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Sample records for ultrafast directional beam

  1. Ultrafast directional beam switching in coupled vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, C. Z.; Goorjian, P.

    2001-01-01

    We propose a strategy to performing ultrafast directional beam switching using two coupled vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). The proposed strategy is demonstrated for two VCSELs of 5.6 μm in diameter placed about 1 μm apart from the edges, showing a switching speed of 42 GHz with a maximum far-field angle span of about 10 degree. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  2. Compression of Ultrafast Laser Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Copyright 2003, AIP Publishing LLC. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.1611998.) When designing the pulse shaper, the laser beam must completely fill the...for the design of future versions of this device. The easiest way to align the pulse shaper is to use the laser beam that will be shaped, without...Afterward, an ultrafast thin beam splitter is placed into the system after the diameter of the laser beam is reduced; this is done to monitor the beam

  3. Laser-driven ultrafast antiproton beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shun; Pei, Zhikun; Shen, Baifei; Xu, Jiancai; Zhang, Lingang; Zhang, Xiaomei; Xu, Tongjun; Yu, Yong; Bu, Zhigang

    2018-02-01

    Antiproton beam generation is investigated based on the ultra-intense femtosecond laser pulse by using two-dimensional particle-in-cell and Geant4 simulations. A high-flux proton beam with an energy of tens of GeV is generated in sequential radiation pressure and bubble regime and then shoots into a high-Z target for producing antiprotons. Both yield and energy of the antiproton beam increase almost linearly with the laser intensity. The generated antiproton beam has a short pulse duration of about 5 ps and its flux reaches 2 × 10 20 s - 1 at the laser intensity of 2.14 × 10 23 W / cm 2 . Compared to conventional methods, this new method based on the ultra-intense laser pulse is able to provide a compact, tunable, and ultrafast antiproton source, which is potentially useful for quark-gluon plasma study, all-optical antihydrogen generation, and so on.

  4. Ultrafast electron microscopy integrated with a direct electron detection camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Min Lee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, we have witnessed the rapid growth of the field of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM, which provides intuitive means to watch atomic and molecular motions of matter. Yet, because of the limited current of the pulsed electron beam resulting from space-charge effects, observations have been mainly made to periodic motions of the crystalline structure of hundreds of nanometers or higher by stroboscopic imaging at high repetition rates. Here, we develop an advanced UEM with robust capabilities for circumventing the present limitations by integrating a direct electron detection camera for the first time which allows for imaging at low repetition rates. This approach is expected to promote UEM to a more powerful platform to visualize molecular and collective motions and dissect fundamental physical, chemical, and materials phenomena in space and time.

  5. Ultrafast electron microscopy integrated with a direct electron detection camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Min; Kim, Young Jae; Kim, Ye-Jin; Kwon, Oh-Hoon

    2017-07-01

    In the past decade, we have witnessed the rapid growth of the field of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM), which provides intuitive means to watch atomic and molecular motions of matter. Yet, because of the limited current of the pulsed electron beam resulting from space-charge effects, observations have been mainly made to periodic motions of the crystalline structure of hundreds of nanometers or higher by stroboscopic imaging at high repetition rates. Here, we develop an advanced UEM with robust capabilities for circumventing the present limitations by integrating a direct electron detection camera for the first time which allows for imaging at low repetition rates. This approach is expected to promote UEM to a more powerful platform to visualize molecular and collective motions and dissect fundamental physical, chemical, and materials phenomena in space and time.

  6. Generation of mega-electron-volt electron beams by an ultrafast intense laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaofang; Saleh, Ned; Krishnan, Mohan; Wang Haiwen; Backus, Sterling; Murnane, Margaret; Kapteyn, Henry; Umstadter, Donald; Wang Quandong; Shen Baifei

    2003-01-01

    Mega-electron-volt (MeV) electron emission from the interaction of an ultrafast (τ∼29 fs), intense (>10 18 W/cm 2 ) laser pulse with underdense plasmas has been studied. A beam of MeV electrons with a divergence angle as small as 1 deg. is observed in the forward direction, which is correlated with relativistic filamentation of the laser pulse in plasmas. A novel net-energy-gain mechanism is proposed for electron acceleration resulting from the relativistic filamentation and beam breakup. These results suggest an approach for generating a beam of femtosecond, MeV electrons at a kilohertz repetition rate with a compact ultrafast intense laser system

  7. Ultrafast Melting of Carbon Induced by Intense Proton Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelka, A.; Guenther, M. M.; Harres, K.; Otten, A.; Roth, M.; Gregori, G.; Gericke, D. O.; Vorberger, J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Kritcher, A. L.; Heathcote, R.; Li, B.; Neely, D.; Kugland, N. L.; Niemann, C.; Makita, M.; Riley, D.; Mithen, J.; Schaumann, G.; Schollmeier, M.

    2010-01-01

    Laser-produced proton beams have been used to achieve ultrafast volumetric heating of carbon samples at solid density. The isochoric melting of carbon was probed by a scattering of x rays from a secondary laser-produced plasma. From the scattering signal, we have deduced the fraction of the material that was melted by the inhomogeneous heating. The results are compared to different theoretical approaches for the equation of state which suggests modifications from standard models.

  8. Direct Characterization of Ultrafast Energy-Time Entangled Photon Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Jean-Philippe W; Donohue, John M; Resch, Kevin J

    2018-02-02

    Energy-time entangled photons are critical in many quantum optical phenomena and have emerged as important elements in quantum information protocols. Entanglement in this degree of freedom often manifests itself on ultrafast time scales, making it very difficult to detect, whether one employs direct or interferometric techniques, as photon-counting detectors have insufficient time resolution. Here, we implement ultrafast photon counters based on nonlinear interactions and strong femtosecond laser pulses to probe energy-time entanglement in this important regime. Using this technique and single-photon spectrometers, we characterize all the spectral and temporal correlations of two entangled photons with femtosecond resolution. This enables the witnessing of energy-time entanglement using uncertainty relations and the direct observation of nonlocal dispersion cancellation on ultrafast time scales. These techniques are essential to understand and control the energy-time degree of freedom of light for ultrafast quantum optics.

  9. Ultrafast Bessel beams: advanced tools for laser materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoian, Razvan; Bhuyan, Manoj K.; Zhang, Guodong; Cheng, Guanghua; Meyer, Remy; Courvoisier, Francois

    2018-05-01

    Ultrafast Bessel beams demonstrate a significant capacity of structuring transparent materials with a high degree of accuracy and exceptional aspect ratio. The ability to localize energy on the nanometer scale (bypassing the 100-nm milestone) makes them ideal tools for advanced laser nanoscale processing on surfaces and in the bulk. This allows to generate and combine micron and nano-sized features into hybrid structures that show novel functionalities. Their high aspect ratio and the accurate location can equally drive an efficient material modification and processing strategy on large dimensions. We review, here, the main concepts of generating and using Bessel non-diffractive beams and their remarkable features, discuss general characteristics of their interaction with matter in ablation and material modification regimes, and advocate their use for obtaining hybrid micro and nanoscale structures in two and three dimensions (2D and 3D) performing complex functions. High-throughput applications are indicated. The example list ranges from surface nanostructuring and laser cutting to ultrafast laser welding and the fabrication of 3D photonic systems embedded in the volume.

  10. Directionally positionable neutron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dance, W.E.; Bumgardner, H.M.

    1981-01-01

    Disclosed is apparatus for forming and directionally positioning a neutron beam. The apparatus includes an enclosed housing rotatable about a first axis with a neutron source axially positioned on the axis of rotation of the enclosed housing but not rotating with the housing. The rotatable housing is carried by a vertically positionable arm carried on a mobile transport. A collimator is supported by the rotatable housing and projects into the housing to orientationally position its inlet window at an adjustably fixed axial and radial spacing from the neutron source so that rotation of the enclosed housing causes the inlet window to rotate about a circle which is a fixed axial distance from the neutron source and has the axis of rotation of the housing as its center. (author)

  11. Direct emission of chirality controllable femtosecond LG01 vortex beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Zhang, S.; Yang, H.; Xie, J.; Jiang, S.; Feng, G.; Zhou, S.

    2018-05-01

    Direct emission of a chirality controllable ultrafast LG01 mode vortex optical beam from a conventional z-type cavity design SESAM (SEmiconductor Saturable Absorber Mirror) mode locked LD pumped Yb:Phosphate laser has been demonstrated. A clean 360 fs vortex beam of ˜45.7 mW output power has been achieved. A radial shear interferometer has been built to determine the phase singularity and the wavefront helicity of the ultrafast output laser. Theoretically, it is found that the LG01 vortex beam is obtained via the combination effect of diagonal HG10 mode generation by off-axis pumping and the controllable Gouy phase difference between HG10 and HG01 modes in the sagittal and tangential planes. The chirality of the LG01 mode can be manipulated by the pump position to the original point of the laser cavity optical axis.

  12. Influence of temporal–spectral effects on ultrafast fiber coherent polarization beam combining system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, H L; Ma, P F; Wang, X L; Su, R T; Zhou, P; Chen, J B

    2015-01-01

    The active coherent polarization beam combining (CPBC) technique has been experimentally proved to be a promising approach for the energy and power scaling of ultrashort laser pulses, despite the tremendous challenge in temporal synchronization, dispersion management and nonlinearity control. In order to develop a comprehensive theoretical model to investigate the influence of temporal–spectral effects on ultrafast fiber active CPBC systems, a generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation carrying spectral factors is used to depict the propagation of ultrashort pulses in fiber amplifier channels and ultrashort-pulsed Gaussian beams (PGBs) carrying temporal–spatial factors are utilized to picture the propagation of ultrashort pulses in the free space. To the best of our knowledge, the influence of different temporal–spectral effects has been segregated for the first time and corresponding analytical equations have been strictly derived to link the combining efficiency with specific factors. Based on our analysis, the optical path difference (OPD) has the most detrimental impact on the combining efficiency because of the high controlling accuracy and anti-interference requirements. For instance, the OPD must be controlled in ∼  ±14 μm to achieve a combining efficiency of above 95% for combining ultrashort laser pulses with a 3 dB spectral bandwidth of 13 nm centered at 1064 nm. Besides, the analytical expression also demonstrates that the impact of self-phase modulation on the combining efficiency has no dependence on spectral bandwidth and only depends on the B integral difference if neglecting the direct influence of the peak power difference. Our analysis also indicates that the group velocity dispersion has relatively small influence on the combining efficiency. These formulas can be used to diagnose the influence of temporal–spectral effects and provide useful guidelines for the design or optimization of the active CPBC system of ultrafast

  13. Quantitative characterization of near-field fuel sprays by multi-orifice direct injection using ultrafast x-tomography technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, X.; Im, K.S.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J.; Hung, D.L.S.; Winkelman, J.R.; Tate, M.W.; Ercan, A.; Koerner, L.J.; Caswell, T.; Chamberlain, D.; Schuette, D.R.; Philipp, H.; Smilgies, D.M.; Gruner, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    A low-pressure direct injection fuel system for spark ignition direct injection engines has been developed, in which a high-turbulence nozzle technology was employed to achieve fine fuel droplet size at a low injection pressure around 2 MPa. It is particularly important to study spray characteristics in the near-nozzle region due to the immediate liquid breakup at the nozzle exit. By using an ultrafast x-ray area detector and intense synchrotron x-ray beams, the interior structure and dynamics of the direct injection gasoline sprays from a multi-orifice turbulence-assisted nozzle were elucidated for the first time in a highly quantitative manner with μs-temporal resolution. Revealed by a newly developed, ultrafast computed x-microtomography technique, many detailed features associated with the transient liquid flows are readily observable in the reconstructed spray. Furthermore, an accurate 3-dimensional fuel density distribution, in the form of fuel volume fraction, was obtained by the time-resolved computed tomography. The time-dependent fuel density distribution revealed that the fuel jet is well broken up immediately at the nozzle exits. These results not only reveal the near-field characteristics of the partial atomized fuel sprays with unprecedented detail, but also facilitate the development of an advanced multi-orifice direct injector. This ultrafast tomography capability also will facilitate the realistic computational fluid dynamic simulations in highly transient and multiphase fuel spray systems.

  14. Ultrafast generation of skyrmionic defects with vortex beams: Printing laser profiles on magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Hiroyuki; Sato, Masahiro

    2017-02-01

    Controlling electric and magnetic properties of matter by laser beams is actively explored in the broad region of condensed matter physics, including spintronics and magneto-optics. Here we theoretically propose an application of optical and electron vortex beams carrying intrinsic orbital angular momentum to chiral ferro- and antiferromagnets. We analyze the time evolution of spins in chiral magnets under irradiation of vortex beams by using the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. We show that beam-driven nonuniform temperature leads to a class of ring-shaped magnetic defects, what we call skyrmion multiplex, as well as conventional skyrmions. We discuss the proper beam parameters and the optimal way of applying the beams for the creation of these topological defects. Our findings provide an ultrafast scheme of generating topological magnetic defects in a way applicable to both metallic and insulating chiral (anti-) ferromagnets.

  15. Ultra-fast fluence optimization for beam angle selection algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangert, M.; Ziegenhein, P.; Oelfke, U.

    2014-03-01

    Beam angle selection (BAS) including fluence optimization (FO) is among the most extensive computational tasks in radiotherapy. Precomputed dose influence data (DID) of all considered beam orientations (up to 100 GB for complex cases) has to be handled in the main memory and repeated FOs are required for different beam ensembles. In this paper, the authors describe concepts accelerating FO for BAS algorithms using off-the-shelf multiprocessor workstations. The FO runtime is not dominated by the arithmetic load of the CPUs but by the transportation of DID from the RAM to the CPUs. On multiprocessor workstations, however, the speed of data transportation from the main memory to the CPUs is non-uniform across the RAM; every CPU has a dedicated memory location (node) with minimum access time. We apply a thread node binding strategy to ensure that CPUs only access DID from their preferred node. Ideal load balancing for arbitrary beam ensembles is guaranteed by distributing the DID of every candidate beam equally to all nodes. Furthermore we use a custom sorting scheme of the DID to minimize the overall data transportation. The framework is implemented on an AMD Opteron workstation. One FO iteration comprising dose, objective function, and gradient calculation takes between 0.010 s (9 beams, skull, 0.23 GB DID) and 0.070 s (9 beams, abdomen, 1.50 GB DID). Our overall FO time is < 1 s for small cases, larger cases take ~ 4 s. BAS runs including FOs for 1000 different beam ensembles take ~ 15-70 min, depending on the treatment site. This enables an efficient clinical evaluation of different BAS algorithms.

  16. Ultra-fast fluence optimization for beam angle selection algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangert, M; Ziegenhein, P; Oelfke, U

    2014-01-01

    Beam angle selection (BAS) including fluence optimization (FO) is among the most extensive computational tasks in radiotherapy. Precomputed dose influence data (DID) of all considered beam orientations (up to 100 GB for complex cases) has to be handled in the main memory and repeated FOs are required for different beam ensembles. In this paper, the authors describe concepts accelerating FO for BAS algorithms using off-the-shelf multiprocessor workstations. The FO runtime is not dominated by the arithmetic load of the CPUs but by the transportation of DID from the RAM to the CPUs. On multiprocessor workstations, however, the speed of data transportation from the main memory to the CPUs is non-uniform across the RAM; every CPU has a dedicated memory location (node) with minimum access time. We apply a thread node binding strategy to ensure that CPUs only access DID from their preferred node. Ideal load balancing for arbitrary beam ensembles is guaranteed by distributing the DID of every candidate beam equally to all nodes. Furthermore we use a custom sorting scheme of the DID to minimize the overall data transportation. The framework is implemented on an AMD Opteron workstation. One FO iteration comprising dose, objective function, and gradient calculation takes between 0.010 s (9 beams, skull, 0.23 GB DID) and 0.070 s (9 beams, abdomen, 1.50 GB DID). Our overall FO time is < 1 s for small cases, larger cases take ∼ 4 s. BAS runs including FOs for 1000 different beam ensembles take ∼ 15–70 min, depending on the treatment site. This enables an efficient clinical evaluation of different BAS algorithms.

  17. High-speed ultrafast laser machining with tertiary beam positioning (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuan; Zhang, Haibin

    2017-03-01

    For an industrial laser application, high process throughput and low average cost of ownership are critical to commercial success. Benefiting from high peak power, nonlinear absorption and small-achievable spot size, ultrafast lasers offer advantages of minimal heat affected zone, great taper and sidewall quality, and small via capability that exceeds the limits of their predecessors in via drilling for electronic packaging. In the past decade, ultrafast lasers have both grown in power and reduced in cost. For example, recently, disk and fiber technology have both shown stable operation in the 50W to 200W range, mostly at high repetition rate (beyond 500 kHz) that helps avoid detrimental nonlinear effects. However, to effectively and efficiently scale the throughput with the fast-growing power capability of the ultrafast lasers while keeping the beneficial laser-material interactions is very challenging, mainly because of the bottleneck imposed by the inertia-related acceleration limit and servo gain bandwidth when only stages and galvanometers are being used. On the other side, inertia-free scanning solutions like acoustic optics and electronic optical deflectors have small scan field, and therefore not suitable for large-panel processing. Our recent system developments combine stages, galvanometers, and AODs into a coordinated tertiary architecture for high bandwidth and meanwhile large field beam positioning. Synchronized three-level movements allow extremely fast local speed and continuous motion over the whole stage travel range. We present the via drilling results from such ultrafast system with up to 3MHz pulse to pulse random access, enabling high quality low cost ultrafast machining with emerging high average power laser sources.

  18. Concept and design of a beam blanker with integrated photoconductive switch for ultrafast electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weppelman, I G C; Moerland, R J; Hoogenboom, J P; Kruit, P

    2018-01-01

    We present a new method to create ultrashort electron pulses by integrating a photoconductive switch with an electrostatic deflector. This paper discusses the feasibility of such a system by analytical and numerical calculations. We argue that ultrafast electron pulses can be achieved for micrometer scale dimensions of the blanker, which are feasible with MEMS-based fabrication technology. According to basic models, the design presented in this paper is capable of generating 100 fs electron pulses with spatial resolutions of less than 10 nm. Our concept for an ultrafast beam blanker (UFB) may provide an attractive alternative to perform ultrafast electron microscopy, as it does not require modification of the microscope nor realignment between DC and pulsed mode of operation. Moreover, only low laser pulse energies are required. Due to its small dimensions the UFB can be inserted in the beam line of a commercial microscope via standard entry ports for blankers or variable apertures. The use of a photoconductive switch ensures minimal jitter between laser and electron pulses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ultrafast transmission electron microscopy using a laser-driven field emitter: Femtosecond resolution with a high coherence electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feist, Armin; Bach, Nora; Rubiano da Silva, Nara; Danz, Thomas; Möller, Marcel; Priebe, Katharina E.; Domröse, Till; Gatzmann, J. Gregor; Rost, Stefan; Schauss, Jakob; Strauch, Stefanie; Bormann, Reiner; Sivis, Murat; Schäfer, Sascha, E-mail: sascha.schaefer@phys.uni-goettingen.de; Ropers, Claus, E-mail: claus.ropers@uni-goettingen.de

    2017-05-15

    We present the development of the first ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UTEM) driven by localized photoemission from a field emitter cathode. We describe the implementation of the instrument, the photoemitter concept and the quantitative electron beam parameters achieved. Establishing a new source for ultrafast TEM, the Göttingen UTEM employs nano-localized linear photoemission from a Schottky emitter, which enables operation with freely tunable temporal structure, from continuous wave to femtosecond pulsed mode. Using this emission mechanism, we achieve record pulse properties in ultrafast electron microscopy of 9 Å focused beam diameter, 200 fs pulse duration and 0.6 eV energy width. We illustrate the possibility to conduct ultrafast imaging, diffraction, holography and spectroscopy with this instrument and also discuss opportunities to harness quantum coherent interactions between intense laser fields and free-electron beams. - Highlights: • First implementation of an ultrafast TEM employing a nanoscale photocathode. • Localized single photon-photoemission from nanoscopic field emitter yields low emittance ultrashort electron pulses. • Electron pulses focused down to ~9 Å, with a duration of 200 fs and an energy width of 0.6 eV are demonstrated. • Quantitative characterization of ultrafast electron gun emittance and brightness. • A range of applications of high coherence ultrashort electron pulses is shown.

  20. Electron beam dynamics in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope with Wehnelt electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bücker, K; Picher, M; Crégut, O; LaGrange, T; Reed, B W; Park, S T; Masiel, D J; Banhart, F

    2016-12-01

    High temporal resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques have shown significant progress in recent years. Using photoelectron pulses induced by ultrashort laser pulses on the cathode, these methods can probe ultrafast materials processes and have revealed numerous dynamic phenomena at the nanoscale. Most recently, the technique has been implemented in standard thermionic electron microscopes that provide a flexible platform for studying material's dynamics over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. In this study, the electron pulses in such an ultrafast transmission electron microscope are characterized in detail. The microscope is based on a thermionic gun with a Wehnelt electrode and is operated in a stroboscopic photoelectron mode. It is shown that the Wehnelt bias has a decisive influence on the temporal and energy spread of the picosecond electron pulses. Depending on the shape of the cathode and the cathode-Wehnelt distance, different emission patterns with different pulse parameters are obtained. The energy spread of the pulses is determined by space charge and Boersch effects, given by the number of electrons in a pulse. However, filtering effects due to the chromatic aberrations of the Wehnelt electrode allow the extraction of pulses with narrow energy spreads. The temporal spread is governed by electron trajectories of different length and in different electrostatic potentials. High temporal resolution is obtained by excluding shank emission from the cathode and aberration-induced halos in the emission pattern. By varying the cathode-Wehnelt gap, the Wehnelt bias, and the number of photoelectrons in a pulse, tradeoffs between energy and temporal resolution as well as beam intensity can be made as needed for experiments. Based on the characterization of the electron pulses, the optimal conditions for the operation of ultrafast TEMs with thermionic gun assembly are elaborated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Blockage of ultrafast and directional diffusion of Li atoms on phosphorene with intrinsic defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiqi; Wu, Xiaojun; Yang, Jinlong

    2016-02-21

    The diffusion of Li in electrode materials is a key factor for the charging/discharging rate capacity of a Li-ion battery (LIB). Recently, two-dimensional phosphorene has been proposed as a very promising electrode material due to its ultrafast and directional lithium diffusion, as well as large energy capacity. Herein, on the basis of density functional theory, we report that intrinsic point defects, including vacancy and stone-wales defects, will block the directional ultrafast diffusion of lithium in phosphorene. On the defect-free phosphorene, diffusion of Li along the zig-zag lattice direction is 1.6 billion times faster than along the armchair lattice direction, and 260 times faster than that in graphite. After introducing intrinsic vacancy and stone-wales defect, the diffusion energy barrier of Li along the zig-zag lattice direction increases sharply to the range of 0.17-0.49 eV, which blocks the ultrafast migration of lithium along the zig-zag lattice direction. Moreover, the open circuit voltage increases with the emergence of defects, which is not suitable for anode materials. In addition, the formation energies of the defects in phosphorene are considerably lower than those in graphene and silicene sheet; therefore, it is highly important to generate defect-free phosphorene for LIB applications.

  2. Electron beam dynamics in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope with Wehnelt electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bücker, K.; Picher, M.; Crégut, O. [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg, UMR 7504 CNRS, Université de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg (France); LaGrange, T. [Interdisciplinary Centre for Electron Microscopy, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Reed, B.W.; Park, S.T.; Masiel, D.J. [Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions, Inc., 5653 Stoneridge Drive 117, Pleasanton, CA 94588 (United States); Banhart, F., E-mail: florian.banhart@ipcms.unistra.fr [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg, UMR 7504 CNRS, Université de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg (France)

    2016-12-15

    High temporal resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques have shown significant progress in recent years. Using photoelectron pulses induced by ultrashort laser pulses on the cathode, these methods can probe ultrafast materials processes and have revealed numerous dynamic phenomena at the nanoscale. Most recently, the technique has been implemented in standard thermionic electron microscopes that provide a flexible platform for studying material's dynamics over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. In this study, the electron pulses in such an ultrafast transmission electron microscope are characterized in detail. The microscope is based on a thermionic gun with a Wehnelt electrode and is operated in a stroboscopic photoelectron mode. It is shown that the Wehnelt bias has a decisive influence on the temporal and energy spread of the picosecond electron pulses. Depending on the shape of the cathode and the cathode-Wehnelt distance, different emission patterns with different pulse parameters are obtained. The energy spread of the pulses is determined by space charge and Boersch effects, given by the number of electrons in a pulse. However, filtering effects due to the chromatic aberrations of the Wehnelt electrode allow the extraction of pulses with narrow energy spreads. The temporal spread is governed by electron trajectories of different length and in different electrostatic potentials. High temporal resolution is obtained by excluding shank emission from the cathode and aberration-induced halos in the emission pattern. By varying the cathode-Wehnelt gap, the Wehnelt bias, and the number of photoelectrons in a pulse, tradeoffs between energy and temporal resolution as well as beam intensity can be made as needed for experiments. Based on the characterization of the electron pulses, the optimal conditions for the operation of ultrafast TEMs with thermionic gun assembly are elaborated. - Highlights: • A detailed characterization of electron

  3. Multiobjective optimizations of a novel cryocooled dc gun based ultrafast electron diffraction beam line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colwyn Gulliford

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of multiobjective genetic algorithm optimizations of a single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction beam line utilizing a 225 kV dc gun with a novel cryocooled photocathode system and buncher cavity. Optimizations of the transverse projected emittance as a function of bunch charge are presented and discussed in terms of the scaling laws derived in the charge saturation limit. Additionally, optimization of the transverse coherence length as a function of final rms bunch length at the sample location have been performed for three different sample radii: 50, 100, and 200  μm, for two final bunch charges: 10^{5} electrons (16 fC and 10^{6} electrons (160 fC. Example optimal solutions are analyzed, and the effects of disordered induced heating estimated. In particular, a relative coherence length of L_{c,x}/σ_{x}=0.27  nm/μm was obtained for a final bunch charge of 10^{5} electrons and final bunch length of σ_{t}≈100  fs. For a final charge of 10^{6} electrons the cryogun produces L_{c,x}/σ_{x}≈0.1  nm/μm for σ_{t}≈100–200  fs and σ_{x}≥50  μm. These results demonstrate the viability of using genetic algorithms in the design and operation of ultrafast electron diffraction beam lines.

  4. Ultrafast cone-beam CT scatter correction with GPU-based Monte Carlo simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Xu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Scatter artifacts severely degrade image quality of cone-beam CT (CBCT. We present an ultrafast scatter correction framework by using GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC simulation and prior patient CT image, aiming at automatically finish the whole process including both scatter correction and reconstruction within 30 seconds.Methods: The method consists of six steps: 1 FDK reconstruction using raw projection data; 2 Rigid Registration of planning CT to the FDK results; 3 MC scatter calculation at sparse view angles using the planning CT; 4 Interpolation of the calculated scatter signals to other angles; 5 Removal of scatter from the raw projections; 6 FDK reconstruction using the scatter-corrected projections. In addition to using GPU to accelerate MC photon simulations, we also use a small number of photons and a down-sampled CT image in simulation to further reduce computation time. A novel denoising algorithm is used to eliminate MC noise from the simulated scatter images caused by low photon numbers. The method is validated on one simulated head-and-neck case with 364 projection angles.Results: We have examined variation of the scatter signal among projection angles using Fourier analysis. It is found that scatter images at 31 angles are sufficient to restore those at all angles with < 0.1% error. For the simulated patient case with a resolution of 512 × 512 × 100, we simulated 5 × 106 photons per angle. The total computation time is 20.52 seconds on a Nvidia GTX Titan GPU, and the time at each step is 2.53, 0.64, 14.78, 0.13, 0.19, and 2.25 seconds, respectively. The scatter-induced shading/cupping artifacts are substantially reduced, and the average HU error of a region-of-interest is reduced from 75.9 to 19.0 HU.Conclusion: A practical ultrafast MC-based CBCT scatter correction scheme is developed. It accomplished the whole procedure of scatter correction and reconstruction within 30 seconds.----------------------------Cite this

  5. Ultra-fast evaluation of protein energies directly from sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gevorg Grigoryan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The structure, function, stability, and many other properties of a protein in a fixed environment are fully specified by its sequence, but in a manner that is difficult to discern. We present a general approach for rapidly mapping sequences directly to their energies on a pre-specified rigid backbone, an important sub-problem in computational protein design and in some methods for protein structure prediction. The cluster expansion (CE method that we employ can, in principle, be extended to model any computable or measurable protein property directly as a function of sequence. Here we show how CE can be applied to the problem of computational protein design, and use it to derive excellent approximations of physical potentials. The approach provides several attractive advantages. First, following a one-time derivation of a CE expansion, the amount of time necessary to evaluate the energy of a sequence adopting a specified backbone conformation is reduced by a factor of 10(7 compared to standard full-atom methods for the same task. Second, the agreement between two full-atom methods that we tested and their CE sequence-based expressions is very high (root mean square deviation 1.1-4.7 kcal/mol, R2 = 0.7-1.0. Third, the functional form of the CE energy expression is such that individual terms of the expansion have clear physical interpretations. We derived expressions for the energies of three classic protein design targets-a coiled coil, a zinc finger, and a WW domain-as functions of sequence, and examined the most significant terms. Single-residue and residue-pair interactions are sufficient to accurately capture the energetics of the dimeric coiled coil, whereas higher-order contributions are important for the two more globular folds. For the task of designing novel zinc-finger sequences, a CE-derived energy function provides significantly better solutions than a standard design protocol, in comparable computation time. Given these advantages

  6. Beam test results of a 16 ps timing system based on ultra-fast silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartiglia, N., E-mail: cartiglia@to.infn.it [INFN, Torino (Italy); Staiano, A.; Sola, V. [INFN, Torino (Italy); Arcidiacono, R. [INFN, Torino (Italy); Università del Piemonte Orientale (Italy); Cirio, R.; Cenna, F.; Ferrero, M.; Monaco, V.; Mulargia, R.; Obertino, M.; Ravera, F.; Sacchi, R. [INFN, Torino (Italy); Università di Torino, Torino (Italy); Bellora, A.; Durando, S. [Università di Torino, Torino (Italy); Mandurrino, M. [Politecnico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Minafra, N. [University of Kansas, KS (United States); Fadeyev, V.; Freeman, P.; Galloway, Z.; Gkougkousis, E. [SCIPP, University of California Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); and others

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we report on the timing resolution obtained in a beam test with pions of 180 GeV/c momentum at CERN for the first production of 45 µm thick Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors (UFSD). UFSD are based on the Low-Gain Avalanche Detector (LGAD) design, employing n-on-p silicon sensors with internal charge multiplication due to the presence of a thin, low-resistivity diffusion layer below the junction. The UFSD used in this test had a pad area of 1.7 mm{sup 2}. The gain was measured to vary between 5 and 70 depending on the sensor bias voltage. The experimental setup included three UFSD and a fast trigger consisting of a quartz bar readout by a SiPM. The timing resolution was determined by doing Gaussian fits to the time-of-flight of the particles between one or more UFSD and the trigger counter. For a single UFSD the resolution was measured to be 34 ps for a bias voltage of 200 V, and 27 ps for a bias voltage of 230 V. For the combination of 3 UFSD the timing resolution was 20 ps for a bias voltage of 200 V, and 16 ps for a bias voltage of 230 V.

  7. Compressed beam directed particle nuclear energy generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salisbury, W.W.

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to the generation of energy from the fusion of atomic nuclei which are caused to travel towards each other along collision courses, orbiting in common paths having common axes and equal radii. High velocity fusible ion beams are directed along head-on circumferential collision paths in an annular zone wherein beam compression by electrostatic focusing greatly enhances head-on fusion-producing collisions. In one embodiment, a steady radial electric field is imposed on the beams to compress the beams and reduce the radius of the spiral paths for enhancing the particle density. Beam compression is achieved through electrostatic focusing to establish and maintain two opposing beams in a reaction zone

  8. Direct observation of ultrafast atomic motion using time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shymanovich, U.

    2007-11-13

    This thesis is dedicated to the study of the atomic motion in laser irradiated solids on a picosecond to subpicosecond time-scale using the time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique. In the second chapter, the laser system, the laser-plasma based X-ray source and the experimental setup for optical pump / X-ray probe measurements were presented. Chapter 3 is devoted to the characterization and comparison of different types of X-ray optics. Chapter 4 presented the time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments performed for this thesis. The first two sections of this chapter discuss the measurements of initially unexpected strain-induced transient changes of the integrated reflectivity of the X-ray probe beam. The elimination of the strain-induced transient changes of the integrated reflectivity represented an important prerequisite to perform the study of lattice heating in Germanium after femtosecond optical excitation by measuring the transient Debye-Waller effect. The third section describes the investigations of acoustic waves upon ultrafast optical excitation and discusses the two different pressure contributions driving them: the thermal and the electronic ones. (orig.)

  9. Direct observation of ultrafast atomic motion using time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shymanovich, U.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to the study of the atomic motion in laser irradiated solids on a picosecond to subpicosecond time-scale using the time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique. In the second chapter, the laser system, the laser-plasma based X-ray source and the experimental setup for optical pump / X-ray probe measurements were presented. Chapter 3 is devoted to the characterization and comparison of different types of X-ray optics. Chapter 4 presented the time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments performed for this thesis. The first two sections of this chapter discuss the measurements of initially unexpected strain-induced transient changes of the integrated reflectivity of the X-ray probe beam. The elimination of the strain-induced transient changes of the integrated reflectivity represented an important prerequisite to perform the study of lattice heating in Germanium after femtosecond optical excitation by measuring the transient Debye-Waller effect. The third section describes the investigations of acoustic waves upon ultrafast optical excitation and discusses the two different pressure contributions driving them: the thermal and the electronic ones. (orig.)

  10. Ultrafast two-dimensional lithium beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic on the EAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoletnik, S.; Hu, G. H.; Tál, B.; Dunai, D.; Anda, G.; Asztalos, O.; Pokol, G. I.; Kálvin, S.; Németh, J.; Krizsanóczi, T.

    2018-06-01

    A diagnostic instrument is described for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) for the measurement of the edge plasma electron density profile and plasma turbulence properties. An accelerated neutral lithium beam is injected into the tokamak and the Doppler shifted 670.8 nm light emission of the Li2p-2s transition is detected. A novel compact setup is used, where the beam injection and observation take place from the same equatorial diagnostic port and radial-poloidal resolution is achieved with microsecond time resolution. The observation direction is optimized in order to achieve a sufficient Doppler shift of the beam light to be able to separate from the strong edge lithium line emission on this lithium coated device. A 250 kHz beam chopping technique is also demonstrated for the removal of background light. First results show the capability of measuring turbulence and its poloidal flow velocity in the scrape-off layer and edge region and the resolution of details of transient phenomena like edge localized modes with few microsecond time resolution.

  11. Mask-free and programmable patterning of graphene by ultrafast laser direct writing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hao-Yan; Han, Dongdong; Tian, Ye; Shao, Ruiqiang; Wei, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We present a mask-free and programmable patterning of graphene. • Ultrafast laser can homogeneously reduce graphene oxides into micropatterns. • Desired graphene micropatterns could be created on flexible substrates. • Laser exposure duration shows influence on the conductivity of reduced graphene. • The method holds promise for fabrication and integration of graphene electronics. - Abstract: Reported here is a mask-free and programmable patterning of graphene by using femtosecond laser direct writing on graphene oxide (GO) films. Take advantage of the ultrahigh instantaneous intensity of the femtosecond laser pulse, and especially its nonlinear interactions with materials, the GO could be efficiently reduced under atmospheric condition at room temperature. Moreover, the designability of femtosecond laser direct writing (FsLDW) technique allow making graphene micropatterns arbitrarily according to the preprogrammed structures, which provides the feasibility for rational design, flexible fabrication and integration of graphene-based micro-devices. Raman spectra show that the reduced and patterned region is very homogeneous, which is confirmed by the almost consistent I D /I G ratio. The novel graphene patterning technique would provide a technical support for the development of graphene-based micro-devices for future electronics

  12. Direct energy recovery from helium ion beams by a beam direct converter with secondary electron suppressors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Toku, H.; Kobayashi, A.; Okazaki, T.

    1989-01-01

    A 5-yr study of beam direct energy conversion was performed at the Kyoto University Institute of Atomic Energy to clarify the essential features of direct energy recovery from monoenergetic ion beams so that the performance characteristics of energy recovery can be predicted reasonably well by numerical calculations. The study used an improved version of an electrostatically electron-suppressed beam direct converter. Secondary electron suppressor grids were added, and a helium ion beam was used with typical parameters of 15.4 keV, 90 mA, and 100 ms. This paper presents a comparison of experimental results with numerical results by the two-dimensional Kyoto University Advanced Dart (KUAD) code, including evaluation of atomic processes

  13. Direct observation of the ultrafast electron transfer process in a polymer/fullerene blend

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cerullo, G.; Lanzani, G.; Silvestri, S. De; Brabec, Ch.J.; Zerza, G.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Hummelen, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer in organic molecules is an extensively investigated topic both because of fundamental interest in the photophysics and for applications to artificial photosynthesis. Highly efficient ultrafast electron transfer from photoexcited conjugated polymers to C60 has been

  14. Direct observation of ultrafast long-range charge separation at polymer–fullerene heterojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Provencher, Franç oise; Bé rubé , Nicolas; Parker, Anthony W.; Greetham, Gregory M.; Towrie, Michael; Hellmann, Christoph; Cô té , Michel; Stingelin, Natalie; Silva, Carlos; Hayes, Sophia C.

    2014-01-01

    In polymeric semiconductors, charge carriers are polarons, which means that the excess charge deforms the molecular structure of the polymer chain that hosts it. This results in distinctive signatures in the vibrational modes of the polymer. Here, we probe polaron photogeneration dynamics at polymer:fullerene heterojunctions by monitoring its time-resolved resonance-Raman spectrum following ultrafast photoexcitation. We conclude that polarons emerge within 300 fs. Surprisingly, further structural evolution on ≤50-ps timescales is modest, indicating that the polymer conformation hosting nascent polarons is not significantly different from that near equilibrium. We interpret this as suggestive that charges are free from their mutual Coulomb potential because we would expect rich vibrational dynamics associated with charge-pair relaxation. We address current debates on the photocarrier generation mechanism at molecular heterojunctions, and our work is, to our knowledge, the first direct probe of molecular conformation dynamics during this fundamentally important process in these materials. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  15. Direct observation of ultrafast long-range charge separation at polymer–fullerene heterojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Provencher, Françoise

    2014-07-01

    In polymeric semiconductors, charge carriers are polarons, which means that the excess charge deforms the molecular structure of the polymer chain that hosts it. This results in distinctive signatures in the vibrational modes of the polymer. Here, we probe polaron photogeneration dynamics at polymer:fullerene heterojunctions by monitoring its time-resolved resonance-Raman spectrum following ultrafast photoexcitation. We conclude that polarons emerge within 300 fs. Surprisingly, further structural evolution on ≤50-ps timescales is modest, indicating that the polymer conformation hosting nascent polarons is not significantly different from that near equilibrium. We interpret this as suggestive that charges are free from their mutual Coulomb potential because we would expect rich vibrational dynamics associated with charge-pair relaxation. We address current debates on the photocarrier generation mechanism at molecular heterojunctions, and our work is, to our knowledge, the first direct probe of molecular conformation dynamics during this fundamentally important process in these materials. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  16. Microwave and particle beam sources and directed energy concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, H.E.

    1989-01-01

    This book containing the proceedings of the SPIE on microwave and particle beam sources and directed energy concepts. Topics covered include: High power microwave sources, Direct energy concepts, Advanced accelerators, and Particle beams

  17. Proton- and x-ray beams generated by ultra-fast CO2 lasers for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Shkolnikov, Peter; Najmudin, Zulfikar; Palmer, Charlotte A. J.; Dover, Nicholas P.; Oliva, Piernicola; Carpinelli, Massimo

    2011-05-01

    Recent progress in using picosecond CO2 lasers for Thomson scattering and ion-acceleration experiments underlines their potentials for enabling secondary radiation- and particle- sources. These experiments capitalize on certain advantages of long-wavelength CO2 lasers, such as higher number of photons per energy unit, and favorable scaling of the electrons' ponderomotive energy and critical plasma density. The high-flux x-ray bursts produced by Thomson scattering of the CO2 laser off a counter-propagating electron beam enabled high-contrast, time-resolved imaging of biological objects in the picosecond time frame. In different experiments, the laser, focused on a hydrogen jet, generated monoenergetic proton beams via the radiation-pressure mechanism. The strong power-scaling of this regime promises realization of proton beams suitable for laser-driven proton cancer therapy after upgrading the CO2 laser to sub-PW peak power. This planned improvement includes optimizing the 10-μm ultra-short pulse generation, assuring higher amplification in the CO2 gas under combined isotopic- and power-broadening effects, and shortening the postamplification pulse to a few laser cycles (150-200 fs) via chirping and compression. These developments will move us closer to practical applications of ultra-fast CO2 lasers in medicine and other areas.

  18. Beam pointing direction changes in a misaligned Porro prism resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jyh-Fa; Leung, Chung-Yee

    1988-07-01

    The relative change of the beam pointing direction for a misaligned Porro prism resonator has been analyzed, using an oscillation axis concept for the Porro prism resonator to find the beam direction. Expressions for the beam tilting angles are presented which show that the angular misalignment in the horizontal direction will result in beam tilting in both the horizontal and vertical directions. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical results is found.

  19. Ultrafast harmonic rf kicker design and beam dynamics analysis for an energy recovery linac based electron circulator cooler ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulu Huang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An ultrafast kicker system is being developed for the energy recovery linac (ERL based electron circulator cooler ring (CCR in the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC, previously named MEIC. In the CCR, the injected electron bunches can be recirculated while performing ion cooling for 10–30 turns before the extraction, thus reducing the recirculation beam current in the ERL to 1/10−1/30 (150  mA-50  mA of the cooling beam current (up to 1.5 A. Assuming a bunch repetition rate of 476.3 MHz and a recirculating factor of 10 in the CCR, the kicker is required to operate at a pulse repetition rate of 47.63 MHz with pulse width of around 2 ns, so that only every 10th bunch in the CCR will experience a transverse kick while the rest of the bunches will not be disturbed. Such a kicker pulse can be synthesized by ten harmonic modes of the 47.63 MHz kicker pulse repetition frequency, using up to four quarter wavelength resonator (QWR based deflecting cavities. In this paper, several methods to synthesize such a kicker waveform will be discussed and a comparison of their beam dynamics performance is made using ELEGANT. Four QWR cavities are envisaged with high transverse shunt impedance requiring less than 100 W of total rf power for a Flat-Top kick pulse. Multipole fields due to the asymmetry of this type of cavity are analyzed. The transverse emittance growth due to the sextupole component is simulated in ELEGANT. Off-axis injection and extraction issues and beam optics using a multicavity kick-drift scheme will also be discussed.

  20. Imaging nanoscale spatial modulation of a relativistic electron beam with a MeV ultrafast electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Lingrong; Zhu, Pengfei; Liu, Yaqi; Xu, Jun; Yu, Dapeng; Wan, Weishi; Zhu, Yimei; Xiang, Dao; Zhang, Jie

    2018-03-01

    An accelerator-based MeV ultrafast electron microscope (MUEM) has been proposed as a promising tool to the study structural dynamics at the nanometer spatial scale and the picosecond temporal scale. Here, we report experimental tests of a prototype MUEM where high quality images with nanoscale fine structures were recorded with a pulsed ˜3 MeV picosecond electron beam. The temporal and spatial resolutions of the MUEM operating in the single-shot mode are about 4 ps (FWHM) and 100 nm (FWHM), corresponding to a temporal-spatial resolution of 4 × 10-19 s m, about 2 orders of magnitude higher than that achieved with state-of-the-art single-shot keV UEM. Using this instrument, we offer the demonstration of visualizing the nanoscale periodic spatial modulation of an electron beam, which may be converted into longitudinal density modulation through emittance exchange to enable production of high-power coherent radiation at short wavelengths. Our results mark a great step towards single-shot nanometer-resolution MUEMs and compact intense x-ray sources that may have widespread applications in many areas of science.

  1. Electron beam directed energy device and methods of using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retsky, Michael W.

    2007-10-16

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for an electron beam directed energy device. The device consists of an electron gun with one or more electron beams. The device includes one or more accelerating plates with holes aligned for beam passage. The plates may be flat or preferably shaped to direct each electron beam to exit the electron gun at a predetermined orientation. In one preferred application, the device is located in outer space with individual beams that are directed to focus at a distant target to be used to impact and destroy missiles. The aimings of the separate beams are designed to overcome Coulomb repulsion. A method is also presented for directing the beams to a target considering the variable terrestrial magnetic field. In another preferred application, the electron beam is directed into the ground to produce a subsurface x-ray source to locate and/or destroy buried or otherwise hidden objects including explosive devices.

  2. Frontiers of beam diagnostics in plasma accelerators: Measuring the ultra-fast and ultra-cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianchi, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bisesto, F.; Chiadroni, E.; Curcio, A.; Ferrario, M.; Giribono, A.; Marocchino, A.; Pompili, R.; Scifo, J.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.; Mostacci, A.; Bacci, A.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Zigler, A.

    2018-05-01

    Advanced diagnostics are essential tools in the development of plasma-based accelerators. The accurate measurement of the quality of beams at the exit of the plasma channel is crucial to optimize the parameters of the plasma accelerator. 6D electron beam diagnostics will be reviewed with emphasis on emittance measurement, which is particularly complex due to large energy spread and divergence of the emerging beams, and on femtosecond bunch length measurements.

  3. A directly heated electron beam line source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, M.; Masood, K.; Rafiq, M.; Chaudhry, M.A.

    2002-05-01

    A 140-mm cathode length, Electron Beam Line Source with a high degree of focusing of the beam is constructed. The design principles and basic characteristic considerations for electron beam line source consists of parallel plate electrode geometric array as well as a beam power of 35kW are worked out. The dimensions of the beam at the work site are 1.25xl00mm. The gun is designed basically for the study of evaporation and deposition characteristic of refractory metals for laboratory use. However, it may be equally used for melting and casting of these metals. (author)

  4. Femtosecond Laser-Inscripted Direct Ultrafast Fabrication of a DNA Distributor Using Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojun Shin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A femtosecond laser can be used for single or multiple writing processes to create sub 10-μm lines or holes directly without the use of masks. In this study, we characterized the depth and width of micro-channels created by femtosecond laser micro-scribing in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS under various energy doses (1%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% and laser beam passes (5, 10 and 15. Based on a microfluidic simulation in a bio-application, a DNA distributor was designed and fabricated based on an energy dose of 5% and a laser beam pass of 5. The simulated depth and width of the micro-channels was 3.58 and 5.27 μm, respectively. The depth and width of the micro-channels were linearly proportional to the energy dose and the number of laser beam passes. In a DNA distribution experiment, a brighter fluorescent intensity for YOYO-1 Iodide with DNA was observed in the middle channels with longer DNA. In addition, the velocity was the lowest as estimated in the computational simulation. The polymer processability of the femtosecond laser and the bio-applicability of the DNA distributor were successfully confirmed. Therefore, a promising technique for the maskless fabrication of sub 10-μm bio-microfluidic channels was demonstrated.

  5. Ultrafast and scalable cone-beam CT reconstruction using MapReduce in a cloud computing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Bowen; Pratx, Guillem; Xing, Lei

    2011-12-01

    Four-dimensional CT (4DCT) and cone beam CT (CBCT) are widely used in radiation therapy for accurate tumor target definition and localization. However, high-resolution and dynamic image reconstruction is computationally demanding because of the large amount of data processed. Efficient use of these imaging techniques in the clinic requires high-performance computing. The purpose of this work is to develop a novel ultrafast, scalable and reliable image reconstruction technique for 4D CBCT∕CT using a parallel computing framework called MapReduce. We show the utility of MapReduce for solving large-scale medical physics problems in a cloud computing environment. In this work, we accelerated the Feldcamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm by porting it to Hadoop, an open-source MapReduce implementation. Gated phases from a 4DCT scans were reconstructed independently. Following the MapReduce formalism, Map functions were used to filter and backproject subsets of projections, and Reduce function to aggregate those partial backprojection into the whole volume. MapReduce automatically parallelized the reconstruction process on a large cluster of computer nodes. As a validation, reconstruction of a digital phantom and an acquired CatPhan 600 phantom was performed on a commercial cloud computing environment using the proposed 4D CBCT∕CT reconstruction algorithm. Speedup of reconstruction time is found to be roughly linear with the number of nodes employed. For instance, greater than 10 times speedup was achieved using 200 nodes for all cases, compared to the same code executed on a single machine. Without modifying the code, faster reconstruction is readily achievable by allocating more nodes in the cloud computing environment. Root mean square error between the images obtained using MapReduce and a single-threaded reference implementation was on the order of 10(-7). Our study also proved that cloud computing with MapReduce is fault tolerant: the reconstruction completed

  6. TH-A-18C-04: Ultrafast Cone-Beam CT Scatter Correction with GPU-Based Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Bai, T [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Yan, H; Ouyang, L; Wang, J; Pompos, A; Jiang, S; Jia, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Zhou, L [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Scatter artifacts severely degrade image quality of cone-beam CT (CBCT). We present an ultrafast scatter correction framework by using GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and prior patient CT image, aiming at automatically finish the whole process including both scatter correction and reconstructions within 30 seconds. Methods: The method consists of six steps: 1) FDK reconstruction using raw projection data; 2) Rigid Registration of planning CT to the FDK results; 3) MC scatter calculation at sparse view angles using the planning CT; 4) Interpolation of the calculated scatter signals to other angles; 5) Removal of scatter from the raw projections; 6) FDK reconstruction using the scatter-corrected projections. In addition to using GPU to accelerate MC photon simulations, we also use a small number of photons and a down-sampled CT image in simulation to further reduce computation time. A novel denoising algorithm is used to eliminate MC scatter noise caused by low photon numbers. The method is validated on head-and-neck cases with simulated and clinical data. Results: We have studied impacts of photo histories, volume down sampling factors on the accuracy of scatter estimation. The Fourier analysis was conducted to show that scatter images calculated at 31 angles are sufficient to restore those at all angles with <0.1% error. For the simulated case with a resolution of 512×512×100, we simulated 10M photons per angle. The total computation time is 23.77 seconds on a Nvidia GTX Titan GPU. The scatter-induced shading/cupping artifacts are substantially reduced, and the average HU error of a region-of-interest is reduced from 75.9 to 19.0 HU. Similar results were found for a real patient case. Conclusion: A practical ultrafast MC-based CBCT scatter correction scheme is developed. The whole process of scatter correction and reconstruction is accomplished within 30 seconds. This study is supported in part by NIH (1R01CA154747-01), The Core Technology Research

  7. Electron-beam direct drive for rf accelerator cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahemow, M.D.; Humphries, S. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a Program to Demonstrate Electron-Beam Direct Drive for Radio Frequency (RF) Linear Accelerators at the Westinghouse R and D Center. The experimental program was undertaken using an existing electron beam facility at the Westinghouse R and C Center to demonstrate the potential of the Direct Drive RF Cavities for High Power Beams concept discussed as part of a program to develop a viable alternate concept for driving RF linear accelerators

  8. FMIT direct-current beam monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brousseau, A.T.; Chamberlin, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    The prototype injector section for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory requires that beam parameters be noninterceptively monitored. This report describes the application of a single toroidal core, coupled with very simple circuitry, that results in the production of a simple instrument, and eliminates the problems inherent in the Faraday cup technique for the current measurements of the FMIT injector beam

  9. Breaking the Attosecond, Angstrom and TV/m Field Barriers with Ultrafast Electron Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Andonian, G.; Fukasawa, A.; Hemsing, E.; Marcus, G.; Marinelli, A.; Musumeci, P.; O'Shea, B.; O'Shea, F.; Pellegrini, C.; Schiller, D.; Travish, G.; Bucksbaum, P.; Hogan, M.; Krejcik, Patrick; Ferrario, M.; Muggli, Patric

    2010-01-01

    Recent initiatives at UCLA concerning ultra-short, GeV electron beam generation have been aimed at achieving sub-fs pulses capable of driving X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) in single-spike mode. This scheme uses very low charge beams, which may allow existing FEL injectors to produce few-100 attosecond pulses, with very high brightness. Towards this end, recent experiments at the Stanford X-ray FEL (LCLS, first of its kind, built with essential UCLA leadership) have produced ∼2 fs, 20 pC electron pulses. We discuss here extensions of this work, in which we seek to exploit the beam brightness in FELs, in tandem with new developments at UCLA in cryogenic undulator technology, to create compact accelerator/undulator systems that can lase below 0.15 Angst , or be used to permit 1.5 Angst operation at 4.5 GeV. In addition, we are now developing experiments which use the present LCLS fs pulses to excite plasma wakefields exceeding 1 TV/m, permitting a table-top TeV accelerator for frontier high energy physics applications. We discuss the experimental issues associated with this initiative.

  10. Physical mechanisms of SiNx layer structuring with ultrafast lasers by direct and confined laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapp, S.; Heinrich, G.; Wollgarten, M.; Huber, H. P.; Schmidt, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the production process of silicon microelectronic devices and high efficiency silicon solar cells, local contact openings in thin dielectric layers are required. Instead of photolithography, these openings can be selectively structured with ultra-short laser pulses by confined laser ablation in a fast and efficient lift off production step. Thereby, the ultrafast laser pulse is transmitted by the dielectric layer and absorbed at the substrate surface leading to a selective layer removal in the nanosecond time domain. Thermal damage in the substrate due to absorption is an unwanted side effect. The aim of this work is to obtain a deeper understanding of the physical laser-material interaction with the goal of finding a damage-free ablation mechanism. For this, thin silicon nitride (SiN x ) layers on planar silicon (Si) wafers are processed with infrared fs-laser pulses. Two ablation types can be distinguished: The known confined ablation at fluences below 300 mJ/cm 2 and a combined partial confined and partial direct ablation at higher fluences. The partial direct ablation process is caused by nonlinear absorption in the SiN x layer in the center of the applied Gaussian shaped laser pulses. Pump-probe investigations of the central area show ultra-fast reflectivity changes typical for direct laser ablation. Transmission electron microscopy results demonstrate that the Si surface under the remaining SiN x island is not damaged by the laser ablation process. At optimized process parameters, the method of direct laser ablation could be a good candidate for damage-free selective structuring of dielectric layers on absorbing substrates

  11. Giant narrowband twin-beam generation along the pump-energy propagation direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Angela M.; Spasibko, Kirill Yu; Sharapova, Polina R.; Tikhonova, Olga V.; Leuchs, Gerd; Chekhova, Maria V.

    2015-07-01

    Walk-off effects, originating from the difference between the group and phase velocities, limit the efficiency of nonlinear optical interactions. While transverse walk-off can be eliminated by proper medium engineering, longitudinal walk-off is harder to avoid. In particular, ultrafast twin-beam generation via pulsed parametric down-conversion and four-wave mixing is only possible in short crystals or fibres. Here we show that in high-gain parametric down-conversion, one can overcome the destructive role of both effects and even turn them into useful tools for shaping the emission. In our experiment, one of the twin beams is emitted along the pump Poynting vector or its group velocity matches that of the pump. The result is markedly enhanced generation of both twin beams, with the simultaneous narrowing of angular and frequency spectrum. The effect will enable efficient generation of ultrafast twin photons and beams in cavities, waveguides and whispering-gallery mode resonators.

  12. Directed Neutron Beams From Inverse Kinematic Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhoy, J. R.; Guardala, N. A.; Glass, G. A.

    2011-06-01

    Kinematic focusing of an emitted fairly mono-energetic neutron beam by the use of inverse-kinematic reactions, i.e. where the projectile mass is greater than the target atom's mass, can provide for the utilization of a significant fraction of the fast neutron yield and also provide for a safer radiation environment. We examine the merit of various neutron production reactions and consider the practicalities of producing the primary beam using the suitable accelerator technologies. Preliminary progress at the NSWC-Carderock Positive Ion Accelerator Facility is described. Possible important applications for this type of neutron-based system can be both advanced medical imaging techniques and active "stand-off" interrogation of contraband items.

  13. Characterization of low energy radioactive beams using direct reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J.G.; Fraser, M.A.; Bildstein, V.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a new technique to determine the beam structure of low energy radioactive beams using coincidence events from a direct reaction. The technique will be described and tested using Geant4 simulations. We use the technique to determine for the first time the width, divergence and energy...

  14. Topology Control in Aerial Multi-Beam Directional Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-24

    Topology Control in Aerial Multi-Beam Directional Networks Brian Proulx, Nathaniel M. Jones, Jennifer Madiedo, Greg Kuperman {brian.proulx, njones...significant interference. Topology control (i.e., selecting a subset of neighbors to communicate with) is vital to reduce the interference. Good topology ...underlying challenges to topology control in multi-beam direction networks. Two topology control algorithms are developed: a centralized algorithm

  15. Networked Airborne Communications Using Adaptive Multi Beam Directional Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-05

    Networked Airborne Communications Using Adaptive Multi-Beam Directional Links R. Bruce MacLeod Member, IEEE, and Adam Margetts Member, IEEE MIT...provide new techniques for increasing throughput in airborne adaptive directional net- works. By adaptive directional linking, we mean systems that can...techniques can dramatically increase the capacity in airborne networks. Advances in digital array technology are beginning to put these gains within reach

  16. Two applications of direct digital down converters in beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, Tom; Flood, Roger; Hovater, Curt; Musson, John

    2000-01-01

    The technologies of direct digital down converters, digital frequency synthesis, and digital signal processing are being used in many commercial applications. Because of this commercialization, the component costs are being reduced to the point where they are economically viable for large scale accelerator applications. This paper will discuss two applications of these technologies to beam diagnostics. In the first application the combination of direct digital frequency synthesis and direct digital down converters are coupled with digital signal processor technology in order to maintain the stable gain environment required for a multi-electrode beam position monitoring system. This is done by injecting a CW reference signal into the electronics as part of the front-end circuitry. In the second application direct digital down converters are used to provide a novel approach to the measurement of beam intensity using cavity current monitors. In this system a pair of reference signals are injected into the cavity through an auxiliary port. The beam current is then calculated as the ratio of the beam signal divided by the average of the magnitude of the two reference signals

  17. Direct cone beam SPECT reconstruction with camera tilt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jianying Li; Jaszczak, R.J.; Greer, K.L.; Coleman, R.E.; Zongjian Cao; Tsui, B.M.W.

    1993-01-01

    A filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm is derived to perform cone beam (CB) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) reconstruction with camera tilt using circular orbits. This algorithm reconstructs the tilted angle CB projection data directly by incorporating the tilt angle into it. When the tilt angle becomes zero, this algorithm reduces to that of Feldkamp. Experimentally acquired phantom studies using both a two-point source and the three-dimensional Hoffman brain phantom have been performed. The transaxial tilted cone beam brain images and profiles obtained using the new algorithm are compared with those without camera tilt. For those slices which have approximately the same distance from the detector in both tilt and non-tilt set-ups, the two transaxial reconstructions have similar profiles. The two-point source images reconstructed from this new algorithm and the tilted cone beam brain images are also compared with those reconstructed from the existing tilted cone beam algorithm. (author)

  18. Quasi-Airy beams along tunable propagation trajectories and directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yixian; Zhang, Site

    2016-05-02

    We present a theoretical and experimental exhibit that accelerates quasi-Airy beams propagating along arbitrarily appointed parabolic trajectories and directions in free space. We also demonstrate that such quasi-Airy beams can be generated by a tunable phase pattern, where two disturbance factors are introduced. The topological structures of quasi-Airy beams are readily manipulated with tunable phase patterns. Quasi-Airy beams still possess the characteristics of non-diffraction, self-healing to some extent, although they are not the solutions for paraxial wave equation. The experiments show the results are consistent with theoretical predictions. It is believed that the property of propagation along arbitrarily desired parabolic trajectories will provide a broad application in trapping atom and living cell manipulation.

  19. Direct writing of birefringent elements by ultrafast laser nanostructuring in multicomponent glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotov, S. S.; Drevinskas, R.; Lotarev, S. V.; Lipatiev, A. S.; Beresna, M.; ČerkauskaitÄ--, A.; Sigaev, V. N.; Kazansky, P. G.

    2016-02-01

    Self-assembled nanostructures created by femtosecond laser irradiation are demonstrated in alkali-free aluminoborosilicate glass. The growth of the induced retardance associated with the nanograting formation is three orders of magnitude slower than in silica glass and is observed only within a narrow range of pulse energies. However, the strength of retardance asymptotically approaches the value typically measured in pure silica glass, which is attractive for practical applications. A similar intensity threshold for nanograting formation of about 1 TW/cm2 is observed for all glasses studied. The radially polarized vortex beam micro-converter designed as a space-variant quarter-wave retarder for the near-infrared spectral range is imprinted in commercial Schott AF32 glass.

  20. Distributed Optimization of Multi Beam Directional Communication Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-30

    Distributed Optimization of Multi-Beam Directional Communication Networks Theodoros Tsiligkaridis MIT Lincoln Laboratory Lexington, MA 02141, USA...based routing. I. INTRODUCTION Missions where multiple communication goals are of in- terest are becoming more prevalent in military applications...Multilayer communications may occur within a coalition; for example, a team consisting of ground vehicles and an airborne set of assets may desire to

  1. Avant-Garde Ultrafast Laser Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazansky P. G.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast laser processing of transparent materials reveals new phenomena. Reviewed, are recent demonstrations of 5D optical memory, vortex polarization and Airy beam converters employing self-assembled nanostructuring, ultrafast laser calligraphy and polarization writing control using pulses with tilted front.

  2. Ultrafast direct imprinting of nanostructures in metals by pulsed laser melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Bo; Keimel, Chris; Chou, Stephen Y

    2010-01-01

    We report a method of one-step direct patterning of metallic nanostructures. In the method, termed laser assisted direct imprinting (LADI), the surface of a metal film on a substrate is melted by a single excimer laser pulse and subsequently imprinted within ∼100 ns using a transparent quartz mold, while the substrate is kept at a low temperature and in a solid phase. Using LADI, we imprinted gratings with ∼100 nm linewidth, 100 nm depth, and 200 nm pitch, as well as isolated mesas of ∼20 μm size, in Al, Au, Cu and Ni thin films. We found that the quartz mold was able to imprint metals even at temperatures higher than its melting point. The technique could be extended to other metals regardless of their ductility and hardness, and would find applications in photonic and plasmonic device production.

  3. A Direct Mechanism of Ultrafast Intramolecular Singlet Fission in Pentacene Dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-24

    Queisser limit of solar power conversion efficiency. In conventional materials, the mechanism of SF is an intermolecular process (xSF), which is mediated by...property for materials used in third-generation solar cells and photodetectors, among other optoelectronic devices.1−3 Unfortunately, techno- logical...mixing. Previous work investigating the mechanism of xSF unfavorably compared the direct coupling mechanism against superexchange mediated by high

  4. Engineering of beam direct conversion for a 120-kV, 1-MW ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, W.L.; Doggett, J.N.; Hamilton, G.W.; Kinney, J.D.; Moir, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    Practical systems for beam direct conversion are required to recover the energy from ion beams at high efficiency and at very high beam power densities in the environment of a high-power, neutral-injection system. Such an experiment is now in progress using a 120-kV beam with a maximum total current of 20 A. After neutralization, the H + component to be recovered will have a power of approximately 1MW. A system testing these concepts has been designed and tested at 15 kV, 2 kW in preparation for the full-power tests. The engineering problems involved in the full-power tests affect electron suppression, gas pumping, voltage holding, diagnostics, and measurement conditions. Planning for future experiments at higher power includes the use of cryopumping and electron suppression by a magnetic field rather than by an electrostatic field. Beam direct conversion for large fusion experiments and reactors will save millions of dollars in the cost of power supplies and electricity and will dispose of the charged beam under conditions that may mot be possible by other techniques

  5. Engineering of beam direct conversion for a 120-kV, 1-MW ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, W.L.; Doggett, J.N.; Hamilton, G.W.; Kinney, J.D.; Moir, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    Practical systems for beam direct conversion are required to recover the energy from ion beams at high efficiency and at very high beam power densities in the environment of a high-power, neutral-injection system. Such an experiment is now in progress using a 120-kV beam with a maximum total current of 20 A. After neutralization, the H + component to be recovered will have a power of approximately 1 MW. A system testing these concepts has been designed and tested at 15 kV, 2 kW in preparation for the full-power tests. The engineering problems involved in the full-power tests affect electron suppression, gas pumping, voltage holding, diagnostics, and measurement conditions. Planning for future experiments at higher power includes the use of cryopumping and electron suppression by a magnetic field rather than by an electrostatic field. Beam direct conversion for large fusion experiments and reactors will save millions of dollars in the cost of power supplies and electricity and will dispose of the charged beam under conditions that may not be possible by other techniques

  6. Ion Diffusion-Directed Assembly Approach to Ultrafast Coating of Graphene Oxide Thick Multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoli; Gao, Weiwei; Yao, Weiquan; Jiang, Yanqiu; Xu, Zhen; Gao, Chao

    2017-10-24

    The layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly approach has been widely used to fabricate multilayer coatings on substrates with multiple cycles, whereas it is hard to access thick films efficiently. Here, we developed an ion diffusion-directed assembly (IDDA) strategy to rapidly make multilayer thick coatings in one step on arbitrary substrates. To achieve multifunctional coatings, graphene oxide (GO) and metallic ions were selected as the typical building blocks and diffusion director in IDDA, respectively. With diffusion of metallic ions from substrate to negatively charged GO dispersion spontaneously (i.e., from high-concentration region to low-concentration region), GO was assembled onto the substrate sheet-by-sheet via sol-gel transformation. Because metallic ions with size of subnanometers can diffuse directionally and freely in the aqueous dispersion, GO was coated on the substrate efficiently, giving rise to films with desired thickness up to 10 μm per cycle. The IDDA approach shows three main merits: (1) high efficiency with a μm-scale coating rate; (2) controllability over thickness and evenness; and (3) generality for substrates of plastics, metals and ceramics with any shapes and morphologies. With these merits, IDDA strategy was utilized in the efficient fabrication of functional graphene coatings that exhibit outstanding performance as supercapacitors, electromagnetic interference shielding textiles, and anticorrosion coatings. This IDDA approach can be extended to other building blocks including polymers and colloidal nanoparticles, promising for the scalable production and application of multifunctional coatings.

  7. Ultrafast and directional diffusion of lithium in phosphorene for high-performance lithium-ion battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weifeng; Yang, Yanmei; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2015-03-11

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed to investigate the binding and diffusion behavior of Li in phosphorene. Our studies reveal the following findings: (1) Li atom forms strong binding with phosphorus atoms and exists in the cationic state; (2) the shallow energy barrier (0.08 eV) of Li diffusion on monolayer phosphorene along zigzag direction leads to an ultrahigh diffusivity, which is estimated to be 10(2) (10(4)) times faster than that on MoS2 (graphene) at room temperature; (3) the large energy barrier (0.68 eV) along armchair direction results in a nearly forbidden diffusion, and such strong diffusion anisotropy is absent in graphene and MoS2; (4) a remarkably large average voltage of 2.9 V is predicted in the phosphorene-based Li-ion battery; and (5) a semiconducting to metallic transition induced by Li intercalation of phosphorene gives rise to a good electrical conductivity, ideal for use as an electrode. Given these advantages, it is expected that phosphorene will present abundant opportunities for applications in novel electronic device and lithium-ion battery with a high rate capability and high charging voltage.

  8. Direct Observation of Ultrafast Hole Injection from Lead Halide Perovskite by Differential Transient Transmission Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishioka, Kunie; Barker, Bobby G; Yanagida, Masatoshi; Shirai, Yasuhiro; Miyano, Kenjiro

    2017-08-17

    Efficient charge separation at the interfaces of the perovskite with the carrier transport layers is crucial for perovskite solar cells to achieve high power conversion efficiency. We present a systematic experimental study on the hole injection dynamics from MAPbI 3 perovskite to three typical hole transport materials (HTMs). We extract the carrier dynamics directly related to the hole injection by employing a pump light with short absorption depth and comparing the transient transmission signals excited on the two sides of the sample. The differential transmission signals reveal the hole injections to PTAA and PEDOT:PSS to be complete within 1 and 2 ps, respectively, and that to NiO x to exhibit an additional slow process on a 40 ps time scale. The obtained injection dynamics are discussed in comparison with the device performance of the solar cells containing the same MAPbI 3 /HTM interfaces.

  9. Comparative study of direct and inverse problems of cracked beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahieddine Chettah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, the analysis and evaluation of the cracked structures were hot spots in several engineering fields and has been the subject of great interest with important and comprehensive surveys covering various methodologies and applications, in order to obtain reliable and effective methods to maintain the safety and performance of structures on a proactive basis. The presence of a crack, not only causes a local variation in the structural parameters (e.g., the stiffness of a beam at its location, but it also has a global effect which affects the overall dynamic behavior of the structure (such as the natural frequencies. For this reason, the dynamic characterization of the cracked structures can be used to detect damage from non-destructive testing. The objective of this paper is to compare the accuracy and ability of two methods to correctly predict the results for both direct problem to find natural frequencies and inverse problem to find crack’s locations and depths of a cracked simply supported beam. Several cases of crack depths and crack locations are investigated. The crack is supposed to remain open. The Euler–Bernoulli beam theory is employed to model the cracked beam and the crack is represented as a rotational spring with a sectional flexibility. In the first method, the transfer matrix method is used; the cracked beam is modeled as two uniform sub-segments connected by a rotational spring located at the cracked section. In the second method which is based on the Rayleigh’s method, the mode shape of the cracked beam is constructed by adding a cubic polynomial function to that of the undamaged beam. By applying the compatibility conditions at crack’s location and the corresponding boundary conditions, the general forms of characteristic equations for this cracked system are obtained. The two methods are then utilized to determine the locations and depths by using any two natural frequencies of a cracked simply

  10. Direct deposition of gold on silicon with focused ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebiker, P.W.; Doebeli, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Muehle, R. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Irradiation with ions at very low energies (below 500 eV) no longer induces a removal of substrate material, but the ions are directly deposited on the surface. In this way, gold has been deposited on silicon with focused ion beam exposure and the properties of the film have been investigated with atomic force microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. (author) 3 figs., 1 ref.

  11. Beam profiles in the nonwedged direction for dynamic wedges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lydon, J.M.; Rykers, K.L.

    1996-01-01

    One feature of the dynamic wedge is the improved flatness of the beam profile in the nonwedged direction when compared to fixed wedges. Profiles in the nonwedged direction for fixed wedges show a fall-off in dose away from the central axis when compared to the open field profile. This study will show that there is no significant difference between open field profiles and nonwedged direction profiles for dynamically wedged beams. The implications are that the dynamic wedge offers an improved dose distribution in the nonwedged direction that can be modelled by approximating the dynamically wedged field to an open field. This is possible as both the profiles and depth doses of the dynamically wedged fields match those of the open fields, if normalized to d max of the same field size. For treatment planning purposes the effective wedge factor (EWF) provides a normalization factor for the open field depth dose data set. Data will be presented to demonstrate that the EWF shows relatively little variation with depth and can be treated as being independent of field size in the nonwedged direction. (author)

  12. Direct cryosorption pumping of an energetic hydrogen ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenterly, S.W.; Ryan, P.M.; Tsai, C.C.

    1979-01-01

    Cryosorption pumps (CSP) are a prime candidate for the pumping of helium and deuterium-tritium (D-T) in tokamak divertor systems and may also see service in neutral beam injectors. However, the ability of a CSP to take high energy ions escaping from a plasma or neutral beam has not previously been demonstrated. In this study we arranged a 10-cm ion source of the type used in the Oak Ridge Tokamak (ORMAK) to inject a beam of ions directly into the inlet of a CSP. The pump contained two chevron baffles at 100K and 15K as well as a 15K cryosorption surface covered with a type 5A molecular sieve. The cryosurfaces were cooled by a closed-cycle helium refrigerator. For hydrogen ion pulses up to 11.5-keV energy and 1.3-A current, the pressure maintained during the pulse was only a few percent higher than that maintained with an equal flow of cold neutral gas. Pulse lengths of 100-300 ms were used. Calorimetric measurements showed that 40-60% of the I-V power was incident on the pump inlet. Cool-down and regeneration behavior of the pump will also be discussed

  13. Direct measurement of the beam deflection angle using the axial B-dot field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhong He

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Beam position monitors are an important diagnostics tool for particle accelerator operation and related beam dynamics research. The measurement of the beam deflection angle, or moving direction of a charged particle beam with respect to the beam pipe axis, can provide useful additional information. Beam monitors sensitive to the beam’s azimuthal B-dot field (sometimes referred as B dots are used to measure the displacement (position of the beam centroid, as the beam generates a dipole term of the azimuthal magnetic field. Similarly, a dipole term of the axial magnetic field will be generated by the beam moving in a direction not parallel to the axis of the beam pipe. In this paper, a new method using the axial B-dot field is presented to measure the beam deflection angle directly, including the theoretical background. Simulations using the MAFIA numerical code have been performed, demonstrating a good agreement to the new established analytical model.

  14. Ultrafast Science Opportunities with Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DURR, HERMANN; Wang, X.J., ed.

    2016-04-28

    X-rays and electrons are two of the most fundamental probes of matter. When the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world’s first x-ray free electron laser, began operation in 2009, it transformed ultrafast science with the ability to generate laser-like x-ray pulses from the manipulation of relativistic electron beams. This document describes a similar future transformation. In Transmission Electron Microscopy, ultrafast relativistic (MeV energy) electron pulses can achieve unsurpassed spatial and temporal resolution. Ultrafast temporal resolution will be the next frontier in electron microscopy and can ideally complement ultrafast x-ray science done with free electron lasers. This document describes the Grand Challenge science opportunities in chemistry, material science, physics and biology that arise from an MeV ultrafast electron diffraction & microscopy facility, especially when coupled with linac-based intense THz and X-ray pump capabilities.

  15. Single-step fabrication of stressed waveguides with tubular depressed-cladding in phosphate glasses using ultrafast vortex laser beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Guanghua

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on the fabrication of the stressed optical waveguide with tubular depressed-refractive-index cladding in phosphate glasses by use of femtosecond vortex beam. Strained regions were emerged in domains surrounding the tubular track. Waveguiding occurs mainly within the tube induced by femtosecond laser.

  16. Direct Reaction Experimental Studies with Beams of Radioactive Tin Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K. L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Ahn, S.H. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Allmond, James M [ORNL; Ayres, A. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL; Baugher, T. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Bazin, D. [Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); Beene, James R [ORNL; Berryman, J. S. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Bey, A. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Bingham, C. R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Cartegni, L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chae, K. Y. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)/Sungkyunkwan University, Korea; Cizewski, J. A. [Rutgers University; Gade, A. [Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn} [ORNL; Garcia-Ruiz, R.F. [Instituut voor Kernen Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven, B-3001, Leuven, Belgium; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz [ORNL; Howard, Meredith E [ORNL; Kozub, R. L. [Tennessee Technological University (TTU); Liang, J Felix [ORNL; Manning, Brett M [ORNL; Matos, M. [Louisiana State University; McDaniel, S. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Miller, D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nesaraja, Caroline D [ORNL; O' Malley, Patrick [Rutgers University; Padgett, S [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Padilla-Rodal, Elizabeth [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM); Pain, Steven D [ORNL; Pittman, S. T. [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Radford, David C [ORNL; Ratkiewicz, Andrew J [ORNL; Schmitt, Kyle [ORNL; Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL; Stracener, Daniel W [ORNL; Stroberg, S. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Tostevin, Jeffrey A [ORNL; Varner Jr, Robert L [ORNL; Weisshaar, D. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Wimmer, K. [Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL)/Central Michigan University; Winkler, R. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

    2015-01-01

    The tin chain of isotopes provides a unique region in which to investigate the evolution of single-particle structure, spreading from N = 50 at Sn-100, through 10 stable isotopes and the N = 82 shell closure at Sn-132 out into the r-process path. Direct reactions performed on radioactive ion beams are sensitive spectroscopic tools for studying exotic nuclei. Here we present one experiment knocking out neutrons from tin isotopes that are already neutron deficient and two reactions that add a neutron to neutron-rich Sn-130. Both techniques rely on selective particle identification and the measurement of gamma rays in coincidence with charged ions. We present the goals of the two experiments and the particle identification for the channels of interest. The final results will be presented in future publications.

  17. Ultrafast biophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Vasa, P

    2016-01-01

    This book presents emerging contemporary optical techniques of ultrafast science which have opened entirely new vistas for probing biological entities and processes. The spectrum reaches from time-resolved imaging and multiphoton microscopy to cancer therapy and studies of DNA damage. The book displays interdisciplinary research at the interface of physics and biology. Emerging topics on the horizon are also discussed, like the use of squeezed light, frequency combs and terahertz imaging as the possibility of mimicking biological systems. The book is written in a manner to make it readily accessible to researchers, postgraduate biologists, chemists, engineers, and physicists and students of optics, biomedical optics, photonics and biotechnology.

  18. Direct nano-patterning of graphene with helium ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naitou, Y., E-mail: yu-naitou@aist.go.jp [Nanoelectronics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8562 (Japan); Iijima, T.; Ogawa, S. [Nanoelectronics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba 305-8569 (Japan)

    2015-01-19

    Helium ion microscopy (HIM) was used for direct nano-patterning of single-layer graphene (SLG) on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates. This technique involves irradiation of the sample with accelerated helium ions (He{sup +}). Doses of 2.0 × 10{sup 16 }He{sup + }cm{sup −2} from a 30 kV beam induced a metal-insulator transition in the SLG. The resolution of HIM patterning on SLG was investigated by fabricating nanoribbons and nanostructures. Analysis of scanning capacitance microscopy measurements revealed that the spatial resolution of HIM patterning depended on the dosage of He{sup +} in a non-monotonic fashion. Increasing the dose from 2.0 × 10{sup 16} to 5.0 × 10{sup 16 }He{sup + }cm{sup −2} improved the spatial resolution to several tens of nanometers. However, doses greater than 1.0 × 10{sup 17 }He{sup + }cm{sup −2} degraded the patterning characteristics. Direct patterning using HIM is a versatile approach to graphene fabrication and can be applied to graphene-based devices.

  19. Direct nano-patterning of graphene with helium ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naitou, Y.; Iijima, T.; Ogawa, S.

    2015-01-01

    Helium ion microscopy (HIM) was used for direct nano-patterning of single-layer graphene (SLG) on SiO 2 /Si substrates. This technique involves irradiation of the sample with accelerated helium ions (He + ). Doses of 2.0 × 10 16  He +  cm −2 from a 30 kV beam induced a metal-insulator transition in the SLG. The resolution of HIM patterning on SLG was investigated by fabricating nanoribbons and nanostructures. Analysis of scanning capacitance microscopy measurements revealed that the spatial resolution of HIM patterning depended on the dosage of He + in a non-monotonic fashion. Increasing the dose from 2.0 × 10 16 to 5.0 × 10 16  He +  cm −2 improved the spatial resolution to several tens of nanometers. However, doses greater than 1.0 × 10 17  He +  cm −2 degraded the patterning characteristics. Direct patterning using HIM is a versatile approach to graphene fabrication and can be applied to graphene-based devices

  20. PREFACE: Ultrafast biophotonics Ultrafast biophotonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Min; Reid, Derryck; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2010-08-01

    The use of light to explore biology can be traced to the first observations of tissue made with early microscopes in the mid-seventeenth century, and has today evolved into the discipline which we now know as biophotonics. This field encompasses a diverse range of activities, each of which shares the common theme of exploiting the interaction of light with biological material. With the rapid advancement of ultrafast optical technologies over the last few decades, ultrafast lasers have increasingly found applications in biophotonics, to the extent that the distinctive new field of ultrafast biophotonics has now emerged, where robust turnkey ultrafast laser systems are facilitating cutting-edge studies in the life sciences to take place in everyday laboratories. The broad spectral bandwidths, precision timing resolution, low coherence and high peak powers of ultrafast optical pulses provide unique opportunities for imaging and manipulating biological systems. Time-resolved studies of bio-molecular dynamics exploit the short pulse durations from such lasers, while other applications such as optical coherence tomography benefit from the broad optical bandwidths possible by using super-continuum generation and additionally allowing for high speed imaging with speeds as high as 47 000 scans per second. Continuing progress in laser-system technology is accelerating the adoption of ultrafast techniques across the life sciences, both in research laboratories and in clinical applications, such as laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) eye surgery. Revolutionizing the field of optical microscopy, two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy has enabled higher spatial resolution with improved depth penetration into biological specimens. Advantages of this nonlinear optical process include: reduced photo-interactions, allowing for extensive imaging time periods; simultaneously exciting multiple fluorescent molecules with only one excitation wavelength; and

  1. On the ultrafast charge migration and subsequent charge directed reactivity in Cl⋯N halogen-bonded clusters following vertical ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, Sankhabrata; Bhattacharya, Atanu; Periyasamy, Ganga

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we have presented ultrafast charge transfer dynamics through halogen bonds following vertical ionization of representative halogen bonded clusters. Subsequent hole directed reactivity of the radical cations of halogen bonded clusters is also discussed. Furthermore, we have examined effect of the halogen bond strength on the electron-electron correlation- and relaxation-driven charge migration in halogen bonded complexes. For this study, we have selected A-Cl (A represents F, OH, CN, NH 2 , CF 3 , and COOH substituents) molecules paired with NH 3 (referred as ACl:NH 3 complex): these complexes exhibit halogen bonds. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on purely electron correlation- and relaxation-driven ultrafast (attosecond) charge migration dynamics through halogen bonds. Both density functional theory and complete active space self-consistent field theory with 6-31 + G(d, p) basis set are employed for this work. Upon vertical ionization of NCCl⋯NH 3 complex, the hole is predicted to migrate from the NH 3 -end to the ClCN-end of the NCCl⋯NH 3 complex in approximately 0.5 fs on the D 0 cationic surface. This hole migration leads to structural rearrangement of the halogen bonded complex, yielding hydrogen bonding interaction stronger than the halogen bonding interaction on the same cationic surface. Other halogen bonded complexes, such as H 2 NCl:NH 3 , F 3 CCl:NH 3 , and HOOCCl:NH 3 , exhibit similar charge migration following vertical ionization. On the contrary, FCl:NH 3 and HOCl:NH 3 complexes do not exhibit any charge migration following vertical ionization to the D 0 cation state, pointing to interesting halogen bond strength-dependent charge migration

  2. On the ultrafast charge migration and subsequent charge directed reactivity in Cl⋯N halogen-bonded clusters following vertical ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Sankhabrata; Bhattacharya, Atanu, E-mail: atanub@ipc.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India); Periyasamy, Ganga [Department of Chemistry, Central College Campus, Bangalore University, Bangalore (India)

    2015-06-28

    In this article, we have presented ultrafast charge transfer dynamics through halogen bonds following vertical ionization of representative halogen bonded clusters. Subsequent hole directed reactivity of the radical cations of halogen bonded clusters is also discussed. Furthermore, we have examined effect of the halogen bond strength on the electron-electron correlation- and relaxation-driven charge migration in halogen bonded complexes. For this study, we have selected A-Cl (A represents F, OH, CN, NH{sub 2}, CF{sub 3}, and COOH substituents) molecules paired with NH{sub 3} (referred as ACl:NH{sub 3} complex): these complexes exhibit halogen bonds. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on purely electron correlation- and relaxation-driven ultrafast (attosecond) charge migration dynamics through halogen bonds. Both density functional theory and complete active space self-consistent field theory with 6-31 + G(d, p) basis set are employed for this work. Upon vertical ionization of NCCl⋯NH{sub 3} complex, the hole is predicted to migrate from the NH{sub 3}-end to the ClCN-end of the NCCl⋯NH{sub 3} complex in approximately 0.5 fs on the D{sub 0} cationic surface. This hole migration leads to structural rearrangement of the halogen bonded complex, yielding hydrogen bonding interaction stronger than the halogen bonding interaction on the same cationic surface. Other halogen bonded complexes, such as H{sub 2}NCl:NH{sub 3}, F{sub 3}CCl:NH{sub 3}, and HOOCCl:NH{sub 3}, exhibit similar charge migration following vertical ionization. On the contrary, FCl:NH{sub 3} and HOCl:NH{sub 3} complexes do not exhibit any charge migration following vertical ionization to the D{sub 0} cation state, pointing to interesting halogen bond strength-dependent charge migration.

  3. TH-A-18C-09: Ultra-Fast Monte Carlo Simulation for Cone Beam CT Imaging of Brain Trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisniega, A; Zbijewski, W; Stayman, J [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University (United States); Yorkston, J [Carestream Health (United States); Aygun, N [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University (United States); Koliatsos, V [Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University (United States); Siewerdsen, J [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University (United States); Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Application of cone-beam CT (CBCT) to low-contrast soft tissue imaging, such as in detection of traumatic brain injury, is challenged by high levels of scatter. A fast, accurate scatter correction method based on Monte Carlo (MC) estimation is developed for application in high-quality CBCT imaging of acute brain injury. Methods: The correction involves MC scatter estimation executed on an NVIDIA GTX 780 GPU (MC-GPU), with baseline simulation speed of ~1e7 photons/sec. MC-GPU is accelerated by a novel, GPU-optimized implementation of variance reduction (VR) techniques (forced detection and photon splitting). The number of simulated tracks and projections is reduced for additional speed-up. Residual noise is removed and the missing scatter projections are estimated via kernel smoothing (KS) in projection plane and across gantry angles. The method is assessed using CBCT images of a head phantom presenting a realistic simulation of fresh intracranial hemorrhage (100 kVp, 180 mAs, 720 projections, source-detector distance 700 mm, source-axis distance 480 mm). Results: For a fixed run-time of ~1 sec/projection, GPU-optimized VR reduces the noise in MC-GPU scatter estimates by a factor of 4. For scatter correction, MC-GPU with VR is executed with 4-fold angular downsampling and 1e5 photons/projection, yielding 3.5 minute run-time per scan, and de-noised with optimized KS. Corrected CBCT images demonstrate uniformity improvement of 18 HU and contrast improvement of 26 HU compared to no correction, and a 52% increase in contrast-tonoise ratio in simulated hemorrhage compared to “oracle” constant fraction correction. Conclusion: Acceleration of MC-GPU achieved through GPU-optimized variance reduction and kernel smoothing yields an efficient (<5 min/scan) and accurate scatter correction that does not rely on additional hardware or simplifying assumptions about the scatter distribution. The method is undergoing implementation in a novel CBCT dedicated to brain

  4. TH-A-18C-09: Ultra-Fast Monte Carlo Simulation for Cone Beam CT Imaging of Brain Trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisniega, A; Zbijewski, W; Stayman, J; Yorkston, J; Aygun, N; Koliatsos, V; Siewerdsen, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Application of cone-beam CT (CBCT) to low-contrast soft tissue imaging, such as in detection of traumatic brain injury, is challenged by high levels of scatter. A fast, accurate scatter correction method based on Monte Carlo (MC) estimation is developed for application in high-quality CBCT imaging of acute brain injury. Methods: The correction involves MC scatter estimation executed on an NVIDIA GTX 780 GPU (MC-GPU), with baseline simulation speed of ~1e7 photons/sec. MC-GPU is accelerated by a novel, GPU-optimized implementation of variance reduction (VR) techniques (forced detection and photon splitting). The number of simulated tracks and projections is reduced for additional speed-up. Residual noise is removed and the missing scatter projections are estimated via kernel smoothing (KS) in projection plane and across gantry angles. The method is assessed using CBCT images of a head phantom presenting a realistic simulation of fresh intracranial hemorrhage (100 kVp, 180 mAs, 720 projections, source-detector distance 700 mm, source-axis distance 480 mm). Results: For a fixed run-time of ~1 sec/projection, GPU-optimized VR reduces the noise in MC-GPU scatter estimates by a factor of 4. For scatter correction, MC-GPU with VR is executed with 4-fold angular downsampling and 1e5 photons/projection, yielding 3.5 minute run-time per scan, and de-noised with optimized KS. Corrected CBCT images demonstrate uniformity improvement of 18 HU and contrast improvement of 26 HU compared to no correction, and a 52% increase in contrast-tonoise ratio in simulated hemorrhage compared to “oracle” constant fraction correction. Conclusion: Acceleration of MC-GPU achieved through GPU-optimized variance reduction and kernel smoothing yields an efficient (<5 min/scan) and accurate scatter correction that does not rely on additional hardware or simplifying assumptions about the scatter distribution. The method is undergoing implementation in a novel CBCT dedicated to brain

  5. Efficiency calculations for the direct energy conversion system of the Cadarache neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    A prototype energy conversion system is presently in operation at Cadarache, France. Such a device is planned for installation on each six neutral beam injectors for use in the Tore Supra experiment in 1989. We present calculations of beam performance that may influence design considerations. The calculations are performed with the DART charged particle beam code. We investigate the effects of cold plasma, direct energy conversion and neutral beam production. 4 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  6. Selected topics on surface effects in fusion devices: neutral-beam injectors and beam-direct converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminsky, M.

    1978-01-01

    Neutral-beam injectors are being used for the heating and fueling of plasmas in existing devices such as PLT (Princeton), ISX (Oak Ridge) and 2XIIB (Lawrence Livermore Laboratory) and will be used in devices such as TFTR (Princeton), MX (Livermore) and Doublet III (Gulf Atomic). For example, TFTR has been designed to receive a total of 20 MW of 120-keV deuterium atoms in pulses of 0.5-sec duration from 12 neutral beam injectors; for the MX experiment it is planned to inject a total of 750A (equivalent) of deuterium atoms with a mean energy of 56 keV in 0.5-sec pulses. The interaction of energetic deuterium atoms with exposed surfaces of device components such as beam dumps, beam-direct-convertors collectors, beam calorimeters, and armor plates, cause a variety of surface effects which affect deleteriously the operation of such devices. Some of the major effects will be discussed

  7. Acoustic beam splitting in a sonic crystal around a directional band gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicek Ahmet; Kaya Olgun Adem; Ulug Bulent

    2013-01-01

    Beam splitting upon refraction in a triangular sonic crystal composed of aluminum cylinders in air is experimentally and numerically demonstrated to occur due to finite source size, which facilitates circumvention of a directional band gap. Experiments reveal that two distinct beams emerge at crystal output, in agreement with the numerical results obtained through the finite-element method. Beam splitting occurs at sufficiently-small source sizes comparable to lattice periodicity determined by the spatial gap width in reciprocal space. Split beams propagate in equal amplitude, whereas beam splitting is destructed for oblique incidence above a critical incidence angle

  8. Vortex Airy beams directly generated via liquid crystal q-Airy-plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bing-Yan; Liu, Sheng; Chen, Peng; Qi, Shu-Xia; Zhang, Yi; Hu, Wei; Lu, Yan-Qing; Zhao, Jian-Lin

    2018-03-01

    Liquid crystal q-Airy-plates with director distributions integrated by q-plates and polarization Airy masks are proposed and demonstrated via the photoalignment technique. Single/dual vortex Airy beams of opposite topological charges and orthogonal circular polarizations are directly generated with polarization-controllable characteristic. The singular phase of the vortex part is verified by both astigmatic transformation and digital holography. The trajectory of vortex Airy beams is investigated, manifesting separate propagation dynamics of optical vortices and Airy beams. Meanwhile, Airy beams still keep their intrinsic transverse acceleration, self-healing, and nondiffraction features. This work provides a versatile candidate for generating high-quality vortex Airy beams.

  9. Ultrafast molecular dynamics illuminated with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozek, John D.; Miron, Catalin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ultrafast molecular dynamics probed with synchrotron radiation. • Core-excitation as probe of ultrafast dynamics through core-hole lifetime. • Review of experimental and theoretical methods in ultrafast dynamics using core-level excitation. - Abstract: Synchrotron radiation is a powerful tool for studying molecular dynamics in small molecules in spite of the absence of natural matching between the X-ray pulse duration and the time scale of nuclear motion. Promoting core level electrons to unoccupied molecular orbitals simultaneously initiates two ultrafast processes, nuclear dynamics on the potential energy surfaces of the highly excited neutral intermediate state of the molecule on the one hand and an ultrafast electronic decay of the intermediate excited state to a cationic final state, characterized by a core hole lifetime. The similar time scales of these processes enable core excited pump-probe-type experiments to be performed with long duration X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source. Recent results obtained at the PLIEADES beamline concerning ultrafast dissociation of core excited states and molecular potential energy curve mapping facilitated by changes in the geometry of the short-lived intermediate core excited state are reviewed. High brightness X-ray beams combined with state-of-the art electron and ion-electron coincidence spectrometers and highly sophisticated theoretical methods are required to conduct these experiments and to achieve a full understanding of the experimental results.

  10. Intra-cavity decomposition of a dual-directional laser beam

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, Darryl

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A method of decomposing a dual-directional laser beam into a forward propagating field and a backward propagating field for an apertured plano-concave cavity is presented. An intra-cavity aperture is a simple method of laser beam shaping as higher...

  11. Direct Measurement of Neutral/Ion Beam Power using Thermocouple Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, I.; Gee, S.

    2006-01-01

    Modern Neutral Beam Injection systems such as those used on JET and MAST routinely use thermocouples embedded close to the surface of beam stopping elements, such as calorimeters and ion dumps, coupled to high speed data acquisition systems to determine beam profile and position from temperature rise data. With the availability of low cost data acquisition and storage systems it is now possible to record data from all thermocouples in a fully instrumented calorimeter or ion dump on 20 ms timescales or better. This sample rate is sufficiently fast to enable the thermocouple data to be used to calculate the incident power density from 1d heat transfer theory. This power density data coupled with appropriate Gaussian fits enables the determination of the 2d beam profile and thus allows an instantaneous and direct measurement of beam power. The theory and methodology required to analyse the fast thermocouple data from the MAST calorimeter and residual ion dump thermocouples is presented and direct measurements of beam power density are demonstrated. The power of desktop computers allows such analysis to be carried out virtually instantaneously. The methods used to automate this analysis are discussed in detail. A code, utilising the theory and methodology, has been developed to allow immediate measurements of beam power on a pulse by pulse basis. The uncertainty in determining the beam power density is shown to be less than 10 %. This power density data is then fitted to a 2d Gaussian beam profile and integrated to establish the total beam power. Results of this automated analysis for the neutral beam and residual ion power of the MAST duopigatron and PINI NBI systems are presented. This technology could be applied to a beam power safety interlock system. The application to a beam shine through protection system for the inner wall of the JET Tokamak is discussed as an example. (author)

  12. Ultrafast pulse lasers jump to macro applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebel, Martin; Lutze, Walter; Scheller, Torsten

    2016-03-01

    Ultrafast Lasers have been proven for several micro applications, e.g. stent cutting, for many years. Within its development of applications Jenoptik has started to use ultrafast lasers in macro applications in the automotive industry. The JenLas D2.fs-lasers with power output control via AOM is an ideal tool for closed loop controlled material processing. Jenoptik enhanced his well established sensor controlled laser weakening process for airbag covers to a new level. The patented process enables new materials using this kind of technology. One of the most sensitive cover materials is genuine leather. As a natural product it is extremely inhomogeneous and sensitive for any type of thermal load. The combination of femtosecond pulse ablation and closed loop control by multiple sensor array opens the door to a new quality level of defined weakening. Due to the fact, that the beam is directed by scanning equipment the process can be split in multiple cycles additionally reducing the local energy input. The development used the 5W model as well as the latest 10W release of JenLas D2.fs and achieved amazing processing speeds which directly fulfilled the requirements of the automotive industry. Having in mind that the average cycle time of automotive processes is about 60s, trials had been done of processing weakening lines in genuine leather of 1.2mm thickness. Parameters had been about 15 cycles with 300mm/s respectively resulting in an average speed of 20mm/s and a cycle time even below 60s. First samples had already given into functional and aging tests and passed successfully.

  13. Directional sound beam emission from a configurable compact multi-source system

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Jiajun; Jadhali, Rasha Al; Zhang, Likun; Wu, Ying

    2018-01-01

    We propose to achieve efficient emission of highly directional sound beams from multiple monopole sources embedded in a subwavelength enclosure. Without the enclosure, the emitted sound fields have an indistinguishable or omnidirectional radiation

  14. Decomposition and decoloration of a direct dye by electron beam radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahdat, Ali; Bahrami, S.H.; Arami, M.; Motahari, A.

    2010-01-01

    The wastewaters released by textile industries to the environment contain hazardous compounds like toxic refractory dye stuff at high concentration. In this study, electron beam irradiation-induced decoloration and decomposition of C.I. Direct Black 22 aqueous solutions were investigated. The influences of absorbed doses and initial dye concentration on the percent of decoloration, COD and pH of the solutions are described. The results show that the direct dye solutions can be effectively degraded by electron beam irradiation.

  15. E-beam direct write versus reticle/stepper technology for ASICS in small volume production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    The pros and cons of using e-beam direct writing or reticles plus optical/UV steppers in fast prototyping and the small volume production of ASICs are discussed. The main conclusion is that fast prototyping is best achieved by e-beam direct write whereas small volume production of ASICs is best done via reticles and optical/UV stepping provided that the reticles are made in-house rather than by commercial maskhouses

  16. Coulomb-Driven Relativistic Electron Beam Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Lingrong; Zhu, Pengfei; Xiang, Dao; Zhang, Jie

    2018-01-01

    Coulomb interaction between charged particles is a well-known phenomenon in many areas of research. In general, the Coulomb repulsion force broadens the pulse width of an electron bunch and limits the temporal resolution of many scientific facilities such as ultrafast electron diffraction and x-ray free-electron lasers. Here we demonstrate a scheme that actually makes use of the Coulomb force to compress a relativistic electron beam. Furthermore, we show that the Coulomb-driven bunch compression process does not introduce additional timing jitter, which is in sharp contrast to the conventional radio-frequency buncher technique. Our work not only leads to enhanced temporal resolution in electron-beam-based ultrafast instruments that may provide new opportunities in probing material systems far from equilibrium, but also opens a promising direction for advanced beam manipulation through self-field interactions.

  17. Coulomb-Driven Relativistic Electron Beam Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Lingrong; Zhu, Pengfei; Xiang, Dao; Zhang, Jie

    2018-01-26

    Coulomb interaction between charged particles is a well-known phenomenon in many areas of research. In general, the Coulomb repulsion force broadens the pulse width of an electron bunch and limits the temporal resolution of many scientific facilities such as ultrafast electron diffraction and x-ray free-electron lasers. Here we demonstrate a scheme that actually makes use of the Coulomb force to compress a relativistic electron beam. Furthermore, we show that the Coulomb-driven bunch compression process does not introduce additional timing jitter, which is in sharp contrast to the conventional radio-frequency buncher technique. Our work not only leads to enhanced temporal resolution in electron-beam-based ultrafast instruments that may provide new opportunities in probing material systems far from equilibrium, but also opens a promising direction for advanced beam manipulation through self-field interactions.

  18. Symmetry issues in a class of ion beam targets using short direct drive pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, J.W.K.; Lindl, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    We address a class of modified ion beam targets where the symmetry issues are ameliorated in the regime of short bursts of direct drive pulses. Short pulses are here defined so that the fractional change in target radii of peak beam energy deposition are assumed to be small (during each such direct drive burst with a fixed beam focal radius). This requirement is actually not stringent on the temporal pulse-length. In fact we show an explicit example where this can be satisfied by a ≥ 60 ns direct drive pulse-train. A new beam placement scheme is used which systematically eliminated low order spherical harmonic asymmetries. The residual asymmetries of such pulses are studied with both simple model and numerical simulations

  19. Directional sound beam emission from a configurable compact multi-source system

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Jiajun

    2018-01-12

    We propose to achieve efficient emission of highly directional sound beams from multiple monopole sources embedded in a subwavelength enclosure. Without the enclosure, the emitted sound fields have an indistinguishable or omnidirectional radiation directivity in far fields. The strong directivity formed in the presence of the enclosure is attributed to interference of sources under degenerate Mie resonances in the enclosure of anisotropic property. Our numerical simulations of sound emission from the sources demonstrate the radiation of a highly directed sound beam of unidirectional or bidirectional patterns, depending on how the sources are configured inside the enclosure. Our scheme, if achieved, can solve the challenging problem of poor directivity of a subwavelength sound system, and can guide beam forming and collimation by miniaturized devices.

  20. Impact system for ultrafast synchrotron experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, B. J.; Owens, C. T.; Ramos, K. J.; Yeager, J. D.; Saavedra, R. A.; Luo, S. N.; Hooks, D. E.; Iverson, A. J.; Fezzaa, K.

    2013-01-01

    The impact system for ultrafast synchrotron experiments, or IMPULSE, is a 12.6-mm bore light-gas gun (<1 km/s projectile velocity) designed specifically for performing dynamic compression experiments using the advanced imaging and X-ray diffraction methods available at synchrotron sources. The gun system, capable of reaching projectile velocities up to 1 km/s, was designed to be portable for quick insertion/removal in the experimental hutch at Sector 32 ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne, IL) while allowing the target chamber to rotate for sample alignment with the beam. A key challenge in using the gun system to acquire dynamic data on the nanosecond time scale was synchronization (or bracketing) of the impact event with the incident X-ray pulses (80 ps width). A description of the basic gun system used in previous work is provided along with details of an improved launch initiation system designed to significantly reduce the total system time from launch initiation to impact. Experiments were performed to directly measure the gun system time and to determine the gun performance curve for projectile velocities ranging from 0.3 to 0.9 km/s. All results show an average system time of 21.6 ± 4.5 ms, making it possible to better synchronize the gun system and detectors to the X-ray beam.

  1. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF DEEP BEAM UNDER DIRECT AND INDIRECT LOAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haleem K. Hussain

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This research study the effect of exist of opening in web of deep beam loaded directly and indirectly and the behavior of reinforced concrete deep beams without with and without web reinforcement, the opening size and shear span ratio (a/d was constant. Nonlinear analysis using the finite element method with ANSYS software release 12.0 program was used to predict the ultimate load capacity and crack propagation for reinforced concrete deep beams with openings. The adopted beam models depend on experimental test program of reinforced concrete deep beam with and without openings and the finite element analysis result showed a good agreement with small amount of deference in ultimate beam capacity with (ANSYS analysis and it was completely efficient to simulate the behavior of reinforced concrete deep beams. The mid-span deflection at ultimate applied load and inclined cracked were highly compatible with experimental results. The model with opening in the shear span shows a reduction in the load-carrying capacity of beam and adding the vertical stirrup has improve the capacity of ultimate beam load.

  2. Direct-current proton-beam measurements at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, J.; Stevens, R.R.; Schneider, J.D.; Zaugg, T.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, a CW proton accelerator complex was moved from Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) to Los Alamos National Laboratory. This includes a 50-keV dc proton injector with a single-solenoid low-energy beam transport system (LEBT) and a CW 1.25-MeV, 267-MHz radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ). The move was completed after CRL had achieved 55-mA CW operation at 1.25 MeV using 250-kW klystrode tubes to power the RFQ. These accelerator components are prototypes for the front end of a CW linac required for an accelerator-driven transmutation linac, and they provide early confirmation of some CW accelerator components. The injector (ion source and LEBT) and emittance measuring unit are installed and operational at Los Alamos. The dc microwave ion source has been operated routinely at 50-keV, 75-mA hydrogen-ion current. This ion source has demonstrated very good discharge and H 2 gas efficiencies, and sufficient reliability to complete CW RFQ measurements at CRL. Proton fraction of 75% has been measured with 550-W discharge power. This high proton fraction removes the need for an analyzing magnet. Proton LEBT emittance measurements completed at Los Alamos suggest that improved transmission through the RFQ may be achieved by increasing the solenoid focusing current. Status of the final CW RFQ operation at CRL and the installation of the RFQ at Los Alamos is given

  3. The role of ultra-fast solvent evaporation on the directed self-assembly of block polymer thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapes, Chloe; Nelson, G.; Grant, M.; Wong, J.; Baruth, A.

    The directed self-assembly of nano-structures in block polymer thin films viasolvent vapor annealing is complicated by several factors, including evaporation rate. Solvent vapor annealing exposes a disordered film to solvent(s) in the vapor phase, increasing mobility and tuning surface energy, with the intention of producing an ordered structure. Recent theoretical predictions reveal the solvent evaporation affects the resultant nano-structuring. In a competition between phase separation and kinetic trapping during drying, faster solvent removal can enhance the propagation of a given morphology into the bulk of the thin film down to the substrate. Recent construction of a purpose-built, computer controlled solvent vapor annealing chamber provides control over forced solvent evaporation down to 15 ms. This is accomplished using pneumatically actuated nitrogen flow into and out of the chamber. Furthermore, in situ spectral reflectance, with 10 ms temporal resolution, monitors the swelling and evaporation. Presently, cylinder-forming polystyrene-block-polylactide thin films were swollen with 40% (by volume) tetrahydrofuran, followed by immediate evaporation under a variety of designed conditions. This includes various evaporation times, ranging from 15 ms to several seconds, and four unique rate trajectories, including linear, exponential, and combinations. Atomic force microscopy reveals specific surface, free and substrate, morphologies of the resultant films, dependent on specific evaporation conditions. Funded by the Clare Boothe Luce Foundation and Nebraska EPSCoR.

  4. Reduction of deposition asymmetries in directly driven ion-beam and laser targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have developed a procedure for reducing energy-dependent asymmetry in spherical targets driven directly by ion or laser beams. This work is part of a strategy for achieving illumination symmetry in such targets, which they propose as an alternative to those in the literature. This strategy allows an axially symmetric placement of beamlets, which would be convenient for some driver or reactor scenarios. It also allows the use of beam currents or energy fluxes to help reduce deposition asymmetry

  5. A Waveguide Antenna with an Extended Angular Range for Remote Steering of Wave-Beam Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, D. I.; Denisov, G. G.

    2018-03-01

    A new method for increasing the angular range of a waveguide antenna for remote steering of the wave-beam direction in thermonuclear-fusion experimental setups with plasma magnetic confinement is proposed. Characteristics for large beam inclination angles can be improved using the synthesized nonuniform waveguide profile. For small angles, the characteristics remain invariable, the waveguide profile differs only slightly from the regular shape, and can be fit to limited waveguide-channel sizes.

  6. Effect of an ultrafast laser induced plasma on a relativistic electron beam to determine temporal overlap in pump–probe experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scoby, Cheyne M., E-mail: scoby@physics.ucla.edu [UCLA Department of Physics, 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Li, R.K.; Musumeci, P. [UCLA Department of Physics, 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    In this paper we report on a simple and robust method to measure the absolute temporal overlap of the laser and the electron beam at the sample based on the effect of a laser induced plasma on the electron beam transverse distribution, successfully extending a similar method from keV to MeV electron beams. By pumping a standard copper TEM grid to form the plasma, we gain timing information independent of the sample under study. In experiments discussed here the optical delay to achieve temporal overlap between the pump electron beam and probe laser can be determined with ∼1ps precision.

  7. Effect of an ultrafast laser induced plasma on a relativistic electron beam to determine temporal overlap in pump–probe experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scoby, Cheyne M.; Li, R.K.; Musumeci, P.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we report on a simple and robust method to measure the absolute temporal overlap of the laser and the electron beam at the sample based on the effect of a laser induced plasma on the electron beam transverse distribution, successfully extending a similar method from keV to MeV electron beams. By pumping a standard copper TEM grid to form the plasma, we gain timing information independent of the sample under study. In experiments discussed here the optical delay to achieve temporal overlap between the pump electron beam and probe laser can be determined with ∼1ps precision

  8. Direct writing of microtunnels using proton beam micromachining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marot, Laurent; Munnik, Frans; Mikhailov, Serguei

    2006-01-01

    The production of high aspect ratio microstructures is a potential growth area. The combination of deep X-ray lithography with electroforming and micromolding (i.e. LIGA) is one of the main techniques used to produce 3D microstructures. The new technique of proton micromachining employs focused MeV protons in a direct write process which is complementary to LIGA. During ion exposure of positive photoresist like PMMA, scission of molecular chains occurs. These degraded polymer chains are removed by the developer. The aim of this paper is to investigate the capabilities of proton micromachining as a lithographic technique. We show the realization of sub-surface channels, or microtunnels, which have been fabricated in only one exposure and without cutting or resurfacing the material. Using our Van-de-Graaff accelerator, the resist (PMMA) has been exposed with high-energy protons (2.5 MeV). The range of charged particles in matter is well-defined and depends on the energy. Therefore, it is possible to obtain a dose which is sufficient to develop the bottom part of the ion paths but not the top part. Thus, by selecting the energy and the exposure time, a big variety of microtunnels can be realized

  9. Preparing patterned carbonaceous nanostructures directly by overexposure of PMMA using electron-beam lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan Huigao; Zhao Jianguo; Zhang Yongzhe; Xie Erqing [School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Han Li [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)], E-mail: duanhg@gmail.com, E-mail: xieeq@lzu.edu.cn

    2009-04-01

    The overexposure process of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was studied in detail using electron-beam lithography. It was found that PMMA films could be directly patterned without development due to the electron-beam-induced collapse of PMMA macromolecular chains. By analyzing the evolution of surface morphologies and compositions of the overexposed PMMA films, it was also found that the transformation of PMMA from positive to negative resist was a carbonization process, so patterned carbonaceous nanostructures could be prepared directly by overexposure of PMMA using electron-beam lithography. This simple one-step process for directly obtaining patterned carbonaceous nanostructures has promising potential application as a tool to make masks and templates, nanoelectrodes, and building blocks for MEMS and nanophotonic devices.

  10. Ultrafast Laser Fabrication of Bragg Waveguides in GLS Chalcogenide Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMillen Ben

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present work on the fabrication of Bragg waveguides in gallium-lanthanum-sulfide chalcogenide glass using an ultrafast laser. Waveguides were written with a single pass while modulating the writing beam. The spatial and temporal profile of the writing beam was ontrolled during waveguide fabrication in order to control the shape and size of the waveguide cross-section.

  11. Direct Optimization of Printed Reflectarrays for Contoured Beam Satellite Antenna Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Min; Sorensen, Stig B.; Kim, Oleksiy S.

    2013-01-01

    An accurate and efficient direct optimization technique for the design of contoured beam reflectarrays is presented. It is based on the spectral domain method of moments assuming local periodicity and minimax optimization. Contrary to the conventional phase-only optimization techniques, the geome......An accurate and efficient direct optimization technique for the design of contoured beam reflectarrays is presented. It is based on the spectral domain method of moments assuming local periodicity and minimax optimization. Contrary to the conventional phase-only optimization techniques......, the geometrical parameters of the array elements are directly optimized to fulfill the contoured beam requirements, thus maintaining a direct relation between optimization goals and optimization variables, and hence resulting in more optimal designs. Both co- and cross-polar radiation patterns of the reflectarray...... can be optimized for multiple frequencies, polarizations, and feed illuminations. Several contoured beam reflectarrays, that radiate a high-gain beam on a European coverage, have been designed and compared to similar designs obtained using the phase-only optimization technique. The comparisons show...

  12. Ultrafast electron diffraction with megahertz MeV electron pulses from a superconducting radio-frequency photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, L. W.; Lin, L.; Huang, S. L.; Quan, S. W.; Hao, J. K.; Zhu, F.; Wang, F.; Liu, K. X., E-mail: kxliu@pku.edu.cn [Institute of Heavy Ion Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Jiang, T.; Zhu, P. F.; Fu, F.; Wang, R.; Zhao, L.; Xiang, D., E-mail: dxiang@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-11-30

    We report ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction operating at the megahertz repetition rate where the electron beam is produced in a superconducting radio-frequency (rf) photoinjector. We show that the beam quality is sufficiently high to provide clear diffraction patterns from gold and aluminium samples. With the number of electrons, several orders of magnitude higher than that from a normal conducting photocathode rf gun, such high repetition rate ultrafast MeV electron diffraction may open up many new opportunities in ultrafast science.

  13. Ion-beam-directed self-organization of conducting nanowire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batzill, M.; Bardou, F.; Snowdon, K. J.

    2001-01-01

    Glancing-incidence ion-beam irradiation has been used both to ease kinetic constraints which otherwise restrict the establishment of long-range order and to impose external control on the orientation of nanowire arrays formed during stress-field-induced self-ordering of calcium atoms on a CaF 2 (111) surface. The arrays exhibit exceptional long-range order, with the long axis of the wires oriented along the azimuthal direction of ion-beam incidence. Transport measurements reveal a highly anisotropic electrical conductivity, whose maximum lies in the direction of the long axis of the 10.1-nm-period calcium wires

  14. Intensified CCD for ultrafast diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, J.; Tripp, G.; Coleman, L.

    1978-01-01

    Many of the present laser fusion diagnostics are recorded on either ultrafast streak cameras or on oscilloscopes. For those experiments in which a large volume of data is accumulated, direct computer processing of the information becomes important. We describe an approach which uses a RCA 52501 back-thinned CCD sensor to obtain direct electron readouts for both the streak camera and the CRT. Performance of the 100 GHz streak camera and the 4 GHz CRT are presented. Design parameters and computer interfacing for both systems are described in detail

  15. The noise power spectrum in CT with direct fan beam reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Jongduk; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2010-01-01

    The noise power spectrum (NPS) is a useful metric for understanding the noise content in images. To examine some unique properties of the NPS of fan beam CT, the authors derived an analytical expression for the NPS of fan beam CT and validated it with computer simulations. The nonstationary noise behavior of fan beam CT was examined by analyzing local regions and the entire field-of-view (FOV). This was performed for cases with uniform as well as nonuniform noise across the detector cells and across views. The simulated NPS from the entire FOV and local regions showed good agreement with the analytically derived NPS. The analysis shows that whereas the NPS of a large FOV in parallel beam CT (using a ramp filter) is proportional to frequency, the NPS with direct fan beam FBP reconstruction shows a high frequency roll off. Even in small regions, the fan beam NPS can show a sharp transition (discontinuity) at high frequencies. These effects are due to the variable magnification and therefore are more pronounced as the fan angle increases. For cases with nonuniform noise, the NPS can show the directional dependence and additional effects.

  16. Direct diode lasers with comparable beam quality to fiber, CO2, and solid state lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Robin K.; Chann, Bien; Burgess, James; Kaiman, Michael; Overman, Robert; Glenn, John D.; Tayebati, Parviz

    2012-03-01

    TeraDiode has produced kW-class ultra-high brightness fiber-coupled direct diode lasers. A fiber-coupled direct diode laser with a power level of 2,040 W from a 50 μm core diameter, 0.15 numerical aperture (NA) output fiber at a single center wavelength was demonstrated. This was achieved with a novel beam combining and shaping technique using COTS diode lasers. The fiber-coupled output corresponds to a Beam Parameter Product (BPP) of 3.75 mm-mrad and is the lowest BPP kW-class direct diode laser yet reported. This laser is suitable for industrial materials processing applications, including sheet metal cutting and welding. This 2-kW fiber-coupled direct diode laser has comparable brightness to that of industrial fiber lasers and CO2 lasers, and is over 10x brighter than state-of-the-art direct diode lasers.

  17. High-speed fan-beam reconstruction using direct two-dimensional Fourier transform method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niki, Noboru; Mizutani, Toshio; Takahashi, Yoshizo; Inouye, Tamon.

    1984-01-01

    Since the first development of X-ray computer tomography (CT), various efforts have been made to obtain high quality of high-speed image. However, the development of high resolution CT and the ultra-high speed CT to be applied to hearts is still desired. The X-ray beam scanning method was already changed from the parallel beam system to the fan-beam system in order to greatly shorten the scanning time. Also, the filtered back projection (DFBP) method has been employed to directly processing fan-beam projection data as reconstruction method. Although the two-dimensional Fourier transform (TFT) method significantly faster than FBP method was proposed, it has not been sufficiently examined for fan-beam projection data. Thus, the ITFT method was investigated, which first executes rebinning algorithm to convert the fan-beam projection data to the parallel beam projection data, thereafter, uses two-dimensional Fourier transform. By this method, although high speed is expected, the reconstructed images might be degraded due to the adoption of rebinning algorithm. Therefore, the effect of the interpolation error of rebinning algorithm on the reconstructed images has been analyzed theoretically, and finally, the result of the employment of spline interpolation which allows the acquisition of high quality images with less errors has been shown by the numerical and visual evaluation based on simulation and actual data. Computation time was reduced to 1/15 for the image matrix of 512 and to 1/30 for doubled matrix. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  18. Direct measurement of electron beam quality conversion factors using water calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renaud, James, E-mail: james.renaud@mail.mcgill.ca; Seuntjens, Jan [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montréal, Québec H3G 1A4 (Canada); Sarfehnia, Arman [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montréal, Québec H3G 1A4, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2 (Canada); Marchant, Kristin [Allan Blair Cancer Centre, Saskatchewan Cancer Agency, Regina, Saskatchewan S4T 7T1, Canada and Department of Oncology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5A1 (Canada); McEwen, Malcolm; Ross, Carl [Ionizing Radiation Standards, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors describe an electron sealed water calorimeter (ESWcal) designed to directly measure absorbed dose to water in clinical electron beams and its use to derive electron beam quality conversion factors for two ionization chamber types. Methods: A functioning calorimeter prototype was constructed in-house and used to obtain reproducible measurements in clinical accelerator-based 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV electron beams. Corrections for the radiation field perturbation due to the presence of the glass calorimeter vessel were calculated using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The conductive heat transfer due to dose gradients and nonwater materials was also accounted for using a commercial finite element method software package. Results: The relative combined standard uncertainty on the ESWcal dose was estimated to be 0.50% for the 9–20 MeV beams and 1.00% for the 6 MeV beam, demonstrating that the development of a water calorimeter-based standard for electron beams over such a wide range of clinically relevant energies is feasible. The largest contributor to the uncertainty was the positioning (Type A, 0.10%–0.40%) and its influence on the perturbation correction (Type B, 0.10%–0.60%). As a preliminary validation, measurements performed with the ESWcal in a 6 MV photon beam were directly compared to results derived from the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) photon beam standard water calorimeter. These two independent devices were shown to agree well within the 0.43% combined relative uncertainty of the ESWcal for this beam type and quality. Absorbed dose electron beam quality conversion factors were measured using the ESWcal for the Exradin A12 and PTW Roos ionization chambers. The photon-electron conversion factor, k{sub ecal}, for the A12 was also experimentally determined. Nonstatistically significant differences of up to 0.7% were found when compared to the calculation-based factors listed in the AAPM’s TG-51 protocol

  19. Direct measurement of electron beam quality conversion factors using water calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, James; Sarfehnia, Arman; Marchant, Kristin; McEwen, Malcolm; Ross, Carl; Seuntjens, Jan

    2015-11-01

    In this work, the authors describe an electron sealed water calorimeter (ESWcal) designed to directly measure absorbed dose to water in clinical electron beams and its use to derive electron beam quality conversion factors for two ionization chamber types. A functioning calorimeter prototype was constructed in-house and used to obtain reproducible measurements in clinical accelerator-based 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV electron beams. Corrections for the radiation field perturbation due to the presence of the glass calorimeter vessel were calculated using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The conductive heat transfer due to dose gradients and nonwater materials was also accounted for using a commercial finite element method software package. The relative combined standard uncertainty on the ESWcal dose was estimated to be 0.50% for the 9-20 MeV beams and 1.00% for the 6 MeV beam, demonstrating that the development of a water calorimeter-based standard for electron beams over such a wide range of clinically relevant energies is feasible. The largest contributor to the uncertainty was the positioning (Type A, 0.10%-0.40%) and its influence on the perturbation correction (Type B, 0.10%-0.60%). As a preliminary validation, measurements performed with the ESWcal in a 6 MV photon beam were directly compared to results derived from the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) photon beam standard water calorimeter. These two independent devices were shown to agree well within the 0.43% combined relative uncertainty of the ESWcal for this beam type and quality. Absorbed dose electron beam quality conversion factors were measured using the ESWcal for the Exradin A12 and PTW Roos ionization chambers. The photon-electron conversion factor, kecal, for the A12 was also experimentally determined. Nonstatistically significant differences of up to 0.7% were found when compared to the calculation-based factors listed in the AAPM's TG-51 protocol. General agreement between the relative

  20. Effect of an ultrafast laser induced plasma on a relativistic electron beam to determine temporal overlap in pump-probe experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoby, Cheyne M; Li, R K; Musumeci, P

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we report on a simple and robust method to measure the absolute temporal overlap of the laser and the electron beam at the sample based on the effect of a laser induced plasma on the electron beam transverse distribution, successfully extending a similar method from keV to MeV electron beams. By pumping a standard copper TEM grid to form the plasma, we gain timing information independent of the sample under study. In experiments discussed here the optical delay to achieve temporal overlap between the pump electron beam and probe laser can be determined with ~1 ps precision. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Echolocating bats emit a highly directional sonar sound beam in the field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Surlykke, Annemarie; Boel Pedersen, Simon; Jakobsen, Lasse

    2009-01-01

    Bats use echolocation or biosonar to navigate and find prey at night. They emit short ultrasonic calls and listen for reflected echoes. The beam width of the calls is central to the function of the sonar, but directionality of echolocation calls has never been measured from bats flying in the wild....... We used a microphone array to record sounds and determine horizontal directionality for echolocation calls of the trawling Daubenton's bat, Myotis daubentonii, flying over a pond in its natural habitat. Myotis daubentonii emitted highly directional calls in the field. Directionality increased...... and directionality can be explained by the simple piston model. The model also suggests that the increase in the emitted intensity in the field is caused by the increased directionality, focusing sound energy in the forward direction. The bat may increase directionality by opening the mouth wider to emit a louder...

  2. Direct energy conversion and neutral beam injection for catalyzed D and D-3He tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, A.S.; Moir, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    The calculated performance of single stage and Venetian blind direct energy converters for Catalyzed D and D- 3 He Tokamak reactors are discussed. Preliminary results on He pumping are outlined. The efficiency of D and T neutral beam injection is reviewed

  3. Simulation and Modeling of a New Medium Access Control Scheme for Multi-Beam Directional Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-03

    Multi-beam directional systems are a novel approach to networking which leverage recent advances in physical layer technology, allowing formation of...for a programmatic method for setting up emulation experiments. Rather than hard code all of the underlying pieces for EMANE (such as the over-the-air

  4. Direct measurement of refracted trajectory of transmitting electron cyclotron beam through plasma on the Large Helical Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The electron-cyclotron (EC -beam refraction due to the presence of plasma was investigated in the Large Helical Device. The transmitted-EC-beam measurement system was constructed and the beam pattern on the opposite side of the irradiated surface was measured using an IR camera. Clear dependence of the EC-beam refraction on the electron density was observed and the beam shift in the toroidal direction showed good agreement with the ray-trace calculation of TRAVIS. The influence of the peripheral density profile and the thermal effect on the beam refraction were discussed.

  5. Ultra-Fast Hadronic Calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisov, Dmitri [Fermilab; Lukić, Strahinja [VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade; Mokhov, Nikolai [Fermilab; Striganov, Sergei [Fermilab; Ujić, Predrag [VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade

    2017-12-18

    Calorimeters for particle physics experiments with integration time of a few ns will substantially improve the capability of the experiment to resolve event pileup and to reject backgrounds. In this paper time development of hadronic showers induced by 30 and 60 GeV positive pions and 120 GeV protons is studied using Monte Carlo simulation and beam tests with a prototype of a sampling steel-scintillator hadronic calorimeter. In the beam tests, scintillator signals induced by hadronic showers in steel are sampled with a period of 0.2 ns and precisely time-aligned in order to study the average signal waveform at various locations w.r.t. the beam particle impact. Simulations of the same setup are performed using the MARS15 code. Both simulation and test beam results suggest that energy deposition in steel calorimeters develop over a time shorter than 3 ns providing opportunity for ultra-fast calorimetry. Simulation results for an "ideal" calorimeter consisting exclusively of bulk tungsten or copper are presented to establish the lower limit of the signal integration window.

  6. Design of titania nanotube structures by focused laser beam direct writing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enachi, Mihai; Stevens-Kalceff, Marion A.; Sarua, Andrei; Ursaki, Veaceslav; Tiginyanu, Ion

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we report on electrochemical fabrication of titania films consisting of nanotubes (NTs) and their treatment by focused laser beam. The results of sample characterization by optical and scanning electron microscopy, cathodoluminescence imaging, and Raman scattering scanning spectroscopy are compared to those inherent to specimens subjected to thermal treatment in a furnace. The obtained data demonstrate possibilities for controlling crystallographic structure of TiO 2 NTs by focused laser beam direct writing. These findings open new prospects for the design and fabrication of spatial architectures based on titania nanotubes

  7. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, Abigail T.; James, Sara St.; Rengan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT), through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning

  8. Direct acceleration of ions to low and medium energies by a crossed-laser-beam configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef I. Salamin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Calculations show that 10 keV helium and carbon ions, injected midway between two identical 1 TW-power crossed laser beams of radial polarization, can be accelerated in vacuum to energies of utility in ion lithography. As examples, identical laser beams, crossed at 10° and focused to waist radii of 7.42  μm, accelerate He^{2+} and C^{6+} ions to average kinetic energies near 75 and 165 keV over distances averaging less than 7 and 6 mm, respectively. The spread in kinetic energy in both cases is less than 1% and the particle average angular deflection is less than 7 mrad. More energy-demanding industrial applications require higher-power laser beams for their direct ion laser acceleration.

  9. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail T. Berman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT, through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning.

  10. 120-keV beam direct conversion system for TFTR injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, G.W.

    1976-01-01

    Several practical motivations exist for the development of beam direct conversion systems that are compatible with the injection systems of large experiments such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). We present a preliminary design in which we analyze the most acute problems involved in scaling up existing designs and apparatus to fulfill TFTR requirements. Some of the questions addressed are the requirements for electron suppression, gas pumping, compactness, and power densities. A new idea is presented that allows for the handling of higher beam power. The gross savings in the capital cost of injector power supplies for the TFTR will be about $7.2 million, but the net savings will be somewhat less than this. This preliminary design has not yet revealed fundamental limitations with respect to the development of beam energy-recovery systems operating at high levels of current, voltage, and power densities

  11. 2000W high beam quality diode laser for direct materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wen-bin; Liu, You-qiang; Cao, Yin-hua; Gao, Jing; Pan, Fei; Wang, Zhi-yong

    2011-11-01

    This article describes high beam quality and kilowatt-class diode laser system for direct materials processing, using optical design software ZEMAX® to simulate the diode laser optical path, including the beam shaping, collimation, coupling, focus, etc.. In the experiment, the diode laser stack of 808nm and the diode laser stack of 915nm were used for the wavelength coupling, which were built vertical stacks up to 16 bars. The threshold current of the stack is 6.4A, the operating current is 85A and the output power is 1280W. Through experiments, after collimating the diode laser beam with micro-lenses, the fast axis BPP of the stack is less than 60mm.mrad, and the slow-axis BPP of the stack is less than 75mm.mrad. After shaping the laser beam and improving the beam quality, the fast axis BPP of the stack is still 60mm.mrad, and the slow-axis BPP of the stack is less than 19mm.mrad. After wavelength coupling and focusing, ultimately the power of 2150W was obtained, focal spot size of 1.5mm * 1.2mm with focal length 300mm. The laser power density is 1.2×105W/cm2, and that can be used for metal remelting, alloying, cladding and welding. The total optical coupling conversion efficiency is 84%, and the total electrical - optical conversion efficiency is 50%.

  12. Direct-aperture optimization applied to selection of beam orientations in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedford, J L; Webb, S

    2007-01-01

    Direct-aperture optimization (DAO) was applied to iterative beam-orientation selection in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), so as to ensure a realistic segmental treatment plan at each iteration. Nested optimization engines dealt separately with gantry angles, couch angles, collimator angles, segment shapes, segment weights and wedge angles. Each optimization engine performed a random search with successively narrowing step sizes. For optimization of segment shapes, the filtered backprojection (FBP) method was first used to determine desired fluence, the fluence map was segmented, and then constrained direct-aperture optimization was used thereafter. Segment shapes were fully optimized when a beam angle was perturbed, and minimally re-optimized otherwise. The algorithm was compared with a previously reported method using FBP alone at each orientation iteration. An example case consisting of a cylindrical phantom with a hemi-annular planning target volume (PTV) showed that for three-field plans, the method performed better than when using FBP alone, but for five or more fields, neither method provided much benefit over equally spaced beams. For a prostate case, improved bladder sparing was achieved through the use of the new algorithm. A plan for partial scalp treatment showed slightly improved PTV coverage and lower irradiated volume of brain with the new method compared to FBP alone. It is concluded that, although the method is computationally intensive and not suitable for searching large unconstrained regions of beam space, it can be used effectively in conjunction with prior class solutions to provide individually optimized IMRT treatment plans

  13. Direct nanopatterning of polymer/silver nanoblocks under low energy electron beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Stephant, Nicolas; Gautier, Romain

    2016-10-06

    In this communication, we report on the growth, direct writing and nanopatterning of polymer/silver nanoblocks under low energy electron beam irradiation using a scanning electron microscope. The nanoblocks are produced by placing a droplet of an ethylene glycol solution containing silver nitrate and polyvinylpyrrolidone diluted in ethanol directly on a hot substrate heated up to 150 °C. Upon complete evaporation of the droplet, nanospheres, nano- and micro-triangles and nanoblocks made of silver-containing polymers, form over the substrate surface. Considering the nanoblocks as a model system, we demonstrate that such nanostructures are extremely sensitive to the e-beam extracted from the source of a scanning electron microscope operating at low acceleration voltages (between 5 and 7 kV). This sensitivity allows us to efficiently create various nanopatterns (e.g. arrays of holes, oblique slits and nanotrenches) in the material under e-beam irradiation. In addition to the possibility of writing, the nanoblocks revealed a self-healing ability allowing them to recover a relatively smooth surface after etching. Thanks to these properties, such nanomaterials can be used as a support for data writing and erasing on the nanoscale under low energy electron beam irradiation.

  14. Implementation of a Direct Link between the LHC Beam Interlock System and the LHC Beam Dumping System Re-Triggering Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Gabourin, S; Denz, R; Magnin, N; Uythoven, J; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M; Vatansever, V; Bartholdt, M; Bertsche, B; Zeiler, P

    2014-01-01

    To avoid damage of accelerator equipment due to impacting beam, the controlled removal of the LHC beams from the collider rings towards the dump blocks must be guaranteed at all times. When a beam dump is demanded, the Beam Interlock System communicates this request to the Trigger Synchronisation and Distribution System of the LHC Beam Dumping System. Both systems were built according to high reliability standards. To further reduce the risk of incapability to dump the beams in case of correlated failures in the Trigger Synchronisation and Distribution System, a new direct link from the Beam Interlock System to the re-triggering lines of the LHC Beam Dumping System will be implemented for the start-up with beam in 2015. The link represents a diverse redundancy to the current implementation, which should neither significantly increase the risk for so-called asynchronous beam dumps nor compromise machine availability. This paper describes the implementation choices of this link. Furthermore the results of a rel...

  15. Attosecond electron pulse trains and quantum state reconstruction in ultrafast transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priebe, Katharina E.; Rathje, Christopher; Yalunin, Sergey V.; Hohage, Thorsten; Feist, Armin; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2017-12-01

    Ultrafast electron and X-ray imaging and spectroscopy are the basis for an ongoing revolution in the understanding of dynamical atomic-scale processes in matter. The underlying technology relies heavily on laser science for the generation and characterization of ever shorter pulses. Recent findings suggest that ultrafast electron microscopy with attosecond-structured wavefunctions may be feasible. However, such future technologies call for means to both prepare and fully analyse the corresponding free-electron quantum states. Here, we introduce a framework for the preparation, coherent manipulation and characterization of free-electron quantum states, experimentally demonstrating attosecond electron pulse trains. Phase-locked optical fields coherently control the electron wavefunction along the beam direction. We establish a new variant of quantum state tomography—`SQUIRRELS'—for free-electron ensembles. The ability to tailor and quantitatively map electron quantum states will promote the nanoscale study of electron-matter entanglement and new forms of ultrafast electron microscopy down to the attosecond regime.

  16. Polymeric flat focal field arrayed waveguide grating using electron-beam direct writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Si; Yan, Yingbai; Jin, Guofan; Wong, W. H.; Pun, E. Y. B.

    2004-06-01

    A four-channel 400-GHz spacing flat focal field arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) demultiplexer is designed based on polymeric optical waveguide. The waveguide core-layer material is a newly developed negative tone epoxy Novolak resin (ENR) polymer with ultravoilet (UV) cured resin Norland optical adhesive 61 (NOA61) as the cladding layer. The device is fabricated using electron-beam direct writing, which has less processing steps than the reported polymeric AWGs. The experimental result is presented.

  17. Uncoordinated MAC for Adaptive Multi-Beam Directional Networks: Analysis and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-10

    omni-directional and cannot support the desired data rates, number of nodes, or the necessary communications ranges to support emerging applications ...cations: IS-95 and third generation CDMA applications . Prentice Hall PTR, 1999. [3] V. Jain, A. Gupta, and D. P. Agrawal, “On-demand medium access in...of medium access control for wlans with multi-beam access point,” IEEE Trans. Wireless Commun., vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 556–565, 2007. [18] D. Lal, V

  18. Ultrafast nonlinear optics

    CERN Document Server

    Leburn, Christopher; Reid, Derryck

    2013-01-01

    The field of ultrafast nonlinear optics is broad and multidisciplinary, and encompasses areas concerned with both the generation and measurement of ultrashort pulses of light, as well as those concerned with the applications of such pulses. Ultrashort pulses are extreme events – both in terms of their durations, and also the high peak powers which their short durations can facilitate. These extreme properties make them powerful experiment tools. On one hand, their ultrashort durations facilitate the probing and manipulation of matter on incredibly short timescales. On the other, their ultrashort durations can facilitate high peak powers which can drive highly nonlinear light-matter interaction processes. Ultrafast Nonlinear Optics covers a complete range of topics, both applied and fundamental in nature, within the area of ultrafast nonlinear optics. Chapters 1 to 4 are concerned with the generation and measurement of ultrashort pulses. Chapters 5 to 7 are concerned with fundamental applications of ultrasho...

  19. Coherent combination of ultrafast fiber amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, Marc; Guichard, Florent; Druon, Frédéric; Georges, Patrick; Zaouter, Yoann; Papadopoulos, Dimitris N

    2016-01-01

    We review recent progress in coherent combining of femtosecond pulses amplified in optical fibers as a way to scale the peak and average power of ultrafast sources. Different methods of achieving coherent pulse addition in space (beam combining) and time (divided pulse amplification) domains are described. These architectures can be widely classified into active methods, where the relative phases between pulses are subject to a servomechanism, and passive methods, where phase matching is inherent to the geometry. Other experiments that combine pulses with different spectral contents, pulses that have been nonlinearly broadened or successive pulses from a mode-locked laser oscillator, are then presented. All these techniques allow access to unprecedented parameter range for fiber ultrafast sources. (topical review)

  20. Modelling multi-pulse population dynamics from ultrafast spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luuk J G W van Wilderen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Current advanced laser, optics and electronics technology allows sensitive recording of molecular dynamics, from single resonance to multi-colour and multi-pulse experiments. Extracting the occurring (bio- physical relevant pathways via global analysis of experimental data requires a systematic investigation of connectivity schemes. Here we present a Matlab-based toolbox for this purpose. The toolbox has a graphical user interface which facilitates the application of different reaction models to the data to generate the coupled differential equations. Any time-dependent dataset can be analysed to extract time-independent correlations of the observables by using gradient or direct search methods. Specific capabilities (i.e. chirp and instrument response function for the analysis of ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopic data are included. The inclusion of an extra pulse that interacts with a transient phase can help to disentangle complex interdependent pathways. The modelling of pathways is therefore extended by new theory (which is included in the toolbox that describes the finite bleach (orientation effect of single and multiple intense polarised femtosecond pulses on an ensemble of randomly oriented particles in the presence of population decay. For instance, the generally assumed flat-top multimode beam profile is adapted to a more realistic Gaussian shape, exposing the need for several corrections for accurate anisotropy measurements. In addition, the (selective excitation (photoselection and anisotropy of populations that interact with single or multiple intense polarised laser pulses is demonstrated as function of power density and beam profile. Using example values of real world experiments it is calculated to what extent this effectively orients the ensemble of particles. Finally, the implementation includes the interaction with multiple pulses in addition to depth averaging in optically dense samples. In summary, we show that mathematical

  1. Modelling multi-pulse population dynamics from ultrafast spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Lincoln, Craig N; van Thor, Jasper J

    2011-03-21

    Current advanced laser, optics and electronics technology allows sensitive recording of molecular dynamics, from single resonance to multi-colour and multi-pulse experiments. Extracting the occurring (bio-) physical relevant pathways via global analysis of experimental data requires a systematic investigation of connectivity schemes. Here we present a Matlab-based toolbox for this purpose. The toolbox has a graphical user interface which facilitates the application of different reaction models to the data to generate the coupled differential equations. Any time-dependent dataset can be analysed to extract time-independent correlations of the observables by using gradient or direct search methods. Specific capabilities (i.e. chirp and instrument response function) for the analysis of ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopic data are included. The inclusion of an extra pulse that interacts with a transient phase can help to disentangle complex interdependent pathways. The modelling of pathways is therefore extended by new theory (which is included in the toolbox) that describes the finite bleach (orientation) effect of single and multiple intense polarised femtosecond pulses on an ensemble of randomly oriented particles in the presence of population decay. For instance, the generally assumed flat-top multimode beam profile is adapted to a more realistic Gaussian shape, exposing the need for several corrections for accurate anisotropy measurements. In addition, the (selective) excitation (photoselection) and anisotropy of populations that interact with single or multiple intense polarised laser pulses is demonstrated as function of power density and beam profile. Using example values of real world experiments it is calculated to what extent this effectively orients the ensemble of particles. Finally, the implementation includes the interaction with multiple pulses in addition to depth averaging in optically dense samples. In summary, we show that mathematical modelling is

  2. Polarization leakage in epoch of reionization windows - II. Primary beam model and direction-dependent calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asad, K. M. B.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Jelić, V.; Ghosh, A.; Abdalla, F. B.; Brentjens, M. A.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Ciardi, B.; Gehlot, B. K.; Iliev, I. T.; Mevius, M.; Pandey, V. N.; Yatawatta, S.; Zaroubi, S.

    2016-11-01

    Leakage of diffuse polarized emission into Stokes I caused by the polarized primary beam of the instrument might mimic the spectral structure of the 21-cm signal coming from the epoch of reionization (EoR) making their separation difficult. Therefore, understanding polarimetric performance of the antenna is crucial for a successful detection of the EoR signal. Here, we have calculated the accuracy of the nominal model beam of Low Frequency ARray (LOFAR) in predicting the leakage from Stokes I to Q, U by comparing them with the corresponding leakage of compact sources actually observed in the 3C 295 field. We have found that the model beam has errors of ≤10 per cent on the predicted levels of leakage of ˜1 per cent within the field of view, I.e. if the leakage is taken out perfectly using this model the leakage will reduce to 10-3 of the Stokes I flux. If similar levels of accuracy can be obtained in removing leakage from Stokes Q, U to I, we can say, based on the results of our previous paper, that the removal of this leakage using this beam model would ensure that the leakage is well below the expected EoR signal in almost the whole instrumental k-space of the cylindrical power spectrum. We have also shown here that direction-dependent calibration can remove instrumentally polarized compact sources, given an unpolarized sky model, very close to the local noise level.

  3. Tissue strain rate estimator using ultrafast IQ complex data

    OpenAIRE

    TERNIFI , Redouane; Elkateb Hachemi , Melouka; Remenieras , Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Pulsatile motion of brain parenchyma results from cardiac and breathing cycles. In this study, transient motion of brain tissue was estimated using an Aixplorer® imaging system allowing an ultrafast 2D acquisition mode. The strain was computed directly from the ultrafast IQ complex data using the extended autocorrelation strain estimator (EASE), which provides great SNRs regardless of depth. The EASE first evaluates the autocorrelation function at each depth over a set...

  4. Neighbor Discovery Algorithm in Wireless Local Area Networks Using Multi-beam Directional Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Peng, Wei; Liu, Song

    2017-10-01

    Neighbor discovery is an important step for Wireless Local Area Networks (WLAN) and the use of multi-beam directional antennas can greatly improve the network performance. However, most neighbor discovery algorithms in WLAN, based on multi-beam directional antennas, can only work effectively in synchronous system but not in asynchro-nous system. And collisions at AP remain a bottleneck for neighbor discovery. In this paper, we propose two asynchrono-us neighbor discovery algorithms: asynchronous hierarchical scanning (AHS) and asynchronous directional scanning (ADS) algorithm. Both of them are based on three-way handshaking mechanism. AHS and ADS reduce collisions at AP to have a good performance in a hierarchical way and directional way respectively. In the end, the performance of the AHS and ADS are tested on OMNeT++. Moreover, it is analyzed that different application scenarios and the factors how to affect the performance of these algorithms. The simulation results show that AHS is suitable for the densely populated scenes around AP while ADS is suitable for that most of the neighborhood nodes are far from AP.

  5. Radiolytic preparation of thin Au film directly on resin substrate using high-energy electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohkubo, Yuji, E-mail: okubo@upst.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Seino, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Takashi; Kugai, Junichiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ueno, Koji [Japan Electron Beam Irradiation Service Ltd., 5-3 Ozushima, Izumiohtsu, Osaka 595-0074 (Japan); Yamamoto, Takao A. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2016-04-01

    A novel method for preparing thin Au films directly on resin substrates using an electron beam was developed. The thin Au films were prepared on a resin substrate by the reduction of Au ions in an aqueous solution via irradiation with a high-energy electron beam (4.8 MeV). This reduction method required 7 s of the irradiation time of the electron beam. Furthermore, no reductant or catalyst was needed. As the concentration of Au ions in the precursor solution was increased, the amount of Au deposited on the resin substrate increased, too, and the structure of the prepared Au film changed. As a result, the film color changed as well. Cross-sectional scanning electron microscope images of the thus-prepared Au film indicated that the Au films were consisted of two layers: a particle layer and a bottom bulk layer. There was strong adhesion between the Au films and the underlying resin substrates. This was confirmed by the tape-peeling test and through ultrasonic cleaning. After both processes, Au remained on the resin substrates, while most of the particle-like moieties were removed. This indicated that the thin Au films prepared via irradiation with a high-energy electron beam adhered strongly to the resin substrates. - Highlights: • A thin gold (Au) film was formed by EBIRM for the first time. • The irradiation time of the electron beam was less than 10 s. • Thin Au films were obtained without reductant or catalyst. • Au films were consisted of two layers: a particle layer and a bottom bulk layer. • There was strong adhesion between the bottom bulk layer and the underlying resin substrates.

  6. Tunable third-harmonic probe for non-degenerate ultrafast pump ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-12

    Feb 12, 2014 ... 413–417. Tunable third-harmonic probe for non-degenerate ultrafast ... A beam splitter was used to split the beam into two with the power ratio of ... Now polarization of the 800-nm beam is made to be parallel with the 400-nm.

  7. Ultrafast gas switching experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, C.A.; Martin, T.H.; Patterson, P.E.; Rinehart, L.F.; Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.; Aurand, J.F.; Buttram, M.T.

    1993-01-01

    We describe recent experiments which studied the physics of ultrafast gas breakdown under the extreme overvoltages which occur when a high pressure gas switch is pulse charged to hundreds of kV in 1 ns or less. The highly overvolted peaking gaps produce powerful electromagnetic pulses with risetimes Khz at > 100 kV/m E field

  8. Direct generation of abruptly focusing vortex beams using a 3/2 radial phase-only pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey A; Cottrell, Don M; Zinn, Jonathan M

    2013-03-20

    Abruptly focusing Airy beams have previously been generated using a radial cubic phase pattern that represents the Fourier transform of the Airy beam. The Fourier transform of this pattern is formed using a system length of 2f, where f is the focal length of the Fourier transform lens. In this work, we directly generate these abruptly focusing Airy beams using a 3/2 radial phase pattern encoded onto a liquid crystal display. The resulting optical system is much shorter. In addition, we can easily produce vortex patterns at the focal point of these beams. Experimental results match theoretical predictions.

  9. Image covariance and lesion detectability in direct fan-beam x-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Adam; Noo, Frédéric

    2008-05-21

    We consider noise in computed tomography images that are reconstructed using the classical direct fan-beam filtered backprojection algorithm, from both full- and short-scan data. A new, accurate method for computing image covariance is presented. The utility of the new covariance method is demonstrated by its application to the implementation of a channelized Hotelling observer for a lesion detection task. Results from the new covariance method and its application to the channelized Hotelling observer are compared with results from Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, the impact of a bowtie filter and x-ray tube current modulation on reconstruction noise and lesion detectability are explored for full-scan reconstruction.

  10. Direct UV-Written Integrated Optical Beam Combiner for Stellar Interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivero, Massimo; Svalgaard, Mikael; Jocou, L.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we report the fabrication of an optical-beam combiner for stellar interferometry by means of direct ultraviolet (UV) writing. The component is shown to have good performance (fringe contrast > 95%, total loss similar to 0.7, -40-dB crosstalk, broadband operation covering at least...... the range 1.49-1.65 mu m, and low differential chromatic dispersion). The overall performance exceeds that of similar components currently used for astronomical research. This result, combined with the fast-prototyping ability of UV writing, opens up new possibilities for the realization of highly optimized...

  11. Image covariance and lesion detectability in direct fan-beam x-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderlich, Adam; Noo, Frederic

    2008-01-01

    We consider noise in computed tomography images that are reconstructed using the classical direct fan-beam filtered backprojection algorithm, from both full- and short-scan data. A new, accurate method for computing image covariance is presented. The utility of the new covariance method is demonstrated by its application to the implementation of a channelized Hotelling observer for a lesion detection task. Results from the new covariance method and its application to the channelized Hotelling observer are compared with results from Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, the impact of a bowtie filter and x-ray tube current modulation on reconstruction noise and lesion detectability are explored for full-scan reconstruction

  12. Preparation of MgB2 superconducting microbridges by focused ion beam direct milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuena; Li, Yanli; Xu, Zhuang; Kong, Xiangdong; Han, Li

    2017-01-01

    MgB2 superconducting microbridges were prepared by focused ion beam (FIB) direct milling on MgB2 films. The surface topography of the microbridges were observed using SEM and AFM and the superconductivity was measured in this paper. Lots of cracks and holes were found near the milled area. And the superconducting transition temperature was decreased a lot and the bridges prepared were not superconducting due to ion damage after milled with large dose. Through these works, we explored the effect regular of FIB milling and experimental parameters on the performance of microbridges.

  13. Perspective: Ultrafast magnetism and THz spintronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walowski, Jakob; Münzenberg, Markus [Institut für Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2016-10-14

    This year the discovery of femtosecond demagnetization by laser pulses is 20 years old. For the first time, this milestone work by Bigot and coworkers gave insight directly into the time scales of microscopic interactions that connect the spin and electron system. While intense discussions in the field were fueled by the complexity of the processes in the past, it now became evident that it is a puzzle of many different parts. Rather than providing an overview that has been presented in previous reviews on ultrafast processes in ferromagnets, this perspective will show that with our current depth of knowledge the first applications are developed: THz spintronics and all-optical spin manipulation are becoming more and more feasible. The aim of this perspective is to point out where we can connect the different puzzle pieces of understanding gathered over 20 years to develop novel applications. Based on many observations in a large number of experiments. Differences in the theoretical models arise from the localized and delocalized nature of ferromagnetism. Transport effects are intrinsically non-local in spintronic devices and at interfaces. We review the need for multiscale modeling to address the processes starting from electronic excitation of the spin system on the picometer length scale and sub-femtosecond time scale, to spin wave generation, and towards the modeling of ultrafast phase transitions that altogether determine the response time of the ferromagnetic system. Today, our current understanding gives rise to the first usage of ultrafast spin physics for ultrafast magnetism control: THz spintronic devices. This makes the field of ultrafast spin-dynamics an emerging topic open for many researchers right now.

  14. Perspective: Ultrafast magnetism and THz spintronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walowski, Jakob; Münzenberg, Markus

    2016-01-01

    This year the discovery of femtosecond demagnetization by laser pulses is 20 years old. For the first time, this milestone work by Bigot and coworkers gave insight directly into the time scales of microscopic interactions that connect the spin and electron system. While intense discussions in the field were fueled by the complexity of the processes in the past, it now became evident that it is a puzzle of many different parts. Rather than providing an overview that has been presented in previous reviews on ultrafast processes in ferromagnets, this perspective will show that with our current depth of knowledge the first applications are developed: THz spintronics and all-optical spin manipulation are becoming more and more feasible. The aim of this perspective is to point out where we can connect the different puzzle pieces of understanding gathered over 20 years to develop novel applications. Based on many observations in a large number of experiments. Differences in the theoretical models arise from the localized and delocalized nature of ferromagnetism. Transport effects are intrinsically non-local in spintronic devices and at interfaces. We review the need for multiscale modeling to address the processes starting from electronic excitation of the spin system on the picometer length scale and sub-femtosecond time scale, to spin wave generation, and towards the modeling of ultrafast phase transitions that altogether determine the response time of the ferromagnetic system. Today, our current understanding gives rise to the first usage of ultrafast spin physics for ultrafast magnetism control: THz spintronic devices. This makes the field of ultrafast spin-dynamics an emerging topic open for many researchers right now.

  15. Direct observation of the Andreev reflection of a quasiparticle beam by quantum turbulence in superfluid 3He-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, D.I.; Fisher, S.N.; Guenault, A.M.; Lowe, M.R.; Pickett, G.R.; Rahm, A.

    2003-01-01

    A beam of quasiparticles from a black-body radiator is directed at a localized region of quantum turbulence generated by a vibrating wire resonator driven at super-critical velocity. We are able to measure directly the fraction of the incident quasiparticle beam which is retro-reflected from the turbulence by Andreev processes. Combining these measurements with previous measurements on the spatial extent of the turbulence may allow us to infer the vortex line density

  16. Ultrafast Photovoltaic Response in Ferroelectric Nanolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-19

    the free energy of the system [3,4,8]. Intensive research has been aimed at bypassing the intrinsic size limits imposed by the depolarization field...Page 1 of 21   Ultrafast photovoltaic response in ferroelectric nanolayers Dan Daranciang1,2, Matthew J. Highland3, Haidan Wen4, Steve M. Young5...ferroelectric PbTiO3 via direct coupling to its intrinsic photovoltaic response. Using time-resolved x-ray scattering to visualize atomic displacements on

  17. YBa2Cu3O7 nanobridges fabricated by direct-write electron beam lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendt, J.R.; Martens, J.S.; Ashby, C.I.H.; Plut, T.A.; Hietala, V.M.; Tigges, C.P.; Ginley, D.S.; Siegal, M.P.; Phillips, J.M.; Hohenwarter, G.K.G.

    1992-01-01

    A direct method for nondamaging, nanometer-scale patterning of high T c superconductor thin films is presented. We have fabricated superconducting nanobridges in high-quality, epitaxial thin-film YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 (YBCO) by combining direct-write electron beam lithography and an improved aqueous etchant. Weak links with both length and width dimensions less than 20 nm have exhibited critical currents at 77 K of 4--20 μA and I cRn products of 10--100 μV which compare favorably with results for other YBCO junction technologies. We have used this technique in the fabrication of a shock-wave pulse former as an initial demonstration of its applicability to monolithic superconductive electronics

  18. The Conductive Silver Nanowires Fabricated by Two-beam Laser Direct Writing on the Flexible Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Gui-Cang; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Dong, Xian-Zi; Jin, Feng; Liu, Jie; Duan, Xuan-Ming; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng

    2017-02-01

    Flexible electrically conductive nanowires are now a key component in the fields of flexible devices. The achievement of metal nanowire with good flexibility, conductivity, compact and smooth morphology is recognized as one critical milestone for the flexible devices. In this study, a two-beam laser direct writing system is designed to fabricate AgNW on PET sheet. The minimum width of the AgNW fabricated by this method is 187 ± 34 nm with the height of 84 ± 4 nm. We have investigated the electrical resistance under different voltages and the applicable voltage per meter range is determined to be less than 7.5 × 103 V/m for the fabricated AgNW. The flexibility of the AgNW is very excellent, since the resistance only increases 6.63% even after the stretched bending of 2000 times at such a small bending radius of 1.0 mm. The proposed two-beam laser direct writing is an efficient method to fabricate AgNW on the flexible sheet, which could be applied in flexible micro/nano devices.

  19. RadSensor: Xray Detection by Direct Modulation of an Optical Probe Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowry, M E; Bennett, C V; Vernon, S P; Bond, T; Welty, R; Behymer, E; Petersen, H; Krey, A; Stewart, R; Kobayashi, N P; Sperry, V; Stephan, P; Reinhardt, C; Simpson, S; Stratton, P; Bionta, R; McKernan, M; Ables, E; Ott, L; Bond, S; Ayers, J.; Landen, O L; Bell, P M

    2003-01-01

    We present a new x-ray detection technique based on optical measurement of the effects of x-ray absorption and electron hole pair creation in a direct band-gap semiconductor. The electron-hole pairs create a frequency dependent shift in optical refractive index and absorption. This is sensed by simultaneously directing an optical carrier beam through the same volume of semiconducting medium that has experienced an xray induced modulation in the electron-hole population. If the operating wavelength of the optical carrier beam is chosen to be close to the semiconductor band-edge, the optical carrier will be modulated significantly in phase and amplitude. This approach should be simultaneously capable of very high sensitivity and excellent temporal response, even in the difficult high-energy xray regime. At xray photon energies near 10 keV and higher, we believe that sub-picosecond temporal responses are possible with near single xray photon sensitivity. The approach also allows for the convenient and EMI robust transport of high-bandwidth information via fiber optics. Furthermore, the technology can be scaled to imaging applications. The basic physics of the detector, implementation considerations, and preliminary experimental data are presented and discussed

  20. Quantum coherent optical phase modulation in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, Armin; Echternkamp, Katharina E; Schauss, Jakob; Yalunin, Sergey V; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-05-14

    Coherent manipulation of quantum systems with light is expected to be a cornerstone of future information and communication technology, including quantum computation and cryptography. The transfer of an optical phase onto a quantum wavefunction is a defining aspect of coherent interactions and forms the basis of quantum state preparation, synchronization and metrology. Light-phase-modulated electron states near atoms and molecules are essential for the techniques of attosecond science, including the generation of extreme-ultraviolet pulses and orbital tomography. In contrast, the quantum-coherent phase-modulation of energetic free-electron beams has not been demonstrated, although it promises direct access to ultrafast imaging and spectroscopy with tailored electron pulses on the attosecond scale. Here we demonstrate the coherent quantum state manipulation of free-electron populations in an electron microscope beam. We employ the interaction of ultrashort electron pulses with optical near-fields to induce Rabi oscillations in the populations of electron momentum states, observed as a function of the optical driving field. Excellent agreement with the scaling of an equal-Rabi multilevel quantum ladder is obtained, representing the observation of a light-driven 'quantum walk' coherently reshaping electron density in momentum space. We note that, after the interaction, the optically generated superposition of momentum states evolves into a train of attosecond electron pulses. Our results reveal the potential of quantum control for the precision structuring of electron densities, with possible applications ranging from ultrafast electron spectroscopy and microscopy to accelerator science and free-electron lasers.

  1. Ultrafast Screening and Quantitation of Pesticides in Food and Environmental Matrices by Solid-Phase Microextraction-Transmission Mode (SPME-TM) and Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Ríos, Germán Augusto; Gionfriddo, Emanuela; Poole, Justen; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2017-07-05

    The direct interface of microextraction technologies to mass spectrometry (MS) has unquestionably revolutionized the speed and efficacy at which complex matrices are analyzed. Solid Phase Micro Extraction-Transmission Mode (SPME-TM) is a technology conceived as an effective synergy between sample preparation and ambient ionization. Succinctly, the device consists of a mesh coated with polymeric particles that extracts analytes of interest present in a given sample matrix. This coated mesh acts as a transmission-mode substrate for Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART), allowing for rapid and efficient thermal desorption/ionization of analytes previously concentrated on the coating, and dramatically lowering the limits of detection attained by sole DART analysis. In this study, we present SPME-TM as a novel tool for the ultrafast enrichment of pesticides present in food and environmental matrices and their quantitative determination by MS via DART ionization. Limits of quantitation in the subnanogram per milliliter range can be attained, while total analysis time does not exceed 2 min per sample. In addition to target information obtained via tandem MS, retrospective studies of the same sample via high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) were accomplished by thermally desorbing a different segment of the microextraction device.

  2. Ultrafast magnetization dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Woodford, Simon

    2008-01-01

    This thesis addresses ultrafast magnetization dynamics from a theoretical perspective. The manipulation of magnetization using the inverse Faraday effect has been studied, as well as magnetic relaxation processes in quantum dots. The inverse Faraday effect – the generation of a magnetic field by nonresonant, circularly polarized light – offers the possibility to control and reverse magnetization on a timescale of a few hundred femtoseconds. This is important both for the technological advant...

  3. Studies of the Influence of Beam Profile and Cooling Conditions on the Laser Deposition of a Directionally-Solidified Superalloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Yang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In the laser deposition of single crystal and directionally-solidified superalloys, it is desired to form laser deposits with high volume fractions of columnar grains by suppressing the columnar-to-equiaxed transition efficiently. In this paper, the influence of beam profile (circular and square shapes and cooling conditions (natural cooling and forced cooling on the geometric morphology and microstructure of deposits were experimentally studied in the laser deposition of a directionally-solidified superalloy, IC10, and the mechanisms of influence were revealed through a numerical simulation of the thermal processes during laser deposition. The results show that wider and thinner deposits were obtained with the square laser beam than those with the circular laser beam, regardless of whether natural or forced cooling conditions was used. The heights and contact angles of deposits were notably increased due to the reduced substrate temperatures by the application of forced cooling for both laser beam profiles. Under natural cooling conditions, columnar grains formed epitaxially at both the center and the edges of the deposits with the square laser beam, but only at the center of the deposits with the circular laser beam; under forced cooling conditions, columnar grains formed at both the center and the edges of deposits regardless of the laser beam profile. The high ratios of thermal gradient and solidification velocity in the height direction of the deposits were favorable to forming deposits with higher volume fractions of columnar grains.

  4. Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging With Cascaded Dual-Polarity Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Guo, Yuexin; Lee, Wei-Ning

    2018-04-01

    Ultrafast ultrasound imaging using plane or diverging waves, instead of focused beams, has advanced greatly the development of novel ultrasound imaging methods for evaluating tissue functions beyond anatomical information. However, the sonographic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of ultrafast imaging remains limited due to the lack of transmission focusing, and thus insufficient acoustic energy delivery. We hereby propose a new ultrafast ultrasound imaging methodology with cascaded dual-polarity waves (CDWs), which consists of a pulse train with positive and negative polarities. A new coding scheme and a corresponding linear decoding process were thereby designed to obtain the recovered signals with increased amplitude, thus increasing the SNR without sacrificing the frame rate. The newly designed CDW ultrafast ultrasound imaging technique achieved higher quality B-mode images than coherent plane-wave compounding (CPWC) and multiplane wave (MW) imaging in a calibration phantom, ex vivo pork belly, and in vivo human back muscle. CDW imaging shows a significant improvement in the SNR (10.71 dB versus CPWC and 7.62 dB versus MW), penetration depth (36.94% versus CPWC and 35.14% versus MW), and contrast ratio in deep regions (5.97 dB versus CPWC and 5.05 dB versus MW) without compromising other image quality metrics, such as spatial resolution and frame rate. The enhanced image qualities and ultrafast frame rates offered by CDW imaging beget great potential for various novel imaging applications.

  5. Progress in ultrafast laser processing and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugioka, Koji

    2017-03-01

    The unique characteristics of ultrafast lasers have rapidly revolutionized materials processing after their first demonstration in 1987. The ultrashort pulse width of the laser suppresses heat diffusion to the surroundings of the processed region, which minimizes the formation of a heat-affected zone and thereby enables ultrahigh precision micro- and nanofabrication of various materials. In addition, the extremely high peak intensity can induce nonlinear multiphoton absorption, which extends the diversity of materials that can be processed to transparent materials such as glass. Nonlinear multiphoton absorption enables three-dimensional (3D) micro- and nanofabrication by irradiation with tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses inside transparent materials. Thus, ultrafast lasers are currently widely used for both fundamental research and practical applications. This review presents progress in ultrafast laser processing, including micromachining, surface micro- and nanostructuring, nanoablation, and 3D and volume processing. Advanced technologies that promise to enhance the performance of ultrafast laser processing, such as hybrid additive and subtractive processing, and shaped beam processing are discussed. Commercial and industrial applications of ultrafast laser processing are also introduced. Finally, future prospects of the technology are given with a summary.

  6. Development of Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscope Capability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Kimberlee Chiyoko [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Talin, Albert Alec [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Chandler, David W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Michael, Joseph R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Modern semiconductor devices rely on the transport of minority charge carriers. Direct examination of minority carrier lifetimes in real devices with nanometer-scale features requires a measurement method with simultaneously high spatial and temporal resolutions. Achieving nanometer spatial resolutions at sub-nanosecond temporal resolution is possible with pump-probe methods that utilize electrons as probes. Recently, a stroboscopic scanning electron microscope was developed at Caltech, and used to study carrier transport across a Si p-n junction [ 1 , 2 , 3 ] . In this report, we detail our development of a prototype scanning ultrafast electron microscope system at Sandia National Laboratories based on the original Caltech design. This effort represents Sandia's first exploration into ultrafast electron microscopy.

  7. Electromagnetic Design and Optimization of Directivity of Stripline Beam Position Monitors for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Draskovic, Drasko; Jones, Owain Rhodri; Lefèvre, Thibaut; Wendt, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary electromagnetic design of a stripline Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the High Luminosity program of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) at CERN. The design is fitted into a new octagonal shielded Beam Screen for the low-beta triplets and is optimized for high directivity. It also includes internal Tungsten absorbers, required to reduce the energy deposition in the superconducting magnets. The achieved broadband directivity in wakefield solver simulations presents significant improvement over the directivity of the current stripline BPMs installed in the LHC.

  8. Mechanical analysis of non-uniform bi-directional functionally graded intelligent micro-beams using modified couple stress theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshi Khaniki, Hossein; Rajasekaran, Sundaramoorthy

    2018-05-01

    This study develops a comprehensive investigation on mechanical behavior of non-uniform bi-directional functionally graded beam sensors in the framework of modified couple stress theory. Material variation is modelled through both length and thickness directions using power-law, sigmoid and exponential functions. Moreover, beam is assumed with linear, exponential and parabolic cross-section variation through the length using power-law and sigmoid varying functions. Using these assumptions, a general model for microbeams is presented and formulated by employing Hamilton’s principle. Governing equations are solved using a mixed finite element method with Lagrangian interpolation technique, Gaussian quadrature method and Wilson’s Lagrangian multiplier method. It is shown that by using bi-directional functionally graded materials in nonuniform microbeams, mechanical behavior of such structures could be affected noticeably and scale parameter has a significant effect in changing the rigidity of nonuniform bi-directional functionally graded beams.

  9. Ultrafast disk lasers and amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Dirk H.; Kleinbauer, Jochen; Bauer, Dominik; Wolf, Martin; Tan, Chuong; Gebs, Raphael; Budnicki, Aleksander; Wagenblast, Philipp; Weiler, Sascha

    2012-03-01

    Disk lasers with multi-kW continuous wave (CW) output power are widely used in manufacturing, primarily for cutting and welding applications, notably in the automotive industry. The ytterbium disk technology combines high power (average and/or peak power), excellent beam quality, high efficiency, and high reliability with low investment and operating costs. Fundamental mode picosecond disk lasers are well established in micro machining at high throughput and perfect precision. Following the world's first market introduction of industrial grade 50 W picosecond lasers (TruMicro 5050) at the Photonics West 2008, the second generation of the TruMicro series 5000 now provides twice the average power (100 W at 1030 nm, or 60 W frequency doubled, green output) at a significantly reduced footprint. Mode-locked disk oscillators achieve by far the highest average power of any unamplified lasers, significantly exceeding the 100 W level in laboratory set-ups. With robust long resonators their multi-microjoule pulse energies begin to compete with typical ultrafast amplifiers. In addition, significant interest in disk technology has recently come from the extreme light laser community, aiming for ultra-high peak powers of petawatts and beyond.

  10. Compact broadband polarization beam splitter using a symmetric directional coupler with sinusoidal bends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Yun, Han; Wang, Yun; Lu, Zeqin; Chrostowski, Lukas; Jaeger, Nicolas A F

    2017-01-15

    We design and demonstrate a compact broadband polarization beam splitter (PBS) using a symmetric directional coupler with sinusoidal bends on a silicon-on-insulator platform. The sinusoidal bends in our PBS suppress the power exchange between two parallel symmetric strip waveguides for the transverse-electric (TE) mode, while allowing for the maximum power transfer to the adjacent waveguide for the transverse-magnetic (TM) mode. Our PBS has a nominal coupler length of 8.55 μm, and it has an average extinction ratio (ER) of 12.0 dB for the TE mode, an average ER of 20.1 dB for the TM mode, an average polarization isolation (PI) of 20.6 dB for the through port, and an average PI of 11.5 dB for the cross port, all over a bandwidth of 100 nm.

  11. Design of a compact polarization beam splitter based on a deformed photonic crystal directional coupler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Gang; Zheng Wanhua; Wang Ke; Du Xiaoyu; Xing Mingxin; Chen Lianghui

    2008-01-01

    In this paper a compact polarization beam splitter based on a deformed photonic crystal directional coupler is designed and simulated. The transverse-electric (TE) guided mode and transverse-magnetic (TM) guided mode are split due to different guiding mechanisms. The effect of the shape deformation of the air holes on the coupler is studied. It discovered that the coupling strength of the coupled waveguides is strongly enhanced by introducing elliptical airholes, which reduce the device length to less than 18.5μm. A finite-difference time-domain simulation is performed to evaluate the performance of the device, and the extinction ratios for both TE and TM polarized light are higher than 20 dB. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  12. Nickel enhanced graphene growth directly on dielectric substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wofford, Joseph M., E-mail: joewofford@gmail.com, E-mail: lopes@pdi-berlin.de; Lopes, Joao Marcelo J., E-mail: joewofford@gmail.com, E-mail: lopes@pdi-berlin.de; Riechert, Henning [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Speck, Florian; Seyller, Thomas [Technische Universität Chemnitz, Institut für Physik, Reichenhainer Str. 70, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2016-07-28

    The efficacy of Ni as a surfactant to improve the crystalline quality of graphene grown directly on dielectric Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy is examined. Simultaneously exposing the substrate to a Ni flux throughout C deposition at 950 °C led to improved charge carrier mobility and a Raman spectrum indicating less structural disorder in the resulting nanocrystalline graphene film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed that no residual Ni could be detected in the film and showed a decrease in the intensity of the defect-related component of the C1s level. Similar improvements were not observed when a lower substrate temperature (850 °C) was used. A close examination of the Raman spectra suggests that Ni reduces the concentration of lattice vacancies in the film, possibly by catalytically assisting adatom incorporation.

  13. Wide-angle full-vector beam propagation method based on an alternating direction implicit preconditioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Siu Lit; Lu, Ya Yan

    2004-03-01

    Wide-angle full-vector beam propagation methods (BPMs) for three-dimensional wave-guiding structures can be derived on the basis of rational approximants of a square root operator or its exponential (i.e., the one-way propagator). While the less accurate BPM based on the slowly varying envelope approximation can be efficiently solved by the alternating direction implicit (ADI) method, the wide-angle variants involve linear systems that are more difficult to handle. We present an efficient solver for these linear systems that is based on a Krylov subspace method with an ADI preconditioner. The resulting wide-angle full-vector BPM is used to simulate the propagation of wave fields in a Y branch and a taper.

  14. An Evaluation of Semiempirical Models for Partitioning Photosynthetically Active Radiation Into Diffuse and Direct Beam Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliphant, Andrew J.; Stoy, Paul C.

    2018-03-01

    Photosynthesis is more efficient under diffuse than direct beam photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) per unit PAR, but diffuse PAR is infrequently measured at research sites. We examine four commonly used semiempirical models (Erbs et al., 1982, https://doi.org/10.1016/0038-092X(82)90302-4; Gu et al., 1999, https://doi.org/10.1029/1999JD901068; Roderick, 1999, https://doi.org/10.1016/S0168-1923(99)00028-3; Weiss & Norman, 1985, https://doi.org/10.1016/0168-1923(85)90020-6) that partition PAR into diffuse and direct beam components based on the negative relationship between atmospheric transparency and scattering of PAR. Radiation observations at 58 sites (140 site years) from the La Thuille FLUXNET data set were used for model validation and coefficient testing. All four models did a reasonable job of predicting the diffuse fraction of PAR (ϕ) at the 30 min timescale, with site median r2 values ranging between 0.85 and 0.87, model efficiency coefficients (MECs) between 0.62 and 0.69, and regression slopes within 10% of unity. Model residuals were not strongly correlated with astronomical or standard meteorological variables. We conclude that the Roderick (1999, https://doi.org/10.1016/S0168-1923(99)00028-3) and Gu et al. (1999, https://doi.org/10.1029/1999JD901068) models performed better overall than the two older models. Using the basic form of these models, the data set was used to find both individual site and universal model coefficients that optimized predictive accuracy. A new universal form of the model is presented in section 5 that increased site median MEC to 0.73. Site-specific model coefficients increased median MEC further to 0.78, indicating usefulness of local/regional training of coefficients to capture the local distributions of aerosols and cloud types.

  15. Measuring Broadband IR Irradiance in the Direct Solar Beam and Recent Developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reda, Ibrahim; Andreas, Afshin; Dooraghi, Mike; Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Kutchenreiter, Mark

    2016-12-14

    Solar and atmospheric science radiometers such as pyranometers, pyrheliometers, and photovoltaic cells are calibrated with traceability to a consensus reference which is maintained by Absolute Cavity Radiometers (ACRs). An ACR is an open cavity with no window, developed to measure the extended broadband spectrum of the terrestrial direct solar beam irradiance that extends beyond the ultraviolet and infrared bands; i.e. below 0.2 um and above 50 um, respectively. On the other hand, the pyranometers and pyrheliometers were developed to measure broadband shortwave irradiance from approximately 0.3 um to 3 um, while the present photovoltaic cells are limited to the spectral range of approximately 0.3 um to 1 um. The broadband mismatch of ACR versus such radiometers causes discrepancy in radiometers' calibration methods that has not been discussed or addressed in the solar and atmospheric science literature. Pyrgeometers, which measure the atmospheric longwave irradiance, are also used for solar and atmospheric science applications and calibrated with traceability to a consensus reference, yet they are calibrated during nighttime only, because no consensus reference has been established for the daytime longwave irradiance. This poster describes a method to measure the broadband longwave irradiance in the terrestrial direct solar beam from 3 um to 50 um, as a first step that might be used to help develop calibration methods to address the mismatch between broadband ACR and shortwave radiometers, and the lack of a daytime reference for pyrgeometers. The described method is used to measure the irradiance from sunrise to sunset; the irradiance varied from approximately 1 Wm-2 to 16 Wm-2 with an estimated uncertainty of 1.5 Wm-2, for a solar zenith angle range from 80 degrees to 16 degrees, respectively. Recent development shows that there is greater than 1.1 percent bias in measuring shortwave solar irradiance.

  16. WE-A-207-02: Electron Beam Therapy - Current Status and Future Directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q. [Duke University Medical Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    In memory of the significant contribution of Dr. Jacques Ovadia to electron beam techniques, this session will review recent, advanced techniques which are reinvigorating the science of electron beam radiation therapy. Recent research efforts in improving both the applicability and quality of the electron beam therapy will be discussed, including modulated electron beam radiotherapy (MERT) and dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR). Learning Objectives: To learn about recent advances in electron beam therapy, including modulated electron beam therapy and dynamic electron arc therapy (DEAR). Put recent advances in the context of work that Dr. Ovadia pursued during his career in medical physics.

  17. WE-A-207-02: Electron Beam Therapy - Current Status and Future Directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Q.

    2015-01-01

    In memory of the significant contribution of Dr. Jacques Ovadia to electron beam techniques, this session will review recent, advanced techniques which are reinvigorating the science of electron beam radiation therapy. Recent research efforts in improving both the applicability and quality of the electron beam therapy will be discussed, including modulated electron beam radiotherapy (MERT) and dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR). Learning Objectives: To learn about recent advances in electron beam therapy, including modulated electron beam therapy and dynamic electron arc therapy (DEAR). Put recent advances in the context of work that Dr. Ovadia pursued during his career in medical physics

  18. Dose-volume based ranking of incident beam direction and its utility in facilitating IMRT beam placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreibmann, Eduard; Xing Lei

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Beam orientation optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is computationally intensive, and various single beam ranking techniques have been proposed to reduce the search space. Up to this point, none of the existing ranking techniques considers the clinically important dose-volume effects of the involved structures, which may lead to clinically irrelevant angular ranking. The purpose of this work is to develop a clinically sensible angular ranking model with incorporation of dose-volume effects and to show its utility for IMRT beam placement. Methods and Materials: The general consideration in constructing this angular ranking function is that a beamlet/beam is preferable if it can deliver a higher dose to the target without exceeding the tolerance of the sensitive structures located on the path of the beamlet/beam. In the previously proposed dose-based approach, the beamlets are treated independently and, to compute the maximally deliverable dose to the target volume, the intensity of each beamlet is pushed to its maximum intensity without considering the values of other beamlets. When volumetric structures are involved, the complication arises from the fact that there are numerous dose distributions corresponding to the same dose-volume tolerance. In this situation, the beamlets are not independent and an optimization algorithm is required to find the intensity profile that delivers the maximum target dose while satisfying the volumetric constraints. In this study, the behavior of a volumetric organ was modeled by using the equivalent uniform dose (EUD). A constrained sequential quadratic programming algorithm (CFSQP) was used to find the beam profile that delivers the maximum dose to the target volume without violating the EUD constraint or constraints. To assess the utility of the proposed technique, we planned a head-and-neck and abdominal case with and without the guidance of the angular ranking information. The qualities of the

  19. Effect of beam condition in variable-shaped electron-beam direct writing for 0.25 μm and below

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirasawa, S.; Nakajima, K.; Tamura, T.; Aizaki, N.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of incident electron-beam conditions, which are acceleration voltage and beam blur of variable-shaped electron-beam direct writing, is investigated using the deposited energy distribution to realize a fine pattern of ≤0.25 μm in trilayer resist process. The deposited energy distribution is calculated using a three-dimensional Monte Carlo method. In a trilayer resist system, a thin bottom resist layer can be used, because the contrast value derived from the Monte Carlo calculation is independent of the bottom layer thickness. The beam blur of 0.05 μm does not degrade 0.25 μm line-and-space (L/S) patterns, but seriously degrades 0.1 μm L/S patterns. Higher acceleration voltage is effective for improving the contrast. At lower acceleration voltage, the slope of the deposited energy profile defined at the resist bottom is mainly influenced by electron scattering. On the other hand, at higher acceleration voltage, the slope of deposited energy profile mainly depends on the beam blur. The 0.1 μm L/S patterns are expected to be resolved at 30 kV when there is less than 0.02 μm beam blur with trilayer resist system. The possibility of using a single layer resist process for 0.1 μm L/S pattern will be barely realized at the conditions of 50 kV and 0.02 μm beam blur

  20. Manipulation of inverted and direct opals by a focused ion beam scanning electron microscope (FIB SEM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magni, S; Milani, M; Tatti, F; Savoia, C

    2008-01-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) milling techniques are presented aiming at the manipulation of both tin dioxide (SnO 2 ) inverted opals and polystyrene (PS) direct opals. Different SnO 2 opals are considered in order to estimate the regularity of their bulk after the production. A SnO 2 mesoporous monolith is FIB micromachined to make it suitable for optical applications. PS direct opals are structured by FIB milling at different scales. Ordered arrays of PS opals are modified by selectively removing a single sphere. In performing this task, we discuss the effects on the FIB milling due to the gas-assisted enhanced etching and to the binding of the nearest neighbours. Techniques to achieve imaging of PS opals in absence of a conductive coating are also brought up. Furthermore, isolated PS spheres are drilled with or without enhanced etching in order to produce controlled defects on them. The FIB-assisted manipulations we show may find potential applications in the field of photonic crystals, (bio)sensors and lithography assisted by colloidal masks.

  1. Multi-color imaging of fluorescent nanodiamonds in living HeLa cells using direct electron-beam excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu; Fang, Chia-Yi; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2014-03-17

    Multi-color, high spatial resolution imaging of fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) in living HeLa cells has been performed with a direct electron-beam excitation-assisted fluorescence (D-EXA) microscope. In this technique, fluorescent materials are directly excited with a focused electron beam and the resulting cathodoluminescence (CL) is detected with nanoscale resolution. Green- and red-light-emitting FNDs were employed for two-color imaging, which were observed simultaneously in the cells with high spatial resolution. This technique could be applied generally for multi-color immunostaining to reveal various cell functions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Ultrafast THz saturable absorption in doped semiconductors at room temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Hoffmann, M. V.

    2011-01-01

    Ultrafast Phenomena XVII presents the latest advances in ultrafast science, including both ultrafast optical technology and the study of ultrafast phenomena. It covers picosecond, femtosecond and attosecond processes relevant to applications in physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. Ultraf...

  3. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botkin, D.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  4. Characterization of a free-air ionization chamber in direct X-ray beams as used in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Mateus Hilario de

    2014-01-01

    At this work stability and characterization tests were undertaken on a Victoreen free-air ionization chamber, model 481. The tests were realized using direct X-ray beams as a contribution for its establishment as a primary standard system of the quantity air kerma. The characterization tests were: saturation curve, ion collection efficiency, polarity effect, response linearity with the air kerma rate and response linearity with the chamber volume variation. The ion collection efficiency allowed the determination of the ion recombination factor. Most of the test results showed agreement with the limits established by international standards. Furthermore, the air attenuation factors for the mammography beams with aluminum and molybdenum filters were obtained. The factors for photon transmission and scattering at the diaphragm edges were also determined for mammography beams with aluminum filter and for the standard beam with molybdenum filter. (author)

  5. Ultrafast Graphene Photonics and Optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-14

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0032 Ultrafast Graphene Photonics and Optoelectronics Kuang-Hsiung Wu National Chiao Tung University Final Report 04/14/2017...DATES COVERED (From - To) 18 Apr 2013 to 17 Apr 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ultrafast Graphene Photonics and Optoelectronics 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Final Report for AOARD Grant FA2386-13-1-4022 “Ultrafast Graphene Photonics and Optoelectronics” Date May 23th, 2016

  6. Development of a two-dimensional simulation code (koad) including atomic processes for beam direct energy conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Yoshikawa, K.; Hattori, Y.

    1987-01-01

    A two-dimensional simulation code for the beam direct energy conversion called KVAD (Kyoto University Advanced DART) including various loss mechanisms has been developed, and shown excellent agreement with the authors' experiments using the He + beams. The beam direct energy converter (BDC) is the device to recover the kinetic energy of unneutralized ions in the neutral beam injection (NBI) system directly into electricity. The BDC is very important and essential not only to the improvements of NBI system efficiency, but also to the relaxation of high heat flux problems on the beam dump with increase of injection energies. So far no simulation code could have successfully predicted BDC experimental results. The KUAD code applies, an optimized algorithm for vector processing, the finite element method (FEM) for potential calculation, and a semi-automatic method for spatial segmentations. Since particle trajectories in the KVAD code are analytically solved, very high speed tracings of the particle could be achieved by introducing an adjacent element matrix to identify the neighboring triangle elements and electrodes. Ion space charges are also analytically calculated by the Cloud in Cell (CIC) method, as well as electron space charges. Power losses due to atomic processes can be also evaluated in the KUAD code

  7. A spectroelectrochemical cell for ultrafast two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Khoury, Youssef; Van Wilderen, Luuk J. G. W.; Vogt, Tim; Winter, Ernst; Bredenbeck, Jens, E-mail: bredenbeck@biophysik.uni-frankfurt.org, E-mail: bredenbeck@biophysik.uni-frankfurt.de [Institut für Biophysik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    A spectroelectrochemical cell has been designed to combine electrochemistry and ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy, which is a powerful tool to extract structure and dynamics information on the femtosecond to picosecond time scale. Our design is based on a gold mirror with the dual role of performing electrochemistry and reflecting IR light. To provide the high optical surface quality required for laser spectroscopy, the gold surface is made by electron beam evaporation on a glass substrate. Electrochemical cycling facilitates in situ collection of ultrafast dynamics of redox-active molecules by means of 2D-IR. The IR beams are operated in reflection mode so that they travel twice through the sample, i.e., the signal size is doubled. This methodology is optimal for small sample volumes and successfully tested with the ferricyanide/ferrocyanide redox system of which the corresponding electrochemically induced 2D-IR difference spectrum is reported.

  8. A spectroelectrochemical cell for ultrafast two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Khoury, Youssef; Van Wilderen, Luuk J. G. W.; Vogt, Tim; Winter, Ernst; Bredenbeck, Jens

    2015-01-01

    A spectroelectrochemical cell has been designed to combine electrochemistry and ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy, which is a powerful tool to extract structure and dynamics information on the femtosecond to picosecond time scale. Our design is based on a gold mirror with the dual role of performing electrochemistry and reflecting IR light. To provide the high optical surface quality required for laser spectroscopy, the gold surface is made by electron beam evaporation on a glass substrate. Electrochemical cycling facilitates in situ collection of ultrafast dynamics of redox-active molecules by means of 2D-IR. The IR beams are operated in reflection mode so that they travel twice through the sample, i.e., the signal size is doubled. This methodology is optimal for small sample volumes and successfully tested with the ferricyanide/ferrocyanide redox system of which the corresponding electrochemically induced 2D-IR difference spectrum is reported

  9. Direct fourier methods in 3D-reconstruction from cone-beam data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axelsson, C.

    1994-01-01

    The problem of 3D-reconstruction is encountered in both medical and industrial applications of X-ray tomography. A method able to utilize a complete set of projections complying with Tuys condition was proposed by Grangeat. His method is mathematically exact and consists of two distinct phases. In phase 1 cone-beam projection data are used to produce the derivative of the radon transform. In phase 2, after interpolation, the radon transform data are used to reconstruct the three-dimensional object function. To a large extent our method is an extension of the Grangeat method. Our aim is to reduce the computational complexity, i.e. to produce a faster method. The most taxing procedure during phase 1 is computation of line-integrals in the detector plane. By applying the direct Fourier method in reverse for this computation, we reduce the complexity of phase 1 from O(N 4 ) to O(N 3 logN). Phase 2 can be performed either as a straight 3D-reconstruction or as a sequence of two 2D-reconstructions in vertical and horizontal planes, respectively. Direct Fourier methods can be applied for the 2D- and for the 3D-reconstruction, which reduces the complexity of phase 2 from O(N 4 ) to O(N 3 logN) as well. In both cases, linogram techniques are applied. For 3D-reconstruction the inversion formula contains the second derivative filter instead of the well-known ramp-filter employed in the 2D-case. The derivative filter is more well-behaved than the 2D ramp-filter. This implies that less zeropadding is necessary which brings about a further reduction of the computational efforts. The method has been verified by experiments on simulated data. The image quality is satisfactory and independent of cone-beam angles. For a 512 3 volume we estimate that our method is ten times faster than Grangeats method

  10. The effects of electrode materials on the conversion efficiency of a direct converter used in neutral beam injection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Shunichi; Nagae, Hiroshi; Yano, Hidenobu; Masuda, Mitsuharu; Akazaki, Masanori

    1986-01-01

    The injection of fast neutral beams into plasmas is thought to be the most promising way for the fusion plasma heating. Fast neutral beams are obtained by injecting fast ions into a neutralizer cell, in which ions are neutralized through charge exchange collisions with the ambient gas. However, the neutralization efficiency in the neutralizer cell is so low that the net power may not be extracted from a fusion reactor unless the energy of the ions being not neutralized in the cell is recovered. The present paper describes some problems associated with the electrostatic direct energy recovery of fast ion beams for this purpose. The titanium and molybdenum were tested as the direct converter electrode materials, and it was found that the conversion efficiency and the conditioning process of the converter electrode depended strongly on the electrode material. The effect of secondary electrons emitted from the electron repeller on the conversion efficiency was also made clear in the present experiments. (author)

  11. Time-resolved cathodoluminescence microscopy with sub-nanosecond beam blanking for direct evaluation of the local density of states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerland, R.J.; Weppelman, I.G.C.; Garming, M.W.H.; Kruit, P.; Hoogenboom, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    We show cathodoluminescence-based time-resolved electron beam spectroscopy in order to directly probe the spontaneous emission decay rate that is modified by the local density of states in a nanoscale environment. In contrast to dedicated laser-triggered electron-microscopy setups, we use commercial

  12. Direct cone-beam cardiac reconstruction algorithm with cardiac banding artifact correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Chiang, Beshan S.; Hein, Ilmar A.

    2006-01-01

    Multislice helical computed tomography (CT) is a promising noninvasive technique for coronary artery imaging. Various factors can cause inconsistencies in cardiac CT data, which can result in degraded image quality. These inconsistencies may be the result of the patient physiology (e.g., heart rate variations), the nature of the data (e.g., cone-angle), or the reconstruction algorithm itself. An algorithm which provides the best temporal resolution for each slice, for example, often provides suboptimal image quality for the entire volume since the cardiac temporal resolution (TRc) changes from slice to slice. Such variations in TRc can generate strong banding artifacts in multi-planar reconstruction images or three-dimensional images. Discontinuous heart walls and coronary arteries may compromise the accuracy of the diagnosis. A β-blocker is often used to reduce and stabilize patients' heart rate but cannot eliminate the variation. In order to obtain robust and optimal image quality, a software solution that increases the temporal resolution and decreases the effect of heart rate is highly desirable. This paper proposes an ECG-correlated direct cone-beam reconstruction algorithm (TCOT-EGR) with cardiac banding artifact correction (CBC) and disconnected projections redundancy compensation technique (DIRECT). First the theory and analytical model of the cardiac temporal resolution is outlined. Next, the performance of the proposed algorithms is evaluated by using computer simulations as well as patient data. It will be shown that the proposed algorithms enhance the robustness of the image quality against inconsistencies by guaranteeing smooth transition of heart cycles used in reconstruction

  13. Fourteenth International Conference on Ultrafast Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Nelson, Keith A; Silvestri, Sandro; Ultrafast Phenomena XIV

    2005-01-01

    Ultrafast Phenomena XIV presents the latest advances in ultrafast science, including ultrafast laser and measurement technology as well as studies of ultrafast phenomena. Pico-, femto-, and atosecond processes relevant in physics, chemistry, biology and engineering are presented. Ultrafast technology is now having a profound impact within a wide range of applications, among them imaging, material diagnostics, and transformation and high-speed optoelectronics. This book summarizes results presented at the 14th Ultrafast Phenomena Conference and reviews the state of the art in this important and rapidly advancing field.

  14. Sixteenth International Conference on Ultrafast Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Corkum, Paul; Nelson, Keith A; Riedle, Eberhard; Schoenlein, Robert W; Ultrafast Phenomena XVI

    2009-01-01

    Ultrafast Phenomena XVI presents the latest advances in ultrafast science, including both ultrafast optical technology and the study of ultrafast phenomena. It covers picosecond, femtosecond and attosecond processes relevant to applications in physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. Ultrafast technology has a profound impact in a wide range of applications, amongst them biomedical imaging, chemical dynamics, frequency standards, material processing, and ultrahigh speed communications. This book summarizes the results presented at the 16th International Conference on Ultrafast Phenomena and provides an up-to-date view of this important and rapidly advancing field.

  15. A US Based Ultrafast Interdisciplinary Research Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueye, Paul; Hill, Wendell; Johnson, Anthony

    2006-10-01

    The US scientific competitiveness on the world arena has substantially decreased due to the lack of funding and training of qualified personnel. Most of the potential workforce found in higher education is composed of foreign students and post-docs. In the specific field of low- and high-field science, the European and Asian communities are rapidly catching-up with the US, even leading in some areas. To remain the leader in ultrafast science and technology, new visions and commitment must be embraced. For that reason, an international effort of more than 70 countries for a US-based interdisciplinary research facility using ultrafast laser technology is under development. It will provide research and educational training, as well as new venues for a strong collaboration between the fields of astrophysics, nuclear/high energy physics, plasma physics, optical sciences, biological and medical physics. This facility will consist of a uniquely designed high contrast multi-lines concept housing twenty experimental rooms shared between four beams:[0.1 TW, 1 kHz], [10 TW, 9 kHz], [100-200 TW, 10 Hz] and [500 TW, 10 Hz]. The detail schematic of this multi-laser system, foreseen research and educational programs, and organizational structure of this facility will be presented.

  16. Mega-electron-volt ultrafast electron diffraction at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weathersby, S. P.; Brown, G.; Chase, T. F.; Coffee, R.; Corbett, J.; Eichner, J. P.; Frisch, J. C.; Fry, A. R.; Gühr, M.; Hartmann, N.; Hast, C.; Hettel, R.; Jobe, R. K.; Jongewaard, E. N.; Lewandowski, J. R.; Li, R. K., E-mail: lrk@slac.stanford.edu; Lindenberg, A. M.; Makasyuk, I.; May, J. E.; McCormick, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    Ultrafast electron probes are powerful tools, complementary to x-ray free-electron lasers, used to study structural dynamics in material, chemical, and biological sciences. High brightness, relativistic electron beams with femtosecond pulse duration can resolve details of the dynamic processes on atomic time and length scales. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory recently launched the Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) and microscopy Initiative aiming at developing the next generation ultrafast electron scattering instruments. As the first stage of the Initiative, a mega-electron-volt (MeV) UED system has been constructed and commissioned to serve ultrafast science experiments and instrumentation development. The system operates at 120-Hz repetition rate with outstanding performance. In this paper, we report on the SLAC MeV UED system and its performance, including the reciprocal space resolution, temporal resolution, and machine stability.

  17. Simulation and Modeling of a Novel Medium Access Control Scheme for Multi-Beam Directional Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-03

    formation of multiple simultaneous beams in both transmit and receive. These multiple beams allows for the re- moval of burdensome coordination...experiments. Rather than hard code all of the underlying pieces for EMANE (such as the over-the-air (OTA) channel, generic routing encapsulation (GRE

  18. Ultrafast X-ray Imaging of Fuel Sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin

    2007-01-01

    Detailed analysis of fuel sprays has been well recognized as an important step for optimizing the operation of internal combustion engines to improve efficiency and reduce emissions. Ultrafast radiographic and tomographic techniques have been developed for probing the fuel distribution close to the nozzles of direct-injection diesel and gasoline injectors. The measurement was made using x-ray absorption of monochromatic synchrotron-generated radiation, allowing quantitative determination of the fuel distribution in this optically impenetrable region with a time resolution on the order of 1 μs. Furthermore, an accurate 3-dimensional fuel-density distribution, in the form of fuel volume fraction, was obtained by the time-resolved computed tomography. These quantitative measurements constitute the most detailed near-nozzle study of a fuel spray to date. With high-energy and high-brilliance x-ray beams available at the Advanced Photon Source, propagation-based phase-enhanced imaging was developed as a unique metrology technique to visualize the interior of an injection nozzle through a 3-mm-thick steel with a 10-μs temporal resolution, which is virtually impossible by any other means.

  19. Ultrafast X-ray Imaging of Fuel Sprays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jin

    2007-01-01

    Detailed analysis of fuel sprays has been well recognized as an important step for optimizing the operation of internal combustion engines to improve efficiency and reduce emissions. Ultrafast radiographic and tomographic techniques have been developed for probing the fuel distribution close to the nozzles of direct-injection diesel and gasoline injectors. The measurement was made using x-ray absorption of monochromatic synchrotron-generated radiation, allowing quantitative determination of the fuel distribution in this optically impenetrable region with a time resolution on the order of 1 μs. Furthermore, an accurate 3-dimensional fuel-density distribution, in the form of fuel volume fraction, was obtained by the time-resolved computed tomography. These quantitative measurements constitute the most detailed near-nozzle study of a fuel spray to date. With high-energy and high-brilliance x-ray beams available at the Advanced Photon Source, propagation-based phase-enhanced imaging was developed as a unique metrology technique to visualize the interior of an injection nozzle through a 3-mm-thick steel with a 10-μs temporal resolution, which is virtually impossible by any other means

  20. Ultrafast dynamics of correlated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rettig, Laurenz

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the ultrafast electron dynamics in correlated, low-dimensional model systems using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (trARPES) directly in the time domain. In such materials, the strong electron-electron (e-e) correlations or coupling to other degrees of freedom such as phonons within the complex many-body quantum system lead to new, emergent properties that are characterized by phase transitions into broken-symmetry ground states such as magnetic, superconducting or charge density wave (CDW) phases. The dynamical processes related to order like transient phase changes, collective excitations or the energy relaxation within the system allow deeper insight into the complex physics governing the emergence of the broken-symmetry state. In this work, several model systems for broken-symmetry ground states and for the dynamical charge balance at interfaces have been studied. In the quantum well state (QWS) model system Pb/Si(111), the charge transfer across the Pb/Si interface leads to an ultrafast energetic stabilization of occupied QWSs, which is the result of an increase of the electronic confinement to the metal film. In addition, a coherently excited surface phonon mode is observed. In antiferromagnetic (AFM) Fe pnictide compounds, a strong momentum-dependent asymmetry of electron and hole relaxation rates allows to separate the recovery dynamics of the AFM phase from electron-phonon (e-ph) relaxation. The strong modulation of the chemical potential by coherent phonon modes demonstrates the importance of e-ph coupling in these materials. However, the average e-ph coupling constant is found to be small. The investigation of the excited quasiparticle (QP) relaxation dynamics in the high-T c 4 superconductor Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ reveals a striking momentum and fluence independence of the QP life times. In combination with the momentum-dependent density of excited QPs, this demonstrates the suppression of momentum

  1. Ultrafast dynamics of correlated electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rettig, Laurenz

    2012-07-09

    This work investigates the ultrafast electron dynamics in correlated, low-dimensional model systems using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (trARPES) directly in the time domain. In such materials, the strong electron-electron (e-e) correlations or coupling to other degrees of freedom such as phonons within the complex many-body quantum system lead to new, emergent properties that are characterized by phase transitions into broken-symmetry ground states such as magnetic, superconducting or charge density wave (CDW) phases. The dynamical processes related to order like transient phase changes, collective excitations or the energy relaxation within the system allow deeper insight into the complex physics governing the emergence of the broken-symmetry state. In this work, several model systems for broken-symmetry ground states and for the dynamical charge balance at interfaces have been studied. In the quantum well state (QWS) model system Pb/Si(111), the charge transfer across the Pb/Si interface leads to an ultrafast energetic stabilization of occupied QWSs, which is the result of an increase of the electronic confinement to the metal film. In addition, a coherently excited surface phonon mode is observed. In antiferromagnetic (AFM) Fe pnictide compounds, a strong momentum-dependent asymmetry of electron and hole relaxation rates allows to separate the recovery dynamics of the AFM phase from electron-phonon (e-ph) relaxation. The strong modulation of the chemical potential by coherent phonon modes demonstrates the importance of e-ph coupling in these materials. However, the average e-ph coupling constant is found to be small. The investigation of the excited quasiparticle (QP) relaxation dynamics in the high-T{sub c}4 superconductor Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ} reveals a striking momentum and fluence independence of the QP life times. In combination with the momentum-dependent density of excited QPs, this demonstrates the

  2. Fast computation of statistical uncertainty for spatiotemporal distributions estimated directly from dynamic cone beam SPECT projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reutter, Bryan W.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2001-01-01

    The estimation of time-activity curves and kinetic model parameters directly from projection data is potentially useful for clinical dynamic single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies, particularly in those clinics that have only single-detector systems and thus are not able to perform rapid tomographic acquisitions. Because the radiopharmaceutical distribution changes while the SPECT gantry rotates, projections at different angles come from different tracer distributions. A dynamic image sequence reconstructed from the inconsistent projections acquired by a slowly rotating gantry can contain artifacts that lead to biases in kinetic parameters estimated from time-activity curves generated by overlaying regions of interest on the images. If cone beam collimators are used and the focal point of the collimators always remains in a particular transaxial plane, additional artifacts can arise in other planes reconstructed using insufficient projection samples [1]. If the projection samples truncate the patient's body, this can result in additional image artifacts. To overcome these sources of bias in conventional image based dynamic data analysis, we and others have been investigating the estimation of time-activity curves and kinetic model parameters directly from dynamic SPECT projection data by modeling the spatial and temporal distribution of the radiopharmaceutical throughout the projected field of view [2-8]. In our previous work we developed a computationally efficient method for fully four-dimensional (4-D) direct estimation of spatiotemporal distributions from dynamic SPECT projection data [5], which extended Formiconi's least squares algorithm for reconstructing temporally static distributions [9]. In addition, we studied the biases that result from modeling various orders temporal continuity and using various time samplings [5]. the present work, we address computational issues associated with evaluating the statistical uncertainty of

  3. Ultrafast measurements of chlorine dioxide photochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludowise, P.D.

    1997-08-01

    Time-resolved mass spectrometry and time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy are used to study the ultrafast photodissociation dynamics of chlorine dioxide, an important constituent in stratospheric ozone depletion. Chapter 1 introduces these pump/probe techniques, in which a femtosecond pump pulse excites a molecule to a dissociative state. At a later time, a second femtosecond probe pulse ionizes the molecule. The resulting mass and photoelectron spectra are acquired as a function of the delay between the pump and probe pulses, which follows the evolution of the molecule on the excited state. A comparison to other techniques used to study reaction dynamics is discussed. Chapter 2 includes a detailed description of the design and construction of the experimental apparatus, which consists of a femtosecond laser system, a molecular beam time-of-flight spectrometer, and a data acquisition system. The time-of-flight spectrometer is specifically designed to have a short flight distance to maximize the photoelectron collection efficiency without degrading the resolution, which is limited by the bandwidth of the femtosecond laser system. Typical performance of the apparatus is demonstrated in a study of the time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of nitric oxide. The results of the time-resolved mass spectrometry experiments of chlorine dioxide are presented in Chapter 3. Upon excitation to the A {sup 2}A{sub 2} state near 3.2 eV, the molecule dissociates through an indirect two-step mechanism. The direct dissociation channel has been predicted to be open, but is not observed. A quantum beat is observed in the OClO{sup +} species, which is described as a vibrational coherence of the optically prepared A {sup 2}A{sub 2} state. Chapter 4 presents the results of the time-resolved photoelectron experiments of chlorine dioxide. At short delay time, the quantum beat of the OClO{sup +} species is observed in the X {sup 1}A{sub 1} state of the ion. At infinite delay, the signal

  4. Femtosecond laser studies of ultrafast intramolecular processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayden, C. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this research is to better understand the detailed mechanisms of chemical reactions by observing, directly in time, the dynamics of fundamental chemical processes. In this work femtosecond laser pulses are used to initiate chemical processes and follow the progress of these processes in time. The authors are currently studying ultrafast internal conversion and subsequent intramolecular relaxation in unsaturated hydrocarbons. In addition, the authors are developing nonlinear optical techniques to prepare and monitor the time evolution of specific vibrational motions in ground electronic state molecules.

  5. Direct Kernel Perceptron (DKP): ultra-fast kernel ELM-based classification with non-iterative closed-form weight calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Delgado, Manuel; Cernadas, Eva; Barro, Senén; Ribeiro, Jorge; Neves, José

    2014-02-01

    The Direct Kernel Perceptron (DKP) (Fernández-Delgado et al., 2010) is a very simple and fast kernel-based classifier, related to the Support Vector Machine (SVM) and to the Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) (Huang, Wang, & Lan, 2011), whose α-coefficients are calculated directly, without any iterative training, using an analytical closed-form expression which involves only the training patterns. The DKP, which is inspired by the Direct Parallel Perceptron, (Auer et al., 2008), uses a Gaussian kernel and a linear classifier (perceptron). The weight vector of this classifier in the feature space minimizes an error measure which combines the training error and the hyperplane margin, without any tunable regularization parameter. This weight vector can be translated, using a variable change, to the α-coefficients, and both are determined without iterative calculations. We calculate solutions using several error functions, achieving the best trade-off between accuracy and efficiency with the linear function. These solutions for the α coefficients can be considered alternatives to the ELM with a new physical meaning in terms of error and margin: in fact, the linear and quadratic DKP are special cases of the two-class ELM when the regularization parameter C takes the values C=0 and C=∞. The linear DKP is extremely efficient and much faster (over a vast collection of 42 benchmark and real-life data sets) than 12 very popular and accurate classifiers including SVM, Multi-Layer Perceptron, Adaboost, Random Forest and Bagging of RPART decision trees, Linear Discriminant Analysis, K-Nearest Neighbors, ELM, Probabilistic Neural Networks, Radial Basis Function neural networks and Generalized ART. Besides, despite its simplicity and extreme efficiency, DKP achieves higher accuracies than 7 out of 12 classifiers, exhibiting small differences with respect to the best ones (SVM, ELM, Adaboost and Random Forest), which are much slower. Thus, the DKP provides an easy and fast way

  6. Using deep recurrent neural network for direct beam solar irradiance cloud screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Maosi; Davis, John M.; Liu, Chaoshun; Sun, Zhibin; Zempila, Melina Maria; Gao, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Cloud screening is an essential procedure for in-situ calibration and atmospheric properties retrieval on (UV-)MultiFilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer [(UV-)MFRSR]. Previous study has explored a cloud screening algorithm for direct-beam (UV-)MFRSR voltage measurements based on the stability assumption on a long time period (typically a half day or a whole day). To design such an algorithm requires in-depth understanding of radiative transfer and delicate data manipulation. Recent rapid developments on deep neural network and computation hardware have opened a window for modeling complicated End-to-End systems with a standardized strategy. In this study, a multi-layer dynamic bidirectional recurrent neural network is built for determining the cloudiness on each time point with a 17-year training dataset and tested with another 1-year dataset. The dataset is the daily 3-minute cosine corrected voltages, airmasses, and the corresponding cloud/clear-sky labels at two stations of the USDA UV-B Monitoring and Research Program. The results show that the optimized neural network model (3-layer, 250 hidden units, and 80 epochs of training) has an overall test accuracy of 97.87% (97.56% for the Oklahoma site and 98.16% for the Hawaii site). Generally, the neural network model grasps the key concept of the original model to use data in the entire day rather than short nearby measurements to perform cloud screening. A scrutiny of the logits layer suggests that the neural network model automatically learns a way to calculate a quantity similar to total optical depth and finds an appropriate threshold for cloud screening.

  7. Ultrafast photoconductor detector-laser-diode transmitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.L.; Davis, B.A.; Davies, T.J.; Nelson, M.A.; Thomas, M.C.; Zagarino, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    We report the results of an experiment in which we used an ultrafast, photoconductive, radiation detector to drive a fast laser-diode transmitter. When we irradiated the neutron-damaged Cr-doped GaAs detector with 17-MeV electron beams, the temporal response was measured to be less than 30 ps. The pulses from this detector modulated a fast GaAlAs laser diode to transmit the laser output through 30- and 1100-m optical fibers. Preliminary results indicate that 50- and 80-ps time resolutions, respectively, are obtainable with these fibers. We are now working to integrate the photoconductive detector and the laser diode transmitter into a single chip

  8. Ultrafast photoconductive detector-laser-diode transmitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.L.; Davies, T.J.; Nelson, M.A.; Thomas, M.C.; Zagarino, P.A.; Davis, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors report the results of an experiment in which they used an ultrafast, photoconductive, radiation detector to drive a fast laser-diode transmitter. When they irradiated the neutron-damaged Cr-doped Ga/As detector with 17-MeV electron beams, the temporal response of was measured to be less than 30 ps. The pulses from this detector modulated a fast GaAlAs laser diode to transmit the laser output through 30- and 1100-m optical fibers. Preliminary results indicate that 50- and 80-ps time resolutions, respectively, are obtainable with these fibers. They are now working to integrate the photoconductive detector and the laser diode transmitter into a single chip

  9. Probe beam deflection technique as acoustic emission directionality sensor with photoacoustic emission source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Ronald A; Maswadi, Saher; Glickman, Randolph; Shadaram, Mehdi

    2014-01-20

    The goal of this paper is to demonstrate the unique capability of measuring the vector or angular information of propagating acoustic waves using an optical sensor. Acoustic waves were generated using photoacoustic interaction and detected by the probe beam deflection technique. Experiments and simulations were performed to study the interaction of acoustic emissions with an optical sensor in a coupling medium. The simulated results predict the probe beam and wavefront interaction and produced simulated signals that are verified by experiment.

  10. Arbitrary Control of Polarization and Intensity Profiles of Diffraction-Attenuation-Resistant Beams along the Propagation Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corato-Zanarella, Mateus; Dorrah, Ahmed H.; Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Mojahedi, Mo

    2018-02-01

    We report on the theory and experimental generation of a class of diffraction-attenuation-resistant beams with state of polarization (SOP) and intensity that can be controlled on demand along the propagation direction. This control is achieved by a suitable superposition of Bessel beams, whose parameters are systematically chosen based on closed-form analytic expressions provided by the frozen waves method. Using an amplitude-only spatial light modulator, we experimentally demonstrate three scenarios. In the first, the SOP of a horizontally polarized beam evolves to radial polarization and is then changed to vertical polarization, with the beam intensity held constant. In the second, we simultaneously control the SOP and the longitudinal intensity profile, which is chosen such that the beam's central ring can be switched off over predefined space regions, thus generating multiple foci with different SOPs and at different intensity levels along the propagation. Finally, the ability to control the SOP while overcoming attenuation inside lossy fluids is shown experimentally. We envision our proposed method to be of great interest for many applications, such as optical tweezers, atom guiding, material processing, microscopy, and optical communications.

  11. High-power direct diode laser output by spectral beam combining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hao; Meng, Huicheng; Ruan, Xu; Du, Weichuan; Wang, Zhao

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrate a spectral beam combining scheme based on multiple mini-bar stacks, which have more diode laser combining elements, to increase the combined diode laser power and realize equal beam quality in both the fast and slow axes. A spectral beam combining diode laser output of 1130 W is achieved with an operating current of 75 A. When a 9.6 X de-magnifying telescope is introduced between the output mirror and the diffraction grating, to restrain cross-talk among diode laser emitters, a 710 W spectral beam combining diode laser output is achieved at the operating current of 70 A, and the beam quality on the fast and slow axes of the combined beam is about 7.5 mm mrad and 7.3 mm mrad respectively. The power reduction is caused by the existence of a couple resonator between the rear facet of the diode laser and the fast axis collimation lens, and it should be eliminated by using diode laser chips with higher front facet transmission efficiency and a fast axis collimation lens with lower residual reflectivity.

  12. Seeing the invisible: direct visualization of therapeutic radiation beams using air scintillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahimian, Benjamin; Ceballos, Andrew; Türkcan, Silvan; Kapp, Daniel S; Pratx, Guillem

    2014-01-01

    To assess whether air scintillation produced during standard radiation treatments can be visualized and used to monitor a beam in a nonperturbing manner. Air scintillation is caused by the excitation of nitrogen gas by ionizing radiation. This weak emission occurs predominantly in the 300-430 nm range. An electron-multiplication charge-coupled device camera, outfitted with an f/0.95 lens, was used to capture air scintillation produced by kilovoltage photon beams and megavoltage electron beams used in radiation therapy. The treatment rooms were prepared to block background light and a short-pass filter was utilized to block light above 440 nm. Air scintillation from an orthovoltage unit (50 kVp, 30 mA) was visualized with a relatively short exposure time (10 s) and showed an inverse falloff (r(2) = 0.89). Electron beams were also imaged. For a fixed exposure time (100 s), air scintillation was proportional to dose rate (r(2) = 0.9998). As energy increased, the divergence of the electron beam decreased and the penumbra improved. By irradiating a transparent phantom, the authors also showed that Cherenkov luminescence did not interfere with the detection of air scintillation. In a final illustration of the capabilities of this new technique, the authors visualized air scintillation produced during a total skin irradiation treatment. Air scintillation can be measured to monitor a radiation beam in an inexpensive and nonperturbing manner. This physical phenomenon could be useful for dosimetry of therapeutic radiation beams or for online detection of gross errors during fractionated treatments.

  13. Seeing the invisible: Direct visualization of therapeutic radiation beams using air scintillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahimian, Benjamin; Türkcan, Silvan; Kapp, Daniel S.; Pratx, Guillem, E-mail: pratx@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Ceballos, Andrew [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To assess whether air scintillation produced during standard radiation treatments can be visualized and used to monitor a beam in a nonperturbing manner. Methods: Air scintillation is caused by the excitation of nitrogen gas by ionizing radiation. This weak emission occurs predominantly in the 300–430 nm range. An electron-multiplication charge-coupled device camera, outfitted with an f/0.95 lens, was used to capture air scintillation produced by kilovoltage photon beams and megavoltage electron beams used in radiation therapy. The treatment rooms were prepared to block background light and a short-pass filter was utilized to block light above 440 nm. Results: Air scintillation from an orthovoltage unit (50 kVp, 30 mA) was visualized with a relatively short exposure time (10 s) and showed an inverse falloff (r{sup 2} = 0.89). Electron beams were also imaged. For a fixed exposure time (100 s), air scintillation was proportional to dose rate (r{sup 2} = 0.9998). As energy increased, the divergence of the electron beam decreased and the penumbra improved. By irradiating a transparent phantom, the authors also showed that Cherenkov luminescence did not interfere with the detection of air scintillation. In a final illustration of the capabilities of this new technique, the authors visualized air scintillation produced during a total skin irradiation treatment. Conclusions: Air scintillation can be measured to monitor a radiation beam in an inexpensive and nonperturbing manner. This physical phenomenon could be useful for dosimetry of therapeutic radiation beams or for online detection of gross errors during fractionated treatments.

  14. Quantitative assessment of the ion-beam irradiation induced direct damage of nucleic acid bases through FTIR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Qing, E-mail: huangq@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agriculture Engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029, Anhui (China); Su, Xi; Yao, Guohua; Lu, Yilin; Ke, Zhigang; Liu, Jinghua; Wu, Yuejin; Yu, Zengliang [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agriculture Engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2014-07-01

    Energetic particles exist ubiquitously in nature, and when they hit DNA molecules in organisms, they may induce critical biological effects such as mutation. It is however still a challenge to measure directly and quantitatively the damage imposed by the energetic ions on target DNA molecules. In this work we attempted to employ Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to assess the ion-induced direct damage of four nucleic acid bases, namely, thymine (T), cytosine (C), guanine (G), and adenine (A), which are the building blocks of DNA molecules. The samples were prepared as thin films, irradiated by argon ion-beams at raised ion fluences, and in the meantime measured by FTIR spectroscopy for the damage in a quasi-in-situ manner. It was found that the low-energy ion-beam induced radiosensitivity of the four bases shows the sequence G > T > C > A, wherein the possible mechanism was also discussed.

  15. Ultrafast Microscopy of Energy and Charge Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Libai

    The frontier in solar energy research now lies in learning how to integrate functional entities across multiple length scales to create optimal devices. Advancing the field requires transformative experimental tools that probe energy transfer processes from the nano to the meso lengthscales. To address this challenge, we aim to understand multi-scale energy transport across both multiple length and time scales, coupling simultaneous high spatial, structural, and temporal resolution. In my talk, I will focus on our recent progress on visualization of exciton and charge transport in solar energy harvesting materials from the nano to mesoscale employing ultrafast optical nanoscopy. With approaches that combine spatial and temporal resolutions, we have recently revealed a new singlet-mediated triplet transport mechanism in certain singlet fission materials. This work demonstrates a new triplet exciton transport mechanism leading to favorable long-range triplet exciton diffusion on the picosecond and nanosecond timescales for solar cell applications. We have also performed a direct measurement of carrier transport in space and in time by mapping carrier density with simultaneous ultrafast time resolution and 50 nm spatial precision in perovskite thin films using transient absorption microscopy. These results directly visualize long-range carrier transport of 220nm in 2 ns for solution-processed polycrystalline CH3NH3PbI3 thin films. The spatially and temporally resolved measurements reported here underscore the importance of the local morphology and establish an important first step towards discerning the underlying transport properties of perovskite materials.

  16. Opto-microwave, Butler matrixes based front-end for a multi-beam large direct radiating array antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqueras, M. A.; Mengual, T.; Navasquillo, O.; Sotom, M.; Caille, G.

    2017-11-01

    The evolution of broadband communication satellites shows a clear trend towards beam forming and beamswitching systems with efficient multiple access schemes with wide bandwidths, for which to be economically viable, the communication price shall be as low as possible. In such applications, the most demanding antenna concept is the Direct Radiating Array (DRA) since its use allows a flexible power allocation between beams and may afford failures in their active chains with low impact on the antenna radiating pattern. Forming multiple antenna beams, as for `multimedia via satellite' missions, can be done mainly in three ways: in microwave domain, by digital or optical processors: - Microwave beam-formers are strongly constrained by the mass and volume of microwave devices and waveguides - the bandwidth of digital processors is limited due to power consumption and complexity constraints. - The microwave photonics is an enabling technology that can improve the antenna feeding network performances, overcoming the limitations of the traditional technology in the more demanding scenarios, and may overcome the conventional RF beam-former issues, to generate accurately the very numerous time delays or phase shifts required in a DRA with a large number of beams and of radiating elements. Integrated optics technology can play a crucial role as an alternative technology for implementing beam-forming structures for satellite applications thanks to the well known advantages of this technology such as low volume and weight, huge electrical bandwidth, electro-magnetic interference immunity, low consumption, remote delivery capability with low-attenuation (by carrying all microwave signals over optical fibres) and the robustness and precision that exhibits integrated optics. Under the ESA contract 4000105095/12/NL/RA the consortium formed by DAS Photonics, Thales Alenia Space and the Nanophotonic Technology Center of Valencia is developing a three-dimensional Optical Beamforming

  17. Transmission characteristics of Bessel-Gaussian vortex beams propagating along both longitudinal and transverse directions in a subway tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohui; Song, Yingxiong

    2018-02-01

    By exploiting the non-Kolmogorov model and Rytov approximation theory, a propagation model of Bessel-Gaussian vortex beams (BGVB) propagating in a subway tunnel is derived. Based on the propagation model, a model of orbital angular momentum (OAM) mode probability distribution is established to evaluate the propagation performance when the beam propagates along both longitudinal and transverse directions in the subway tunnel. By numerical simulations and experimental verifications, the influences of the various parameters of BGVB and turbulence on the OAM mode probability distribution are evaluated, and the results of simulations are consistent with the experimental statistics. The results verify that the middle area of turbulence is more beneficial for the vortex beam propagation than the edge; when the BGVB propagates along the longitudinal direction in the subway tunnel, the effects of turbulence on the OAM mode probability distribution can be decreased by selecting a larger anisotropy parameter, smaller coherence length, larger non-Kolmogorov power spectrum coefficient, smaller topological charge number, deeper subway tunnel, lower train speed, and longer wavelength. When the BGVB propagates along the transverse direction, the influences can be also mitigated by adopting a larger topological charge number, less non-Kolmogorov power spectrum coefficient, smaller refractive structure index, shorter wavelength, and shorter propagation distance.

  18. Automation of researches on direction, forming and transportation of electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balafanov, E.K; Voronova, N.A.; Kupchishin, A.I.; Kolodin, L.G.; Grimal'skij, B.V.

    1998-01-01

    Automated control system Kristall is intended to control for technological processes of unit, for study of electrons channeling in crystals and for registration of accompanying radiation. Unit consists of 4 connected parts: EhLU-6 type electron accelerator; system for forming and transportation of electron beam; goniometer system; radiation detecting system. Aims of creation of the automated system are as follows: increase of EhLU-6 accelerator stability at the expense of automated stabilization of their parameters; increase of quality of monochromatization of electron beam; ensuring of electron miss to given point of crystal by dint of automated control for rotary electromagnet; simplification of crystal initial adjustment against initial electron beam and crystal displacement in given position at the expense automation control of goniometer; ensuring of automated gathering of information and data processing of physical experiment

  19. Direct measurement of the energy spectrum of an intense proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeper, R.J.; Lee, J.R.; Kissel, L.; Johnson, D.J.; Stygar, W.A.; Hebron, D.E.; Roose, L.D.

    1983-01-01

    A time-resolved magnetic spectrometer has been used to measure the energy spectrum of an intense (0.5 TW/cm 2 ) proton beam. A thin (2400 A) gold foil placed at the focus of an ion diode Rutherford scattered protons by 90 0 into the spectrometer, reducing the beam intensity to a level suitable for magnetic analysis. The scattered beam was collimated by two 1 mm diameter apertures separated by 12.3 cm. The collimated protons were deflected in a 12.7 cm diameter, 6.65 Kg samarium-cobalt permanent magnet. The deflected protons were recorded simultaneously on CR-39 and eight 1 mm 2 by 35 μm thick PIN diodes. A Monte Carlo computer code was used to calculate the sensitivity and resolution of the spectrometer. Data taken on Proto-I show a 150 keV to 250 keV wide proton energy spectrum at each instant in time

  20. rf streak camera based ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P; Moody, J T; Scoby, C M; Gutierrez, M S; Tran, T

    2009-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate the possibility of using a rf streak camera to time resolve in a single shot structural changes at the sub-100 fs time scale via relativistic electron diffraction. We experimentally tested this novel concept at the UCLA Pegasus rf photoinjector. Time-resolved diffraction patterns from thin Al foil are recorded. Averaging over 50 shots is required in order to get statistics sufficient to uncover a variation in time of the diffraction patterns. In the absence of an external pump laser, this is explained as due to the energy chirp on the beam out of the electron gun. With further improvements to the electron source, rf streak camera based ultrafast electron diffraction has the potential to yield truly single shot measurements of ultrafast processes.

  1. Experiments on the nuclear fragmentation and on the production of radioactive beams for direct reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, A.

    1993-06-01

    In April 1992 at the GSI a prototype experiment on the production and study of the double-magic radioactive nucleus 56 Ni was successfully performed with proton scattering in inverse kinematics. A 350 MeV/u 56 Ni primary beam from the heavy ion synchrotron SIS was fragmented in a 4/g/cm 2 thick beryllium target. The separation of the formed isotopes ensued in the fragment separator FRS, which was operated in the achromatic mode with a degrader. Production cross sections for a whole series of fragments in the range 29≥Z≥19 and 57≥A≥41 were obtained. It succeeded to detect proton-rich isotopes at the boundary of the stability as for instance 52 Co, 51 Co, 50 Co, or 52 Ni and to determine for the first time their production cross sections. A further part of this thesis with regard to experiments with radioactive beams were first test experiments at the experimental storage ring ESR. The spotlight held luminosity measurements at the internal gas target with cooled, stable proton beam. For this the elastic scattering was stuided in inverse kinematics in the Rutherford range. Studied were different projectile beams (Ne, Xe) at energies of 150 MeV/u respectively 250 MeV/u and gas jets of nitrogen, argon, and hydrogen. The measured energy spectra of the recoils are in agreement with simulation calculations

  2. Direct estimation of human trabecular bone stiffness using cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klintström, Eva; Klintström, Benjamin; Pahr, Dieter; Brismar, Torkel B; Smedby, Örjan; Moreno, Rodrigo

    2018-04-10

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of estimating the biomechanical properties of trabecular bone through finite element simulations by using dental cone beam computed tomography data. Fourteen human radius specimens were scanned in 3 cone beam computed tomography devices: 3-D Accuitomo 80 (J. Morita MFG., Kyoto, Japan), NewTom 5 G (QR Verona, Verona, Italy), and Verity (Planmed, Helsinki, Finland). The imaging data were segmented by using 2 different methods. Stiffness (Young modulus), shear moduli, and the size and shape of the stiffness tensor were studied. Corresponding evaluations by using micro-CT were regarded as the reference standard. The 3-D Accuitomo 80 (J. Morita MFG., Kyoto, Japan) showed good performance in estimating stiffness and shear moduli but was sensitive to the choice of segmentation method. NewTom 5 G (QR Verona, Verona, Italy) and Verity (Planmed, Helsinki, Finland) yielded good correlations, but they were not as strong as Accuitomo 80 (J. Morita MFG., Kyoto, Japan). The cone beam computed tomography devices overestimated both stiffness and shear compared with the micro-CT estimations. Finite element-based calculations of biomechanics from cone beam computed tomography data are feasible, with strong correlations for the Accuitomo 80 scanner (J. Morita MFG., Kyoto, Japan) combined with an appropriate segmentation method. Such measurements might be useful for predicting implant survival by in vivo estimations of bone properties. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ultrafast Structural Dynamics in InSb Probed by Time-Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, A.H.; Shank, C.V.; Chin, A.H.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Shank, C.V.; Glover, T.E.; Leemans, W.P.; Balling, P.

    1999-01-01

    Ultrafast structural dynamics in laser-perturbed InSb are studied using time-resolved x-ray diffraction with a novel femtosecond x-ray source. We report the first observation of a delay in the onset of lattice expansion, which we attribute to energy relaxation processes and lattice strain propagation. In addition, we observe direct indications of ultrafast disordering on a subpicosecond time scale. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  4. Quantification of the Relative Biological Effectiveness for Ion Beam Radiotherapy: Direct Experimental Comparison of Proton and Carbon Ion Beams and a Novel Approach for Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsaesser, Thilo; Weyrather, Wilma K.; Friedrich, Thomas; Durante, Marco; Iancu, Gheorghe; Kraemer, Michael; Kragl, Gabriele; Brons, Stephan; Winter, Marcus; Weber, Klaus-Josef; Scholz, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To present the first direct experimental in vitro comparison of the biological effectiveness of range-equivalent protons and carbon ion beams for Chinese hamster ovary cells exposed in a three-dimensional phantom using a pencil beam scanning technique and to compare the experimental data with a novel biophysical model. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was measured in the phantom after irradiation with two opposing fields, thus mimicking the typical patient treatment scenario. The novel biophysical model represents a substantial extension of the local effect model, previously used for treatment planning in carbon ion therapy for more than 400 patients, and potentially can be used to predict effectiveness of all ion species relevant for radiotherapy. A key feature of the new approach is the more sophisticated consideration of spatially correlated damage induced by ion irradiation. Results: The experimental data obtained for Chinese hamster ovary cells clearly demonstrate that higher cell killing is achieved in the target region with carbon ions as compared with protons when the effects in the entrance channel are comparable. The model predictions demonstrate agreement with these experimental data and with data obtained with helium ions under similar conditions. Good agreement is also achieved with relative biological effectiveness values reported in the literature for other cell lines for monoenergetic proton, helium, and carbon ions. Conclusion: Both the experimental data and the new modeling approach are supportive of the advantages of carbon ions as compared with protons for treatment-like field configurations. Because the model predicts the effectiveness for several ion species with similar accuracy, it represents a powerful tool for further optimization and utilization of the potential of ion beams in tumor therapy.

  5. Direct Coupling of Electron Beam Irradiation and Polymer Extrusion for a Continuous Polymer Modification in Molten State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephan, M.

    2006-01-01

    The new approach of an e-beam initiating of chemical reactions in polymers in molten state results in some innovative results. High temperature, intensive macromolecular mobility and the absence of any crystallinity are some reasons for achieving unexpected structures, processing behaviour and properties changes in such treated thermoplastics and rubbers. Examples are a much more effective crosslinking of polyethylene and special rubbers, long chain branching of polypropylene or a partial crosslinking of polysulfone. Additionally, most of these modification effects are also achievable by a direct coupling of electron beam irradiation and conventional polymer extrusion processing for a continuous polymer modification in molten state. For realizing this unique processing technique a special MOBILE RADIATION FACILITY (MOBRAD1/T) was designed, constructed and manufactured in the IPF Dresden at which a lab-scale single screw extruder was adapted direct to an electron beam accelerator to realize a prompt irradiation of extruded polymer melt profiles before there solidification. Surprisingly, as a result of these short-time-melt reactions some effective and new polymer modification effects were found and will be presented

  6. Ultra-fast ipsilateral DPOAE adaptation not modulated by attention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalhoff, Ernst; Zelle, Dennis; Gummer, Anthony W.

    2018-05-01

    Efferent stimulation of outer hair cells is supposed to attenuate cochlear amplification of sound waves and is accompanied by reduced DPOAE amplitudes. Recently, a method using two subsequent f2 pulses during presentation of a longer f1 pulse was introduced to measure fast ipsilateral adaptation effects on separated DPOAE components. Compensating primary-tone onsets for their latencies at the f2-tonotopic place, the average adaptation measured in four normal-hearing subjects was 5.0 dB with a time constant below 5 ms. In the present study, two experiments were performed to determine the origin of this ultra-fast ipsilateral adaptation effect. The first experiment measured ultra-fast ipsilateral adaptation using a two-pulse paradigm at three frequencies in the four subjects, while controlling for visual attention of the subjects. The other experiment also controlled for visual attention, but utilized a sequence of f2 short pulses in the presence of a continuous f1 tone to sample ipsilateral adaptation effects with longer time constants in eight subjects. In the first experiment, no significant change in the ultra-fast adaptation between non-directed attention and visual attention could be detected. In contrast, the second experiment revealed significant changes in the magnitude of the slower ipsilateral adaptation in the visual-attention condition. In conclusion, the lack of an attentional influence indicates that the ultra-fast ipsilateral DPOAE adaptation is not solely mediated by the medial olivocochlear reflex.

  7. Fabrication of hydrophobic structures on coronary stent surface based on direct three-beam laser interference lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Long-yue; Zhou, Wei-qi; Wang, Yuan-bo; Wang, Si-qi; Bai, Chong; Li, Shi-ming; Liu, Bin; Wang, Jun-nan; Cui, Cheng-kun; Li, Yong-liang

    2016-05-01

    To solve the problems with coronary stent implantation, coronary artery stent surface was directly modified by three-beam laser interference lithography through imitating the water-repellent surface of lotus leaf, and uniform micro-nano structures with the controllable period were fabricated. The morphological properties and contact angle (CA) of the microstructure were measured by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and CA system. The water repellency of stent was also evaluated by the contact and then separation between the water drop and the stent. The results show that the close-packed concave structure with the period of about 12 μm can be fabricated on the stent surface with special parameters (incident angle of 3°, laser energy density of 2.2 J·cm-2 and exposure time of 80 s) by using the three-beam laser at 1 064 nm, and the structure has good water repellency with CA of 120°.

  8. Ultrafast vibrations of gold nanorings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelf, T; Tanaka, Y; Matsuda, O

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the vibrational modes of gold nanorings on a silica substrate with an ultrafast optical technique. By comparison with numerical simulations, we identify several resonances in the gigahertz range associated with axially symmetric deformations of the nanoring and substrate. We...

  9. Ultrafast spectroscopy of biological photoreceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kennis, J.T.M.; Groot, M.L.

    2007-01-01

    We review recent new insights on reaction dynamics of photoreceptors proteins gained from ultrafast spectroscopy. In Blue Light sensing Using FAD (BLUF) domains, a hydrogen-bond rearrangement around the flavin chromophore proceeds through a radical-pair mechanism, by which light-induced electron and

  10. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Semiconductor Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang; Hvam, Jørn Marcher

    1999-01-01

    In this work we present an experimental technique for investigating ultrafast carrier dynamics in semiconductor optical amplifiers at room temperature. These dynamics, influenced by carrier heating, spectral hole-burning and two-photon absorption, are very important for device applications in inf...

  11. Ultrafast vibrations of gold nanorings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelf, T; Tanaka, Y; Matsuda, O

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the vibrational modes of gold nanorings on a silica substrate with an ultrafast optical technique. By comparison with numerical simulations, we identify several resonances in the gigahertz range associated with axially symmetric deformations of the nanoring and substrate. We elucid...

  12. Direction-dependent waist-shift-difference of Gaussian beam in a multiple-pass zigzag slab amplifier and geometrical optics compensation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaoyang; Kurita, Takashi; Miyanaga, Noriaki

    2017-10-20

    Zigzag and non-zigzag beam waist shifts in a multiple-pass zigzag slab amplifier are investigated based on the propagation of a Gaussian beam. Different incident angles in the zigzag and non-zigzag planes would introduce a direction-dependent waist-shift-difference, which distorts the beam quality in both the near- and far-fields. The theoretical model and analytical expressions of this phenomenon are presented, and intensity distributions in the two orthogonal planes are simulated and compared. A geometrical optics compensation method by a beam with 90° rotation is proposed, which not only could correct the direction-dependent waist-shift-difference but also possibly average the traditional thermally induced wavefront-distortion-difference between the horizontal and vertical beam directions.

  13. Consistency of the directionality of partially coherent beams in turbulence expressed in terms of the angular spread and the far-field average intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao-Wen, Chen; Xiao-Ling, Ji

    2010-01-01

    Under the quadratic approximation of the Rytov's phase structure function, this paper derives the general closed-form expressions for the mean-squared width and the angular spread of partially coherent beams in turbulence. It finds that under a certain condition different types of partially coherent beams may have the same directionality as a fully coherent Gaussian beam in free space and also in atmospheric turbulence if the angular spread is chosen as the characteristic parameter of beam directionality. On the other hand, it shows that generally, the directionality of partially coherent beams expressed in terms of the angular spread is not consistent with that in terms of the normalized far-field average intensity distribution in free space, but the consistency can be achieved due to turbulence. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  14. Molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendelbury, J.M.; Smith, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    Studies with directed collision-free beams of particles continue to play an important role in the development of modern physics and chemistry. The deflections suffered by such beams as they pass through electric and magnetic fields or laser radiation provide some of the most direct information about the individual constituents of the beam; the scattering observed when two beams intersect yields important data about the intermolecular forces responsible for the scattering. (author)

  15. Direct Trace Element Analysis of Liquid Blood Samples by In-Air Ion Beam Analytical Techniques (PIXE-PIGE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huszank, Robert; Csedreki, László; Török, Zsófia

    2017-02-07

    There are various liquid materials whose elemental composition is of interest in various fields of science and technology. In many cases, sample preparation or the extraction can be complicated, or it would destroy the original environment before the analysis (for example, in the case of biological samples). However, multielement direct analysis of liquid samples can be realized by an external PIXE-PIGE measurement system. Particle-induced X-ray and gamma-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE, PIGE) techniques were applied in external (in-air) microbeam configuration for the trace and main element determination of liquid samples. The direct analysis of standard solutions of several metal salts and human blood samples (whole blood, blood serum, blood plasma, and formed elements) was realized. From the blood samples, Na, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Br elemental concentrations were determined. The focused and scanned ion beam creates an opportunity to analyze very small volume samples (∼10 μL). As the sample matrix consists of light elements, the analysis is possible at ppm level. Using this external beam setup, it was found that it is possible to determine elemental composition of small-volume liquid samples routinely, while the liquid samples do not require any preparation processes, and thus, they can be analyzed directly. In the case of lower concentrations, the method is also suitable for the analysis (down to even ∼1 ppm level) but with less accuracy and longer measurement times.

  16. System for monitoring the position, intensity, uniformity, and directivity of a beam of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boux, R.

    1976-01-01

    A monitoring device transparent to ionizing radiation, designed to measure the orientation, intensity and uniformity of an incident beam, comprises a cylindrical housing forming at least one ionization chamber with one or more ion-collecting electrodes transverse to the housing axis, each electrode being subdivided into a plurality of mutually insulated conductive elements connected to respective amplifiers. The elements of at least one electrode include one or more outer elements surrounding or bracketing one or more inner elements to measure the radiation in a central zone and a peripheral zone. The outputs of the respective amplifiers are additively and subtractively combined in an evaluation circuit

  17. Beam propagation modeling of modified volume Fresnel zone plates fabricated by femtosecond laser direct writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srisungsitthisunti, Pornsak; Ersoy, Okan K; Xu, Xianfan

    2009-01-01

    Light diffraction by volume Fresnel zone plates (VFZPs) is simulated by the Hankel transform beam propagation method (Hankel BPM). The method utilizes circularly symmetric geometry and small step propagation to calculate the diffracted wave fields by VFZP layers. It is shown that fast and accurate diffraction results can be obtained with the Hankel BPM. The results show an excellent agreement with the scalar diffraction theory and the experimental results. The numerical method allows more comprehensive studies of the VFZP parameters to achieve higher diffraction efficiency.

  18. Employing beam-forming for estimating the direction of arrival in a multi-path propagation environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bresch

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to recent researches on traffic accidents with vulnerable road users (VRUs, several measures revealed a great opportunity of reduction. However, all measures applied so far failed to reduce the number of traffic accidents if there is no line-of-sight. Therefore, a transponder signal is utilized to make the VRU visible. The motor vehicle carries a mobile receiver for VRU detection and location. The receiver employs digital beam-forming for estimating the direction of arrival (DOA with an antenna array for RF ISM band. A sequence of DOA estimations is used for location and motion estimation purposes.

  19. Acoustic beam steering by light refraction: illustration with directivity patterns of a tilted volume photoacoustic source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raetz, Samuel; Dehoux, Thomas; Perton, Mathieu; Audoin, Bertrand

    2013-12-01

    The symmetry of a thermoelastic source resulting from laser absorption can be broken when the direction of light propagation in an elastic half-space is inclined relatively to the surface. This leads to an asymmetry of the directivity patterns of both compressional and shear acoustic waves. In contrast to classical surface acoustic sources, the tunable volume source allows one to take advantage of the mode conversion at the surface to control the directivity of specific modes. Physical interpretations of the evolution of the directivity patterns with the increasing light angle of incidence and of the relations between the preferential directions of compressional- and shear-wave emission are proposed. In order to compare calculated directivity patterns with measurements of normal displacement amplitudes performed on plates, a procedure is proposed to transform the directivity patterns into pseudo-directivity patterns representative of the experimental conditions. The comparison of the theoretical with measured pseudo-directivity patterns demonstrates the ability to enhance bulk-wave amplitudes and to steer specific bulk acoustic modes by adequately tuning light refraction.

  20. Lasing cavities and ultra-fast switch based on self-collimation of photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Deyin; Zhou Chuanhong; Gong Qian; Jiang Xunya

    2008-01-01

    The lasing cavities and ultra-fast switch based on the self-collimation (SC) of photonic crystal have been studied in this work. Some special properties of these devices are demonstrated, such as the higher quality factors and concise integration of the lasing cavities, the tolerance of the non-parallel reflectors in Fabry-Perot cavities. With nonlinearity, the ultra-fast switch can also be realized around the SC frequency. All these functional devices are designed based on the strong beam confinement of SC

  1. Lasing cavities and ultra-fast switch based on self-collimation of photonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Deyin; Zhou Chuanhong; Gong Qian; Jiang Xunya [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)], E-mail: xyjiang@mit.edu

    2008-06-07

    The lasing cavities and ultra-fast switch based on the self-collimation (SC) of photonic crystal have been studied in this work. Some special properties of these devices are demonstrated, such as the higher quality factors and concise integration of the lasing cavities, the tolerance of the non-parallel reflectors in Fabry-Perot cavities. With nonlinearity, the ultra-fast switch can also be realized around the SC frequency. All these functional devices are designed based on the strong beam confinement of SC.

  2. An ultrafast electron microscope gun driven by two-photon photoemission from a nanotip cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bormann, Reiner; Strauch, Stefanie; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally and numerically investigate the performance of an advanced ultrafast electron source, based on two-photon photoemission from a tungsten needle cathode incorporated in an electron microscope gun geometry. Emission properties are characterized as a function of the electrostatic gun settings, and operating conditions leading to laser-triggered electron beams of very low emittance (below 20 nm mrad) are identified. The results highlight the excellent suitability of optically driven nano-cathodes for the further development of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy

  3. Theoretical model of an optothermal microactuator directly driven by laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Xu; Zhang, Haijun; Xu, Rui; Wang, Shuying; Qin, Chun

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel method of optothermal microactuation based on single and dual laser beams (spots). The theoretical model of the optothermal temperature distribution of an expansion arm is established and simulated, indicating that the maximum temperature of the arm irradiated by dual laser spots, at the same laser power level, is much lower than that irradiated by one single spot, and thus the risk of burning out and damaging the optothermal microactuator (OTMA) can be effectively avoided. To verify the presented method, a 750 μm long OTMA with a 100 μm wide expansion arm is designed and microfabricated, and single/dual laser beams with a wavelength of 650 nm are adopted to carry out experiments. The experimental results showed that the optothermal deflection of the OTMA under the irradiation of dual laser spots is larger than that under the irradiation of a single spot with the same power, which is in accordance with theoretical prediction. This method of optothermal microactuation may expand the practical applications of microactuators, which serve as critical units in micromechanical devices and micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems (MOEMS). (paper)

  4. Directed ion beam sputter etching of polytetrafluorethylene (teflon) using an argon ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, C E; Gabriel, S B; Kuo, Y S

    1982-09-24

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) tubes of outside diameter 375-625 ..mu..m were perforated by bombarding the tubes with an argon ion beam. Holes of diameter 18 ..mu..m and 40 ..mu..m on a side and open-are ratios of 55% and 65% respectively were formed using electroformed nickel mesh masks. Scanning electron micrographs of the hole walls reveal that they are relatively smooth and that the holes go completely through the tubing walls. Holes with the smoothest walls and the sharpest definition were obtained by using low beam power densities and a tubing target temperature of less than 50/sup 0/C. Volumetric flow rate measurements show that the flow rate through the perforated tubules is 0.2-0.5 cm/sup 3/ min/sup -1/ for a pressure drop across the tubes of 2.2 Torr. The perforated microtubules have an important application in medicine for sufferers of hydrocephalus, a malady which results in the build-up of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain. The perforated tubing is inserted into the ventricle and serves as a shunt by draining off the excess cerebrospinal fluid into another part of the brain, where the fluid is absorbed by normal processes.

  5. Direct coupling of a dense (supercritical) gas chromatograph to a mass spectrometer using a supersonic molecular beam interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, L.G.; Wahrhaftig, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    A detecting mass spectrometer has been successfully coupled to a dense gas (supercritical fluid) chromatograph to produce an instrument (DGC/MS) that may be an alternative to high performance liquid chromatograph/mass spectrometer instruments (HPLC/MS) and gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer instruments (GC/MS) for analysis of involatile and/or thermally labile compounds. The mobile phase in DGC is a gas held at temperatures above the critical temperature and at pressures sufficient to obtain nearly liquid-like densities. DGC combines advantages of GC and HPLC: rapid separations, moderate operating temperatures, and analysis of involatile compounds. An advantage unique to DGC is the solvent power dependence upon pressure. While several groups have studied DGC, its development has been limited by the lack of a sensitive and selective detector. Hence, work has been directed towards the design and construction of a DGC/MS resulting in a trial instrument capable of chromatographic pressures of at least 300 atm and temperatures from 10 0 to 60 0 C. The DGC/MS coupling has been accomplished by the use of a supersonic molecular beam interface. This application of molecular beam formation appears to be unique in its requirements of a large pressure ratio (approx.10 8 ), low flow rates, and low final pressures. The authors outline characteristics of supersonic jets and molecular beams pertinent to the design of such an instrument. The interface which uses pumping speeds of 2400 and 1200 l/s in the beam forming chambers is described in detail, while the other components: the detecting mass spectrometer, the dense gas supply, and the DGC: are briefly described. Preliminary work with this instrument has established the feasibility of DGC/MS as an analytical technique and further development is recommended

  6. Enhanced surface structuring by ultrafast XUV/NIR dual action

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubczak, Krzysztof; Mocek, Tomáš; Chalupský, Jaromír; Lee, G.H.; Kim, T.K.; Park, S.B.; Nam, Ch. H.; Hájková, Věra; Toufarová, Martina; Juha, Libor; Rus, Bedřich

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 5 (2011), s. 1-12 ISSN 1367-2630 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN300100702; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA MŠk LA08024; GA ČR GC202/07/J008 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M100100911 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : XUV beam * ultrafast NIR laser pulses * high-order harmonics * laser-induced periodic surface structures Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 4.177, year: 2011 http://iopscience.iop.org/1367-2630/13/5/053049

  7. On nonequilibrium many-body systems V: ultrafast transport phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, V.N.; Vasconcellos, A.R.; Luzzi, R.

    1989-01-01

    The monequilibrium statistical operator method and its accompanying nonlinear quantum transport theory, are used to perform an analytical study of the ultrafast mobility transient of central-valley photoinjected carriers in direct-gap polar semiconductors. Expressions for the time-resolved mobility of the hot carriers are derived. A brief discussion of the carriers' diffusion coefficient is done. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  8. Ultrafast MR Imaging in Pediatric Neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.K.; Smith, J.T.; Wilkinson, I.D.; Griffiths, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the diagnostic information obtained from ultrafast MR imaging with standard MR imaging techniques in pediatric neuroradiology. The goal was to judge whether ultrafast methods can be used to replace standard methods and reduce the need for sedation or general anesthesia as a result of the considerably shorter scan times. Material and Methods: Our prospective study involved 125 patients. Routine clinical imaging was performed along with two ultrafast methods. Single shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) was used to give T2-weighted images and an echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence to provide a T1-weighted images. The ultrafast images were presented to an experienced neuro radiologist who was also given the information present on the initial referral card. These reports based on the ultrafast images were then compared with the formal radiologic report made solely on the basis of the standard imaging. Results: The overall sensitivity and specificity for ultrafast imaging when compared to the reference standard were 78% and 98% with positive and negative predictive values of 98% and 76%. Pathologies characterized by small areas of subtle T2 prolongation were difficult or impossible to see on the ultrafast images but otherwise they provided reliable information. Conclusions: This paper demonstrates that ultrafast MR imaging can diagnose many pediatric intracranial abnormalities as well as standard methods. Anatomic resolution limits its capacity to define subtle developmental anomalies and contrast resolution limitations of the ultrafast methods reduce the detection of pathology characterized by subtle T2 prolongation

  9. Two-dimensional materials for ultrafast lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fengqiu

    2017-01-01

    As the fundamental optical properties and novel photophysics of graphene and related two-dimensional (2D) crystals are being extensively investigated and revealed, a range of potential applications in optical and optoelectronic devices have been proposed and demonstrated. Of the many possibilities, the use of 2D materials as broadband, cost-effective and versatile ultrafast optical switches (or saturable absorbers) for short-pulsed lasers constitutes a rapidly developing field with not only a good number of publications, but also a promising prospect for commercial exploitation. This review primarily focuses on the recent development of pulsed lasers based on several representative 2D materials. The comparative advantages of these materials are discussed, and challenges to practical exploitation, which represent good future directions of research, are laid out. (paper)

  10. Behavior of Equipment Support Beam Joint Directly Connected to A Steel-plate Concrete(SC) Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. S.; Kwon, K. J.

    2008-01-01

    To decrease the time for building nuclear power plants, a modular construction method, 'Steel-plate Concrete(SC)', has been investigated for over a decade. To construct a SC wall, a pair of steel plates are placed in parallel similar to a form-work in conventional reinforced concrete (RC) structures, and concrete is filled between the steel plates. Instead of removing the steel plates after the concrete has cured, the steel plates serve as components of the structural member. The exposed steel plate of SC structures serves as the base plate for the equipment support, and the headed studs welded to the steel plates are used as anchor bolts. Then, a support beam can be directly welded to the surface of the steel plate in any preferred position. In this study, we discuss the behavior and evaluation method of the equipment support joint directly connected to exposed steel plate of SC wall

  11. Direct fabrication of nano-gap electrodes by focused ion beam etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Takashi; Gamo, Kenji; Kubota, Tohru; Mashiko, Shinro

    2006-01-01

    A simple approach to increase the reliability of nano-gap electrode fabrication techniques is presented. The method is based on maskless sputter etching of Au electrodes using a focused ion beam (FIB) and in-situ monitoring of the etching steps by measuring a current fed to the Au electrodes. The in-situ monitoring is crucial to form nano-gaps much narrower than a FIB spot size. By using this approach, gaps of ∼3-6 nm are fabricated with the high yield of ∼90%, and most of the fabricated nano-gap electrodes showed high resistances of 10 GΩ-1 TΩ. The controllability of the fabrication steps is significantly improved by using triple-layered films consisting of top Ti, Au, and bottom adhesion Ti layers. The applicability of the fabricated nano-gap electrodes to electron transport studies of nano-sized objects is demonstrated by electrical measurement of Au colloidal nano-particles

  12. WE-B-210-02: The Advent of Ultrafast Imaging in Biomedical Ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanter, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the last fifteen years, the introduction of plane or diverging wave transmissions rather than line by line scanning focused beams has broken the conventional barriers of ultrasound imaging. By using such large field of view transmissions, the frame rate reaches the theoretical limit of physics dictated by the ultrasound speed and an ultrasonic map can be provided typically in tens of micro-seconds (several thousands of frames per second). Interestingly, this leap in frame rate is not only a technological breakthrough but it permits the advent of completely new ultrasound imaging modes, including shear wave elastography, electromechanical wave imaging, ultrafast doppler, ultrafast contrast imaging, and even functional ultrasound imaging of brain activity (fUltrasound) introducing Ultrasound as an emerging full-fledged neuroimaging modality. At ultrafast frame rates, it becomes possible to track in real time the transient vibrations – known as shear waves – propagating through organs. Such “human body seismology” provides quantitative maps of local tissue stiffness whose added value for diagnosis has been recently demonstrated in many fields of radiology (breast, prostate and liver cancer, cardiovascular imaging, …). Today, Supersonic Imagine company is commercializing the first clinical ultrafast ultrasound scanner, Aixplorer with real time Shear Wave Elastography. This is the first example of an ultrafast Ultrasound approach surpassing the research phase and now widely spread in the clinical medical ultrasound community with an installed base of more than 1000 Aixplorer systems in 54 countries worldwide. For blood flow imaging, ultrafast Doppler permits high-precision characterization of complex vascular and cardiac flows. It also gives ultrasound the ability to detect very subtle blood flow in very small vessels. In the brain, such ultrasensitive Doppler paves the way for fUltrasound (functional ultrasound imaging) of brain activity with unprecedented

  13. WE-B-210-02: The Advent of Ultrafast Imaging in Biomedical Ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanter, M. [Laboratoire Ondes et Acoustique (France)

    2015-06-15

    In the last fifteen years, the introduction of plane or diverging wave transmissions rather than line by line scanning focused beams has broken the conventional barriers of ultrasound imaging. By using such large field of view transmissions, the frame rate reaches the theoretical limit of physics dictated by the ultrasound speed and an ultrasonic map can be provided typically in tens of micro-seconds (several thousands of frames per second). Interestingly, this leap in frame rate is not only a technological breakthrough but it permits the advent of completely new ultrasound imaging modes, including shear wave elastography, electromechanical wave imaging, ultrafast doppler, ultrafast contrast imaging, and even functional ultrasound imaging of brain activity (fUltrasound) introducing Ultrasound as an emerging full-fledged neuroimaging modality. At ultrafast frame rates, it becomes possible to track in real time the transient vibrations – known as shear waves – propagating through organs. Such “human body seismology” provides quantitative maps of local tissue stiffness whose added value for diagnosis has been recently demonstrated in many fields of radiology (breast, prostate and liver cancer, cardiovascular imaging, …). Today, Supersonic Imagine company is commercializing the first clinical ultrafast ultrasound scanner, Aixplorer with real time Shear Wave Elastography. This is the first example of an ultrafast Ultrasound approach surpassing the research phase and now widely spread in the clinical medical ultrasound community with an installed base of more than 1000 Aixplorer systems in 54 countries worldwide. For blood flow imaging, ultrafast Doppler permits high-precision characterization of complex vascular and cardiac flows. It also gives ultrasound the ability to detect very subtle blood flow in very small vessels. In the brain, such ultrasensitive Doppler paves the way for fUltrasound (functional ultrasound imaging) of brain activity with unprecedented

  14. Ultrafast Thermal Transport at Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahill, David [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Murphy, Catherine [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Martin, Lane [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2014-10-21

    Our research program on Ultrafast Thermal Transport at Interfaces advanced understanding of the mesoscale science of heat conduction. At the length and time scales of atoms and atomic motions, energy is transported by interactions between single-particle and collective excitations. At macroscopic scales, entropy, temperature, and heat are the governing concepts. Key gaps in fundamental knowledge appear at the transitions between these two regimes. The transport of thermal energy at interfaces plays a pivotal role in these scientific issues. Measurements of heat transport with ultrafast time resolution are needed because picoseconds are the fundamental scales where the lack of equilibrium between various thermal excitations becomes a important factor in the transport physics. A critical aspect of our work has been the development of experimental methods and model systems that enabled more precise and sensitive investigations of nanoscale thermal transport.

  15. Ultrafast comparison of personal genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Mauldin, Denise; Hood, Leroy; Robinson, Max; Glusman, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    We present an ultra-fast method for comparing personal genomes. We transform the standard genome representation (lists of variants relative to a reference) into 'genome fingerprints' that can be readily compared across sequencing technologies and reference versions. Because of their reduced size, computation on the genome fingerprints is fast and requires little memory. This enables scaling up a variety of important genome analyses, including quantifying relatedness, recognizing duplicative s...

  16. Beam-beam phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, L.C.

    1980-01-01

    In colliding beam storage rings the beam collision regions are generally so short that the beam-beam interaction can be considered as a series of evenly spaced non-linear kicks superimposed on otherwise stable linear oscillations. Most of the numerical studies on computers were carried out in just this manner. But for some reason this model has not been extensively employed in analytical studies. This is perhaps because all analytical work has so far been done by mathematicians pursuing general transcendental features of non-linear mechanics for whom this specific model of the specific system of colliding beams is too parochial and too repugnantly physical. Be that as it may, this model is of direct interest to accelerator physicists and is amenable to (1) further simplification, (2) physical approximation, and (3) solution by analogy to known phenomena

  17. High-Average-Power Diffraction Pulse-Compression Gratings Enabling Next-Generation Ultrafast Laser Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alessi, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Pulse compressors for ultrafast lasers have been identified as a technology gap in the push towards high peak power systems with high average powers for industrial and scientific applications. Gratings for ultrashort (sub-150fs) pulse compressors are metallic and can absorb a significant percentage of laser energy resulting in up to 40% loss as well as thermal issues which degrade on-target performance. We have developed a next generation gold grating technology which we have scaled to the petawatt-size. This resulted in improvements in efficiency, uniformity and processing as compared to previous substrate etched gratings for high average power. This new design has a deposited dielectric material for the grating ridge rather than etching directly into the glass substrate. It has been observed that average powers as low as 1W in a compressor can cause distortions in the on-target beam. We have developed and tested a method of actively cooling diffraction gratings which, in the case of gold gratings, can support a petawatt peak power laser with up to 600W average power. We demonstrated thermo-mechanical modeling of a grating in its use environment and benchmarked with experimental measurement. Multilayer dielectric (MLD) gratings are not yet used for these high peak power, ultrashort pulse durations due to their design challenges. We have designed and fabricated broad bandwidth, low dispersion MLD gratings suitable for delivering 30 fs pulses at high average power. This new grating design requires the use of a novel Out Of Plane (OOP) compressor, which we have modeled, designed, built and tested. This prototype compressor yielded a transmission of 90% for a pulse with 45 nm bandwidth, and free of spatial and angular chirp. In order to evaluate gratings and compressors built in this project we have commissioned a joule-class ultrafast Ti:Sapphire laser system. Combining the grating cooling and MLD technologies developed here could enable petawatt laser systems to

  18. Direction-dependent stopping power and beam deflection in anisotropic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, O.H.

    1989-01-01

    Directional effects on the motion of swift ions in anisotropic media are studied. The stopping power is a function of the direction of the velocity relative to the principle axes of the medium, and there is a nonzero lateral force on the ion tending to bend its trajectory. These effects arise from the anisotropy of the dielectric response, and are distinct from channeling. Simple expressions are derived for the stopping power and lateral force in the nonrelativistic high-velocity limit, and calculations are performed for crystalline graphite. 6 refs., 7 figs

  19. Demonstration of direct energy recovery of full energy ions at 40 keV on a PLT/ISX beam system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stirling, W.L.; Barber, G.C.; Dagenhart, W.K.

    1980-01-01

    The desire for multisecond beams in the 80-keV/nucleon energy range at 10 MW/module has emphasized the need for technological advances in several areas. At such beam energies, as much as 75% of the initial beam energy is retained in the unneutralized ion components. As a result, two questions immediately come to mind: how can one dispose of this energy; or better still, how can one efficiently recover this energy. The conventional way of treating such a problem is to deflect the ions out of the neutral beam and onto water-cooled plates or beam dumps. This method has worked satisfactorily for 40-keV/nucleon beams in excess of 1.5 MW and approx. 0.5 s. However, the power per unit area to be disposed of in the high power, multisecond beams mentioned above is beyond present-day technology. We have proposed and demonstrated a unique solution to this problem which not only removes the need for beam dumps but also returns from 50 to 80% of the energy contained in the full energy ion component directly and dynamically to the high voltage supply. In fact, the energy in the residual ion component is not expended. The tests were made on a PLT/ISX type beam line at 40 keV/nucleon of about 800 kW and 0.1 s

  20. Direct focusing error correction with ring-wide TBT beam position data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Turn-By-Turn (TBT) betatron oscillation data is a very powerful tool in studying machine optics. Hundreds and thousands of turns of free oscillations are taken in just few tens of milliseconds. With beam covering all positions and angles at every location TBT data can be used to diagnose focusing errors almost instantly. This paper describes a new approach that observes focusing error collectively over all available TBT data to find the optimized quadrupole strength, one location at a time. Example will be shown and other issues will be discussed. The procedure presented clearly has helped to reduce overall deviations significantly, with relative ease. Sextupoles, being a permanent feature of the ring, will need to be incorporated into the model. While cumulative effect from all sextupoles around the ring may be negligible on turn-to-turn basis it is not so in this transfer line analysis. It should be noted that this procedure is not limited to looking for quadrupole errors. By modifying the target of minimization it could in principle be used to look for skew quadrupole errors and sextupole errors as well.

  1. Vector velocity estimation using directional beam forming and cross-correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    The two-dimensional velocity vector using a pulsed ultrasound field can be determined with the invention. The method uses a focused ultrasound field along the velocity direction for probing the moving medium under investigation. Several pulses are emitted and the focused received fields along...

  2. The law of distribution of light beam direction fluctuations in telescopes. [normal density functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divinskiy, M. L.; Kolchinskiy, I. G.

    1974-01-01

    The distribution of deviations from mean star trail directions was studied on the basis of 105 star trails. It was found that about 93% of the trails yield a distribution in agreement with the normal law. About 4% of the star trails agree with the Charlier distribution.

  3. Ultrafast Hierarchical OTDM/WDM Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Sotobayashi

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast hierarchical OTDM/WDM network is proposed for the future core-network. We review its enabling technologies: C- and L-wavelength-band generation, OTDM-WDM mutual multiplexing format conversions, and ultrafast OTDM wavelengthband conversions.

  4. Harmonics generation of a terahertz wakefield free-electron laser from a dielectric loaded waveguide excited by a direct current electron beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiwei; Lu, Yalin; He, Zhigang; Jia, Qika; Wang, Lin

    2016-06-01

    We propose to generate high-power terahertz (THz) radiation from a cylindrical dielectric loaded waveguide (DLW) excited by a direct-current electron beam with the harmonics generation method. The DLW supports a discrete set of modes that can be excited by an electron beam passing through the structure. The interaction of these modes with the co-propagating electron beam results in micro-bunching and the coherent enhancement of the wakefield radiation, which is dominated by the fundamental mode. By properly choosing the parameters of DLW and beam energy, the high order modes can be the harmonics of the fundamental one; thus, high frequency radiation corresponding to the high order modes will benefit from the dominating bunching process at the fundamental eigenfrequency and can also be coherently excited. With the proposed method, high power THz radiation can be obtained with an easily achievable electron beam and a large DLW structure.

  5. Femtosecond single-beam direct laser poling of stable and efficient second-order nonlinear optical properties in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papon, G.; Marquestaut, N.; Royon, A.; Canioni, L.; Petit, Y.; Dussauze, M.; Rodriguez, V.; Cardinal, T.

    2014-01-01

    We depict a new approach for the localized creation in three dimensions (3D) of a highly demanded nonlinear optical function for integrated optics, namely second harmonic generation. We report on the nonlinear optical characteristics induced by single-beam femtosecond direct laser writing in a tailored silver-containing phosphate glass. The original spatial distribution of the nonlinear pattern, composed of four lines after one single laser writing translation, is observed and modeled with success, demonstrating the electric field induced origin of the second harmonic generation. These efficient second-order nonlinear structures (with χ eff (2)  ∼ 0.6 pm V −1 ) with sub-micron scale are impressively stable under thermal constraint up to glass transition temperature, which makes them very promising for new photonic applications, especially when 3D nonlinear architectures are desired

  6. Direct fabrication through electron beam melting technology of custom cranial implants designed in a PHANToM-based haptic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzoli, Alida; Germani, Michele; Raffaeli, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Repairing critical human skull injuries requires the production and use of customized cranial implants and involves the integration of computer aided design and manufacturing (CAD and CAM). The main causes for large cranial defects are trauma, cranial tumors, infected craniotomy bone flaps and external neurosurgical decompression. The success of reconstructive cranial surgery depends upon: the preoperative evaluation of the defect, the design and manufacturing of the implant, and the skill of the operating surgeon. Cranial implant design is usually carried out manually using CAD although this process is very time-consuming and the quality of the end product depends wholly upon the skill of the operator. This paper presents an alternative automated method for the design of custom-made cranial plates in a PHANToM ® -based haptic environment, and their direct fabrication in biocompatible metal using electron beam melting (EBM) technology.

  7. Aerosol Properties Derived from Airborne Sky Radiance and Direct Beam Measurements in Recent NASA and DoE Field Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redemann, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Russell, P. B.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, M.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Dunagan, S. E.; Johnson, R. R.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) ground-based suite of sunphotometers provides measurements of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), precipitable water and spectral sky radiance, which can be inverted to retrieve aerosol microphysical properties that are critical to assessments of aerosol-climate interactions. Because of data quality criteria and sampling constraints, there are significant limitations to the temporal and spatial coverage of AERONET data and their representativeness for global aerosol conditions.The 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument, jointly developed by NASA Ames and PNNL (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) with NASA Goddard collaboration, combines airborne sun tracking and AERONET-like sky scanning with spectroscopic detection. Being an airborne instrument, 4STAR has the potential to fill gaps in the AERONET data set. The 4STAR instrument operated successfully in the SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys) experiment in Aug./Sep. 2013 aboard the NASA DC-8 and in the DoE (Department of Energy)-sponsored TCAP (Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013) experiment aboard the DoE G-1 aircraft. 4STAR provided direct beam measurements of hyperspectral AOD, columnar trace gas retrievals (H2O, O3, NO2), and the first ever airborne hyperspectral sky radiance scans, which can be inverted to yield the same products as AERONET ground-based observations. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the new 4STAR capabilities, with an emphasis on 26 high-quality sky radiance measurements carried out by 4STAR in SEAC4RS. We compare collocated 4STAR and AERONET sky radiances, as well as their retrievals of aerosol microphysical properties for a subset of the available case studies. We summarize the particle property and air-mass characterization studies made possible by the combined 4STAR direct beam and sky radiance

  8. Study of direct beam radiation and standardization of (Engineering) insolation data in korea. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, H S; Auh, C M; Lee, T K; Kim, E I; Jo, D K; Kim, H J; Kim, D H; Jeon, M S; Lee, S M; Chun, I S [Korea Inst. of Energy Research, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    Owing to the world-wide environmental issue and the unbalance on energy demands-offers, it is inevitable to conduct the research and development on clean alternative energy resource. The solar energy resource is recognized as one of the alternatives. A preparation for basic data should, therefore, arise for the extensive utilization of solar energy. Engineering solar (weather) data measured for at least a 30-year period should be needed for solar energy and energy conservation applications. These data should contain hourly averages of global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiation with hourly observations of other meteorological parameters such as sky cover, temperature, humidity, and wind speed. Normals, means, and extremes serving as system design data are to be selected from the 30 years basic data. However, collection of reasonable solar data has merely been carried out for global horizontal insolation since 1882 and direct normal insolation since 1991 in Korea. It still requires the considerable effort and time to square the reliability and to standardize the solar data. In parallel, the related techniques are to be developed such as data quality assessments and control, missing data and inconsistent data treatments, inter- and extra-potation techniques for the intermediate region among the weather stations. The R and D on these subject should be done advancing the practical applications. (author). 43 refs., 31 figs., 16 tabs.

  9. Transient measurements with an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1998-01-01

    We use a photoconductively gated ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope to resolve laser-induced transients on transmission lines and photoconductors. The photoconductive switch on the tunneling probe is illuminated through a rigidly attached fiber. The use of the fiber enables us to scan across...... the transmission line while the change in delay time between pump beam (on the sample) and probe beam (on the probe) provides the temporal information. The investigated photoconductor sample is a low-temperature-grown GaAs layer placed on a sapphire substrate with a thin, semitransparent gold layer. In tunneling...... mode the probe is sensitive to laser-induced field changes in the semiconductor layer. Laser-induced transient signals of 2.2 ps widths are detected. As for the transmission lines, the signals can be explained by a capacitive coupling across the tunneling gap....

  10. LCLS: Ultrafast Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucksbaum, Philip

    2005-01-01

    Everyone knows that lasers can be bright. From Goldfinger to Star Wars, intense lasers carry a 'death ray' reputation in popular culture. But what is intense light, anyway? How can you even make or direct something that will blast to smithereens any material that it encounters? And how can something as ephemeral as a ray of light turn into an irresistible force? Is there an ultimate intensity, a brightest light? We'll answer these questions, and more.

  11. TH-CD-202-02: A Preliminary Study Evaluating Beam-Hardening Artifact Reduction On CT Direct Electron-Density Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H; Dolly, S; Zhao, T; Anastasio, M; Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Ritter, A; Colombo, V; Raupach, R; Huenemohr, N [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Deutschland (Germany); Mistry, N [Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Malvern, PA (United States); Yu, L [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A prototype reconstruction algorithm that can provide direct electron density (ED) images from single energy CT scans is being currently developed by Siemens Healthcare GmbH. This feature can eliminate the need for kV specific calibration curve for radiation treatemnt planning. An added benefit is that beam-hardening artifacts are also reduced on direct-ED images due to the underlying material decomposition. This study is to quantitatively analyze the reduction of beam-hardening artifacts on direct-ED images and suggest additional clinical usages. Methods: HU and direct-ED images were reconstructed on a head phantom scanned on a Siemens Definition AS CT scanner at five tube potentials of 70kV, 80kV, 100kV, 120kV and 140kV respectively. From these images, mean, standard deviation (SD), and local NPS were calculated for regions of interest (ROI) of same locations and sizes. A complete analysis of beam-hardening artifact reduction and image quality improvement was conducted. Results: Along with the increase of tube potentials, ROI means and SDs decrease on both HU and direct-ED images. The mean value differences between HU and direct-ED images are up to 8% with absolute value of 2.9. Compared to that on HU images, the SDs are lower on direct-ED images, and the differences are up to 26%. Interestingly, the local NPS calculated from direct-ED images shows consistent values in the low spatial frequency domain for images acquired from all tube potential settings, while varied dramatically on HU images. This also confirms the beam -hardening artifact reduction on ED images. Conclusions: The low SDs on direct-ED images and relative consistent NPS values in the low spatial frequency domain indicate a reduction of beam-hardening artifacts. The direct-ED image has the potential to assist in more accurate organ contouring, and is a better fit for the desired purpose of CT simulations for radiotherapy.

  12. Design and optimization of a modular setup for measurements of three-dimensional spin polarization with ultrafast pulsed sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincelli, T; Petrov, V N; Brajnik, G; Ciprian, R; Lollobrigida, V; Torelli, P; Krizmancic, D; Salvador, F; De Luisa, A; Sergo, R; Gubertini, A; Cautero, G; Carrato, S; Rossi, G; Panaccione, G

    2016-03-01

    ULTRASPIN is an apparatus devoted to the measurement of the spin polarization (SP) of electrons ejected from solid surfaces in a UHV environment. It is designed to exploit ultrafast light sources (free electron laser or laser high harmonic generation) and to perform (photo)electron spin analysis by an arrangement of Mott scattering polarimeters that measure the full SP vector. The system consists of two interconnected UHV vessels: one for surface science sample cleaning treatments, e-beam deposition of ultrathin films, and low energy electron diffraction/AES characterization. The sample environment in the polarimeter allows for cryogenic cooling and in-operando application of electric and magnetic fields. The photoelectrons are collected by an electrostatic accelerator and transport lens that form a periaxial beam that is subsequently directed by a Y-shaped electrostatic deflector to either one of the two orthogonal Mott polarimeters. The apparatus has been designed to operate in the extreme conditions of ultraintense single-X-ray pulses as originated by free electron lasers (up to 1 kHz), but it allows also for the single electron counting mode suitable when using statistical sources such as synchrotron radiation, cw-laser, or e-gun beams (up to 150 kcps).

  13. Design and optimization of a modular setup for measurements of three-dimensional spin polarization with ultrafast pulsed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pincelli, T.; Rossi, G.; Petrov, V. N.; Brajnik, G.; Carrato, S.; Ciprian, R.; Torelli, P.; Krizmancic, D.; Salvador, F.; De Luisa, A.; Panaccione, G.; Lollobrigida, V.; Sergo, R.; Gubertini, A.; Cautero, G.

    2016-01-01

    ULTRASPIN is an apparatus devoted to the measurement of the spin polarization (SP) of electrons ejected from solid surfaces in a UHV environment. It is designed to exploit ultrafast light sources (free electron laser or laser high harmonic generation) and to perform (photo)electron spin analysis by an arrangement of Mott scattering polarimeters that measure the full SP vector. The system consists of two interconnected UHV vessels: one for surface science sample cleaning treatments, e-beam deposition of ultrathin films, and low energy electron diffraction/AES characterization. The sample environment in the polarimeter allows for cryogenic cooling and in-operando application of electric and magnetic fields. The photoelectrons are collected by an electrostatic accelerator and transport lens that form a periaxial beam that is subsequently directed by a Y-shaped electrostatic deflector to either one of the two orthogonal Mott polarimeters. The apparatus has been designed to operate in the extreme conditions of ultraintense single-X-ray pulses as originated by free electron lasers (up to 1 kHz), but it allows also for the single electron counting mode suitable when using statistical sources such as synchrotron radiation, cw-laser, or e-gun beams (up to 150 kcps).

  14. Design and optimization of a modular setup for measurements of three-dimensional spin polarization with ultrafast pulsed sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincelli, T.; Petrov, V. N.; Brajnik, G.; Ciprian, R.; Lollobrigida, V.; Torelli, P.; Krizmancic, D.; Salvador, F.; De Luisa, A.; Sergo, R.; Gubertini, A.; Cautero, G.; Carrato, S.; Rossi, G.; Panaccione, G.

    2016-03-01

    ULTRASPIN is an apparatus devoted to the measurement of the spin polarization (SP) of electrons ejected from solid surfaces in a UHV environment. It is designed to exploit ultrafast light sources (free electron laser or laser high harmonic generation) and to perform (photo)electron spin analysis by an arrangement of Mott scattering polarimeters that measure the full SP vector. The system consists of two interconnected UHV vessels: one for surface science sample cleaning treatments, e-beam deposition of ultrathin films, and low energy electron diffraction/AES characterization. The sample environment in the polarimeter allows for cryogenic cooling and in-operando application of electric and magnetic fields. The photoelectrons are collected by an electrostatic accelerator and transport lens that form a periaxial beam that is subsequently directed by a Y-shaped electrostatic deflector to either one of the two orthogonal Mott polarimeters. The apparatus has been designed to operate in the extreme conditions of ultraintense single-X-ray pulses as originated by free electron lasers (up to 1 kHz), but it allows also for the single electron counting mode suitable when using statistical sources such as synchrotron radiation, cw-laser, or e-gun beams (up to 150 kcps).

  15. Design and optimization of a modular setup for measurements of three-dimensional spin polarization with ultrafast pulsed sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pincelli, T., E-mail: pincelli@iom.cnr.it; Rossi, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Laboratorio TASC, IOM-CNR, S.S. 14 km 163.5, Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Petrov, V. N. [Saint Petersburg State Polytechnical University, Politechnicheskaya Street 29, 195251 Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Brajnik, G.; Carrato, S. [Università degli Studi di Trieste, Piazzale Europa 1, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Ciprian, R.; Torelli, P.; Krizmancic, D.; Salvador, F.; De Luisa, A.; Panaccione, G. [Laboratorio TASC, IOM-CNR, S.S. 14 km 163.5, Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Lollobrigida, V. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Sergo, R.; Gubertini, A.; Cautero, G. [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A, Strada Statale 14-km 163.5 in AREA Science Park, Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    ULTRASPIN is an apparatus devoted to the measurement of the spin polarization (SP) of electrons ejected from solid surfaces in a UHV environment. It is designed to exploit ultrafast light sources (free electron laser or laser high harmonic generation) and to perform (photo)electron spin analysis by an arrangement of Mott scattering polarimeters that measure the full SP vector. The system consists of two interconnected UHV vessels: one for surface science sample cleaning treatments, e-beam deposition of ultrathin films, and low energy electron diffraction/AES characterization. The sample environment in the polarimeter allows for cryogenic cooling and in-operando application of electric and magnetic fields. The photoelectrons are collected by an electrostatic accelerator and transport lens that form a periaxial beam that is subsequently directed by a Y-shaped electrostatic deflector to either one of the two orthogonal Mott polarimeters. The apparatus has been designed to operate in the extreme conditions of ultraintense single-X-ray pulses as originated by free electron lasers (up to 1 kHz), but it allows also for the single electron counting mode suitable when using statistical sources such as synchrotron radiation, cw-laser, or e-gun beams (up to 150 kcps).

  16. Maximizing direct current power delivery from bistable vibration energy harvesting beams subjected to realistic base excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Quanqi; Harne, Ryan L.

    2017-04-01

    Effective development of vibration energy harvesters is required to convert ambient kinetic energy into useful electrical energy as power supply for sensors, for example in structural health monitoring applications. Energy harvesting structures exhibiting bistable nonlinearities have previously been shown to generate large alternating current (AC) power when excited so as to undergo snap-through responses between stable equilibria. Yet, most microelectronics in sensors require rectified voltages and hence direct current (DC) power. While researchers have studied DC power generation from bistable energy harvesters subjected to harmonic excitations, there remain important questions as to the promise of such harvester platforms when the excitations are more realistic and include both harmonic and random components. To close this knowledge gap, this research computationally and experimentally studies the DC power delivery from bistable energy harvesters subjected to such realistic excitation combinations as those found in practice. Based on the results, it is found that the ability for bistable energy harvesters to generate peak DC power is significantly reduced by introducing sufficient amount of stochastic excitations into an otherwise harmonic input. On the other hand, the elimination of a low amplitude, coexistent response regime by way of the additive noise promotes power delivery if the device was not originally excited to snap-through. The outcomes of this research indicate the necessity for comprehensive studies about the sensitivities of DC power generation from bistable energy harvester to practical excitation scenarios prior to their optimal deployment in applications.

  17. Cutting-Edge High-Power Ultrafast Thin Disk Oscillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Südmeyer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of applications in science and industry are currently pushing the development of ultrafast laser technologies that enable high average powers. SESAM modelocked thin disk lasers (TDLs currently achieve higher pulse energies and average powers than any other ultrafast oscillator technology, making them excellent candidates in this goal. Recently, 275 W of average power with a pulse duration of 583 fs were demonstrated, which represents the highest average power so far demonstrated from an ultrafast oscillator. In terms of pulse energy, TDLs reach more than 40 μJ pulses directly from the oscillator. In addition, another major milestone was recently achieved, with the demonstration of a TDL with nearly bandwidth-limited 96-fs long pulses. The progress achieved in terms of pulse duration of such sources enabled the first measurement of the carrier-envelope offset frequency of a modelocked TDL, which is the first key step towards full stabilization of such a source. We will present the key elements that enabled these latest results, as well as an outlook towards the next scaling steps in average power, pulse energy and pulse duration of such sources. These cutting-edge sources will enable exciting new applications, and open the door to further extending the current performance milestones.

  18. High speed fluorescence imaging with compressed ultrafast photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J. V.; Mason, J. D.; Beier, H. T.; Bixler, J. N.

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescent lifetime imaging is an optical technique that facilitates imaging molecular interactions and cellular functions. Because the excited lifetime of a fluorophore is sensitive to its local microenvironment,1, 2 measurement of fluorescent lifetimes can be used to accurately detect regional changes in temperature, pH, and ion concentration. However, typical state of the art fluorescent lifetime methods are severely limited when it comes to acquisition time (on the order of seconds to minutes) and video rate imaging. Here we show that compressed ultrafast photography (CUP) can be used in conjunction with fluorescent lifetime imaging to overcome these acquisition rate limitations. Frame rates up to one hundred billion frames per second have been demonstrated with compressed ultrafast photography using a streak camera.3 These rates are achieved by encoding time in the spatial direction with a pseudo-random binary pattern. The time domain information is then reconstructed using a compressed sensing algorithm, resulting in a cube of data (x,y,t) for each readout image. Thus, application of compressed ultrafast photography will allow us to acquire an entire fluorescent lifetime image with a single laser pulse. Using a streak camera with a high-speed CMOS camera, acquisition rates of 100 frames per second can be achieved, which will significantly enhance our ability to quantitatively measure complex biological events with high spatial and temporal resolution. In particular, we will demonstrate the ability of this technique to do single-shot fluorescent lifetime imaging of cells and microspheres.

  19. Tracking Ultrafast Carrier Dynamics in Single Semiconductor Nanowire Heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor A.J.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of non-equilibrium carrier dynamics in silicon (Si nanowires (NWs and NW heterostructures is very important due to their many nanophotonic and nanoelectronics applications. Here, we describe the first measurements of ultrafast carrier dynamics and diffusion in single heterostructured Si nanowires, obtained using ultrafast optical microscopy. By isolating individual nanowires, we avoid complications resulting from the broad size and alignment distribution in nanowire ensembles, allowing us to directly probe ultrafast carrier dynamics in these quasi-one-dimensional systems. Spatially-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy demonstrates the influence of surface-mediated mechanisms on carrier dynamics in a single NW, while polarization-resolved femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy reveals a clear anisotropy in carrier lifetimes measured parallel and perpendicular to the NW axis, due to density-dependent Auger recombination. Furthermore, separating the pump and probe spots along the NW axis enabled us to track space and time dependent carrier diffusion in radial and axial NW heterostructures. These results enable us to reveal the influence of radial and axial interfaces on carrier dynamics and charge transport in these quasi-one-dimensional nanosystems, which can then be used to tailor carrier relaxation in a single nanowire heterostructure for a given application.

  20. Photonic crystal fiber technology for compact fiber-delivered high-power ultrafast fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triches, Marco; Michieletto, Mattia; Johansen, Mette M.; Jakobsen, Christian; Olesen, Anders S.; Papior, Sidsel R.; Kristensen, Torben; Bondue, Magalie; Weirich, Johannes; Alkeskjold, Thomas T.

    2018-02-01

    Photonic crystal fiber (PCF) technology has radically impacted the scientific and industrial ultrafast laser market. Reducing platform dimensions are important to decrease cost and footprint while maintaining high optical efficiency. We present our recent work on short 85 μm core ROD-type fiber amplifiers that maintain single-mode performance and excellent beam quality. Robust long-term performance at 100 W average power and 250 kW peak power in 20 ps pulses at 1030 nm wavelength is presented, exceeding 500 h with stable performance in terms of both polarization and power. In addition, we present our recent results on hollow-core ultrafast fiber delivery maintaining high beam quality and polarization purity.

  1. Ultrafast electron microscopy in materials science, biology, and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Wayne E.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; Frank, Alan; Reed, Bryan; Schmerge, John F.; Siwick, Bradley J.; Stuart, Brent C.; Weber, Peter M.

    2005-01-01

    The use of pump-probe experiments to study complex transient events has been an area of significant interest in materials science, biology, and chemistry. While the emphasis has been on laser pump with laser probe and laser pump with x-ray probe experiments, there is a significant and growing interest in using electrons as probes. Early experiments used electrons for gas-phase diffraction of photostimulated chemical reactions. More recently, scientists are beginning to explore phenomena in the solid state such as phase transformations, twinning, solid-state chemical reactions, radiation damage, and shock propagation. This review focuses on the emerging area of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM), which comprises ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) and dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM). The topics that are treated include the following: (1) The physics of electrons as an ultrafast probe. This encompasses the propagation dynamics of the electrons (space-charge effect, Child's law, Boersch effect) and extends to relativistic effects. (2) The anatomy of UED and DTEM instruments. This includes discussions of the photoactivated electron gun (also known as photogun or photoelectron gun) at conventional energies (60-200 keV) and extends to MeV beams generated by rf guns. Another critical aspect of the systems is the electron detector. Charge-coupled device cameras and microchannel-plate-based cameras are compared and contrasted. The effect of various physical phenomena on detective quantum efficiency is discussed. (3) Practical aspects of operation. This includes determination of time zero, measurement of pulse-length, and strategies for pulse compression. (4) Current and potential applications in materials science, biology, and chemistry. UEM has the potential to make a significant impact in future science and technology. Understanding of reaction pathways of complex transient phenomena in materials science, biology, and chemistry will provide fundamental

  2. First Observation of Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Mitigation for Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions Using Wavelength Detuning at the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marozas, J A; Hohenberger, M; Rosenberg, M J; Turnbull, D; Collins, T J B; Radha, P B; McKenty, P W; Zuegel, J D; Marshall, F J; Regan, S P; Sangster, T C; Seka, W; Campbell, E M; Goncharov, V N; Bowers, M W; Di Nicola, J-M G; Erbert, G; MacGowan, B J; Pelz, L J; Yang, S T

    2018-02-23

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) results from two-beam energy exchange via seeded stimulated Brillouin scattering, which detrimentally reduces ablation pressure and implosion velocity in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Mitigating CBET is demonstrated for the first time in inertial-confinement implosions at the National Ignition Facility by detuning the laser-source wavelengths (±2.3  Å UV) of the interacting beams. We show that, in polar direct-drive, wavelength detuning increases the equatorial region velocity experimentally by 16% and alters the in-flight shell morphology. These experimental observations are consistent with design predictions of radiation-hydrodynamic simulations that indicate a 10% increase in the average ablation pressure.

  3. Design and implementation of an optimal laser pulse front tilting scheme for ultrafast electron diffraction in reflection geometry with high temporal resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pennacchio

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast electron diffraction is a powerful technique to investigate out-of-equilibrium atomic dynamics in solids with high temporal resolution. When diffraction is performed in reflection geometry, the main limitation is the mismatch in group velocity between the overlapping pump light and the electron probe pulses, which affects the overall temporal resolution of the experiment. A solution already available in the literature involved pulse front tilt of the pump beam at the sample, providing a sub-picosecond time resolution. However, in the reported optical scheme, the tilted pulse is characterized by a temporal chirp of about 1 ps at 1 mm away from the centre of the beam, which limits the investigation of surface dynamics in large crystals. In this paper, we propose an optimal tilting scheme designed for a radio-frequency-compressed ultrafast electron diffraction setup working in reflection geometry with 30 keV electron pulses containing up to 105 electrons/pulse. To characterize our scheme, we performed optical cross-correlation measurements, obtaining an average temporal width of the tilted pulse lower than 250 fs. The calibration of the electron-laser temporal overlap was obtained by monitoring the spatial profile of the electron beam when interacting with the plasma optically induced at the apex of a copper needle (plasma lensing effect. Finally, we report the first time-resolved results obtained on graphite, where the electron-phonon coupling dynamics is observed, showing an overall temporal resolution in the sub-500 fs regime. The successful implementation of this configuration opens the way to directly probe structural dynamics of low-dimensional systems in the sub-picosecond regime, with pulsed electrons.

  4. Direct growth of Ge quantum dots on a graphene/SiO2/Si structure using ion beam sputtering deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Wang, R F; Zhang, J; Li, H S; Zhang, J; Qiu, F; Yang, J; Wang, C; Yang, Y

    2016-07-29

    The growth of Ge quantum dots (QDs) using the ion beam sputtering deposition technique has been successfully conducted directly on single-layer graphene supported by SiO2/Si substrate. The results show that the morphology and size of Ge QDs on graphene can be modulated by tuning the Ge coverage. Charge transfer behavior, i.e. doping effect in graphene has been demonstrated at the interface of Ge/graphene. Compared with that of traditional Ge dots grown on Si substrate, the positions of both corresponding photoluminescence (PL) peaks of Ge QDs/graphene hybrid structure undergo a large red-shift, which can probably be attributed to the lack of atomic intermixing and the existence of surface states in this hybrid material. According to first-principles calculations, the Ge growth on the graphene should follow the so-called Volmer-Weber mode instead of the Stranski-Krastanow one which is observed generally in the traditional Ge QDs/Si system. The calculations also suggest that the interaction between Ge and graphene layer can be enhanced with the decrease of the Ge coverage. Our results may supply a prototype for fabricating novel optoelectronic devices based on a QDs/graphene hybrid nanostructure.

  5. Broadband silicon polarization beam splitter with a high extinction ratio using a triple-bent-waveguide directional coupler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Jun Rong; Ang, Thomas Y L; Sahin, Ezgi; Pawlina, Bryan; Chen, G F R; Tan, D T H; Lim, Soon Thor; Png, Ching Eng

    2017-11-01

    We report on the design and experimental demonstration of a broadband silicon polarization beam splitter (PBS) with a high extinction ratio (ER)≥30  dB. This was achieved using triple-bent-waveguide directional coupling in a single PBS, and cascaded PBS topology. For the single PBS, the bandwidths for an ER≥30  dB are 20 nm for the quasi-TE mode, and 70 nm for the quasi-TM mode when a broadband light source (1520-1610 nm) was employed. The insertion loss (IL) varies from 0.2 to 1 dB for the quasi-TE mode and 0.2-2 dB for the quasi-TM mode. The cascaded PBS improved the bandwidth of the quasi-TE mode for an ER≥30  dB to 90 nm, with a low IL of 0.2-2 dB. To the best of our knowledge, our PBS system is one of the best broadband PBSs with an ER as high as ∼42  dB and a low IL below 1 dB around the central wavelength, and experimentally demonstrated using edge-coupling.

  6. Neural-network-directed alignment of optical systems using the laser-beam spatial filter as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Weiland, Kenneth E.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes an effort at NASA Lewis Research Center to use artificial neural networks to automate the alignment and control of optical measurement systems. Specifically, it addresses the use of commercially available neural network software and hardware to direct alignments of the common laser-beam-smoothing spatial filter. The report presents a general approach for designing alignment records and combining these into training sets to teach optical alignment functions to neural networks and discusses the use of these training sets to train several types of neural networks. Neural network configurations used include the adaptive resonance network, the back-propagation-trained network, and the counter-propagation network. This work shows that neural networks can be used to produce robust sequencers. These sequencers can learn by example to execute the step-by-step procedures of optical alignment and also can learn adaptively to correct for environmentally induced misalignment. The long-range objective is to use neural networks to automate the alignment and operation of optical measurement systems in remote, harsh, or dangerous aerospace environments. This work also shows that when neural networks are trained by a human operator, training sets should be recorded, training should be executed, and testing should be done in a manner that does not depend on intellectual judgments of the human operator.

  7. Fragmentation and direct transfer reactions for 40Ar incident beam on 27Al target at 1760 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisse, Ousmane

    1985-01-01

    Peripheral collision studies performed with 40 Ar projectiles at 44 MeV/A and 27 Al target show that both fragmentation and transfer reactions can be discerned in this type of interaction. The experimental observation of fragments with masses charges and velocities close to those of the incident beam are the signature of transfer reactions and a detailed analysis of the energy spectra of such fragments has been carried out and interpreted in terms of a direct diffraction transfer model. On the other hand, for large mass transfer reactions, abrasion is the suitable mechanism. Inclusive fragment measurement together with the appropriate residual nuclei-fragment coincidence results then provides experimental data in good agreement with the theoretical predictions obtained from a participant spectator model. These investigations also indicate that the separation energies of the participant from the spectator nucleus, at least within the framework of the above model, can be interpreted in terms of a friction force which becomes more efficient as the projectile energy decreases. (author) [fr

  8. Direct growth of hexagonal boron nitride/graphene heterostructures on cobalt foil substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhongguang; Khanaki, Alireza; Tian, Hao; Zheng, Renjing; Suja, Mohammad; Liu, Jianlin, E-mail: jianlin@ece.ucr.edu [Quantum Structures Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Zheng, Jian-Guo [Irvine Materials Research Institute, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-2800 (United States)

    2016-07-25

    Graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (G/h-BN) heterostructures have attracted a great deal of attention because of their exceptional properties and wide variety of potential applications in nanoelectronics. However, direct growth of large-area, high-quality, and stacked structures in a controllable and scalable way remains challenging. In this work, we demonstrate the synthesis of h-BN/graphene (h-BN/G) heterostructures on cobalt (Co) foil by sequential deposition of graphene and h-BN layers using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. It is found that the coverage of h-BN layers can be readily controlled on the epitaxial graphene by growth time. Large-area, uniform-quality, and multi-layer h-BN films on thin graphite layers were achieved. Based on an h-BN (5–6 nm)/G (26–27 nm) heterostructure, capacitor devices with Co(foil)/G/h-BN/Co(contact) configuration were fabricated to evaluate the dielectric properties of h-BN. The measured breakdown electric field showed a high value of ∼2.5–3.2 MV/cm. Both I-V and C-V characteristics indicate that the epitaxial h-BN film has good insulating characteristics.

  9. Wavelength-detuning cross-beam energy transfer mitigation scheme for direct drive: Modeling and evidence from National Ignition Facility implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marozas, J. A.; Hohenberger, M.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Turnbull, D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Radha, P. B.; McKenty, P. W.; Zuegel, J. D.; Marshall, F. J.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Campbell, E. M.; Goncharov, V. N.; Bowers, M. W.; Di Nicola, J.-M. G.; Erbert, G.; MacGowan, B. J.; Pelz, L. J.; Moody, J.; Yang, S. T.

    2018-05-01

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) results from two-beam energy exchange via seeded stimulated Brillouin scattering, which detrimentally reduces laser-energy absorption for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Consequently, ablation pressure and implosion velocity suffer from the decreased absorption, reducing target performance in both symmetric and polar direct drive. Additionally, CBET alters the time-resolved scattered-light spectra and redistributes absorbed and scattered-light-changing shell morphology and low-mode drive symmetry. Mitigating CBET is demonstrated in inertial confinement implosions at the National Ignition Facility by detuning the laser-source wavelengths (±2.3 Å UV) of the interacting beams. In polar direct drive, wavelength detuning was shown to increase the equatorial region velocity experimentally by 16% and to alter the in-flight shell morphology. These experimental observations are consistent with design predictions of radiation-hydrodynamic simulations that indicate a 10% increase in the average ablation pressure. These results indicate that wavelength detuning successfully mitigates CBET. Simulations predict that optimized phase plates and wavelength-detuning CBET mitigation utilizing the three-legged beam layout of the OMEGA Laser System significantly increase absorption and achieve >100-Gbar hot-spot pressures in symmetric direct drive.

  10. A simple, direct method for x-ray scatter estimation and correction in digital radiography and cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siewerdsen, J.H.; Daly, M.J.; Bakhtiar, B.

    2006-01-01

    X-ray scatter poses a significant limitation to image quality in cone-beam CT (CBCT), resulting in contrast reduction, image artifacts, and lack of CT number accuracy. We report the performance of a simple scatter correction method in which scatter fluence is estimated directly in each projection from pixel values near the edge of the detector behind the collimator leaves. The algorithm operates on the simple assumption that signal in the collimator shadow is attributable to x-ray scatter, and the 2D scatter fluence is estimated by interpolating between pixel values measured along the top and bottom edges of the detector behind the collimator leaves. The resulting scatter fluence estimate is subtracted from each projection to yield an estimate of the primary-only images for CBCT reconstruction. Performance was investigated in phantom experiments on an experimental CBCT benchtop, and the effect on image quality was demonstrated in patient images (head, abdomen, and pelvis sites) obtained on a preclinical system for CBCT-guided radiation therapy. The algorithm provides significant reduction in scatter artifacts without compromise in contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). For example, in a head phantom, cupping artifact was essentially eliminated, CT number accuracy was restored to within 3%, and CNR (breast-to-water) was improved by up to 50%. Similarly in a body phantom, cupping artifact was reduced by at least a factor of 2 without loss in CNR. Patient images demonstrate significantly increased uniformity, accuracy, and contrast, with an overall improvement in image quality in all sites investigated. Qualitative evaluation illustrates that soft-tissue structures that are otherwise undetectable are clearly delineated in scatter-corrected reconstructions. Since scatter is estimated directly in each projection, the algorithm is robust with respect to system geometry, patient size and heterogeneity, patient motion, etc. Operating without prior information, analytical modeling

  11. Comparative evaluation of cone-beam computed tomography versus direct surgical measurements in the diagnosis of mandibular molar furcation involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Padmanabhan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Periodontists frequently experience inconvenience in accurate assessment and treatment of furcation areas affected by periodontal disease. Furcation involvement (FI most commonly affects the mandibular molars. Diagnosis of furcation-involved teeth is mainly by the assessment of probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, furcation entrance probing, and intraoral periapical radiographs. Three-dimensional imaging has provided advantage to the clinician in assessment of bone morphology. Thus, the present study aimed to compare the diagnostic efficacy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT as against direct intrasurgical measurements of furcation defects in mandibular molars. Subjects and Methods: Study population included 14 patients with 25 mandibular molar furcation sites. CBCT was performed to measure height, width, and depth of furcation defects of mandibular molars with Grade II and Grade III FI. Intrasurgical measurements of the FI were assessed during periodontal flap surgery in indicated teeth which were compared with CBCT measurements. Statistical analysis was done using paired t-test and Bland–Altman plot. Results: The CBCT versus intrasurgical furcation measurements were 2.18 ± 0.86 mm and 2.30 ± 0.89 mm for furcation height, 1.87 ± 0.52 mm and 1.84 ± 0.49 mm for furcation width, and 3.81 ± 1.37 mm and 4.05 ± 1.49 mm for furcation depth, respectively. Results showed that there was no statistical significance between the measured parameters, indicating that the two methods were statistically similar. Conclusion: Accuracy of assessment of mandibular molar FI by CBCT was comparable to that of direct surgical measurements. These findings indicate that CBCT is an excellent adjunctive diagnostic tool in periodontal treatment planning.

  12. Ultrafast THz Saturable Absorption in Doped Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Hoffmann, Matthias C.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate ultrafast THz saturable absorption in n-doped semiconductors by nonlinear THz time-domain spectroscopy. This effect is caused by the semiconductor conductivity modulation due to electron heating and satellite-valley scattering in strong THz fields.......We demonstrate ultrafast THz saturable absorption in n-doped semiconductors by nonlinear THz time-domain spectroscopy. This effect is caused by the semiconductor conductivity modulation due to electron heating and satellite-valley scattering in strong THz fields....

  13. Real-Space Imaging of Carrier Dynamics of Materials Surfaces by Second-Generation Four-Dimensional Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya

    2015-09-14

    In the fields of photocatalysis and photovoltaics, ultrafast dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination on material surfaces, are among the key factors that determine the overall energy conversion efficiency. A precise knowledge of these dynamical events on the nanometer (nm) and femtosecond (fs) scales was not accessible until recently. The only way to access such fundamental processes fully is to map the surface dynamics selectively in real space and time. In this study, we establish a second generation of four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (4D S-UEM) and demonstrate the ability to record time-resolved images (snapshots) of material surfaces with 650 fs and ∼5 nm temporal and spatial resolutions, respectively. In this method, the surface of a specimen is excited by a clocking optical pulse and imaged using a pulsed primary electron beam as a probe pulse, generating secondary electrons (SEs), which are emitted from the surface of the specimen in a manner that is sensitive to the local electron/hole density. This method provides direct and controllable information regarding surface dynamics. We clearly demonstrate how the surface morphology, grains, defects, and nanostructured features can significantly impact the overall dynamical processes on the surface of photoactive-materials. In addition, the ability to access two regimes of dynamical probing in a single experiment and the energy loss of SEs in semiconductor-nanoscale materials will also be discussed.

  14. Accelerator-based single-shot ultrafast transmission electron microscope with picosecond temporal resolution and nanometer spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, D.; Fu, F.; Zhang, J.; Huang, X.; Wang, L.; Wang, X.; Wan, W.

    2014-09-01

    We present feasibility study of an accelerator-based ultrafast transmission electron microscope (u-TEM) capable of producing a full field image in a single-shot with simultaneous picosecond temporal resolution and nanometer spatial resolution. We study key physics related to performance of u-TEMs and discuss major challenges as well as possible solutions for practical realization of u-TEMs. The feasibility of u-TEMs is confirmed through simulations using realistic electron beam parameters. We anticipate that u-TEMs with a product of temporal and spatial resolution beyond 10-19 ms will open up new opportunities in probing matter at ultrafast temporal and ultrasmall spatial scales.

  15. Ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy of small molecule organic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Kendall Laine

    As research in the field of ultrafast optics has produced shorter and shorter pulses, at an ever-widening range of frequencies, ultrafast spectroscopy has grown correspondingly. In particular, ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy allows direct observation of electrons in transient or excited states, regardless of the eventual relaxation mechanisms. High-harmonic conversion of 800nm, femtosecond, Ti:sapphire laser pulses allows excite/probe spectroscopy down into atomic core level states. To this end, an ultrafast, X-UV photoelectron spectroscopic system is described, including design considerations for the high-harmonic generation line, the time of flight detector, and the subsequent data collection electronics. Using a similar experimental setup, I have performed several ultrafast, photoelectron excited state decay studies at the IBM, T. J. Watson Research Center. All of the observed materials were electroluminescent thin film organics, which have applications as the emitter layer in organic light emitting devices. The specific materials discussed are: Alq, BAlq, DPVBi, and Alq doped with DCM or DMQA. Alq:DCM is also known to lase at low photoexcitation thresholds. A detailed understanding of the involved relaxation mechanisms is beneficial to both applications. Using 3.14 eV excite, and 26.7 eV probe, 90 fs laser pulses, we have observed the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) decay rate over the first 200 picoseconds. During this time, diffusion is insignificant, and all dynamics occur in the absence of electron transport. With excitation intensities in the range of 100μJ/cm2, we have modeled the Alq, BAlq, and DPVBi decays via bimolecular singlet-singlet annihilation. At similar excitations, we have modeled the Alq:DCM decay via Förster transfer, stimulated emission, and excimeric formation. Furthermore, the Alq:DCM occupied to unoccupied molecular orbital energy gap was seen to shrink as a function of excite-to-probe delay, in accordance with the

  16. Theory and Modelling of Ultrafast X-ray Imaging of Dynamical Non-equilibrium Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, Ulf

    Over the next few years, a new generation of x-ray sources is going online. These freeelectron lasers will provide extremely bright subpicosecond x-ray pulses. Traditionally, x-ray diraction has the advantage of directly determining the atomic positions within a sample. With these new machines......, it becomes feasible to exploit this concept for ultrafast processes; in eect, we can study chemical reactions as they occur. This thesis deals with theoretical aspect of ultrafast time-resolved x-ray diraction (TRXD).We derive general formulas for calculating the diraction signal that are closely related...

  17. Demonstration of direct energy recovery of full-energy ions at 40 keV on a PLT/ISX beam system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stirling, W.L.; Barber, G.C.; Dagenhart, W.K.

    1981-01-01

    Neutral beam injection systems that employ positive ion sources presently operate at energies of about 40 to 50 keV/nucleon at 60 A [Princeton Large Torus (PLT)] or 100 A [Princeton Divertor Experiment (PDX) or the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Impurities Study Experiment (ISX)] with about 60% conversion efficiency. However, the desire for multisecond beams in the 80-keV/nucleon energy range at approx. 10 MW/module has emphasized the need for technological advances in several areas. At such beam energies, as much as 75% of the initial beam energy is retained in the unneutralized ion components. As a result, two questions immediately come to mind: (1) how can one dispose of this energy; or better still, (2) how can one efficiently recover this energy. We have proposed and demonstrated a unique solution to this problem that not only removes the need for beam dumps but also returns from 50 to 80% of the energy contained in the full energy ion component directly and dynamically to the high voltage supply. In fact, the energy in the residual ion component is not expended. The tests were made on a PLT/ISX-type beam line at 40 keV/nucleon with about 800 kW and 0.1 s

  18. Measuring voltage transients with an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1997-01-01

    circuit, where the tunneling tip is directly connected to the current amplifier of the scanning tunneling microscope, this dependence is eliminated. Ail results can be explained with coupling through the geometrical capacitance of the tip-electrode junction. By illuminating the current......We use an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope to resolve propagating voltage transients in space and time. We demonstrate that the previously observed dependence of the transient signal amplitude on the tunneling resistance was only caused by the electrical sampling circuit. With a modified...

  19. Cladding-like waveguide fabricated by cooperation of ultrafast laser writing and ion irradiation: characterization and laser generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jinman; Shang, Zhen; Tan, Yang; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier Rodríguez; Chen, Feng

    2017-08-07

    We report the surface cladding-like waveguide fabricated by the cooperation of the ultrafast laser writing and the ion irradiation. The ultrafast laser writes tracks near the surface of the Nd:YAG crystal, constructing a semi-circle columnar structure with a decreased refractive index of - 0.00208. Then, the Nd:YAG crystal is irradiated by the Carbon ion beam, forming an enhanced-well in the semi-circle columnar with an increased refractive index of + 0.0024. Tracks and the enhanced-well consisted a surface cladding-like waveguide. Utilizing this cladding-like waveguide as the gain medium for the waveguide lasing, optimized characterizations were observed compared with the monolayer waveguide. This work demonstrates the refractive index of the Nd:YAG crystal can be well tailored by the cooperation of the ultrafast laser writing and the ion irradiation, which provides an convenient way to fabricate the complex and multilayered photonics devices.

  20. Spherical transceivers for ultrafast optical wireless communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xian; Hristovski, Blago A.; Collier, Christopher M.; Geoffroy-Gagnon, Simon; Born, Brandon; Holzman, Jonathan F.

    2016-02-01

    Optical wireless communications (OWC) offers the potential for high-speed and mobile operation in indoor networks. Such OWC systems often employ a fixed transmitter grid and mobile transceivers, with the mobile transceivers carrying out bi-directional communication via active downlinks (ideally with high-speed signal detection) and passive uplinks (ideally with broad angular retroreflection and high-speed modulation). It can be challenging to integrate all of these bidirectional communication capabilities within the mobile transceivers, however, as there is a simultaneous desire for compact packaging. With this in mind, the work presented here introduces a new form of transceiver for bi-directional OWC systems. The transceiver incorporates radial photoconductive switches (for high-speed signal detection) and a spherical retro-modulator (for broad angular retroreflection and high-speed all-optical modulation). All-optical retromodulation are investigated by way of theoretical models and experimental testing, for spherical retro-modulators comprised of three glasses, N-BK7, N-LASF9, and S-LAH79, having differing levels of refraction and nonlinearity. It is found that the spherical retro-modulator comprised of S-LAH79, with a refractive index of n ≍ 2 and a Kerr nonlinear index of n2 ≍ (1.8 ± 0.1) × 10-15 cm2/W, yields both broad angular retroreflection (over a solid angle of 2π steradians) and ultrafast modulation (over a duration of 120 fs). Such transceivers can become important elements for all-optical implementations in future bi-directional OWC systems.

  1. Investigation of the Direct Charge Transfer in Low Energy D2+ + H Collisions using Merged-Beams Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, S. L.; Guillen, C. I.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.; Havener, C. C.

    2011-10-01

    The hydrogen - hydrogen (deuterium) molecular ion is the most fundamental ion-molecule two-electron system. Charge transfer (CT) for H2+ on H, which is one of the possible reaction paths for the (H-H2)+ system, is of special interest because of its contribution to H2 formation in the early universe, its exoergicity, and rich collision dynamics. Due to technical difficulty in making an atomic H target, the direct experimental investigations of CT for H2+ on H are sparse and generally limited to higher collision energies. The measurements of the absolute cross section of different CT paths for H2+ on H over a large range of collision energy are needed to benchmark theoretical calculations, especially the ones at low energies. The rate coefficient of CT at low energy is not known but may be comparable to other reaction rate coefficients in cold plasmas with H, H+, H2+, and H3+ as constituents. For instance, CT for H2+ on H and the following H3+ formation reaction H2+ + H2 → H + H3+ are clearly rate interdependent although it was always assumed that every ionization of H2 will lead to the formation of H3+. CT proceeds through dynamically coupled electronic, vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom. One can depict three paths, electronic CT, CT with nuclear substitution, and CT with dissociation. Electronic CT and CT with nuclear substitution in the H2+ on H collisions are not distinguishable by any quantum theory. Here we use the isotopic system (D2+ - H) to measure without ambiguity the electronic CT cross section by observing the H+ products. Using the ion-atom merged-beam apparatus at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the absolute direct CT cross sections for D2+ + H from keV/u to meV/u collision energies have been measured. The molecular ions are extracted from an Electron-Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source with a vibrational state distribution which is most likely determined by Frank-Condon transitions between ground state D2 and D2+. A ground-state H beam

  2. Time resolved 3D momentum imaging of ultrafast dynamics by coherent VUV-XUV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturm, F. P., E-mail: fpsturm@lbl.gov [Ultrafast X-Ray Science Lab, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Institut für Kernphysik, Universität Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Wright, T. W.; Ray, D.; Zalyubovskaya, I.; Shivaram, N.; Slaughter, D. S.; Belkacem, A.; Weber, Th. [Ultrafast X-Ray Science Lab, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Ranitovic, P. [Ultrafast X-Ray Science Lab, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); ELI-ALPS, ELI-Hu Nkft, Dugonics ter 13, Szeged H6720 (Hungary)

    2016-06-15

    We present a new experimental setup for measuring ultrafast nuclear and electron dynamics of molecules after photo-excitation and ionization. We combine a high flux femtosecond vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) source with an internally cold molecular beam and a 3D momentum imaging particle spectrometer to measure electrons and ions in coincidence. We describe a variety of tools developed to perform pump-probe studies in the VUV-XUV spectrum and to modify and characterize the photon beam. First benchmark experiments are presented to demonstrate the capabilities of the system.

  3. High peak power THz source for ultrafast electron diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengguang Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Terahertz (THz science and technology have already become the research highlight at present. In this paper, we put forward a device setup to carry out ultrafast fundamental research. A photocathode RF gun generates electron bunches with ∼MeV energy, ∼ps bunch width and about 25pC charge. The electron bunches inject the designed wiggler, the coherent radiation at THz spectrum emits from these bunches and increases rapidly until the saturation at ∼MW within a short wiggler. THz pulses can be used as pump to stimulate an ultra-short excitation in some kind of sample. Those electron bunches out of wiggler can be handled into bunches with ∼1pC change, small beam spot and energy spread to be probe. Because the pump and probe comes from the same electron source, synchronization between pump and probe is inherent. The whole facility can be compacted on a tabletop.

  4. Beam-Beam Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herr, W; Pieloni, T

    2014-01-01

    One of the most severe limitations in high-intensity particle colliders is the beam-beam interaction, i.e. the perturbation of the beams as they cross the opposing beams. This introduction to beam-beam effects concentrates on a description of the phenomena that are present in modern colliding beam facilities

  5. Sub-micrometric surface texturing of AZ31 Mg-alloy through two-beam direct laser interference patterning with a ns-pulsed green fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Valentina; Biondi, Marco; Demir, Ali Gökhan; Pariani, Giorgio; Previtali, Barbara; Bianco, Andrea

    2017-11-01

    Two-beam direct laser interference patterning (DLIP) is the method that employs two beams and provides control over the pattern geometry by regulating the angle between the beams and the wavelength of the beam. Despite the simplistic optical arrangement required for the method, the feasibility of sub-micrometric patterning of a surface depends on the correct manipulation of the process parameters, especially in the case of metallic materials. Magnesium alloys, from this point of view, exhibit further difficulty in processability due to low melting point and high reactivity. With biocompatibility and biodegradability features, Mg-alloy implants can take further advantage of surface structuring for tailoring the biological behaviour. In this work, a two-beam DLIP setup has been developed employing an industrial grade nanosecond-pulsed fiber laser emitting at 532 nm. The high repetition rate and ramped pulse profile provided by the laser were exploited for a more flexible control over the energy content deposited over the heat-sensitive Mg-alloy. The paper describes the strategies developed for controlling ramped laser emission at 20 kHz repetition rate. The process feasibility window was assessed within a large range of parameters. Within the feasibility window, a complete experimental plan was applied to investigate the effect of main laser process parameters on the pattern dimensions. Periodic surface structures with good definition down to 580 nm ± 20 nm spacing were successfully produced.

  6. Ultrafast laser spectroscopy in complex solid state materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tianqi [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This thesis summarizes my work on applying the ultrafast laser spectroscopy to the complex solid state materials. It shows that the ultrafast laser pulse can coherently control the material properties in the femtosecond time scale. And the ultrafast laser spectroscopy can be employed as a dynamical method for revealing the fundamental physical problems in the complex material systems.

  7. Experiments with trapped ions and ultrafast laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kale Gifford

    Since the dawn of quantum information science, laser-cooled trapped atomic ions have been one of the most compelling systems for the physical realization of a quantum computer. By applying qubit state dependent forces to the ions, their collective motional modes can be used as a bus to realize entangling quantum gates. Ultrafast state-dependent kicks [1] can provide a universal set of quantum logic operations, in conjunction with ultrafast single qubit rotations [2], which uses only ultrafast laser pulses. This may present a clearer route to scaling a trapped ion processor [3]. In addition to the role that spin-dependent kicks (SDKs) play in quantum computation, their utility in fundamental quantum mechanics research is also apparent. In this thesis, we present a set of experiments which demonstrate some of the principle properties of SDKs including ion motion independence (we demonstrate single ion thermometry from the ground state to near room temperature and the largest Schrodinger cat state ever created in an oscillator), high speed operations (compared with conventional atom-laser interactions), and multi-qubit entanglement operations with speed that is not fundamentally limited by the trap oscillation frequency. We also present a method to provide higher stability in the radial mode ion oscillation frequencies of a linear radiofrequency (rf) Paul trap-a crucial factor when performing operations on the rf-sensitive modes. Finally, we present the highest atomic position sensitivity measurement of an isolated atom to date of 0.5 nm Hz. (-1/2) with a minimum uncertaintyof 1.7 nm using a 0.6 numerical aperature (NA) lens system, along with a method to correct aberrations and a direct position measurement of ion micromotion (the inherent oscillations of an ion trapped in an oscillating rf field). This development could be used to directly image atom motion in the quantum regime, along with sensing forces at the yoctonewton [10. (-24) N)] scale forgravity sensing

  8. CSR Fields: Direct Numerical Solution of the Maxwell's Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novokhatski, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the properties of the coherent electromagnetic fields of a very short, ultra-relativistic bunch in a rectangular vacuum chamber inside a bending magnet. The analysis is based on the results of a direct numerical solution of Maxwell's equations together with Newton's equations. We use a new dispersion-free time-domain algorithm which employs a more efficient use of finite element mesh techniques and hence produces self-consistent and stable solutions for very short bunches. We investigate the fine structure of the CSR fields including coherent edge radiation. This approach should be useful in the study of existing and future concepts of particle accelerators and ultrafast coherent light sources. The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) fields have a strong action on the beam dynamics of very short bunches, which are moving in the bends of all kinds of magnetic elements. They are responsible for additional energy loss and energy spread; micro bunching and beam emittance growth. These fields may bound the efficiency of damping rings, electron-positron colliders and ultrafast coherent light sources, where high peak currents and very short bunches are envisioned. This is relevant to most high-brightness beam applications. On the other hand these fields together with transition radiation fields can be used for beam diagnostics or even as a powerful resource of THz radiation. A history of the study of CSR and a good collection of references can be found in (1). Electromagnetic theory suggests several methods on how to calculate CSR fields. The most popular method is to use Lienard-Wiechert potentials. Other approach is to solve numerically the approximate equations, which are a Schrodinger type equation. These numerical methods are described in (2). We suggest that a direct solution of Maxwell's equations together with Newton's equations can describe the detailed structure of the CSR fields (3).

  9. Ultrafast palladium diffusion in germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Tahini, Hassan Ali

    2015-01-01

    The slow transport of dopants through crystal lattices has hindered the development of novel devices. Typically atoms are contained within deep potential energy wells which necessitates multiple attempts to hop between minimum energy positions. This is because the bonds that constrain atoms are strongest at the minimum positions. As they hop between sites the bonds must be broken, only to re-form as the atoms slide into adjacent minima. Here we demonstrate that the Pd atoms introduced into the Ge lattice behave differently. They retain bonds as the atoms shift across so that at the energy maximum between sites Pd still exhibits strong bonding characteristics. This reduces the energy maximum to almost nothing (a migration energy of only 0.03 eV) and means that the transport of Pd through the Ge lattice is ultrafast. We scrutinize the bonding characteristics at the atomic level using quantum mechanical simulation tools and demonstrate why Pd behaves so differently to other metals we investigated (i.e. Li, Cu, Ag, Pt and Au). Consequently, this fundamental understanding can be extended to systems where extremely rapid diffusion is desired, such as radiation sensors, batteries and solid oxide fuel cells.

  10. Optimizing a neutron-beam focusing device for the direct geometry time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF at the FRM II reactor source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, N. G.; Simeoni, G. G.; Lefmann, K.

    2016-01-01

    A dedicated beam-focusing device has been designed for the direct geometry thermal-cold neutron time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF at the neutron facility FRM II (Garching, Germany). The prototype, based on the compressed Archimedes' mirror concept, benefits from the adaptive-optics technology (a...... than 3.5 would have only marginal influence on the optimal behaviour, whereas comparable spectrometers could take advantage of longer focusing segments, with particular impact for the thermal region of the neutron spectrum....

  11. Ultrafast quenching of tryptophan fluorescence in proteins: Interresidue and intrahelical electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu Weihong; Li Tanping; Zhang Luyuan; Yang Yi; Kao Yating; Wang Lijuan [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biochemistry, Program of Biophysics, Chemical Physics, and Biochemistry, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Zhong Dongping [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biochemistry, Program of Biophysics, Chemical Physics, and Biochemistry, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)], E-mail: dongping@mps.ohio-state.edu

    2008-06-23

    Quenching of tryptophan fluorescence in proteins has been critical to the understanding of protein dynamics and enzyme reactions using tryptophan as a molecular optical probe. We report here our systematic examinations of potential quenching residues with more than 40 proteins. With site-directed mutation, we placed tryptophan to desired positions or altered its neighboring residues to screen quenching groups among 20 amino acid residues and of peptide backbones. With femtosecond resolution, we observed the ultrafast quenching dynamics within 100 ps and identified two ultrafast quenching groups, the carbonyl- and sulfur-containing residues. The former is glutamine and glutamate residues and the later is disulfide bond and cysteine residue. The quenching by the peptide-bond carbonyl group as well as other potential residues mostly occurs in longer than 100 ps. These ultrafast quenching dynamics occur at van der Waals distances through intraprotein electron transfer with high directionality. Following optimal molecular orbital overlap, electron jumps from the benzene ring of the indole moiety in a vertical orientation to the LUMO of acceptor quenching residues. Molecular dynamics simulations were invoked to elucidate various correlations of quenching dynamics with separation distances, relative orientations, local fluctuations and reaction heterogeneity. These unique ultrafast quenching pairs, as recently found to extensively occur in high-resolution protein structures, may have significant biological implications.

  12. Application of adjoint Monte Carlo to accelerate simulations of mono-directional beams in treatment planning for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nievaart, V. A.; Legrady, D.; Moss, R. L.; Kloosterman, J. L.; Hagen, T. H. J. J. van der; Dam, H. van

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the application of the adjoint transport theory in order to optimize Monte Carlo based radiotherapy treatment planning. The technique is applied to Boron Neutron Capture Therapy where most often mixed beams of neutrons and gammas are involved. In normal forward Monte Carlo simulations the particles start at a source and lose energy as they travel towards the region of interest, i.e., the designated point of detection. Conversely, with adjoint Monte Carlo simulations, the so-called adjoint particles start at the region of interest and gain energy as they travel towards the source where they are detected. In this respect, the particles travel backwards and the real source and real detector become the adjoint detector and adjoint source, respectively. At the adjoint detector, an adjoint function is obtained with which numerically the same result, e.g., dose or flux in the tumor, can be derived as with forward Monte Carlo. In many cases, the adjoint method is more efficient and by that is much quicker when, for example, the response in the tumor or organ at risk for many locations and orientations of the treatment beam around the patient is required. However, a problem occurs when the treatment beam is mono-directional as the probability of detecting adjoint Monte Carlo particles traversing the beam exit (detector plane in adjoint mode) in the negative direction of the incident beam is zero. This problem is addressed here and solved first with the use of next event estimators and second with the application of a Legendre expansion technique of the angular adjoint function. In the first approach, adjoint particles are tracked deterministically through a tube to a (adjoint) point detector far away from the geometric model. The adjoint particles will traverse the disk shaped entrance of this tube (the beam exit in the actual geometry) perpendicularly. This method is slow whenever many events are involved that are not contributing to the point

  13. Characterization of Ultrafast Laser Pulses using a Low-dispersion Frequency Resolved Optical Grating Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitelock, Hope; Bishop, Michael; Khosravi, Soroush; Obaid, Razib; Berrah, Nora

    2016-05-01

    A low dispersion frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) spectrometer was designed to characterize ultrashort (non-colinear optical parametric amplifier. This instrument splits a laser pulse into two replicas with a 90:10 intensity ratio using a thin pellicle beam-splitter and then recombines the pulses in a birefringent medium. The instrument detects a wavelength-sensitive change in polarization of the weak probe pulse in the presence of the stronger pump pulse inside the birefringent medium. Scanning the time delay between the two pulses and acquiring spectra allows for characterization of the frequency and time content of ultrafast laser pulses, that is needed for interpretation of experimental results obtained from these ultrafast laser systems. Funded by the DoE-BES, Grant No. DE-SC0012376.

  14. Synchronization control for ultrafast laser parallel microdrilling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zhongsheng; Kuang, Zheng; Ouyang, Jinlei; Liu, Dun; Perrie, Walter; Edwardson, Stuart P.; Dearden, Geoff

    2014-11-01

    Ultrafast lasers, emitting ultra-short pulses of light, generally of the order of femtoseconds to ten picoseconds, are widely used in micro-processing with the advantage of very little thermal damage. Parallel micro-processing is seen significant developments in laser fabrication, thanking to the spatial light modulator (SLM) which can concert single beam to multiple beams through computer generate holograms (CGHs). However, without synchronization control, on the conditions of changing different holograms or processing on large area beyond scanning galvo's ability, the fabrication will be interrupted constantly for changing holograms and moving the stages. Therefore, synchronization control is very important to improve the convenience and application of parallel micro-processing. A synchronization control method, carried out through two application software: SAMLight (or WaveRunner) and Labview, is presented in this paper. SAMLight is used to control the laser and the scanning galvo to implement microprocessing, and the developed program with Labview is used to control the SLM and motion stages. The synchronization signals, transmitted between the two software, are utilized by a National Instruments (NI) device USB-6008. Using optimal control methods, the synchronized system can easily and automatically accomplish complicated fabrications with minimum time. A multi-drilling application is provided to verify the affectivity of the synchronized control method. It uses multiple annular beams, generated by superimposing multi-beam CGH onto a diffractive axicon CGH, to drill multiple holes at one time, and it can automatically finish different patterns based on synchronization control. This drilling way is an optical trepanning and it avoids huge laser energy waste with attenuation. The multi-beam CGHs, generated by the Grating and Lens algorithm, are different for different patterns. The processing is over 200 times faster than traditional mechanical trepanning

  15. Direct generation of an optical vortex beam in a single-frequency Nd:YVO4 laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D J; Kim, J W

    2015-02-01

    A simple method for generating a Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) mode optical vortex beam with well-determined handedness in a single-frequency solid state laser end-pumped by a ring-shaped pump beam is reported. After investigating the intensity profile and the wavefront helicity of each longitudinal mode output to understand generation of the LG mode in a Nd:YVO4 laser resonator, selection of the wavefront handedness has been achieved simply by inserting and tilting an etalon in the resonator, which breaks the propagation symmetry of the Poynting vectors with opposite helicity. Simple calculation and the experimental results are discussed for supporting this selection mechanism.

  16. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science II

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Agostini, Pierre; Ferrante, Gaetano

    2007-01-01

    This book series addresses a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field, Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science. Its progress is being stimulated by the recent development of ultrafast laser technologies. Highlights of this second volume include Coulomb explosion and fragmentation of molecules, control of chemical dynamics, high-order harmonic generation, propagation and filamentation, and laser-plasma interaction. All chapters are authored by foremost experts in their fields and the texts are written at a level accessible to newcomers and graduate students, each chapter beginning with an introductory overview.

  17. Progress in ultrafast intense laser science XI

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Martin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science and optical science, which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield, as well as graduate students, can grasp the importance

  18. Progress in ultrafast intense laser science

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Mathur, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science, which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield, as well as graduate students, can grasp the importance

  19. Ultrafast Nonlinear Signal Processing in Silicon Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Mulvad, Hans Christian Hansen; Hu, Hao

    2012-01-01

    We describe recent demonstrations of exploiting highly nonlinear silicon waveguides for ultrafast optical signal processing. We describe wavelength conversion and serial-to-parallel conversion of 640 Gbit/s data signals and 1.28 Tbit/s demultiplexing and all-optical sampling.......We describe recent demonstrations of exploiting highly nonlinear silicon waveguides for ultrafast optical signal processing. We describe wavelength conversion and serial-to-parallel conversion of 640 Gbit/s data signals and 1.28 Tbit/s demultiplexing and all-optical sampling....

  20. PREFACE: Ultrafast and nonlinear optics in carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Junichiro

    2013-02-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials—single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene, in particular—have emerged in the last decade as novel low-dimensional systems with extraordinary properties. Because they are direct-bandgap systems, SWCNTs are one of the leading candidates to unify electronic and optical functions in nanoscale circuitry; their diameter-dependent bandgaps can be utilized for multi-wavelength devices. Graphene's ultrahigh carrier mobilities are promising for high-frequency electronic devices, while, at the same time, it is predicted to have ideal properties for terahertz generation and detection due to its unique zero-gap, zero-mass band structure. There have been a large number of basic optical studies on these materials, but most of them were performed in the weak-excitation, quasi-equilibrium regime. In order to probe and assess their performance characteristics as optoelectronic materials under device-operating conditions, it is crucial to strongly drive them and examine their optical properties in highly non-equilibrium situations and with ultrashot time resolution. In this section, the reader will find the latest results in this rapidly growing field of research. We have assembled contributions from some of the leading experts in ultrafast and nonlinear optical spectroscopy of carbon-based nanomaterials. Specific topics featured include: thermalization, cooling, and recombination dynamics of photo-generated carriers; stimulated emission, gain, and amplification; ultrafast photoluminescence; coherent phonon dynamics; exciton-phonon and exciton-plasmon interactions; exciton-exciton annihilation and Auger processes; spontaneous and stimulated emission of terahertz radiation; four-wave mixing and harmonic generation; ultrafast photocurrents; the AC Stark and Franz-Keldysh effects; and non-perturbative light-mater coupling. We would like to express our sincere thanks to those who contributed their latest results to this special section, and the

  1. The direct injection of intense ion beams from a high field electron cyclotron resonance ion source into a radio frequency quadrupole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, G; Becker, R; Hamm, R W; Baskaran, R; Kanjilal, D; Roy, A

    2014-02-01

    The ion current achievable from high intensity ECR sources for highly charged ions is limited by the high space charge. This makes classical extraction systems for the transport and subsequent matching to a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator less efficient. The direct plasma injection (DPI) method developed originally for the laser ion source avoids these problems and uses the combined focusing of the gap between the ion source and the RFQ vanes (or rods) and the focusing of the rf fields from the RFQ penetrating into this gap. For high performance ECR sources that use superconducting solenoids, the stray magnetic field of the source in addition to the DPI scheme provides focusing against the space charge blow-up of the beam. A combined extraction/matching system has been designed for a high performance ECR ion source injecting into an RFQ, allowing a total beam current of 10 mA from the ion source for the production of highly charged (238)U(40+) (1.33 mA) to be injected at an ion source voltage of 60 kV. In this design, the features of IGUN have been used to take into account the rf-focusing of an RFQ channel (without modulation), the electrostatic field between ion source extraction and the RFQ vanes, the magnetic stray field of the ECR superconducting solenoid, and the defocusing space charge of an ion beam. The stray magnetic field is shown to be critical in the case of a matched beam.

  2. The direct injection of intense ion beams from a high field electron cyclotron resonance ion source into a radio frequency quadrupole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, G., E-mail: gerosro@gmail.com; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi (India); Becker, R. [Institut fur Angewandte Physik der Universitaet, D-60054 Frankfurt/M (Germany); Hamm, R. W. [R and M Technical Enterprises, Inc., 4725 Arlene Place, Pleasanton, California 94566 (United States); Baskaran, R. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu (India)

    2014-02-15

    The ion current achievable from high intensity ECR sources for highly charged ions is limited by the high space charge. This makes classical extraction systems for the transport and subsequent matching to a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator less efficient. The direct plasma injection (DPI) method developed originally for the laser ion source avoids these problems and uses the combined focusing of the gap between the ion source and the RFQ vanes (or rods) and the focusing of the rf fields from the RFQ penetrating into this gap. For high performance ECR sources that use superconducting solenoids, the stray magnetic field of the source in addition to the DPI scheme provides focusing against the space charge blow-up of the beam. A combined extraction/matching system has been designed for a high performance ECR ion source injecting into an RFQ, allowing a total beam current of 10 mA from the ion source for the production of highly charged {sup 238}U{sup 40+} (1.33 mA) to be injected at an ion source voltage of 60 kV. In this design, the features of IGUN have been used to take into account the rf-focusing of an RFQ channel (without modulation), the electrostatic field between ion source extraction and the RFQ vanes, the magnetic stray field of the ECR superconducting solenoid, and the defocusing space charge of an ion beam. The stray magnetic field is shown to be critical in the case of a matched beam.

  3. The direct injection of intense ion beams from a high field electron cyclotron resonance ion source into a radio frequency quadrupole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, G.; Becker, R.; Hamm, R. W.; Baskaran, R.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.

    2014-02-01

    The ion current achievable from high intensity ECR sources for highly charged ions is limited by the high space charge. This makes classical extraction systems for the transport and subsequent matching to a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator less efficient. The direct plasma injection (DPI) method developed originally for the laser ion source avoids these problems and uses the combined focusing of the gap between the ion source and the RFQ vanes (or rods) and the focusing of the rf fields from the RFQ penetrating into this gap. For high performance ECR sources that use superconducting solenoids, the stray magnetic field of the source in addition to the DPI scheme provides focusing against the space charge blow-up of the beam. A combined extraction/matching system has been designed for a high performance ECR ion source injecting into an RFQ, allowing a total beam current of 10 mA from the ion source for the production of highly charged 238U40+ (1.33 mA) to be injected at an ion source voltage of 60 kV. In this design, the features of IGUN have been used to take into account the rf-focusing of an RFQ channel (without modulation), the electrostatic field between ion source extraction and the RFQ vanes, the magnetic stray field of the ECR superconducting solenoid, and the defocusing space charge of an ion beam. The stray magnetic field is shown to be critical in the case of a matched beam.

  4. Ultrafast laser-semiconductor interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schile, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    Studies of the ultrafast (< 100 fs) interactions of infrared, sub-100 fs laser pulses with IR, photosensitive semiconductor materials InGaAs, InSb, and HgCdTe are reported. Both the carrier dynamics and the associated Terahertz radiation from these materials are discussed. The most recent developments of femtosecond (< 100 fs) Optical Parametric Oscillators (OPO) has extended the wavelength range from the visible to 5.2 μm. The photogenerated semiconductor free carrier dynamics are determined in the 77 to 300 degrees K temperature range using the Transmission Correlation Peak (TCP) method. The electron-phonon scattering times are typically 200 - 600 fs. Depending upon the material composition and substrate on which the IR crystalline materials are deposited, the nonlinear TCP absorption gives recombination rates as fast as 10's of picoseconds. For the HgCdTe, there exists a 400 fs electron-phonon scattering process along with a much longer 3600 fs loss process. Studies of the interactions of these ultrashort laser pulses with semiconductors produce Terahertz (Thz) radiative pulses. With undoped InSb, there is a substantial change in the spectral content of this THz radiation between 80 - 260 degrees K while the spectrum of Te-doped InSb remains nearly unchanged, an effect attributed to its mobility being dominated by impurity scattering. At 80 degrees K, the terahertz radiation from undoped InSb is dependent on wavelength, with both a higher frequency spectrum and much larger amplitudes generated at longer wavelengths. No such effect is observed at 260 degrees K. Finally, new results on the dependence of the emitted THz radiation on the InSb crystal's orientation is presented

  5. Ultrafast Diagnostics for Electron Beams from Laser Plasma Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matlis, N.H.; Bakeman, M.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Gonsalves, T.; Lin, C.; Nakamura, K.; Osterhoff, J.; Plateau, G.R.; Schroeder, C.B.; Shiraishi, S.; Sokollik, T.; van Tilborg, J.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-01-01

    We present an overview of diagnostic techniques for measuring key parameters of electron bunches from Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPAs). The diagnostics presented here were chosen because they highlight the unique advantages (e.g., diverse forms of electromagnetic emission) and difficulties (e.g., shot-to-shot variability) associated with LPAs. Non destructiveness and high resolution (in space and time and energy) are key attributes that enable the formation of a comprehensive suite of simultaneous diagnostics which are necessary for the full characterization of the ultrashort, but highly-variable electron bunches from LPAs.

  6. Ultrafast Diagnostics for Electron Beams from Laser Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlis, N. H.; Bakeman, M.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Gonsalves, T.; Lin, C.; Nakamura, K.; Osterhoff, J.; Plateau, G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Shiraishi, S.; Sokollik, T.; van Tilborg, J.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    We present an overview of diagnostic techniques for measuring key parameters of electron bunches from Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPAs). The diagnostics presented here were chosen because they highlight the unique advantages (e.g., diverse forms of electromagnetic emission) and difficulties (e.g., shot-to-shot variability) associated with LPAs. Non destructiveness and high resolution (in space and time and energy) are key attributes that enable the formation of a comprehensive suite of simultaneous diagnostics which are necessary for the full characterization of the ultrashort, but highly-variable electron bunches from LPAs.

  7. Ultrafast X-Ray Spectroscopy of Conical Intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Simon P.; Chergui, Majed; Stolow, Albert; Schuurman, Michael S.

    2018-06-01

    Ongoing developments in ultrafast x-ray sources offer powerful new means of probing the complex nonadiabatically coupled structural and electronic dynamics of photoexcited molecules. These non-Born-Oppenheimer effects are governed by general electronic degeneracies termed conical intersections, which play a key role, analogous to that of a transition state, in the electronic-nuclear dynamics of excited molecules. Using high-level ab initio quantum dynamics simulations, we studied time-resolved x-ray absorption (TRXAS) and photoelectron spectroscopy (TRXPS) of the prototypical unsaturated organic chromophore, ethylene, following excitation to its S2(π π*) state. The TRXAS, in particular, is highly sensitive to all aspects of the ensuing dynamics. These x-ray spectroscopies provide a clear signature of the wave packet dynamics near conical intersections, related to charge localization effects driven by the nuclear dynamics. Given the ubiquity of charge localization in excited state dynamics, we believe that ultrafast x-ray spectroscopies offer a unique and powerful route to the direct observation of dynamics around conical intersections.

  8. Robust Stacking-Independent Ultrafast Charge Transfer in MoS2/WS2 Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ziheng; Hong, Hao; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Qi; Huang, Wei; Cao, Ting; Qiao, Ruixi; Liu, Can; Liang, Jing; Jin, Chuanhong; Jiao, Liying; Shi, Kebin; Meng, Sheng; Liu, Kaihui

    2017-12-26

    Van der Waals-coupled two-dimensional (2D) heterostructures have attracted great attention recently due to their high potential in the next-generation photodetectors and solar cells. The understanding of charge-transfer process between adjacent atomic layers is the key to design optimal devices as it directly determines the fundamental response speed and photon-electron conversion efficiency. However, general belief and theoretical studies have shown that the charge transfer behavior depends sensitively on interlayer configurations, which is difficult to control accurately, bringing great uncertainties in device designing. Here we investigate the ultrafast dynamics of interlayer charge transfer in a prototype heterostructure, the MoS 2 /WS 2 bilayer with various stacking configurations, by optical two-color ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy. Surprisingly, we found that the charge transfer is robust against varying interlayer twist angles and interlayer coupling strength, in time scale of ∼90 fs. Our observation, together with atomic-resolved transmission electron characterization and time-dependent density functional theory simulations, reveals that the robust ultrafast charge transfer is attributed to the heterogeneous interlayer stretching/sliding, which provides additional channels for efficient charge transfer previously unknown. Our results elucidate the origin of transfer rate robustness against interlayer stacking configurations in optical devices based on 2D heterostructures, facilitating their applications in ultrafast and high-efficient optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices in the near future.

  9. Quantum Computation with Ultrafast Laser Pulse Shaping

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 6. Quantum Computation with Ultrafast Laser Pulse Shaping. Debabrata Goswami. General Article Volume 10 Issue 6 June 2005 pp 8-14. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  10. Ultrafast spectroscopy of model biological membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, Avishek

    2009-01-01

    In this PhD thesis, I have described the novel time-resolved sum-frequency generation (TR-SFG) spectroscopic technique that I developed during the course of my PhD research and used it study the ultrafast vibrational, structural and orientational dynamics of water molecules at model biological

  11. Photonic-assisted ultrafast THz wireless access

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xianbin; Chen, Ying; Galili, Michael

    THz technology has been considered feasible for ultrafast wireless data communi- cation, to meet the increasing demand on next-generation fast wireless access, e.g., huge data file transferring and fast mobile data stream access. This talk reviews recent progress in high-speed THz wireless...

  12. Reply to 'Comments on 'Direct determination of kerma for a d(48.5)+Be therapy beam''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binns, P.J.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Maughan, R.L.; Kota, C.

    1999-01-01

    The comments of Green (see above) which have elicited this response appear to be factually incorrect. As a consequence the authors feel obliged to clarify the confusion they might create. Green is mistaken in the assertion that the recent paper by Binns et al (1998) focuses on differences rather than the similarities between the results of Aro et al (1992) and those reported. Nothing could be further from the truth. The differences referred to in the text of the discussion allude to those observed between the microdose spectra associated with carbon and oxygen that were measured in the d(48.5)+Be therapy beam under identical irradiation conditions. They do not refer to any differences due to employing different therapy beams as he purports. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  13. Heat affected zone microfissuring in a laser beam welded directionally solidified Ni3Al-base alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojo, O.A.; Ding, R.G.; Chaturvedi, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    The laser beam weld heat affected zone (HAZ) microstructure of a newly developed aerospace alloy, IC 6, was examined. HAZ microfissuring was observed and found to be associated with grain boundary liquation facilitated by subsolidus eutectic-type transformation of the alloy's major phase, γ' precipitates, and interfacial melting of M 6 C-type carbide and (Mo 2 Ni)B 2 -type boride particles

  14. Direct experimental observation of the gas density depression effect using a two-bunch X-ray FEL beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Y; Schafer, D W; Song, S; Sun, Y; Zhu, D; Krzywinski, J; Robert, A; Wu, J; Decker, F J

    2018-01-01

    The experimental observation of the depression effect in gas devices designed for X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) is reported. The measurements were carried out at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a two-bunch FEL beam at 6.5 keV with 122.5 ns separation passing through an argon gas cell. The relative intensities of the two pulses of the two-bunch beam were measured, after and before the gas cell, from X-ray scattering off thin targets by using fast diodes with sufficient temporal resolution. At a cell pressure of 140 hPa, it was found that the after-to-before ratio of the intensities of the second pulse was about 17% ± 6% higher than that of the first pulse, revealing lower effective attenuation of the gas cell due to heating by the first pulse and subsequent gas density reduction in the beam path. This measurement is important in guiding the design and/or mitigating the adverse effects in gas devices for high-repetition-rate FELs such as the LCLS-II and the European XFEL or other future high-repetition-rate upgrades to existing FEL facilities.

  15. Accelerator-based Single-shot Ultrafast Transmission Electron Microscope with Picosecond Temporal Resolution and Nanometer Spatial Resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, D.; Fu, F.; Zhang, J.; Huang, X.; Wang, L.; Wang, X.; Wan, W.

    2014-01-01

    We present feasibility study of an accelerator-based ultrafast transmission electron microscope (u-TEM) capable of producing a full field image in a single-shot with simultaneous picosecond temporal resolution and nanometer spatial resolution. We study key physics related to performance of u-TEMs, and discuss major challenges as well as possible solutions for practical realization of u-TEMs. The feasibility of u-TEMs is confirmed through simulations using realistic electron beam parameters. W...

  16. Single bunched beam generation without subharmonic prebuncher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Tagawa, S.

    1995-01-01

    The intensity of the accelerated single bunched electron beam depends on the performance of the electron gun and the fast cathode pulser. The electron beam is emitted by a Y-796 cathode assembly with a cathode of 2 cm 2 (8 A/cm 2 ), and an extracted voltage of 90 kV. The maximum charge of the single bunched beam was attained at 1.5 nC/pulse using SHB. Recently, a single bunched beam has been generated by an ultrafast cathode pulser (rise and fall time <100 ps pulse height -2 kV at 50 Ω) without SHB. The charge of the accelerated electron beam is about 40 pC/pulse (pulse width <10 ps) without the production of a satellite beam. This result show that a single bunched beam can be produced by the linear accelerator without SHB. ((orig.))

  17. Direct writing of gold nanostructures with an electron beam: On the way to pure nanostructures by combining optimized deposition with oxygen-plasma treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domagoj Belić

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a highly effective approach for the chemical purification of directly written 2D and 3D gold nanostructures suitable for plasmonics, biomolecule immobilisation, and nanoelectronics. Gold nano- and microstructures can be fabricated by one-step direct-write lithography process using focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID. Typically, as-deposited gold nanostructures suffer from a low Au content and unacceptably high carbon contamination. We show that the undesirable carbon contamination can be diminished using a two-step process – a combination of optimized deposition followed by appropriate postdeposition cleaning. Starting from the common metal-organic precursor Me2-Au-tfac, it is demonstrated that the Au content in pristine FEBID nanostructures can be increased from 30 atom % to as much as 72 atom %, depending on the sustained electron beam dose. As a second step, oxygen-plasma treatment is established to further enhance the Au content in the structures, while preserving their morphology to a high degree. This two-step process represents a simple, feasible and high-throughput method for direct writing of purer gold nanostructures that can enable their future use for demanding applications.

  18. Wavelength Detuning Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Mitigation Scheme for Direct-Drive: Modeling and Evidence from National Ignition Facility Implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marozas, J. A.

    2017-10-01

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) has been shown to significantly reduce the laser absorption and implosion speed in direct-drive implosion experiments on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Mitigating CBET assists in achieving ignition-relevant hot-spot pressures in deuterium-tritium cryogenic OMEGA implosions. In addition, reducing CBET permits lower, more hydrodynamically stable, in-flight aspect ratio ignition designs with smaller nonuniformity growth during the acceleration phase. Detuning the wavelengths of the crossing beams is one of several techniques under investigation at the University of Rochester to mitigate CBET. This talk will describe these techniques with an emphasis on wavelength detuning. Recent experiments designed and predicted using multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations including CBET on the NIF have exploited the wavelength arrangement of the NIF beam geometry to demonstrate CBET mitigation through wavelength detuning in polar-direct-drive (PDD) implosions. Shapes and trajectories inferred from time-resolved x-ray radiography of the imploding shell, scattered-light spectra, and hard x-ray spectra generated by suprathermal electrons all indicate a reduction in CBET. These results and their implications for direct-drive ignition will be presented and discussed. In addition, hydrodynamically scaled ignition-relevant designs for OMEGA implosions exploiting wavelength detuning will be presented. Changes required to the OMEGA laser to permit wavelength detuning will be discussed. Future plans for PDD on the NIF including more-uniform implosions with CBET mitigation will be explored. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  19. A Recirculating Linac-Based Facility for Ultrafast X-Ray Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corlett, J. N.; Barletta, W. A.; DeSantis, S.; Doolittle, L.; Fawley, W. M.; Green, M.A.; Heimann, P.; Leone, S.; Lidia, S.; Li, D.; Ratti, A.; Robinson, K.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Wan, W.; Wells, R.; Wolski, A.; Zholents, A.; Parmigiani, F.; Placidi, M.; Pirkl, W.; Rimmer, R. A.; Wang, S.

    2003-01-01

    We present an updated design for a proposed source of ultra-fast synchrotron radiation pulses based on a recirculating superconducting linac [1,2], in particular the incorporation of EUV and soft x-ray production. The project has been named LUX--Linac-based Ultrafast X-ray facility. The source produces intense x-ray pulses with duration of 10-100 fs at a 10 kHz repetition rate, with synchronization of 10's fs, optimized for the study of ultra-fast dynamics. The photon range covers the EUV to hard x-ray spectrum by use of seeded harmonic generation in undulators, and a specialized technique for ultra-short pulse photon production in the 1-10 keV range. High brightness rf photocathodes produce electron bunches which are optimized either for coherent emission in free electron lasers, or to provide a large x/y emittance ration and small vertical emittance which allows for manipulation to produce short-pulse hard x-rays. An injector linac accelerates the beam to 120 MeV, and is followed by f our passes through a 600-720 MeV recirculating linac. We outline the major technical components of the proposed facility

  20. Possibilities for direct optical observation of negative hydrogen ions in ion beam plasma sources via Rayleigh or Thomson scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    The possibilities of applying optical scattering techniques to the determination of H - concentrations in plasma sources relevant to negative ion beam generation are considered. Rayleigh scattering measurements for incident wavelengths just below the H - photoionization limit appear to be only just feasible experimentally. A more promising possibility is observation of the modification in a plasma containing negative ions of the collective ion-feature in Thomson scattering. Numerical predictions of the effects of H - concentration on the spectral distribution of the ion-feature are presented. (author)

  1. Direct observation of CD4 T cell morphologies and their cross-sectional traction force derivation on quartz nanopillar substrates using focused ion beam technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Joo; Kim, Gil-Sung; Hyung, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Won-Yong; Hong, Chang-Hee; Lee, Sang-Kwon

    2013-07-01

    Direct observations of the primary mouse CD4 T cell morphologies, e.g., cell adhesion and cell spreading by culturing CD4 T cells in a short period of incubation (e.g., 20 min) on streptavidin-functionalized quartz nanopillar arrays (QNPA) using a high-content scanning electron microscopy method were reported. Furthermore, we first demonstrated cross-sectional cell traction force distribution of surface-bound CD4 T cells on QNPA substrates by culturing the cells on top of the QNPA and further analysis in deflection of underlying QNPA via focused ion beam-assisted technique.

  2. GO Shaping of Omnidirectional Dual-Reflector Antennas with Arbitrary Main-Beam Direction in Elevation Plane by Connecting Conic Sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael A. Penchel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work discusses an alternative geometrical optics (GO technique to synthesize omnidirectional dual-reflector antennas with uniform aperture phase distribution together with an arbitrary main-beam direction for the antenna radiation pattern. Sub- and main reflectors are bodies of revolution generated by shaped curves defined by local conic sections consecutively concatenated. The shaping formulation is derived for configurations like ADC (axis-displaced Cassegrain and ADE (axis-displaced ellipse omnidirectional antennas. As case studies, two configurations fed by a TEM coaxial horn are designed and analyzed by a hybrid technique based on mode matching and method of moments in order to validate the GO shaping procedure.

  3. Investigation of mixed ion fields in the forward direction for 220.5 MeV/u helium ion beams: comparison between water and PMMA targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aricò, G.; Gehrke, T.; Jakubek, J.; Gallas, R.; Berke, S.; Jäkel, O.; Mairani, A.; Ferrari, A.; Martišíková, M.

    2017-10-01

    Currently there is a rising interest in helium ion beams for radiotherapy. For benchmarking of the physical beam models used in treatment planning, there is a need for experimental data on the composition and spatial distribution of mixed ion fields. Of particular interest are the attenuation of the primary helium ion fluence and the build-up of secondary hydrogen ions due to nuclear interactions. The aim of this work was to provide such data with an enhanced precision. Moreover, the validity and limits of the mixed ion field equivalence between water and PMMA targets were investigated. Experiments with a 220.5 MeV/u helium ion pencil beam were performed at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center in Germany. The compact detection system used for ion tracking and identification was solely based on Timepix position-sensitive semiconductor detectors. In comparison to standard techniques, this system is two orders of magnitude smaller, and provides higher precision and flexibility. The numbers of outgoing helium and hydrogen ions per primary helium ion as well as the lateral particle distributions were quantitatively investigated in the forward direction behind water and PMMA targets with 5.2-18 cm water equivalent thickness (WET). Comparing water and PMMA targets with the same WET, we found that significant differences in the amount of outgoing helium and hydrogen ions and in the lateral particle distributions arise for target thicknesses above 10 cm WET. The experimental results concerning hydrogen ions emerging from the targets were reproduced reasonably well by Monte Carlo simulations using the FLUKA code. Concerning the amount of outgoing helium ions, significant differences of 3-15% were found between experiments and simulations. We conclude that if PMMA is used in place of water in dosimetry, differences in the dose distributions could arise close to the edges of the field, in particular for deep seated targets. The results presented in this publication are

  4. Direct atomic fabrication and dopant positioning in Si using electron beams with active real-time image-based feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen; Hudak, Bethany M.; Zarkadoula, Eva; Song, Jiaming; Maksov, Artem; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Kravchenko, Ivan; Snijders, Panchapakesan C.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2018-06-01

    Semiconductor fabrication is a mainstay of modern civilization, enabling the myriad applications and technologies that underpin everyday life. However, while sub-10 nanometer devices are already entering the mainstream, the end of the Moore’s law roadmap still lacks tools capable of bulk semiconductor fabrication on sub-nanometer and atomic levels, with probe-based manipulation being explored as the only known pathway. Here we demonstrate that the atomic-sized focused beam of a scanning transmission electron microscope can be used to manipulate semiconductors such as Si on the atomic level, inducing growth of crystalline Si from the amorphous phase, reentrant amorphization, milling, and dopant front motion. These phenomena are visualized in real-time with atomic resolution. We further implement active feedback control based on real-time image analytics to automatically control the e-beam motion, enabling shape control and providing a pathway for atom-by-atom correction of fabricated structures in the near future. These observations open a new epoch for atom-by-atom manufacturing in bulk, the long-held dream of nanotechnology.

  5. Direct atomic fabrication and dopant positioning in Si using electron beams with active real-time image-based feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen; Hudak, Bethany M; Zarkadoula, Eva; Song, Jiaming; Maksov, Artem; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Kravchenko, Ivan; Snijders, Panchapakesan C; Lupini, Andrew R; Borisevich, Albina Y; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2018-06-22

    Semiconductor fabrication is a mainstay of modern civilization, enabling the myriad applications and technologies that underpin everyday life. However, while sub-10 nanometer devices are already entering the mainstream, the end of the Moore's law roadmap still lacks tools capable of bulk semiconductor fabrication on sub-nanometer and atomic levels, with probe-based manipulation being explored as the only known pathway. Here we demonstrate that the atomic-sized focused beam of a scanning transmission electron microscope can be used to manipulate semiconductors such as Si on the atomic level, inducing growth of crystalline Si from the amorphous phase, reentrant amorphization, milling, and dopant front motion. These phenomena are visualized in real-time with atomic resolution. We further implement active feedback control based on real-time image analytics to automatically control the e-beam motion, enabling shape control and providing a pathway for atom-by-atom correction of fabricated structures in the near future. These observations open a new epoch for atom-by-atom manufacturing in bulk, the long-held dream of nanotechnology.

  6. Edge turbulence effect on ultra-fast swept reflectometry core measurements in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadvitskiy, G. V.; Heuraux, S.; Lechte, C.; Hacquin, S.; Sabot, R.

    2018-02-01

    Ultra-fast frequency-swept reflectometry (UFSR) enables one to provide information about the turbulence radial wave-number spectrum and perturbation amplitude with good spatial and temporal resolutions. However, a data interpretation of USFR is quiet tricky. An iterative algorithm to solve this inverse problem was used in past works, Gerbaud (2006 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77 10E928). For a direct solution, a fast 1D Helmholtz solver was used. Two-dimensional effects are strong and should be taken into account during data interpretation. As 2D full-wave codes are still too time consuming for systematic application, fast 2D approaches based on the Born approximation are of prime interest. Such methods gives good results in the case of small turbulence levels. However in tokamak plasmas, edge turbulence is usually very strong and can distort and broaden the probing beam Sysoeva et al (2015 Nucl. Fusion 55 033016). It was shown that this can change reflectometer phase response from the plasma core. Comparison between 2D full wave computation and the simplified Born approximation was done. The approximated method can provide a right spectral shape, but it is unable to describe a change of the spectral amplitude with an edge turbulence level. Computation for the O-mode wave with the linear density profile in the slab geometry and for realistic Tore-Supra density profile, based on the experimental data turbulence amplitude and spectrum, were performed to investigate the role of strong edge turbulence. It is shown that the spectral peak in the signal amplitude variation spectrum which rises with edge turbulence can be a signature of strong edge turbulence. Moreover, computations for misaligned receiving and emitting antennas were performed. It was found that the signal amplitude variation peak changes its position with a receiving antenna poloidal displacement.

  7. Tracking the ultrafast motion of a single molecule by femtosecond orbital imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocker, Tyler L.; Peller, Dominik; Yu, Ping; Repp, Jascha; Huber, Rupert

    2016-11-01

    Watching a single molecule move on its intrinsic timescale has been one of the central goals of modern nanoscience, and calls for measurements that combine ultrafast temporal resolution with atomic spatial resolution. Steady-state experiments access the requisite spatial scales, as illustrated by direct imaging of individual molecular orbitals using scanning tunnelling microscopy or the acquisition of tip-enhanced Raman and luminescence spectra with sub-molecular resolution. But tracking the intrinsic dynamics of a single molecule directly in the time domain faces the challenge that interactions with the molecule must be confined to a femtosecond time window. For individual nanoparticles, such ultrafast temporal confinement has been demonstrated by combining scanning tunnelling microscopy with so-called lightwave electronics, which uses the oscillating carrier wave of tailored light pulses to directly manipulate electronic motion on timescales faster even than a single cycle of light. Here we build on ultrafast terahertz scanning tunnelling microscopy to access a state-selective tunnelling regime, where the peak of a terahertz electric-field waveform transiently opens an otherwise forbidden tunnelling channel through a single molecular state. It thereby removes a single electron from an individual pentacene molecule’s highest occupied molecular orbital within a time window shorter than one oscillation cycle of the terahertz wave. We exploit this effect to record approximately 100-femtosecond snapshot images of the orbital structure with sub-ångström spatial resolution, and to reveal, through pump/probe measurements, coherent molecular vibrations at terahertz frequencies directly in the time domain. We anticipate that the combination of lightwave electronics and the atomic resolution of our approach will open the door to visualizing ultrafast photochemistry and the operation of molecular electronics on the single-orbital scale.

  8. An ultrafast nanotip electron gun triggered by grating-coupled surface plasmons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schröder, Benjamin; Sivis, Murat; Bormann, Reiner; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus, E-mail: cropers@gwdg.de [4th Physical Institute - Solids and Nanostructures, University of Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2015-12-07

    We demonstrate multiphoton photoelectron emission from gold nanotips induced by nanofocusing surface plasmons, resonantly excited on the tip shaft by a grating coupler. The tip is integrated into an electron gun assembly, which facilitates control over the spatial emission sites and allows us to disentangle direct grating emission from plasmon-triggered apex emission. The nanoscale source size of this electron gun concept enables highly coherent electron pulses with applications in ultrafast electron imaging and diffraction.

  9. Ultrafast electron diffraction using an ultracold source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. van Mourik

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of structural dynamics of complex macromolecular crystals using electrons requires bunches of sufficient coherence and charge. We present diffraction patterns from graphite, obtained with bunches from an ultracold electron source, based on femtosecond near-threshold photoionization of a laser-cooled atomic gas. By varying the photoionization wavelength, we change the effective source temperature from 300 K to 10 K, resulting in a concomitant change in the width of the diffraction peaks, which is consistent with independently measured source parameters. This constitutes a direct measurement of the beam coherence of this ultracold source and confirms its suitability for protein crystal diffraction.

  10. Technical Note: A direct ray-tracing method to compute integral depth dose in pencil beam proton radiography with a multilayer ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Deffet, Sylvain; Meijers, Arturs; Vander Stappen, Francois

    2016-12-01

    To introduce a fast ray-tracing algorithm in pencil proton radiography (PR) with a multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) for in vivo range error mapping. Pencil beam PR was obtained by delivering spots uniformly positioned in a square (45 × 45 mm 2 field-of-view) of 9 × 9 spots capable of crossing the phantoms (210 MeV). The exit beam was collected by a MLIC to sample the integral depth dose (IDD MLIC ). PRs of an electron-density and of a head phantom were acquired by moving the couch to obtain multiple 45 × 45 mm 2 frames. To map the corresponding range errors, the two-dimensional set of IDD MLIC was compared with (i) the integral depth dose computed by the treatment planning system (TPS) by both analytic (IDD TPS ) and Monte Carlo (IDD MC ) algorithms in a volume of water simulating the MLIC at the CT, and (ii) the integral depth dose directly computed by a simple ray-tracing algorithm (IDD direct ) through the same CT data. The exact spatial position of the spot pattern was numerically adjusted testing different in-plane positions and selecting the one that minimized the range differences between IDD direct and IDD MLIC . Range error mapping was feasible by both the TPS and the ray-tracing methods, but very sensitive to even small misalignments. In homogeneous regions, the range errors computed by the direct ray-tracing algorithm matched the results obtained by both the analytic and the Monte Carlo algorithms. In both phantoms, lateral heterogeneities were better modeled by the ray-tracing and the Monte Carlo algorithms than by the analytic TPS computation. Accordingly, when the pencil beam crossed lateral heterogeneities, the range errors mapped by the direct algorithm matched better the Monte Carlo maps than those obtained by the analytic algorithm. Finally, the simplicity of the ray-tracing algorithm allowed to implement a prototype procedure for automated spatial alignment. The ray-tracing algorithm can reliably replace the TPS method in MLIC PR for in

  11. Ultrafast charge transfer and radiationless relaxations from higher excited state (S2) of directly linked Zn-porphyrin (ZP)-acceptor dyads: investigations into fundamental problems of exciplex chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mataga, Noboru; Taniguchi, Seiji; Chosrowjan, Haik; Osuka, Atsuhiro; Yoshida, Naoya

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated photoinduced electron transfer and related processes from the higher excited electronic state (S 2 ) of Zn-porphyrin-imide acceptor directly linked supramolecular systems (ZP-I) designed especially for the critical studies of the energy gap law (EGL) of the charge separation (CS) from the S 2 state and solvent effects upon EGL. We have confirmed the modification of the EGL by change of solvent polarity from acetonitrile (ACN), tetrahydrofuran (THF) to toluene (Tol) and methyl-cyclohexane (MCH), from rather typical bell-shaped one in ACN to that with less prominent normal region and prominent inverted region with moderate slope extending over wider range of -ΔG CS values in nonpolar solvent MCH. We have demonstrated that these solvent effects upon EGL affect delicately various radiationless relaxation processes from S 2 state. We have examined also effects of the hydrogen bonding solvent ethanol (EtOH) on the EGL for CS and found very specific effect controlling the CS reaction and related processes

  12. Direct fabrication of a W-C SNS Josephson junction using focused-ion-beam chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Jun; Kometani, Reo; Ishihara, Sunao; Warisawa, Shin’ichi; Onomitsu, Koji; Krockenberger, Yoshiharu; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    A tungsten-carbide (W-C) superconductor/normal metal/superconductor (SNS) Josephson junction has been fabricated using focused-ion-beam chemical vapour deposition (FIB-CVD). Under certain process conditions, the component ratio has been tuned from W: C: Ga = 26%: 66%: 8% in the superconducting wires to W: C: Ga = 14%: 79%: 7% in the metallic junction. The critical current density at 2.5 K in the SNS Josephson junction is 1/3 of that in W-C superconducting nanowire. Also, a Fraunhofer-like oscillation of critical current in the junction with four periods is observed. FIB-CVD opens avenues for novel functional superconducting nanodevices. (paper)

  13. Progress in ultrafast intense laser science XIII

    CERN Document Server

    III, Wendell; Paulus, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    This thirteenth volume covers a broad range of topics from this interdisciplinary research field, focusing on atoms, molecules, and clusters interacting in intense laser field and high-order harmonics generation and their applications. The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, the interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science, which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield, as well as graduate students, can grasp the importance and attractions of the research topic at hand; these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries.   .

  14. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Li, Ruxin; Chin, See Leang

    2009-01-01

    The PUILS series presents Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science. PUILS has been stimulated by the recent development of ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume contains approximately 15 chapters, authored by researchers at the forefront. Each chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers, who are not experts in the specific topics, as well as graduate students can grasp the importance and attractions of this sub-field of research, and these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. This fourth volume covers a broad range of topics from this interdisciplinary research field, focusing on strong field ionization of atoms; excitation, ionization and fragmentation of molecules; nonlinear intense optical phenomena and attosecond pulses; and laser - solid interactions and photoemission.

  15. Ultrafast surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Emily L; Brandt, Nathaniel C; Cassabaum, Alyssa A; Frontiera, Renee R

    2015-08-07

    Ultrafast surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with pico- and femtosecond time resolution has the ability to elucidate the mechanisms by which plasmons mediate chemical reactions. Here we review three important technological advances in these new methodologies, and discuss their prospects for applications in areas including plasmon-induced chemistry and sensing at very low limits of detection. Surface enhancement, arising from plasmonic materials, has been successfully incorporated with stimulated Raman techniques such as femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). These techniques are capable of time-resolved measurement on the femtosecond and picosecond time scale and can be used to follow the dynamics of molecules reacting near plasmonic surfaces. We discuss the potential application of ultrafast SERS techniques to probe plasmon-mediated processes, such as H2 dissociation and solar steam production. Additionally, we discuss the possibilities for high sensitivity SERS sensing using these stimulated Raman spectroscopies.

  16. Ultrafast magnetodynamics with free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvestuto, Marco; Ciprian, Roberta; Caretta, Antonio; Casarin, Barbara; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2018-02-01

    The study of ultrafast magnetodynamics has entered a new era thanks to the groundbreaking technological advances in free-electron laser (FEL) light sources. The advent of these light sources has made possible unprecedented experimental schemes for time-resolved x-ray magneto-optic spectroscopies, which are now paving the road for exploring the ultimate limits of out-of-equilibrium magnetic phenomena. In particular, these studies will provide insights into elementary mechanisms governing spin and orbital dynamics, therefore contributing to the development of ultrafast devices for relevant magnetic technologies. This topical review focuses on recent advancement in the study of non-equilibrium magnetic phenomena from the perspective of time-resolved extreme ultra violet (EUV) and soft x-ray spectroscopies at FELs with highlights of some important experimental results.

  17. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science III

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Agostini, Pierre; Ferrante, Gaetano

    2008-01-01

    The PUILS series presents Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science. PUILS has been stimulated by the recent development of ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume contains approximately 15 chapters, authored by researchers at the forefront. Each chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers, who are not experts in the specific topics, as well as graduate students can grasp the importance and attractions of this sub-field of research, and these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. This third volume covers a diverse range of disciplines, focusing on such topics as strong field ionization of atoms, ionization and fragmentation of molecules and clusters, generation of high-order harmonics and attosecond pulses, filamentation and laser plasma interaction, and the development of ultrashort and ultrahigh-intensity light sources.

  18. Ultra-fast framing camera tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalibjian, Ralph

    1981-01-01

    An electronic framing camera tube features focal plane image dissection and synchronized restoration of the dissected electron line images to form two-dimensional framed images. Ultra-fast framing is performed by first streaking a two-dimensional electron image across a narrow slit, thereby dissecting the two-dimensional electron image into sequential electron line images. The dissected electron line images are then restored into a framed image by a restorer deflector operated synchronously with the dissector deflector. The number of framed images on the tube's viewing screen is equal to the number of dissecting slits in the tube. The distinguishing features of this ultra-fast framing camera tube are the focal plane dissecting slits, and the synchronously-operated restorer deflector which restores the dissected electron line images into a two-dimensional framed image. The framing camera tube can produce image frames having high spatial resolution of optical events in the sub-100 picosecond range.

  19. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science VIII

    CERN Document Server

    Nisoli, Mauro; Hill, Wendell; III, III

    2012-01-01

    The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science and optical science which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield as well as graduate students can grasp the importance and attractions of the research topic at hand. These are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. This eighth volume covers a broad range of topics from this interdisciplinary research field, focusing on molecules interacting with ultrashort and intense laser fields, advanced technologies for the characterization of ultrashort laser pulses and their applications, laser plasma formation and laser acceleration.

  20. Ultrafast Terahertz Conductivity of Photoexcited Nanocrystalline Silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, David; MacDonald, A. Nicole; Hryciw, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    The ultrafast transient ac conductivity of nanocrystalline silicon films is investigated using time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. While epitaxial silicon on sapphire exhibits a free carrier Drude response, silicon nanocrystals embedded in glass show a response that is best described by a class...... in the silicon nanocrystal films is dominated by trapping at the Si/SiO2 interface states, occurring on a 1–100 ps time scale depending on particle size and hydrogen passivation......The ultrafast transient ac conductivity of nanocrystalline silicon films is investigated using time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. While epitaxial silicon on sapphire exhibits a free carrier Drude response, silicon nanocrystals embedded in glass show a response that is best described...

  1. Silicon based ultrafast optical waveform sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ji, Hua; Galili, Michael; Pu, Minhao

    2010-01-01

    A 300 nmx450 nmx5 mm silicon nanowire is designed and fabricated for a four wave mixing based non-linear optical gate. Based on this silicon nanowire, an ultra-fast optical sampling system is successfully demonstrated using a free-running fiber laser with a carbon nanotube-based mode-locker as th......A 300 nmx450 nmx5 mm silicon nanowire is designed and fabricated for a four wave mixing based non-linear optical gate. Based on this silicon nanowire, an ultra-fast optical sampling system is successfully demonstrated using a free-running fiber laser with a carbon nanotube-based mode......-locker as the sampling source. A clear eye-diagram of a 320 Gbit/s data signal is obtained. The temporal resolution of the sampling system is estimated to 360 fs....

  2. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science VI

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Bandrauk, André D

    2010-01-01

    The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science, which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield, as well as graduate students, can grasp the importance and attractions of the research topic at hand; these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. This sixth volume covers a broad range of topics from this interdisciplinary research field, focusing on responses of molecules to ultrashort intense laser pulses, generation and characterization of attosecond pulses and high-order harmonics, and filamentation and laser-plasma interaction.

  3. Progress in ultrafast intense laser science XII

    CERN Document Server

    Roso, Luis; Li, Ruxin; Mathur, Deepak; Normand, Didier

    2015-01-01

    This  volume covers a broad range of topics focusing on atoms, molecules, and clusters interacting in intense laser field, laser induced filamentation, and laser plasma interaction and application. The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science, which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield, as well as graduate students, can grasp the importance and attractions of the research topic at hand; these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. .

  4. Optical Detection in Ultrafast Short Wavelength Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullagar, Wilfred K.; Hall, Chris J.

    2010-01-01

    A new approach to coherent detection of ionising radiation is briefly motivated and recounted. The approach involves optical scattering of coherent light fields by colour centres in transparent solids. It has significant potential for diffractive imaging applications that require high detection dynamic range from pulsed high brilliance short wavelength sources. It also motivates new incarnations of Bragg's X-ray microscope for pump-probe studies of ultrafast molecular structure-dynamics.

  5. Power scaling of ultrafast mid-IR source enabled by high-power fiber laser technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Gengji

    2017-11-01

    Ultrafast laser sources with high repetition-rate (>10 MHz) and tunable in the mid-infrared (IR) wavelength range of 7-18 μm hold promise for many important spectroscopy applications. Currently, these ultrafast mid- to longwavelength-IR sources can most easily be achieved via difference-frequency generation (DFG) between a pump beam and a signal beam. However, current ultrafast mid- to longwavelength-IR sources feature a low average power, which limits their applications. In this thesis, we propose and demonstrate a novel approach to power scaling of DFG-based ultrafast mid-IR laser sources. The essence of this novel approach is the generation of a high-energy signal beam. Both the pump beam and the signal beam are derived from a home-built Yb-fiber laser system that emits 165-fs pulses centered at 1035 nm with 30-MHz repetition rate and 14.5-W average power (corresponding to 483-nJ pulse energy). We employ fiber-optic self-phase modulation (SPM) to broaden the laser spectrum and generate isolated spectral lobes. Filtering the rightmost spectral lobe leads to femtosecond pulses with >10 nJ pulse energy. Tunable between 1.1-1.2 μm, this SPM-enabled ultrafast source exhibits ∝100 times higher pulse energy than can be obtained from Raman soliton sources in this wavelength range. We use this SPM-enabled source as the signal beam and part of the Yb-fiber laser output as the pump beam. By performing DFG in GaSe crystals, we demonstrate that power scaling of a DFG-based mid-IR source can be efficiently achieved by increasing the signal energy. The resulting mid-IR source is tunable from 7.4 μm to 16.8 μm. Up to 5.04-mW mid-IR pulses centered at 11 μm are achieved. The corresponding pulse energy is 167 pJ, representing nearly one order of magnitude improvement compared with other reported DFG-based mid-IR sources at this wavelength. Despite of low pulse energy, Raman soliton sources have become a popular choice as the signal source. We carry out a detailed study on

  6. Power scaling of ultrafast mid-IR source enabled by high-power fiber laser technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Gengji

    2017-11-15

    Ultrafast laser sources with high repetition-rate (>10 MHz) and tunable in the mid-infrared (IR) wavelength range of 7-18 μm hold promise for many important spectroscopy applications. Currently, these ultrafast mid- to longwavelength-IR sources can most easily be achieved via difference-frequency generation (DFG) between a pump beam and a signal beam. However, current ultrafast mid- to longwavelength-IR sources feature a low average power, which limits their applications. In this thesis, we propose and demonstrate a novel approach to power scaling of DFG-based ultrafast mid-IR laser sources. The essence of this novel approach is the generation of a high-energy signal beam. Both the pump beam and the signal beam are derived from a home-built Yb-fiber laser system that emits 165-fs pulses centered at 1035 nm with 30-MHz repetition rate and 14.5-W average power (corresponding to 483-nJ pulse energy). We employ fiber-optic self-phase modulation (SPM) to broaden the laser spectrum and generate isolated spectral lobes. Filtering the rightmost spectral lobe leads to femtosecond pulses with >10 nJ pulse energy. Tunable between 1.1-1.2 μm, this SPM-enabled ultrafast source exhibits ∝100 times higher pulse energy than can be obtained from Raman soliton sources in this wavelength range. We use this SPM-enabled source as the signal beam and part of the Yb-fiber laser output as the pump beam. By performing DFG in GaSe crystals, we demonstrate that power scaling of a DFG-based mid-IR source can be efficiently achieved by increasing the signal energy. The resulting mid-IR source is tunable from 7.4 μm to 16.8 μm. Up to 5.04-mW mid-IR pulses centered at 11 μm are achieved. The corresponding pulse energy is 167 pJ, representing nearly one order of magnitude improvement compared with other reported DFG-based mid-IR sources at this wavelength. Despite of low pulse energy, Raman soliton sources have become a popular choice as the signal source. We carry out a detailed study on

  7. Quantum modeling of ultrafast photoinduced charge separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozzi, Carlo Andrea; Troiani, Filippo; Tavernelli, Ivano

    2018-01-01

    Phenomena involving electron transfer are ubiquitous in nature, photosynthesis and enzymes or protein activity being prominent examples. Their deep understanding thus represents a mandatory scientific goal. Moreover, controlling the separation of photogenerated charges is a crucial prerequisite in many applicative contexts, including quantum electronics, photo-electrochemical water splitting, photocatalytic dye degradation, and energy conversion. In particular, photoinduced charge separation is the pivotal step driving the storage of sun light into electrical or chemical energy. If properly mastered, these processes may also allow us to achieve a better command of information storage at the nanoscale, as required for the development of molecular electronics, optical switching, or quantum technologies, amongst others. In this Topical Review we survey recent progress in the understanding of ultrafast charge separation from photoexcited states. We report the state-of-the-art of the observation and theoretical description of charge separation phenomena in the ultrafast regime mainly focusing on molecular- and nano-sized solar energy conversion systems. In particular, we examine different proposed mechanisms driving ultrafast charge dynamics, with particular regard to the role of quantum coherence and electron-nuclear coupling, and link experimental observations to theoretical approaches based either on model Hamiltonians or on first principles simulations.

  8. Estimates of oceanic surface wind speed and direction using orthogonal beam scatterometer measurements and comparison of recent sea scattering theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. K.; Fung, A. K.; Dome, G. J.; Birrer, I. J.

    1978-01-01

    The wind direction properties of radar backscatter from the sea were empirically modelled using a cosine Fourier series through the 4th harmonic in wind direction (referenced to upwind). A comparison with 1975 JONSWAP (Joint North Sea Wave Project) scatterometer data, at incidence angles of 40 and 65, indicates that effects to third and fourth harmonics are negligible. Another important result is that the Fourier coefficients through the second harmonic are related to wind speed by a power law expression. A technique is also proposed to estimate the wind speed and direction over the ocean from two orthogonal scattering measurements. A comparison between two different types of sea scatter theories, one type presented by the work of Wright and the other by that of Chan and Fung, was made with recent scatterometer measurements. It demonstrates that a complete scattering model must include some provisions for the anisotropic characteristics of the sea scatter, and use a sea spectrum which depends upon wind speed.

  9. Ultrafast carrier dynamics in tetrahedral amorphous carbon: carrier trapping versus electron-hole recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpene, E; Mancini, E; Dallera, C; Schwen, D; Ronning, C; Silvestri, S De

    2007-01-01

    We report the investigation of the ultrafast carrier dynamics in thin tetrahedral amorphous carbon films by means of femtosecond time-resolved reflectivity. We estimated the electron-phonon relaxation time of a few hundred femtoseconds and we observed that under low optical excitation photo-generated carriers decay according to two distinct mechanisms attributed to trapping by defect states and direct electron-hole recombination. With high excitation, when photo-carrier and trap densities are comparable, a unique temporal evolution develops, as the time dependence of the trapping process becomes degenerate with the electron-hole recombination. This experimental evidence highlights the role of defects in the ultrafast electronic dynamics and is not specific to this particular form of carbon, but has general validity for amorphous and disordered semiconductors

  10. Determination of hot carrier energy distributions from inversion of ultrafast pump-probe reflectivity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilpern, Tal; Manjare, Manoj; Govorov, Alexander O; Wiederrecht, Gary P; Gray, Stephen K; Harutyunyan, Hayk

    2018-05-10

    Developing a fundamental understanding of ultrafast non-thermal processes in metallic nanosystems will lead to applications in photodetection, photochemistry and photonic circuitry. Typically, non-thermal and thermal carrier populations in plasmonic systems are inferred either by making assumptions about the functional form of the initial energy distribution or using indirect sensors like localized plasmon frequency shifts. Here we directly determine non-thermal and thermal distributions and dynamics in thin films by applying a double inversion procedure to optical pump-probe data that relates the reflectivity changes around Fermi energy to the changes in the dielectric function and in the single-electron energy band occupancies. When applied to normal incidence measurements our method uncovers the ultrafast excitation of a non-Fermi-Dirac distribution and its subsequent thermalization dynamics. Furthermore, when applied to the Kretschmann configuration, we show that the excitation of propagating plasmons leads to a broader energy distribution of electrons due to the enhanced Landau damping.

  11. Study of device mass production capability of the character projection based electron beam direct writing process technology toward 14 nm node and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Yasushi; Takakuwa, Masaki; Ohshio, Shuzo; Sugatani, Shinji; Tujimura, Ryo; Takita, Hiroshi; Ogino, Kozo; Hoshino, Hiromi; Ito, Yoshio; Miyajima, Masaaki; Kon, Jun-ichi

    2012-03-01

    Techniques to appropriately control the key factors for a character projection (CP) based electron beam direct writing (EBDW) technology for mass production are shown and discussed. In order to achieve accurate CD control, the CP technique using the master CP is adopted. Another CP technique, the Packed CP, is used to obtain suitable shot count. For the alignment on the some critical layers which have the normally an even surface, the alignment methodology differ from photolithography is required. The process that etches the SiO2 material in the shallow trench isolation is added and then the alignment marks can be detected using electron beam even at the gate layer, which is normally on an even surface. The proximity effect correction using the simplified electron energy flux model and the hybrid exposure are used to obtain enough process margins. As a result, the sufficient CD accuracy, overlay accuracy, and yield are obtained on the 65 nm node device. The condition in our system is checked using self-diagnosis on a regular basis, and scheduled maintenances have been properly performed. Due to the proper system control, more than 10,000 production wafers have been successfully exposed so far without any major system downtime. It is shown that those techniques can be adapted to the 32 nm node production with slight modifications. For the 14 nm node and beyond, however, the drastic increment of the shot count becomes more of a concern. The Multi column cell (MCC) exposure method, the key concept of which is the parallelization of the electron beam columns with a CP, can overcome this concern. It is expected that by using the MCC exposure system, those techniques will be applicable to the rapid establishment for the 14 nm node technology.

  12. Ultrafast photoinduced structure phase transition in antimony single crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fausti, Daniele; Misochko, Oleg V.; van Loosdrecht, Paul H. M.

    2009-01-01

    Picosecond Raman scattering is used to study the photoinduced ultrafast dynamics in Peierls distorted antimony. We find evidence for an ultrafast nonthermal reversible structural phase transition. Most surprisingly, we find evidence that this transition evolves toward a lower symmetry in contrast to

  13. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  14. Generation of ultrafast pulse via combined effects of stimulated

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A project of ultrafast pulse generation has been presented and demonstrated by utilizing the combined nonlinear effects of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and non-degenerate two-photon absorption (TPA) based on silicon nanophotonic chip, in which a continuous wave (CW) and an ultrafast dark pulse are ...

  15. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-10-21

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  16. Direction-dependent Corrections in Polarimetric Radio Imaging. I. Characterizing the Effects of the Primary Beam on Full-Stokes Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagannathan, P.; Bhatnagar, S.; Rau, U. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro (United States); Taylor, A. R., E-mail: pjaganna@nrao.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town (South Africa)

    2017-08-01

    Next generation radio telescope arrays are being designed and commissioned to accurately measure polarized intensity and rotation measures (RMs) across the entire sky through deep, wide-field radio interferometric surveys. Radio interferometer dish antenna arrays are affected by direction-dependent (DD) gains due to both instrumental and atmospheric effects. In this paper, we demonstrate the effect of DD errors of the parabolic dish antenna array on the measured polarized intensities of radio sources in interferometric images. We characterize the extent of polarimetric image degradation due to the DD gains through wide-band VLA simulations of representative point-source simulations of the radio sky at L band (1–2 GHz). We show that at the 0.5 gain level of the primary beam there is significant flux leakage from Stokes I to Q , U amounting to 10% of the total intensity. We further demonstrate that while the instrumental response averages down for observations over large parallactic angle intervals, full-polarization DD correction is required to remove the effects of DD leakage. We also explore the effect of the DD beam on the RM signals and show that while the instrumental effect is primarily centered around 0 rad-m{sup −2}, the effect is significant over a broad range of RM requiring full polarization DD correction to accurately reconstruct the RM synthesis signal.

  17. Direct formation of thin films and epitaxial overlayers at low temperatures using a low-energy (10-500 eV) ion beam deposition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuhr, R.A.; Alton, G.D.; Appleton, B.R.; Herbots, N.; Noggle, T.S.; Pennycook, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    A low-energy ion beam deposition system has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and has been applied successfully to the growth of epitaxial films at low temperatures for a number of different elements. The deposition system utilizes the ion source and optics of a commercial ion implantation accelerator. The 35 keV mass- and energy-analyzed ion beam from the accelerator is decelerated in a four-element electrostatic lens assembly to energies between 10 and 500 eV for direct deposition onto a target under UHV conditions. Current densities on the order of 10 μA/cm 2 are achieved with good uniformity over a 1.4 cm diameter spot. The completed films are characterized by Rutherford backscattering, ion channeling, cross-section transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. The effects of substrate temperature, ion energy, and substrate cleaning have been studied. Epitaxial overlayers which show good minimum yields by ion channeling (3 to 4%) have been produced at temperatures as low as 375 0 C for Si on Si(100) and 250 0 C for Ge on Ge(100) at growth rates that exceed the solid-phase epitaxy rates at these temperatures by more than an order of magnitude

  18. Optimizing a neutron-beam focusing device for the direct geometry time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF at the FRM II reactor source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, N.G. [Nanoscience Center, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Simeoni, G.G., E-mail: ggsimeoni@outlook.com [Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ) and Physics Department, Technical University of Munich, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Lefmann, K. [Nanoscience Center, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark)

    2016-04-21

    A dedicated beam-focusing device has been designed for the direct geometry thermal-cold neutron time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF at the neutron facility FRM II (Garching, Germany). The prototype, based on the compressed Archimedes' mirror concept, benefits from the adaptive-optics technology (adjustable supermirror curvature) and the compact size (only 0.5 m long). We have simulated the neutron transport across the entire guide system. We present a detailed computer characterization of the existing device, along with the study of the factors mostly influencing the future improvement. We have optimized the simulated prototype as a function of the neutron wavelength, accounting also for all relevant features of a real instrument like the non-reflecting side edges. The results confirm the “chromatic” displacement of the focal point (flux density maximum) at fixed supermirror curvature, and the ability of a variable curvature to keep the focal point at the sample position. Our simulations are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions and the experimentally measured beam profile. With respect to the possibility of a further upgrade, we find that supermirror coatings with m-values higher than 3.5 would have only marginal influence on the optimal behaviour, whereas comparable spectrometers could take advantage of longer focusing segments, with particular impact for the thermal region of the neutron spectrum.

  19. Effects of focused ion beam milling on the compressive behavior of directionally solidified micro-pillars and the nanoindentation response of an electro-polished surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Sang Hoon; Bei, Hongbin; Miller, Michael K; Pharr, George Mathews; George, Easo P

    2009-01-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) milling is the typical way in which micro-pillars are fabricated to study small-scale plasticity and size effects in uniaxial compression. However, FIB milling can introduce defects into the milled pillars. To investigate the effects of FIB damage on mechanical behavior, we tested Mo-alloy micro-pillars that were FIB milled following directional solidification, and compared their compressive response to pillars that were not FIB milled. We also FIB milled at glancing incidence a Mo-alloy single-crystal surface, and compared its nanoindentation response to an electro-polished surface of the same crystal. Consequences for the interpretation of data obtained from FIB milled micro-pillars are discussed

  20. Build direction dependence of microstructure and high-temperature tensile property of Co–Cr–Mo alloy fabricated by electron beam melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Shi-Hai; Koizumi, Yuichiro; Kurosu, Shingo; Li, Yun-Ping; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Chiba, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    The microstructures and high-temperature tensile properties of a Co–28Cr–6Mo–0.23C–0.17N alloy fabricated by electron beam melting (EBM) with cylindrical axes deviating from the build direction by 0°, 45°, 55° and 90° were investigated. The preferred crystal orientations of the γ phase in the as-EBM-built samples with angles of 0°, 45°, 55° and 90° were near [0 0 1], [1 1 0], [1 1 1] and [1 0 0], respectively. M 23 C 6 precipitates (M = Cr, Mo or Si) were observed to align along the build direction with intervals of around 3 μm. The phase was completely transformed into a single ε-hexagonal close-packed (hcp) phase after aging treatment at 800 °C for 24 h, when lamellar colonies of M 2 N precipitates and the ε-hcp phase appeared in the matrix. Among the samples, the one built with 55° deviation had the highest ultimate tensile strength of 806 MPa at 700 °C. The relationship between the microstructure and the build direction dependence of mechanical properties suggested that the conditions of heat treatment to homogenize the microstructure throughout the height of the EBM-built object should be determined by taking into account the thermal history during the post-melt period of the EBM process, especially when the solid–solid transformation is sluggish

  1. Direct evaluation of radiobiological parameters from clinical data in the case of ion beam therapy: an alternative approach to the relative biological effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cometto, A; Russo, G; Giordanengo, S; Marchetto, F; Cirio, R; Attili, A; Bourhaleb, F; Milian, F M

    2014-01-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) concept is commonly used in treatment planning for ion beam therapy. Whether models based on in vitro/in vivo RBE data can be used to predict human response to treatments is an open issue. In this work an alternative method, based on an effective radiobiological parameterization directly derived from clinical data, is presented. The method has been applied to the analysis of prostate cancer trials with protons and carbon ions. Prostate cancer trials with proton and carbon ion beams reporting 5 year-local control (LC5) and grade 2 (G2) or higher genitourinary toxicity rates (TOX) were selected from literature to test the method. Treatment simulations were performed on a representative subset of patients to produce dose and linear energy transfer distribution, which were used as explicative physical variables for the radiobiological modelling. Two models were taken into consideration: the microdosimetric kinetic model (MKM) and a linear model (LM). The radiobiological parameters of the LM and MKM were obtained by coupling them with the tumor control probability and normal tissue complication probability models to fit the LC5 and TOX data through likelihood maximization. The model ranking was based on the Akaike information criterion. Results showed large confidence intervals due to the limited variety of available treatment schedules. RBE values, such as RBE = 1.1 for protons in the treated volume, were derived as a by-product of the method, showing a consistency with current approaches. Carbon ion RBE values were also derived, showing lower values than those assumed for the original treatment planning in the target region, whereas higher values were found in the bladder. Most importantly, this work shows the possibility to infer the radiobiological parametrization for proton and carbon ion treatment directly from clinical data. (paper)

  2. Ultrafast crystallization and thermal stability of In-Ge doped eutectic Sb70Te30 phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee Meiling; Miao Xiangshui; Ting Leehou; Shi Luping

    2008-01-01

    Effect of In and Ge doping in the form of In 2 Ge 8 Sb 85 Te 5 on optical and thermal properties of eutectic Sb 70 Te 30 alloys was investigated. Crystalline structure of In 2 Ge 8 Sb 85 Te 5 phase change material consists of a mixture of phases. Thermal analysis shows higher crystallization temperature and activation energy for crystallization. Isothermal reflectivity-time measurement shows a growth-dominated crystallization mechanism. Ultrafast crystallization speed of 30 ns is realized upon irradiation by blue laser beam. The use of ultrafast and thermally stable In 2 Ge 8 Sb 85 Te 5 phase change material as mask layer in aperture-type super-resolution near-field phase change disk is realized to increase the carrier-to-noise ratio and thermal stability

  3. SU-E-I-10: Investigation On Detectability of a Small Target for Different Slice Direction of a Volumetric Cone Beam CT Image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C; Han, M; Baek, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the detectability of a small target for different slice direction of a volumetric cone beam CT image and its impact on dose reduction. Methods: Analytic projection data of a sphere object (1 mm diameter, 0.2/cm attenuation coefficient) were generated and reconstructed by FDK algorithm. In this work, we compared the detectability of the small target from four different backprojection Methods: hanning weighted ramp filter with linear interpolation (RECON 1), hanning weighted ramp filter with Fourier interpolation (RECON2), ramp filter with linear interpolation (RECON 3), and ramp filter with Fourier interpolation (RECON4), respectively. For noise simulation, 200 photons per measurement were used, and the noise only data were reconstructed using FDK algorithm. For each reconstructed volume, axial and coronal slice were extracted and detection-SNR was calculated using channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) with dense difference-of-Gaussian (D-DOG) channels. Results: Detection-SNR of coronal images varies for different backprojection methods, while axial images have a similar detection-SNR. Detection-SNR 2 ratios of coronal and axial images in RECON1 and RECON2 are 1.33 and 1.15, implying that the coronal image has a better detectability than axial image. In other words, using coronal slices for the small target detection can reduce the patient dose about 33% and 15% compared to using axial slices in RECON 1 and RECON 2. Conclusion: In this work, we investigated slice direction dependent detectability of a volumetric cone beam CT image. RECON 1 and RECON 2 produced the highest detection-SNR, with better detectability in coronal slices. These results indicate that it is more beneficial to use coronal slice to improve detectability of a small target in a volumetric cone beam CT image. This research was supported by the MSIP (Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning), Korea, under the IT Consilience Creative Program (NIPA-2014-H0201

  4. SU-E-I-10: Investigation On Detectability of a Small Target for Different Slice Direction of a Volumetric Cone Beam CT Image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C; Han, M; Baek, J [Yonsei University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the detectability of a small target for different slice direction of a volumetric cone beam CT image and its impact on dose reduction. Methods: Analytic projection data of a sphere object (1 mm diameter, 0.2/cm attenuation coefficient) were generated and reconstructed by FDK algorithm. In this work, we compared the detectability of the small target from four different backprojection Methods: hanning weighted ramp filter with linear interpolation (RECON 1), hanning weighted ramp filter with Fourier interpolation (RECON2), ramp filter with linear interpolation (RECON 3), and ramp filter with Fourier interpolation (RECON4), respectively. For noise simulation, 200 photons per measurement were used, and the noise only data were reconstructed using FDK algorithm. For each reconstructed volume, axial and coronal slice were extracted and detection-SNR was calculated using channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) with dense difference-of-Gaussian (D-DOG) channels. Results: Detection-SNR of coronal images varies for different backprojection methods, while axial images have a similar detection-SNR. Detection-SNR{sup 2} ratios of coronal and axial images in RECON1 and RECON2 are 1.33 and 1.15, implying that the coronal image has a better detectability than axial image. In other words, using coronal slices for the small target detection can reduce the patient dose about 33% and 15% compared to using axial slices in RECON 1 and RECON 2. Conclusion: In this work, we investigated slice direction dependent detectability of a volumetric cone beam CT image. RECON 1 and RECON 2 produced the highest detection-SNR, with better detectability in coronal slices. These results indicate that it is more beneficial to use coronal slice to improve detectability of a small target in a volumetric cone beam CT image. This research was supported by the MSIP (Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning), Korea, under the IT Consilience Creative Program (NIPA-2014-H0201

  5. Phosphorene in ultrafast laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nematollahi, Fatemeh; Apalkov, Vadym; Stockman, Mark I.

    2018-01-01

    We study numerically interaction of phosphorene monolayer with a strong femtosecond-long optical pulse. For such a short pulse, the electron dynamics is coherent and can be described by the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Strong optical field of the pulse causes redistribution of electrons between the conduction and valence bands. Such interband dynamics is highly irreversible, i.e., the conduction band population after the pulse is large and comparable to the maximum conduction band during the pulse. The conduction band population distribution in the reciprocal space shows high contrast hot spots, which are due to large interband coupling at the Γ point. The optical pulse also causes the net charge transfer through the phosphorene monolayer. The direction of the transfer is the same as the direction of the field maximum.

  6. An injector for the proposed Berkeley Ultrafast X-Ray Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidia, Steven; Corlett, John; Pusina, Jan; Staples, John; Zholents, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    Berkeley Lab has proposed to build a recirculating linac based X-ray source for ultra-fast dynamic studies [1]. This machine requires a flat electron beam with a small vertical emittance and large x/y emittance ratio to allow for compression of spontaneous undulator emission of soft and hard x-ray pulses, and a low-emittance, round electron beam for coherent emission of soft x-rays via the FEL process based on cascaded harmonic generation [2]. We propose an injector system consisting of two high gradient high repetition rate photo cathode guns [3] (one for each application), an ∼120 MeV super conducting linear accelerator, a 3rd harmonic cavity for linearization of the longitudinal phase space, and a bunch compressor. We present details of the design and the results of particle tracking studies using several computer codes

  7. Real-time ultrafast dynamics of dense, hot matter measured by pump-probe Doppler spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lad, Amit D; Mondal, S; Narayanan, V; Ahmed, Saima; Kumar, G Ravindra; Rajeev, P P; Robinson, A P L [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Pasley, J, E-mail: amitlad@tifr.res.i [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-01

    A detailed understanding of the critical surface motion of high intensity laser produced plasma is very crucial for understanding the interaction. We employ the two colour pump-probe technique to report the first ever femtosecond scale ultrafast dynamics measurement of the critical surface of a solid plasma produced by a relativistically intense, femtosecond pump laser beam (10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, 30 fs, 800 nm) on an aluminium target. We observe the Doppler shift of a time delayed probe laser beam (10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}, 80 fs, 400 nm) up to delays of 30 ps. Such unravelling of dynamics has not been possible in earlier measurements, which typically used the self reflection of a powerful pump pulse. We observe time dependent red and blue shifts and measure their magnitudes to infer plasma expansion velocity and acceleration and thereby the plasma profile. Our results are very well reproduced by 1D hydrodynamic simulation (HYADES code).

  8. High bandwidth beam current monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltrusaitis, R.M.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Cooper, R.G.; Peterson, E.; Warn, C.E.

    1993-01-01

    A stripline directional coupler beam current monitor capable of measuring the time structure of a 30-ps electron beam bunch has been developed. The time response performance of the monitor compares very well with Cherenkov light produced in quartz by the electron beam. The four-pickup monitor is now used on a routine basis for measuring the beam duration, tuning for optimized beam bunching, and centering the bunch in the beam pipe

  9. Beam-Energy Dependence of Directed Flow of Λ , Λ ¯, K±, Ks0, and ϕ in Au +Au Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adams, J. R.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Alekseev, I.; Anderson, D. M.; Aoyama, R.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Ashraf, M. U.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Barish, K.; Behera, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Brown, D.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chankova-Bunzarova, N.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elsey, N.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Esumi, S.; Evdokimov, O.; Ewigleben, J.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Federicova, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fujita, J.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Harlenderova, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Horvat, S.; Huang, X.; Huang, B.; Huang, T.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, P.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Jowzaee, S.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kapukchyan, D.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kim, C.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Kocmanek, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Krauth, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulathunga, N.; Kumar, L.; Kvapil, J.; Kwasizur, J. H.; Lacey, R.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, C.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Lidrych, J.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, P.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, S.; Luo, X.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Ma, G. L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Mallick, D.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Miller, Z. W.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nie, M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Nonaka, T.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Rehbein, M. J.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roth, J. D.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Saur, M.; Schambach, J.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Schweid, B. R.; Seger, J.; Sergeeva, M.; Seto, R.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, Z.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugiura, T.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Taranenko, A.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, G.; Xie, W.; Xu, J.; Xu, Z.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, N.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Z.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2018-02-01

    Rapidity-odd directed-flow measurements at midrapidity are presented for Λ , Λ ¯, K±, Ks0, and ϕ at √{sN N }=7.7 , 11.5, 14.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4, and 200 GeV in Au +Au collisions recorded by the Solenoidal Tracker detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. These measurements greatly expand the scope of data available to constrain models with differing prescriptions for the equation of state of quantum chromodynamics. Results show good sensitivity for testing a picture where flow is assumed to be imposed before hadron formation and the observed particles are assumed to form via coalescence of constituent quarks. The pattern of departure from a coalescence-inspired sum rule can be a valuable new tool for probing the collision dynamics.

  10. Beam-energy dependence of the directed flow of protons, antiprotons, and pions in Au+Au collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-04-25

    Rapidity-odd directed flow (v1) measurements for charged pions, protons, and antiprotons near midrapidity (y=0) are reported in sNN=7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4, and 200 GeV Au+Au collisions as recorded by the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. At intermediate impact parameters, the proton and net-proton slope parameter dv1/dy|y=0 shows a minimum between 11.5 and 19.6 GeV. In addition, the net-proton dv1/dy|y=0 changes sign twice between 7.7 and 39 GeV. The proton and net-proton results qualitatively resemble predictions of a hydrodynamic model with a first-order phase transition from hadronic matter to deconfined matter, and differ from hadronic transport calculations.

  11. Beam-Energy Dependence of the Directed Flow of Protons, Antiprotons, and Pions in Au+Au Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    Rapidity-odd directed flow (v1) measurements for charged pions, protons, and antiprotons near midrapidity (y =0) are reported in √sNN =7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4, and 200 GeV Au+Au collisions as recorded by the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. At intermediate impact parameters, the proton and net-proton slope parameter dv1/dy|y=0 shows a minimum between 11.5 and 19.6 GeV. In addition, the net-proton dv1/dy|y=0 changes sign twice between 7.7 and 39 GeV. The proton and net-proton results qualitatively resemble predictions of a hydrodynamic model with a first-order phase transition from hadronic matter to deconfined matter, and differ from hadronic transport calculations.

  12. Sensors for ultra-fast silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadrozinski, H.F.-W., E-mail: hartmut@scipp.ucsc.edu [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Baselga, M.; Ely, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Ngo, J.; Parker, C.; Schumacher, D.; Seiden, A.; Zatserklyaniy, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Cartiglia, N. [INFN Torino, Torino (Italy); Pellegrini, G.; Fernández-Martínez, P.; Greco, V.; Hidalgo, S.; Quirion, D. [Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica, IMB-CNM-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-11-21

    We report on electrical and charge collection tests of silicon sensors with internal gain as part of our development of ultra-fast silicon detectors. Using C–V and α TCT measurements, we investigate the non-uniform doping profile of so-called low-gain avalanche detectors (LGAD). These are n-on-p pad sensors with charge multiplication due to the presence of a thin, low-resistivity diffusion layer below the junction, obtained with a highly doped implant. We compare the bias dependence of the pulse shapes of traditional sensors and of LGAD sensors with different dopant density of the diffusion layer, and extract the internal gain.

  13. Ultra-fast relaxation kinetics in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzzi, R.

    1983-01-01

    It is presented a brief description of relaxation processes in highly excited semiconductor plasmas (HESP). Comparison with experimental data obtained by means of ultra-fast laser light spectroscopy (UFLS) is made. Some aspects of response funtion theory in systems far-from-equilibrium are reviewed in Section II. In Section III we present some comments on the question of nonequilibrium thermodynamics relevant to the problem to be considered. In last section we present a brief summary of the different aspects of the subject. (author) [pt

  14. Ultrafast Optical Signal Processing with Bragg Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yikun Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The phase, amplitude, speed, and polarization, in addition to many other properties of light, can be modulated by photonic Bragg structures. In conjunction with nonlinearity and quantum effects, a variety of ensuing micro- or nano-photonic applications can be realized. This paper reviews various optical phenomena in several exemplary 1D Bragg gratings. Important examples are resonantly absorbing photonic structures, chirped Bragg grating, and cholesteric liquid crystals; their unique operation capabilities and key issues are considered in detail. These Bragg structures are expected to be used in wide-spread applications involving light field modulations, especially in the rapidly advancing field of ultrafast optical signal processing.

  15. Sensors for ultra-fast silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Baselga, M.; Ely, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Ngo, J.; Parker, C.; Schumacher, D.; Seiden, A.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Pellegrini, G.; Fernández-Martínez, P.; Greco, V.; Hidalgo, S.; Quirion, D.

    2014-01-01

    We report on electrical and charge collection tests of silicon sensors with internal gain as part of our development of ultra-fast silicon detectors. Using C–V and α TCT measurements, we investigate the non-uniform doping profile of so-called low-gain avalanche detectors (LGAD). These are n-on-p pad sensors with charge multiplication due to the presence of a thin, low-resistivity diffusion layer below the junction, obtained with a highly doped implant. We compare the bias dependence of the pulse shapes of traditional sensors and of LGAD sensors with different dopant density of the diffusion layer, and extract the internal gain

  16. Imacon 600 ultrafast streak camera evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, T.C.; Coleman, L.W.

    1975-01-01

    The Imacon 600 has a number of designed in disadvantages for use as an ultrafast diagnostic instrument. The unit is physically large (approximately 5' long) and uses an external power supply rack for the image intensifier. Water cooling is required for the intensifier; it is quiet but not conducive to portability. There is no interlock on the cooling water. The camera does have several switch selectable sweep speeds. This is desirable if one is working with both slow and fast events. The camera can be run in a framing mode. (MOW)

  17. Ultra-fast relaxation kinetics in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzzi, R.

    1983-01-01

    It is presented a brief description of relaxation processes in highly excited semiconductor plasmas (HESP). Comparison with experimental data obtained by means of ultra-fast laser light spectroscopy (UFLS) is made. Some aspects of response function theory in systems far-from-equilibrium are reviewed in Section II. In Section III some comments on the question of nonequilibrium thermodynamics relevant to the problem to be considered are presented. In last Section a brief summary of the different aspects of the subject is also presented. (Author) [pt

  18. Multigigahertz beam-current and position monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.L.; Stout, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    A self-integrating magnetic-loop device having a risetime of less than 175 ps has been developed to monitor the temporal behavior of the electron beam current and position within each 3.3-ns micropulse generated by the PHERMEX rf linear accelerator. Beam current is measured with a 2-GHz bandwidth by combining these loops in a four-port hybrid summer. Another application of these loops uses two 180 0 hybrids to give 2-GHz time-resolved beam position to an accuracy of 1 mm. These sensors are nonintrusive to the propagating beam and allow ultrafast beam measurements previously restricted to the technique of recording the Cerenkov-light emission from an intercepting Kapton foil using a streak camera

  19. Compressed sensing and the reconstruction of ultrafast 2D NMR data: Principles and biomolecular applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrot, Yoav; Frydman, Lucio

    2011-04-01

    A topic of active investigation in 2D NMR relates to the minimum number of scans required for acquiring this kind of spectra, particularly when these are dictated by sampling rather than by sensitivity considerations. Reductions in this minimum number of scans have been achieved by departing from the regular sampling used to monitor the indirect domain, and relying instead on non-uniform sampling and iterative reconstruction algorithms. Alternatively, so-called "ultrafast" methods can compress the minimum number of scans involved in 2D NMR all the way to a minimum number of one, by spatially encoding the indirect domain information and subsequently recovering it via oscillating field gradients. Given ultrafast NMR's simultaneous recording of the indirect- and direct-domain data, this experiment couples the spectral constraints of these orthogonal domains - often calling for the use of strong acquisition gradients and large filter widths to fulfill the desired bandwidth and resolution demands along all spectral dimensions. This study discusses a way to alleviate these demands, and thereby enhance the method's performance and applicability, by combining spatial encoding with iterative reconstruction approaches. Examples of these new principles are given based on the compressed-sensed reconstruction of biomolecular 2D HSQC ultrafast NMR data, an approach that we show enables a decrease of the gradient strengths demanded in this type of experiments by up to 80%. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ultrafast dynamics of Coulomb correlated excitons in GaAs quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mycek, M.A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.

    1995-12-01

    The author measures the transient nonlinear optical response of room temperature excitons in gallium arsenide quantum wells via multi-wave mixing experiments. The dynamics of the resonantly excited excitons is directly reflected by the ultrafast decay of the induced nonlinear polarization, which radiates the detected multi-wave mixing signal. She characterizes this ultrafast coherent emission in both amplitude and phase, using time- and frequency-domain measurement techniques, to better understand the role of Coulomb correlation in these systems. To interpret the experimental results, the nonlinear optical response of a dense medium is calculated using a model including Coulomb interaction. She contributes three new elements to previous theoretical and experimental studies of these systems. First, surpassing traditional time-integrated measurements, she temporally resolves the amplitude of the ultrafast coherent emission. Second, in addition to measuring the third-order four-wave mixing signal, she also investigates the fifth-order six-wave mixing response. Third, she characterizes the ultrafast phase dynamics of the nonlinear emission using interferometric techniques with an unprecedented resolution of approximately 140 attoseconds. The author finds that effects arising from Coulomb correlation dominate the nonlinear optical response when the density of excitons falls below 3 {times} 10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}2}, the saturation density. These signatures of Coulomb correlation are investigated for increasing excitation density to gradually screen the interactions and test the validity of the model for dense media. The results are found to be qualitatively consistent with both the predictions of the model and with numerical solutions to the semiconductor Bloch equations. Importantly, the results also indicate current experimental and theoretical limitations, which should be addressed in future research.

  1. Spin-controlled ultrafast vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höpfner, Henning; Lindemann, Markus; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2014-05-01

    Spin-controlled semiconductor lasers are highly attractive spintronic devices providing characteristics superior to their conventional purely charge-based counterparts. In particular, spin-controlled vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (spin-VCSELs) promise to offer lower thresholds, enhanced emission intensity, spin amplification, full polarization control, chirp control and ultrafast dynamics. Most important, the ability to control and modulate the polarization state of the laser emission with extraordinarily high frequencies is very attractive for many applications like broadband optical communication and ultrafast optical switches. We present a novel concept for ultrafast spin-VCSELs which has the potential to overcome the conventional speed limitation for directly modulated lasers by the relaxation oscillation frequency and to reach modulation frequencies significantly above 100 GHz. The concept is based on the coupled spin-photon dynamics in birefringent micro-cavity lasers. By injecting spin-polarized carriers in the VCSEL, oscillations of the coupled spin-photon system can by induced which lead to oscillations of the polarization state of the laser emission. These oscillations are decoupled from conventional relaxation oscillations of the carrier-photon system and can be much faster than these. Utilizing these polarization oscillations is thus a very promising approach to develop ultrafast spin-VCSELs for high speed optical data communication in the near future. Different aspects of the spin and polarization dynamics, its connection to birefringence and bistability in the cavity, controlled switching of the oscillations, and the limitations of this novel approach will be analysed theoretically and experimentally for spin-polarized VCSELs at room temperature.

  2. Transverse electron beam diagnostics at REGAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayesteh, Shima

    2014-12-15

    The use of high-intensity electron and X-ray pulsed sources allows for the direct observation of atomic motions as they occur. While the production of such high coherent, brilliant, short X-ray pulses requires large-scale and costly accelerator facilities, it is feasible to employ a high-intensity source of electrons by exploiting a more compact design. The Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) facility is a small linear accelerator at DESY, Hamburg, equipped with a photocathode radio frequency (RF) gun that produces relativistic ultra-short (<100 fs), low charge (<1 pC) electron bunches of high coherence. By means of time-resolved diffraction experiments, such an electron source can probe ultrafast laser-induced atomic structural changes that occur with a temporal resolution of ∝100 fs. A comprehensive characterization of the electron beam, for every pulse, is of fundamental importance to study the atomic motions with the desired resolution and quality. This thesis reports on the transversal diagnostics of the electron beam with an emphasis on a scintillator-based beam profile monitor. The diagnostics is capable of evaluating the beam parameters such as charge, energy, energy spread and transverse profile, at very low charges and on a shot-to-shot basis. A full characterization of the scintillator's emission, the optical setup and the detector (camera) of the profile monitor is presented, from which an absolute charge calibration of the system is derived. The profile monitor is specially developed to accommodate more applications, such as dark current suppression, overlapping the electron probe and the laser pump within 1 ns accuracy, as well as charge and transverse emittance measurements. For the determination of the transverse emittance two techniques were applied. The first one introduces a new method that exploits a diffraction pattern to measure the emittance, while the second one is based on a version of the Pepper-pot technique. A

  3. Transverse electron beam diagnostics at REGAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayesteh, Shima

    2014-12-01

    The use of high-intensity electron and X-ray pulsed sources allows for the direct observation of atomic motions as they occur. While the production of such high coherent, brilliant, short X-ray pulses requires large-scale and costly accelerator facilities, it is feasible to employ a high-intensity source of electrons by exploiting a more compact design. The Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) facility is a small linear accelerator at DESY, Hamburg, equipped with a photocathode radio frequency (RF) gun that produces relativistic ultra-short (<100 fs), low charge (<1 pC) electron bunches of high coherence. By means of time-resolved diffraction experiments, such an electron source can probe ultrafast laser-induced atomic structural changes that occur with a temporal resolution of ∝100 fs. A comprehensive characterization of the electron beam, for every pulse, is of fundamental importance to study the atomic motions with the desired resolution and quality. This thesis reports on the transversal diagnostics of the electron beam with an emphasis on a scintillator-based beam profile monitor. The diagnostics is capable of evaluating the beam parameters such as charge, energy, energy spread and transverse profile, at very low charges and on a shot-to-shot basis. A full characterization of the scintillator's emission, the optical setup and the detector (camera) of the profile monitor is presented, from which an absolute charge calibration of the system is derived. The profile monitor is specially developed to accommodate more applications, such as dark current suppression, overlapping the electron probe and the laser pump within 1 ns accuracy, as well as charge and transverse emittance measurements. For the determination of the transverse emittance two techniques were applied. The first one introduces a new method that exploits a diffraction pattern to measure the emittance, while the second one is based on a version of the Pepper-pot technique. A

  4. Ultrafast single-molecule photonics: Excited state dynamics in coherently coupled complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernando, Jordi; Hoogenboom, Jacob; Dijk, Erik van; Garcia-Parajo, Maria; Hulst, Niek F. van

    2008-01-01

    We present a single-molecule study on femtosecond dynamics in multichromophoric systems, combining fs pump-probe, emission-spectra and fluorescence-lifetime analysis. The ultrafast fs approach gives direct information on the initial exciton dynamics after excitation. The lifetime data show superradiance, a direct measure for the extent of the coherent coupling and static disorder. The spectra finally reveal the role of exciton-phonon coupling. At the single-molecule level a wide range of exciton delocalization lengths and energy redistribution times is revealed

  5. Ultrafast single-molecule photonics: Excited state dynamics in coherently coupled complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernando, Jordi [Dept. de Quimica, Universitat Autonoma Barcelona, 08193 Cerdanyola del Valles (Spain); Hoogenboom, Jacob [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, 08860 Castelldefels, Barcelona (Spain); Dijk, Erik van [Applied Optics Group, MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, 7500AE Enschede (Netherlands); Garcia-Parajo, Maria [IBEC-Institute of BioEngineering of Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); ICREA-Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats, 08015 Barcelona (Spain); Hulst, Niek F. van [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, 08860 Castelldefels, Barcelona (Spain) and ICREA-Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats, 08015 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: Niek.vanHulst@ICFO.es

    2008-05-15

    We present a single-molecule study on femtosecond dynamics in multichromophoric systems, combining fs pump-probe, emission-spectra and fluorescence-lifetime analysis. The ultrafast fs approach gives direct information on the initial exciton dynamics after excitation. The lifetime data show superradiance, a direct measure for the extent of the coherent coupling and static disorder. The spectra finally reveal the role of exciton-phonon coupling. At the single-molecule level a wide range of exciton delocalization lengths and energy redistribution times is revealed.

  6. Thermal interaction of short-pulsed laser focused beams with skin tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao Jian; Guo Zhixiong

    2009-01-01

    Time-dependent thermal interaction is developed in a skin tissue cylinder subjected to the irradiation of a train of short laser pulses. The skin embedded with a small tumor is stratified as three layers: epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous fat with different optical, thermal and physiological properties. The laser beam is focused to the tumor site by an objective lens for thermal therapy. The ultrafast radiation heat transfer of the focused beam is simulated by the transient discrete ordinates method. The transient Pennes bio-heat equation is solved numerically by the finite volume method with alternating direction implicit scheme. Emphasis is placed on the characterization of the focused beam propagation and absorption and the temperature rise in the focal spot. The effects of the focal spot size and location, the laser power, and the bio-heat equation are investigated. Comparisons with collimated irradiation are conducted. The focused beam can penetrate a greater depth and produce higher temperature rise at the target area, and thus reduce the possibility of thermal damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. It is ideal for killing cancerous cells and small tumors.

  7. Thermal interaction of short-pulsed laser focused beams with skin tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao Jian; Guo Zhixiong [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)], E-mail: guo@jove.rutgers.edu

    2009-07-07

    Time-dependent thermal interaction is developed in a skin tissue cylinder subjected to the irradiation of a train of short laser pulses. The skin embedded with a small tumor is stratified as three layers: epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous fat with different optical, thermal and physiological properties. The laser beam is focused to the tumor site by an objective lens for thermal therapy. The ultrafast radiation heat transfer of the focused beam is simulated by the transient discrete ordinates method. The transient Pennes bio-heat equation is solved numerically by the finite volume method with alternating direction implicit scheme. Emphasis is placed on the characterization of the focused beam propagation and absorption and the temperature rise in the focal spot. The effects of the focal spot size and location, the laser power, and the bio-heat equation are investigated. Comparisons with collimated irradiation are conducted. The focused beam can penetrate a greater depth and produce higher temperature rise at the target area, and thus reduce the possibility of thermal damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. It is ideal for killing cancerous cells and small tumors.

  8. Direct linear measurement of root dentin thickness and dentin volume changes with post space preparation: A cone-beam computed tomography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoeb Yakub Shaikh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of the present study was direct linear measurement of dentin thickness and dentin volume changes for post space preparation with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT. Materials and Methods: Ten maxillary central incisors were scanned, before and after root canal and post space preparation, with Orthophos XG three-dimensional hybrid unit. Thirteen axial section scans of each tooth from orifice to apex and dentin thickness for buccal, lingual, mesial, and distal were measured using proprietary measuring tool and thereafter subjected to statistical analysis. Furthermore, dentin volume was evaluated using ITK-SNAP software. Results: There was statistically significant difference between the dentin thickness in pre- and postinstrumentation (paired t-test and also between different groups (one-way ANOVA. In the shortest post length of 4.5mm the post space preparation resulted in 2.17% loss of hard tissue volume, where as 11mm longest post length post space preparation resulted in >40% loss of hard tissue volume. Conclusion: CBCT axial section scan for direct measurements of root dentin thickness can be guideline before and after post space preparation for selection of drill length and diameter.

  9. Theoretical predictions for the polarization of the J = 0 - 1 neonlike germanium X-ray laser line in the presence of a directed beam of hot electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inal, M.K.; Dubau, J.; Cornille, M.

    1998-01-01

    The polarization of the neonlike germanium J = 0 - 1 laser line, which would arise from the existence of a directed beam of hot electrons in the amplifying plasma, is theoretically investigated. The relative populations of the magnetic sublevels in the lower J = 1 laser level have been determined by allowing for the processes of direct excitation from the 2p 6 ground level and collisional de-excitation from the upper J = 0 laser level. Elastic collisions leading to transitions between the M J = 0 and M J =1 sublevels within the lower level of the lasing line have also been taken into account. The required elastic and inelastic collision strengths for transitions between magnetic sublevels have been computed in a semi-relativistic distorted-wave approximation, for incident electron energies up to 15 keV. Our calculations predict a rather low degree of polarization for the J = 0 - 1 line, although the elastic collisions are found to play a negligibly small role in the redistribution of magnetic sublevel populations. (author)

  10. Selective area growth of InAs nanowires from SiO2/Si(1 1 1) templates direct-written by focused helium ion beam technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Che-Wei; Chen, Wei-Chieh; Chou, Chieh; Lin, Hao-Hsiung

    2018-02-01

    We report on the selective area growth of InAs nanowires on patterned SiO2/Si (1 1 1) nano-holes, prepared by focused helium ion beam technology. We used a single spot mode, in which the focused helium ion beam was fixed on a single point with a He+-ion dosage, ranging from 1.5 pC to 8 pC, to drill the nano-holes. The smallest hole diameter achieved is ∼8 nm. We found that low He+-ion dosage is able to facilitate the nucleation of (1 1 1)B InAs on the highly mismatched Si, leading to the vertical growth of InAs nanowires (NWs). High He-ion dosage, on the contrary, severely damaged Si surface, resulting in tilted and stripe-like NWs. In addition to titled NW grown from (1 1 1)A InAs domain, a new titled growth direction due to defect induced twinning was observed. Cross-sectional TEM images of vertical NWs show mixed wurtizite (WZ) and zincblende (ZB) phases, while WZ phase dominants. The stacking faults resulting from the phase change is proportional to NW diameter, suggesting that the critical diameter of phase turning is larger than 110 nm, the maximum diameter of our NWs. Period of misfit dislocation at the InAs/Si interface of vertical NW is also found larger than the theoretical value when the diameter of heterointerface is smaller than 50 nm, indicating that the small contact area is able to accommodate the large lattice and thermal mismatch between InAs and Si.

  11. Optimization and practical implementation of ultrafast 2D NMR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroz Junior, Luiz H. K., E-mail: professorkeng@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSC), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica; Universidade Federal de Goias (UFGO), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Ferreira, Antonio G. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSC), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica; Giraudeau, Patrick [Universite de Nantes (France). CNRS, Chimie et Interdisciplinarite: Synthese, Analyse, Modelisation

    2013-09-01

    Ultrafast 2D NMR is a powerful methodology that allows recording of a 2D NMR spectrum in a fraction of second. However, due to the numerous non-conventional parameters involved in this methodology its implementation is no trivial task. Here, an optimized experimental protocol is carefully described to ensure efficient implementation of ultrafast NMR. The ultrafast spectra resulting from this implementation are presented based on the example of two widely used 2D NMR experiments, COSY and HSQC, obtained in 0.2 s and 41 s, respectively. (author)

  12. Using PWE/FE method to calculate the band structures of the semi-infinite beam-like PCs: Periodic in z-direction and finite in x–y plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Denghui, E-mail: qdhsd318@163.com; Shi, Zhiyu, E-mail: zyshi@nuaa.edu.cn

    2017-05-03

    This paper couples the plane wave expansion (PWE) and finite element (FE) methods to calculate the band structures of the semi-infinite beam-like phononic crystals (PCs) with the infinite periodicity in z-direction and finiteness in x–y plane. Explicit matrix formulations are developed for the calculation of band structures. In order to illustrate the applicability and accuracy of the proposed coupled plane wave expansion and finite element (PWE/FE) method to beam-like PCs, several examples are displayed. At first, PWE/FE method is applied to calculate the band structures of the Pb/rubber beam-like PCs with circular and rectangular cross sections, respectively. Then, it is used to calculate the band structures of steel/epoxy and steel/aluminum beam-like PCs with the same geometric parameters. Last, the band structure of the three-component beam-like PC is also calculated by the proposed method. Moreover, all the results calculated by PWE/FE method are compared with those calculated by finite element (FE) method, and the corresponding results are in good agreement. - Highlights: • The concept of the semi-infinite beam-like phononic crystals (PCs) is proposed. • The PWE/FE method is proposed and formulized to calculate the band structures of the semi-infinite beam-like PCs. • The strong applicability and high accuracy of PWE/FE method are verified.

  13. Characterization of a free-air ionization chamber in direct X-ray beams as used in mammography; Caracterizacao de uma camara de ionizacao de ar-livre em feixes diretos de raios X utilizados em mamografia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Mateus Hilario de

    2014-08-01

    At this work stability and characterization tests were undertaken on a Victoreen free-air ionization chamber, model 481. The tests were realized using direct X-ray beams as a contribution for its establishment as a primary standard system of the quantity air kerma. The characterization tests were: saturation curve, ion collection efficiency, polarity effect, response linearity with the air kerma rate and response linearity with the chamber volume variation. The ion collection efficiency allowed the determination of the ion recombination factor. Most of the test results showed agreement with the limits established by international standards. Furthermore, the air attenuation factors for the mammography beams with aluminum and molybdenum filters were obtained. The factors for photon transmission and scattering at the diaphragm edges were also determined for mammography beams with aluminum filter and for the standard beam with molybdenum filter. (author)

  14. Quantitative ultra-fast MRI of HPMC swelling and dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ya Ying; Hughes, L P; Gladden, L F; Mantle, M D

    2010-08-01

    For the first time quantitative Rapid Acquisition with Relaxation Enhancement (RARE) based ultra-fast two-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging has been used to follow the dissolution of hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC) in water. Quantitative maps of absolute water concentration, spin-spin relaxation times and water self-diffusion coefficient are obtained at a spatial resolution of 469 microm in less than 3 min each. These maps allow the dynamic development of the medium release rate HPMC/water system to be followed. It is demonstrated that the evolution of the gel layer and, in particular, the gradient in water concentration across it, is significantly different when comparing the quantitative RARE sequence with a standard (nonquantitative) implementation of RARE. The total gel thickness in the axial direction grows faster than that in the radial direction and that the dry core initially expands anisotropically. Additionally, while HPMC absorbs a large amount of water during the dissolution process, the concentration gradient of water within the gel layer is relatively small. For the first time MRI evidence is presented for a transition swollen glassy layer which resides between the outer edge of the dry tablet core and the inner edge of the gel layer. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  15. The Ultrafast Wolff Rearrangement in the Gas Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbacher, Andreas; Roeding, Sebastian; Brixner, Tobias; Nuernberger, Patrick

    The Wolff rearrangement of gas-phase 5-diazo Meldrum's acid is disclosed with femtosecond ion spectroscopy. Distinct differences are found for 267 nm and 200 nm excitation, the latter leading to even two ultrafast rearrangement reactions.

  16. Ultrafast Plasmonic Electron Emission from Ag Nanolayers with Different Roughness

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Márton, I.; Ayadi, V.; Rácz, P.; Stefaniuk, T.; Wróbel, Piotr; Földi, P.; Dombi, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2016), s. 811-816 ISSN 1557-1955 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Nanoparticles * Ultrafast phenomena * Electron emission Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 2.139, year: 2016

  17. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopies of laser shocked materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcgrane, Shawn David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bolme, Cindy B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Ultrafast ellipsometry and transient absorption spectroscopies are used to measure material dynamics under extreme conditions of temperature, pressure, and volumetric compression induced by shock wave loading with a chirped, spectrally clipped shock drive pulse.

  18. Ultrafast characterization of optoelectronic devices and systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xuemei

    The recent fast growth in high-speed electronics and optoelectronics has placed demanding requirements on testing tools. Electro-optic (EO) sampling is a well-established technique for characterization of high-speed electronic and optoelectronic devices and circuits. However, with the progress in device miniaturization, lower power consumption (smaller signal), and higher throughput (higher clock rate), EO sampling also needs to be updated, accordingly, towards better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and sensitivity, without speed sacrifice. In this thesis, a novel EO sampler with a single-crystal organic 4-dimethylamino-N-methy-4-stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) as the EO sensor is developed. The system exhibits sub-picosecond temporal resolution, sub-millivolt sensitivity, and a 10-fold improvement on SNR, compared with its LiTaO3 counterpart. The success is attributed to the very high EO coefficient, the very low dielectric constant, and the fast response, coming from the major contribution of the pi-electrons in DAST. With the advance of ultrafast laser technology, low-noise and compact femtosecond fiber lasers have come to maturation and become light-source options for ultrafast metrology systems. We have successfully integrated a femtosecond erbium-doped-fiber laser into an EO sampler, making the system compact and very reliable. The fact that EO sampling is essentially an impulse-response measurement process, requires integration of ultrashort (sub-picosecond) impulse generation network with the device under test. We have implemented a reliable lift-off and transfer technique in order to obtain epitaxial-quality freestanding low-temperature-grown GaAs (LT-GaAs) thin-film photo-switches, which can be integrated with many substrates. The photoresponse of our freestanding LT-GaAs devices was thoroughly characterized with the help of our EO sampler. As fast as 360 fs full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) and >1 V electrical pulses were obtained, with quantum efficiency

  19. Ultrafast demagnetisation dependence on film thickness: A TDDFT calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N.; Sharma, S.

    2018-04-01

    Ferromagnetic materials when subjected to intense laser pulses leads to reduction of their magnetisation on an ultrafast scale. Here, we perform an ab-initio calculation to study the behavior of ultrafast demagnetisation as a function of film thickness for Nickel as compared to the bulk of the material. In thin films surface formation results in amplification of demagnetisation with the percentage of demagnetisation depending upon the film thickness.

  20. Ultrafast optical signal processing using semiconductor quantum dot amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    The linear and nonlinear properties of quantum dot amplifiers are discussed on the basis of an extensive theoretical model. These devices show great potential for linear amplification as well as ultrafast signal processing.......The linear and nonlinear properties of quantum dot amplifiers are discussed on the basis of an extensive theoretical model. These devices show great potential for linear amplification as well as ultrafast signal processing....

  1. Direct observation of strain in InAs quantum dots and cap layer during molecular beam epitaxial growth using in situ X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimomura, Kenichi; Ohshita, Yoshio; Kamiya, Itaru; Suzuki, Hidetoshi; Sasaki, Takuo; Takahasi, Masamitu

    2015-01-01

    Direct measurements on the growth of InAs quantum dots (QDs) and various cap layers during molecular beam epitaxy are performed by in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). The evolution of strain induced both in the QDs and cap layers during capping is discussed based on the XRD intensity transients obtained at various lattice constants. Transients with different features are observed from those obtained during InGaAs and GaAs capping. The difference observed is attributed to In-Ga intermixing between the QDs and the cap layer under limited supply of In. Photoluminescence (PL) wavelength can be tuned by controlling the intermixing, which affects both the strain induced in the QDs and the barrier heights. The PL wavelength also varies with the cap layer thickness. A large redshift occurs by reducing the cap thickness. The in situ XRD observation reveals that this is a result of reduced strain. We demonstrate how such information about strain can be applied for designing and preparing novel device structures

  2. Direct observation of strain in InAs quantum dots and cap layer during molecular beam epitaxial growth using in situ X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimomura, Kenichi; Ohshita, Yoshio; Kamiya, Itaru, E-mail: kamiya@toyota-ti.ac.jp [Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan); Suzuki, Hidetoshi [Faculty of Engineering, University of Miyazaki, 1-1 Gakuen Kibanadai-nishi, Miyazaki 889-2192 (Japan); Sasaki, Takuo; Takahasi, Masamitu [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Koto 1-1-1, Sayo-cho, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2015-11-14

    Direct measurements on the growth of InAs quantum dots (QDs) and various cap layers during molecular beam epitaxy are performed by in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). The evolution of strain induced both in the QDs and cap layers during capping is discussed based on the XRD intensity transients obtained at various lattice constants. Transients with different features are observed from those obtained during InGaAs and GaAs capping. The difference observed is attributed to In-Ga intermixing between the QDs and the cap layer under limited supply of In. Photoluminescence (PL) wavelength can be tuned by controlling the intermixing, which affects both the strain induced in the QDs and the barrier heights. The PL wavelength also varies with the cap layer thickness. A large redshift occurs by reducing the cap thickness. The in situ XRD observation reveals that this is a result of reduced strain. We demonstrate how such information about strain can be applied for designing and preparing novel device structures.

  3. A differential optical absorption spectroscopy method for retrieval from ground-based Fourier transform spectrometers measurements of the direct solar beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yanfeng; Duan, Minzheng; Tian, Wenshou; Min, Qilong

    2015-08-01

    A differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS)-like algorithm is developed to retrieve the column-averaged dryair mole fraction of carbon dioxide from ground-based hyper-spectral measurements of the direct solar beam. Different to the spectral fitting method, which minimizes the difference between the observed and simulated spectra, the ratios of multiple channel-pairs—one weak and one strong absorption channel—are used to retrieve from measurements of the shortwave infrared (SWIR) band. Based on sensitivity tests, a super channel-pair is carefully selected to reduce the effects of solar lines, water vapor, air temperature, pressure, instrument noise, and frequency shift on retrieval errors. The new algorithm reduces computational cost and the retrievals are less sensitive to temperature and H2O uncertainty than the spectral fitting method. Multi-day Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) measurements under clear-sky conditions at two sites (Tsukuba and Bremen) are used to derive xxxx for the algorithm evaluation and validation. The DOAS-like results agree very well with those of the TCCON algorithm after correction of an airmass-dependent bias.

  4. A comparison of cone-beam computed tomography and direct measurement in the examination of the mandibular canal and adjacent structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Thomas S; Caruso, Joseph M; Christensen, Heidi; Torabinejad, Mahmoud

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the ability of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanning to measure distances from the apices of selected posterior teeth to the mandibular canal. Measurements were taken from the apices of all posterior teeth that were superior to the mandibular canal. A pilot study was performed to determine the scanning parameters that produced the most diagnostic image and the best dissection technique. Twelve human hemimandibles with posterior teeth were scanned at .20 voxels on an I-CAT Classic CBCT device (Imaging Sciences International, Hatfield, PA), and the scans were exported in Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) format. The scans were examined in InVivo Dental software (Anatomage, San Jose, CA), and measurements were taken from the apex of each root along its long axis to the upper portion of the mandibular canal. The specimens were dissected under a dental operating microscope, and analogous direct measurements were taken with a Boley gauge. All measurements were taken in triplicate at least 1 week apart by one individual (TSK). The results were averaged and the data separated into matching pairs for statistical analysis. There was no statistical difference (alpha = .05) between the methods of measurement according to the Wilcoxon matched pairs test (p = 0.676). For the anatomic measurements, the intra-rater correlation coefficient (ICC) was .980 and for the CBCT it was .949, indicating that both methods were highly reproducible. Both measurement methods were highly predictive of and highly correlated to each other according to regression and correlation analysis, respectively. Based on the results of this study, the I-CAT Classic can be used to measure distances from the apices of the posterior teeth to the mandibular canal as accurately as direct anatomic dissection. Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. All rights reserved.

  5. Femtosecond X-Ray Scattering Study of Ultrafast Photoinduced Structural Dynamics in Solvated [Co(terpy)2]2+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biasin, Elisa; Brandt van Driel, Tim; Kjær, Kasper Skov

    2016-01-01

    We study the structural dynamics of photoexcited [Co(terpy)2]2+ in an aqueous solution with ultrafast x-ray diffuse scattering experiments conducted at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Through direct comparisons with density functional theory calculations, our analysis shows that the photoexcitat......We study the structural dynamics of photoexcited [Co(terpy)2]2+ in an aqueous solution with ultrafast x-ray diffuse scattering experiments conducted at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Through direct comparisons with density functional theory calculations, our analysis shows...... find that the equilibrium bond-elongated structure of the high spin state is established on a single-picosecond time scale and that this state has a lifetime of ∼7 ps....

  6. Ultra-fast secure communication with complex systems in classical channels (Conference Presentation)

    KAUST Repository

    Mazzone, Valerio

    2017-04-28

    Developing secure communications is a research area of growing interest. During the past years, several cryptographic schemes have been developed, with Quantum cryptography being a promising scheme due to the use of quantum effects, which make very difficult for an eavesdropper to intercept the communication. However, practical quantum key distribution methods have encountered several limitations; current experimental realizations, in fact, fail to scale up on long distances, as well as in providing unconditional security and speed comparable to classical optical communications channels. Here we propose a new, low cost and ultra-fast cryptographic system based on a fully classical optical channel. Our cryptographic scheme exploits the complex synchronization of two different random systems (one on the side of the sender and another on the side of the receiver) to realize a “physical” one paid system. The random medium is created by an optical chip fabricated through electron beam lithography on a Silicon On Insulator (SOI) substrate. We present experiments with ps lasers and commercial fibers, showing the ultrafast distribution of a random key between two users (Alice and Bob), with absolute no possibility for a passive/active eavesdropper to intercept the communication. Remarkably, this system enables the same security of quantum cryptography, but with the use of a classical communication channel. Our system exploits a unique synchronization that exists between two different random systems, and at such is extremely versatile and can enable safe communications among different users in standards telecommunications channels.

  7. Ultrafast Synaptic Events in a Chalcogenide Memristor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Zhong, Yingpeng; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Jinjian; Xu, Xiaohua; Sun, Huajun; Miao, Xiangshui

    2013-04-01

    Compact and power-efficient plastic electronic synapses are of fundamental importance to overcoming the bottlenecks of developing a neuromorphic chip. Memristor is a strong contender among the various electronic synapses in existence today. However, the speeds of synaptic events are relatively slow in most attempts at emulating synapses due to the material-related mechanism. Here we revealed the intrinsic memristance of stoichiometric crystalline Ge2Sb2Te5 that originates from the charge trapping and releasing by the defects. The device resistance states, representing synaptic weights, were precisely modulated by 30 ns potentiating/depressing electrical pulses. We demonstrated four spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) forms by applying programmed pre- and postsynaptic spiking pulse pairs in different time windows ranging from 50 ms down to 500 ns, the latter of which is 105 times faster than the speed of STDP in human brain. This study provides new opportunities for building ultrafast neuromorphic computing systems and surpassing Von Neumann architecture.

  8. Ultrafast strain engineering in complex oxide heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovich, Paul; Caviglia, Andrea; Hu, Wanzheng; Bromberger, Hubertus; Singla, Rashmi; Mitrano, Matteo; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Kaiser, Stefan; Foerst, Michael [Max-Planck Research Group for Structural Dynamics - Center for Free Electron Laser Science, University of Hamburg (Germany); Scherwitzl, Raoul; Zubko, Pavlo; Gariglio, Sergio; Triscone, Jean-Marc [Departement de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, University of Geneva, 24 Quai Ernest-Ansermet, 1211 Geneve 4, Geneva (Switzerland); Cavalleri, Andrea [Max-Planck Research Group for Structural Dynamics - Center for Free Electron Laser Science, University of Hamburg (Germany); Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The mechanical coupling between the substrate and the thin film is expected to be effective on the ultrafast timescale, and could be exploited for the dynamic control of materials properties. Here, we demonstrate that a large-amplitude mid-infrared field, made resonant with a stretching mode of the substrate, can switch the electronic properties of a thin film across an interface. Exploiting dynamic strain propagation between different components of a heterostructure, insulating antiferromagnetic NdNiO{sub 3} is driven through a prompt, five-order-of-magnitude increase of the electrical conductivity, with resonant frequency and susceptibility that is controlled by choice of the substrate material. Vibrational phase control, extended here to a wide class of heterostructures and interfaces, may be conductive to new strategies for electronic phase control at THz repetition rates.

  9. Investigations of ultrafast charge dynamics in laser-irradiated targets by a self probing technique employing laser driven protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, H. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Kar, S., E-mail: s.kar@qub.ac.uk [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Cantono, G. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Department of Physics “E. Fermi”, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Research Unit Adriano Gozzini, via G. Moruzzi 1, Pisa 56124 (Italy); Nersisyan, G. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Brauckmann, S. [Institut für Laser-und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Düsseldorf (Germany); Doria, D.; Gwynne, D. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Macchi, A. [Department of Physics “E. Fermi”, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Research Unit Adriano Gozzini, via G. Moruzzi 1, Pisa 56124 (Italy); Naughton, K. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Willi, O. [Institut für Laser-und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Düsseldorf (Germany); Lewis, C.L.S.; Borghesi, M. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    The divergent and broadband proton beams produced by the target normal sheath acceleration mechanism provide the unique opportunity to probe, in a point-projection imaging scheme, the dynamics of the transient electric and magnetic fields produced during laser-plasma interactions. Commonly such experimental setup entails two intense laser beams, where the interaction produced by one beam is probed with the protons produced by the second. We present here experimental studies of the ultra-fast charge dynamics along a wire connected to laser irradiated target carried out by employing a ‘self’ proton probing arrangement – i.e. by connecting the wire to the target generating the probe protons. The experimental data shows that an electromagnetic pulse carrying a significant amount of charge is launched along the wire, which travels as a unified pulse of 10s of ps duration with a velocity close to speed of light. The experimental capabilities and the analysis procedure of this specific type of proton probing technique are discussed. - Highlights: • Prompt charging of laser irradiated target generates ultra-short EM pulses. • Its ultrafast propagation along a wire was studied by self-proton probing technique. • Self-proton probing technique is the proton probing with one laser pulse. • Pulse temporal profile and speed along the wire were measured with high resolution.

  10. 650-nJ pulses from a cavity-dumped Yb:fiber-pumped ultrafast optical parametric oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamour, Tobias P.; Reid, Derryck T.

    2011-08-01

    Sub-250-fs pulses with energies of up to 650 nJ and peak powers up to 2.07 MW were generated from a cavity-dumped optical parametric oscillator, synchronously-pumped at 15.3 MHz with sub-400-fs pulses from an Yb:fiber laser. The average beam quality factor of the dumped output was M2 ~1.2 and the total relative-intensity noise was 8 mdBc, making the system a promising candidate for ultrafast laser inscription of infrared materials.

  11. Direct longitudinal laser acceleration of electrons in free space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Carbajo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Compact laser-driven accelerators are pursued heavily worldwide because they make novel methods and tools invented at national laboratories widely accessible in science, health, security, and technology [V. Malka et al., Principles and applications of compact laser-plasma accelerators, Nat. Phys. 4, 447 (2008]. Current leading laser-based accelerator technologies [S. P. D. Mangles et al., Monoenergetic beams of relativistic electrons from intense laser-plasma interactions, Nature (London 431, 535 (2004; T. Toncian et al., Ultrafast laser-driven microlens to focus and energy-select mega-electron volt protons, Science 312, 410 (2006; S. Tokita et al. Single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction with a laser-accelerated sub-MeV electron pulse, Appl. Phys. Lett. 95, 111911 (2009] rely on a medium to assist the light to particle energy transfer. The medium imposes material limitations or may introduce inhomogeneous fields [J. R. Dwyer et al., Femtosecond electron diffraction: “Making the molecular movie,”, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A 364, 741 (2006]. The advent of few cycle ultraintense radially polarized lasers [S. Carbajo et al., Efficient generation of ultraintense few-cycle radially polarized laser pulses, Opt. Lett. 39, 2487 (2014] has ushered in a novel accelerator concept [L. J. Wong and F. X. Kärtner, Direct acceleration of an electron in infinite vacuum by a pulsed radially polarized laser beam, Opt. Express 18, 25035 (2010; F. Pierre-Louis et al. Direct-field electron acceleration with ultrafast radially polarized laser beams: Scaling laws and optimization, J. Phys. B 43, 025401 (2010; Y. I. Salamin, Electron acceleration from rest in vacuum by an axicon Gaussian laser beam, Phys. Rev. A 73, 043402 (2006; C. Varin and M. Piché, Relativistic attosecond electron pulses from a free-space laser-acceleration scheme, Phys. Rev. E 74, 045602 (2006; A. Sell and F. X. Kärtner, Attosecond electron bunches accelerated and

  12. Real-Time Observation of Internal Motion within Ultrafast Dissipative Optical Soliton Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Nithyanandan, K.; Andral, Ugo; Tchofo-Dinda, Patrice; Grelu, Philippe

    2017-06-01

    Real-time access to the internal ultrafast dynamics of complex dissipative optical systems opens new explorations of pulse-pulse interactions and dynamic patterns. We present the first direct experimental evidence of the internal motion of a dissipative optical soliton molecule generated in a passively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser. We map the internal motion of a soliton pair molecule by using a dispersive Fourier-transform imaging technique, revealing different categories of internal pulsations, including vibrationlike and phase drifting dynamics. Our experiments agree well with numerical predictions and bring insights to the analogy between self-organized states of lights and states of the matter.

  13. Topological mass of magnetic Skyrmions probed by ultrafast dynamic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buettner, Felix

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, we investigate the GHz dynamics of skyrmionic spin structures by means of pump-probe dynamic imaging to determine the equation of motion that governs the behavior of these technologically relevant spin structures. To achieve this goal, we first designed and optimized a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy CoB/Pt multilayer material for low magnetic pinning, as required for ultrafast pump-probe imaging experiments. Second, we developed an integrated sample design for X-ray holography capable of tracking relative magnetic positional changes down to 3 nm spatial resolution. These advances enabled us to image the trajectory of a single magnetic Skyrmion. We find that the motion is comprised of two gyrotropic modes, one clockwise and one counterclockwise. The existence of two modes shows that Skyrmions are massive quasiparticles. From their derived frequencies we find an inertial mass for the Skyrmion which is a factor of five larger than expected based on existing models for inertia in magnetism. Our results demonstrate that the mass of Skyrmions is based on a novel mechanism emerging from their confined nature, which is a direct consequence of their topology.

  14. Ultra-fast Escape of a Octopus-inspired Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weymouth, Gabriel; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2013-11-01

    The octopus, squid, and other cephalopods inflate with water and then release a jet to accelerate in the opposite direction. This escape mechanism is particularly interesting in the octopus because they become initially quite bluff, yet this does not hinder them in achieving impressive bursts of speed. We examine this somewhat paradoxical maneuver using a simple deflating spheroid model in both potential and viscous flow. We demonstrate that the dynamic reduction of the width of the body completely changes the flow and forces acting on the escaping rocket in three ways. First, a body which reduces in size can generate an added mass thrust which counteracts the added mass inertia. Second, the motion of the shrinking wall acts similar to suction on a static wall, reducing separation and drag forces in a viscous fluid, but that this effects depends on the rate of size change. Third, using a combination of these two features it is possible to initially load the fluid with kinetic energy when heavy and bluff and then recover that energy when streamlined and light, enabling ultra-fast accelerations. As a notable example, these mechanisms allow a shrinking spheroid rocket in a heavy inviscid fluid to achieve speeds greater than an identical rocket in the vacuum of space. Southampton Marine and Maritime Institute.

  15. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics of 2,5-dimethylpyrrole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongyuan; Min, Yanjun; Chen, Zhichao; He, Zhigang; Yuan, Kaijun; Dai, Dongxu; Yang, Xueming; Wu, Guorong

    2018-04-17

    The ultrafast excited-state dynamics of 2,5-dimethylpyrrole following excitation at wavelengths in the range of 265.7-216.7 nm is studied using the time-resolved photoelectron imaging method. It is found that excitation at longer wavelengths (265.7-250.2 nm) results in the population of the S1(1πσ*) state, which decays out of the photoionization window in about 90 fs. At shorter pump wavelengths (242.1-216.7 nm), the assignments are less clear-cut. We tentatively assign the initially photoexcited state(s) to the 1π3p Rydberg state(s) which has lifetimes of 159 ± 20, 125 ± 15, 102 ± 10 and 88 ± 10 fs for the pump wavelengths of 242.1, 238.1, 232.6 and 216.7 nm, respectively. Internal conversion to the S1(1πσ*) state represents at most a minor decay channel. The methyl substitution effects on the decay dynamics of the excited states of pyrrole are also discussed. Methyl substitution on the pyrrole ring seems to enhance the direct internal conversion from the 1π3p Rydberg state to the ground state, while methyl substitution on the N atom has less influence and the internal conversion to the S1(πσ*) state represents a main channel.

  16. EUROv Super Beam Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dracos, Marcos

    2011-01-01

    Neutrino Super Beams use conventional techniques to significantly increase the neutrino beam intensity compared to the present neutrino facilities. An essential part of these facilities is an intense proton driver producing a beam power higher than a MW. The protons hit a target able to accept the high proton beam intensity. The produced charged particles are focused by a system of magnetic horns towards the experiment detectors. The main challenge of these projects is to deal with the high beam intensity for many years. New high power neutrino facilities could be build at CERN profiting from an eventual construction of a high power proton driver. The European FP7 Design Study EUROv, among other neutrino beams, studies this Super Beam possibility. This paper will give the latest developments in this direction.

  17. HIBP primary beam detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, T.W.

    1979-01-01

    A position measuring detector was fabricated for the Heavy Ion Beam Probe. The 11 cm by 50 cm detector was a combination of 15 detector wires in one direction and 63 copper bars - .635 cm by 10 cm to measure along an orthogonal axis by means of a current divider circuit. High transmission tungsten meshes provide entrance windows and suppress secondary electrons. The detector dimensions were chosen to resolve the beam position to within one beam diameter

  18. Ultrafast dynamics of electronically excited molecules and clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lietard, Aude

    2014-01-01

    This PhD thesis investigated the ultrafast dynamics of photo-chromic molecules and argon clusters in the gas phase at the femtosecond timescale. Pump-probe experiments are performed in a set-up which associates a versatile pulsed molecular beam coupled to a photoelectron/photoion velocity map imager (VMI) and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). Theses pump-probe experiments provides the temporal evolution of the electronic distribution for each system of interest. Besides, a modelization has been performed in order to characterize the density and the velocity distribution in the pulsed beam. Regarding the photo-chromic di-thienyl-ethene molecules, parallel electronic relaxation pathways were observed. This contrasts with the observation of sequential relaxation processes in most molecules studied so far. In the present case, the initial wave packet splits in two parts. One part is driven to the ground state at the femtosecond time scale through a conical intersection, and the second part remains for ps in the excited state and experiences oscillations in a suspended well. This study has shed light into the intrinsic dynamics of the molecules under study and a general relaxation mechanism has been proposed, which applies to the whole family of di-thienyl-ethene molecules whatever the state of matter (gas phase or solution) in which they have been investigated. Concerning argon clusters excited at about 14 eV, two behaviors of different time scale have been observed at different time scales. The first one occurs in the first picoseconds of the dynamics. It corresponds to the electronic relaxation of an excitonic state at a rate of 1 eV.ps -1 . The second phenomenon corresponds to the localization of the exciton on the excimer Ar 2 *. This phenomenon is observed 4-5 ps after the excitation. In this study, we also observed the ejection of excited argon atoms, addressing the lifetime of the delocalized excitonic state. This work provide additional informations

  19. Two-section linear direct-current accelerator of 1.2 MeV electrons. Mean beam current of 50 mA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alimov, A.S.; Ermakov, D.I.; Ishkhanov, B.S.; Shvedunov, V.I.; Sakharov, V.P.; Trower, W.P.

    2002-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental results, obtained by simulation, creation and start-up of the two-section linear electron accelerator, are presented. The following beam parameters: beam current of 49 mA, mean energy of 1.2 MeV, of 59 kV, normalized emittance of 11 mm mrad are determined on the basis of the data on the beam dynamics simulation and the accelerating structure optimization. Special attention is paid to the choice of the version of the SHF-supply system of the two-section accelerator. The version of the SHF-supply system, based on the sections phasing, operating in the auto-oscillation model by means of the synchronizing signal from the feedback chain of the first section into the feedback chain of the second section, is considered. The electron beam parameters on the accelerator outlet (beam current - 44 mA, beam energy - 1.15 MeV, beam efficiency - 50.6 kW) proved to be close to the simulation results [ru

  20. Picosecond phase-velocity dispersion of hypersonic phonons imaged with ultrafast electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremons, Daniel R.; Du, Daniel X.; Flannigan, David J.

    2017-01-01

    We describe the direct imaging—with four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy—of the emergence, evolution, dispersion, and decay of photoexcited, hypersonic coherent acoustic phonons in nanoscale germanium wedges. Coherent strain waves generated via ultrafast in situ photoexcitation were imaged propagating with initial phase velocities of up to 35 km/s across discrete micrometer-scale crystal regions. We then observe that, while each wave front travels at a constant velocity, the entire wave train evolves with a time-varying phase-velocity dispersion, displaying a single-exponential decay to the longitudinal speed of sound (5 km/s) and with a mean lifetime of 280 ps. We also find that the wave trains propagate along a single in-plane direction oriented parallel to striations introduced during specimen preparation, independent of crystallographic direction. Elastic-plate modeling indicates the dynamics arise from excitation of a single, symmetric (dilatational) guided acoustic mode. Further, by precisely determining the experiment time-zero position with a plasma-lensing method, we find that wave-front emergence occurs approximately 100 ps after femtosecond photoexcitation, which matches well with Auger recombination times in germanium. We conclude by discussing the similarities between the imaged hypersonic strain-wave dynamics and electron/hole plasma-wave dynamics in strongly photoexcited semiconductors.

  1. Picosecond phase-velocity dispersion of hypersonic phonons imaged with ultrafast electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremons, Daniel R.; Du, Daniel X.; Flannigan, David J.

    2017-12-01

    Here, we describe the direct imaging—with four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy—of the emergence, evolution, dispersion, and decay of photoexcited, hypersonic coherent acoustic phonons in nanoscale germanium wedges. Coherent strain waves generated via ultrafast in situ photoexcitation were imaged propagating with initial phase velocities of up to 35 km/s across discrete micrometer-scale crystal regions. We observe that, while each wave front travels at a constant velocity, the entire wave train evolves with a time-varying phase-velocity dispersion, displaying a single-exponential decay to the longitudinal speed of sound (5 km/s) and with a mean lifetime of 280 ps. We also find that the wave trains propagate along a single in-plane direction oriented parallel to striations introduced during specimen preparation, independent of crystallographic direction. Elastic-plate modeling indicates the dynamics arise from excitation of a single, symmetric (dilatational) guided acoustic mode. Further, by precisely determining the experiment time-zero position with a plasma-lensing method, we find that wave-front emergence occurs approximately 100 ps after femtosecond photoexcitation, which matches well with Auger recombination times in germanium. We conclude by discussing the similarities between the imaged hypersonic strain-wave dynamics and electron/hole plasma-wave dynamics in strongly photoexcited semiconductors.

  2. Preparation of PtRu/C and PtSn/C electrocatalysts using electron beam irradiation for direct and ethanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Dionisio Furtunato da

    2009-01-01

    PtRu/C and PtSn/C electrocatalysts were prepared using electron beam irradiation. The metal ions were dissolved in water/2-propanol and water/ethylene glycol solutions and the carbon support was added. The resulting mixtures were irradiated under stirring. The effect of water/ethylene glycol and water/2-propanol (v/v) ratio, Pt:Ru and Pt:Sn atomic ratios, the irradiation time and dose rate were studied. The obtained materials were characterized by Energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and Moessbauer spectroscopy. The electro-oxidation of methanol and ethanol were studied by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry using the thin porous coating technique. The electrocatalysts were also tested on the Direct Methanol and Ethanol Fuel Cells. PtRu/C electrocatalysts prepared in water/ethylene glycol showed Pt:Ru atomic ratios different from the nominal ones. The results suggested that part of the Ru(III) ions were not reduced. The obtained materials showed the face-centered cubic (fcc) structure of Pt and Pt alloys with crystallite sizes of 2-3 nm. PtRu/C electrocatalysts prepared in water/2-propanol showed Pt:Ru atomic ratios similar to the nominal ones. The obtained materials also showed the fcc structure of platinum and platinum alloys with crystallite sizes of 3-4 nm. PtSn/C electrocatalysts prepared in water/ethylene glycol and water/2-propanol showed Pt:Sn atomic ratios similar to the nominal ones. The obtained materials showed the platinum (fcc) phase with crystallite sizes in the range of 2 - 4 nm and a SnO 2 (cassiterite) phase. The obtained PtRu/C and PtSn/C electrocatalysts showed similar or superior performance for methanol and ethanol electro-oxidation compared to commercial PtRu/C (E-TEK) and PtSn/C (BASF) electrocatalysts. (author)

  3. An ultrafast angle-resolved photoemission apparatus for measuring complex materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smallwood, Christopher L.; Lanzara, Alessandra; Jozwiak, Christopher; Zhang Wentao

    2012-01-01

    We present technical specifications for a high resolution time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy setup based on a hemispherical electron analyzer and cavity-dumped solid state Ti:sapphire laser used to generate pump and probe beams, respectively, at 1.48 and 5.93 eV. The pulse repetition rate can be tuned from 209 Hz to 54.3 MHz. Under typical operating settings the system has an overall energy resolution of 23 meV, an overall momentum resolution of 0.003 Å −1 , and an overall time resolution of 310 fs. We illustrate the system capabilities with representative data on the cuprate superconductor Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ . The descriptions and analyses presented here will inform new developments in ultrafast electron spectroscopy.

  4. A microfluidic flow-cell for the study of the ultrafast dynamics of biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauvet, Adrien, E-mail: adrien.chauvet@epfl.ch; Chergui, Majed [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Ultrarapide, ISIC, Faculté des Sciences de Base, Station 6, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Tibiletti, Tania; Caffarri, Stefano [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, CEA, UMR 7265 Biologie Végétale et Microbiologie Environnementales, 13009 Marseille (France)

    2014-10-01

    The study of biochemical dynamics by ultrafast spectroscopic methods is often restricted by the limited amount of liquid sample available, while the high repetition rate of light sources can induce photodamage. In order to overcome these limitations, we designed a high flux, sub-ml, capillary flow-cell. While the 0.1 mm thin window of the 0.5 mm cross-section capillary ensures an optimal temporal resolution and a steady beam deviation, the cell-pump generates flows up to ~0.35 ml/s that are suitable to pump laser repetition rates up to ~14 kHz, assuming a focal spot-diameter of 100 μm. In addition, a decantation chamber efficiently removes bubbles and allows, via septum, for the addition of chemicals while preserving the closed atmosphere. The minimal useable amount of sample is ~250 μl.

  5. An ultrafast angle-resolved photoemission apparatus for measuring complex materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Christopher L.; Jozwiak, Christopher; Zhang, Wentao; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2012-12-01

    We present technical specifications for a high resolution time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy setup based on a hemispherical electron analyzer and cavity-dumped solid state Ti:sapphire laser used to generate pump and probe beams, respectively, at 1.48 and 5.93 eV. The pulse repetition rate can be tuned from 209 Hz to 54.3 MHz. Under typical operating settings the system has an overall energy resolution of 23 meV, an overall momentum resolution of 0.003 Å-1, and an overall time resolution of 310 fs. We illustrate the system capabilities with representative data on the cuprate superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ. The descriptions and analyses presented here will inform new developments in ultrafast electron spectroscopy.

  6. Investigation of an Ultrafast Harmonic Resonant RF Kicker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yulu [Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China)

    2016-10-01

    An Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) based multi-turn electron Circulator Cooler Ring (CCR) is envisaged in the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC) to cool the ion bunches with high energy (55 MeV), high current (1.5 A), high repetition frequency (476.3 MHz), high quality magnetized electron bunches. A critical component in this scheme is a pair of ultrafast kickers for the exchange of electron bunches between the ERL and the CCR. The ultrafast kicker should operate with the rise and fall time in less than 2.1 ns, at the repetition rate of ~10s MHz, and should be able to run continuously during the whole period of cooling. These -and-fall time being combined together, are well beyond the state-of-art of traditional pulsed power supplies and magnet kickers. To solve this technical challenge, an alternative method is to generate this high repetition rate, fast rise-and-fall time short pulse continuous waveform by summing several finite number of (co)sine waves at harmonic frequencies of the kicking repetition frequency, and these harmonic modes can be generated by the Quarter Wave Resonater (QWR) based multifrequency cavities. Assuming the recirculator factor is 10, 10 harmonic modes (from 47.63 MHz to 476.3 MHz) with proper amplitudes and phases, plus a DC offset are combined together, a continuous short pulse waveform with the rise-and-fall time in less than 2.1 ns, repetition rate of 47.63 MHz waveform can be generated. With the compact and matured technology of QWR cavities, the total cost of both hardware development and operation can be reduced to a modest level. Focuse on the technical scheme, three main topics will be discussed in this thesis: the synthetization of the kicking pulse, the design and optimization of the deflecting QWR multi-integer harmonic frequency resonator and the fabrication and bench measurements of a half scale copper prototype. In the kicking pulse synthetization part, we begin with the Fourier Series expansion of an ideal

  7. SLIM (secondary emission monitor for low interception monitoring) an innovative non-destructive beam monitor for the extraction lines of a hadrontherapy centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, P.N.; Holzwarth, U.; Abbas, K.

    2005-01-01

    Real time monitoring of hadron therapy beam intensity and profile is a critical issue for the optimisation of dose delivery to carcinogenic tissue, patient safety and operation of the accelerator complex. For this purpose an innovative beam monitor, SLIM (Secondary electron emission for Low Interception Monitoring) is being developed in the framework of the EC-funded SUCIMA (Silicon Ultra-fast Cameras for electrons and gamma sources In Medical Application) project. The detector system is based on the secondary emission of electrons by a non-perturbative, sub-micron thick Al foil placed directly in the extracted beam path. The secondary electrons, accelerated by an electrostatic focusing system, are detected by a monolithic silicon position-sensitive sensor, which provides the beam intensity and its position with a precision of 1 mm at 10 kHz frame rate. The results of the laboratory tests of the first system prototype with thermoionic electrons emitted from a hot Tungsten wire are presented together with the measurements performed on a low intensity hadron beam at the Cyclotron of the Joint Research Centre in Ispra. (author)

  8. The East Pacific Rise and its flanks 8 18° N: History of segmentation, propagation and spreading direction based on SeaMARC II and Sea Beam studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Ken C.; Fox, Paul J.; Miller, Steve; Carbotte, Suzanne; Edwards, Margo H.; Eisen, Mark; Fornari, Daniel J.; Perram, Laura; Pockalny, Rob; Scheirer, Dan; Tighe, Stacey; Weiland, Charles; Wilson, Doug

    1992-12-01

    SeaMARC II and Sea Beam bathymetric data are combined to create a chart of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) from 8°N to 18°N reaching at least 1 Ma onto the rise flanks in most places. Based on these data as well as SeaMARC II side scan sonar mosaics we offer the following observations and conclusions. The EPR is segmented by ridge axis discontinuities such that the average segment lengths in the area are 360 km for first-order segments, 140 km for second-order segments, 52 km for third-order segments, and 13 km for fourth-order segments. All three first-order discontinuities are transform faults. Where the rise axis is a bathymetric high, second-order discontinuities are overlapping spreading centers (OSCs), usually with a distinctive 3:1 overlap to offset ratio. The off-axis discordant zones created by the OSCs are V-shaped in plan view indicating along axis migration at rates of 40 100 mm yr-1. The discordant zones consist of discrete abandoned ridge tips and overlap basins within a broad wake of anomalously deep bathymetry and high crustal magnetization. The discordant zones indicate that OSCs have commenced at different times and have migrated in different directions. This rules out any linkage between OSCs and a hot spot reference frame. The spacing of abandoned ridges indicates a recurrence interval for ridge abandonment of 20,000 200,000 yrs for OSCs with an average interval of approximately 100,000 yrs. Where the rise axis is a bathymetric low, the only second-order discontinuity mapped is a right-stepping jog in the axial rift valley. The discordant zone consists of a V-shaped wake of elongated deeps and interlocking ridges, similar to the wakes of second-order discontinuities on slow-spreading ridges. At the second-order segment level, long segments tend to lengthen at the expense of neighboring shorter segments. This can be understood if segments can be approximated by cracks, because the propagation force at a crack tip is directly proportional to crack

  9. Dual-beam CRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A dual-beam cathode-ray tube having a pair of electron guns and associated deflection means disposed side-by-side on each side of a central axis is described. The electron guns are parallel and the deflection means includes beam centering plates and angled horizontal deflection plates to direct the electron beams toward the central axis, precluding the need for a large-diameter tube neck in which the entire gun structures are angled. Bowing control plates are disposed adjacent to the beam centering plates to minimize trace bowing, and an intergun shield is disposed between the horizontal deflection plates to control and correct display pattern geometry distortion

  10. Ultrafast lattice dynamics in photoexcited nanostructures. Femtosecond X-ray diffraction with optimized evaluation schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schick, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Within the course of this thesis, I have investigated the complex interplay between electron and lattice dynamics in nanostructures of perovskite oxides. Femtosecond hard X-ray pulses were utilized to probe the evolution of atomic rearrangement directly, which is driven by ultrafast optical excitation of electrons. The physics of complex materials with a large number of degrees of freedom can be interpreted once the exact fingerprint of ultrafast lattice dynamics in time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments for a simple model system is well known. The motion of atoms in a crystal can be probed directly and in real-time by femtosecond pulses of hard X-ray radiation in a pump-probe scheme. In order to provide such ultrashort X-ray pulses, I have built up a laser-driven plasma X-ray source. The setup was extended by a stable goniometer, a two-dimensional X-ray detector and a cryogen-free cryostat. The data acquisition routines of the diffractometer for these ultrafast X-ray diffraction experiments were further improved in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and angular resolution. The implementation of a high-speed reciprocal-space mapping technique allowed for a two-dimensional structural analysis with femtosecond temporal resolution. I have studied the ultrafast lattice dynamics, namely the excitation and propagation of coherent phonons, in photoexcited thin films and superlattice structures of the metallic perovskite SrRuO 3 . Due to the quasi-instantaneous coupling of the lattice to the optically excited electrons in this material a spatially and temporally well-defined thermal stress profile is generated in SrRuO 3 . This enables understanding the effect of the resulting coherent lattice dynamics in time-resolved X-ray diffraction data in great detail, e.g. the appearance of a transient Bragg peak splitting in both thin films and superlattice structures of SrRuO 3 . In addition, a comprehensive simulation toolbox to calculate the ultrafast lattice dynamics and the

  11. Supercomputations and big-data analysis in strong-field ultrafast optical physics: filamentation of high-peak-power ultrashort laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, A. A.; Panchenko, V. Ya; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    High-intensity ultrashort laser pulses propagating in gas media or in condensed matter undergo complex nonlinear spatiotemporal evolution where temporal transformations of optical field waveforms are strongly coupled to an intricate beam dynamics and ultrafast field-induced ionization processes. At the level of laser peak powers orders of magnitude above the critical power of self-focusing, the beam exhibits modulation instabilities, producing random field hot spots and breaking up into multiple noise-seeded filaments. This problem is described by a (3  +  1)-dimensional nonlinear field evolution equation, which needs to be solved jointly with the equation for ultrafast ionization of a medium. Analysis of this problem, which is equivalent to solving a billion-dimensional evolution problem, is only possible by means of supercomputer simulations augmented with coordinated big-data processing of large volumes of information acquired through theory-guiding experiments and supercomputations. Here, we review the main challenges of supercomputations and big-data processing encountered in strong-field ultrafast optical physics and discuss strategies to confront these challenges.

  12. Ultrafast Electron Dynamics in Solar Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponseca, Carlito S; Chábera, Pavel; Uhlig, Jens; Persson, Petter; Sundström, Villy

    2017-08-23

    Electrons are the workhorses of solar energy conversion. Conversion of the energy of light to electricity in photovoltaics, or to energy-rich molecules (solar fuel) through photocatalytic processes, invariably starts with photoinduced generation of energy-rich electrons. The harvesting of these electrons in practical devices rests on a series of electron transfer processes whose dynamics and efficiencies determine the function of materials and devices. To capture the energy of a photogenerated electron-hole pair in a solar cell material, charges of opposite sign have to be separated against electrostatic attractions, prevented from recombining and being transported through the active material to electrodes where they can be extracted. In photocatalytic solar fuel production, these electron processes are coupled to chemical reactions leading to storage of the energy of light in chemical bonds. With the focus on the ultrafast time scale, we here discuss the light-induced electron processes underlying the function of several molecular and hybrid materials currently under development for solar energy applications in dye or quantum dot-sensitized solar cells, polymer-fullerene polymer solar cells, organometal halide perovskite solar cells, and finally some photocatalytic systems.

  13. Laser Beam Focus Analyser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Carøe; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2007-01-01

    the obtainable features in direct laser machining as well as heat affected zones in welding processes. This paper describes the development of a measuring unit capable of analysing beam shape and diameter of lasers to be used in manufacturing processes. The analyser is based on the principle of a rotating......The quantitative and qualitative description of laser beam characteristics is important for process implementation and optimisation. In particular, a need for quantitative characterisation of beam diameter was identified when using fibre lasers for micro manufacturing. Here the beam diameter limits...... mechanical wire being swept through the laser beam at varying Z-heights. The reflected signal is analysed and the resulting beam profile determined. The development comprised the design of a flexible fixture capable of providing both rotation and Z-axis movement, control software including data capture...

  14. High intensity beam dump for the Tevatron beam abort system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kidd, J.; Mokhov, N.; Murphy, T.; Palmer, M.; Toohig, T.; Turkot, F.; VanGinneken, A.

    1981-01-01

    The beam abort system proposed for the Fermilab Tevatron Accelerator will extract the proton beam from the ring in a single turn (approximately 20/mu/s) and direct it to an external beam dump. It is the function of the beam dump to absorb the unwanted beam and limit the escaping radiation to levels that are acceptable to the surrounding populace and apparatus. A beam dump that is expected to meet these requirements has been designed and constructed. Detailed design of the dump, including considerations leading to the choice of materials, are given. 6 refs

  15. Application of Hoffman modulation contrast microscopy coupled with three-wavelength two-beam interferometry to the in situ direct observation of the growth process of a crystal in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Katsuo

    1988-01-01

    Direct visualization of three dimensional transfer process of both heat and mass around a growing crystal and mono-molecular growth layers on the surface is possible in situ by means of high resolution Hoffman modulation contrast microscopy coupled with three wavelength two beam Mach-Zehnder interferometry. This in situ observation is very suitable for the verification of the growth mechanism of a crystal in a solution or a melt in microgravity.

  16. Coherent beam-beam effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.

    1992-01-01

    There are two physical pictures that describe the beam-beam interaction in a storage ring collider: The weak-strong and the strong-strong pictures. Both pictures play a role in determining the beam-beam behavior. This review addresses only the strong-strong picture. The corresponding beam dynamical effects are referred to as the coherent beam-beam effects. Some basic knowledge of the weak-strong picture is assumed. To be specific, two beams of opposite charges are considered. (orig.)

  17. Carrier dynamics in graphene. Ultrafast many-particle phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malic, E.; Brem, S.; Jago, R. [Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Winzer, T.; Wendler, F.; Knorr, A. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Mittendorff, M.; Koenig-Otto, J.C.; Schneider, H.; Helm, M.; Winnerl, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Ploetzing, T.; Neumaier, D. [Advanced Microelectronic Center Aachen, AMO GmbH, Aachen (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Graphene is an ideal material to study fundamental Coulomb- and phonon-induced carrier scattering processes. Its remarkable gapless and linear band structure opens up new carrier relaxation channels. In particular, Auger scattering bridging the valence and the conduction band changes the number of charge carriers and gives rise to a significant carrier multiplication - an ultrafast many-particle phenomenon that is promising for the design of highly efficient photodetectors. Furthermore, the vanishing density of states at the Dirac point combined with ultrafast phonon-induced intraband scattering results in an accumulation of carriers and a population inversion suggesting the design of graphene-based terahertz lasers. Here, we review our work on the ultrafast carrier dynamics in graphene and Landau-quantized graphene is presented providing a microscopic view on the appearance of carrier multiplication and population inversion. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. 9th International Symposium on Ultrafast Processes in Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Silvestri, S; Denardo, G

    1996-01-01

    This volume is a collection of papers presented at the Ninth International Symposium on "Ultrafast Processes in Spectroscopy" (UPS '95) held at the International Centre for Theo­ retical Physics (ICTP), Trieste (Italy), October 30 -November 3, 1995. These meetings have become recognized as the major forum in Europe for discussion of new work in this rapidly moving field. The UPS'95 Conference in Trieste brought together a multidisciplinary group of researchers sharing common interests in the generation of ultrashort optical pulses and their application to studies of ultrafast phenomena in physics, chemistry, material science, electronics, and biology. It was attended by approximately 250 participants from 20 countries and the five-day program comprises more than 200 papers. The progress of both technology and applications in the field of ultrafast processes during these last years is truly remarkable. The advent of all solid state femtosecond lasers and the extension of laser wavelengths by frequency convers...

  19. All-optical temporal integration of ultrafast pulse waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yongwoo; Ahn, Tae-Jung; Dai, Yitang; Yao, Jianping; Azaña, José

    2008-10-27

    An ultrafast all-optical temporal integrator is experimentally demonstrated. The demonstrated integrator is based on a very simple and practical solution only requiring the use of a widely available all-fiber passive component, namely a reflection uniform fiber Bragg grating (FBG). This design allows overcoming the severe speed (bandwidth) limitations of the previously demonstrated photonic integrator designs. We demonstrate temporal integration of a variety of ultrafast optical waveforms, including Gaussian, odd-symmetry Hermite Gaussian, and (odd-)symmetry double pulses, with temporal features as fast as ~6-ps, which is about one order of magnitude faster than in previous photonic integration demonstrations. The developed device is potentially interesting for a multitude of applications in all-optical computing and information processing, ultrahigh-speed optical communications, ultrafast pulse (de-)coding, shaping and metrology.

  20. The cooling of particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1994-10-01

    A review is given of the various methods which can be employed for cooling particle beams. These methods include radiation damping, stimulated radiation damping, ionization cooling, stochastic cooling, electron cooling, laser cooling, and laser cooling with beam coupling. Laser Cooling has provided beams of the lowest temperatures, namely 1 mK, but only for ions and only for the longitudinal temperature. Recent theoretical work has suggested how laser cooling, with the coupling of beam motion, can be used to reduce the ion beam temperature in all three directions. The majority of this paper is devoted to describing laser cooling and laser cooling with beam coupling

  1. Femtochemistry and femtobiology ultrafast dynamics in molecular science

    CERN Document Server

    Douhal, Abderrazzak

    2002-01-01

    This book contains important contributions from top international scientists on the-state-of-the-art of femtochemistry and femtobiology at the beginning of the new millennium. It consists of reviews and papers on ultrafast dynamics in molecular science.The coverage of topics highlights several important features of molecular science from the viewpoint of structure (space domain) and dynamics (time domain). First of all, the book presents the latest developments, such as experimental techniques for understanding ultrafast processes in gas, condensed and complex systems, including biological mol

  2. Patellofemoral joint motion: Evaluation by ultrafast computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanford, W.; Phelan, J.; Kathol, M.H.; Rooholamini, S.A.; El-Khoury, G.Y.; Palutsis, G.R.; Albright, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    Patellofemoral maltracking is a recognized cause of peripatellar pain. Clinicians currently rely on observation, palpation, and static radiographic images to evaluate the symptomatic patient. Ultrafast computed tomography (ultrafast CT) offers objective observations of the dynamic influences of muscle contraction on the patellofemoral joint as the knee is actively moved through a range of motion from 90 0 C flexion of full extension. This study reports our initial observations and establishes a range of normal values so that patients with a clinical suspicion of patellar maltracking may be evaluated. (orig./GDG)

  3. Patellofemoral joint motion: Evaluation by ultrafast computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanford, W.; Phelan, J.; Kathol, M.H.; Rooholamini, S.A.; El-Khoury, G.Y.; Palutsis, G.R.; Albright, J.P.

    1988-10-01

    Patellofemoral maltracking is a recognized cause of peripatellar pain. Clinicians currently rely on observation, palpation, and static radiographic images to evaluate the symptomatic patient. Ultrafast computed tomography (ultrafast CT) offers objective observations of the dynamic influences of muscle contraction on the patellofemoral joint as the knee is actively moved through a range of motion from 90/sup 0/C flexion of full extension. This study reports our initial observations and establishes a range of normal values so that patients with a clinical suspicion of patellar maltracking may be evaluated. (orig./GDG).

  4. Study of the ultrafast polarization dynamics in lithium borohydride by means of femtosecond X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stingl, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis the ultrafast electronic polarisation in the crystalline material lithium borohydride (LiBH 4 ) is examined. The material is excited by a femtosecond long optical pulse and scanned by a likewise short X-ray pulse. Using X-ray scattering the optically induced spatial rearrangement of electronic charge can be directly mapped with atomic spatial resolution. Copper K-alpha X-rays for the experiment are produced in a laboratory table-top laserplasma source with 1 kHz repetition rate. This radiation is then focused on a powdered sample. Debye-Scherrer rings produced from powder diffraction are collected on a large area detector and processed to yield intensity profiles. Using pump-probe technique the change in diffracted intensity, triggered by excitation with a femtosecond optical pulse is examined. The temporal resolution is given by the delay between pump and probe pulse. This way insight is gained into the dynamic electronic evolution of the system. Intensity changes can be correlated to changes in charge density in the relevant material to elucidate structural dynamics on the femtosecond time scale. Lithium borohydride was chosen since it displays necessary characteristics for the exploration of ultrafast electronic polarisation. Up to date there has been no spatially resolved research in the femtosecond regime elucidating this electronic phenomenon. This work presents the ultrafast resonse in Lithiumborhydrid (LiBH 4 ) to strong electronic fields with optical frequencies, which leads to charge relocation accompanied by electronic polarisation.

  5. What extent will small-scale laser-beam fluctuations seed the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in direct-drive targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skupsky, S.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P.

    1984-01-01

    The nonuniformity in laser energy deposition on a spherical target is calculated for multiple overlapping beams having small-scale fluctuations. Such nonuniformities can imprint themselves on the target surface and ''seed'' the Rayleigh-Taylor instability early in the pulse before an adequate, smoothing plasma-atmosphere has been established. The resulting growth of target deformation during the implosion is estimated

  6. Technical Note : A direct ray-tracing method to compute integral depth dose in pencil beam proton radiography with a multilayer ionization chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Deffet, Sylvain; Meijers, Arturs; Vander Stappen, Francois

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To introduce a fast ray-tracing algorithm in pencil proton radiography (PR) with a multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) for in vivo range error mapping. Methods: Pencil beam PR was obtained by delivering spots uniformly positioned in a square (45x45 mm(2) field-of-view) of 9x9 spots capable

  7. Application of adjoint Monte Carlo to accelerate simulations of mono-directional beams in treatment planning for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nievaart, V.A.; Legrady, D.; Moss, R.L.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Van der Hagen, T.H.; Van Dam, H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the application of the adjoint transport theory in order to optimize Monte Carlo based radiotherapy treatment planning. The technique is applied to Boron Neutron Capture Therapy where most often mixed beams of neutrons and gammas are involved. In normal forward Monte Carlo

  8. Are water simulation models consistent with steady-state and ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy experiments?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.R.; Roberts, S.T.; Loparo, J.J.; Tokmakoff, A.; Fayer, M.D.; Skinner, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy can provide important information about structure and dynamics in liquids. In the case of liquid water, this is particularly true for isotopically dilute HOD/D 2 O and HOD/H 2 O systems. Infrared and Raman line shapes for these systems were measured some time ago. Very recently, ultrafast three-pulse vibrational echo experiments have been performed on these systems, which provide new, exciting, and important dynamical benchmarks for liquid water. There has been tremendous theoretical effort expended on the development of classical simulation models for liquid water. These models have been parameterized from experimental structural and thermodynamic measurements. The goal of this paper is to determine if representative simulation models are consistent with steady-state, and especially with these new ultrafast, experiments. Such a comparison provides information about the accuracy of the dynamics of these simulation models. We perform this comparison using theoretical methods developed in previous papers, and calculate the experimental observables directly, without making the Condon and cumulant approximations, and taking into account molecular rotation, vibrational relaxation, and finite excitation pulses. On the whole, the simulation models do remarkably well; perhaps the best overall agreement with experiment comes from the SPC/E model

  9. High Harmonic Generation XUV Spectroscopy for Studying Ultrafast Photophysics of Coordination Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryland, Elizabeth S.; Lin, Ming-Fu; Benke, Kristin; Verkamp, Max A.; Zhang, Kaili; Vura-Weis, Josh

    2017-06-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectroscopy is an inner shell technique that probes the M_{2,3}-edge excitation of atoms. Absorption of the XUV photon causes a 3p→3d transition, the energy and shape of which is directly related to the element and ligand environment. This technique is thus element-, oxidation state-, spin state-, and ligand field specific. A process called high-harmonic generation (HHG) enables the production of ultrashort (˜20fs) pulses of collimated XUV photons in a tabletop instrument. This allows transient XUV spectroscopy to be conducted as an in-lab experiment, where it was previously only possible at accelerator-based light sources. Additionally, ultrashort pulses provide the capability for unprecedented time resolution (˜50fs IRF). This technique has the capacity to serve a pivotal role in the study of electron and energy transfer processes in materials and chemical biology. I will present the XUV transient absorption instrument we have built, along with ultrafast transient M_{2,3}-edge absorption data of a series of small inorganic molecules in order to demonstrate the high specificity and time resolution of this tabletop technique as well as how our group is applying it to the study of ultrafast electronic dynamics of coordination complexes.

  10. Ultrafast surface carrier dynamics in the topological insulator Bi₂Te₃.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajlaoui, M; Papalazarou, E; Mauchain, J; Lantz, G; Moisan, N; Boschetto, D; Jiang, Z; Miotkowski, I; Chen, Y P; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A; Perfetti, L; Marsi, M

    2012-07-11

    We discuss the ultrafast evolution of the surface electronic structure of the topological insulator Bi(2)Te(3) following a femtosecond laser excitation. Using time and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, we provide a direct real-time visualization of the transient carrier population of both the surface states and the bulk conduction band. We find that the thermalization of the surface states is initially determined by interband scattering from the bulk conduction band, lasting for about 0.5 ps; subsequently, few picoseconds are necessary for the Dirac cone nonequilibrium electrons to recover a Fermi-Dirac distribution, while their relaxation extends over more than 10 ps. The surface sensitivity of our measurements makes it possible to estimate the range of the bulk-surface interband scattering channel, indicating that the process is effective over a distance of 5 nm or less. This establishes a correlation between the nanoscale thickness of the bulk charge reservoir and the evolution of the ultrafast carrier dynamics in the surface Dirac cone.

  11. Structural dynamics of surfaces by ultrafast electron crystallography: experimental and multiple scattering theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Sascha; Liang, Wenxi; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2011-12-07

    Recent studies in ultrafast electron crystallography (UEC) using a reflection diffraction geometry have enabled the investigation of a wide range of phenomena on the femtosecond and picosecond time scales. In all these studies, the analysis of the diffraction patterns and their temporal change after excitation was performed within the kinematical scattering theory. In this contribution, we address the question, to what extent dynamical scattering effects have to be included in order to obtain quantitative information about structural dynamics. We discuss different scattering regimes and provide diffraction maps that describe all essential features of scatterings and observables. The effects are quantified by dynamical scattering simulations and examined by direct comparison to the results of ultrafast electron diffraction experiments on an in situ prepared Ni(100) surface, for which structural dynamics can be well described by a two-temperature model. We also report calculations for graphite surfaces. The theoretical framework provided here allows for further UEC studies of surfaces especially at larger penetration depths and for those of heavy-atom materials. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  12. Ultrafast Laser Engraving Method to Fabricate Gravure Plate for Printed Metal-Mesh Touch Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiyuan Chen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to engrave gravure plate with fine lines structures, conventional art used lithography with dry/wet etching. Lithography with dry/wet etching method allows to engrave lines with smooth concave shape, but its disadvantages include difficulty in controlling aspect ratio, high and uniform in large size process, substrate material limitation due to etching solution availability, and process complexity. We developed ultra-fast laser technology to directly engrave a stainless plate, a gravure plate, to be used for fabricating 23 in. metal-mesh touch panel by gravure offset printing process. The technology employs high energy pulse to ablate materials from a substrate. Because the ultra-fast laser pulse duration is shorter than the energy dissipation time between material lattices, there is no heating issue during the ablation process. Therefore, no volcano-type protrusion on the engraved line edges occurs, leading to good printing quality. After laser engraving, we then reduce surface roughness of the gravure plate using electro-polishing process. Diamond like carbon (DLC coating layer is then added onto the surface to increase scratch resistance. We show that this procedure can fabricate gravure plate for gravure offset printing process with minimum printing linewidth 10.7 μm. A 23 in. metal-mesh pattern was printed using such gravure plate and fully functional touch panel was demonstrated in this work.

  13. Ultrafast geometric control of a single qubit using chirped pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, Patrick E; Malinovskaya, Svetlana A; Malinovsky, Vladimir S

    2012-01-01

    We propose a control strategy to perform arbitrary unitary operations on a single qubit based solely on the geometrical phase that the qubit state acquires after cyclic evolution in the parameter space. The scheme uses ultrafast linearly chirped pulses and provides the possibility of reducing the duration of a single-qubit operation to a few picoseconds.

  14. Measuring and understanding ultrafast phenomena using X-rays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Kristoffer; Nielsen, Martin Meedom

    2014-01-01

    Within the last decade, significant advances in X-ray sources and instrumentation as well as simultaneous developments in analysis methodology has allowed the field of fast- and ultrafast time-resolved X-ray studies of solution-state systems to truly come of age. We here describe some aspects of ...

  15. Tracking ultrafast relaxation dynamics of furan by femtosecond photoelectron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yuzhu; Knopp, Gregor; Qin, Chaochao; Gerber, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Relaxation dynamics of furan are tracked by femtosecond photoelectron imaging. • The mechanism for ultrafast formation of α-carbene and β-carbene is proposed. • Ultrafast internal conversion from S 2 to S 1 is observed. • The transient characteristics of the fragment ions are obtained. • Single-color multi-photon ionization dynamics at 800 nm are also studied. - Abstract: Ultrafast internal conversion dynamics of furan has been studied by femtosecond photoelectron imaging (PEI) coupled with photofragmentation (PF) spectroscopy. Photoelectron imaging of single-color multi-photon ionization and two-color pump–probe ionization are obtained and analyzed. Photoelectron bands are assigned to the related states. The time evolution of the photoelectron signal by pump–probe ionization can be well described by a biexponential decay: two rapid relaxation pathways with time constants of ∼15 fs and 85 (±11) fs. The rapid relaxation is ascribed to the ultrafast internal conversion (IC) from the S 2 state to the vibrationally hot S 1 state. The second relaxation process is attributed to the redistributions and depopulation of secondarily populated high vibronic S 1 state and the formation of α-carbene and β-carbene by H immigration. Additionally, the transient characteristics of the fragment ions are also measured and discussed as a complementary understanding

  16. Ultrafast terahertz scanning tunneling microscopy with atomic resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelic, Vedran; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Nguyen, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that ultrafast terahertz scanning tunneling microscopy (THz-STM) can probe single atoms on a silicon surface with simultaneous sub-nanometer and sub-picosecond spatio-temporal resolution. THz-STM is established as a new technique for exploring high-field non-equilibrium tunneling...

  17. Ultrafast Digital Printing toward 4D Shape Changing Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Limei; Jiang, Ruiqi; Wu, Jingjun; Song, Jizhou; Bai, Hao; Li, Bogeng; Zhao, Qian; Xie, Tao

    2017-02-01

    Ultrafast 4D printing (printing converts the structure into 3D. An additional dimension can be incorporated by choosing the printing precursors. The process overcomes the speed limiting steps of typical 3D (4D) printing. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Ultrafast Dynamics of Quantum-Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poel, Mike van der; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2007-01-01

    We report on a series of experiments on the dynamical properties of quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers. We show how the amplifier responds to one or several ultrafast (170 fs) pulses in rapid succession and our results demonstrate applicability and ultimate limitations to application...

  19. Tracking ultrafast relaxation dynamics of furan by femtosecond photoelectron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yuzhu, E-mail: yuzhu.liu@gmail.com [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044 (China); Knopp, Gregor [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen 5232 (Switzerland); Qin, Chaochao [Department of Physics, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Gerber, Thomas [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen 5232 (Switzerland)

    2015-01-13

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Relaxation dynamics of furan are tracked by femtosecond photoelectron imaging. • The mechanism for ultrafast formation of α-carbene and β-carbene is proposed. • Ultrafast internal conversion from S{sub 2} to S{sub 1} is observed. • The transient characteristics of the fragment ions are obtained. • Single-color multi-photon ionization dynamics at 800 nm are also studied. - Abstract: Ultrafast internal conversion dynamics of furan has been studied by femtosecond photoelectron imaging (PEI) coupled with photofragmentation (PF) spectroscopy. Photoelectron imaging of single-color multi-photon ionization and two-color pump–probe ionization are obtained and analyzed. Photoelectron bands are assigned to the related states. The time evolution of the photoelectron signal by pump–probe ionization can be well described by a biexponential decay: two rapid relaxation pathways with time constants of ∼15 fs and 85 (±11) fs. The rapid relaxation is ascribed to the ultrafast internal conversion (IC) from the S{sub 2} state to the vibrationally hot S{sub 1} state. The second relaxation process is attributed to the redistributions and depopulation of secondarily populated high vibronic S{sub 1} state and the formation of α-carbene and β-carbene by H immigration. Additionally, the transient characteristics of the fragment ions are also measured and discussed as a complementary understanding.

  20. Ultrafast control and monitoring of material properties using terahertz pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowlan, Pamela Renee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Lab. for Ultrafast Materials Optical Science (LUMOS)

    2016-05-02

    These are a set of slides on ultrafast control and monitoring of material properties using terahertz pulses. A few of the topics covered in these slides are: How fast is a femtosecond (fs), Different frequencies probe different properties of molecules or solids, What can a THz pulse do to a material, Ultrafast spectroscopy, Generating and measuring ultrashort THz pulses, Tracking ultrafast spin dynamics in antiferromagnets through spin wave resonances, Coherent two-dimensional THz spectroscopy, and Probing vibrational dynamics at a surface. Conclusions are: Coherent two-dimensional THz spectroscopy: a powerful approach for studying coherence and dynamics of low energy resonances. Applying this to graphene we investigated the very strong THz light mater interaction which dominates over scattering. Useful for studying coupled excitations in multiferroics and monitoring chemical reactions. Also, THz-pump, SHG-probe spectoscopy: an ultrafast, surface sensitive probe of atomic-scale symmetry changes and nonlinear phonon dymanics. We are using this in Bi2Se3 to investigate the nonlinear surface phonon dynamics. This is potentially very useful for studying catalysis.

  1. Update on The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) Pathfinder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossan, B.; Brandt, Søren; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl

    2011-01-01

    The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) uses an X/gamma and an optical/UV instrument to observe gamma-ray bursts (GRB) starting milliseconds after burst trigger and location. The X/gamma instrument, a standard coded-mask camera, locates the GRB and triggers the system. The optical/UV instrument, ...

  2. Ultrafast nonlinear response of silicon carbide to intense THz fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarekegne, Abebe Tilahun; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Kaltenecker, Korbinian J.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate ultrafast nonlinear absorption induced by strong, single-cycle THz fields in bulk, lightly doped 4H silicon carbide. A combination of Zener tunneling and intraband transitions makes the effect as at least as fast as the excitation pulse. The sub-picosecond recovery time makes...

  3. Ultrafast Non-Thermal Electron Dynamics in Single Layer Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novoselov K.S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We study the ultrafast dynamics of non-thermal electron relaxation in graphene upon impulsive excitation. The 10-fs resolution two color pump-probe allows us to unveil the non-equilibrium electron gas decay at early times.

  4. Development of Ultrafast Indirect Flash Heating Methods for RDX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    8 1 1. Introduction The mission of the Multiscale Response of Energetic Materials program is to establish...vinyl nitrate ) Films. J. Phys. Chem. A 2004, 108 (43), 9342–9347. 11 12. Gottfried, J. L.; de Lucia, F. C., Jr.; Piraino, S. M. Ultrafast Laser

  5. An ultrafast study of Zinc Phthalocyanine in DMSO

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ombinda-Lemboumba, Saturnin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The ultrafast dynamics of Zinc Phthalocyanine was studied using trasient absorption pump probe spectroscopy. Zinc Phthalocyanine was excited (pumped) at 672nm and probed by a white light continuum. The pump-probe technique used in this study...

  6. All-optical devices for ultrafast packet switching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorren, H.J.S.; HerreraDorren, J.; Raz, O.

    2007-01-01

    We discuss integrated devices for all-optical packet switching. We focus on monolithically integrated all-optical flip-flops, ultra-fast semiconductor based wavelength converters and explain the operation principles. Finally, a 160 Gb/s all-optical packet switching experiment over 110 km of field...

  7. Basic principles of ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    field tries to drive the electron with its frequency. If the applied field is of the form E = E0eiωt , the driving ..... (CARS),8 coherent Stokes Raman scattering (CSRS), ... gain or loss process in which only two beams are required and it is a self ...

  8. Development of Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors for 4D tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiano, A.; Arcidiacono, R.; Boscardin, M.; Dalla Betta, G. F.; Cartiglia, N.; Cenna, F.; Ferrero, M.; Ficorella, F.; Mandurrino, M.; Obertino, M.; Pancheri, L.; Paternoster, G.; Sola, V.

    2017-12-01

    In this contribution we review the progress towards the development of a novel type of silicon detectors suited for tracking with a picosecond timing resolution, the so called Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors. The goal is to create a new family of particle detectors merging excellent position and timing resolution with GHz counting capabilities, very low material budget, radiation resistance, fine granularity, low power, insensitivity to magnetic field, and affordability. We aim to achieve concurrent precisions of ~ 10 ps and ~ 10 μm with a 50 μm thick sensor. Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors are based on the concept of Low-Gain Avalanche Detectors, which are silicon detectors with an internal multiplication mechanism so that they generate a signal which is factor ~10 larger than standard silicon detectors. The basic design of UFSD consists of a thin silicon sensor with moderate internal gain and pixelated electrodes coupled to full custom VLSI chip. An overview of test beam data on time resolution and the impact on this measurement of radiation doses at the level of those expected at HL-LHC is presented. First I-V and C-V measurements on a new FBK sensor production of UFSD, 50 μm thick, with B and Ga, activated at two diffusion temperatures, with and without C co-implantation (in Low and High concentrations), and with different effective doping concentrations in the Gain layer, are shown. Perspectives on current use of UFSD in HEP experiments (UFSD detectors have been installed in the CMS-TOTEM Precision Protons Spectrometer for the forward physics tracking, and are currently taking data) and proposed applications for a MIP timing layer in the HL-LHC upgrade are briefly discussed.

  9. SU-E-T-272: Direct Verification of a Treatment Planning System Megavoltage Linac Beam Photon Spectra Models, and Analysis of the Effects On Patient Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leheta, D; Shvydka, D; Parsai, E [University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: For the photon dose calculation Philips Pinnacle Treatment Planning System (TPS) uses collapsed cone convolution algorithm, which relies on energy spectrum of the beam in computing the scatter component. The spectrum is modeled based on Linac’s standard commissioning data and typically is not independently verified. We explored a methodology of using transmission measurements in combination with regularization data processing to unfold Linac spectra. The measured spectra were compared to those modeled by the TPS, and the effect on patient plans was evaluated. Methods: Transmission measurements were conducted in narrow-beam geometry using a standard Farmer ionization chamber. Two attenuating materials and two build -up caps, having different atomic numbers, served to enhance discrimination between absorption of low and high-energy portions of the spectra, thus improving the accuracy of the results. The data was analyzed using a regularization technique implemented through spreadsheet-based calculations. Results: The unfolded spectra were found to deviate from the TPS beam models. The effect of such deviations on treatment planning was evaluated for patient plans through dose distribution calculations with either TPS modeled or measured energy spectra. The differences were reviewed through comparison of isodose distributions, and quantified based on maximum dose values for critical structures. While in most cases no drastic differences in the calculated doses were observed, plans with deviations of 4 to 8% in the maximum dose values for critical structures were discovered. The anatomical sites with large scatter contributions are the most vulnerable to inaccuracies in the modeled spectrum. Conclusion: An independent check of the TPS model spectrum is highly desirable and should be included as part of commissioning of a new Linac. The effect is particularly important for dose calculations in high heterogeneity regions. The developed approach makes

  10. Feed-forward motor control of ultrafast, ballistic movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagaya, K; Patek, S N

    2016-02-01

    To circumvent the limits of muscle, ultrafast movements achieve high power through the use of springs and latches. The time scale of these movements is too short for control through typical neuromuscular mechanisms, thus ultrafast movements are either invariant or controlled prior to movement. We tested whether mantis shrimp (Stomatopoda: Neogonodactylus bredini) vary their ultrafast smashing strikes and, if so, how this control is achieved prior to movement. We collected high-speed images of strike mechanics and electromyograms of the extensor and flexor muscles that control spring compression and latch release. During spring compression, lateral extensor and flexor units were co-activated. The strike initiated several milliseconds after the flexor units ceased, suggesting that flexor activity prevents spring release and determines the timing of strike initiation. We used linear mixed models and Akaike's information criterion to serially evaluate multiple hypotheses for control mechanisms. We found that variation in spring compression and strike angular velocity were statistically explained by spike activity of the extensor muscle. The results show that mantis shrimp can generate kinematically variable strikes and that their kinematics can be changed through adjustments to motor activity prior to the movement, thus supporting an upstream, central-nervous-system-based control of ultrafast movement. Based on these and other findings, we present a shishiodoshi model that illustrates alternative models of control in biological ballistic systems. The discovery of feed-forward control in mantis shrimp sets the stage for the assessment of targets, strategic variation in kinematics and the role of learning in ultrafast animals. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Application of An Avalanche Photodiode in Synchrotron-Based Ultra-fast X-Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, S.-K.; Liu Jinyuan; Wang Jin; Powell, Christopher F.

    2004-01-01

    A possibility of using avalanche photodiode has been investigated while operated in current or continuous wave mode to accommodate high-intensity synchrotron x-ray beams in an ultra-fast x-radiography. To achieve a time resolution of 1 μs or better in a time-resolved x-radiograhic experiment, the entire time-sequence of the APD response to the pulsed synchrotron x-ray beam is recorded with time resolution of 1-2 ns. We have characterized the APD detector in the continuous wave mode to reveal its linearity, signal to noise ratio, and the time response with various circuit configurations. We have demonstrated that signal-to-noise ratio better than 1000 can be achieved, which is limited only by Poisson statistics. These detectors, coupled with finely focused x-rays, have been used to study structure and dynamics of supersonic fuel sprays with 50 μm-spatial resolution and μs-temporal resolution in the region close to an injection nozzle

  12. Electro-optic sampling for time resolving relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scoby, C. M.; Musumeci, P.; Moody, J.; Gutierrez, M.; Tran, T.

    2009-01-01

    The Pegasus laboratory at UCLA features a state-of-the-art electron photoinjector capable of producing ultrashort (<100 fs) high-brightness electron bunches at energies of 3.75 MeV. These beams recently have been used to produce static diffraction patterns from scattering off thin metal foils, and it is foreseen to take advantage of the ultrashort nature of these bunches in future pump-probe time-resolved diffraction studies. In this paper, single shot 2-d electro-optic sampling is presented as a potential technique for time of arrival stamping of electron bunches used for diffraction. Effects of relatively low bunch charge (a few 10's of pC) and modestly relativistic beams are discussed and background compensation techniques to obtain high signal-to-noise ratio are explored. From these preliminary tests, electro-optic sampling is suitable to be a reliable nondestructive time stamping method for relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction at the Pegasus lab.

  13. MONDO: A tracker for the characterization of secondary fast and ultrafast neutrons emitted in particle therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabelli, R.; Battistoni, G.; Giacometti, V.; Patera, V.; Pinci, D.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Traini, G.; Marafini, M.

    2018-01-01

    In Particle Therapy (PT) accelerated charged particles and light ions are used for treating tumors. One of the main limitation to the precision of PT is the emission of secondary particles due to the beam interaction with the patient: secondary emitted neutrons can release a significant dose far from the tumor. Therefore, a precise characterization of their flux, production energy and angle distribution is eagerly needed in order to improve the Treatment Planning Systems (TPS) codes. The principal aim of the MONDO (MOnitor for Neutron Dose in hadrOntherapy) project is the development of a tracking device optimized for the detection of fast and ultra-fast secondary neutrons emitted in PT. The detector consists of a matrix of scintillating square fibres coupled with a CMOS-based readout. Here, we present the characterization of the detector tracker prototype and CMOS-based digital SPAD (Single Photon Avalanche Diode) array sensor tested with protons at the Beam Test Facility (Frascati, Italy) and at the Proton Therapy Centre (Trento, Italy), respectively.

  14. Beam loading

    OpenAIRE

    Boussard, Daniel

    1987-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the radio-frequency generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, radio-frequency feedback and feedforward are described. Examples of digital radio-frequency phase and amplitude control for the special case of superco...

  15. Earle K. Plyler Prize Lecture: The Three Pillars of Ultrafast Molecular Science - Time, Phase, Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolow, Albert

    We discuss the probing and control of molecular wavepacket dynamics in the context of three main `pillars' of light-matter interaction: time, phase, intensity. Time: Using short, coherent laser pulses and perturbative matter-field interactions, we study molecular wavepackets with a focus on the ultrafast non-Born-Oppenheimer dynamics, that is, the coupling of electronic and nuclear motions. Time-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy (TRPES) is a powerful ultrafast probe of these processes in polyatomic molecules because it is sensitive both electronic and vibrational dynamics. Ideally, one would like to observe these ultrafast processes from the molecule's point of view - the Molecular Frame - thereby avoiding loss of information due to orientational averaging. This can be achieved by Time-Resolved Coincidence Imaging Spectroscopy (TRCIS) which images 3D recoil vectors of both photofragments and photoelectrons, in coincidence and as a function of time, permitting direct Molecular Frame imaging of valence electronic dynamics during a molecular dynamics. Phase: Using intermediate strength non-perturbative interactions, we apply the second order (polarizability) Non-Resonant Dynamic Stark Effect (NRDSE) to control molecular dynamics without any net absorption of light. NRDSE is also the interaction underlying molecular alignment and applies to field-free 1D of linear molecules and field-free 3D alignment of general (asymmetric) molecules. Using laser alignment, we can transiently fix a molecule in space, yielding a more general approach to direct Molecular Frame imaging of valence electronic dynamics during a chemical reaction. Intensity: In strong (ionizing) laser fields, a new laser-matter physics emerges for polyatomic systems wherein both the single active electron picture and the adiabatic electron response, both implicit in the standard 3-step models, can fail dramatically. This has important consequences for all attosecond strong field spectroscopies of

  16. LHC First Beam 2008

    CERN Multimedia

    Tuura, L

    2008-01-01

    The CMS Centre played a major part in the LHC First Beam Event on September 10th 2008: it was a central point for CMS, hosting journalists from all over the world and providing live link-ups to collaborating institutes as well as, of course, monitoring events as they happened at Point 5. It was also a venue for celebration as the beam completed circuits of the LHC in both directions, passing successfully through the detector (Courtesy of Lassi Tuura)

  17. Particles beams and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzureau, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    This issue of the ''Chocs'' journal is devoted to particles beams used by the D.A.M. (Direction of Military Applications) and to their applications. The concerned beams are limited to those in an energy range from hundred of Kev to several Gev. Light ions (protons, deuterons, alpha) where it is easy to produce neutrons sources and heavy ions (from carbon to gold). (N.C.). 8 refs., 2 figs

  18. New photonic devices for ultrafast pulse processing operating on the basis of the diffraction-dispersion analogy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres-Company, Victor; Minguez-Vega, Gladys; Climent, Vicent; Lands, Jesus [GROC-UJI, Departament de Fisica, Universitat Jaume I, 12080 Castello (Spain); Andres, Pedro [Departament d' Optica, Universitat de Valencia, 46100 Burjassot (Spain)], E-mail: lancis@fca.uji.es

    2008-11-01

    The space-time analogy is a well-known topic within wave optics that brings together some results from beam diffraction and pulse dispersion. On the above basis, and taking as starting point some classical concepts in Optics, several photonic devices have been proposed during the last few years with application in rapidly evolving fields such as ultrafast (femtosecond) optics or RF and microwave signal processing. In this contribution, we briefly review the above ideas with particular emphasis in the generation of trains of ultrafast pulses from periodic modulation of the phase of a CW laser source. This is the temporal analogue of Fresnel diffraction by a pure phase grating. Finally, we extend the analogy to the partially coherent case, what enables us to design an original technique for wavelength-to-time mapping of the spectrum of a temporally stationary source. Results of laboratory experiments concerning the generation of user-defined radio-frequency waveforms and filtering of microwave signals will be shown. The devices are operated with low-cost incoherent sources.

  19. Diffraction contrast as a sensitive indicator of femtosecond sub-nanoscale motion in ultrafast transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremons, Daniel R.; Schliep, Karl B.; Flannigan, David J.

    2013-09-01

    With ultrafast transmission electron microscopy (UTEM), access can be gained to the spatiotemporal scales required to directly visualize rapid, non-equilibrium structural dynamics of materials. This is achieved by operating a transmission electron microscope (TEM) in a stroboscopic pump-probe fashion by photoelectrically generating coherent, well-timed electron packets in the gun region of the TEM. These probe photoelectrons are accelerated down the TEM column where they travel through the specimen before reaching a standard, commercially-available CCD detector. A second laser pulse is used to excite (pump) the specimen in situ. Structural changes are visualized by varying the arrival time of the pump laser pulse relative to the probe electron packet at the specimen. Here, we discuss how ultrafast nanoscale motions of crystalline materials can be visualized and precisely quantified using diffraction contrast in UTEM. Because diffraction contrast sensitively depends upon both crystal lattice orientation as well as incoming electron wavevector, minor spatial/directional variations in either will produce dynamic and often complex patterns in real-space images. This is because sections of the crystalline material that satisfy the Laue conditions may be heterogeneously distributed such that electron scattering vectors vary over nanoscale regions. Thus, minor changes in either crystal grain orientation, as occurs during specimen tilting, warping, or anisotropic expansion, or in the electron wavevector result in dramatic changes in the observed diffraction contrast. In this way, dynamic contrast patterns observed in UTEM images can be used as sensitive indicators of ultrafast specimen motion. Further, these motions can be spatiotemporally mapped such that direction and amplitude can be determined.

  20. Beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the open-quotes Boosterclose quotes and open-quotes ATLASclose quotes linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates