmospheric pressure was by 22-67% and 26-37% for mixed and secondary sludge, respectively. Besides, mean particle diameter (D[4,3]) of the three sludge types decreased respectively from 408, 117, and 110 μm to about 94-97, 37-42, and 36-40 μm regardless of sonication conditions, and the size reduction process was much faster than COD extraction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Advances in ultrasonic fuel cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blok, J.; Frattini, P.; Moser, T.

    2002-01-01

    The economics of electric generation is requiring PWR plant operators to consider higher fuel duty and longer cycles. As a result, sub-cooled nucleate boiling is now an accepted occurrence in the upper spans of aggressively driven PWR cores. Thermodynamic and hydraulic factors determine that the boiling surfaces of the fuel favor deposition of corrosion products. Thus, the deposits on high-duty fuel tend to be axially distributed in an inhomogeneous manner. Axial offset anomaly (AOA) is the result of axially non-homogeneous distribution of boron compounds in these axially variable fuel deposits. Besides their axial asymmetry, fuel deposits in boiling cores tend to be qualitatively different from deposits on non-boiling fuel. Thus, deposits on moderate-duty PWR fuel are generally iron rich, predominating in nickel ferrites. Deposits on cores with high boiling duty, on the other hand, tend to be rich in nickel, with sizeable fractions of NiO or elemental nickel. Other unexpected compounds such as m-ZrO 2 and Ni-Fe oxy-borates have been found in significant quantity in deposits on boiling cores. This paper describes the ultrasonic fuel cleaning technology developed by EPRI. Data will be presented to confirm that the method is effective for removing fuel deposits from both high-duty and normal-duty fuel. The report will describe full-core fuel cleaning using the EPRI technology for Callaway Cycle 12 reload fuel. The favorable impact of fuel cleaning on Cycle 12 AOA performance will also be presented. (authors)

  15. Development of coaxial ultrasonic probe for fatty liver diagnostic system using ultrasonic velocity change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Makoto; Yokota, Daiki; Aotani, Yuhei; Kumagai, Yuta; Wada, Kenji; Matsunaka, Toshiyuki; Morikawa, Hiroyasu; Horinaka, Hiromichi

    2017-07-01

    A diagnostic system for fatty liver at an early stage is needed because fatty liver is linked to metabolic syndrome. We have already proposed a fatty liver diagnosis method based on the temperature coefficient of ultrasonic velocity. In this study, we fabricated a coaxial ultrasonic probe by integrating two kinds of transducers for warming and signal detection. The diagnosis system equipped with the coaxial probe was applied to tissue-mimicking phantoms including the fat area. The fat content rates corresponding to the set rates of the phantoms were estimated by the ultrasonic velocity-change method.

  16. Ultrasonic unit for line-by-line ultrasonic scanning of bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soldner, R.

    1978-01-01

    The ultrasonic unit for medical diagnostics operates by the sectorial scanning principle, which avoids direct coupling of the transducer head to the surface of the body. For this purpose, several transmitter/receiver units (approx. 100) are arranged on a partial ring of a circular arc and the ultrasonic beams, which can be triggered sequentially in time, are directed at a common intersection behind the ultrasonic window of the unit, i.e., outside the unit. A mechanical system is employed to set and adjust the partial ring carrying the transmitter/receiver units. (DG) [de

  17. Investigation of geometric design in piezoelectric microelectromechanical systems diaphragms for ultrasonic energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qiongfeng; Wang, Tao; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Lee, Chengkuo

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic energy transfer (AET) has been widely used for contactless energy delivery to implantable devices. However, most of the energy harvesters (ultrasonic receivers) for AET are macro-scale transducers with large volume and limited operation bandwidth. Here, we propose and investigate two microelectromechanical systems diaphragm based piezoelectric ultrasonic energy harvesters (PUEHs) as an alternative for AET. The proposed PUEHs consist of micro-scale diaphragm array with different geometric parameter design. Diaphragms in PUEH-1 have large length to width ratio to achieve broadband property, while its energy harvesting performance is compromised. Diaphragms in PUEH-2 have smaller length to width ratio and thinner thickness to achieve both broadband property and good energy harvesting performance. Both PUEHs have miniaturized size and wide operation bandwidth that are ideally suitable to be integrated as power source for implantable biomedical devices. PUEH-1 has a merged -6 dB bandwidth of 74.5% with a central frequency of 350 kHz. PUEH-2 has two separate -6 dB bandwidth of 73.7%/30.8% with central frequencies of 285 kHz/650 kHz. They can adapt to various ultrasonic sources with different working frequency spectrum. Maximum output power is 34.3 nW and 84.3 nW for PUEH-1 and PUEH-2 at 1 mW/cm2 ultrasound intensity input, respectively. The associated power density is 0.734 μW/cm2 and 4.1 μW/cm2, respectively. Better energy harvesting performance is achieved for PUEH-2 because of the optimized length to width ratio and thickness design. Both PUEHs offer more alignment flexibility with more than 40% power when they are in the range of the ultrasound transmitter.

  18. Characterization methods for ultrasonic test systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busse, L.J.; Becker, F.L.; Bowey, R.E.; Doctor, S.R.; Gribble, R.P.; Posakony, G.J.

    1982-07-01

    Methods for the characterization of ultrasonic transducers (search units) and instruments are presented. The instrument system is considered as three separate components consisting of a transducer, a receiver-display, and a pulser. The operation of each component is assessed independently. The methods presented were chosen because they provide the greatest amount of information about component operation and were not chosen based upon such conditions as cost, ease of operation, field implementation, etc. The results of evaluating a number of commercially available ultrasonic test instruments are presented

  19. Absorption and dispersion of ultrasonic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Herzfeld, Karl F; Massey, H S W; Brueckner, Keith A

    1959-01-01

    Absorption and Dispersion of Ultrasonic Waves focuses on the influence of ultrasonics on molecular processes in liquids and gases, including hydrodynamics, energy exchange, and chemical reactions. The book first offers information on the Stokes-Navier equations of hydrodynamics, as well as equations of motion, viscosity, formal introduction of volume viscosity, and linearized wave equation for a nonviscous fluid. The manuscript then ponders on energy exchange between internal and external degrees of freedom as relaxation phenomenon; effect of slow energy exchange on sound propagation; differe

  20. Ultrasonic methods in solid state physics

    CERN Document Server

    Truell, John; Elbaum, Charles

    1969-01-01

    Ultrasonic Methods in Solid State Physics is devoted to studies of energy loss and velocity of ultrasonic waves which have a bearing on present-day problems in solid-state physics. The discussion is particularly concerned with the type of investigation that can be carried out in the megacycle range of frequencies from a few megacycles to kilomegacycles; it deals almost entirely with short-duration pulse methods rather than with standing-wave methods. The book opens with a chapter on a classical treatment of wave propagation in solids. This is followed by separate chapters on methods and techni

  1. Ultrasonic process for detoxification of groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jiann M.; Huang, H.S.; Livengood, C.D.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results of an investigation of the ultrasonic irradiation of carbon tetrachloride at various pH values, temperatures, and power intensities. Kinetic data and selected chemical mechanism are discussed and proposed. To study oxidant efficiency, chemical oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide, are also considered. This work is part of a project entitled ''Ultrasonic Process for Detoxification of Groundwater and Soil,'' sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development, to develop an innovative process for the effective destruction of chlorinated organics in soil and groundwater

  2. Ultrasonic Ranging System With Increased Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, William E.; Johnson, William G.

    1987-01-01

    Master-oscillator frequency increased. Ultrasonic range-measuring system with 0.1-in. resolution provides continuous digital display of four distance readings, each updated four times per second. Four rangefinder modules in system are modified versions of rangefinder used for automatic focusing in commercial series of cameras. Ultrasonic pulses emitted by system innocuous to both people and equipment. Provides economical solutions to such distance-measurement problems as posed by boats approaching docks, truck backing toward loading platform, runway-clearance readout for tail of airplane with high angle attack, or burglar alarm.

  3. Control of hydrodynamic cavitation using ultrasonic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Dhiman; Arakeri, Vijay H.

    2003-11-01

    Hydrodynamic cavitation is known to have many harmful effects like surface damage and generation of noise. We investigated the use of ultrasonics to control traveling bubble cavitation. Ultrasonic pressure field, produced by a piezoelectric crystal, was applied to modify the nuclei size distribution. Effects of continuous-wave (CW) and pulsed excitations were studied. At low dissolved gas content the CW-mode performed better than the pulsed one, whereas for high gas content the pulsed one was more effective. The dominant mechanisms were Bjerknes force and rectified diffusion in these two cases. Simultaneous excitation by two crystals in CW and pulsed modes was seen to control cavitation better.

  4. Evaluation of bone loss in antibacterial coated dental implants: An experimental study in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godoy-Gallardo, Maria [Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Manzanares-Céspedes, Maria Cristina [Unidad de Anatomía y Embriología Humana, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Sevilla, Pablo [Department of Mechanics, Escola Universitària Salesiana de Sarrià (EUSS), Barcelona (Spain); Nart, José [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, Sant Cugat (Spain); Manzanares, Norberto [Unidad de Anatomía y Embriología Humana, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Manero, José M. [Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Dept. Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC-BarcelonaTECH), Barcelona (Spain); Centre for Research in NanoEngineering (CRNE), UPC-BarcelonaTECH, Barcelona (Spain); Gil, Francisco Javier [Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, Sant Cugat (Spain); Boyd, Steven K. [McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Rodríguez, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.rodriguez.rius@upc.edu [Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Dept. Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC-BarcelonaTECH), Barcelona (Spain); Centre for Research in NanoEngineering (CRNE), UPC-BarcelonaTECH, Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo effect of antibacterial modified dental implants in the first stages of peri-implantitis. Thirty dental implants were inserted in the mandibular premolar sites of 5 beagle dogs. Sites were randomly assigned to Ti (untreated implants, 10 units), Ti-Ag (silver electrodeposition treatment, 10 units), and Ti-TSP (silanization treatment, 10 units). Coated implants were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, interferometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Two months after implant insertion, experimental peri-implantitis was initiated by ligature placement. Ligatures were removed 2 months later, and plaque formation was allowed for 2 additional months. Clinical and radiographic analyses were performed during the study. Implant-tissue samples were prepared for micro computed tomography, backscattered scanning electron microscopy, histomorphometric and histological analyses and ion release measurements. X-ray, SEM and histology images showed that vertical bone resorption in treated implants was lower than in the control group (P < 0.05). This effect is likely due to the capacity of the treatments to reduce bacteria colonization on the implant surface. Histological analysis suggested an increase of peri-implant bone formation on silanized implants. However, the short post-ligature period was not enough to detect differences in clinical parameters among implant groups. Within the limits of this study, antibacterial surface treatments have a positive effect against bone resorption induced by peri-implantitis. - Highlights: • Dental implants were modified with two antibacterial treatments, silver and TESPSA silanization. • Performance of the modified dental implants was studied in vivo. • Treated implants showed less peri-implant bone resorption. • Decrease in bone resorption was attributed to the antibacterial surface treatments. • Silane treatment enhanced bone regeneration around dental implants.

  5. Evaluation of bone loss in antibacterial coated dental implants: An experimental study in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy-Gallardo, Maria; Manzanares-Céspedes, Maria Cristina; Sevilla, Pablo; Nart, José; Manzanares, Norberto; Manero, José M.; Gil, Francisco Javier; Boyd, Steven K.; Rodríguez, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo effect of antibacterial modified dental implants in the first stages of peri-implantitis. Thirty dental implants were inserted in the mandibular premolar sites of 5 beagle dogs. Sites were randomly assigned to Ti (untreated implants, 10 units), Ti-Ag (silver electrodeposition treatment, 10 units), and Ti-TSP (silanization treatment, 10 units). Coated implants were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, interferometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Two months after implant insertion, experimental peri-implantitis was initiated by ligature placement. Ligatures were removed 2 months later, and plaque formation was allowed for 2 additional months. Clinical and radiographic analyses were performed during the study. Implant-tissue samples were prepared for micro computed tomography, backscattered scanning electron microscopy, histomorphometric and histological analyses and ion release measurements. X-ray, SEM and histology images showed that vertical bone resorption in treated implants was lower than in the control group (P < 0.05). This effect is likely due to the capacity of the treatments to reduce bacteria colonization on the implant surface. Histological analysis suggested an increase of peri-implant bone formation on silanized implants. However, the short post-ligature period was not enough to detect differences in clinical parameters among implant groups. Within the limits of this study, antibacterial surface treatments have a positive effect against bone resorption induced by peri-implantitis. - Highlights: • Dental implants were modified with two antibacterial treatments, silver and TESPSA silanization. • Performance of the modified dental implants was studied in vivo. • Treated implants showed less peri-implant bone resorption. • Decrease in bone resorption was attributed to the antibacterial surface treatments. • Silane treatment enhanced bone regeneration around dental implants.

  6. Development and evaluation of porous dental implants in miniature swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagianes, M T; Westerman, R E; Rasmussen, J J; Lodmell, A M

    1976-01-01

    Organized bone ingrowth in endosteal porous implants fabricated from VMC titanium alloy and surgically implanted with a tight interference fit, securely anchored the implants in fresh and healed mandibular premolar sites of miniature swine. This bone-implant union retained its integrity under high as well as slight masticatory stresses up to one-year after implantation. Bone invasion of the alumina porcelain implants was impeded by the lack of adequate interconnecting porosity; when the porosity was increased, insufficient ceramic strength prohibited a tight initial bone-implant fit. As a consequence, inadequate initial implant stability resulted in a soft tissue encapsulation of the majority of the ceramic implants. Histological examination and mechanical testing results were similar for bone-ingrown implants exposed to different experimental stresses for 4, 5, 8, and 12 months. Bone ingrowth and interface shear strengths were also similar in the different VMC pore sizes and shapes investigated. The design of intraoral attachments appeared critical, at least in swine where no postoperative treatment was administered. Gingival inflammation and alveolar bone resorption caused by calculus were severe around truncated cone-shaped devices. Slender transgingival posts, occlusal caps, and crown restorations were less susceptible to calculus accumulation, resulting in a more satisfactory gingival and subgingival response. Excessive epithelial invagination was a problem only in implants with transgingival truncated cones. Good adherence of soft tissue to metal under the gingival mucosa prevented epithelial migration around implants with other transgingival devices. Alveolar bone resportion around the tops of bone-ingrown implants was minimal at the time intervals examined (up to one year); however, a definite conclusion should be delayed until longer-term implants under full occlusion are evaluated.

  7. Ultrasonic recording and display techniques for the inspection of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ely, R.W.; Hall, G.D.; Johnson, A.; Pascoe, P.T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes four systems: MDU, PURDIE, LAURA and DRUID, under development as ultrasonic recording and display techniques for the inspection of nuclear power plant. The MDU system plots either plan or sectional views of the component under test onto a bistable storage screen. PURDIE is a system based around a video cassette recorder which has been modified to record ultrasonic A-scan waveforms and probe positional information. MDU and PURDIE are portable systems, for use under difficult site conditions. They may be manufactured in quantity to satisfy the demanding inspection programmes of nuclear power stations. LAURA is a desk top replay system for the video cassette tapes produced on site by PURDIE. DRUID is a digital desk top replay/display system incorporating a high resolution colour graphics terminal and therefore offering more flexibility and improved display formats. The systems are compatible with each other and some component units are directly interchangeable between the various systems

  8. Field testing and applications of the Ultrasonic Ranging and Data (USRAD) System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, K.S.; Pickering, D.A.; Blair, M.S.; Espegren, M.L.; Nyquist, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    The Ultrasonic Ranging and Data (USRAD) System is a patented, computerized data acquisition system developed to relate the radiological surveyor's precise physical location to instantaneous radiation data taken during walk-on surveys. The USRAD System incorporates three technologies: radio frequency communications, ultrasonics, and microcomputers. Initial field testing of the USRAD System has resulted in several improvements to walk-on radiological surveys including real-time position data, reproducible survey results, on-site verification of survey coverage, on-site data reduction and graphics, and permanent data storage on magnetic media. Although the USRAD System was developed specifically for use with a gamma-ray detector, it is adaptable to other instruments. Applications of the USRAD System may include verification of remediated and uncontaminated areas, emergency response in mapping pollutant locations after accidents, and characterization of hazardous waste areas. 2 refs., 8 figs

  9. Minimally invasive piezosurgery for a safe placement of blade dental implants in jaws with severe bone loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rossi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim :Severe atrophies of edentulous jaws require major reconstructive bone surgery in order to allow the placement of root-form implants with standard diameter. These bone augmentation techniques represent the best option reported in the literature, but they are often rejected by patients because of their high economic and biological costs in addition to the possibility of failure in the short and/or long term. In the maxilla regenerative methods (onlay, inlay, and distraction have high success rates, whereas in the mandible, especially in the distal atrophic area, they are not so predictable. In such situations an alternative technique for fixed prosthethic rebilitation is the insertion of platform blade implants, which have their elective indication for atrophic bone ridges with reduced width, owing to their reduced thickness. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of the use of piezoelectric ultrasonic handpieces, in order to simplify the placement of blade implants, making it safer and less traumatic than with conventional surgical procedures. Materials and methods: Platform blade implants are extension implant functionally and aesthetically reliable, even if they require a more difficult surgical technique compared with the one currently in use for screw implants. A minimally invasive procedure by means of piezosurgery that was performed on 142 subjects is presented and a case is reported which highlights the successful results. Results: and conclusion The use of piezoelectric ultrasonic handpieces simplifies the surgical procedure for the placement of blade implant, making it safer and less traumatic.

  10. Analysis of Ultrasonic Transmitted Signal for Apple using Wavelet Transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Bok; Lee, Sang Dae; Choi, Man Yong; Kim, Man Soo

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted to analyze the ultrasonic transmitted signal for apple using wavelet transform. Fruit consists of nonlinear visco-elastic properties such as flesh, an ovary and rind and lienee most ultrasonic wave is attenuated and its frequency is shifted during passing the fruit. Thus it is not easy to evaluate the internal quality of the fruit using typical ultrasonic parameters such as wave velocity, attenuation, and frequency spectrum. The discrete wavelet transform was applied to the ultrasonic transmitted signal for apple. The magnitude of the first peak frequency of the wavelet basis from the ultrasonic transmitted signal showed a close correlation to the storage time of apple

  11. Comparison of Subgingival and Peri-implant Microbiome in Chronic Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Qin, Xue Yan; Jiang, Wei Peng; Zheng, Hui; Xu, Xin Li; Chen, Feng

    2015-09-01

    To analyse the microbia composition of 10 healthy dental implants and 10 chronic periodontitis patients. Subgingival plaque and peri-implant biofilm were sampled at the first molar site before and after implant restoration. The analysis was conducted by 454-prosequencing of bacterial V1 to V3 regions of 16S rDNA. Chronic periodontitis subjects showed greater bacterial diversity compared with implant subjects. The relative abundance of sixteen genera and twelve species differed significantly between implant and chronic periodontitis subjects. The genera Catonella, Desulfovibrio, Mogibacterium, Peptostreptococcus and Propionibacterium were present in higher abundance in chronic periodontitis subjects, while implant subjects had higher proportions of Brevundimonas and Pseudomonas species. Our results demonstrate that implant restoration changes the oral microbiota. The analysis suggests that periodontal bacteria can remain for a prolonged period of time at non-dental sites, from where they can colonise the peri-implant.

  12. Effects of ultrasonic irradiation on crystallization and structural properties of EMT-type zeolite nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Eng-Poh, E-mail: epng@usm.my [School of Chemical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, USM, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Awala, Hussein [Laboratoire Catalyse & Spectrochimie, CNRS-ENSICAEN, Université de Caen (France); Ghoy, Jia-Pei [School of Chemical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, USM, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Vicente, Aurélie [Laboratoire Catalyse & Spectrochimie, CNRS-ENSICAEN, Université de Caen (France); Ling, Tau Chuan [Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya (Malaysia); Ng, Yun Hau [School of Chemical Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Mintova, Svetlana [Laboratoire Catalyse & Spectrochimie, CNRS-ENSICAEN, Université de Caen (France); Adam, Farook, E-mail: farook@usm.my [School of Chemical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, USM, 11800 Penang (Malaysia)

    2015-06-01

    Synthesis of EMT zeolite nanocrystals from rice husk ash biomass (RHA) under continuous ultrasonic irradiation is reported. The aging, nucleation and crystallization stages of EMT zeolite in the system were monitored at ambient temperature, and compared with the conventional hydrothermal method. It was found that ultrasonic wave induced rapid crystal growth of the nanosized EMT zeolite. Complete crystallization of EMT nanocrystals was achieved within 24 h which was much faster than conventional hydrothermal synthesis (36 h). Furthermore, XRD and TEM analyses revealed that more nuclei were formed during the nucleation stage, allowing the preparation of smaller zeolite nanocrystals with high crystallinity. The results also showed that sonocrystallization produced EMT zeolite with high yield (ca. 80%). The ultrasound-prepared EMT nanocrystals were also found to have high porosity and high hydrophilicity, making the material promising for water sorption applications including vapor sensing, heat pump and adsorption technologies. - Highlights: • Nanosized EMT zeolites are formed from rice husk ash under ultrasonic irradiation. • The effects of ultrasonic waves in nanosized EMT zeolite synthesis are studied. • Ultrasound induces rapid crystal growth and produces high zeolite yield. • Smaller zeolite nanocrystals with high crystallinity and large defect sites are obtained. • Improved surface hydrophilicity of crystals is beneficial for water sorption applications.

  13. Optical effects of ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, P.D.

    1987-01-01

    The review concerns the effects of ion implantation that specifically relate to the optical properties of insulators. Topics which are reviewed include: ion implantation, ion range and damage distributions, colour centre production by ion implantation, high dose ion implantation, and applications for integrated optics. Numerous examples are presented of both diagnostic and industrial examples of ion implantation effects in insulators. (U.K.)

  14. Ion implantation in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, V.; Gusevova, M.

    1980-01-01

    The historical development is described of the method of ion implantation, the physical research of the method, its technological solution and practical uses. The method is universally applicable, allows the implantation of arbitrary atoms to an arbitrary material, ensures high purity of the doping element. It is linked with sample processing at low temperatures. In implantation it is possible to independently change the dose and energy of the ions thereby affecting the spatial distribution of the ions. (M.S.)

  15. Ion implantation in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusev, V; Gusevova, M

    1980-06-01

    The historical development of the method of ion implantation, the physical research of the method, its technological solution and practical uses is described. The method is universally applicable, allows the implantation of arbitrary atoms to an arbitrary material and ensures high purity of the doping element. It is linked with sample processing at low temperatures. In implantation it is possible to independently change the dose and energy of the ions thereby affecting the spatial distribution of the ions.

  16. Trends in Cochlear Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2004-01-01

    More than 60,000 people worldwide use cochlear implants as a means to restore functional hearing. Although individual performance variability is still high, an average implant user can talk on the phone in a quiet environment. Cochlear-implant research has also matured as a field, as evidenced by the exponential growth in both the patient population and scientific publication. The present report examines current issues related to audiologic, clinical, engineering, anatomic, and physiologic as...

  17. Development of ultrasonic testing scanner for NPP steam generator tubes (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, J. I.; Huh, H.

    1998-12-01

    Testing tubes are designed and fabricated to investigate the optimum test conditions through the various experiments. The proto-type P/C-controlled automatic rotating scanner is fabricated to obtain the ultrasonic data automatically from test tubes. It was attempted to visualize the shape of defects presented inside the specimen using peak amplitude at each point. However, further research works will be needed to be applied at the plant site as a more reliable technology

  18. Clinical outcomes of implant therapy in ectodermal dysplasia patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; He, J; Decker, A M; Hu, J C; Zou, D

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this review was to determine the outcome of oral function reconstruction in ectodermal dysplasia (ED) patients who have received dental implant therapy. A search was made of the PubMed and Web of Science databases; key words used were "(ectodermal dysplasia) AND (implant OR implants)", with supplementary retrieval key words "dental implant", "zygomatic implant", "anodontia", and "edentulous". Patient age, use of bone graft, implant site, type of implant, and survival rate of the implants were included in the subsequent data analysis. Forty-five articles published between 1988 and October 2015 were included in this analysis. The cases of a total of 96 patients were retrieved (22 children and 74 adults); these patients received a total of 701 implants. Fourteen implants were removed during a median follow-up time of 24 months. The 24-month implant survival rate was 97.9% in adult subjects and 98.6% in children. Sixty-eight percent of adult patients underwent bone augmentation prior to implant placement. Based on this review, dental implants are commonly used in the oral reconstruction of ED patients. However, long-term data on bone augmentation and implant success are needed, as well as additional clinical evidence on bone resorption, the esthetic outcomes of implant therapy, and physiological considerations in ED patients. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Piezosurgery in Bone Augmentation Procedures Previous to Dental Implant Surgery: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrin, Gabriel Leonardo; Sigua-Rodriguez, Eder Alberto; Goulart, Douglas Rangel; Asprino, Luciana

    2015-01-01

    The piezosurgery has been used with increasing frequency and applicability by health professionals, especially those who deal with dental implants. The concept of piezoelectricity has emerged in the nineteenth century, but it was applied in oral surgery from 1988 by Tomaso Vercellotti. It consists of an ultrasonic device able to cut mineralized bone tissue, without injuring the adjacent soft tissue. It also has several advantages when compared to conventional techniques with drills and saws, such as the production of a precise, clean and low bleed bone cut that shows positive biological results. In dental implants surgery, it has been used for maxillary sinus lifting, removal of bone blocks, distraction osteogenesis, lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve, split crest of alveolar ridge and even for dental implants placement. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the use of piezosurgery in bone augmentation procedures used previously to dental implants placement. PMID:26966469

  20. Immediate provisional restoration of a single-tooth implant in the esthetic zone: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Sung Fu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Immediate implant restoration of single implants may demonstrate a positive effect on peri-implant soft tissue. Placement of a provisional restoration following implant surgery can create soft tissue contours that resemble normal gingival topography before placement of the definitive prosthesis. This article describes a staged approach of the mandibular permanent right central incisor, which was congenital missing. The proper space for restoration of the missing incisor was created through orthodontic treatment. The scheduled implant site was reconstructed using autogenous bone harvested from the chin region. After a healing period of four months, an implant was installed with the connection of a fixed provisional crown to a prefabricated temporary abutment. The soft tissue around the implant healed according to the contours of the provisional restoration and the emergence profile was used to duplicate the definitive restoration. Peri-implant esthetics was achieved through the staged approach and immediate restoration of the implant.

  1. Treatment Alternatives to Negotiate Peri-Implantitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli E. Machtei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Peri-implant diseases are becoming a major health issue in dentistry. Despite the magnitude of this problem and the potential grave consequences, commonly acceptable treatment protocols are missing. Hence, the present paper reviews the literature treatment of peri-implantitis in order to explore their benefits and limitations. Treatment of peri-implantitis may include surgical and nonsurgical approaches, either individually or combined. Nonsurgical therapy is aimed at removing local irritants from the implants’ surface with or without surface decontamination and possibly some additional adjunctive therapies agents or devices. Systemic antibiotics may also be incorporated. Surgical therapy is aimed at removing any residual subgingival deposits and additionally reducing the peri-implant pockets depth. This can be done alone or in conjunction with either osseous respective approach or regenerative approach. Finally, if all fails, explantation might be the best alternative in order to arrest the destruction of the osseous structure around the implant, thus preserving whatever is left in this site for future reconstruction. The available literature is still lacking with large heterogeneity in the clinical response thus suggesting possible underlying predisposing conditions that are not all clear to us. Therefore, at present time treatment of peri-implantitis should be considered possible but not necessarily predictable.

  2. Ion implantation technology

    CERN Document Server

    Downey, DF; Jones, KS; Ryding, G

    1993-01-01

    Ion implantation technology has made a major contribution to the dramatic advances in integrated circuit technology since the early 1970's. The ever-present need for accurate models in ion implanted species will become absolutely vital in the future due to shrinking feature sizes. Successful wide application of ion implantation, as well as exploitation of newly identified opportunities, will require the development of comprehensive implant models. The 141 papers (including 24 invited papers) in this volume address the most recent developments in this field. New structures and possible approach

  3. High energy ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    High energy ion implantation offers the oppertunity for unique structures in semiconductor processing. The unusual physical properties of such implantations are discussed as well as the special problems in masking and damage annealing. A review is made of proposed circuit structures which involve deep implantation. Examples are: deep buried bipolar collectors fabricated without epitaxy, barrier layers to reduce FET memory sensitivity to soft-fails, CMOS isolation well structures, MeV implantation for customization and correction of completed circuits, and graded reach-throughs to deep active device components. (orig.)

  4. [Silastic implant and synovitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennwald, G

    1989-07-22

    The silastic implant based on siloxane polymere induces granulomatous synovitis in certain predisposed individuals, a reaction which may continue even after removal of the implant. This is also true of a prosthesis of the trapezium in two of our patients, though to a lesser degree. This is probably the reason why the problem has not yet been widely recognized. The hypothesis is put forward that an enzymatic predisposition may allow chemical degradation of the fragmented silastic implant into a toxic component responsible for the pathologic condition. The slow progression of the lesions is a challenge for the future and puts in question the further use of silastic implants.

  5. Cochlear implant magnet retrofit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, N L; Breda, S D; Hoffman, R A

    1988-06-01

    An implantable magnet is now available for patients who have received the standard Nucleus 22-channel cochlear implant and who are not able to wear the headband satisfactorily. This magnet is attached in piggy-back fashion to the previously implanted receiver/stimulator by means of a brief operation under local anesthesia. Two patients have received this magnet retrofit, and are now wearing the headset with greater comfort and satisfaction. It is felt that the availability of this magnet will increase patient compliance in regard to hours of implant usage.

  6. Ultrasonic Tomography Imaging for Liquid-Gas Flow Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Jaysuman PUSPPANATHAN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research was carried out to measure two-phase liquid – gas flow regime by using a dual functionality ultrasonic transducer. Comparing to the common separated transmitter–receiver ultrasonic pairs transducer, the dual functionality ultrasonic transceiver is capable to produce the same measurable results hence further improvises and contributes to the hardware design improvement and system accuracy. Due to the disadvantages and the limitations of the separated ultrasonic transmitter–receiver pair, this paper presents a non-invasive ultrasonic tomography system using ultrasonic transceivers as an alternative approach. Implementation of ultrasonic transceivers, electronic measurement circuits, data acquisition system and suitable image reconstruction algorithms, the measurement of a liquid/gas flow was realized.

  7. Ultrasonic Low-Friction Containment Plate for Thermal and Ultrasonic Stir Weld Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Karl; Short, Matt

    2013-01-01

    The thermal stir welding (TSW) process is finding applications in fabrication of space vehicles. In this process, workpieces to be joined by TSW are drawn, by heavy forces, between "containment plates," past the TSW tool that then causes joining of the separate plates. It is believed that the TSW process would be significantly improved by reducing the draw force, and that this could be achieved by reducing the friction forces between the workpieces and containment plates. Based on use of high-power ultrasonics in metal forming processes, where friction reduction in drawing dies has been achieved, it is believed that ultrasonic vibrations of the containment plates could achieve similar friction reduction in the TSW process. By applying ultrasonic vibrations to the containment plates in a longitudinal vibration mode, as well as by mounting and holding the containment plates in a specific manner such as to permit the plates to acoustically float, friction between the metal parts and the containment plates is greatly reduced, and so is the drawing force. The concept was to bring in the ultrasonics from the sides of the plates, permitting the ultrasonic hardware to be placed to the side, away from the equipment that contains the thermal stir tooling and that applies clamping forces to the plates. Tests demonstrated that one of the major objectives of applying ultrasonics to the thermal stir system, that of reducing draw force friction, should be achievable on a scaled-up system.

  8. Radial vibration and ultrasonic field of a long tubular ultrasonic radiator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuyu, Lin; Zhiqiang, Fu; Xiaoli, Zhang; Yong, Wang; Jing, Hu

    2013-09-01

    The radial vibration of a metal long circular tube is studied analytically and its electro-mechanical equivalent circuit is obtained. Based on the equivalent circuit, the radial resonance frequency equation is derived. The theoretical relationship between the radial resonance frequency and the geometrical dimensions is studied. Finite element method is used to simulate the radial vibration and the radiated ultrasonic field and the results are compared with those from the analytical method. It is concluded that the radial resonance frequency for a solid metal rod is larger than that for a metal tube with the same outer radius. The radial resonance frequencies from the analytical method are in good agreement with those from the numerical method. Based on the acoustic field analysis, it is concluded that the long metal tube with small wall thickness is superior to that with large wall thickness in producing radial vibration and ultrasonic radiation. Therefore, it is expected to be used as an effective radial ultrasonic radiator in ultrasonic sewage treatment, ultrasonic antiscale and descaling and other ultrasonic liquid handling applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Concrete deterioration: detection by ultrasonic pulse velocity method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutan, N.M.; Jaafar, M.S.; Hamdan, S.

    2003-01-01

    Tests were performed to evaluate the feasibility of using Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity Method (UPVM) in detecting defect and determining its depth during the early age concrete. Five reinforced concrete (RC) slabs of grade 30, 40 and 50 specimens at day 3, 7,14 and 28 with a fabricated void at a known location were used. The results obtained were compared to determine the accuracy of the method hence the effectiveness of the method with different strength and as the concrete matures. This method detects defects in specimens during the early age The accuracy varies with concrete strength and as the concrete mature. The test results indicate the method can be used to assess the in-situ properties of concrete or for quality control on site. The method showed better accuracy with stronger concrete detects defects with the accuracy ranging from 55.75-99.62% from day 3-28 (full strength) respectively. (author)

  10. Immediate provisionalization of immediate implants in the esthetic zone: a prospective case series evaluating implant survival, esthetics, and bone maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Barry P; Wilk, Brian L

    2013-05-01

    This prospective study evaluates immediately placed and immediately provisionalized implants in the esthetic zone. All implants were TiO2-blasted, fluoride-modified, grade 4 titanium, with a coronal microthread design. Bone grafting and guided bone regeneration (GBR) was performed at all sites, and screw-retained temporary restorations were delivered on the day of surgery. All of the provisional crown(s) were out of occlusal function and remained in place for at least 8 weeks prior to initiation of definitive restorative therapy. Bone maintenance (BM) was considered successful if radiographs demonstrated proximal bone levels even or coronal to the implant platform. Of the 29 implants placed, 25 (86 percent) achieved bone maintenance at least 12 months post-loading with the final restorations. This study was considered successful, with 100 percent implant survival after at least 1 year loading of the final restoration, and 100 percent of patients were satisfied with the esthetics of their implant treatment.

  11. Periodontal ligament formation around different types of dental titanium implants. I. The self-tapping screw type implant system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warrer, K; Karring, T; Gotfredsen, K

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if a periodontal ligament can form around self-tapping, screw type titanium dental implants. Implants were inserted in contact with the periodontal ligament of root tips retained in the mandibular jaws of 7 monkeys. In each side of the mandible, 1 premolar......, a periodontal ligament can form on self-tapping, screw type titanium dental implants in areas where a void is present between the surrounding bone and the implant at the time of insertion....... and 2 molars were removed in such a manner that in approximately half the cases, the root tips were retained. Following healing, the experimental areas were examined on radiographs, and sites were selected for the insertion of the implants, so that every second implant would have a close contact...

  12. A study on the resistance at bone-implant interface during implant insertion in a cadaver goat jaw model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goutam Das

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study is to determine the resistance at bone-implant interface during insertion of dental implant. Materials and Methods: Freshly procured cadaver goat mandibles were collected from slaughterhouses. Four dental implants of two different diameters were inserted into osteotomized sites of the goat mandibles. The gradual changes in resonance frequency (RF were recorded in RF analyzer for the five consecutive turns of implant insertion. Results and Observations: RF was found to be positively correlated with diameter of dental implants. Conclusion: RF analysis can be used to determine the type of resistance the implant faces during insertion and the kind of bone density through which it passes. It gives a forecast of expected initial stability.

  13. Ultrasonic sensor for sodium perspective device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Fujio; Onuki, Koji.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention concerns an ultrasonic wave sensor for a sodium perspective device disposed in an FBR type reactor, which can change the directing angle of the ultrasonic sensor irrespective of the external conditions in liquid sodium. Namely, the sensor comprises (1) a sensor main body, (2) a diaphragm disposed on an oscillating surface of ultrasonic waves generated from the sensor main body, (3) a pressurizing and depressurizing nozzle connected to the sensor main body, and (4) a pressure detector disposed to these nozzles. A gas is charged/discharged to and from the sensor main body to control a gas pressure in the main body. If the gas pressure is made higher, the diaphragm is deformed convexly. If the gas pressure is lowered, the diaphragm is deformed concavely. The directing angle is greater when it is deformed a convexly, and it is smaller when it is deformed concavely. Accordingly, ultrasonic wave receiving/sending range in the sodium can be varied optionally by controlling the gas pressure in the main body. (I.S.)

  14. Development of ultrasonic instrument 'UT1000 Series'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Yukio; Ikeda, Toshimichi

    1984-01-01

    The ultrasonic flaw detectors with 'A-scope indication' have been frequently used as the means for confirming the soundness of structures and equipments, but there are problems in their operational, quantifying and recording capabilities. Recently, the digital ultrasonic measuring instrument of touch panel type ''UT 1000 Series'' has been developed, which resolves these problems by a single effort. This measuring instrument is that of portable type, which gives the digital output of measured results in real time only by lightly touching the peak point of an echo on the Brown tube. This instrument contains the rich software for measurement, and can measure the positions and dimensions of defects and the pressure on contact surfaces with high accuracy. 'A-scope indication' is the indication with an oscilloscope taking the intensity of echo and the propagation time of ultrasonic waves on the ordinate and abscissa, respectively. There are three types of the instrument, that is, for detecting defects, for measuring contact surface pressure and for both purposes. The size of the instrument is 240 mm width, 350 mm length and 175 mm height, and the weight is 8.5 kgf. The specification, function and features of the ultrasonic flaw detector, touch panel, gain setter, key board, microcomputer and others are reported. (Kako, I.)

  15. Ultrasonic attenuation in rare-earth monoarsenides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 86; Issue 6. Ultrasonic attenuation in rare-earth monoarsenides .... Proceedings of the International Workshop/Conference on Computational Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science (IWCCMP-2015). Posted on November 27, 2015. Guest Editors: Anurag ...

  16. Coded ultrasonic remote control without batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerhardy, C; Burlage, K; Schomburg, W K

    2009-01-01

    A concept for battery-less remote controls has been developed based on mechanically actuated beams and micro whistles generating ultrasound signals. These signals need to be frequency or time coded to increase the number of signals which can be distinguished from each other and environmental ultrasound. Several designs for generating coded ultrasonic signals have been investigated

  17. Automated ultrasonic inspection of nuclear plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, J.A.; Dolbey, M.P.

    1982-01-01

    For reasons of safety and efficiency, automated systems are used in performing ultrasonic inspection of nuclear components. An automated system designed specifically for the inspection of headers in a nuclear plant is described. In-service inspection results obtained with this system are shown to correlate with pre-service inspection results obtained by manual methods

  18. Applications of precision ultrasonic thickness gauging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, K.A.; Elfbaum, G.M.; Husarek, V.; Castel, J.G.

    1976-01-01

    Pulse-echo ultrasonic thickness gauging is now recognized as an accurate method of measuring thickness of a product from one side when the velocity of ultrasound in the material is known. The advantages and present limitation of this gauging technique are presented, together with several applications of industrial interest [fr

  19. Auto-positioning ultrasonic transducer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Randy K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An ultrasonic transducer apparatus and process for determining the optimal transducer position for flow measurement along a conduit outer surface. The apparatus includes a transmitting transducer for transmitting an ultrasonic signal, said transducer affixed to a conduit outer surface; a guide rail attached to a receiving transducer for guiding movement of a receiving transducer along the conduit outer surface, wherein the receiving transducer receives an ultrasonic signal from the transmitting transducer and sends a signal to a data acquisition system; and a motor for moving the receiving transducer along the guide rail, wherein the motor is controlled by a controller. The method includes affixing a transmitting transducer to an outer surface of a conduit; moving a receiving transducer on the conduit outer surface, wherein the receiving transducer is moved along a guide rail by a motor; transmitting an ultrasonic signal from the transmitting transducer that is received by the receiving transducer; communicating the signal received by the receiving transducer to a data acquisition and control system; and repeating the moving, transmitting, and communicating along a length of the conduit.

  20. Ferroelectret non-contact ultrasonic transducers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bovtun, Viktor; Döring, J.; Bartusch, J.; Beck, U.; Erhard, A.; Yakymenko, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 4 (2007), s. 737-743 ISSN 0947-8396 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/06/0403 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : ferroelectrets * polymers * ultrasonic transducers Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.857, year: 2007

  1. Experimental development of an ultrasonic linear motor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    M'Boungui, G

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available the stator structure. In contrast to traditional travelling wave ultrasonic motors, which require two modes to be driven 90° out of phase, only one amplifier is required to drive the proposed device. A prototype device was characterised experimentally...

  2. Ultrasonic Diagnosis of Fetal Ascites and Toxoplasmosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaakær, Jan

    1986-01-01

    The ultrasonic diagnosis of fetal ascites caused by Toxoplasma Gondii is presented. When a diagnosis of fetal ascites without obvious etiological malformation is established, toxoplasmosis should be suspected. A serological test should be performed, in view of the possibility of antenatal treatme...

  3. Repartition of ultrasonic energies at the interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deleuze, M.; Bourdarios, M.; Lepoutre, M.

    1983-06-01

    Energy repartition of ultrasonic waves at the interfaces is studied as a function of incidence angle of the acoustic beam in immersion testing. For each interface type mathematical relations give the ratio of incident energy and energy of the wave reemitted by the interface. As an example curves for the interfaces water-uranium are given [fr

  4. Advanced ultrasonic field system: a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikesell, C.R.; Beller, L.S.

    1984-02-01

    An advanced ultrasonic system was developed to obtain highly reproducible inspection data and to overcome certain limitations encountered with the manual scanning method. Experience from field operations from 1976 through 1980 is discussed. The scope includes a description of the computer controlled system, personnel training, inservice inspections, data analysis, and current upgrading of the system

  5. Ultrasonic thermometry for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saravana Kumar, S.; Arunraj, A.L.R.; Swaminathan, K.

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic transducer provides a method of measurement of temperature in industrial tanks and boilers containing different liquids with varied salt content. This method is used to measure the average temperature continuously where other traditional methods available do not offer. Traditional methods used for temperature measurement like infrared thermometers, thermocouples, measures temperature at a single location. Numerous thermocouples are to be fixed at various part of the boiler in order to measure the temperature of the entire boiler, which incurs high cost. Reliability of the system decreases, with increasing number of thermocouples. When they fail at a point, the time incurred in finding the faulty part or faulty thermocouple is high. Ultrasonic transducer provides continuous measurement for all different characteristic liquids with higher accuracy and lesser response time. Fault location and clearance time is also less in ultrasonic measurement method, since only a couple of transducers used for the entire boiler structure. Additionally ultrasonic thermometry along support measuring electronic system can be built of low cost. (author)

  6. Reduction of aerosols produced by ultrasonic scalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrel, S K; Barnes, J B; Rivera-Hidalgo, F

    1996-01-01

    There is concern with decreased air quality and potential aerosol contamination in the dental operatory. This problem has been addressed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which recommends that all sources of blood-contaminated splatter and aerosols be minimized. One of the major sources of potential aerosol contamination in the dental setting is the ultrasonic scaler. This study looks at the use of a high volume evacuator attachment for the ultrasonic scaler handpiece. Artificial teeth were mock-scaled for 1 minute with and without the evacuator attachment. The mock scaling was performed within a plastic enclosure that had a 1 cm grid laid out on 4 sides. Scaling was performed 10 times each by 2 operators. An erythrosin solution was used for the ultrasonic scaler coolant with a coolant volume of 17.5 ml/min. The number of squares containing a red erythrosin spot were counted and considered to represent aerosol contamination. The high volume evacuator attachment produced a 93% reduction in the number of contaminated squares (chi squared significant at P < 0.05). There was no increase in heat transfer to a tooth analogue when the high volume evacuator attachment was used with the ultrasonic scaler as compared to the scaler without the evacuator attachment. It is felt that the high volume evacuator attachment is capable of significantly reducing the amount of aerosol contamination produced within the test system without increased heat transfer to the tooth.

  7. Percutaneously Inject able Fetal Pacemaker: Electrodes, Mechanical Design and Implantation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Chmait, Ramen; Bar-Cohen, Yaniv; Peck, Raymond A.; Loeb, Gerald E.

    2015-01-01

    We are developing a self-contained cardiac pacemaker with a small, cylindrical shape (~3×20mm) that permits it to be implanted percutaneously into a fetus to treat complete heart block and consequent hydrops fetalis, which is otherwise fatal. The device uses off-the-shelf components including a rechargeable lithium cell and a highly efficient relaxation oscillator encapsulated in epoxy and glass. A corkscrew electrode made from activated iridium can be screwed into the myocardium, followed by release of the pacemaker and a short, flexible lead entirely within the chest of the fetus to avoid dislodgement from fetal movement. The feasibility of implanting the device percutaneously under ultrasonic imaging guidance was demonstrated in acute adult rabbit experiments. PMID:23367442

  8. Percutaneously injectable fetal pacemaker: electrodes, mechanical design and implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Chmait, Ramen; Bar-Cohen, Yaniv; Peck, Raymond A; Loeb, Gerald E

    2012-01-01

    We are developing a self-contained cardiac pacemaker with a small, cylindrical shape (~3 × 20 mm) that permits it to be implanted percutaneously into a fetus to treat complete heart block and consequent hydrops fetalis, which is otherwise fatal. The device uses off-the-shelf components including a rechargeable lithium cell and a highly efficient relaxation oscillator encapsulated in epoxy and glass. A corkscrew electrode made from activated iridium can be screwed into the myocardium, followed by release of the pacemaker and a short, flexible lead entirely within the chest of the fetus to avoid dislodgement from fetal movement. The feasibility of implanting the device percutaneously under ultrasonic imaging guidance was demonstrated in acute adult rabbit experiments.

  9. Ultrasonic Communication Project, Phase 1, FY1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, H.D.; Akerman, M.A.; Baylor, V.M.

    2000-06-01

    This Phase 1 project has been successful in identifying, exploring, and demonstrating methods for ultrasonic-based communication with an emphasis on the application of digital signal processing techniques. During the project, at the direction of the agency project monitor, particular attention was directed at sending and receiving ultrasonic data through air and through pipes that would be commonly found in buildings. Efforts were also focused on development of a method for transmitting computer files ultrasonically. New methods were identified and evaluated for ultrasonic communication. These methods are based on a technique called DFS. With DFS, individual alphanumeric characters are broken down into a sequence of bits, and each bit is used to generate a discrete ultrasonic frequency. Characters are then transmitted one-bit-at-a-time, and reconstructed by the receiver. This technique was put into practice through the development of LabVIEW{trademark}VIs. These VIs were integrated with specially developed electronic circuits to provide a system for demonstrating the transmission and reception/reconstruction of typed messages and computer files. Tests were performed to determine the envelope for ultrasound transmission through pipes (with and without water) versus through air. The practical aspects of connections, efficient electronics, impedance matching, and the effect of damping mechanisms were all investigated. These tests resulted in a considerable number of reference charts that illustrate the absorption of ultrasound through different pipe materials, both with and without water, as a function of distance. Ultrasound was found to be least attenuated by copper pipe and most attenuated by PVC pipe. Water in the pipe provides additional damping and attenuation of ultrasonic signals. Dramatic improvements are observed, however, in ultrasound signal strength if the transducers are directly coupled to the water, rather than simply attaching them to the outside of

  10. The effect of implant number and position on the stress behavior of mandibular implant retained overdentures: A three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topkaya, Tolga; Solmaz, Murat Yavuz

    2015-07-16

    The present study evaluated the effects of ball anchor abutment attached to implants with a 4.30 mm diameter and 11 mm insert length on stress distribution in a patient without any remaining teeth in the lower jaw. In the study, the stress analysis was performed for five different configurations (2 with 4 implant-supported and 3 with 2 implant-supported) and three different loading types using ANSYS Workbench software. The stresses measured in the 4 implant-supported models were lower compared to the stresses measured in the 2 implant-supported models. The stresses on the implants intensified on the cervical region of the implants. When the effects of the loading sites on the stress were examined, the loading on the first molar tooth produced the highest stresses on the implants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Automatic analysis of ultrasonic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horteur, P.; Colin, J.; Benoist, P.; Bonis, M.; Paradis, L.

    1986-10-01

    This paper describes an automatic and self-contained data processing system, transportable on site, able to perform images such as ''A. Scan'', ''B. Scan'', ... to present very quickly the results of the control. It can be used in the case of pressure vessel inspection [fr

  12. Spectroscopic analyses on interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with toluidine blue (TB) and its sonodynamic damage under ultrasonic irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jun, E-mail: wangjun890@126.co [Department of Chemistry, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Guo Yuwei [Department of Chemistry, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Department of Chemistry, Baotou Normal College, Baotou 014030 (China); Liu Bin [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Cheng Chunping [Department of Chemistry, Baotou Normal College, Baotou 014030 (China); Wang Zhiqiu; Han Guangxi; Gao Jingqun; Zhang Xiangdong [Department of Chemistry, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China)

    2011-02-15

    In this paper, the toluidine blue (TB) with tricyclic quinone imide plane structure is used as sonosensitizer to study the interaction and sonodynamic damage to bovine serum albumin (BSA) by UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The results show that the TB can bind to BSA molecules, obviously, and the synergetic effects of TB and ultrasonic irradiation can efficiently damage the BSA molecules. Otherwise, some influencing factors such as ultrasonic irradiation time, TB concentration, pH value and ionic strength on the damage of BSA molecules were also considered by the numbers. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy indicates that the tyrosine (Tyr) residues of BSA molecules are damaged more seriously than the tryptophan (Trp) residues under ultrasonic irradiation. - Research Highlights: TB is used as quencher to study interaction to BSA. TB is used as sonosensitizer to study the sonodynamic damage to BSA. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy is used to study TB binding site to BSA.

  13. Spectroscopic analyses on interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with toluidine blue (TB) and its sonodynamic damage under ultrasonic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jun; Guo Yuwei; Liu Bin; Cheng Chunping; Wang Zhiqiu; Han Guangxi; Gao Jingqun; Zhang Xiangdong

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the toluidine blue (TB) with tricyclic quinone imide plane structure is used as sonosensitizer to study the interaction and sonodynamic damage to bovine serum albumin (BSA) by UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The results show that the TB can bind to BSA molecules, obviously, and the synergetic effects of TB and ultrasonic irradiation can efficiently damage the BSA molecules. Otherwise, some influencing factors such as ultrasonic irradiation time, TB concentration, pH value and ionic strength on the damage of BSA molecules were also considered by the numbers. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy indicates that the tyrosine (Tyr) residues of BSA molecules are damaged more seriously than the tryptophan (Trp) residues under ultrasonic irradiation. - Research Highlights: → TB is used as quencher to study interaction to BSA. → TB is used as sonosensitizer to study the sonodynamic damage to BSA. → Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy is used to study TB binding site to BSA.

  14. Percutaneous and skeletal biocarbon implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, V.

    1977-01-01

    Review of carbon implants developed by NASA discussed four different types of implants and subsequent improvements. Improvements could be of specific interest to rehabilitation centers and similar organizations.

  15. Degradable Implantate: Entwicklungsbeispiele

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffieux, Kurt; Wintermantel, Erich

    Resorbierbare Implantate werden seit mehreren Jahrzehnten in der Implantologie eingesetzt. Bekannt wurden diese Biomaterialien mit dem Aufkommen von sich selbst auflösenden Nahtfäden auf der Basis von synthetisch hergestellten Polylactiden und Polyglycoliden in den 70er Jahren. In einem nächsten Schritt wurden Implantate wie Platten und Schrauben zur Gewebefixation aus den gleichen Biomaterialien hergestellt.

  16. Risks of Breast Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have a risk of developing a type of cancer called breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL) in the breast tissue surrounding the implant. BIA-ALCL is not breast cancer. Women diagnosed with BIA-ALCL may need to ...

  17. Ion implantation of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearnaley, G.

    1976-01-01

    In this part of the paper descriptions are given of the effects of ion implantation on (a) friction and wear in metals; and (b) corrosion of metals. In the study of corrosion, ion implantation can be used either to introduce a constituent that is known to convey corrosion resistance, or more generally to examine the parameters which control corrosion. (U.K.)

  18. Ion implantation into diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Susumu

    1994-01-01

    The graphitization and the change to amorphous state of diamond surface layer by ion implantation and its characteristics are reported. In the diamond surface, into which more than 10 16 ions/cm 2 was implanted, the diamond crystals are broken, and the structure changes to other carbon structure such as amorphous state or graphite. Accompanying this change of structure, the electric conductivity of the implanted layer shows two discontinuous values due to high resistance and low resistance. This control of structure can be done by the temperature of the base during the ion implantation into diamond. Also it is referred to that by the base temperature during implantation, the mutual change of the structure between amorphous state and graphite can be controlled. The change of the electric resistance and the optical characteristics by the ion implantation into diamond surface, the structural analysis by Raman spectroscopy, and the control of the structure of the implanted layer by the base temperature during implantation are reported. (K.I.)

  19. Effect on Bone Architecture of Marginal Grooves in Dental Implants Under Occlusal Loaded Conditions in Beagle Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hatsumi; Kuroshima, Shinichiro; Inaba, Nao; Uto, Yusuke; Sawase, Takashi

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify whether marginal grooves on dental implants affect osseointegration, bone structure, and the alignment of collagen fibers to determine bone quality under loaded conditions. Anodized Ti-6Al-4V alloy dental implants, with and without marginal grooves (test and control implants, respectively), were used (3.7 × 8.0 mm). Fourth premolars and first molars of 6 beagle mandibles were extracted. Two control and test implants were placed in randomly selected healed sites at 12 weeks after tooth extraction. Screw-retained single crowns for first molars were fabricated. Euthanasia was performed at 8 weeks after the application of occlusal forces. Implant marginal bone level, bone to implant contact (BIC), bone structure around dental implants, and the alignment of collagen fibers determining bone quality were analyzed. The marginal bone level in test implants was significantly higher than that in control implants. Occlusal forces significantly increased BIC in test implants ( P = .007), whereas BIC did not change in control implants, irrespective of occlusal forces ( P = .303). Moreover, occlusal forces significantly increased BIC in test implants compared with control implants ( P = .032). Additionally, occlusal forces preferentially aligned collagen fibers in test implants, but not control implants. Hence, marginal grooves on dental implants have positive effects on increased osseointegration and adapted bone quality based on the preferential alignment of collagen fibers around dental implants under loaded conditions.

  20. Development of the Automated Ultrasonic Testing System for Inspection of the flaw in the Socket Weldment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Ki; Park, Moon Ho; Park, Ki Sung; Lee, Jae Ho; Lim, Sung Jin

    2004-01-01

    Socket weldment used to change the flow direction of fluid nay have flaws such as lack of fusion and cracks. Liquid penetrant testing or Radiography testing have been applied as NDT methods for flaw detection of the socket weldment. But it is difficult to detect the flaw inside of the socket weldment with these methods. In order to inspect the flaws inside the socket weldment, a ultrasonic testing method is established and a ultrasonic transducer and automated ultrasonic testing system are developed for the inspection. The automated ultrasonic testing system is based on the portable personal computer and operated by the program based Windows 98 or 2000. The system has a pulser/receiver, 100MHz high speed A/D board, and basic functions of ultrasonic flaw detector using the program. For the automated testing, motion controller board of ISA interface type is developed to control the 4-axis scanner and a real time iC-scan image of the automated testing is displayed on the monitor. A flaws with the size of less than 1mm in depth are evaluated smaller than its actual site in the testing, but the flaws larger than 1mm appear larger than its actual size on the contrary. This tendency is shown to be increasing as the flaw size increases. h reliable and objective testing results are obtained with the developed system, so that it is expected that it can contribute to safety management and detection of repair position of pipe lines of nuclear power plants and chemical plants

  1. Number of implants for mandibular implant overdentures: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Yol; Kim, Ha-Young; Bryant, S. Ross

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this systematic review is to address treatment outcomes of Mandibular implant overdentures relative to implant survival rate, maintenance and complications, and patient satisfaction. MATERIALS AND METHODS A systematic literature search was conducted by a PubMed search strategy and hand-searching of relevant journals from included studies. Randomized Clinical Trials (RCT) and comparative clinical trial studies on mandibular implant overdentures until August, 2010 were selected. Eleven studies from 1098 studies were finally selected and data were analyzed relative to number of implants. RESULTS Six studies presented the data of the implant survival rate which ranged from 95% to 100% for 2 and 4 implant group and from 81.8% to 96.1% for 1 and 2 implant group. One study, which statistically compared implant survival rate showed no significant differences relative to the number of implants. The most common type of prosthetic maintenance and complications were replacement or reattaching of loose clips for 2 and 4 implant group, and denture repair due to the fracture around an implant for 1 and 2 implant groups. Most studies showed no significant differences in the rate of prosthetic maintenance and complication, and patient satisfaction regardless the number of implants. CONCLUSION The implant survival rate of mandibular overdentures is high regardless of the number of implants. Denture maintenance is likely not inflenced substantially by the number of implants and patient satisfaction is typically high again regardless os the number of implants. PMID:23236572

  2. Ion implantation into iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwaki, Masaya

    1978-01-01

    The distribution of implanted ions in iron, the friction characteristics and the corrosion of iron were studied. The distribution of Ni or Cr ions implanted into mild steel was measured. The accelerated voltage was 150 keV, and the beam current density was about 2 microampere/cm 2 . The measurement was made with an ion microanalyzer. The measured distribution was compared with that of LSS theory. Deep invasion of Ni was seen in the measured distribution. The distribution of Cr ions was different from the distribution calculated by the LSS theory. The relative friction coefficient of mild steel varied according to the dose of implanted Cu or N ions, and to the accelerating voltage. Formation of compound metals on the surfaces of metals by ion-implantation was investigated for the purpose to prevent the corrosion of metals. The resistance of mild steel in which Ni ions were implanted was larger than that of mild steel without any treatment. (Kato, T.)

  3. [Effects of ultrasonic pretreatment on drying characteristics of sewage sludge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Run-Dong; Yang, Yu-Ting; Li, Yan-Long; Niu, Hui-Chang; Wei, Li-Hong; Sun, Yang; Ke, Xin

    2009-11-01

    The high water content of sewage sludge has engendered many inconveniences to its treatment and disposal. While ultrasonic takes on unique advantages on the sludge drying because of its high ultrasonic power, mighty penetrating capability and the ability of causing cavitations. Thus this research studies the characteristics influences of ultrasonic bring to the sludge drying and effects of the exposure time, ultrasonic generator power, temperatures of ultrasonic and drying temperature on the drying characteristics of dewatered sludge. Results indicate that ultrasonic pretreatment could speed up evaporation of the free water in sludge surface and help to end the drying stage with constant speed. In addition, ultrasonic treatment can effectively improve the sludge drying efficiency which could be more evident with the rise of the ultrasonic power (100-250 W), ultrasonic temperature and drying temperature. If dried under low temperature such as 105 degrees C, sludge will have premium drying characteristics when radiated under ultrasound for a shorter time such as 3 min. In the end, the ultrasonic treatment is expected to be an effective way to the low-cost sludge drying and also be an important reference to the optimization of the sludge drying process because of its effects on the increase of sludge drying efficiency.

  4. Remote consulting based on ultrasonic digital immages and dynamic ultrasonic sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margan, Anamarija; Rustemović, Nadan

    2006-03-01

    Telematic ultrasonic diagnostics is a relatively new tool in providing health care to patients in remote, islolated communities. Our project facility, "The Virtual Polyclinic - A Specialists' Consulting Network for the Islands", is located on the island of Cres in the Adriatic Sea in Croatia and has been extending telemedical services to the archipelago population since 2000. Telemedicine applications include consulting services by specialists at the University Clinical Hospital Center Rebro in Zagreb and at "Magdalena", a leading cardiology clinic in Croatia. After several years of experience with static high resolution ultrasonic digital immages for referral consulting diagnostics purposes, we now also use dynamic ultrasonic sequences in a project with the Department of Emmergency Gastroenterology at Rebro in Zagreb. The aim of the ongoing project is to compare the advantages and shortcomings in transmitting static ultrasonic digital immages and live sequences of ultrasonic examination in telematic diagnostics. Ultrasonic examination is a dynamic process in which the diagnostic accuracy is highly dependent on the dynamic moment of an ultrasound probe and signal. Our first results indicate that in diffuse parenchymal organ pathology the progression and the follow up of a disease is better presented to a remote consulting specialist by dynamic ultrasound sequences. However, the changes that involve only one part of a parenchymal organ can be suitably presented by static ultrasonic digital images alone. Furthermore, we need less time for digital imaging and such tele-consultations overall are more economical. Our previous telemedicine research and practice proved that we can greatly improve the level of medical care in remote healthcare facilities and cut healthcare costs considerably. The experience in the ongoing project points to a conclusion that we can further optimize remote diagnostics benefits by a right choice of telematic application thus reaching a

  5. An Analysis of Peak Wind Speed Data from Collocated Mechanical and Ultrasonic Anemometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, David A.; Wells, Leonard; Merceret, Francis J.; Roeder, William P.

    2007-01-01

    This study compared peak wind speeds reported by mechanical and ultrasonic anemometers at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center (CCAFS/KSC) on the east central coast of Florida and Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) on the central coast of California. Launch Weather Officers, forecasters, and Range Safety analysts need to understand the performance of wind sensors at CCAFS/KSC and VAFB for weather warnings, watches, advisories, special ground processing operations, launch pad exposure forecasts, user Launch Commit Criteria (LCC) forecasts and evaluations, and toxic dispersion support. The legacy CCAFS/KSC and VAFB weather tower wind instruments are being changed from propeller-and-vane (CCAFS/KSC) and cup-and-vane (VAFB) sensors to ultrasonic sensors under the Range Standardization and Automation (RSA) program. Mechanical and ultrasonic wind measuring techniques are known to cause differences in the statistics of peak wind speed as shown in previous studies. The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) and the 30th Weather Squadron (30 WS) requested the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to compare data between the RSA ultrasonic and legacy mechanical sensors to determine if there are significant differences. Note that the instruments were sited outdoors under naturally varying conditions and that this comparison was not designed to verify either technology. Approximately 3 weeks of mechanical and ultrasonic wind data from each range from May and June 2005 were used in this study. The CCAFS/KSC data spanned the full diurnal cycle, while the VAFB data were confined to 1000-1600 local time. The sample of 1-minute data from numerous levels on five different towers on each range totaled more than 500,000 minutes of data (482,979 minutes of data after quality control). The ten towers were instrumented at several levels, ranging from 12 ft to 492 ft above ground level. The ultrasonic sensors were collocated at the same vertical levels as the mechanical sensors and

  6. Pneumococcal meningitis post-cochlear implantation: preventative measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Benjamin P C; Shepherd, Robert K; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Clark, Graeme M; O'Leary, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Both clinical data and laboratory studies demonstrated the risk of pneumococcal meningitis post-cochlear implantation. This review examines strategies to prevent post-implant meningitis. Medline/PubMed database; English articles after 1980. Search terms: cochlear implants, pneumococcus meningitis, streptococcus pneumonia, immunization, prevention. Narrative review. All articles relating to post-implant meningitis without any restriction in study designs were assessed and information extracted. The presence of inner ear trauma as a result of surgical technique or cochlear implant electrode array design was associated with a higher risk of post-implant meningitis. Laboratory data demonstrated the effectiveness of pneumococcal vaccination in preventing meningitis induced via the hematogenous route of infection. Fibrous sealing around the electrode array at the cochleostomy site, and the use of antibiotic-coated electrode array reduced the risk of meningitis induced via an otogenic route. The recent scientific data support the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommendation of pneumococcal vaccination for the prevention of meningitis in implant recipients. Nontraumatic cochlear implant design, surgical technique, and an adequate fibrous seal around the cochleostomy site further reduce the risk of meningitis. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Soft Tissue Surgical Procedures for Optimizing Anterior Implant Esthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou, Andreas L.; Kotsakis, Georgios A.; McHale, Michelle G.; Lareau, Donald E.; Hinrichs, James E.; Romanos, Georgios E.

    2015-01-01

    Implant dentistry has been established as a predictable treatment with excellent clinical success to replace missing or nonrestorable teeth. A successful esthetic implant reconstruction is predicated on two fundamental components: the reproduction of the natural tooth characteristics on the implant crown and the establishment of soft tissue housing that will simulate a healthy periodontium. In order for an implant to optimally rehabilitate esthetics, the peri-implant soft tissues must be preserved and/or augmented by means of periodontal surgical procedures. Clinicians who practice implant dentistry should strive to achieve an esthetically successful outcome beyond just osseointegration. Knowledge of a variety of available techniques and proper treatment planning enables the clinician to meet the ever-increasing esthetic demands as requested by patients. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the implant surgeon's rationale and techniques beyond that of simply placing a functional restoration in an edentulous site to a level whereby an implant-supported restoration is placed in reconstructed soft tissue, so the site is indiscernible from a natural tooth. PMID:26124837

  8. Influence of Palatal Coverage and Implant Distribution on Implant Strain in Maxillary Implant Overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Toshihito; Gonda, Tomoya; Mizuno, Yoko; Fujinami, Yozo; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    2016-01-01

    Maxillary implant overdentures are often used in clinical practice. However, there is no agreement or established guidelines regarding prosthetic design or optimal implant placement configuration. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of palatal coverage and implant number and distribution in relation to impact strain under maxillary implant overdentures. A maxillary edentulous model with implants and experimental overdentures with and without palatal coverage was fabricated. Four strain gauges were attached to each implant, and they were positioned in the anterior, premolar, and molar areas. A vertical occlusal load of 98 N was applied through a mandibular complete denture, and the implant strains were compared using one-way analysis of variance (P = .05). The palatolabial strain was much higher on anterior implants than on other implants in both denture types. Although there was no significant difference between the strain under dentures with and without palatal coverage, palateless dentures tended to result in higher implant strain than dentures with palatal coverage. Dentures supported by only two implants registered higher strain than those supported by four or six implants. Implants under palateless dentures registered higher strain than those under dentures with palatal coverage. Anterior implants exhibited higher palatolabial strain than other implants regardless of palatal coverage and implant configuration; it is therefore recommended that maxillary implant overdentures should be supported by six implants with support extending to the distal end of the arch.

  9. Ultrastructural study of tissues surrounding replanted teeth and dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shioya, Kazuhiro; Sawada, Takashi; Miake, Yasuo; Inoue, Sadayuki; Yanagisawa, Takaaki

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the ultrastructure of the dentogingival border at replanted teeth and implants. Wistar rats (8 weeks old) were divided into groups for replantation and implantation experiments. In the former, the upper right first molars were extracted and then immediately replanted. In the latter, pure titanium implants were used. All tissues were fixed, demineralized and embedded in epoxy resin for ultrastructural observations. One week after replantation, the junctional epithelium was lost, and the oral sulcular epithelium covered the enamel surface. The amount of the epithelium increased in 2 weeks, and resembled the junctional epithelium, and the internal basal lamina and hemidesmosomes were formed in 4 weeks. One week after implantation, peri-implant epithelium was formed, and in 2 and 4 weeks, this epithelium with aggregated connective tissue cells were observed. In 8 weeks, the peri-implant epithelium receded, and aligned special cells with surrounding elongated fibroblasts and bundles of collagen fibers appeared to seal the implant interface. In replantation of the tooth, the internal basal lamina remained at the surface of the enamel of the replanted tooth, which is likely to be related to regeneration of the junctional epithelium and the attachment apparatus at the epithelium-tooth interface. Following implantation, a layer of cells with characteristics of connective tissue cells, but no junctional epithelium and attachment apparatus, was formed to seal the site of the implant.

  10. Geotechnical site assessment methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunbridge, L.W.; Richards, L.R.

    1985-09-01

    A final report summarizing the research conducted on geotechnical site assessment methodology at the Carwynnen test mine in Cornwall. The geological setting of the test site in the Cornubian granite batholith is described. The effect of structure imposed by discontinuities on the engineering behaviour of rock masses is discussed and the scanline survey method of obtaining data on discontinuities in the rock mass is described. The applicability of some methods of statistical analysis for discontinuity data is reviewed. The requirement for remote geophysical methods of characterizing the mass is discussed and experiments using seismic and ultrasonic velocity measurements are reported. Methods of determining the in-situ stresses are described and the final results of a programme of in-situ stress measurements using the overcoring and hydrofracture methods are reported. (author)

  11. Implants for orthodontic anchorage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaowen; Sun, Yannan; Zhang, Yimei; Cai, Ting; Sun, Feng; Lin, Jiuxiang

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Implantanchorage continues to receive much attention as an important orthodontic anchorage. Since the development of orthodontic implants, the scope of applications has continued to increase. Although multiple reviews detailing implants have been published, no comprehensive evaluations have been performed. Thus, the purpose of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the effects of implants based on data published in review articles. An electronic search of the Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, Ebsco and Sicencedirect for reviews with “orthodontic” and “systematic review or meta analysis” in the title, abstract, keywords, or full text was performed. A subsequent manual search was then performed to identify reviews concerning orthodontic implants. A manual search of the orthodontic journals American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (AJODO), European Journal of Orthodontics (EJO), and Angle Othodontist was also performed. Such systematic reviews that evaluated the efficacy and safety of orthodontic implants were used to indicate success rates and molar movements. A total of 23 reviews were included in the analysis. The quality of each review was assessed using a measurement tool for Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR), and the review chosen to summarize outcomes had a quality score of >6. Most reviews were less than moderate quality. Success rates of implants ranged in a broad scope, and movement of the maxillary first molar was superior with implants compared with traditional anchorage. PMID:29595673

  12. Maintenance in dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle Póvoa Gomes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In implants, maintenance is a decisive factor for obtaining success when implant supported overdentures and dentures are used. The present stud presents, a clinical case of a patient, a 70 year-old white man, with a completely edentulous mandibular alveolar ridge, severe bone resorption with presence of basal bone only, and absence of vestibule. Initially, treatment consisted of the placement of a mandibular overdenture, supported on three implants in the anterior inter-foramen region, as the left implant was transfixed in the basal bone of 2 to 3 millimeters. Eleven years later, another two implants were placed in the anterior area and an immediate load was performed up to the first molars, for the placement of an implant supported fixed. Throughout the entire treatment, meticulous maintenance was carried out, with follow-up for fourteen years, interrupted by the patient’s death. From the third month after the opening the three implants initially placed, the presence of keratinized mucosa, definition of the vestibule, maturation of the alveolar ridge and bone formation in the mento region were observed. It was concluded that good planning, allied to mastery of the technique and adequate maintenance were the prerequisites necessary for obtaining favorable results, success of the present case, and for the patient to have a better quality of life.

  13. Computer simulation of ultrasonic testing for aerospace vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamawaki, H [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1, Sengen, 305-0047 Tsukuba (Japan); Moriya, S; Masuoka, T [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 1 Koganesawa, Kimigawa, 981-1525 Kakuda (Japan); Takatsubo, J, E-mail: yamawaki.hisashi@nims.go.jp [Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, AIST Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, 305-8568 Tsukuba (Japan)

    2011-01-01

    Non-destructive testing techniques are developed to secure reliability of aerospace vehicles used repetitively. In the case of cracks caused by thermal stress on walls in combustion chambers of liquid-fuel rockets, it is examined by ultrasonic waves visualization technique developed in AIST. The technique is composed with non-contact ultrasonic generation by pulsed-laser scanning, piezoelectric transducer for the ultrasonic detection, and image reconstruction processing. It enables detection of defects by visualization of ultrasonic waves scattered by the defects. In NIMS, the condition of the detection by the visualization is investigated using computer simulation for ultrasonic propagation that has capability of fast 3-D calculation. The simulation technique is based on finite-difference method and two-step elastic wave equations. It is reported about the investigation by the calculation, and shows availability of the simulation for the ultrasonic testing technique of the wall cracks.

  14. Development of an intelligent ultrasonic welding defect classification software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sung Jin; Kim, Hak Joon; Jeong, Hee Don

    1997-01-01

    Ultrasonic pattern recognition is the most effective approach to the problem of discriminating types of flaws in weldments based on ultrasonic flaw signals. In spite of significant progress in the research on this methodology, it has not been widely used in many practical ultrasonic inspections of weldments in industry. Hence, for the convenient application of this approach in many practical situations, we develop an intelligent ultrasonic signature classification software which can discriminate types of flaws in weldments based on their ultrasonic signals using various tools in artificial intelligence such as neural networks. This software shows the excellent performance in an experimental problem where flaws in weldments are classified into two categories of cracks and non-cracks. This performance demonstrates the high possibility of this software as a practical tool for ultrasonic flaw classification in weldments.

  15. Influence of collar design on peri-implant tissue healing around immediate implants: A pilot study in Foxhound dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Guirado, José Luis; López-López, Patricia Jara; Maté Sánchez de Val, José Eduardo; Mareque-Bueno, Javier; Delgado-Ruiz, Rafael Arcesio; Romanos, Georgios E

    2015-07-01

    The study aims to assess the soft tissue level (STL) and crestal bone level (CBL), of titanium dental implants with different mixed collar abutments configurations. This study included 48 implants with the same dimensions. They were divided into two groups of 24 implants each one: implants with a polished collar of 2 mm plus a roughened area of 0.8 mm (CONTROL) and implants with a polished collar of 0.8 mm plus a micro-threated and roughened area of 2 mm (TEST). The implants were inserted randomly in the post-extraction sockets of P2, P3, P4, and M1 bilaterally in the lower jaw of six foxhound dogs. STL and CBL were evaluated after 8 and 12 weeks by histology and histometry. All implants were clinically and histologically osseointegrated. Healing patterns examined microscopically at 8 and 12 weeks for both groups yielded similar qualitative findings for the STL evaluation, without significant differences between groups (P > 0.05). CBL was significantly higher in the buccal side in comparison with the lingual side for both groups (P implant shoulder to the top of the bony crest) and IS-C (distance from the implant shoulder to the first bone-to-implant contact) values significantly higher for control group in comparison with test (P < 0.05). At 12 weeks, CBL showed increased values for both groups that were higher in controls group in comparison with test (P < 0.05). Bony crest resorption could not be avoided both at test and control sites. However, the neck conformation at the test sites reduced the buccal bone resorption. Soft tissue dimensions were similar both at the test and control sites. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Clinical and Radiologic Outcomes of Submerged and Nonsubmerged Bone-Level Implants with Internal Hexagonal Connections in Immediate Implantation: A 5-Year Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shiyu; Wu, Xiayi; Shrestha, Rachana; Lin, Jinying; Feng, Zhicai; Liu, Yudong; Shi, Yunlin; Huang, Baoxin; Li, Zhipeng; Liu, Quan; Zhang, Xiaocong; Hu, Mingxuan; Chen, Zhuofan

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the 5-year clinical and radiologic outcome of immediate implantation using submerged and nonsubmerged techniques with bone-level implants and internal hexagonal connections and the effects of potential influencing factors. A total of 114 bone-level implants (XiVE S plus) with internal hexagonal connections inserted into 72 patients were included. Patients were followed up for 5 years. A t-test was used to statistically evaluate the marginal bone loss between the submerged and nonsubmerged groups. The cumulative survival rate (CSR) was calculated according to the life table method and illustrated with Kaplan-Meier survival curves. Comparisons of the CSR between healing protocols, guided bone regeneration, implants with different sites, lengths, and diameters were performed using log-rank tests. The 5-year cumulative implant survival rates with submerged and nonsubmerged healing were 94% and 96%, respectively. No statistically significant differences in terms of marginal bone loss, healing protocol, application of guided bone regeneration, implant site, or length were observed. High CSRs and good marginal bone levels were achieved 5 years after immediate implantation of bone-level implants with internal hexagonal connections using both the submerged and nonsubmerged techniques. Factors such as implant length, site, and application of guided bone regeneration did not have an impact on the long-term success of the implants. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  17. Reconstruction from gamma radiography and ultrasonic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier, S.; Lavayssiere, B.; Idier, J.; Mohammad-Djafari, A.

    1998-02-01

    This work deals with the three-dimensional reconstruction from gamma radiographic and ultrasonic images. Such an issue belongs to the field of data fusion since the data provide complementary information. The two sets of data are independently related to two sets of parameters: gamma ray attenuation and ultrasonic reflectivity. The fusion problem is addressed in a Bayesian framework; the kingpin of the task is then to define a joint a priori model for both attenuation and reflectivity. Thus, the developing of this model and the entailed joint estimation constitute the principal contribution of this work. The results of real data treatments demonstrate the validity of this method as compared to a sequential approach of the two sets of data

  18. Embedded fiber optic ultrasonic sensors and generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorighi, John F.; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar; Achenbach, Jan D.

    1995-04-01

    Ultrasonic sensors and generators based on fiber-optic systems are described. It is shown that intrinsic fiber optic Fabry-Perot ultrasound sensors that are embedded in a structure can be stabilized by actively tuning the laser frequency. The need for this method of stabilization is demonstrated by detecting piezoelectric transducer-generated ultrasonic pulses in the presence of low frequency dynamic strains that are intentionally induced to cause sensor drift. The actively stabilized embedded fiber optic Fabry-Perot sensor is also shown to have sufficient sensitivity to detect ultrasound that is generated in the interior of a structure by means of a high-power optical fiber that pipes energy from a pulsed laser to an embedded generator of ultrasound.

  19. Industrial Applications of High Power Ultrasonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patist, Alex; Bates, Darren

    Since the change of the millennium, high-power ultrasound has become an alternative food processing technology applicable to large-scale commercial applications such as emulsification, homogenization, extraction, crystallization, dewatering, low-temperature pasteurization, degassing, defoaming, activation and inactivation of enzymes, particle size reduction, extrusion, and viscosity alteration. This new focus can be attributed to significant improvements in equipment design and efficiency during the late 1990 s. Like most innovative food processing technologies, high-power ultrasonics is not an off-the-shelf technology, and thus requires careful development and scale-up for each and every application. The objective of this chapter is to present examples of ultrasonic applications that have been successful at the commercialization stage, advantages, and limitations, as well as key learnings from scaling up an innovative food technology in general.

  20. Ultrasonic examination of JBK-75 strip material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, K.V.; Cunningham, R.A. Jr.; Lewis, J.C.; McClung, R.W.

    1982-12-01

    An ultrasonic inspection system was assembled to inspect the JBK-75 stainless steel sheath material (for the Large Coil Project) for the Westinghouse-Airco superconducting magnet program. The mechanical system provided for handling the 180-kg (400-lb) coils of strip material [1.6 mm thick by 78 mm wide by 90 to 120 m long (0.064 by 3.07 in. by 300 to 400 ft)], feeding the strip through the ultrasonic inspection and cleaning stations, and respooling the coils. We inspected 54 coils of strip for both longitudinal and laminar flaws. Simulated flaws were used to calibrate both inspections. Saw-cut notches [0.28 mm deep (0.011 in., about 17% of the strip thickness)] were used to calibrate the longitudinal flaw inspections; 1.59-mm-diam (0.063-in.) flat-bottom holes drilled halfway through a calibration strip were used to calibrate the laminar flaw tests

  1. Automated ultrasonic pipe weld inspection. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karl Deutsch, W.A.; Schulte, P.; Joswig, M.; Kattwinkel, R.

    2006-01-01

    This article contains a brief overview on automated ultrasonic welded inspection for various pipe types. Some inspection steps might by carried out with portable test equipment (e.g. pipe and test), but the weld inspection in all internationally relevant specification must be automated. The pipe geometry, the production process, and the pipe usage determine the number of required probes. Recent updates for some test specifications enforce a large number of ultrasonic probes, e.g. the Shell standard. Since seamless pipes are sometimes replaced by ERW pipes and LSAW pipes (in both cases to save production cost), the inspection methods change gradually between the various pipe types. Each testing system is unique and shows its specialties which have to be discussed by supplier, testing system user and final customer of the pipe. (author)

  2. Ultrasonic transducer design for uniform insonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, G.H.; Balcer-Kubiczek, E.K.; McCulloch, D.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques used in transducer development for acoustical imaging have been evaluated for the purpose of producing broad, uniform ultrasonic fields from planar radiators. Such fields should be useful in hyperthermia, physical therapy, and ultrasonic bioeffects studies. Fourier inversion of the circ function yielded a source velocity distribution proportional to (P/r) exp ((-ik/2Z) (2Z/sup 2/+r/sup 2/)) J/sub 1/(krP/Z), where r is the radial source coordinate, k is the wave number, and P is the desired radius of uniform insonation at a depth Z in water. This source distribution can be truncated without significantly degrading the solution. A simpler solution consists of exponentially shading the edge of an otherwise uniformly excited disk transducer. This approach was successfully approximated experimentally

  3. Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids. The present invention includes the use of two closely spaced transducers, or one transducer and a closely spaced reflector plate, to form an interferometer suitable for ultrasonic characterization of droplet-size and smaller samples without the need for a container. The droplet is held between the interferometer elements, whose distance apart may be adjusted, by surface tension. The surfaces of the interferometer elements may be readily cleansed by a stream of solvent followed by purified air when it is desired to change samples. A single drop of liquid is sufficient for high-quality measurement. Examples of samples which may be investigated using the apparatus and method of the present invention include biological specimens (tear drops; blood and other body fluid samples; samples from tumors, tissues, and organs; secretions from tissues and organs; snake and bee venom, etc.) for diagnostic evaluation, samples in forensic investigations, and detection of drugs in small quantities.

  4. Ultrasonic identity data storage and archival system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mc Kenzie, J.M.; Self, B.G.; Walker, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Ultrasonic seals are being used to determine if an underwater stored spent fuel container has been compromised and can be used to determine if a nuclear material container has been compromised. The Seal Pattern Reader (SPAR) is a microprocessor controlled instrument which interrogates an ultrasonic seal to obtain its identity. The SPAR can compare the present identity with a previous identity, which it obtains from a magnetic bubble cassette memory. A system has been developed which allows an IAEA inspector to transfer seal information obtained at a facility by the SPAR to an IAEA-based data storage and retrieval system, using the bubble cassette memory. Likewise, magnetic bubbles can be loaded at the IAEA with seal signature data needed at a facility for comparison purposes. The archived signatures can be retrieved from the data base for relevant statistical manipulation and for plotting

  5. Ultrasonic examination of stainless steel weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullan, J.V.

    1976-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. have specified a combination of liquid penetrant, radiography and ultrasonic examination of welds in austenitic stainless steel. In the past, angle wedges attached to ultrasonic transducers have been designed so that only shear waves are propagated in the medium. Shear waves, however, do not penetrate one half inch of weld metal without high transmission losses, so that the signal-to-noise ratio is poor. Canadian Vickers have therefore developed a method using longitudinal waves at 45 deg in the material. The presence also of a shear wave at an angle of 19 deg does not cause confusion, because the shear wave travels slower, and has farther to travel. Some considerations for the design of transducers and wedges are outlined. (N.D.H.)

  6. Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation systems industrial application issues

    CERN Document Server

    Callegari, Sergio; Montisci, Augusto; Ricci, Marco; Versaci, Mario

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the practical implementation of ultrasonic NDT techniques in an industrial environment, discussing several issues that may emerge and proposing strategies for addressing them successfully.  It aims to bridge advanced academic research results and their application to industrial procedures. The topics covered in the text range from the basic operation of an ultrasonic NDT system to the simulation of the measurement operations; from the choice and generation of the signals energizing the system to the different ways of exploiting the probes and their output signals; and from quality assessment evaluation to the use of soft computing techniques for classification. Throughout the text, an effort is made to embrace a system view where the physical and technological aspects of sensing are addressed together with higher abstraction levels, such as signal and information processing. Consequently, the book aims at guiding the reader through the various tasks requested for developing a complete ultras...

  7. Nondestructive evaluation ultrasonic methods for construction materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilibon, I.; Zisu, T.; Raetchi, V.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents some ultrasonic methods for evaluation of physical-mechanical properties of construction materials (bricks, concrete, BCA), such as: pulse method, examination methods, and direct measurement of the propagation velocity and impact-echo method. Utilizing these nondestructive evaluation ultrasonic methods it can be determined the main material parameters and material characteristics (elasticity coefficients, density, propagation velocity, ultrasound attenuation, etc.) of construction materials. These method are suitable for construction materials because the defectoscopy methods for metallic materials cannot be utilized, due to its rugged and non-homogeneous structures and grate attenuation coefficients of ultrasound propagation through materials. Also, the impact-echo method is a technique for flaw detection in concrete based on stress wave propagation. Studies have shown that the impact-echo method is effective for locating voids, honeycombing, delaminating, depth of surface opening cracks, and measuring member thickness

  8. An ultrasonic inspection tool for production tubulars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, K; Martin, R; Ravenscroft, F [AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1994-06-01

    Advances in ultrasonic technology, high temperature techniques and remote processing power are enabling a new generation of inspection tools to be developed. This paper describes a particular new ultrasonic caliper system, developed by AEA Technology, with the aim of providing improved information about the condition of production tubulars of oil and gas wells. The system is designed to provide enhanced surface area coverage compared to the current devices, which are typically mechanical 'finger' calipers. It also provides a non-contacting measure of corrosion and wear together with direct on-line output and automated data analysis. The new tool is designed to operate in oil and gas, vertical or deviated wells and has the potential for modification to inspect small diameter pipes in topside or other plant. (author)

  9. Ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Shunichi; Hida, Yoshio; Yamamoto, Michio; Ando, Tomozumi; Shirai, Tasuku.

    1982-05-01

    Ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds has been considered difficult because of the high noise level and remarkable attenuation of ultrasonic waves. To improve flaw detectability in this kind of steel, various inspection techniques have been studied. A series of tests indicated: (1) The longitudinal angle beam transducers newly developed during this study can detect 4.8 mm dia. side drilled holes in dissimilar metal welds (refraction angle: 55 0 from SUS side, 45 0 from CS side) and in cast stainless steel welds (refraction angle: 45 0 , inspection frequency: 1 MHz). (2) Cracks more than 5% t in depth in the heat affected zones of fine-grain stainless steel pipe welds can be detected by the 45 0 shear wave angle beam method (inspection frequency: 2 MHz). (3) The pattern recognition method using frequency analysis technology was presumed useful for discriminating crack signals from spurious echoes. (author)

  10. Process monitoring using optical ultrasonic wave detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telschow, K.L.; Walter, J.B.; Garcia, G.V.; Kunerth, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    Optical ultrasonic wave detection techniques are being developed for process monitoring. An important limitation on optical techniques is that the material surface, in materials processing applications, is usually not a specular reflector and in many cases is totally diffusely reflecting. This severely degrades the light collected by the detection optics, greatly reducing the intensity and randomly scattering the phase of the reflected light. A confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer, which is sensitive to the Doppler frequency shift resulting from the surface motion and not to the phase of the collected light, is well suited to detecting ultrasonic waves in diffusely reflecting materials. This paper describes the application of this detector to the real-time monitoring of the sintering of ceramic materials. 8 refs., 5 figs

  11. Ultrasonic cleaning of electrodes of wire chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnov, V.A.; Kurepin, A.B.; Razin, V.I.

    1980-01-01

    A technological process of cleaning electrodes and working volume surfaces of wire chambers from contaminations by the simultaneous mechanical action of the energy of ultrasonic oscillations and the chemical action of detergents is discussed. A device for cleaning wire electrodes of proportional chambers of 0.3x0.4 m is described. The device uses two ultrasonic generators with a total power of 0.5 kW. As a detergent use is made of a mixture of ethyl alcohol, gasoline and freon. In the process of cleaning production defects can be detected in the wire chambers which makes it possible to timely remove the defects. Measurements of the surface resistance of fiberglass laminate of printed drift chamber electrodes at a voltage of 2 kV showed that after completing the cleaning process the resistance increases 15-20%

  12. Nanotechnology for dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsia, Antoni P; Lee, Janice S; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Saiz, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, an opportunity exists for the engineering of new dental implant materials. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have shortcomings related to osseointegration and mechanical properties that do not match those of bone. Absent the development of an entirely new class of materials, faster osseointegration of currently available dental implants can be accomplished by various surface modifications. To date, there is no consensus regarding the preferred method(s) of implant surface modification, and further development will be required before the ideal implant surface can be created, let alone become available for clinical use. Current approaches can generally be categorized into three areas: ceramic coatings, surface functionalization, and patterning on the micro- to nanoscale. The distinctions among these are imprecise, as some or all of these approaches can be combined to improve in vivo implant performance. These surface improvements have resulted in durable implants with a high percentage of success and long-term function. Nanotechnology has provided another set of opportunities for the manipulation of implant surfaces in its capacity to mimic the surface topography formed by extracellular matrix components of natural tissue. The possibilities introduced by nanotechnology now permit the tailoring of implant chemistry and structure with an unprecedented degree of control. For the first time, tools are available that can be used to manipulate the physicochemical environment and monitor key cellular events at the molecular level. These new tools and capabilities will result in faster bone formation, reduced healing time, and rapid recovery to function.

  13. Antibacterial iodine-supported titanium implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, T; Shimizu, T; Ohtani, K; Zen, Y; Takaya, M; Tsuchiya, H

    2011-04-01

    Deep infection remains a serious complication in orthopedic implant surgery. In order to reduce the incidence of implant-associated infections, several biomaterial surface treatments have been proposed. This study focused on evaluating the antibacterial activity of iodine-supported titanium (Ti-I(2)) and its impact on post-implant infection, as well as determining the potential suitability of Ti-I(2) as a biomaterial. External fixation pins were used in this experiment as trial implants because of the ease of making the septic models. The antibacterial activity of the metal was measured using a modification of the Japanese Industrial Standards method. Activity was evaluated by exposing the implants to Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli and comparing reaction of pathogens to Ti-I(2) vs. stainless steel and titanium controls. Ti-I(2) clearly inhibited bacterial colonization more than the control metals. In addition, cytocompatibility was assessed by counting the number of colonies that formed on the metals. The three metals showed the same amount of fibroblast colony formation. Japanese white rabbits were used as an in vivo model. Three pins were inserted into both femora of six rabbits for histological analysis. Pin sites were inspected and graded for infection and inflammation. Fewer signs of infection and inflammatory changes were observed in conjunction with the Ti-I(2) pins. Furthermore, osteoconductivity of the implant was evaluated with osteoid formation surface of the pin. Consecutive bone formation was observed around the Ti-I(2) and titanium pins, while little osteoid formation was found around the stainless steel pins. These findings suggest that Ti-I(2) has antimicrobial activity and exhibits cytocompatibility. Therefore, Ti-I(2) substantially reduces the incidence of implant infection and shows particular promise as a biomaterial. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ultrasonic inspection of primary pump casing by means of focussing probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dombret, Ph.; Cermak, J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a study conducted in laboratory on ultrasonic defect detection capabilities in primary pump casings and welds, in the framework of the joint research programme appointed by Framatome, EdF, CEA and Westinghouse, and devoted to improving the ultrasonic inspection of austenitic stainless steel components. Several transducers, including focussing probes and transmitter-receivers, were designed and compared on two 180 mm thick blocks strictly representative of the statically cast casing and of the electroslag welding, and containing various artificial and simulated reflectors. Detection trial results show that focussing probes can achieve fair sensitivity levels even through the full thickness, and appear promising as for on-site applications of this technique. 5 refs

  15. Updated Results of Ultrasonic Transducer Irradiation Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daw, Joshua; Palmer, Joe [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, MS 4112, Idaho Falls, ID, 38415-3840 (United States); Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Keller, Paul; Montgomery, Robert [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd. Richland, WA, 99354 (United States); Chien, Hual-Te [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL, 60439 (United States); Tittmann, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Brian [Pennsylvania State University, 212 Earth and Engr. Sciences Building, University Park, PA, 16802 (United States); Kohse, Gordon [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave. Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Rempe, Joy [Rempe and Associates, LLC, 360 Stillwater, Idaho Falls, ID 83404 (United States); Villard, J.F. [Commissariat a l' energie atomique et aux energies alternatives, Centre d' etudes de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high accuracy and resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. These efforts are limited by the lack of identified ultrasonic transducer materials capable of long term performance under irradiation test conditions. To address this need, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project to evaluate the performance of promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducers in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2}. A multi-National Laboratory collaboration funded by the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation (NEET-ASI) program also provided initial support for this effort. This irradiation, which started in February 2014, is an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data are collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The irradiation is ongoing and will continue to approximately mid-2015. To date, very encouraging results have been attained as several transducers continue to operate under irradiation. (authors)

  16. Ultrasonic characterization of pork meat salting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Pérez, J V; De Prados, M; Pérez-Muelas, N; Cárcel, J A; Benedito, J

    2012-01-01

    Salting process plays a key role in the preservation and quality of dry-cured meat products. Therefore, an adequate monitoring of salt content during salting is necessary to reach high quality products. Thus, the main objective of this work was to test the ability of low intensity ultrasound to monitor the salting process of pork meat. Cylindrical samples (diameter 36 mm, height 60±10 mm) of Biceps femoris were salted (brine 20% NaCl, w/w) at 2 °C for 1, 2, 4 and 7 days. During salting and at each experimental time, three cylinders were taken in order to measure the ultrasonic velocity at 2 °C. Afterwards, the cylinders were split in three sections (height 20 mm), measuring again the ultrasonic velocity and determining the salt and the moisture content by AOAC standards. In the whole cylinders, moisture content was reduced from 763 (g/kg sample) in fresh samples to 723 (g/kg sample) in samples salted for 7 days, while the maximum salt gain was 37.3 (g/kg sample). Although, moisture and salt contents up to 673 and 118 (g/kg sample) were reached in the sections of meat cylinders, respectively. During salting, the ultrasonic velocity increased due to salt gain and water loss. Thus, significant (p 2 = 0.975) and moisture (R 2 = 0.863) contents. In addition, the change of the ultrasonic velocity with the increase of the salt content showed a good agreement with the Kinsler equation. Therefore, low intensity ultrasound emerges as a potential technique to monitor, in a non destructive way, the meat salting processes carried out in the food industry.

  17. Cavitation occurrence around ultrasonic dental scalers

    OpenAIRE

    Felver, Bernhard; King, David C; Lea, Simon C; Price, Gareth J; Damien Walmsley, A

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasonic scalers are used in dentistry to remove calculus and other contaminants from teeth. One mechanism which may assist in the cleaning is cavitation generated in cooling water around the scaler. The vibratory motion of three designs of scaler tip in a water bath has been characterised by laser vibrometry, and compared with the spatial distribution of cavitation around the scaler tips observed using sonochemiluminescence from a luminol solution. The type of cavitation was confirmed by a...

  18. Ultrasonic flotational separation of syrup with polyacrylamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng SiXian; Qiu TaiQiu; Xie XiongFei; Hu SongQing

    1998-01-01

    A 60 degrees Bx solution of Australian raw sugar was treated at 80 degrees C with 300 ppm phosphoric acid and neutralized to pH 7 with Ca(OH)2. The resulting syrup (as model cane syrup rather than phosphatated liquor?) was subjected to flotational separation with and without ultrasonic vibration (16.5-33 kHz, 20-300 W) and/or addition of polyacrylamide (PAM; dose not stated)

  19. Ultrasonic imaging with a fixed instrument configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witten, A.; Tuggle, J.; Waag, R.C.

    1988-07-04

    Diffraction tomography is a technique based on an inversion of the wave equation which has been proposed for high-resolution ultrasonic imaging. While this approach has been considered for diagnostic medical applications, it has, until recently, been limited by practical limitations on the speed of data acquisition associated with instrument motions. This letter presents the results of an experimental study directed towards demonstrating tomography utilizing a fixed instrument configuration.

  20. Ultrasonic evaluation of local human skin anisotropy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tokar, Daniel; Převorovský, Zdeněk; Hradilová, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 12 (2014) ISSN 1435-4934. [European Conference on Non-Destructive Testing (ECNDT 2014) /11./. Praha, 06.10.2014-10.10.2014] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : anisotropy * ultrasonic testing * human skin in-vivo * fabric-fiber composite * signal processing Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics http://www.ndt.net/events/ECNDT2014/app/content/Paper/324_Tokar.pdf