WorldWideScience

Sample records for ultracold atomic systems

  1. Ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    Miniaturized potentials near the surface of atom chips can be used as flexible and versatile tools for the manipulation of ultracold atoms on a microscale. The full scope of possibilities is only accessible if atom-surface distances can be reduced to microns. We discuss experiments in this regime...

  2. A hybrid system of a membrane oscillator coupled to ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampschulte, Tobias

    2015-05-01

    The control over micro- and nanomechanical oscillators has recently made impressive progress. First experiments demonstrated ground-state cooling and single-phonon control of high-frequency oscillators using cryogenic cooling and techniques of cavity optomechanics. Coupling engineered mechanical structures to microscopic quantum system with good coherence properties offers new possibilities for quantum control of mechanical vibrations, precision sensing and quantum-level signal transduction. Ultracold atoms are an attractive choice for such hybrid systems: Mechanical can either be coupled to the motional state of trapped atoms, which can routinely be ground-state cooled, or to the internal states, for which a toolbox of coherent manipulation and detection exists. Furthermore, atomic collective states with non-classical properties can be exploited to infer the mechanical motion with reduced quantum noise. Here we use trapped ultracold atoms to sympathetically cool the fundamental vibrational mode of a Si3N4 membrane. The coupling of membrane and atomic motion is mediated by laser light over a macroscopic distance and enhanced by an optical cavity around the membrane. The observed cooling of the membrane from room temperature to 650 +/- 230 mK shows that our hybrid mechanical-atomic system operates at a large cooperativity. Our scheme could provide ground-state cooling and quantum control of low-frequency oscillators such as levitated nanoparticles, in a regime where purely optomechanical techniques cannot reach the ground state. Furthermore, we will present a scheme where an optomechanical system is coupled to internal states of ultracold atoms. The mechanical motion is translated into a polarization rotation which drives Raman transitions between atomic ground states. Compared to the motional-state coupling, the new scheme enables to couple atoms to high-frequency structures such as optomechanical crystals.

  3. Superconducting microtraps for ultracold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hufnagel, C.

    2011-01-01

    Atom chips are integrated devices in which atoms and atomic clouds are stored and manipulated in miniaturized magnetic traps. State of the art fabrication technologies allow for a flexible design of the trapping potentials and consequently provide extraordinary control over atomic samples, which leads to a promising role of atom chips in the engineering and investigation of quantum mechanical systems. Naturally, for quantum mechanical applications, the atomic coherence has to be preserved. Using room temperature circuits, the coherence time of atoms close to the surface was found to be drastically limited by thermal current fluctuations in the conductors. Superconductors offer an elegant way to circumvent thermal noise and therefore present a promising option for the coherent manipulation of atomic quantum states. In this thesis trapping and manipulation of ultracold Rubidium atoms in superconducting microtraps is demonstrated. In this connection the unique properties of superconductors are used to build traps based on persistent currents, the Meissner effect and remanent magnetization. In experiment it is shown, that in superconducting atom chips, thermal magnetic field noise is significantly reduced. Furthermore it is demonstrated, that atomic samples can be employed to probe the properties of superconducting materials. (author) [de

  4. Ultracold atoms in optical lattices simulating quantum many-body systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lewenstein, Maciej; Ahufinger, Verònica

    2012-01-01

    Quantum computers, though not yet available on the market, will revolutionize the future of information processing. Quantum computers for special purposes like quantum simulators are already within reach. The physics of ultracold atoms, ions and molecules offer unprecedented possibilities of control of quantum many body systems and novel possibilities of applications to quantum information processing and quantum metrology. Particularly fascinating is the possibility of usingultracold atoms in lattices to simulate condensed matter or even high energy physics.This book provides a complete and co

  5. Quantum phases of low-dimensional ultra-cold atom systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathey, Ludwig G.

    2007-06-01

    In this thesis we derive and explore the quantum phases of various types of ultracold atom systems, as well as their experimental signature. The technology of cooling, trapping and manipulating ultracold atoms has advanced in an amazing fashion during the last decade, which has led to the study of many-body effects of atomic ensembles. We first consider atomic mixtures in one dimension, which show a rich structure of phases, using a Luttinger liquid description. We then go on to consider how noise correlations in time-of-flight images of one-dimensional systems can be used to draw conclusions about the many-body state that they're in. Thirdly, we consider the quantum phases of Bose-Fermi mixtures in optical lattices, either square lattices or triangular lattices, using the powerful method of functional renormalization group analysis. Lastly, we study the phases of two-coupled quasi-superfluids in two dimensions, which shows unusual phases, and which could be used to realize the Kibble-Zurek mechanism, i.e. the generation of topological defects by ramping across a phase transition, first proposed in the context of an early universe scenario.

  6. Pseudogap phenomena in ultracold atomic Fermi gases

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Qijin; Wang, Jibiao

    2014-01-01

    The pairing and superfluid phenomena in a two-component ultracold atomic Fermi gas is an analogue of Cooper pairing and superconductivity in an electron system, in particular, the high $T_c$ superconductors. Owing to the various tunable parameters that have been made accessible experimentally in recent years, atomic Fermi gases can be explored as a prototype or quantum simulator of superconductors. It is hoped that, utilizing such an analogy, the study of atomic Fermi gases may shed light to ...

  7. Generalized quantum mean-field systems and their application to ultracold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trimborn-Witthaut, Friederike Annemarie

    2011-01-01

    Strongly interacting many-body systems consisting of a large number of indistinguishable particles play an important role in many areas of physics. Though such systems are hard to deal with theoretically since the dimension of the respective Hilbert space increases exponentially both in the particle number and in the number of system modes. Therefore, approximations are of considerable interest. The mean-field approximation describes the behaviour in the macroscopic limit N→∞, which leads to an effective nonlinear single-particle problem. Although this approximation is widely used, rigorous results on the applicability and especially on finite size corrections are extremely rare. One prominent example of strongly interacting many-body systems are ultracold atoms in optical lattices, which are a major subject of this thesis. Typically these systems consist of a large but well-defined number of particles, such that corrections to the mean-field limit can be systematically studied. This thesis is divided into two parts: In the first part we study generalized quantum mean-field systems in a C * -algebraic framework. These systems are characterized by their intrinsic permutation symmetry. In the limit of infinite system size, N→∞, the intensive observables converge to the commutative algebra of weak * -continuous functions on the single particle state space. To quantify the deviations from the meanfield prediction for large but finite N, we establish a differential calculus for state space functions and provide a generalized Taylor expansion around the mean-field limit. Furthermore, we introduce the algebra of macroscopic fluctuations around the mean-field limit and prove a quantum version of the central limit theorem. On the basis of these results, we give a detailed study of the finite size corrections to the ground state energy and establish bounds, for both the quantum and the classical case. Finally, we restrict ourselves to the subspace of Bose

  8. Towards quantum magnetism with ultracold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weld, David M; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    At ICAP we presented the efforts and progress at MIT towards using ultracold atoms for the realization of various forms of quantum magnetism. These efforts include a study of fermions with strong repulsive interactions in which we obtained evidence for a phase transition to itinerant ferromagnetism, the characterization of cold atom systems by noise measurements, and a new adiabatic gradient demagnetization cooling scheme which has enabled us to realize temperatures of less than 350 picokelvin and spin temperatures of less than 50 picokelvin in optical lattices. These are the lowest temperatures ever measured in any physical system.

  9. High-Flux Ultracold-Atom Chip Interferometers, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ColdQuanta's ultimate objective is to produce a compact, turnkey, ultracold-atom system specifically designed for performing interferometry with Bose-Einstein...

  10. Soliton Trains Induced by Adaptive Shaping with Periodic Traps in Four-Level Ultracold Atom Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djouom Tchenkoue, M. L.; Welakuh Mbangheku, D.; Dikandé, Alain M.

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that an optical trap can be imprinted by a light field in an ultracold-atom system embedded in an optical cavity, and driven by three different coherent fields. Of the three fields coexisting in the optical cavity there is an intense control field that induces a giant Kerr nonlinearity via electromagnetically-induced transparency, and another field that creates a periodic optical grating of strength proportional to the square of the associated Rabi frequency. In this work elliptic-soliton solutions to the nonlinear equation governing the propagation of the probe field are considered, with emphasis on the possible generation of optical soliton trains forming a discrete spectrum with well defined quantum numbers. The problem is treated assuming two distinct types of periodic optical gratings and taking into account the negative and positive signs of detunings (detuning above or below resonance). Results predict that the competition between the self-phase and cross-phase modulation nonlinearities gives rise to a rich family of temporal soliton train modes characterized by distinct quantum numbers. (paper)

  11. Soliton Trains Induced by Adaptive Shaping with Periodic Traps in Four-Level Ultracold Atom Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djouom Tchenkoue, M. L.; Welakuh Mbangheku, D.; Dikandé, Alain M.

    2017-06-01

    It is well known that an optical trap can be imprinted by a light field in an ultracold-atom system embedded in an optical cavity, and driven by three different coherent fields. Of the three fields coexisting in the optical cavity there is an intense control field that induces a giant Kerr nonlinearity via electromagnetically-induced transparency, and another field that creates a periodic optical grating of strength proportional to the square of the associated Rabi frequency. In this work elliptic-soliton solutions to the nonlinear equation governing the propagation of the probe field are considered, with emphasis on the possible generation of optical soliton trains forming a discrete spectrum with well defined quantum numbers. The problem is treated assuming two distinct types of periodic optical gratings and taking into account the negative and positive signs of detunings (detuning above or below resonance). Results predict that the competition between the self-phase and cross-phase modulation nonlinearities gives rise to a rich family of temporal soliton train modes characterized by distinct quantum numbers.

  12. Realization of the manipulation of ultracold atoms with a reconfigurable nanomagnetic system of domain walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Adam D; Weatherill, Kevin J; Hayward, Thomas J; Fry, Paul W; Schrefl, Thomas; Gibbs, Mike R J; Adams, Charles S; Allwood, Dan A; Hughes, Ifan G

    2012-08-08

    Planar magnetic nanowires have been vital to the development of spintronic technology. They provide an unparalleled combination of magnetic reconfigurability, controllability, and scalability, which has helped to realize such applications as racetrack memory and novel logic gates. Microfabricated atom optics benefit from all of these properties, and we present the first demonstration of the amalgamation of spintronic technology with ultracold atoms. A magnetic interaction is exhibited through the reflection of a cloud of (87)Rb atoms at a temperature of 10 μK, from a 2 mm × 2 mm array of nanomagnetic domain walls. In turn, the incident atoms approach the array at heights of the order of 100 nm and are thus used to probe magnetic fields at this distance.

  13. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob

    2013-05-01

    We investigate non-destructive measurements of ultra-cold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. In particular, we pursue applications to dynamically controlled ultracold atoms. The dependence of the Faraday signal on laser detuning, atomic density and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. In particular the destructivity per measurement is extremely low and we illustrate this by imaging the same cloud up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration. Adding dynamic changes to system parameters, we demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. The method can be implemented particularly easily in standard imaging systems by the insertion of an extra polarizing beam splitter. These results are steps towards quantum state engineering using feedback control of ultracold atoms.

  14. Ultracold atoms in a cavity-mediated double-well system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, Jonas; Martikainen, Jani-Petri

    2010-01-01

    We study ground-state properties and dynamics of a dilute ultracold atomic gas in a double-well potential. The Gaussian barrier separating the two wells derives from the interaction between the atoms and a quantized field of a driven Fabry-Perot cavity. Due to intrinsic atom-field nonlinearity, several interesting phenomena arise which are the focus of this work. For the ground state, there is a critical pumping amplitude in which the atoms self-organize and the intra-cavity-field amplitude drastically increases. In the dynamical analysis, we show that the Josephson oscillations depend strongly on the atomic density and may be greatly suppressed within certain regimes, reminiscent of self-trapping of Bose-Einstein condensates in double-well setups. This pseudo-self-trapping effect is studied within a mean-field treatment valid for large atom numbers. For small numbers of atoms, we consider the analogous many-body problem and demonstrate a collapse-revival structure in the Josephson oscillations.

  15. Emulating Molecular Orbitals and Electronic Dynamics with Ultracold Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk-Sören Lühmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, ultracold atoms in optical lattices have proven their great value as quantum simulators for studying strongly correlated phases and complex phenomena in solid-state systems. Here, we reveal their potential as quantum simulators for molecular physics and propose a technique to image the three-dimensional molecular orbitals with high resolution. The outstanding tunability of ultracold atoms in terms of potential and interaction offer fully adjustable model systems for gaining deep insight into the electronic structure of molecules. We study the orbitals of an artificial benzene molecule and discuss the effect of tunable interactions in its conjugated π electron system with special regard to localization and spin order. The dynamical time scales of ultracold atom simulators are on the order of milliseconds, which allows for the time-resolved monitoring of a broad range of dynamical processes. As an example, we compute the hole dynamics in the conjugated π system of the artificial benzene molecule.

  16. Quantum information entropies of ultracold atomic gases in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bosonic systems and a ≃ 1.982 and b = 1 for ideal fermionic systems. These results obey the entropic uncertainty relation given by Beckner, Bialynicki-Birula and Myceilski. Keywords. Ultracold atomic gases; information entropy; foundations of quantum mechanics. PACS Nos 67.85.−d; 89.70.Cf; 03.65.Ta. 1. Introduction.

  17. Illustration of Babinet's principle with ultracold atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Reinhard, Aaron; Riou, Jean-Félix; Zundel, Laura A.; Weiss, David S.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate Babinet's principle by the absorption of high intensity light from dense clouds of ultracold atoms. Images of the diffracted light are directly related to the spatial distribution of atoms. The advantages of employing Babinet's principle as an imaging technique are that it is easy to implement and the detected signal is large. We discuss the regimes of applicability of this technique as well as its limitations.

  18. Manipulating collective quantum states of ultracold atoms by probing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wade, Andrew Christopher James

    2015-01-01

    The field of cold gases has grown dramatically over the past few decades. The exquisite experimental control of their environment and properties has lead to landmark achievements, and has motivated the pursuit of quantum technologies with ultracold atoms. At the same time, the theory of measureme......The field of cold gases has grown dramatically over the past few decades. The exquisite experimental control of their environment and properties has lead to landmark achievements, and has motivated the pursuit of quantum technologies with ultracold atoms. At the same time, the theory...... of measurements on quantum systems has grown into a well established field. Experimental demonstrations of nondestructive continuous measurements on individual quantum systems now occur in many laboratories. Such experiments with ultracold atoms have shown great progress, but the exploitation of the quantum...... nature of the measurement interaction and backaction is yet to be realised. This dissertation is concerned with ultracold atoms and their control via fully quantum mechanical probes. Nonclassical, squeezed and entangled states of matter and single photon sources are important for fundamental studies...

  19. Absorption imaging of ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, David A.; Aigner, Simon; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Imaging ultracold atomic gases close to surfaces is an important tool for the detailed analysis of experiments carried out using atom chips. We describe the critical factors that need be considered, especially when the imaging beam is purposely reflected from the surface. In particular we present...... methods to measure the atom-surface distance, which is a prerequisite for magnetic field imaging and studies of atom surface-interactions....

  20. Ultracold atoms and the Functional Renormalization Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boettcher, Igor; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Diehl, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    We give a self-contained introduction to the physics of ultracold atoms using functional integral techniques. Based on a consideration of the relevant length scales, we derive the universal effective low energy Hamiltonian describing ultracold alkali atoms. We then introduce the concept of the effective action, which generalizes the classical action principle to full quantum status and provides an intuitive and versatile tool for practical calculations. This framework is applied to weakly interacting degenerate bosons and fermions in the spatial continuum. In particular, we discuss the related BEC and BCS quantum condensation mechanisms. We then turn to the BCS-BEC crossover, which interpolates between both phenomena, and which is realized experimentally in the vicinity of a Feshbach resonance. For its description, we introduce the Functional Renormalization Group approach. After a general discussion of the method in the cold atoms context, we present a detailed and pedagogical application to the crossover problem. This not only provides the physical mechanism underlying this phenomenon. More generally, it also reveals how the renormalization group can be used as a tool to capture physics at all scales, from few-body scattering on microscopic scales, through the finite temperature phase diagram governed by many-body length scales, up to critical phenomena dictating long distance physics at the phase transition. The presentation aims to equip students at the beginning PhD level with knowledge on key physical phenomena and flexible tools for their description, and should enable to embark upon practical calculations in this field.

  1. On the tunneling time of ultracold atoms through a system of two mazer cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badshah, Fazal; Ge, Guo-Qin; Irfan, Muhammad; Qamar, Sajid; Qamar, Shahid

    2018-01-30

    We study the resonant tunneling of ultraslow atoms through a system of high quality microwave cavities. We find that the phase tunneling time across the two coupled cavities exhibits more frequent resonances as compared to the single cavity interaction. The increased resonances are instrumental in the display of an alternate sub and superclassical character of the tunneling time along the momentum axis with increasing energies of the incident slow atoms. Here, the intercavity separation appears as an additional controlling parameter of the system that provides an efficient control of the superclassical behavior of the phase tunneling time. Further, we find that the phase time characteristics through two cavity system has the combined features of the tunneling through a double barrier and a double well arrangements.

  2. Spatially resolved photoionization of ultracold atoms on an atom chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, S.; Guenther, A.; Fortagh, J.; Zimmermann, C.

    2007-01-01

    We report on photoionization of ultracold magnetically trapped Rb atoms on an atom chip. The atoms are trapped at 5 μK in a strongly anisotropic trap. Through a hole in the chip with a diameter of 150 μm, two laser beams are focused onto a fraction of the atomic cloud. A first laser beam with a wavelength of 778 nm excites the atoms via a two-photon transition to the 5D level. With a fiber laser at 1080 nm the excited atoms are photoionized. Ionization leads to depletion of the atomic density distribution observed by absorption imaging. The resonant ionization spectrum is reported. The setup used in this experiment is suitable not only to investigate mixtures of Bose-Einstein condensates and ions but also for single-atom detection on an atom chip

  3. Extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juergensen, Ole

    2015-06-05

    In this thesis, the phase diagrams and dynamics of various extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices are studied. Hubbard models are the primary description for many interacting particles in periodic potentials with the paramount example of the electrons in solids. The very same models describe the behavior of ultracold quantum gases trapped in the periodic potentials generated by interfering beams of laser light. These optical lattices provide an unprecedented access to the fundamentals of the many-particle physics that govern the properties of solid-state materials. They can be used to simulate solid-state systems and validate the approximations and simplifications made in theoretical models. This thesis revisits the numerous approximations underlying the standard Hubbard models with special regard to optical lattice experiments. The incorporation of the interaction between particles on adjacent lattice sites leads to extended Hubbard models. Offsite interactions have a strong influence on the phase boundaries and can give rise to novel correlated quantum phases. The extended models are studied with the numerical methods of exact diagonalization and time evolution, a cluster Gutzwiller approximation, as well as with the strong-coupling expansion approach. In total, this thesis demonstrates the high relevance of beyond-Hubbard processes for ultracold atoms in optical lattices. Extended Hubbard models can be employed to tackle unexplained problems of solid-state physics as well as enter previously inaccessible regimes.

  4. Extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juergensen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the phase diagrams and dynamics of various extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices are studied. Hubbard models are the primary description for many interacting particles in periodic potentials with the paramount example of the electrons in solids. The very same models describe the behavior of ultracold quantum gases trapped in the periodic potentials generated by interfering beams of laser light. These optical lattices provide an unprecedented access to the fundamentals of the many-particle physics that govern the properties of solid-state materials. They can be used to simulate solid-state systems and validate the approximations and simplifications made in theoretical models. This thesis revisits the numerous approximations underlying the standard Hubbard models with special regard to optical lattice experiments. The incorporation of the interaction between particles on adjacent lattice sites leads to extended Hubbard models. Offsite interactions have a strong influence on the phase boundaries and can give rise to novel correlated quantum phases. The extended models are studied with the numerical methods of exact diagonalization and time evolution, a cluster Gutzwiller approximation, as well as with the strong-coupling expansion approach. In total, this thesis demonstrates the high relevance of beyond-Hubbard processes for ultracold atoms in optical lattices. Extended Hubbard models can be employed to tackle unexplained problems of solid-state physics as well as enter previously inaccessible regimes.

  5. Mixtures of ultracold atoms and the quest for ultracold molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidemueller, M.

    2000-08-01

    A cold atomic gas formed by two different species represents an intriguing system for a deeper understanding of atom-atom interactions at ultralow temperatures. We present experiments on a mixture of atomic lithium and cesium which are of particular interest regarding the formation of heteronuclear molecules on the one hand, and the prospects for sympathetic cooling of atomic gases through mutual thermalization on the other hand. A first series of experiments on interaction in presence of a near-resonant light field is performed in a two-species magneto-optical trap. The collisional properties of the lithium-cesium mixture are investigated through detailed analysis of trap-loss processes induced by the trap light. Photoassociation in an additional near-resonant laser field yields high-resolution spectra of the excited Cs 2 dimers, but shows no unambiguous indication of LiCs molecule formation. A second series of experiments on pure ground-state collisional properties utilizes an optical dipole trap formed by light that is detuned extremely far below atomic resonance (quasi-electrostatic trap). Storage times of many minutes are achieved in a particularly simple and versatile setup for both atomic species. Cooling of cesium through evaporation and thermalization by elastic collisions is observed. The evolution of temperature and particle number is compared with model simulations of evaporative cooling. Direct laser cooling of trapped cesium in the absolute energetic ground state is demonstrated. Homonuclear spin-changing collisions of ground-state cesium and lithium atoms are analyzed, and first evidence for pure ground-state collisions between atoms of different species is found. Based on the current achievements, prospects for future experiments are discussed. (orig.)

  6. Velocity selection for ultra-cold atoms using bimodal mazer cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irshad, A.; Qamar, S.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we discuss the velocity selection of ultra-cold three-level atoms in Λ configuration using a micromazer. Our model is the same as discussed by Arun et al., for mazer action in a bimodal cavity. We have shown that significantly narrowed velocity distribution of ultra-cold atoms can be obtained in this system due to the presence of dark states. (author)

  7. Phase-space curvature in spin-orbit-coupled ultracold atomic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaitis, J.; Ruseckas, J.; Anisimovas, E.

    2017-04-01

    We consider a system with spin-orbit coupling and derive equations of motion which include the effects of Berry curvatures. We apply these equations to investigate the dynamics of particles with equal Rashba-Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling in one dimension. In our derivation, the adiabatic transformation is performed first and leads to quantum Heisenberg equations of motion for momentum and position operators. These equations explicitly contain position-space, momentum-space, and phase-space Berry curvature terms. Subsequently, we perform the semiclassical approximation and obtain the semiclassical equations of motion. Taking the low-Berry-curvature limit results in equations that can be directly compared to previous results for the motion of wave packets. Finally, we show that in the semiclassical regime, the effective mass of the equal Rashba-Dresselhaus spin-orbit-coupled system can be viewed as a direct effect of the phase-space Berry curvature.

  8. Preparation of Ultracold Atom Clouds at the Shot Noise Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gajdacz, M.; Hilliard, A. J.; Kristensen, Mick

    2016-01-01

    We prepare number stabilized ultracold atom clouds through the real-time analysis of nondestructive images and the application of feedback. In our experiments, the atom number N∼10^6 is determined by high precision Faraday imaging with uncertainty ΔN below the shot noise level, i.e., ΔN... on this measurement, feedback is applied to reduce the atom number to a user-defined target, whereupon a second imaging series probes the number stabilized cloud. By this method, we show that the atom number in ultracold clouds can be prepared below the shot noise level....

  9. Few-particle quantum magnetism with ultracold atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murmann, Simon

    2015-11-25

    This thesis reports on the deterministic preparation of magnetically ordered states in systems of few fermionic atoms. We follow the concept of quantum simulation and use {sup 6}Li atoms in two different hyperfine states to mimic the behavior of electrons in a solidstate system. In a first experiment, we simulate the two-site Hubbard model by using two atoms in an isolated double-well potential. We prepare the two-particle ground state of this model with a fidelity exceeding 90%. By introducing strong repulsive interactions, we are able to realize a pure spin model and describe the energy spectrum with a two-site Heisenberg Hamiltonian. In a second experiment, we realize Heisenberg spin chains of up to four atoms in a single strongly-elongated trapping potential. Here, the atoms self-align along the potential axis due to strong repulsive interactions. We introduce two novel measurement techniques to identify the state of the spin chains and thereby confirm that we can deterministically prepare antiferromagnetic ground-state systems. This constitutes the first observation of quantum magnetism with fermionic atoms that exceeds nearest-neighbor correlations. Both the double-well system and the spin chains can be seen as building blocks of larger ground-state spin systems. Their deterministic preparation therefore opens up a new bottom-up approach to the experimental realization of quantum many-body systems with ultracold atoms.

  10. Thermometry of ultracold atoms by electromagnetically induced transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Thorsten; Wittrock, Benjamin; Blatt, Frank; Halfmann, Thomas; Yatsenko, Leonid P.

    2012-06-01

    We report on systematic numerical and experimental investigations of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) to determine temperatures in an ultracold atomic gas. The technique relies on the strong dependence of EIT on atomic motion (i.e., Doppler shifts), when the relevant atomic transitions are driven with counterpropagating probe and control laser beams. Electromagnetically induced transparency permits thermometry with satisfactory precision over a large temperature range, which can be addressed by the appropriate choice of Rabi frequency in the control beam. In contrast to time-of-flight techniques, thermometry by EIT is fast and nondestructive, i.e., essentially it does not affect the ultracold medium. In an experimental demonstration we apply both EIT and time-of-flight measurements to determine temperatures along different symmetry axes of an anisotropic ultracold gas. As an interesting feature we find that the temperatures in the anisotropic atom cloud vary in different directions.

  11. From few to many. Ultracold atoms in reduced dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, Andre Niklas

    2013-01-01

    This thesis reports on experimental studies exploring few and many-body physics of ultracold Bose and Fermi gases with reduced dimensionality. These experiments illustrate the versatility and great amount of control over the particle number, the interaction and other degrees of freedom, like the spin, that these generic quantum systems offer. In the first part of this thesis, we use quasi one-dimensional few-particle systems of one to ten fermionic atoms to investigate the crossover from few to many-body physics. This is achieved by measuring the interaction energy between a single impurity atom in a state vertical stroke ↓ right angle which repulsively interacts with an increasing number of majority atoms in a state vertical stroke ↑ right angle. We find that the system quickly approaches the results from the many-body theory, which describes the behavior of a single impurity immersed in a Fermi sea of an infinite number of majority particles. The second part of this thesis presents studies of the time evolution of a bosonic F=1 spinor BEC of 87 Rb atoms. In this system, we investigate the emergence and coarsening of ferromagnetic spin textures from initially unmagnetized samples. While the ferromagnetic domains grow, we observe the development of a spin space anisotropy which is in agreement with the predicted phase-diagram. The last part of this thesis presents our first steps towards the investigation of phase coherence of quasi two-dimensional quantum gases in the crossover from bosonic molecules to fermionic atoms.

  12. Light-induced gauge fields for ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, N.; Juzeliūnas, G.; Öhberg, P.; Spielman, I. B.

    2014-12-01

    Gauge fields are central in our modern understanding of physics at all scales. At the highest energy scales known, the microscopic universe is governed by particles interacting with each other through the exchange of gauge bosons. At the largest length scales, our Universe is ruled by gravity, whose gauge structure suggests the existence of a particle—the graviton—that mediates the gravitational force. At the mesoscopic scale, solid-state systems are subjected to gauge fields of different nature: materials can be immersed in external electromagnetic fields, but they can also feature emerging gauge fields in their low-energy description. In this review, we focus on another kind of gauge field: those engineered in systems of ultracold neutral atoms. In these setups, atoms are suitably coupled to laser fields that generate effective gauge potentials in their description. Neutral atoms ‘feeling’ laser-induced gauge potentials can potentially mimic the behavior of an electron gas subjected to a magnetic field, but also, the interaction of elementary particles with non-Abelian gauge fields. Here, we review different realized and proposed techniques for creating gauge potentials—both Abelian and non-Abelian—in atomic systems and discuss their implication in the context of quantum simulation. While most of these setups concern the realization of background and classical gauge potentials, we conclude with more exotic proposals where these synthetic fields might be made dynamical, in view of simulating interacting gauge theories with cold atoms.

  13. Light-induced gauge fields for ultracold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, N; Juzeliūnas, G; Öhberg, P; Spielman, I B

    2014-01-01

    Gauge fields are central in our modern understanding of physics at all scales. At the highest energy scales known, the microscopic universe is governed by particles interacting with each other through the exchange of gauge bosons. At the largest length scales, our Universe is ruled by gravity, whose gauge structure suggests the existence of a particle—the graviton—that mediates the gravitational force. At the mesoscopic scale, solid-state systems are subjected to gauge fields of different nature: materials can be immersed in external electromagnetic fields, but they can also feature emerging gauge fields in their low-energy description. In this review, we focus on another kind of gauge field: those engineered in systems of ultracold neutral atoms. In these setups, atoms are suitably coupled to laser fields that generate effective gauge potentials in their description. Neutral atoms ‘feeling’ laser-induced gauge potentials can potentially mimic the behavior of an electron gas subjected to a magnetic field, but also, the interaction of elementary particles with non-Abelian gauge fields. Here, we review different realized and proposed techniques for creating gauge potentials—both Abelian and non-Abelian—in atomic systems and discuss their implication in the context of quantum simulation. While most of these setups concern the realization of background and classical gauge potentials, we conclude with more exotic proposals where these synthetic fields might be made dynamical, in view of simulating interacting gauge theories with cold atoms. (review article)

  14. Quantum chaos in ultracold collisions of gas-phase erbium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Albert; Mark, Michael; Aikawa, Kiyotaka; Ferlaino, Francesca; Bohn, John L; Makrides, Constantinos; Petrov, Alexander; Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-03-27

    Atomic and molecular samples reduced to temperatures below one microkelvin, yet still in the gas phase, afford unprecedented energy resolution in probing and manipulating the interactions between their constituent particles. As a result of this resolution, atoms can be made to scatter resonantly on demand, through the precise control of a magnetic field. For simple atoms, such as alkalis, scattering resonances are extremely well characterized. However, ultracold physics is now poised to enter a new regime, where much more complex species can be cooled and studied, including magnetic lanthanide atoms and even molecules. For molecules, it has been speculated that a dense set of resonances in ultracold collision cross-sections will probably exhibit essentially random fluctuations, much as the observed energy spectra of nuclear scattering do. According to the Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture, such fluctuations would imply chaotic dynamics of the underlying classical motion driving the collision. This would necessitate new ways of looking at the fundamental interactions in ultracold atomic and molecular systems, as well as perhaps new chaos-driven states of ultracold matter. Here we describe the experimental demonstration that random spectra are indeed found at ultralow temperatures. In the experiment, an ultracold gas of erbium atoms is shown to exhibit many Fano-Feshbach resonances, of the order of three per gauss for bosons. Analysis of their statistics verifies that their distribution of nearest-neighbour spacings is what one would expect from random matrix theory. The density and statistics of these resonances are explained by fully quantum mechanical scattering calculations that locate their origin in the anisotropy of the atoms' potential energy surface. Our results therefore reveal chaotic behaviour in the native interaction between ultracold atoms.

  15. Coupling ultracold atoms to a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator

    OpenAIRE

    Hattermann, H.; Bothner, D.; Ley, L. Y.; Ferdinand, B.; Wiedmaier, D.; Sárkány, L.; Kleiner, R.; Koelle, D.; Fortágh, J.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate coupling of magnetically trapped ultracold $^87$Rb ground state atoms to a coherently driven superconducting coplanar resonator on an integrated atom chip. We measure the microwave field strength in the cavity through observation of the AC shift of the hyperfine transition frequency when the cavity is driven off-resonance from the atomic transition. The measured shifts are used to reconstruct the field in the resonator, in close agreement with transmission measurements of the c...

  16. Strategic Applications of Ultra-Cold Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-07

    Peer-Reviewed Conference Proceeding publications (other than abstracts): “Laser cooling in anisotropic traps”, M. Vengalattore, R.S. Conroy, M. Prentiss...IEEE Cat. No. 04CH37598. Piscataway, NJ, IEEE, 2004, 1 pp. “Guiding of light in an ultracold, anisotropic medium”, M. Vengalattore and M. Prentiss, in...molecules the rotational dynamics imposes significantly larger Rabi frequencies than would otherwise be expected, but within this limitation, a full

  17. Dressed molecules in resonantly interacting ultracold atomic Fermi gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falco, G.M.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    2007-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the two-channel atom-molecule effective Hamiltonian for an ultracold two-component homogeneous Fermi gas interacting near a Feshbach resonance. We particularly focus on the two-body and many-body properties of the dressed molecules in such a gas. An exact result

  18. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul Lindholm; Mørch, Troels

    2013-01-01

    We describe an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed theoretically and, in the absence of experimental imperfections, the sensitivity limit...

  19. Ultracold atoms for precision measurement of fundamental physical quantities

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    Cooling and trapping of neutral atoms has been one of the most active fields of research in physics in recent years. Several methods were demonstrated to reach temperatures as low as a few nanokelvin allowing, for example, the investigation of quantum degenerate gases. The ability to control the quantum degrees of freedom of atoms opens the way to applications for precision measurement of fundamental physical quantities. Experiments in progress, planned or being considered using new quantum devices based on ultracold atoms, namely atom interferometers and atomic clocks, will be discussed.

  20. Quantum simulation of conductivity plateaux and fractional quantum Hall effect using ultracold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barberán, Nuria; García-March, Miguel Angel; Taron, Josep; Dagnino, Daniel; Trombettoni, Andrea; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the role of impurities in the fractional quantum Hall effect using a highly controllable system of ultracold atoms. We investigate the mechanism responsible for the formation of plateaux in the resistivity/conductivity as a function of the applied magnetic field in the lowest Landau level regime. To this aim, we consider an impurity immersed in a small cloud of an ultracold quantum Bose gas subjected to an artificial magnetic field. We consider scenarios corresponding to experimentally realistic systems with gauge fields induced by rotation of the trapping parabolic potential. Systems of this kind are adequate to simulate quantum Hall effects in ultracold atom setups. We use exact diagonalization for few atoms and to emulate transport equations, we analyze the time evolution of the system under a periodic perturbation. We provide a theoretical proposal to detect the up-to-now elusive presence of strongly correlated states related to fractional filling factors in the context of ultracold atoms. We analyze the conditions under which these strongly correlated states are associated with the presence of the resistivity/conductivity plateaux. Our main result is the presence of a plateau in a region, where the transfer between localized and non-localized particles takes place, as a necessary condition to maintain a constant value of the resistivity/conductivity as the magnetic field increases. (paper)

  1. From few to many. Ultracold atoms in reduced dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenz, Andre Niklas

    2013-12-19

    This thesis reports on experimental studies exploring few and many-body physics of ultracold Bose and Fermi gases with reduced dimensionality. These experiments illustrate the versatility and great amount of control over the particle number, the interaction and other degrees of freedom, like the spin, that these generic quantum systems offer. In the first part of this thesis, we use quasi one-dimensional few-particle systems of one to ten fermionic atoms to investigate the crossover from few to many-body physics. This is achieved by measuring the interaction energy between a single impurity atom in a state vertical stroke ↓ right angle which repulsively interacts with an increasing number of majority atoms in a state vertical stroke ↑ right angle. We find that the system quickly approaches the results from the many-body theory, which describes the behavior of a single impurity immersed in a Fermi sea of an infinite number of majority particles. The second part of this thesis presents studies of the time evolution of a bosonic F=1 spinor BEC of {sup 87}Rb atoms. In this system, we investigate the emergence and coarsening of ferromagnetic spin textures from initially unmagnetized samples. While the ferromagnetic domains grow, we observe the development of a spin space anisotropy which is in agreement with the predicted phase-diagram. The last part of this thesis presents our first steps towards the investigation of phase coherence of quasi two-dimensional quantum gases in the crossover from bosonic molecules to fermionic atoms.

  2. Rydberg Molecules for Ion-Atom Scattering in the Ultracold Regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, T; Veit, C; Zuber, N; Löw, R; Pfau, T; Tarana, M; Tomza, M

    2018-04-13

    We propose a novel experimental method to extend the investigation of ion-atom collisions from the so far studied cold, essentially classical regime to the ultracold, quantum regime. The key aspect of this method is the use of Rydberg molecules to initialize the ultracold ion-atom scattering event. We exemplify the proposed method with the lithium ion-atom system, for which we present simulations of how the initial Rydberg molecule wave function, freed by photoionization, evolves in the presence of the ion-atom scattering potential. We predict bounds for the ion-atom scattering length from ab initio calculations of the interaction potential. We demonstrate that, in the predicted bounds, the scattering length can be experimentally determined from the velocity of the scattered wave packet in the case of ^{6}Li^{+}-^{6}Li and from the molecular ion fraction in the case of ^{7}Li^{+}-^{7}Li. The proposed method to utilize Rydberg molecules for ultracold ion-atom scattering, here particularized for the lithium ion-atom system, is readily applicable to other ion-atom systems as well.

  3. Microscopic description and simulation of ultracold atoms in optical resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedenzu, W.

    2012-01-01

    Ultracold atoms in optical resonators are an ideal system to investigate the full quantum regime of light-matter interaction. Microscopic insight into the underlying processes can nowadays easily be obtained from numerical calculations, e.g. with Monte Carlo wave function simulations. In the first part we discuss cold atoms in ring resonators, where the modified boundary conditions significantly alter the dynamics as compared to the standing-wave case. Quantum jumps induce momentum correlations and entanglement between the particles. We observe strong non-classical motional correlations, cooling and entanglement heralded by single photon measurements. For deeply trapped particles the complex system Hamiltonian can be mapped onto a generic optomechanical model, allowing for analytical microscopic insight into the dynamics. The rates of cavity-mediated correlated heating and cooling processes are obtained by adiabatically eliminating the cavity field from the dynamics and can be directly related to the steady-state momentum correlation coefficient. The second part is devoted to cooling and self-organisation of a cold gas in a transversally pumped standing-wave resonator, in which the atoms are directly illuminated by a laser beam. Above a certain critical laser intensity the atoms order in a specific pattern, maximising light scattering into the cavity. The particles thus create and sustain their own trap. We derive a nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation for the one-particle distribution function describing the gas dynamics below and above threshold. This kinetic theory predicts dissipation-induced self-organisation and q-Gaussian velocity distributions in steady state. (author)

  4. Measurement of Spectral Functions of Ultracold Atoms in Disordered Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volchkov, Valentin V.; Pasek, Michael; Denechaud, Vincent; Mukhtar, Musawwadah; Aspect, Alain; Delande, Dominique; Josse, Vincent

    2018-02-01

    We report on the measurement of the spectral functions of noninteracting ultracold atoms in a three-dimensional disordered potential resulting from an optical speckle field. Varying the disorder strength by 2 orders of magnitude, we observe the crossover from the "quantum" perturbative regime of low disorder to the "classical" regime at higher disorder strength, and find an excellent agreement with numerical simulations. The method relies on the use of state-dependent disorder and the controlled transfer of atoms to create well-defined energy states. This opens new avenues for experimental investigations of three-dimensional Anderson localization.

  5. Interfacing ultracold atoms and cryogenic micromechanical oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bick, Andreas

    2015-02-06

    fiber. This previously unknown effect was identified as crucial in asymmetric fiber-based cavities and is studied in this thesis using an analytical model, which is verified using numerical calculations and experimental data. The curved structures necessary for a stable cavity mode in the MiM system are processed onto the fiber tips using CO{sub 2} laser pulses. The light is absorbed, resulting in the evaporation of material. Afterwards, the fiber is analyzed using a Linnik interference microscope to determine the radius of curvature of the processed feature. With this knowledge, an asymmetric fiber-based MiM system at room temperature was set up and in first measurements the mechanical quality factor and the optomechanical coupling strength were studied. Furthermore, a setup to create BECs was planned and realized. Here, in first measurements, Bose-Einstein condensation was observed. The system is based on a 2D/3D MOT design in combination with a Hybrid-Dee magnetic trap. Using radio-frequency evaporation, BECs with N ∼ 8 x 10{sup 4} atoms can be produced at a cycle time of 30 s.

  6. Optical ferris wheel for ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke-Arnold, S.; Leach, J.; Padgett, M. J.; Lembessis, V. E.; Ellinas, D.; Wright, A. J.; Girkin, J. M.; Ohberg, P.; Arnold, A. S.

    2007-07-01

    We propose a versatile optical ring lattice suitable for trapping cold and quantum degenerate atomic samples. We demonstrate the realisation of intensity patterns from pairs of Laguerre-Gauss (exp(iℓө) modes with different ℓ indices. These patterns can be rotated by introducing a frequency shift between the modes. We can generate bright ring lattices for trapping atoms in red-detuned light, and dark ring lattices suitable for trapping atoms with minimal heating in the optical vortices of blue-detuned light. The lattice sites can be joined to form a uniform ring trap, making it ideal for studying persistent currents and the Mott insulator transition in a ring geometry.

  7. Floquet Engineering of Correlated Tunneling in the Bose-Hubbard Model with Ultracold Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinert, F; Mark, M J; Lauber, K; Daley, A J; Nägerl, H-C

    2016-05-20

    We report on the experimental implementation of tunable occupation-dependent tunneling in a Bose-Hubbard system of ultracold atoms via time-periodic modulation of the on-site interaction energy. The tunneling rate is inferred from a time-resolved measurement of the lattice site occupation after a quantum quench. We demonstrate coherent control of the tunneling dynamics in the correlated many-body system, including full suppression of tunneling as predicted within the framework of Floquet theory. We find that the tunneling rate explicitly depends on the atom number difference in neighboring lattice sites. Our results may open up ways to realize artificial gauge fields that feature density dependence with ultracold atoms.

  8. Atomic physics precise measurements and ultracold matter

    CERN Document Server

    Inguscio, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Atomic Physics provides an expert guide to two spectacular new landscapes in physics: precision measurements, which have been revolutionized by the advent of the optical frequency comb, and atomic physics, which has been revolutionized by laser cooling. These advances are not incremental but transformative: they have generated a consilience between atomic and many-body physics, precipitated an explosion of scientific and technological applications, opened new areas of research, and attracted a brilliant generation of younger scientists. The research is advancing so rapidly, the barrage of applications is so dazzling, that students can be bewildered. For both students and experienced scientists, this book provides an invaluable description of basic principles, experimental methods, and scientific applications.

  9. Superexchange-mediated magnetization dynamics with ultracold alkaline-earth atoms in an optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shaobing; Qian Jun; Wang Yuzhu

    2017-01-01

    Superexchange and inter-orbital spin-exchange interactions are key ingredients for understanding (orbital) quantum magnetism in strongly correlated systems and have been realized in ultracold atomic gases. Here we study the spin dynamics of ultracold alkaline-earth atoms in an optical lattice when the two exchange interactions coexist. In the superexchange interaction dominating regime, we find that the time-resolved spin imbalance shows a remarkable modulated oscillation, which can be attributed to the interplay between local and nonlocal quantum mechanical exchange mechanisms. Moreover, the filling of the long-lived excited atoms affects the collapse and revival of the magnetization dynamics. These observations can be realized in state-dependent optical lattices combined with the state-of-the-art advances in optical lattice clock spectroscopy. (paper)

  10. Individual Tracer Atoms in an Ultracold Dilute Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohmann, Michael; Kindermann, Farina; Lausch, Tobias; Mayer, Daniel; Schmidt, Felix; Lutz, Eric; Widera, Artur

    2017-06-01

    We report on the experimental investigation of individual Cs atoms impinging on a dilute cloud of ultracold Rb atoms with variable density. We study the relaxation of the initial nonthermal state and detect the effect of single collisions which has so far eluded observation. We show that, after few collisions, the measured spatial distribution of the tracer atoms is correctly described by a Langevin equation with a velocity-dependent friction coefficient, over a large range of Knudsen numbers. Our results extend the simple and effective Langevin treatment to the realm of light particles in dilute gases. The experimental technique developed opens up the microscopic exploration of a novel regime of diffusion at the level of individual collisions.

  11. Tunable superconducting resonators with integrated trap structures for coupling with ultracold atomic gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferdinand, Benedikt; Wiedmaier, Dominik; Koelle, Dieter; Kleiner, Reinhold [Physikalisches Institut and Center for Quantum Science in LISA+, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Bothner, Daniel [Physikalisches Institut and Center for Quantum Science in LISA+, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    2016-07-01

    We intend to investigate a hybrid quantum system where ultracold atomic gases play the role of a long-living quantum memory, coupled to a superconducting qubit via a coplanar waveguide transmission line resonator. As a first step we developed a resonator chip containing a Z-shaped trapping wire for the atom trap. In order to suppress parasitic resonances due to stray capacitances, and to achieve good ground connection we use hybrid superconductor - normal conductor chips. As an additional degree of freedom we add a ferroelectric capacitor making the resonators voltage-tunable. We furthermore show theoretical results on the expected coupling strength between resonator and atomic cloud.

  12. Permanent magnetic lattices for ultracold atoms and quantum degenerate gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghanbari, Saeed; Kieu, Tien D; Sidorov, Andrei; Hannaford, Peter

    2006-01-01

    We propose the use of periodic arrays of permanent magnetic films for producing magnetic lattices of microtraps for confining, manipulating and controlling small clouds of ultracold atoms and quantum degenerate gases. Using analytical expressions and numerical calculations we show that periodic arrays of magnetic films can produce one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) magnetic lattices with non-zero potential minima, allowing ultracold atoms to be trapped without losses due to spin flips. In particular, we show that two crossed layers of periodic arrays of parallel rectangular magnets plus bias fields, or a single layer of periodic arrays of square-shaped magnets with three different thicknesses plus bias fields, can produce 2D magnetic lattices of microtraps having non-zero potential minima and controllable trap depth. For arrays with micron-scale periodicity, the magnetic microtraps can have very large trap depths (∼0.5 mK for the realistic parameters chosen for the 2D lattice) and very tight confinement

  13. Quantifying, characterizing, and controlling information flow in ultracold atomic gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haikka, P.; McEndoo, S.; Maniscalco, S.; De Chiara, G.; Palma, G. M.

    2011-01-01

    We study quantum information flow in a model comprised of a trapped impurity qubit immersed in a Bose-Einstein-condensed reservoir. We demonstrate how information flux between the qubit and the condensate can be manipulated by engineering the ultracold reservoir within experimentally realistic limits. We show that this system undergoes a transition from Markovian to non-Markovian dynamics, which can be controlled by changing key parameters such as the condensate scattering length. In this way, one can realize a quantum simulator of both Markovian and non-Markovian open quantum systems, the latter ones being characterized by a reverse flow of information from the background gas (reservoir) to the impurity (system).

  14. Scattering resonances of ultracold atoms in confined geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeidian, Shahpoor

    2008-06-18

    Subject of this thesis is the investigation of the quantum dynamics of ultracold atoms in confined geometries. We discuss the behavior of ground state atoms inside a 3D magnetic quadrupole field. Such atoms in enough weak magnetic fields can be approximately treated as neutral point-like particles. Complementary to the well-known positive energy resonances, we point out the existence of short-lived negative energy resonances. The latter originate from a fundamental symmetry of the underlying Hamiltonian. We drive a mapping of the two branches of the spectrum. Moreover, we analyze atomic hyperfine resonances in a magnetic quadrupole field. This corresponds to the case for which both the hyperfine and Zeeman interaction, are comparable, and should be taken into account. Finally, we develop a general grid method for multichannel scattering of two atoms in a two-dimensional harmonic confinement. With our approach we analyze transverse excitations/deexcitations in the course of the collisional process (distinguishable or identical atoms) including all important partial waves and their couplings due to the broken spherical symmetry. Special attention is paid to suggest a non-trivial extension of the CIRs theory developed so far only for the single-mode regime and zero-energy limit. (orig.)

  15. Scattering resonances of ultracold atoms in confined geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeidian, Shahpoor

    2008-01-01

    Subject of this thesis is the investigation of the quantum dynamics of ultracold atoms in confined geometries. We discuss the behavior of ground state atoms inside a 3D magnetic quadrupole field. Such atoms in enough weak magnetic fields can be approximately treated as neutral point-like particles. Complementary to the well-known positive energy resonances, we point out the existence of short-lived negative energy resonances. The latter originate from a fundamental symmetry of the underlying Hamiltonian. We drive a mapping of the two branches of the spectrum. Moreover, we analyze atomic hyperfine resonances in a magnetic quadrupole field. This corresponds to the case for which both the hyperfine and Zeeman interaction, are comparable, and should be taken into account. Finally, we develop a general grid method for multichannel scattering of two atoms in a two-dimensional harmonic confinement. With our approach we analyze transverse excitations/deexcitations in the course of the collisional process (distinguishable or identical atoms) including all important partial waves and their couplings due to the broken spherical symmetry. Special attention is paid to suggest a non-trivial extension of the CIRs theory developed so far only for the single-mode regime and zero-energy limit. (orig.)

  16. De Haas-van Alphen effect of a two-dimensional ultracold atomic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, B.; Furtado, C.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we show how the ultracold atom analogue of the two-dimensional de Haas-van Alphen effect in electronic condensed matter systems can be induced by optical fields in a neutral atomic system. The interaction between the suitable spatially varying laser fields and tripod-type trapped atoms generates a synthetic magnetic field which leads the particles to organize themselves in Landau levels. Initially, with the atomic gas in a regime of lowest Landau level, we display the oscillatory behaviour of the atomic energy and its derivative with respect to the effective magnetic field (B) as a function of 1/B. Furthermore, we estimate the area of the Fermi circle of the two-dimensional atomic gas.

  17. D-state Rydberg electrons interacting with ultracold atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupp, Alexander Thorsten

    2014-10-02

    This thesis was established in the field of ultracold atoms where the interaction of highly excited D-state electrons with rubidium atoms was examined. This work is divided into two main parts: In the first part we study D-state Rydberg molecules resulting from the binding of a D-state Rydberg electron to a ground state rubidium atom. We show that we can address specific rovibrational molecular states by changing our laser detuning and thus create perfectly aligned axial or antialigned toroidal molecules, in good agreement with our theoretical calculations. Furthermore the influence of the electric field on the Rydberg molecules was investigated, creating novel states which show a different angular dependence and alignment. In the second part of this thesis we excite single D-state Rydberg electrons in a Bose-Einstein condensate. We study the lifetime of these Rydberg electrons, the change of the shape of our condensate and the atom losses in the condensate due to this process. Moreover, we observe quadrupolar shape oscillations of the whole condensate created by the consecutive excitation of Rydberg atoms and compare all results to previous S-state measurements. In the outlook we propose a wide range of further experiments including the proposal of imaging a single electron wavefunction by the imprint of its orbit into the Bose-Einstein condensate.

  18. Disordered ultracold atomic gases in optical lattices: A case study of Fermi-Bose mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahufinger, V.; Sanchez-Palencia, L.; Kantian, A.; Sanpera, A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2005-01-01

    We present a review of properties of ultracold atomic Fermi-Bose mixtures in inhomogeneous and random optical lattices. In the strong interacting limit and at very low temperatures, fermions form, together with bosons or bosonic holes, composite fermions. Composite fermions behave as a spinless interacting Fermi gas, and in the presence of local disorder they interact via random couplings and feel effective random local potential. This opens a wide variety of possibilities of realizing various kinds of ultracold quantum disordered systems. In this paper we review these possibilities, discuss the accessible quantum disordered phases, and methods for their detection. The discussed quantum phases include Fermi glasses, quantum spin glasses, 'dirty' superfluids, disordered metallic phases, and phases involving quantum percolation

  19. Rydberg-atom formation in strongly correlated ultracold plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannasch, G.; Pohl, T.

    2011-01-01

    In plasmas at very low temperatures, the formation of neutral atoms is dominated by collisional three-body recombination, owing to the strong ∼T -9/2 scaling of the corresponding recombination rate with the electron temperature T. While this law is well established at high temperatures, the unphysical divergence as T→0 clearly suggests a breakdown in the low-temperature regime. Here, we present a combined molecular dynamics Monte Carlo study of electron-ion recombination over a wide range of temperatures and densities. Our results reproduce the known behavior of the recombination rate at high temperatures, but reveal significant deviations with decreasing temperature. We discuss the fate of the kinetic bottleneck and resolve the divergence problem as the plasma enters the ultracold, strongly coupled domain.

  20. Strongly-correlated ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, Tung-Lam

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the theoretical study of strongly correlated quantum states of ultra-cold fermionic atoms trapped in optical lattices. This field has grown considerably in recent years, following the experimental progress made in cooling and controlling atomic gases, which has led to the observation of the first Bose-Einstein condensation (in 1995). The trapping of these gases in optical lattices has opened a new field of research at the interface between atomic physics and condensed matter physics. The observation of the transition from a superfluid to a Mott insulator for bosonic atoms paved the way for the study of strongly correlated phases and quantum phase transitions in these systems. Very recently, the investigation of the Mott insulator state of fermionic atoms provides additional motivation to conduct such theoretical studies. This thesis can be divided broadly into two types of work: - On the one hand, we have proposed a new type of spectroscopy to measure single-particle correlators and associated physical observables in these strongly correlated states. - On the other hand, we have studied the ground state of the fermionic Hubbard model under different conditions (mass imbalance, population imbalance) by using analytical techniques and numerical simulations. In a collaboration with J. Dalibard and C. Salomon (LKB at the ENS Paris) and I. Carusotto (Trento, Italy), we have proposed and studied a novel spectroscopic method for the measurement and characterization of single particle excitations (in particular, the low energy excitations, namely the quasiparticles) in systems of cold fermionic atoms, with energy and momentum resolution. This type of spectroscopy is an analogue of angular-resolved photoemission in solid state physics (ARPES). We have shown, via simple models, that this method of measurement can characterize quasiparticles not only in the 'conventional' phases such as the weakly interacting gas in the lattice or in Fermi

  1. First-principles many-body theory for ultra-cold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drummond, Peter D.; Hu Hui; Liu Xiaji

    2010-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in the creation of ultra-cold atoms in the laboratory have ushered in unprecedented changes in physical science. These enormous changes in the coldest temperatures available in the laboratory mean that many novel experiments are possible. There is unprecedented control and simplicity in these novel systems, meaning that quantum many-body theory is now facing severe challenges in quantitatively understanding these new results. We discuss some of the new experiments and recently developed theoretical techniques required to predict the results obtained.

  2. Tunneling and traversal of ultracold three-level atoms through vacuum-induced potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badshah, Fazal; Irfan, Muhammad; Qamar, Shahid [Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan); Qamar, Sajid [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2011-09-15

    The passage of ultracold three-level atoms through the potential induced by the vacuum cavity mode is discussed using cascade atomic configuration. We study the tunneling or traversal time of the ultracold atoms via a bimodal high-Q cavity. It is found that the phase time, which may be considered as a measure for the time required to traverse the cavity, exhibits superclassical and subclassical behaviors. Further, the dark states and interference effects in cascade atomic configuration may influence the passage time of the atom through the cavity.

  3. Tunneling and traversal of ultracold three-level atoms through vacuum-induced potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badshah, Fazal; Irfan, Muhammad; Qamar, Shahid; Qamar, Sajid

    2011-01-01

    The passage of ultracold three-level atoms through the potential induced by the vacuum cavity mode is discussed using cascade atomic configuration. We study the tunneling or traversal time of the ultracold atoms via a bimodal high-Q cavity. It is found that the phase time, which may be considered as a measure for the time required to traverse the cavity, exhibits superclassical and subclassical behaviors. Further, the dark states and interference effects in cascade atomic configuration may influence the passage time of the atom through the cavity.

  4. Manipulating beams of ultra-cold atoms with a static magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowlands, W.J.; Lau, D.C.; Opat, G.I.; Sidorov, A.I.; McLean, R.J.; Hannaford, P.

    1996-01-01

    The preliminary results on the deflection of a beam of ultra-cold atoms by a static magnetic field are presented. Caesium atoms trapped in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) are cooled using optical molasses, and then fall freely under gravity to form a beam of ultra-cold atoms. The atoms pass through a static inhomogeneous magnetic field produced by a single current-carrying wire, and are deflected by a force dependent on the magnetic substate of the atom. A schematical diagram of the experimental layout for laser trapping and cooling of cesium atom is given. The population of atoms in various magnetic substates can be altered by using resonant laser radiation to optically pump the atoms. The single-wire deflection experiment described can be considered as atomic reflexion from a cylindrical magnetic mirror; the underlying principles and techniques being relevant to the production of atomic mirrors and diffraction gratings. 16 refs., 10 figs

  5. Dipole-dipole interactions in a hot atomic vapor and in an ultracold gas of Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sautenkov, V. A.; Saakyan, S. A.; Bronin, S. Ya; Klyarfeld, A. B.; Zelener, B. B.; Zelener, B. V.

    2018-01-01

    In our paper ideal and non-ideal gas media of neutral atoms are analyzed. The first we discuss a dipole broadening of atomic transitions in excited dilute and dense metal vapors. Then the theoretical studies of the dipole-dipole interactions in dense ultracold gas of Rydberg atoms are considered. Possible future experiments on a base of our experimental arrangement are suggested.

  6. Quantum information entropies of ultracold atomic gases in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The position and momentum space information entropies of weakly interacting trapped atomic Bose–Einstein condensates and spin-polarized trapped atomic Fermi gases at absolute zero temperature are evaluated. We find that sum of the position and momentum space information entropies of these quantum systems ...

  7. Experimental apparatus for overlapping a ground-state cooled ion with ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Ziv; Sikorsky, Tomas; Ben-shlomi, Ruti; Akerman, Nitzan; Pinkas, Meirav; Dallal, Yehonatan; Ozeri, Roee

    2018-03-01

    Experimental realizations of charged ions and neutral atoms in overlapping traps are gaining increasing interest due to their wide research application ranging from chemistry at the quantum level to quantum simulations of solid state systems. In this paper, we describe our experimental system in which we overlap a single ground-state cooled ion trapped in a linear Paul trap with a cloud of ultracold atoms such that both constituents are in the ?K regime. Excess micromotion (EMM) currently limits atom-ion interaction energy to the mK energy scale and above. We demonstrate spectroscopy methods and compensation techniques which characterize and reduce the ion's parasitic EMM energy to the ?K regime even for ion crystals of several ions. We further give a substantial review on the non-equilibrium dynamics which governs atom-ion systems. The non-equilibrium dynamics is manifested by a power law distribution of the ion's energy. We also give an overview on the coherent and non-coherent thermometry tools which can be used to characterize the ion's energy distribution after single to many atom-ion collisions.

  8. Lattice-Assisted Spectroscopy: A Generalized Scanning Tunneling Microscope for Ultracold Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantian, A; Schollwöck, U; Giamarchi, T

    2015-10-16

    We propose a scheme to measure the frequency-resolved local particle and hole spectra of any optical lattice-confined system of correlated ultracold atoms that offers single-site addressing and imaging, which is now an experimental reality. Combining perturbation theory and time-dependent density matrix renormalization group simulations, we quantitatively test and validate this approach of lattice-assisted spectroscopy on several one-dimensional example systems, such as the superfluid and Mott insulator, with and without a parabolic trap, and finally on edge states of the bosonic Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model. We highlight extensions of our basic scheme to obtain an even wider variety of interesting and important frequency resolved spectra.

  9. Predicting scattering properties of ultracold atoms : Adiabatic accumulated phase method and mass scaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaar, B.J.; Kempen, van E.G.M.; Kokkelmans, S.J.J.M.F.

    2009-01-01

    Ultracold atoms are increasingly used for high-precision experiments that can be utilized to extract accurate scattering properties. This results in a stronger need to improve on the accuracy of interatomic potentials, and in particular the usually rather inaccurate inner-range potentials. A

  10. Observation of electric quadrupole transitions to Rydberg nd states of ultracold rubidium atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tong, D.; Farooqi, S.M.; Kempen, van E.G.M.; Pavlovic, Z.; Stanojevic, J.; Coté, R.; Eyler, E.E.; Gould, P.L.

    2009-01-01

    We report the observation of dipole-forbidden, but quadrupole-allowed, one-photon transitions to high-Rydberg states in Rb. Using pulsed uv excitation of ultracold atoms in a magneto-optical trap, we excite 5s¿nd transitions over a range of principal quantum numbers n=27–59. Compared to

  11. Generating a picokelvin ultracold atomic ensemble in microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lu; Ma, Zhao-Yuan; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Xu-Zong

    2013-01-01

    Applying the direct Monte Carlo simulation (DSMC) method developed for a cold atom system, we study the evaporative cooling process in tilted optical dipole traps with a magnetic field gradient-induced over-levitation or merely a gravitational force. We propose a two-stage decomposed evaporative cooling process in a microgravity environment, and suggest that quantum degeneracy can be obtained at a few picokelvins with several thousand atoms. (paper)

  12. Tunable spin-orbit coupling for ultracold atoms in two-dimensional optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grusdt, Fabian; Li, Tracy; Bloch, Immanuel; Demler, Eugene

    2017-06-01

    Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is at the heart of many exotic band structures and can give rise to many-body states with topological order. Here we present a general scheme based on a combination of microwave driving and lattice shaking for the realization of two-dimensional SOC with ultracold atoms in systems with inversion symmetry. We show that the strengths of Rashba and Dresselhaus SOC can be independently tuned in a spin-dependent square lattice. More generally, our method can be used to open gaps between different spin states without breaking time-reversal symmetry. We demonstrate that this allows for the realization of topological insulators with nontrivial spin textures closely related to the Kane-Mele model.

  13. Sympathetic cooling in a rubidium cesium mixture: Production of ultracold cesium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, M.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents experiments for the production of ultracold rubidium cesium mixture in a magnetic trap. The long-termed aim of the experiment is the study of the interaction of few cesium atoms with a Bose-Einstein condensate of rubidium atoms. Especially by controlled variation of the cesium atom number the transition in the description of the interaction by concepts of the one-particle physics to the description by concepts of the many-particle physics shall be studied. The rubidium atoms are trapped in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) and from there reloaded into a magnetic trap. In this the rubidium atoms are stored in the state vertical stroke f=2,m f =2 right angle of the electronic ground state and evaporatively cooled by means of microwave-induced transitions into the state vertical stroke f=1,m f =1] (microwave cooling). The cesium atoms are also trppaed in a MOT and into the same magnetic trap reloaded, in which they are stored in the state vertical stroke f=4,m f =4 right angle of the electronic ground state together with rubidium. Because of the different hyperfine splitting only rubidium is evaporatively cooled, while cesium is cooled jointly sympathetically - i.e. by theramal contact via elastic collisions with rubidium atoms. The first two chapters contain a description of interatomic interactions in ultracold gases as well as a short summary of theoretical concepts in the description of Bose-Einstein condensates. The chapters 3 and 4 contain a short presentation of the methods applied in the experiment for the production of ultracold gases as well as the experimental arrangement; especially in the framework of this thesis a new coil system has been designed, which offers in view of future experiments additionally optical access for an optical trap. Additionally the fourth chapter contains an extensive description of the experimental cycle, which is applied in order to store rubidium and cesium atoms together into the magnetic trap. The last chapter

  14. Effects of mode profile on tunneling and traversal of ultracold atoms through vacuum-induced potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badshah, Fazal; Irfan, Muhammad; Qamar, Sajid; Qamar, Shahid

    2016-04-01

    We consider the resonant interaction of an ultracold two-level atom with an electromagnetic field inside a high-Q micromaser cavity. In particular, we study the tunneling and traversal of ultracold atoms through vacuum-induced potentials for secant hyperbolic square and sinusoidal cavity mode functions. The phase time which may be considered as an appropriate measure of the time required for the atoms to cross the cavity, significantly modifies with the change of cavity mode profile. For example, switching between the sub and superclassical behaviors in phase time can occur due to the mode function. Similarly, negative phase time appears for the transmission of the two-level atoms in both excited and ground states for secant hyperbolic square mode function which is in contrast to the mesa mode case.

  15. Realizing analogues of color superconductivity with ultracold alkali atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, K M

    2011-01-01

    A degenerate three-component Fermi gas of atoms with identical attractive interactions is expected to exhibit superfluidity and magnetic order at low temperature and, for sufficiently strong pairwise interactions, become a Fermi liquid of weakly interacting trimers. The phase diagram of this system is analogous to that of quark matter at low temperature, motivating strong interest in its investigation. We describe how a three-component gas below the superfluid critical temperature can be prepared in an optical lattice. To realize an SU(3)-symmetric system, we show how pairwise interactions in the three-component atomic system can be made equal by applying radiofrequency and microwave radiation. Finally, motivated by the aim to make more accurate models of quark matter, which have color, flavor and spin degrees of freedom, we discuss how an atomic system with SU(2)xSU(3) symmetry can be achieved by confining a three-component Fermi gas in the p-orbital band of an optical lattice potential.

  16. Atom Interferometry with Ultracold Quantum Gases in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jason; D'Incao, Jose; Chiow, Sheng-Wey; Yu, Nan

    2015-05-01

    Precision atom interferometers (AI) in space promise exciting technical capabilities for fundamental physics research, with proposals including unprecedented tests of the weak equivalence principle, precision measurements of the fine structure and gravitational constants, and detection of gravity waves and dark energy. Consequently, multiple AI-based missions have been proposed to NASA, including a dual-atomic-species interferometer that is to be integrated into the Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) onboard the International Space Station. In this talk, I will discuss our plans and preparation at JPL for the proposed flight experiments to use the CAL facility to study the leading-order systematics expected to corrupt future high-precision measurements of fundamental physics with AIs in microgravity. The project centers on the physics of pairwise interactions and molecular dynamics in these quantum systems as a means to overcome uncontrolled shifts associated with the gravity gradient and few-particle collisions. We will further utilize the CAL AI for proof-of-principle tests of systematic mitigation and phase-readout techniques for use in the next-generation of precision metrology experiments based on AIs in microgravity. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  17. Measuring the One-Particle Excitations of Ultracold Fermionic Atoms by Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, T.-L.; Georges, Antoine; Dalibard, Jean; Salomon, Christophe; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2007-01-01

    We propose a Raman spectroscopy technique which is able to probe the one-particle Green function, the Fermi surface, and the quasiparticles of a gas of strongly interacting ultracold atoms. We give quantitative examples of experimentally accessible spectra. The efficiency of the method is validated by means of simulated images for the case of a usual Fermi liquid as well as for more exotic states: specific signatures of, e.g., a d-wave pseudogap are clearly visible

  18. Towards experimental quantum-field tomography with ultracold atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, A; Friesdorf, M; Langen, T; Rauer, B; Schweigler, T; Hübener, R; Schmiedmayer, J; Riofrío, C A; Eisert, J

    2015-07-03

    The experimental realization of large-scale many-body systems in atomic-optical architectures has seen immense progress in recent years, rendering full tomography tools for state identification inefficient, especially for continuous systems. To work with these emerging physical platforms, new technologies for state identification are required. Here we present first steps towards efficient experimental quantum-field tomography. Our procedure is based on the continuous analogues of matrix-product states, ubiquitous in condensed-matter theory. These states naturally incorporate the locality present in realistic physical settings and are thus prime candidates for describing the physics of locally interacting quantum fields. To experimentally demonstrate the power of our procedure, we quench a one-dimensional Bose gas by a transversal split and use our method for a partial quantum-field reconstruction of the far-from-equilibrium states of this system. We expect our technique to play an important role in future studies of continuous quantum many-body systems.

  19. Quantum many-body dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, Stefan

    2014-04-15

    Ultracold atoms can be trapped in periodic intensity patterns of light created by counterpropagating laser beams, so-called optical lattices. In contrast to its natural counterpart, electrons in a solid state crystal, this man-made setup is very clean and highly isolated from environmental degrees of freedom. Moreover, to a large extent, the experimenter has dynamical control over the relevant system parameters: the interaction between atoms, the tunneling amplitude between lattice sites, and even the dimensionality of the lattice. These advantages render this system a unique platform for the simulation of quantum many-body dynamics for various lattice Hamiltonians as has been demonstrated in several experiments by now. The most significant step in recent times has arguably been the introduction of single-site detection of individual atoms in optical lattices. This technique, based on fluorescence microscopy, opens a new doorway for the study of quantum many-body states: the detection of the microscopic atom configuration. In this thesis, we theoretically explore the dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices for various setups realized in present-day experiments. Our main focus lies on aspects that become experimentally accessible by (realistic extensions of) the novel single-site measurement technique. The first part deals with the expansion of initially confined atoms in a homogeneous lattice, which is one way to create atomic motion in experiments. We analyze the buildup of spatial correlations during the expansion of a finitely extended band insulating state in one dimension. The numerical simulation reveals the creation of remote spin-entangled fermions in the strongly interacting regime. We discuss the experimental observation of such spin-entangled pairs by means of a single-site measurement. Furthermore, we suggest studying the impact of observations on the expansion dynamics for the extreme case of a projective measurement in the spatial occupation

  20. Quantum many-body dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Ultracold atoms can be trapped in periodic intensity patterns of light created by counterpropagating laser beams, so-called optical lattices. In contrast to its natural counterpart, electrons in a solid state crystal, this man-made setup is very clean and highly isolated from environmental degrees of freedom. Moreover, to a large extent, the experimenter has dynamical control over the relevant system parameters: the interaction between atoms, the tunneling amplitude between lattice sites, and even the dimensionality of the lattice. These advantages render this system a unique platform for the simulation of quantum many-body dynamics for various lattice Hamiltonians as has been demonstrated in several experiments by now. The most significant step in recent times has arguably been the introduction of single-site detection of individual atoms in optical lattices. This technique, based on fluorescence microscopy, opens a new doorway for the study of quantum many-body states: the detection of the microscopic atom configuration. In this thesis, we theoretically explore the dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices for various setups realized in present-day experiments. Our main focus lies on aspects that become experimentally accessible by (realistic extensions of) the novel single-site measurement technique. The first part deals with the expansion of initially confined atoms in a homogeneous lattice, which is one way to create atomic motion in experiments. We analyze the buildup of spatial correlations during the expansion of a finitely extended band insulating state in one dimension. The numerical simulation reveals the creation of remote spin-entangled fermions in the strongly interacting regime. We discuss the experimental observation of such spin-entangled pairs by means of a single-site measurement. Furthermore, we suggest studying the impact of observations on the expansion dynamics for the extreme case of a projective measurement in the spatial occupation

  1. Holographic method for site-resolved detection of a 2D array of ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Daniel Kai; Deissler, Benjamin; Limmer, Wolfgang; Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel approach to site-resolved detection of a 2D gas of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. A near-resonant laser beam is coherently scattered by the atomic array, and after passing a lens its interference pattern is holographically recorded by superimposing it with a reference laser beam on a CCD chip. Fourier transformation of the recorded intensity pattern reconstructs the atomic distribution in the lattice with single-site resolution. The holographic detection method requires only about two hundred scattered photons per atom in order to achieve a high reconstruction fidelity of 99.9 %. Therefore, additional cooling during detection might not be necessary even for light atomic elements such as lithium. Furthermore, first investigations suggest that small aberrations of the lens can be post-corrected in imaging processing.

  2. A quantum trampoline for ultra-cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert-de-Saint-Vincent, M.; Brantut, J.-P.; Bordé, Ch. J.; Aspect, A.; Bourdel, T.; Bouyer, P.

    2010-01-01

    We have observed the interferometric suspension of a free-falling Bose-Einstein condensate periodically submitted to multiple-order diffraction by a vertical 1D standing wave. This scheme permits simultaneously the compensation of gravity and coherent splitting/recombination of the matter waves. It results in high-contrast interference in the number of atoms detected at constant height. For long suspension times, multiple-wave interference is revealed through a sharpening of the fringes. We characterize our atom interferometer and use it to measure the acceleration of gravity.

  3. Scattering amplitude of ultracold atoms near the p-wave magnetic Feshbach resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Peng; Naidon, Pascal; Ueda, Masahito

    2010-01-01

    Most of the current theories on the p-wave superfluid in cold atomic gases are based on the effective-range theory for the two-body scattering, where the low-energy p-wave scattering amplitude f 1 (k) is given by f 1 (k)=-1/[ik+1/(Vk 2 )+1/R]. Here k is the incident momentum, V and R are the k-independent scattering volume and effective range, respectively. However, due to the long-range nature of the van der Waals interaction between two colliding ultracold atoms, the p-wave scattering amplitude of the two atoms is not described by the effective-range theory [J. Math. Phys. 4, 54 (1963); Phys. Rev. A 58, 4222 (1998)]. In this paper we provide an explicit calculation for the p-wave scattering of two ultracold atoms near the p-wave magnetic Feshbach resonance. We show that in this case the low-energy p-wave scattering amplitude f 1 (k)=-1/[ik+1/(V eff k 2 )+1/(S eff k)+1/R eff ] where V eff , S eff , and R eff are k-dependent parameters. Based on this result, we identify sufficient conditions for the effective-range theory to be a good approximation of the exact scattering amplitude. Using these conditions we show that the effective-range theory is a good approximation for the p-wave scattering in the ultracold gases of 6 Li and 40 K when the scattering volume is enhanced by the resonance.

  4. Reactive Collisions and Interactions of Ultracold Dipolar Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-29

    Kotochigova Department of Physics, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122-6082 I. COLLISIONAL INTERACTIONS OF RARE- EARTH MAGNETIC ATOMS The breakthroughs...technologies, it was not previously implemented, possibly owing to the misconception that molecular ions predominantly undergo charge-exchange reactions leading

  5. Classical and quantum analysis of one-dimensional velocity selection for ultracold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, J K; Kim, H A; Mishra, S R; Myrskog, S H; Jofre, A M; Segal, L R; Kim, J B; Steinberg, A M

    2005-01-01

    We discuss a velocity selection technique for obtaining cold atoms, in which all atoms below a certain energy are spatially selected from the surrounding atom cloud. Velocity selection can in some cases be more efficient than other cooling techniques for the preparation of ultracold atom clouds in one dimension. With quantum mechanical and classical simulations and theory we present a scheme using a dipole force barrier to select the coldest atoms from a magnetically trapped atom cloud. The dipole and magnetic potentials create a local minimum which traps the coldest atoms. A unique advantage of this technique is the sharp cut-off in the velocity distribution of the sample of selected atoms. Such a non-thermal distribution should prove useful for a variety of experiments, including proposed studies of atomic tunnelling and scattering from quantum potentials. We show that when the rms size of the atom cloud is smaller than the local minimum in which the selected atoms are trapped, the velocity selection technique can be more efficient in one dimension than some common techniques such as evaporative cooling. For example, one simulation shows nearly 6% of the atoms retained at a temperature 100 times lower than the starting condition

  6. Numerical methods for atomic quantum gases with applications to Bose-Einstein condensates and to ultracold fermions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minguzzi, A.; Succi, S.; Toschi, F.; Tosi, M.P.; Vignolo, P.

    2004-01-01

    The achievement of Bose–Einstein condensation in ultra-cold vapours of alkali atoms has given enormous impulse to the study of dilute atomic gases in condensed quantum states inside magnetic traps and optical lattices. High-purity and easy optical access make them ideal candidates to investigate

  7. Conjugate gradient minimisation approach to generating holographic traps for ultracold atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte, Tiffany; Bruce, Graham D; Keeling, Jonathan; Cassettari, Donatella

    2014-11-03

    Direct minimisation of a cost function can in principle provide a versatile and highly controllable route to computational hologram generation. Here we show that the careful design of cost functions, combined with numerically efficient conjugate gradient minimisation, establishes a practical method for the generation of holograms for a wide range of target light distributions. This results in a guided optimisation process, with a crucial advantage illustrated by the ability to circumvent optical vortex formation during hologram calculation. We demonstrate the implementation of the conjugate gradient method for both discrete and continuous intensity distributions and discuss its applicability to optical trapping of ultracold atoms.

  8. Symmetry breaking in small rotating clouds of trapped ultracold Bose atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagnino, D.; Barberan, N.; Riera, A.; Osterloh, K.; Lewenstein, M.

    2007-01-01

    We study the signatures of rotational and phase symmetry breaking in small rotating clouds of trapped ultracold Bose atoms by looking at rigorously defined condensate wave function. Rotational symmetry breaking occurs in narrow frequency windows, where energy degeneracy between the lowest energy states of different total angular momentum takes place. This leads to a complex condensate wave function that exhibits vortices clearly seen as holes in the density, as well as characteristic local phase patterns, reflecting the appearance of vorticities. Phase symmetry (or gauge symmetry) breaking, on the other hand, is clearly manifested in the interference of two independent rotating clouds

  9. Photo-associative ionization in ultracold sodium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagnato, V.; Marcassa, L.; Tsao, C.; Wang, Y.; Weiner, J.

    1993-01-01

    We study photo-associative ionization (PAI) for sodium atoms held in a magneto-optical trap (T < 1 mK). The process is investigated using one and two laser frequencies. For a single color PAI, we measure the rate constant as a function of light intensity and the result is compared with calculation based on semiclassical Bloch equation theory. The measured rate constant appears to saturate sooner than theory. In the two-color PAI (TCPAI) we investigate individual steps of the process. Different combinations of laser frequencies prepare different populations in each of the hyperfine ground state and the contribution of each one in this collisional process is investigated. The comparison with theory allows a fairly clear understanding of PAI and TCPAI

  10. Robust mesoscopic superposition of strongly correlated ultracold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallwood, David W.; Ernst, Thomas; Brand, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    We propose a scheme to create coherent superpositions of annular flow of strongly interacting bosonic atoms in a one-dimensional ring trap. The nonrotating ground state is coupled to a vortex state with mesoscopic angular momentum by means of a narrow potential barrier and an applied phase that originates from either rotation or a synthetic magnetic field. We show that superposition states in the Tonks-Girardeau regime are robust against single-particle loss due to the effects of strong correlations. The coupling between the mesoscopically distinct states scales much more favorably with particle number than in schemes relying on weak interactions, thus making particle numbers of hundreds or thousands feasible. Coherent oscillations induced by time variation of parameters may serve as a 'smoking gun' signature for detecting superposition states.

  11. Dark states and interferences in cascade transitions of ultracold atoms in a cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arun, R.; Agarwal, G.S.

    2002-01-01

    We examine the competition among one- and two-photon processes in an ultracold, three-level atom undergoing cascade transitions as a result of its interaction with a bimodal cavity. We show parameter domains where two-photon transitions are dominant, and we also study the effect of two-photon emission on the mazer action in the cavity. The two-photon emission leads to the loss of detailed balance and therefore we obtain the photon statistics of the cavity field by the numerical integration of the master equation. The photon distribution in each cavity mode exhibits sub- and super-Poissonian behaviors depending on the strength of atom-field coupling. The photon distribution becomes identical to a Poisson distribution when the atom-field coupling strengths of the modes are equal

  12. Probe Knots and Hopf Insulators with Ultracold Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dong-Ling; Wang, Sheng-Tao; Sun, Kai; Duan, L.-M.

    2018-01-01

    Knots and links are fascinating and intricate topological objects. Their influence spans from DNA and molecular chemistry to vortices in superfluid helium, defects in liquid crystals and cosmic strings in the early universe. Here we find that knotted structures also exist in a peculiar class of three-dimensional topological insulators—the Hopf insulators. In particular, we demonstrate that the momentum-space spin textures of Hopf insulators are twisted in a nontrivial way, which implies the presence of various knot and link structures. We further illustrate that the knots and nontrivial spin textures can be probed via standard time-of-flight images in cold atoms as preimage contours of spin orientations in stereographic coordinates. The extracted Hopf invariants, knots, and links are validated to be robust to typical experimental imperfections. Our work establishes the existence of knotted structures in Hopf insulators, which may have potential applications in spintronics and quantum information processing. D.L.D., S.T.W. and L.M.D. are supported by the ARL, the IARPA LogiQ program, and the AFOSR MURI program, and supported by Tsinghua University for their visits. K.S. acknowledges the support from NSF under Grant No. PHY1402971. D.L.D. is also supported by JQI-NSF-PFC and LPS-MPO-CMTC at the final stage of this paper.

  13. Ultracold Atoms in a Square Lattice with Spin-Orbit Coupling: Charge Order, Superfluidity, and Topological Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Peter; Shi, Hao; Zhang, Shiwei

    2017-12-01

    We present an ab initio, numerically exact study of attractive fermions in square lattices with Rashba spin-orbit coupling. The ground state of this system is a supersolid, with coexisting charge and superfluid order. The superfluid is composed of both singlet and triplet pairs induced by spin-orbit coupling. We perform large-scale calculations using the auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo method to provide the first full, quantitative description of the charge, spin, and pairing properties of the system. In addition to characterizing the exotic physics, our results will serve as essential high-accuracy benchmarks for the intense theoretical and especially experimental efforts in ultracold atoms to realize and understand an expanding variety of quantum Hall and topological superconductor systems.

  14. Observation of Spin Polarons in a Tunable Fermi Liquid of Ultracold Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwierlein, Martin

    2009-05-01

    We have observed spin polarons, dressed spin down impurities in a spin up Fermi sea of ultracold atoms via tomographic RF spectroscopy. Feshbach resonances allow to freely tune the interactions between the two spin states involved. A single spin down atom immersed in a Fermi sea of spin up atoms can do one of two things: For strong attraction, it can form a molecule with exactly one spin up partner, but for weaker interaction it will spread its attraction and surround itself with a collection of majority atoms. This spin down atom dressed with a spin up cloud constitutes the spin- or Fermi polaron. We have observed a striking spectroscopic signature of this quasi-particle for various interaction strengths, a narrow peak in the spin down spectrum that emerges above a broad background. The spectra allow us to directly measure the polaron energy and the quasi-particle residue Z. The polarons are found to be only weakly interacting with each other, and can thus be identified with the quasi-particles of Landau's Fermi liquid theory. At a critical interaction strength, we observe a transition from spin one-half polarons to spin zero molecules. At this point the Fermi liquid undergoes a phase transition into a superfluid Bose liquid.

  15. Hybrid quantum systems of ions and atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Sias, Carlo; Köhl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter we review the progress in experiments with hybrid systems of trapped ions and ultracold neutral atoms. We give a theoretical overview over the atom-ion interactions in the cold regime and give a summary of the most important experimental results. We conclude with an overview of remaining open challenges and possible applications in hybrid quantum systems of ions and neutral atoms.

  16. Ultracold atoms in one-dimensional optical lattices approaching the Tonks-Girardeau regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollet, L.; Rombouts, S.M.A.; Denteneer, P.J. H.

    2004-01-01

    Recent experiments on ultracold atomic alkali gases in a one-dimensional optical lattice have demonstrated the transition from a gas of soft-core bosons to a Tonks-Girardeau gas in the hard-core limit, where one-dimensional bosons behave like fermions in many respects. We have studied the underlying many-body physics through numerical simulations which accommodate both the soft-core and hard-core limits in one single framework. We find that the Tonks-Girardeau gas is reached only at the strongest optical lattice potentials. Results for slightly higher densities, where the gas develops a Mott-like phase already at weaker optical lattice potentials, show that these Mott-like short-range correlations do not enhance the convergence to the hard-core limit

  17. Fast, High-Precision Optical Polarization Synthesizer for Ultracold-Atom Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robens, Carsten; Brakhane, Stefan; Alt, Wolfgang; Meschede, Dieter; Zopes, Jonathan; Alberti, Andrea

    2018-03-01

    We present a technique for the precision synthesis of arbitrary polarization states of light with a high modulation bandwidth. Our approach consists of superimposing two laser light fields with the same wavelength, but with opposite circular polarizations, where the phase and the amplitude of each light field are individually controlled. We find that the polarization-synthesized beam reaches a degree of polarization of 99.99%, which is mainly limited by static spatial variations of the polarization state over the beam profile. We also find that the depolarization caused by temporal fluctuations of the polarization state is about 2 orders of magnitude smaller. In a recent work, Robens et al. [Low-Entropy States of Neutral Atoms in Polarization-Synthesized Optical Lattices, Phys. Rev. Lett. 118, 065302 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.065302] demonstrated an application of the polarization synthesizer to create two independently controllable optical lattices which trap atoms depending on their internal spin state. We use ultracold atoms in polarization-synthesized optical lattices to give an independent, in situ demonstration of the performance of the polarization synthesizer.

  18. Universal Three-Body Physics in Ultracold KRb Mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wacker, L. J.; Jørgensen, N. B.; Birkmose, Danny Matthiesen

    2016-01-01

    Ultracold atomic gases have recently become a driving force in few-body physics due to the observation of the Efimov effect. While initially observed in equal mass systems, one expects even richer few-body physics in the mass-imbalanced case. In previous experiments with ultracold mixtures of pot...

  19. Superfluidity and BCS-BEC crossover of ultracold atomic Fermi gases in mixed dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Leifeng; Chen, Qijin

    Atomic Fermi gases have been under active investigation in the past decade. Here we study the superfluid and pairing phenomena of a two-component ultracold atomic Fermi gas in the presence of mixed dimensionality, in which one component is confined on a 1D optical lattice whereas the other is free in the 3D continuum. We assume a short-range pairing interaction and determine the superfluid transition temperature Tc and the phase diagram for the entire BCS-BEC crossover, using a pairing fluctuation theory which includes self-consistently the contributions of finite momentum pairs. We find that, as the lattice depth increases and the lattice spacing decreases, the behavior of Tc becomes very similar to that of a population imbalance Fermi gas in a simple 3D continuum. There is no superfluidity even at T = 0 below certain threshold of pairing strength in the BCS regime. Nonmonotonic Tc behavior and intermediate temperature superfluidity emerge, and for deep enough lattice, the Tc curve will split into two parts. Implications for experiment will be discussed. References: 1. Q.J. Chen, Ioan Kosztin, B. Janko, and K. Levin, Phys. Rev. B 59, 7083 (1999). 2. Chih-Chun Chien, Qijin Chen, Yan He, and K. Levin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 090402(2006). Work supported by NSF of China and the National Basic Research Program of China.

  20. Evolution from Rydberg gas to ultracold plasma in a supersonic atomic beam of Xe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, J; Sadeghi, H; Schulz-Weiling, M; Grant, E R

    2014-01-01

    A Rydberg gas of xenon, entrained in a supersonic atomic beam, evolves slowly to form an ultracold plasma. In the early stages of this evolution, when the free-electron density is low, Rydberg atoms undergo long-range ℓ-mixing collisions, yielding states of high orbital angular momentum. The development of high-ℓ states promotes dipole–dipole interactions that help to drive Penning ionization. The electron density increases until it reaches the threshold for avalanche. Ninety μs after the production of a Rydberg gas with the initial state, n 0 ℓ 0 =42d, a 432 V cm −1 electrostatic pulse fails to separate charge in the excited volume, an effect which is ascribed to screening by free electrons. Photoexcitation cross sections, observed rates of ℓ-mixing, and a coupled-rate-equation model simulating the onset of the electron-impact avalanche point consistently to an initial Rydberg gas density of 5×10 8 cm −3 . (paper)

  1. Evolution from Rydberg gas to ultracold plasma in a supersonic atomic beam of Xe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, J.; Sadeghi, H.; Schulz-Weiling, M.; Grant, E. R.

    2014-08-01

    A Rydberg gas of xenon, entrained in a supersonic atomic beam, evolves slowly to form an ultracold plasma. In the early stages of this evolution, when the free-electron density is low, Rydberg atoms undergo long-range \\ell -mixing collisions, yielding states of high orbital angular momentum. The development of high-\\ell states promotes dipole-dipole interactions that help to drive Penning ionization. The electron density increases until it reaches the threshold for avalanche. Ninety μs after the production of a Rydberg gas with the initial state, {{n}_{0}}{{\\ell }_{0}}=42d, a 432 V cm-1 electrostatic pulse fails to separate charge in the excited volume, an effect which is ascribed to screening by free electrons. Photoexcitation cross sections, observed rates of \\ell -mixing, and a coupled-rate-equation model simulating the onset of the electron-impact avalanche point consistently to an initial Rydberg gas density of 5\\times {{10}^{8}}\\;c{{m}^{-3}}.

  2. Ground States of Ultracold Spin-1 Atoms in a Deep Double-Well Optical Superlattice in a Weak Magnetic Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Gong-Ping; Qin Shuai-Feng; Wang Shou-Yang; Jian Wen-Tian

    2013-01-01

    The ground states of the ultracold spin-1 atoms trapped in a deep one-dimensional double-well optical superlattice in a weak magnetic field are obtained. It is shown that the ground-state diagrams of the reduced double-well model are remarkably different for the antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic condensates. The transition between the singlet state and nematic state is observed for the antiferromagnetic interaction atoms, which can be realized by modulating the tunneling parameter or the quadratic Zeeman energy. An experiment to distinguish the different spin states is suggested. (general)

  3. Numerical methods for atomic quantum gases with applications to Bose-Einstein condensates and to ultracold fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minguzzi, A.; Succi, S.; Toschi, F.; Tosi, M.P.; Vignolo, P.

    2004-01-01

    The achievement of Bose-Einstein condensation in ultra-cold vapours of alkali atoms has given enormous impulse to the study of dilute atomic gases in condensed quantum states inside magnetic traps and optical lattices. High-purity and easy optical access make them ideal candidates to investigate fundamental issues on interacting quantum systems. This review presents some theoretical issues which have been addressed in this area and the numerical techniques which have been developed and used to describe them, from mean-field models to classical and quantum simulations for equilibrium and dynamical properties. After an introductory overview on dilute quantum gases, both in the homogeneus state and under harmonic or periodic confinement, the article is organized in three main sections. The first concerns Bose-condensed gases at zero temperature, with main regard to the properties of the ground state in different confinements and to collective excitations and transport in the condensate. Bose-Einstein-condensed gases at finite temperature are addressed in the next section, the main emphasis being on equilibrium properties and phase transitions and on dynamical and transport properties associated with the presence of the thermal cloud. Finally, the last section is focused on theoretical and computational issues that have emerged from the efforts to drive gases of fermionic atoms and boson-fermion mixtures deep into the quantum degeneracy regime, with the aim of realizing novel superfluids from fermion pairing. The attention given in this article to methods beyond standard mean-field approaches should make it a useful reference point for future advances in these areas

  4. Formation of Ultracold Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, Robin [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Advances in our ability to slow down and cool atoms and molecules to ultracold temperatures have paved the way to a revolution in basic research on molecules. Ultracold molecules are sensitive of very weak interactions, even when separated by large distances, which allow studies of the effect of those interactions on the behavior of molecules. In this program, we have explored ways to form ultracold molecules starting from pairs of atoms that have already reached the ultracold regime. We devised methods that enhance the efficiency of ultracold molecule production, for example by tuning external magnetic fields and using appropriate laser excitations. We also investigates the properties of those ultracold molecules, especially their de-excitation into stable molecules. We studied the possibility of creating new classes of ultra-long range molecules, named macrodimers, thousand times more extended than regular molecules. Again, such objects are possible because ultra low temperatures prevent their breakup by collision. Finally, we carried out calculations on how chemical reactions are affected and modified at ultracold temperatures. Normally, reactions become less effective as the temperature decreases, but at ultracold temperatures, they can become very effective. We studied this counter-intuitive behavior for benchmark chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen.

  5. Competition between Final-State and Pairing-Gap Effects in the Radio-Frequency Spectra of Ultracold Fermi Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perali, A.; Pieri, P.; Strinati, G. C.

    2008-01-01

    The radio-frequency spectra of ultracold Fermi atoms are calculated by including final-state interactions affecting the excited level of the transition and compared with the experimental data. A competition is revealed between pairing-gap effects which tend to push the oscillator strength toward high frequencies away from threshold and final-state effects which tend instead to pull the oscillator strength toward threshold. As a result of this competition, the position of the peak of the spectra cannot be simply related to the value of the pairing gap, whose extraction thus requires support from theoretical calculations

  6. The Pauli potential in relation to the differential virial theorem with application to experiments on ultracold atomic gases of fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March, N.H.

    2008-08-01

    In early work by the writer introducing the Pauli potential VP (r) into density functional theory, the relation of VP (r) to the, as yet unknown, single-particle kinetic energy density functional was emphasized. Here, because of ongoing experiments on ultracold atomic gases of fermions, an explicit expression for the first derivative of VP (r) for an arbitrary number of closed shells generated by harmonic confinement is derived in terms of the spherically symmetric particle density n(r) and the confining potential. (author)

  7. An ultracold, optically trapped mixture of 87Rb and metastable 4He atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flores, A.S.; Mishra, H.P.; Vassen, Wim; Knoop, S.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the realization of an ultracold (<25 μK) mixture of rubidium (87Rb) and metastable triplet helium (4He) in an optical dipole trap. Our scheme involves laser cooling in a dual-species magneto-optical trap, simultaneous MW- and RF-induced forced evaporative cooling in a quadrupole

  8. Production and manipulation of wave packets from ultracold atoms in an optical lattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Poul Lindholm; Gajdacz, Miroslav; Winter, Nils

    2013-01-01

    of the system. The modulation technique also allows for a controllable transfer (deexcitation) of atoms from such wave packets to a state bound by the lattice. Thus, it acts as a beam splitter for matter waves that can selectively address different bands, enabling the preparation of atoms in localized states...

  9. Exciton induced directed motion of unconstrained atoms in an ultracold gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, K.; Wüster, S.; Rost, J. M.

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate that through localised Rydberg excitation in a three-dimensional cold atom cloud atomic motion can be rendered directed and nearly confined to a plane, without spatial constraints for the motion of individual atoms. This enables creation and observation of non-adiabatic electronic Rydberg dynamics in atoms accelerated by dipole-dipole interactions under natural conditions. Using the full l = 0, 1 m=0,+/- 1 angular momentum state space, our simulations show that conical intersection crossings are clearly evident, both in atomic position information and excited state spectra of the Rydberg system. Hence, flexible Rydberg aggregates suggest themselves for probing quantum chemical effects in experiments on length scales much inflated as compared to a standard molecular situation.

  10. Pump-probe study of the formation of rubidium molecules by ultrafast photoassociation of ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, David J.; England, Duncan G.; Martay, Hugo E. L.; Friedman, Melissa E.; Petrovic, Jovana; Dimova, Emiliya; Chatel, Béatrice; Walmsley, Ian A.

    2009-09-01

    An experimental pump-probe study of the photoassociative creation of translationally ultracold rubidium molecules is presented together with numerical simulations of the process. The formation of loosely bound excited-state dimers is observed as a first step toward a fully coherent pump-dump approach to the stabilization of Rb2 into its lowest ground vibrational states. The population that contributes to the pump-probe process is characterized and found to be distinct from a background population of preassociated molecules.

  11. Sympathetic cooling in a rubidium cesium mixture: Production of ultracold cesium atoms; Sympathetisches Kuehlen in einer Rubidium-Caesium-Mischung: Erzeugung ultrakalter Caesiumatome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, M.

    2007-07-01

    This thesis presents experiments for the production of ultracold rubidium cesium mixture in a magnetic trap. The long-termed aim of the experiment is the study of the interaction of few cesium atoms with a Bose-Einstein condensate of rubidium atoms. Especially by controlled variation of the cesium atom number the transition in the description of the interaction by concepts of the one-particle physics to the description by concepts of the many-particle physics shall be studied. The rubidium atoms are trapped in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) and from there reloaded into a magnetic trap. In this the rubidium atoms are stored in the state vertical stroke f=2,m{sub f}=2 right angle of the electronic ground state and evaporatively cooled by means of microwave-induced transitions into the state vertical stroke f=1,m{sub f}=1] (microwave cooling). The cesium atoms are also trppaed in a MOT and into the same magnetic trap reloaded, in which they are stored in the state vertical stroke f=4,m{sub f}=4 right angle of the electronic ground state together with rubidium. Because of the different hyperfine splitting only rubidium is evaporatively cooled, while cesium is cooled jointly sympathetically - i.e. by theramal contact via elastic collisions with rubidium atoms. The first two chapters contain a description of interatomic interactions in ultracold gases as well as a short summary of theoretical concepts in the description of Bose-Einstein condensates. The chapters 3 and 4 contain a short presentation of the methods applied in the experiment for the production of ultracold gases as well as the experimental arrangement; especially in the framework of this thesis a new coil system has been designed, which offers in view of future experiments additionally optical access for an optical trap. Additionally the fourth chapter contains an extensive description of the experimental cycle, which is applied in order to store rubidium and cesium atoms together into the magnetic trap. The

  12. Photon-Induced Spin-Orbit Coupling in Ultracold Atoms inside Optical Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Dong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We consider an atom inside a ring cavity, where a plane-wave cavity field together with an external coherent laser beam induces a two-photon Raman transition between two hyperfine ground states of the atom. This cavity-assisted Raman transition induces effective coupling between atom’s internal degrees of freedom and its center-of-mass motion. In the meantime, atomic dynamics exerts a back-action to cavity photons. We investigate the properties of this system by adopting a mean-field and a full quantum approach, and show that the interplay between the atomic dynamics and the cavity field gives rise to intriguing nonlinear phenomena.

  13. Limit Cycles and Chaos via Quasi-periodicity in Two Coupled Ensembles of Ultra-cold Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Aniket; Yuzbashyan, Emil; Altshuler, Boris

    We study the dynamics of two mesoscopic ensembles of ultra-cold two level atoms, which are collectively coupled to an optical cavity and are being pumped incoherently to the excited state. Whereas the time independent steady states are well understood, little is known about the time dependent ones. We explore and categorize various time dependent steady states, e.g. limit cycles and chaotic behavior. We draw a non-equilibrium phase diagram indicating different steady-state behaviors in different parts of the parameter space. We discuss the synchronization of the two ensembles in the time dependent steady states. We also show the onset of chaos via quasi-periodicity. The rich time dependent steady-state behavior, especially the existence of chaos, opens up possibilities for several engineering applications. Supported in part by the University and Louis Bevier Graduate Fellowship.

  14. Manipulation of ultracold atoms in dressed adiabatic radio-frequency potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lesanovsky, Igor; Hofferberth, S.; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2006-01-01

    We explore properties of atoms whose magnetic hyperfine sublevels are coupled by an external magnetic radio frequency (rf) field. We perform a thorough theoretical analysis of this driven system and present a number of systematic approximations which eventually give rise to dressed adiabatic radio...... frequency potentials. The predictions of this analytical investigation are compared to numerically exact results obtained by a wave packet propagation. We outline the versatility and flexibility of this class of potentials and demonstrate their potential use to build atom optical elements such as double...... wells, interferometers, and ringtraps. Moreover, we perform simulations of interference experiments carried out in rf induced double-well potentials. We discuss how the nature of the atom-field coupling mechanism gives rise to a decrease of the interference contrast....

  15. Spin-orbit coupling in ultracold Fermi gases of 173Yb atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bo; He, Chengdong; Hajiyev, Elnur; Ren, Zejian; Seo, Bojeong; Cai, Geyue; Amanov, Dovran; Zhang, Shanchao; Jo, Gyu-Boong

    2017-04-01

    Synthetic spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in cold atoms opens an intriguing new way to probe nontrivial topological orders beyond natural conditions. Here, we report the realization of the SOC physics both in a bulk system and in an optical lattice. First, we demonstrate two hallmarks induced from SOC in a bulk system, spin dephasing in the Rabi oscillation and asymmetric atomic distribution in the momentum space respectively. Then we describe the observation of non-trivial spin textures and the determination of the topological phase transition in a spin-dependent optical lattice dressed by the periodic Raman field. Furthermore, we discuss the quench dynamics between topological and trivial states by suddenly changing the band topology. Our work paves a new way to study non-equilibrium topological states in a controlled manner. Funded by Croucher Foundation and Research Grants Council (RGC) of Hong Kong (Project ECS26300014, GRF16300215, GRF16311516, and Croucher Innovation Grants).

  16. Intertwined and vestigial order with ultracold atoms in multiple cavity modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Shchadilova, Yulia E.; Demler, Eugene

    2017-12-01

    Atoms in transversely pumped optical cavities "self-organize" by forming a density wave and emitting superradiantly into the cavity mode(s). For a single-mode cavity, the properties of this self-organization transition are well characterized both theoretically and experimentally. Here, we explore the self-organization of a Bose-Einstein condensate in the presence of two cavity modes—a system that recently was realized experimentally [Léonard et al., Nature (London) 543, 87 (2017), 10.1038/nature21067]. We argue that this system can exhibit a "vestigially ordered" phase in which neither cavity mode exhibits superradiance but the cavity modes are mutually phase locked by the atoms. We argue that this vestigially ordered phase should generically be present in multimode cavity geometries.

  17. Ultracold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenstrup, S.

    Briefly surveys recent developments in research work with ultracold neutrons (neutrons of very low velocity, up to 10 m/s at up to 10 -7 eV and 10 -3 K). Slow neutrons can be detected in an ionisation chamber filled with B 10 F 3 . Very slow neutrons can be used for investigations into the dipole moment of neutrons. Neutrons of large wave length have properties similar to those of light. The limit angle for total reflection is governed by the wave length and by the material. Total reflection can be used to filter ultracold neutrons out of the moderator material of a reactor. Total reflection can also be used to store ultracold neutrons but certain problems with storage have not yet been clarified. Slow neutrons can be made to lose speed in a neutron turbine, and come out as ultracold neutrons. A beam of ultracold neutrons could be used in a neutron microscope. (J.S.)

  18. Magnetic transport apparatus for the production of ultracold atomic gases in the vicinity of a dielectric surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haendel, S.; Marchant, A. L.; Wiles, T. P.; Hopkins, S. A.; Cornish, S. L.

    2012-01-01

    We present an apparatus designed for studies of atom-surface interactions using quantum degenerate gases of 85 Rb and 87 Rb in the vicinity of a room temperature dielectric surface. The surface to be investigated is a super-polished face of a glass Dove prism mounted in a glass cell under ultra-high vacuum. To maintain excellent optical access to the region surrounding the surface, magnetic transport is used to deliver ultracold atoms from a separate vacuum chamber housing the magneto-optical trap (MOT). We present a detailed description of the vacuum apparatus highlighting the novel design features; a low profile MOT chamber and the inclusion of an obstacle in the transport path. We report the characterization and optimization of the magnetic transport around the obstacle, achieving transport efficiencies of 70% with negligible heating. Finally, we demonstrate the loading of a hybrid optical-magnetic trap with 87 Rb and the creation of Bose-Einstein condensates via forced evaporative cooling close to the dielectric surface.

  19. Ultra-cold molecules in an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynar, Roahn Helden

    2000-08-01

    This thesis is about photoassociation of Bose-condensed 87Rb. Most importantly we report that state selected 87Rb2 molecules were created at rest in a condensate of 87Rb using two-photon photoassociation. Additionally, we have identified three weakly bound states of the 87Rb2 S+u3 , potential for the |1, -1> + |1, - 1> collisional channel. The binding energies of these states are 529.4 +/- .07, 636.0094 +/- .0012, and 24.24 +/- .01 MHz respectively. We have also carried out a detailed study of the density dependence of the shift and width of the two-photon lineshape. This shift and width is modeled using the theory of Bohn and Julienne [34] and in addition to the precise measurement of binding energy we also report the first measurement of an atom molecule scattering length, aam, which we conclude is -180 +/- 150 a0, and the inelastic collision rate, Kinel dependent coherent coupling between atoms and molecules. This theory yields two coupled equations, one for the evolution of atomic condensate amplitude and one for the evolution of molecular condensate amplitude. The nature of the atomic-molecular condensate evolution is shown to depend on six, model parameters including the coherent coupling, given by cn . The other five parameters can be interpreted as light-shifts and incoherent loss rates. We present a calculation intended to estimate the values of these six parameters for the 87Rb - 87Rb 2 system. Based on the results of this calculation we identify two locations in the 87Rb2 spectrum where coherent transfer of population from atomic condensate to molecular condensate is plausible. Finally, we examine the credibility of the theoretical model used to estimate the six parameters used by the mean field theory. By comparing the measured Stark shifts of two-color resonances with predictions based on our theoretical model we conclude that the model is satisfactory for the v = 37 level of the S+u3 potential. This work also describes the experimental details of

  20. Forward and backward scattering experiments in ultra-cold Rubidium atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampel, Nir Shlomo

    project, we have studied coherent forward scattering in the form of a memory experiment. In such an experiment we convert the input light pulse to an atomic excitation, and at a later time convert back the atomic excitation into the retrieved light pulse. In the first project, we investigate the source...

  1. Quantum measurement-induced dynamics of many-body ultracold bosonic and fermionic systems in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzucchi, Gabriel; Kozlowski, Wojciech; Caballero-Benitez, Santiago F.; Elliott, Thomas J.; Mekhov, Igor B.

    2016-02-01

    Trapping ultracold atoms in optical lattices enabled numerous breakthroughs uniting several disciplines. Coupling these systems to quantized light leads to a plethora of new phenomena and has opened up a new field of study. Here we introduce an unusual additional source of competition in a many-body strongly correlated system: We prove that quantum backaction of global measurement is able to efficiently compete with intrinsic short-range dynamics of an atomic system. The competition becomes possible due to the ability to change the spatial profile of a global measurement at a microscopic scale comparable to the lattice period without the need of single site addressing. In coherence with a general physical concept, where new competitions typically lead to new phenomena, we demonstrate nontrivial dynamical effects such as large-scale multimode oscillations, long-range entanglement, and correlated tunneling, as well as selective suppression and enhancement of dynamical processes beyond the projective limit of the quantum Zeno effect. We demonstrate both the breakup and protection of strongly interacting fermion pairs by measurement. Such a quantum optical approach introduces into many-body physics novel processes, objects, and methods of quantum engineering, including the design of many-body entangled environments for open systems.

  2. Bloch oscillations of ultracold atoms and measurement of the fine structure constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clade, P.

    2005-10-01

    From a measurement of the recoil velocity of an atom absorbing a photon, it is possible to deduce a determination of the ratio h/m between the Planck constant and the mass of the atoms and then to deduce a value of the fine structure constant alpha. To do this measurement, we use the technique of Bloch oscillations, which allows us to transfer a large number of recoils to atoms. A velocity sensor, based on velocity selective Raman transition, enables us to measure the momentum transferred to the atoms. A measurement with a statistical uncertainty of 4.4 10 -9 , in conjunction with a careful study of systematic effects (5 10 -9 ), has led us to a determination of alpha with an uncertainty of 6.7 10 -9 : α -1 (Rb) = 137.03599878 (91). This uncertainty is similar to the uncertainty of the best determinations of alpha based on atom interferometry. (author)

  3. Detecting Friedel oscillations in ultracold Fermi gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechers, Keno; Hueck, Klaus; Luick, Niclas; Lompe, Thomas; Moritz, Henning

    2017-09-01

    Investigating Friedel oscillations in ultracold gases would complement the studies performed on solid state samples with scanning-tunneling microscopes. In atomic quantum gases interactions and external potentials can be tuned freely and the inherently slower dynamics allow to access non-equilibrium dynamics following a potential or interaction quench. Here, we examine how Friedel oscillations can be observed in current ultracold gas experiments under realistic conditions. To this aim we numerically calculate the amplitude of the Friedel oscillations which are induced by a potential barrier in a 1D Fermi gas and compare it to the expected atomic and photonic shot noise in a density measurement. We find that to detect Friedel oscillations the signal from several thousand one-dimensional systems has to be averaged. However, as up to 100 parallel one-dimensional systems can be prepared in a single run with present experiments, averaging over about 100 images is sufficient.

  4. Fundamental Interactions for Atom Interferometry with Ultracold Quantum Gases in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Incao, Jose P.; Willians, Jason R.

    2015-05-01

    Precision atom interferometers (AI) in space are a key element for several applications of interest to NASA. Our proposal for participating in the Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) onboard the International Space Station is dedicated to mitigating the leading-order systematics expected to corrupt future high-precision AI-based measurements of fundamental physics in microgravity. One important focus of our proposal is to enhance initial state preparation for dual-species AIs. Our proposed filtering scheme uses Feshbach molecular states to create highly correlated mixtures of heteronuclear atomic gases in both their position and momentum distributions. We will detail our filtering scheme along with the main factors that determine its efficiency. We also show that the atomic and molecular heating and loss rates can be mitigated at the unique temperature and density regimes accessible on CAL. This research is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  5. Surface modes of ultra-cold atomic clouds with very large number of vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazalilla, M A [Donostia International Physics Center, Donostia (Spain); [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)

    2003-04-01

    We study the surface modes of some of the vortex liquids recently found by means of exact diagonalizations in systems of rapidly rotating bosons. In contrast to the surface modes of Bose condensates, we find that the surface waves have a frequency linear in the excitation angular momentum, h-bar l > 0. Furthermore, in analogy with the edge waves of electronic quantum Hall states, these excitations are chiral, that is, they can be excited only for values of l that increase the total angular momentum of the vortex liquid. However, differently from the quantum Hall phenomena for electrons, we also find other excitations that are approximately degenerate in the laboratory frame with the surface modes, and which decrease the total angular momentum by l quanta. The surface modes of the Laughlin, as well as other scalar and vector boson states are analyzed, and their observable properties characterized. We argue that measurement of the response of a vortex liquid to a weak time-dependent potential that imparts angular momentum to the system should provide valuable information to characterize the vortex liquid. In particular, the intensity of the signal of the surface waves in the dynamic structure factor has been studied and found to depend on the type of vortex liquid. We point out that the existence of surface modes has observable consequences on the density profile of the Laughlin state. These features are due to the strongly correlated behavior of atoms in the vortex liquids. We point out that these correlations should be responsible for a remarkable stability of some vortex liquids with respect to three-body losses. (author)

  6. Accurate calculations of the ground state and low-lying excited states of the (RbBa)+ molecular ion: a proposed system for ultracold reactive collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knecht, Stefan; Sørensen, Lasse Kragh; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard

    2010-01-01

    Collisions of ultracold Ba+ ions on a Rb Bose–Einstein condensate have been suggested as a possible benchmark system for ultracold ion-neutral collision experiments. However, a priori knowledge of the possible processes is desirable. For this purpose, we here present high-level four-component cou...

  7. From Nanoscale Systems to Ultracold Atoms and Molecules, and Back

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-05

    Francesco Bariani 0.18 Swati Singh 0.71 Steven Steinke 0.37 1.26 3 PERCENT_SUPPORTEDNAME FTE Equivalent: Total Number: National Academy Member...doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.210403 H. Seok, L. Buchmann, S. Singh , S. Steinke, P. Meystre. Generation of mechanical squeezing via magnetic dipoles...10.1126/science.1208322 S. Singh , S. Steinke, M. Tasgin, P. Meystre, K. Schwab, M. Vengalattore. Quantum-measurement backaction from a Bose-Einstein

  8. Understanding Molecular-Ion Neutral Atom Collisions for the Production of Ultracold Molecular Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-03

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: This project was superseded and replaced by another ARO-funded project of the same name, which is still continuing. The goal...cooled atoms," IOTA -COST Workshop on molecular ions, Arosa, Switzerland. 5. E.R. Hudson, "Sympathetic cooling of molecules with laser cooled

  9. Understanding Molecular Ion-Neutral Atom Collisions for the Production of Ultracold Molecular Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-06

    2012): 0. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.223002 Kuang Chen, Scott T. Sullivan, Wade G. Rellergert, Eric R. Hudson. Measurement of the Coulomb Logarithm...or fellowships for further studies in science, mathematics, engineering or technology fields: Student Metrics This section only applies to graduating...clouds of Ba+ ions and Ca atoms. Due to the strong Coulomb interaction, the Ba+ ions quickly cool the molecular ion translation motion, while the

  10. One dimensional Bosons: From Condensed Matter Systems to Ultracold Gases

    OpenAIRE

    Cazalilla, M. A.; Citro, R.; Giamarchi, T.; Orignac, E.; Rigol, M.

    2011-01-01

    The physics of one-dimensional interacting bosonic systems is reviewed. Beginning with results from exactly solvable models and computational approaches, the concept of bosonic Tomonaga-Luttinger liquids relevant for one-dimensional Bose fluids is introduced, and compared with Bose-Einstein condensates existing in dimensions higher than one. The effects of various perturbations on the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid state are discussed as well as extensions to multicomponent and out of equilibrium ...

  11. The BCS-BEC crossover: From ultra-cold Fermi gases to nuclear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strinati, Giancarlo Calvanese; Pieri, Pierbiagio; Röpke, Gerd; Schuck, Peter; Urban, Michael

    2018-04-01

    of the theory, especially in the normal phase where they account for precursor pairing effects. After an introduction to present the key concepts of the BCS-BEC crossover, this report discusses the mean-field treatment of the superfluid phase, both for homogeneous and inhomogeneous systems, as well as for symmetric (spin- or isospin-balanced) and asymmetric (spin- or isospin-imbalanced) matter. Pairing fluctuations in the normal phase are then considered, with their manifestations in thermodynamic and dynamic quantities. The last two Sections provide a more specialized discussion of the BCS-BEC crossover in ultra-cold Fermi gases and nuclear matter, respectively. The separate discussion in the two contexts aims at cross communicating to both communities topics and aspects which, albeit arising in one of the two fields, share a strong common interest.

  12. Inhomogeneous spectral moment sum rules for the retarded Green function and self-energy of strongly correlated electrons or ultracold fermionic atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freericks, J. K.; Turkowski, V.

    2009-01-01

    Spectral moment sum rules are presented for the inhomogeneous many-body problem described by the fermionic Falicov-Kimball or Hubbard models. These local sum rules allow for arbitrary hoppings, site energies, and interactions. They can be employed to quantify the accuracy of numerical solutions to the inhomogeneous many-body problem such as strongly correlated multilayered devices, ultracold atoms in an optical lattice with a trap potential, strongly correlated systems that are disordered, or systems with nontrivial spatial ordering such as a charge-density wave or a spin-density wave. We also show how the spectral moment sum rules determine the asymptotic behavior of the Green function, self-energy, and dynamical mean field when applied to the dynamical mean-field theory solution of the many-body problem. In particular, we illustrate in detail how one can dramatically reduce the number of Matsubara frequencies needed to solve the Falicov-Kimball model while still retaining high precision, and we sketch how one can incorporate these results into Hirsch-Fye quantum Monte Carlo solvers for the Hubbard (or more complicated) models. Since the solution of inhomogeneous problems is significantly more time consuming than periodic systems, efficient use of these sum rules can provide a dramatic speed up in the computational time required to solve the many-body problem. We also discuss how these sum rules behave in nonequilibrium situations as well, where the Hamiltonian has explicit time dependence due to a driving field or due to the time-dependent change in a parameter such as the interaction strength or the origin of the trap potential.

  13. Quantum Simulation of the Hubbard Model Using Ultra-Cold Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    Hubbard model. The SU(3) Hubbard model has been proposed as a model system for studying different phases of matter expected to occur in quantum...chromodynamics (QCD): the color superconducting phase and the formation of baryons . Our initial investigations have focused on understanding three-body...density quark matter described by quantum chromodynamics . We have been investigating the stability of the 3-state Fermi gas with respect to decay due

  14. Virtual states, halos and resonances in three-body atomic and nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederico, T.; Yamashita, M.T.; Tomio, L.

    2009-01-01

    By considering nuclear and ultracold trapped atomic systems, we review the trajectory of Efimov excited states in the complex plane by changing the two-body scattering lengths and one three-body scale. This article is based on the presentation by T. Frederico at the Fifth Workshop on Critical Stability, Erice, Sicily. (author)

  15. Sensitivity of ultracold-atom scattering experiments to variation of the fine-structure constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borschevsky, A.; Beloy, K.; Flambaum, V. V.; Schwerdtfeger, P.

    2011-01-01

    We present numerical calculations for cesium and mercury to estimate the sensitivity of the scattering length to the variation of the fine-structure constant α. The method used follows the ideas of Chin and Flambaum [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 230801 (2006)], where the sensitivity to the variation of the electron-to-proton mass ratio β was considered. We demonstrate that for heavy systems, the sensitivity to the variation of α is of the same order of magnitude as to the variation of β. Near narrow Feshbach resonances, the enhancement of the sensitivity may exceed nine orders of magnitude.

  16. Continuous-measurement-enhanced self-trapping of degenerate ultracold atoms in a double well: Nonlinear quantum Zeno effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Weidong; Liu Jie

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper we investigate the influence of measurements on the quantum dynamics of degenerate Bose atoms gases in a symmetric double well. We show that continuous measurements enhance asymmetry on the density distribution of the atoms and broaden the parameter regime for self-trapping. We term this phenomenon as nonlinear quantum Zeno effect in analog to the celebrated Zeno effect in a linear quantum system. Under discontinuous measurements, the self-trapping due to the atomic interaction in the degenerate bosons is shown to be destroyed completely. Underlying physics is revealed and possible experimental realization is discussed

  17. Quantum control of ultra-cold atoms: uncovering a novel connection between two paradigms of quantum nonlinear dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jiao; Mouritzen, Anders Sørrig; Gong, Jiangbin

    2009-01-01

    Controlling the translational motion of cold atoms using optical lattice potentials is of both theoretical and experimental interest. By designing two on-resonance time sequences of kicking optical lattice potentials, a novel connection between two paradigms of nonlinear mapping systems, i.e. the...... sequences of control fields. Extensions of this study are also discussed. The results are intended to open up a new generation of cold-atom experiments of quantum nonlinear dynamics.......Controlling the translational motion of cold atoms using optical lattice potentials is of both theoretical and experimental interest. By designing two on-resonance time sequences of kicking optical lattice potentials, a novel connection between two paradigms of nonlinear mapping systems, i...

  18. Tunneling dynamics in open ultracold bosonic systems. Numerically exact dynamics - Analytical models - Control schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lode, Axel U.J.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis explores the quantum many-body tunneling dynamics of open ultracold bosonic systems with the recently developed multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree for bosons (MCTDHB) method. The capabilities of MCTDHB to provide solutions to the full time-dependent many-body problem are assessed in a benchmark using the analytically solvable harmonic interaction Hamiltonian and a generalization of it with time-dependent both one- and two-body potentials. In a comparison with numerically exact MCTDHB results, it is shown that e.g. lattice methods fail qualitatively to describe the tunneling dynamics. A model assembling the many-body physics of the process from basic simultaneously happening single-particle processes is derived and verified with a numerically exact MCTDHB description. The generality of the model is demonstrated even for strong interactions and large particle numbers. The ejection of the bosons from the source occurs with characteristic velocities. These velocities are defined by the chemical potentials of systems with different particle numbers which are converted to kinetic energy. The tunneling process is accompanied by fragmentation: the ejected bosons lose their coherence with the source and among each other. It is shown that the various aspects of the tunneling dynamics' can be controlled well with the interaction and the potential threshold.

  19. Tunneling dynamics in open ultracold bosonic systems. Numerically exact dynamics - Analytical models - Control schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lode, Axel U.J.

    2013-06-03

    This thesis explores the quantum many-body tunneling dynamics of open ultracold bosonic systems with the recently developed multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree for bosons (MCTDHB) method. The capabilities of MCTDHB to provide solutions to the full time-dependent many-body problem are assessed in a benchmark using the analytically solvable harmonic interaction Hamiltonian and a generalization of it with time-dependent both one- and two-body potentials. In a comparison with numerically exact MCTDHB results, it is shown that e.g. lattice methods fail qualitatively to describe the tunneling dynamics. A model assembling the many-body physics of the process from basic simultaneously happening single-particle processes is derived and verified with a numerically exact MCTDHB description. The generality of the model is demonstrated even for strong interactions and large particle numbers. The ejection of the bosons from the source occurs with characteristic velocities. These velocities are defined by the chemical potentials of systems with different particle numbers which are converted to kinetic energy. The tunneling process is accompanied by fragmentation: the ejected bosons lose their coherence with the source and among each other. It is shown that the various aspects of the tunneling dynamics' can be controlled well with the interaction and the potential threshold.

  20. Ultracold Dipolar Gases in Optical Lattices

    OpenAIRE

    Trefzger, C.; Menotti, C.; Capogrosso-Sansone, B.; Lewenstein, M.

    2011-01-01

    This tutorial is a theoretical work, in which we study the physics of ultra-cold dipolar bosonic gases in optical lattices. Such gases consist of bosonic atoms or molecules that interact via dipolar forces, and that are cooled below the quantum degeneracy temperature, typically in the nK range. When such a degenerate quantum gas is loaded into an optical lattice produced by standing waves of laser light, new kinds of physical phenomena occur. These systems realize then extended Hubbard-type m...

  1. Momentum distribution functions in ensembles: the inequivalence of microcannonical and canonical ensembles in a finite ultracold system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Xianlong, Gao; Li, Haibin

    2013-08-01

    It is demonstrated in many thermodynamic textbooks that the equivalence of the different ensembles is achieved in the thermodynamic limit. In this present work we discuss the inequivalence of microcanonical and canonical ensembles in a finite ultracold system at low energies. We calculate the microcanonical momentum distribution function (MDF) in a system of identical fermions (bosons). We find that the microcanonical MDF deviates from the canonical one, which is the Fermi-Dirac (Bose-Einstein) function, in a finite system at low energies where the single-particle density of states and its inverse are finite.

  2. Trapping ultracold gases near cryogenic materials with rapid reconfigurability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naides, Matthew A.; Turner, Richard W.; Lai, Ruby A.; DiSciacca, Jack M.; Lev, Benjamin L. [Departments of Applied Physics and Physics and Ginzton Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2013-12-16

    We demonstrate an atom chip trapping system that allows the placement and high-resolution imaging of ultracold atoms within microns from any ≲100 μm-thin, UHV-compatible material, while also allowing sample exchange with minimal experimental downtime. The sample is not connected to the atom chip, allowing rapid exchange without perturbing the atom chip or laser cooling apparatus. Exchange of the sample and retrapping of atoms has been performed within a week turnaround, limited only by chamber baking. Moreover, the decoupling of sample and atom chip provides the ability to independently tune the sample temperature and its position with respect to the trapped ultracold gas, which itself may remain in the focus of a high-resolution imaging system. As a first demonstration of this system, we have confined a 700-nK cloud of 8 × 10{sup 4} {sup 87}Rb atoms within 100 μm of a gold-mirrored 100-μm-thick silicon substrate. The substrate was cooled to 35 K without use of a heat shield, while the atom chip, 120 μm away, remained at room temperature. Atoms may be imaged and retrapped every 16 s, allowing rapid data collection.

  3. Ultracold lithium-6 atoms in the BEC-BCS crossover: experiments and the construction of a new apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teichmann, M.

    2007-09-01

    We use a fermionic gas of Lithium-6 as a model system to study superfluidity. The limiting cases of superfluidity are Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) and superconductivity, described by the theory by Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer (BCS). In Lithium-6 gases, we can explore the whole range between the two cases, known as the BEC-BCS crossover, using a Feshbach resonance. We study the change of the momentum distribution of the gas in this cross-over and compare to theoretical models. We also investigate the hydrodynamic expansion, characteristic for a superfluid gas. We observe a sudden change of the ellipticity of the gas close to the transition to the superfluid phase. Moreover, we localized heteronuclear Feshbach resonances between 6 Li and 7 Li. We are currently constructing a second generation of the experimental setup. An new laser system, based on high power laser diodes, was developed. Changes in the vacuum chamber, including a complete reconstruction of the Zeeman slower, have increased the atomic flux, allowing us to increase the repetition rate of our experiment. Modifications of the geometry of the magnetic traps lead to a higher number of trapped atoms. (author)

  4. Ultracold Mixtures of Rubidium and Ytterbium for Open Quantum System Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    species can be vanishing. 2.4.1 Miscibility Even at ultracold temperatures , our trapped gasses are very dilute. On the high side of achievable densities...essentially ideal. Therefore, any combination of isotopes will mix at high enough temperatures . Close to degeneracy, miscibility depends on the strength of...bakeout temperature is 200 ◦C, while the braze alloy melts at 305 ◦C. Custom dielectric AR coatings were designed and applied by Spectrum Thin Films

  5. Interatomic interaction effects on second-order momentum correlations and Hong-Ou-Mandel interference of double-well-trapped ultracold fermionic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Benedikt B.; Yannouleas, Constantine; Landman, Uzi

    2018-05-01

    Identification and understanding of the evolution of interference patterns in two-particle momentum correlations as a function of the strength of interatomic interactions are important in explorations of the nature of quantum states of trapped particles. Together with the analysis of two-particle spatial correlations, they offer the prospect of uncovering fundamental symmetries and structure of correlated many-body states, as well as opening vistas into potential control and utilization of correlated quantum states as quantum-information resources. With the use of the second-order density matrix constructed via exact diagonalization of the microscopic Hamiltonian, and an analytic Hubbard-type model, we explore here the systematic evolution of characteristic interference patterns in the two-body momentum and spatial correlation maps of two entangled ultracold fermionic atoms in a double well, for the entire attractive- and repulsive-interaction range. We uncover quantum-statistics-governed bunching and antibunching, as well as interaction-dependent interference patterns, in the ground and excited states, and interpret our results in light of the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference physics, widely exploited in photon indistinguishability testing and quantum-information science.

  6. EDITORIAL: Focus on Cold and Ultracold Molecules FOCUS ON COLD AND ULTRACOLD MOLECULES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Lincoln D.; Ye, Jun

    2009-05-01

    , controllability, tunable interactions, no disorder, etc). First, they are more easily manipulated because of the strong response of their electric dipole moment to external electric fields, DC or AC. The electric dipole moment also creates the new aspect of long range interactions. Second, they have a rich internal structure, with vibrational and rotational states, fine or hyperfine structure, and Ω- or Λ-doublets. This internal structure allows for wonderful new possibilities in areas such as precision measurement and exquisite control of system dynamics. Therefore, although this focus issue contains a few articles on homonuclear molecules, more complex molecules such as benzene, and even a contribution on atomic chromium, which has a significant magnetic dipole moment, our main focus is on the heteronuclear polar case. This focus issue explores both direct and indirect cooling of mainly polar molecules, and the theory to support and inspire these advances. Thirty-eight research groups have contributed original work, and there are two review articles to complement these advances: the first covers cold and ultracold molecules broadly from few body to many body physics, including foundational theory, the technology to make them, and their scientific applications. The second is on the search for time variation of fundamental constants. The former review, which is comprehensive in nature, concludes with a list of open questions. This sets the tone for the focus issue, namely, openness, innovation, and possibility, an emphasis for which New Journal of Physics, an open-access journal of the highest quality, is especially fitted. Focus on Cold and Ultracold Molecules Contents Cold and ultracold molecules: science, technology and applications Lincoln D Carr, David DeMille, Roman V Krems and Jun Ye Ultracold molecules: new probes on the variation of fundamental constants Cheng Chin, V V Flambaum and M G Kozlov Probing the unitarity limit at low laser intensities Philippe Pellegrini and

  7. Fragmentation of atomic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohn, J.L.; Fano, U.

    1996-01-01

    We report recent progress toward a nonperturbative formulation of many-body quantum dynamics that treats all constituent particles on an equal footing. This formulation is capable of detailing the evolution of a system toward the diverse fragments into which it can break up. We illustrate the general concept with the simple example of the simultaneous excitation of both electrons in a helium atom. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  8. Statistics of work and orthogonality catastrophe in discrete level systems: an application to fullerene molecules and ultra-cold trapped Fermi gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonello Sindona

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The sudden introduction of a local impurity in a Fermi sea leads to an anomalous disturbance of its quantum state that represents a local quench, leaving the system out of equilibrium and giving rise to the Anderson orthogonality catastrophe. The statistics of the work done describe the energy fluctuations produced by the quench, providing an accurate and detailed insight into the fundamental physics of the process. We present here a numerical approach to the non-equilibrium work distribution, supported by applications to phenomena occurring at very diverse energy ranges. One of them is the valence electron shake-up induced by photo-ionization of a core state in a fullerene molecule. The other is the response of an ultra-cold gas of trapped fermions to an embedded two-level atom excited by a fast pulse. Working at low thermal energies, we detect the primary role played by many-particle states of the perturbed system with one or two excited fermions. We validate our approach through the comparison with some photoemission data on fullerene films and previous analytical calculations on harmonically trapped Fermi gases.

  9. Magnetic-Field Dependence of Raman Coupling Strength in Ultracold "4"0K Atomic Fermi Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Liang-Hui; Wang Peng-Jun; Meng Zeng-Ming; Peng Peng; Chen Liang-Chao; Li Dong-Hao; Zhang Jing

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the relation of Raman coupling strength with the external bias magnetic field in degenerate Fermi gas of "4"0K atoms. Two Raman lasers couple two Zeeman energy levels, whose energy splitting depends on the external bias magnetic field. The Raman coupling strength is determined by measuring the Rabi oscillation frequency. The characteristics of the Rabi oscillation is to be damped after several periods due to Fermi atoms in different momentum states oscillating with different Rabi frequencies. The experimental results show that the Raman coupling strength will decrease as the external bias magnetic field increases, which is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. (paper)

  10. Strongly correlated quantum fluids: ultracold quantum gases, quantum chromodynamic plasmas and holographic duality

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Allan; Carr, Lincoln D.; Schafer, Thomas; Steinberg, Peter; Thomas, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Strongly correlated quantum fluids are phases of matter that are intrinsically quantum mechanical, and that do not have a simple description in terms of weakly interacting quasi-particles. Two systems that have recently attracted a great deal of interest are the quark-gluon plasma, a plasma of strongly interacting quarks and gluons produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions, and ultracold atomic Fermi gases, very dilute clouds of atomic gases confined in optical or magnetic traps. These sy...

  11. Light crystals for ultracold quantum degenerate bosonic gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimondo, E.

    2009-01-01

    Full text follows. The experimental realization of quantum degenerate states in ultracold atomic gases has opened the possibility to realize few body systems isolated from external perturbations and at temperatures close to absolute zero. Under these conditions counterintuitive phenomena characteristic of the quantum mechanical evolution may be assessed experimentally. Matter quantum-mechanical waves inside periodic potentials investigated in solid-state physics, where electrons propagate within a crystal lattice. Interfering laser beams create a light-induced spatial periodic potential for ultracold atoms called an 'optical lattice'. Atoms hopping between the lattice periodic potential minima emulate the motion of electrons in a crystal. The creation of one-, two-, and three-dimensional periodic structures in which atoms can be trapped and accelerated, with the possibility of switching or modulating the lattice at will, gives a great flexibility. In addition atomic physicists can tune the lattice's geometry, the rate of hopping, and the push and pull between atoms within the light crystals. So they hope to map the various behaviors of solid-state models. On the basis of the research work performed at Pisa, several processes of quantum mechanics evolution within a spatial periodic potential and associated to the solid-state physics will be presented

  12. Time-dependent analysis of tunneling effect in the formation of ultracold molecules via photo-association of laser-cooled atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatasescu, M.; Masnou-Seeuws, F.

    2002-01-01

    The paper contains a time-dependent investigation of the tunneling effect observed in the photo-association spectrum of Cs 2 and attributed to the 0 g - (6s,6p 3/2 ) double well. When by photo-association of two cold cesium atoms a vibrational level of the outer well is populated, tunneling is an efficient mechanism for transferring the population to the inner well (R 0 ), where spontaneous emission may lead to formation of cold molecules in low vibrational levels of the a 3 Σ u + (6s,6s) electronic state. This tunneling effect is analyzed by wave packets propagation, first considering the double well potential alone, and following a packet made by a superposition of states initially located at large distances. Characteristic times for the vibration dynamics, corresponding to a beating phenomenon between the two wells, to partial 'revival' at large distances, and to maxima in the population localized in the inner well are reported and discussed. Second, we simulate the two-channels a 3 Σ u + (6s,6s) → 0 g - (6s,6p 3/2 ) photo-association at detuning around 2.9 cm -1 : the inner well can be populated either by the excitation of a vibrational level of the external well (resonant excitation), or by tuning the photo-association laser at the energy of the inner well level which displays tunneling (''off-resonance excitation''). In the first case the photo-association is efficient, while the tunneling probability is small; in the second, the tunneling probability is large, so that despite the poor efficiency of the photo-association process, more population can be transferred to the inner well. This second choice is shown to be very sensitive to the laser intensity, which could be used to control the population of the inner well and hence the formation of ultracold molecules in low vibrational levels. (authors)

  13. Sympathetic cooling of a membrane oscillator in a hybrid mechanical-atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jöckel, Andreas; Faber, Aline; Kampschulte, Tobias; Korppi, Maria; Rakher, Matthew T.; Treutlein, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Sympathetic cooling with ultracold atoms and atomic ions enables ultralow temperatures in systems where direct laser or evaporative cooling is not possible. It has so far been limited to the cooling of other microscopic particles, with masses up to 90 times larger than that of the coolant atom. Here, we use ultracold atoms to sympathetically cool the vibrations of a Si3N4 nanomembrane, the mass of which exceeds that of the atomic ensemble by a factor of 1010. The coupling of atomic and membrane vibrations is mediated by laser light over a macroscopic distance and is enhanced by placing the membrane in an optical cavity. We observe cooling of the membrane vibrations from room temperature to 650 ± 230 mK, exploiting the large atom-membrane cooperativity of our hybrid optomechanical system. With technical improvements, our scheme could provide ground-state cooling and quantum control of low-frequency oscillators such as nanomembranes or levitated nanoparticles, in a regime where purely optomechanical techniques cannot reach the ground state.

  14. Collisional Cooling of Light Ions by Cotrapped Heavy Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sourav; Sawant, Rahul; Rangwala, S A

    2017-03-17

    We experimentally demonstrate cooling of trapped ions by collisions with cotrapped, higher-mass neutral atoms. It is shown that the lighter ^{39}K^{+} ions, created by ionizing ^{39}K atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT), when trapped in an ion trap and subsequently allowed to cool by collisions with ultracold, heavier ^{85}Rb atoms in a MOT, exhibit a longer trap lifetime than without the localized ^{85}Rb MOT atoms. A similar cooling of trapped ^{85}Rb^{+} ions by ultracold ^{133}Cs atoms in a MOT is also demonstrated in a different experimental configuration to validate this mechanism of ion cooling by localized and centered ultracold neutral atoms. Our results suggest that the cooling of ions by localized cold atoms holds for any mass ratio, thereby enabling studies on a wider class of atom-ion systems irrespective of their masses.

  15. Quantum optics with ultracold quantum gases: towards the full quantum regime of the light-matter interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekhov, Igor B; Ritsch, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    Although the study of ultracold quantum gases trapped by light is a prominent direction of modern research, the quantum properties of light were widely neglected in this field. Quantum optics with quantum gases closes this gap and addresses phenomena where the quantum statistical natures of both light and ultracold matter play equally important roles. First, light can serve as a quantum nondemolition probe of the quantum dynamics of various ultracold particles from ultracold atomic and molecular gases to nanoparticles and nanomechanical systems. Second, due to the dynamic light-matter entanglement, projective measurement-based preparation of the many-body states is possible, where the class of emerging atomic states can be designed via optical geometry. Light scattering constitutes such a quantum measurement with controllable measurement back-action. As in cavity-based spin squeezing, the atom number squeezed and Schrödinger cat states can be prepared. Third, trapping atoms inside an optical cavity, one creates optical potentials and forces, which are not prescribed but quantized and dynamical variables themselves. Ultimately, cavity quantum electrodynamics with quantum gases requires a self-consistent solution for light and particles, which enriches the picture of quantum many-body states of atoms trapped in quantum potentials. This will allow quantum simulations of phenomena related to the physics of phonons, polarons, polaritons and other quantum quasiparticles. (topical review)

  16. Bloch oscillations of ultracold atoms and measurement of the fine structure constant; Oscillations de Bloch d'atomes ultrafroids et mesure de la constante de structure fine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clade, P

    2005-10-15

    From a measurement of the recoil velocity of an atom absorbing a photon, it is possible to deduce a determination of the ratio h/m between the Planck constant and the mass of the atoms and then to deduce a value of the fine structure constant alpha. To do this measurement, we use the technique of Bloch oscillations, which allows us to transfer a large number of recoils to atoms. A velocity sensor, based on velocity selective Raman transition, enables us to measure the momentum transferred to the atoms. A measurement with a statistical uncertainty of 4.4 10{sup -9}, in conjunction with a careful study of systematic effects (5 10{sup -9}), has led us to a determination of alpha with an uncertainty of 6.7 10{sup -9}: {alpha}{sup -1}(Rb) = 137.03599878 (91). This uncertainty is similar to the uncertainty of the best determinations of alpha based on atom interferometry. (author)

  17. Nonequilibrium Quantum Phase Transition in a Hybrid Atom-Optomechanical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Niklas; Bakhtiari, M. Reza; Pelster, Axel; Thorwart, Michael

    2018-02-01

    We consider a hybrid quantum many-body system formed by a vibrational mode of a nanomembrane, which interacts optomechanically with light in a cavity, and an ultracold atom gas in the optical lattice of the out-coupled light. The adiabatic elimination of the light field yields an effective Hamiltonian which reveals a competition between the force localizing the atoms and the membrane displacement. At a critical atom-membrane interaction, we find a nonequilibrium quantum phase transition from a localized symmetric state of the atom cloud to a shifted symmetry-broken state, the energy of the lowest collective excitation vanishes, and a strong atom-membrane entanglement arises. The effect occurs when the atoms and the membrane are nonresonantly coupled.

  18. Ultrafast electron diffraction using an ultracold source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. van Mourik

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of structural dynamics of complex macromolecular crystals using electrons requires bunches of sufficient coherence and charge. We present diffraction patterns from graphite, obtained with bunches from an ultracold electron source, based on femtosecond near-threshold photoionization of a laser-cooled atomic gas. By varying the photoionization wavelength, we change the effective source temperature from 300 K to 10 K, resulting in a concomitant change in the width of the diffraction peaks, which is consistent with independently measured source parameters. This constitutes a direct measurement of the beam coherence of this ultracold source and confirms its suitability for protein crystal diffraction.

  19. Mean-field description of ultracold bosons on disordered two-dimensional optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonsante, Pierfrancesco; Massel, Francesco; Penna, Vittorio; Vezzani, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    In the present communication, we describe the properties induced by disorder on an ultracold gas of bosonic atoms loaded into a two-dimensional optical lattice with global confinement ensured by a parabolic potential. Our analysis is centred on the spatial distribution of the various phases, focusing particularly on the superfluid properties of the system as a function of external parameters and disorder amplitude. In particular, it is shown how disorder can suppress superfluidity, while partially preserving the system coherence. (fast track communication)

  20. Ultracold fermions with repulsive interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketterle W.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available An ultracold Fermi gas with repulsive interaction has been studied. For weak interactions, the atomic gas is metastable, and the interactions were characterized by obtaining the isothermal compressibility from atomic density profiles. For stronger interactions (kFa ≈ 1, rapid conversion into Feshbach molecules is observed. When the conversion rate becomes comparable to the Fermi energy divided by η, the atomic gas cannot reach equilibrium without forming pairs. This precludes the predicted transition to a ferromagnetic state (Stoner transition. The absence of spin fluctuations proves that the gas stays paramagnetic. In free space, a Fermi gas with strong short-range repulsion does not exist because of the rapid coupling to molecular states.

  1. Dissociation and decay of ultracold sodium molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukaiyama, T.; Abo-Shaeer, J.R.; Xu, K.; Chin, J.K.; Ketterle, W.

    2004-01-01

    The dissociation of ultracold molecules was studied by ramping an external magnetic field through a Feshbach resonance. The observed dissociation energies directly yielded the strength of the atom-molecule coupling. They showed nonlinear dependence on the ramp speed. This was explained by a Wigner threshold law which predicts that the decay rate of the molecules above threshold increases with the density of states. In addition, inelastic molecule-molecule and molecule-atom collisions were characterized

  2. Development of ultracold neutron detectors and a polarization analyzing system for the measurement of the neutron electric dipole moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogel, Gwendal

    2009-01-01

    This thesis was performed in the context of a project aiming to measure the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Two aspects have been studied: The detection and the polarization analysis of ultracold neutrons. Three types of detectors have been tested at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL): The Cascade-U (GEM technology), the "3He gas detector and "6Li-doped glass scintillators (GS family). Their detection efficiency and their background sensitivity have been measured. The GS10 scintillator is competitive with the "3He gas detector under the conditions realized with the EDM spectrometer. A GS3/GS20 scintillator stack has enabled to improve the neutron/gamma discrimination. It has been found 20% less efficient than the "3He gas detector under the EDM spectrometer. The Cascade-U detector has been observed to be 20% less efficient than a 500 microns thick GS10 glass as confirmed by simulations. A new system for simultaneous spin analysis is presented. It consists of two independent detection systems (arms) which are each made of an adiabatic spin flipper, a spin analyzer, and a detector. The arms detect opposite spin components, allowing the simultaneous counting of both neutron spin orientations. A prototype mounted in horizontal configuration has been tested at ILL. The analyzing power of both arms has been measured to be 80%. The transmission of the system without spin analyzers has been found to be 50%. (author) [fr

  3. From ultracold Fermi Gases to Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Christophe

    2012-02-01

    Ultracold dilute atomic gases can be considered as model systems to address some pending problem in Many-Body physics that occur in condensed matter systems, nuclear physics, and astrophysics. We have developed a general method to probe with high precision the thermodynamics of locally homogeneous ultracold Bose and Fermi gases [1,2,3]. This method allows stringent tests of recent many-body theories. For attractive spin 1/2 fermions with tunable interaction (^6Li), we will show that the gas thermodynamic properties can continuously change from those of weakly interacting Cooper pairs described by Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory to those of strongly bound molecules undergoing Bose-Einstein condensation. First, we focus on the finite-temperature Equation of State (EoS) of the unpolarized unitary gas. Surprisingly, the low-temperature properties of the strongly interacting normal phase are well described by Fermi liquid theory [3] and we localize the superfluid phase transition. A detailed comparison with theories including recent Monte-Carlo calculations will be presented. Moving away from the unitary gas, the Lee-Huang-Yang and Lee-Yang beyond-mean-field corrections for low density bosonic and fermionic superfluids are quantitatively measured for the first time. Despite orders of magnitude difference in density and temperature, our equation of state can be used to describe low density neutron matter such as the outer shell of neutron stars. [4pt] [1] S. Nascimbène, N. Navon, K. Jiang, F. Chevy, and C. Salomon, Nature 463, 1057 (2010) [0pt] [2] N. Navon, S. Nascimbène, F. Chevy, and C. Salomon, Science 328, 729 (2010) [0pt] [3] S. Nascimbène, N. Navon, S. Pilati, F. Chevy, S. Giorgini, A. Georges, and C. Salomon, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 215303 (2011)

  4. Ultra-cold molecule production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-01-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled

  5. Observation of symmetry-protected topological band with ultracold fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bo; Zhang, Long; He, Chengdong; Poon, Ting Fung Jeffrey; Hajiyev, Elnur; Zhang, Shanchao; Liu, Xiong-Jun; Jo, Gyu-Boong

    2018-01-01

    Symmetry plays a fundamental role in understanding complex quantum matter, particularly in classifying topological quantum phases, which have attracted great interests in the recent decade. An outstanding example is the time-reversal invariant topological insulator, a symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phase in the symplectic class of the Altland-Zirnbauer classification. We report the observation for ultracold atoms of a noninteracting SPT band in a one-dimensional optical lattice and study quench dynamics between topologically distinct regimes. The observed SPT band can be protected by a magnetic group and a nonlocal chiral symmetry, with the band topology being measured via Bloch states at symmetric momenta. The topology also resides in far-from-equilibrium spin dynamics, which are predicted and observed in experiment to exhibit qualitatively distinct behaviors in quenching to trivial and nontrivial regimes, revealing two fundamental types of spin-relaxation dynamics related to bulk topology. This work opens the way to expanding the scope of SPT physics with ultracold atoms and studying nonequilibrium quantum dynamics in these exotic systems. PMID:29492457

  6. Evidence of Antiblockade in an Ultracold Rydberg Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amthor, Thomas; Giese, Christian; Hofmann, Christoph S.; Weidemüller, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    We present the experimental observation of the antiblockade in an ultracold Rydberg gas recently proposed by Ates et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 023002 (2007)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.98.023002]. Our approach allows the control of the pair distribution in the gas and is based on a strong coupling of one transition in an atomic three-level system, while introducing specific detunings of the other transition. When the coupling energy matches the interaction energy of the Rydberg long-range interactions, the otherwise blocked excitation of close pairs becomes possible. A time-resolved spectroscopic measurement of the Penning ionization signal is used to identify slight variations in the Rydberg pair distribution of a random arrangement of atoms. A model based on a pair interaction Hamiltonian is presented which well reproduces our experimental observations and allows one to deduce the distribution of nearest-neighbor distances.

  7. Coherent Radiation in Atomic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Robert Tyler

    Over the last century, quantum mechanics has dramatically altered our understanding of light and matter. Impressively, exploring the relationship between the two continues to provide important insights into the physics of many-body systems. In this thesis, we add to this still growing field of study. Specifically, we discuss superradiant line-broadening and cooperative dipole-dipole interactions for cold atom clouds in the linear-optics regime. We then discuss how coherent radiation changes both the photon scattering properties and the excitation distribution of atomic arrays. After that, we explore the nature of superradiance in initially inverted clouds of multi-level atoms. Finally, we explore the physics of clouds with degenerate Zeeman ground states, and show that this creates quantum effects that fundamentally change the photon scattering of atomic ensembles.

  8. Electric-field-modified Feshbach resonances in ultracold atom–molecule collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Dong; Li Ya; Feng Eryin; Huang Wuying

    2017-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of near zero-energy Feshbach resonances in ultracold collisions of atom and molecule, taking the He–PH system as an example, subject to superimposed electric and magnetic static fields. We find that the electric field can induce Feshbach resonance which cannot occur when only a magnetic field is applied, through couplings of the adjacent rotational states of different parities. We show that the electric field can shift the position of the magnetic Feshbach resonance, and change the amplitude of resonance significantly. Finally, we demonstrate that, for narrow magnetic Feshbach resonance as in most cases of ultracold atom–molecule collision, the electric field may be used to modulate the resonance, because the width of resonance in electric field scale is relatively larger than that in magnetic field scale. (paper)

  9. Rapid prototyping of versatile atom chips for atom interferometry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasch, Brian; Squires, Matthew; Olson, Spencer; Kroese, Bethany; Imhof, Eric; Kohn, Rudolph; Stuhl, Benjamin; Schramm, Stacy; Stickney, James

    2016-05-01

    We present recent advances in the manipulation of ultracold atoms with ex-vacuo atom chips (i.e. atom chips that are not inside to the UHV chamber). Details will be presented of an experimental system that allows direct bonded copper (DBC) atom chips to be removed and replaced in minutes, requiring minimal re-optimization of parameters. This system has been used to create Bose-Einstein condensates, as well as magnetic waveguides with precisely tunable axial parameters, allowing double wells, pure harmonic confinement, and modified harmonic traps. We investigate the effects of higher order magnetic field contributions to the waveguide, and the implications for confined atom interferometry.

  10. Quantum Simulations of Condensed Matter Systems Using Ultra-Cold Atomic Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    DD-MM-YYYY) 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5d...M.    Moreno-­‐ Cardoner ,    T.    Kitagawa,    T.    Best,    S.    Will,          E.  Demler

  11. Functional renormalization and ultracold quantum gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floerchinger, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Modern techniques from quantum field theory are applied in this work to the description of ultracold quantum gases. This leads to a unified description of many phenomena including superfluidity for bosons and fermions, classical and quantum phase transitions, different dimensions, thermodynamic properties and few-body phenomena as bound state formation or the Efimov effect. The non-perturbative treatment with renormalization group flow equations can account for all known limiting cases by solving one single equation. It improves previous results quantitatively and brings qualitatively new insights. As an example, new quantum phase transitions are found for fermions with three spin states. Ultracold atomic gases can be seen as an interesting model for features of high energy physics and for condensed matter theory. The research reported in this thesis helps to solve the difficult complexity problem in modern theoretical physics. (orig.)

  12. Detecting high-density ultracold molecules using atom–molecule collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jun-Ren; Kao, Cheng-Yang; Chen, Hung-Bin; Liu, Yi-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing single-photon photoassociation, we have achieved ultracold rubidium molecules with a high number density that provides a new efficient approach toward molecular quantum degeneracy. A new detection mechanism for ultracold molecules utilizing inelastic atom–molecule collision is demonstrated. The resonant coupling effect on the formation of the X 1 Σ + g ground state 85 Rb 2 allows for a sufficient number of more deeply bound ultracold molecules, which induced an additional trap loss and heating of the co-existing atoms owing to the inelastic atom–molecule collision. Therefore, after the photoassociation process, the ultracold molecules can be investigated using the absorption image of the ultracold rubidium atoms mixed with the molecules in a crossed optical dipole trap. The existence of the ultracold molecules was then verified, and the amount of accumulated molecules was measured. This method detects the final produced ultracold molecules, and hence is distinct from the conventional trap loss experiment, which is used to study the association resonance. It is composed of measurements of the time evolution of an atomic cloud and a decay model, by which the number density of the ultracold 85 Rb 2 molecules in the optical trap was estimated to be >5.2 × 10 11 cm −3 . (paper)

  13. The formation and interactions of cold and ultracold molecules: new challenges for interdisciplinary physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dulieu, O [Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS, Bat. 505, Univ Paris-Sud 11, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Gabbanini, C [Istituto per i processi chimico-fisici del C.N.R., Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: olivier.dulieu@lac.u-psud.fr, E-mail: carlo@ipcf.cnr.it

    2009-08-15

    Progress on research in the field of molecules at cold and ultracold temperatures is reported in this review. It covers extensively the experimental methods to produce, detect and characterize cold and ultracold molecules including association of ultracold atoms, deceleration by external fields and kinematic cooling. Confinement of molecules in different kinds of traps is also discussed. The basic theoretical issues related to the knowledge of the molecular structure, the atom-molecule and molecule-molecule mutual interactions, and to their possible manipulation and control with external fields, are reviewed. A short discussion on the broad area of applications completes the review.

  14. Trapped atoms along nanophotonic resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Brian; Kim, May; Chang, Tzu-Han; Hung, Chen-Lung

    2017-04-01

    Many-body systems subject to long-range interactions have remained a very challenging topic experimentally. Ultracold atoms trapped in extreme proximity to the surface of nanophotonic structures provides a dynamic system combining the strong atom-atom interactions mediated by guided mode photons with the exquisite control implemented with trapped atom systems. The hybrid system promises pair-wise tunability of long-range interactions between atomic pseudo spins, allowing studies of quantum magnetism extending far beyond nearest neighbor interactions. In this talk, we will discuss our current status developing high quality nanophotonic ring resonators, engineered on CMOS compatible optical chips with integrated nanostructures that, in combination with a side illuminating beam, can realize stable atom traps approximately 100nm above the surface. We will report on our progress towards loading arrays of cold atoms near the surface of these structures and studying atom-atom interaction mediated by photons with high cooperativity.

  15. High-precision multiband spectroscopy of ultracold fermions in a nonseparable optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fläschner, Nick; Tarnowski, Matthias; Rem, Benno S.; Vogel, Dominik; Sengstock, Klaus; Weitenberg, Christof

    2018-05-01

    Spectroscopic tools are fundamental for the understanding of complex quantum systems. Here, we demonstrate high-precision multiband spectroscopy in a graphenelike lattice using ultracold fermionic atoms. From the measured band structure, we characterize the underlying lattice potential with a relative error of 1.2 ×10-3 . Such a precise characterization of complex lattice potentials is an important step towards precision measurements of quantum many-body systems. Furthermore, we explain the excitation strengths into different bands with a model and experimentally study their dependency on the symmetry of the perturbation operator. This insight suggests the excitation strengths as a suitable observable for interaction effects on the eigenstates.

  16. Expansion of an ultracold Rydberg plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Gabriel T.; Li, Yin; Ward, Edwin D.; Goodsell, Anne L.; Tate, Duncan A.

    2018-04-01

    We report a systematic experimental and numerical study of the expansion of ultracold Rydberg plasmas. Specifically, we have measured the asymptotic expansion velocities, v0, of ultracold neutral plasmas (UNPs) which evolve from cold, dense samples of Rydberg rubidium atoms using ion time-of-flight spectroscopy. From this, we have obtained values for the effective initial plasma electron temperature, Te ,0=mionv02/kB (where mion is the Rb+ ion mass), as a function of the original Rydberg atom density and binding energy, Eb ,i. We have also simulated numerically the interaction of UNPs with a large reservoir of Rydberg atoms to obtain data to compare with our experimental results. We find that for Rydberg atom densities in the range 107-109 cm-3, for states with principal quantum number n >40 , Te ,0 is insensitive to the initial ionization mechanism which seeds the plasma. In addition, the quantity kBTe ,0 is strongly correlated with the fraction of atoms which ionize, and is in the range 0.6 ×| Eb ,i|≲ kBTe ,0≲2.5 ×|Eb ,i| . On the other hand, plasmas from Rydberg samples with n ≲40 evolve with no significant additional ionization of the remaining atoms once a threshold number of ions has been established. The dominant interaction between the plasma electrons and the Rydberg atoms is one in which the atoms are deexcited, a heating process for electrons that competes with adiabatic cooling to establish an equilibrium where Te ,0 is determined by their Coulomb coupling parameter, Γe˜0.01 .

  17. Long-distance entanglement in many-body atomic and optical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giampaolo, Salvatore M; Illuminati, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Universita degli Studi di Salerno, Via Ponte don Melillo, I-84084 Fisciano, SA (Italy)], E-mail: illuminati@sa.infn.it

    2010-02-15

    We discuss the phenomenon of long-distance entanglement (LDE) in the ground state of quantum spin models, its use in high-fidelity and robust quantum communication, and its realization in many-body systems of ultracold atoms in optical lattices and in arrays of coupled optical cavities. We investigate XX quantum spin models on one-dimensional lattices with open ends and different patterns of site-dependent interaction couplings, singling out two general settings: patterns that allow for perfect LDE in the ground state of the system, namely such that the end-to-end entanglement remains finite in the thermodynamic limit, and patterns of quasi-long-distance entanglement (QLDE) in the ground state of the system, namely such that the end-to-end entanglement vanishes with a very slow power-law decay as the length of the spin chain is increased. We discuss physical realizations of these models in ensembles of ultracold bosonic atoms loaded in optical lattices. We show how, using either suitably engineered super-lattice structures or exploiting the presence of edge impurities in lattices with single periodicity, it is possible to realize models endowed with nonvanishing LDE or QLDE. We then study how to realize models that optimize the robustness of QLDE at finite temperature and in the presence of imperfections using suitably engineered arrays of coupled optical cavities. For both cases the numerical estimates of the end-to-end entanglement in the actual physical systems are thoroughly compared with the analytical results obtained for the spin model systems. We finally introduce LDE-based schemes of long-distance quantum teleportation in linear arrays of coupled cavities, and show that they allow for high-fidelity and high success rates even at moderately high temperatures.

  18. Long-distance entanglement in many-body atomic and optical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giampaolo, Salvatore M; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the phenomenon of long-distance entanglement (LDE) in the ground state of quantum spin models, its use in high-fidelity and robust quantum communication, and its realization in many-body systems of ultracold atoms in optical lattices and in arrays of coupled optical cavities. We investigate XX quantum spin models on one-dimensional lattices with open ends and different patterns of site-dependent interaction couplings, singling out two general settings: patterns that allow for perfect LDE in the ground state of the system, namely such that the end-to-end entanglement remains finite in the thermodynamic limit, and patterns of quasi-long-distance entanglement (QLDE) in the ground state of the system, namely such that the end-to-end entanglement vanishes with a very slow power-law decay as the length of the spin chain is increased. We discuss physical realizations of these models in ensembles of ultracold bosonic atoms loaded in optical lattices. We show how, using either suitably engineered super-lattice structures or exploiting the presence of edge impurities in lattices with single periodicity, it is possible to realize models endowed with nonvanishing LDE or QLDE. We then study how to realize models that optimize the robustness of QLDE at finite temperature and in the presence of imperfections using suitably engineered arrays of coupled optical cavities. For both cases the numerical estimates of the end-to-end entanglement in the actual physical systems are thoroughly compared with the analytical results obtained for the spin model systems. We finally introduce LDE-based schemes of long-distance quantum teleportation in linear arrays of coupled cavities, and show that they allow for high-fidelity and high success rates even at moderately high temperatures.

  19. Electronic structure of atoms: atomic spectroscopy information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazakov, V V; Kazakov, V G; Kovalev, V S; Meshkov, O I; Yatsenko, A S

    2017-01-01

    The article presents a Russian atomic spectroscopy, information system electronic structure of atoms (IS ESA) (http://grotrian.nsu.ru), and describes its main features and options to support research and training. The database contains over 234 000 records, great attention paid to experimental data and uniform filling of the database for all atomic numbers Z, including classified levels and transitions of rare earth and transuranic elements and their ions. Original means of visualization of scientific data in the form of spectrograms and Grotrian diagrams have been proposed. Presentation of spectral data in the form of interactive color charts facilitates understanding and analysis of properties of atomic systems. The use of the spectral data of the IS ESA together with its functionality is effective for solving various scientific problems and training of specialists. (paper)

  20. Electronic structure of atoms: atomic spectroscopy information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, V. V.; Kazakov, V. G.; Kovalev, V. S.; Meshkov, O. I.; Yatsenko, A. S.

    2017-10-01

    The article presents a Russian atomic spectroscopy, information system electronic structure of atoms (IS ESA) (http://grotrian.nsu.ru), and describes its main features and options to support research and training. The database contains over 234 000 records, great attention paid to experimental data and uniform filling of the database for all atomic numbers Z, including classified levels and transitions of rare earth and transuranic elements and their ions. Original means of visualization of scientific data in the form of spectrograms and Grotrian diagrams have been proposed. Presentation of spectral data in the form of interactive color charts facilitates understanding and analysis of properties of atomic systems. The use of the spectral data of the IS ESA together with its functionality is effective for solving various scientific problems and training of specialists.

  1. Role of Feshbach resonances in enhancing the production of deeply bound ultracold LiRb molecules with laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacesa, Marko; Ghosal, Subhas; Côté, Robin

    2010-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of forming deeply bound LiRb molecules in a two-color photoassociation experiment. Ultracold ^6Li and ^87Rb atoms colliding in the vicinity of a magnetic Feshbach resonance are photoassociated into an excited electronic state. A wavepacket is then formed by exciting a few vibrational levels of the excited state and allowed to propagate. We calculate the time-dependent overlaps between the wave packet and the lowest vibrational levels of the ground state. After the optimal overlap is obtained we use the second laser pulse to dump the wave packet and efficiently populate the deeply bound ro-vibrational levels of ^6Li^87Rb in the ground state. The resulting combination of Feshbach-optimized photoassociation (FOPA) with the time-dependent pump-dump approach will produce a large number of stable ultracold molecules in the ground state. This technique is general and applicable to other systems.

  2. Development and optimisation of a ultracold neutron polarizing system in the framework of a new measurement of the neutron electric dipole moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierre, Edgard

    2012-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis has been performed within the framework of an experiment located at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) and dedicated to the measurement of the neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM). The expected sensitivity is 10"-"2"7 e cm at the end of 2013. The experiment requires a polarized ultracold neutron (UCN) beam. A new polarizing system, a spin transport device and a spin reversal system have been developed for this purpose. Their study is detailed in this thesis. These systems are currently installed on the experiment. Thanks to magnetic field mappings done on the spectrometer, to magnetic field simulations using the Radia and Maentouch programs and also to Monte-Carlo simulations using the Geant4 software, the efficiency of the device has been calculated. The measured efficiency is 88.5±0.3%, which is slightly less than the expected value of 95%. Furthermore, this preliminary data taken in October 2011 allows the determination of some fundamental parameters of the experiment such as the filling, storage and longitudinal depolarization time constants of the spectrometer. These parameters are promising for the continuation of the experiment. (author) [fr

  3. Ultracold lithium-6 atoms in the BEC-BCS crossover: experiments and the construction of a new apparatus; Atomes de lithium-6 ultra froids dans la transition BEC-BCS: experiences et construction d'un montage experimental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teichmann, M

    2007-09-15

    We use a fermionic gas of Lithium-6 as a model system to study superfluidity. The limiting cases of superfluidity are Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) and superconductivity, described by the theory by Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer (BCS). In Lithium-6 gases, we can explore the whole range between the two cases, known as the BEC-BCS crossover, using a Feshbach resonance. We study the change of the momentum distribution of the gas in this cross-over and compare to theoretical models. We also investigate the hydrodynamic expansion, characteristic for a superfluid gas. We observe a sudden change of the ellipticity of the gas close to the transition to the superfluid phase. Moreover, we localized heteronuclear Feshbach resonances between {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li. We are currently constructing a second generation of the experimental setup. An new laser system, based on high power laser diodes, was developed. Changes in the vacuum chamber, including a complete reconstruction of the Zeeman slower, have increased the atomic flux, allowing us to increase the repetition rate of our experiment. Modifications of the geometry of the magnetic traps lead to a higher number of trapped atoms. (author)

  4. Ultracold lithium-6 atoms in the BEC-BCS crossover: experiments and the construction of a new apparatus; Atomes de lithium-6 ultra froids dans la transition BEC-BCS: experiences et construction d'un montage experimental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teichmann, M

    2007-09-15

    We use a fermionic gas of Lithium-6 as a model system to study superfluidity. The limiting cases of superfluidity are Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) and superconductivity, described by the theory by Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer (BCS). In Lithium-6 gases, we can explore the whole range between the two cases, known as the BEC-BCS crossover, using a Feshbach resonance. We study the change of the momentum distribution of the gas in this cross-over and compare to theoretical models. We also investigate the hydrodynamic expansion, characteristic for a superfluid gas. We observe a sudden change of the ellipticity of the gas close to the transition to the superfluid phase. Moreover, we localized heteronuclear Feshbach resonances between {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li. We are currently constructing a second generation of the experimental setup. An new laser system, based on high power laser diodes, was developed. Changes in the vacuum chamber, including a complete reconstruction of the Zeeman slower, have increased the atomic flux, allowing us to increase the repetition rate of our experiment. Modifications of the geometry of the magnetic traps lead to a higher number of trapped atoms. (author)

  5. Time-Dependent Wave Packet Dynamics Calculations of Cross Sections for Ultracold Scattering of Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiayu; Liu, Shu; Zhang, Dong H.; Krems, Roman V.

    2018-04-01

    Because the de Broglie wavelength of ultracold molecules is very large, the cross sections for collisions of molecules at ultracold temperatures are always computed by the time-independent quantum scattering approach. Here, we report the first accurate time-dependent wave packet dynamics calculation for reactive scattering of ultracold molecules. Wave packet dynamics calculations can be applied to molecular systems with more dimensions and provide real-time information on the process of bond rearrangement and/or energy exchange in molecular collisions. Our work thus makes possible the extension of rigorous quantum calculations of ultracold reaction properties to polyatomic molecules and adds a new powerful tool for the study of ultracold chemistry.

  6. Thermalization and Prethermalization in an ultracold Bose Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhnert, M.

    2013-01-01

    Atom chips consist of microscopic current carrying structures that generate magnetic trapping potentials for ultracold neutral atoms. These atom chips provide a high design flexibility of possible trap geometries, making the creation of highly anisotropic trapping potentials feasible. The resulting magnetic traps are characterized by a high isolation from the environment and are used to create degenerate, one-dimensional (1d) Bose gases. On typical experimental time scales, these 1d Bose gases can be described as practically closed quantum many-body systems. By applying a rapid quantum quench, the many-body system is brought out of thermal equilibrium and the resulting dynamics are studied via the statistical properties of matter-wave interference measurements. These measured quantum statistical distributions reveal that thermalization of this effectively integrable 1d Bose gas happens in a two-step process. First, the system rapidly dephases to a prethermalized state, characterized by thermal-like correlation properties, which are still distinctly different from the true thermal equilibrium state. Second, on a much longer time scale, the measured distribution functions indicate a further decay to the true thermal equilibrium state. Furthermore, by studying a highly non-equilibrium system via matter-wave interferometry, the underlying multimode dynamics, characterizing one-dimensional quantum systems, are revealed. This thesis shows that these dynamics are essential in establishing the prethermalized state and that its properties are defined by the quantum shot noise of the splitting process. In conclusion, this work aims at improving the understanding of quantum thermalization processes in integrable and nearly-integrable systems in the 1d and 1d/3d crossover regimes. Apparently, the general paths to thermal equilibrium in nearly-integrable systems are indirect and complex. This work provides an in depth experimental study of the relaxation dynamics of a highly

  7. Photodissociation of ultracold diatomic strontium molecules with quantum state control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, M; McGuyer, B H; Apfelbeck, F; Lee, C-H; Majewska, I; Moszynski, R; Zelevinsky, T

    2016-07-07

    Chemical reactions at ultracold temperatures are expected to be dominated by quantum mechanical effects. Although progress towards ultracold chemistry has been made through atomic photoassociation, Feshbach resonances and bimolecular collisions, these approaches have been limited by imperfect quantum state selectivity. In particular, attaining complete control of the ground or excited continuum quantum states has remained a challenge. Here we achieve this control using photodissociation, an approach that encodes a wealth of information in the angular distribution of outgoing fragments. By photodissociating ultracold (88)Sr2 molecules with full control of the low-energy continuum, we access the quantum regime of ultracold chemistry, observing resonant and nonresonant barrier tunnelling, matter-wave interference of reaction products and forbidden reaction pathways. Our results illustrate the failure of the traditional quasiclassical model of photodissociation and instead are accurately described by a quantum mechanical model. The experimental ability to produce well-defined quantum continuum states at low energies will enable high-precision studies of long-range molecular potentials for which accurate quantum chemistry models are unavailable, and may serve as a source of entangled states and coherent matter waves for a wide range of experiments in quantum optics.

  8. A device for simultaneous spin analysis of ultracold neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afach, S. [Institute for Particle Physics, ETH Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Jena University Hospital, Hans Berger Department of Neurology, Jena (Germany); Ban, G.; Lefort, T.; Lemiere, Y.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Quemener, G. [Universite de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3, LPC Caen ENSICAEN, Caen (France); Bison, G.; Chowdhuri, Z.; Daum, M.; Henneck, R.; Lauss, B.; Mtchedlishvili, A.; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.; Zsigmond, G. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Bodek, K.; Rawlik, M.; Rozpedzik, D.; Zejma, J. [Jagiellonian University, Marian Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Cracow (Poland); Fertl, M.; Franke, B.; Kirch, K.; Komposch, S. [Institute for Particle Physics, ETH Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Geltenbort, P. [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Grujic, Z.D.; Kasprzak, M.; Weis, A. [University of Fribourg, Physics Department, Fribourg (Switzerland); Hayen, L.; Severijns, N.; Wursten, E. [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Instituut voor Kernen Stralingsfysica, Leuven (Belgium); Helaine, V. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Universite de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3, LPC Caen ENSICAEN, Caen (France); Kermaidic, Y.; Pignol, G.; Rebreyend, D. [Universite Grenoble Alpes, CNRS/IN2P3, LPSC, Grenoble (France); Kozela, A. [Henryk Niedwodniczanski Institute for Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Krempel, J.; Piegsa, F.M. [Institute for Particle Physics, ETH Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Prashanth, P.N. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Instituut voor Kernen Stralingsfysica, Leuven (Belgium); Ries, D. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Jena University Hospital, Hans Berger Department of Neurology, Jena (Germany); Roccia, S. [Universite Paris Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, CSNSM, Orsay campus (France); Wyszynski, G. [Institute for Particle Physics, ETH Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Jagiellonian University, Marian Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    2015-11-15

    We report on the design and first tests of a device allowing for measurement of ultracold neutrons polarisation by means of the simultaneous analysis of the two spin components. The device was developed in the framework of the neutron electric dipole moment experiment at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Individual parts and the entire newly built system have been characterised with ultracold neutrons. The gain in statistical sensitivity obtained with the simultaneous spin analyser is (18.2 ± 6.1) % relative to the former sequential analyser under nominal running conditions. (orig.)

  9. Diatomic molecules in ultracold Fermi gases - Novel composite bosons

    OpenAIRE

    Petrov, D. S.; Salomon, C.; Shlyapnikov, G. V.

    2005-01-01

    We give a brief overview of recent studies of weakly bound homonuclear molecules in ultracold two-component Fermi gases. It is emphasized that they represent novel composite bosons, which exhibit features of Fermi statistics at short intermolecular distances. In particular, Pauli exclusion principle for identical fermionic atoms provides a strong suppression of collisional relaxation of such molecules into deep bound states. We then analyze heteronuclear molecules which are expected to be for...

  10. Quantum Fluctuations of Vortex Lattices in Ultracold Gases

    OpenAIRE

    Kwasigroch, M. P.; Cooper, N. R.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the effects of quantum fluctuations on the properties of vortex lattices in rapidly rotating ultracold atomic gases. We develop a variational method that goes beyond the Bogoliubov theory by including the effects of interactions between the quasiparticle excitations. These interactions are found to have significant quantitative effects on physical properties even at relatively large filling factors. We use our theory to predict the expected experimental signatures of quantum fluctu...

  11. Ultracold gas shows 'lopsided' properties

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Duke University researchers have created an ultracold gas that has the startling property of bursting outward in a preferred direction when released. According to the researchers, studying the properties of the "lopsided" gas will yield fundamental insights into how matter holds itself together at the subatomic level" (1 page).

  12. Comparing and contrasting nuclei and cold atomic gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas; Jensen, Aksel Stenholm

    2013-01-01

    The experimental revolution in ultracold atomic gas physics over the past decades has brought tremendous amounts of new insight to the world of degenerate quantum systems. Here we compare and contrast the developments of cold atomic gases with the physics of nuclei since many concepts, techniques......, and nomenclatures are common to both fields. However, nuclei are finite systems with interactions that are typically much more complicated than those of ultracold atomic gases. The similarities and differences must therefore be carefully addressed for a meaningful comparison and to facilitate fruitful......, interactions, and relevant length and energy scales of cold atoms and nuclei. Next we address some attempts in nuclear physics to transfer the concepts of condensates in nuclei that can in principle be built from bosonic alpha-particle constituents. We also consider Efimov physics, a prime example of nuclear...

  13. Non-equilibrium quantum dynamics of ultra-cold atomic mixtures: the multi-layer multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method for bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krönke, Sven; Cao, Lushuai; Schmelcher, Peter; Vendrell, Oriol

    2013-01-01

    We develop and apply the multi-layer multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method for bosons, which represents an ab initio method for investigating the non-equilibrium quantum dynamics of multi-species bosonic systems. Its multi-layer feature allows for tailoring the wave function ansatz to describe intra- and inter-species correlations accurately and efficiently. To demonstrate the beneficial scaling and efficiency of the method, we explored the correlated tunneling dynamics of two species with repulsive intra- and inter-species interactions, to which a third species with vanishing intra-species interaction was weakly coupled. The population imbalances of the first two species can feature a temporal equilibration and their time evolution significantly depends on the coupling to the third species. Bosons of the first and second species exhibit a bunching tendency, whose strength can be influenced by their coupling to the third species. (paper)

  14. Advances in ultracold collisions: Experimentation and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiner, J.

    1995-01-01

    Collisions between optically cooled and trapped atoms have been the subject of intensive investigation since early proposals discussed their novel features and key importance to the achievement of a gaseous ensemble in a single quantum state. Progress in both experimentation and theory has accelerated rapidly over the last three years, and two reviews, one emphasizing theory and the other, experiments, recount the state of the art published up to about the midpoint of 1993. The purpose of this chapter is to update continuing lines of research set forth in these and earlier works and to relate new results, establishing novel directions for investigation that have appeared in the literature. Two principal questions motivate research into the nature of ultracold collisions: (1) what new phenomena arise when collisionally interacting particles also exchange photons with modes of the radiation field and (2) what are the important two-body collisional heating mechanisms and how can they be overcome in order to achieve the temperature and density conditions appropriate for Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC)? In fact these two questions are not mutually exclusive, and one of the most notable developments in the past year, relevant to both, has been the demonstration of optical control of two-body ultracold collisional processes. Other important issues touching, on one or both of these questions are the magnitude and sign of the scattering length in s-wave collisions between species in various well-defined quantum states, progress in high-resolution trap loss and photoassociation spectroscopy, and application of optical cooling and compression to atomic beams. 58 refs., 21 figs

  15. Atomic physics of strongly correlated systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    This abstract summarizes the progress made in the last year and the future plans of our research in the study of strongly correlated atomic systems. In atomic structure and atomic spectroscopy we are investigating the classification and supermultiplet structure of doubly excited states. We are also beginning the systematic study of triply excited states. In ion-atom collisions, we are exploring an AO-MO matching method for treating multi-electron collision systems to extract detailed information such as subshell cross sections, alignment and orientation parameters, etc. We are also beginning ab initio calculations on the angular distributions for electron transfer processes in low-energy (about 10-100eV/amu) ion-atom collisions in a full quantum mechanical treatment of the motion of heavy particles

  16. Spatial noise correlations of a chain of ultracold fermions: A numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luescher, Andreas; Laeuchli, Andreas M.; Noack, Reinhard M.

    2007-01-01

    We present a numerical study of noise correlations, i.e., density-density correlations in momentum space, in the extended fermionic Hubbard model in one dimension. In experiments with ultracold atoms, these noise correlations can be extracted from time-of-flight images of the expanding cloud. Using the density-matrix renormalization group method to investigate the Hubbard model at various fillings and interactions, we confirm that the noise correlations contain full information on the most important fluctuations present in the system. We point out the importance of the sum rules fulfilled by the noise correlations and show that they yield nonsingular structures beyond the predictions of bosonization approaches. Noise correlations can thus serve as a universal probe of order and can be used to characterize the many-body states of cold atoms in optical lattices

  17. On a magnet configuration for confining ultracold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abov, Yu.G.; Vasil'ev, V.V.; Vladimirskij, V.V.; Krupchitskij, P.A.; Rissukhin, V.K.

    1977-01-01

    A magnetic system for experiments on the ultracold neutron confinement is described. The magnetic field calculation results are given. They make it possible to select the geometric places of points in which the neutron depolarization may appear and to suggest the way for diminishing the depolarization

  18. Evolution Properties of Atomic Fidelity in the Combined Multi-Atom-Cavity Field System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ju-Xia; Zhang Xiao-Juan; Zhang Xiu-Xing

    2015-01-01

    The atom fidelity is investigated in a system consisting of Mtwo-level atoms and M single-mode fields by use of complete quantum theory and numerical evaluation method. The influences of various system parameters on the evolution of atomic fidelity are studied. The results show that the atomic fidelity evolves in a Rabi oscillation manner. The oscillation frequency is mainly modulated by the coupling strength between atoms and light field, the atomic transition probabilities and the average photon numbers. Other factors hardly impact on the atomic fidelity. The present results may provide a useful approach to the maintenance of the atomic fidelity in the atom cavity field systems. (paper)

  19. Non-Hermitian optics in atomic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Ma, Danmeng; Sheng, Jiteng; Zhang, Yiqi; Zhang, Yanpeng; Xiao, Min

    2018-04-01

    A wide class of non-Hermitian Hamiltonians can possess entirely real eigenvalues when they have parity-time (PT) symmetric potentials. Recently, this family of non-Hermitian systems has attracted considerable attention in diverse areas of physics due to their extraordinary properties, especially in optical systems based on solid-state materials, such as coupled gain-loss waveguides and microcavities. Considering the desired refractive index can be effectively manipulated through atomic coherence, it is important to realize such non-Hermitian optical potentials and further investigate their distinct properties in atomic systems. In this paper, we review the recent theoretical and experimental progress of non-Hermitian optics with coherently prepared multi-level atomic configurations. The realizations of (anti-) PT symmetry with different schemes have extensively demonstrated the special optical properties of non-Hermitian optical systems with atomic coherence.

  20. Engineering quantum hyperentangled states in atomic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Mehwish; -Islam, Rameez-ul; Abbas, Tasawar; Ikram, Manzoor

    2017-11-01

    Hyperentangled states have boosted many quantum informatics tasks tremendously due to their high information content per quantum entity. Until now, however, the engineering and manipulation of such states were limited to photonic systems only. In present article, we propose generating atomic hyperentanglement involving atomic internal states as well as atomic external momenta states. Hypersuperposition, hyperentangled cluster, Bell and Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states are engineered deterministically through resonant and off-resonant Bragg diffraction of neutral two-level atoms. Based on the characteristic parameters of the atomic Bragg diffraction, such as comparatively large interaction times and spatially well-separated outputs, such decoherence resistant states are expected to exhibit good overall fidelities and offer the evident benefits of full controllability, along with extremely high detection efficiency, over the counterpart photonic states comprised entirely of flying qubits.

  1. Formation of ultracold NaRb Feshbach molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Fudong; He, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaoke; Zhu, Bing; Chen, Jun; Wang, Dajun

    2015-01-01

    We report the creation of ultracold bosonic 23 Na 87 Rb Feshbach molecules via magneto-association. By ramping the magnetic field across an interspecies Feshbach resonance (FR), at least 4000 molecules can be produced out of the near degenerate ultracold mixture. Fast loss due to inelastic atom–molecule collisions is observed, which limits the pure molecule number, after residual atoms removal, to 1700. The pure molecule sample can live for 21.8(8) ms in the optical trap, long enough for future molecular spectroscopy studies toward coherently transferring to the singlet ro-vibrational ground state, where these molecules are stable against chemical reaction and have a permanent electric dipole moment of 3.3 Debye. We have also measured the Feshbach molecule’s binding energy near the FR by the oscillating magnetic field method and found these molecules have a large closed-channel fraction. (paper)

  2. A low-cost vaporization-atomization system for atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhn F, C.G.; Ambiado V, F.; Woerner V, R.

    1990-01-01

    A low-cost vaporization-atomization system for atomic absorption spectrometry is developed as an alternative to the use of a graphite furnace in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. (Author)

  3. Optical trapping and Feshbach spectroscopy of an ultracold Rb-Cs mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilch, K.

    2009-01-01

    magnetic field is unusual for alkali mixtures. The presence of many resonances points to scattering properties of the mixture, which include higher-order coupling mechanisms. The obtained data on the Feshbach spectroscopy provide, on one hand, fundamental experimental input to characterize the Rb-Cs scattering properties and, on the other hand, identification of possible starting points for the association of ultracold heteronuclear RbCs molecules. In addition we show preliminary results on spectroscopy of the binding energy of RbCs dimers, based on a modulation of the magnetic field. The recently obtained Bose-Einstein condensate of Cs atoms, which represents a benchmark for the performance of the present apparatus, will be discussed as well as the potential pathways towards a double-degenerate mixture. We follow two main goals, first the production of a double Bose-Einstein condensate and, second, the transfer of shallow bound Feshbach molecules to the absolute internal ground state. The production of heteronuclear ground state molecules allows to enter the world of ultracold polar quantum systems. (author)

  4. Physics with Ultracold and Thermal Neutron Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    2004-01-01

    The final report is broken into 5 segments, reflecting research conclusions reached during specific time periods: 1991-1997, 1997-1999, 1999-2000, 2000-2001, and 2001-2002. The first part of the work reported was carried out at the 2 Mw research reactor of the Rhode Island Nuclaer Science Center (RJNSC). Chosen for study was the slow phase separation in mixtures of oil and water in the presence of a surfactant, and the structural features of an oil layer during the slow build-up from the gas phase. The results of these measurements, as well as studies of the capillary wave properties of oil/surfactant/water interfaces are described. The second part of the work was performed at the neutron reflection facilities of the Intennse Pulsed Neutron Source at Argonne and of the NBSR reactor at NIST. At Argonne, the uniaxial magnetic order of an Fe/CR superlattice was investigated, while the experiments at NIST studied the swelling behavior of ordered thin films of diblock copolymers when they were exposed to solvent vapors. The third part of the work was concerned with the storage properties of ultracold neturons in a trap. New experiments on spectral evolution during storage, using the UCN source of the Institut Laue-Langevin were able to be run. Subsequent periods focussed on the ultracold neutrons work, spin valve multilayer systems, and pseudo-partial wetting

  5. Response Functions for the Two-Dimensional Ultracold Fermi Gas: Dynamical BCS Theory and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Ettore; Shi, Hao; Qin, Mingpu; Zhang, Shiwei

    2017-12-01

    Response functions are central objects in physics. They provide crucial information about the behavior of physical systems, and they can be directly compared with scattering experiments involving particles such as neutrons or photons. Calculations of such functions starting from the many-body Hamiltonian of a physical system are challenging and extremely valuable. In this paper, we focus on the two-dimensional (2D) ultracold Fermi atomic gas which has been realized experimentally. We present an application of the dynamical BCS theory to obtain response functions for different regimes of interaction strengths in the 2D gas with zero-range attractive interaction. We also discuss auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) methods for the calculation of imaginary time correlations in these dilute Fermi gas systems. Illustrative results are given and comparisons are made between AFQMC and dynamical BCS theory results to assess the accuracy of the latter.

  6. Production and spectroscopy of ultracold YbRb{sup *} molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemitz, Nils

    2008-11-15

    This thesis describes the formation of electronically excited but translationally cold molecules formed from rubidium atoms and two isotopes of ytterbium ({sup 176}Yb and {sup 174}Yb) by means of photoassociation. The experiments were performed in a combined MOT with 10{sup 9} rubidium atoms and 2.10{sup 6} ytterbium atoms at temperatures of less than 1 mK. Photoassociation lines were found by trap loss spectroscopy throughout a wavelength range of 2 nm near the 795 nm D1 transition in rubidium. The majority of lines belong to two vibrational series in the excited YbRb{sup *} molecule, converging on a system of a ground state ytterbium atom and an excited rubidium atom. The strong variation of line strength between different vibrational lines is explained through the Franck-Condon principle. An improved version of the Leroy-Bernstein equation was used to extract the leading dispersion coefficient of the potential from the vibrational progression. Most of the observed lines show a resolved rotational structure as expected from a basic quantum mechanical model. The series terminates with the third or forth rotational component due to the ground state centrifugal barrier.The measured rotational constants agree very well with calculations based on the C{sub 6} coefficient. The discovery of a splitting of the rotational components into subcomponents indicates an uncommon angular momentum coupling described by Hund's case. Variations in the depth of the subcomponents indicates a similar splitting in the ground state, with the energies of the substates based on the alignment of the rubidium atom's magnetic dipole moment relative to the angular momentum carried by an approaching ytterbium atom. This creates an additional ground state barrier, partially suppressing some of the subcomponents. Using a rate equation model developed for this purpose, a maximum formation rate of 2.5.10{sup 6} molecules per second was calculated over the volume of the entire trap. The

  7. Production and spectroscopy of ultracold YbRb* molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemitz, Nils

    2008-11-01

    This thesis describes the formation of electronically excited but translationally cold molecules formed from rubidium atoms and two isotopes of ytterbium ( 176 Yb and 174 Yb) by means of photoassociation. The experiments were performed in a combined MOT with 10 9 rubidium atoms and 2.10 6 ytterbium atoms at temperatures of less than 1 mK. Photoassociation lines were found by trap loss spectroscopy throughout a wavelength range of 2 nm near the 795 nm D1 transition in rubidium. The majority of lines belong to two vibrational series in the excited YbRb * molecule, converging on a system of a ground state ytterbium atom and an excited rubidium atom. The strong variation of line strength between different vibrational lines is explained through the Franck-Condon principle. An improved version of the Leroy-Bernstein equation was used to extract the leading dispersion coefficient of the potential from the vibrational progression. Most of the observed lines show a resolved rotational structure as expected from a basic quantum mechanical model. The series terminates with the third or forth rotational component due to the ground state centrifugal barrier.The measured rotational constants agree very well with calculations based on the C 6 coefficient. The discovery of a splitting of the rotational components into subcomponents indicates an uncommon angular momentum coupling described by Hund's case. Variations in the depth of the subcomponents indicates a similar splitting in the ground state, with the energies of the substates based on the alignment of the rubidium atom's magnetic dipole moment relative to the angular momentum carried by an approaching ytterbium atom. This creates an additional ground state barrier, partially suppressing some of the subcomponents. Using a rate equation model developed for this purpose, a maximum formation rate of 2.5.10 6 molecules per second was calculated over the volume of the entire trap. The work presented here is an important step on

  8. The International Atomic Energy Agency's safeguards system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, W.

    2000-01-01

    A system of international safeguards has been established to provide assurance that nuclear materials in civilian use are not diverted from their peaceful purpose. The safeguards system is administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency/Department of Safeguards and devolves from treaties and other international agreements. Inspectors from the Agency verify reports from States about nuclear facilities by audits, observation, and measurements. (author)

  9. Ultracold chromium: a dipolar quantum gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfau, T.; Stuhler, J.; Griesmaier, A.; Fattori, M.; Koch, T.

    2005-01-01

    We report on our recent achievement of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a gas of chromium atoms. Peculiar electronic and magnetic properties of chromium require the implementation of novel cooling strategies. We observe up to ∼ 10 5 condensed 52 Cr atoms after forced evaporation within a crossed optical dipole trap. Due to its large magnetic moment (6μ B ), the dipole-dipole interaction strength in chromium is comparable with the one of the van der Waals interaction. We prove the anisotropic nature of the dipolar interaction by releasing the condensate from a cigar shaped trap and observe, in time of flight measurements, the change of the aspect-ratio for different in-trap orientations of the atomic dipoles. We also report on the recent observation of 14 Feshbach resonances in elastic collisions between polarized ultra-cold 52 Cr atoms. This is the first Ballistic expansion of a dipolar quantum gas: The anisotropic interaction leads to a different expansion dynamics for the case of the magnetic dipoles aligned with the symmetry axis of the cigar shaped trap as compared with the dipoles oriented perpendicular to the axis of the cigar. The straight lines correspond to the theoretical expectation according to mean field theory without free parameters. observation of collisional Feshbach resonances in an atomic species with more than one valence electron. Moreover, such resonances constitute an important tool towards the realization of a purely dipolar interacting gas because they can be used to change strength and sign of the van der Waals interaction. (author)

  10. The production and storage of ultracold neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshiki, Hajime [Kure University, Hiroshima (Japan); Shimizu, Hirohiko; Sakai, Kenji [and others

    1998-01-01

    The electric dipole measurement done on the ultracold neutron till now shows that its quantity is minute, not more than 10{sup -25}e.cm. It is purpose of this particular research program to produce such very slow neutrons, or so-cold ultracold neutrons in great quantity. Then, it was investigated what was the ultracold neutron important for, how is the ultracold neutron made, and how is very pure superfluid liquid helium made. As a result of these investigations, it was found that the validity of ultracold neutron production by superfluid liquid helium was established, that its efficiency is high enough to improve the neutron electric dipole moment detection sensitivity by at least one order of magnitude, and so forth. (G.K.)

  11. Two-dimensional atom localization via probe absorption in a four-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhi-Ping; Ge Qiang; Ruan Yu-Hua; Yu Ben-Li

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the two-dimensional (2D) atom localization via probe absorption in a coherently driven four-level atomic system by means of a radio-frequency field driving a hyperfine transition. It is found that the detecting probability and precision of 2D atom localization can be significantly improved via adjusting the system parameters. As a result, our scheme may be helpful in laser cooling or the atom nano-lithography via atom localization

  12. Optimal control of complex atomic quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Frank, S; Bonneau, M; Schmiedmayer, J; Hild, S; Gross, C; Cheneau, M; Bloch, I; Pichler, T; Negretti, A; Calarco, T; Montangero, S

    2016-10-11

    Quantum technologies will ultimately require manipulating many-body quantum systems with high precision. Cold atom experiments represent a stepping stone in that direction: a high degree of control has been achieved on systems of increasing complexity. However, this control is still sub-optimal. In many scenarios, achieving a fast transformation is crucial to fight against decoherence and imperfection effects. Optimal control theory is believed to be the ideal candidate to bridge the gap between early stage proof-of-principle demonstrations and experimental protocols suitable for practical applications. Indeed, it can engineer protocols at the quantum speed limit - the fastest achievable timescale of the transformation. Here, we demonstrate such potential by computing theoretically and verifying experimentally the optimal transformations in two very different interacting systems: the coherent manipulation of motional states of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate and the crossing of a quantum phase transition in small systems of cold atoms in optical lattices. We also show that such processes are robust with respect to perturbations, including temperature and atom number fluctuations.

  13. The ALADDIN atomic physics database system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulse, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    ALADDIN is an atomic physics database system which has been developed in order to provide a broadly-based standard medium for the exchange and management of atomic data. ALADDIN consists of a data format definition together with supporting software for both interactive searches as well as for access to the data by plasma modeling and other codes. 8AB The ALADDIN system is designed to offer maximum flexibility in the choice of data representations and labeling schemes, so as to support a wide range of atomic physics data types and allow natural evolution and modification of the database as needs change. Associated dictionary files are included in the ALADDIN system for data documentation. The importance of supporting the widest possible user community was also central to be ALADDIN design, leading to the use of straightforward text files with concatentated data entries for the file structure, and the adoption of strict FORTRAN 77 code for the supporting software. This will allow ready access to the ALADDIN system on the widest range of scientific computers, and easy interfacing with FORTRAN modeling codes, user developed atomic physics codes and database, etc. This supporting software consists of the ALADDIN interactive searching and data display code, together with the ALPACK subroutine package which provides ALADDIN datafile searching and data retrieval capabilities to user's codes

  14. Stability of a fully magnetized ferromagnetic state in repulsively interacting ultracold Fermi gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Xiaoling; Zhai Hui

    2010-01-01

    We construct a variational wave function to study whether a fully polarized Fermi sea of ultracold atoms is energetically stable against a single spin flip. Our variational wave function contains short-range correlations at least to the same level as Gutzwiller's projected wave function. For the Hubbard lattice model and the continuum model with pure repulsive interaction, we show that a fully polarized Fermi sea is generally unstable even for infinite repulsive strength. By contrast, for a resonance model, the ferromagnetic state is possible if the s-wave scattering length is positive and sufficiently large and the system is prepared to be orthogonal to the molecular bound state. However, we cannot rule out the possibility that more exotic correlations can destabilize the ferromagnetic state.

  15. Nonlinear dynamics of ultracold gases in double-well lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukalov, V I; Yukalova, E P

    2009-01-01

    An ultracold gas is considered, loaded into a lattice, each site of which is formed by a double-well potential. Initial conditions, after the loading, correspond to a nonequilibrium state. The nonlinear dynamics of the system, starting with a nonequilibrium state, is analysed in the local-field approximation. The importance of taking into account attenuation, caused by particle collisions, is emphasized. The presence of this attenuation dramatically influences the system dynamics

  16. Magnetic-field gradiometer based on ultracold collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasak, Tomasz; Jachymski, Krzysztof; Calarco, Tommaso; Negretti, Antonio

    2018-05-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the usefulness of ultracold atomic collisions for sensing the strength of an external magnetic field as well as its spatial gradient. The core idea of the sensor, which we recently proposed in Jachymski et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 120, 013401 (2018), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.120.013401], is to probe the transmission of the atoms through a set of quasi-one-dimensional waveguides that contain an impurity. Magnetic-field-dependent interactions between the incoming atoms and the impurity naturally lead to narrow resonances that can act as sensitive field probes since they strongly affect the transmission. We illustrate our findings with concrete examples of experimental relevance, demonstrating that for large atom fluences N a sensitivity of the order of 1 nT/√{N } for the field strength and 100 nT/(mm √{N }) for the gradient can be reached with our scheme.

  17. General Atomic's radioactive gas recovery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahn, J.A.; Perry, C.A.

    1975-01-01

    General Atomic Company has developed a Radioactive Gas Recovery System for the HTGR which separates, for purposes of retention, the radioactive components from the non-radioactive reactor plant waste gases. This provides the capability for reducing to an insignificant level the amount of radioactivity released from the gas waste system to the atmosphere--a most significant improvement in reducing total activity release to the environment. (U.S.)

  18. On the theory of ultracold neutrons scattering by Davydov solitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brizhik, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    Elastic coherent scattering of ultracold neutrons by Davydov solitons in one-dimensional periodic molecular chains without account of thermal oscillations of chain atoms is studied. It is shown that the expression for the differential cross section of the elastic neutron scattering by Davydov soliton breaks down into two components. One of them corresponds to scattering by a resting soliton, the other is proportional to the soliton velocity and has a sharp maximum in the direction of mirror reflection of neutrons from the chain

  19. Trapping and Evolution Dynamics of Ultracold Two-Component Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J.-H.; Knuffman, B.; Zhang, X. H.; Povilus, A. P.; Raithel, G.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate the trapping of a strongly magnetized, quasineutral ultracold plasma in a nested Penning trap with a background field of 2.9 T. Electrons remain trapped in this system for several milliseconds. Early in the evolution, the dynamics are driven by a breathing-mode oscillation in the ionic charge distribution, which modulates the electron trap depth. Over longer times scales, the electronic component undergoes cooling. Trap loss resulting from ExB drift is characterized

  20. SO(3) "Nuclear Physics" with ultracold Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, E.; Dalmonte, M.; Zoller, P.; Banerjee, D.; Bögli, M.; Stebler, P.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2018-06-01

    An ab initio calculation of nuclear physics from Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental SU(3) gauge theory of the strong interaction, remains an outstanding challenge. Here, we discuss the emergence of key elements of nuclear physics using an SO(3) lattice gauge theory as a toy model for QCD. We show that this model is accessible to state-of-the-art quantum simulation experiments with ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. First, we demonstrate that our model shares characteristic many-body features with QCD, such as the spontaneous breakdown of chiral symmetry, its restoration at finite baryon density, as well as the existence of few-body bound states. Then we show that in the one-dimensional case, the dynamics in the gauge invariant sector can be encoded as a spin S = 3/2 Heisenberg model, i.e., as quantum magnetism, which has a natural realization with bosonic mixtures in optical lattices, and thus sheds light on the connection between non-Abelian gauge theories and quantum magnetism.

  1. Manipulating Atoms with Light Achievements and Perspectives

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    During the last few decades spectacular progress has been achieved in the control of atomic systems by light. It will be shown how it is possible to use the basic conservation laws in atom-photon interactions for polarizing atoms, for trapping them, for cooling them to extremely low temperatures, in the microkelvin, and even in the nanokelvin range. A review will be given of recent advances in this field and of new applications, including atomic clocks with very high relative stability and accuracy, atomic interferometers allowing precise measurement of rotation speeds and gravitational fields, the realization of new states of matter such as Bose-Einstein condensates, matter waves and atom lasers, ultracold molecules. New perspectives opened by these results will be also briefly discussed.

  2. Atomic force microscopy of starch systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fan

    2017-09-22

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) generates information on topography, adhesion, and elasticity of sample surface by touching with a tip. Under suitable experimental settings, AFM can image biopolymers of few nanometers. Starch is a major food and industrial component. AFM has been used to probe the morphology, properties, modifications, and interactions of starches from diverse botanical origins at both micro- and nano-structural levels. The structural information obtained by AFM supports the blocklet structure of the granules, and provides qualitative and quantitative basis for some physicochemical properties of diverse starch systems. It becomes evident that AFM can complement other microscopic techniques to provide novel structural insights for starch systems.

  3. Ultracold molecules: vehicles to scalable quantum information processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brickman Soderberg, Kathy-Anne; Gemelke, Nathan; Chin Cheng

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a novel scheme to implement scalable quantum information processing using Li-Cs molecular states to entangle 6 Li and 133 Cs ultracold atoms held in independent optical lattices. The 6 Li atoms will act as quantum bits to store information and 133 Cs atoms will serve as messenger bits that aid in quantum gate operations and mediate entanglement between distant qubit atoms. Each atomic species is held in a separate optical lattice and the atoms can be overlapped by translating the lattices with respect to each other. When the messenger and qubit atoms are overlapped, targeted single-spin operations and entangling operations can be performed by coupling the atomic states to a molecular state with radio-frequency pulses. By controlling the frequency and duration of the radio-frequency pulses, entanglement can be either created or swapped between a qubit messenger pair. We estimate operation fidelities for entangling two distant qubits and discuss scalability of this scheme and constraints on the optical lattice lasers. Finally we demonstrate experimental control of the optical potentials sufficient to translate atoms in the lattice.

  4. Band structure engineering for ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, Malte

    2014-01-01

    the same system maps onto a quantum spin-1/2 XY model. Owing to the quantum nature of the pseudospins, geometrical frustration leads to a highly degenerate ground state which can result in exotic valence bond spin-liquid phases. First signatures of an order-by-disorder effect emerge in this regime. A complementary approach to the manipulation of the band structure is investigated in a honeycomb potential. By rotating the quantization field of the system, the statedependent energy offset between the twofold atomic basis of the hexagonal Bravais lattice can be adjusted. This purposeful breaking of inversion symmetry enables the continuous opening of an energy gap at the Dirac points of the honeycomb band structure. In addition, a striking influence of the band gap onto the lifetimes for atoms in the first excited energy band is observed. In the last part of the thesis, both experimental manipulation techniques are discussed with respect to future applications for ultracold quantum gases in non-cubic optical lattices.

  5. Three-dimensional atom localization via electromagnetically induced transparency in a three-level atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiping; Cao, Dewei; Yu, Benli

    2016-05-01

    We present a new scheme for three-dimensional (3D) atom localization in a three-level atomic system via measuring the absorption of a weak probe field. Owing to the space-dependent atom-field interaction, the position probability distribution of the atom can be directly determined by measuring the probe absorption. It is found that, by properly varying the parameters of the system, the probability of finding the atom in 3D space can be almost 100%. Our scheme opens a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-efficiency 3D atom localization, which provides some potential applications in laser cooling or atom nano-lithography via atom localization.

  6. Thermodynamics of ultracold Fermi gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimbene, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    Complex Hamiltonians from condensed matter, such as the Fermi-Hubbard model, can be experimentally studied using ultracold gases. This thesis describes a new method for determining the equation of state of an ultracold gas, making the comparison with many-body theories straightforward. It is based on the measurement of the local pressure inside a trapped gas from the analysis of its in situ image. We first apply this method to the study of a Fermi gas with resonant interactions, a weakly-interacting 7 Li gas acting as a thermometer. Surprisingly, none of the existing many-body theories of the unitary gas accounts for the equation of state deduced from our study over its full range. The virial expansion extracted from the high-temperature data agrees with the resolution of the three-body problem. At low temperature, we observe, contrary to some previous studies, that the normal phase behaves as a Fermi liquid. Finally we obtain the critical temperature for superfluidity from a clear signature on the equation of state. We also measure the pressure of the ground state as a function of spin imbalance and interaction strength - measure directly relevant to describe the crust of neutron stars. Our data validate Monte-Carlo simulations and quantify the Lee-Huang-Yang corrections to mean-field interactions in low-density fermionic or bosonic superfluids. We show that, in most cases, the partially polarized normal phase can be described as a Fermi liquid of polarons. The polaron effective mass extracted from the equation of state is in agreement with a study of collective modes. (author)

  7. Diffusion of Magnetized Binary Ionic Mixtures at Ultracold Plasma Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Keith R.; Baalrud, Scott D.

    2017-10-01

    Ultracold plasma experiments offer an accessible means to test transport theories for strongly coupled systems. Application of an external magnetic field might further increase their utility by inhibiting heating mechanisms of ions and electrons and increasing the temperature at which strong coupling effects are observed. We present results focused on developing and validating a transport theory to describe binary ionic mixtures across a wide range of coupling and magnetization strengths relevant to ultracold plasma experiments. The transport theory is an extension of the Effective Potential Theory (EPT), which has been shown to accurately model correlation effects at these conditions, to include magnetization. We focus on diffusion as it can be measured in ultracold plasma experiments. Using EPT within the framework of the Chapman-Enskog expansion, the parallel and perpendicular self and interdiffusion coefficients for binary ionic mixtures with varying mass ratios are calculated and are compared to molecular dynamics simulations. The theory is found to accurately extend Braginskii-like transport to stronger coupling, but to break down when the magnetization strength becomes large enough that the typical gyroradius is smaller than the interaction scale length. This material is based upon work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Award Number FA9550-16-1-0221.

  8. s-wave elastic scattering of antihydrogen off atomic alkali-metal targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Prabal K.; Ghosh, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the s-wave elastic scattering of antihydrogen atoms off atomic alkali-metal targets (Li, Na, K, and Rb) at thermal energies (10 -16 -10 -4 a.u.) using an atomic orbital expansion technique. The elastic cross sections of these systems at thermal energies are found to be very high compared to H-H and H-He systems. The theoretical models employed in this study are so chosen to consider long-range forces dynamically in the calculation. The mechanism of cooling suggests that Li may be considered to be a good candidate as a buffer gas for enhanced cooling of antihydrogen atoms to ultracold temperature

  9. Harmonically trapped cold atom systems: Few-body dynamics and application to many-body thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, Kevin Michael

    Underlying the many-body effects of ultracold atomic gases are the few-body dynamics and interparticle interactions. Moreover, the study of few-body systems on their own has accelerated due to confining few atoms in each well of a deep optical lattice or in a single microtrap. This thesis studies the microscopic properties of few-body systems under external spherically symmetric harmonic confinement and how the few-body properties translate to the many-body system. Bosonic and fermionic few-body systems are considered and the dependence of the energetics and other quantities are investigated as functions of the s-wave scattering length, the mass ratio and the temperature. It is found that the condensate fraction of a weakly-interacting trapped Bose gas depletes quadratically with the s-wave scattering length. The next order term in the depletion depends not only, as might be expected naively, on the s-wave scattering length and the effective range but additionally on a two-body parameter that is not needed to reproduce the energy of weakly-interacting trapped Bose gases. This finding has important implications for effective field theory treatments of the system. Weakly-interacting atomic and molecular two-component Fermi gases with equal masses are described using perturbative approaches. The energy shifts are tabulated and interpreted, and a measure of the molecular condensate fraction is developed. We develop a measure of the molecular condensate fraction using the two-body density matrix and we develop a model of the spherical component of the momentum distribution that agrees well with stochastic variational calculations. We establish the existence of intersystem degeneracies for equal mass two-component Fermi gases with zero-range interactions, where the eigen energies of the spin-imbalanced system are degenerate with a subset of the eigen energies of the more spin-balanced system and the same total number of fermions. For unequal mass two-component Fermi

  10. Atomic four-level N systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goren, C.; Rosenbluh, M.; Wilson-Gordon, A.D.; Friedmann, H.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the atomic four-level N configuration both analytically and numerically, for various pump and probe intensities, with and without transfer of coherence (TOC) and Doppler broadening, and compare the results obtained to those of realistic atomic systems. We find that TOC affects the whole spectrum, in addition to producing an electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) peak at line center. We show that the EIA peak splits as the pump intensity increases. These results are compared with those of realistic systems. When the pump is σ + polarized and the probe is π polarized, the results are similar to those of the N configuration. When the pump and probe polarizations are both linear with perpendicular polarizations, various N-like subsystems contribute to the spectrum. Consequently, the splitting of the EIA peak only occurs at very high pump intensities. We also discuss the influence of the probe on the pump absorption and refraction and find that both the pump and probe show EIA peaks when the pump intensity is low, and complementary behavior when the pump is intense. At both low and high pump intensity, the pump and probe dispersions are of opposite sign

  11. High-dimensional atom localization via spontaneously generated coherence in a microwave-driven atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiping; Chen, Jinyu; Yu, Benli

    2017-02-20

    We investigate the two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) atom localization behaviors via spontaneously generated coherence in a microwave-driven four-level atomic system. Owing to the space-dependent atom-field interaction, it is found that the detecting probability and precision of 2D and 3D atom localization behaviors can be significantly improved via adjusting the system parameters, the phase, amplitude, and initial population distribution. Interestingly, the atom can be localized in volumes that are substantially smaller than a cubic optical wavelength. Our scheme opens a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-efficiency atom localization, which provides some potential applications in high-dimensional atom nanolithography.

  12. On-line system for investigation of atomic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amus'ya, M.Ya.; Chernysheva, L.V.

    1983-01-01

    A description of the on-line ATOM system is presented that enables to investigate the structure of atomic electron shells and their interactions with different scattering particles-electrons, positronse photons, mesons - with the use of computerized numerical solutions. The problem is stated along with mathematical description of atomic properties including theoretical and numerical models for each investigated physical process. The ATOM system structure is considered. The Hartree-Fock method is used to determine the wave functions of the ground and excited atomic states. The programs are written in the ALGOL langauge. Different atomic characteristics were possible to be calculated for the first time with an accuracy exceeding an experimental one

  13. Atomic switch networks as complex adaptive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharnhorst, Kelsey S.; Carbajal, Juan P.; Aguilera, Renato C.; Sandouk, Eric J.; Aono, Masakazu; Stieg, Adam Z.; Gimzewski, James K.

    2018-03-01

    Complexity is an increasingly crucial aspect of societal, environmental and biological phenomena. Using a dense unorganized network of synthetic synapses it is shown that a complex adaptive system can be physically created on a microchip built especially for complex problems. These neuro-inspired atomic switch networks (ASNs) are a dynamic system with inherent and distributed memory, recurrent pathways, and up to a billion interacting elements. We demonstrate key parameters describing self-organized behavior such as non-linearity, power law dynamics, and multistate switching regimes. Device dynamics are then investigated using a feedback loop which provides control over current and voltage power-law behavior. Wide ranging prospective applications include understanding and eventually predicting future events that display complex emergent behavior in the critical regime.

  14. Majorana spin in magnetic atomic chain systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Jeon, Sangjun; Xie, Yonglong; Yazdani, Ali; Bernevig, B. Andrei

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we establish that Majorana zero modes emerging from a topological band structure of a chain of magnetic atoms embedded in a superconductor can be distinguished from trivial localized zero energy states that may accidentally form in this system using spin-resolved measurements. To demonstrate this key Majorana diagnostics, we study the spin composition of magnetic impurity induced in-gap Shiba states in a superconductor using a hybrid model. By examining the spin and spectral densities in the context of the Bogoliubov-de Gennes (BdG) particle-hole symmetry, we derive a sum rule that relates the spin densities of localized Shiba states with those in the normal state without superconductivity. Extending our investigations to a ferromagnetic chain of magnetic impurities, we identify key features of the spin properties of the extended Shiba state bands, as well as those associated with a localized Majorana end mode when the effect of spin-orbit interaction is included. We then formulate a phenomenological theory for the measurement of the local spin densities with spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) techniques. By combining the calculated spin densities and the measurement theory, we show that spin-polarized STM measurements can reveal a sharp contrast in spin polarization between an accidental-zero-energy trivial Shiba state and a Majorana zero mode in a topological superconducting phase in atomic chains. We further confirm our results with numerical simulations that address generic parameter settings.

  15. Atom localization via controlled spontaneous emission in a five-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiping; Yu Benli; Zhu Jun; Cao Zhigang; Zhen Shenglai; Wu Xuqiang; Xu Feng

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the one- and two-dimensional atom localization behaviors via spontaneous emission in a coherently driven five-level atomic system by means of a radio-frequency field driving a hyperfine transition. It is found that the detecting probability and precision of atom localization behaviors can be significantly improved via adjusting the system parameters. More importantly, the two-dimensional atom localization patterns reveal that the maximal probability of finding an atom within the sub-wavelength domain of the standing waves can reach unity when the corresponding conditions are satisfied. As a result, our scheme may be helpful in laser cooling or the atom nano-lithography via atom localization. - Highlights: ► One- and two-dimensional atom localization behaviors via spontaneous emission in five-level atoms are investigated. ► An assisting radio-frequency field is used to control the atom localization behaviors. ► High-precision and high-resolution two-dimensional atom localization can be realized in this scheme.

  16. Scattering Length Scaling Laws for Ultracold Three-Body Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Incao, J.P.; Esry, B.D.

    2005-01-01

    We present a simple and unifying picture that provides the energy and scattering length dependence for all inelastic three-body collision rates in the ultracold regime for three-body systems with short-range two-body interactions. Here, we present the scaling laws for vibrational relaxation, three-body recombination, and collision-induced dissociation for systems that support s-wave two-body collisions. These systems include three identical bosons, two identical bosons, and two identical fermions. Our approach reproduces all previous results, predicts several others, and gives the general form of the scaling laws in all cases

  17. Universal Four-Boson System: Dimer-Atom-Atom Efimov Effect and Recombination Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deltuva, A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent theoretical developments in the four-boson system with resonant interactions are described. Momentum-space scattering equations for the four-particle transition operators are used. The properties of unstable tetramers with approximate dimer-atom-atom structure are determined. In addition, the three- and four-cluster recombination processes in the four-boson system are studied. (author)

  18. NADS - Nuclear and Atomic Data System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinley, Michael S.; Beck, Bret; McNabb, Dennis

    2005-01-01

    We have developed NADS (Nuclear and Atomic Data System), a web-based graphical interface for viewing pointwise and grouped cross sections and distributions. Our implementation is a client / server model. The client is a Java applet that displays the graphical interface, which has interactive 2-D, 3-D, and 4-D plots and tables. The server, which can serve and perform computations of the data, has been implemented in Python using the FUDGE package developed by Bret Beck at LLNL. Computational capabilities include algebraic manipulation of nuclear evaluated data in databases such as LLNL's ENDL-99, ENDF/B-V, and ENDF/B-VI, as well as user data. Processed data used in LLNL's transport codes are accessible as well. NADS is available from http://nuclear.llnl.gov/

  19. Three-dimensional atom localization via probe absorption in a cascade four-level atomic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Wei

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available For an atomic system with cascade four-level type, a useful scheme about three-dimensional (3D atom localization is proposed. In our scheme the atomic system is coherently controlled by using a radio-frequency field to couple with two-folded levels under the condition of the existence of probe absorption. Our results show that detecting precision of 3D atom localization may be obviously improved by properly adjusting the frequency detuning and strength of the radio-frequency driving field. So our scheme could be helpful to realize 3D atom localization with high-efficiency and high-precision . In the field of laser cooling or the atom nano-lithography, our studies provide potential applications.

  20. Three-dimensional atom localization via probe absorption in a cascade four-level atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei; Deng, Li; Chen, Aixi

    2018-03-01

    For an atomic system with cascade four-level type, a useful scheme about three-dimensional (3D) atom localization is proposed. In our scheme the atomic system is coherently controlled by using a radio-frequency field to couple with two-folded levels under the condition of the existence of probe absorption. Our results show that detecting precision of 3D atom localization may be obviously improved by properly adjusting the frequency detuning and strength of the radio-frequency driving field. So our scheme could be helpful to realize 3D atom localization with high-efficiency and high-precision . In the field of laser cooling or the atom nano-lithography, our studies provide potential applications.

  1. High-precision atom localization via controllable spontaneous emission in a cycle-configuration atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chunling; Li, Jiahua; Yu, Rong; Hao, Xiangying; Wu, Ying

    2012-03-26

    A scheme for realizing two-dimensional (2D) atom localization is proposed based on controllable spontaneous emission in a coherently driven cycle-configuration atomic system. As the spatial-position-dependent atom-field interaction, the frequency of the spontaneously emitted photon carries the information about the position of the atom. Therefore, by detecting the emitted photon one could obtain the position information available, and then we demonstrate high-precision and high-resolution 2D atom localization induced by the quantum interference between the multiple spontaneous decay channels. Moreover, we can achieve 100% probability of finding the atom at an expected position by choosing appropriate system parameters under certain conditions.

  2. Design of atomic energy information network system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. T.; Lee, E. J.; Han, K. W.; Lee, H. C.; Chang, J. H.

    2004-01-01

    As the 21 st century is expected to induce a Knowledge based society, responding to this kind of change on our own initiative could be achieved by establishing networks among atomic energy agencies with the Atomic Energy Portal Site in a pivotal role. Thus, enabling the knowledge information from each agency to be easily shared and utilized. Furthermore, it can contribute to further researches by providing accumulated knowledge in the atomic energy, such as research output and past achievements, and by avoiding the repetition of researches on the same subjects. It could also provide remote educational data to researchers and industrial experts in atomic energy, as well as atomic energy information for general public consistently, so that we can promote our confidence in atomic energy

  3. Characterization of a scintillating lithium glass ultra-cold neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson, B.; Rebenitsch, L.A.; Hansen-Romu, S.; Mammei, R.; Martin, J.W. [University of Winnipeg, Department of Physics, Winnipeg (Canada); Lauss, B. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory for Particle Physics, Villigen (Switzerland); Lindner, T. [TRIUMF, Vancouver (Canada); University of Winnipeg, Department of Physics, Winnipeg (Canada); Pierre, E. [TRIUMF, Vancouver (Canada); Osaka University, Research Centre for Nuclear Physics, Osaka (Japan)

    2017-01-15

    A {sup 6}Li-glass-based scintillation detector developed for the TRIUMF neutron electric dipole moment experiment was characterized using the ultra-cold neutron source at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). The data acquisition system for this detector was demonstrated to perform well at rejecting backgrounds. An estimate of the absolute efficiency of background rejection of 99.7±0.1% is made. For variable ultra-cold neutron rate (varying from < 1 kHz to approx. 100 kHz per channel) and background rate seen at the Paul Scherrer Institute, we estimate that the absolute detector efficiency is 89.7{sup +1.3}{sub -1.9}%. Finally a comparison with a commercial Cascade detector was performed for a specific setup at the West-2 beamline of the ultra-cold neutron source at PSI. (orig.)

  4. Atomic energy indemnification system in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Eiichi

    1980-01-01

    The Japanese legislation on the indemnification by atomic energy enterprisers for atomic energy damages, published in 1961 and enforced in 1962, includes the law concerning indemnification for atomic energy damages and the law concerning atomic energy damage indemnification contracts (hereafter referred to as ''the law concerning indemnification contracts''). While the Japanese laws are same as the foreign legislation in the provisions of the responsibility of atomic energy damages without the error of atomic energy enterprisers, exemption reasons are more important in this respect. When damages are due to exceptionally grave natural disasters or social disturbances, atomic energy enterprisers are exempted from the responsibility. Indemnification amounts are determined, but the Japanese laws do not limit then, different from the foreign regulations. The periods for demanding indemnification are not defined particularly in the law concerning indemnification contracts, and the general basic rules of the civil law are applied. As a result, the demand right terminates in 3 years after the injured persons find damage and offenders, and in 20 years since the unlawful act (Article 724, Civil law). The indemnification liability for atomic energy damages is focused on atomic energy enterprisers concerned in the same way as the foreign laws. The measures for assuring the execution of indemnification responsibility consist in principle of the firm conbination of the liability insurance contracts with private insurance companies and the indemnification contracts for atomic energy damages with the state. The damages of employes suffered in works are excluded from indemnification, which has been the main issue of discussion since the enactment of atomic energy laws. (Okada, K.)

  5. Nucleon Edm from Atomic Systems and Constraints on Supersymmetry Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Oshima, Sachiko; Nihei, Takeshi; Fujita, Takehisa

    2005-01-01

    The nucleon EDM is shown to be directly related to the EDM of atomic systems. From the observed EDM values of the atomic Hg system, the neutron EDM can be extracted, which gives a very stringent constraint on the supersymmetry parameters. It is also shown that the measurement of Nitrogen and Thallium atomic systems should provide important information on the flavor dependence of the quark EDM. We perform numerical analyses on the EDM of neutron, proton and electron in the minimal supersymmetr...

  6. Efficient atom localization via probe absorption in an inverted-Y atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianchun; Wu, Bo; Mao, Jiejian

    2018-06-01

    The behaviour of atom localization in an inverted-Y atomic system is theoretically investigated. For the atoms interacting with a weak probe field and several orthogonal standing-wave fields, their position information can be obtained by measuring the probe absorption. Compared with the traditional scheme, we couple the probe field to the transition between the middle and top levels. It is found that the probe absorption sensitively depends on the detuning and strength of the relevant light fields. Remarkably, the atom can be localized at a particular position in the standing-wave fields by coupling a microwave field to the transition between the two ground levels.

  7. Atoms as many-body systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M Ya

    2011-01-01

    Contrary to common wisdom, not everything is clear and simple in the structure of many-electron atoms. Complexity in atoms is mainly a result of interelectron interaction that leads to rather unusual behaviour. Most transparently this is manifested in photo-ionization processes of many-electron atoms and some multi-atomic objects e.g. endohedrals. Particular attention will be given to the approach describing the interaction of photons with many-electron atoms in the frame of the many-body theory based on the Feynman diagrams technique. As a suitable one-electron approximation the Hartree - Fock (HF) approach will be presented. On its ground we will include the so-called electron correlation effects and discuss the frequently used Random Phase Approximation with Exchange - RPAE. Some results of recent calculations will be presented.

  8. Atoms as many-body systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amusia, M Ya, E-mail: amusia@vms.huji.ac.il [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem (Israel); Ioffe Physical-technical Institute, RAS, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-16

    Contrary to common wisdom, not everything is clear and simple in the structure of many-electron atoms. Complexity in atoms is mainly a result of interelectron interaction that leads to rather unusual behaviour. Most transparently this is manifested in photo-ionization processes of many-electron atoms and some multi-atomic objects e.g. endohedrals. Particular attention will be given to the approach describing the interaction of photons with many-electron atoms in the frame of the many-body theory based on the Feynman diagrams technique. As a suitable one-electron approximation the Hartree - Fock (HF) approach will be presented. On its ground we will include the so-called electron correlation effects and discuss the frequently used Random Phase Approximation with Exchange - RPAE. Some results of recent calculations will be presented.

  9. A Many-Atom Cavity QED System with Homogeneous Atom-Cavity Coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jongmin; Vrijsen, Geert; Teper, Igor; Hosten, Onur; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a many-atom-cavity system with a high-finesse dual-wavelength standing wave cavity in which all participating rubidium atoms are nearly identically coupled to a 780-nm cavity mode. This homogeneous coupling is enforced by a one-dimensional optical lattice formed by the field of a 1560-nm cavity mode.

  10. Making ultracold molecules in a two color pump-dump photoassociation scheme using chirped pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Christiane P.; Luc-Koenig, Eliane; Masnou-Seeuws, Françoise

    2005-01-01

    This theoretical paper investigates the formation of ground state molecules from ultracold cesium atoms in a two-color scheme. Following previous work on photoassociation with chirped picosecond pulses [Luc-Koenig et al., Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 70}, 033414 (2004)], we investigate stabilization by a second (dump) pulse. By appropriately choosing the dump pulse parameters and time delay with respect to the photoassociation pulse, we show that a large number of deeply bound molecules are created in t...

  11. Hofstadter's butterfly energy spectrum of ultracold fermions on the two-dimensional triangular optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Jingmin; Lu Qingqing

    2009-01-01

    We study the energy spectrum of ultracold fermionic atoms on the two-dimensional triangular optical lattice subjected to a perpendicular effective magnetic field, which can be realized with laser beams. We derive the generalized Harper's equations and numerically solve them, then we obtain the Hofstadter's butterfly-like energy spectrum, which has a novel fractal structure. The observability of the Hofstadter's butterfly spectrum is also discussed

  12. Association of atoms into universal dimers using an oscillating magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmack, Christian; Smith, D Hudson; Braaten, Eric

    2015-03-13

    In a system of ultracold atoms near a Feshbach resonance, pairs of atoms can be associated into universal dimers by an oscillating magnetic field with a frequency near that determined by the dimer binding energy. We present a simple expression for the transition rate that takes into account many-body effects through a transition matrix element of the contact. In a thermal gas, the width of the peak in the transition rate as a function of the frequency is determined by the temperature. In a dilute Bose-Einstein condensate of atoms, the width is determined by the inelastic scattering rates of a dimer with zero-energy atoms. Near an atom-dimer resonance, there is a dramatic increase in the width from inelastic atom-dimer scattering and from atom-atom-dimer recombination. The recombination contribution provides a signature for universal tetramers that are Efimov states consisting of two atoms and a dimer.

  13. Observation of Resonant Effects in Ultracold Collisions between Heteronuclear Feshbach Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xin; Wang, Fudong; Zhu, Bing; Guo, Mingyang; Lu, Bo; Wang, Dajun

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic field dependent dimer-dimer collisional losses are studied with ultracold 23 Na87 Rb Feshbach molecules. By ramping the magnetic field across the 347.8 G inter-species Feshbach resonance and removing residual atoms with a magnetic field gradient, ~ 8000 pure NaRb Feshbach molecules with a temperature below 1 μK are produced. By holding the pure molecule sample in a crossed optical dipole trap and measuring the time-dependent loss curves under different magnetic fields near the Feshbach resonance, the dimer-dimer loss rates with respect to the atomic scattering length a are mapped out. We observe a resonant feature at around a = 600a0 and a rising tail at above a = 1600a0 . This behavior resembles previous theoretical works on homonuclear Feshbach molecule, where resonant effects between dimer-dimer collisions tied to tetramer bound states were predicted. Our work shows the possibility of exploring four-body physics within a heteronuclear system. We are supported by Hong Kong RGC General Research Fund no. CUHK403813.

  14. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Alain; Villani, Cedric; Guthleben, Denis; Leduc, Michele; Brenner, Anastasios; Pouthas, Joel; Perrin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  15. Matter-wave localization in disordered cold atom lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavish, Uri; Castin, Yvan

    2005-07-08

    We propose to observe Anderson localization of ultracold atoms in the presence of a random potential made of atoms of another species or spin state and trapped at the nodes of an optical lattice, with a filling factor less than unity. Such systems enable a nearly perfect experimental control of the disorder, while the possibility of modeling the scattering potentials by a set of pointlike ones allows an exact theoretical analysis. This is illustrated by a detailed analysis of the one-dimensional case.

  16. Quantum versus classical statistical dynamics of an ultracold Bose gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berges, Juergen; Gasenzer, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the conditions under which quantum fluctuations are relevant for the quantitative interpretation of experiments with ultracold Bose gases. This requires to go beyond the description in terms of the Gross-Pitaevskii and Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mean-field theories, which can be obtained as classical (statistical) field-theory approximations of the quantum many-body problem. We employ functional-integral techniques based on the two-particle irreducible (2PI) effective action. The role of quantum fluctuations is studied within the nonperturbative 2PI 1/N expansion to next-to-leading order. At this accuracy level memory integrals enter the dynamic equations, which differ for quantum and classical statistical descriptions. This can be used to obtain a classicality condition for the many-body dynamics. We exemplify this condition by studying the nonequilibrium evolution of a one-dimensional Bose gas of sodium atoms, and discuss some distinctive properties of quantum versus classical statistical dynamics

  17. A Michelson interferometer for ultracold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steyerl, A.; Malik, S.S.; Steinhauser, K.A.; Berger, L.

    1979-01-01

    We propose a neutron Michelson Interferometer installed within a focussing 'gravity diffractometer' for ultracold neutrons. In this arrangement the expected interference pattern depends only on the well-defined vertical component of neutron wavevector. Possible applications of such an interferometer are discussed. (orig.)

  18. Many-body physics using cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Bhuvanesh

    Advances in experiments on dilute ultracold atomic gases have given us access to highly tunable quantum systems. In particular, there have been substantial improvements in achieving different kinds of interaction between atoms. As a result, utracold atomic gases oer an ideal platform to simulate many-body phenomena in condensed matter physics, and engineer other novel phenomena that are a result of the exotic interactions produced between atoms. In this dissertation, I present a series of studies that explore the physics of dilute ultracold atomic gases in different settings. In each setting, I explore a different form of the inter-particle interaction. Motivated by experiments which induce artificial spin-orbit coupling for cold fermions, I explore this system in my first project. In this project, I propose a method to perform universal quantum computation using the excitations of interacting spin-orbit coupled fermions, in which effective p-wave interactions lead to the formation of a topological superfluid. Motivated by experiments which explore the physics of exotic interactions between atoms trapped inside optical cavities, I explore this system in a second project. I calculate the phase diagram of lattice bosons trapped in an optical cavity, where the cavity modes mediates effective global range checkerboard interactions between the atoms. I compare this phase diagram with one that was recently measured experimentally. In two other projects, I explore quantum simulation of condensed matter phenomena due to spin-dependent interactions between particles. I propose a method to produce tunable spin-dependent interactions between atoms, using an optical Feshbach resonance. In one project, I use these spin-dependent interactions in an ultracold Bose-Fermi system, and propose a method to produce the Kondo model. I propose an experiment to directly observe the Kondo effect in this system. In another project, I propose using lattice bosons with a large hyperfine spin

  19. Itinerant ferromagnetism in an atomic Fermi gas: Influence of population imbalance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conduit, G. J.; Simons, B. D.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate ferromagnetic ordering in an itinerant ultracold atomic Fermi gas with repulsive interactions and population imbalance. In a spatially uniform system, we show that at zero temperature the transition to the itinerant magnetic phase transforms from first to second order with increasing population imbalance. Drawing on these results, we elucidate the phases present in a trapped geometry, finding three characteristic types of behavior with changing population imbalance. Finally, we outline the potential experimental implications of the findings.

  20. Mode-coupling of interaction quenched ultracold bosons in periodically driven lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistakidis, Simeon; Schmelcher, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The out-of-equilibrium dynamics of interaction quenched finite ultracold bosonic ensembles in periodically driven one-dimensional optical lattices is investigated. As a first attempt a brief analysis of the dynamics caused exclusively by the periodically driven lattice is presented and the induced low-lying modes are introduced. It is shown that the periodic driving enforces the bosons in the outer wells to exhibit out-of-phase dipole-like modes, while in the central well the cloud experiences a local-breathing mode. The dynamical behavior of the system is investigated with respect to the driving frequency, revealing a resonant-like behavior of the intra-well dynamics. Subsequently, we drive the system to a highly non-equilibrium state by performing an interaction quench upon the periodically driven lattice. This protocol gives rise to admixtures of excitations in the outer wells, an enhanced breathing in the center and an amplification of the tunneling dynamics. As a result (of the quench) the system experiences multiple resonances between the inter- and intra-well dynamics at different quench amplitudes. Finally, our study reveals that the position of the resonances can be adjusted e.g. via the driving frequency or the atom number manifesting their many-body nature. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) in the framework of the SFB 925 ``Light induced dynamics and control of correlated quantum systems''.

  1. Nonstationary Heat Conduction in Atomic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit K.

    Understanding heat at the atomistic level is an interesting exercises. It is fascinating to note how the vibration of atoms result into thermodynamic concept of heat. This thesis aims to bring insights into different constitutive laws of heat conduction. We also develop a framework in which the interaction of thermostats to the system can be studied and a well known Kapitza effect can be reduced. The thesis also explores stochastic and continuum methods to model the latent heat release in the first order transition of ideal silicon surfaces into dimers. We divide the thesis into three works which are connected to each other: 1. Fourier's law leads to a diffusive model of heat transfer in which a thermal signal propagates infinitely fast and the only material parameter is the thermal conductivity. In micro- and nano-scale systems, non-Fourier effects involving coupled diffusion and wavelike propagation of heat can become important. An extension of Fourier's law to account for such effects leads to a Jeffreys-type model for heat transfer with two relaxation times. In this thesis, we first propose a new Thermal Parameter Identification (TPI) method for obtaining the Jeffreys-type thermal parameters from molecular dynamics simulations. The TPI method makes use of a nonlinear regression-based approach for obtaining the coefficients in analytical expressions for cosine and sine-weighted averages of temperature and heat flux over the length of the system. The method is applied to argon nanobeams over a range of temperature and system sizes. The results for thermal conductivity are found to be in good agreement with standard Green-Kubo and direct method calculations. The TPI method is more efficient for systems with high diffusivity and has the advantage, that unlike the direct method, it is free from the influence of thermostats. In addition, the method provides the thermal relaxation times for argon. Using the determined parameters, the Jeffreys-type model is able to

  2. Recoil saturation of the self-energy in atomic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manson, J.R.; Ritchie, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    Within the framework of the general self-energy problem for the interaction of a projectile with a many-body system, we consider the dispersion force between two atoms or between a charge and an atom. Since the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is not made, this is a useful approach for exhibiting non-adiabatic effects. We find compact expressions in terms of matrix elements of operators in the atomic displacement which are not limited by multipole expansions. 7 refs

  3. Universal Borromean Binding in Spin-Orbit-Coupled Ultracold Fermi Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Cui

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Borromean rings and Borromean binding, a class of intriguing phenomena as three objects are linked (bound together while any two of them are unlinked (unbound, widely exist in nature and have been found in systems of biology, chemistry, and physics. Previous studies have suggested that the occurrence of such a binding in physical systems typically relies on the microscopic details of pairwise interaction potentials at short range and is, therefore, nonuniversal. Here, we report a new type of Borromean binding in ultracold Fermi gases with Rashba spin-orbit coupling, which is universal against short-range interaction details, with its binding energy only dependent on the s-wave scattering length and the spin-orbit-coupling strength. We show that the occurrence of this universal Borromean binding is facilitated by the symmetry of the single-particle dispersion under spin-orbit coupling and is, therefore, symmetry selective rather than interaction selective. The state is robust over a wide range of mass ratios between composing fermions, which are accessible by Li-Li, K-K, and K-Li mixtures in cold-atom experiments. Our results reveal the importance of single- particle spectral symmetry in few-body physics and shed light on the emergence of new quantum phases in a many-body system with exotic few-body correlations.

  4. Time-Dependent Impurity in Ultracold Fermions: Orthogonality Catastrophe and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Knap

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent experimental realization of strongly imbalanced mixtures of ultracold atoms opens new possibilities for studying impurity dynamics in a controlled setting. In this paper, we discuss how the techniques of atomic physics can be used to explore new regimes and manifestations of Anderson’s orthogonality catastrophe (OC, which could not be accessed in solid-state systems. Specifically, we consider a system of impurity atoms, localized by a strong optical-lattice potential, immersed in a sea of itinerant Fermi atoms. We point out that the Ramsey-interference-type experiments with the impurity atoms allow one to study the OC in the time domain, while radio-frequency (RF spectroscopy probes the OC in the frequency domain. The OC in such systems is universal, not only in the long-time limit, but also for all times and is determined fully by the impurity-scattering length and the Fermi wave vector of the itinerant fermions. We calculate the universal Ramsey response and RF-absorption spectra. In addition to the standard power-law contributions, which correspond to the excitation of multiple particle-hole pairs near the Fermi surface, we identify a novel, important contribution to the OC that comes from exciting one extra particle from the bottom of the itinerant band. This contribution gives rise to a nonanalytic feature in the RF-absorption spectra, which shows a nontrivial dependence on the scattering length, and evolves into a true power-law singularity with the universal exponent 1/4 at the unitarity. We extend our discussion to spin-echo-type experiments, and show that they probe more complicated nonequilibirum dynamics of the Fermi gas in processes in which an impurity switches between states with different interaction strength several times; such processes play an important role in the Kondo problem, but remained out of reach in the solid-state systems. We show that, alternatively, the OC can be seen in the energy-counting statistics

  5. Open quantum spin systems in semiconductor quantum dots and atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwager, Heike

    2012-07-04

    In this Thesis, we study open quantum spin systems from different perspectives. The first part is motivated by technological challenges of quantum computation. An important building block for quantum computation and quantum communication networks is an interface between material qubits for storage and data processing and travelling photonic qubits for communication. We propose the realisation of a quantum interface between a travelling-wave light field and the nuclear spins in a quantum dot strongly coupled to a cavity. Our scheme is robust against cavity decay as it uses the decay of the cavity to achieve the coupling between nuclear spins and the travelling-wave light fields. A prerequiste for such a quantum interface is a highly polarized ensemble of nuclear spins. High polarization of the nuclear spin ensemble is moreover highly desirable as it protects the potential electron spin qubit from decoherence. Here we present the theoretical description of an experiment in which highly asymmetric dynamic nuclear spin pumping is observed in a single self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot. The second part of this Thesis is devoted to fundamental studies of dissipative spin systems. We study general one-dimensional spin chains under dissipation and propose a scheme to realize a quantum spin system using ultracold atoms in an optical lattice in which both coherent interaction and dissipation can be engineered and controlled. This system enables the study of non-equilibrium and steady state physics of open and driven spin systems. We find, that the steady state expectation values of different spin models exhibit discontinuous behaviour at degeneracy points of the Hamiltonian in the limit of weak dissipation. This effect can be used to dissipatively probe the spectrum of the Hamiltonian. We moreover study spin models under the aspect of state preparation and show that dissipation drives certain spin models into highly entangled state. Finally, we study a spin chain with

  6. Open quantum spin systems in semiconductor quantum dots and atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwager, Heike

    2012-01-01

    In this Thesis, we study open quantum spin systems from different perspectives. The first part is motivated by technological challenges of quantum computation. An important building block for quantum computation and quantum communication networks is an interface between material qubits for storage and data processing and travelling photonic qubits for communication. We propose the realisation of a quantum interface between a travelling-wave light field and the nuclear spins in a quantum dot strongly coupled to a cavity. Our scheme is robust against cavity decay as it uses the decay of the cavity to achieve the coupling between nuclear spins and the travelling-wave light fields. A prerequiste for such a quantum interface is a highly polarized ensemble of nuclear spins. High polarization of the nuclear spin ensemble is moreover highly desirable as it protects the potential electron spin qubit from decoherence. Here we present the theoretical description of an experiment in which highly asymmetric dynamic nuclear spin pumping is observed in a single self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot. The second part of this Thesis is devoted to fundamental studies of dissipative spin systems. We study general one-dimensional spin chains under dissipation and propose a scheme to realize a quantum spin system using ultracold atoms in an optical lattice in which both coherent interaction and dissipation can be engineered and controlled. This system enables the study of non-equilibrium and steady state physics of open and driven spin systems. We find, that the steady state expectation values of different spin models exhibit discontinuous behaviour at degeneracy points of the Hamiltonian in the limit of weak dissipation. This effect can be used to dissipatively probe the spectrum of the Hamiltonian. We moreover study spin models under the aspect of state preparation and show that dissipation drives certain spin models into highly entangled state. Finally, we study a spin chain with

  7. Development of the Science Data System for the International Space Station Cold Atom Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Harmelen, Chris; Soriano, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) is a facility that will enable scientists to study ultra-cold quantum gases in a microgravity environment on the International Space Station (ISS) beginning in 2016. The primary science data for each experiment consists of two images taken in quick succession. The first image is of the trapped cold atoms and the second image is of the background. The two images are subtracted to obtain optical density. These raw Level 0 atom and background images are processed into the Level 1 optical density data product, and then into the Level 2 data products: atom number, Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT) lifetime, magnetic chip-trap atom lifetime, and condensate fraction. These products can also be used as diagnostics of the instrument health. With experiments being conducted for 8 hours every day, the amount of data being generated poses many technical challenges, such as downlinking and managing the required data volume. A parallel processing design is described, implemented, and benchmarked. In addition to optimizing the data pipeline, accuracy and speed in producing the Level 1 and 2 data products is key. Algorithms for feature recognition are explored, facilitating image cropping and accurate atom number calculations.

  8. Interactions of Ultracold Impurity Particles with Bose-Einstein Condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-23

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0141 INTERACTIONS OF ULTRACOLD IMPURITY PARTICLES WITH BOSE- EINSTEIN CONDENSATES Georg Raithel UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Final...SUBTITLE Interactions of ultracold impurity particles with Bose- Einstein Condensates 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-10-1-0453 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...Interactions of ultracold impurity particles with Bose- Einstein Condensates Contract/Grant #: FA9550-10-1-0453 Reporting Period: 8/15/2010 to 2/14

  9. Investigation of dye laser excitation of atomic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abate, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A stabilized cw dye laser system and an optical pumping scheme for a sodium atomic beam were developed, and the improvements over previously existing systems are discussed. A method to stabilize both the output intensity and the frequency of the cw dye laser for periods of several hours is described. The fluctuation properties of this laser are investigated by photon counting and two-time correlation measurements. The results show significant departures from the usual single-mode laser theory in the region of threshold and below. The implications of the deviation from accepted theory are discussed. The atomic beam system that was constructed and tested is described. A method of preparing atomic sodium so that it behaves as a simple two-level atom is outlined, and the results of some experiments to study the resonant interaction between the atoms and the dye laser beam are presented

  10. Atoms as many-body systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya.

    1995-01-01

    The author presents this article in the volume, dedicated to the 70th birthday of Academician S. T. Belyaev. He has known him personally since 1961 and admires his profound contributions to the theory of Bose-liquids, to the theory of superconductivity of atomic nuclei and some other important scientific works. Belyaev is well known also as an organizer of science and education. For years he was, and is still the Chairman of the Synchrotron Radiation Commission of the Russian Academy of Science, a body which was established long ago to promote construction of high intensity light sources, and technological as well as scientific research using this light. One of the important directions of this study is investigation of photoabsorbtion by multielectron atoms in order to obtain information about their structure

  11. The charge imbalance in ultracold plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Tianxing; Lu, Ronghua; Guo, Li; Han, Shensheng

    2016-01-01

    Ultracold plasmas are regarded as quasineutral but not strictly neutral. The results of charge imbalance in the expansion of ultracold plasmas are reported. The calculations are performed by a full molecular-dynamics simulation. The details of the electron velocity distributions are calculated without the assumption of electron global thermal equilibrium and Boltzmann distribution. Spontaneous evolutions of the charge imbalance from the initial states with perfect neutrality are given in the simulations. The expansion of outer plasma slows down with the charge imbalance. The influences of plasma size and parameters on the charge imbalance are discussed. The radial profiles of electron temperature are given for the first time, and the self-similar expansion can still occur even if there is no global thermal equilibrium. The electron disorder induced heating is also found in the simulation.

  12. The charge imbalance in ultracold plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Tianxing; Lu, Ronghua, E-mail: lurh@siom.ac.cn; Guo, Li; Han, Shensheng [Key Laboratory for Quantum Optics and Center for Cold Atom Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2016-09-15

    Ultracold plasmas are regarded as quasineutral but not strictly neutral. The results of charge imbalance in the expansion of ultracold plasmas are reported. The calculations are performed by a full molecular-dynamics simulation. The details of the electron velocity distributions are calculated without the assumption of electron global thermal equilibrium and Boltzmann distribution. Spontaneous evolutions of the charge imbalance from the initial states with perfect neutrality are given in the simulations. The expansion of outer plasma slows down with the charge imbalance. The influences of plasma size and parameters on the charge imbalance are discussed. The radial profiles of electron temperature are given for the first time, and the self-similar expansion can still occur even if there is no global thermal equilibrium. The electron disorder induced heating is also found in the simulation.

  13. Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffray, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The atom through centuries, has been imagined, described, explored, then accelerated, combined...But what happens truly inside the atom? And what are mechanisms who allow its stability? Physicist and historian of sciences, Jean-Paul Auffray explains that these questions are to the heart of the modern physics and it brings them a new lighting. (N.C.)

  14. Cold atoms in a cryogenic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haslinger, S.

    2011-01-01

    The idea of quantum information processing attracts increasingly interest, where a complex collection of quantum objects and quantum bits are employed to find the ideal building blocks for quantum information systems. Hybrid quantum systems are therefore promising objects as they countervail the particular drawbacks of single quantum objects. Based on superconducting resonator technology, microwave coplanar waveguides provide a well suited interconnection for photons and solid-state quantum bits (qubits), extensively investigated in recent years. Since a quantum memory is presently missing in those electrical accessible circuit cavity quantum devices, connecting the fast processing in a solid sate device to the exceptional long coherence times in atomic ensembles, the presented work is focused to establish the technological foundations for the hybridization of such quantum systems. The microwave photons stored in a superconducting high finesse microwave resonator are therefore an ideal connection between the atom and the solid state quantum world. In the last decade, the miniaturization and integration of quantum optics and atomic physics manipulation techniques on to a single chip was successfully established. Such atom chips are capable of detailed quantum manipulation of ultra-cold atoms and provide a versatile platform to combine the manipulation techniques from atomic physics with the capability of nano-fabrication. In recent years several experiments succeeded in realization of superconducting atom chips in cryogenic environments which opens the road for integrating super-conductive microwave resonators to magnetically couple an atomic ensemble to photons stored in the coplanar high finesse cavity. This thesis presents the concept, design and experimental setup of two approaches to establish an atomic ensemble of rubidium atoms inside a cryogenic environment, based on an Electron beam driven alkali metal atom source for loading a magneto optical trap in a

  15. Nucleon EDM from atomic systems and constraints on supersymmetry parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Sachiko; Nihei, Takeshi; Fujita, Takehisa

    2005-01-01

    The nucleon EDM is shown to be directly related to the EDM of atomic systems. From the observed EDM values of the atomic Hg system, the neutron EDM can be extracted, which gives a very stringent constraint on the supersymmetry parameters. It is also shown that the measurement of Nitrogen and Thallium atomic systems should provide important information on the flavor dependence of the quark EDM. We perform numerical analyses on the EDM of neutron, proton and electron in the minimal supersymmetric standard model with CP-violating phases. We demonstrate that the new limit on the neutron EDM extracted from atomic systems excludes a wide parameter region of supersymmetry breaking masses above 1 TeV, while the old limit excludes only a small mass region below 1 TeV. (author)

  16. Focus on strongly correlated quantum fluids: from ultracold quantum gases to QCD plasmas Focus on strongly correlated quantum fluids: from ultracold quantum gases to QCD plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Allan; Carr, Lincoln D.; Schaefer, Thomas; Steinberg, Peter; Thomas, John E.

    2013-04-01

    interdisciplinary appeal and include new studies of high temperature superfluidity, viscosity, spin-transport, spin-imbalanced mixtures, and three-component gases, this last having a close parallel to color superconductivity. Another system important for the field of strongly-interacting quantum fluids was revealed by analysis of data from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Despite naive expectations based on asymptotic freedom that the deconfinement of quarks and gluons at high temperatures would lead to a weakly-interacting quark gluon plasma (QGP), the system appeared to be quite strongly coupled. Subsequent estimates of the viscosity-to-entropy ratio suggest that the system is tantalizingly close to the postulated bound from AdS/CFT calculations. The field is quite dynamic at the moment; new measurements are expected from upgraded detectors at RHIC, and an entirely new energy regime is being opened up by heavy ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. On the theoretical side, much work remains to be done to extract the precise values of the transport coefficients, and to characterize the nature of quasi-particle excitations in the plasma. Finally, holographic dualities such as anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT) have opened a new theoretical window on strongly correlated fluids. Holography relates strongly-interacting quantum many-body systems to weakly-coupled semi-classical gravitational systems, replacing quasiparticles with geometry and translating various difficult questions about quantum fluids into simple and calculable geometric exercises. Already, some of the earliest lessons of holography, such as the conjectural bound on the viscosity-to-entropy ratio, have had a considerable impact on the theoretical and experimental study of strongly correlated fluids, from RHIC to ultracold atoms. More recently, the study of holographic superconductors, non-Fermi liquids and unitary quantum gases has touched

  17. Subwavelength atom localization via quantum coherence in a three-level atomic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghafoor, Fazal [Centre for Quantum Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2011-12-15

    We propose a three-level atomic system where quantum coherence is generated by a classical standing-wave field coupled to the two upper excited decaying levels. Quantum coherence results in cancellation of the spontaneously emitted spectral lines depending on the choice of the phase of the standing wave. We exploit this phenomenon for precision measurement of the atomic position in the standing wave. Measurement of the conditional position probability distribution shows one to eight peaks per unit wavelength of the standing wave. Only one controllable parameter, that is, the phase of the driving standing wave, is enough to control these atomic positions. Along with the other results, the result of obtaining a single peak is remarkable as it enhances the efficiency of our system by a factor of 8.

  18. Subwavelength atom localization via quantum coherence in a three-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghafoor, Fazal

    2011-01-01

    We propose a three-level atomic system where quantum coherence is generated by a classical standing-wave field coupled to the two upper excited decaying levels. Quantum coherence results in cancellation of the spontaneously emitted spectral lines depending on the choice of the phase of the standing wave. We exploit this phenomenon for precision measurement of the atomic position in the standing wave. Measurement of the conditional position probability distribution shows one to eight peaks per unit wavelength of the standing wave. Only one controllable parameter, that is, the phase of the driving standing wave, is enough to control these atomic positions. Along with the other results, the result of obtaining a single peak is remarkable as it enhances the efficiency of our system by a factor of 8.

  19. Theoretical treatment of electron capture and excitation in two-electron system ion-atom, atom-atom collisions at low to intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, M.

    1986-01-01

    A review of various theoretical treatments which have been used to study electron-capture and excitation processes in two-electron-system ion-atom, atom-atom collisions at low to intermediate energy is presented. Advantages as well as limitations associated with these theoretical models in application to practical many-electron ion-atom, atom-atom collisions are specifically pointed out. Although a rigorous theoretical study of many-electron systems has just begun so that reports of theoretical calculations are scarce to date in comparison to flourishing experimental activities, some theoretical results are of great interest and provide important information for understanding collision dynamics of the system which contains many electrons. Selected examples are given for electron capture in a multiply charged ion-He collision, ion-pair formation in an atom-atom collision and alignment and orientation in a Li + + He collision. (Auth.)

  20. Ultracold fermion race is on

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulet, R.

    1999-01-01

    At the quantum level, particles behave very differently depending on whether their spin angular momentum is an integer or a half-integer. Half-integer spin particles are known as fermions, and include all the constituents of atoms: electrons, protons and neutrons. Bosons, on the other hand, are particles with integer spin, such as photons. Atoms are fermions if they are composed of an odd number of particles, like helium-3 or lithium-6. If they have an even number of constituents, like hydrogen, helium-4 or lithium-7, they are known as bosons. Fermions and bosons behave in profoundly different ways under certain conditions, especially at low temperatures. Four years ago, physicists created a Bose condensate, a quantum degenerate gas of bosons. Now the race is on to do the same with fermions. Deborah Jin's group at the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Colorado has cooled a fermion gas to the lowest temperature yet (B DeMarco 1999 Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 4208). And John Thomas and co-workers at Duke University have set a new record for the length of time that fermions can be trapped using lasers (K O'Hara 1999 Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 4204). In this article the author describes the latest advances in the race to create a quantum degenerate gas of fermions. (UK)

  1. Quantized Ultracold Neutrons in Rough Waveguides: GRANIT Experiments and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Escobar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We apply our general theory of transport in systems with random rough boundaries to gravitationally quantized ultracold neutrons in rough waveguides as in GRANIT experiments (ILL, Grenoble. We consider waveguides with roughness in both two and one dimensions (2D and 1D. In the biased diffusion approximation the depletion times for the gravitational quantum states can be easily expressed via each other irrespective of the system parameters. The calculation of the exit neutron count reduces to evaluation of a single constant which contains a complicated integral of the correlation function of surface roughness. In the case of 1D roughness (random grating this constant is calculated analytically for common types of the correlation functions. The results obey simple scaling relations which are slightly different in 1D and 2D. We predict the exit neutron count for the new GRANIT cell.

  2. Dressed-state analysis of efficient two-dimensional atom localization in a four-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhiping; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    We investigate two-dimensional atom localization via spontaneous emission in a four-level atomic system. It is found that the detection probability and precision of two-dimensional atom localization can be significantly improved due to the interference effect between the spontaneous decay channels and the dynamically induced quantum interference generated by the probe and composite fields. More importantly, a 100% probability of finding an atom within the sub-half-wavelength domain of the standing waves can be reached when the corresponding conditions are satisfied. As a result, our scheme may be helpful in laser cooling or atom nano-lithography via atom localization. (paper)

  3. Thermoelectric transport and Peltier cooling of cold atomic gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Charles; Kollath, Corinna; Georges, Antoine

    2016-12-01

    This brief review presents the emerging field of mesoscopic physics with cold atoms, with an emphasis on thermal and 'thermoelectric' transport, i.e. coupled transport of particles and entropy. We review in particular the comparison between theoretically predicted and experimentally observed thermoelectric effects in such systems. We also show how combining well-designed transport properties and evaporative cooling leads to an equivalent of the Peltier effect with cold atoms, which can be used as a new cooling procedure with improved cooling power and efficiency compared to the evaporative cooling currently used in atomic gases. This could lead to a new generation of experiments probing strong correlation effects of ultracold fermionic atoms at low temperatures.

  4. Improved Noninterferometric Test of Collapse Models Using Ultracold Cantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinante, A.; Mezzena, R.; Falferi, P.; Carlesso, M.; Bassi, A.

    2017-09-01

    Spontaneous collapse models predict that a weak force noise acts on any mechanical system, as a consequence of the collapse of the wave function. Significant upper limits on the collapse rate have been recently inferred from precision mechanical experiments, such as ultracold cantilevers and the space mission LISA Pathfinder. Here, we report new results from an experiment based on a high-Q cantilever cooled to millikelvin temperatures, which is potentially able to improve the current bounds on the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) model by 1 order of magnitude. High accuracy measurements of the cantilever thermal fluctuations reveal a nonthermal force noise of unknown origin. This excess noise is compatible with the CSL heating predicted by Adler. Several physical mechanisms able to explain the observed noise have been ruled out.

  5. Quasi-energy of ultracold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, A.I.; Nosov, V.G.

    1992-01-01

    A solution is found to the problem of the propagation of a neutron beam transmitted through a periodically acting high-speed chopper. It is a generalization of the Moshinsky's problem of the evolution of a plane wave in the right half-space after an ideal absorber at the origin of coordinates has been instantaneously removed. The energy spectrum of transmitted neutrons is found to be discrete and corresponding to their quasi-energy. Interference of the states corresponding to different satellite lines leads to a complex spatial pattern with typical beats. A number of experiments with ultracold neutrons are suggested and discussed. 12 refs.; 1 fig

  6. Transfer coefficients in ultracold strongly coupled plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrov, A. A.; Vorob'ev, V. S.; Zelener, B. V.

    2018-03-01

    We use both analytical and molecular dynamic methods for electron transfer coefficients in an ultracold plasma when its temperature is small and the coupling parameter characterizing the interaction of electrons and ions exceeds unity. For these conditions, we use the approach of nearest neighbor to determine the average electron (ion) diffusion coefficient and to calculate other electron transfer coefficients (viscosity and electrical and thermal conductivities). Molecular dynamics simulations produce electronic and ionic diffusion coefficients, confirming the reliability of these results. The results compare favorably with experimental and numerical data from earlier studies.

  7. Research using ultracold neutrons at the ILL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steyerl, A.

    1990-01-01

    In this talk I will make no effort to give an exhaustive, detailed description of the well-published results of recent work with ultracold neutrons (UCN) at the ILL. Instead, there will be a biased selection of some topics in which author happens to be most interested, though in some cases as a spectator from a considerable distance than as an actor. The selection includes the recent lifetime experiment using a Fomblin-coated bottle, the continuing search for an electric dipole moment of the neutron and some ideas on high precision neutron optics experiments

  8. From the atomic nucleus to mesoscopic systems to microwave cavities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Universal statistical aspects of wave scattering by a variety of physical systems ranging from atomic nuclei to mesoscopic systems and microwave cavities are described. A statistical model for the scattering matrix is employed to address the problem of quantum chaotic scattering. The model, introduced in the past ...

  9. Highly versatile atomic micro traps generated by multifrequency magnetic field modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courteille, Ph W; Deh, B; Fortagh, J; Guenther, A; Kraft, S; Marzok, C; Slama, S; Zimmermann, C

    2006-01-01

    We propose the realization of custom-designed adiabatic potentials for cold atoms based on multimode radio frequency radiation in combination with static inhomogeneous magnetic fields. For example, the use of radio frequency combs gives rise to periodic potentials acting as gratings for cold atoms. In strong magnetic field gradients, the lattice constant can be well below 1 μm. By changing the frequencies of the comb in time the gratings can easily be propagated in space, which may prove useful for Bragg scattering atomic matter waves. Furthermore, almost arbitrarily shaped potentials are possible such as disordered potentials on a scale of several 100 nm or lattices with a spatially varying lattice constant. The potentials can be made state selective and, in the case of atomic mixtures, also species selective. This opens new perspectives for generating tailored quantum systems based on ultracold single atoms or degenerate atomic and molecular quantum gases

  10. Hybrid Systems: Cold Atoms Coupled to Micro Mechanical Oscillators =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya Monge, Cris A.

    Micro mechanical oscillators can serve as probes in precision measurements, as transducers to mediate photon-phonon interactions, and when functionalized with magnetic material, as tools to manipulate spins in quantum systems. This dissertation includes two projects where the interactions between cold atoms and mechanical oscillators are studied. In one of the experiments, we have manipulated the Zeeman state of magnetically trapped Rubidium atoms with a magnetic micro cantilever. The results show a spatially localized effect produced by the cantilever that agrees with Landau-Zener theory. In the future, such a scalable system with highly localized interactions and the potential for single-spin sensitivity could be useful for applications in quantum information science or quantum simulation. In a second experiment, work is in progress to couple a sample of optically trapped Rubidium atoms to a levitated nanosphere via an optical lattice. This coupling enables the cooling of the center-of-mass motion of the nanosphere by laser cooling the atoms. In this system, the atoms are trapped in the optical lattice while the sphere is levitated in a separate vacuum chamber by a single-beam optical tweezer. Theoretical analysis of such a system has determined that cooling the center-of-mass motion of the sphere to its quantum ground state is possible, even when starting at room temperature, due to the excellent environmental decoupling achievable in this setup. Nanospheres cooled to the quantum regime can provide new tests of quantum behavior at mesoscopic scales and have novel applications in precision sensing.

  11. A high resolution ion microscope for cold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stecker, Markus; Schefzyk, Hannah; Fortágh, József; Günther, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    We report on an ion-optical system that serves as a microscope for ultracold ground state and Rydberg atoms. The system is designed to achieve a magnification of up to 1000 and a spatial resolution in the 100 nm range, thereby surpassing many standard imaging techniques for cold atoms. The microscope consists of four electrostatic lenses and a microchannel plate in conjunction with a delay line detector in order to achieve single particle sensitivity with high temporal and spatial resolution. We describe the design process of the microscope including ion-optical simulations of the imaging system and characterize aberrations and the resolution limit. Furthermore, we present the experimental realization of the microscope in a cold atom setup and investigate its performance by patterned ionization with a structure size down to 2.7 μ m. The microscope meets the requirements for studying various many-body effects, ranging from correlations in cold quantum gases up to Rydberg molecule formation. (paper)

  12. Using Three-Body Recombination to Extract Electron Temperatures of Ultracold Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, R. S.; Zhang, X. L.; Rolston, S. L.

    2007-01-01

    Three-body recombination, an important collisional process in plasmas, increases dramatically at low electron temperatures, with an accepted scaling of T e -9/2 . We measure three-body recombination in an ultracold neutral xenon plasma by detecting recombination-created Rydberg atoms using a microwave-ionization technique. With the accepted theory (expected to be applicable for weakly coupled plasmas) and our measured rates, we extract the plasma temperatures, which are in reasonable agreement with previous measurements early in the plasma lifetime. The resulting electron temperatures indicate that the plasma continues to cool to temperatures below 1 K

  13. Atomic physics. Introduction to quantum physics and structure of the atomic system. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cagnac, Bernard; Pebay-Peyroula, J.-C.

    1975-01-01

    This lecture is intended for providing experimental foundations to the basic principles of quantum mechanics, from descriptions of some characteristic experiments which emphasize the limitations of the classical theory. The basic laws that govern the internal structure of atomic systems are exposed (waves and photons, the planetary model and principal quantum number, and the spatial classification of kinetic momenta and magnetic moments). Experimental studies presently in progress are reviewed and their aims are outlined [fr

  14. Towards a Negative Refractive Index in an Atomic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Zach; Brewer, Nick; Yavuz, Deniz

    2014-05-01

    The goal of our experiments is to obtain a negative index of refraction in the optical region of the spectrum using an atomic system. The concept of negative refraction, which was first predicted by Veselago more than four decades ago, has recently emerged as a very exciting field of science. Negative index materials exhibit many seemingly strange properties such as electromagnetic vectors forming a left-handed triad. A key potential application for these materials was discovered in 2000 when Pendry predicted that a slab with a negative refractive index can image objects with a resolution far better than the diffraction limit. Thus far, research in negative index materials has primarily focused on meta-materials. The fixed response and often large absorption of these engineered materials motivates our efforts to work in an atomic system. An atomic media offers the potential to be actively modified, for example by changing laser parameters, and can be tuned to cancel absorption. A doped crystal allows for high atomic densities compared to other atomic systems. So far we have identified a transition in such a material, Eu:YSO, as a candidate for these experiments and are performing spectroscopy on this material.

  15. Resonances in atomic few-body systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezei, J.Zs.; Kruppa, A.T.

    2005-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The variational method using a correlated Gaussian basis (SVM, see [1]) has proved to be an excellent method in calculating the characteristics of bound-states. Its trial and error procedures are very powerful to select an optimal basis, while the simple form of the trial function simplifies the calculations, because most of the matrix elements have analytic form. Combining the SVM with the complex rotational technique we are able to determine auto-ionizing states of Coulombic systems with three or more charged particles. Performing the complex rotation of the coordinates (r → re iθ the complex scaled Hamiltonian of a Coulombic system - only Coulomb interactions act between the particles - is a simple function of the rotational angle H(θ) Te -2iθ + Ve -iθ , where T,V are the kinetic and the potential energies of the system. In order to find the complex eigen energies of the rotated Hamiltonian, we have to solve the equation det/e -i2θ T i,j + e -iθ V ij - EΔ ij / = 0, where T ij and V i,j are the matrix elements of the original kinetic energy operator and the potential energy operator, while Δ ij are the overlap integrals of the basis elements. The SVM optimizes the non-linear parameters of the basis in a very specific way in order to get the best ground state energy. In the calculation of the excited auto-ionizing states we used the same set of parameters as for the ground state, because there are no simple recipes to optimize the parameters of a basis in a resonance state calculation. We have found that with the same set of non- linear parameters as for the ground state, we are able to describe all resonances of the Ps - (e + + e - + e - ) system calculated by Ho. We get almost the same accuracy as Ho, although Ho uses different bases for each resonant state. For the second resonance state in Table 1, our width is an order-of-magnitude smaller than Ho's, but our result is in a good agreement with recent calculations

  16. Geometric phase effects in ultracold chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Jisha; Naduvalath, Balakrishnan; Kendrick, Brian K.

    2016-05-01

    In molecules, the geometric phase, also known as Berry's phase, originates from the adiabatic transport of the electronic wavefunction when the nuclei follow a closed path encircling a conical intersection between two electronic potential energy surfaces. It is demonstrated that the inclusion of the geometric phase has an important effect on ultracold chemical reaction rates. The effect appears in rotationally and vibrationally resolved integral cross sections as well as cross sections summed over all product quantum states. It arises from interference between scattering amplitudes of two reaction pathways: a direct path and a looping path that encircle the conical intersection between the two lowest adiabatic electronic potential energy surfaces. Illustrative results are presented for the O+ OH --> H+ O2 reaction and for hydrogen exchange in H+ H2 and D+HD reactions. It is also qualitatively demonstrated that the geometric phase effect can be modulated by applying an external electric field allowing the possibility of quantum control of chemical reactions in the ultracold regime. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant PHY-1505557 (N.B.) and ARO MURI Grant No. W911NF-12-1-0476 (N.B.).

  17. Performance investigation on the ultrasonic atomization liquid desiccant regeneration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zili; Zhang, Kaisheng; Hwang, Yunho; Lian, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We applied ultrasonic atomization technology to boost liquid desiccant regeneration. • We established a novel UARS and made a thorough study on its performance. • We developed a performance prediction model for UARS and validated its accuracy. • The necessary regeneration temperature dropped significantly (4.4 °C) in UARS. • Energy consumption for regenerating desiccant was reduced greatly (60.4%) in UARS. - Abstract: Liquid desiccant dehumidification systems have accumulated considerable research interest in recent years for their great energy saving potential in buildings. Within the system, the regenerator recovering liquid desiccant plays a major role in its performance. When the ultrasonic atomization technology is applied to atomize the desiccant solution into numerous tiny droplets with diameters around 50 μm, the regeneration process could be greatly enhanced. To validate this approach, a novel ultrasonic atomization liquid desiccant regeneration system (UARS) was studied in this work. An Ideal Regeneration Model (IRM) was developed to predict the regeneration performance of the UARS. Additionally, thorough experiments were carried out to validate the model under different operating conditions of the desiccant solution and air stream. The model predicted values and the experimental results coincided, with the average deviation less than 7.9%. The performance of UARS was compared with other regeneration systems from the open literature, while a case study was conducted for the power consumption and energy saving potential of UARS. It was found that the ultrasonic atomization technology enabled utilization of lower-grade energy for desiccant regeneration with the regeneration temperature lowered as much as 4.4 °C. In addition, a considerable energy saving potential of up to 23.4% could be achieved by the UARS for regenerating per unit mass flow of desiccant solution, while the power consumption of the ultrasonic atomization system

  18. A compound parabolic concentrator as an ultracold neutron spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickerson, K.P., E-mail: hickerson@gmail.com; Filippone, B.W., E-mail: bradf@caltech.edu

    2013-09-01

    The design principles of nonimaging optics are applied to ultracold neutrons (UCN). In particular a vertical compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) that efficiently redirects UCN vertically into a bounded spatial volume where they have a maximum energy mga that depends only on the initial phase space cross sectional area πa{sup 2} creates a spectrometer which can be applied to neutron lifetime and gravitational quantum state experiments. -- Highlights: • Nonimaging optics is applied to ultracold neutrons. • A novel ultracold neutron spectrometer is discussed. • New uses may include a neutron lifetime experiment.

  19. A compound parabolic concentrator as an ultracold neutron spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickerson, K.P.; Filippone, B.W.

    2013-01-01

    The design principles of nonimaging optics are applied to ultracold neutrons (UCN). In particular a vertical compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) that efficiently redirects UCN vertically into a bounded spatial volume where they have a maximum energy mga that depends only on the initial phase space cross sectional area πa 2 creates a spectrometer which can be applied to neutron lifetime and gravitational quantum state experiments. -- Highlights: • Nonimaging optics is applied to ultracold neutrons. • A novel ultracold neutron spectrometer is discussed. • New uses may include a neutron lifetime experiment

  20. Quantum-Classical Connection for Hydrogen Atom-Like Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syam, Debapriyo; Roy, Arup

    2011-01-01

    The Bohr-Sommerfeld quantum theory specifies the rules of quantization for circular and elliptical orbits for a one-electron hydrogen atom-like system. This article illustrates how a formula connecting the principal quantum number "n" and the length of the major axis of an elliptical orbit may be arrived at starting from the quantum…

  1. Relativistic Green function for atomic and molecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruzdev, P.F.; Sherstyuk, A.I.

    1981-12-01

    The problem on Green function construction of Dirac equation is solved for a wide class of single electron potentials in the atom and molecule theory. The solution is obtained in the form of a spectrum analysis according to the total system of eigenfuctions of the generalized Dirac problem for eigenvalues. The problem possesses a purely discrete spectrum.

  2. Heralded Magnetism in Non-Hermitian Atomic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony E. Lee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Quantum phase transitions are usually studied in terms of Hermitian Hamiltonians. However, cold-atom experiments are intrinsically non-Hermitian because of spontaneous decay. Here, we show that non-Hermitian systems exhibit quantum phase transitions that are beyond the paradigm of Hermitian physics. We consider the non-Hermitian XY model, which can be implemented using three-level atoms with spontaneous decay. We exactly solve the model in one dimension and show that there is a quantum phase transition from short-range order to quasi-long-range order despite the absence of a continuous symmetry in the Hamiltonian. The ordered phase has a frustrated spin pattern. The critical exponent ν can be 1 or 1/2. Our results can be seen experimentally with trapped ions, cavity QED, and atoms in optical lattices.

  3. Taming light with cold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vestergaard Hau, Lene

    2002-01-01

    Much of the extraordinary progress of developments in communication (e-mail, and/or internet) has been achieved due to improvements in optical communication. This paper describes a new approach which could improve the speed of communication. The ability to stop light in its tracks by passing it through a cloud of ultracold atoms could lead to new techniques for optical storage. The described slow-light experiments have triggered new physics both on the experimental and theoretical fronts. The cold atom system allows the steepest possible refractive index profiles, and therefore the most dramatic effects, as Doppler effects are eliminated. Furthermore, cold atoms provide maximum flexibility in the choice of beam geometry. This is important for the storage and retrieval of multiple pulses of optical information in an atomic medium, as it would allow individual pulses to be selectively addressed. Slow and stopped light have many potential applications in optical communication and processing, including optical information storage, ultra-sensitive optical switches, and optical delay lines. It could also be used in quantum-information processing, in which quantum-mechanical information is used for computing and communication purposes. On a very different front, slow light provides us with a totally new way of probing the unusual properties of Bose-Einstein condensates

  4. Cold and ultracold molecules: science, technology and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, Lincoln D; DeMille, David; Krems, Roman V; Ye Jun

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the current state of the art in the research field of cold and ultracold molecules. It serves as an introduction to the focus issue of New Journal of Physics on Cold and Ultracold Molecules and describes new prospects for fundamental research and technological development. Cold and ultracold molecules may revolutionize physical chemistry and few-body physics, provide techniques for probing new states of quantum matter, allow for precision measurements of both fundamental and applied interest, and enable quantum simulations of condensed-matter phenomena. Ultracold molecules offer promising applications such as new platforms for quantum computing, precise control of molecular dynamics, nanolithography and Bose-enhanced chemistry. The discussion is based on recent experimental and theoretical work and concludes with a summary of anticipated future directions and open questions in this rapidly expanding research field.

  5. Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Many Particle Cold Atom Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-05

    simulate their dynamics far from equilibrium . It is likely that these ideas will find many applications in many areas of physics, quantum chemistry and...focus of this proposal was theoretical research on various non- equilibrium phenomena in isolated quantum systems and applications to experimental setups...theoretical research on various non- equilibrium phenomena in isolated quantum systems and applications to experimental setups largely to cold atoms

  6. An endoscopic detector for ultracold neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goeltl, L.; Fertl, M.; Kirch, K. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory for Particle Physics, Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Institute for Particle Physics, Zuerich (Switzerland); Chowdhuri, Z.; Henneck, R.; Lauss, B.; Mtchedlishvili, A.; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.; Zsigmond, G. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory for Particle Physics, Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Gray, F. [Regis University, Denver, CO (United States); Lefort, T. [Universite de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, Caen (France)

    2013-01-15

    A new versatile detector for ultracold neutrons (UCN) has been built and operated which combines multi-pixel photon counters and GS10 lithium-doped scintillators. Such detectors can be very small and can be used to monitor UCN inside storage vessels or guides with negligible influence (of order 10{sup -6}) on the UCN intensity itself. We have shown that such detectors can be used in a very harsh radiation environment of up to 200Gy/h via the addition of a 4m long quartz light guide in order to place the radiation-sensitive photon counters outside the hot zone. Additionally we have measured the UCN storage times in situ in this harsh environment. (orig.)

  7. A multilayer surface detector for ultracold neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhehui, E-mail: zwang@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hoffbauer, M.A.; Morris, C.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Callahan, N.B.; Adamek, E.R. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Bacon, J.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Blatnik, M. [Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH 44115 (United States); Brandt, A.E. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Broussard, L.J.; Clayton, S.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Cude-Woods, C. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Currie, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Dees, E.B. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Ding, X. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Gao, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Gray, F.E. [Regis University, Denver, CO 80221 (United States); Hickerson, K.P. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Holley, A.T. [Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN 38505 (United States); Ito, T.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Liu, C.-Y. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); and others

    2015-10-21

    A multilayer surface detector for ultracold neutrons (UCNs) is described. The top {sup 10}B layer is exposed to vacuum and directly captures UCNs. The ZnS:Ag layer beneath the {sup 10}B layer is a few microns thick, which is sufficient to detect the charged particles from the {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li neutron-capture reaction, while thin enough that ample light due to α and {sup 7}Li escapes for detection by photomultiplier tubes. A 100-nm thick {sup 10}B layer gives high UCN detection efficiency, as determined by the mean UCN kinetic energy, detector materials, and other parameters. Low background, including negligible sensitivity to ambient neutrons, has also been verified through pulse-shape analysis and comparison with other existing {sup 3}He and {sup 10}B detectors. This type of detector has been configured in different ways for UCN flux monitoring, development of UCN guides and neutron lifetime research.

  8. Cold atoms close to surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Wildermuth, Stephan; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2005-01-01

    Microscopic atom optical devices integrated on atom chips allow to precisely control and manipulate ultra-cold (T atoms and Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) close to surfaces. The relevant energy scale of a BEC is extremely small (down to ... be utilized as a sensor for variations of the potential energy of the atoms close to the surface. Here we describe how to use trapped atoms as a measurement device and analyze the performance and flexibility of the field sensor. We demonstrate microscopic magnetic imaging with simultaneous high spatial...

  9. Asymptotic inference in system identification for the atom maser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Catalin; van Horssen, Merlijn; Guta, Madalin

    2012-11-28

    System identification is closely related to control theory and plays an increasing role in quantum engineering. In the quantum set-up, system identification is usually equated to process tomography, i.e. estimating a channel by probing it repeatedly with different input states. However, for quantum dynamical systems such as quantum Markov processes, it is more natural to consider the estimation based on continuous measurements of the output, with a given input that may be stationary. We address this problem using asymptotic statistics tools, for the specific example of estimating the Rabi frequency of an atom maser. We compute the Fisher information of different measurement processes as well as the quantum Fisher information of the atom maser, and establish the local asymptotic normality of these statistical models. The statistical notions can be expressed in terms of spectral properties of certain deformed Markov generators, and the connection to large deviations is briefly discussed.

  10. Two-dimensional atom localization via two standing-wave fields in a four-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongtao; Wang Hui; Wang Zhiping

    2011-01-01

    We propose a scheme for the two-dimensional (2D) localization of an atom in a four-level Y-type atomic system. By applying two orthogonal standing-wave fields, the atoms can be localized at some special positions, leading to the formation of sub-wavelength 2D periodic spatial distributions. The localization peak position and number as well as the conditional position probability can be controlled by the intensities and detunings of optical fields.

  11. Heavy particle scattering by atomic and nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazauskas, R.

    2003-10-01

    In this thesis quantum mechanical non-relativistic few-body problem is discussed. Basing on fundamentals ideas from Faddeev and Yakubovski three and four body equations are formulated and solved for fermionic atomic and nuclear systems. Former equations are modified to include long range interactions. Original results for nuclear and molecular physics were obtained: -) positively charged particle scattering on hydrogen atoms was considered; predictions for π + → H, μ + → H and p + → H scattering lengths were given. Existence of an unknown, very weakly bound H + 2 bound state was predicted. -) Motivated by the possible observation of bound four neutron structure at GANIL we have studied compatibility of such an existence within the current nuclear interaction models. -) 4 nucleon scattering at low energies was investigated. Results for n → 3 H, p → 3 H and p → 3 He systems were compared with the experimental data. Validity of realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction models is questioned. (author)

  12. The geometric phase in two-level atomic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Mingzhen; Barber, Zeb W.; Fischer, Joe A.; Randall Babbitt, Wm.

    2004-01-01

    We report the observation of the geometric phase in a closed two-level atomic system using stimulated photon echoes. The two-level system studied consists of the two-electronic energy levels ( 3 H 4 and 3 H 6 ) of Tm 3+ doped in YAG crystal. When a two-level atom at an arbitrary superposition state is excited by a pair of specially designed laser pulses, the excited state component gains a relative phase with respect to the ground state component. We identified the phase shift to be of pure geometric nature. The dynamic phase associated to the driving Hamiltonian is unchanged. The experiment results of the phase change agree with the theory to the extent of the measurement limit

  13. Assembly, destruction and manipulation of atomic, molecular and complex systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Padellec, Arnaud Pierre Frederic

    2003-04-01

    In this report for Accreditation to Supervise Researches (HDR), the author first indicates his professional curriculum (diplomas, teaching activities, responsibilities in the field of education and research, publications), and then proposes a presentation of his scientific works and researches. He notably proposes an overview of the different experimental techniques he implemented: CRYRING storage ring, confluent beams, flow post-discharge with mass spectrometry and Langmuir probe, crossed beams, and so on. He reports works dealing with the manipulation and destruction of atomic, molecular and complex systems: detachment of atomic anions by electronic impact, detachment and dissociation of small carbon aggregates by electronic impact, dissociative recombination, dissociative ionisation and excitation, creation of pairs of ions, manipulation of sodium fluoride aggregates. He finally presents research projects regarding the assembly of molecular and complex systems

  14. Single-atom detection on a chip: from realization to application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stibor, A; Bender, H; Kuehnhold, S; Fortagh, J; Zimmermann, C; Guenther, A, E-mail: aguenth@pit.physik.uni-tuebingen.d [CQ Center for Collective Quantum Phenomena and their Applications, Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    In this paper, we describe the preparation and detection of ultracold atoms on a microchip with single-atom sensitivity. The detection scheme is based on multi-photon ionization of atoms and the subsequent guiding of the generated ions by ion optics to a channel electron multiplier. We resolve single atoms with a detection efficiency above 60%. The detector is suitable for real-time observations of static and dynamic processes in ultracold quantum gases. Although the ionization is destructive, sampling a small subset of the atomic distribution is sufficient for the determination of the desired information. We take full high-resolution spectra of ultracold atoms by ionizing only 5% of the atoms. Using an additional microwave near 6.8 GHz, the detection scheme becomes energy, position and state selective. This can be used for in situ determination of the energy distribution and temperature of atom clouds inside the trap and applied for future correlation measurements.

  15. Efficient Atomic One-Qubit Phase Gate Realized by a Cavity QED and Identical Atoms System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yong; Jiang Nianquan

    2010-01-01

    We present a scheme to implement a one-qubit phase gate with a two-level atom crossing an optical cavity in which some identical atoms are trapped. One can conveniently acquire an arbitrary phase shift of the gate by properly choosing the number of atoms trapped in the cavity and the velocity of the atom crossing the cavity. The present scheme provides a very simple and efficient way for implementing one-qubit phase gate. (general)

  16. EON: software for long time simulations of atomic scale systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chill, Samuel T.; Welborn, Matthew; Terrell, Rye; Zhang, Liang; Berthet, Jean-Claude; Pedersen, Andreas; Jónsson, Hannes; Henkelman, Graeme

    2014-07-01

    The EON software is designed for simulations of the state-to-state evolution of atomic scale systems over timescales greatly exceeding that of direct classical dynamics. States are defined as collections of atomic configurations from which a minimization of the potential energy gives the same inherent structure. The time evolution is assumed to be governed by rare events, where transitions between states are uncorrelated and infrequent compared with the timescale of atomic vibrations. Several methods for calculating the state-to-state evolution have been implemented in EON, including parallel replica dynamics, hyperdynamics and adaptive kinetic Monte Carlo. Global optimization methods, including simulated annealing, basin hopping and minima hopping are also implemented. The software has a client/server architecture where the computationally intensive evaluations of the interatomic interactions are calculated on the client-side and the state-to-state evolution is managed by the server. The client supports optimization for different computer architectures to maximize computational efficiency. The server is written in Python so that developers have access to the high-level functionality without delving into the computationally intensive components. Communication between the server and clients is abstracted so that calculations can be deployed on a single machine, clusters using a queuing system, large parallel computers using a message passing interface, or within a distributed computing environment. A generic interface to the evaluation of the interatomic interactions is defined so that empirical potentials, such as in LAMMPS, and density functional theory as implemented in VASP and GPAW can be used interchangeably. Examples are given to demonstrate the range of systems that can be modeled, including surface diffusion and island ripening of adsorbed atoms on metal surfaces, molecular diffusion on the surface of ice and global structural optimization of nanoparticles.

  17. Universal relations of an ultracold Fermi gas with arbitrary spin-orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Jianwen; Qi, Ran; Zhang, Peng

    2018-05-01

    We derive the universal relations for an ultracold two-component Fermi gas with a spin-orbit coupling (SOC) ∑α,β =x ,y ,zλα βσαpβ , where px ,y ,z and σx ,y ,z are the single-atom momentum and Pauli operators for pseudospin, respectively, and the SOC intensity λα β could take an arbitrary value. We consider the system with an s -wave short-range interspecies interaction, and ignore the SOC-induced modification for the value of the scattering length. Using the first-quantized approach developed by Tan [S. Tan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 145302 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.145302], we obtain the short-range and high-momentum expansions for the one-body real-space correlation function and momentum distribution function, respectively. For our system these functions are a 2 ×2 matrix in the pseudospin basis. We find that the leading-order (1 /k4 ) behavior of the diagonal elements of the momentum distribution function, i.e., n↑↑(k ) and n↓↓(k ) , are not modified by the SOC. However, the SOC can significantly modify the large-k behaviors of the distribution difference δ n (k ) ≡n↑↑(k ) -n↓↓(k ) as well as the nondiagonal elements of the momentum distribution function, i.e., n↑↓(k ) and n↓↑(k ) . In the absence of the SOC, the leading order of δ n (k ) , n↑↓(k ) , and n↓↑(k ) is O (1 /k6) . When SOC appears, it can induce a term on the order of 1 /k5 for these elements. We further derive the adiabatic relation and the energy functional. Our results show that the SOC can induce an additional term in the energy functional, which describes the contribution from the SOC to the total energy. In addition, the form of the adiabatic relation for our system is not modified by the SOC. Our results are applicable for the systems with any type of single-atom trapping potential, which could be either diagonal or nondiagonal in the pseudospin basis.

  18. Optical Studies of Strong Coupling and Recombination in Ultracold Neutral Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killian, Thomas C.

    2004-01-01

    The ultracold atoms and plasmas research group at Rice University uses a combination of atomic and plasma physics techniques to create neutral plasmas that are orders of magnitude colder than have ever been studied before. Through this work, we probe the basic plasma physics of this exotic regime. During the past year, the major components of a new experiment were completed. We demonstrated a powerful new diagnostic, optical imaging of the plasma, which led to a paper that was published in Physical Review Letters. (Figure A, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 143001 (2004)) This was the central feature of my DOE Junior Faculty Award proposal. DOE funding has been used to support one postdoctoral researcher, multiple graduate students, the principle investigator, apparatus construction, and normal laboratory expenses

  19. Cold atoms as a coolant for levitated optomechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjit, Gambhir; Montoya, Cris; Geraci, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    Optically trapped dielectric objects are well suited for reaching the quantum regime of their center-of-mass motion in an ultrahigh-vacuum environment. We show that ground-state cooling of an optically trapped nanosphere is achievable when starting at room temperature, by sympathetic cooling of a cold-atomic gas optically coupled to the nanoparticle. Unlike cavity cooling in the resolved-sideband limit, this system requires only a modest cavity finesse and it allows the cooling to be turned off, permitting subsequent observation of strongly coupled dynamics between the atoms and sphere. Nanospheres cooled to their quantum ground state could have applications in quantum information science or in precision sensing.

  20. Atomic and Molecular Systems in Intense Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenz, A.

    2008-07-01

    The full quantum mechanical treatment of atomic and molecular systems exposed to intense laser pulses is a so far unsolved challenge, even for systems as small as molecular hydrogen. Therefore, a number of simplified qualitative and quantitative models have been introduced in order to provide at least some interpretational tools for experimental data. The assessment of these models describing the molecular response is complicated, since a comparison to experiment requires often a number of averages to be performed. This includes in many cases averaging of different orientations of the molecule with respect to the laser field, focal volume effects, etc. Furthermore, the pulse shape and even the peak intensity is experimentally not known with very high precision; considering, e.g., the exponential intensity dependence of the ionization signal. Finally, experiments usually provide only relative yields. As a consequence of all these averagings and uncertainties, it is possible that different models may successfully explain some experimental results or features, although these models disagree substantially, if their predictions are compared before averaging. Therefore, fully quantum-mechanical approaches at least for small atomic and molecular systems are highly desirable and have been developed in our group. This includes efficient codes for solving the time-dependent Schrodinger equation of atomic hydrogen, helium or other effective one- or two-electron atoms as well as for the electronic motion in linear (effective) one-and two-electron diatomic molecules like H_2.Very recently, a code for larger molecular systems that adopts the so-called single-active electron approximation was also successfully implemented and applied. In the first part of this talk popular models describing intense laser-field ionization of atoms and their extensions to molecules are described. Then their validity is discussed on the basis of quantum-mechanical calculations. Finally, some

  1. Precision spectroscopy with ultracold 87Rb2 triplet molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis I report precision spectroscopy with ultracold 87 Rb 2 triplet molecules where we use lasers to couple the states in different molecular potentials. We study in detail states of the a 3 sum + u and (1) 3 sum + g potentials. These states are of great importance for transferring weakly bound molecules to the ro-vibrational triplet ground state via states of the excited potential. As most experiments start from molecules in their X 1 sum + g ground state, the triplet states were hard to access via dipole transitions and remained largely unexplored. The measurements presented in this thesis are the first detailed study of diatomic 87 Rb 2 molecules in these states. Our experiments start with an ultracold cloud of 87 Rb atoms. We then load this cloud into an optical lattice where we use a magnetic Feshbach resonance at 1007.4 G to perform a Feshbach association. After we have removed all unbound atoms, we end up with a pure sample of weakly bound Feshbach molecules inside the optical lattice. The optical lattice prevents these molecules from colliding with each other which results in molecular lifetimes on the order of a few hundred milliseconds. In the first set of experiments, we use a laser coupling the Feshbach state to the excited (1) 3 sum + g triplet state to map out its low-lying vibrational (v = 0.. 15), rotational, hyperfine, and Zeeman structure. The experimental results are in good agreement with calculations done by Marius Lysebo and Prof. Leif Veseth. We then map out in detail the vibrational, rotational, hyperfine, and Zeeman structure of the a 3 sum + u triplet ground state using dark state spectroscopy with levels in the (1) 3 sum + g potential as an intermediate state. In this scheme we are able to access molecules in triplet states because our Feshbach state has strong triplet character. Interestingly, it happens that some deeply bound states which belong to the X 1 sum + g potential are close to levels in the a 3 sum + u potential. In

  2. Atomic size effect on the formation of ionized cluster beam epitaxy in Lennard-Jones systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh Horngming; Averback, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    Ionized cluster beam deposition is studied by molecular dynamics simulations in which the atomic size of incident cluster atoms is different from the size of substrate atoms. Lennard-Jones interatomic potentials are used for the two-component system. The results provide the morphologies of the overlayers for various atomic sizes and are compared to simulation results of molecular beam epitaxy. (orig.)

  3. Safety and Mission Assurance (SMA) Automated Task Order Management System (ATOMS) Operation Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Shawn; Fikes, Lou A.

    2016-01-01

    This document describes operational aspects of the ATOMS system. The information provided is limited to the functionality provided by ATOMS and does not include information provided in the contractor's proprietary financial and task management system.

  4. Ordered structures in rotating ultracold Bose gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barberan, N.; Dagnino, D.; Lewenstein, M.; Osterloh, K.

    2006-01-01

    Two-dimentional systems of trapped samples of few cold bosonic atoms submitted to strong rotation around the perpendicular axis may be realized in optical lattices and microtraps. We investigate theoretically the evolution of ground state structures of such systems as the rotational frequency Ω increases. Various kinds of ordered structures are observed. In some cases, hidden interference patterns exhibit themselves only in the pair correlation function; in some other cases explicit broken-symmetry structures appear that modulate the density. For N<10 atoms, the standard scenario, valid for large sytems is absent, and is only gradually recovered as N increases. On the one hand, the Laughlin state in the strong rotational regime contains ordered structures much more similar to a Wigner molecule than to a fermionic quantum liquid. On the other hand, in the weak rotational regime, the possibility to obtain equilibrium states, whose density reveals an array of vortices, is restricted to the vicinity of some critical values of the rotational frequency Ω

  5. Use of ultracold neutrons for condensed-matter studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaudon, A.

    1997-05-01

    Ultracold neutrons have such low velocities that they are reflected by most materials at all incident angles and can be stored in material bottles for long periods of time during which their intrinsic properties can be studied in great detail. These features have been mainly used for fundamental-physics studies including the detection of a possible neutron electric dipole moment and the precise determination of neutron-decay properties. Ultracold neutrons can also play a role in condensed-matter studies with the help of high-resolution spectrometers that use gravity as a strongly dispersive medium for low-velocity neutrons. Such studies have so far been limited by the low intensity of existing ultracold-neutron sources but could be reconsidered with more intense sources, which are now envisaged. This report provides a broad survey of the properties of ultracold neutrons (including their reflectivity by different types of samples), of ultracold-neutron spectrometers that are compared with other high-resolution instruments, of results obtained in the field of condensed matter with these instruments, and of neutron microscopes. All these subjects are illustrated by numerous examples.

  6. Use of ultracold neutrons for condensed-matter studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaudon, A.

    1997-05-01

    Ultracold neutrons have such low velocities that they are reflected by most materials at all incident angles and can be stored in material bottles for long periods of time during which their intrinsic properties can be studied in great detail. These features have been mainly used for fundamental-physics studies including the detection of a possible neutron electric dipole moment and the precise determination of neutron-decay properties. Ultracold neutrons can also play a role in condensed-matter studies with the help of high-resolution spectrometers that use gravity as a strongly dispersive medium for low-velocity neutrons. Such studies have so far been limited by the low intensity of existing ultracold-neutron sources but could be reconsidered with more intense sources, which are now envisaged. This report provides a broad survey of the properties of ultracold neutrons (including their reflectivity by different types of samples), of ultracold-neutron spectrometers that are compared with other high-resolution instruments, of results obtained in the field of condensed matter with these instruments, and of neutron microscopes. All these subjects are illustrated by numerous examples

  7. Quantum interference and coherent control in dissipative atomic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paspalakis, E.

    1999-01-01

    In this thesis we study the effects of quantum interference arising from dissipative processes in atomic systems. First, we identify quantum interference phenomena arising from decay mechanisms. Second, we use dynamical methods (the properties of laser fields) to obtain a tailored response of systems in which such interferences are present. We are mainly concerned with two dissipative processes: spontaneous emission and ionization. First, we study the effects of quantum interference arising from spontaneous emission on the population dynamics and the spontaneous emission spectrum of several multi-level systems. Coherent 'phase' control methods for manipulating the response of systems involving spontaneous emission interference are also proposed. Several interesting phenomena are identified such as partial and total quenching of spontaneous emission, phase dependent population dynamics and coherent population trapping. Next, we consider the process of laser-induced continuum structure, where an atom is coupled by two laser fields to the same electronic continuum. An {it ab initio}, non-perturbative study of this process in helium using the R-Matrix Floquet theory is presented. The results of our numerical calculations are compared with those obtained by simple perturbative models and with recent experimental results. The possibility of coherent population transfer via a continuum of states is then analyzed. We study two distinct atomic systems. A laser-induced continuum structure scheme (unstructured continuum) and a bichromatically driven autoionizing scheme (structured continuum). We find that the same conditions which lead to 'dark' states in these systems lead to efficient population transfer. We also identify parameters detrimental to the transfer efficiency and propose methods to overcome them. Finally, we study short pulse propagation in systems involving interfering dissipation mechanisms. We show that the existence of dark states can lead to loss-free and

  8. Utilization of atomic energy in Asia and nuclear nonproliferation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Makoto

    1995-01-01

    The economical growth in East Asia is conspicuous as it was called East Asian Miracle, and also the demand of energy increased rapidly. The end of Cold War created the condition for the further development in this district. Many countries advanced positively the plan of atomic energy utilization, and it can be said that the smooth progress of atomic energy utilization is the key for the continuous growth in this district in view of the restriction of petroleum resources and its price rise in future and the deterioration of global environment. The nuclear nonproliferation treaty (NPT) has accomplished large role, but also its limitation became clear. At present, there is not the local security system in Asia, but in order that the various countries in Asia make the utilization of atomic energy and the security compatible, it is useful to jointly develop safety technology, execute security measures and form the nuclear fuel cycle as Asia. Energy and environmental problems in Asia are reported. Threat is essentially intention and capability, and the regulation only by capability regardless of intention brings about unrealistic result. The limitation of the NPT is discussed. The international relation of interdependence deepends after Cold War, and the security in Asia after Cold War is considered. As the mechanism of forming the nuclear fuel cycle for whole Asia, it is desirable to realize ASIATOM by accumulating the results of possible cooperation. (K.I.)

  9. Trapping and interactions of an ultracold gas of Cs2 molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, M.; Kraemer, T.; Herbig, J.; Waldburger, P.; Naegerl, H.C.; Chin, C.; Grimm, R.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We investigate dynamics and interactions of Cs 2 dimers in a CO2-laser dipole trap. Starting with a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of 2.2 x 10 5 Cs atoms, we create ultracold molecules in a single, weakly bound quantum state by sweeping the magnetic field across a narrow Feshbach resonance. When the molecules are created in free space, the conversion efficiency exceeds 30 %, yielding up to 50000 molecules. In our trapping experiments, about 6000 ultracold Cs 2 dimers are prepared in the optical trap at a temperature of 200 nK. We transfer the trapped molecules from the initial molecular state to other molecular states by following avoided crossings. We find two magnetically tunable resonances in collisions between the molecules for one of the molecular states. We interpret these Feshbach-liKEX resonances as being induced by Cs 4 bound states near the molecular scattering continuum. Further, we have discovered a new molecular state with very large orbital angular momentum of l = 8. This state is very weakly coupled to one of the initial molecular states. We use the associated avoided crossing as a molecular beam splitter to realize a molecular Ramsey-type interferometer. Refs. 2 (author)

  10. APIPIS: the Atomic Physics Ion-Photon Interaction System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Meron, M.; Kostroun, V.O.

    1985-01-01

    A proposed new facility for the study of highly charged heavy ions is described. The basic elements of APIPIS, the Atomic Physics Ion-Photon Interaction System, are: (1) a source of multiply-charged ions; (2) a linear accelerator; (3) a synchrotron storage ring; and (4) a source of high brightness x rays. The placement of a heavy ion storage ring at the x-ray ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source will provide unique opportunities for the study of photo-excitation of heavy ions

  11. Wireless embedded control system for atomically precise manufacturing

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Yasser; Randall, John N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper will explore the possibilities of implementing a wireless embedded control system for atomically precise manufacturing. The manufacturing process, similar to Scanning Tunneling Microscopy, takes place within an Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) chamber at a pressure of 10-10 torr. In order to create vibration isolation, and to keep internal noise to a minimum, a wireless link inside the UHV chamber becomes essential. We present a MATLAB simulation of the problem, and then demonstrate a hardware scheme between a Gumstix computer and a Linux based laptop for controlling nano-manipulators with three degrees of freedom. © 2011 IEEE.

  12. Wireless embedded control system for atomically precise manufacturing

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Yasser

    2011-04-01

    This paper will explore the possibilities of implementing a wireless embedded control system for atomically precise manufacturing. The manufacturing process, similar to Scanning Tunneling Microscopy, takes place within an Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) chamber at a pressure of 10-10 torr. In order to create vibration isolation, and to keep internal noise to a minimum, a wireless link inside the UHV chamber becomes essential. We present a MATLAB simulation of the problem, and then demonstrate a hardware scheme between a Gumstix computer and a Linux based laptop for controlling nano-manipulators with three degrees of freedom. © 2011 IEEE.

  13. Moeller polarimetry with atomic hydrogen targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chudakov, E.; Luppov, V.

    2005-01-01

    A novel proposal of using polarized atomic hydrogen gas, stored in an ultra-cold magnetic trap, as the target for electron beam polarimetry based on Moeller scattering is discussed. Such a target of practically 100% polarized electrons could provide a superb systematic accuracy of about 0.5% for beam polarization measurements. Feasibility studies for the CEBAF electron beam have been performed. (orig.)

  14. Quantum Control of Open Systems and Dense Atomic Ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLoreto, Christopher

    Controlling the dynamics of open quantum systems; i.e. quantum systems that decohere because of interactions with the environment, is an active area of research with many applications in quantum optics and quantum computation. My thesis expands the scope of this inquiry by seeking to control open systems in proximity to an additional system. The latter could be a classical system such as metal nanoparticles, or a quantum system such as a cluster of similar atoms. By modelling the interactions between the systems, we are able to expand the accessible state space of the quantum system in question. For a single, three-level quantum system, I examine isolated systems that have only normal spontaneous emission. I then show that intensity-intensity correlation spectra, which depend directly on the density matrix of the system, can be used detect whether transitions share a common energy level. This detection is possible due to the presence of quantum interference effects between two transitions if they are connected. This effect allows one to asses energy level structure diagrams in complex atoms/molecules. By placing an open quantum system near a nanoparticle dimer, I show that the spontaneous emission rate of the system can be changed "on demand" by changing the polarization of an incident, driving field. In a three-level, Lambda system, this allows a qubit to both retain high qubit fidelity when it is operating, and to be rapidly initialized to a pure state once it is rendered unusable by decoherence. This type of behaviour is not possible in a single open quantum system; therefore adding a classical system nearby extends the overall control space of the quantum system. An open quantum system near identical neighbours in a dense ensemble is another example of how the accessible state space can be expanded. I show that a dense ensemble of atoms rapidly becomes disordered with states that are not directly excited by an incident field becoming significantly populated

  15. Repulsive atomic gas in a harmonic trap on the border of itinerant ferromagnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conduit, G J; Simons, B D

    2009-11-13

    Alongside superfluidity, itinerant (Stoner) ferromagnetism remains one of the most well-characterized phases of correlated Fermi systems. A recent experiment has reported the first evidence for novel phase behavior on the repulsive side of the Feshbach resonance in a two-component ultracold Fermi gas. By adapting recent theoretical studies to the atomic trap geometry, we show that an adiabatic ferromagnetic transition would take place at a weaker interaction strength than is observed in experiment. This discrepancy motivates a simple nonequilibrium theory that takes account of the dynamics of magnetic defects and three-body losses. The formalism developed displays good quantitative agreement with experiment.

  16. Dimensional BCS-BEC crossover in ultracold Fermi gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boettcher, Igor

    2014-12-10

    We investigate thermodynamics and phase structure of ultracold Fermi gases, which can be realized and measured in the laboratory with modern trapping techniques. We approach the subject from a both theoretical and experimental perspective. Central to the analysis is the systematic comparison of the BCS-BEC crossover of two-component fermions in both three and two dimensions. A dimensional reduction can be achieved in experiments by means of highly anisotropic traps. The Functional Renormalization Group (FRG) allows for a description of both cases in a unified theoretical framework. In three dimensions we discuss with the FRG the influence of high momentum particles onto the density, extend previous approaches to the Unitary Fermi Gas to reach quantitative precision, and study the breakdown of superfluidity due to an asymmetry in the population of the two fermion components. In this context we also investigate the stability of the Sarma phase. For the two-dimensional system scattering theory in reduced dimension plays an important role. We present both the theoretically as well as experimentally relevant aspects thereof. After a qualitative analysis of the phase diagram and the equation of state in two dimensions with the FRG we describe the experimental determination of the phase diagram of the two-dimensional BCS-BEC crossover in collaboration with the group of S. Jochim at PI Heidelberg.

  17. The MCUCN simulation code for ultracold neutron physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsigmond, G.

    2018-02-01

    Ultracold neutrons (UCN) have very low kinetic energies 0-300 neV, thereby can be stored in specific material or magnetic confinements for many hundreds of seconds. This makes them a very useful tool in probing fundamental symmetries of nature (for instance charge-parity violation by neutron electric dipole moment experiments) and contributing important parameters for the Big Bang nucleosynthesis (neutron lifetime measurements). Improved precision experiments are in construction at new and planned UCN sources around the world. MC simulations play an important role in the optimization of such systems with a large number of parameters, but also in the estimation of systematic effects, in benchmarking of analysis codes, or as part of the analysis. The MCUCN code written at PSI has been extensively used for the optimization of the UCN source optics and in the optimization and analysis of (test) experiments within the nEDM project based at PSI. In this paper we present the main features of MCUCN and interesting benchmark and application examples.

  18. Ultracold Anions for High-Precision Antihydrogen Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerchiari, G; Kellerbauer, A; Safronova, M S; Safronova, U I; Yzombard, P

    2018-03-30

    Experiments with antihydrogen (H[over ¯]) for a study of matter-antimatter symmetry and antimatter gravity require ultracold H[over ¯] to reach ultimate precision. A promising path towards antiatoms much colder than a few kelvin involves the precooling of antiprotons by laser-cooled anions. Because of the weak binding of the valence electron in anions-dominated by polarization and correlation effects-only few candidate systems with suitable transitions exist. We report on a combination of experimental and theoretical studies to fully determine the relevant binding energies, transition rates, and branching ratios of the most promising candidate La^{-}. Using combined transverse and collinear laser spectroscopy, we determined the resonant frequency of the laser cooling transition to be ν=96.592 713(91)  THz and its transition rate to be A=4.90(50)×10^{4}  s^{-1}. Using a novel high-precision theoretical treatment of La^{-} we calculated yet unmeasured energy levels, transition rates, branching ratios, and lifetimes to complement experimental information on the laser cooling cycle of La^{-}. The new data establish the suitability of La^{-} for laser cooling and show that the cooling transition is significantly stronger than suggested by a previous theoretical study.

  19. Key technologies and applications of laser cooling and trapping "8"7Rb atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ru, Ning; Zhang, Li; Wang, Yu; Fan, Shangchun

    2016-01-01

    Atom Interferometry is proved to be a potential method for measuring the acceleration of atoms due to Gravity, we are now building a feasible system of cold atom gravimeter. In this paper development and the important applications of laser cooling and trapping atoms are introduced, some key techniques which are used to obtain "8"7Rb cold atoms in our experiments are also discussed.

  20. Information entropy properties of the atoms in the system of coupled Λ-type three-level atoms interacting with coherent field in Kerr medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ke; Ling Weijun

    2011-01-01

    The information entropy properties of the atoms of coupled Λ-type three-level atoms interacting with coherent field are studied by means of quantum theory, and discussed the time evolutions of the information entropy of the atoms via the average photon number, initial state of the atoms, detuning, coupling constant between the atoms and the coefficient of Kerr medium. Numerical calculation results show that the time evolutions of the information entropy properties of the atoms strongly dependent on the initial state of the system and the average photon number. Detuning, coupling constant between the atoms and the Kerr coefficient still make influence on the information entropy of the atoms. (authors)

  1. Confinement of ultra-cold neutron in a multiple cusp magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, Nobumichi; Inoue, Nobuyuki; Nihei, Hitoshi; Kinosita, Ken-ichi [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-08-01

    A new confinement system of ultra-cold neutrons is proposed. The neutron bottle is made of a rectangular vacuum chamber with the size of 40 cm x 40 cm x 30 cm covered with arrays of bar type permanent magnets. The operation of bottle requires neither cooling system nor high electric power supply, and thereby the bottle is appropriate to use in the room which is located in controlled area. The maximum kinetic energy of neutrons confined is 20 neV. Experimental scheme to test the performance of the bottle is described. (author)

  2. Analytical results for the time-dependent current density distribution of expanding ultracold gases after a sudden change of the confining potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boumaza, R.; Bencheikh, K.

    2017-12-01

    Using the so-called operator product expansion to lowest order, we extend the work in Campbell et al (2015 Phys. Rev. Lett 114 125302) by deriving a simple analytical expression for the long-time asymptotic one-body reduced density matrix during free expansion for a one-dimensional system of bosons with large atom number interacting through a repulsive delta potential initially confined by a potential well. This density matrix allows direct access to the momentum distribution and also to the mass current density. For initially confining power-law potentials we give explicit expressions, in the limits of very weak and very strong interaction, for the current density distributions during the free expansion. In the second part of the work we consider the expansion of ultracold gas from a confining harmonic trap to another harmonic trap with a different frequency. For the case of a quantum impenetrable gas of bosons (a Tonks-Girardeau gas) with a given atom number, we present an exact analytical expression for the mass current distribution (mass transport) after release from one harmonic trap to another harmonic trap. It is shown that, for a harmonically quenched Tonks-Girardeau gas, the current distribution is a suitable collective observable and under the weak quench regime, it exhibits oscillations at the same frequencies as those recently predicted for the peak momentum distribution in the breathing mode. The analysis is extended to other possible quenched systems.

  3. Atomic rubidium, the workhorse of theoretical collision physics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaar, B.; van Kempen, E.; Kokkelmans, S.J.J.M.F.

    2008-01-01

    Since the first realizations of Bose-Einstein condensates in ultracold atomic gases in 1995, the 85Rb and 87Rb atomic species have acted as the workhorses of experimental developments in this field. Parallel to and partly preceding this work the same isotopes figured also as workhorses for

  4. Ultracold molecules for the masses: Evaporative cooling and magneto-optical trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhl, B. K.

    While cold molecule experiments are rapidly moving towards their promised benefits of precision spectroscopy, controllable chemistry, and novel condensed phases, heretofore the field has been greatly limited by a lack of methods to cool and compress chemically diverse species to temperatures below ten millikelvin. While in atomic physics these needs are fulfilled by laser cooling, magneto-optical trapping, and evaporative cooling, until now none of these techniques have been applicable to molecules. In this thesis, two major breakthroughs are reported. The first is the observation of evaporative cooling in magnetically trapped hydroxyl (OH) radicals, which potentially opens a path all the way to Bose-Einstein condensation of dipolar radicals, as well as allowing cold- and ultracold-chemistry studies of fundamental reaction mechanisms. Through the combination of an extremely high gradient magnetic quadrupole trap and the use of the OH Λ-doublet transition to enable highly selective forced evaporation, cooling by an order of magnitude in temperature was achieved and yielded a final temperature no higher than 5mK. The second breakthrough is the successful application of laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping to molecules. Motivated by a proposal in this thesis, laser cooling of molecules is now known to be technically feasible in a select but substantial pool of diatomic molecules. The demonstration of not only Doppler cooling but also two-dimensional magneto-optical trapping in yttrium (II) oxide, YO, is expected to enable rapid growth in the availability of ultracold molecules—just as the invention of the atomic magneto-optical trap stimulated atomic physics twenty-five years ago.

  5. Ultracold and very cold neutron facility in KUR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Yuji; Utsuro, Masahiko

    1992-01-01

    The present status of the ultracold and very cold neutron facility installed in the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) is described in this presentation. It consists of a VCN (very cold neutrons) guide tube, a VCN bender and a supermirror neutron turbine. The guide tube extracts VCN from a liquid deuterium cold neutron source in a graphite thermal column and the neutron turbine converts VCN to UCN (ultracold neutrons). As for the utilization of the present facility, VCN radiography and an UCN gravity spectrometer are shown for the practical examples of the research with VCN and UCN. (author)

  6. Hydrogen atom as a quantum-classical hybrid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan, Fei; Wu, Biao

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen atom is studied as a quantum-classical hybrid system, where the proton is treated as a classical object while the electron is regarded as a quantum object. We use a well known mean-field approach to describe this hybrid hydrogen atom; the resulting dynamics for the electron and the proton is compared to their full quantum dynamics. The electron dynamics in the hybrid description is found to be only marginally different from its full quantum counterpart. The situation is very different for the proton: in the hybrid description, the proton behaves like a free particle; in the fully quantum description, the wave packet center of the proton orbits around the center of mass. Furthermore, we find that the failure to describe the proton dynamics properly can be regarded as a manifestation of the fact that there is no conservation of momentum in the mean-field hybrid approach. We expect that such a failure is a common feature for all existing approaches for quantum-classical hybrid systems of Born-Oppenheimer type.

  7. Spatially distributed multipartite entanglement enables EPR steering of atomic clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Philipp; Prüfer, Maximilian; Strobel, Helmut; Linnemann, Daniel; Frölian, Anika; Gasenzer, Thomas; Gärttner, Martin; Oberthaler, Markus K.

    2018-04-01

    A key resource for distributed quantum-enhanced protocols is entanglement between spatially separated modes. However, the robust generation and detection of entanglement between spatially separated regions of an ultracold atomic system remain a challenge. We used spin mixing in a tightly confined Bose-Einstein condensate to generate an entangled state of indistinguishable particles in a single spatial mode. We show experimentally that this entanglement can be spatially distributed by self-similar expansion of the atomic cloud. We used spatially resolved spin read-out to reveal a particularly strong form of quantum correlations known as Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering between distinct parts of the expanded cloud. Based on the strength of EPR steering, we constructed a witness, which confirmed genuine 5-partite entanglement.

  8. Materials selection for long life in LEO: a critical evaluation of atomic oxygen testing with thermal atom systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, S.L.; Kuminecz, J.; Leger, L.; Nordine, P.

    1988-01-01

    The use of thermal atom test methods as a materials selection and screening technique for low-Earth orbit (LEO) spacecraft is critically evaluated. The chemistry and physics of thermal atom environments are compared with the LEO environment. The relative reactivities of a number of materials determined to be in thermal atom environments are compared to those observed in LEO and in high quality LEO simulations. Reaction efficiencies measured in a new type of thermal atom apparatus are one-hundredth to one-thousandth those observed in LEO, and many materials showing nearly identical reactivities in LEO show relative reactivities differing by as much as a factor of 8 in thermal atom systems. A simple phenomenological kinetic model for the reaction of oxygen atoms with organic materials can be used to explain the differences in reactivity in different environments. Certain specific thermal test environments can be used as reliable materials screening tools. Using thermal atom methods to predict material lifetime in LEO requires direct calibration of the method against LEO data or high quality simulation data for each material

  9. Possible Many-Body Localization in a Long-Lived Finite-Temperature Ultracold Quasineutral Molecular Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sous, John; Grant, Edward

    2018-03-01

    We argue that the quenched ultracold plasma presents an experimental platform for studying the quantum many-body physics of disordered systems in the long-time and finite energy-density limits. We consider an experiment that quenches a plasma of nitric oxide to an ultracold system of Rydberg molecules, ions, and electrons that exhibits a long-lived state of arrested relaxation. The qualitative features of this state fail to conform with classical models. Here, we develop a microscopic quantum description for the arrested phase based on an effective many-body spin Hamiltonian that includes both dipole-dipole and van der Waals interactions. This effective model appears to offer a way to envision the essential quantum disordered nonequilibrium physics of this system.

  10. Quantum dot systems: artificial atoms with tunable properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weis, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Quantum dots - also called zero-dimensional electron systems or artificial atoms - are physical objects where the constituent electrons are confined in a small spatial region, leading to discrete eigenvalues for the energies of the confined electrons. Large quantum dots offer a dense energy spectrum comparable to that of metallic grains, whereas small quantum dots more closely resemble atoms in their electronic properties. Quantum dots can be linked to leads by tunnel barriers, hence permitting electrical transport measurements: Coulomb blockade and single-electron charging effects are observed due to the repulsive electron electron interaction on the quantum dot site. Usually fabricated by conventional semiconductor growth and processing technology, the advantage is that both simple and also more complex quantum dot systems can be designed to purpose, acting as model systems with in-situ tunable parameters such as the number of confined electrons in the quantum dot and the strength of the tunnel coupling to the leads, electrostatically controlled by the applied voltages to gate electrodes. With increasing the tunnel coupling to the leads, the virtual occupation of the quantum dot from the leads becomes more and more important -- the simple description of electrical transport by single-electron tunneling events breaks down. The basic physics is described by the Kondo physics based on the Anderson impurity model. A system consisting of strongly electrostatically coupled quantum dots with separate leads to each quantum dot represent another realization of the Anderson impurity model. Experiments to verify the analogy are presented. The experimental data embedded within this tutorial have been obtained with Alexander Huebel, Matthias Keller, Joerg Schmid, David Quirion, Armin Welker, Ulf Wilhelm, and Klaus von Klitzing. (author)

  11. Collapse and revival oscillations as a probe for the tunneling amplitude in an ultracold Bose gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, F. Alexander; Hen, Itay; Rigol, Marcos

    2010-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the quantum corrections to the revival time due to finite tunneling in the collapse and revival of matter-wave interference after a quantum quench. We study hard-core bosons in a superlattice potential and the Bose-Hubbard model by means of exact numerical approaches and mean-field theory. We consider systems without and with a trapping potential present. We show that the quantum corrections to the revival time can be used to accurately determine the value of the hopping parameter in experiments with ultracold bosons in optical lattices.

  12. Excited, bound and resonant positron-atom systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromley, M W J [Department of Physics and Computational Science Research Center, San Diego State University, San Diego CA 92182 (United States); Mitroy, J, E-mail: mbromley@physics.sdsu.ed [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies and Faculty of Education, Health and Science, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia)

    2010-01-01

    Calculations have demonstrated that eleven neutral atoms can bind positrons, while many more can bind positronium. This is a short review of recent progress made in understanding some of the underlying mechanisms. The emphasis here being on configuration interaction calculations with excited state configurations. These have demonstrated the existence of a {sup 2}P{sup o} excited state of e{sup +}Ca, which consists predominantly of a positronium cluster orbiting the Ca{sup +} ion in the L = 1 partial wave. Preliminary results are presented of excited state positron binding to a model alkali atom, where the excited {sup 1}P{sup o} states are stable over a limited region. Implications for the unnatural parity, {sup 2,4}S{sup o}, states of PsH, LiPs, NaPs and KPs are also discussed. The e{sup +}Mg, e{sup +}Cu, e{sup +}Zn and e{sup +}Cd systems show a lack of a {sup 2}P{sup o} excited state, each instead possessing a low-energy p-wave shape resonance of varying strength.

  13. Excited, bound and resonant positron-atom systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromley, M W J; Mitroy, J

    2010-01-01

    Calculations have demonstrated that eleven neutral atoms can bind positrons, while many more can bind positronium. This is a short review of recent progress made in understanding some of the underlying mechanisms. The emphasis here being on configuration interaction calculations with excited state configurations. These have demonstrated the existence of a 2 P o excited state of e + Ca, which consists predominantly of a positronium cluster orbiting the Ca + ion in the L = 1 partial wave. Preliminary results are presented of excited state positron binding to a model alkali atom, where the excited 1 P o states are stable over a limited region. Implications for the unnatural parity, 2,4 S o , states of PsH, LiPs, NaPs and KPs are also discussed. The e + Mg, e + Cu, e + Zn and e + Cd systems show a lack of a 2 P o excited state, each instead possessing a low-energy p-wave shape resonance of varying strength.

  14. The atomic hydrogen cloud in the saturnian system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, W.-L.; Johnson, R. E.; Ip, W.-H.

    2013-09-01

    The importance of Titan's H torus shaped by solar radiation pressure and of hydrogen atoms flowing out of Saturn's atmosphere in forming the broad hydrogen cloud in Saturn's magnetosphere is still debated. Since the Saturnian system also contains a water product torus which originates from the Enceladus plumes, the icy ring particles, and the inner icy satellites, as well as Titan's H2 torus, we have carried out a global investigation of the atomic hydrogen cloud taking into account all sources. We show that the velocity and angle distributions of the hot H ejected from Saturn's atmosphere following electron-impact dissociation of H2 are modified by collisions with the ambient atmospheric H2 and H. This in turn affects the morphology of the escaping hydrogen from Saturn, as does the morphology of the ionospheric electron distribution. Although an exact agreement with the Cassini observations is not obtained, our simulations show that H directly escaping from Titan is the dominant contributor in the outer magnetosphere. Of the total number of H observed by Cassini from 1 to 5RS, ∼5.7×1034, our simulations suggest ∼20% is from dissociation in the Enceladus torus, ∼5-10% is from dissociation of H2 in the atmosphere of the main rings, and ∼50% is from Titan's H torus, implying that ∼20% comes from Saturn atmosphere.

  15. Entangling two transportable neutral atoms via local spin exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, A M; Lester, B J; Foss-Feig, M; Wall, M L; Rey, A M; Regal, C A

    2015-11-12

    To advance quantum information science, physical systems are sought that meet the stringent requirements for creating and preserving quantum entanglement. In atomic physics, robust two-qubit entanglement is typically achieved by strong, long-range interactions in the form of either Coulomb interactions between ions or dipolar interactions between Rydberg atoms. Although such interactions allow fast quantum gates, the interacting atoms must overcome the associated coupling to the environment and cross-talk among qubits. Local interactions, such as those requiring substantial wavefunction overlap, can alleviate these detrimental effects; however, such interactions present a new challenge: to distribute entanglement, qubits must be transported, merged for interaction, and then isolated for storage and subsequent operations. Here we show how, using a mobile optical tweezer, it is possible to prepare and locally entangle two ultracold neutral atoms, and then separate them while preserving their entanglement. Ground-state neutral atom experiments have measured dynamics consistent with spin entanglement, and have detected entanglement with macroscopic observables; we are now able to demonstrate position-resolved two-particle coherence via application of a local gradient and parity measurements. This new entanglement-verification protocol could be applied to arbitrary spin-entangled states of spatially separated atoms. The local entangling operation is achieved via spin-exchange interactions, and quantum tunnelling is used to combine and separate atoms. These techniques provide a framework for dynamically entangling remote qubits via local operations within a large-scale quantum register.

  16. Transport in a capacitive ultracold atomtronic circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Mark; Eller, Benjamin; Eckel, Steve; Clark, Charles

    A recent NIST experiment studied the transport of a gaseous Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) confined in an atomtronic ``dumbbell'' circuit. The optically created condensate potential consisted of a tight harmonic potential in the vertical direction confining the BEC to a horizontial plane. The horizontal potential consisted of two cylindrical wells separated by a channel produced by a harmonic oscillator potential transverse to the line joining the wells. The BEC, formed in the ``source'' well, was released to flow toward the ``drain'' well. The evolution of this system was shown to be reproduced by a model electronic circuit consisting of a charged capacitor, C, in series with an inductor, L, and a parallel combination of a resistor, R, and a Josephson junction. We modeled this system with the Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equation and found good agreement with the data provided that the confining potential is carefully reproduced. The GP simulations show behavior, not detectable in the experiment, that atoms can jump out of the dumbbell area after filling up the drain well. We also present the dependence of R and L on the channel shape. Supported by NSF Grants PHY-1413768 and ARO Atomtronics MURI.

  17. Superfluid and antiferromagnetic phases in ultracold fermionic quantum gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottwald, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis several models are treated, which are relevant for ultracold fermionic quantum gases loaded onto optical lattices. In particular, imbalanced superfluid Fermi mixtures, which are considered as the best way to realize Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) states experimentally, and antiferromagnetic states, whose experimental realization is one of the next major goals, are examined analytically and numerically with the use of appropriate versions of the Hubbard model. The usual Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) superconductor is known to break down in a magnetic field with a strength exceeding the size of the superfluid gap. A spatially inhomogeneous spin-imbalanced superconductor with a complex order parameter known as FFLO-state is predicted to occur in translationally invariant systems. Since in ultracold quantum gases the experimental setups have a limited size and a trapping potential, we analyze the realistic situation of a non-translationally invariant finite sized Hubbard model for this purpose. We first argue analytically, why the order parameter should be real in a system with continuous coordinates, and map our statements onto the Hubbard model with discrete coordinates defined on a lattice. The relevant Hubbard model is then treated numerically within mean field theory. We show that the numerical results agree with our analytically derived statements and we simulate various experimentally relevant systems in this thesis. Analogous calculations are presented for the situation at repulsive interaction strength where the N'eel state is expected to be realized experimentally in the near future. We map our analytical results obtained for the attractive model onto corresponding results for the repulsive model. We obtain a spatially invariant unit vector defining the direction of the order parameter as a consequence of the trapping potential, which is affirmed by our mean field numerical results for the repulsive case. Furthermore, we observe

  18. Superfluid and antiferromagnetic phases in ultracold fermionic quantum gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottwald, Tobias

    2010-08-27

    In this thesis several models are treated, which are relevant for ultracold fermionic quantum gases loaded onto optical lattices. In particular, imbalanced superfluid Fermi mixtures, which are considered as the best way to realize Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) states experimentally, and antiferromagnetic states, whose experimental realization is one of the next major goals, are examined analytically and numerically with the use of appropriate versions of the Hubbard model. The usual Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) superconductor is known to break down in a magnetic field with a strength exceeding the size of the superfluid gap. A spatially inhomogeneous spin-imbalanced superconductor with a complex order parameter known as FFLO-state is predicted to occur in translationally invariant systems. Since in ultracold quantum gases the experimental setups have a limited size and a trapping potential, we analyze the realistic situation of a non-translationally invariant finite sized Hubbard model for this purpose. We first argue analytically, why the order parameter should be real in a system with continuous coordinates, and map our statements onto the Hubbard model with discrete coordinates defined on a lattice. The relevant Hubbard model is then treated numerically within mean field theory. We show that the numerical results agree with our analytically derived statements and we simulate various experimentally relevant systems in this thesis. Analogous calculations are presented for the situation at repulsive interaction strength where the N'eel state is expected to be realized experimentally in the near future. We map our analytical results obtained for the attractive model onto corresponding results for the repulsive model. We obtain a spatially invariant unit vector defining the direction of the order parameter as a consequence of the trapping potential, which is affirmed by our mean field numerical results for the repulsive case. Furthermore, we observe

  19. Quantum dynamics of atoms in a resonator-generated optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschler, C.; Ritsch, H.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We investigate the quantum motion of coherently driven ultracold atoms in the field of a damped high-Q optical cavity mode. The laser field is chosen far detuned from the atomic transition but close to a cavity resonance, so that spontaneous emission is strongly suppressed but a coherent field builds up in the resonator by stimulated scattering. On one hand the shape of the atomic wave function determines the field dynamics via the magnitude of the scattering and the effective refractive index the atoms create for the mode. The mode intensity on the other hand determines the optical dipole force on the atoms.The system shows rich atom-field dynamics including self organization, self-trapping, cooling or heating. In the limit of deep trapping we are able to derive a system of closed, coupled equations for a finite set of atomic expectation values and the field. This allows us to determine the self-consistent ground state of the system as well as the eigenfrequencies and damping rates for excitations. To treat several atoms in more detail we introduce the Bose-Hubbard model. This allows us to investigate several aspects of the quantum motion of the atoms inside the cavity. (author)

  20. Making ultracold molecules in a two-color pump-dump photoassociation scheme using chirped pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, Christiane P.; Luc-Koenig, Eliane; Masnou-Seeuws, Francoise

    2006-01-01

    This theoretical paper investigates the formation of ground state molecules from ultracold cesium atoms in a two-color scheme. Following previous work on photoassociation with chirped picosecond pulses [Luc-Koenig et al., Phys. Rev. A, 70, 033414 (2004)], we investigate stabilization by a second (dump) pulse. By appropriately choosing the dump pulse parameters and time delay with respect to the photoassociation pulse, we show that a large number of deeply bound molecules are created in the ground triplet state. We discuss (i) broad-bandwidth dump pulses which maximize the probability to form molecules while creating a broad vibrational distribution as well as (ii) narrow-bandwidth pulses populating a single vibrational ground state level, bound by 113 cm -1 . The use of chirped pulses makes the two-color scheme robust, simple, and efficient

  1. Experimental testing of the dispersion law of ultracold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, I.V.; Krasnoperov, A.V.; Frank, A.I.; Geltenbort, P.; Hoghoj, P.; Klein, A.G.; Cimmino, A.; Masalovich, S.V.; Nosov, V.G.

    1998-01-01

    Experiment on testing the generally accepted laws on ultracold neutron dispersion is described. The experiment is based on search of displacement lines of a neutron interference filter resonance by variation of neutrons rapidity component, parallel to the filter surface. The first results testify to the presence of statistically meaningful effect

  2. Depolarization of ultracold neutrons during their storage in material bottles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serebrov, A.P.; Lasakov, M.S.; Vassiljev, A.V.; Krasnoschekova, I.A.; Rudnev, Yu.P.; Fomin, A.K.; Varlamov, V.E.; Geltenbort, P.; Butterworth, J.; Young, A.R.; Pesavento, U.

    2003-01-01

    The depolarization of ultracold neutrons (UCN) during their storage in traps has been investigated. The neutron spin-flip probability for the materials studied amounts to ∼(1-2)x10 -5 per collision and does not depend on the temperature. The possible connection between the phenomenon of UCN depolarization and that of anomalous losses is discussed

  3. Depolarization of ultracold neutrons during their storage in material bottles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serebrov, A.P.; Lasakov, M.S.; Vassiljev, A.V.; Krasnoschekova, I.A.; Rudnev, Yu.P.; Fomin, A.K.; Varlamov, V.E.; Geltenbort, P.; Butterworth, J.; Young, A.R.; Pesavento, U

    2003-07-14

    The depolarization of ultracold neutrons (UCN) during their storage in traps has been investigated. The neutron spin-flip probability for the materials studied amounts to {approx}(1-2)x10{sup -5} per collision and does not depend on the temperature. The possible connection between the phenomenon of UCN depolarization and that of anomalous losses is discussed.

  4. Observation of electromagnetically induced Talbot effect in an atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Liu, Xing; Zhang, Dan; Sheng, Jiteng; Zhang, Yiqi; Zhang, Yanpeng; Xiao, Min

    2018-01-01

    The electromagnetically induced Talbot effect (EITE) resulting from the repeated self-reconstruction of a spatially intensity-modulated probe field is experimentally demonstrated in a three-level atomic configuration. The probe beam is launched into an optically induced lattice (established by the interference of two coupling fields) inside a rubidium vapor cell and is diffracted by the electromagnetically induced grating that was formed. The diffraction pattern repeats itself at the planes of integer multiple Talbot lengths. In addition, a fractional EITE is also investigated. The experimental observations agree well with the theoretical predictions. This investigation may potentially pave the way for studying the nonlinear and quantum dynamical features that have been predicted for established periodic optical systems.

  5. Exploring strategies for the production of ultracold RbYb molecules in conservative traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruni, Cristian

    2015-07-14

    Within the scope of this thesis, the production of ultracold molecules at a temperature of a few μK with various isotopes of rubidium (Rb) and ytterbium (Yb) was examined by means of photoassociation spectroscopy and magnetic Feshbach resonances in combined conservative traps. The long-term goal of this experiment is the production of ultracold RbYb molecules in the rovibronic ground state. It was possible to produce electronically excited {sup 87}Rb {sup 176}Yb molecules in a novel hybrid trap (HT) at a combined temperature of 1.7 μK by means of 1-photon photoassociation close to the Rb D1 line at 795 nm. This HT takes advantage of the different magnetic properties of Rb and Yb and allows for independent trapping and manipulation of the atomic species. It combines an Ioffe-Pritchard type magnetic trap for Rb and a near-resonant optical dipole trap for Yb. The excited molecular {sup 2}Π{sub 1/2} state could be characterized further extending previous works in a combined MOT and vibrational levels reaching binding energies up to E{sub b}=-h x 2.2 THz could be assigned by trap-loss spectroscopy. Almost every detected vibrational state consists of two resonances that could be assigned to the molecular analogue of the hyperfine structure of {sup 87}Rb. An important experimental observation is a decrease in hyperfine splitting with increasing binding energy of a vibrational level. For the deepest found vibrational state the hyperfine splitting amounts only 70 % of the atomic value (817 MHz) which emphasizes a gradual passage from weakly to tightly bound molecules. Furthermore, detailed attempts were undertaken to induce magnetic Feshbach resonances in {sup 85}Rb and different Yb isotopes, especially {sup 171}Yb in a crossed optical dipole trap at 1064 nm at temperatures of 10 μK. For this purpose, a homogeneous magnetic field was applied and scanned in small steps over the range of 495 G ∼ 640 G. Unfortunately, our efforts were without success. Additionally, well

  6. Atomic Quantum Simulations of Abelian and non-Abelian Gauge Theories

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    Using a Fermi-Bose mixture of ultra-cold atoms in an optical lattice, in a collaboration of atomic and particle physicists, we have constructed a quantum simulator for a U(1) gauge theory coupled to fermionic matter. The construction is based on quantum link models which realize continuous gauge symmetry with discrete quantum variables. At low energies, quantum link models with staggered fermions emerge from a Hubbard-type model which can be quantum simulated. This allows investigations of string breaking as well as the real-time evolution after a quench in gauge theories, which are inaccessible to classical simulation methods. Similarly, using ultracold alkaline-earth atoms in optical lattices, we have constructed a quantum simulator for U(N) and SU(N) lattice gauge theories with fermionic matter based on quantum link models. These systems share qualitative features with QCD, including chiral symmetry breaking and restoration at non-zero temperature or baryon density. Unlike classical simulations, a quantum ...

  7. Atom-dimer scattering in a heteronuclear mixture with a finite intraspecies scattering length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chao; Zhang, Peng

    2018-04-01

    We study the three-body problem of two ultracold identical bosonic atoms (denoted by B ) and one extra atom (denoted by X ), where the scattering length aB X between each bosonic atom and atom X is resonantly large and positive. We calculate the scattering length aad between one bosonic atom and the shallow dimer formed by the other bosonic atom and atom X , and investigate the effect induced by the interaction between the two bosonic atoms. We find that even if this interaction is weak (i.e., the corresponding scattering length aB B is of the same order of the van der Waals length rvdW or even smaller), it can still induce a significant effect for the atom-dimer scattering length aad. Explicitly, an atom-dimer scattering resonance can always occur when the value of aB B varies in the region with | aB B|≲ rvdW . As a result, both the sign and the absolute value of aad, as well as the behavior of the aad-aB X function, depends sensitively on the exact value of aB B. Our results show that, for a good quantitative theory, the intraspecies interaction is required to be taken into account for this heteronuclear system, even if this interaction is weak.

  8. Atom interferometry with trapped Bose-Einstein condensates: impact of atom-atom interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grond, Julian; Hohenester, Ulrich; Mazets, Igor; Schmiedmayer, Joerg

    2010-01-01

    Interferometry with ultracold atoms promises the possibility of ultraprecise and ultrasensitive measurements in many fields of physics, and is the basis of our most precise atomic clocks. Key to a high sensitivity is the possibility to achieve long measurement times and precise readout. Ultracold atoms can be precisely manipulated at the quantum level and can be held for very long times in traps; they would therefore be an ideal setting for interferometry. In this paper, we discuss how the nonlinearities from atom-atom interactions, on the one hand, allow us to efficiently produce squeezed states for enhanced readout and, on the other hand, result in phase diffusion that limits the phase accumulation time. We find that low-dimensional geometries are favorable, with two-dimensional (2D) settings giving the smallest contribution of phase diffusion caused by atom-atom interactions. Even for time sequences generated by optimal control, the achievable minimal detectable interaction energy ΔE min is of the order of 10 -4 μ, where μ is the chemical potential of the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in the trap. From these we have to conclude that for more precise measurements with atom interferometers, more sophisticated strategies, or turning off the interaction-induced dephasing during the phase accumulation stage, will be necessary.

  9. Quantum-mechanical transport equation for atomic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, P. R.

    1972-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical transport equation (QMTE) is derived which should be applicable to a wide range of problems involving the interaction of radiation with atoms or molecules which are also subject to collisions with perturber atoms. The equation follows the time evolution of the macroscopic atomic density matrix elements of atoms located at classical position R and moving with classical velocity v. It is quantum mechanical in the sense that all collision kernels or rates which appear have been obtained from a quantum-mechanical theory and, as such, properly take into account the energy-level variations and velocity changes of the active (emitting or absorbing) atom produced in collisions with perturber atoms. The present formulation is better suited to problems involving high-intensity external fields, such as those encountered in laser physics.

  10. Storage ring to investigate cold unidimensional atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcassa, L. G.; Caires, A. R. L.; Nascimento, V. A.; Dulieu, O.; Weiner, J.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we employ a circulating ring of trapped atoms, that we have named the atomotron, to study cold collisions. The atomotron is obtained from a conventional magneto-optical trap when the two pairs of normally retroreflecting Gaussian laser beams in the x-y plane are slightly offset. Circulating stable atomic orbits then form a racetrack geometry in this plane. The circulating atom flux behaves similarly to an atomic beam with an average tangential velocity much greater than the transverse components, and is therefore suitable for one-dimensional atomic collision studies. Using the atomotron, we have investigated the polarization dependence of ultracold photoassociation collisions between Rb atoms circulating in the racetrack. The ability to investigate collisions in ultracold circulating atomic rings reveals alignment and orientation properties that are averaged away in ordinary three-dimensional magneto-optical trap collision processes

  11. Upper Secondary Students' Understanding of the Basic Physical Interactions in Analogous Atomic and Solar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, Keith S.

    2013-01-01

    Comparing the atom to a "tiny solar system" is a common teaching analogy, and the extent to which learners saw the systems as analogous was investigated. English upper secondary students were asked parallel questions about the physical interactions between the components of a simple atomic system and a simple solar system to investigate…

  12. First principles investigation of interaction between impurity atom (Si, Ge, Sn) and carbon atom in diamond-like carbon system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaowei; Wang, Aiying; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between impurity atom (Si, Ge, and Sn) and carbon atom in diamond-like carbon (DLC) system was investigated by the first principles simulation method based on the density functional theory. The tetrahedral configuration was selected as the calculation model for simplicity. When the bond angle varied in a range of 90°–130° from the equivalent state of 109.471°, the distortion energy and the electronic structures including charge density of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and partial density of state (PDOS) in the different systems were calculated. The results showed that the addition of Si, Ge and Sn atom into amorphous carbon matrix significantly decreased the distortion energy of the system as the bond angles deviated from the equilibrium one. Further studies of the HOMO and PDOS indicated that the weak covalent bond between Si(Ge, Sn) and C atoms was formed with the decreased strength and directionality, which were influenced by the electronegative difference. These results implied that the electron transfer behavior at the junction of carbon nano-devices could be tailored by the impurity element, and the compressive stress in DLC films could be reduced by the incorporation of Si, Ge and Sn because of the formation of weaker covalent bonds. - Highlights: ►Distortion energy after bond angle distortion was decreased comparing with C-C unit. ►The weak covalent bond was formed between impurity atoms and corner carbon atoms. ►Observed electron transfer behavior affected the strength and directionality of bond. ►Reduction of strength and directionality of bond contributed to small energy change.

  13. Multimode quantum model of a cw atom laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hope, J.J.; Haine, S.A.; Savage, C.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Laser cooling allows dilute atomic gases to be cooled to within K of absolute zero. Ultracold gases were first achieved twenty years ago and have since found applications in areas such as spectroscopy, time standards, frequency standards, quantum information processing and atom optics. The atomic analogue of the lasing mode in optical lasers is Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC), in which a cooled sample of atoms condense into the lowest energy quantum state. This new state of matter was recently achieved in dilute Bose gases in 1995. Atoms coupled out of a BEC exhibit long-range spatial coherence, and provide the coldest atomic source currently available. These atomic sources are called 'atom lasers' because the BEC is analogous to the lasing mode of an optical laser. The high spectral flux from optical lasers is caused by a process called gain-narrowing, which requires continuous wave (cw) operation. Coupling a BEC quickly into an untrapped state forms a coherent atomic beam but it has a spread in momentum as large as the trapped BEC. Coupling the atoms out more slowly reduces the output linewidth at the expense of reducing the overall flux. These atom lasers are equivalent to Q-switched optical lasers. A cw atom laser with gain-narrowing would produce an increasingly monoenergetic output as the flux increased, dramatically improving the spectral flux. A cw atom laser is therefore a major goal of the atom optics community, but there are several theoretical and practical obstacles to understanding the complexities of such a system. The main obstacle to the production of a cw atom laser is the technical difficulties involved in continuously pumping the lasing mode. No complete theory exists which describes a cw atom laser. Complete cw atom laser models require a quantum field description due to their non-Markovian dynamics, significant spatial effects and the dependence of the output on the quantum statistics of the lasing mode. The extreme dimensionality

  14. PHYSICS OF POLARIZED SCATTERING AT MULTI-LEVEL ATOMIC SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenflo, J. O., E-mail: stenflo@astro.phys.ethz.ch [Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich, SwitzerlandAND (Switzerland); Istituto Ricerche Solari Locarno, Via Patocchi, CH-6605 Locarno-Monti (Switzerland)

    2015-03-01

    The symmetric peak observed in linear polarization in the core of the solar sodium D{sub 1} line at 5896 Å has remained enigmatic since its discovery nearly two decades ago. One reason is that the theory of polarized scattering has not been experimentally tested for multi-level atomic systems in the relevant parameter domains, although the theory is continually being used for the interpretation of astrophysical observations. A laboratory experiment that was set up a decade ago to find out whether the D{sub 1} enigma is a problem of solar physics or quantum physics revealed that the D{sub 1} system has a rich polarization structure in situations where standard scattering theory predicts zero polarization, even when optical pumping of the m state populations of the hyperfine-split ground state is accounted for. Here we show that the laboratory results can be modeled in great quantitative detail if the theory is extended to include the coherences in both the initial and final states of the scattering process. Radiative couplings between the allowed dipole transitions generate coherences in the initial state. Corresponding coherences in the final state are then demanded by a phase closure selection rule. The experimental results for the well understood D{sub 2} line are used to constrain the two free parameters of the experiment, collision rate and optical depth, to suppress the need for free parameters when fitting the D{sub 1} results.

  15. High precision optical spectroscopy and quantum state selected photodissociation of ultracold 88Sr2 molecules in an optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Mickey

    2017-04-01

    Over the past several decades, rapid progress has been made toward the accurate characterization and control of atoms, epitomized by the ever-increasing accuracy and precision of optical atomic lattice clocks. Extending this progress to molecules will have exciting implications for chemistry, condensed matter physics, and precision tests of physics beyond the Standard Model. My thesis describes work performed over the past six years to establish the state of the art in manipulation and quantum control of ultracold molecules. We describe a thorough set of measurements characterizing the rovibrational structure of weakly bound 88Sr2 molecules from several different perspectives, including determinations of binding energies; linear, quadratic, and higher order Zeeman shifts; transition strengths between bound states; and lifetimes of narrow subradiant states. Finally, we discuss measurements of photofragment angular distributions produced by photodissociation of molecules in single quantum states, leading to an exploration of quantum-state-resolved ultracold chemistry. The images of exploding photofragments produced in these studies exhibit dramatic interference effects and strongly violate semiclassical predictions, instead requiring a fully quantum mechanical description.

  16. Nuclear spin dominated relaxation of atomic tunneling systems in glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luck, Annina

    2016-11-16

    The measurements performed in this thesis have revealed a non phononic relaxation channel for atomic tunneling systems in glasses at very low temperatures due to the presence of nuclear electric quadrupoles. Dielectric measurements on the multicomponent glasses N-KZFS11 and HY-1, containing {sup 181}Ta and {sup 165}Ho, respectively, that both carry very large nuclear electric quadrupole moments, show a relaxation rate in the kilohertz range, that is constant for temperatures exceeding the nuclear quadrupole splitting of the relevant isotopes. The results are compared to measurements performed on the glasses Herasil and N-BK7 that both contain no large nuclear quadrupole moments. Using three different setups to measure the complex dielectric function, the measurements cover almost eight orders of magnitude in frequency from 60 Hz to 1 GHz and temperatures down to 7.5 mK. This has allowed us a detailed study of the novel effects observed within this thesis and has led to a simplified model explaining the effects of nuclear electric quadrupoles on the behavior of glasses at low temperatures. Numeric calculations based on this model are compared to the measured data.

  17. Evaluation of commercial nickel-phosphorus coating for ultracold neutron guides using a pinhole bottling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattie, R. W.; Adamek, E. R.; Brenner, T.; Brandt, A.; Broussard, L. J.; Callahan, N. B.; Clayton, S. M.; Cude-Woods, C.; Currie, S. A.; Geltenbort, P.; Ito, T. M.; Lauer, T.; Liu, C. Y.; Majewski, J.; Makela, M.; Masuda, Y.; Morris, C. L.; Ramsey, J. C.; Salvat, D. J.; Saunders, A.; Schroffenegger, J.; Tang, Z.; Wei, W.; Wang, Z.; Watkins, E.; Young, A. R.; Zeck, B. A.

    2017-11-01

    We report on the evaluation of commercial electroless nickel phosphorus (NiP) coatings for ultracold neutron (UCN) transport and storage. The material potential of 50 μm thick NiP coatings on stainless steel and aluminum substrates was measured to be VF = 213(5 . 2) neV using the time-of-flight spectrometer ASTERIX at the Lujan Center. The loss per bounce probability was measured in pinhole bottling experiments carried out at ultracold neutron sources at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and the Institut Laue-Langevin. For these tests a new guide coupling design was used to minimize gaps between the guide sections. The observed UCN loss in the bottle was interpreted in terms of an energy independent effective loss per bounce, which is the appropriate model when gaps in the system and upscattering are the dominate loss mechanisms, yielding a loss per bounce of 1 . 3(1) × 10-4. We also present a detailed discussion of the pinhole bottling methodology and an energy dependent analysis of the experimental results.

  18. Observation of Fano-Type Interference in a Coupled Cavity-Atom System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Yong; Tan Zheng; Wang Jin; Zhan Ming-Sheng; Zhu Yi-Fu

    2016-01-01

    We present the experimental observation of the Fano-type interference in a coupled cavity-atom system by confining the laser-cooled "8"5Rb atoms in an optical cavity. The asymmetric Fano profile is obtained through quantum interference in a three-level atomic system coherently coupled to a single mode cavity field. The observed Fano profile can be explained by the interference between the intra-cavity dark state and the polariton state of the coupled cavity-atom system. The possible applications of our observations include all-optical switching, optical sensing and narrow band optical filters. (paper)

  19. A study on the improvement of the legal system concerning Korean Atomic Energy Act

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Il Un; Jung, Jong Hak; Kim, Jae Ho; Moon, Jong Wook; Kim, In Sub [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-03-15

    Cause-effect analysis, adjustment, and generalization of the current atomic energy act are contents of this research. These are to be based on the legal theory. Analysis of the current atomic energy act from the viewpoint of constitutional law and administrative law. Review of the other domestic legal systems which have similar problems as the atomic energy act has. Inquiry about the operation of nuclear legal systems of foreign nations.

  20. A study on the improvement of the legal system concerning Korean Atomic Energy Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Il Un; Jung, Jong Hak; Kim, Jae Ho; Moon, Jong Wook; Kim, In Sub

    1998-03-01

    Cause-effect analysis, adjustment, and generalization of the current atomic energy act are contents of this research. These are to be based on the legal theory. Analysis of the current atomic energy act from the viewpoint of constitutional law and administrative law. Review of the other domestic legal systems which have similar problems as the atomic energy act has. Inquiry about the operation of nuclear legal systems of foreign nations

  1. Study of multi-level atomic systems with the application of magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianping; Roy, Subhankar; Ummal Momeen, M.

    2018-04-01

    The complexity of multiple energy levels associated with each atomic system determines the various processes related to light- matter interactions. It is necessary to understand the influence of different levels in a given atomic system. In this work we focus on multi- level atomic schemes with the application of magnetic field. We analyze the different EIT windows which appears in the presence of moderately high magnetic field (∼ 10 G) strength.

  2. An ultracold neutron storage bottle for UCN density measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bison, G.; Burri, F.; Daum, M. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Kirch, K. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute for Particle Physics, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich (Switzerland); Krempel, J. [Institute for Particle Physics, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich (Switzerland); Lauss, B., E-mail: bernhard.lauss@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Meier, M. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ries, D., E-mail: dieter.ries@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute for Particle Physics, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich (Switzerland); Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.; Zsigmond, G. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2016-09-11

    We have developed a storage bottle for ultracold neutrons (UCNs) in order to measure the UCN density at the beamports of the Paul Scherrer Institute's (PSI) UCN source. This paper describes the design, construction and commissioning of the robust and mobile storage bottle with a volume comparable to typical storage experiments (32 L) e.g. searching for an electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  3. Theoretical model for ultracold molecule formation via adaptive feedback control

    OpenAIRE

    Poschinger, Ulrich; Salzmann, Wenzel; Wester, Roland; Weidemueller, Matthias; Koch, Christiane P.; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2006-01-01

    We investigate pump-dump photoassociation of ultracold molecules with amplitude- and phase-modulated femtosecond laser pulses. For this purpose a perturbative model for the light-matter interaction is developed and combined with a genetic algorithm for adaptive feedback control of the laser pulse shapes. The model is applied to the formation of 85Rb2 molecules in a magneto-optical trap. We find for optimized pulse shapes an improvement for the formation of ground state molecules by more than ...

  4. Strong dependence of ultracold chemical rates on electric dipole moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quemener, Goulven; Bohn, John L.

    2010-01-01

    We use the quantum threshold laws combined with a classical capture model to provide an analytical estimate of the chemical quenching cross sections and rate coefficients of two colliding particles at ultralow temperatures. We apply this quantum threshold model (QT model) to indistinguishable fermionic polar molecules in an electric field. At ultracold temperatures and in weak electric fields, the cross sections and rate coefficients depend only weakly on the electric dipole moment d induced by the electric field. In stronger electric fields, the quenching processes scale as d 4(L+(1/2)) where L>0 is the orbital angular-momentum quantum number between the two colliding particles. For p-wave collisions (L=1) of indistinguishable fermionic polar molecules at ultracold temperatures, the quenching rate thus scales as d 6 . We also apply this model to pure two-dimensional collisions and find that chemical rates vanish as d -4 for ultracold indistinguishable fermions. This model provides a quick and intuitive way to estimate chemical rate coefficients of reactions occuring with high probability.

  5. Influence of electron evaporative cooling on ultracold plasma expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Truman; Chen, Wei-Ting; Roberts, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The expansion of ultracold neutral plasmas (UCP) is driven primarily by the thermal pressure of the electron component and is therefore sensitive to the electron temperature. For typical UCP spatial extents, evaporative cooling has a significant influence on the UCP expansion rate at lower densities (less than 10 8 /cm 3 ). We studied the effect of electron evaporation in this density range. Owing to the low density, the effects of three-body recombination were negligible. We modeled the expansion by taking into account the change in electron temperature owing to evaporation as well as adiabatic expansion and found good agreement with our data. We also developed a simple model for initial evaporation over a range of ultracold plasma densities, sizes, and electron temperatures to determine over what parameter range electron evaporation is expected to have a significant effect. We also report on a signal calibration technique, which relates the signal at our detector to the total number of ions and electrons in the ultracold plasma

  6. Magnetic field modification of ultracold molecule-molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tscherbul, T V; Suleimanov, Yu V; Aquilanti, V; Krems, R V

    2009-01-01

    We present an accurate quantum mechanical study of molecule-molecule collisions in the presence of a magnetic field. The work focuses on the analysis of elastic scattering and spin relaxation in collisions of O 2 ( 3 Σ g - ) molecules at cold (∼0.1 K) and ultracold (∼10 -6 K) temperatures. Our calculations show that magnetic spin relaxation in molecule-molecule collisions is extremely efficient except at magnetic fields below 1 mT. The rate constant for spin relaxation at T=0.1 K and a magnetic field of 0.1 T is found to be as large as 6.1x10 -11 cm -3 s -1 . The magnetic field dependence of elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections at ultracold temperatures is dominated by a manifold of Feshbach resonances with the density of ∼100 resonances per Tesla for collisions of molecules in the absolute ground state. This suggests that the scattering length of ultracold molecules in the absolute ground state can be effectively tuned in a very wide range of magnetic fields. Our calculations demonstrate that the number and properties of the magnetic Feshbach resonances are dramatically different for molecules in the absolute ground and excited spin states. The density of Feshbach resonances for molecule-molecule scattering in the low-field-seeking Zeeman state is reduced by a factor of 10.

  7. Optical polarization modulation by competing atomic coherence effects in a degenerate four-level Yb atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Jong; Park, Chang Yong; Yoon, Tai Hyun

    2005-01-01

    A scheme of optical polarization modulation of a linearly polarized infrared probe field is studied in a degenerate four-level Yb atomic system. We have observed an anomalous transmission spectra of two circular polarization components of the probe field exhibiting an enhanced two-photon absorption and a three-photon gain with comparable magnitude, leading to the lossless transmission and enhanced circular dichroism. We carried out a proof-of-principle experiment of fast optical polarization modulation in such a system by modulating the polarization state of the coupling field. The observed enhanced two-photon absorption and three-photon gain of the probe field are due to the result of competing atomic coherence effects

  8. On the shake-off probability for atomic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, A.C.F., E-mail: toniufrj@gmail.com [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, P.O. Box 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Almeida, D.P. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis (Brazil)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • The scope is to find the relationship among SO probabilities, Z and electron density. • A scaling law is suggested, allowing us to find the SO probabilities for atoms. • SO probabilities have been scaled as a function of target Z and polarizability. - Abstract: The main scope in this work has been upon the relationship between shake-off probabilities, target atomic number and electron density. By comparing the saturation values of measured double-to-single photoionization ratios from the literature, a simple scaling law has been found, which allows us to predict the shake-off probabilities for several elements up to Z = 54 within a factor 2. The electron shake-off probabilities accompanying valence shell photoionization have been scaled as a function of the target atomic number, Z, and polarizability, α. This behavior is in qualitative agreement with the experimental results.

  9. Atomic probe Wigner tomography of a nanomechanical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Swati; Meystre, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    We propose a scheme to measure the quantum state of a nanomechanical oscillator cooled near its ground state of vibrational motion. This is an extension of the nonlinear atomic homodyning technique scheme first developed to measure the intracavity field in a micromaser. It involves the use of a detector atom that is simultaneously coupled to the resonator via a magnetic interaction and to (classical) optical fields via a Raman transition. We show that the probability for the atom to be found in the ground state is a direct measure of the Wigner characteristic function of the nanomechanical oscillator. We also investigate the back-action effect of this destructive measurement on the state of the resonator.

  10. Interaction of antihydrogen with ordinary atoms and solid surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froelich, Piotr, E-mail: piotr.froelich@kvac.uu.se; Voronin, Alexei [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-15

    The characteristic features of cold atom-antiatom collisions and antiatom-surface interactions are discussed and illustrated by the results for hydrogen-antihydrogen scattering and for quantum reflection of ultracold antihydrogen from a metallic surface. We discuss in some detail the case of spin-exchange in ultracold H-bar - H collisions, exposing the interplay of Coulombic, strong and dispersive forces, and demonstrating the sensitivity of the spin-exchange cross sections to hypothetical violations of Charge-Parity-Time (CPT) symmetry.

  11. Low-energy-spread ion bunches from a trapped atomic gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnders, M.P.; Kruisbergen, van P.A.; Taban, G.; Geer, van der S.B.; Mutsaers, P.H.A.; Vredenbregt, E.J.D.; Luiten, O.J.

    2009-01-01

    We present time-of-flight measurements of the longitudinal energy spread of pulsed ultracold ion beams, produced by near-threshold ionization of rubidium atoms captured in a magneto-optical atom trap. Well-defined pulsed beams have been produced with energies of only 1 eV and a root-mean-square

  12. Another way to approach zero entropy for a finite system of atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, D.S.; Vala, J.; Myrgren, S.; Whaley, K.B.; Thapliyal, A.V.; Vazirani, U.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a way to manifestly reduce the entropy of a finite system of atoms to arbitrarily small values. First, the locations of vacancies of laser-cooled atoms in a deep optical lattice are measured. Then, the distribution is efficiently compacted using a combination of site-specific atomic state flips and state-sensitive lattice site translations. In the final state, the central region of the lattice has exactly one atom per site in its vibrational ground state. This is a good initial state for a quantum computer. The process can be understood to be an experimentally viable Maxwell demon with a memory

  13. 2D atom localization in a four-level tripod system in laser fields

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanov, Vladimir; Rozhdestvensky, Yuri

    2012-01-01

    We propose a scheme for two-dimensional (2D) atom localization in a four-level tripod system under an influence of two orthogonal standing-wave fields. Position information of the atom is retained in the atomic internal states by an additional probe field either of a standing or of a running wave. It is shown that the localization factors depend crucially on the atom-field coupling that results in such spatial structures of populations as spikes, craters and waves. We demonstrate a high-preci...

  14. A three-level atomicity model for decentralized workflow management systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shaul, Israel Z.; Heineman, George T.

    1996-12-01

    A workflow management system (WFMS) employs a workflow manager (WM) to execute and automate the various activities within a workflow. To protect the consistency of data, the WM encapsulates each activity with a transaction; a transaction manager (TM) then guarantees the atomicity of activities. Since workflows often group several activities together, the TM is responsible for guaranteeing the atomicity of these units. There are scalability issues, however, with centralized WFMSs. Decentralized WFMSs provide an architecture for multiple autonomous WFMSs to interoperate, thus accommodating multiple workflows and geographically-dispersed teams. When atomic units are composed of activities spread across multiple WFMSs, however, there is a conflict between global atomicity and local autonomy of each WFMS. This paper describes a decentralized atomicity model that enables workflow administrators to specify the scope of multi-site atomicity based upon the desired semantics of multi-site tasks in the decentralized WFMS. We describe an architecture that realizes our model and execution paradigm.

  15. High-resolution imaging of ultracold fermions in microscopically tailored optical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, B; Mueller, T; Meineke, J; Esslinger, T; Moritz, H

    2011-01-01

    We report on the local probing and preparation of an ultracold Fermi gas on the length scale of one micrometer, i.e. of the order of the Fermi wavelength. The essential tool of our experimental setup is a pair of identical, high-resolution microscope objectives. One of the microscope objectives allows local imaging of the trapped Fermi gas of 6 Li atoms with a maximum resolution of 660 nm, while the other enables the generation of arbitrary optical dipole potentials on the same length scale. Employing a two-dimensional (2D) acousto-optical deflector, we demonstrate the formation of several trapping geometries, including a tightly focused single optical dipole trap, a 4x4 site 2D optical lattice and an 8 site ring lattice configuration. Furthermore, we show the ability to load and detect a small number of atoms in these trapping potentials. A site separation down to one micrometer in combination with the low mass of 6 Li results in tunneling rates that are sufficiently large for the implementation of Hubbard models with the designed geometries.

  16. Effect of pairwise dipole–dipole interaction among three-atom systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-18

    Jul 18, 2014 ... We present an analysis of a system of three two-level atoms interacting with one another through dipole–dipole interaction. The interaction manifests between the excited state of one of the atoms and the ground state of its nearest neighbour. Steady-state populations of the density matrix elements are ...

  17. Damping of electron center-of-mass oscillation in ultracold plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wei-Ting; Witte, Craig; Roberts, Jacob L.

    2016-01-01

    Applying a short electric field pulse to an ultracold plasma induces an electron plasma oscillation. This manifests itself as an oscillation of the electron center of mass around the ion center of mass in the ultracold plasma. In general, the oscillation can damp due to either collisionless or collisional mechanisms, or a combination of the both. To investigate the nature of oscillation damping in ultracold plasmas, we developed a molecular dynamics model of the ultracold plasma electrons. Through this model, we found that depending on the neutrality of the ultracold plasma and the size of an applied DC electric field, there are some parameter ranges where the damping is primarily collisional and some primarily collisionless. We conducted experiments to compare the measured damping rate with theory predictions and found them to be in good agreement. Extension of our measurements to different parameter ranges should enable studies for strong-coupling influence on electron-ion collision rates.

  18. Proposal for efficient two-dimensional atom localization using probe absorption in a microwave-driven four-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Chunling; Li Jiahua; Yang Xiaoxue; Xiong Hao; Zhang Duo

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of two-dimensional (2D) atom localization is explored by monitoring the probe absorption in a microwave-driven four-level atomic medium under the action of two orthogonal standing-wave fields. Because of the position-dependent atom-field interaction, the information about the position of the atom can be obtained via the absorption measurement of the weak probe field. It is found that the localization behavior is significantly improved due to the joint quantum interference induced by the standing-wave and microwave-driven fields. Most importantly, the atom can be localized at a particular position and the maximal probability of finding the atom in one period of the standing-wave fields reaches unity by properly adjusting the system parameters. The proposed scheme may provide a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-resolution 2D atom localization.

  19. Transport, atom blockade, and output coupling in a Tonks-Girardeau gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford, L.; McCann, J. F.; Goold, J.; Busch, Th.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experiments have demonstrated how quantum-mechanical impurities can be created within strongly correlated quantum gases and used to probe the coherence properties of these systems [S. Palzer, C. Zipkes, C. Sias, and M. Koehl, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 150601 (2009).]. Here we present a phenomenological model to simulate such an output coupler for a Tonks-Girardeau gas that shows qualitative agreement with the experimental results for atom transport and output coupling. Our model allows us to explore nonequilibrium transport phenomena in ultracold quantum gases and leads us to predict a regime of atom blockade, where the impurity component becomes localized in the parent cloud despite the presence of gravity. We show that this provides a stable mixed-species quantum gas in the strongly correlated limit.

  20. Entanglement detection from interference fringes in atom-photon systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Jun; Nemoto, Kae; Miniatura, Christian

    2010-01-01

    A measurement scheme of atomic qubits pinned at given positions is studied by analyzing the interference pattern obtained when they emit photons spontaneously. In the case of two qubits, a well-known relation is revisited in which the interference visibility is equal to the concurrence of the state in the infinite spatial separation limit of the qubits. By taking into account the superradiant and subradiant effects, it is shown that a state tomography is possible when the qubit spatial separation is comparable to the wavelength of the atomic transition. In the case of three qubits, the relations between various entanglement measures and the interference visibility are studied, where the visibility is defined from the two-qubit case. A qualitative correspondence among these entanglement relations is discussed. In particular, it is shown that the interference visibility is directly related to the maximal bipartite negativity.

  1. High-precision two-dimensional atom localization via quantum interference in a tripod-type system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhiping; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    A scheme is proposed for high-precision two-dimensional atom localization in a four-level tripod-type atomic system via measurement of the excited state population. It is found that because of the position-dependent atom–field interaction, the precision of 2D atom localization can be significantly improved by appropriately adjusting the system parameters. Our scheme may be helpful in laser cooling or atom nanolithography via high-precision and high-resolution atom localization. (letter)

  2. Semiclassical neutral atom as a reference system in density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, Lucian A; Fabiano, E; Laricchia, S; Della Sala, F

    2011-05-06

    We use the asymptotic expansions of the semiclassical neutral atom as a reference system in density functional theory to construct accurate generalized gradient approximations (GGAs) for the exchange-correlation and kinetic energies without any empiricism. These asymptotic functionals are among the most accurate GGAs for molecular systems, perform well for solid state, and overcome current GGA state of the art in frozen density embedding calculations. Our results also provide evidence for the conjointness conjecture between exchange and kinetic energies of atomic systems.

  3. Moller Polarimetry with Atomic Hydrogen Targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chudakov, Eugene; Luppov, V.

    2012-01-01

    A proposal to use polarized atomic hydrogen gas as the target for electron beam polarimetry based on the Moller scattering is described. Such a gas, stored in an ultra-cold magnetic trap, would provide a target of practically 100% polarized electrons. It is conceivable to reach a ∼0.3% systematic accuracy of the beam polarimetry with such a target. Feasibility studies for the CEBAF electron beam have been performed

  4. Recent developments in trapping and manipulation of atoms with adiabatic potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraway, Barry M.; Perrin, Hélène

    2016-09-01

    A combination of static and oscillating magnetic fields can be used to ‘dress’ atoms with radio-frequency (RF), or microwave, radiation. The spatial variation of these fields can be used to create an enormous variety of traps for ultra-cold atoms and quantum gases. This article reviews the type and character of these adiabatic traps and the applications which include atom interferometry and the study of low-dimensional quantum systems. We introduce the main concepts of magnetic traps leading to adiabatic dressed traps. The concept of adiabaticity is discussed in the context of the Landau-Zener model. The first bubble trap experiment is reviewed together with the method used for loading it. Experiments based on atom chips show the production of double wells and ring traps. Dressed atom traps can be evaporatively cooled with an additional RF field, and a weak RF field can be used to probe the spectroscopy of the adiabatic potentials. Several approaches to ring traps formed from adiabatic potentials are discussed, including those based on atom chips, time-averaged adiabatic potentials and induction methods. Several proposals for adiabatic lattices with dressed atoms are also reviewed.

  5. Precision Measurement of the Position-Space Wave Functions of Gravitationally Bound Ultracold Neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kamiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gravity is the most familiar force at our natural length scale. However, it is still exotic from the view point of particle physics. The first experimental study of quantum effects under gravity was performed using a cold neutron beam in 1975. Following this, an investigation of gravitationally bound quantum states using ultracold neutrons was started in 2002. This quantum bound system is now well understood, and one can use it as a tunable tool to probe gravity. In this paper, we review a recent measurement of position-space wave functions of such gravitationally bound states and discuss issues related to this analysis, such as neutron loss models in a thin neutron guide, the formulation of phase space quantum mechanics, and UCN position sensitive detectors. The quantum modulation of neutron bound states measured in this experiment shows good agreement with the prediction from quantum mechanics.

  6. Quantum dynamics of a two-atom-qubit system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Van Hieu; Nguyen Bich Ha; Le Thi Ha Linh

    2009-01-01

    A physical model of the quantum information exchange between two qubits is studied theoretically. The qubits are two identical two-level atoms, the physical mechanism of the quantum information exchange is the mutual dependence of the reduced density matrices of two qubits generated by their couplings with a multimode radiation field. The Lehmberg-Agarwal master equation is exactly solved. The explicit form of the mutual dependence of two reduced density matrices is established. The application to study the entanglement of two qubits is discussed.

  7. Emission Spectrum Property of Modulated Atom-Field Coupling System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yun-Feng; Feng Jian; Li Yue-Ke

    2013-01-01

    The emission spectrum of a two-level atom interacting with a single mode radiation field in the case of periodic oscillation coupling coefficient is investigated. A general expression for the emission spectrum is derived. The numerical results for the initial field in pure number stare are calculated. It is found that the effect of the coupling coefficient modulation on the spectral structure is very obvious in the case of a low modulation frequency and larger amplitude when the initial field is vacuum, which is potentially useful for exploring a modulated light source. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  8. An ultra-cold neutron source at the MLNSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowles, T.J.; Brun, T.; Hill, R.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.J.; Crow, L.; Serebrov, A.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors have carried out the research and development of an Ultra-Cold Neutron (UCN) source at the Manuel Lujan Neutron Scattering Center (MLNSC). A first generation source was constructed to test the feasibility of a rotor source. The source performed well with an UCN production rate reasonably consistent with that expected. This source can now provide the basis for further development work directed at using UCN in fundamental physics research as well as possible applications in materials science

  9. Spectroscopy with cold and ultra-cold neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abele Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present two new types of spectroscopy methods for cold and ultra-cold neutrons. The first method, which uses the R×B drift effect to disperse charged particles in a uniformly curved magnetic field, allows to study neutron β-decay. We aim for a precision on the 10−4 level. The second method that we refer to as gravity resonance spectroscopy (GRS allows to test Newton’s gravity law at short distances. At the level of precision we are able to provide constraints on any possible gravity-like interaction. In particular, limits on dark energy chameleon fields are improved by several orders of magnitude.

  10. Diamondlike carbon can replace beryllium in physics with ultracold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atchison, F.; Blau, B.; Daum, M.; Fierlinger, P.; Foelske, A.; Geltenbort, P.; Gupta, M.; Henneck, R.; Heule, S.; Kasprzak, M.; Kuzniak, M.; Kirch, K.; Meier, M.; Pichlmaier, A.; Plonka, Ch.; Reiser, R.; Theiler, B.; Zimmer, O.; Zsigmond, G.

    2006-01-01

    To complete our study of ultracold neutron (UCN) storage-vessel coatings, we have measured the Fermi potential for neutrons on diamondlike carbon coatings produced by laser induced vacuum arc deposition. A sample with an sp 3 content of 0.45, measured using, for the first time, neutron transmission had a Fermi potential of (249+/-14)neV. A second sample with an sp 3 fraction of 0.67, measured using cold neutron reflectometry, gave (271+/-13)neV. These values complete the demonstration that there is a viable alternative to Be in UCN physics

  11. Diamond-like carbon coated ultracold neutron guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heule, S.; Atchison, F.; Daum, M.; Foelske, A.; Henneck, R.; Kasprzak, M.; Kirch, K.; Knecht, A.; Kuzniak, M.; Lippert, T.; Meier, M.; Pichlmaier, A.; Straumann, U.

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown recently that diamond-like carbon (DLC) with a sp 3 fraction above 60% is a better wall coating material for ultracold neutron applications than beryllium. We report on results of Raman spectroscopic and XPS measurements obtained for diamond-like carbon coated neutron guides produced in a new facility, which is based on pulsed laser deposition at 193 nm. For diamond-like carbon coatings on small stainless steel substrates we find sp 3 fractions in the range from 60 to 70% and showing slightly increasing values with laser pulse energy and pulse repetition rate

  12. Progress towards magnetic trapping of ultra-cold neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Huffman, P R; Butterworth, J S; Coakley, K J; Dewey, M S; Dzhosyuk, S N; Gilliam, D M; Golub, R; Greene, G L; Habicht, K; Lamoreaux, S K; Mattoni, C E H; McKinsey, D N; Wietfeldt, F E; Doyle, J M

    2000-01-01

    We report progress towards magnetic trapping of ultra-cold neutrons (UCN) in preparation for a neutron lifetime measurement. UCN will be produced by inelastic scattering of cold (0.89 nm) neutrons in a reservoir of superfluid sup 4 He and confined in a three-dimensional magnetic trap. As the trapped neutrons decay, recoil electrons will generate scintillations in the liquid He, which should be detectable with nearly 100% efficiency. This direct measure of the number of UCN decays vs. time can be used to determine the neutron beta-decay lifetime.

  13. Quantum levitation of nanoparticles seen with ultracold neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesvizhevsky, V. V., E-mail: nesvizhevsky@ill.eu [Institut Laue-Langevin (France); Voronin, A. Yu. [Lebedev Institute (Russian Federation); Lambrecht, A.; Reynaud, S. [Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, CNRS, ENS, UPMC (France); Lychagin, E. V.; Muzychka, A. Yu.; Strelkov, A. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15

    Analyzing new experiments with ultracold neutrons (UCNs) we show that physical adsorption of nanoparticles/nanodroplets, levitating in high-excited states in a deep and broad potential well formed by van der Waals/Casimir-Polder (vdW/CP) forces results in new effects on a cross-road of the fields of fundamental interactions, neutron, surface and nanoparticle physics. Accounting for the interaction of UCNs with nanoparticles explains a recently discovered intriguing so-called 'small heating' of UCNs in traps. It might be relevant to the striking conflict of the neutron lifetime experiments with smallest reported uncertainties by adding false effects there.

  14. Quantum levitation of nanoparticles seen with ultracold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Voronin, A. Yu.; Lambrecht, A.; Reynaud, S.; Lychagin, E. V.; Muzychka, A. Yu.; Strelkov, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    Analyzing new experiments with ultracold neutrons (UCNs) we show that physical adsorption of nanoparticles/nanodroplets, levitating in high-excited states in a deep and broad potential well formed by van der Waals/Casimir-Polder (vdW/CP) forces results in new effects on a cross-road of the fields of fundamental interactions, neutron, surface and nanoparticle physics. Accounting for the interaction of UCNs with nanoparticles explains a recently discovered intriguing so-called “small heating” of UCNs in traps. It might be relevant to the striking conflict of the neutron lifetime experiments with smallest reported uncertainties by adding false effects there

  15. An ultra-cold neutron source at the MLNSC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowles, T.J.; Brun, T.; Hill, R.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Crow, L. [Univ. of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (United States); Serebrov, A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Inst. (Russian Federation)

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors have carried out the research and development of an Ultra-Cold Neutron (UCN) source at the Manuel Lujan Neutron Scattering Center (MLNSC). A first generation source was constructed to test the feasibility of a rotor source. The source performed well with an UCN production rate reasonably consistent with that expected. This source can now provide the basis for further development work directed at using UCN in fundamental physics research as well as possible applications in materials science.

  16. Localization of Cold Atoms in State-Dependent Optical Lattices via a Rabi Pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horstmann, Birger; Duerr, Stephan; Roscilde, Tommaso

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel realization of Anderson localization in nonequilibrium states of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. A Rabi pulse transfers part of the population to a different internal state with infinite effective mass. These frozen atoms create a quantum superposition of different disorder potentials, localizing the mobile atoms. For weakly interacting mobile atoms, Anderson localization is obtained. The localization length increases with increasing disorder and decreasing interaction strength, contrary to the expectation for equilibrium localization.

  17. Radio frequency selective addressing of localized atoms in a periodic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, H.; De Mirandes, E.; Ferlaino, F.; Roati, G.; Tuerck, V.; Modugno, G.; Inguscio, M.

    2004-01-01

    We study the localization and addressability of ultracold atoms in a combined parabolic and periodic potential. Such a potential supports the existence of localized stationary states and we show that applying a radio frequency field allows us to selectively address atoms in these states. This method is used to measure the energy and momentum distribution of the atoms in the localized states. We also discuss possible extensions of this scheme to address and manipulate atoms in single lattice sites

  18. A phenomenological model for collisional coherence transfer in an optically pumped atomic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanbekyan, K; Bevilaqua, G; Mariotti, E; Moi, L [Universita degli Studi di Siena, Siena, 53100 (Italy); Khanbekyan, A; Papoyan, A, E-mail: karen.khanbekyan@gmail.com [Institute for Physical Research, National Academy of Sciences, Ashtarak 2 (Armenia)

    2011-03-14

    We consider a dual {Lambda}-system under double laser excitation to investigate the possibility of indirect coherence transfer between atomic ground states through an excited state. The atomic system is excited by a frequency modulated pump laser and probed by a low-power cw laser. All the decoherence mechanisms are discussed and taken into account. Adjustment of parameters of the two radiations aimed at maximization of coherence transfer is addressed. The study can help to understand the phenomena as collisional transfer of coherence and can find application in the experimental realization of atomic sensors.

  19. Gravity sensing using Very Long Baseline Atom Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlippert, D.; Wodey, E.; Meiners, C.; Tell, D.; Schubert, C.; Ertmer, W.; Rasel, E. M.

    2017-12-01

    Very Long Baseline Atom Interferometry (VLBAI) has applications in high-accuracy absolute gravimetry, gravity-gradiometry, and for tests of fundamental physics. Thanks to the quadratic scaling of the phase shift with increasing free evolution time, extending the baseline of atomic gravimeters from tens of centimeters to meters puts resolutions of 10-13g and beyond in reach.We present the design and progress of key elements of the VLBAI-test stand: a dual-species source of Rb and Yb, a high-performance two-layer magnetic shield, and an active vibration isolation system allowing for unprecedented stability of the mirror acting as an inertial reference. We envisage a vibration-limited short-term sensitivity to gravitational acceleration of 1x10-8 m/s-2Hz-1/2 and up to a factor of 25 improvement when including additional correlation with a broadband seismometer. Here, the supreme long-term stability of atomic gravity sensors opens the route towards competition with superconducting gravimeters. The operation of VLBAI as a differential dual-species gravimeter using ultracold mixtures of Yb and Rb atoms enables quantum tests of the universality of free fall (UFF) at an unprecedented level of <10-13, potentially surpassing the best experiments to date.

  20. Precision Measurements of Atomic Lifetimes and Hyperfine Energies in Alkali Like Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, Carol E.

    2005-01-01

    Financial support of this research project has lead to advances in the study of atomic structure through precision measurements of atomic lifetimes, energy splittings, and transitions energies. The interpretation of data from many areas of physics and chemistry requires an accurate understanding of atomic structure. For example, scientists in the fields of astrophysics, geophysics, and plasma fusion depend on transition strengths to determine the relative abundances of elements. Assessing the operation of discharges and atomic resonance line filters also depends on accurate knowledge of transition strengths. Often relative transition strengths are measured precisely, but accurate atomic lifetimes are needed to obtain absolute values. Precision measurements of atomic lifetimes and energy splittings also provide fundamentally important atomic structure information. Lifetimes of allowed transitions depend most strongly on the electronic wave function far from the nucleus. Alternatively, hyperfine splittings give important information about the electronic wave function in the vicinity of the nucleus as well as the structure of the nucleus. Our main focus throughout this project has been the structure of atomic cesium because of its connection to the study of atomic parity nonconservation (PNC). The interpretation of atomic PNC experiments in terms of weak interaction coupling constants requires accurate knowledge of the electronic wave function near the nucleus as well as far from the nucleus. It is possible to address some of these needs theoretically with sophisticated many-electron atomic structure calculations. However, this program has been able to address these needs experimentally with a precision that surpasses current theoretical accuracy. Our measurements also play the important role of providing a means for testing the accuracy of many-electron calculations and guiding further theoretical development, Atomic systems such as cesium, with a single electron

  1. Precision Measurements of Atomic Lifetimes and Hyperfine Energies in Alkali Like Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, Carol E.

    2005-03-04

    Financial support of this research project has lead to advances in the study of atomic structure through precision measurements of atomic lifetimes, energy splittings, and transitions energies. The interpretation of data from many areas of physics and chemistry requires an accurate understanding of atomic structure. For example, scientists in the fields of astrophysics, geophysics, and plasma fusion depend on transition strengths to determine the relative abundances of elements. Assessing the operation of discharges and atomic resonance line filters also depends on accurate knowledge of transition strengths. Often relative transition strengths are measured precisely, but accurate atomic lifetimes are needed to obtain absolute values. Precision measurements of atomic lifetimes and energy splittings also provide fundamentally important atomic structure information. Lifetimes of allowed transitions depend most strongly on the electronic wave function far from the nucleus. Alternatively, hyperfine splittings give important information about the electronic wave function in the vicinity of the nucleus as well as the structure of the nucleus. Our main focus throughout this project has been the structure of atomic cesium because of its connection to the study of atomic parity nonconservation (PNC). The interpretation of atomic PNC experiments in terms of weak interaction coupling constants requires accurate knowledge of the electronic wave function near the nucleus as well as far from the nucleus. It is possible to address some of these needs theoretically with sophisticated many-electron atomic structure calculations. However, this program has been able to address these needs experimentally with a precision that surpasses current theoretical accuracy. Our measurements also play the important role of providing a means for testing the accuracy of many-electron calculations and guiding further theoretical development, Atomic systems such as cesium, with a single electron

  2. Ground state of the polar alkali-metal-atom-strontium molecules: Potential energy curve and permanent dipole moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerout, R.; Aymar, M.; Dulieu, O.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the structure of the polar alkali-metal-atom-strontium diatomic molecules as possible candidates for the realization of samples of ultracold polar molecular species not yet investigated experimentally. Using a quantum chemistry approach based on effective core potentials and core polarization potentials, we model these systems as effective three-valence-electron systems, allowing for calculation of electronic properties with full configuration interaction. The potential curve and the permanent dipole moment of the 2 Σ + ground state are determined as functions of the internuclear distance for LiSr, NaSr, KSr, RbSr, and CsSr molecules. These molecules are found to exhibit a significant permanent dipole moment, though smaller than those of the alkali-metal-atom-Rb molecules.

  3. Towards Quantum Simulation with Circular Rydberg Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Nguyen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of quantum simulation is an in-depth understanding of many-body physics, which is important for fundamental issues (quantum phase transitions, transport, … and for the development of innovative materials. Analytic approaches to many-body systems are limited, and the huge size of their Hilbert space makes numerical simulations on classical computers intractable. A quantum simulator avoids these limitations by transcribing the system of interest into another, with the same dynamics but with interaction parameters under control and with experimental access to all relevant observables. Quantum simulation of spin systems is being explored with trapped ions, neutral atoms, and superconducting devices. We propose here a new paradigm for quantum simulation of spin-1/2 arrays, providing unprecedented flexibility and allowing one to explore domains beyond the reach of other platforms. It is based on laser-trapped circular Rydberg atoms. Their long intrinsic lifetimes, combined with the inhibition of their microwave spontaneous emission and their low sensitivity to collisions and photoionization, make trapping lifetimes in the minute range realistic with state-of-the-art techniques. Ultracold defect-free circular atom chains can be prepared by a variant of the evaporative cooling method. This method also leads to the detection of arbitrary spin observables with single-site resolution. The proposed simulator realizes an XXZ spin-1/2 Hamiltonian with nearest-neighbor couplings ranging from a few to tens of kilohertz. All the model parameters can be dynamically tuned at will, making a large range of simulations accessible. The system evolution can be followed over times in the range of seconds, long enough to be relevant for ground-state adiabatic preparation and for the study of thermalization, disorder, or Floquet time crystals. The proposed platform already presents unrivaled features for quantum simulation of regular spin chains. We

  4. Towards Quantum Simulation with Circular Rydberg Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T. L.; Raimond, J. M.; Sayrin, C.; Cortiñas, R.; Cantat-Moltrecht, T.; Assemat, F.; Dotsenko, I.; Gleyzes, S.; Haroche, S.; Roux, G.; Jolicoeur, Th.; Brune, M.

    2018-01-01

    The main objective of quantum simulation is an in-depth understanding of many-body physics, which is important for fundamental issues (quantum phase transitions, transport, …) and for the development of innovative materials. Analytic approaches to many-body systems are limited, and the huge size of their Hilbert space makes numerical simulations on classical computers intractable. A quantum simulator avoids these limitations by transcribing the system of interest into another, with the same dynamics but with interaction parameters under control and with experimental access to all relevant observables. Quantum simulation of spin systems is being explored with trapped ions, neutral atoms, and superconducting devices. We propose here a new paradigm for quantum simulation of spin-1 /2 arrays, providing unprecedented flexibility and allowing one to explore domains beyond the reach of other platforms. It is based on laser-trapped circular Rydberg atoms. Their long intrinsic lifetimes, combined with the inhibition of their microwave spontaneous emission and their low sensitivity to collisions and photoionization, make trapping lifetimes in the minute range realistic with state-of-the-art techniques. Ultracold defect-free circular atom chains can be prepared by a variant of the evaporative cooling method. This method also leads to the detection of arbitrary spin observables with single-site resolution. The proposed simulator realizes an X X Z spin-1 /2 Hamiltonian with nearest-neighbor couplings ranging from a few to tens of kilohertz. All the model parameters can be dynamically tuned at will, making a large range of simulations accessible. The system evolution can be followed over times in the range of seconds, long enough to be relevant for ground-state adiabatic preparation and for the study of thermalization, disorder, or Floquet time crystals. The proposed platform already presents unrivaled features for quantum simulation of regular spin chains. We discuss

  5. An intrinsic representation of atomic structure: From clusters to periodic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Tian; Xu, Shao-Gang; Yang, Xiao-Bao; Zhao, Yu-Jun

    2017-10-01

    We have improved our distance matrix and eigen-subspace projection function (EPF) [X.-T. Li et al., J. Chem. Phys. 146, 154108 (2017)] to describe the atomic structure for periodic systems. Depicting the local structure of an atom, the EPF turns out to be invariant with respect to the choices of the unit cell and coordinate frame, leading to an intrinsic representation of the crystal with a set of EPFs of the nontrivial atoms. The difference of EPFs reveals the difference of atoms in local structure, while the accumulated difference between two sets of EPFs can be taken as the distance between configurations. Exemplified with the cases of carbon allotropes and boron sheets, our EPF approach shows exceptional rationality and efficiency to distinguish the atomic structures, which is crucial in structure recognition, comparison, and analysis.

  6. Development of ultracold neutron detectors and a polarization analyzing system for the measurement of the neutron electric dipole moment; Developpement de detecteurs de neutrons ultra-froids et d'un systeme d'analyse de polarisation pour la mesure du moment electrique dipolaire du neutron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogel, Gwendal

    2009-10-29

    This thesis was performed in the context of a project aiming to measure the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Two aspects have been studied: The detection and the polarization analysis of ultracold neutrons. Three types of detectors have been tested at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL): The Cascade-U (GEM technology), the {sup 3}He gas detector and {sup 6}Li-doped glass scintillators (GS family). Their detection efficiency and their background sensitivity have been measured. The GS10 scintillator is competitive with the {sup 3}He gas detector under the conditions realized with the EDM spectrometer. A GS3/GS20 scintillator stack has enabled to improve the neutron/gamma discrimination. It has been found 20% less efficient than the {sup 3}He gas detector under the EDM spectrometer. The Cascade-U detector has been observed to be 20% less efficient than a 500 microns thick GS10 glass as confirmed by simulations. A new system for simultaneous spin analysis is presented. It consists of two independent detection systems (arms) which are each made of an adiabatic spin flipper, a spin analyzer, and a detector. The arms detect opposite spin components, allowing the simultaneous counting of both neutron spin orientations. A prototype mounted in horizontal configuration has been tested at ILL. The analyzing power of both arms has been measured to be 80%. The transmission of the system without spin analyzers has been found to be 50%. (author) [French] Cette these s'inscrit dans un nouveau projet de mesure du moment dipolaire electrique (EDM) du neutron a l'institut Paul Scherrer. Deux aspects ont ete etudies ici: la detection et l'analyse de polarisation de neutrons ultra-froids. Trois types de detecteurs ont ete testes a l'Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL): le Cascade-U (technologie GEM), le compteur a gaz {sup 3}He et des scintillateurs dopes au {sup 6}Li (type GS). Leur efficacite de detection ainsi que leur sensibilite au bruit de fond ont

  7. Spectroscopy of systems of two identical atoms: effects of quantum interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, A.A.; Yudson, V.I.

    2017-01-01

    Several effects of quantum interference in spectroscopy of a system of two atoms are discussed. (i) In the system of spatially separated atoms in a one-dimensional (1D) geometry (a single-mode waveguide or photon crystal), a (meta)stable excited entangled state can be formed, its decay being very sensitive to the distance between the atoms and to perturbations which cause a difference between their resonance frequencies. (ii) In a system of closely located atoms in 3D space, the extreme sensitivity of absorption and fluorescence spectra to the direction of the applied magnetic field is demonstrated. These theoretical predictions can be useful for the quantum information processing and ultrasensitive measurements.

  8. Condensing and water supplying systems in an atomic power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinmura, Akira.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To reduce heat loss and eliminate accumulation of drain in water supplying and heating units in an atomic power plant by providing a direct contact type drain cooler between a gland-exhauster vapor condenser and a condensing and de-salting means, the drain from each water supplying and heating unit being collected in said cooler for heating the condensed water. Structure: Condensed water from a condenser is fed by a low pressure condensing pump through an air ejector and gland-exhauster vapor condenser to the direct-contact type drain cooler and is condensed in each water supply heater. Next, it is heated by drain fed through a drain level adjuster valve and an orifice and then forced by a medium pressure condenser pump into the condensing and de-salting means. It is then supplied by a high pressure condensing pump into the successive water supply heater. (Kamimura, M.)

  9. Laser-Cooled Ions and Atoms in a Storage Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinert, J.; Hannemann, S.; Eike, B.; Eisenbarth, U.; Grieser, M.; Grimm, R.; Gwinner, G.; Karpuk, S.; Saathoff, G.; Schramm, U.; Schwalm, D.; Weidemueller, M.

    2003-01-01

    We review recent experiments at the Heidelberg Test Storage Ring which apply advanced laser cooling techniques to stored ion beams. Very high phase-space densities are achieved by three-dimensional laser cooling of a coasting 9 Be + beam at 7.3 MeV. Laser-cooled, trapped Cs atoms are used as an ultracold precision target for the study of ion-atom interactions with a 74 MeV beam of 12 C 6+ ions.

  10. Magnetic-film atom chip with 10 μm period lattices of microtraps for quantum information science with Rydberg atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, V Y F; Pijn, D R M; Schlatter, H; Torralbo-Campo, L; La Rooij, A L; Mulder, G B; Naber, J; Soudijn, M L; Tauschinsky, A; Abarbanel, C; Hadad, B; Golan, E; Folman, R; Spreeuw, R J C

    2014-05-01

    We describe the fabrication and construction of a setup for creating lattices of magnetic microtraps for ultracold atoms on an atom chip. The lattice is defined by lithographic patterning of a permanent magnetic film. Patterned magnetic-film atom chips enable a large variety of trapping geometries over a wide range of length scales. We demonstrate an atom chip with a lattice constant of 10 μm, suitable for experiments in quantum information science employing the interaction between atoms in highly excited Rydberg energy levels. The active trapping region contains lattice regions with square and hexagonal symmetry, with the two regions joined at an interface. A structure of macroscopic wires, cutout of a silver foil, was mounted under the atom chip in order to load ultracold (87)Rb atoms into the microtraps. We demonstrate loading of atoms into the square and hexagonal lattice sections simultaneously and show resolved imaging of individual lattice sites. Magnetic-film lattices on atom chips provide a versatile platform for experiments with ultracold atoms, in particular for quantum information science and quantum simulation.

  11. Magnetic-film atom chip with 10 μm period lattices of microtraps for quantum information science with Rydberg atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, V. Y. F. [Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, PO Box 94485, 1090 GL Amsterdam (Netherlands); Complex Photonic Systems (COPS), MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Pijn, D. R. M.; Schlatter, H.; Torralbo-Campo, L.; La Rooij, A. L.; Mulder, G. B.; Naber, J.; Soudijn, M. L.; Tauschinsky, A.; Spreeuw, R. J. C., E-mail: r.j.c.spreeuw@uva.nl [Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, PO Box 94485, 1090 GL Amsterdam (Netherlands); Abarbanel, C.; Hadad, B.; Golan, E. [Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Be' er Sheva 84105 (Israel); Folman, R. [Department of Physics and Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Be' er Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2014-05-15

    We describe the fabrication and construction of a setup for creating lattices of magnetic microtraps for ultracold atoms on an atom chip. The lattice is defined by lithographic patterning of a permanent magnetic film. Patterned magnetic-film atom chips enable a large variety of trapping geometries over a wide range of length scales. We demonstrate an atom chip with a lattice constant of 10 μm, suitable for experiments in quantum information science employing the interaction between atoms in highly excited Rydberg energy levels. The active trapping region contains lattice regions with square and hexagonal symmetry, with the two regions joined at an interface. A structure of macroscopic wires, cutout of a silver foil, was mounted under the atom chip in order to load ultracold {sup 87}Rb atoms into the microtraps. We demonstrate loading of atoms into the square and hexagonal lattice sections simultaneously and show resolved imaging of individual lattice sites. Magnetic-film lattices on atom chips provide a versatile platform for experiments with ultracold atoms, in particular for quantum information science and quantum simulation.

  12. Composition of Cu/Al system constructed by means of dynamic atomic deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashlykov, I.S.; Tul'ev, V.V.

    2011-01-01

    Rutherford backscattering and RUMP simulation programme have been applied to investigate composition of Cu/Al system prepared using dynamic atomic deposition process when deposition of Cu thin film on Al substrate was assisted with 6 keV Ar + ions irradiation. It is estimated that thin ( ~15 nm) surface layer consists of ~50 at.% Cu, ~10 at.% Ar, ~4 at.% O and the remaining is Al. Dynamic deposition of Cu on Al substrate is accompanied with radiation enhanced diffusion of Cu, O, Ar atoms in substrate and out diffusion of Al atoms in deposited Cu coating. (authors)

  13. Dynamics of ionisation and entanglement in the 'atom + quantum electromagnetic field' system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharapova, P R; Tikhonova, O V [Department of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2012-03-31

    The dynamics of a model Rydberg atom in a strong nonclassical electromagnetic field is investigated. The field-induced transitions to the continuum involving different numbers of photons (with intermediate states in the discrete spectrum) are taken into account and the specific features of ionisation in 'squeezed' field states are considered in comparison with the case of classical light. A significant decrease in the ionisation rate is found, which is caused by the interference stabilisation of the atomic system. The entanglement of the atomic and field subsystems, the temporal dynamics of the correlations found, and the possibility of measuring them are analysed.

  14. Spectral analysis for systems of atoms and molecules coupled to the quantized radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, V.; Sigal, I.M.

    1999-01-01

    We consider systems of static nuclei and electrons - atoms and molecules - coupled to the quantized radiation field. The interactions between electrons and the soft modes of the quantized electromagnetic field are described by minimal coupling, p→p-eA(x), where A(x) is the electromagnetic vector potential with an ultraviolet cutoff. If the interactions between the electrons and the quantized radiation field are turned off, the atom or molecule is assumed to have at least one bound state. We prove that, for sufficiently small values of the fine structure constant α, the interacting system has a ground state corresponding to the bottom of its energy spectrum. For an atom, we prove that its excited states above the ground state turn into metastable states whose life-times we estimate. Furthermore the energy spectrum is absolutely continuous, except, perhaps,in a small interval above the ground state energy and around the threshold energies of the atom or molecule. (orig.)

  15. Entanglement of a two-atom system driven by the quantum vacuum in arbitrary cavity size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores-Hidalgo, G., E-mail: gfloreshidalgo@unifei.edu.br [Instituto de Física e Química, Universidade Federal de Itajubá, 37500-903, Itajubá, MG (Brazil); Rojas, M., E-mail: moises.leyva@dfi.ufla.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Lavras, CP 3037, 37200-000, Lavras, MG (Brazil); Rojas, Onofre, E-mail: ors@dfi.ufla.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Lavras, CP 3037, 37200-000, Lavras, MG (Brazil)

    2017-05-10

    We study the entanglement dynamics of two distinguishable atoms confined into a cavity and interacting with a quantum vacuum field. As a simplified model for this system, we consider two harmonic oscillators linearly coupled to a massless scalar field which are inside a spherical cavity of radius R. Through the concurrence, the entanglement dynamics for the two-atom system is discussed for a range of initial states composed of a superposition of atomic states. Our results reveal how the entanglement of the two atoms behaves through the time evolution, in a precise way, for arbitrary cavity size and for arbitrary coupling constant. All our computations are analytical and only the final step is numerical. - Highlights: • Entanglement time evolution in arbitrary cavity size is considered. • In free space concurrence approaches a fixed value at large time. • For finite cavity, concurrence behaves almost as a periodic function of time.

  16. Probing Efimov discrete scaling in an atom-molecule collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalchi, M. A.; Yamashita, M. T.; Hadizadeh, M. R.; Garrido, E.; Tomio, Lauro; Frederico, T.

    2018-01-01

    The discrete Efimov scaling behavior, well known in the low-energy spectrum of three-body bound systems for large scattering lengths (unitary limit), is identified in the energy dependence of an atom-molecule elastic cross section in mass-imbalanced systems. That happens in the collision of a heavy atom with mass mH with a weakly bound dimer formed by the heavy atom and a lighter one with mass mL≪mH . Approaching the heavy-light unitary limit, the s -wave elastic cross section σ will present a sequence of zeros or minima at collision energies following closely the Efimov geometrical law. Our results, obtained with Faddeev calculations and supplemented by a Born-Oppenheimer analysis, open a perspective to detecting the discrete scaling behavior from low-energy scattering data, which is timely in view of the ongoing experiments with ultracold binary mixtures having strong mass asymmetries, such as lithium and cesium or lithium and ytterbium.

  17. The ''GAPHYOR'' system: A computerized retrieval system of the properties of atoms, molecules, gases and plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delcroix, J.L.

    1977-08-01

    GAPHYOR (GAz PHYsique ORsay) is a retrieval system of the simple properties of atoms and molecules (energy levels, lifetimes, dipole moments, polarizability etc.), of the interaction properties between these particles (cross-sections, reaction rates etc.) and of the macroscopic properties of the corresponding gases (viscosity, electronic and ion mobility, thermodynamic functions etc.). The chemical systems described must be based on a small number of elements (1 to 4 in the most recent version) and composed of molecules having 8 atoms at the most. In the present article the fundamental principles of GAPHYOR are described and by means of a few simple statistics the present state of the bank after five years of operation is analysed. On 1.11.76 the file contained more than 33,000 lines, and these increase by about 10,000 per year. The information comes from about 300 periodicals, although 45% of the results are taken from 4 principal journals. Geographical analysis of the file provides useful information about the scientific work of the various research centres and the scientific publishing policies of the different countries. Finally, the qualities, difficulties and possible improvements of GAPHYOR are analysed

  18. Quantification of entanglement entropies for doubly excited resonance states in two-electron atomic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Yew Kam; Lin, Chien-Hao

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we study the quantum entanglement for doubly excited resonance states in two-electron atomic systems such as the H - and Ps - ions and the He atom by using highly correlated Hylleraas type functions The resonance states are determined by calculation of density of resonance states with the stabilization method. The spatial (electron-electron orbital) entanglement entropies (linear and von Neumann) for the low-lying doubly excited states are quantified using the Schmidt-Slater decomposition method. (paper)

  19. Atomic systems with one and two active electrons in electromagnetic fields: Ionization and high harmonics generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, I A; Kheifets, A S

    2010-01-01

    We describe a theoretical procedure for solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) for atomic systems with one or two valence electrons. Motion of the valence electrons is described by means of the Hartree-Fock potential including the exchange interaction. We apply the procedure to various physical phenomena occurring in atoms exposed to strong electromagnetic fields. As an illustration, we consider below the processes of high harmonics generation and attosecond pulses production.

  20. Correlated wave functions for three-particle systems with Coulomb interaction - The muonic helium atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, K.-N.

    1977-01-01

    A computational procedure for calculating correlated wave functions is proposed for three-particle systems interacting through Coulomb forces. Calculations are carried out for the muonic helium atom. Variational wave functions which explicitly contain interparticle coordinates are presented for the ground and excited states. General Hylleraas-type trial functions are used as the basis for the correlated wave functions. Excited-state energies of the muonic helium atom computed from 1- and 35-term wave functions are listed for four states.

  1. Experiments with cold hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonas, V.B.

    1981-01-01

    Numerous investigations of atomic processes in Waseous phase on the surface with participation of ''cold'' hydrogen atoms, made during the last years, are considered. The term ''cold atom'' means the range of relative collision energies E<10 MeV (respectively 'ultracold ' atoms at E< or approximately 1 MeV) which corresponds to the range of temperatures in tens (units) of K degrees. Three main ranges of investigations where extensive experimental programs are realized are considered: study of collisional processes with hydrogen atom participation, hydrogen atoms being of astrophysical interest; study of elastic atom-molecular scattering at superlow energies and studies on the problem of condensed hydrogen. Hydrogen atoms production is realized at dissociation in non-electrode high-frequency or superhigh-frequency discharge. A method of hydrogen quantum generator and of its modifications appeared to be rather an effective means to study collisional changes of spin state of hydrogen atoms. First important results on storage and stabilization of the gas of polarized hydrogen atoms are received

  2. First row transition metal atoms embedded in multivacancies in a rippled graphene system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mombrú, Dominique; Faccio, Ricardo; Mombrú, Alvaro W.

    2018-03-01

    Ab-initio calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) have been performed to study systems where a first row transition metal atom is embedded in a rippled graphene due to the existence of an 8-order multivacancy. In addition to these cases, also the inclusion of a zinc atom, with a 3d10 electron configuration, was also studied. Structural distortions and magnetic response for each system were studied. A correlation was found for the magnitude of the rippling and the distortion in the vacancy. Variation in the trends was found for Cu and Zn cases, which were explained on the basis of the filling of the 3dx2-y2 orbital. All the systems exhibit lower magnetic moment in comparison to the metal-less system. The quenching of the magnetic moment due to the carbon atoms in the vacancy is observed for Sc and Cu.

  3. Lasing by driven atoms-cavity system in collective strong coupling regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Rahul; Rangwala, S A

    2017-09-12

    The interaction of laser cooled atoms with resonant light is determined by the natural linewidth of the excited state. An optical cavity is another optically resonant system where the loss from the cavity determines the resonant optical response of the system. The near resonant combination of an optical Fabry-Pérot cavity with laser cooled and trapped atoms couples two distinct optical resonators via light and has great potential for precision measurements and the creation of versatile quantum optics systems. Here we show how driven magneto-optically trapped atoms in collective strong coupling regime with the cavity leads to lasing at a frequency red detuned from the atomic transition. Lasing is demonstrated experimentally by the observation of a lasing threshold accompanied by polarization and spatial mode purity, and line-narrowing in the outcoupled light. Spontaneous emission into the cavity mode by the driven atoms stimulates lasing action, which is capable of operating as a continuous wave laser in steady state, without a seed laser. The system is modeled theoretically, and qualitative agreement with experimentally observed lasing is seen. Our result opens up a range of new measurement possibilities with this system.

  4. Construction of maintenance management system of atomic power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibasaki, Naofumi; Ookawara, Koumei; Suzuki, Masashi

    2005-01-01

    This maintenance management system has the retrieval function of the variation conditions with the three dimensions models and repair history. The structure of system consists of the management data retrieval tool and the total facilities repair plan support tool. The system has the management function of facilities information, a bird's-eye view of three dimensions models, data recording function, output of various kinds of registers, pre-estimation of degradation and the repair plan support function. When the total facilities repair plan support tool is selected, the variation conditions of facilities, repair history and repair cost are shown, and each part of facility and materials is able to display. (S.Y.)

  5. A portable source of lattice-trapped and ultracold strontium (PLUS), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to design and demonstrate a portable source of lattice-trapped, ultracold strontium (PLUS). The device uses simplified and robust techniques for loading...

  6. A Portable Source of Lattice-Trapped and Ultracold Strontium (PLUS), Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to demonstrate the portable source of lattice-trapped, ultracold strontium (PLUS) designed during Phase I. The device uses simplified and robust...

  7. New high-throughput material-exploration system based on combinatorial chemistry and electrostatic atomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, K.; Takahashi, H.; Ito, S.; Inoue, S.; Watanabe, M.

    2006-01-01

    As a tool to facilitate future material explorations, our group has developed a new combinatorial system for the high-throughput preparation of compounds made up of more than three components. The system works in two steps: the atomization of a liquid by a high electric field followed by deposition to a grounded substrate. The combinatorial system based on this method has plural syringe pumps. The each starting materials are fed through the syringe pumps into a manifold, thoroughly mixed as they pass through the manifold, and atomized from the tip of a stainless steel nozzle onto a grounded substrate

  8. Two-dimensional atom localization via a coherence-controlled absorption spectrum in an N-tripod-type five-level atomic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Chunling; Li Jiahua; Yang Xiaoxue [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhan Zhiming [School of Physics and Information Engineering, Jianghan University, Wuhan 430056 (China); Liu Jibing, E-mail: clding2006@126.com, E-mail: huajia_li@163.com [Department of Physics, Hubei Normal University, Huangshi 435002 (China)

    2011-07-28

    A scheme of two-dimensional atom localization based on a coherence-controlled absorption spectrum in an N-tripod-type five-level system is proposed, in which the atom interacts with a weak probe field and three standing-wave fields. Position information of the atom can be achieved by measuring the probe absorption. It is found that the localization properties are significantly improved due to the interaction of dark resonances. It is also shown that the localization factors depend strongly on the system parameters that lead to such spatial structures of localization as chain-like, wave-like, '8'-like, spike-like, crater-like and heart-like patterns. By properly adjusting the system parameters, we can achieve a high-precision and high-resolution atom localization under certain conditions.

  9. Two-dimensional atom localization via a coherence-controlled absorption spectrum in an N-tripod-type five-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Chunling; Li Jiahua; Yang Xiaoxue; Zhan Zhiming; Liu Jibing

    2011-01-01

    A scheme of two-dimensional atom localization based on a coherence-controlled absorption spectrum in an N-tripod-type five-level system is proposed, in which the atom interacts with a weak probe field and three standing-wave fields. Position information of the atom can be achieved by measuring the probe absorption. It is found that the localization properties are significantly improved due to the interaction of dark resonances. It is also shown that the localization factors depend strongly on the system parameters that lead to such spatial structures of localization as chain-like, wave-like, '8'-like, spike-like, crater-like and heart-like patterns. By properly adjusting the system parameters, we can achieve a high-precision and high-resolution atom localization under certain conditions.

  10. Entanglement between two spatially separated atomic modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Karsten; Peise, Jan; Lücke, Bernd; Kruse, Ilka; Vitagliano, Giuseppe; Apellaniz, Iagoba; Kleinmann, Matthias; Tóth, Géza; Klempt, Carsten

    2018-04-01

    Modern quantum technologies in the fields of quantum computing, quantum simulation, and quantum metrology require the creation and control of large ensembles of entangled particles. In ultracold ensembles of neutral atoms, nonclassical states have been generated with mutual entanglement among thousands of particles. The entanglement generation relies on the fundamental particle-exchange symmetry in ensembles of identical particles, which lacks the standard notion of entanglement between clearly definable subsystems. Here, we present the generation of entanglement between two spatially separated clouds by splitting an ensemble of ultracold identical particles prepared in a twin Fock state. Because the clouds can be addressed individually, our experiments open a path to exploit the available entangled states of indistinguishable particles for quantum information applications.

  11. Deterministically swapping frequency-bin entanglement from photon-photon to atom-photon hybrid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Bao-Quan; Liu, Chang; Sun, Yuan; Chen, Ping-Xing

    2018-02-01

    Inspired by the recent developments of the research on the atom-photon quantum interface and energy-time entanglement between single-photon pulses, we are motivated to study the deterministic protocol for the frequency-bin entanglement of the atom-photon hybrid system, which is analogous to the frequency-bin entanglement between single-photon pulses. We show that such entanglement arises naturally in considering the interaction between a frequency-bin entangled single-photon pulse pair and a single atom coupled to an optical cavity, via straightforward atom-photon phase gate operations. Its anticipated properties and preliminary examples of its potential application in quantum networking are also demonstrated. Moreover, we construct a specific quantum entanglement witness tool to detect such extended frequency-bin entanglement from a reasonably general set of separable states, and prove its capability theoretically. We focus on the energy-time considerations throughout the analysis.

  12. Coherent and dissipative transport in a Josephson junction between fermionic superfluids of 6Li atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Elettra; Scazza, Francesco; Roati, Giacomo

    2018-04-01

    Quantum systems out of equilibrium offer the possibility of understanding intriguing and challenging problems in modern physics. Studying transport properties is not only valuable to unveil fundamental properties of quantum matter but it is also an excellent tool for developing new quantum devices which inherently employ quantum-mechanical effects. In this contribution, we present our experimental studies on quantum transport using ultracold Fermi gases of 6Li atoms. We realize the analogous of a Josephson junction by bisecting fermionic superfluids by a thin optical barrier. We observe coherent dynamics in both the population and in the relative phase between the two reservoirs. For critical parameters, the superfluid dynamics exhibits both coherent and resistive flow due to phase-slippage events manifesting as vortices propagating into the bulk. We uncover also a regime of strong dissipation where the junction operation is irreversibly affected by vortex proliferation. Our studies open new directions for investigating dissipation and superfluid transport in strongly correlated fermionic systems.

  13. High-precision two-dimensional atom localization from four-wave mixing in a double-Λ four-level atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Tao; Yang, Wen-Xing; Chen, Ai-Xi; Liu, Shaopeng; Li, Ling; Zhu, Zhonghu

    2018-03-01

    We propose a scheme for high-precision two-dimensional (2D) atom localization via the four-wave mixing (FWM) in a four-level double-Λ atomic system. Due to the position-dependent atom-field interaction, the 2D position information of the atoms can be directly determined by the measurement of the normalized light intensity of output FWM-generated field. We further show that, when the position-dependent generated FWM field has become sufficiently intense, efficient back-coupling to the FWM generating state becomes important. This back-coupling pathway leads to competitive multiphoton destructive interference of the FWM generating state by three supplied and one internally generated fields. We find that the precision of 2D atom localization can be improved significantly by the multiphoton destructive interference and depends sensitively on the frequency detunings and the pump field intensity. Interestingly enough, we show that adjusting the frequency detunings and the pump field intensity can modify significantly the FWM efficiency, and consequently lead to a redistribution of the atoms. As a result, the atom can be localized in one of four quadrants with holding the precision of atom localization.

  14. Manipulating ultracold polar molecules with microwave radiation: The influence of hyperfine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldegunde, J.; Hutson, Jeremy M.; Ran Hong

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the microwave spectra of ultracold 40 K 87 Rb alkali-metal dimers, including hyperfine interactions and in the presence of electric and magnetic fields. We show that microwave transitions may be used to transfer molecules between different hyperfine states, but only because of the presence of nuclear quadrupole interactions. Hyperfine splittings may also complicate the use of ultracold molecules for quantum computing. The spectrum of molecules oriented in electric fields may be simplified dramatically by applying a simultaneous magnetic field.

  15. Microcontroller-driven fluid-injection system for atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasas, S; Alonso, L; Jacquet, P; Adamcik, J; Haeberli, C; Dietler, G

    2010-01-01

    We present a programmable microcontroller-driven injection system for the exchange of imaging medium during atomic force microscopy. Using this low-noise system, high-resolution imaging can be performed during this process of injection without disturbance. This latter circumstance was exemplified by the online imaging of conformational changes in DNA molecules during the injection of anticancer drug into the fluid chamber.

  16. Body frames and frame singularities for three-atom systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littlejohn, R.G.; Mitchell, K.A.; Aquilanti, V.; Cavalli, S.

    1998-01-01

    The subject of body frames and their singularities for three-particle systems is important not only for large-amplitude rovibrational coupling in molecular spectroscopy, but also for reactive scattering calculations. This paper presents a geometrical analysis of the meaning of body frame conventions and their singularities in three-particle systems. Special attention is devoted to the principal axis frame, a certain version of the Eckart frame, and the topological inevitability of frame singularities. The emphasis is on a geometrical picture, which is intended as a preliminary study for the more difficult case of four-particle systems, where one must work in higher-dimensional spaces. The analysis makes extensive use of kinematic rotations. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  17. Quantum coherence and entanglement control for atom-cavity systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Wenchong

    Coherence and entanglement play a significant role in the quantum theory. Ideal quantum systems, "closed" to the outside world, remain quantum forever and thus manage to retain coherence and entanglement. Real quantum systems, however, are open to the environment and are therefore susceptible to the phenomenon of decoherence and disentanglement which are major hindrances to the effectiveness of quantum information processing tasks. In this thesis we have theoretically studied the evolution of coherence and entanglement in quantum systems coupled to various environments. We have also studied ways and means of controlling the decay of coherence and entanglement. We have studied the exact qubit entanglement dynamics of some interesting initial states coupled to a high-Q cavity containing zero photon, one photon, two photons and many photons respectively. We have found that an initially correlated environmental state can serve as an enhancer for entanglement decay or generation processes. More precisely, we have demonstrated that the degree of entanglement, including its collapse as well as its revival times, can be significantly modified by the correlated structure of the environmental modes. We have also studied dynamical decoupling (DD) technique --- a prominent strategy of controlling decoherence and preserving entanglement in open quantum systems. We have analyzed several DD control methods applied to qubit systems that can eliminate the system-environment coupling and prolong the quantum coherence time. Particularly, we have proposed a new DD sequence consisting a set of designed control operators that can universally protected an unknown qutrit state against colored phase and amplitude environment noises. In addition, in a non-Markovian regime, we have reformulated the quantum state diffusion (QSD) equation to incorporate the effect of the external control fields. Without any assumptions on the system-environment coupling and the size of environment, we have

  18. Sheet Fluorescence and Annular Analysis of Ultracold Neutral Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, J.; Gao, H.; Killian, T. C.

    2009-01-01

    Annular analysis of fluorescence imaging measurements on Ultracold Neutral Plasmas (UNPs) is demonstrated. Spatially-resolved fluorescence imaging of the strontium ions produces a spectrum that is Doppler-broadened due to the thermal ion velocity and shifted due to the ion expansion velocity. The fluorescence excitation beam is spatially narrowed into a sheet, allowing for localized analysis of ion temperatures within a volume of the plasma with small density variation. Annular analysis of fluorescence images permits an enhanced signal-to-noise ratio compared to previous fluorescence measurements done in strontium UNPs. Using this technique and analysis, plasma ion temperatures are measured and shown to display characteristics of plasmas with strong coupling such as disorder induced heating and kinetic energy oscillations.

  19. Theoretical model for ultracold molecule formation via adaptive feedback control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poschinger, Ulrich; Salzmann, Wenzel; Wester, Roland; Weidemueller, Matthias; Koch, Christiane P; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2006-01-01

    We theoretically investigate pump-dump photoassociation of ultracold molecules with amplitude- and phase-modulated femtosecond laser pulses. For this purpose, a perturbative model for light-matter interaction is developed and combined with a genetic algorithm for adaptive feedback control of the laser pulse shapes. The model is applied to the formation of 85 Rb 2 molecules in a magneto-optical trap. We find that optimized pulse shapes may maximize the formation of ground state molecules in a specific vibrational state at a pump-dump delay time for which unshaped pulses lead to a minimum of the formation rate. Compared to the maximum formation rate obtained for unshaped pulses at the optimum pump-dump delay, the optimized pulses lead to a significant improvement of about 40% for the target level population. Since our model yields the spectral amplitudes and phases of the optimized pulses, the results are directly applicable in pulse shaping experiments

  20. Applications of Miniaturized Atomic Magnetic Sensors in Military Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    system - sensors are obscured under traffic cones and laid out in an array depending on the protection scenario; The Operator Control Station tablet PC...T., Peters, M., Sandin, H., Savukov, I., Schultz, L., Urbatis, A., Volegov, P., and Zotev, V., 2010, Ultra-low-field MRI for the detection of

  1. Controllable optical bistability in a three-mode optomechanical system with atom-cavity-mirror couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Yan, Jia-Kai; Zhu, Xiao-Fei; Jiang, Cheng

    2018-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the optical bistable behavior in a three-mode optomechanical system with atom-cavity-mirror couplings. The effects of the cavity-pump detuning and the pump power on the bistable behavior are discussed detailedly, the impacts of the atom-pump detuning and the atom-cavity coupling strength on the bistability of the system are also explored, and the influences of the cavity-resonator coupling strength and the cavity decay rate are also taken into consideration. The numerical results demonstrate that by tuning these parameters the bistable behavior of the system can be freely switched on or off, and the threshold of the pump power for the bistability as well as the bistable region width can also be effectively controlled. These results can find potential applications in optical bistable switch in the quantum information processing.

  2. Analogies between dark solitons in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates and optical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proukakis, N P; Parker, N G; Frantzeskakis, D J; Adams, C S

    2004-01-01

    Dark solitons have been observed in optical systems (optical fibres, dielectric guides and bulk media), and, more recently, in harmonically confined atomic Bose-Einstein condensates. This paper presents an overview of some of the common features and analogies experienced by these two intrinsically nonlinear systems, with emphasis on the stability of dark solitons in such systems and their decay via emission of radiation. The closely related issue of vortex dynamics in such systems is also briefly discussed

  3. Exploiting Universality in Atoms with Large Scattering Lengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braaten, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this research project was atoms with scattering lengths that are large compared to the range of their interactions and which therefore exhibit universal behavior at sufficiently low energies. Recent dramatic advances in cooling atoms and in manipulating their scattering lengths have made this phenomenon of practical importance for controlling ultracold atoms and molecules. This research project was aimed at developing a systematically improvable method for calculating few-body observables for atoms with large scattering lengths starting from the universal results as a first approximation. Significant progress towards this goal was made during the five years of the project.

  4. Coupled Atom-Polar Molecule Condensate Systems: A Theoretical Adventure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-14

    second uses the linear-response theory more familiar to people working in the �eld of condensed-matter physics. We have introduced a quasiparticle ...picture and found that in this picture the bare EIT model in Fig. 2 (a) can be compared to a double EIT system shown in Fig. 2 (b). The quasiparticle ...energy levels consists of a particle (with positive quasiparticle energy ) and a hole (with negative quasiparticle energy) branch. The double EIT

  5. Tightly localized stationary pulses in a multilevel atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiong-Jun; Oh, C. H.; Liu, Xin; Liu, Zheng-Xin; Kwek, L. C.

    2007-01-01

    We show that the pulse matching phenomenon can be obtained in the general multilevel system with electromagnetically induced transparency. For this we find a different way to create tightly localized stationary pulses by using counterpropagating pump fields. The present process is a spatial compression of excitation so that it allows us to shape and further intensify the localized stationary pulses, without using standing waves of pump fields or spatially modulated pump fields

  6. Simulating spontaneously generated coherence in a four-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Aijun; Gao Jinyue; Wu Jinhui; Wang Lei

    2005-01-01

    We study the spontaneous emission property of a four-level atomic system driven by two coherent fields. By numerical calculations in the bare state picture, we show that such interesting phenomena as extremely narrow peaks and spontaneous emission quenching can be realized, which are well understood by qualitative explanations in the partially and fully dressed state pictures. Especially, this coherently driven atomic system has two close-lying levels in the partially dressed state picture so that spontaneously generated coherence arises. Using our considered scheme it is feasible to carry out experiments based on spontaneously generated coherence because all rigorous requirements have been avoided in the bare state picture

  7. Universal quantum gates for photon-atom hybrid systems assisted by bad cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guan-Yu; Liu, Qian; Wei, Hai-Rui; Li, Tao; Ai, Qing; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-01-01

    We present two deterministic schemes for constructing a CNOT gate and a Toffoli gate on photon-atom and photon-atom-atom hybrid quantum systems assisted by bad cavities, respectively. They are achieved by cavity-assisted photon scattering and work in the intermediate coupling region with bad cavities, which relaxes the difficulty of their implementation in experiment. Also, bad cavities are feasible for fast quantum operations and reading out information. Compared with previous works, our schemes do not need any auxiliary qubits and measurements. Moreover, the schematic setups for these gates are simple, especially that for our Toffoli gate as only a quarter wave packet is used to interact the photon with each of the atoms every time. These atom-cavity systems can be used as the quantum nodes in long-distance quantum communication as their relatively long coherence time is suitable for multi-time operations between the photon and the system. Our calculations show that the average fidelities and efficiencies of our two universal hybrid quantum gates are high with current experimental technology. PMID:27067992

  8. Quantum physics of entangled systems: wave-particle duality and atom-photon molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, G.

    2000-01-01

    One of the cornerstones of quantum physics is the wave nature of matter. It explains experimentally observed effects like interference and diffraction, occurring when an object moves from one place to another along several indistinguishable ways simultaneously. The wave nature disappears when the individual ways are distinguishable. In this case, the particle nature of the object becomes visible. To determine the particle nature quantitatively, the way of the object has to be measured. Here, large progress has been made recently with new techniques, enabling one to investigate single moving atoms in a controlled manner. Two examples are discussed in the following two sections. The first experiment describes an atom interferometer, where the way of the atom is entangled with its internal state. This allows one to explore the origin of wave-particle duality and perform a quantitative test of this fundamental principle. The second experiment reports on the observation of an atom-photon molecule, a bound state between an atom and a single photon. A fascinating aspect of this system is that it makes possible to monitor the motion of a single neutral atom in real time. (orig.)

  9. Theoretical Study of Triatomic Systems Involving Helium Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suno, H.; Hiyama, E.; Kamimura, M.

    2013-01-01

    The triatomic 4 He system and its isotopic species 4 He 2 3 He are theoretically investigated. By adopting the best empirical helium interaction potentials, we calculate the bound state energy levels as well as the rates for the three-body recombination processes: 4 He + 4 He + 4 He → 4 He 2 + 4 He and 4 He + 4 He + 3 He → 4 He 2 + 3 He. We consider not only zero total angular momentum J = 0 states, but also J > 0 states. We also extend our study to mixed helium-alkali triatomic systems, that is 4 He 2 X with X = 7 Li, 23 Na, 39 K, 85 Rb, and 133 Cs. The energy levels of all the J ≥ 0 bound states for these species are calculated as well as the rates for three-body recombination processes such as 4 He + 4 He + 7 Li → 4 He 2 + 7 Li and 4 He + 4 He + 7 Li → 4 He 7 Li + 4 He. In our calculations, the adiabatic hyperspherical representation is employed but we also obtain preliminary results using the Gaussian expansion method. (author)

  10. Measurement of complete and continuous Wigner functions for discrete atomic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yali; Wang, Zhihui; Zhang, Pengfei; Li, Gang; Li, Jie; Zhang, Tiancai

    2018-01-01

    We measure complete and continuous Wigner functions of a two-level cesium atom in both a nearly pure state and highly mixed states. We apply the method [T. Tilma et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 180401 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.180401] of strictly constructing continuous Wigner functions for qubit or spin systems. We find that the Wigner function of all pure states of a qubit has negative regions and the negativity completely vanishes when the purity of an arbitrary mixed state is less than 2/3 . We experimentally demonstrate these findings using a single cesium atom confined in an optical dipole trap, which undergoes a nearly pure dephasing process. Our method can be applied straightforwardly to multi-atom systems for measuring the Wigner function of their collective spin state.

  11. Interaction-induced decay of a heteronuclear two-atom system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Yang, Jiaheng; Liu, Min; He, Xiaodong; Zeng, Yong; Wang, Kunpeng; Wang, Jin; Papoular, D. J.; Shlyapnikov, G. V.; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2015-01-01

    Two-atom systems in small traps are of fundamental interest for understanding the role of interactions in degenerate cold gases and for the creation of quantum gates in quantum information processing with single-atom traps. One of the key quantities is the inelastic relaxation (decay) time when one of the atoms or both are in a higher hyperfine state. Here we measure this quantity in a heteronuclear system of 87Rb and 85Rb in a micro optical trap and demonstrate experimentally and theoretically the presence of both fast and slow relaxation processes, depending on the choice of the initial hyperfine states. This experimental method allows us to single out a particular relaxation process thus provides an extremely clean platform for collisional physics studies. Our results have also implications for engineering of quantum states via controlled collisions and creation of two-qubit quantum gates. PMID:26199051

  12. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. I. System-bath modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H; Burghardt, Irene; Martinazzo, Rocco

    2015-09-28

    An accurate system-bath model to investigate the quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on graphene is presented. The system comprises a hydrogen atom and the carbon atom from graphene that forms the covalent bond, and it is described by a previously developed 4D potential energy surface based on density functional theory ab initio data. The bath describes the rest of the carbon lattice and is obtained from an empirical force field through inversion of a classical equilibrium correlation function describing the hydrogen motion. By construction, model building easily accommodates improvements coming from the use of higher level electronic structure theory for the system. Further, it is well suited to a determination of the system-environment coupling by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. This paper details the system-bath modeling and shows its application to the quantum dynamics of vibrational relaxation of a chemisorbed hydrogen atom, which is here investigated at T = 0 K with the help of the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. Paper II deals with the sticking dynamics.

  13. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. I. System-bath modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfanti, Matteo, E-mail: matteo.bonfanti@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Jackson, Bret [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Hughes, Keith H. [School of Chemistry, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Burghardt, Irene [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Goethe University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 7, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Martinazzo, Rocco, E-mail: rocco.martinazzo@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari, Consiglio Nazionale delle Richerche, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-09-28

    An accurate system-bath model to investigate the quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on graphene is presented. The system comprises a hydrogen atom and the carbon atom from graphene that forms the covalent bond, and it is described by a previously developed 4D potential energy surface based on density functional theory ab initio data. The bath describes the rest of the carbon lattice and is obtained from an empirical force field through inversion of a classical equilibrium correlation function describing the hydrogen motion. By construction, model building easily accommodates improvements coming from the use of higher level electronic structure theory for the system. Further, it is well suited to a determination of the system-environment coupling by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. This paper details the system-bath modeling and shows its application to the quantum dynamics of vibrational relaxation of a chemisorbed hydrogen atom, which is here investigated at T = 0 K with the help of the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. Paper II deals with the sticking dynamics.

  14. Configurable memory system and method for providing atomic counting operations in a memory device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellofatto, Ralph E.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Ohmacht, Martin

    2010-09-14

    A memory system and method for providing atomic memory-based counter operations to operating systems and applications that make most efficient use of counter-backing memory and virtual and physical address space, while simplifying operating system memory management, and enabling the counter-backing memory to be used for purposes other than counter-backing storage when desired. The encoding and address decoding enabled by the invention provides all this functionality through a combination of software and hardware.

  15. Two-dimensional atom localization based on coherent field controlling in a five-level M-type atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiangqian; Li, Jinjiang; Sun, Xiudong

    2017-12-11

    We study two-dimensional sub-wavelength atom localization based on the microwave coupling field controlling and spontaneously generated coherence (SGC) effect. For a five-level M-type atom, introducing a microwave coupling field between two upper levels and considering the quantum interference between two transitions from two upper levels to lower levels, the analytical expression of conditional position probability (CPP) distribution is obtained using the iterative method. The influence of the detuning of a spontaneously emitted photon, Rabi frequency of the microwave field, and the SGC effect on the CPP are discussed. The two-dimensional sub-half-wavelength atom localization with high-precision and high spatial resolution is achieved by adjusting the detuning and the Rabi frequency, where the atom can be localized in a region smaller thanλ/10×λ/10. The spatial resolution is improved significantly compared with the case without the microwave field.

  16. Quantum coherent tractor beam effect for atoms trapped near a nanowaveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadgrove, Mark; Wimberger, Sandro; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-01-01

    We propose several schemes to realize a tractor beam effect for ultracold atoms in the vicinity of a few-mode nanowaveguide. Atoms trapped near the waveguide are transported in a direction opposite to the guided mode propagation direction. We analyse three specific examples for ultracold 23Na atoms trapped near a specific nanowaveguide (i.e. an optical nanofibre): (i) a conveyor belt-type tractor beam effect, (ii) an accelerator tractor beam effect, and (iii) a quantum coherent tractor beam effect, all of which can effectively pull atoms along the nanofibre toward the light source. This technique provides a new tool for controlling the motion of particles near nanowaveguides with potential applications in the study of particle transport and binding as well as atom interferometry. PMID:27440516

  17. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, P.; Beyer, H.; Bosch, F.; Dohmann, H.D.; Kozhuharov, C.; Liesen, D.; Mann, R.; Mokler, P.H.

    1984-01-01

    The heavy ion accelerator UNILAC is well suited to experiments in the field of atomic physics because, with the aid of high-energy heavy ions atoms can be produced in exotic states - that is, heavy atoms with only a few electrons. Also, in close collisions of heavy ions (atomic number Z 1 ) and heavy target atoms (Z 2 ) short-lived quasi-atomic 'superheavy' systems will be formed - huge 'atoms', where the inner electrons are bound in the field of the combined charge Z 1 + Z 2 , which exceeds by far the charge of the known elements (Z <= 109). Those exotic or transient superheavy atoms delivered from the heavy ion accelerator make it possible to study for the first time in a terrestrial laboratory exotic, but fundamental, processes, which occur only inside stars. Some of the basic research carried out with the UNILAC is discussed. This includes investigation of highly charged heavy atoms with the beam-foil method, the spectroscopy of highly charged slow-recoil ions, atomic collision studies with highly ionised, decelerated ions and investigations of super-heavy quasi-atoms. (U.K.)

  18. Slow collisions between identical atoms in a laser field: Application of the Born and Markov approximations to the system of moving atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trippenbach, M.; Gao, B.; Cooper, J.; Burnett, K.

    1992-01-01

    We have derived reduced-density-matrix equations of motion for a pair of two identical atoms moving in the radiation field as the first step in establishing a theory of collisional redistribution of light from neutral-atom traps. We use the Zwanzig projection-operator technique to average over spontaneous field modes and establish the conditions under which Born and Markov approximations can be applied to the system of moving atoms. It follows from these considerations that when these conditions hold, the reduced-density-matrix equation for moving atoms has the same form as that for the stationary case: time dependence is introduced into the decay rates and interaction potentials by making the substitution R=R(t)

  19. Ultracold neutron source at the PULSTAR reactor: Engineering design and cryogenic testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korobkina, E., E-mail: ekorobk@ncsu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, 2500 Stinson Drive, Box 7909, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Medlin, G. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, 2401 Stinson Drive, Box 8202, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, 116 Science Drive, Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Wehring, B.; Hawari, A.I. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, 2500 Stinson Drive, Box 7909, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Huffman, P.R.; Young, A.R. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, 2401 Stinson Drive, Box 8202, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, 116 Science Drive, Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Beaumont, B. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, 2401 Stinson Drive, Box 8202, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Palmquist, G. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, 2401 Stinson Drive, Box 8202, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, 116 Science Drive, Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2014-12-11

    Construction is completed and commissioning is in progress for an ultracold neutron (UCN) source at the PULSTAR reactor on the campus of North Carolina State University. The source utilizes two stages of neutron moderation, one in heavy water at room temperature and the other in solid methane at ∼40K, followed by a converter stage, solid deuterium at 5 K, that allows a single down scattering of cold neutrons to provide UCN. The UCN source rolls into the thermal column enclosure of the PULSTAR reactor, where neutrons will be delivered from a bare face of the reactor core by streaming through a graphite-lined assembly. The source infrastructure, i.e., graphite-lined assembly, heavy-water system, gas handling system, and helium liquefier cooling system, has been tested and all systems operate as predicted. The research program being considered for the PULSTAR UCN source includes the physics of UCN production, fundamental particle physics, and material surface studies of nanolayers containing hydrogen. In the present paper we report details of the engineering and cryogenic design of the facility as well as results of critical commissioning tests without neutrons.

  20. Control dynamics of interaction quenched ultracold bosons in periodically driven lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistakidis, Simeon; Schmelcher, Peter; Group of Fundamental Processes in Quantum Physics Team

    2016-05-01

    The out-of-equilibrium dynamics of ultracold bosons following an interaction quench upon a periodically driven optical lattice is investigated. It is shown that an interaction quench triggers the inter-well tunneling dynamics, while for the intra-well dynamics breathing and cradle-like processes can be generated. In particular, the occurrence of a resonance between the cradle and tunneling modes is revealed. On the other hand, the employed periodic driving enforces the bosons in the mirror wells to oscillate out-of-phase and to exhibit a dipole mode, while in the central well the cloud experiences a breathing mode. The dynamical behaviour of the system is investigated with respect to the driving frequency revealing a resonant behaviour of the intra-well dynamics. To drive the system in a highly non-equilibrium state an interaction quench upon the driving is performed giving rise to admixtures of excitations in the outer wells, an enhanced breathing in the center and an amplification of the tunneling dynamics. As a result of the quench the system experiences multiple resonances between the inter- and intra-well dynamics at different quench amplitudes. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, SFB 925 ``Light induced dynamics and control of correlated quantum systems''.

  1. The Langevin and generalised Langevin approach to the dynamics of atomic, polymeric and colloidal systems

    CERN Document Server

    Snook, Ian

    2007-01-01

    The Langevin and Generalised Langevin Approach To The Dynamics Of Atomic, Polymeric And Colloidal Systems is concerned with the description of aspects of the theory and use of so-called random processes to describe the properties of atomic, polymeric and colloidal systems in terms of the dynamics of the particles in the system. It provides derivations of the basic equations, the development of numerical schemes to solve them on computers and gives illustrations of application to typical systems.Extensive appendices are given to enable the reader to carry out computations to illustrate many of the points made in the main body of the book.* Starts from fundamental equations* Gives up-to-date illustration of the application of these techniques to typical systems of interest* Contains extensive appendices including derivations, equations to be used in practice and elementary computer codes

  2. Pairing in Fermionic Systems Basic Concepts and Modern Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, John W; Alford, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Cooper pairing of fermions is a profound phenomenon that has become very important in many different areas of physics in the recent past. This book brings together, for the first time, experts from various fields involving Cooper pairing, at the level of BCS theory and beyond, including the study of novel states of matter such as ultracold atomic gases, nuclear systems at the extreme, and quark matter with application to neutron stars. Cross-disciplinary in nature, the book will be of interest to physicists in many different specialties, including condensed matter, nuclear, high-energy, and as

  3. Quantum simulation of strongly correlated condensed matter systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, W.; Qin, T.

    2018-04-01

    We review recent experimental and theoretical progress in realizing and simulating many-body phases of ultracold atoms in optical lattices, which gives access to analog quantum simulations of fundamental model Hamiltonians for strongly correlated condensed matter systems, such as the Hubbard model. After a general introduction to quantum gases in optical lattices, their preparation and cooling, and measurement techniques for relevant observables, we focus on several examples, where quantum simulations of this type have been performed successfully during the past years: Mott-insulator states, itinerant quantum magnetism, disorder-induced localization and its interplay with interactions, and topological quantum states in synthetic gauge fields.

  4. Hyperfine structure of 2Σ molecules containing alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldegunde, Jesus; Hutson, Jeremy M.

    2018-04-01

    Ultracold molecules with both electron spin and an electric dipole moment offer new possibilities in quantum science. We use density-functional theory to calculate hyperfine coupling constants for a selection of molecules important in this area, including RbSr, LiYb, RbYb, CaF, and SrF. We find substantial hyperfine coupling constants for the fermionic isotopes of the alkaline-earth-metal and Yb atoms. We discuss the hyperfine level patterns and Zeeman splittings expected for these molecules. The results will be important both to experiments aimed at forming ultracold open-shell molecules and to their applications.

  5. Simulations of quantum transport in nanoscale systems: application to atomic gold and silver wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mozos, J.L.; Ordejon, P.; Brandbyge, Mads

    2002-01-01

    . The potential drop profile and induced electronic current (and therefore the conductance) are obtained from first principles. The method takes into account the atomic structure of both the nanoscale structure and the semi-infinite electrodes through which the potential is applied. Non-equilibrium Green......'s function techniques are used to calculate the quantum conductance. Here we apply the method to the study of the electronic transport in wires of gold and silver with atomic thickness. We show the results of our calculations, and compare with some of the abundant experimental data on these systems....

  6. Applications of Atomic Systems in Quantum Simulation, Quantum Computation and Topological Phases of Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengtao

    The ability to precisely and coherently control atomic systems has improved dramatically in the last two decades, driving remarkable advancements in quantum computation and simulation. In recent years, atomic and atom-like systems have also been served as a platform to study topological phases of matter and non-equilibrium many-body physics. Integrated with rapid theoretical progress, the employment of these systems is expanding the realm of our understanding on a range of physical phenomena. In this dissertation, I draw on state-of-the-art experimental technology to develop several new ideas for controlling and applying atomic systems. In the first part of this dissertation, we propose several novel schemes to realize, detect, and probe topological phases in atomic and atom-like systems. We first theoretically study the intriguing properties of Hopf insulators, a peculiar type of topological insulators beyond the standard classification paradigm of topological phases. Using a solid-state quantum simulator, we report the first experimental observation of Hopf insulators. We demonstrate the Hopf fibration with fascinating topological links in the experiment, showing clear signals of topological phase transitions for the underlying Hamiltonian. Next, we propose a feasible experimental scheme to realize the chiral topological insulator in three dimensions. They are a type of topological insulators protected by the chiral symmetry and have thus far remained unobserved in experiment. We then introduce a method to directly measure topological invariants in cold-atom experiments. This detection scheme is general and applicable to probe of different topological insulators in any spatial dimension. In another study, we theoretically discover a new type of topological gapless rings, dubbed a Weyl exceptional ring, in three-dimensional dissipative cold atomic systems. In the second part of this dissertation, we focus on the application of atomic systems in quantum computation

  7. Dependences of the van der Waals atom-wall interaction on atomic and material properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caride, A.O.; Klimchitskaya, G.L.; Mostepanenko, V.M.; Zanette, S.I.

    2005-01-01

    The 1%-accurate calculations of the van der Waals interaction between an atom and a cavity wall are performed in the separation region from 3 nm to 150 nm. The cases of metastable He * and Na atoms near metal, semiconductor, and dielectric walls are considered. Different approximations to the description of wall material and atomic dynamic polarizability are carefully compared. The smooth transition to the Casimir-Polder interaction is verified. It is shown that to obtain accurate results for the atom-wall van der Waals interaction at short separations with an error less than 1% one should use the complete optical-tabulated data for the complex refractive index of the wall material and the accurate dynamic polarizability of an atom. The obtained results may be useful for the theoretical interpretation of recent experiments on quantum reflection and Bose-Einstein condensation of ultracold atoms on or near surfaces of different kinds

  8. Atomic and molecular physics - Ions in solids - Laser systems. Courses, corrected exercises and problems Level M1/M2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremer, Georgette-Laura; Moncorge, Richard; Chesnel, Jean-Yves; Adoui, Lamri; Lelievre, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    This document proposes the table of contents and a brief presentation of a course book for students in atomic and molecular physics. After some generalities on energy quantification and on photon momentum / Compton Effect, the different chapters address topics like hydrogen and helium atoms, alkalis, alkaline-earth, atoms with several valence electrons, the atom-radiation interaction, molecule and ion spectroscopy in solids, and the most significant laser systems using an active media based on atoms, ions or molecules in a diluted environment. Each chapter contains exercises and problems

  9. Coulomb systems distorted at short distances in atomic and nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, V.S.

    1987-01-01

    In systems bound by the Coulomb interaction distorted at short distances there may appear, under certain conditions, a rearrangment of atomic spectrum (or the Zel'dovich effect). Specific features of this effect are discussed for states with an arbitrary angular momentum l (both with and without the absorption). The equation is studied which connects nuclear level shifts with the low-energy scattering parameters a l , r l . The conditions have been found under which the rearrangement of spectrum is replaced by oscillations of atomic levels. The Coulomb renormalization of scattering lengths and that of effective ranges is discussed. Some manifestations of the Zel'dovich effect in the physics of hadronic atoms and mesomolecules are considered

  10. Scalable quantum information processing with photons and atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jian-Wei

    Over the past three decades, the promises of super-fast quantum computing and secure quantum cryptography have spurred a world-wide interest in quantum information, generating fascinating quantum technologies for coherent manipulation of individual quantum systems. However, the distance of fiber-based quantum communications is limited due to intrinsic fiber loss and decreasing of entanglement quality. Moreover, probabilistic single-photon source and entanglement source demand exponentially increased overheads for scalable quantum information processing. To overcome these problems, we are taking two paths in parallel: quantum repeaters and through satellite. We used the decoy-state QKD protocol to close the loophole of imperfect photon source, and used the measurement-device-independent QKD protocol to close the loophole of imperfect photon detectors--two main loopholes in quantum cryptograph. Based on these techniques, we are now building world's biggest quantum secure communication backbone, from Beijing to Shanghai, with a distance exceeding 2000 km. Meanwhile, we are developing practically useful quantum repeaters that combine entanglement swapping, entanglement purification, and quantum memory for the ultra-long distance quantum communication. The second line is satellite-based global quantum communication, taking advantage of the negligible photon loss and decoherence in the atmosphere. We realized teleportation and entanglement distribution over 100 km, and later on a rapidly moving platform. We are also making efforts toward the generation of multiphoton entanglement and its use in teleportation of multiple properties of a single quantum particle, topological error correction, quantum algorithms for solving systems of linear equations and machine learning. Finally, I will talk about our recent experiments on quantum simulations on ultracold atoms. On the one hand, by applying an optical Raman lattice technique, we realized a two-dimensional spin-obit (SO

  11. Calibration and validation of coarse-grained models of atomic systems: application to semiconductor manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Kathryn; Oden, J. Tinsley

    2014-07-01

    Coarse-grained models of atomic systems, created by aggregating groups of atoms into molecules to reduce the number of degrees of freedom, have been used for decades in important scientific and technological applications. In recent years, interest in developing a more rigorous theory for coarse graining and in assessing the predictivity of coarse-grained models has arisen. In this work, Bayesian methods for the calibration and validation of coarse-grained models of atomistic systems in thermodynamic equilibrium are developed. For specificity, only configurational models of systems in canonical ensembles are considered. Among major challenges in validating coarse-grained models are (1) the development of validation processes that lead to information essential in establishing confidence in the model's ability predict key quantities of interest and (2), above all, the determination of the coarse-grained model itself; that is, the characterization of the molecular architecture, the choice of interaction potentials and thus parameters, which best fit available data. The all-atom model is treated as the "ground truth," and it provides the basis with respect to which properties of the coarse-grained model are compared. This base all-atom model is characterized by an appropriate statistical mechanics framework in this work by canonical ensembles involving only configurational energies. The all-atom model thus supplies data for Bayesian calibration and validation methods for the molecular model. To address the first challenge, we develop priors based on the maximum entropy principle and likelihood functions based on Gaussian approximations of the uncertainties in the parameter-to-observation error. To address challenge (2), we introduce the notion of model plausibilities as a means for model selection. This methodology provides a powerful approach toward constructing coarse-grained models which are most plausible for given all-atom data. We demonstrate the theory and

  12. Quantum properties of a parametric four-wave mixing in a Raman type atomic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharypov A.V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a study of the quantum properties of two light fields used to parametric four-wave mixing in a Raman type atomic system. The system realizes an effective Hamiltonian of beamsplitter type coupling between the light fields, which allows to control squeezing and amplitude distribution of the light fields, as well as realizing their entanglement. The scheme can be feasibly applied to engineer the quantum properties of two single-mode light fields in properly chosen input states.

  13. Evaluation of a hydride generation-atomic fluorescence system for the determination of arsenic using a dielectric barrier discharge atomizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhenli; Liu Jixin; Zhang Sichun; Na Xing; Zhang Xinrong

    2008-01-01

    A new atomizer based on atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma was specially designed for atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) in order to be applied to the measurement of arsenic. The characteristics of the DBD atomizer and the effects of different parameters (power, discharge gas, gas flow rate, and KBH 4 concentration) were discussed in the paper. The DBD atomizer shows the following features: (1) low operation temperature (between 44 and 70 deg. C, depending on the operation conditions); (2) low power consumption; (3) operation at atmospheric pressure. The detection limit of As(III) using hydride generation (HG) with the proposed DBD-AFS was 0.04 μg L -1 . The analytical results obtained by the present method for total arsenic in reference materials, orchard leaves (SRM 1571) and water samples GBW(E) 080390, agree well with the certified values. The present HG-DBD-AFS is more sensitive and reliable for the determination of arsenic. It is a very promising technique allowing for field arsenic analysis based on atomic spectrometry

  14. Precision spectroscopy with ultracold {sup 87}Rb{sub 2} triplet molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, Christoph

    2011-10-19

    In this thesis I report precision spectroscopy with ultracold {sup 87}Rb{sub 2} triplet molecules where we use lasers to couple the states in different molecular potentials. We study in detail states of the a {sup 3} sum {sup +}{sub u} and (1) {sup 3} sum {sup +}{sub g} potentials. These states are of great importance for transferring weakly bound molecules to the ro-vibrational triplet ground state via states of the excited potential. As most experiments start from molecules in their X {sup 1} sum {sup +}{sub g} ground state, the triplet states were hard to access via dipole transitions and remained largely unexplored. The measurements presented in this thesis are the first detailed study of diatomic {sup 87}Rb{sub 2} molecules in these states. Our experiments start with an ultracold cloud of {sup 87}Rb atoms. We then load this cloud into an optical lattice where we use a magnetic Feshbach resonance at 1007.4 G to perform a Feshbach association. After we have removed all unbound atoms, we end up with a pure sample of weakly bound Feshbach molecules inside the optical lattice. The optical lattice prevents these molecules from colliding with each other which results in molecular lifetimes on the order of a few hundred milliseconds. In the first set of experiments, we use a laser coupling the Feshbach state to the excited (1) {sup 3} sum {sup +}{sub g} triplet state to map out its low-lying vibrational (v = 0.. 15), rotational, hyperfine, and Zeeman structure. The experimental results are in good agreement with calculations done by Marius Lysebo and Prof. Leif Veseth. We then map out in detail the vibrational, rotational, hyperfine, and Zeeman structure of the a {sup 3} sum {sup +}{sub u} triplet ground state using dark state spectroscopy with levels in the (1) {sup 3} sum {sup +}{sub g} potential as an intermediate state. In this scheme we are able to access molecules in triplet states because our Feshbach state has strong triplet character. Interestingly, it

  15. Precision spectroscopy with ultracold {sup 87}Rb{sub 2} triplet molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, Christoph

    2011-10-19

    In this thesis I report precision spectroscopy with ultracold {sup 87}Rb{sub 2} triplet molecules where we use lasers to couple the states in different molecular potentials. We study in detail states of the a {sup 3} sum {sup +}{sub u} and (1) {sup 3} sum {sup +}{sub g} potentials. These states are of great importance for transferring weakly bound molecules to the ro-vibrational triplet ground state via states of the excited potential. As most experiments start from molecules in their X {sup 1} sum {sup +}{sub g} ground state, the triplet states were hard to access via dipole transitions and remained largely unexplored. The measurements presented in this thesis are the first detailed study of diatomic {sup 87}Rb{sub 2} molecules in these states. Our experiments start with an ultracold cloud of {sup 87}Rb atoms. We then load this cloud into an optical lattice where we use a magnetic Feshbach resonance at 1007.4 G to perform a Feshbach association. After we have removed all unbound atoms, we end up with a pure sample of weakly bound Feshbach molecules inside the optical lattice. The optical lattice prevents these molecules from colliding with each other which results in molecular lifetimes on the order of a few hundred milliseconds. In the first set of experiments, we use a laser coupling the Feshbach state to the excited (1) {sup 3} sum {sup +}{sub g} triplet state to map out its low-lying vibrational (v = 0.. 15), rotational, hyperfine, and Zeeman structure. The experimental results are in good agreement with calculations done by Marius Lysebo and Prof. Leif Veseth. We then map out in detail the vibrational, rotational, hyperfine, and Zeeman structure of the a {sup 3} sum {sup +}{sub u} triplet ground state using dark state spectroscopy with levels in the (1) {sup 3} sum {sup +}{sub g} potential as an intermediate state. In this scheme we are able to access molecules in triplet states because our Feshbach state has strong triplet character. Interestingly, it

  16. Progress on the Magnetic Trapping of Ultra-cold Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, John M.

    1998-04-01

    Ultra-cold neutrons (UCN) have been instrumental in making improved measurements of the neutron beta-decay lifetime and in searches for a permanent electric dipole moment.(R. Golub, D. Richardson and S.K. Lamoreaux, Ultra-cold Neutrons), Adam Hilger, 1991 The most accurate experiments have taken place using in-core devices at ILL (Grenoble, France) and PNPI (St. Petersburg, Russia). Superthermal techniques offer the promise of high-density sources of UCN via scattering of cold neutrons. Cold neutron beams are available at many neutron facilities. We are currently working on the development of a superfluid helium UCN source using the Cold Neutron Research Facility at the NIST Research Reactor (Gaithersburg) . Our first experiment plans to use superthermal scattering of neutrons in superfluid helium to produce UCN within a magnetic trapping volume. A magnetic trap 30 cm long and 4 cm diameter will be filled with helium at about 100 mK. Cold neutrons (around 11 K) will be introduced into the trapping region where some of them scatter to low enough energies (around 1 mK) so that they are magnetically trapped. Once trapped the UCN travel undisturbed; they have a very small probability of upscattering. Detection will be accomplished as the UCN beta-decay. The resultant high-energy electron creates excited molecular helium dimers, a portion which decay in less than 10 ns and emit radiation in the XUV (50-100 nm). We have developed techniques to measure these scintillations. Analysis indicates that a high accuracy measurement of the neutron beta decay lifetime should be possible using our techniques. An apparatus has been constructed and initial runs are underway. An overview of the experiment, discussion of systematic errors and recent experimental progress will be presented. This work is done in collaboration with C. Brome, J. Butterworth, S. Dzhosyuk, P. Huffman, C. Mattoni, D. McKinsey, M. Cooper, G. Greene, S. Lamoreaux, R. Golub, K. Habicht, K. Coakley, S. Dewey, D

  17. Evaluation of the roughness of the surface of porcelain systems with the atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavarria Rodriguez, Bernal

    2013-01-01

    The surface of a dental ceramic was evaluated and compared with an atomic force microscope after being treated with different systems of polishing. 14 identical ceramic Lava® Zirconia discs were used to test the different polishing systems. 3 polishing systems from different matrix houses were used to polish dental porcelain. The samples were evaluated quantitatively with an atomic force microscope in order to study the real effectiveness of each system, on the roughness average (Ra) and the maximum peak to valley roughness (Ry) of the ceramic surfaces. A considerable reduction of the surface roughness was obtained by applying different polishing systems on the surface of dental ceramics. Very reliable values of Ra and Ry were obtained by making measurements on the structure reproduced by the atomic force microscope. The advanced ceramics of zirconium oxide presented the best physical characteristics and low levels of surface roughness. A smoother surface was achieved with the application of polishing systems, thus demonstrating the reduction of the surface roughness of a dental ceramic [es

  18. Reconstructive surgery for male stress urinary incontinence: Experiences using the ATOMS system at a single center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krause, Jens

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To propose possible success-driven solutions for problem and complication rates encountered with the ATOMS sling system, based on first-hand experience; and to provide possible actual alternative scenarios for the treatment of male . Patients and methods: During the defined period (between 4/2010 and 04/2014, 36 patients received ATOMS system implants at our clinic. We collected pre- and post-operative evaluation data using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form (ICIQ SF. As an expansion of the questionnaire, we added questions about post-operative perineal pain, the general satisfaction with the results of the intervention and willingness to recommend the operation to a best friend. Results: Our data shows a relatively high explantation rate, but a surprisingly high patient satisfaction rate. Explantation was required mainly due to late onset infections or other symptomatic factors. Compared to other studies early onset infections were rare. Conclusion: A non-invasive, uncomplicated adjustable system to alleviate male stress urinary incontinence remains a challenge. Although there are various systems available for the treatment of male stress urinary incontinence, it seems that despite the advantages of the ATOMS system, an artificial sphincter system may pose more advantages based on our experience, understanding and knowledge of its well-documented long-term solutions and problems.

  19. Ghost imaging with atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakimov, R. I.; Henson, B. M.; Shin, D. K.; Hodgman, S. S.; Dall, R. G.; Baldwin, K. G. H.; Truscott, A. G.

    2016-12-01

    Ghost imaging is a counter-intuitive phenomenon—first realized in quantum optics—that enables the image of a two-dimensional object (mask) to be reconstructed using the spatio-temporal properties of a beam of particles with which it never interacts. Typically, two beams of correlated photons are used: one passes through the mask to a single-pixel (bucket) detector while the spatial profile of the other is measured by a high-resolution (multi-pixel) detector. The second beam never interacts with the mask. Neither detector can reconstruct the mask independently, but temporal cross-correlation between the two beams can be used to recover a ‘ghost’ image. Here we report the realization of ghost imaging using massive particles instead of photons. In our experiment, the two beams are formed by correlated pairs of ultracold, metastable helium atoms, which originate from s-wave scattering of two colliding Bose-Einstein condensates. We use higher-order Kapitza-Dirac scattering to generate a large number of correlated atom pairs, enabling the creation of a clear ghost image with submillimetre resolution. Future extensions of our technique could lead to the realization of ghost interference, and enable tests of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entanglement and Bell’s inequalities with atoms.

  20. Cooling atoms with extraresonant stimulated emission below the Doppler limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevy, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The process of cooling atoms with radiation pressure is well understood in terms of absorption and spontaneous emission of fluorescence photons. This process imposes a lower limit on the minimum equilibrium temperature of laser cooled two level atoms of K b T = ℎΓ 21 /2 (the Doppler limit), where Γ 21 is the excited state decay rate to the ground state. At high laser intensity, it has been demonstrated that the stimulated emission process changes the sign of the force to a heating force at the red side of the atomic resonance and to a cooling force at blue detunings. Although this stimulated force is more efficient than the radiation pressure force, it has been generally accepted that this force cannot lead to lower equilibrium temperatures due to the large heating caused by diffusion of momentum at high intensity. These conclusions are valid only when the sole damping mechanism is the excited state decay to the ground state by spontaneous emission. However, when the atomic system is opened, i.e., is allowed to decay to other levels, or the dipole decay rate is altered by dephasing events, the stimulated force is dramatically modified. Under this conditions the stimulated force can occur at lower laser intensity and can even reverse sign to provide damping at the red side of resonance. These phenomena originate from extraresonances in the stimulated emission process between the two counterpropagating waves. These resonances appear as a dispersive feature in pump probe spectra (Two Wave Mixing) and are closely related to the extraresonances in four wave mixing studied originally by Bloembergen and co-workers. This paper establishes this connection and the potential of these phenomena for laser cooling. The implications of these results to the recently observed ultra-cold Na and Cs atoms are also discussed