WorldWideScience

Sample records for ulnar bending stiffness

  1. A comparative study on free vibration analysis of delaminated torsion stiff and bending stiff composite shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, Sudip; Karmakar, Amit

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a finite element method to compare the effects of delamination on free vibration of graphite-epoxy bending stiff and torsion stiff composite pretwisted shallow conical shells. The generalized dynamic equilibrium equation is derived from Lagrange's equation of motion neglecting the Coriolis effect for moderate rotational speeds. An eight noded isoparametric plate bending element is employed incorporating rotary inertia and effects of transverse shear deformation based on Mindlin's theory. The multipoint constraint; algorithm is utilized to ensure the compatibility of deformation and equilibrium of resultant forces and moments at the delamination crack front. The standard eigen value problem is solved by applying the QR iteration algorithm. Mode shapes for typical configurations are also depicted. Numerical results obtained are the first known non-dimensional frequencies which could serve as reference solutions for the future investigators.

  2. Pipe elbow stiffness coefficients including shear and bend flexibility factors for use in direct stiffness codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, R.F.

    1977-01-01

    Historically, developments of computer codes used for piping analysis were based upon the flexibility method of structural analysis. Because of the specialized techniques employed in this method, the codes handled systems composed of only piping elements. Over the past ten years, the direct stiffness method has gained great popularity because of its systematic solution procedure regardless of the type of structural elements composing the system. A great advantage is realized with a direct stiffness code that combines piping elements along with other structural elements such as beams, plates, and shells, in a single model. One common problem, however, has been the lack of an accurate pipe elbow element that would adequately represent the effects of transverse shear and bend flexibility factors. The purpose of the present paper is to present a systematic derivation of the required 12x12 stiffness matrix and load vectors for a three dimensional pipe elbow element which includes the effects of transverse shear and pipe bend flexibility according to the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III. The results are presented analytically and as FORTRAN subroutines to be directly incorporated into existing direct stiffness codes. (Auth.)

  3. The gearing function of running shoe longitudinal bending stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willwacher, Steffen; König, Manuel; Braunstein, Björn; Goldmann, Jan-Peter; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether altered longitudinal bending stiffness (LBS) levels of the midsole of a running shoe lead to a systematic change in lower extremity joint lever arms of the ground reaction force (GRF). Joint moments and GRF lever arms in the sagittal plane were determined from 19 male subjects running at 3.5 m/s using inverse dynamics procedures. LBS was manipulated using carbon fiber insoles of 1.9 mm and 3.2 mm thickness. Increasing LBS led to a significant shift of joint lever arms to a more anterior position. Effects were more pronounced at distal joints. Ankle joint moments were not significantly increased in the presence of higher GRF lever arms when averaged over all subjects. Still, two individual strategies (1: increase ankle joint moments while keeping push-off times almost constant, 2: decrease ankle joint moments and increase push-off times) could be identified in response to increased ankle joint lever arms that might reflect individual differences between subjects with respect to strength capacities or anthropometric characteristics. The results of the present study indicate that LBS systematically influences GRF lever arms of lower extremity joints during the push-off phase in running. Further, individual responses to altered LBS levels could be identified that could aid in finding optimum LBS values for a given individual. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Prediction of Bending Stiffness for Laminated CFRP and Its Application to Manufacturing of Roof Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Min Lee

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP with high strength, stiffness, and lightweight is used widely in number of composite applications such as commercial aircraft, transportation, machinery, and sports equipment. Especially, it is necessary to apply lightweight materials to car components for reducing energy consumption and CO2 emissions. In case of car roof reinforcement manufactured using CFRP, superior strength and bending stiffness are required for the safety of drivers in the rollover accident. Mechanical properties of CFRP laminates are generally dependent on the stacking sequence. Therefore, research of stacking sequence using CFRP prepreg is required for superior bending stiffness. In this study, the 3-point bending FE-analysis for predicting the bending stiffness of CFRP roof reinforcement was carried out on three cases [0PW∘]5, [0PW°/0UD°/0-PW°]s, and [0UD∘]5. Material properties that the six independent elastic constants are E11, E22, G12, G23, G13, and ν12 used in FE-analysis were evaluated by the tensile test in 0°, 45°, and 90° directions. Through structural strength analysis of the automobile roof reinforcement fabricated using CFRP, the effect of the stacking sequence on the bending stiffness was evaluated and validated through experiments under the same conditions as the analysis.

  5. Shoe midsole longitudinal bending stiffness and running economy, joint energy, and EMG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Jean-Pierre R; Stefanyshyn, Darren J

    2006-03-01

    It has been shown that mechanical energy is dissipated at the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint during running and jumping. Furthermore, increasing the longitudinal bending stiffness of the midsole significantly reduced the energy dissipated at the MTP joint and increased jump performance. It was hypothesized that increasing midsole longitudinal bending stiffness would also lead to improvements in running economy. This study investigated the influence of midsole longitudinal bending stiffness on running economy (performance variable) and evaluated the local effects on joint energetics and muscular activity. Carbon fiber plates were inserted into running shoe midsoles and running economy, joint energy, and electromyographic (EMG) data were collected on 13 subjects. Approximately a 1% metabolic energy savings was observed when subjects ran in a stiff midsole relative to the control midsole. Subjects with a greater body mass had a greater decrease in oxygen consumption rates in the stiff midsole relative to the control midsole condition. The stiffer midsoles showed no significant differences in energy absorption at the MTP joint compared with the control shoe. Finally, no significant changes were observed in muscular activation. Increasing midsole longitudinal bending stiffness led to improvements in running economy, yet the underlying mechanisms that can be attributed to this improvement are still not fully understood.

  6. Effect of contouring on bending structural stiffness and bending strength of the 3.5 titanium SOP implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Scott; Ness, Malcolm G

    2012-11-01

    To compare the bending structural stiffness (BSS) and bending strength (BS) of the 3.5 titanium (Ti) string of pearls (SOP) plate and the 3.5 316LVM stainless steel SOP plate; and the effect of contouring on the BSS and BS of the 3.5 Ti SOP plate. In vitro experimental static 4-point bending materials testing. Twenty-five 3.5 mm Ti and five 3.5 mm 316LVM stainless steel SOP locking bone plates. Each plate was tested in 4-point bending until 10 mm of displacement was achieved. BSS and BS were then calculated for each plate. A 2-sample t-test was used to compare the mean BSS and BS of the different groups. The 3.5 Ti SOP plate had lower mean BSS (0.00263 Nm(2) ) but similar mean BS (12.8 Nm) when compared to the 3.5 316LVM SOP (0.00402 Nm(2) , 13.0 Nm). Prebending the 3.5 Ti SOP diminished its mean BSS (0.00224 Nm(2) ) and mean BS (9.4 Nm) when compared to the Ti control. Pretwisting the 3.5 Ti SOP increased its mean BSS (0.00273 Nm(2) ) but decreased its mean BS (12.4 Nm) when compared to the Ti control. The 3.5 Ti SOP is less stiff but of similar strength to the 3.5 316LVM stainless steel SOP. Prebending the Ti SOP significantly lowers its stiffness and strength. Pretwisting the SOP actually increases its stiffness but slightly lowers its strength. © Copyright 2012 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  7. [Odontoid bending stiffness after anterior fixation with a single lag screw: biomechanical study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchvald, P; Čapek, L; Barsa, P

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY The aim of the experiment was to compare the bending stiffness of an intact odontoid process with bending stiffness after its simulated type II fracture was fixed with a single lag screw. The experiment was done with a desire to answer the question of whether a single osteosynthetic screw is sufficient for good fixation of a type II odontoid fracture. MATERIAL AND METHODS The C2 vertebrae of six cadavers were used. With simultaneous measurement of odontoid bending stiffness, the occurrence of a fracture (type IIA, Grauer's modification of the Anderson- D'Alonzo classification) was simulated using action exerted by a tearing machine in the direction perpendicular to the odontoid axis. Each odontoid fracture was subsequently treated by direct osteosynthesis with a single lag screw inserted in the axial direction by a standard surgical procedure in order to provide conditions similar to those achieved by routine surgical management. The treated odontoid process was subsequently subjected to the same tearing machine loading as applied to it at the start of the experiment. The bending stiffness measured was then compared with that found before the fracture occurred. The results were statistically evaluated by the t-test for paired samples at the level of significance α = 0.05. RESULTS The average value of bending stiffness for odontoid processes of intact vertebrae at the moment of fracture occurrence was 318.3 N/mm. After single axial lag screw fixation of the fracture, the average bending stiffness for the odontoid processes treated was 331.3 N/mm. DISCUSSION Higher values of bending stiffness after screw fixation were found in all specimens and, in comparison with the values recorded before simulated fractures, the increase was statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS The results of our measurements suggest that the single lag screw fixation of a type IIA odontoid fracture will provide better stability for the fracture fragment-C2 body complex on

  8. Dynamic Bending and Torsion Stiffness Derivation from Modal Curvatures and Torsion Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    MAECK, J.; DE ROECK, G.

    1999-08-01

    In order to maintain the reliability of civil engineering structures, considerable effort is currently spent on developing a non-destructive vibration testing method for monitoring the structural integrity of constructions. The technique must be able to observe damage, secondly to localize the damage; and finally to give an idea of the severity of the damage. Within the framework of relating changes of measured modal parameters to changes in the integrity of the structure, it is important to be able to determine the dynamic stiffness in each section of the structure from measured modal characteristics.A damaged structure results in a dynamic stiffness reduction of the cracked sections. The dynamic stiffnesses provide directly an indication of the extension of the cracked zones in the structure. The dynamic stiffness reduction can also be associated with a degree of cracking in a particular zone.In an experimental programme, a concrete beam of 6 m length is subjected to an increasing static load to produce cracks. After each static perload, the beam is tested dynamically in a free-free set-up. The change in modal parameters is then related to damage in the beam.The technique that will be presented in the paper to predict the damage location and intensity is a direct stiffness derivation from measured modal displacement derivatives. Using the bending modes, the dynamic bending stiffness can be derived from modal curvatures. Using the torsional modes, the dynamic torsion stiffness can be derived from modal torsion rates.

  9. Controlled bending and folding of a bilayer structure consisting of a thin stiff film and a heat shrinkable polymer sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jianxun; Adams, John G. M.; Zhu, Yong

    2018-05-01

    Bending pre-designed flat sheets into three-dimensional (3D) structures is attracting much interest, as it provides a simple approach to make 3D devices. Here we report controlled bending and folding of a bilayer structure consisting of a heat shrinkable polymer sheet and a thin stiff film (not thermally responsive). Upon heating, the prestrained polymer sheet shrinks, leading to bending or folding of the bilayer. We studied the effect of relative dimensions of the two layers on the bending behavior and demonstrated the transition from longitudinal bending to transverse bending of the bilayer strip. Transverse bending was utilized to fold origami structures, including several flat letters, a crane, and a corrugated metal sheet via Miura-ori folding. We developed a method to further control the bending orientation based on bio-inspired anisotropic bending stiffness. By bending the metal foil in different orientations, several structures were obtained, including cylindrical surfaces and left-handed/right-handed helical structures.

  10. Quasi-stationary mechanics of elastic continua with bending stiffness wrapping on a pulley system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarczyk, S.; Mirhadizadeh, S.

    2016-05-01

    In many engineering applications elastic continua such as ropes and belts often are subject to bending when they pass over pulleys / sheaves. In this paper the quasi-stationary mechanics of a cable-pulley system is studied. The cable is modelled as a moving Euler- Bernoulli beam. The distribution of tension is non-uniform along its span and due to the bending stiffness the contact points at the pulley-beam boundaries are not unknown. The system is described by a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations with undetermined boundary conditions. The resulting nonlinear Boundary Value Problem (BVP) with unknown boundaries is solved by converting the problem into the ‘standard’ form defined over a fixed interval. Numerical results obtained for a range of typical configurations with relevant boundary conditions applied demonstrate that due to the effects of bending stiffness the angels of wrap are reduced and the span tensions are increased.

  11. The Effect of Stick Stiffness of Friction Models on the Bending Behavior in Non-Bonded Flexible Risers

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Tianjiao; Ye, Naiquan; Sævik, Svein

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of stick stiffness on the bending behavior in non-bonded flexible risers. The stick stiffness was normally implemented in the friction model for calculating the friction stress between layers in such structures. As the stick stiffness may be too small to achieve the plane-surfaces-remain-plane assumption under low contact pressure in some friction models [1], a new friction model was proposed for maintaining the constant stick stiffness in the present work. ...

  12. Accuracy and reproducibility of bending stiffness measurements by mechanical response tissue analysis in artificial human ulnas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Patricia A; Ellerbrock, Emily R; Bowman, Lyn; Loucks, Anne B

    2014-11-07

    Osteoporosis is characterized by reduced bone strength, but no FDA-approved medical device measures bone strength. Bone strength is strongly associated with bone stiffness, but no FDA-approved medical device measures bone stiffness either. Mechanical Response Tissue Analysis (MRTA) is a non-significant risk, non-invasive, radiation-free, vibration analysis technique for making immediate, direct functional measurements of the bending stiffness of long bones in humans in vivo. MRTA has been used for research purposes for more than 20 years, but little has been published about its accuracy. To begin to investigate its accuracy, we compared MRTA measurements of bending stiffness in 39 artificial human ulna bones to measurements made by Quasistatic Mechanical Testing (QMT). In the process, we also quantified the reproducibility (i.e., precision and repeatability) of both methods. MRTA precision (1.0±1.0%) and repeatability (3.1 ± 3.1%) were not as high as those of QMT (0.2 ± 0.2% and 1.3+1.7%, respectively; both pstiffness was indistinguishable from the identity line (p=0.44) and paired measurements by the two methods agreed within a 95% confidence interval of ± 5%. If such accuracy can be achieved on real human ulnas in situ, and if the ulna is representative of the appendicular skeleton, MRTA may prove clinically useful. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Stiffness Matrix of Thin-Walled Open Bar Subject to Bending, Bending Torsion and Shift of Cross Section Middle Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panasenko, N. N.; Sinelschikov, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    One of the main stages in the analysis of complex 3D structures and engineering constructions made of thin-walled open bars using FEM is a stiffness matrix developing. Taking into account middle surface shear deformation caused by the work of tangential stresses in the formula to calculate a potential energy of thin-walled open bars, the authors obtain an important correction at calculation of the bar deformation and fundamental frequencies. The results of the analysis of the free end buckling of a cantilever H-bar under plane bending differ from exact solution by 0.53%. In the course of comparison of the obtained results with the cantilever bar buckling regardless the middle surface shear deformation, an increase made 16.6%. The stiffness matrix of a thin-walled open bar developed in the present work can be integrated into any software suite using FEM for the analysis of complex 3-D structures and engineering constructions with n-freedoms.

  14. Effect of materials and manufacturing on the bending stiffness of vaulting poles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, C. L.; Kukureka, S. N.

    2012-09-01

    The increase in the world record height achieved in pole vaulting can be related to the improved ability of the athletes, in terms of their fitness and technique, and to the change in materials used to construct the pole. For example in 1960 there was a change in vaulting pole construction from bamboo to glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites. The lighter GFRP pole enabled the athletes to have a faster run-up, resulting in a greater take-off speed, giving them more kinetic energy to convert into potential energy and hence height. GFRP poles also have a much higher failure stress than bamboo, so the poles were engineered to bend under the load of the athlete, thereby storing elastic strain energy that can be released as the pole straightens, resulting in greater energy efficiency. The bending also allowed athletes to change their vaulting technique from a style that involved the body remaining almost upright during the vault to one where the athlete goes over the bar with their feet upwards. Modern vaulting poles can be made from GFRP and/or carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites. The addition of carbon fibres maintains the mechanical properties of the pole, but allows a reduction in the weight. The number and arrangement of the fibres determines the mechanical properties, in particular the bending stiffness. Vaulting poles are also designed for an individual athlete to take into account each athlete’s ability and physical characteristics. The poles are rated by ‘weight’ to allow athletes to select an appropriate pole for their ability. This paper will review the development of vaulting poles and the requirements to maximize performance. The properties (bending stiffness and pre-bend) and microstructure (fibre volume fraction and lay-up) of typical vaulting poles will be discussed. Originally published as Davis C L and Kukureka S N (2004) Effect of materials and manufacturing on the bending stiffness of vaulting poles The Engineering of

  15. The bending stiffness of shoes is beneficial to running energetics if it does not disturb the natural MTP joint flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Keonyoung; Park, Sukyung

    2017-02-28

    A local minimum for running energetics has been reported for a specific bending stiffness, implying that shoe stiffness assists in running propulsion. However, the determinant of the metabolic optimum remains unknown. Highly stiff shoes significantly increase the moment arm of the ground reaction force (GRF) and reduce the leverage effect of joint torque at ground push-off. Inspired by previous findings, we hypothesized that the restriction of the natural metatarsophalangeal (MTP) flexion caused by stiffened shoes and the corresponding joint torque changes may reduce the benefit of shoe bending stiffness to running energetics. We proposed the critical stiffness, k cr , which is defined as the ratio of the MTP joint (MTPJ) torque to the maximal MTPJ flexion angle, as a possible threshold of the elastic benefit of shoe stiffness. 19 subjects participated in a running test while wearing insoles with five different bending stiffness levels. Joint angles, GRFs, and metabolic costs were measured and analyzed as functions of the shoe stiffness. No significant changes were found in the take-off velocity of the center of mass (CoM), but the horizontal ground push-offs were significantly reduced at different shoe stiffness levels, indicating that complementary changes in the lower-limb joint torques were introduced to maintain steady running. Slight increases in the ankle, knee, and hip joint angular impulses were observed at stiffness levels exceeding the critical stiffness, whereas the angular impulse at the MTPJ was significantly reduced. These results indicate that the shoe bending stiffness is beneficial to running energetics if it does not disturb the natural MTPJ flexion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of web stiffness on the bending behaviour of timber composite I-beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racher, P.; Bocquet, J.F.; Bouchair, A.

    2007-01-01

    The design of timber I-beams with glued OSB web is currently based on simplified analytical model and experimental works. At the ultimate limit state, normal forces in the flanges and shear stresses in the web govern the load-carrying capacity of the beams. Applications in industrial or commercial buildings requires cross-section with greater height. In this paper, the effect of the slenderness of the web is analysed through an experimental program and a finite element model. For beams with finger-jointed flanges and butt-joints between web panels, the effective stiffness and the bending capacity are evaluated considering a web of 12 mm in thickness and height varying from 225 to 495 mm. The experimental values of the effective stiffness were compared to the theoretical evaluation taking into account the shear deformations of the web. For highest heights of the cross-section, the results shown that the ultimate capacity is governed by the plate behaviour of the web, resulting in the failure of the glued joint. On this basis, the internal behaviour is examined using a three-dimensional finite element modelling. The effect of the mains parameters such as the relative stiffness of the components and the gap between web panels is investigated. The stress concentration in the area of the web joint is analysed and a new design criterion is calibrated

  17. Effect of web stiffness on the bending behaviour of timber composite I-beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racher, P. [Civil Engineering Laboratory, CUST, Blaise Pascal University - Campus des Cezeaux, BP 206, 63174 Aubiere Cedex (France)]. E-mail: p.racher@cust.univ-bpclermont.fr; Bocquet, J.F. [LERMAB, ENSTIB, Henri Poincarre University, 88000 Epinal (France); Bouchair, A. [Civil Engineering Laboratory, CUST, Blaise Pascal University - Campus des Cezeaux, BP 206, 63174 Aubiere Cedex (France)

    2007-07-01

    The design of timber I-beams with glued OSB web is currently based on simplified analytical model and experimental works. At the ultimate limit state, normal forces in the flanges and shear stresses in the web govern the load-carrying capacity of the beams. Applications in industrial or commercial buildings requires cross-section with greater height. In this paper, the effect of the slenderness of the web is analysed through an experimental program and a finite element model. For beams with finger-jointed flanges and butt-joints between web panels, the effective stiffness and the bending capacity are evaluated considering a web of 12 mm in thickness and height varying from 225 to 495 mm. The experimental values of the effective stiffness were compared to the theoretical evaluation taking into account the shear deformations of the web. For highest heights of the cross-section, the results shown that the ultimate capacity is governed by the plate behaviour of the web, resulting in the failure of the glued joint. On this basis, the internal behaviour is examined using a three-dimensional finite element modelling. The effect of the mains parameters such as the relative stiffness of the components and the gap between web panels is investigated. The stress concentration in the area of the web joint is analysed and a new design criterion is calibrated.

  18. Effect of interlayer bonding strength and bending stiffness on 2-dimensional materials’ frictional properties at atomic-scale steps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, Haojie; Peng, Yitian; Zeng, Xingzhong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Bending of uncovered step edge of 2-dimensional materials could be a common phenomenon during friction processes. • 2-dimensional materials with large interlayer bonding strength possess good frictional properties at step. • Increased bending stiffness of step edge could be the major reason that lateral force increased with step height. - Abstract: Atomic-scale steps generally presented in 2-dimensional materials have important influence on the overall nanotribological properties of surface. Frictional properties at atomic-scale steps of two types of 2-dimensional materials are studied using calibrated atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip sliding against the steps. The lateral force at uncovered step is larger than covered step due to the bending of step edge. The lateral force at monolayer uncovered step edge of h-BN is lower than graphene because h-BN possesses higher interlayer bonding strength than graphene and the bending of h-BN step edge is suppressed to some extent. The high uncovered step exhibits much larger lateral force than low uncovered step, which could be mainly induced by increased bending stiffness of step edge rather than increased step height. The results revealed that interlayer bonding strength and bending stiffness have great influence on the lateral force at atomic-scale steps. The studies can provide a further understanding of frictional properties at atomic scale steps and could be helpful for the applications of 2-dimensional materials as lubricant coating.

  19. Effect of interlayer bonding strength and bending stiffness on 2-dimensional materials’ frictional properties at atomic-scale steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, Haojie; Peng, Yitian, E-mail: yitianpeng@dhu.edu.cn; Zeng, Xingzhong

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • Bending of uncovered step edge of 2-dimensional materials could be a common phenomenon during friction processes. • 2-dimensional materials with large interlayer bonding strength possess good frictional properties at step. • Increased bending stiffness of step edge could be the major reason that lateral force increased with step height. - Abstract: Atomic-scale steps generally presented in 2-dimensional materials have important influence on the overall nanotribological properties of surface. Frictional properties at atomic-scale steps of two types of 2-dimensional materials are studied using calibrated atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip sliding against the steps. The lateral force at uncovered step is larger than covered step due to the bending of step edge. The lateral force at monolayer uncovered step edge of h-BN is lower than graphene because h-BN possesses higher interlayer bonding strength than graphene and the bending of h-BN step edge is suppressed to some extent. The high uncovered step exhibits much larger lateral force than low uncovered step, which could be mainly induced by increased bending stiffness of step edge rather than increased step height. The results revealed that interlayer bonding strength and bending stiffness have great influence on the lateral force at atomic-scale steps. The studies can provide a further understanding of frictional properties at atomic scale steps and could be helpful for the applications of 2-dimensional materials as lubricant coating.

  20. Equilibria and Free Vibration of a Two-Pulley Belt-Driven System with Belt Bending Stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieyu Ding

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear equilibrium curvatures and free vibration characteristics of a two-pulley belt-driven system with belt bending stiffness and a one-way clutch are investigated. With nonlinear dynamical tension, the transverse vibrations of the translating belt spans and the rotation motions of the pulleys and the accessory shaft are coupled. Therefore, nonlinear piecewise discrete-continuous governing equations are established. Considering the bending stiffness of the translating belt spans, the belt spans are modeled as axially moving beams. The pattern of equilibria is a nontrivial solution. Furthermore, the nontrivial equilibriums of the dynamical system are numerically determined by using two different approaches. The governing equations of the vibration near the equilibrium solutions are derived by introducing a coordinate transform. The natural frequencies of the dynamical systems are studied by using the Galerkin method with various truncations and the differential and integral quadrature methods. Moreover, the convergence of the Galerkin truncation is investigated. Numerical results reveal that the study needs 16 terms after truncation in order to determine the free vibration characteristics of the pulley-belt system with the belt bending stiffness. Furthermore, the first five natural frequencies are very sensitive to the bending stiffness of the translating belt.

  1. Optimization of the bending stiffness of beam-to-column and column-to-foundation connections in precast concrete structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. R. COSTA

    Full Text Available Abstract This work involved the structural optimization of precast concrete rigid frames with semi-rigid beam-to-column connections. To this end, several frames were simulated numerically using the Finite Element Method. Beams and columns were modeled using bar elements and their connections were modeled using spring elements, with variable bending stiffness. The objective function was based on the search of the least stiff connection able to ensure the global stability of the building. Lastly, a connection model with optimal stiffness was adopted to design the frame. Semi-rigid beam-to-column connections with a constraint factors of 0.33 sufficed to ensure the maximum allowable horizontal displacement and bending moment of the connection, with a global stability parameter of 1.12. This confirms that even connections with low constraints generate significant gains from the structural standpoint, without affecting construction and assembly-related aspects.

  2. Effect of bending stiffness on the peeling behavior of an elastic thin film on a rigid substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhilong; Chen, Shaohua

    2015-04-01

    Inspired by the experimental observation that the maximum peeling force of elastic films on rigid substrates does not always emerge at the steady-state peeling stage, but sometimes at the initial one, a theoretical model is established in this paper, in which not only the effect of the film's bending stiffness on the peeling force is considered, but also the whole peeling process, from the initiation of debonding to the steady-state stage, is characterized. Typical peeling force-displacement curves and deformed profiles of the film reappear for the whole peeling process. For the case of a film with relatively large bending stiffness, the maximum peeling force is found arising at the initial peeling stage and the larger the stiffness of the film, the larger the maximum peeling force is. With the peeling distance increasing, the peeling force is reduced from the maximum to a constant at the steady-state stage. For the case of a film with relatively small stiffness, the peeling force increases monotonically at the initial stage and then achieves a constant as the maximum at the steady-state stage. Furthermore, the peeling forces in the steady-state stage are compared with those of the classical Kendall model. All the theoretical predictions agree well with the existing experimental and numerical observations, from which the maximum peeling force can be predicted precisely no matter what the stiffness of the film is. The results in this paper should be very helpful in the design and assessment of the film-substrate interface.

  3. Effects of forefoot bending stiffness of badminton shoes on agility, comfort perception and lower leg kinematics during typical badminton movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Kyoon; Lam, Wing-Kai; Yoon, Sukhoon; Lee, Ki-Kwang; Ryu, Jiseon

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated whether an increase in the forefoot bending stiffness of a badminton shoe would positively affect agility, comfort and biomechanical variables during badminton-specific movements. Three shoe conditions with identical shoe upper and sole designs with different bending stiffness (Flexible, Regular and Stiff) were used. Elite male badminton players completed an agility test on a standard badminton court involving consecutive lunges in six directions, a comfort test performed by a pair of participants conducting a game-like practice trial and a biomechanics test involving a random assignment of consecutive right forward lunges. No significant differences were found in agility time and biomechanical variables among the three shoes. The players wearing the shoe with a flexible forefoot outsole demonstrated a decreased perception of comfort in the forefoot cushion compared to regular and stiffer conditions during the comfort test (p badminton-specific tasks. It was concluded that an optimisation of forefoot structure and materials in badminton shoes should consider the individual's perception to maximise footwear comfort in performance.

  4. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropathy - ulnar nerve; Ulnar nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy; Cubital tunnel syndrome ... Damage to one nerve group, such as the ulnar nerve, is called mononeuropathy . Mononeuropathy means there is damage to a single nerve. Both ...

  5. Identification of cation-binding sites on actin that drive polymerization and modulate bending stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyeran; Bradley, Michael J.; McCullough, Brannon R.; Pierre, Anaëlle; Grintsevich, Elena E.; Reisler, Emil; De La Cruz, Enrique M.

    2012-01-01

    The assembly of actin monomers into filaments and networks plays vital roles throughout eukaryotic biology, including intracellular transport, cell motility, cell division, determining cellular shape, and providing cells with mechanical strength. The regulation of actin assembly and modulation of filament mechanical properties are critical for proper actin function. It is well established that physiological salt concentrations promote actin assembly and alter the overall bending mechanics of assembled filaments and networks. However, the molecular origins of these salt-dependent effects, particularly if they involve nonspecific ionic strength effects or specific ion-binding interactions, are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that specific cation binding at two discrete sites situated between adjacent subunits along the long-pitch helix drive actin polymerization and determine the filament bending rigidity. We classify the two sites as “polymerization” and “stiffness” sites based on the effects that mutations at the sites have on salt-dependent filament assembly and bending mechanics, respectively. These results establish the existence and location of the cation-binding sites that confer salt dependence to the assembly and mechanics of actin filaments. PMID:23027950

  6. Ulnar nerve damage (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ulnar nerve originates from the brachial plexus and travels down arm. The nerve is commonly injured at the elbow because of elbow fracture or dislocation. The ulnar nerve is near the surface of the body where ...

  7. An experimental investigation on bending stiffness and neutral axis depth variation of over-reinforced high strength concrete beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadhassani, Mohammad; Bin Jumaat, Mohd Zamin; Chemrouk, Mohamed; Akbar Maghsoudi, Ali; Jameel, Mohammed; Akib, Shatirah

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Improvement of the assessment of correspond stress for calculation of modules of elasticity → better evaluation of cracked moment of inertia. → Low distinction of neutral axis depth → low bending stiffness variation. → Rate of slope in the line connecting the origin of first crack to yield point of N.A.D-LOAD graph → rate of ductility of beam section. - Abstract: The present work is an attempt to study the neutral axis variation and the evolution of the moment inertia with the loading of over reinforced high strength concrete sections in conjunction with ACI 318-05. In this sense, four high strength concrete beams, having different tension reinforcement quantities expressed as proportions of the balanced steel ratio (0.75ρ b , 0.85ρ b , ρ b , 1.2ρ b ) were tested. Measurements of the deflection and the reinforcement and concrete strains of all specimens were made during the loading process. The load-neutral axis depth variation and the load-section stiffness curves were drawn. The slope of the line connecting the origin of the first crack to the initial yielding of the failure point in the neutral axis depth-load graphs shows the rate of ductility; ductile behaviour in the beam increases as the slope becomes steeper. Based on the results of this study, it is recommended that the modulus of elasticity of concrete E c be reviewed and evaluated at a stress higher than 0.5f ' c for the determination of the cracked moment of inertia.

  8. Traumatic Distal Ulnar Artery Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet A. Karaarslan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about a posttraumatic distal ulnar artery thrombosis case that has occurred after a single blunt trauma. The ulnar artery thrombosis because of chronic trauma is a frequent condition (hypothenar hammer syndrome but an ulnar artery thrombosis because of a single direct blunt trauma is rare. Our patient who has been affected by a single blunt trauma to his hand and developed ulnar artery thrombosis has been treated by resection of the thrombosed ulnar artery segment. This report shows that a single blunt trauma can cause distal ulnar artery thrombosis in the hand and it can be treated merely by thrombosed segment resection in suitable cases.

  9. Ulnar Collateral Ligament Injuries of the Thumb

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeon, Kathleen E.; Gelberman, Richard H.; Calfee, Ryan P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The clinical diagnosis of thumb ulnar collateral ligament disruption has been based on joint angulation during valgus stress testing. This report describes a definitive method of distinguishing between complete and partial ulnar collateral ligament injuries by quantifying translation of the proximal phalanx on the metacarpal head during valgus stress testing. Methods: Sixty-two cadaveric thumbs underwent standardized valgus stress testing under fluoroscopy with the ulnar collateral ligament intact, following an isolated release of the proper ulnar collateral ligament, and following a combined release of both the proper and the accessory ulnar collateral ligament (complete ulnar collateral ligament release). Following complete ulnar collateral ligament release, the final thirty-seven thumbs were also analyzed after the application of a valgus force sufficient to cause 45° of valgus angulation at the metacarpophalangeal joint to model more severe soft-tissue injury. Two independent reviewers measured coronal plane joint angulation (in degrees), ulnar joint line gap formation (in millimeters), and radial translation of the proximal phalanx on the metacarpal head (in millimeters) on digital fluoroscopic images that had been randomized. Results: Coronal angulation across the stressed metacarpophalangeal joint progressively increased through the stages of the testing protocol: ulnar collateral ligament intact (average [and standard deviation], 20° ± 8.1°), release of the proper ulnar collateral ligament (average, 23° ± 8.3°), and complete ulnar collateral ligament release (average, 30° ± 8.9°) (p collateral ligament release (5.7 ± 1.5 mm), to that following complete ulnar collateral ligament release (7.2 ± 1.5 mm) (p collateral ligament (1.6 ± 0.8 mm vs. 1.5 ± 0.9 mm in the intact state). There was a significant increase in translation following release of the complete ulnar collateral ligament complex (3.0 ± 0.9 mm; p collateral ligament

  10. A radiographic study of pediatric ulnar anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravino, Mattia; Oni, Julius K; Sala, Debra A; Chu, Alice

    2014-01-01

    The adult ulna has a unique bony architecture that has been described in the literature, but, to the best of our knowledge, the ulnar anatomy in children has not been described. We examined 75 anteroposterior (AP) and 64 lateral radiographs (29 were bilateral) of 50, 0.5- to 11-year-old, healthy children's forearms. On AP radiographs, the total ulnar length, the ulnar proximal angle, the ulnar distal angle, and the distance between each angle from the tip of the triceps insertion; and, on lateral radiographs, the ulnar length and bow deviation were measured. The correlation between age and radiographic measurements, differences based on sex, differences compared with adults' measurements, and interobserver/intraobserver reliability were assessed. Age had a very strong/strong positive correlation with length/distance measurements on both AP and lateral radiographs. Only AP ulnar distal angle was significantly different between sexes (females > males). Compared with the adult ulnar studies, the AP proximal angle in children is significantly smaller and the location of this angle is significantly more distal. Interobserver and intraobserver reliability were very good for length/distance measurements on AP and lateral radiographs. The knowledge of pediatric ulnar anatomy could be helpful in the treatment of forearm deformities due to multiple hereditary exostosis and osteogenesis imperfecta, and in the treatment of ulnar fractures, particularly in Monteggia variants, where restoration of the correct forearm anatomy is essential to obtain good clinical and functional results. Study of diagnostic test, Level II.

  11. Rigidez do papelão ondulado: comparação entre resultados experimentais e os obtidos por cálculo analítico Bending stiffness evaluation of cardboard: comparison between experimental and analytically results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo G. Magalhães

    2006-04-01

    transverse direction. The papers liner and medium resistance to the traction, used to calculate the bending stiffness, was determined in a universal machine test. To obtaining of the bending stiffens the four points test was accomplished. Expressive variations among the methods from which the modulus of elasticity is obtained were observed and that influence the bending stiffness of the structure. The stiffness values obtained experimentally were always greater than the values obtained from analytical method. This difference can be attributed to two factors, the production processes that assurance a larger rigidity than the components separately and the addition of the adhesive layer that is not taken in consideration in the analytic calculations.

  12. Ulnar variance: its relationship to ulnar foveal morphology and forearm kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Toshiyuki; Moritomo, Hisao; Omokawa, Shohei; Iida, Akio; Murase, Tsuyoshi; Sugamoto, Kazuomi

    2012-04-01

    It is unclear how individual differences in the anatomy of the distal ulna affect kinematics and pathology of the distal radioulnar joint. This study evaluated how ulnar variance relates to ulnar foveal morphology and the pronosupination axis of the forearm. We performed 3-dimensional computed tomography studies in vivo on 28 forearms in maximum supination and pronation to determine the anatomical center of the ulnar distal pole and the forearm pronosupination axis. We calculated the forearm pronosupination axis using a markerless bone registration technique, which determined the pronosupination center as the point where the axis emerges on the distal ulnar surface. We measured the depth of the anatomical center and classified it into 2 types: concave, with a depth of 0.8 mm or more, and flat, with a depth less than 0.8 mm. We examined whether ulnar variance correlated with foveal type and the distance between anatomical and pronosupination centers. A total of 18 cases had a concave-type fovea surrounded by the C-shaped articular facet of the distal pole, and 10 had a flat-type fovea with a flat surface without evident central depression. Ulnar variance of the flat type was 3.5 ± 1.2 mm, which was significantly greater than the 1.2 ± 1.1 mm of the concave type. Ulnar variance positively correlated with distance between the anatomical and pronosupination centers. Flat-type ulnar heads have a significantly greater ulnar variance than concave types. The pronosupination axis passes through the ulnar head more medially and farther from the anatomical center with increasing ulnar variance. This study suggests that ulnar variance is related in part to foveal morphology and pronosupination axis. This information provides a starting point for future studies investigating how foveal morphology relates to distal ulnar problems. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ulnar nerve injury associated with trampoline injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclin, Melvin M; Novak, Christine B; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2004-08-01

    This study reports three cases of ulnar neuropathy after trampoline injuries in children. A chart review was performed on children who sustained an ulnar nerve injury from a trampoline accident. In all cases, surgical intervention was required. Injuries included upper-extremity fractures in two cases and an upper-extremity laceration in one case. All cases required surgical exploration with internal neurolysis and ulnar nerve transposition. Nerve grafts were used in two cases and an additional nerve transfer was used in one case. All patients had return of intrinsic hand function and sensation after surgery. Children should be followed for evolution of ulnar nerve neuropathy after upper-extremity injury with consideration for electrical studies and surgical exploration if there is no improvement after 3 months.

  14. Ulnar nerve sonography in leprosy neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhu; Liu, Da-Yue; Lei, Yang-Yang; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A 23-year-old woman presented with a half-year history of right forearm sensory and motor dysfunction. Ultrasound imaging revealed definite thickening of the right ulnar nerve trunk and inner epineurium, along with heterogeneous hypoechogenicity and unclear nerve fiber bundle. Color Doppler exhibited a rich blood supply, which was clearly different from the normal ulnar nerve presentation with a scarce blood supply. The patient subsequently underwent needle aspiration of the right ulnar nerve, and histopathological examination confirmed that granulomatous nodules had formed with a large number of infiltrating lymphocytes and a plurality of epithelioid cells in the fibrous connective tissues, with visible atypical foam cells and proliferous vascularization, consistent with leprosy. Our report will familiarize readers with the characteristic sonographic features of the ulnar nerve in leprosy, particularly because of the decreasing incidence of leprosy in recent years.

  15. Ulnar nerve entrapment by anconeus epitrochlearis ligament.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tiong, William H C

    2012-01-01

    Ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow is the second most common upper limb entrapment neuropathy other than carpal tunnel syndrome. There have been many causes identified ranging from chronic aging joint changes to inflammatory conditions or systemic disorders. Among them, uncommon anatomical variants accounts for a small number of cases. Here, we report our experience in managing ulnar nerve entrapment caused by a rare vestigial structure, anconeus epitrochlearis ligament, and provide a brief review of the literature of its management.

  16. Diagnosing ulnar neuropathy at the elbow using magnetic resonance neurography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, Nayela N.; Chin, Cynthia T.; Saloner, David; Steinbach, Lynne S.; Engstrom, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Early diagnosis of ulnar neuropathy at the elbow is important. Magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) images peripheral nerves. We evaluated the usefulness of elbow MRN in diagnosing ulnar neuropathy at the elbow. The MR neurograms of 21 patients with ulnar neuropathy were reviewed retrospectively. MRN was performed prospectively on 10 normal volunteers. The MR neurograms included axial T1 and axial T2 fat-saturated and/or axial STIR sequences. The sensitivity and specificity of MRN in detecting ulnar neuropathy were determined. The mean ulnar nerve size in the symptomatic and normal groups was 0.12 and 0.06 cm 2 (P 2 , sensitivity was 95% and specificity was 80%. Ulnar nerve size and signal intensity were greater in patients with ulnar neuropathy. MRN is a useful test in evaluating ulnar neuropathy at the elbow. (orig.)

  17. Artificial muscles with adjustable stiffness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutlu, Rahim; Alici, Gursel

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a stiffness enhancement methodology based on using a suitably designed contact surface with which cantilevered-type conducting polymer bending actuators are in contact during operation. The contact surface constrains the bending behaviour of the actuators. Depending on the topology of the contact surface, the resistance of the polymer actuators to deformation, i.e. stiffness, is varied. As opposed to their predecessors, these polymer actuators operate in air. Finite element analysis and modelling are used to quantify the effect of the contact surface on the effective stiffness of a trilayer cantilevered beam, which represents a one-end-free, the-other-end-fixed polypyrrole (PPy) conducting polymer actuator under a uniformly distributed load. After demonstrating the feasibility of the adjustable stiffness concept, experiments were conducted to determine the stiffness of bending-type conducting polymer actuators in contact with a range (20–40 mm in radius) of circular contact surfaces. The numerical and experimental results presented demonstrate that the stiffness of the actuators can be varied using a suitably profiled contact surface. The larger the radius of the contact surface is, the higher is the stiffness of the polymer actuators. The outcomes of this study suggest that, although the stiffness of the artificial muscles considered in this study is constant for a given geometric size, and electrical and chemical operation conditions, it can be changed in a nonlinear fashion to suit the stiffness requirement of a considered application. The stiffness enhancement methodology can be extended to other ionic-type conducting polymer actuators

  18. Anomalies of radial and ulnar arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajani Singh

    Full Text Available Abstract During dissection conducted in an anatomy department of the right upper limb of the cadaver of a 70-year-old male, both origin and course of the radial and ulnar arteries were found to be anomalous. After descending 5.5 cm from the lower border of the teres major, the brachial artery anomalously bifurcated into a radial artery medially and an ulnar artery laterally. In the arm, the ulnar artery lay lateral to the median nerve. It followed a normal course in the forearm. The radial artery was medial to the median nerve in the arm and then, at the level of the medial epicondyle, it crossed from the medial to the lateral side of the forearm, superficial to the flexor muscles. The course of the radial artery was superficial and tortuous throughout the arm and forearm. The variations of radial and ulnar arteries described above were associated with anomalous formation and course of the median nerve in the arm. Knowledge of neurovascular anomalies are important for vascular surgeons and radiologists.

  19. A thermo-viscoelastic approach for the characterization and modeling of the bending behavior of thermoplastic composites – Part II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ropers, Steffen; Sachs, Ulrich; Kardos, Marton; Osswald, Tim A.

    2017-01-01

    A proper description of the bending behavior is crucial to obtain accurate forming simulations, especially for continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites. These materials exhibit a highly temperature and bending-curvature dependent bending stiffness. These dependencies make the property

  20. Median and ulnar neuropathies in university guitarists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Rachel H; Hutcherson, Kimberly J; Kain, Jennifer B; Phillips, Alicia L; Halle, John S; Greathouse, David G

    2006-02-01

    Descriptive study. To determine the presence of median and ulnar neuropathies in both upper extremities of university guitarists. Peripheral nerve entrapment syndromes of the upper extremities are well documented in musicians. Guitarists and plucked-string musicians are at risk for entrapment neuropathies in the upper extremities and are prone to mild neurologic deficits. Twenty-four volunteer male and female guitarists (age range, 18-26 years) were recruited from the Belmont University School of Music and the Vanderbilt University Blair School of Music. Individuals were excluded if they were pregnant or had a history of recent upper extremity or neck injury. Subjects completed a history form, were interviewed, and underwent a physical examination. Nerve conduction status of the median and ulnar nerves of both upper extremities was obtained by performing motor, sensory, and F-wave (central) nerve conduction studies. Descriptive statistics of the nerve conduction study variables were computed using Microsoft Excel. Six subjects had positive findings on provocative testing of the median and ulnar nerves. Otherwise, these guitarists had normal upper extremity neural and musculoskeletal function based on the history and physical examinations. When comparing the subjects' nerve conduction study values with a chart of normal nerve conduction studies values, 2 subjects had prolonged distal motor latencies (DMLs) of the left median nerve of 4.3 and 4.7 milliseconds (normal, DMLs are compatible with median neuropathy at or distal to the wrist. Otherwise, all electrophysiological variables were within normal limits for motor, sensory, and F-wave (central) values. However, comparison studies of median and ulnar motor latencies in the same hand demonstrated prolonged differences of greater than 1.0 milliseconds that affected the median nerve in 2 additional subjects, and identified contralateral limb involvement in a subject with a prolonged distal latency. The other 20

  1. Ulnar nerve entrapment complicating radial head excision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Parfait Bienvenu Bouhelo-Pam

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several mechanisms are involved in ischemia or mechanical compression of ulnar nerve at the elbow. Presentation of case: We hereby present the case of a road accident victim, who received a radial head excision for an isolated fracture of the radial head and complicated by onset of cubital tunnel syndrome. This outcome could be the consequence of an iatrogenic valgus of the elbow due to excision of the radial head. Hitherto the surgical treatment of choice it is gradually been abandoned due to development of radial head implant arthroplasty. However, this management option is still being performed in some rural centers with low resources. Discussion: The radial head plays an important role in the stability of the elbow and his iatrogenic deformity can be complicated by cubital tunnel syndrome. Conclusion: An ulnar nerve release was performed with favorable outcome. Keywords: Cubital tunnel syndrome, Peripheral nerve palsy, Radial head excision, Elbow valgus

  2. Biomechanical properties of orthogonal plate configuration versus parallel plate configuration using the same locking plate system for intra-articular distal humeral fractures under radial or ulnar column axial load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Toshiya; Hara, Akira; Iwase, Hideaki; Ichihara, Satoshi; Nagao, Masashi; Maruyama, Yuichiro; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2016-10-01

    Previous reports have questioned whether an orthogonal or parallel configuration is superior for distal humeral articular fractures. In previous clinical and biomechanical studies, implant failure of the posterolateral plate has been reported with orthogonal configurations; however, the reason for screw loosening in the posterolateral plate is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate biomechanical properties and to clarify the causes of posterolateral plate loosening using a humeral fracture model under axial compression on the radial or ulnar column separately. And we changed only the plate set up: parallel or orthogonal. We used artificial bone to create an Association for the Study of Internal Fixation type 13-C2.3 intra-articular fracture model with a 1-cm supracondylar gap. We used an anatomically-preshaped distal humerus locking compression plate system (Synthes GmbH, Solothurn, Switzerland). Although this is originally an orthogonal plate system, we designed a mediolateral parallel configuration to use the contralateral medial plate instead of the posterolateral plate in the system. We calculated the stiffness of the radial and ulnar columns and anterior movement of the condylar fragment in the lateral view. The parallel configuration was superior to the orthogonal configuration regarding the stiffness of the radial column axial compression. There were significant differences between the two configurations regarding anterior movement of the capitellum during axial loading of the radial column. The posterolateral plate tended to bend anteriorly under axial compression compared with the medial or lateral plate. We believe that in the orthogonal configuration axial compression induced more anterior displacement of the capitellum than the trochlea, which eventually induced secondary fragment or screw dislocation on the posterolateral plate, or nonunion at the supracondylar level. In the parallel configuration, anterior movement of the capitellum or

  3. In vivo fluoroscopic kinematography of dynamic radio-ulnar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... canine elbow joint, as part of the physiological kinematic pattern. However, dysplastic elbow joints do not show an increased radio-ulnar translation, and therfore dRUI cannot be considered causative for medial coronoid disease. Keywords: Canine, Elbow dysplasia, Fluoroscopy, Gait analysis, Radio-ulnar incongruence.

  4. Diagnosing ulnar neuropathy at the elbow using magnetic resonance neurography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keen, Nayela N.; Chin, Cynthia T.; Saloner, David; Steinbach, Lynne S. [University of California San Francisco, Dept of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Engstrom, John W. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Neurology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Early diagnosis of ulnar neuropathy at the elbow is important. Magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) images peripheral nerves. We evaluated the usefulness of elbow MRN in diagnosing ulnar neuropathy at the elbow. The MR neurograms of 21 patients with ulnar neuropathy were reviewed retrospectively. MRN was performed prospectively on 10 normal volunteers. The MR neurograms included axial T1 and axial T2 fat-saturated and/or axial STIR sequences. The sensitivity and specificity of MRN in detecting ulnar neuropathy were determined. The mean ulnar nerve size in the symptomatic and normal groups was 0.12 and 0.06 cm{sup 2} (P < 0.001). The mean relative signal intensity in the symptomatic and normal groups was 2.7 and 1.4 (P < 0.01). When using a size of 0.08 cm{sup 2}, sensitivity was 95% and specificity was 80%. Ulnar nerve size and signal intensity were greater in patients with ulnar neuropathy. MRN is a useful test in evaluating ulnar neuropathy at the elbow. (orig.)

  5. Timoshenko-Wagner-Kappus Torsion Bending Theory and Wind ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Theory and Wind Tunnel Balance Design. S P Govinda ... The study of torsion and bending has always been a favourite ... Since it was difficult to work quietlyin Petersburg, .... should be stiff and strong to endure shocks and ensure long life.

  6. Palm to Finger Ulnar Sensory Nerve Conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidowich, Eduardo; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M; Orsini, Marco; Pupe, Camila; Pessoa, Bruno; Bittar, Caroline; Pires, Karina Lebeis; Bruno, Carlos; Coutinho, Bruno Mattos; de Souza, Olivia Gameiro; Ribeiro, Pedro; Velasques, Bruna; Bittencourt, Juliana; Teixeira, Silmar; Bastos, Victor Hugo

    2015-12-29

    Ulnar neuropathy at the wrist (UNW) is rare, and always challenging to localize. To increase the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnosis of UNW many authors advocate the stimulation of the ulnar nerve (UN) in the segment of the wrist and palm. The focus of this paper is to present a modified and simplified technique of sensory nerve conduction (SNC) of the UN in the wrist and palm segments and demonstrate the validity of this technique in the study of five cases of type III UNW. The SNC of UN was performed antidromically with fifth finger ring recording electrodes. The UN was stimulated 14 cm proximal to the active electrode (the standard way) and 7 cm proximal to the active electrode. The normal data from amplitude and conduction velocity (CV) ratios between the palm to finger and wrist to finger segments were obtained. Normal amplitude ratio was 1.4 to 0.76. Normal CV ratio was 0.8 to 1.23.We found evidences of abnormal SNAP amplitude ratio or substantial slowing of UN sensory fibers across the wrist in 5 of the 5 patients with electrophysiological-definite type III UNW.

  7. Palm to finger ulnar sensory nerve conduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Davidowich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ulnar neuropathy at the wrist (UNW is rare, and always challenging to localize. To increase the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnosis of UNW many authors advocate the stimulation of the ulnar nerve (UN in the segment of the wrist and palm. The focus of this paper is to present a modified and simplified technique of sensory nerve conduction (SNC of the UN in the wrist and palm segments and demonstrate the validity of this technique in the study of five cases of type III UNW. The SNC of UN was performed antidromically with fifth finger ring recording electrodes. The UN was stimulated 14 cm proximal to the active electrode (the standard way and 7 cm proximal to the active electrode. The normal data from amplitude and conduction velocity (CV ratios between the palm to finger and wrist to finger segments were obtained. Normal amplitude ratio was 1.4 to 0.76. Normal CV ratio was 0.8 to 1.23.We found evidences of abnormal SNAP amplitude ratio or substantial slowing of UN sensory fibers across the wrist in 5 of the 5 patients with electrophysiological-definite type III UNW.

  8. Osteosynthesis for symptomatic ulnar styloid nonunion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajiwara, Ryoji; Kimori, Kenji; Kawagoe, Hiroyuki; Tsuge, Kenya; Ikuta, Yosikazu

    2008-01-01

    We reviewed cases of osteosynthesis for symptomatic ulnar styloid nonunion. Since 1998, 13 cases of ulnar styloid nonunion have been treated by osteosynthesis. The patients were 10 men and 3 women, with a mean age of 27 years (range 11-65). The nonunion site was located in the middle in one case, in the base in 8 cases, and in the epiphyseal region in 4 cases. Osteosynthesis was performed with tension band wiring in all cases, and cancellous bone graft was performed in 12 of 13 cases. Distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability was found by radiograph or CT in four cases; in two of these, osteosynthesis alone did not improve DRUJ instability and additional DRUJ stabilization was performed. One patient whose treatment failed to correct nonunion did not seek further treatment. In another case, an additional surgery was performed 1 week after the initial surgery to correct displacement of the fragment. The mean follow-up period was 15 months (range 8-45 months). According to Hauck's criteria, final pain was evaluated as excellent in nine cases, good in three cases, including the case resulting in nonunion, and fair in one case. (author)

  9. Bending stresses in Facetted Glass Shells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Anne; Jönsson, Jeppe; Almegaard, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    A shell structure of glass combines a highly effective structural principle with a material of optimal permeability to light. A facetted shell structure has a piecewise plane geometry, and together the facets form an approximation to a curved surface. A distributed load on a plane-based facetted...... structure will locally cause bending moments in the loaded facets. The bending stresses are dependent on the stiffness of the joints. Approximate solutions are developed to estimate the magnitude of the bending stresses. A FE-model of a facetted glass shell structure is used to validate the expressions...

  10. Stiff Hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Stiff Hands Email to a friend * required fields ...

  11. Ulnar nerve paralysis after forearm bone fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Roberto Schwartsmann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Paralysis or nerve injury associated with fractures of forearm bones fracture is rare and is more common in exposed fractures with large soft-tissue injuries. Ulnar nerve paralysis is a rare condition associated with closed fractures of the forearm. In most cases, the cause of paralysis is nerve contusion, which evolves with neuropraxia. However, nerve lacerations and entrapment at the fracture site always need to be borne in mind. This becomes more important when neuropraxia appears or worsens after reduction of a closed fracture of the forearm has been completed. The importance of diagnosing this injury and differentiating its features lies in the fact that, depending on the type of lesion, different types of management will be chosen.

  12. Ulnar-sided wrist pain. II. Clinical imaging and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Atsuya; Souza, Felipe [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Vezeridis, Peter S.; Blazar, Philip [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Yoshioka, Hiroshi [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); University of California-Irvine, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine, CA (United States); UC Irvine Medical Center, Department of Radiological Sciences, Orange, CA (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Pain at the ulnar aspect of the wrist is a diagnostic challenge for hand surgeons and radiologists due to the small and complex anatomical structures involved. In this article, imaging modalities including radiography, arthrography, ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR arthrography are compared with regard to differential diagnosis. Clinical imaging findings are reviewed for a more comprehensive understanding of this disorder. Treatments for the common diseases that cause the ulnar-sided wrist pain including extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendonitis, flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) tendonitis, pisotriquetral arthritis, triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) lesions, ulnar impaction, lunotriquetral (LT) instability, and distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability are reviewed. (orig.)

  13. Ulnar nerve entrapment in Guyon's canal due to a lipoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, O; Calisaneller, T; Gerilmez, A; Gulsen, S; Altinors, N

    2010-09-01

    Guyon's canal syndrome is an ulnar nerve entrapment at the wrist or palm that can cause motor, sensory or combined motor and sensory loss due to various factors . In this report, we presented a 66-year-old man admitted to our clinic with a history of intermittent pain in the left palm and numbness in 4th and 5th finger for two years. His neurological examination revealed a sensory impairment in the right fifth finger. Also, physical examination displayed a subcutaneous mobile soft tissue in ulnar side of the wrist. Electromyographic examination confirmed the diagnosis of type-1 Guyon's canal syndrome. Under axillary blockage, a lipoma compressing the ulnar nerve was excised totally and ulnar nerve was decompressed. The symptoms were improved after the surgery and patient was symptom free on 3rd postoperative week.

  14. Injury to ulnar collateral ligament of thumb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Simerjit Singh; Pai, Dinker R; Kaur, Avneet; Dixit, Ruchita

    2014-02-01

    Injury of the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) of thumb can be incapacitating if untreated or not treated properly. This injury is notorious for frequently being missed by inexperienced health care personnel in emergency departments. It has frequently been described in skiers, but also occurs in other sports such as rugby, soccer, handball, basketball, volleyball and even after a handshake. The UCL of the thumb acts as a primary restraint to valgus stress and is injured if hyperabduction and hyperextension forces are applied to the first metacarpophalangeal joint. The diagnosis is best established clinically, though MRI is the imaging modality of choice. Many treatment options exist, surgical treatment being offered depending on various factors, including timing of presentation (acute or chronic), grade (severity of injury), displacement (Stener lesion), location of tear (mid-substance or peripheral), associated or concomitant surrounding tissue injury (bone, volar plate, etc.), and patient-related factors (occupational demands, etc.). This review aims to identify the optimal diagnostic techniques and management options for UCL injury available thus far. © 2014 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. A novel variable stiffness mechanism for dielectric elastomer actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Bo; Zhang, Wen-Ming; Zou, Hong-Xiang; Peng, Zhi-Ke; Meng, Guang

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, a novel variable stiffness mechanism is proposed for the design of a variable stiffness dielectric elastomer actuator (VSDEA) which combines a flexible strip with a DEA in a dielectric elastomer minimum energy structure. The DEA induces an analog tuning of the transverse curvature of the strip, thus conveniently providing a voltage-controllable flexural rigidity. The VSDEA tends to be a fully flexible and compact structure with the advantages of simplicity and fast response. Both experimental and theoretical investigations are carried out to reveal the variable stiffness performances of the VSDEA. The effect of the clamped location on the bending stiffness of the VSDEA is analyzed, and then effects of the lengths, the loading points and the applied voltages on the bending stiffness are experimentally investigated. An analytical model is developed to verify the availability of this variable stiffness mechanism, and the theoretical results demonstrate that the bending stiffness of the VSDEA decreases as the applied voltage increases, which agree well with the experimental data. Moreover, the experimental results show that the maximum change of the relative stiffness can reach about 88.80%. It can be useful for the design and optimization of active variable stiffness structures and DEAs for soft robots, vibration control, and morphing applications.

  16. Arterial stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula Quinn

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of biomechanical properties of arteries have become an important surrogate outcome used in epidemiological and interventional cardiovascular research. Structural and functional differences of vessels in the arterial tree result in a dampening of pulsatility and smoothing of blood flow as it progresses to capillary level. A loss of arterial elastic properties results a range of linked pathophysiological changes within the circulation including increased pulse pressure, left ventricular hypertrophy, subendocardial ischaemia, vessel endothelial dysfunction and cardiac fibrosis. With increased arterial stiffness, the microvasculature of brain and kidneys are exposed to wider pressure fluctuations and may lead to increased risk of stroke and renal failure. Stiffening of the aorta, as measured by the gold-standard technique of aortic Pulse Wave Velocity (aPWV, is independently associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes across many different patient groups and in the general population. Therefore, use of aPWV has been proposed for early detection of vascular damage and individual cardiovascular risk evaluation and it seems certain that measurement of arterial stiffness will become increasingly important in future clinical care. In this review we will consider some of the pathophysiological processes that result from arterial stiffening, how it is measured and factors that may drive it as well as potential avenues for therapy. In the face of an ageing population where mortality from atheromatous cardiovascular disease is falling, pathology associated with arterial stiffening will assume ever greater importance. Therefore, understanding these concepts for all clinicians involved in care of patients with cardiovascular disease will become vital.

  17. Role of flexural stiffness of leukocyte microvilli in adhesion dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tai-Hsien; Qi, Dewei

    2018-03-01

    Previous work reported that microvillus deformation has an important influence on dynamics of cell adhesion. However, the existing studies were limited to the extensional deformation of microvilli and did not consider the effects of their bending deformation on cell adhesion. This Rapid Communication investigates the effects of flexural stiffness of microvilli on the rolling process related to adhesion of leukocytes by using a lattice-Boltzmann lattice-spring method (LLM) combined with adhesive dynamics (AD) simulations. The simulation results reveal that the flexural stiffness of microvilli and their bending deformation have a profound effect on rolling velocity and adhesive forces. As the flexural stiffness of the microvilli decreases, their bending angles increase, resulting in an increase in the number of receptor-ligand bonds and adhesive bonding force and a decrease in the rolling velocity of leukocytes. The effects of flexural stiffness on deformation and adhesion represent crucial factors involved in cell adhesion.

  18. Development of a stiffness-angle law for simplifying the measurement of human hair stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, I K; Park, S C; Lee, Y R; Bin, S A; Hong, Y D; Eun, D; Lee, J H; Roh, Y S; Kim, B M

    2018-04-01

    This research examines the benefits of caffeine absorption on hair stiffness. To test hair stiffness, we have developed an evaluation method that is not only accurate, but also inexpensive. Our evaluation method for measuring hair stiffness culminated in a model, called the Stiffness-Angle Law, which describes the elastic properties of hair and can be widely applied to the development of hair care products. Small molecules (≤500 g mol -1 ) such as caffeine can be absorbed into hair. A common shampoo containing 4% caffeine was formulated and applied to hair 10 times, after which the hair stiffness was measured. The caffeine absorption of the treated hair was observed using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) with a focal plane array (FPA) detector. Our evaluation method for measuring hair stiffness consists of a regular camera and a support for single strands of hair. After attaching the hair to the support, the bending angle of the hair was observed with a camera and measured. Then, the hair strand was weighed. The stiffness of the hair was calculated based on our proposed Stiffness-Angle Law using three variables: angle, weight of hair and the distance the hair was pulled across the support. The caffeine absorption was confirmed by FTIR analysis. The concentration of amide bond in the hair certainly increased due to caffeine absorption. After caffeine was absorbed into the hair, the bending angle and weight of the hair changed. Applying these measured changes to the Stiffness-Angle Law, it was confirmed that the hair stiffness increased by 13.2% due to caffeine absorption. The theoretical results using the Stiffness-Angle Law agree with the visual examinations of hair exposed to caffeine and also the known results of hair stiffness from a previous report. Our evaluation method combined with our proposed Stiffness-Angle Law effectively provides an accurate and inexpensive evaluation technique for measuring bending stiffness of human hair. © 2018

  19. The design of and chronic tissue response to a composite nerve electrode with patterned stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeberg, M. J.; Stone, M. A.; Triolo, R. J.; Tyler, D. J.

    2017-06-01

    between implant and explant (p  >  0.15 for all measures). Axonal density and myelin sheath thickness was not significantly different within the electrode compared to sections greater than 2 cm proximal to implanted cuffs (p  >  0.14 for all measures). Significance. We present the design and verification of a novel nerve cuff electrode, the C-FINE. Laminar manufacturing processes allow C-FINE stiffness to be configured for specific applications. Here, the central region in the configuration tested is stiff to reshape or conform to the target nerve, while edges are highly flexible to bend along its length. The C-FINE occupies less volume than other NCEs, making it suitable for implantation in highly mobile locations near joints. Design constraints during simulated transient swelling were verified in vitro. Maintenance of nerve health in various challenging anatomical locations (sciatic and median/ulnar nerves) was verified in a chronic feline model in vivo.

  20. HIGH ORIGIN OF SUPERFICIAL ULNAR ARTERY- A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjana Jayakumaran Nair

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND High origin and superficially placed ulnar artery is a rare anatomical variant that usually arises either in the axilla or arm and runs a superficial course in the forearm, enters the hand and participates in the formation of superficial palmar arch. During routine dissection of cadavers in our department, we observed a unilateral case of high origin and superficial ulnar artery in a human male cadaver. It originated from the brachial artery in the lower third of arm 4 cm above its bifurcation. From its origin, it passed downwards along the medial aspect of forearm, superficial to the flexors, entered hand superficial to the flexor retinaculum and formed superficial palmar arch. The knowledge of existence of a superficial ulnar artery is important during vascular and reconstructive surgery and also in evaluation of angiographic images. Superficial position makes it more vulnerable to trauma and more accessible to cannulation.

  1. Reconstruction of hand contracture by reverse ulnar perforator flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cengiz Eser

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hand burn scar contractures affect patients in aesthetic and functional aspects. After releasing these scars, the defects should be repaired. The reconstruction methods include primary suturation, Z plasty, skin grafting, local or free flaps, etc. All methods have their own advantages and disadvantages. One of the most useful flaps is the reverse ulnar perforator flap. We performed a two-staged procedure for repairing a post-burn contracture release defect in a 40-year-old male. In the first stage we applied reverse ulnar perforator flap for the hand defect, and ulnar artery and vein repair in the second stage. In conclusion, this two-staged procedure is a non-primary but useful option for hand and finger defects and prevents major vascular structure damage of the forearm. [Hand Microsurg 2016; 5(1.000: 40-43

  2. Cold intolerance following median and ulnar nerve injuries : prognosis and predictors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, A.C.J; Jaquet, J-B.; van Riel, W. G.; Daanen, H. A M; Hovius, S.E.R.

    This study describes the predictors for cold intolerance and the relationship to sensory recovery after median and ulnar nerve injuries. The study population consisted of 107 patients 2 to 10 years after median, ulnar or combined median and ulnar nerve injuries. Patients were asked to fill out the

  3. Cold intolerance following median and ulnar nerve injuries : prognosis and predictors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, A.C.J.; Jaquet, J.B.; Riel, W.G. van; Daanen, H.A.M.; Hovius, S.E.R.

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the predictors for cold intolerance and the relationship to sensory recovery after median and ulnar nerve injuries. The study population consisted of 107 patients 2 to 10 years after median, ulnar or combined median and ulnar nerve injuries. Patients were asked to fill out the

  4. Dynamic ulnar impaction syndrome in tennis players: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgard de Novaes França Bisneto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In this report, two tennis players with symptoms of ulnar impaction syndrome are reviewed. Both players have neutral ulnar variance. These cases represent dynamic ulnar impaction syndrome, when the impact between ulna and carpus occurs during conditions of pronated grip. The literature and the treatment of these two cases are discussed.

  5. Relative stiffness of flat conductor cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankins, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    The measurement of the bending moment required to obtain a given deflection in short lengths of flat conductor cable (FCC) is presented in this report. Experimental data were taken on 10 different samples of FCC and normalized to express all bending moments (relative stiffness factor) in terms of a cable 5.1 cm (2.0 in.) in width. Data are presented in tabular and graphical form for the covenience of designers who may be interested in finding torques exerted on critical components by short lengths of FCC.

  6. A Comparison of Ulnar Shortening Osteotomy Alone Versus Combined Arthroscopic Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Debridement and Ulnar Shortening Osteotomy for Ulnar Impaction Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyun Seok

    2011-01-01

    Background This study compared the results of patients treated for ulnar impaction syndrome using an ulnar shortening osteotomy (USO) alone with those treated with combined arthroscopic debridement and USO. Methods The results of 27 wrists were reviewed retrospectively. They were divided into three groups: group A (USO alone, 10 cases), group B (combined arthroscopic debridement and USO, 9 cases), and group C (arthroscopic triangular fibrocartilage complex [TFCC] debridement alone, 8 cases). The wrist function was evaluated using the modified Mayo wrist score, disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) score and Chun and Palmer grading system. Results The modified Mayo wrist score in groups A, B, and C was 74.5 ± 8.9, 73.9 ± 11.6, and 61.3 ± 10.2, respectively (p 0.05). Conclusions Both USO alone and combined arthroscopic TFCC debridement with USO improved the wrist function and reduced the level of pain in the patients treated for ulnar impaction syndrome. USO alone may be the preferred method of treatment in patients if the torn flap of TFCC is not unstable. PMID:21909465

  7. Ulnar hammer syndrome: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartija, Larisa; Cheung, Kevin; Kaur, Manraj; Coroneos, Christopher James; Thoma, Achilleas

    2013-11-01

    Ulnar hammer syndrome is an uncommon form of arterial insufficiency. Many treatments have been described, and debate continues about the best option. The goal of this systematic review was to determine whether ulnar hammer syndrome has an occupational association, to identify the most reliable diagnostic test, and to determine the best treatment modality. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and EMBASE. Data from articles meeting inclusion criteria were collected in duplicate. Methodological quality of studies was assessed using the Methodological Index for Nonrandomized Studies scale. Thirty studies were included in the systematic review. No randomized controlled trials were identified. There is low-quality evidence suggestive of an association between exposure to repetitive hand trauma and vibration and ulnar hammer syndrome. Various diagnostic investigations were used, but few were compared, making it difficult to determine the most reliable diagnostic test. Numerous nonoperative and operative treatments were reported. With nonoperative treatment, 12 percent had complete resolution and 70 percent had partial resolution of their symptoms. Of patients treated operatively, 42.5 percent had complete resolution and 42.5 percent had partial resolution of their symptoms. The heterogeneity in study design and outcome measures limits definitive conclusions about occupational association, best diagnostic test, and treatment for ulnar hammer syndrome. However, there is low-quality evidence that suggests that most patients with ulnar hammer syndrome will have partial relief of symptoms with nonoperative treatment, and operative treatment results in complete or partial resolution of symptoms in the majority of cases. Therapeutic, IV.

  8. Mass and stiffness calibration of nanowires using thermally driven vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiracofe, D R; Raman, A; Yazdanpanah, M M

    2011-01-01

    Cantilevered or suspended nanowires show promise for force or mass sensing applications due to their small mass, high force sensitivity and high frequency bandwidth. To use these as quantitative sensors, their bending stiffness or mass must be calibrated experimentally, often using thermally driven vibration. However, this can be difficult because nanowires are slightly asymmetric, which results in two spatially orthogonal bending eigenmodes with closely spaced frequencies. This asymmetry presents problems for traditional stiffness calibration methods, which equate the measured thermal vibration spectrum near a resonance to that of a single eigenmode. Moreover, the principal axes may be arbitrarily rotated with respect to the measurement direction. In this work, the authors propose a method for calibrating the bending stiffness and mass of such nanowires' eigenmodes using a single measurement taken at an arbitrary orientation with respect to the principal axes.

  9. Ulnar nerve entrapment in a French horn player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppmann, R A

    1997-10-01

    Nerve entrapment syndromes are frequent among musicians. Because of the demands on the musculoskeletal system and the great agility needed to per-form, musicians often present with vague complaints early in the course of entrapment, which makes the diagnosis a challenge for the clinician. Presented here is such a case of ulnar nerve entrapment at the left elbow of a French horn player. This case points out some of the difficulties in establishing a diagnosis of nerve entrapment in musicians. It also supports the theory that prolonged elbow flexion and repetitive finger movement contribute to the development of ulnar entrapment at the elbow. Although surgery is not required for most of the musculoskeletal problems of musicians, release of an entrapped nerve refractory to conservative therapy may be career-saving for the musician.

  10. Stiffness requirement of flexible skin for variable trailing-edge camber wing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The method for analyzing the deformation of flexible skin under the air loads was developed based on the panel method and finite element method.The deformation of flexible skin under air pressures and effects of the local deformation on the aerodynamic characteristics were discussed.Numerical results show that the flexible skin on the upper surface of trailing-edge will bubble under the air loads and the bubble has a powerful effect on the aerodynamic pressure near the surface of local deforma-tion.Then the stiffness requirements for flexible skin of variable trailing-edge were given by using the Jacobs rule,i.e.,the maximum displacement of skin is not greater than 0.1% of wing chord.Results show that the in-plane stiffness can be reduced by increasing the ratio of bending stiffness to in-plane stiffness.Although the deformation of flexible skin increases with the in-plane stiffness decreasing,it depends on the bending stiffness.When the bending stiffness exceeds critical value,the deformation of flexible skin only depends on the bending stiffness and has nothing to do with the in-plane stiffness.The conclusions can be used for the structural design of flexible skin.

  11. Perforator anatomy of the ulnar forearm fasciocutaneous flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathy, Jon A; Moaveni, Zachary; Tan, Swee T

    2012-08-01

    The ulnar forearm fasciocutaneous flap (UFFF) is a favourable alternative to the radial forearm flap when thin and pliable tissue is required. The precise anatomy of the cutaneous perforators of UFFF has not been previously reported. The position of cutaneous perforators>0.5 mm was recorded while raising 52 consecutive free UFFFs in 51 patients at our Centre. Three (6%) UFFFs in two patients demonstrated direct cutaneous supply through a superficial ulnar artery, a known anatomic variance. There was no cutaneous perforator>0.5 mm in one flap. Among the remaining 48 dissections, an average of 3 (range, 1-6) cutaneous perforators were identified. Ninety-four percent of these forearms demonstrated at least one perforator>0.5 mm within 3 cm, and all had at least one perforator within 6 cm of the midpoint of the forearm. Proximal perforators were more likely to be musculo-cutaneous through the edge of flexor carpi ulnaris or flexor digitorum superficialis, while mid- to distal perforators were septo-cutaneous. UFFF skin paddle designed to overlie an area within 3 cm of the midpoint between the medial epicondyle and the pisiform is most likely to include at least one cutaneous perforator from the ulnar artery, without a need for intra-operative skin island adjustment. This novel anatomic finding and other practical generalisations are discussed to facilitate successful elevation of UFFF. Copyright © 2012 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Bend me, shape me

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    A Japanese team has found a way to bend and shape silicon substrates by growing a thin layer of diamond on top. The technique has been proposed as an alternative to mechanical bending, which is currently used to make reflective lenses for X-ray systems and particle physics systems (2 paragraphs).

  13. Occipital bending in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maller, Jerome J; Anderson, Rodney J; Thomson, Richard H; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of occipital bending (an occipital lobe crossing or twisting across the midline) in subjects with schizophrenia and matched healthy controls. Occipital bending prevalence was investigated in 37 patients with schizophrenia and 44 healthy controls. Ratings showed that prevalence was nearly three times higher among schizophrenia patients (13/37 [35.1%]) than in control subjects (6/44 [13.6%]). Furthermore, those with schizophrenia had greater normalized gray matter volume but less white matter volume and had larger brain-to-cranial ratio. The results suggest that occipital bending is more prevalent among schizophrenia patients than healthy subjects and that schizophrenia patients have different gray matter-white matter proportions. Although the cause and clinical ramifications of occipital bending are unclear, the results infer that occipital bending may be a marker of psychiatric illness.

  14. Out-of-Plane Bending Properties of Out-of-Autoclave Thermosetting Prepregs during Forming Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan A. Alshahrani; Mehdi H. Hojjati

    2016-01-01

    In order to predict and model wrinkling which is caused by out of plane deformation due to compressive loading in the plane of the material during composite prepregs forming, it is necessary to quantitatively understand the relative magnitude of the bending stiffness. This study aims to examine the bending properties of out-of-autoclave (OOA) thermosetting prepreg under vertical cantilever test condition. A direct method for characterizing the bending behavior of composite prepregs was develo...

  15. Computer use and ulnar neuropathy: results from a case-referent study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, JH; Frost, P.; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, A.

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate associations between vocational computer use and 1) ulnar neuropathy, and 2) ulnar neuropathy- like symptoms as distinguished by electroneurography. We identified all patients aged 18-65 years, examined at the Department of Neurophysiology on suspicion of ulnar neuropathy, 2001...... was performed by conditional logistic regression.There were a negative association between daily hours of computer use and the two outcomes of interest. Participants who reported their elbow to be in contact with their working table for 2 hours or more during the workday had an elevated risk for ulnar...

  16. Different findings in bone scintigraphy between ulnar impaction syndrome and Kienbock's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, J.K.; Lee, H.Y.; Lee, M.C.; Baik, G.H.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: There is an ethnic variance on the length of the ulnar and radius. In Caucasian the length of the radius is relatively longer than the ulnar, but in Oriental the length of the ulnar is longer. This difference results in the different ethnic prevalence of ulnar impaction syndrome and Kienbock's disease, avascular necrosis of the lunate. It is important to differentiate ulnar impaction syndrome from Kienbock's disease, because they show similar symptoms but need different treatment and different method of operation. Methods: Seventeen patients with the wrist pain were enrolled in this study (mean age: 45+/-13yrs M:F=12:5). Nine patients were diagnosed as Kienbock's disease and Eight patients were diagnosed as ulnar impaction. Three to four hours after injection of 20mCi of Tc-99m MDP, bone scintigraphy images of the both hands were obtained and analyzed visually. Results: In Kienbock's disease, 8 patients showed increased uptake in the lunate with or without other carpal bones. One patient showed photon defect in the lunate. Otherwise in all patients with ulnar impaction syndrome, increased uptakes were found in the lunate, with or without increase uptake in the triquetrum or the distal ulnar, which are related to triangular fibrocartilage complex. Pin hole scintigraphy and pin hole SPECT demonstrated more precise structure of the wrist. Conclusion: We could differentiate ulnar impaction syndrome from Kienbock's disease in bone scan. We should carefully evaluate bone scintigraphic findings in patients with wrist pain

  17. Ulnar-sided wrist pain. Part I: anatomy and physical examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vezeridis, Peter S.; Blazar, Philip; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Han, Roger

    2010-01-01

    Ulnar-sided wrist pain is a common complaint, and it presents a diagnostic challenge for hand surgeons and radiologists. The complex anatomy of this region, combined with the small size of structures and subtle imaging findings, compound this problem. A thorough understanding of ulnar-sided wrist anatomy and a systematic clinical examination of this region are essential in arriving at an accurate diagnosis. In part I of this review, ulnar-sided wrist anatomy and clinical examination are discussed for a more comprehensive understanding of ulnar-sided wrist pain. (orig.)

  18. Clinical bending of nickel titanium wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Chain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the evolution and the involvement of Nickel Titanium wires in the field of Orthodontics. The treatment plan has evolved with the use of low force Nickel Titanium wires. Because of their high springback, low stiffness, they are the key initial wires in leveling and alignment but have poor formability. Since poor formability limits its ability to create variable arch forms thus; limits the form of treatment. We have devised a method to bend the Nickel Titanium wires to help in our inventory but also customized the wire according to the treatment.

  19. Where Is the Ulnar Styloid Process? Identification of the Absolute Location of the Ulnar Styloid Process Based on CT and Verification of Neutral Forearm Rotation on Lateral Radiographs of the Wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung-Han; Lee, Yong-Suk; Kang, Jin-Woo; Noh, Dong-Young; Jung, Joon-Yong; Chung, Yang-Guk

    2018-03-01

    The location of the ulnar styloid process can be confusing because the radius and the hand rotate around the ulna. The purpose of this study was to identify the absolute location of the ulnar styloid process, which is independent of forearm pronation or supination, to use it as a reference for neutral forearm rotation on lateral radiographs of the wrist. Computed tomography (CT) images of 23 forearms taken with elbow flexion of 70° to 90° were analyzed. The axial CT images were reconstructed to be perpendicular to the distal ulnar shaft. The absolute location of the ulnar styloid process in this study was defined as the position of the ulnar styloid process on the axial plane of the ulnar head relative to the long axis of the humeral shaft with the elbow set in the position for standard lateral radiographs of the wrist. To identify in which direction the ulnar styloid is located on the axial plane of the ulnar head, the angle between "the line of humeral long axis projected on the axial plane of the ulna" and "the line passing the center of the ulnar head and the center of the ulnar styloid" was measured (ulnar styloid direction angle). To identify how volarly or dorsally the ulnar styloid should appear on the true lateral view of the wrist, the ratio of "the volar-dorsal diameter of the ulnar head" and "the distance between the volar-most aspect of the ulnar head and the center of the ulnar styloid" was calculated (ulnar styloid location ratio). The mean ulnar styloid direction angle was 12° dorsally. The mean ulnar styloid location ratio was 1:0.55. The ulnar styloid is located at nearly the ulnar-most (the opposite side of the humerus with the elbow flexed) and slightly dorsal aspects of the ulnar head on the axial plane. It should appear almost midway (55% dorsally) from the ulnar head on the standard lateral view of the wrist in neutral forearm rotation. These location references could help clinicians determine whether the forearm is in neutral or rotated

  20. Estimating Gear Teeth Stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard

    2013-01-01

    The estimation of gear stiffness is important for determining the load distribution between the gear teeth when two sets of teeth are in contact. Two factors have a major influence on the stiffness; firstly the boundary condition through the gear rim size included in the stiffness calculation...... and secondly the size of the contact. In the FE calculation the true gear tooth root profile is applied. The meshing stiffness’s of gears are highly non-linear, it is however found that the stiffness of an individual tooth can be expressed in a linear form assuming that the contact length is constant....

  1. Magnetically Assisted Bilayer Composites for Soft Bending Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Hwan Jang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a soft pneumatic bending actuator using a magnetically assisted bilayer composite composed of silicone polymer and ferromagnetic particles. Bilayer composites were fabricated by mixing ferromagnetic particles to a prepolymer state of silicone in a mold and asymmetrically distributed them by applying a strong non-uniform magnetic field to one side of the mold during the curing process. The biased magnetic field induces sedimentation of the ferromagnetic particles toward one side of the structure. The nonhomogeneous distribution of the particles induces bending of the structure when inflated, as a result of asymmetric stiffness of the composite. The bilayer composites were then characterized with a scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The bending performance and the axial expansion of the actuator were discussed for manipulation applications in soft robotics and bioengineering. The magnetically assisted manufacturing process for the soft bending actuator is a promising technique for various applications in soft robotics.

  2. Magnetically Assisted Bilayer Composites for Soft Bending Actuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sung-Hwan; Na, Seon-Hong; Park, Yong-Lae

    2017-06-12

    This article presents a soft pneumatic bending actuator using a magnetically assisted bilayer composite composed of silicone polymer and ferromagnetic particles. Bilayer composites were fabricated by mixing ferromagnetic particles to a prepolymer state of silicone in a mold and asymmetrically distributed them by applying a strong non-uniform magnetic field to one side of the mold during the curing process. The biased magnetic field induces sedimentation of the ferromagnetic particles toward one side of the structure. The nonhomogeneous distribution of the particles induces bending of the structure when inflated, as a result of asymmetric stiffness of the composite. The bilayer composites were then characterized with a scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The bending performance and the axial expansion of the actuator were discussed for manipulation applications in soft robotics and bioengineering. The magnetically assisted manufacturing process for the soft bending actuator is a promising technique for various applications in soft robotics.

  3. Analysis of ulnar variance as a risk factor for developing scaphoid nonunion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lirola-Palmero, S; Salvà-Coll, G; Terrades-Cladera, F J

    2015-01-01

    Ulnar variance may be a risk factor of developing scaphoid non-union. A review was made of the posteroanterior wrist radiographs of 95 patients who were diagnosed of scaphoid fracture. All fractures with displacement less than 1mm treated conservatively were included. The ulnar variance was measured in all patients. Ulnar variance was measured in standard posteroanterior wrist radiographs of 95 patients. Eighteen patients (19%) developed scaphoid nonunion, with a mean value of ulnar variance of -1.34 (-/+ 0.85) mm (CI -2.25 - 0.41). Seventy seven patients (81%) healed correctly, and the mean value of ulnar variance was -0.04 (-/+ 1.85) mm (CI -0.46 - 0.38). A significant difference was observed in the distribution of ulnar variance (pvariance less than -1mm, and ulnar variance greater than -1mm. It appears that patients with ulnar variance less than -1mm had an OR 4.58 (CI 1.51 to 13.89) with pvariance less than -1mm have a greater risk of developing scaphoid nonunion, OR 4.58 (CI 1.51 to 13.89) with p<.007. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. 21 CFR 888.3810 - Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. 888.3810 Section 888.3810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis...

  5. Association between distal ulnar morphology and extensor carpi ulnaris tendon pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Connie Y.; Huang, Ambrose J.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Kattapuram, Susan V.; Torriani, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between distal ulnar morphology and extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendon pathology. We retrospectively reviewed 71 adult wrist MRI studies with ECU tendon pathology (tenosynovitis, tendinopathy, or tear), and/or ECU subluxation. Subjects did not have a history of trauma, surgery, infection, or inflammatory arthritis. MRI studies from 46 subjects without ECU tendon pathology or subluxation were used as controls. The following morphological parameters of the distal ulna were measured independently by two readers: ulnar variance relative to radius, ulnar styloid process length, ECU groove depth and length. Subjects and controls were compared using Student's t test. Inter-observer agreement (ICC) was calculated. There was a significant correlation between negative ulnar variance and ECU tendon pathology (reader 1 [R1], P = 0.01; reader 2 [R2], P 0.64 for all parameters. Distal ulnar morphology may be associated with ECU tendon abnormalities. (orig.)

  6. Impact of ancestry and body size on sonographic ulnar nerve dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, Jessie T.; Phillips, Maureen; Thoirs, Kerry A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact that geographic ancestry and body size have on ultrasonographic measurements of the ulnar nerve size measured at the elbow. Materials and methods: We performed anthropometric measurements of body size and ultrasonographic measurements of the ulnar nerve at the elbow on 13 Vietnamese and 24 European participants. Regression analysis was used to determine the effect of body size and geographic ancestry on ulnar nerve size. Results: BMI had the greatest impact on ulnar nerve size. The short axis diameter was least resilient, and the long axis diameter was the most resilient to the effects of body size and geographic ancestry. Discussion: The long axis diameter has an apparent immunity to the influences of overall body size, arm size, or geographic ancestry and has the most potential as a sensitive discriminator between normal nerves and nerves affected by ulnar neuropathy at the elbow.

  7. Evaluation of spinal instrumentation rod bending characteristics for in-situ contouring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noshchenko, Andriy; Xianfeng, Yao; Armour, Grant Alan; Baldini, Todd; Patel, Vikas V; Ayers, Reed; Burger, Evalina

    2011-07-01

    Bending characteristics were studied in rods used for spinal instrumentation at in-situ contouring conditions. Five groups of five 6 mm diameter rods made from: cobalt alloy (VITALLIUM), titanium-aluminum-vanadium alloy (SDI™), β-titanium alloy (TNTZ), cold worked stainless steel (STIFF), and annealed stainless steel (MALLEABLE) were studied. The bending procedure was similar to that typically applied for in-situ contouring in the operating room and included two bending cycles: first--bending to 21-24° under load with further release of loading for 10 min, and second--bending to 34-37° at the previously bent site and release of load for 10 min. Applied load, bending stiffness, and springback effect were studied. Statistical evaluation included ANOVA, correlation and regression analysis. TNTZ and SDI™ rods showed the highest (p under load (p < 0.001). To reach the necessary bend angle after unloading, over bending should be 37-40% of the required angle in TNTZ and SDI™ rods, 27-30% in VITALLIUM and STIFF rods, and around 20% in MALLEABLE rods. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Adjustable Tooling for Bending Brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Deep metal boxes and other parts easily fabricated. Adjustable tooling jig for bending brake accommodates spacing blocks and either standard male press-brake die or bar die. Holds spacer blocks, press-brake die, bar window die, or combination of three. Typical bending operations include bending of cut metal sheet into box and bending of metal strip into bracket with multiple inward 90 degree bends. By increasing free space available for bending sheet-metal parts jig makes it easier to fabricate such items as deep metal boxes or brackets with right-angle bends.

  9. Assessment of ulnar variance: a radiological investigation in a Dutch population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuurman, A.H. [Dept. of Plastic, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery, University Medical Centre, Utrecht (Netherlands); Dept. of Plastic Surgery, University Medical Centre, Utrecht (Netherlands); Maas, M.; Dijkstra, P.F. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kauer, J.M.G. [Dept. of Anatomy and Embryology, Univ. of Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2001-11-01

    Objective: A radiological study was performed to evaluate ulnar variance in 68 Dutch patients using an electronic digitizer compared with Palmer's concentric circle method. Using the digitizer method only, the effect of different wrist positions and grip on ulnar variance was then investigated. Finally the distribution of ulnar variance in the selected patients was investigated also using the digitizer method. Design and patients: All radiographs were performed with the wrist in a standard zero-rotation position (posteroanterior) and in supination (anteroposterior). Palmer's concentric circle method and an electronic digitizer connected to a personal computer were used to measure ulnar variance. The digitizer consists of a Plexiglas plate with an electronically activated grid beneath it. A radiograph is placed on the plate and a cursor activates a point on the grid. Three plots are marked on the radius and one plot on the most distal part of the ulnar head. The digitizer then determines the difference between a radius passing through the radius plots and the ulnar plot. Results and conclusions: Using the concentric circle method we found an ulna plus predominance, but an ulna minus predominance when using the digitizer method. Overall the ulnar variance distribution for Palmer's method was 41.9% ulna plus, 25.7% neutral and 32.4% ulna minus variance, and for the digitizer method was 40.4% ulna plus, 1.5% neutral and 58.1% ulna minus. The percentage ulnar variance greater than 1 mm on standard radiographs increased from 23% to 58% using the digitizer, with maximum grip, clearly demonstrating the (dynamic) effect of grip on ulnar variance. This almost threefold increase was found to be a significant difference. Significant differences were found between ulnar variance when different wrist positions were compared. (orig.)

  10. Ulnar artery: The Ulysses ultimate resort for coronary procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Hahalis, MD, PhD

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing worldwide adoption of the transradial access site, the ulnar artery (UA only very infrequently serves as a primary option for coronary procedures. In contrast to the uncertainty surrounding previous reports regarding the feasibility and safety, recent data from larger registries and randomized trials provide more conclusive evidence that the transulnar route may be safely selected as an alternative arterial access approach. However, a default transulnar strategy appears time-consuming and is associated with higher crossover rates compared with the radial artery (RA. Once arterial access is obtained, the likelihood of a successful coronary procedure is high and similar between the two forearm arteries. The UA has similar flow-mediating vasodilating properties with and seems at least as vulnerable as the RA with regard to incident occlusion, with UA occlusion (UAO rates being probably higher than previously anticipated. A learning curve effect may not be apparent for crossover rates among experienced radialists, but increasing experience is associated with reduction in the fluoroscopy time, contrast volume and frequency of large hematoma formation. The UA may represents an important alternative access site for coronary procedures, and experienced radial operators should obtain additional skills to perform the transulnar approach. Nevertheless, in view of this method's lower feasibility compared to the RA, an initial ulnar access strategy should be reserved for carefully selected patients to ensure satisfactory cannulation rates.

  11. Ulnar artery: The Ulysses ultimate resort for coronary procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahalis, George; Deftereos, Spyridon; Bertrand, Olivier F

    2016-08-20

    Despite the increasing worldwide adoption of the transradial access site, the ulnar artery (UA) only very infrequently serves as a primary option for coronary procedures. In contrast to the uncertainty surrounding previous reports regarding the feasibility and safety, recent data from larger registries and randomized trials provide more conclusive evidence that the transulnar route may be safely selected as an alternative arterial access approach. However, a default transulnar strategy appears time-consuming and is associated with higher crossover rates compared with the radial artery (RA). Once arterial access is obtained, the likelihood of a successful coronary procedure is high and similar between the two forearm arteries. The UA has similar flow-mediating vasodilating properties with and seems at least as vulnerable as the RA with regard to incident occlusion, with UA occlusion (UAO) rates being probably higher than previously anticipated. A learning curve effect may not be apparent for crossover rates among experienced radialists, but increasing experience is associated with reduction in the fluoroscopy time, contrast volume and frequency of large hematoma formation. The UA may represents an important alternative access site for coronary procedures, and experienced radial operators should obtain additional skills to perform the transulnar approach. Nevertheless, in view of this method's lower feasibility compared to the RA, an initial ulnar access strategy should be reserved for carefully selected patients to ensure satisfactory cannulation rates. Copyright © 2016 Hellenic Cardiological Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Modeling the dynamic stiffness of cracked reinforced concrete beams under low-amplitude vibration loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tengfei; Castel, Arnaud

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a model, initially developed to calculate the stiffness of cracked reinforced concrete beams under static loading, is used to assess the dynamic stiffness. The model allows calculating the average inertia of cracked beams by taking into account the effect of bending cracks (primary cracks) and steel-concrete bond damage (i.e. interfacial microcracks). Free and forced vibration experiments are used to assess the performance of the model. The respective influence of bending cracks and steel-concrete bond damage on both static and dynamic responses is analyzed. The comparison between experimental and simulated deflections confirms that the effects of both bending cracks and steel-concrete bond loss should be taken into account to assess reinforced concrete stiffness under service static loading. On the contrary, comparison of experimental and calculated dynamic responses reveals that localized steel-concrete bond damages do not influence significantly the dynamic stiffness and the fundamental frequency.

  13. Occipital bending in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maller, Jerome J; Thomson, Richard H S; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Anderson, Rodney; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2014-06-01

    There are reports of differences in occipital lobe asymmetry within psychiatric populations when compared with healthy control subjects. Anecdotal evidence and enlarged lateral ventricles suggests that there may also be a different pattern of curvature whereby one occipital lobe wraps around the other, termed 'occipital bending'. We investigated the prevalence of occipital bending in 51 patients with major depressive disorder (males mean age = 41.96 ± 14.00 years, females mean age = 40.71 ± 12.41 years) and 48 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects (males mean age = 40.29 ± 10.23 years, females mean age = 42.47 ± 14.25 years) and found the prevalence to be three times higher among patients with major depressive disorder (18/51, 35.3%) when compared with control subjects (6/48, 12.5%). The results suggest that occipital bending is more common among patients with major depressive disorder than healthy subjects, and that occipital asymmetry and occipital bending are separate phenomena. Incomplete neural pruning may lead to the cranial space available for brain growth being restricted, or ventricular enlargement may exacerbate the natural occipital curvature patterns, subsequently causing the brain to become squashed and forced to 'wrap' around the other occipital lobe. Although the clinical implications of these results are unclear, they provide an impetus for further research into the relevance of occipital bending in major depression disorder. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Posttraumatic stiff elbow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Mittal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic stiff elbow is a frequent and disabling complication and poses serious challenges for its management. In this review forty studies were included to know about the magnitude of the problem, causes, pathology, prevention, and treatment of posttraumatic stiff elbow. These studies show that simple measures such as internal fixation, immobilization in extension, and early motion of elbow joint are the most important steps that can prevent elbow stiffness. It also supports conservative treatment in selected cases. There are no clear guidelines about the choice between the numerous procedures described in literature. However, this review article disproves two major beliefs-heterotopic ossification is a bad prognostic feature, and passive mobilization of elbow causes elbow stiffness.

  15. [False traumatic aneurysm of the ulnar artery in a teenager].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nour, M; Talha, H; El Idrissi, R; Lahraoui, Y; Ouazzani, L; Oubejja, H; Erraji, M; Zerhouni, H; Ettayebi, F

    2014-12-01

    Most aneurysms of hand arteries are traumatic. It is a generally rare unrecognized pathology. Complications are serious (embolism and thromboses of interdigital arteries). Two main causes can be recalled: acute trauma, with development of a false aneurysm; repeated microtrauma (hand hammer syndrome), with occurrence of an arterial dysplasic aneurysm. The diagnosis is based on the presence of a pulsatile mass, with finger dysesthesia, unilateral Raynaud's phenomenon. It is confirmed by duplex Doppler. Arteriography is necessary but can be replaced by an angio-MR. We report a case of false traumatic aneurysm of the ulnar artery in a teenager. This case illustrates this rare condition and opens discussion on therapeutic options. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. AA, bending magnet, BLG

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    The very particular lattice of the AA required 2 types of dipole (bending magnets; BLG, long and narrow; BST, short and wide). The BLG had a steel length of 4.70 m, a good field width of 0.24 m, and a weight of about 70 t. Jean-Claude Brunet inspects the lower half of a BLG. For the BST magnets see 7811105 and 8006036.

  17. Cooling modifies mixed median and ulnar palmar studies in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Rogério Gayer Machado de; Kouyoumdjian, João Aris

    2007-09-01

    Temperature is an important and common variable that modifies nerve conduction study parameters in practice. Here we compare the effect of cooling on the mixed palmar median to ulnar negative peak-latency difference (PMU) in electrodiagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Controls were 22 subjects (19 women, mean age 42.1 years, 44 hands). Patients were diagnosed with mild symptomatic CTS (25 women, mean age 46.6 years, 34 hands). PMU was obtained at the usual temperature, >32 degrees C, and after wrist/hand cooling to PMU and mixed ulnar palmar latency in patients versus controls. We concluded that cooling significantly modifies the PMU. We propose that the latencies of compressed nerve overreact to cooling and that this response could be a useful tool for incipient CTS electrodiagnosis. There was a significant latency overreaction of the ulnar nerve to cooling in CTS patients. We hypothesize that subclinical ulnar nerve compression is associated with CTS.

  18. Donor-site morbidity of the radial forearm free flap versus the ulnar forearm free flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekner, Dominique D; Abbink, Jan H; van Es, Robert J; Rosenberg, Antoine; Koole, Ronald; Van Cann, Ellen M

    2013-08-01

    Donor-site morbidity following harvest of the radial forearm free flap was compared with that following harvest of the ulnar forearm free flap. Twenty-eight radial forearm and 27 ulnar forearm flaps were harvested in 55 patients with head and neck defects. Pressure perception was measured with Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments. Cold perception was tested with chloroethyl. Donor-site healing was evaluated. Patients were interviewed about grip and pinch strength and donor-site appearance. In the radial forearm free flap group, pressure perception and cold perception were reduced in the donor hand, whereas in the ulnar group, no differences were observed between the donor and unoperated hands. In the radial forearm group, 15 percent of patients experienced reduced strength in the donor hand, whereas in the ulnar forearm group, none of the patients reported reduced strength in the donor hand. In the radial forearm group, 14 percent had partial or complete loss of the skin graft, whereas in the ulnar forearm group, 4 percent had partial loss of the skin graft. In the radial forearm group, 18 percent of patients were dissatisfied with the appearance of the donor site, and no complaints were reported in the ulnar forearm group. The authors' study shows less donor site-morbidity following harvest of the ulnar forearm free flap than following harvest of the radial forearm free flap. These results emphasize that the ulnar forearm free flap should be considered as an alternative for the radial forearm free flap for reconstruction of soft-tissue defects. Therapeutic, III.

  19. Ganglion Cyst Associated with Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Tear That Caused Ulnar Nerve Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Anil Bingol, MD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Ganglions are the most frequently seen soft-tissue tumors in the hand. Nerve compression due to ganglion cysts at the wrist is rare. We report 2 ganglion cysts arising from triangular fibrocartilage complex, one of which caused ulnar nerve compression proximal to the Guyonʼs canal, leading to ulnar neuropathy. Ganglion cysts seem unimportant, and many surgeons refrain from performing a general hand examination.

  20. Prolonged phone-call posture causes changes of ulnar motor nerve conduction across elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padua, Luca; Coraci, Daniele; Erra, Carmen; Doneddu, Pietro Emiliano; Granata, Giuseppe; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2016-08-01

    Postures and work-hobby activities may play a role in the origin and progression of ulnar neuropathy at the elbow (UNE), whose occurrence appears to be increasing. The time spent on mobile-phone has increased in the last decades leading to an increased time spent with flexed elbow (prolonged-phone-posture, PPP). We aimed to assess the effect of PPP both in patients with symptoms of UNE and in symptom-free subjects. Patients with pure sensory symptoms of UNE and negative neurophysiological tests (MIN-UNE) and symptom-free subjects were enrolled. We evaluated ulnar motor nerve conduction velocity across elbow at baseline and after 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18min of PPP in both groups. Fifty-six symptom-free subjects and fifty-eight patients were enrolled. Globally 186 ulnar nerves from 114 subjects were studied. Conduction velocity of ulnar nerve across the elbow significantly changed over PPP time in patients with MIN-UNE, showing a different evolution between the two groups. PPP causes a modification of ulnar nerve functionality in patients with MIN-UNE. PPP may cause transient stress of ulnar nerve at elbow. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The superficial ulnar artery: development and clinical significance Artéria ulnar superficial: desenvolvimento e relevância clínica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasulu Reddy

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The principal arteries of the upper limb show a wide range of variation that is of considerable interest to orthopedic surgeons, plastic surgeons, radiologists and anatomists. We present here a case of superficial ulnar artery found during the routine dissection of right upper limb of a 50-year-old male cadaver. The superficial ulnar artery originated from the brachial artery, crossed the median nerve anteriorly and ran lateral to this nerve and the brachial artery. The superficial ulnar artery in the arm gave rise to a narrow muscular branch to the biceps brachii. At the elbow level the artery ran superficial to the bicipital aponeurosis where it was crossed by the median cubital vein. It then ran downward and medially superficial to the forearm flexor muscles, and then downward to enter the hand. At the palm, it formed the superficial and deep palmar arches together with the branches of the radial artery. The presence of a superficial ulnar artery is clinically important when raising forearm flaps in reconstructive surgery. The embryology and clinical significance of the variation are discussed.As principais artérias do membro superior apresentam uma ampla variação, que é relativamente importante a cirurgiões ortopédicos e plásticos, radiologistas e anatomistas.Apresentamosumcaso de artéria ulnar superficial encontrada durante dissecção de rotina de membro superior direito de um cadáver masculino de 50 anos de idade.Aartéria ulnar superficial originava-se da artéria braquial, cruzava o nervo mediano anteriormente e percorria lateralmente esse nervo e a artéria braquial. A artéria ulnar superficial no braço deu origem a um ramo muscular estreito do músculo bíceps braquial. Ao nível do cotovelo, a artéria percorria superficialmente a aponeurose bicipital, onde era cruzada pela veia cubital mediana. Percorria, então, em sentido descendente e medialmente superficial aos músculos flexores do antebraço, e então descendia para

  2. A comparison of plastic collapse and limit loads for single mitred pipe bends under in-plane bending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilson, R.; Wood, J.; Hamilton, R.; Li, H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of the plastic collapse loads from experimental in-plane bending tests on three 90 o single un-reinforced mitred pipe bends, with the results from various 3D solid finite element models. The bending load applied reduced the bend angle and in turn, the resulting cross-sectional ovalisation led to a recognised weakening mechanism. In addition, at maximum load there was a reversal in stiffness, characteristic of buckling. This reversal in stiffness was accompanied by significant ovalisation and plasticity at the mitre intersection. Both the weakening mechanism and the post-buckling behaviour are only observable by testing or by including large displacement effects in the plastic finite element solution. A small displacement limit solution with an elastic-perfectly plastic material model overestimated the collapse load by more than 40% and could not reproduce the buckling behaviour. The plastic collapse finite element solution, with large displacements, produced excellent agreement with the experiment. Sufficient experimental detail is presented for these results to be used as a benchmark for analysts in this area. Given the robustness of non-linear solutions in commercial finite element codes and the ready availability of computing resources, it is argued that pressure vessel code developers should now be recommending large displacement analysis as the default position for limit and plastic collapse analyses, rather than expecting engineers to anticipate weakening mechanisms and related non-linear phenomena.

  3. Fitness as a determinant of arterial stiffness in healthy adult men: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jinwook; Kim, Milyang; Jin, Youngsoo; Kim, Yonghwan; Hong, Jeeyoung

    2018-01-01

    Fitness is known to influence arterial stiffness. This study aimed to assess differences in cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength, and flexibility according to arterial stiffness, based on sex and age. We enrolled 1590 healthy adults (men: 1242, women: 348) who were free of metabolic syndrome. We measured cardiorespiratory endurance in an exercise stress test on a treadmill, muscular strength by a grip test, and flexibility by upper body forward-bends from a standing position. The brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity test was performed to measure arterial stiffness before the fitness test. Cluster analysis was performed to divide the patients into groups with low (Cluster 1) and high (Cluster 2) arterial stiffness. According to the k-cluster analysis results, Cluster 1 included 624 men and 180 women, and Cluster 2 included 618 men and 168 women. Men in the middle-aged group with low arterial stiffness demonstrated higher cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength, and flexibility than those with high arterial stiffness. Similarly, among men in the old-aged group, the cardiorespiratory endurance and muscular strength, but not flexibility, differed significantly according to arterial stiffness. Women in both clusters showed similar cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength, and flexibility regardless of their arterial stiffness. Among healthy adults, arterial stiffness was inversely associated with fitness in men but not in women. Therefore, fitness seems to be a determinant for arterial stiffness in men. Additionally, regular exercise should be recommended for middle-aged men to prevent arterial stiffness.

  4. AGS superconducting bending magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robins, K.E.; Sampson, W.B.; McInturff, A.D.; Dahl, P.F.; Abbatiello, F.; Aggus, J.; Bamberger, J.; Brown, D.; Damm, R.; Kassner, D.; Lasky, C.; Schlafke, A.

    1976-01-01

    Four large aperture superconducting bending magnets are being built for use in the experimental beams at the AGS. Each of these magnets is 2.5 m long and has a room temperature aperture of 20 cm. The magnets are similar in design to the dipoles being developed for ISABELLE and employ a low temperature iron core. Results are presented on the ''training'' behavior of the magnets and a comparison will be made with the smaller aperture versions of this design. The magnet field measurements include end fields and leakage fields as well as the harmonic components of the straight section of the magnet

  5. Parametric control of structural vibrations and sound radiation by fast time-space variation of distributed stiffness parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krylov, V.I.; Sorokin, S.V.

    1998-01-01

    The dynamics of a Euler-Bernoulli beam with a time-and-space dependent bending stiffness is studied. The , problem is considered in connection with the application of noise control using smart structures. It is shown that a control for the vibrations of the beam can be achieved by varying the bending stiffness. The technique of direct separation of fast and slow motion coupled with a Green's function method is used to analyze the dynamics of the beam with high-frequency modulation of the stiffness

  6. Stiff quantum polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinert, H.

    2009-01-01

    At ultralow temperatures, polymers exhibit quantum behavior, which is calculated here for the second and fourth moments of the end-to-end distribution in the large-stiffness regime. The result should be measurable for polymers in wide optical traps.

  7. Etiology and mechanisms of ulnar and median forearm nerve injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puzović Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacgraund/Aim. Most often injuries of brachial plexus and its branches disable the injured from using their arms and/or hands. The aim of this study was to investigate the etiology and mechanisms of median and ulnar forearm nerves injuries. Methods. This retrospective cohort study included 99 patients surgically treated in the Clinic of Neurosurgery, Clinical Center of Serbia, from January 1st, 2000 to December 31st, 2010. All data are obtained from the patients' histories. Results. The majority of the injured patients were male, 81 (81.8%, while only 18 (18.2% were females, both mainly with nerve injuries of the distal forearm - 75 (75.6%. Two injury mechanisms were present, transection in 85 patients and traction and contusion in 14 of the patients. The most frequent etiological factor of nerve injuries was cutting, in 61 of the patients. Nerve injuries are often associated with other injuries. In the studied patients there were 22 vascular injuries, 33 muscle and tendon injuries and 20 bone fractures. Conclusion. The majority of those patients with peripheral nerve injuries are represented in the working age population, which is a major socioeconomic problem. In our study 66 out of 99 patients were between 17 and 40 years old, in the most productive age. The fact that the majority of patients had nerve injuries of the distal forearm and that they are operated within the first 6 months after injury, promises them good functional prognosis.

  8. Atraumatic Main-En-Griffe due to Ulnar Nerve Leprosy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aswani, Yashant; Saifi, Shenaz

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is the most common form of treatable peripheral neuropathy. However, in spite of effective chemotherapeutic agents, neuropathy and associated deformities are seldom ameliorated to a significant extent. This necessitates early diagnosis and treatment. Clinical examination of peripheral nerves is highly subjective and inaccurate. Electrophysiological studies are painful and expensive. Ultrasonography circumvents these demerits and has emerged as the preferred modality for probing peripheral nerves. We describe a 23-year-old male who presented with weakness and clawing of the medial digits of the right hand (main-en-griffe) and a few skin lesions since eighteen months. The right ulnar nerve was thickened and exquisitely tender on palpation. Ultrasonography revealed an extensive enlargement of the nerve with presence of intraneural color Doppler signals suggestive of acute neuritis. Skin biopsy was consistent with borderline tuberculoid leprosy with type 1 lepra reaction. The patient was started on WHO multidrug therapy for paucibacillary leprosy along with antiinflammatory drugs. Persistence of vascular signals at two months’ follow-up has led to continuation of the steroid therapy. The patient is compliant with the treatment and is on monthly follow-up. In this manuscript, we review multitudinous roles of ultrasonography in examination of peripheral nerves in leprosy. Ultrasonography besides diagnosing enlargement of nerves in leprosy and acute neuritis due to lepra reactions, guides the duration of anti-inflammatory therapy in lepra reactions. Further, it is relatively inexpensive, non-invasive and easily available. All these features make ultrasonography a preferred modality for examination of peripheral nerves

  9. Quantification of hand function by power grip and pinch strength force measurements in ulnar nerve lesion simulated by ulnar nerve block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Nikolaus Johannes; Mentzel, Martin; Krischak, Gert D; Gülke, Joachim

    2017-06-24

    In the assessment of hand and upper limb function, grip strength is of the major importance. The measurement by dynamometers has been established. In this study, the effect of a simulated ulnar nerve lesion on different grip force measurements was evaluated. In 25 healthy volunteers, grip force measurement was done by the JAMAR dynamometer (Fabrication Enterprises Inc, Irvington, NY) for power grip and by a pinch strength dynamometer for tip pinch strength, tripod grip, and key pinch strength. A within-subject research design was used in this prospective study. Each subject served as the control by preinjection measurements of grip and pinch strength. Subsequent measurements after ulnar nerve block were used to examine within-subject change. In power grip, there was a significant reduction of maximum grip force of 26.9% with ulnar nerve block compared with grip force without block (P force could be confirmed. However, the assessment of other dimensions of hand strength as tip pinch, tripod pinch and key pinch had more relevance in demonstrating hand strength changes resulting from an distal ulnar nerve lesion. The measurement of tip pinch, tripod grip and key pinch can improve the follow-up in hand rehabilitation. II. Copyright © 2017 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The potential complications of open carpal tunnel release surgery to the ulnar neurovascular bundle and its branches: A cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughton, O; Adds, P J; Jayasinghe, J A P

    2010-07-01

    This study investigated the ulnar artery and the ulnar nerve and its branches in the palm to assess how frequently they may be at risk of damage during open carpal tunnel release surgery. Twenty-one formalin-embalmed cadaveric hands were dissected, and the proximity of the ulnar neurovascular bundle to two different lines of incision, the 3rd and 4th interdigital web space axis and the ring finger axis, was assessed and compared. It was found that an incision in the latter (ring finger) axis put the ulnar artery at risk in 12 of 21 specimens, whereas an incision in the former axis (3rd/4th interdigital web space) put the ulnar artery at risk in only two specimens. In 15 hands at least one structure (the ulnar artery or a branch of the ulnar nerve) was at risk in the ring finger axis compared to only seven hands in the axis of the 3rd/4th interdigital web space. We conclude that the ulnar artery and branches of the ulnar nerve are at increased risk of damage with an incision in the axis of the ring finger. The importance of using a blunt dissection technique under direct vision during surgery to identify and preserve these structures and median nerve branches is emphasized. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Relationship between Static Stiffness and Modal Stiffness of Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianjian Ji Tianjian Ji

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper derives the relationship between the static stiffness and modal stiffness of a structure. The static stiffness and modal stiffness are two important concepts in both structural statics and dynamics. Although both stiffnesses indicate the capacity of the structure to resist deformation, they are obtained using different methods. The former is calculated by solving the equations of equilibrium and the latter can be obtained by solving an eigenvalue problem. A mathematical relationship between the two stiffnesses was derived based on the definitions of two stiffnesses. This relationship was applicable to a linear system and the derivation of relationships does not reveal any other limitations. Verification of the relationship was given by using several examples. The relationship between the two stiffnesses demonstrated that the modal stiffness of the fundamental mode was always larger than the static stiffness of a structure if the critical point and the maximum mode value are at the same node, i.e. for simply supported beam and seven storeys building are 1.5% and 15% respectively. The relationship could be applied into real structures, where the greater the number of modes being considered, the smaller the difference between the modal stiffness and the static stiffness of a structure.

  12. Design of a Variable Stiffness Soft Dexterous Gripper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefti-Meziani, Samia; Davis, Steve

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This article presents the design of a variable stiffness, soft, three-fingered dexterous gripper. The gripper uses two designs of McKibben muscles. Extensor muscles that increase in length when pressurized are used to form the fingers of the gripper. Contractor muscles that decrease in length when pressurized are then used to apply forces to the fingers through tendons, which cause flexion and extension of the fingers. The two types of muscles are arranged to act antagonistically and this means that by raising the pressure in all of the pneumatic muscles, the stiffness of the system can be increased without a resulting change in finger position. The article presents the design of the gripper, some basic kinematics to describe its function, and then experimental results demonstrating the ability to adjust the bending stiffness of the gripper's fingers. It has been demonstrated that the fingers' bending stiffness can be increased by more than 150%. The article concludes by demonstrating that the fingers can be closed loop position controlled and are able to track step and sinusoidal inputs. PMID:29062630

  13. Experimental Analysis of Stiffness of the Riveted Steel Railway Bridge Deck Members’ Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gocál Jozef

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the real behaviour of the riveted steel railway bridge deck members’ connections with respect to their bending stiffness. Attention is paid to the stringer-to-cross beam connection as well as the cross beam-to-main girder connection. The stiffness of the two connections is investigated on the basis of evaluation of the experimentally determined stress response of the observed structural members to the actual traffic load on an existing railway bridge.

  14. Bend testing for miniature disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.; Hamilton, M.L.; Wire, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    A bend test was developed to obtain ductility measurements on a large number of alloy variants being irradiated in the form of miniature disks. Experimental results were shown to be in agreement with a theoretical analysis of the bend configuration. Disk specimens fabricated from the unstrained grip ends of previously tested tensile specimens were used for calibration purposes; bend ductilities and tensile ductilities were in good agreement. The criterion for estimating ductility was judged acceptable for screening purposes

  15. On gear tooth stiffness evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard; Jørgensen, Martin Felix

    2014-01-01

    The estimation of gear stiffness is important for determining the load distribution between the gear teeth when two sets of teeth are in contact. Two factors have a major influence on the stiffness; firstly the boundary condition through the gear rim size included in the stiffness calculation...

  16. How does ulnar shortening osteotomy influence morphologic changes in the triangular fibrocartilage complex?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Toshiyasu; Sato, Kazuki; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    2014-11-01

    Ulnar shortening osteotomy often is indicated for treatment of injuries to the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC). However, the effect of ulnar shortening osteotomy on the changes in shape of the TFCC is unclear. In our study, quantitative evaluations were performed using MRI to clarify the effect of ulnar shortening on triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) thickness attributable to disc regeneration of the TFC and TFC angle attributable to the suspension effect of ulnar shortening on the TFC. The purposes of this study were (1) to compare preoperative and postoperative TFC thickness and TFC angle on MR images to quantitatively evaluate the effect of ulnar shortening osteotomy on disc regeneration and the suspension effect on the TFC; and (2) to assess whether changes in TFC thickness and TFC angle correlated with the Mayo wrist score. Between 1995 and 2008, 256 patients underwent ulnar shortening osteotomy for TFCC injuries. The minimum followup was 24 months (mean, 51 months; range, 24-210 months). A total of 79 patients (31%) with complete followup including preoperative and postoperative MR images and the Mayo wrist score was included in this retrospective study. Evaluation of the postoperative MR images and the Mayo wrist score were performed at the final followup. The remaining 177 patients did not undergo postoperative MRI, or they had a previous fracture, large tears of the disc proper, or were lost to followup. Two orthopaedists, one of whom performed the surgeries, measured the TFC thickness and the TFC angle on coronal MR images before and after surgery for each patient. Correlations of the percent change in the TFC thickness and the magnitude of TFC angle change with age, sex, postoperative MR images, extent of ulnar shortening, preoperative ulnar variance, and postoperative Mayo wrist score were assessed. Stepwise regression analysis showed a correlation between the percent change in TFC thickness and preoperative ulnar variance (R2=0.21; β=-0.33; 95

  17. Clinical and X-ray investigations on congenital radio-ulnar synostosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heisel, A.

    1982-01-01

    Out of 13 patients with cogenital radio-ulnar synostosis, 10 could be subjected to clinical and X-ray examination and chromosome analysis. In all the family histories the radio-ulnar synostosis was an isolated event. In no case was definite heredity of the same malformation confirmed. In most cases the radio-ulnar synostosis was an isolated malformation. 7 patients were of female, 6 of male sex. In 5 cases the synostosis was bi-lateral, in 8 cases it was unilateral without preference of either side of the body. In 2 out of 10 patients subjected to chromosome analysis gonosomal aneuploidy was found. More often than hitherto supposed, radio-ulnar synostosis seems to be associated with lower forms of polysomia of the x-chromosomes. 15 out of 18 synostoses belonged to type II, 3 to type I. The different types represent merely differring degrees of manifestation of the same deformity occurring bilaterally in one person. All patients with radio-ulnar synostosis exhibited a high degree of functional tolerance to the malformation. The development in child age and the educational and professional record were hardly impaired. (orig./MG) [de

  18. Intermuscular aponeuroses between the flexor muscles of the forearm and their relationships with the ulnar nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Hyung-Sun; Liu, Hong-Fu; Kim, Jun-Ho; Kwak, Dai-Soon; Chung, In-Hyuk; Kim, In-Beom

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the morphological characteristics of the intermuscular aponeurosis between the flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) and flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS; IMAS), and that between the FCU and flexor digitorum profundus (FDP; IMAP), and their topographic relationships with the ulnar nerve. Fifty limbs of 38 adult cadavers were studied. The IMAS extended along the deep surface of the FCU adjoining the FDS, having the appearance of a ladder, giving off "steps" that decreased in width from superficial to deep around the middle of the forearm. Its proximal part divided into two bands connected by a thin membrane, and was attached to the medial epicondyle and the tubercle (the most medial prominent part of the coronoid process of the ulna), respectively. The IMAP extended deep between the FCU and FDP from the antebrachial fascia, and its distal end was located on the posterior border of the FCU. The IMAP became broader toward its proximal part, and its proximal end was attached anterior and posterior to the tubercle and the olecranon, respectively. The ulnar nerve passed posterior to the medial epicondyle and then medial to the tubercle, and was crossed by the deep border of the IMAS at 58.3 ± 14.1 mm below the medial epicondyle. The deep border of the IMAS and aberrant tendinous structure passing across the ulnar nerve, or the parts of the IMAS and IMAP passing posterior to the ulnar nerve are potential causes of ulnar nerve compression.

  19. Ulnar neuropathy and medial elbow pain in women's fastpitch softball pitchers: a report of 6 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Adam M; Butler, Thomas H; Dolan, Michael S

    2017-12-01

    Elite-level women's fastpitch softball players place substantial biomechanical strains on the elbow that can result in medial elbow pain and ulnar neuropathic symptoms. There is scant literature reporting the expected outcomes of the treatment of these injuries. This study examined the results of treatment in a series of these patients. We identified 6 female softball pitchers (4 high school and 2 collegiate) with medial elbow pain and ulnar neuropathic symptoms. Trials of conservative care failed in all 6, and they underwent surgical treatment with subcutaneous ulnar nerve transposition. These patients were subsequently monitored postoperatively to determine outcome. All 6 female pitchers had early resolution of elbow pain and neuropathic symptoms after surgical treatment. Long-term follow-up demonstrated that 1 patient quit playing softball because of other injuries but no longer reported elbow pain or paresthesias. One player was able to return to pitching at the high school level but had recurrent forearm pain and neuritis 1 year later while playing a different sport and subsequently stopped playing competitive sports. Four patients continued to play at the collegiate level without further symptoms. Medial elbow pain in women's softball pitchers caused by ulnar neuropathy can be treated effectively with subcutaneous ulnar nerve transposition if nonsurgical options fail. Further study is necessary to examine the role of overuse, proper training techniques, and whether pitching limits may be necessary to avoid these injuries. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Classification of ulnar triangular fibrocartilage complex tears. A treatment algorithm for Palmer type IB tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzei, A; Luchetti, R; Garagnani, L

    2017-05-01

    The classical definition of 'Palmer Type IB' triangular fibrocartilage complex tear, includes a spectrum of clinical conditions. This review highlights the clinical and arthroscopic criteria that enable us to categorize five classes on a treatment-oriented classification system of triangular fibrocartilage complex peripheral tears. Class 1 lesions represent isolated tears of the distal triangular fibrocartilage complex without distal radio-ulnar joint instability and are amenable to arthroscopic suture. Class 2 tears include rupture of both the distal triangular fibrocartilage complex and proximal attachments of the triangular fibrocartilage complex to the fovea. Class 3 tears constitute isolated ruptures of the proximal attachment of the triangular fibrocartilage complex to the fovea; they are not visible at radio-carpal arthroscopy. Both Class 2 and Class 3 tears are diagnosed with a positive hook test and are typically associated with distal radio-ulnar joint instability. If required, treatment is through reattachment of the distal radio-ulnar ligament insertions to the fovea. Class 4 lesions are irreparable tears due to the size of the defect or to poor tissue quality and, if required, treatment is through distal radio-ulnar ligament reconstruction with tendon graft. Class 5 tears are associated with distal radio-ulnar joint arthritis and can only be treated with salvage procedures. This subdivision of type IB triangular fibrocartilage complex tear provides more insights in the pathomechanics and treatment strategies. II.

  1. Clinical effects of internal fixation for ulnar styloid fractures associated with distal radius fractures: A matched case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Hideyoshi; Shinohara, Takaaki; Natsume, Tadahiro; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2016-11-01

    Ulnar styloid fractures are often associated with distal radius fractures. However, controversy exists regarding whether to treat ulnar styloid fractures. This study aimed to evaluate clinical effects of internal fixation for ulnar styloid fractures after distal radius fractures were treated with the volar locking plate system. We used prospectively collected data of distal radius fractures. 111 patients were enrolled in this study. A matched case-control study design was used. We selected patients who underwent fixation for ulnar styloid fractures (case group). Three control patients for each patient of the case group were matched on the basis of age, sex, and fracture type of distal radius fractures from among patients who did not undergo fixation for ulnar styloid fractures (control group). The case group included 16 patients (7 men, 9 women; mean age: 52.6 years; classification of ulnar styloid fractures: center, 3; base, 11; and proximal, 2). The control group included 48 patients (15 men, 33 women; mean age: 61.1 years; classification of ulnar styloid fractures: center, 10; base, 31; and proximal, 7). For radiographic examination, the volar tilt angle, radial inclination angle, and ulnar variance length were measured, and the union of ulnar styloid fractures was judged. For clinical examination, the range of motions, grip strength, Hand20 score, and Numeric Rating Scale score were evaluated. There was little correction loss for each radiological parameter of fracture reduction, and these parameters were not significantly different between the groups. The bone-healing rate of ulnar styloid fractures was significantly higher in the case group than in the control group, but the clinical results were not significantly different. We revealed that there was no need to fix ulnar styloid fractures when distal radius fractures were treated via open reduction and internal fixation with a volar locking plate system. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association

  2. Modal Properties and Stability of Bend-Twist Coupled Wind Turbine Blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stäblein, Alexander R.; Hansen, Morten Hartvig; Verelst, David Robert

    2017-01-01

    a steady-state equilibrium using the aero-servo-elastic tool HAWCStab2 which has been extended by a beam element that allows for fully coupled cross-sectional properties. Bend-twist coupling is introduced in the cross-sectional stiffness matrix by means of coupling coefficients that introduce twist...

  3. Variable stiffness corrugated composite structure with shape memory polymer for morphing skin applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiaobo; Liu, Liwu; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Leng, Jinsong; Liu, Yanju

    2017-03-01

    This work presents a variable stiffness corrugated structure based on a shape memory polymer (SMP) composite with corrugated laminates as reinforcement that shows smooth aerodynamic surface, extreme mechanical anisotropy and variable stiffness for potential morphing skin applications. The smart composite corrugated structure shows a low in-plane stiffness to minimize the actuation energy, but also possess high out-of-plane stiffness to transfer the aerodynamic pressure load. The skin provides an external smooth aerodynamic surface because of the one-sided filling with the SMP. Due to variable stiffness of the shape memory polymer the morphing skin exhibits a variable stiffness with a change of temperature, which can help the skin adjust its stiffness according different service environments and also lock the temporary shape without external force. Analytical models related to the transverse and bending stiffness are derived and validated using finite element techniques. The stiffness of the morphing skin is further investigated by performing a parametric analysis against the geometry of the corrugation and various sets of SMP fillers. The theoretical and numerical models show a good agreement and demonstrate the potential of this morphing skin concept for morphing aircraft applications. We also perform a feasibility study of the use of this morphing skin in a variable camber morphing wing baseline. The results show that the morphing skin concept exhibits sufficient bending stiffness to withstand the aerodynamic load at low speed (less than 0.3 Ma), while demonstrating a large transverse stiffness variation (up to 191 times) that helps to create a maximum mechanical efficiency of the structure under varying external conditions.

  4. Perforator anatomy of the radial forearm free flap versus the ulnar forearm free flap for head and neck reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekner, D.D.; Roeling, TAP; van Cann, EM

    The aim of this study was to investigate the vascular anatomy of the distal forearm in order to optimize the choice between the radial forearm free flap and the ulnar forearm free flap and to select the best site to harvest the flap. The radial and ulnar arteries of seven fresh cadavers were

  5. Tubular bending and pull-out forces in high-curvature well bores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dareing, D.W.; Ahlers, C.A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is concerned with drag forces developed on tubulars in high-curvature well bores typically found in drainhole and horizontal drilling. The dog-leg severity of these types of boreholes are considerably higher than those typically found in conventional directional drilling. The objective of the study was to determine the significance of bending stiffness on drag forces in the pull-out mode. The method of analysis treats the tubular as a multi-spanned curved beam under tension and solves for radial displacements, slope, shear and bending moment over each span. Calculations show that bending stiffness is a minor factor provided there are no locally severe dog legs superimposed in the high-curvature well bore

  6. Association between distal ulnar morphology and extensor carpi ulnaris tendon pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Connie Y.; Huang, Ambrose J.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Kattapuram, Susan V.; Torriani, Martin [General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between distal ulnar morphology and extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendon pathology. We retrospectively reviewed 71 adult wrist MRI studies with ECU tendon pathology (tenosynovitis, tendinopathy, or tear), and/or ECU subluxation. Subjects did not have a history of trauma, surgery, infection, or inflammatory arthritis. MRI studies from 46 subjects without ECU tendon pathology or subluxation were used as controls. The following morphological parameters of the distal ulna were measured independently by two readers: ulnar variance relative to radius, ulnar styloid process length, ECU groove depth and length. Subjects and controls were compared using Student's t test. Inter-observer agreement (ICC) was calculated. There was a significant correlation between negative ulnar variance and ECU tendon pathology (reader 1 [R1], P = 0.01; reader 2 [R2], P < 0.0001; R1 and R2 averaged data, P < 0.0001) and ECU tendon subluxation (P = 0.001; P = 0.0001; P < 0.0001). In subjects with ECU tendon subluxation there was also a trend toward a shorter length (P = 0.3; P <0.0001; P = 0.001) and a shallower ECU groove (P = 0.01; P = 0.03; P = 0.01; R1 and R2 averaged data with Bonferroni correction, P = 0.08). ECU groove depth (P = 0.6; P = 0.8; P = 0.9) and groove length (P = 0.1; P = 0.4; P = 0.7) showed no significant correlation with ECU tendon pathology, and length of the ulnar styloid process showed no significant correlation with ECU tendon pathology (P = 0.2; P = 0.3; P = 0.2) or subluxation (P = 0.4; P = 0.5; P = 0.5). Inter-observer agreement (ICC) was >0.64 for all parameters. Distal ulnar morphology may be associated with ECU tendon abnormalities. (orig.)

  7. The effect of short-term isometric training on core/torso stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Benjamin; McGill, Stuart

    2017-09-01

    "Core" exercise is a basic part of many physical training regimens with goals ranging from rehabilitation of spine and knee injuries to improving athletic performance. Core stiffness has been proposed to perform several functions including reducing pain by minimising joint micro-movements, and enhancing strength and speed performance. This study probes the links between a training approach and immediate but temporary changes in stiffness. Passive and active stiffness was measured on 24 participants; 12 having little to no experience in core training (inexperienced), and the other 12 being athletes experienced to core training methods; before and after a 15 min bout of isometric core exercises. Passive stiffness was assessed on a "frictionless" bending apparatus and active stiffness assessed via a quick release mechanism. Short-term isometric core training increased passive and active stiffness in most directions for both inexperienced and experienced participants, passive left lateral bend among experienced participants being the exception (P core stiffness, in this case following a single session. This may influence performance and injury resilience for a brief period.

  8. Elastic metamaterial beam with remotely tunable stiffness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Wei [University of Michigan–Shanghai Jiao Tong University Joint Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Yu, Zhengyue [School of Naval Architecture, Ocean & Civil Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wang, Xiaole [School of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Lai, Yun [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy & Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Yellen, Benjamin B., E-mail: yellen@duke.edu [University of Michigan–Shanghai Jiao Tong University Joint Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Duke University, P.O. Box 90300, Hudson Hall, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2016-02-07

    We demonstrate a dynamically tunable elastic metamaterial, which employs remote magnetic force to adjust its vibration absorption properties. The 1D metamaterial is constructed from a flat aluminum beam milled with a linear array of cylindrical holes. The beam is backed by a thin elastic membrane, on which thin disk-shaped permanent magnets are mounted. When excited by a shaker, the beam motion is tracked by a Laser Doppler Vibrometer, which conducts point by point scanning of the vibrating element. Elastic waves are unable to propagate through the beam when the driving frequency excites the first elastic bending mode in the unit cell. At these frequencies, the effective mass density of the unit cell becomes negative, which induces an exponentially decaying evanescent wave. Due to the non-linear elastic properties of the membrane, the effective stiffness of the unit cell can be tuned with an external magnetic force from nearby solenoids. Measurements of the linear and cubic static stiffness terms of the membrane are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements of the bandgap shift as a function of the applied force. In this implementation, bandgap shifts by as much as 40% can be achieved with ∼30 mN of applied magnetic force. This structure has potential for extension in 2D and 3D, providing a general approach for building dynamically tunable elastic metamaterials for applications in lensing and guiding elastic waves.

  9. Elastic metamaterial beam with remotely tunable stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wei; Yu, Zhengyue; Wang, Xiaole; Lai, Yun; Yellen, Benjamin B.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate a dynamically tunable elastic metamaterial, which employs remote magnetic force to adjust its vibration absorption properties. The 1D metamaterial is constructed from a flat aluminum beam milled with a linear array of cylindrical holes. The beam is backed by a thin elastic membrane, on which thin disk-shaped permanent magnets are mounted. When excited by a shaker, the beam motion is tracked by a Laser Doppler Vibrometer, which conducts point by point scanning of the vibrating element. Elastic waves are unable to propagate through the beam when the driving frequency excites the first elastic bending mode in the unit cell. At these frequencies, the effective mass density of the unit cell becomes negative, which induces an exponentially decaying evanescent wave. Due to the non-linear elastic properties of the membrane, the effective stiffness of the unit cell can be tuned with an external magnetic force from nearby solenoids. Measurements of the linear and cubic static stiffness terms of the membrane are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements of the bandgap shift as a function of the applied force. In this implementation, bandgap shifts by as much as 40% can be achieved with ˜30 mN of applied magnetic force. This structure has potential for extension in 2D and 3D, providing a general approach for building dynamically tunable elastic metamaterials for applications in lensing and guiding elastic waves.

  10. Reversed Palmaris Longus Muscle Causing Volar Forearm Pain and Ulnar Nerve Paresthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhashyam, Abhiram R; Harper, Carl M; Iorio, Matthew L

    2017-04-01

    A case of volar forearm pain associated with ulnar nerve paresthesia caused by a reversed palmaris longus muscle is described. The patient, an otherwise healthy 46-year-old male laborer, presented after a previous unsuccessful forearm fasciotomy for complaints of exercise exacerbated pain affecting the volar forearm associated with paresthesia in the ulnar nerve distribution. A second decompressive fasciotomy was performed revealing an anomalous "reversed" palmaris longus, with the muscle belly located distally. Resection of the anomalous muscle was performed with full relief of pain and sensory symptoms. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Stiffness, resilience, compressibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leu, Bogdan M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Advanced Photon Source (United States); Sage, J. Timothy, E-mail: jtsage@neu.edu [Northeastern University, Department of Physics and Center for Interdisciplinary Research on Complex Systems (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The flexibility of a protein is an important component of its functionality. We use nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) to quantify the flexibility of the heme iron environment in the electron-carrying protein cytochrome c by measuring the stiffness and the resilience. These quantities are sensitive to structural differences between the active sites of different proteins, as illustrated by a comparative analysis with myoglobin. The elasticity of the entire protein, on the other hand, can be probed quantitatively from NRVS and high energy-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) measurements, an approach that we used to extract the bulk modulus of cytochrome c.

  12. Mechanical properties of two-way grid shells optimized considering roundness and elastic stiffness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Toshiyuki; Yuta, Nishikawa; Rie, Tateishi; Ohsaki, Makoto

    2002-01-01

    A single-layer two-way grid shell defined by Bezier surface is optimized by coordinates of the control points as design variables. The purpose of this paper is to find optimal shapes considering roundness and elastic stiffness, and to investigate their mechanical properties. The distance of the center of curvature from the specified point is used for formulating the objective function for generating a round shape. Consider next a problem of minimizing the compliance as mechanical performance measure. The compliance is defined by the external work against the static loads applied to the nodes. The mechanically optimal shape is different from the round shape. Therefore, the multi objective optimization problem is formulated for optimizing the two objectives, which are roundness and the elastic stiffness defined by using the compliance. The constraint method is used for obtaining Pareto optimal solutions between the two objectives. We optimize single-layer two-way grid shells with square and rectangle plans. Mechanical properties of the optimal shapes are investigated by compliance and the distributions of axial force and bending moment. The round shape is significantly dominated by the bending moment and its compliance is large. The bending moment of the mechanically optimal shape is not very large, and the latticed shell has large stiffness through axial deformation. A trade-off shape is round enough, and the influence of the bending moment is smaller than that of the optimal round shape and the elastic stiffness is moderately large

  13. Breathing, bubbling, and bending: DNA flexibility from multimicrosecond simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeida, Ari; Machado, Matías Rodrigo; Dans, Pablo Daniel; Pantano, Sergio

    2012-08-01

    Bending of the seemingly stiff DNA double helix is a fundamental physical process for any living organism. Specialized proteins recognize DNA inducing and stabilizing sharp curvatures of the double helix. However, experimental evidence suggests a high protein-independent flexibility of DNA. On the basis of coarse-grained simulations, we propose that DNA experiences thermally induced kinks associated with the spontaneous formation of internal bubbles. Comparison of the protein-induced DNA curvature calculated from the Protein Data Bank with that sampled by our simulations suggests that thermally induced distortions can account for ˜80% of the DNA curvature present in experimentally solved structures.

  14. Breathing, bubbling, and bending: DNA flexibility from multimicrosecond simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeida, Ari; Machado, Matías Rodrigo; Dans, Pablo Daniel; Pantano, Sergio

    2012-08-01

    Bending of the seemingly stiff DNA double helix is a fundamental physical process for any living organism. Specialized proteins recognize DNA inducing and stabilizing sharp curvatures of the double helix. However, experimental evidence suggests a high protein-independent flexibility of DNA. On the basis of coarse-grained simulations, we propose that DNA experiences thermally induced kinks associated with the spontaneous formation of internal bubbles. Comparison of the protein-induced DNA curvature calculated from the Protein Data Bank with that sampled by our simulations suggests that thermally induced distortions can account for ~80% of the DNA curvature present in experimentally solved structures.

  15. Pharmacological modulation of arterial stiffness.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boutouyrie, Pierre

    2011-09-10

    Arterial stiffness has emerged as an important marker of cardiovascular risk in various populations and reflects the cumulative effect of cardiovascular risk factors on large arteries, which in turn is modulated by genetic background. Arterial stiffness is determined by the composition of the arterial wall and the arrangement of these components, and can be studied in humans non-invasively. Age and distending pressure are two major factors influencing large artery stiffness. Change in arterial stiffness with drugs is an important endpoint in clinical trials, although evidence for arterial stiffness as a therapeutic target still needs to be confirmed. Drugs that independently affect arterial stiffness include antihypertensive drugs, mostly blockers of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, hormone replacement therapy and some antidiabetic drugs such as glitazones. While the quest continues for \\'de-stiffening drugs\\

  16. Design and optimization of a bend-and-sweep compliant mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tummala, Y; Frecker, M I; Wissa, A A; Hubbard Jr, J E

    2013-01-01

    A novel contact aided compliant mechanism called bend-and-sweep compliant mechanism is presented in this paper. This mechanism has nonlinear stiffness properties in two orthogonal directions. An angled compliant joint (ACJ) is the fundamental element of this mechanism. Geometric parameters of ACJs determine the stiffness of the compliant mechanism. This paper presents the design and optimization of bend-and-sweep compliant mechanism. A multi-objective optimization problem was formulated for design optimization of the bend-and-sweep compliant mechanism. The objectives of the optimization problem were to maximize or minimize the bending and sweep displacements, depending on the situation, while minimizing the von Mises stress and mass of each mechanism. This optimization problem was solved using NSGA-II (a genetic algorithm). The results of this optimization for a single ACJ during upstroke and downstroke are presented in this paper. Results of two different loading conditions used during optimization of a single ACJ for upstroke are presented. Finally, optimization results comparing the performance of compliant mechanisms with one and two ACJs are also presented. It can be inferred from these results that the number of ACJs and the design of each ACJ determines the stiffness of the bend-and-sweep compliant mechanism. These mechanisms can be used in various applications. The goal of this research is to improve the performance of ornithopters by passively morphing their wings. In order to achieve a bio-inspired wing gait called continuous vortex gait, the wings of the ornithopter need to bend, and sweep simultaneously. This can be achieved by inserting the bend-and-sweep compliant mechanism into the leading edge wing spar of the ornithopters. (paper)

  17. Origami tubes assembled into stiff, yet reconfigurable structures and metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipov, Evgueni T; Tachi, Tomohiro; Paulino, Glaucio H

    2015-10-06

    Thin sheets have long been known to experience an increase in stiffness when they are bent, buckled, or assembled into smaller interlocking structures. We introduce a unique orientation for coupling rigidly foldable origami tubes in a "zipper" fashion that substantially increases the system stiffness and permits only one flexible deformation mode through which the structure can deploy. The flexible deployment of the tubular structures is permitted by localized bending of the origami along prescribed fold lines. All other deformation modes, such as global bending and twisting of the structural system, are substantially stiffer because the tubular assemblages are overconstrained and the thin sheets become engaged in tension and compression. The zipper-coupled tubes yield an unusually large eigenvalue bandgap that represents the unique difference in stiffness between deformation modes. Furthermore, we couple compatible origami tubes into a variety of cellular assemblages that can enhance mechanical characteristics and geometric versatility, leading to a potential design paradigm for structures and metamaterials that can be deployed, stiffened, and tuned. The enhanced mechanical properties, versatility, and adaptivity of these thin sheet systems can provide practical solutions of varying geometric scales in science and engineering.

  18. Dynamic stiffness of suction caissons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Liingaard, Morten; Andersen, Lars

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the dynamic soil-structure interaction of suction caissons for offshore wind turbines. The investigation is limited to a determination of the vertical dynamic stiffness of suction caissons. The soil surrounding the foundation is homogenous with linear...... viscoelastic properties. The dynamic stiffness of the suction caisson is expressed by dimensionless frequency-dependent dynamic stiffness coefficients corresponding to the vertical degree of freedom. The dynamic stiffness coefficients for the foundations are evaluated by means of a dynamic three...

  19. Trabecular meshwork stiffness in glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Read, A Thomas; Sulchek, Todd; Ethier, C Ross

    2017-05-01

    Alterations in stiffness of the trabecular meshwork (TM) may play an important role in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), the second leading cause of blindness. Specifically, certain data suggest an association between elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and increased TM stiffness; however, the underlying link between TM stiffness and IOP remains unclear and requires further study. We here first review the literature on TM stiffness measurements, encompassing various species and based on a number of measurement techniques, including direct approaches such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) and uniaxial tension tests, and indirect methods based on a beam deflection model. We also briefly review the effects of several factors that affect TM stiffness, including lysophospholipids, rho-kinase inhibitors, cytoskeletal disrupting agents, dexamethasone (DEX), transforming growth factor-β 2 (TGF-β 2 ), nitric oxide (NO) and cellular senescence. We then describe a method we have developed for determining TM stiffness measurement in mice using a cryosection/AFM-based approach, and present preliminary data on TM stiffness in C57BL/6J and CBA/J mouse strains. Finally, we investigate the relationship between TM stiffness and outflow facility between these two strains. The method we have developed shows promise for further direct measurements of mouse TM stiffness, which may be of value in understanding mechanistic relations between outflow facility and TM biomechanical properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. INDEX FINGER POSITION AND FORCE OF THE HUMAN FIRST DORSAL INTEROSSEUS AND ITS ULNAR NERVE ANTAGONIST

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZIJDEWIND, Inge; KERNELL, D

    In normal subjects, maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and electrical ulnar nerve stimulation (UNS; 30-Hz bursts of 0.33 s) were systematically compared with regard to the forces generated in different directions (abduction/adduction and flexion) and at different degrees of index finger abduction.

  1. Complete dislocation of the ulnar nerve at the elbow: a protective effect against neuropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leis, A Arturo; Smith, Benn E; Kosiorek, Heidi E; Omejec, Gregor; Podnar, Simon

    2017-08-01

    Recurrent complete ulnar nerve dislocation has been perceived as a risk factor for development of ulnar neuropathy at the elbow (UNE). However, the role of dislocation in the pathogenesis of UNE remains uncertain. We studied 133 patients with complete ulnar nerve dislocation to determine whether this condition is a risk factor for UNE. In all, the nerve was palpated as it rolled over the medial epicondyle during elbow flexion. Of 56 elbows with unilateral dislocation, UNE localized contralaterally in 17 elbows (30.4%) and ipsilaterally in 10 elbows (17.9%). Of 154 elbows with bilateral dislocation, 26 had UNE (16.9%). Complete dislocation decreased the odds of having UNE by 44% (odds ratio = 0.475; P =  0.028), and was associated with less severe UNE (P = 0.045). UNE occurs less frequently and is less severe on the side of complete dislocation. Complete dislocation may have a protective effect on the ulnar nerve. Muscle Nerve 56: 242-246, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Pisotriquetral joint disorders: an under-recognized cause of ulnar side wrist pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraux, A. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Imagerie Medicale Jacquemars Gielee, Lille (France); Lefebvre, G.; Pansini, V.; Aucourt, J.; Vandenbussche, L.; Cotten, A. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Demondion, X. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Pole Recherche Faculte de Medecine de Lille, Laboratoire d' Anatomie, Lille (France)

    2014-06-15

    Pisotriquetral joint disorders are often under-recognized in routine clinical practice. They nevertheless represent a significant cause of ulnar side wrist pain. The aim of this article is to present the main disorders of this joint and discuss the different imaging modalities that can be useful for its assessment. (orig.)

  3. MRI shows thickening and altered diffusion in the median and ulnar nerves in multifocal motor neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haakma, Wieke; Jongbloed, Bas A.; Froeling, Martijn

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To study disease mechanisms in multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the median and ulnar nerves. Methods We enrolled ten MMN patients, ten patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and ten healthy controls...

  4. Reliability, reference values and predictor variables of the ulnar sensory nerve in disease free adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruediger, T M; Allison, S C; Moore, J M; Wainner, R S

    2014-09-01

    The purposes of this descriptive and exploratory study were to examine electrophysiological measures of ulnar sensory nerve function in disease free adults to determine reliability, determine reference values computed with appropriate statistical methods, and examine predictive ability of anthropometric variables. Antidromic sensory nerve conduction studies of the ulnar nerve using surface electrodes were performed on 100 volunteers. Reference values were computed from optimally transformed data. Reliability was computed from 30 subjects. Multiple linear regression models were constructed from four predictor variables. Reliability was greater than 0.85 for all paired measures. Responses were elicited in all subjects; reference values for sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) amplitude from above elbow stimulation are 3.3 μV and decrement across-elbow less than 46%. No single predictor variable accounted for more than 15% of the variance in the response. Electrophysiologic measures of the ulnar sensory nerve are reliable. Absent SNAP responses are inconsistent with disease free individuals. Reference values recommended in this report are based on appropriate transformations of non-normally distributed data. No strong statistical model of prediction could be derived from the limited set of predictor variables. Reliability analyses combined with relatively low level of measurement error suggest that ulnar sensory reference values may be used with confidence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. A study on operative findings and pathogenic factors in ulnar neuropathy at the elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, T; Kurihara, K; Nagano, T

    1979-01-01

    A study was made of operative findings obtained in 44 cases of ulnar nerve neuropathy at the elbow in an attempt to help elucidate the pathogenetic factors for the condition. Distinction must be made between Lig. epitrochleo-anconeum or a ligament-like thickening at the same site and the tendinous arch of M. flexor carpi ulnaris. These 2 sites constitute the entrapment points for the condition. A thick tendinous arch, Lig. epitrochleo-anconeum of M. anconeus epitrochlearis deters the ulnar nerve from being mobile, thereby contributing to the development of neuropathy with trauma acting as a precipitating factor. Dislocation of the ulnar nerve cannot be considered a factor of major etiologic significance. An important part is played by the tendinous arch in the pathogenesis of neuropathy, regardless of whether it is in association with ganglion, osteochondromatosis or osteoarthritis. In surgery for ulnar neuropathy decompression of the nerve is of primary necessity. Division of the tendinous arch is mandatory. Medial epicondylectomy may be added as required.

  6. MR neurography of ulnar nerve entrapment at the cubital tunnel: a diffusion tensor imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, Julia B.; Berzaczy, Dominik; Nemec, Stefan F.; Weber, Michael; Prayer, Daniela; Kasprian, Gregor; Kranz, Gottfried; Sycha, Thomas; Hold, Alina

    2015-01-01

    MR neurography, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tractography at 3 Tesla were evaluated for the assessment of patients with ulnar neuropathy at the elbow (UNE). Axial T2-weighted and single-shot DTI sequences (16 gradient encoding directions) were acquired, covering the cubital tunnel of 46 patients with clinically and electrodiagnostically confirmed UNE and 20 healthy controls. Cross-sectional area (CSA) was measured at the retrocondylar sulcus and FA and ADC values on each section along the ulnar nerve. Three-dimensional nerve tractography and T2-weighted neurography results were independently assessed by two raters. Patients showed a significant reduction of ulnar nerve FA values at the retrocondylar sulcus (p = 0.002) and the deep flexor fascia (p = 0.005). At tractography, a complete or partial discontinuity of the ulnar nerve was found in 26/40 (65 %) of patients. Assessment of T2 neurography was most sensitive in detecting UNE (sensitivity, 91 %; specificity, 79 %), followed by tractography (88 %/69 %). CSA and FA measurements were less effective in detecting UNE. T2-weighted neurography remains the most sensitive MR technique in the imaging evaluation of clinically manifest UNE. DTI-based neurography at 3 Tesla supports the MR imaging assessment of UNE patients by adding quantitative and 3D imaging data. (orig.)

  7. MR neurography of ulnar nerve entrapment at the cubital tunnel: a diffusion tensor imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitenseher, Julia B.; Berzaczy, Dominik; Nemec, Stefan F.; Weber, Michael; Prayer, Daniela; Kasprian, Gregor [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Kranz, Gottfried; Sycha, Thomas [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Neurology, Vienna (Austria); Hold, Alina [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-07-15

    MR neurography, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tractography at 3 Tesla were evaluated for the assessment of patients with ulnar neuropathy at the elbow (UNE). Axial T2-weighted and single-shot DTI sequences (16 gradient encoding directions) were acquired, covering the cubital tunnel of 46 patients with clinically and electrodiagnostically confirmed UNE and 20 healthy controls. Cross-sectional area (CSA) was measured at the retrocondylar sulcus and FA and ADC values on each section along the ulnar nerve. Three-dimensional nerve tractography and T2-weighted neurography results were independently assessed by two raters. Patients showed a significant reduction of ulnar nerve FA values at the retrocondylar sulcus (p = 0.002) and the deep flexor fascia (p = 0.005). At tractography, a complete or partial discontinuity of the ulnar nerve was found in 26/40 (65 %) of patients. Assessment of T2 neurography was most sensitive in detecting UNE (sensitivity, 91 %; specificity, 79 %), followed by tractography (88 %/69 %). CSA and FA measurements were less effective in detecting UNE. T2-weighted neurography remains the most sensitive MR technique in the imaging evaluation of clinically manifest UNE. DTI-based neurography at 3 Tesla supports the MR imaging assessment of UNE patients by adding quantitative and 3D imaging data. (orig.)

  8. Limit cycles and stiffness control with variable stiffness actuators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carloni, Raffaella; Marconi, L.

    2012-01-01

    Variable stiffness actuators realize highly dynamic systems, whose inherent mechanical compliance can be properly exploited to obtain a robust and energy-efficient behavior. The paper presents a control strategy for variable stiffness actuators with the primarily goal of tracking a limit cycle

  9. The study of stiffness modulus values for AC-WC pavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubis, AS; Muis, Z. A.; Iskandar, T. D.

    2018-02-01

    One of the parameters of the asphalt mixture in order for the strength and durability to be achieved as required is the stress-and-strain showing the stiffness of a material. Stiffness modulus is a very necessary factor that will affect the performance of asphalt pavements. If the stiffness modulus value decreases there will be a cause of aging asphalt pavement crack easily when receiving a heavy load. The high stiffness modulus asphalt concrete causes more stiff and resistant to bending. The stiffness modulus value of an asphalt mixture material can be obtained from the theoretical (indirect methods) and laboratory test results (direct methods). For the indirect methods used Brown & Brunton method, and Shell Bitumen method; while for the direct methods used the UMATTA tool. This study aims to determine stiffness modulus values for AC-WC pavement. The tests were conducted in laboratory that used 3 methods, i.e. Brown & Brunton Method, Shell Bitumen Method and Marshall Test as a substitute tool for the UMATTA tool. Hotmix asphalt made from type AC-WC with pen 60/70 using a mixture of optimum bitumen content was 5.84% with a standard temperature variation was 60°C and several variations of temperature that were 30, 40, 50, 70 and 80°C. The stiffness modulus value results obtained from Brown & Brunton Method, Shell Bitumen Method and Marshall Test which were 1374,93 Mpa, 235,45 Mpa dan 254,96 Mpa. The stiffness modulus value decreases with increasing temperature of the concrete asphalt. The stiffness modulus value from the Bitumen Shell method and the Marshall Test has a relatively similar value.The stiffness modulus value from the Brown & Brunton method is greater than the Bitumen Shell method and the Marshall Test, but can not measure the stiffness modulus value at temperature above 80°C.

  10. Stiffness Customization and Patterning for Property Modulation of Silicone-Based Soft Pneumatic Actuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Yap, Hong Kai; Liang, Xinquan; Guo, Jin; Qi, Peng; Ang, Marcelo H; Yeow, Chen-Hua

    2017-09-01

    Soft pneumatic actuators (SPAs), as novel types of motion drivers for robotic devices, excel in many applications, such as rehabilitation and biomimicry, which demand compliance and softness. To further expand their scope of utilization, the SPAs should be customizable to meet the distinctive requirements of different applications. This article proposes a novel perspective on the SPA working mechanism based on stiffness distribution and then presents a versatile method called stiffness customization and patterning (SCP) for SPA body stiffness layout as a novel attempt to customize SPAs with distinctive properties. We fabricated a hybrid type of material combining unstretchable material and silicone with customizable aggregated elasticity. The tensile results showed that embedding unstretchable material directly increases the stiffness of the hybrid material sample, and our stress-strain model for SCP is able to adequately predict the elasticity of hybrid samples with specific material ratios. By applying this approach to bending-type SPAs, we are able to mitigate SPA buckling, a main failure mode of SPAs, and improve the SPA tip force by using hybrid material with globally increased stiffness. We also diversify bending modalities with different stiffness configurations in the hybrid material. SCP offers numerous ways to engineer SPAs for more applications.

  11. Extension of elastic stiffness formula for leaf type holddown spring assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kee Nam; Kang, Heung Seok; Yoon, Kyung Ho; Kim, Hyung Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-09-01

    Based on the Euler beam theory and the strain energy method, an elastic stiffness formula of the holddown spring assembly consisting of several leaves was previously derived. The formula was known to be useful to estimate the elastic stiffness of the holddown spring assembly only with the geometric data and the material properties of the leaf. Recently, it was reported that the elastic stiffness from the formula deviated much from the test results as the number of leaves was increased. In this study, in order to resolve such an increasing deviation as the increasing number of leaves, the formula has been extended to be able to consider normal forces and friction forces acting on interfaces between the leaves. The elastic stiffness analysis on specimens of leaf type holddown springs has been carried out using the extended formula and the analysis results are compared with the test results. As a result of comparisons, it is found that the extended formula is able to evaluate the elastic stiffness of the holddown spring assembly within an error range of 10%, irrespective of the number of leaves. In addition, it is found that the effect of shear forces and axial forces on the elastic stiffness of the holddown spring assembly is only below 0.2% of the elastic stiffness, and therefore the greatest portion of the elastic stiffness of the holddown spring assembly is attributed to the bending moment. (author). 13 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs.

  12. Stiffness Coefficients of Mortise and Tenon Joints used on Wooden Window Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Podlena

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Samples of corner joints of wooden rectangular windows, with widths of 78 and 92 mm, were used to determine the stiffness of tenon and mortise joints. Two series of samples were loaded statically in the angular plane of compression and tension, so that the bending moment could be derived. The objective of the experiment was to determine the existing correlations between the stiffness in maximum strength and the stiffness in the elastic area for both types of tests. After strength tests were carried out, the annual ring width of the samples was measured to determine whether this factor affects the stiffness of the joints. The results showed that there was a relatively strong correlation between the stiffness in the elastic area and the maximum load. A two-factor analysis of variance confirmed that the type of load did not affect the stiffness of the joint, but the type of joint (width does significantly affect the stiffness. Therefore, the width of annual rings was positively correlated with the stiffness of the joints.

  13. Drilling the near cortex with elongated figure-of-8 holes to reduce the stiffness of a locking compression plate construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jerry Yongqiang; Zhou, Zhihong; Ang, Benjamin Fu Hong; Yew, Andy Khye Soon; Chou, Siaw Meng; Chia, Shi-Lu; Koh, Joyce Suang Bee; Howe, Tet Sen

    2015-12-01

    To compare the stiffness of locking compression plate (LCP) constructs with or without drilling the near cortex with elongated figure-of-8 holes. 24 synthetic bones were sawn to create a 10-mm gap and were fixed with a 9-hole 4.5-mm narrow LCP. In 12 bones, the near cortex of the adjacent holes to the LCP holes was drilled to create elongated figure-of-8 holes before screw insertion. The stiffness of LCP constructs under axial loading or 4-point bending was assessed by (1) dynamic quasi-physiological testing for fatigue strength, (2) quasi-static testing for stiffness, and (3) testing for absolute strength to failure. None of the 24 constructs had subcatastrophic or catastrophic failure after 10 000 cycles of fatigue loading (p=1.000). The axial stiffness reduced by 16% from 613±62 to 517±44 N/mm (p=0.012) in the case group, whereas the bending stiffness was 16±1 Nm2 in both groups (p=1.000). The maximum axial load to catastrophic failure was 1596±84 N for the control group and 1627±48 N for the case group (p=0.486), whereas the maximum bending moment to catastrophic failure was 79±12 and 80±10 Nm, respectively (p=0.919). Drilling the near cortex with elongated figure-of-8 holes reduces the axial stiffness of the LCP construct, without compromising its bending stiffness or strength.

  14. A New Kind of Bend Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new kind of bend sensor is introduced.It can be used to detect the bend angle of an object or inclination between two objects.It has characteristics of small size, lightweight, high reliability, fine flexibility and plasticity.When this bend sensor is used with a proper converting circuit, it can implement dynamic measuring the bend angle of an object conveniently.The application of the bend sensor in dataglove is also described.

  15. Bending characteristics of resin concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Maria Cristina Santos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research work the influence of composition and curing conditions in bending strength of polyester and epoxy concrete is analyzed. Various mixtures of resin and aggregates were considered in view of an optimal combination. The Taguchi methodology was applied in order to reduce the number of tests, and in order to evaluate the influence of various parameters in concrete properties. This methodology is very useful for the planning of experiments. Test results, analyzed by this methodology, shown that the most significant factors affecting bending strength properties of resin concretes are the type of resin, resin content and charge content. An optimal formulation leading to a maximum bending strength was achieved in terms of material parameters.

  16. Bending Characteristics of Foldable Touch Display Panel with a Protection Structure Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsien-Chie Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study proposes and demonstrates an enhancement of a touch display panel (TDP through a polymer-based protection structure to achieve higher bendability and reliability. The bending performance of the TDP without or with the protection structure designs is addressed using three-dimensional geometry-nonlinear finite element analysis and mechanical testing. The elastic properties of the components in the TDP structure are derived from nanoindentation and uniaxial tensile/compressive testing. The calculated results are compared with each other and also against the experimental bending fatigue test data. At last, a design guideline and optimal factor setting for enhanced bending performance are sought through parametric FE analysis and Taguchi experimental design, respectively. The optimal design is compared with the original in terms of bending stress. The simulation results show that bending would create significant tensile and compressive bending stresses on the indium tin oxide/dielectric layers, which are the main cause of several commonly observed failures, such as thin film cracking and delamination, in a thin rigid film coating on a thick compliant substrate. It also turns out that a substrate with a lower stiffness has a better mechanical stability against bending stress.

  17. Arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxuan; Lyu, Peiyuan; Ren, Yanyan; An, Jin; Dong, Yanhong

    2017-09-15

    Arterial stiffness is one of the earliest indicators of changes in vascular wall structure and function and may be assessed using various indicators, such as pulse-wave velocity (PWV), the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI), the ankle-brachial index (ABI), pulse pressure (PP), the augmentation index (AI), flow-mediated dilation (FMD), carotid intima media thickness (IMT) and arterial stiffness index-β. Arterial stiffness is generally considered an independent predictor of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. To date, a significant number of studies have focused on the relationship between arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment. To investigate the relationships between specific arterial stiffness parameters and cognitive impairment, elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the relationship between arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment and determine how to interfere with arterial stiffness to prevent cognitive impairment, we searched PUBMED for studies regarding the relationship between arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment that were published from 2000 to 2017. We used the following key words in our search: "arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment" and "arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment mechanism". Studies involving human subjects older than 30years were included in the review, while irrelevant studies (i.e., studies involving subjects with comorbid kidney disease, diabetes and cardiac disease) were excluded from the review. We determined that arterial stiffness severity was positively correlated with cognitive impairment. Of the markers used to assess arterial stiffness, a higher PWV, CAVI, AI, IMT and index-β and a lower ABI and FMD were related to cognitive impairment. However, the relationship between PP and cognitive impairment remained controversial. The potential mechanisms linking arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment may be associated with arterial pulsatility, as greater arterial pulsatility

  18. Stiffness of desiccating insect wings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mengesha, T E; Vallance, R R; Mittal, R

    2011-01-01

    The stiffness of insect wings is typically determined through experimental measurements. Such experiments are performed on wings removed from insects. However, the wings are subject to desiccation which typically leads to an increase in their stiffness. Although this effect of desiccation is well known, a comprehensive study of the rate of change in stiffness of desiccating insect wings would be a significant aid in planning experiments as well as interpreting data from such experiments. This communication presents a comprehensive experimental analysis of the change in mass and stiffness of gradually desiccating forewings of Painted Lady butterflies (Vanessa cardui). Mass and stiffness of the forewings of five butterflies were simultaneously measured every 10 min over a 24 h period. The averaged results show that wing mass declined exponentially by 21.1% over this time period with a time constant of 9.8 h, while wing stiffness increased linearly by 46.2% at a rate of 23.4 μN mm -1 h -1 . For the forewings of a single butterfly, the experiment was performed over a period of 1 week, and the results show that wing mass declined exponentially by 52.2% with a time constant of 30.2 h until it reached a steady-state level of 2.00 mg, while wing stiffness increased exponentially by 90.7% until it reached a steady-state level of 1.70 mN mm -1 . (communication)

  19. Stiffness of desiccating insect wings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mengesha, T E; Vallance, R R [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The George Washington University, 738 Phillips Hall, 801 22nd St NW, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Mittal, R, E-mail: vallance@gwu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 126 Latrobe Hall, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    The stiffness of insect wings is typically determined through experimental measurements. Such experiments are performed on wings removed from insects. However, the wings are subject to desiccation which typically leads to an increase in their stiffness. Although this effect of desiccation is well known, a comprehensive study of the rate of change in stiffness of desiccating insect wings would be a significant aid in planning experiments as well as interpreting data from such experiments. This communication presents a comprehensive experimental analysis of the change in mass and stiffness of gradually desiccating forewings of Painted Lady butterflies (Vanessa cardui). Mass and stiffness of the forewings of five butterflies were simultaneously measured every 10 min over a 24 h period. The averaged results show that wing mass declined exponentially by 21.1% over this time period with a time constant of 9.8 h, while wing stiffness increased linearly by 46.2% at a rate of 23.4 {mu}N mm{sup -1} h{sup -1}. For the forewings of a single butterfly, the experiment was performed over a period of 1 week, and the results show that wing mass declined exponentially by 52.2% with a time constant of 30.2 h until it reached a steady-state level of 2.00 mg, while wing stiffness increased exponentially by 90.7% until it reached a steady-state level of 1.70 mN mm{sup -1}. (communication)

  20. The creep bending of short radius pipe bends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, John

    1975-01-01

    In existing and proposed liquid metal fast breeder reactor design the pipework has considerable importance. Parts of the LMFBR include thin walled short radius bends which are expected to operate in the creep regime. In linear elasticity it is known that the assumption of long radius bends is not too severe as far as the flexibility characteristics are concerned although some modifications are necessary for accurate determination of the stresses. No data exists for nonlinear creep. Current work is aimed at elucidating the effect of the various assumptions common to linear elastic theory in so far as they affect the creep characteristics of bends on systems. Herein an energy based analysis using a simple n power constitutive law for stationary creep is employed to derive basic design data for flexibilities and stresses which will be necessary before complete systems can be assessed for creep. The analysis shows on comparison with the long radius work that the assumption of R>r is not much more restrictive in creep than for linear elasticity. Flexibilities for short radius bends appear to be well approximated by the long radius values. Thus the attractive reference stress information already derived may be used directly to find deformations without a complete knowledge of the constitutive relationship. However, stresses are somewhat different. Fortunately the maximum deviation occurs at relatively low levels of stress, the peak stresses being in fair agreement. When n=1 the present results reduce essentially to those obtained from existing linear elastic theory

  1. Finite element based nonlinear normalization of human lumbar intervertebral disc stiffness to account for its morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquer, Ghislain; Laurent, Marc; Brandejsky, Vaclav; Pretterklieber, Michael L; Zysset, Philippe K

    2014-06-01

    Disc degeneration, usually associated with low back pain and changes of intervertebral stiffness, represents a major health issue. As the intervertebral disc (IVD) morphology influences its stiffness, the link between mechanical properties and degenerative grade is partially lost without an efficient normalization of the stiffness with respect to the morphology. Moreover, although the behavior of soft tissues is highly nonlinear, only linear normalization protocols have been defined so far for the disc stiffness. Thus, the aim of this work is to propose a nonlinear normalization based on finite elements (FE) simulations and evaluate its impact on the stiffness of human anatomical specimens of lumbar IVD. First, a parameter study involving simulations of biomechanical tests (compression, flexion/extension, bilateral torsion and bending) on 20 FE models of IVDs with various dimensions was carried out to evaluate the effect of the disc's geometry on its compliance and establish stiffness/morphology relations necessary to the nonlinear normalization. The computed stiffness was then normalized by height (H), cross-sectional area (CSA), polar moment of inertia (J) or moments of inertia (Ixx, Iyy) to quantify the effect of both linear and nonlinear normalizations. In the second part of the study, T1-weighted MRI images were acquired to determine H, CSA, J, Ixx and Iyy of 14 human lumbar IVDs. Based on the measured morphology and pre-established relation with stiffness, linear and nonlinear normalization routines were then applied to the compliance of the specimens for each quasi-static biomechanical test. The variability of the stiffness prior to and after normalization was assessed via coefficient of variation (CV). The FE study confirmed that larger and thinner IVDs were stiffer while the normalization strongly attenuated the effect of the disc geometry on its stiffness. Yet, notwithstanding the results of the FE study, the experimental stiffness showed consistently

  2. Analysis of pipe mitred bends using beam models - by finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salles, A.C.S.L. de.

    1984-01-01

    The formulation of a recently proposed displacement based straight pipe element for the analysis of pipe mitred bends is summarized in this work. The element kinematics includes axial, bending, torsional and ovalisation displacements, all varying cubically along the axis of the element. Interaction effects between angle adjoined straight pipe section are modeled including the appropriate additional strain terms in the stiffness matrix formulation and by using a penalty procedure to enforce continuity of pipe skin flexural rotations at the common helical edge. The element model capabilities are ilustrated in some sample analysis and the results are compared with other available experimental, analytical or more complex numerical models. (Author) [pt

  3. Motor branches of the ulnar nerve to the forearm: an anatomical study and guidelines for selective neurectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulos, Renata; Leclercq, Caroline

    2015-11-01

    Precise knowledge of motor nerve branches is critical to plan selective neurectomies for the treatment of spastic limbs. Our objective is to describe the muscular branching pattern of the ulnar nerve in the forearm and suggest an ideal surgical approach for selective neurectomy of the flexor carpi ulnaris. The ulnar nerve was dissected under loop magnification in 20 upper limbs of fresh frozen cadavers and its branches to the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle (FCU) and to the flexor digitorum profundus muscle (FDP) were quantified. We measured their diameter, length and distance between their origin and the medial epicondyle. The point where the ulnar artery joined the nerve was observed. The position in which the ulnar nerve gave off each branch was noted (ulnar, posterior or radial) and the Martin-Gruber connection, when present, had its origin observed and its diameter measured. The ulnar nerve gave off two to five muscular branches, among which, one to four to the FCU and one or two to the FDP. In all cases, the first branch was to the FCU. It arose on average 1.4 cm distal to the epicondyle, but in four specimens it arose above or at the level of the medial epicondyle (2.0 cm above in one case, 1.5 cm above in two cases, and at the level of the medial epicondyle in one). The first branch to the FDP arose on average 5.0 cm distal to the medial epicondyle. All the branches to FDP but one arose from the radial aspect of the ulnar nerve. A Martin-Gruber connection was present in nine cases. All motor branches arose in the proximal half of the forearm and the ulnar nerve did not give off branches distal to the point where it was joined by the ulnar artery. The number of motor branches of the ulnar nerve to the FCU varies from 2 to 4. An ideal approach for selective neurectomy of the FCU should start 4 cm above the medial epicondyle, and extend distally to 50% of the length of the forearm or just to the point where the ulnar artery joins the nerve.

  4. Functions of fish skin: flexural stiffness and steady swimming of longnose gar, Lepisosteus osseus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long; Hale; Mchenry; Westneat

    1996-01-01

    The functions of fish skin during swimming remain enigmatic. Does skin stiffen the body and alter the propagation of the axial undulatory wave? To address this question, we measured the skin's in situ flexural stiffness and in vivo mechanical role in the longnose gar Lepisosteus osseus. To measure flexural stiffness, dead gar were gripped and bent in a device that measured applied bending moment (N m) and the resulting midline curvature (m-1). From these values, the flexural stiffness of the body (EI in N m2) was calculated before and after sequential alterations of skin structure. Cutting of the dermis between two caudal scale rows significantly reduced the flexural stiffness of the body and increased the neutral zone of curvature, a region of bending without detectable stiffness. Neither bending property was significantly altered by the removal of a caudal scale row. These alterations in skin structure were also made in live gar and the kinematics of steady swimming was measured before and after each treatment. Cutting of the dermis between two caudal scale rows, performed under anesthesia, changed the swimming kinematics of the fish: tailbeat frequency (Hz) and propulsive wave speed (body lengths per second, L s-1) decreased, while the depth (in L) of the trailing edge of the tail increased. The decreases in tailbeat frequency and wave speed are consistent with predictions of the theory of forced, harmonic vibrations; wave speed, if equated with resonance frequency, is proportional to the square root of a structure's stiffness. While it did not significantly reduce the body's flexural stiffness, surgical removal of a caudal scale row resulted in increased tailbeat amplitude and the relative total hydrodynamic power. In an attempt to understand the specific function of the scale row, we propose a model in which a scale row resists medio-lateral force applied by a single myomere, thus functioning to enhance mechanical advantage for bending. Finally, surgical

  5. A comparison of 3-D computed tomography versus 2-D radiography measurements of ulnar variance and ulnolunate distance during forearm rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanishi, Y; Moritomo, H; Omori, S; Kataoka, T; Murase, T; Sugamoto, K

    2014-06-01

    Positive ulnar variance is associated with ulnar impaction syndrome and ulnar variance is reported to increase with pronation. However, radiographic measurement can be affected markedly by the incident angle of the X-ray beam. We performed three-dimensional (3-D) computed tomography measurements of ulnar variance and ulnolunate distance during forearm rotation and compared these with plain radiographic measurements in 15 healthy wrists. From supination to pronation, ulnar variance increased in all cases on the radiographs; mean ulnar variance increased significantly and mean ulnolunate distance decreased significantly. However on 3-D imaging, ulna variance decreased in 12 cases on moving into pronation and increased in three cases; neither the mean ulnar variance nor mean ulnolunate distance changed significantly. Our results suggest that the forearm position in which ulnar variance increased varies among individuals. This may explain why some patients with ulnar impaction syndrome complain of wrist pain exacerbated by forearm supination. It also suggests that standard radiographic assessments of ulnar variance are unreliable. © The Author(s) 2013.

  6. Differentiating C8–T1 Radiculopathy from Ulnar Neuropathy: A Survey of 24 Spine Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoker, Geoffrey E.; Kim, Han Jo; Riew, K. Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Questionnaire. Objective To evaluate the ability of spine surgeons to distinguish C8–T1 radiculopathies from ulnar neuropathy. Methods Twenty-four self-rated “experienced” cervical spine surgeons completed a questionnaire with the following items. (1) If the ulnar nerve is cut at the elbow, which of the following would be numb: ulnar forearm, small and ring fingers; only the ulnar forearm; only the small and ring fingers; or none of the above? (2) Which of the following muscles are weak with C8–T1 radiculopathies but intact with ulnar neuropathy at the elbow: flexor digiti minimi brevis, flexor pollicis brevis, abductor digiti minimi, abductor pollicis brevis, adductor pollicis, opponens digiti minimi, opponens pollicis, medial lumbricals, lateral lumbricals, dorsal interossei, palmar interossei? Results Fifteen of 24 surgeons (63%) correctly answered the first question—that severing the ulnar nerve results in numbness of the fifth and fourth fingers. None correctly identified all four nonulnar, C8–T1-innervated options in the second question without naming additional muscles. Conclusion The ulnar nerve provides sensation to the fourth and fifth fingers and medial border of the hand. The medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve provides sensation to the medial forearm. The ulnar nerve innervates all intrinsic hand muscles, except the abductor and flexor pollicis brevis, opponens pollicis, and lateral two lumbricals, which are innervated by C8 and T1 via the median nerve. By examining these five muscles, one can clinically differentiate cubital tunnel syndrome from C8–T1 radiculopathies. Although all participants considered themselves to be experienced cervical spine surgeons, this study reveals inadequate knowledge regarding the clinical manifestations of C8–T1 radiculopathies and cubital tunnel syndrome. PMID:24494175

  7. Perforator anatomy of the radial forearm free flap versus the ulnar forearm free flap for head and neck reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekner, D D; Roeling, T A P; Van Cann, E M

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the vascular anatomy of the distal forearm in order to optimize the choice between the radial forearm free flap and the ulnar forearm free flap and to select the best site to harvest the flap. The radial and ulnar arteries of seven fresh cadavers were injected with epoxy resin (Araldite) and the perforating arteries were dissected. The number of clinically relevant perforators from the radial and ulnar arteries was not significantly different in the distal forearm. Most perforators were located in the proximal half of the distal one third, making this part probably the safest location for flap harvest. Close to the wrist, i.e. most distally, there were more perforators on the ulnar side than on the radial side. The ulnar artery stained 77% of the skin surface area of the forearm, showing the ulnar forearm free flap to be more suitable than the radial forearm free flap for the restoration of large defects. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Intra-articular Entrapment of Medial Epicondyle Fracture Fragment in Elbow Joint Dislocation Causing Ulnar Neuropraxia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed J

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic elbow dislocations in children are rare but most of them are complex dislocations, and in such dislocations, medial humerus epicondyle fractureis the most common associated injury. Fracture incarceration in the elbow joint occurs in 5-18% of medial humerus epicondyle fractures but ulnar neuropraxia is very rare. Open reduction internal fixation is indicated in medial humerus epicondyle fracture with fracture incarceration, ulnar neuropraxia, marked instability or open fracture. Operative treatment options include fragment excision and sutures, closed or open reduction and Kirschner wire fixation, open reduction and suture fixation, open reduction and smooth pin fixation, and open reduction and screw fixation. However, ulnar nerve transposition is debatable as good outcome had been reported with and without nerve transposition. We report a case of a 13-year old boy, who presented with right elbow dislocation and intra-articular entrapment of medial humerus epicondyle fracture fragment, complicated with sensory ulnar neuropraxia, following a fall onto his right outstretched hand in a motor vehicle accident. The elbow joint was reduced using close manipulative reduction but the fracture fragment remained entrapped post-reduction. The patient then underwent open reduction and screw fixation of the medial humerus epicondyle fracture without ulnar nerve transposition. He had good functional outcome six weeks after surgical intervention, with complete recovery of ulnar neuropraxia six months later. Currently, he is doing well at school and is active with his sporting activity.

  9. Radial and ulnar bursae of the wrist: cadaveric investigation of regional anatomy with ultrasonographic-guided tenography and MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, R.O.C.; Gasparetto, E.L.; Marchiori, E.; Escuissato, D.L.; Trudell, D.J.; Haghighi, P.; Resnik, D.

    2006-01-01

    To demonstrate the anatomy of the radial and ulnar bursae of the wrist using MR and US images. Ultrasonographic-guided tenography of the tendon sheath of flexor pollicis longus (FPL) and the common tendon sheath of the flexor digitorum of the fifth digit (FD5) of ten cadaveric hands was performed, followed by magnetic resonance imaging and gross anatomic correlation. Patterns of communication were observed between these tendon sheaths and the radial and ulnar bursae of the wrist. The tendon sheath of the FPL communicated with the radial bursa in 100% (10/10) of cases, and the tendon sheath of the FD5 communicated with the ulnar bursa in 80% (8/10). Communication of the radial and ulnar bursae was evident in 100% (10/10), and presented an ''hourglass'' configuration in the longitudinal plane. The ulnar and radial bursae often communicate. The radial bursa communicates with the FPL tendon sheath, and the ulnar bursa may communicate with the FD5 tendon sheath

  10. Ulnar nerve lesion at the wrist and sport: A report of 8 cases compared with 45 non-sport cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seror, P

    2015-04-01

    Reporting clinical and electrodiagnostic characteristics of sport-related ulnar neuropathies at the wrist. Eight sport-related and 45 non-sport-related cases from 53 ulnar neuropathies at the wrist cases over 14 years. Sport-related ulnar neuropathies at the wrist cases were due to cycling (5 cases), kayaking (2 cases), and big-game fishing (1 case). No patient had sensory complaints in ulnar digits, and all had motor impairment. Conduction across the wrist with recording on the first dorsal interosseous muscle was impaired in all cases, with conduction block in 5. Two cyclists showed bilateral ulnar neuropathies at the wrist. All cases recovered within 2 to 6 months with sport discontinuation. Distal lesions of the deep motor branch were more frequent in sport- than non-sport-related cases. The 8 sport-related ulnar neuropathies at the wrist cases involved the deep motor branch. Conduction study to the first dorsal interosseous muscle across the wrist is the key to electrodiagnostics. Bilateral cases in cyclists does not require wrist imaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Treatment of humeroulnar subluxation with a dynamic proximal ulnar osteotomy: a review of 13 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilson, S.D.; Piermattei, D.L.; Schwarz, P.D.

    1989-01-01

    Humeroulnar subluxation was treated surgically in 13 dogs with 18 affected elbows using a proximal osteotomy of the ulna that allowed the ulna to elongate dynamically. Distal humeroulnar subluxation was secondary to premature closure of the distal ulnar physis in 16 elbows. One distal subluxation was secondary to a radioulnar synostosis, and one proximal subluxation developed after premature closure of the distal radial physis. The mean follow-up time was 22 months. Twenty-eight percent of the elbows were judged to have excellent results, 22% good results, 50% fair results, and none was judged to have a poor outcome. The presenting lameness grade and the severity of preoperative and postoperative humeroulnar subluxation had significant correlations with the prognosis. Associated orthopedic abnormalities and complications of concurrent surgical procedures affected the outcome in several dogs. Overall, the dynamic proximal ulnar osteotomy was a simple and effective technique for the treatment of uncomplicated humeroulnar subluxation

  12. Analysis of the Papal Benediction Sign: The ulnar neuropathy of St. Peter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futterman, Bennett

    2015-09-01

    The origin of the Papal Benediction Sign has been a source of controversy for many generations of medical students. The question has been whether the Papal Benediction Sign posture is the result of an injury to the median nerve or to the ulnar nerve. The increasingly popular use of online "chat rooms" and the vast quantities of information available on the internet has led to an increasing level of confusion. Looking in major anatomy texts, anatomy and board review books as well as numerous internet sites the answer remains unresolved. Through the analysis of functional anatomy of the hand, cultural and religious practices of the early centuries of the Common Era and church art a clear answer emerges. It will become apparent that this hand posture results from an ulnar neuropathy. Copyright © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Rupture of the ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb ? a review

    OpenAIRE

    Mahajan, Mandhkani; Rhemrev, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Skier?s thumb is a partial or complete rupture of the ulnar collateral ligament of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb. It is an often-encountered injury and can lead to chronic pain and instability when diagnosed incorrectly. Knowledge of the anatomy and accurate physical examination are essential in the evaluation of a patient with skier?s thumb. This article provides a review of the relevant anatomy, the correct method of physical examination and the options for additional imaging a...

  14. Sonography of injury of the ulnar collateral ligament of the elbow - initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Theodore T.; Adler, Ronald S.; Friedman, Lawrence

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the sonographic appearance of injuries of the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) of the elbow. Eight non-professional male baseball pitchers, ages 13-35 years, with medial elbow pain and clinical suspicion of ulnar collateral ligament injury, were referred for imaging. All eight underwent sonography of the affected and contralateral asymptomatic elbow, and six also underwent MR imaging. Neither valgus stress nor power Doppler was used during the sonographic examinations. Time from onset of symptoms to imaging was 1.5 weeks to 6 months. Three patients had surgical confirmation of their injuries, with time from imaging to surgery of 2 days to 9 months. In four patients, the UCL was ruptured, manifest sonographically in three cases as discontinuity of the normally hyperechoic ligament with anechoic fluid in the gap and in one case as non-visualization of the ligament with heterogeneous echogenicity in the expected location of the ligament. Two adolescent patients had avulsions of the UCL from the medial epicondyle, with sonographic demonstration of the avulsed echogenic bony fragment in both cases. One patient had a mild sprain, manifest as mild thickening and decreased echogenicity of the ligament sonographically compared with the contralateral normal elbow, with mild surrounding hypoechoic edema. The eighth patient had a small partial tear of the deep surface of the distal aspect of the ligament, visualized as a hypoechoic focus between the deep surface of the ligament and its ulnar attachment. Tears of the ulnar collateral ligament are manifested sonographically as non-visualization of the ligament or alteration of the normal morphology. (orig.)

  15. High-resolution MRI of the ulnar and radial collateral ligaments of the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Taiki; Wu, Wei Der; Kaneko, Yasuhito; Rafijah, Gregory; Yang, Lily; Hitt, Dave; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    2017-12-01

    Background Accurate diagnosis of injuries to the collateral ligaments of the wrist is technically challenging on MRI. Purpose To investigate usefulness of high-resolution two-dimensional (2D) and isotropic three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for identifying and classifying the morphology of the ulnar and radial collateral ligaments (UCL and RCL) of the wrist. Material and Methods Thirty-seven participants were evaluated using 3T coronal 2D and isotropic 3D images by two radiologists independently. The UCL was classified into four types: 1a, narrow attachment to the tip of the ulnar styloid (Tip); 1b, broad attachment to the Tip; 2a, narrow attachment to the medial base of the ulnar styloid (Base); and 2b, broad attachment to the Base. The RCL was also classified into four types: 1a, separate radioscaphoid and scaphotrapezial ligaments (RS + ST) with narrow scaphoid attachment; 1b, RS + ST with broad scaphoid attachment; 2a, continuous radio-scapho-trapezial ligaments (RST) with narrow scaphoid attachment; and 2b, RST with broad scaphoid attachment. The inter-observer reliability of these classifications was calculated. Results Type 1a was the most common of both collateral ligaments. Of UCL classifications, 31.4% were revised after additional review of multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images from isotropic data. The inter-observer reliability of UCL classification was substantial (k = 0.62) without MPR, and almost perfect (k = 0.84) with MPR. The inter-observer reliability of RCL classification was almost perfect (k = 0.89). Anatomic delineation between the two sequences was not statistically different. Conclusion The UCL and RCL were each identified on high-resolution 2D and isotropic 3D MRI equally well. MPR allows accurate identification of the UCL attachment to the ulnar styloid.

  16. The "hierarchical" Scratch Collapse Test for identifying multilevel ulnar nerve compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidge, Kristen M; Gontre, Gil; Tang, David; Boyd, Kirsty U; Yee, Andrew; Damiano, Marci S; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2015-09-01

    The Scratch Collapse Test (SCT) is used to assist in the clinical evaluation of patients with ulnar nerve compression. The purpose of this study is to introduce the hierarchical SCT as a physical examination tool for identifying multilevel nerve compression in patients with cubital tunnel syndrome. A prospective cohort study (2010-2011) was conducted of patients referred with primary cubital tunnel syndrome. Five ulnar nerve compression sites were evaluated with the SCT. Each site generating a positive SCT was sequentially "frozen out" with a topical anesthetic to allow determination of both primary and secondary ulnar nerve entrapment points. The order or "hierarchy" of compression sites was recorded. Twenty-five patients (mean age 49.6 ± 12.3 years; 64 % female) were eligible for inclusion. The primary entrapment point was identified as Osborne's band in 80 % and the cubital tunnel retinaculum in 20 % of patients. Secondary entrapment points were also identified in the following order in all patients: (1) volar antebrachial fascia, (2) Guyon's canal, and (3) arcade of Struthers. The SCT is useful in localizing the site of primary compression of the ulnar nerve in patients with cubital tunnel syndrome. It is also sensitive enough to detect secondary compression points when primary sites are sequentially frozen out with a topical anesthetic, termed the hierarchical SCT. The findings of the hierarchical SCT are in keeping with the double crush hypothesis described by Upton and McComas in 1973 and the hypothesis of multilevel nerve compression proposed by Mackinnon and Novak in 1994.

  17. Median and ulnar neuropathies in U.S. Army Medical Command Band members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Scott W; Koreerat, Nicholas R; Gordon, Lindsay B; Santillo, Douglas R; Moore, Josef H; Greathouse, David G

    2013-12-01

    Musicians have been reported as having a high prevalence of upper-extremity musculoskeletal disorders, including carpal tunnel syndrome. The purpose of this study was to determine the presence of median and ulnar neuropathies in U.S. Army Medical Command (MEDCOM) Band members at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Thirty-five MEDCOM Band members (30 males, 5 females) volunteered to participate. There were 33 right-handed musicians, and the mean length of time in the MEDCOM Band was 12.2 yrs (range, 1-30 yrs). Subjects completed a history form, were interviewed, and underwent a physical examination of the cervical spine and bilateral upper extremities. Nerve conduction studies of the bilateral median and ulnar nerves were performed. Electrophysiological variables served as the reference standard for median and ulnar neuropathy and included distal sensory latencies, distal motor latencies, amplitudes, conduction velocities, and comparison study latencies. Ten of the 35 subjects (29%) presented with abnormal electrophysiologic values suggestive of an upper extremity mononeuropathy. Nine of the subjects had abnormal median nerve electrophysiologic values at or distal to the wrist; 2 had bilateral abnormal values. One had an abnormal ulnar nerve electrophysiologic assessment at the elbow. Nine of these 10 subjects had clinical examination findings consistent with the electrophysiological findings. The prevalence of mononeuropathies in this sample of band members is similar to that found in previous research involving civilian musicians (20-36%) and far exceeds that reported in the general population. Prospective research investigating screening, examination items, and injury prevention measures in musicians appears to be warranted.

  18. Lipomatous macrodystrophy of the ulnar nerve: Role of magnetic resonance in the diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capelastegui, A.; Astigarraga, E.; Galan, V.

    1996-01-01

    Lipomatous macrodystrophy is a rare cause of macrodactyly that can be included among the bening adipose tissue tumors of the peripheral nerves. We present a case involving ulnar nerve, which is an unusual location since most of the reported cases correspond to median nerve. the magnetic resonance (MR) images are analyzed, and their role in the characterization and definition of the extension of these lesions is assessed. 4 refs

  19. Luxation of the elbow complicated by proximal radio-ulnar translocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekloef, O.; Nybonde, T.; Karlsson, G.; St. Goeran's Children's Hospital, Stockholm

    1990-01-01

    Luxation of the elbow complicated by proximal radio-ulnar translocation is a rare entity. The clue to diagosis is the reversed position of the bones of the proxomal forearm. In the a.p. projection the radial head articulates with the trochlea and the ulna with the capitellum. This unexpected anatomic relationship is easily overlooked. Delayed reduction may result in permanent impairment of elbow motility. Our experience with three recent cases is presented. (orig.)

  20. Luxation of the elbow complicated by proximal radio-ulnar translocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekloef, O.; Nybonde, T.; Karlsson, G. (St. Goeran' s Children' s Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Radiology St. Goeran' s Children' s Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Surgery)

    1990-03-01

    Luxation of the elbow complicated by proximal radio-ulnar translocation is a rare entity. The clue to diagosis is the reversed position of the bones of the proxomal forearm. In the a.p. projection the radial head articulates with the trochlea and the ulna with the capitellum. This unexpected anatomic relationship is easily overlooked. Delayed reduction may result in permanent impairment of elbow motility. Our experience with three recent cases is presented. (orig.).

  1. Transfixation pinning and casting of radial-ulnar fractures in calves: A review of three cases

    OpenAIRE

    St-Jean, Guy; Debowes, Richard M.

    1992-01-01

    We reviewed the medical records of three calves with radial-ulnar fractures which were reduced and stabilized by transfixation pinning and casting. Multiple Steinmann pins were placed transversely through proximal and distal fracture fragments and the pin ends were incorporated in fiberglass cast material after fracture reduction. Cast material was placed from proximal to distal radius and served as an external frame to maintain pin position and fracture reduction.

  2. The effect of distal ulnar implant stem material and length on bone strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austman, Rebecca L; Beaton, Brendon J B; Quenneville, Cheryl E; King, Graham J W; Gordon, Karen D; Dunning, Cynthia E

    2007-01-01

    Implant design parameters can greatly affect load transfer from the implant stem to the bone. We have investigated the effect of length or material of distal ulnar implant stems on the surrounding bone strains. Eight cadaveric ulnas were instrumented with 12 strain gauges and secured in a customized jig. Strain data were collected while loads (5-30 N) were applied to the medial surface of the native ulnar head. The native ulnar head was removed, and a stainless steel implant with an 8-cm-long finely threaded stem was cemented into the canal. After the cement had cured, the 8-cm stem was removed, leaving a threaded cement mantle in the canal that could accept shorter threaded stems of interest. The loading protocol was then repeated for stainless steel stems that were 7, 5, and 3 cm in length, as well as for a 5-cm-long titanium alloy (TiAl(6)V(4)) stem. Other stainless steel stem lengths between 3 and 7 cm were tested at intervals of 0.5 cm, with only a 20 N load applied. No stem length tested matched the native strains at all gauge locations. No significant differences were found between any stem length and the native bone at the 5th and 6th strain gauge positions. Strains were consistently closer to the native bone strains with the titanium stem than the stainless steel stem for each gauge pair that was positioned on the bone overlying the stem. The 3-cm stem results were closer to the native strains than the 7-cm stem for all loads at gauges locations that were on top of the stem. The results from this study suggest that the optimal stem characteristics for distal ulnar implants from a load transfer point of view are possessed by shorter (approximately 3 to 4 cm) titanium stems.

  3. Mobilização do osso pisiforme no tratamento da neuropraxia do nervo ulnar no canal de Guyon: relato de caso Pisiform bone mobilization for treating ulnar nerve neuropraxia at Guyon's canal: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio Guilherme Silva

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available As neuropraxias do nervo ulnar são lesões bastante freqüentes que provocam efeitos deletérios, como diminuição de força muscular e parestesias; geralmente ocorrem no nível do epicôndilo medial e do túnel ulnar (canal de Guyon. São escassos os relatos referentes a técnicas de terapia manual para compressões do nervo ulnar no canal de Guyon. Este trabalho relata o uso da técnica de mobilização do pisiforme na compressão do nervo ulnar no canal de Guyon de um homem que sofreu luxação do punho direito aos 8 anos e, aos 25, queixava-se de um deficit para adução do dedo mínimo, que atrapalhava a realização de algumas atividades de vida diária. O paciente foi submetido a uma única sessão de mobilização articular do pisiforme. Após a aplicação da técnica, o sinal positivo do teste foi eliminado, restabelecendo-se a função de adução do 5o dedo. Embora carecendo de maior fundamentação teórica, pode-se afirmar que a técnica usada, de mobilização articular do osso pisiforme, é eficaz para melhora do quadro de paresia por neuropraxia do nervo ulnar no canal de Guyon.A common ulnar nerve neuropraxia is lesion that may result in muscle strength decrease and/or paresthesia; it usually takes place at medial epicondyle level and the ulnar tunnel (Guyon's canal. Studies on manual therapy techniques for ulnar nerve compression in Guyon's canal are scarce. This paper reports the use of a technique of pisiform bone mobilization for relieving ulnar nerve compression in Guyon's canal, in a man who had suffered a luxation of the right wrist at the age of 8 and, at 25, complained of adduction deficit of the fifth finger that interfered in his daily life activities. He was submitted to one session of pisiform mobilization; after the session, the positive test sign was eliminated, thus restoring the fifth finger function. Though lacking further grounding, it may be said that the technique used, of mobilizing the pisiform bone

  4. Transfixation pinning and casting of radial-ulnar fractures in calves: A review of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Jean, G; Debowes, R M

    1992-04-01

    We reviewed the medical records of three calves with radial-ulnar fractures which were reduced and stabilized by transfixation pinning and casting. Multiple Steinmann pins were placed transversely through proximal and distal fracture fragments and the pin ends were incorporated in fiberglass cast material after fracture reduction. Cast material was placed from proximal to distal radius and served as an external frame to maintain pin position and fracture reduction.At the time of injury, the calves ranged in age from one day to two months and weighed from 37-102 kg. Two fractures were comminuted and one was transverse. All fractures were closed. After surgery, all calves could walk within 24 hours. Radiographic and clinical evidence of fracture healing was present five to seven weeks (mean 6) after surgery. At that time, the pins and cast material were removed. Return to normal function was rapid and judged to be excellent at follow-up evaluation five to nine months later.Advantages of transfixation pinning and casting in management of radial-ulnar fractures include flexibility in pin positioning, adequate maintenance of reduction, early return to weight-bearing status, preservation of joint mobility, and ease of ambulation. The inability to adjust fixation and alignment after cast application is a disadvantage of this technique compared with other external fixators. We concluded that transfixation pinning is a useful means of stabilizing radial-ulnar fractures in pediatric bovine patients.

  5. Use of locking compression plates in ulnar fractures of 18 horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Carrie C; Levine, David G; Richardson, Dean W

    2017-02-01

    To describe the outcome, clinical findings, and complications associated with the use of the locking compression plate (LCP) for various types of ulnar fractures in horses. Retrospective case series. Client owned horses (n = 18). Medical records, radiographs, and follow-up for horses having an ulnar fracture repaired using at least 1 LCP were reviewed. Fifteen of 18 horses had fractures of the ulna only, and 3 horses had fractures of the ulna and proximal radius. All 18 horses were discharged from the hospital. Complications occurred in 5 horses; incisional infection (n = 4, 22%), implant-associated infection (n = 2, 11%), and colic (n = 1, 6%). Follow-up was available for all horses at a range of 13-120 months and 15 horses (83%) were sound for their intended purpose and 3 horses (17%) were euthanatized. One horse was euthanatized for complications associated with original injury and surgery. The LCP is a viable method of internal fixation for various types of ulnar fractures, with most horses in this series returning to soundness. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  6. [Preliminary investigation of treatment of ulnar nerve defect by end-to-side neurorrhaphy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y; Wang, T; Fang, H

    1997-11-01

    In the repair of the defect of peripheral nerve, it was necessary to find an operative method with excellent therapeutic effect but simple technique. Based on the experimental study, one case of old injury of the ulnar nerve was treated by end-to-side neurorraphy with the intact median nerve. In this case the nerve defect was over 3 cm and unable to be sutured directly. The patient was followed up for fourteen months after the operation. The recovery of the sensation and the myodynamia was evaluated. The results showed that: the sensation and the motor function innervated by ulnar nerve were recovered. The function of the hand was almost recovered to be normal. It was proved that the end-to-side neurorraphy between the distal stump with the intact median nerve to repair the defect of the ulnar nerve was a new operative procedure for nerve repair. Clinically it had good effect with little operative difficulty. This would give a bright prospect to repair of peripheral nerve defect in the future.

  7. The distally-based island ulnar artery perforator flap for wrist defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karki Durga

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reconstruction of soft tissue defects around the wrist with exposed tendons, joints, nerves and bone represents a challenge to plastic surgeons, and such defects necessitate flap coverage to preserve hand functions and to protect its vital structures. We evaluated the use of a distally-based island ulnar artery perforator flap in patients with volar soft tissue defects around the wrist. Materials and Methods: Between June 2004 and June 2006, seven patients of soft tissue defects on the volar aspect of the wrist underwent distally-based island ulnar artery perforator flap. Out of seven patients, five were male and two patients were female. This flap was used in the reconstruction of the post road traffic accident defects in four patients and post electric burn defects in three patients. Flap was raised on one or two perforators and was rotated to 180°. Results: All flaps survived completely. Donor sites were closed primarily without donor site morbidity. Conclusion: The distally-based island Ulnar artery perforator flap is convenient, reliable, easy to manage and is a single-stage technique for reconstructing soft tissue defects of the volar aspect of the wrist. Early use of this flap allows preservation of vital structures, decreases morbidity and allows for early rehabilitation.

  8. Damage severity estimation from the global stiffness decrease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitescu, C; Gillich, G R; Manescu, T; Korka, Z I; Abdel Wahab, M

    2017-01-01

    In actual damage detection methods, localization and severity estimation can be treated separately. The severity is commonly estimated using fracture mechanics approach, with the main disadvantage of involving empirically deduced relations. In this paper, a damage severity estimator based on the global stiffness reduction is proposed. This feature is computed from the deflections of the intact and damaged beam, respectively. The damage is always located where the bending moment achieves maxima. If the damage is positioned elsewhere on the beam, its effect becomes lower, because the stress is produced by a diminished bending moment. It is shown that the global stiffness reduction produced by a crack is the same for all beams with a similar cross-section, regardless of the boundary conditions. One mathematical relation indicating the severity and another indicating the effect of removing damage from the beam. Measurements on damaged beams with different boundary conditions and cross-sections are carried out, and the location and severity are found using the proposed relations. These comparisons prove that the proposed approach can be used to accurately compute the severity estimator. (paper)

  9. Morphing wing structure with controllable twist based on adaptive bending-twist coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raither, Wolfram; Heymanns, Matthias; Bergamini, Andrea; Ermanni, Paolo

    2013-06-01

    A novel semi-passive morphing airfoil concept based on variable bending-twist coupling induced by adaptive shear center location and torsional stiffness is presented. Numerical parametric studies and upscaling show that the concept relying on smart materials permits effective twist control while offering the potential of being lightweight and energy efficient. By means of an experimental characterization of an adaptive beam and a scaled adaptive wing structure, effectiveness and producibility of the structural concept are demonstrated.

  10. Morphology and morphometry of the ulnar head of the pronator teres muscle in relation to median nerve compression at the proximal forearm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurses, I A; Altinel, L; Gayretli, O; Akgul, T; Uzun, I; Dikici, F

    2016-12-01

    The pronator syndrome is a rare compression neuropathy of the median nerve. Ulnar head of the pronator teres muscle may cause compression at proximal forearm. Detailed morphologic and morphometric studies on the anatomy of the ulnar head of pronator teres is scarce. We dissected 112 forearms of fresh cadavers. We evaluated the morphology and morphometry of the ulnar head of pronator teres muscle. The average ulnar head width was 16.3±8.2mm. The median nerve passed anterior to the ulnar head at a distance of 50.4±10.7mm from the interepicondylar line. We classified the morphology of the ulnar head into 5 types. In type 1, the ulnar head was fibromuscular in 60 forearms (53.6%). In type 2, it was muscular in 23 forearms (20.5%). In type 3, it was just a fibrotic band in 18 forearms (16.1%). In type 4, it was absent in 9 forearms (8%). In type 5, the ulnar head had two arches in 2 forearms (1.8%). In 80 forearms (71.5%: types 1, 3, and 5), the ulnar head was either fibromuscular or a fibrotic band. Although the pronator syndrome is a rare compression syndrome, the ulnar head of pronator teres is reported as the major cause of entrapment in the majority of the cases. The location of the compression of the median nerve in relation to the ulnar head of pronator teres muscle and the morphology of the ulnar head is important for open or minimally-invasive surgical treatment. Sectional study. Basic science study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Measurement and Treatment of Passive Muscle Stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Henrik

    , which aimed to investigate: 1) The development of a clinical method to evaluate and distinguish neural (reflex mediated stiffness) and non-neural (passive muscle stiffness) components of muscle stiffness in adults with CP by objective and reliable measurements. 2) The association between increased...... and reliability of the method, and argue for the use of the method in the clinical practice. The device is able to distinguish between passive muscle stiffness and reflex-mediated stiffness in subjects with CP. It shows good high intrarater and interrater reliability in evaluation of passive muscle stiffness...... to measure muscle stiffness, and distinguish between passive muscle stiffness and reflex-mediated stiffness. Furthermore, it is a reliable device to measure changes in passive ROM. Treatment of passive muscle stiffness should be directed towards intense training, comprising many repetitions with a functional...

  12. Comparison of femoropopliteal artery stents under axial and radial compression, axial tension, bending, and torsion deformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleckis, Kaspars; Deegan, Paul; Poulson, William; Sievers, Cole; Desyatova, Anastasia; MacTaggart, Jason; Kamenskiy, Alexey

    2017-11-01

    High failure rates of Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) stenting appear to be associated with the inability of certain stent designs to accommodate severe biomechanical environment of the femoropopliteal artery (FPA) that bends, twists, and axially compresses during limb flexion. Twelve Nitinol stents (Absolute Pro, Supera, Lifestent, Innova, Zilver, Smart Control, Smart Flex, EverFlex, Viabahn, Tigris, Misago, and Complete SE) were quasi-statically tested under bench-top axial and radial compression, axial tension, bending, and torsional deformations. Stents were compared in terms of force-strain behavior, stiffness, and geometrical shape under each deformation mode. Tigris was the least stiff stent under axial compression (6.6N/m axial stiffness) and bending (0.1N/m) deformations, while Smart Control was the stiffest (575.3N/m and 105.4N/m, respectively). Under radial compression Complete SE was the stiffest (892.8N/m), while Smart Control had the lowest radial stiffness (211.0N/m). Viabahn and Supera had the lowest and highest torsional stiffness (2.2μNm/° and 959.2μNm/°), respectively. None of the 12 PAD stents demonstrated superior characteristics under all deformation modes and many experienced global buckling and diameter pinching. Though it is yet to be determined which of these deformation modes might have greater clinical impact, results of the current analysis may help guide development of new stents with improved mechanical characteristics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sleeve bridging of the rhesus monkey ulnar nerve with muscular branches of the pronator teres: multiple amplification of axonal regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-hui Kou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple-bud regeneration, i.e., multiple amplification, has been shown to exist in peripheral nerve regeneration. Multiple buds grow towards the distal nerve stump during proximal nerve fiber regeneration. Our previous studies have verified the limit and validity of multiple amplification of peripheral nerve regeneration using small gap sleeve bridging of small donor nerves to repair large receptor nerves in rodents. The present study sought to observe multiple amplification of myelinated nerve fiber regeneration in the primate peripheral nerve. Rhesus monkey models of distal ulnar nerve defects were established and repaired using muscular branches of the right forearm pronator teres. Proximal muscular branches of the pronator teres were sutured into the distal ulnar nerve using the small gap sleeve bridging method. At 6 months after suture, two-finger flexion and mild wrist flexion were restored in the ulnar-sided injured limbs of rhesus monkey. Neurophysiological examination showed that motor nerve conduction velocity reached 22.63 ± 6.34 m/s on the affected side of rhesus monkey. Osmium tetroxide staining demonstrated that the number of myelinated nerve fibers was 1,657 ± 652 in the branches of pronator teres of donor, and 2,661 ± 843 in the repaired ulnar nerve. The rate of multiple amplification of regenerating myelinated nerve fibers was 1.61. These data showed that when muscular branches of the pronator teres were used to repair ulnar nerve in primates, effective regeneration was observed in regenerating nerve fibers, and functions of the injured ulnar nerve were restored to a certain extent. Moreover, multiple amplification was subsequently detected in ulnar nerve axons.

  14. Sleeve bridging of the rhesus monkey ulnar nerve with muscular branches of the pronator teres: multiple amplification of axonal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Yu-Hui; Zhang, Pei-Xun; Wang, Yan-Hua; Chen, Bo; Han, Na; Xue, Feng; Zhang, Hong-Bo; Yin, Xiao-Feng; Jiang, Bao-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Multiple-bud regeneration, i.e., multiple amplification, has been shown to exist in peripheral nerve regeneration. Multiple buds grow towards the distal nerve stump during proximal nerve fiber regeneration. Our previous studies have verified the limit and validity of multiple amplification of peripheral nerve regeneration using small gap sleeve bridging of small donor nerves to repair large receptor nerves in rodents. The present study sought to observe multiple amplification of myelinated nerve fiber regeneration in the primate peripheral nerve. Rhesus monkey models of distal ulnar nerve defects were established and repaired using muscular branches of the right forearm pronator teres. Proximal muscular branches of the pronator teres were sutured into the distal ulnar nerve using the small gap sleeve bridging method. At 6 months after suture, two-finger flexion and mild wrist flexion were restored in the ulnar-sided injured limbs of rhesus monkey. Neurophysiological examination showed that motor nerve conduction velocity reached 22.63 ± 6.34 m/s on the affected side of rhesus monkey. Osmium tetroxide staining demonstrated that the number of myelinated nerve fibers was 1,657 ± 652 in the branches of pronator teres of donor, and 2,661 ± 843 in the repaired ulnar nerve. The rate of multiple amplification of regenerating myelinated nerve fibers was 1.61. These data showed that when muscular branches of the pronator teres were used to repair ulnar nerve in primates, effective regeneration was observed in regenerating nerve fibers, and functions of the injured ulnar nerve were restored to a certain extent. Moreover, multiple amplification was subsequently detected in ulnar nerve axons.

  15. MIT miniaturized disk bend test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harling, O.K.; Lee, M.; Sohn, D.S.; Kohse, G.; Lau, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    A miniaturized disk bend test (MDBT) using transmission electron microscopy specimens for the determination of various mechanical properties is being developed at MIT. Recent progress in obtaining strengths and ductilities of highly irradiated metal alloys is reviewed. Other mechanical properties can also be obtained using the MDBT approach. Progress in fatigue testing and in determination of the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature is reviewed briefly. 11 figures

  16. Elastic Modulus of Foamcrete in Compression and Bending at Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Azree Othuman Mydin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper will presents the experimental results that have been performed to examine and characterize the mechanical properties of foamcrete at elevated temperatures. Foamcrete of 650 and 1000 kg/m 3 density were cast and tested under compression and bending. The tests were done at room temperature, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, and 600°C. The results of this study consistently demonstrated that the loss in stiffness for cement based material like foamcrete at elevated temperatures occurs predominantly after about 95°C, regardless of density. This indicates that the primary mechanism causing stiffness degradation is microcracking, which occurs as water expands and evaporates from the porous body. As expected, reducing the density of LFC reduces its strength and stiffness. However, for LFC of different densities, the normalised strength-temperature and stiffnesstemperature relationships are very similar.

  17. Stabilization of the ulnar stump using modified Breen method after the Sauve-Kapandji procedure in rheumatoid wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanino, Yoshihiko; Yabe, Yutaka; Yamauchi, Kenji; Ikegami, Hiroyasu; Ichikawa, Tooru

    2006-01-01

    We report on the utility of the modified Breen method in addition to the Sauve-Kapandji operation for the treatment of instability and pain in the proximal ulnar stump in rheumatoid arthrities (RA) wrist. We treated a total of 15 hands in 12 patients with disturbances due to instability and pain at the proximal ulnar stump. The average follow-up period was 47 months. We evaluated the range of motion, grip strength, radioulnar distance, and the radioulnar distance at the stump using CT during pronation, supination, and neutral positions of the forearm in 11 of the 15 operated hands. We observed that none of the patients showed any signs of pain at the proximal ulnar stump and no scallop sign was observed. In all the cases, the line connecting the center of the radial head to the proximal ulnar stump served as the axis of rotation for the forearm; this was confirmed by the CT images. We concluded that our operative method resulted in stabilization of the proximal ulnar stump and recovery of powerful grip without pain during forearm rotation. (author)

  18. Effect of long-term isometric training on core/torso stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Benjamin C Y; McGill, Stuart M

    2015-06-01

    Although core stiffness enhances athletic performance traits, controversy exists regarding the effectiveness of isometric vs. dynamic core training methods. This study aimed to determine whether long-term changes in stiffness can be trained, and if so, what is the most effective method. Twenty-four healthy male subjects (23 ± 3 years; 1.8 ± 0.06 m; 77.5 ± 10.8 kg) were recruited for passive and active stiffness measurements before and after a 6-week core training intervention. Twelve subjects (22 ± 2 years; 1.8 ± 0.08 m; 78.3 ± 12.3 kg) were considered naive to physical and core exercise. The other 12 subjects (24 ± 3 years; 1.8 ± 0.05 m; 76.8 ± 9.7 kg) were Muay Thai athletes (savvy). A repeated-measures design compared core training methods (isometric vs. dynamic, with a control group) and subject training experience (naive vs. savvy) before and after a 6-week training period. Passive stiffness was assessed on a "frictionless" bending apparatus and active stiffness assessed through a quick release mechanism. Passive stiffness increased after the isometric training protocol. Dynamic training produced a smaller effect, and as expected, there was no change in the control group. Active stiffness did not change in any group. Comparisons between subject and training groups did not reveal any interactions. Thus, an isometric training approach was superior in terms of enhancing core stiffness. This is important since increased core stiffness enhances load bearing ability, arrests painful vertebral micromovements, and enhances ballistic distal limb movement. This may explain the efficacy reported for back and knee injury reduction.

  19. Association of Gastrocnemius Muscle Stiffness With Passive Ankle Joint Stiffness and Sex-Related Difference in the Joint Stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chino, Kintaro; Takashi, Hideyuki

    2017-11-15

    Passive ankle joint stiffness is affected by all structures located within and over the joint, and is greater in men than in women. Localized muscle stiffness can be assessed by ultrasound shear wave elastography, and muscle architecture such as fascicle length and pennation angle can be measured by B-mode ultrasonography. Thus, we assessed localized muscle stiffness of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) with consideration of individual variability in the muscle architecture, and examined the association of the muscle stiffness with passive ankle joint stiffness and the sex-related difference in the joint stiffness. Localized muscle stiffness of the MG in 16 men and 17 women was assessed at 10° and 20° plantar flexion, neutral anatomical position, 10° and 20° dorsiflexion. Fascicle length and pennation angle of the MG were measured at these joint positions. Passive ankle joint stiffness was determined by the ankle joint angle-torque relationship. Localized MG muscle stiffness was not significantly correlated with passive ankle joint stiffness, and did not show significant sex-related difference, even when considering the muscle architecture. This finding suggest that muscle stiffness of the MG would not be a prominent factor to determine passive ankle joint stiffness and the sex-related difference in the joint stiffness.

  20. Sonographic measurements of the ulnar nerve at the elbow with different degrees of elbow flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Prutha; Norbury, John W; Fang, Xiangming

    2014-05-01

    To determine whether there were differences in the cross-sectional area (CSA) and the flattening ratio of the normative ulnar nerve as it passes between the medial epicondyle and the olecranon at 30° of elbow flexion versus 90° of elbow flexion. Bilateral upper extremities of normal healthy adult volunteers were evaluated with ultrasound. The CSA and the flattening ratio of the ulnar nerve at the elbow as it passes between the medial epicondyle and the olecranon were measured, with the elbow flexed at 30° and at 90°, by 2 operators with varying ultrasound scanning experience by using ellipse and direct tracing methods. The results from the 2 different angles of elbow flexion were compared for each individual operator. Finally, intraclass correlations for absolute agreement and consistency between the 2 raters were calculated. An outpatient clinic room at a regional rehabilitation center. Twenty-five normal healthy adult volunteers. The mean CSA and the mean flattening ratio of the ulnar nerve at 30° of elbow flexion and at 90° of elbow flexion. First, for the ellipse method, the mean CSA of the ulnar nerve at 90° (9.93 mm(2)) was slightly larger than at 30° (9.77 mm(2)) for rater 1. However, for rater 2, the mean CSA of the ulnar nerve at 90° (6.80 mm(2)) was slightly smaller than at 30° (7.08 mm(2)). This was found to be statistically insignificant when using a matched pairs t test and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test, with a significance level of .05. Similarly, the difference between the right side and the left side was not statistically significant. The intraclass correlations for absolute agreement between the 2 raters were not very high due to different measurement locations, but the intraclass correlations for consistency were high. Second, for the direct tracing method, the mean CSA at 90° (7.26 mm(2)) was slightly lower than at 30° (7.48 mm(2)). This was found to be statistically nonsignificant when using the matched pairs t test and the

  1. Radiologic examination and measurement of the wrist and distal radio-ulnar joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toernvall, A.H.; Ekenstam, F. af; Hagert, C.G.; Irstam, L.; Sahlgrenska Sjukhuset, Goeteborg; Uppsala Univ.

    1986-01-01

    Following fractures of the distal radius, a relatively high incidence of complications is caused by malalignment in the distal radio-ulnar (DRU) joint; recent anatomic and clinical investigations have shown a congruity of that joint to be of significant importance for restoring the function of the wrist. The radius forms a moderately arched bone, which moves around the ulna in pronation and supination. Biomechanically, the ulna may be regarded as the pillar around which the radius moves. In an anatomic investigation of 5 arm specimens, we have shown that the maximum cartilage contact in the DRU joint between the ulna head and the distal radius occurs in the neutral rotation position. A proposed routine examination method of the wrist and forearm includes a true antero-posterior and a lateral projection of the radius and the ulna, performed with the forearm and wrist in a neutral rotation, a neutral wrist deviation and with the elbow angled 90 degrees. Such an examination implies a standardized and reproducible method. In a radioanatomic investigation, a series of 50 healthy wrists and forearms were examined. A simple measuring technique is presented, applicable to the DRU joint and wrist favouring the ulna as the bone through which a reproducible long axis of the forearm/wrist may be drawn. It is suggested that the length of the radius should be judged relative to the ulna. Ulnar head inclination and radio-ulnar angle are new concepts, being major characteristics of the DRU joint. These angles of the right and left wrist were equal and no difference was found between the sexes. Minor alterations of the distal radius may be revealed when estimating these angles. (orig.)

  2. Radiologic examination and measurement of the wrist and distal radio-ulnar joint. New aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toernvall, A.H.; Ekenstam, F. af; Hagert, C.G.; Irstam, L.

    Following fractures of the distal radius, a relatively high incidence of complications is caused by malalignment in the distal radio-ulnar (DRU) joint; recent anatomic and clinical investigations have shown a congruity of that joint to be of significant importance for restoring the function of the wrist. The radius forms a moderately arched bone, which moves around the ulna in pronation and supination. Biomechanically, the ulna may be regarded as the pillar around which the radius moves. In an anatomic investigation of 5 arm specimens, we have shown that the maximum cartilage contact in the DRU joint between the ulna head and the distal radius occurs in the neutral rotation position. A proposed routine examination method of the wrist and forearm includes a true antero-posterior and a lateral projection of the radius and the ulna, performed with the forearm and wrist in a neutral rotation, a neutral wrist deviation and with the elbow angled 90 degrees. Such an examination implies a standardized and reproducible method. In a radioanatomic investigation, a series of 50 healthy wrists and forearms were examined. A simple measuring technique is presented, applicable to the DRU joint and wrist favouring the ulna as the bone through which a reproducible long axis of the forearm/wrist may be drawn. It is suggested that the length of the radius should be judged relative to the ulna. Ulnar head inclination and radio-ulnar angle are new concepts, being major characteristics of the DRU joint. These angles of the right and left wrist were equal and no difference was found between the sexes. Minor alterations of the distal radius may be revealed when estimating these angles.

  3. ULNAR NEURITIS ASSOCIATED WITH GUN STOCK DEFORMITY FOLLOWING SUPRACONDYLAR FRACTURE OF HUMERUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Morhan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: This case report describes a patient who was referred to physiotherapist from a hand surgeon. Among the fractures around the elbow joint, radial head fracture and fracture of distal end of radius are common among adults. The occurrence of Supracondylar fractures are more commonly seen in children when compared to adults. One of the complications of this fracture is malunion resulting in Gun stock deformity. The main Purpose of this case report is to explore, 1. The complication associated with gunstock deformity 2. Chances of iatrogenic nerve injury after manipulation under anesthesia. 3.Long term supervised rehabilitation approach. Case Description: A 40 years old male patient referred to our Physiotherapy department by a hand surgeon. After the initial evaluation, findings revealed limitation in right elbow movement and tingling and numbness sensation in little and half of ring fingers in his right side. This patient underwent ulnar nerve transposition surgery followed by rehabilitation. His physiotherapy session includes electrotherapeutic agents for pain relief, passive mobilization of elbow and strengthening program for his flexors and extensors of elbow for a period of one year. Outcome: The outcome of the long term rehabilitation approach for a patient with ulnar neuropathy secondary to gunstock deformity after ulnar nerve transposition surgery is good. The patients tingling and numbness decreased and the range of elbow movement improved significantly. Discussion: Most common complications of fracture of distal end of humerus include malunion,ischemic contracture and nerve injuries. The relative incidence of iatrogenic nerve injuries associatedwith this fracture has been reported as being 2%-6%. Nerve injuries after Supracondylar humeral fractures occur primarily due to tenting or entrapment of the nerve on the sharp proximal humeral fragment, while iatrogenic injuries occur either during closed manipulation or percutaneous

  4. Bending and stretching of plates

    CERN Document Server

    Mansfield, E H; Hemp, W S

    1964-01-01

    The Bending and Stretching of Plates deals with elastic plate theory, particularly on small- and large-deflexion theory. Small-deflexion theory concerns derivation of basic equations, rectangular plates, plates of various shapes, plates whose boundaries are amenable to conformal transformation, plates with variable rigidity, and approximate methods. Large-deflexion theory includes general equations and some exact solutions, approximate methods in large-deflexion theory, asymptotic large-deflexion theories for very thin plates. Asymptotic theories covers membrane theory, tension field theory, a

  5. The travail of River Bend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studness, C.M.

    1990-01-01

    This article looks at the attempts by Gulf States Utilities to get the River Bend Nuclear Plant into its rate base. The review begins with the initial filing of rate cases in Texas and Louisiana in 1986 and continues through many court cases and appeals all the way to the Texas Supreme Court. The preferred and preference shareholders now nominally control the company through election of 10 of 15 members of the company's board of directors. This case is used as an argument for deregulation in favor of competition

  6. Interfascicular suture with nerve autografts for median, ulnar and radial nerve lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluchino, F; Luccarelli, G

    1981-05-01

    Interfascicular nerve suture with autografts is the operation of choice for repairing peripheral nerve injuries because it ensures more precise alignment of the fasciculi and so better chances of reinnervation of the sectioned nerve. The procedure as described by Millesi et al has been used at the Istituto Neurologico di Milano in 30 patients with traumatic lesions of the median, ulnar and radial nerves. All have been followed up for 2 to 7 years since operation. The results obtained are compared with those of other series obtained with interfascicular suture and with epineural suture. Microsurgery is essential. The best time to operate is discussed.

  7. Radiocephalic Fistula Complicated by Distal Ischemia: Treatment by Ulnar Artery Dilatation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raynaud, Alain; Novelli, Luigi; Rovani, Xavier; Carreres, Thierry; Bourquelot, Pierre; Hermelin, Alain; Angel, C.; Beyssen, B.

    2010-01-01

    Hand ischemic steal syndrome due to a forearm arteriovenous fistula is a rare occurrence. However, its frequency is increasing with the rise in numbers of elderly and diabetic patients. This complication, which is more common for proximal than for distal accesses, can be very severe and may cause loss of hand function, damage to fingers, and even amputation of fingers or the hand. Its treatment is difficult and often leads to access loss. We report here a case of severe hand ischemia related to a radiocephalic fistula successfully treated by ulnar artery dilatation.

  8. Severe Ulnar Nerve Injury After Bee Venom Acupuncture at a Traditional Korean Medicine Clinic: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joon Sang; Park, Yoon Ghil; Jang, Chul Hoon; Cho, Yoo Na; Park, Jung Hyun

    2017-06-01

    This case report describes a severe nerve injury to the right ulnar nerve, caused by bee venom acupuncture. A 52-year-old right-handed man received bee venom acupuncture on the medial side of his right elbow and forearm, at a Traditional Korean Medicine (TKM) clinic. Immediately after acupuncture, the patient experienced pain and swelling on the right elbow. There was further development of weakness of the right little finger, and sensory changes on the ulnar dermatome of the right hand. The patient visited our clinic 7 days after acupuncture. Electrodiagnostic studies 2 weeks after the acupuncture showed ulnar nerve damage. The patient underwent steroid pulse and rehabilitation treatments. However, his condition did not improve completely, even 4 months after acupuncture.

  9. Influence of Tension Stiffening on the Flexural Stiffness of Reinforced Concrete Circular Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Francesco; Amico, Cosimo; Salvatore, Walter; Squeglia, Nunziante; Stacul, Stefano

    2017-06-18

    Within this paper, the assessment of tension stiffening effects on a reinforced concrete element with the circular sections subjected to axial and bending loads is presented. To this purpose, an enhancement of an analytical model already present within the actual technical literature is proposed. The accuracy of the enhanced method is assessed by comparing the experimental results carried out in past research and the numerical ones obtained by the model. Finally, a parametric study is executed in order to study the influence of axial compressive force on the flexural stiffness of reinforced concrete elements that are characterized by a circular section, comparing the secant stiffness evaluated at yielding and at maximum resistance, considering and not considering the effects of tension stiffness.

  10. Influence of Tension Stiffening on the Flexural Stiffness of Reinforced Concrete Circular Sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Morelli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Within this paper, the assessment of tension stiffening effects on a reinforced concrete element with the circular sections subjected to axial and bending loads is presented. To this purpose, an enhancement of an analytical model already present within the actual technical literature is proposed. The accuracy of the enhanced method is assessed by comparing the experimental results carried out in past research and the numerical ones obtained by the model. Finally, a parametric study is executed in order to study the influence of axial compressive force on the flexural stiffness of reinforced concrete elements that are characterized by a circular section, comparing the secant stiffness evaluated at yielding and at maximum resistance, considering and not considering the effects of tension stiffness.

  11. A eutectic-alloy-infused soft actuator with sensing, tunable degrees of freedom, and stiffness properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yufei; Wang, Tianmiao; Xie, Zhexin; Sun, Wenguang; Liu, Zemin; Fang, Xi; Yang, Minxuan; Wen, Li

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents a soft actuator embedded with two types of eutectic alloys which enable sensing, tunable mechanical degrees of freedom (DOF), and variable stiffness properties. To modulate the stiffness of the actuator, we embedded a low melting point alloy (LMPA) in the bottom portion of the soft actuator. Different sections of the LMPA could be selectively melted by the Ni-Cr wires twined underneath. To acquire the curvature information, EGaIn (eutectic gallium indium) was infused into a microchannel surrounding the chambers of the soft actuator. Systematic experiments were performed to characterize the stiffness, tunable DOF, and sensing the bending curvature. We found that the average bending force and elasticity modulus could be increased about 35 and 4000 times, respectively, with the LMPA in a solid state. The entire LMPA could be melted from a solid to a liquid state within 12 s. In particular, up to six different motion patterns could be achieved under each pneumatic pressure of the soft actuator. Furthermore, the kinematics of the actuator under different motion patterns could be obtained by a mathematical model whose input was provided by the EGaIn sensor. For demonstration purposes, a two-fingered gripper was fabricated to grasp various objects by adjusting the DOF and mechanical stiffness.

  12. Longitudinal relaxation of initially straight flexible and stiff polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrakopoulos, Panagiotis; Dissanayake, Inuka

    2004-11-01

    The present talk considers the relaxation of a single flexible or stiff polymer chain from an initial straight configuration in a viscous solvent. This problem commonly arises when strong flows are turned off in both industrial and biological applications. The problem is also motivated by recent experiments with single biopolymer molecules relaxing after being fully extended by applied forces as well as by the recent development of micro-devices involving stretched tethered biopolymers. Our results are applicable to a wide array of synthetic polymers such as polyacrylamides, Kevlar and polyesters as well as biopolymers such as DNA, actin filaments, microtubules and MTV. In this talk we discuss the mechanism of the polymer relaxation as was revealed through Brownian Dynamics simulations covering a broad range of time scales and chain stiffness. After the short-time free diffusion, the chain's longitudinal reduction at early intermediate times is shown to constitute a universal behavior for any chain stiffness caused by a quasi-steady relaxation of tensions associated with the deforming action of the Brownian forces. Stiff chains are shown to exhibit a late intermediate-time longitudinal reduction associated with a relaxation of tensions affected by the deforming Brownian and the restoring bending forces. The longitudinal and transverse relaxations are shown to obey different laws, i.e. the chain relaxation is anisotropic at all times. In the talk, we show how from the knowledge of the relaxation mechanism, we can predict and explain the polymer properties including the polymer stress and the solution birefringence. In addition, a generalized stress-optic law is derived valid for any time and chain stiffness. All polymer properties which depend on the polymer length are shown to exhibit two intermediate-time behaviors with the early one to constitute a universal behavior for any chain stiffness. This work was supported in part by the Minta Martin Research Fund. The

  13. Properties and determination of the interface stiffness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Danxu; Zhang Hao; Srolovitz, David J.

    2007-01-01

    The chemical potential of a curved interface contains a term that is proportional to the product of the interface curvature and the interface stiffness. In crystalline materials, the interface stiffness is a tensor. This paper examines several basic issues related to the properties of the interface stiffness, especially the determination of the interface stiffness in particular directions (i.e. the commonly used scalar form of the interface stiffness). Of the five parameters that describe an arbitrary grain boundary, only those describing the inclination are crucial for the scalar stiffness. We also examine the influence of crystal symmetry on the stiffness tensor for both free surfaces and grain boundaries. This results in substantial simplifications for cases in which interfaces possess mirror or rotational symmetries. An efficient method for determining the interface stiffness tensor using atomistic simulations is proposed

  14. OSTEOID OSTEOMA OF THE HAMATE AS A CAUSE OF COMPRESSION NEUROPATHY OF THE ULNAR NERVE IN GUYON CANAL (CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Semenkin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoid  osteoma of the wrist bones is rare and its diagnostics is complicated. A clinical case of the surgical treatment of the patient with osteoid osteoma is presented. The clinical manifestations included  pain, extensors  tenosynovitis and neuropathy of the ulnar nerve in guyon’s canal. The diagnosis was confirmed by computer tomography, ultrasonography and electromyography. Partial resection of the hamate including pathology area, and mobilization of the ulnar nerve in the wrist enabled authors  to obtain a good functional outcome.

  15. TOPOGRAFÍA INTRANEURAL DE LA RAMA PROFUNDA DEL NERVIO ULNAR EN EL ANTEBRAZO DISTAL: ESTUDIO CADAVÉRICO. Intraneural topography of the deep branch of the ulnar nerve in the distal forearm: cadaveric study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín García Pisón

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: estudiar la topografía intraneural de la rama profunda del nervio ulnar (RPNU en el antebrazo distal en vistas a su identificación mediante disección intraneural mínima durante la transferencia del nervio del pronador cuadrado (NPC a la RPNU. Materiales y métodos: En 15 antebrazos cadavéricos se fijó el paquete vasculonervioso ulnar a los planos musculares profundos cada un centímetro tomando como referencia el hueso pisiforme. Se disecó en sentido proximal la RPNU bajo microscopio quirúrgico (Olympus OME, 4-20x y se registró su posición intraneural en base a una división en cuadrantes. Se midió la distancia desde el origen de la rama cutánea dorsal (RCD del nervio ulnar al pisiforme y se registró su relación intraneural con la RPNU. Resultados: La RPNU se individualizó hasta 69mm (41-94 proximal al hueso pisiforme, ubicándose en el cuadrante posteromedial del nervio ulnar en el 78% (67-87, el 93% (92-93 y el 100% de los casos entre los 0-2, 3-6 y 7-9 centímetros, respectivamente. La distancia pisiforme-RCD fue de 63mm (52-83. En 11 miembros la disección de la RPNU se extendió proximalmente al origen de la RCD, ubicándose siempre entre esta última y la rama superficial del nervio ulnar. Conclusiones: La topografía intraneural de la RPNU en el sitio óptimo para su sección en vistas a su anastomosis con el NPC es predecible en la mayoría de los casos, lo que confirma la viabilidad de su identificación precisa mediante disección intraneural mínima.  Objective: to assess the intraneural anatomy of the deep branch of the ulnar nerve (DBUN in the distal forearm in reference to its identification by means of minimal intraneural dissection during pronator quadratus nerve to DBUN transfers. Materials and methods: In 15 cadaveric forearms the ulnar neurovascular bundle was identified and attached to the subjacent muscles every one centimeter. Pisiform bone was used as reference. Intraneural proximal dissection of

  16. Lamb Wave Stiffness Characterization of Composites Undergoing Thermal-Mechanical Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, Michael D.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2004-01-01

    The introduction of new, advanced composite materials into aviation systems requires a thorough understanding of the long term effects of combined thermal and mechanical loading upon those materials. Analytical methods investigating the effects of intense thermal heating combined with mechanical loading have been investigated. The damage mechanisms and fatigue lives were dependent on test parameters as well as stress levels. Castelli, et al. identified matrix dominated failure modes for out-of-phase cycling and fiber dominated damage modes for in-phase cycling. In recent years, ultrasonic methods have been developed that can measure the mechanical stiffness of composites. To help evaluate the effect of aging, a suitably designed Lamb wave measurement system is being used to obtain bending and out-of-plane stiffness coefficients of composite laminates undergoing thermal-mechanical loading. The system works by exciting an antisymmetric Lamb wave and calculating the velocity at each frequency from the known transducer separation and the measured time-of-flight. The same peak in the waveforms received at various distances is used to measure the time difference between the signals. The velocity measurements are accurate and repeatable to within 1% resulting in reconstructed stiffness values repeatable to within 4%. Given the material density and plate thickness, the bending and out-of-plane shear stiffnesses are calculated from a reconstruction of the dispersion curve. A mechanical scanner is used to move the sensors over the surface to map the time-of-flight, velocity, or stiffnesses of the entire specimen. Access to only one side of the material is required and no immersion or couplants are required because the sensors are dry coupled to the surface of the plate. In this study, the elastic stiffnesses D(sub 11), D(sub 22), A(sub 44), and A(sub 55) as well as time-of-flight measurements for composite samples that have undergone combined thermal and mechanical aging for

  17. Evaluation on Bending Properties of Biomaterial GUM Metal Meshed Plates for Bone Graft Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hiromichi; He, Jianmei

    2017-11-01

    There are three bone graft methods for bone defects caused by diseases such as cancer and accident injuries: Autogenous bone grafts, Allografts and Artificial bone grafts. In this study, meshed GUM Metal plates with lower elasticity, high strength and high biocompatibility are introduced to solve the over stiffness & weight problems of ready-used metal implants. Basic mesh shapes are designed and applied to GUM Metal plates using 3D CAD modeling tools. Bending properties of prototype meshed GUM Metal plates are evaluated experimentally and analytically. Meshed plate specimens with 180°, 120° and 60° axis-symmetrical types were fabricated for 3-point bending tests. The pseudo bending elastic moduli of meshed plate specimens obtained from 3-point bending test are ranged from 4.22 GPa to 16.07 GPa, within the elasticity range of natural cortical bones from 2.0 GPa to 30.0 GPa. Analytical approach method is validated by comparison with experimental and analytical results for evaluation on bending property of meshed plates.

  18. Shoulder Stiffness : Current Concepts and Concerns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Itoi, Eiji; Arce, Guillermo; Bain, Gregory I.; Diercks, Ronald L.; Guttmann, Dan; Imhoff, Andreas B.; Mazzocca, Augustus D.; Sugaya, Hiroyuki; Yoo, Yon-Sik

    Shoulder stiffness can be caused by various etiologies such as immobilization, trauma, or surgical interventions. The Upper Extremity Committee of ISAKOS defined the term "frozen shoulder" as idiopathic stiff shoulder, that is, without a known cause. Secondary stiff shoulder is a term that should be

  19. Completed Ulnar Shaft Stress Fracture in a Fast-Pitch Softball Pitcher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltfong, Roger E; Carruthers, Katherine H; Popp, James E

    2017-03-01

    Stress fractures of the upper extremity have been previously described in the literature, yet reports of isolated injury to the ulna diaphysis or olecranon are rare. The authors describe a case involving an 18-year-old fast-pitch softball pitcher. She presented with a long history of elbow and forearm pain, which was exacerbated during a long weekend of pitching. Her initial physician diagnosed her as having forearm tendinitis. She was treated with nonsurgical means including rest, anti-inflammatory medications, therapy, and kinesiology taping. She resumed pitching when allowed and subsequently had an acute event immediately ceasing pitching. She presented to an urgent care clinic that evening and was diagnosed as having a complete ulnar shaft fracture subsequently needing surgical management. This case illustrates the need for a high degree of suspicion for ulnar stress fractures in fast-pitch soft-ball pitchers with an insidious onset of unilateral forearm pain. Through early identification and intervention, physicians may be able to reduce the risk of injury progression and possibly eliminate the need for surgical management. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):e360-e362.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Median and Ulnar Neuropathy Assessment in Parkinson’s Disease regarding Symptom Severity and Asymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilgul Yardimci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. While increasing evidence suggests comorbidity of peripheral neuropathy (PNP and Parkinson’s disease (PD, the pathogenesis of PNP in PD is still a debate. The aim of this article is to search the core PD symptoms such as rigidity and tremor as contributing factors to mononeuropathy development while emphasizing each individual patient’s asymmetric symptom severity. Methods. We studied 62 wrists and 62 elbows of 31 patients (mean age 66.48±10.67 and 64 wrists and 64 elbows of 32 age-gender matched healthy controls (mean age 62.03±10.40, p=0.145. The Hoehn and Yahr disability scale and Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rated Scale were used to determine the severity of the disease. Results. According to electrodiagnostic criteria, we confirmed median neuropathy in 16.12% (bilateral in two-thirds of the patients and ulnar neuropathy in 3.22% of the PD group. While mean age (p=0.003, age at PD onset (p=0.019, and H&Y scores (p=0.016 were significant, tremor and rigidity scores were not. The comparison of the mean indices of electrophysiologic parameters indicated subclinical median and ulnar nerve demyelination both at the wrist and at the elbow in the patient groups where a longer disease duration and mild tremor and rigidity scores are prominent, remarkably. Conclusion. A disease related peripheral neurodegeneration beyond symptom severity occurs in PD.

  1. Anterior subcutaneous transposition of the ulnar nerve improves neurological function in patients with cubital tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although several surgical procedures exist for treating cubital tunnel syndrome, the best surgical option remains controversial. To evaluate the efficacy of anterior subcutaneous transposition of the ulnar nerve in patients with moderate to severe cubital tunnel syndrome and to analyze prognostic factors, we retrospectively reviewed 62 patients (65 elbows diagnosed with cubital tunnel syndrome who underwent anterior subcutaneous transposition. Preoperatively, the initial severity of the disease was evaluated using the McGowan scale as modified by Goldberg: 18 patients (28% had grade IIA neuropathy, 20 (31% had grade IIB, and 27 (42% had grade III. Postoperatively, according to the Wilson & Krout criteria, treatment outcomes were excellent in 38 patients (58%, good in 16 (25%, fair in 7 (11%, and poor in 4 (6%, with an excellent and good rate of 83%. A negative correlation was found between the preoperative McGowan grade and the postoperative Wilson & Krout score. The patients having fair and poor treatment outcomes had more advanced age, lower nerve conduction velocity, and lower action potential amplitude compared with those having excellent and good treatment outcomes. These results suggest that anterior subcutaneous transposition of the ulnar nerve is effective and safe for the treatment of moderate to severe cubital tunnel syndrome, and initial severity, advancing age, and electrophysiological parameters can affect treatment outcome.

  2. Dynamic bending of bionic flexible body driven by pneumatic artificial muscles(PAMs) for spinning gait of quadruped robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jingtao; Yu, Huangying; Wang, Tianmiao

    2016-01-01

    The body of quadruped robot is generally developed with the rigid structure. The mobility of quadruped robot depends on the mechanical properties of the body mechanism. It is difficult for quadruped robot with rigid structure to achieve better mobility walking or running in the unstructured environment. A kind of bionic flexible body mechanism for quadruped robot is proposed, which is composed of one bionic spine and four pneumatic artificial muscles(PAMs). This kind of body imitates the four-legged creatures' kinematical structure and physical properties, which has the characteristic of changeable stiffness, lightweight, flexible and better bionics. The kinematics of body bending is derived, and the coordinated movement between the flexible body and legs is analyzed. The relationship between the body bending angle and the PAM length is obtained. The dynamics of the body bending is derived by the floating coordinate method and Lagrangian method, and the driving force of PAM is determined. The experiment of body bending is conducted, and the dynamic bending characteristic of bionic flexible body is evaluated. Experimental results show that the bending angle of the bionic flexible body can reach 18°. An innovation body mechanism for quadruped robot is proposed, which has the characteristic of flexibility and achieve bending by changing gas pressure of PAMs. The coordinated movement of the body and legs can achieve spinning gait in order to improve the mobility of quadruped robot.

  3. Dynamic stiffness of suction caissons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Liingaard, Morten; Andersen, Lars

    This report concerns the dynamic soil-structure interaction of steel suction caissons applied as foundations for offshore wind turbines. An emphasis is put on torsional vibrations and coupled sliding/rocking motion, and the influence of the foundation geometry and the properties of the surrounding...... soil is examined. The soil is simplified as a homogenous linear viscoelastic material and the dynamic stiffness of the suction caisson is expressed in terms of dimensionless frequency-dependent coefficients corresponding to the different degrees of freedom. The dynamic stiffness coefficients...... for the skirted foundation are evaluated by means of a three-dimensional coupled boundary element/finite element model. Comparisons with known analytical and numerical solutions indicate that the static and dynamic behaviour of the foundation are predicted accurately with the applied model. The analysis has been...

  4. Use of Guided Acoustic Waves to Assess the Effects of Thermal-Mechanical Cycling on Composite Stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, Michael D.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2000-01-01

    The introduction of new, advanced composite materials into aviation systems requires it thorough understanding of the long-term effects of combined thermal and mechanical loading. As part of a study to evaluate the effects of thermal-mechanical cycling, it guided acoustic (Lamb) wave measurement system was used to measure the bending and out-of-plane stiffness coefficients of composite laminates undergoing thermal-mechanical loading. The system uses a pulse/receive technique that excites an antisymmetric Lamb mode and measures the time-of-flight over a wide frequency range. Given the material density and plate thickness, the bending and out-of-plane shear stiffnesses are calculated from a reconstruction of the velocity dispersion curve. A series of 16 and 32-ply composite laminates were subjected to it thermal-mechanical loading profile in load frames equipped with special environmental chambers. The composite systems studied were it graphite fiber reinforced amorphous thermoplastic polyimide and it graphite fiber reinforced bismaleimide thermoset. The samples were exposed to both high and low temperature extremes its well as high and low strain profiles. The bending and out-of-plane stiffnesses for composite sample that have undergone over 6,000 cycles of thermal-mechanical loading are reported. The Lamb wave generated elastic stiffness results have shown decreases of up to 20% at 4,936 loading cycles for the graphite/thermoplastic samples and up to 64% at 4,706 loading cycles for the graphite/thermoset samples.

  5. Stiffness and frictional resistance of a superelastic nickel-titanium orthodontic wire with low-stress hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Yu-Cheng; Su, Yu-Yu M; Lai, Yu-Lin; Lee, Shyh-Yuan

    2007-05-01

    Stress-induced martensite formation with stress hysteresis that changes the elasticity and stiffness of nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) wire influences the sliding mechanics of archwire-guided tooth movement. This in-vitro study investigated the frictional behavior of an improved superelastic Ni-Ti wire with low-stress hysteresis. Improved superelastic Ni-Ti alloy wires (L & H Titan, Tomy International, Tokyo, Japan) with low-stress hysteresis were examined by using 3-point bending and frictional resistance tests with a universal test machine at a constant temperature of 35 degrees C, and compared with the former conventional austenitic-active superelastic Ni-Ti wires (Sentalloy, Tomy International). Wire stiffness levels were derived from differentiation of the polynomial regression of the unloading curves, and values for kinetic friction were measured at constant bending deflection distances of 0, 2, 3, and 4 mm, respectively. Compared with conventional Sentalloy wires, the L & H Titan wire had a narrower stress hysteresis including a lower loading plateau and a higher unloading plateau. In addition, L & H Titan wires were less stiff than the Sentalloy wires during most unloading stages. Values of friction measured at deflections of 0, 2, and 3 mm were significantly (P Sentalloy wires at all bending deflections (P <.05). Stress-induced martensite formation significantly reduced the stiffness and thus could be beneficial to decrease the binding friction of superelastic Ni-Ti wires during sliding with large bending deflections. Austenitic-active alloy wires with low-stress hysteresis and lower stiffness and friction offer significant potential for further investigation.

  6. [Metabolic syndrome and aortic stiffness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simková, A; Bulas, J; Murín, J; Kozlíková, K; Janiga, I

    2010-09-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of risk factors that move the patient into higher level of risk category of cardiovascular disease and the probability of type 2 diabetes mellitus manifestation. Definition of MS is s based on the presence of selected risk factors as: abdominal obesity (lager waist circumpherence), atherogenic dyslipidemia (low value of HDL-cholesterol and increased level of triglycerides), increased fasting blood glucose (or type 2 DM diagnosis), higher blood pressure or antihypertensive therapy. In 2009 there were created harmonizing criteria for MS definition; the condition for assignment of MS is the presence of any 3 criteria of 5 mentioned above. The underlying disorder of MS is an insulin resistance or prediabetes. The patients with MS more frequently have subclinical (preclinical) target organ disease (TOD) which is the early sings of atherosclerosis. Increased aortic stiffness is one of the preclinical diseases and is defined by pathologically increased carotidofemoral pulse wave velocity in aorta (PWV Ao). With the aim to assess the influence of MS on aortic stiffness we examined the group of women with arterial hypertension and MS and compare them with the group of women without MS. The aortic stiffness was examined by Arteriograph--Tensiomed, the equipment working on the oscillometric principle in detection of pulsations of brachial artery. This method determines the global aortic stiffness based on the analysis of the shape of pulse curve of brachial artery. From the cohort of 49 pts 31 had MS, the subgroups did not differ in age or blood pressure level. The mean number of risk factors per person in MS was 3.7 comparing with 1.7 in those without MS. In the MS group there was more frequently abdominal obesity present (87% vs 44%), increased fasting blood glucose (81% vs 22%) and low HDL-cholesterol level. The pulse wave velocity in aorta, PWV Ao, was significantly higher in patients with MS (mean value 10,19 m/s vs 8,96 m

  7. A Numerical Study of the Spring-Back Phenomenon in Bending with a Rebar Bending Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Hwan Choi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the rebar bending methodology started to change from field processing to utilizing rebar bending machines at plant sites prior to transport to the construction locations. Computerized control of rebar plant bending machines provides more accurate and faster bending of rebars than the low quality inefficient field processing alternative. The bending process involves plastic deformation of rebars, where bending stress beyond the yield point of the material is applied. When the bending stress is removed, spring back is caused by the elastic restoring stress. Therefore, an accurate numerical analysis of the spring-back process is required to reduce the bending process errors. The most sensitive factors affecting the spring-back process are the bending radius, the bending angle, the diameter of the rebar, the friction coefficient, and the yielding strength of material. In this paper, we suggest a numerical modeling method using these factors. The finite element modeling of the dynamic mechanical behavior of the material during bending is performed using a commercial dynamic analysis program “DAFUL.” We use the least squares approach to derive the spring-back deflection as a function of the rebar bending parameters.

  8. Regional variation in the mechanical properties of the vertebral column during lateral bending in Morone saxatilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowroozi, B N; Brainerd, E L

    2012-10-07

    Unlike mammalian, disc-shaped intervertebral joints (IVJs), the IVJs in fishes are biconid structures, filled with fluid and thought to act as hydrostatic hinge joints during swimming. However, it remains unclear which IVJ structures are dominant in mechanical resistance to forces in fishes, and whether variation in these tissues might impact the function of the vertebral column along its length. Here, we measured the dynamic mechanical behaviour of IVJs from striped bass, Morone saxatilis. During lateral bending, angular stiffness was significantly lower in the caudal and cervical regions, relative to the abdominal region. The neutral zone, defined as the range of motion (ROM) at bending moments less than 0.001 Nm, was longer in the caudal relative to the abdominal IVJs. Hysteresis was 30-40% in all regions, suggesting that IVJs may play a role in energy dissipation during swimming. Cutting the vertical septum had no statistically significant effect, but cutting the encapsulating tissues caused a sharp decline in angular stiffness and a substantial increase in ROM and hysteresis. We conclude that stiffness decreases and ROM increases from cranial to caudal in striped bass, and that the encapsulating tissues play a prominent role in mechanical variation along the length of the vertebral column.

  9. KIN SP: A boundary element method based code for single pile kinematic bending in layered soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Stacul

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In high seismicity areas, it is important to consider kinematic effects to properly design pile foundations. Kinematic effects are due to the interaction between pile and soil deformations induced by seismic waves. One of the effect is the arise of significant strains in weak soils that induce bending moments on piles. These moments can be significant in presence of a high stiffness contrast in a soil deposit. The single pile kinematic interaction problem is generally solved with beam on dynamic Winkler foundation approaches (BDWF or using continuous models. In this work, a new boundary element method (BEM based computer code (KIN SP is presented where the kinematic analysis is preceded by a free-field response analysis. The analysis results of this method, in terms of bending moments at the pile-head and at the interface of a two-layered soil, are influenced by many factors including the soil–pile interface discretization. A parametric study is presented with the aim to suggest the minimum number of boundary elements to guarantee the accuracy of a BEM solution, for typical pile–soil relative stiffness values as a function of the pile diameter, the location of the interface of a two-layered soil and of the stiffness contrast. KIN SP results have been compared with simplified solutions in literature and with those obtained using a quasi-three-dimensional (3D finite element code.

  10. Clarification of Eponymous Anatomical Terminology: Structures Named After Dr Geoffrey V. Osborne That Compress the Ulnar Nerve at the Elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wali, Arvin R; Gabel, Brandon; Mitwalli, Madhawi; Tubbs, R Shane; Brown, Justin M

    2017-05-01

    In 1957, Dr Geoffrey Osborne described a structure between the medial epicondyle and the olecranon that placed excessive pressure on the ulnar nerve. Three terms associated with such structures have emerged: Osborne's band, Osborne's ligament, and Osborne's fascia. As anatomical language moves away from eponymous terminology for descriptive, consistent nomenclature, we find discrepancies in the use of anatomic terms. This review clarifies the definitions of the above 3 terms. We conducted an extensive electronic search via PubMed and Google Scholar to identify key anatomical and surgical texts that describe ulnar nerve compression at the elbow. We searched the following terms separately and in combination: "Osborne's band," "Osborne's ligament," and "Osborne's fascia." A total of 36 papers were included from 1957 to 2016. Osborne's band, Osborne's ligament, and Osborne's fascia were found to inconsistently describe the etiology of ulnar neuritis, referring either to the connective tissue between the 2 heads of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle as described by Dr Osborne or to the anatomically distinct fibrous tissue between the olecranon process of the ulna and the medial epicondyle of the humerus. The use of eponymous terms to describe ulnar pathology of the elbow remains common, and although these terms allude to the rich history of surgical anatomy, these nonspecific descriptions lead to inconsistencies. As Osborne's band, Osborne's ligament, and Osborne's fascia are not used consistently across the literature, this research demonstrates the need for improved terminology to provide reliable interpretation of these terms among surgeons.

  11. Handlebar palsy--a compression syndrome of the deep terminal (motor) branch of the ulnar nerve in biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitani, Daniel; Beer, Serafin

    2002-10-01

    We describe 3 patients who developed a severe palsy of the intrinsic ulnar supplied hand muscles after bicycle riding. Clinically and electrophysiologically all showed an isolated lesion of the deep terminal motor branch of the ulnar nerve leaving the hypothenar muscle and the distal sensory branch intact. This type of lesion at the canal of Guyon is quite unusual, caused in the majority of cases by chronic external pressure over the ulnar palm. In earlier reports describing this lesion in bicycle riders, most patients experienced this lesion after a long distance ride. Due to the change of riding position and shape of handlebars (horn handle) in recent years, however, even a single bicycle ride may be sufficient to cause a lesion of this ulnar branch. Especially in downhill riding, a large part of the body weight is supported by the hand on the corner of the handlebar leading to a high load at Guyon's canal. As no sensory fibres are affected, the patients are not aware of the ongoing nerve compression until a severe lesion develops. Individual adaptation of the handlebar and riding position seems to be crucial for prevention of this type of nerve lesion.

  12. Giant-Cell Tumor of the Distal Ulna Treated by Wide Resection and Ulnar Support Reconstruction: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Minami

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant-cell tumor of bone occurred in the distal end of the ulna is extremely uncommon. A 23-year-old male had a giant-cell tumor occurred in the distal end of the ulna. After wide resection of the distal segment of the ulna including giant-cell tumor, ulnar components of the wrist joint were reconstructed with modified Sauvé-Kapandji procedure using the iliac bone graft, preserving the triangular fibrocartilage complex and ulnar collateral ligament in order to maintain ulnar support of the wrist, and the proximal stump of the resected ulna was stabilized by tenodesis using the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon. One year after operation, the patient's wrist was pain-free and had a full range of motion. Postoperative X-rays showed no abnormal findings including recurrence of the giant-cell tumor and ulnar translation of the entire carpus. The stability of the proximal stump of the distal ulna was also maintained.

  13. Bends and splitters in graphene nanoribbon waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Yan, Wei; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the performance of bends and splitters in graphene nanoribbon waveguides. Although the graphene waveguides are lossy themselves, we show that bends and splitters do not induce any additional loss provided that the nanoribbon width is sub-wavelength. We use transmission line theory...

  14. Effect of therapeutic ultrasound intensity on subcutaneous tissue temperature and ulnar nerve conduction velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, J F

    1985-02-01

    Twenty subjects completed 5 min. periods of sonation, at each of six US intensities, over the ulnar nerve in the proximal forearm. All posttreatment NCV's differed significantly from the respective pretreatment velocities. The immediate posttreatment NCV associated with placebo US was significantly (p less than 0.01) less than that observed immediately pretreatment (2.81 m/s), while the five clinical US intensities produced significantly increased immediate posttreatment velocities: 0.5 w/cm2 (2.23 m/s) at (p less than 0.05), and 1.0 w/cm2 (2.78 m/s), 1.5 w/cm2 (3.15 m/s), 2.0 w/cm2 (4.47 m/s) and 2.5 w/cm2 (2.97 m/s) at (p less than 0.01). The posttreatment velocities associated with the five clinical intensities were all significantly greater (p less than 0.01) than that associated with placebo US. Subcutaneous tissue temperatures were directly related to the intensity of US. Not until US intensity had reached 1.5 w/cm2 did the heating effect of US negate the cooling effect of the US transmission gel, to produce significantly increased subcutaneous tissue temperatures after 5 min. sonation. The decreased ulnar motor NCV's associated with placebo US are attributed to the cooling effect of the US transmission gel. The increased ulnar motor NCV's associated with the clinical intensities of US are attributed to the deep heating effect of US. The breakdown of this linear relationship at 2.5 w/cm2 intensity suggests that at this point heating on the nerve and/or the mechanical effects of US were of sufficient magnitude so as to limit the increase in conduction velocity. Sonation over an area of approximately 4.5 times the soundhead for 5 min., along the proximal forearm, at clinical intensities did not have a bipositive effect on motor NCV.

  15. Relationship between the Ulnar Nerve and the Branches of the Radial Nerve to the Medial Head of the Triceps Brachii Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sh, Cho; Ih, Chung; Uy, Lee

    2018-05-17

    One branch of the radial nerve to the medial head of the triceps brachii muscle (MHN) has been described as accompanying or joining the ulnar nerve. Mostly two MHN branches have been reported, with some reports of one; however, the topographical anatomy is not well documented. We dissected 52 upper limbs from adult cadavers and found one, two, and three MHN branches in 9.6%, 80.8%, and 9.6% of cases, respectively. The MHN accompanying the ulnar nerve was always the superior MHN. The relationship between the ulnar nerve and the MHN was classified into four types according to whether the MHN was enveloped along with the ulnar nerve in the connective tissue sheath and whether it was in contact with the ulnar nerve. It contacted the ulnar nerve in 75.0% of cases and accompanied it over a mean distance of 73.6 mm (range 36-116 mm). In all cases in which the connective tissue sheath enveloped the branch of the MHN and the ulnar nerve, removing the sheath confirmed that the MHN branch originated from the radial nerve. The detailed findings and anatomical measurements of the MHN in this study will help in identifying its branches during surgical procedures. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. An analytical study on the static vertical stiffness of wire rope isolators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balaji, P. S.; Rahman, M. E.; Ho, Lau Hieng [Curtin University Sarawak, Miri (Malaysia); Moussa, Leblouba [University of Sharjah, Sharjah (United Arab Emirates)

    2016-01-15

    The vibrations caused by earthquake ground motions or the operations of heavy machineries can affect the functionality of equipment and cause damages to the hosting structures and surrounding equipment. A Wire rope isolator (WRI), which is a type of passive isolator known to be effective in isolating shocks and vibrations, can be used for vibration isolation of lightweight structures and equipment. The primary advantage of the WRI is that it can provide isolation in all three planes and in any orientation. The load-supporting capability of the WRI is identified from the static stiffness in the loading direction. Static stiffness mainly depends on the geometrical and material properties of the WRI. This study develops an analytical model for the static stiffness in the vertical direction by using Castigliano's second theorem. The model is validated by using the experimental results obtained from a series of monotonic loading tests. The flexural rigidity of the wire ropes required in the model is obtained from the transverse bending test. Then, the analytical model is used to conduct a parametric analysis on the effects of wire rope diameter, width, height, and number of turns (loops) on vertical stiffness. The wire rope diameter influences stiffness more than the other geometric parameters. The developed model can be accurately used for the evaluation and design of WRIs.

  17. Plastic loads of pipe bends under combined pressure and out-of-plane bending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kuk Hee; Kim, Yun Jae; Park, Chi Yong; Lee, Sung Ho; Kim, Tae Ryong

    2007-01-01

    Based on three-Dimensional (3-D) FE limit analyses, this paper provides plastic limit and TES(Twice- Elastic-Slope) loads for pipe bends under combined pressure and out-of-plane bending. The plastic limit loads are determined from FE limit analyses based on elastic.perfectly-plastic materials using the small geometry change option, and the FE limit analyses using the large geometry change option provide TES plastic loads. A wide range of parameters related to the bend geometry is considered. Based on the FE results, closed-form approximations of plastic limit and TES plastic load solutions for pipe bends under out-of-plane bending are proposed

  18. Pure neuritic leprosy presenting as ulnar nerve neuropathy: a case report of electrodiagnostic, radiographic, and histopathological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Russell; Baccon, Jennifer; Dossett, John; Scollard, David; Byler, Debra; Patel, Akshal; Harbaugh, Kimberly

    2015-11-01

    Hansen's disease, or leprosy, is a chronic infectious disease with many manifestations. Though still a major health concern and leading cause of peripheral neuropathy in the developing world, it is rare in the United States, with only about 150 cases reported each year. Nevertheless, it is imperative that neurosurgeons consider it in the differential diagnosis of neuropathy. The causative organism is Mycobacterium leprae, which infects and damages Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system, leading first to sensory and then to motor deficits. A rare presentation of Hansen's disease is pure neuritic leprosy. It is characterized by nerve involvement without the characteristic cutaneous stigmata. The authors of this report describe a case of pure neuritic leprosy presenting as ulnar nerve neuropathy with corresponding radiographic, electrodiagnostic, and histopathological data. This 11-year-old, otherwise healthy male presented with progressive right-hand weakness and numbness with no cutaneous abnormalities. Physical examination and electrodiagnostic testing revealed findings consistent with a severe ulnar neuropathy at the elbow. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse thickening and enhancement of the ulnar nerve and narrowing at the cubital tunnel. The patient underwent ulnar nerve decompression with biopsy. Pathology revealed acid-fast organisms within the nerve, which was pathognomonic for Hansen's disease. He was started on antibiotic therapy, and on follow-up he had improved strength and sensation in the ulnar nerve distribution. Pure neuritic leprosy, though rare in the United States, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of those presenting with peripheral neuropathy and a history of travel to leprosy-endemic areas. The long incubation period of M. leprae, the ability of leprosy to mimic other conditions, and the low sensitivity of serological tests make clinical, electrodiagnostic, and radiographic evaluation necessary for diagnosis

  19. Coupling between the Output Force and Stiffness in Different Variable Stiffness Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Jafari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental objective in developing variable stiffness actuators is to enable the actuator to deliberately tune its stiffness. This is done through controlling the energy flow extracted from internal power units, i.e., the motors of a variable stiffness actuator (VSA. However, the stiffness may also be unintentionally affected by the external environment, over which, there is no control. This paper analysis the correlation between the external loads, applied to different variable stiffness actuators, and their resultant output stiffness. Different types of variable stiffness actuators have been studied considering springs with different types of nonlinearity. The results provide some insights into how to design the actuator mechanism and nonlinearity of the springs in order to increase the decoupling between the load and stiffness in these actuators. This would significantly widen the application range of a variable stiffness actuator.

  20. In-plane and out-of-plane bending tests on carbon steel pipe bends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouard, D.; Tremblais, A.; Vrillon, B.

    1979-01-01

    The objectives of these tests were to obtain experimental results on bends behaviour in elastic and plastic regime by in plane and out of plane bending. Results were used to improve the computer model, for large distorsion of bends, to be used in a simplified beam type computer code for piping calculations. Tests were made on type ANSI B 169 DN 5 bends in ASTM A 106 Grade B carbon steel. These tests made it possible to measure, for identical bends, in elastic regime, the flexibility factors and, in plastic regime, the total evolution in opening, in closing and out of plane. Flexibility factors of 180 0 bend without flanges are approximately the same in opening and in closing. The end effect due to flanges is not very significant, but it is important for 90 0 bends. In plastic regime, collapse loads or collapse moments of bends depends also of both the end effects and the angle bend. The end effects and the angle bend are more sensitive in opening than in closing. The interest of these tests is to procure some precise evolution curves of identical bends well characterized in geometry and metal strength, deflected in large distorsions. (orig./HP)

  1. Nonreconstruction Options for Treating Medial Ulnar Collateral Ligament Injuries of the Elbow in Overhead Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Nicholas J; Desai, Vishal S; Dines, Joshua D; Morrey, Mark E; Camp, Christopher L

    2018-03-01

    This review aims to describe the nonreconstructive options for treating ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) injuries ranging from nonoperative measures, including physical therapy and biologic injections, to ligament repair with and without augmentation. Nonoperative options for UCL injuries include guided physical therapy and biologic augmentation with platelet-rich plasma (PRP). In some patients, repair of the UCL has shown promising return to sport rates by using modern suture and suture anchor techniques. Proximal avulsion injuries have shown the best results after repair. Currently, there is growing interest in augmentation of UCL repair with an internal brace. The treatment of UCL injuries involves complex decision making. UCL reconstruction remains the gold standard for attritional injuries and complete tears, which occur commonly in professional athletes. However, nonreconstructive options have shown promising results for simple avulsion or partial thickness UCL injuries. Future research comparing reconstructive versus nonreconstructive options is necessary.

  2. In vivo electrophysiological measurement of the rat ulnar nerve with axonal excitability testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wild, Brandon M.; Morris, Renée; Moldovan, Mihai

    2018-01-01

    Electrophysiology enables the objective assessment of peripheral nerve function in vivo. Traditional nerve conduction measures such as amplitude and latency detect chronic axon loss and demyelination, respectively. Axonal excitability techniques "by threshold tracking" expand upon these measures...... by providing information regarding the activity of ion channels, pumps and exchangers that relate to acute function and may precede degenerative events. As such, the use of axonal excitability in animal models of neurological disorders may provide a useful in vivo measure to assess novel therapeutic...... interventions. Here we describe an experimental setup for multiple measures of motor axonal excitability techniques in the rat ulnar nerve. The animals are anesthetized with isoflurane and carefully monitored to ensure constant and adequate depth of anesthesia. Body temperature, respiration rate, heart rate...

  3. Recovery from distal ulnar motor conduction block injury: serial EMG studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Liliana; Felice, Kevin J

    2002-07-01

    Acute conduction block injuries often result from nerve compression or trauma. The temporal pattern of clinical, electrophysiologic, and histopathologic changes following these injuries has been extensively studied in experimental animal models but not in humans. Our recent evaluation of a young man with an injury to the deep motor branch of the ulnar nerve following nerve compression from weightlifting exercises provided the opportunity to follow the course and recovery of a severe conduction block injury with sequential nerve conduction studies. The conduction block slowly and completely resolved, as did the clinical deficit, over a 14-week period. The reduction in conduction block occurred at a linear rate of -6.1% per week. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Ulnar nerve injury due to lateral traction device during shoulder arthroscopy: Was it avoidable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Pandey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the nerve injuries reported during shoulder arthroscopy in a beach chair, or lateral position is related to inappropriate patient positioning or excess traction. The lateral decubitus position is more vulnerable for traction-related neuropraxia. The present case serves as an important lesson from an avoidable situation of “having a one track mind” of the surgical team during the arthroscopic repair of shoulder instability performed in the lateral decubitus position. The operating surgeon must supervise the appropriate positioning of the patient on operation table and adequate padding of vulnerable bony points before beginning of shoulder arthroscopy to prevent any position-related nerve injuries. This is probably the first case to illustrate an unusual cause of ulnar nerve compression particularly related to the use of an additional traction device in the arthroscopic repair of shoulder instability performed in lateral decubitus position, which has not been previously defined.

  5. Pseudarthrosis of radial shaft with dislocation of heads of radial and ulnar bones (case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Puseva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors presented a rare clinical case - the injury of forearm complicated by the formation of the pseudarthrosis of the radial shaft in combination with old dislocation of heads the radius and ulna. The differentiated approach to the choice of surgical tactics was proposed, which consists of several consistent stages: taking free autotransplant from the crest of iliac bone, resection of pseudarthrosis of radius with replacement of the bone defect by the graft for restoration of anatomic length, conducting combined strained osteosynthesis and elimination of dislocation of a head of radial and ulnar bones by transosseous osteosynthesis. The chosen treatment strategy allowed to restore the anatomy and function of the upper extremity.

  6. Acute Compressive Ulnar Neuropathy in a Patient of Dengue Fever: An Unusual Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Mehtani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dengue haemorrhagic fever is known for its haemorrhagic and neurologic complications. Neurologic complications are caused by three mechanism namely neurotropism, systemic complications causing encephalopathy and postinfectious immune-mediated mechanisms. However acute compressive neuropathy due to haemorrhage is not frequent and we could find no literature describing this Case Report: We report a case of acute compressive ulnar neuropathy due to peri neural hematoma, following an attempt at intravenous cannulation in the cubital fossa in a patient of dengue haemorrhagic fever with thrombocytopenia. Immediate fasciotomy and removal of haematoma was performed to relieve the symptoms. Conclusion: Compression neuropathies can be seen in dengue hemorrhagic fever and removal of compressing hematoma relieves symptoms. Keywords: Dengue haemmorrhagic fever; coagulopathy; peri neural haematoma.

  7. [Instability of the distal radioulnar joint: Treatment options for ulnar lesions of the triangular fibrocartilage complex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, C K; Prommersberger, K J; Langer, M; Müller, L P; Hahn, P; Unglaub, F

    2015-08-01

    Injuries of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) may be fatal to the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). This structure is one of the crucial stabilizers and guarantees unrestricted pronosupination of the forearm. A systematic examination is mandatory to diagnose DRUJ instability reliably. A clinical examination in comparison to the contralateral side is obligatory. Plain radiographs are required to exclude osseous lesions or deformities. Computed tomography of both wrists in neutral, pronation and supination is necessary to verify DRUJ instability in ambiguous situations. Based on a systematic examination wrist and DRUJ arthroscopy identify lesions clearly. Injuries of the radioulnar ligaments which entail DRUJ instability, should be reconstructed preferably anatomically. Ulnar-sided TFCC lesions may often cause DRUJ instability. Osseous ligament avulsions are mostly treated osteosynthetically. Ligament tears may be refixated using anchor or transosseous sutures. Tendon transplants are necessary for an anatomical reconstruction in cases of irreparable ruptures.

  8. Effect of crosslink torsional stiffness on elastic behavior of semiflexible polymer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatami-Marbini, H.

    2018-02-01

    Networks of semiflexible filaments are building blocks of different biological and structural materials such as cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix. The mechanical response of these systems when subjected to an applied strain at zero temperature is often investigated numerically using networks composed of filaments, which are either rigidly welded or pinned together at their crosslinks. In the latter, filaments during deformation are free to rotate about their crosslinks while the relative angles between filaments remain constant in the former. The behavior of crosslinks in actual semiflexible networks is different than these idealized models and there exists only partial constraint on torques at crosslinks. The present work develops a numerical model in which two intersecting filaments are connected to each other by torsional springs with arbitrary stiffness. We show that fiber networks composed of rigid and freely rotating crosslinks are the limiting case of the present model. Furthermore, we characterize the effects of stiffness of crosslinks on effective Young's modulus of semiflexible networks as a function of filament flexibility and crosslink density. The effective Young's modulus is determined as a function of the mechanical properties of crosslinks and is found to vanish for networks composed of very weak torsional springs. Independent of the stiffness of crosslinks, it is found that the effective Young's modulus is a function of fiber flexibility and crosslink density. In low density networks, filaments primarily bend and the effective Young's modulus is much lower than the affine estimate. With increasing filament bending stiffness and/or crosslink density, the mechanical behavior of the networks becomes more affine and the stretching of filaments depicts itself as the dominant mode of deformation. The torsional stiffness of the crosslinks significantly affects the effective Young's modulus of the semiflexible random fiber networks.

  9. MRI shows thickening and altered diffusion in the median and ulnar nerves in multifocal motor neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haakma, Wieke [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Aarhus University, Department of Forensic Medicine and Comparative Medicine Lab, Aarhus (Denmark); Jongbloed, Bas A.; Goedee, H.S.; Berg, Leonard H. van den; Pol, W.L. van der [University Medical Center Utrecht, Brain Centre Rudolf Magnus, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); Froeling, Martijn; Bos, Clemens; Hendrikse, Jeroen [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Leemans, Alexander [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2017-05-15

    To study disease mechanisms in multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the median and ulnar nerves. We enrolled ten MMN patients, ten patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and ten healthy controls (HCs). Patients underwent MRI (in a prone position) and nerve conduction studies. DTI and fat-suppressed T2-weighted scans of the forearms were performed on a 3.0T MRI scanner. Fibre tractography of the median and ulnar nerves was performed to extract diffusion parameters: fractional anisotropy (FA), mean (MD), axial (AD) and radial (RD) diffusivity. Cross-sectional areas (CSA) were measured on T2-weighted scans. Forty-five out of 60 arms were included in the analysis. AD was significantly lower in MMN patients (2.20 ± 0.12 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) compared to ALS patients (2.31 ± 0.17 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s; p < 0.05) and HCs (2.31± 0.17 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s; p < 0.05). Segmental analysis showed significant restriction of AD, RD and MD (p < 0.005) in the proximal third of the nerves. CSA was significantly larger in MMN patients compared to ALS patients and HCs (p < 0.01). Thickening of nerves is compatible with changes in the myelin sheath structure, whereas lowered AD values suggest axonal dysfunction. These findings suggest that myelin and axons are diffusely involved in MMN pathogenesis. (orig.)

  10. Electrostatic bending response of a charged helix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampetaki, A. V.; Stockhofe, J.; Schmelcher, P.

    2018-04-01

    We explore the electrostatic bending response of a chain of charged particles confined on a finite helical filament. We analyze how the energy difference Δ E between the bent and the unbent helical chain scales with the length of the helical segment and the radius of curvature and identify features that are not captured by the standard notion of the bending rigidity, normally used as a measure of bending tendency in the linear response regime. Using Δ E to characterize the bending response of the helical chain we identify two regimes with qualitatively different bending behaviors for the ground state configuration: the regime of small and the regime of large radius-to-pitch ratio, respectively. Within the former regime, Δ E changes smoothly with the variation of the system parameters. Of particular interest are its oscillations with the number of charged particles encountered for commensurate fillings which yield length-dependent oscillations in the preferred bending direction of the helical chain. We show that the origin of these oscillations is the nonuniformity of the charge distribution caused by the long-range character of the Coulomb interactions and the finite length of the helix. In the second regime of large values of the radius-to-pitch ratio, sudden changes in the ground state structure of the charges occur as the system parameters vary, leading to complex and discontinuous variations in the ground state bending response Δ E .

  11. Compressive and bending behavior of sandwich panels with Octet truss core fabricated from wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Ji Hyun; Nah, Seong Jun; Kang, Ki Ju; Koo, Man Hoe

    2005-01-01

    Ultra light metal structures have been studied for several years because of their superior specific stiffness, strength and potential of multi functions. Many studies have been focused on how to manufacture ultra light metal structures and optimize them. In this study, we introduced a new idea to make sandwich panels having Octet truss cores. Wires bent in a shape of triangular wave were assembled to construct an Octet truss core and it was bonded with two face sheets to be a sandwich panel. The bending and compressive strength and stiffness were estimated through elementary mechanics for the sandwich specimens with two kinds of face sheets and the results were compared with the ones measured by experiments. Some aspects of assembling and mechanical behavior were discussed compared with Kagome core fabricated from wire, which had been introduced in the authors' previous work

  12. A cold mass support system based on the use of oriented fiberglass epoxy rods in bending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.; Corradi, Carol A.; LaMantia, Roberto F.; Zbasnik, Jon P.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes a cold mass support system that uses oriented fiberglass epoxy (other low heat leak oriented fiber material can also be used) rods. In the direction of the rods, where forces are carried in tension or compression, the support system is very stiff. In the other directions, the rods are subjected to bending stresses. When the support rods are put in bending the cold mass support is quite compliant. This type of support system can be used in situation where space for a cold mass support system is limited and where compliance can be tolerated in at least one direction. Break test data for 15.9-mm and 19.1-mm diameter oriented fiberglass rods is presented in this report. The cold mass supports for the DFBX distribution boxes are presented as an example of this type of cold mass support system

  13. Fretting fatigue behavior of high-strength steel monostrands under bending load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Jan; Georgakis, Christos T.; Fischer, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the fretting fatigue behavior of pretensioned high-strength steel monostrands is investigated. To measure the local deformations on the strands, a novel method based on the digital image correlation (DIC) technique was used to quantify the relative movement between individual wires...... along the length of the monostrand. Information about the monostrand bending stiffness and the extent of relative displacement between core and outer wires of a monostrand undergoing flexural deformations is provided. From the series of dynamic fatigue tests, a fretting fatigue spectrum is derived...

  14. Dynamic investigation of DNA bending and wrapping by type II topoisomerases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qing; Finzi, Laura; Dunlap, David

    2009-11-01

    Type II topoisomerases catalyze DNA decatenation and unwinding which is crucial for cell division, and therefore type II topoisomerases are some of the main targets of anti-cancer drugs. A recent crystal structure shows that, during the catalytic cycle, a yeast type II topoimerase can bend a 10 base pair DNA segment by up to 150 degrees. Bacterial gyrase, another type II topoisomerase, can wrap DNA into a tight 180 degree turn. Bending a stiff polymer like DNA requires considerable energy and could represent the rate limiting step in the catalytic (topological) cycle. Using modified deoxyribonucleotides in PCR reactions, stiffer DNA fragments have been produced and used as substrates for topoisomerase II-mediated relaxation of plectonemes introduced in single molecules using magnetic tweezers. The wrapping ability of gyrase decreases for diamino-purine-substituted DNA in which every base pair has three hydrogen-bonds. The overall rate of relaxation of plectonemes by recombinant human topoisomerase II alpha also decreases. These results reveal the dynamic properties of DNA bending and wrapping by type II topisomerases and suggest that A:T base pair melting is a rate determining step for bending and wrapping.

  15. Analytic description of the frictionally engaged in-plane bending process incremental swivel bending (ISB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohn, Peter; Engel, Bernd; Groth, Sebastian

    2018-05-01

    Kinematic forming processes shape geometries by the process parameters to achieve a more universal process utilizations regarding geometric configurations. The kinematic forming process Incremental Swivel Bending (ISB) bends sheet metal strips or profiles in plane. The sequence for bending an arc increment is composed of the steps clamping, bending, force release and feed. The bending moment is frictionally engaged by two clamping units in a laterally adjustable bending pivot. A minimum clamping force hindering the material from slipping through the clamping units is a crucial criterion to achieve a well-defined incremental arc. Therefore, an analytic description of a singular bent increment is developed in this paper. The bending moment is calculated by the uniaxial stress distribution over the profiles' width depending on the bending pivot's position. By a Coulomb' based friction model, necessary clamping force is described in dependence of friction, offset, dimensions of the clamping tools and strip thickness as well as material parameters. Boundaries for the uniaxial stress calculation are given in dependence of friction, tools' dimensions and strip thickness. The results indicate that changing the bending pivot to an eccentric position significantly affects the process' bending moment and, hence, clamping force, which is given in dependence of yield stress and hardening exponent. FE simulations validate the model with satisfactory accordance.

  16. Ulnar Artery Compression: A Feasible and Effective Approach to Prevent the Radial Artery Occlusion after Coronary Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Tian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radial artery (RA occlusion (RAO is not rare in patients undergoing coronary intervention by transradial approach (TRCI. Predictors of and prevention from RAO have not been systematically studied. This study aimed to analyze the risk factors of the weakness of RA pulsation (RAP and its predictive value for RAO after TRCI, and simultaneously to describe a feasible and effective approach to maintain RA patency. Methods: Between June 2006 and March 2010, all patients who underwent TRCI were classified according to the weakness of RAP after removing compression bandage with confirmation by Doppler ultrasound for the first 30 consecutive patients. Among a total of 2658 patients studied, 187 (7% patients having a weaker RAP were prospectively monitored. At 1 h after bandage removal, the ulnar artery in puncture side of all patients was blocked with manual compression to favor brachial and collateral artery blood flow through the RA until a good RAP was restored. The primary analysis was the occurrence of RAO. Results: Doppler ultrasound demonstrated the significant reduction of both systolic velocity (61.24 ± 3.95 cm/s vs. 72.31 ± 3.57 cm/s and diastolic velocity (1.83 ± 0.32 cm/s vs. 17.77 ± 3.97 cm/s in RA at access side as compared to the contralateral RA (all P < 0.001, but these velocities in ipsilateral ulnar artery (81.2 ± 2.16 cm/s and 13.1 ± 2.86 cm/s, respectively increased profoundly. The average time of ulnar artery compression was 4.1 ± 1.2 h (ranged 2.5-6.5 h. There were two patients experienced persistent RAO with a success rate of 98.9% and RAO in 0.075% of patients after ulnar artery compression was applied. The pulsation of the ulnar artery after compression was removed had not been influenced by the compression. Conclusions: After intervention using TRCI approach, the presence of a weaker RAP is an indicator of imminent RAO. The continuing compression of ipsilateral ulnar artery is an effective approach to

  17. Effect of fascicle composition on ulnar to musculocutaneous nerve transfer (Oberlin transfer) in neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brandon W; Chulski, Nicholas J; Little, Ann A; Chang, Kate W C; Yang, Lynda J S

    2018-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) continues to be a problematic occurrence impacting approximately 1.5 per 1000 live births in the United States, with 10%-40% of these infants experiencing permanent disability. These children lose elbow flexion, and one surgical option for recovering it is the Oberlin transfer. Published data support the use of the ulnar nerve fascicle that innervates the flexor carpi ulnaris as the donor nerve in adults, but no analogous published data exist for infants. This study investigated the association of ulnar nerve fascicle choice with functional elbow flexion outcome in NBPP. METHODS The authors conducted a retrospective study of 13 cases in which infants underwent ulnar to musculocutaneous nerve transfer for NBPP at a single institution. They collected data on patient demographics, clinical characteristics, active range of motion (AROM), and intraoperative neuromonitoring (IONM) (using 4 ulnar nerve index muscles). Standard statistical analysis compared pre- and postoperative motor function improvement between specific fascicle transfer (1-2 muscles for either wrist flexion or hand intrinsics) and nonspecific fascicle transfer (> 2 muscles for wrist flexion and hand intrinsics) groups. RESULTS The patients' average age at initial clinic visit was 2.9 months, and their average age at surgical intervention was 7.4 months. All NBPPs were unilateral; the majority of patients were female (61%), were Caucasian (69%), had right-sided NBPP (61%), and had Narakas grade I or II injuries (54%). IONM recordings for the fascicular dissection revealed a donor fascicle with nonspecific innervation in 6 (46%) infants and specific innervation in the remaining 7 (54%) patients. At 6-month follow-up, the AROM improvement in elbow flexion in adduction was 38° in the specific fascicle transfer group versus 36° in the nonspecific fascicle transfer group, with no statistically significant difference (p = 0.93). CONCLUSIONS Both specific and

  18. Finite element bending behaviour of discretely delaminated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    due to their light weight, high specific strength and stiffness properties. ... cylindrical shell roofs respectively using finite element method with centrally located .... where { }ε and { }γ are the direct and shear strains in midplane and { }κ denotes ...

  19. Big Bend National Park: Acoustical Monitoring 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    During the summer of 2010 (September October 2010), the Volpe Center collected baseline acoustical data at Big Bend National Park (BIBE) at four sites deployed for approximately 30 days each. The baseline data collected during this period will he...

  20. A variable stiffness joint with electrospun P(VDF-TrFE-CTFE) variable stiffness springs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carloni, Raffaella; Lapp, Valerie I.; Cremonese, Andrea; Belcari, Juri; Zucchelli, Andrea

    This letter presents a novel rotational variable stiffness joint that relies on one motor and a set of variable stiffness springs. The variable stiffness springs are leaf springs with a layered design, i.e., an electro-active layer of electrospun aligned nanofibers of poly(vinylidene

  1. Slice of a LEP bending magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    This is a slice of a LEP dipole bending magnet, made as a concrete and iron sandwich. The bending field needed in LEP is small (about 1000 Gauss), equivalent to two of the magnets people stick on fridge doors. Because it is very difficult to keep a low field steady, a high field was used in iron plates embedded in concrete. A CERN breakthrough in magnet design, LEP dipoles can be tuned easily and are cheaper than conventional magnets.

  2. A transparent bending-insensitive pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungwon; Reuveny, Amir; Reeder, Jonathan; Lee, Sunghoon; Jin, Hanbit; Liu, Qihan; Yokota, Tomoyuki; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Isoyama, Takashi; Abe, Yusuke; Suo, Zhigang; Someya, Takao

    2016-05-01

    Measuring small normal pressures is essential to accurately evaluate external stimuli in curvilinear and dynamic surfaces such as natural tissues. Usually, sensitive and spatially accurate pressure sensors are achieved through conformal contact with the surface; however, this also makes them sensitive to mechanical deformation (bending). Indeed, when a soft object is pressed by another soft object, the normal pressure cannot be measured independently from the mechanical stress. Here, we show a pressure sensor that measures only the normal pressure, even under extreme bending conditions. To reduce the bending sensitivity, we use composite nanofibres of carbon nanotubes and graphene. Our simulations show that these fibres change their relative alignment to accommodate bending deformation, thus reducing the strain in individual fibres. Pressure sensitivity is maintained down to a bending radius of 80 μm. To test the suitability of our sensor for soft robotics and medical applications, we fabricated an integrated sensor matrix that is only 2 μm thick. We show real-time (response time of ∼20 ms), large-area, normal pressure monitoring under different, complex bending conditions.

  3. Bending sound in graphene: Origin and manifestation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamyan, V.M., E-mail: vadamyan@onu.edu.ua [Department of Theoretical Physics, Odessa I.I. Mechnikov National University, 2 Dvoryanska St., Odessa 65026 (Ukraine); Bondarev, V.N., E-mail: bondvic@onu.edu.ua [Department of Theoretical Physics, Odessa I.I. Mechnikov National University, 2 Dvoryanska St., Odessa 65026 (Ukraine); Zavalniuk, V.V., E-mail: vzavalnyuk@onu.edu.ua [Department of Theoretical Physics, Odessa I.I. Mechnikov National University, 2 Dvoryanska St., Odessa 65026 (Ukraine); Department of Fundamental Sciences, Odessa Military Academy, 10 Fontanska Road, Odessa 65009 (Ukraine)

    2016-11-11

    Highlights: • The origin of sound-like dispersion of graphene bending mode is disclosed. • The speed of graphene bending sound is determined. • The renormalized graphene bending rigidity is derived. • The intrinsic corrugations of graphene are estimated. - Abstract: It is proved that the acoustic-type dispersion of bending mode in graphene is generated by the fluctuation interaction between in-plane and out-of-plane terms in the free energy arising with account of non-linear components in the graphene strain tensor. In doing so we use an original adiabatic approximation based on the alleged (confirmed a posteriori) significant difference of sound speeds for in-plane and bending modes. The explicit expression for the bending sound speed depending only on the graphene mass density, in-plane elastic constants and temperature is deduced as well as the characteristics of the microscopic corrugations of graphene. The obtained results are in good quantitative agreement with the data of real experiments and computer simulations.

  4. Bending sound in graphene: Origin and manifestation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamyan, V.M.; Bondarev, V.N.; Zavalniuk, V.V.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The origin of sound-like dispersion of graphene bending mode is disclosed. • The speed of graphene bending sound is determined. • The renormalized graphene bending rigidity is derived. • The intrinsic corrugations of graphene are estimated. - Abstract: It is proved that the acoustic-type dispersion of bending mode in graphene is generated by the fluctuation interaction between in-plane and out-of-plane terms in the free energy arising with account of non-linear components in the graphene strain tensor. In doing so we use an original adiabatic approximation based on the alleged (confirmed a posteriori) significant difference of sound speeds for in-plane and bending modes. The explicit expression for the bending sound speed depending only on the graphene mass density, in-plane elastic constants and temperature is deduced as well as the characteristics of the microscopic corrugations of graphene. The obtained results are in good quantitative agreement with the data of real experiments and computer simulations.

  5. Load to Failure and Stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel, Amanda O.; Duncan, Douglas D.; Dobrasevic, Nikola; Marsh, Stephanie M.; Lemos, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff tendinopathy is a frequent cause of shoulder pain that can lead to decreased strength and range of motion. Failures after using the single-row technique of rotator cuff repair have led to the development of the double-row technique, which is said to allow for more anatomical restoration of the footprint. Purpose: To compare 5 different types of suture patterns while maintaining equality in number of anchors. The hypothesis was that the Mason-Allen–crossed cruciform transosseous-equivalent technique is superior to other suture configurations while maintaining equality in suture limbs and anchors. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: A total of 25 fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were randomized into 5 suture configuration groups: single-row repair with simple stitch technique; single-row repair with modified Mason-Allen technique; double-row Mason-Allen technique; double-row cross-bridge technique; and double-row suture bridge technique. Load and displacement were recorded at 100 Hz until failure. Stiffness and bone mineral density were also measured. Results: There was no significant difference in peak load at failure, stiffness, maximum displacement at failure, or mean bone mineral density among the 5 suture configuration groups (P row rotator cuff repair to be superior to the single-row repair; however, clinical research does not necessarily support this. This study found no difference when comparing 5 different repair methods, supporting research that suggests the number of sutures and not the pattern can affect biomechanical properties. PMID:26665053

  6. Paralisia do nervo ulnar na lepra sem alterações cutâneas: biópsia do ramo superficial do nervo ulnar na mão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FREITAS MARCOS R. G. DE

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A lepra constitui causa frequente de acometimento de nervos periféricos, em nosso meio. O sistema nervoso periférico é acometido por vezes sem que haja alterações cutâneas: é a chamada forma neurítica pura. Nessa variante, o nervo mais afetado é o ulnar. Nos casos de acometimento isolado de nervos periféricos somente a feitura de biópsia de nervo conduzirá ao diagnóstico. Assim, resolvemos realizar biópsia do ramo sensitivo superficial do nervo ulnar na mão em 17 pacientes com paresia ou paralisia desse nervo e espessamento do mesmo na altura do cotovelo. Os principais achados foram: redução do número de fibras mielínicas em 14 casos, infiltrado inflamatório em 13, fibrose em 12, desmielinização e remielinização em 9, presença de granuloma em 6 e visualização do Mycobacterium leprae em 5. Concluímos que a biópsia do ramo sensitivo superficial do nervo ulnar na mão é um bom meio diagnóstico de lepra em pacientes com acometimento desse nervo

  7. Stiffness and damping in mechanical design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rivin, Eugene I

    1999-01-01

    ... important conceptual issues are stiffness of mechanical structures and their components and damping in mechanical systems sensitive to and/or generating vibrations. Stiffness and strength are the most important criteria for many mechanical designs. However, although there are hundreds of books on various aspects of strength, and strength issues ar...

  8. Hypothenar hammer syndrome: long-term follow-up after ulnar artery reconstruction with the lateral circumflex femoral artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Niet, A; Van Uchelen, J H

    2017-06-01

    In symptomatic patients with hypothenar hammer syndrome, the occluded part of the ulnar artery can be reconstructed with an autologous graft. Venous grafts are used frequently, but they are known for their low patency rate. Arterial grafts show better patency rates than venous grafts in coronary bypass surgery. We performed 11 ulnar artery reconstructions with the descending branch of the lateral circumflex femoral artery and compared these with previously performed venous reconstructions. All patients with an arterial graft reconstruction had a patent graft at a mean follow-up of 63 months. In addition, nine out of 11 patients reported improvement in their symptoms. The patency rate of venous reconstructions in hypothenar hammer syndrome is significantly lower. Arterial grafting for hypothenar hammer syndrome has superior patency compared with venous grafting; we recommend it as the surgical treatment of choice for symptomatic hypothenar hammer syndrome. 4.

  9. Stiffness Matters: Part II - The Effects of Plate Stiffness on Load-Sharing and the Progression of Fusion Following ACDF In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Joshua M; Chlebek, Carolyn; Clough, Ashley M; Wells, Alexandra K; Batzinger, Kathleen E; Houston, John M; Kradinova, Katerina; Glennon, Joseph C; DiRisio, Darryl J; Ledet, Eric H

    2018-03-19

    Real time in vivo measurement of forces in the cervical spine of goats following anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). To measure interbody forces in the cervical spine during the time course of fusion following ACDF with plates of different stiffnesses. Following ACDF, the biomechanics of the arthrodesis is largely dictated by the plate. The properties of the plate prescribe the extent of load-sharing through the disc space versus the extent of stress-shielding. Load-sharing promotes interbody bone formation and stress-shielding can inhibit maturation of bone. However, these principles have never been validated in vivo. Measuring in vivo biomechanics of the cervical spine is critical to understanding the complex relationships between implant design, interbody loading, load-sharing, and the progression of fusion. Anterior cervical plates of distinct bending stiffnesses were placed surgically following ACDF in goats. A validated custom force-sensing interbody implant was placed in the disc space to measure load-sharing in the spine. Interbody loads were measured in vivo in real time during the course of fusion for each plate. Interbody forces during flexion/extension were highly dynamic. In animals that received high stiffness plates, maximum forces were in extension whereas in animals that received lower stiffness plates, maximum forces were in flexion. As fusion progressed, interbody load magnitude decreased. The magnitude of interbody forces in the cervical spine is dynamic and correlates to activity and posture of the head and neck. The magnitude and consistency of forces in the interbody space correlates to plate stiffness with more compliant plates resulting in more consistent load-sharing. The magnitude of interbody forces decreases as fusion matures suggesting that smart interbody implants may be used as a diagnostic tool to indicate the progression of interbody fusion. N/A.

  10. Estimates of plastic loads for pipe bends under combined in-plane and out-of-plane bending moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Oh, Chang Sik; Kim, Yun Jae

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a method to estimate plastic loads (defined by twice-elastic-slope) for pipe bends under combined in-plane and out-of-plane bending moment, based on detailed 3-D FE limit analyses using elastic-perfectly plastic materials. Because closing bending moment is always lower than opening bending moment, the combination of in-plane closing bending and out-of-plane bending moment becomes the most significant case. Due to conservatism of each bending moments, the resultant moment provided by ASME B and PV code is unduly conservative. However, the concept of the resultant moment is still valid. In this paper, FE results show that the accurate solutions of bending moments provide better estimates of plastic loads of pipe bend under combined in-plane bending and out-of-plane bending moment

  11. Effect of screw position on single cycle to failure in bending and torsion of a locking plate-rod construct in a synthetic feline femoral gap model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederhäuser, Simone K; Tepic, Slobodan; Weber, Urs T

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of screw position on strength and stiffness of a combination locking plate-rod construct in a synthetic feline femoral gap model. 30 synthetic long-bone models derived from beechwood and balsa wood. 3 constructs (2 locking plate-rod constructs and 1 locking plate construct; 10 specimens/construct) were tested in a diaphyseal bridge plating configuration by use of 4-point bending and torsion. Variables included screw position (near the fracture gap and far from the fracture gap) and application of an intramedullary pin. Constructs were tested to failure in each loading mode to determine strength and stiffness. Failure was defined as plastic deformation of the plate or breakage of the bone model or plate. Strength, yield angle, and stiffness were compared by use of a Wilcoxon test. Placement of screws near the fracture gap did not increase bending or torsional stiffness in the locking plate-rod constructs, assuming the plate was placed on the tension side of the bone. Addition of an intramedullary pin resulted in a significant increase in bending strength of the construct. Screw positioning did not have a significant effect on any torsion variables. Results of this study suggested that, in the investigated plate-rod construct, screw insertion adjacent to the fracture lacked mechanical advantages over screw insertion at the plate ends. For surgeons attempting to minimize soft tissue dissection, the decision to make additional incisions for screw placement should be considered with even more caution.

  12. Outcomes and Return to Sport After Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction in Adolescent Baseball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saper, Michael; Shung, Joseph; Pearce, Stephanie; Bompadre, Viviana; Andrews, James R

    2018-04-01

    The number of ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) reconstructions in adolescent athletes has increased over the past 2 decades. Clinical results in this population have not been well studied. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes and return to sport after UCL reconstruction in a large group of adolescent baseball players. We hypothesized that excellent clinical outcomes and high rates of return to sport would be observed in this population at a minimum 2-year follow-up. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. We reviewed 140 adolescent (aged ≤19 years) baseball players who underwent UCL reconstruction with the American Sports Medicine Institute (ASMI) technique by a single surgeon. Medical records were reviewed for patient demographics, injury characteristics, operative details, and surgical complications. Patient-reported outcomes were assessed using the Conway scale, the Andrews-Timmerman (A-T) score, the Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic (KJOC) score, and a 0- to 100-point subjective scale for elbow function and satisfaction. Return to sporting activity was assessed using a custom-designed questionnaire. The mean age at the time of surgery was 18.0 years (range, 13-19 years), and the mean follow-up was 57.9 months (range, 32.4-115.4 months). Over half (60%) of patients were high school athletes. The mean duration of symptoms before surgery was 6.9 months (range, 0.5-60.0 months). Partial tears were identified in 57.9% of patients, and 41.3% of patients had preoperative ulnar nerve symptoms. Graft type included the ipsilateral palmaris in 77.1% of patients. Concomitant procedures were performed in 25% of patients. Outcomes on the Conway scale were "excellent" in 86.4% of patients. The mean A-T and KJOC scores were 97.3 ± 6.1 and 85.2 ± 14.6, respectively. Mean patient satisfaction was 94.4. Overall, 97.8% of patients reported returning to sport at a mean of 11.6 months (range, 5-24 months), and 89.9% of patients returned to sport at the same level of

  13. Arthroscopically assisted reconstruction of triangular fibrocartilage complex foveal avulsion in the ulnar variance-positive patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, ByungSung; Yoon, Hong-Kee; Nho, Jae-Hwi; Park, Kang Hee; Park, Sung-Yong; Yoon, Jun-Hee; Song, Hyun Seok

    2013-11-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the clinical results of patients treated by arthroscopically assisted reconstruction of foveal avulsion injury of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) using a suture anchor. We retrospectively reviewed the results of 15 patients (11 men and 4 women; mean age, 30.5 years) who underwent surgical procedures for the treatment of TFCC foveal avulsion at our hospital. The patients were followed up for a mean of 29 months. The patients had TFCC foveal avulsion caused by sprains (n = 8), falls (n = 4), playing baseball (n = 2), and a motor vehicle accident (n = 1). All the patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging. Radiographs obtained to assess ulnar variance (UV), ulnar-dorsal subluxation, and function of the wrist based on grip power; Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score; and Mayo wrist score were examined for all patients both preoperatively and postoperatively. On preoperative magnetic resonance imaging, TFCC foveal avulsion was observed in 13 of 15 cases. The mean UV value based on preoperative simple radiographic findings was 1.7 ± 1.0 mm, and dorsal subluxation at the distal ulna improved from 2.9 ± 3.0 mm to 0.2 ± 0.9 mm (P = .017). In all cases the distal radioulnar joint instability disappeared postoperatively. Grip power (compared with the uninvolved limb) was 79.3% preoperatively and 82.9% postoperatively (P = .086). The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand scores were 28.4 points preoperatively and 16.6 points postoperatively (P = .061). The Mayo wrist scores were excellent in 10 cases, good in 2, and fair in 3, and the mean score improved significantly from 64 points preoperatively to 84 points postoperatively (P = .007). Arthroscopic-assisted suture anchor reattachment of the TFCC in patients with traumatic TFCC foveal avulsion can prevent or reduce distal radioulnar joint instability and reduce pain even in chronic cases with positive UV. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2013

  14. Effect of chain stiffness on the structure of single-chain polymer nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Angel J.; Bacova, Petra; Lo Verso, Federica; Arbe, Arantxa; Colmenero, Juan; Pomposo, José A.

    2018-01-01

    Polymeric single-chain nanoparticles (SCNPs) are soft nano-objects synthesized by purely intramolecular cross-linking of single polymer chains. By means of computer simulations, we investigate the conformational properties of SCNPs as a function of the bending stiffness of their linear polymer precursors. We investigate a broad range of characteristic ratios from the fully flexible case to those typical of bulky synthetic polymers. Increasing stiffness hinders bonding of groups separated by short contour distances and increases looping over longer distances, leading to more compact nanoparticles with a structure of highly interconnected loops. This feature is reflected in a crossover in the scaling behaviour of several structural observables. The scaling exponents change from those characteristic for Gaussian chains or rings in θ-solvents in the fully flexible limit, to values resembling fractal or ‘crumpled’ globular behaviour for very stiff SCNPs. We characterize domains in the SCNPs. These are weakly deformable regions that can be seen as disordered analogues of domains in disordered proteins. Increasing stiffness leads to bigger and less deformable domains. Surprisingly, the scaling behaviour of the domains is in all cases similar to that of Gaussian chains or rings, irrespective of the stiffness and degree of cross-linking. It is the spatial arrangement of the domains which determines the global structure of the SCNP (sparse Gaussian-like object or crumpled globule). Since intramolecular stiffness can be varied through the specific chemistry of the precursor or by introducing bulky side groups in its backbone, our results propose a new strategy to tune the global structure of SCNPs.

  15. Multi-layered controllable stiffness beams for morphing: energy, actuation force, and material strain considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, Gabriel; Gandhi, Farhan

    2010-01-01

    Morphing aerospace structures could benefit from the ability of structural elements to transition from a stiff load-bearing state to a relatively compliant state that can undergo large deformation at low actuation cost. The present paper focuses on multi-layered beams with controllable flexural stiffness—comprising polymer layers affixed to the surfaces of a base beam and cover layers, in turn, affixed to the surfaces of the polymer layers. Heating the polymer through the glass transition reduces its shear modulus, decouples the cover layers from the base beam and reduces the overall flexural stiffness. Although the stiffness and actuation force required to bend the beam reduce, the energy required to heat the polymer layer must also be considered. Results show that for beams with low slenderness ratios, relatively thick polymer layers, and cover layers whose extensional stiffness is high, the decoupling of the cover layers through softening of the polymer layers can result in flexural stiffness reductions of over 95%. The energy savings are also highest for these configurations, and will increase as the deformation of the beam increases. The decoupling of the cover layers from the base beam through the softening of the polymer reduces the axial strains in the cover layers significantly; otherwise material failure would prevent large deformation. Results show that when the polymer layer is stiff, the cover layers are the dominant contributors to the total energy in the beam, and the energy in the polymer layers is predominantly axial strain energy. When the polymer layers are softened the energy in the cover layers is a small contributor to the total energy which is dominated by energy in the base beam and shear strain energy in the polymer layer

  16. Effect of relative pile’s stiffness on lateral pile response under loading of large eccentricity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zania, Varvara; Hededal, Ole; Klinkvort, R.T.

    2015-01-01

    The wide application of monopiles as foundations for offshore wind turbines has raised the issue of the suitability of the p –y curves proposed by API for lateral pile loading, since the latter were developed after full-scale tests on flexible and slender piles. This study investigates the role...... of the relative pile’s stiffness, when it is subjected to lateral load of large eccentricity. Employing centrifuge experiments, a hollow steel pile well instrumented with strain gauge pairs has been subjected to lateral load. The bending moment distribution of the model pile embedded in uniform, dense, dry sand...... was obtained under two different stress levels and two different embedment depths. Hence, the p – y curves were obtained providing an insight into the effect of the relative pile’s stiffness on the soil – pile interaction, while the effect of the installation process could also be evaluated....

  17. Skin-Inspired Hierarchical Polymer Architectures with Gradient Stiffness for Spacer-Free, Ultrathin, and Highly Sensitive Triboelectric Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Minjeong; Lim, Seongdong; Cho, Soowon; Lee, Youngoh; Na, Sangyun; Baig, Chunggi; Ko, Hyunhyub

    2018-04-24

    The gradient stiffness between stiff epidermis and soft dermis with interlocked microridge structures in human skin induces effective stress transmission to underlying mechanoreceptors for enhanced tactile sensing. Inspired by skin structure and function, we fabricate hierarchical nanoporous and interlocked microridge structured polymers with gradient stiffness for spacer-free, ultrathin, and highly sensitive triboelectric sensors (TESs). The skin-inspired hierarchical polymers with gradient elastic modulus enhance the compressibility and contact areal differences due to effective transmission of the external stress from stiff to soft layers, resulting in highly sensitive TESs capable of detecting human vital signs and voice. In addition, the microridges in the interlocked polymers provide an effective variation of gap distance between interlocked layers without using the bulk spacer and thus facilitate the ultrathin and flexible design of TESs that could be worn on the body and detect a variety of pressing, bending, and twisting motions even in humid and underwater environments. Our TESs exhibit the highest power density (46.7 μW/cm 2 ), pressure (0.55 V/kPa), and bending (∼0.1 V/°) sensitivities ever reported on flexible TESs. The proposed design of hierarchical polymer architectures for the flexible and wearable TESs can find numerous applications in next-generation wearable electronics.

  18. Multi-stability and variable stiffness of cellular solids designed based on origami patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Sattam; Li, Suyi

    2017-04-01

    The application of origami-inspired designs to engineered structures and materials has been a subject of much research efforts. These structures and materials, whose mechanical properties are directly related to the geometry of folding, are capable of achieving a host of unique adaptive functions. In this study, we investigate a three-dimensional multistability and variable stiffness function of a cellular solid based on the Miura-Ori folding pattern. The unit cell of such a solid, consisting of two stacked Miura-Ori sheets, can be elastically bistable due to the nonlinear relationship between rigid-folding deformation and crease material bending. Such a bistability possesses an unorthodox property: the critical, unstable configuration lies on the same side of two stable ones, so that two different force-deformation curves co-exist within the same range of deformation. By exploiting such unique stability properties, we can achieve a programmable stiffness change between the two elastically stable states, and the stiffness differences can be prescribed by tailoring the crease patterns of the cell. This paper presents a comprehensive parametric study revealing the correlations between such variable stiffness and various design parameters. The unique properties stemming from the bistability and design of such a unit cell can be advanced further by assembling them into a solid which can be capable of shape morphing and programmable mechanical properties.

  19. Dextran as a fast resorbable and mechanically stiff coating for flexible neural probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kil, D.; Brancato, L.; Puers, R.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we report on the use of dextran as a temporary, fast dissolving stiff coating for flexible neural probes. Although polymer-based neural implants offer several advantages, compared to their rigid silicon counterparts, they pose significant challenges during implantation. Due to their extreme flexibility, they have the tendency to buckle under the axial load applied during insertion. The structural stiffness of the implants can be temporarily increased by applying a bioresorbable dextran coating which eases the penetration of neural tissue. For this application three types of dextran with different molecular weights are analysed. The dissolution rate of the coatings is reported as well as the increased bending stiffness resulting from the dextran coating of Parylene C neural probes. Based on these findings the dissolution rate can be linked to parameters such as molecular weight, coating thickness and the surface area exposed to the dissolution medium. The mechanical characterization yields information on how the structural stiffness of neural probes can be tuned by varying the dextran’s molecular weight and coating thickness.

  20. Analysis of the strength and stiffness of timber beams reinforced with carbon fiber and glass fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Fiorelli

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available An experimental analysis of pinewood beams (Pinus caribea var hondurensis reinforced with glass and/or carbon fibers is discussed. The theoretical model employed to calculate the beam's bending strength takes into account the timber's ultimate limit states of tensile strength and failure by compression, considering a model of fragile elastic tension and plastic elastic compression. The validity of the theoretical model is confirmed by a comparison of the theoretical and experimental results, while the efficiency of the fiber reinforcement is corroborated by the increased strength and stiffness of the reinforced timber beams.

  1. Modelling of stiffness and damping change in reinforced concrete structures under seismic actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, G.; Oetes, A.

    1985-01-01

    Restoring force and energy dissipation properties of ductile reinforced concrete structures during seismic excitation are investigated. Interpreting the results of earthquake simulation experiments with large scale reinforced concrete structural members mainly subjected to cyclic bending the various types of the force-deflection response and energy dissipation capability will be identified. Two alternative concepts are suggested for modelling: A rigorous model which considers the numerous deformation and dissipation mechanisms using a step by step algorithm for analysis and a simplified practical model which employs a modified spectrum analysis technique and a simple updating procedure for changing stiffness and damping properties of the members. (orig.)

  2. Reliability of non-heated tube bends of boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugaj, N.V.; Akhremenko, V.L.; Zamotaev, V.S.

    1984-01-01

    Bend failures are described for non-heated boiler tubes of 12Kh1MF and 20 steels. Methods of reliability evaluations are presented which permit revealing and replacing the bends with inadequate resources. Influences of operation conditions on bend durability is shown as well as the factors which are dominating at bend failures

  3. Topology optimization under stochastic stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadpoure, Alireza

    Topology optimization is a systematic computational tool for optimizing the layout of materials within a domain for engineering design problems. It allows variation of structural boundaries and connectivities. This freedom in the design space often enables discovery of new, high performance designs. However, solutions obtained by performing the optimization in a deterministic setting may be impractical or suboptimal when considering real-world engineering conditions with inherent variabilities including (for example) variabilities in fabrication processes and operating conditions. The aim of this work is to provide a computational methodology for topology optimization in the presence of uncertainties associated with structural stiffness, such as uncertain material properties and/or structural geometry. Existing methods for topology optimization under deterministic conditions are first reviewed. Modifications are then proposed to improve the numerical performance of the so-called Heaviside Projection Method (HPM) in continuum domains. Next, two approaches, perturbation and Polynomial Chaos Expansion (PCE), are proposed to account for uncertainties in the optimization procedure. These approaches are intrusive, allowing tight and efficient coupling of the uncertainty quantification with the optimization sensitivity analysis. The work herein develops a robust topology optimization framework aimed at reducing the sensitivity of optimized solutions to uncertainties. The perturbation-based approach combines deterministic topology optimization with a perturbation method for the quantification of uncertainties. The use of perturbation transforms the problem of topology optimization under uncertainty to an augmented deterministic topology optimization problem. The PCE approach combines the spectral stochastic approach for the representation and propagation of uncertainties with an existing deterministic topology optimization technique. The resulting compact representations

  4. Bending Response of Cross-Ply Laminated Composite Plates with Diagonally Perturbed Localized Interfacial Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Zhou Kam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A laminated composite plate element with an interface description is developed using the finite element approach to investigate the bending performance of two-layer cross-ply laminated composite plates in presence of a diagonally perturbed localized interfacial degeneration between laminae. The stiffness of the laminate is expressed through the assembly of the stiffnesses of lamina sub-elements and interface element, the latter of which is formulated adopting the well-defined virtually zero-thickness concept. To account for the extent of both shear and axial weak bonding, a degeneration ratio is introduced in the interface formulation. The model has the advantage of simulating a localized weak bonding at arbitrary locations, with various degeneration areas and intensities, under the influence of numerous boundary conditions since the interfacial description is expressed discretely. Numerical results show that the bending behavior of laminate is significantly affected by the aforementioned parameters, the greatest effect of which is experienced by those with a localized total interface degeneration, representing the case of local delamination.

  5. Bending and tensile deformation of metallic nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, Matthew T; Leach, Austin M; Gall, Ken

    2008-01-01

    Using molecular statics simulations and the embedded atom method, a technique for bending silver nanowires and calculating Young's modulus via continuum mechanics has been developed. The measured Young's modulus values extracted from bending simulations were compared with modulus values calculated from uniaxial tension simulations for a range of nanowire sizes, orientations and geometries. Depending on axial orientation, the nanowires exhibit stiffening or softening under tension and bending as size decreases. Bending simulations typically result in a greater variation of Young's modulus values with nanowire size compared with tensile deformation, which indicates a loading-method-dependent size effect on elastic properties at sub-5 nm wire diameters. Since the axial stress is maximized at the lateral surfaces in bending, the loading-method-dependent size effect is postulated to be primarily a result of differences in nanowire surface and core elastic modulus. The divergence of Young's modulus from the bulk modulus in these simulations occurs at sizes below the range in which experiments have demonstrated a size scale effect on elastic properties of metallic nanowires. This difference indicates that other factors beyond native metallic surface properties play a role in experimentally observed nanowire elastic modulus size effects

  6. Observer-Based Human Knee Stiffness Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misgeld, Berno J E; Luken, Markus; Riener, Robert; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2017-05-01

    We consider the problem of stiffness estimation for the human knee joint during motion in the sagittal plane. The new stiffness estimator uses a nonlinear reduced-order biomechanical model and a body sensor network (BSN). The developed model is based on a two-dimensional knee kinematics approach to calculate the angle-dependent lever arms and the torques of the muscle-tendon-complex. To minimize errors in the knee stiffness estimation procedure that result from model uncertainties, a nonlinear observer is developed. The observer uses the electromyogram (EMG) of involved muscles as input signals and the segmental orientation as the output signal to correct the observer-internal states. Because of dominating model nonlinearities and nonsmoothness of the corresponding nonlinear functions, an unscented Kalman filter is designed to compute and update the observer feedback (Kalman) gain matrix. The observer-based stiffness estimation algorithm is subsequently evaluated in simulations and in a test bench, specifically designed to provide robotic movement support for the human knee joint. In silico and experimental validation underline the good performance of the knee stiffness estimation even in the cases of a knee stiffening due to antagonistic coactivation. We have shown the principle function of an observer-based approach to knee stiffness estimation that employs EMG signals and segmental orientation provided by our own IPANEMA BSN. The presented approach makes realtime, model-based estimation of knee stiffness with minimal instrumentation possible.

  7. Big bang nucleosynthesis with a stiff fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, Sourish; Scherrer, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Models that lead to a cosmological stiff fluid component, with a density ρ S that scales as a -6 , where a is the scale factor, have been proposed recently in a variety of contexts. We calculate numerically the effect of such a stiff fluid on the primordial element abundances. Because the stiff fluid energy density decreases with the scale factor more rapidly than radiation, it produces a relatively larger change in the primordial helium-4 abundance than in the other element abundances, relative to the changes produced by an additional radiation component. We show that the helium-4 abundance varies linearly with the density of the stiff fluid at a fixed fiducial temperature. Taking ρ S10 and ρ R10 to be the stiff fluid energy density and the standard density in relativistic particles, respectively, at T=10 MeV, we find that the change in the primordial helium abundance is well-fit by ΔY p =0.00024(ρ S10 /ρ R10 ). The changes in the helium-4 abundance produced by additional radiation or by a stiff fluid are identical when these two components have equal density at a 'pivot temperature', T * , where we find T * =0.55 MeV. Current estimates of the primordial 4 He abundance give the constraint on a stiff fluid energy density of ρ S10 /ρ R10 <30.

  8. Dynamic stiffness of suction caissons - vertical vibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Liingaard, M.; Andersen, Lars

    2006-12-15

    The dynamic response of offshore wind turbines are affected by the properties of the foundation and the subsoil. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the dynamic soil-structure interaction of suction caissons for offshore wind turbines. The investigation is limited to a determination of the vertical dynamic stiffness of suction caissons. The soil surrounding the foundation is homogenous with linear viscoelastic properties. The dynamic stiffness of the suction caisson is expressed by dimensionless frequency-dependent dynamic stiffness coefficients corresponding to the vertical degree of freedom. The dynamic stiffness coefficients for the foundations are evaluated by means of a dynamic three-dimensional coupled Boundary Element/Finite Element model. Comparisons are made with known analytical and numerical solutions in order to evaluate the static and dynamic behaviour of the Boundary Element/Finite Element model. The vertical frequency dependent stiffness has been determined for different combinations of the skirt length, Poisson's ratio and the ratio between soil stiffness and skirt stiffness. Finally the dynamic behaviour at high frequencies is investigated. (au)

  9. TBX3 regulates splicing in vivo: a novel molecular mechanism for Ulnar-mammary syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan Kumar P

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available TBX3 is a member of the T-box family of transcription factors with critical roles in development, oncogenesis, cell fate, and tissue homeostasis. TBX3 mutations in humans cause complex congenital malformations and Ulnar-mammary syndrome. Previous investigations into TBX3 function focused on its activity as a transcriptional repressor. We used an unbiased proteomic approach to identify TBX3 interacting proteins in vivo and discovered that TBX3 interacts with multiple mRNA splicing factors and RNA metabolic proteins. We discovered that TBX3 regulates alternative splicing in vivo and can promote or inhibit splicing depending on context and transcript. TBX3 associates with alternatively spliced mRNAs and binds RNA directly. TBX3 binds RNAs containing TBX binding motifs, and these motifs are required for regulation of splicing. Our study reveals that TBX3 mutations seen in humans with UMS disrupt its splicing regulatory function. The pleiotropic effects of TBX3 mutations in humans and mice likely result from disrupting at least two molecular functions of this protein: transcriptional regulation and pre-mRNA splicing.

  10. TBX3 regulates splicing in vivo: a novel molecular mechanism for Ulnar-mammary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar P, Pavan; Franklin, Sarah; Emechebe, Uchenna; Hu, Hao; Moore, Barry; Lehman, Chris; Yandell, Mark; Moon, Anne M

    2014-03-01

    TBX3 is a member of the T-box family of transcription factors with critical roles in development, oncogenesis, cell fate, and tissue homeostasis. TBX3 mutations in humans cause complex congenital malformations and Ulnar-mammary syndrome. Previous investigations into TBX3 function focused on its activity as a transcriptional repressor. We used an unbiased proteomic approach to identify TBX3 interacting proteins in vivo and discovered that TBX3 interacts with multiple mRNA splicing factors and RNA metabolic proteins. We discovered that TBX3 regulates alternative splicing in vivo and can promote or inhibit splicing depending on context and transcript. TBX3 associates with alternatively spliced mRNAs and binds RNA directly. TBX3 binds RNAs containing TBX binding motifs, and these motifs are required for regulation of splicing. Our study reveals that TBX3 mutations seen in humans with UMS disrupt its splicing regulatory function. The pleiotropic effects of TBX3 mutations in humans and mice likely result from disrupting at least two molecular functions of this protein: transcriptional regulation and pre-mRNA splicing.

  11. A rare variant of the ulnar artery with important clinical implications: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casal Diogo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variations in the major arteries of the upper limb are estimated to be present in up to one fifth of people, and may have significant clinical implications. Case presentation During routine cadaveric dissection of a 69-year-old fresh female cadaver, a superficial brachioulnar artery with an aberrant path was found bilaterally. The superficial brachioulnar artery originated at midarm level from the brachial artery, pierced the brachial fascia immediately proximal to the elbow, crossed superficial to the muscles that originated from the medial epicondyle, and ran over the pronator teres muscle in a doubling of the antebrachial fascia. It then dipped into the forearm fascia, in the gap between the flexor carpi radialis and the palmaris longus. Subsequently, it ran deep to the palmaris longus muscle belly, and superficially to the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle, reaching the gap between the latter and the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle, where it assumed is usual position lateral to the ulnar nerve. Conclusion As far as the authors could determine, this variant of the superficial brachioulnar artery has only been described twice before in the literature. The existence of such a variant is of particular clinical significance, as these arteries are more susceptible to trauma, and can be easily confused with superficial veins during medical and surgical procedures, potentially leading to iatrogenic distal limb ischemia.

  12. MR arthrography of elbow: evaluation of the ulnar collateral ligament of elbow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Katsunuki; Masatomi, Takashi; Ochi, Takahiro; Ishida, Takeshi; Hori, Shinichi; Ikezoe, Junpei; Nakamura, Hironobu

    1996-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) injury of the elbow in throwing athletes by MRI and MR arthrography. Design. Ten elbows of throwing athletes were examined on both plain MRI and MR saline arthrography and the injuries subsequently surgically proven. Spin-echo (SE) T1-weighted and fast SE T2-weighted coronal images were obtained. Results. The UCL was unclear in all ten cases on T1-weighted MRI. In five cases an avulsion fracture was also found on T1-weighted MRI. On T2-weighted MRI, abnormal high-intensity areas were identified in or around the UCL. On T2-weighted MR arthrography images, extracapsular high-intensity areas, which represent extracapsular leakage, were found in four of five cases with avulsion fracture. At surgery, all these four cases showed avulsion fractures with instability; the other case had a fracture but it was stable and adherent to the humerus. On T2-weighted MR arthrography images, an extracapsular high-intensity area was found in one of the five cases without avulsion fracture. At surgery this patient had a complete tear of the UCL itself. Conclusion. MR arthrography provided additional information for evaluating the degree of UCL injury. (orig.). With 5 figs., 1 tab

  13. Major League pitching workload after primary ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction and risk for revision surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Robert A; Mehran, Nima; Marshall, Nathan E; Okoroha, Kelechi R; Khalil, Lafi; Tibone, James E; Moutzouros, Vasilios

    2017-02-01

    Literature has attempted to correlate pitching workload with risk of ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) injury; however, limited data are available in evaluating workload and its relationship with the need for revision reconstruction in Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers. We identified 29 MLB pitchers who underwent primary UCL reconstruction surgery and subsequently required revision reconstruction and compared them with 121 MLB pitchers who underwent primary reconstruction but did not later require revision surgery. Games pitched, pitch counts, and innings pitched were evaluated and compared for the seasons after returning from primary reconstruction and for the last season pitched before undergoing revision surgery. The difference in workload between pitchers who did and did not require revision reconstruction was not statistically significant in games pitched, innings pitched, and MLB-only pitch counts. The one significant difference in workload was in total pitch counts (combined MLB and minor league), with the pitchers who required revision surgery pitching less than those who did not (primary: 1413.6 pitches vs. revision: 959.0 pitches, P = .04). In addition, pitchers who required revision surgery underwent primary reconstruction at an early age (22.9 years vs. 27.3 years, P risk for injury after primary UCL reconstruction. However, correlations of risk may be younger age and less MLB experience at the time of the primary reconstruction. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. The effects of medial ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction on Major League pitching performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Robert A; Steffes, Matthew J; Zhuo, David; Bey, Michael J; Moutzouros, Vasilios

    2014-11-01

    Medial ulnar collateral ligament (MUCL) reconstruction is commonly performed on Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers. Previous studies have reported that most pitchers return to presurgical statistical performance levels after MUCL reconstruction. Pitching performance data--specifically, earned run average (ERA), walks and hits per inning pitched (WHIP), winning percentage, and innings pitched--were acquired for 168 MLB pitchers who had undergone MUCL reconstruction. These data were averaged over the 3 years before surgery and the 3 years after surgery and also acquired from 178 age-matched, uninjured MLB pitchers. Of the pitchers who had MUCL reconstruction surgery, 87% returned to MLB pitching. However, compared with presurgical data, pitching performance declined in terms of ERA (P = .001), WHIP (P = .011), and innings pitched (P = .026). Pitching performance also declined in the season before the surgery compared with previous years (ERA, P = .014; WHIP, P = .036; innings pitched, P risk factor for requiring surgery. In addition, there is an increased risk of MUCL reconstruction for pitchers who enter the major leagues at a younger age. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. MR imaging in chronic rupture of the ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohman, M.; Kivisaari, A.; Kivisaari, L.; Vasenius, J.

    2000-01-01

    MR imaging has been shown as the best radiologic method for verifying and classifying acute ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) ruptures of the thumb. Our aim was to analyse the usefulness of MR also in old ruptures and to establish the most useful sequences. Ten patients with an old UCL rupture of the thumb were preoperatively imaged using 1.5 T MR. Three radiologists blinded to the findings separately analysed the MR images of these patients and of 10 age-and sex-matched voluntary controls. MR findings of the patients were compared with those of surgery. The consensus diagnosis of an UCL rupture was accurate in all 10 patients. All controls were classified as having no UCL rupture. In 5 of the 7 patients with a surgically defined Stener or non-Stener lesion, the consensus diagnosis was the same as the operative diagnosis. Due to excessive scarring it was not possible to verify any Stener lesion intra-operatively in 3 patients. The most informative MR sequence was T2 TSE in the coronal plane, the second most informative was T1 SE with fat suppression in the coronal plane. An old UCL rupture is well verified by MR but typing of the lesion as either a Stener or non-Stener type is not always possible

  16. Bending the law: tidal bending and its effects on ice viscosity and flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosier, S.; Gudmundsson, G. H.

    2017-12-01

    Many ice shelves are subject to strong ocean tides and, in order to accommodate this vertical motion, the ice must bend within the grounding zone. This tidal bending generates large stresses within the ice, changing its effective viscosity. For a confined ice shelf, this is particularly relevant because the tidal bending stresses occur along the sidewalls, which play an important role in the overall flow regime of the ice shelf. Hence, tidal bending stresses will affect both the mean and time-varying components of ice shelf flow. GPS measurements reveal strong variations in horizontal ice shelf velocities at a variety of tidal frequencies. We show, using full-Stokes viscoelastic modelling, that inclusion of tidal bending within the model accounts for much of the observed tidal modulation of horizontal ice shelf flow. Furthermore, our model shows that in the absence of a vertical tidal forcing, the mean flow of the ice shelf is reduced considerably.

  17. Strength measurement of optical fibers by bending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srubshchik, Leonid S.

    1999-01-01

    A two-point bending technique has been used not only to measure the breaking stress of optical fiber but also to predict its static and dynamic fatigue. The present theory of this test is based on elastica theory of rod. However, within the limits of elastica theory the tensile and shear stresses cannot be determined. In this paper we study dynamic and static problems for optical fiber in the two- point bending test on the base of geometrically exact theory in which rod can suffer flexure, extension, and shear. We obtain the governing partial differential equations taking into account the fact that the lateral motion of the fiber is restrained by the presence of flat parallel plates. We develop the computational methods for solving the initial and equilibrium free-boundary nonlinear planar problems. We derive the formulas for predicting of the tensile strength from strength in the bending and calculate one example.

  18. Magnetic field of longitudinal gradient bend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiba, Masamitsu; Böge, Michael; Ehrlichman, Michael; Streun, Andreas

    2018-06-01

    The longitudinal gradient bend is an effective method for reducing the natural emittance in light sources. It is, however, not a common element. We have analyzed its magnetic field and derived a set of formulae. Based on the derivation, we discuss how to model the longitudinal gradient bend in accelerator codes that are used for designing electron storage rings. Strengths of multipole components can also be evaluated from the formulae, and we investigate the impact of higher order multipole components in a very low emittance lattice.

  19. Slice through an LHC bending magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Slice through an LHC superconducting dipole (bending) magnet. The slice includes a cut through the magnet wiring (niobium titanium), the beampipe and the steel magnet yokes. Particle beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have the same energy as a high-speed train, squeezed ready for collision into a space narrower than a human hair. Huge forces are needed to control them. Dipole magnets (2 poles) are used to bend the paths of the protons around the 27 km ring. Quadrupole magnets (4 poles) focus the proton beams and squeeze them so that more particles collide when the beams’ paths cross. There are 1232 15m long dipole magnets in the LHC.

  20. Bending energy of buckled edge dislocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupferman, Raz

    2017-12-01

    The study of elastic membranes carrying topological defects has a longstanding history, going back at least to the 1950s. When allowed to buckle in three-dimensional space, membranes with defects can totally relieve their in-plane strain, remaining with a bending energy, whose rigidity modulus is small compared to the stretching modulus. In this paper we study membranes with a single edge dislocation. We prove that the minimum bending energy associated with strain-free configurations diverges logarithmically with the size of the system.

  1. Observed variations of monopile foundation stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallehave, Dan; Thilsted, C.L.; Diaz, Alberto Troya

    2015-01-01

    full-scale measurements obtained from one offshore wind turbine structure located within Horns Reef II offshore wind farm. Data are presented for a 2.5 years period and covers normal operating conditions and one larger storm event. A reduction of the pile-soil stiffness was observed during the storm...... events, followed by a complete regain to a pre-storm level when the storm subsided. In additional, no long term variations of the pile-soil stiffness was observed. The wind turbine is located in dense to very dense sand deposits.......The soil-structure stiffness of monopile foundations for offshore wind turbines has a high impact on the fatigue loading during normal operating conditions. Thus, a robust design must consider the evolution of pile-soil stiffness over the lifetime of the wind farm. This paper present and discuss...

  2. Damper modules with adapted stiffness ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonnenburg, R.; Stretz, A. [ZF Sachs AG, Entwicklungszentrum, Schweinfurt (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    A mechanism for the excitation of piston rod vibrations in automotive damper modules is discussed by a simple model. An improved nonlinear model based on elasticity effects leads to good simulation results. It is shown theoretically and experimentally that the adaptation of the stiffness of the piston rod bushing to the ''stiffness'' of the damper force characteristic can eliminate the piston rod oscillations completely. (orig.)

  3. OroSTIFF: Face-referenced measurement of perioral stiffness in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Shin-Ying; Barlow, Steven M; Kieweg, Douglas; Lee, Jaehoon

    2010-05-28

    A new device and automated measurement technology known as OroSTIFF is described to characterize non-participatory perioral stiffness in healthy adults for eventual application to patients with orofacial movement disorders associated with neuromotor disease, traumatic injury, or congenital clefts of the upper lip. Previous studies of perioral biomechanics required head stabilization for extended periods of time during measurement, which precluded sampling patients with involuntary body/head movements (dyskinesias), or pediatric subjects. The OroSTIFF device is face-referenced and avoids the complications associated with head-restraint. Supporting data of non-participatory perioral tissue stiffness using OroSTIFF are included from 10 male and 10 female healthy subjects. The OroSTIFF device incorporates a pneumatic glass air cylinder actuator instrumented for pressure, and an integrated subminiature displacement sensor to encode lip aperture. Perioral electromyograms were simultaneously sampled to confirm passive muscle state for the superior and inferior divisions of the orbicularis oris muscles. Perioral stiffness, derived as a quotient from resultant force (DeltaF) and interangle span (DeltaX), was modeled with multilevel regression techniques. Real-time calculation of the perioral stiffness function demonstrated a significant quadratic relation between imposed interangle stretch and resultant force. This stiffness growth function also differed significantly between males and females. This study demonstrates the OroSTIFF 'proof-of-concept' for cost-effective non-invasive stimulus generation and derivation of perioral stiffness in a group of healthy unrestrained adults, and a case study to illustrate the dose-dependent effects of Levodopa on perioral stiffness in an individual with advanced Parkinson's disease who exhibited marked dyskinesia and rigidity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A quantitative method for evaluating inferior glenohumeral joint stiffness using ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wen-Wei; Lee, Ming-Yih; Yeh, Wen-Lin; Cheng, Shih-Chung; Soon, Kok-Soon; Lei, Kin Fong; Lin, Wen-Yen

    2013-02-01

    and pain in the inferior GHJ at the loading point due to friction between the wide belt and skin. Furthermore, subjects wearing a humerus brace with a belt, which creates the effect of lifting the humerus toward the acromion, had greater GHJ stiffness compared to subjects wearing a shoulder brace without a belt to lift the humerus under the proposed testing conditions. This study provides experimental evidence that shoulder braces may reduce GHJ laxity under an external load, implying that the use of a humeral brace can prevent subluxation in post-stroke patients. The resulting optimal testing conditions for measuring the laxity and stiffness of the GHJ is to constrain the unloaded shoulder and bend the loaded arm at the elbow with loading on the upper arm using a pulley system. Copyright © 2011 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A lightweight, biological structure with tailored stiffness: The feather vane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Tarah N; Pissarenko, Andreï; Herrera, Steven A; Kisailus, David; Lubarda, Vlado A; Meyers, Marc A

    2016-09-01

    The flying feathers of birds are keratinous appendages designed for maximum performance with a minimum weight penalty. Thus, their design contains ingenious combinations of components that optimize lift, stiffness, aerodynamics, and damage resistance. This design involves two main parts: a central shaft that prescribes stiffness and lateral vanes which allows for the capture of air. Within the feather vane, barbs branch from the shaft and barbules branch from barbs, forming a flat surface which ensures lift. Microhooks at the end of barbules hold barbs tightly together, providing the close-knit, unified structure of the feather vane and enabling a repair of the structure through the reattachment of un-hooked junctions. Both the shaft and barbs are lightweight biological structures constructed of keratin using the common motif of a solid shell and cellular interior. The cellular core increases the resistance to buckling with little added weight. Here we analyze the detailed structure of the feather barb and, for the first time, explain its flexural stiffness in terms of the mechanics of asymmetric foam-filled beams subjected to bending. The results are correlated and validated with finite element modeling. We compare the flexure of single barbs as well as arrays of barbs and find that the interlocking adherence of barbs to one another enables a more robust structure due to minimized barb rotation during deflection. Thus, the flexure behavior of the feather vane can be tailored by the adhesive hooking between barbs, creating a system that mitigates damage. A simplified three-dimensional physical model for this interlocking mechanism is constructed by additive manufacturing. The exceptional architecture of the feather vane will motivate the design of bioinspired structures with tailored and unique properties ranging from adhesives to aerospace materials. Despite its importance to bird flight, literature characterizing the feather vane is extremely limited. The feather

  6. On the role of CFRP reinforcement for wood beams stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianasi, A. C.

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, carbon fiber composites have been increasingly used in different ways in reinforcing structural elements. Specifically, the use of composite materials as a reinforcement for wood beams under bending loads requires paying attention to several aspects of the problem such as the number of the composite layers applied on the wood beams. Study consolidation of composites revealed that they are made by bonding fibrous material impregnated with resin on the surface of various elements, to restore or increase the load carrying capacity (bending, cutting, compression or torque) without significant damage of their rigidity. Fibers used in building applications can be fiberglass, aramid or carbon. Items that can be strengthened are concrete, brick, wood, steel and stone, and in terms of structural beams, walls, columns and floors. This paper describes an experimental study which was designed to evaluate the effect of composite material on the stiffness of the wood beams. It proposes a summary of the fundamental principles of analysis of composite materials and the design and use. The type of reinforcement used on the beams is the carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheet and plates and also an epoxy resin for bonding all the elements. Structural epoxy resins remain the primary choice of adhesive to form the bond to fiber-reinforced plastics and are the generally accepted adhesives in bonded CFRP-wood connections. The advantages of using epoxy resin in comparison to common wood-laminating adhesives are their gap-filling qualities and the low clamping pressures that are required to form the bond between carbon fiber plates or sheets and the wood beams. Mechanical tests performed on the reinforced wood beams showed that CFRP materials may produce flexural displacement and lifting increases of the beams. Observations of the experimental load-displacement relationships showed that bending strength increased for wood beams reinforced with CFRP composite plates

  7. Stiffness of Railway Soil-Steel Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machelski Czesław

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The considerable influence of the soil backfill properties and that of the method of compacting it on the stiffness of soil-steel structures is characteristic of the latter. The above factors (exhibiting randomness become apparent in shell deformation measurements conducted during construction and proof test loading. A definition of soil-shell structure stiffness, calculated on the basis of shell deflection under the service load, is proposed in the paper. It is demonstrated that the stiffness is the inverse of the deflection influence function used in structural mechanics. The moving load methodology is shown to be useful for testing, since it makes it possible to map the shell deflection influence line also in the case of group loads (concentrated forces, as in bridges. The analyzed cases show that the shell’s span, geometry (static scheme and the height of earth fill influence the stiffness of the structure. The soil-steel structure’s characteristic parameter in the form of stiffness k is more suitable for assessing the quality of construction works than the proposed in code geometric index ω applied to beam structures. As shown in the given examples, parameter k is more effective than stiffness parameter λ used to estimate the deformation of soil-steel structures under construction. Although the examples concern railway structures, the methodology proposed in the paper is suitable also for road bridges.

  8. Stiffness of Railway Soil-Steel Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machelski, Czesław

    2015-12-01

    The considerable influence of the soil backfill properties and that of the method of compacting it on the stiffness of soil-steel structures is characteristic of the latter. The above factors (exhibiting randomness) become apparent in shell deformation measurements conducted during construction and proof test loading. A definition of soil-shell structure stiffness, calculated on the basis of shell deflection under the service load, is proposed in the paper. It is demonstrated that the stiffness is the inverse of the deflection influence function used in structural mechanics. The moving load methodology is shown to be useful for testing, since it makes it possible to map the shell deflection influence line also in the case of group loads (concentrated forces), as in bridges. The analyzed cases show that the shell's span, geometry (static scheme) and the height of earth fill influence the stiffness of the structure. The soil-steel structure's characteristic parameter in the form of stiffness k is more suitable for assessing the quality of construction works than the proposed in code geometric index ω applied to beam structures. As shown in the given examples, parameter k is more effective than stiffness parameter λ used to estimate the deformation of soil-steel structures under construction. Although the examples concern railway structures, the methodology proposed in the paper is suitable also for road bridges.

  9. A Non-linear Model for Predicting Tip Position of a Pliable Robot Arm Segment Using Bending Sensor Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth I. SKLAR

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Using pliable materials for the construction of robot bodies presents new and interesting challenges for the robotics community. Within the EU project entitled STIFFness controllable Flexible & Learnable manipulator for surgical Operations (STIFF-FLOP, a bendable, segmented robot arm has been developed. The exterior of the arm is composed of a soft material (silicone, encasing an internal structure that contains air-chamber actuators and a variety of sensors for monitoring applied force, position and shape of the arm as it bends. Due to the physical characteristics of the arm, a proper model of robot kinematics and dynamics is difficult to infer from the sensor data. Here we propose a non-linear approach to predicting the robot arm posture, by training a feed-forward neural network with a structured series of pressures values applied to the arm's actuators. The model is developed across a set of seven different experiments. Because the STIFF-FLOP arm is intended for use in surgical procedures, traditional methods for position estimation (based on visual information or electromagnetic tracking will not be possible to implement. Thus the ability to estimate pose based on data from a custom fiber-optic bending sensor and accompanying model is a valuable contribution. Results are presented which demonstrate the utility of our non-linear modelling approach across a range of data collection procedures.

  10. Comparison of different nail bending apparatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vianen, H.P.C.A.; Schot, F.; Vermeltfoort, A.Th.

    1992-01-01

    A research to develope a registrated testmethod to define the allowable bending moment of a nail was started in spring of this year. A request for a registrated testmethod is caused by the final project of ir. H.P.C.A. Vianen ‘s study. The consequence of developing new codes in The Netherlands and

  11. Amplification caused by gravitational bending of light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, P.

    1985-01-01

    Gravitational bending of light may not only lead to multiple imaging (gravitational lens effect), but also affects the apparent luminosity of a source. It is shown here that a mass distribution near the line-of-sight to any source always increases the observable flux relative to the case in which the deflector is absent

  12. Interdisciplinary Invitations: Exploring Gee's Bend Quilts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rebecca; Whitin, Phyllis; Whitin, David

    2012-01-01

    Engaging with the quilts of Gee's Bend offers a rich opportunity for students in grades four through eight to develop appreciation for pattern, rhythm, and innovation while learning about history, entrepreneurship, and political activism. By easily accessing print, film, and Internet resources teachers can include these vibrant quilts and…

  13. Demonstration model of LEP bending magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    To save iron and raise the flux density, the LEP bending magnet laminations were separated by spacers and the space between the laminations was filled with concrete. This is a demonstration model, part of it with the spaced laminations only, the other part filled with concrete.

  14. Tubular lining material for pipelines having bends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moringa, A.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Hyodo, M.; Yagi, I.

    1987-03-24

    A tubular lining material for pipelines having bends or curved portions comprises a tubular textile jacket made of warps and wefts woven in a tubular form overlaid with a coating of a flexible synthetic resin. It is applicable onto the inner surface of a pipeline having bends or curved portions in such manner that the tubular lining material with a binder onto the inner surface thereof is inserted into the pipeline and allowed to advance within the pipeline, with or without the aid of a leading rope-like elongated element, while turning the tubular lining material inside out under fluid pressure. In this manner the tubular lining material is applied onto the inner surface of the pipeline with the binder being interposed between the pipeline and the tubular lining material. The lining material is characterized in that a part of all of the warps are comprised of an elastic yarn around which, over the full length thereof, a synthetic fiber yarn or yarns have been left-and/or right-handedly coiled. This tubular lining material is particularly suitable for lining a pipeline having an inner diameter of 25-200 mm and a plurality of bends, such as gas service pipelines or house pipelines, without occurrence of wrinkles in the lining material in a bend.

  15. Systematisk løbende refleksion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansson, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Artiklen omhandler en model kaldet systematisk løbende refleksion, der repræsenterer en procedure til overvejelse og genovervejelse af de vurderingskriterier, man lægger til grund for evaluering af et udviklingsprojekt. Pointen er at justere udviklingsprojektet ind i en ønsket retning. Formålet m...

  16. Fuzzy model for Laser Assisted Bending Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannini Oliviero

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a fuzzy model was developed to predict the residual bending in a conventional metal bending process assisted by a high power diode laser. The study was focused on AA6082T6 aluminium thin sheets. In most dynamic sheet metal forming operations, the highly nonlinear deformation processes cause large amounts of elastic strain energy stored in the formed material. The novel hybrid forming process was thus aimed at inducing the local heating of the mechanically bent workpiece in order to decrease or eliminate the related springback phenomena. In particular, the influence on the extent of springback phenomena of laser process parameters such as source power, scan speed and starting elastic deformation of mechanically bent sheets, was experimentally assessed. Consistent trends in experimental response according to operational parameters were found. Accordingly, 3D process maps of the extent of the springback phenomena according to operational parameters were constructed. The effect of the inherent uncertainties on the predicted residual bending caused by the approximation in the model parameters was evaluated. In particular, a fuzzy-logic based approach was used to describe the model uncertainties and the transformation method was applied to propagate their effect on the residual bending.

  17. Aerosol deposition in bends with turbulent flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarland, A.R.; Gong, H.; Wente, W.B. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    The losses of aerosol particles in bends were determined numerically for a broad range of design and operational conditions. Experimental data were used to check the validity of the numerical model, where the latter employs a commercially available computational fluid dynamics code for characterizing the fluid flow field and Lagrangian particle tracking technique for characterizing aerosol losses. Physical experiments have been conducted to examine the effect of curvature ratio and distortion of the cross section of bends. If it curvature ratio ({delta} = R/a) is greater than about 4, it has little effect on deposition, which is in contrast with the recommendation given in ANSI N13.1-1969 for a minimum curvature ratio of 10. Also, experimental results show that if the tube cross section is flattened by 25% or less, the flattening also has little effect on deposition. Results of numerical tests have been used to develop a correlation of aerosol penetration through a bend as a function of Stokes number (Stk), curvature ratio ({delta}) and the bend angle ({theta}). 17 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. POSSIBLE ENTRAPMENT OF THE ULNAR ARTERY BY THE THIRD HEAD OF PRONATOR TERES MUSCLE. El posible atrapamiento de la arteria ulnar por el tercer fascículo del músculo pronador teres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available El conocimiento de las variaciones en los alrededores de la fosa cubital es útil para cirujanos ortopédicos, cirujanos plásticos y médicos en general. Observamos las variaciones arteriales y musculares en y alrededor de la fosa cubital. La arteria braquial terminó 2 pulgadas por encima de la base de la fosa cubital. Las arterias radiales y cubitales entraron en la fosa cubital  pasando delante de los tendones de los músculos braquial y bíceps braquial respectivamente. La arteria cubital estaba rodeada por el tercer fascículo del pronador teres, que tuvo su origen en la fascia cubriendo la parte distal del músculo braquial. Este músculo se unió a tendón de pronador teres distalmente y fue suministrado por una rama del nervio mediano. Este músculo podría alterar el flujo sanguíneo en la arteria cubital y puede causar dificultades para el registro de la presión sanguínea. Knowledge of variations at and in the surroundings of cubital fossa is useful for the orthopedic surgeons, plastic surgeons and medical practitioners in general. During routine dissection, we observed arterial and muscular variations in and around the cubital fossa. The brachial artery terminated 2 inches above the base of the cubital fossa. The radial and ulnar arteries entered the cubital fossa by passing in front of the tendons of brachialis and biceps brachii respectively. The ulnar artery was surrounded by the third head of pronator teres which took its origin from the fascia covering the distal part of the brachialis muscle. This muscle joined pronator teres tendon distally and was supplied by a branch of median nerve. This muscle could alter the blood flow in the ulnar artery and may cause difficulties in recording the blood pressure.

  19. POSSIBLE ENTRAPMENT OF THE ULNAR ARTERY BY THE THIRD HEAD OF PRONATOR TERES MUSCLE. EL POSIBLE ATRAPAMIENTO DE LA ARTERIA ULNAR POR EL TERCER FASCÍCULO DEL MÚSCULO PRONADOR TERES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satheesha Nayak B

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of variations at and in the surroundings of cubital fossa is useful for the orthopedic surgeons, plastic surgeons and medical practitioners in general. During routine dissection, we observed arterial and muscular variations in and around the cubital fossa. The brachial artery terminated 2 inches above the base of the cubital fossa. The radial and ulnar arteries entered the cubital fossa by passing in front of the tendons of brachialis and biceps brachii respectively. The ulnar artery was surrounded by the third head of pronator teres which took its origin from the fascia covering the distal part of the brachialis muscle. This muscle joined pronator teres tendon distally and was supplied by a branch of median nerve. This muscle could alter the blood flow in the ulnar artery and may cause difficulties in recording the blood pressure.El conocimiento de las variaciones en los alrededores de la fosa cubital es útil para cirujanos ortopédicos, cirujanos plásticos y médicos en general. Observamos las variaciones arteriales y musculares en y alrededor de la fosa cubital. La arteria braquial terminó 2 pulgadas por encima de la base de la fosa cubital. Las arterias radiales y cubitales entraron en la fosa cubital pasando delante de los tendones de los músculos braquial y bíceps braquial respectivamente. La arteria cubital estaba rodeada por el tercer fascículo del pronador teres, que tuvo su origen en la fascia cubriendo la parte distal del músculo braquial. Este músculo se unió a tendón de pronador teres distalmente y fue suministrado por una rama del nervio mediano. Este músculo podría alterar el flujo sanguíneo en la arteria cubital y puede causar dificultades para el registro de la presión sanguínea.

  20. Does posteromedial chondromalacia reduce rate of return to play after ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osbahr, Daryl C; Dines, Joshua S; Rosenbaum, Andrew J; Nguyen, Joseph T; Altchek, David W

    2012-06-01

    Biomechanical studies suggest ulnohumeral chondral and ligamentous overload (UCLO) explains the development of posteromedial chondromalacia (PMC) in throwing athletes with ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) insufficiency. UCL reconstruction reportedly allows 90% of baseball players to return to prior or a higher level of play; however, players with concomitant posteromedial chondromalacia may experience lower rates of return to play. The purpose of this investigation is to determine: (1) the rates of return to play of baseball players undergoing UCL reconstruction and posteromedial chondromalacia; and (2) the complications occurring after UCL reconstruction in the setting of posteromedial chondromalacia. We retrospectively reviewed 29 of 161 (18%) baseball players who were treated for the combined posteromedial chondromalacia and UCL injury. UCL reconstruction was accomplished with the docking technique, and the PMC was addressed with nothing or débridement if Grade 2 or 3 and with débridement or microfracture if Grade 4. The mean age was 19.6 years (range, 16-23 years). Most players were college athletes (76%) and pitchers (93%). We used a modified four-level scale of Conway et al. to assess return to play with 1 being the highest level (return to preinjury level of competition or performance for at least one season after UCL reconstruction). The minimum followup was 24 months (mean, 37 months; range, 24-52 months). Return to play was Level 1 in 22 patients (76%), Level 2 in four patients (14%), Level 3 in two patients (7%), and Level 4 in one (3%) patient. Our data suggest baseball players with concomitant PMC, may have lower rates of return to the same or a higher level of play compared with historical controls. Level IV, case series. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  1. Diffusion-weighted MR neurography of median and ulnar nerves in the wrist and palm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Hongjing; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Guangbin; Hasan, Mansoor-ul; Yao, Bin; Wu, Chao; Wu, Lebin [Shandong University, Department of MR, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Yang, Li [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Zhongshan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Xu [Shandong Chest Hospital, Department of Radiology, Jinan, Shandong (China); Chen, Weibo; Chan, Queenie [Philips Healthcare, Shanghai (China); Chhabra, Avneesh [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-06-15

    To investigate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance neurography (DW-MRN) in the visualisation of extremity nerves in the wrist and palm. Thirty-two volunteers and 21 patients underwent imaging of the wrist and palm on a 3-T MR scanner. In all subjects, two radiologists evaluated the image quality on DW-MRN using a four-point grading scale. Kappa statistics were obtained for inter-observer performance. In volunteers, the chi-squared test was used to assess the differences in nerve visualisation on DW-MRN and axial fat-suppressed proton density weighted imaging (FS-PDWI). In volunteers, the mean image quality scores for the median nerve (MN) and ulnar nerve (UN) were 3.71 ± 0.46 and 3.23 ± 0.67 for observer 1, and 3.70 ± 0.46 and 3.22 ± 0.71 for observer 2, respectively. The inter-observer agreement was excellent (k = 0.843) and good (k = 0.788), respectively. DW-MRN provided significantly improved visualisations of the second and the third common palmar digital nerves and three branches of UN compared with FS-PDWI (P < 0.05). In patients, the mean image quality scores for the two observers were 3.24 ± 0.62 and 3.10 ± 0.83, inter-observer performance was excellent (k = 0.842). DW-MRN is feasible for improved visualisation of extremity nerves and their lesions in the wrist and palm with adequate image quality, thereby providing a supplementary method to conventional MR imaging. (orig.)

  2. Reliability and precision of stress sonography of the ulnar collateral ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bica, David; Armen, Joseph; Kulas, Anthony S; Youngs, Kevin; Womack, Zachary

    2015-03-01

    Musculoskeletal sonography has emerged as an additional diagnostic tool that can be used to assess medial elbow pain and laxity in overhead throwers. It provides a dynamic, rapid, and noninvasive modality in the evaluation of ligamentous structural integrity. Many studies have demonstrated the utility of dynamic sonography for medial elbow and ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) integrity. However, evaluating the reliabilityand precision of these measurements is critical if sonography is ultimately used as a clinical diagnostic tool. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and precision of stress sonography applied to the medial elbow. We conducted a cross-sectional study during the 2011 baseball off-season. Eighteen National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I pitchers were enrolled, and 36 elbows were studied. Using sonography, the medial elbow was assessed, and measurements of the UCL length and ulnohumeral joint gapping were performed twice under two conditions (unloaded and loaded) and bilaterally. Intraclass correlation coefficients (0.72-0.94) and standard errors of measurements (0.3-0.9 mm) for UCL length and ulnohumeral joint gapping were good to excellent. Mean differences between unloaded and loaded conditions for the dominant arms were 1.3 mm (gapping; P < .001) and 1.4 mm (UCL length; P < .001). Medial elbow stress sonography is a reliable and precise method for detecting changes in ulnohumeral joint gapping and UCL lengthening. Ultimately, this method may provide clinicians valuable information regarding the medial elbow's response to valgus loading and may help guide treatment options. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  3. Diffusion-weighted MR neurography of median and ulnar nerves in the wrist and palm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Hongjing; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Guangbin; Hasan, Mansoor-ul; Yao, Bin; Wu, Chao; Wu, Lebin; Yang, Li; Zhang, Xu; Chen, Weibo; Chan, Queenie; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance neurography (DW-MRN) in the visualisation of extremity nerves in the wrist and palm. Thirty-two volunteers and 21 patients underwent imaging of the wrist and palm on a 3-T MR scanner. In all subjects, two radiologists evaluated the image quality on DW-MRN using a four-point grading scale. Kappa statistics were obtained for inter-observer performance. In volunteers, the chi-squared test was used to assess the differences in nerve visualisation on DW-MRN and axial fat-suppressed proton density weighted imaging (FS-PDWI). In volunteers, the mean image quality scores for the median nerve (MN) and ulnar nerve (UN) were 3.71 ± 0.46 and 3.23 ± 0.67 for observer 1, and 3.70 ± 0.46 and 3.22 ± 0.71 for observer 2, respectively. The inter-observer agreement was excellent (k = 0.843) and good (k = 0.788), respectively. DW-MRN provided significantly improved visualisations of the second and the third common palmar digital nerves and three branches of UN compared with FS-PDWI (P < 0.05). In patients, the mean image quality scores for the two observers were 3.24 ± 0.62 and 3.10 ± 0.83, inter-observer performance was excellent (k = 0.842). DW-MRN is feasible for improved visualisation of extremity nerves and their lesions in the wrist and palm with adequate image quality, thereby providing a supplementary method to conventional MR imaging. (orig.)

  4. Trends in Revision Elbow Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction in Professional Baseball Pitchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Alexander T; Pidgeon, Tyler S; Morrell, Nathan T; DaSilva, Manuel F

    2015-11-01

    To determine the frequency of revision elbow ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) reconstruction in professional baseball pitchers. Data were collected on 271 professional baseball pitchers who underwent primary UCL reconstruction. Each player was evaluated retrospectively for occurrence of revision UCL reconstructive surgery to treat failed primary reconstruction. Data on players who underwent revision UCL reconstruction were compiled to determine total surgical revision incidence and revision rate by year. The incidence of early revision was analyzed for trends. Average career length after primary UCL reconstruction was calculated and compared with that of players who underwent revision surgery. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess risk factors for revision including handedness, pitching role, and age at the time of primary reconstruction. Between 1974 and 2014, the annual incidence of primary UCL reconstructions among professional pitchers increased, while the proportion of cases being revised per year decreased. Of the 271 pitchers included in the study, 40 (15%) required at least 1 revision procedure during their playing career. Three cases required a second UCL revision reconstruction. The average time from primary surgery to revision was 5.2 ± 3.2 years (range, 1-13 years). The average length of career following primary reconstruction for all players was 4.9 ± 4.3 years (range, 0-22 years). The average length of career following revision UCL reconstruction was 2.5 ± 2.4 years (range, 0-8 years). No risk factors for needing revision UCL reconstruction were identified. The incidence of primary UCL reconstructions among professional pitchers is increasing; however, the rate of primary reconstructions requiring revision is decreasing. Explanations for the decreased revision rate may include improved surgical technique and improved rehabilitation protocols. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by

  5. Major League Baseball pitch velocity and pitch type associated with risk of ulnar collateral ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Robert A; Marshall, Nathan E; Guest, John-Michael; Okoroha, Kelechi R; Jung, Edward K; Moutzouros, Vasilios

    2016-04-01

    The number of Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers requiring ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) reconstructions is increasing. Recent literature has attempted to correlate specific stresses placed on the throwing arm to risk for UCL injury, with limited results. Eighty-three MLB pitchers who underwent primary UCL reconstruction were evaluated. Pitching velocity and percent of pitch type thrown (fastball, curve ball, slider, and change-up) were evaluated 2 years before and after surgery. Data were compared with control pitchers matched for age, position, size, innings pitched, and experience. The evaluation of pitch velocity compared with matched controls found no differences in pre-UCL reconstruction pitch velocities for fastballs (91.5 vs. 91.2 miles per hour [mph], P = .69), curveballs (78.2 vs. 77.9 mph, P = .92), sliders (83.3 vs. 83.5 mph, P = .88), or change-ups (83.9 vs. 83.8 mph, P = .96). When the percentage of pitches thrown was evaluated, UCL reconstructed pitchers pitch significantly more fastballs than controls (46.7% vs. 39.4%, P = .035). This correlated to a 2% increase in risk for UCL injury for every 1% increase in fastballs thrown. Pitching more than 48% fastballs was a significant predictor of UCL injury, because pitchers over this threshold required reconstruction (P = .006). MLB pitchers requiring UCL reconstruction do not pitch at higher velocities than matched controls, and pitch velocity does not appear to be a risk factor for UCL reconstruction. However, MLB pitchers who pitch a high percentage of fastballs may be at increased risk for UCL injury because pitching a higher percent of fastballs appears to be a risk factor for UCL reconstruction. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Relative individual workload changes may be a risk factor for rerupture of ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Robert A; Mehran, Nima; Khalil, Lafi S; Ahmad, Christopher S; ElAttrache, Neal

    2017-03-01

    With an increasing number of Major League Baseball (MLB) players undergoing ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) reconstruction, there remains limited literature on appropriate post-reconstruction workload management to limit the risk of reinjury. A total of 28 MLB pitchers who underwent primary UCL reconstruction surgery and subsequently required revision reconstruction were identified and compared with 137 MLB pitchers who underwent primary reconstruction but did not later require revision surgery. Games pitched, pitch counts, and innings pitched were evaluated and compared 3 years before and after primary reconstruction. Results were then compared between groups. Pitchers who later required revision increased their games pitched by 14.1% after reconstruction whereas the no-revision group pitched 13.6% fewer games than before reconstruction (P < .01). Inning workload was reduced by 9.8% after surgery (89.8 innings after vs 99.6 innings before) for the revision group compared with the no-revision group, which threw 26% fewer innings after surgery (86.3 innings after vs 116.7 innings before) (P = .05). In addition, the revision group pitched 6.6% more pitches after reconstruction, 1138.9 pitches, compared with before reconstruction, 1068.6 pitches. Pitchers who did not require revision, in contrast, pitched 19.6% fewer pitches after reconstruction than before reconstruction (P = .08). This study's findings suggest that MLB pitchers who require revision UCL reconstruction after returning to play following primary UCL reconstruction pitch at or above their pre-primary UCL reconstruction workload whereas control pitchers who do not require revision pitch significantly less, below their pre-primary UCL reconstruction workload. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Symmetric bends how to join two lengths of cord

    CERN Document Server

    Miles, Roger E

    1995-01-01

    A bend is a knot securely joining together two lengths of cord (or string or rope), thereby yielding a single longer length. There are many possible different bends, and a natural question that has probably occurred to many is: "Is there a 'best' bend and, if so, what is it?"Most of the well-known bends happen to be symmetric - that is, the two constituent cords within the bend have the same geometric shape and size, and interrelationship with the other. Such 'symmetric bends' have great beauty, especially when the two cords bear different colours. Moreover, they have the practical advantage o

  8. Contribution to assessing the stiffness reduction of structural elements in the global stability analysis of precast concrete multi-storey buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Marin

    Full Text Available This study deals with the reduction of the stiffness in precast concrete structural elements of multi-storey buildings to analyze global stability. Having reviewed the technical literature, this paper present indications of stiffness reduction in different codes, standards, and recommendations and compare these to the values found in the present study. The structural model analyzed in this study was constructed with finite elements using ANSYS® software. Physical Non-Linearity (PNL was considered in relation to the diagrams M x N x 1/r, and Geometric Non-Linearity (GNL was calculated following the Newton-Raphson method. Using a typical precast concrete structure with multiple floors and a semi-rigid beam-to-column connection, expressions for a stiffness reduction coefficient are presented. The main conclusions of the study are as follows: the reduction coefficients obtained from the diagram M x N x 1/r differ from standards that use a simplified consideration of PNL; the stiffness reduction coefficient for columns in the arrangements analyzed were approximately 0.5 to 0.6; and the variation of values found for stiffness reduction coefficient in concrete beams, which were subjected to the effects of creep with linear coefficients from 0 to 3, ranged from 0.45 to 0.2 for positive bending moments and 0.3 to 0.2 for negative bending moments.

  9. The Relative Contribution to Small Finger Abduction of the Ulnar Versus Radial Slip of the EDM: Implications for Tendon Transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinleye, Sheriff D; Culbertson, Maya Deza; Cappelleti, Giacomo; Garofolo, Garret; Choueka, Jack

    2017-09-01

    The extensor digiti minimi (EDM) tendon is commonly divided into a radial slip (EDM-R) and an ulnar slip (EDM-U). To our knowledge, the degree to which each EDM slip concomitantly abducts the small finger with active extension has not been formally tested. This study sought to characterize the comparative contributions of finger abduction inherent to each slip of the EDM to observe the sequelae of active small finger extension following transfer of the contralateral slip. Eighteen fresh-frozen cadaveric hands were used in this study. Starting with the hand in resting position, a controlled traction of 10 N was applied to each slip of the EDM tendon. The range of small finger abduction with respect to the fixed ring finger was recorded utilizing infrared reflective markers tracked through the range of motion using a digital video camera. The mean abduction of the small finger when the radial slip of the EDM tendon was tested was 13.33° (95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.10°-16.55°), which was significantly different ( P ≤ .001) than small finger abduction produced by the ulnar slip of the EDM, with a mean of 23.72° (95% CI: 19.40°-28.04°). Given the fact that the ulnar slip of the EDM tendon is shown to be the major contributor of aberrant abduction with active small finger extension, as traction on this slip produces almost twice as much abduction as the radial slip, the EDM-U is the ideal donor graft with respect to tendon transfers of the EDM.

  10. Finite Element Analysis for Bending Process of U-Bending Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Won Dong; Bahn, Chi Bum [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    ASTM G30 suggests that the applied strain can be calculated by dividing thickness by a bend radius. It should be noted, however, that the formula is reliable under an assumption that the ratio of thickness to bend radius is less than 0.2. Typically, to increase the applied stress/strain, the ratio of thickness to bend radius becomes larger than 0.2. This suggests that the estimated strain values by ASTM G30 are not reliable to predict the actual residual strain state of the highly deformed U-bend specimen. For this reason, finite element analysis (FEA) for the bending process of Ubend specimens was conducted by using a commercial finite element analysis software ABAQUS. ver.6.14- 2;2014. From the results of FEA, PWSCC initiation time and U-bend specimen size can be determined exactly. Since local stress and strain have a significant effect on the initiation of PWSCC, it was inappropriate to apply results of ASTM G30 to the PWSCC test directly. According to results of finite element analysis (FEA), elastic relaxation can cause inaccuracy in intended final residual stress. To modify this inaccuracy, additional process reducing the spring back is required. However this additional process also may cause uncertainty of stress/strain state. Therefore, the U-bending specimen size which is not creating uncertainty should be optimized and selected. With the bending radius of 8.3 mm, the thickness of 3 mm and the roller distance of 32.6 mm, calculated maximum stress and strain were 670 MPa and 0.21, respectively.

  11. Evaluating the Ergonomic Benefit of a Wrist Brace on Wrist Posture, Muscle Activity, Rotational Stiffness, and Peak Shovel-Ground Impact Force During a Simulated Tree-Planting Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheahan, Peter J; Cashaback, Joshua G A; Fischer, Steven L

    2017-09-01

    Background Tree planters are at a high risk for wrist injury due to awkward postures and high wrist loads experienced during each planting cycle, specifically at shovel-ground impact. Wrist joint stiffness provides a measure that integrates postural and loading information. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate wrist joint stiffness requirements at the instant of shovel-ground impact during tree planting and determine if a wrist brace could alter muscular contributions to wrist joint stiffness. Method Planters simulated tree planting with and without wearing a brace on their planting arm. Surface electromyography (sEMG) from six forearm muscles and wrist kinematics were collected and used to calculate muscular contributions to joint rotational stiffness about the wrist. Results Wrist joint stiffness increased with brace use, an unanticipated and negative consequence of wearing a brace. As a potential benefit, planters achieved a more neutrally oriented wrist angle about the flexion/extension axis, although a less neutral wrist angle about the ulnar/radial axis was observed. Muscle activity did not change between conditions. Conclusion The joint stiffness analysis, combining kinematic and sEMG information in a biologically relevant manner, revealed clear limitations with the interface between the brace grip and shovel handle that jeopardized the prophylactic benefits of the current brace design. This limitation was not as evident when considering kinematics and sEMG data independently. Application A neuromechanical model (joint rotational stiffness) enhanced our ability to evaluate the brace design relative to kinematic and sEMG parameter-based metrics alone.

  12. Influence of Hamstring Tightness in Pelvic, Lumbar and Trunk Range of Motion in Low Back Pain and Asymptomatic Volunteers during Forward Bending

    OpenAIRE

    Jandre Reis, Felipe Jose; Macedo, Adriana Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study. Purpose To verify the association of hamstring tightness and range of motion in anterior pelvic tilt (PT), lumbar motion (LM), and trunk flexion (TF) during forward bending. Overview of Literature Increased hamstring stiffness could be a possible contributing factor to low back injuries. Clinical observations have suggested that hamstring tightness influences lumbar pelvic rhythm. Movement restrictions or postural asymmetry likely lead to compensatory movem...

  13. Single motor–variable stiffness actuator using bistable switching mechanisms for independent motion and stiffness control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothuis, Stefan; Carloni, Raffaella; Stramigioli, Stefano

    This paper presents a proof of concept of a variable stiffness actuator (VSA) that uses only one (high power) input motor. In general, VSAs use two (high power) motors to be able to control both the output position and the output stiffness, which possibly results in a heavy, and bulky system. In

  14. Incomplete (bending) fractures of the mandibular condyle in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahrendt, D.; Swischuk, L.E.; Hayden, C.K. Jr.; Texas Univ., Galveston

    1984-01-01

    Incomplete, bending or bowing fractures of the mandibular condyle in children frequently go undetected. The reason is that the bending deformity often is subtle and passes for normal. This is especially true if the fractures are bilateral. (orig.)

  15. VARIABLE STIFFNESS HAND PROSTHESIS: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Cecilia Tapia-Siles

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetics is an important field in engineering due to the large number of amputees worldwide and the associated problems such as limited functionality of the state of the art. An important functionality of the human hand is its capability of adjusting the stiffness of the joints depending on the currently performed task. For the development of new technology it is important to understand the limitations of existing resources. As part of our efforts to develop a variable stiffness grasper for developing countries a systematic review was performed covering technology of body powered and myoelectric hand prosthesis. Focus of the review is readiness of prosthetic hands regarding their capability of controlling the stiffness of the end effector. Publications sourced through three different digital libraries were systematically reviewed on the basis of the PRISMA standard. We present a search strategy as well as the PRISMA assessment of the resulting records which covered 321 publications. The records were assessed and the results are presented for the ability of devices to control their joint stiffness. The review indicates that body powered prosthesis are preferred to myoelectric hands due to the reduced cost, the simplicity of use and because of their inherent ability to provide feedback to the user. Stiffness control was identified but has not been fully covered in the current state of the art. In addition we summarise the identified requirements on prosthetic hands as well as related information which can support the development of new prosthetics.

  16. A Novel Variable Stiffness Mechanism Capable of an Infinite Stiffness Range and Unlimited Decoupled Output Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Groothuis

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel variable stiffness mechanism is presented, which is capable of achieving an output stiffness with infinite range and an unlimited output motion, i.e., the mechanism output is completely decoupled from the rotor motion, in the zero stiffness configuration. The mechanism makes use of leaf springs, which are engaged at different positions by means of two movable supports, to realize the variable output stiffness. The Euler–Bernoulli leaf spring model is derived and validated through experimental data. By shaping the leaf springs, it is shown that the stiffness characteristic of the mechanism can be changed to fulfill different application requirements. Alternative designs can achieve the same behavior with only one leaf spring and one movable support pin.

  17. A Study on U-bending Technology using Rotary Draw Bending

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Ok-gyu; Kim, Won-seok [BHI Co., Gyunsang-Namdo (Korea, Republic of); Ku, Tae-wan [Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In the steam generator, heat transfer phenomenon for producing the steam between the primary system of the nuclear reactor and the secondary one occurs around the heat transfer tube. That is, the primary coolant with high temperature(320 .deg.. C) and high pressure(157Kgf/cm2) derived from the reactor flows in the heat transfer tube, and the secondary one runs out that tube. Therefore, it is able to mention that the heat transfer tube itself is a boundary of the heat transfer phenomenon. The heat transfer tube bundle of each steam generator used for the PWR and the PHWR(Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor) is generally composed of about 8,000-13,000 U-tubes. And these tubes are the core component as the structural and heat transfer material in the steam generator, which is in charge of cooling about 70% of the cooling surface of the primary system. For achieving the U-bending process with the thin walled tube, generally, a mandrel could be inserted in the tube according to the bending radius. But when the bending radius is small, the tube U-bending process could be also performed without the mandrel. In this study, numerical and experimental investigations on the U-bending process for producing the heat transfer tubes by using the straight and long tubes were carried out with the consideration of the elastic recovery after the U-bending. In the numerical approach, finite element analysis scheme was adopted with a commercial code, ABAQUS Implicit/Explicit. As the precedent study, the related experiment was also performed to verify the predicted results on the ovality and the minimum wall thickness of the U-bending heat transfer tube. Furthermore, its bending process was also conducted to analyze the deformation behavior for the Alloy 690 tube. In this study, the U-bending process was considered to simulate and manufactured the heat transfer tube used for the steam generator. To investigate the deformation behavior of the U-bending process, and a series of the

  18. Neurotization of the biceps muscle by end-to-side neurorraphy between ulnar and musculocutaneous nerves. A series of five cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franciosi, L F; Modestti, C; Mueller, S F

    1998-01-01

    Three patients with avulsed C5, C6, and C7 roots and two patients with avulsed C5 and C6 roots after trauma of the brachial plexus, were treated by neurotization of the biceps using nerve fibers derived from the ulnar nerve and obtained by end-to-side neurorraphy between the ulnar and musculocutaneous nerves. The age of patients ranged from 19 to 45. The interval between the accident and surgery was 2 to 13 months. Return of biceps contraction was observed 4 to 6 months after surgery. Four patients recovered grade 4 elbow flexion. One 45-year-old patient did not obtain any biceps contraction after 9 months.

  19. Thermal Analysis of Bending Under Tension Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceron, Ermanno; Martins, Paulo A.F.; Bay, Niels

    2014-01-01

    during testing is similar to the one in the production tool. A universal sheet tribo-tester has been developed, which can run multiple tests automatically from coil. This allows emulating the temperature increase as in production. The present work performs finite element analysis of the evolution......The tribological conditions in deep drawing can be simulated in the Bending Under Tension test to evaluate the performance of new lubricants, tool materials, etc. Deep drawing production with automatic handling runs normally at high rate. This implies considerable heating of the tools, which...... sometimes can cause lubricant film breakdown and galling. In order to replicate the production conditions in bending under tension testing it is thus important to control the tool/workpiece interface temperature. This can be done by pre-heating the tool, but it is essential that the interface temperature...

  20. Vortex breakdown in simple pipe bends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, Jesse; Shin, Sangwoo; Stone, Howard

    2016-11-01

    Pipe bends and elbows are one of the most common fluid mechanics elements that exists. However, despite their ubiquity and the extensive amount of research related to these common, simple geometries, unexpected complexities still remain. We show that for a range of geometries and flow conditions, these simple flows experience unexpected fluid dynamical bifurcations resembling the bubble-type vortex breakdown phenomenon. Specifically, we show with simulations and experiments that recirculation zones develop within the bends under certain conditions. As a consequence, fluid and particles can remain trapped within these structures for unexpectedly-long time scales. We also present simple techniques to mitigate this recirculation effect which can potentially have impact across industries ranging from biomedical and chemical processing to food and health sciences.

  1. Nuclear fuels accounting interface: River Bend experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    This presentation describes nuclear fuel accounting activities from the perspective of nuclear fuels management and its interfaces. Generally, Nuclear Fuels-River Bend Nuclear Group (RBNG) is involved on a day-by-day basis with nuclear fuel materials accounting in carrying out is procurement, contract administration, processing, and inventory management duties, including those associated with its special nuclear materials (SNM)-isotopics accountability oversight responsibilities as the Central Accountability Office for the River Bend Station. As much as possible, these duties are carried out in an integrated, interdependent manner. From these primary functions devolve Nuclear Fuels interfacing activities with fuel cost and tax accounting. Noting that nuclear fuel tax accounting support is of both an esoteric and intermittent nature, Nuclear Fuels-RBNG support of developments and applications associated with nuclear fuel cost accounting is stressed in this presentation

  2. Effect of confinements: Bending in Paramecium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddins, Aja; Yang, Sung; Spoon, Corrie; Jung, Sunghwan

    2012-02-01

    Paramecium is a unicellular eukaryote which by coordinated beating of cilia, generates metachronal waves which causes it to execute a helical trajectory. We investigate the swimming parameters of the organism in rectangular PDMS channels and try to quantify its behavior. Surprisingly a swimming Paramecium in certain width of channels executes a bend of its flexible body (and changes its direction of swimming) by generating forces using the cilia. Considering a simple model of beam constrained between two walls, we predict the bent shapes of the organism and the forces it exerts on the walls. Finally we try to explain how bending (by sensing) can occur in channels by conducting experiments in thin film of fluid and drawing analogy to swimming behavior observed in different cases.

  3. Measuring device for bending of beryllium reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Seiri; Sakamoto, Naoki.

    1994-01-01

    The device of the present invention can measure bending of a beryllium reflector formed in a reactor core of a nuclear reactor by a relatively easy operation. Namely, a sensor portion comprises a long-support that can be inserted to a fuel element-insertion hole disposed in the reactor and a plurality of distance sensors disposed in a longitudinal direction of the support. A supersonic wave sensor which is advantageous in the heat resistance, the size and the accuracy and can conduct measurement in water relatively easily is used as the distance sensors. However, other sensors, instead of the sensor described above, may also be used. The plurality of distance sensors detect the bending amount of the beryllium reflector in the longitudinal direction by such an easy operation of inserting such a sensor portion to the fuel element-insertion hole upon exchange of fuel elements. (I.S.)

  4. Molecular Origin of Model Membrane Bending Rigidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtisovski, Erol; Taulier, Nicolas; Waks, Marcel; Ober, Raymond; Urbach, Wladimir

    2007-01-01

    The behavior of the bending modulus κ of bilayers in lamellar phases was studied by Small Angle X-ray Scattering technique for various nonionic C i E j surfactants. The bilayers are either unswollen and dispersed in water or swollen by water and dispersed in dodecane. For unswollen bilayers, the values of κ decrease with both an increase in the area per surfactant molecule and in the polar head length. They increase when the aliphatic chain length increases at constant area per surfactant molecule. Whereas for water-swollen membranes, the values of κ decrease as the content of water increases converging to the value of the single monolayer bending modulus. Such a behavior results from the decoupling of the fluctuations of the two surfactant membrane monolayers. Our results emphasize the determinant contribution of the surfactant conformation to κ

  5. Holey fibers for low bend loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Kazuhide; Saito, Kotaro; Yamada, Yusuke; Kurokawa, Kenji; Shimizu, Tomoya; Fukai, Chisato; Matsui, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    Bending-loss insensitive fiber (BIF) has proved an essential medium for constructing the current fiber to the home (FTTH) network. By contrast, the progress that has been made on holey fiber (HF) technologies provides us with novel possibilities including non-telecom applications. In this paper, we review recent progress on hole-assisted type BIF. A simple design consideration is overviewed. We then describe some of the properties of HAF including its mechanical reliability. Finally, we introduce some applications of HAF including to high power transmission. We show that HAF with a low bending loss has the potential for use in various future optical technologies as well as in the optical communication network.

  6. Parallel monostrand stay cable bending fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Jan Pawel

    This dissertation investigates the bending fatigue response of high-strength steel monostrands and multistrand stay cables to cyclic transverse deformations. Increasing bridge stock numbers and a push for longer cable-supported span lengths have led to an increased number of reported incidents...... of damage and replacement of bridge stay cables due to wind and traffic-induced fatigue. The understanding of fatigue mechanisms in most steel structures is well established. However, in the case of cables composed of steel strands, many important aspects related with bending fatigue remain to be clarified...... associated with variable loading, and different testing procedures. As most of the contemporary stay cables are comprised of a number of individual highstrength steel monostrands, the research study started with an extensive experimental work on the fatigue response of a single monostrand to cyclic flexural...

  7. Foam topology. Bending versus stretching dominated architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, V.; Ashby, M.; Fleck, N.

    2000-01-01

    Cellular solids can deform by either the bending or stretching of the cell walls. While most cellular solids are bending-dominated, those that are stretching-dominated are much more weight-efficient for structural applications. In this study we have investigated the topological criteria that dictate the deformation mechanism of a cellular solid by analysing the rigidity (or otherwise) of pin-jointed frameworks comprising inextensional struts. We show that the minimum node connectivity for a special class of lattice structured materials to be stretching-dominated is 6 for 2D foams and 12 for 3D foams. Similarly, sandwich plates comprising of truss cores faced with planar trusses require a minimum node connectivity of 9 to undergo stretching-dominated deformation for all loading states. (author)

  8. Hydrodynamic processes in sharp meander bends and their morphological implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanckaert, K.

    2011-01-01

    The migration rate of sharp meander bends exhibits large variance and indicates that some sharply curved bends tend to stabilize. These observations remain unexplained. This paper examines three hydrodynamic processes in sharp bends with fixed banks and discusses their morphological implications:

  9. Effects of laser bending on the microstructural constituents

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tshabalala, L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article will illustrate the correlation between microstructural and microhardness changes in high-strength-low-alloy steel that occur as a result of laser-bending. Laser bending is a process of bending metal shapes using the laser beam...

  10. Metal-bending brake facilitates lightweight, close-tolerance fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercoline, A. L.; Wilton, K. B.

    1964-01-01

    A lightweight, metal bending brake ensures very accurate bends. Features of the brake that adapt it for making complex reverse bends to close tolerances are a pronounced relief or cutaway of the underside of the bodyplate combined with modification in the leaf design and its suspension.

  11. Characterization and study of photonic crystal fibres with bends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belhadj, W.; AbdelMalek, F.; Bouchriha, H.

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of a photonic crystal fibre (PRCF) with bends is presented. Using the versatile finite difference time domain method, the modal characteristics of the PCFs are found. Possibilities of employing PCFs with bends in sensing are discussed. It is found that a large evanescent field is present when the bend angle exceeds 45 o

  12. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of flow separation at bends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hou, Q.; Kruisbrink, A.C.H.; Pearce, F.R.; Tijsseling, A.S.; Yue, T.

    2014-01-01

    The separated flow in two-dimensional bends is numerically simulated for a right-angled bend with different ratios of the channel widths and for a symmetric bend with different turning angles. Unlike the potential flow solutions that have several restrictive assumptions, the Euler equations are

  13. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of flow separation at bends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hou, Q.; Kruisbrink, A.C.H.; Pearce, F.R.; Tijsseling, A.S.; Yue, T.

    2013-01-01

    The separated flow in two-dimensional bends is numerically simulated for a right-angled bend with different ratios of the channel widths and for a symmetric bend with different turning angles. Unlike the potential flow solutions that have several restrictive assumptions, the Euler equations are

  14. Dynamic Electromechanical Coupling of Piezoelectric Bending Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa R. A. Nabawy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromechanical coupling defines the ratio of electrical and mechanical energy exchanged during a flexure cycle of a piezoelectric actuator. This paper presents an analysis of the dynamic electromechanical coupling factor (dynamic EMCF for cantilever based piezoelectric actuators and provides for the first time explicit expressions for calculation of dynamic EMCF based on arrangement of passive and active layers, layer geometry, and active and passive materials selection. Three main cantilever layer configurations are considered: unimorph, dual layer bimorph and triple layer bimorph. The actuator is modeled using standard constitutive dynamic equations that relate deflection and charge to force and voltage. A mode shape formulation is used for the cantilever dynamics that allows the generalized mass to be the actual mass at the first resonant frequency, removing the need for numerical integration in the design process. Results are presented in the form of physical insight from the model structure and also numerical evaluations of the model to provide trends in dynamic EMCF with actuator design parameters. For given material properties of the active and passive layers and given system overall damping ratio, the triple layer bimorph topology is the best in terms of theoretically achievable dynamic EMCF, followed by the dual layer bimorph. For a damping ratio of 0.035, the dynamic EMCF for an example dual layer bimorph configuration is 9% better than for a unimorph configuration. For configurations with a passive layer, the ratio of thicknesses for the passive and active layers is the primary geometric design variable. Choice of passive layer stiffness (Young’s modulus relative to the stiffness of the material in the active layer is an important materials related design choice. For unimorph configurations, it is beneficial to use the highest stiffness possible passive material, whereas for triple layer bimorph configurations, the passive

  15. The MIT miniaturized disk bend test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harling, O.K.; Lee, M.; Sohn, D.S.; Kohse, G.; Lau, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    A miniaturized disk bend test (MDBT) using transmission electron microscopy specimens for the determination of various mechanical properties is being developed at MIT. Recent progress in obtaining strengths and ductilities of highly irradiated metal alloys is reviewed. Possibilities exist for applying the MDBT approach to the determination of other mechanical properties. Progress in fatigue testing and in determination of the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature is reviewed briefly

  16. AA, assembly of wide bending magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    The very particular lattice of the AA required 2 types of dipoles (bending magnets; BST, short and wide; BLG, long and narrow). The wide ones had a steel length of 2.71 m, a "good field" width of 0.564 m, and a weight of about 75 t. Here we see the copper coils being hoisted onto the lower half of a BST. See also 7811105, 8006050. For a BLG, see 8001044.

  17. Closed-form plastic collapse loads of pipe bends under combined pressure and in-plane bending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Chang Sik; Kim, Yun Jae

    2006-01-01

    Based on three-dimensional (3-D) FE limit analyses, this paper provides plastic limit, collapse and instability load solutions for pipe bends under combined pressure and in-plane bending. The plastic limit loads are determined from FE limit analyses based on elastic-perfectly plastic materials using the small geometry change option, and the FE limit analyses using the large geometry change option provide plastic collapse loads (using the twice-elastic-slope method) and instability loads. For the bending mode, both closing bending and opening bending are considered, and a wide range of parameters related to the bend geometry is considered. Based on the FE results, closed-form approximations of plastic limit and collapse load solutions for pipe bends under combined pressure and bending are proposed

  18. Plant fibre composites - porosity and stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bo; Thygesen, Anders; Lilholt, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Plant fibre composites contain typically a relatively large amount of porosity which influences their performance. A model, based on a modified rule of mixtures, is presented to include the influence of porosity on the composite stiffness. The model integrates the volumetric composition...... of the composites with their mechanical properties. The fibre weight fraction is used as an independent parameter to calculate the complete volumetric composition. A maximum obtainable stiffness of the composites is calculated at a certain transition fibre weight fraction, which is characterised by a best possible...... combination of high fibre volume fraction and low porosity. The model is validated with experimental data from the literature on several types of composites. A stiffness diagram is presented to demonstrate that the calculations can be used for tailoring and design of composites with a given profile...

  19. First multi-bend achromat lattice consideration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einfeld, Dieter, E-mail: dieter.einfeld@maxlab.lu.se [Lund University, PO Box 118, Lund SE-221 00 (Sweden); Plesko, Mark [COSYLAB, Teslova ulica 30, Ljubljana SI-1000 (Slovakia); Schaper, Joachim [HAWK University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Hohnsen 4, D-31134 Hildesheim (Germany)

    2014-08-27

    The first proposed lattice for a ‘diffraction-limited light source’ is reported. This approach has now more or less been used for the MAX IV project. By the beginning of 1990, three third-generation synchrotron light sources had been successfully commissioned in Grenoble, Berkeley and Trieste (ESRF, ALS and ELETTRA). Each of these new machines reached their target specifications without any significant problems. In parallel, already at that time discussions were underway regarding the next generation, the ‘diffraction-limited light source (DLSR)’, which featured sub-nm rad electron beam emittance, photon beam brilliance exceeding 10{sup 22} and the potential to emit coherent radiation. Also, at about that time, a first design for a 3 GeV DLSR was developed, based on a modified multiple-bend achromat (MBA) design leading to a lattice with normalized emittance of ∊{sub x} = 0.5 nm rad. The novel feature of the MBA lattice was the use of seven vertically focusing bend magnets with different bending angles throughout the achromat cell to keep the radiation integrals and resulting beam emittance low. The baseline design called for a 400 m ring circumference with 12 straight sections of 6 m length. The dynamic aperture behaviour of the DLSR lattice was estimated to produce > 5 h beam lifetime at 100 mA stored beam current.

  20. The multi-bend achromat storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Mikael [MAX IV Laboratory Ole Römers v. 1 22100 Lund Sweden (Sweden)

    2016-07-27

    Not very long ago, the 3{sup rd} generation storage ring technology was judged as mature. Most of the 3{sup rd} generation storage rings used the Double-Bend Achromat (DBA) or Triple-Bend Achromat (TBA) concepts. It was however a well-known fact that increasing the number of magnet cells in the rings is a powerful way of decreasing the electron beam emittance and thus the source brilliance, but at the penalty of increasing the size and cost of the rings. Preserving the Dynamic Aperture (DA) in the rings became also an issue when increasing the number of magnet cells. The Multi-Bend Achromat (MBA) concept, including a miniaturization of the ring elements, has now drastically changed the picture. The MBA rings, now in construction or being planned, offer orders of magnitudes higher brilliance than rings of conventional designs. Several light sources around the world are now implementing or planning to implement this MBA concept. This article touches on the science drivers for higher brilliance. We will then describe the MBA concept with its advantages as well as its challenges. A short survey of the MBA activity around the world will also be presented. The author apologies for focusing on the MAX IV project regarding technical solutions. This is motivated by that MAX IV is the facility he knows best and it might be regarded as a fore-runner for the MBA concept.

  1. BENDING BEHAVIOUR OF MAGNETIC COTTON YARNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUPU Iuliana G.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic yarns are composite yarns, i.e. they combine elements of various natures and properties, with proven potential for electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding. In this paper, different mixtures of hard and soft magnetic powder were chosen to cover materials made of cotton yarn. The physical properties and bending behavior of the produced composite yarns were investigated in order to evaluate the yarns for further textile processing.The cotton yarn used as base material was covered with hard (barium hexaferrite BaFe12O19 and soft (Black Toner magnetic particles. An in-house developed laboratory equipment has been used to cover the twist cotton yarns with seven mixtures having different amounts of magnetic powder (30% – 50%. The bending behavior of the coated yarns was evaluated based on the average width of cracks which appeared on the yarn surface after repeated flexural tests. The obtained results revealed that usage of a polyurethane adhesive in the coating solution prevents crack formation on the surface of hard magnetic yarns after flexural tests. At the same time, the higher the mass percentage of hard magnetic powder in the mixture, the higher was the cracks’ width. The soft magnetic yarns are more flexible and a smaller crack width is observed on their surface. Both the coating solution composition and the powder diameter are expected to influence the bending behavior of coated yarns.

  2. The multi-bend achromat storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Not very long ago, the 3"r"d generation storage ring technology was judged as mature. Most of the 3"r"d generation storage rings used the Double-Bend Achromat (DBA) or Triple-Bend Achromat (TBA) concepts. It was however a well-known fact that increasing the number of magnet cells in the rings is a powerful way of decreasing the electron beam emittance and thus the source brilliance, but at the penalty of increasing the size and cost of the rings. Preserving the Dynamic Aperture (DA) in the rings became also an issue when increasing the number of magnet cells. The Multi-Bend Achromat (MBA) concept, including a miniaturization of the ring elements, has now drastically changed the picture. The MBA rings, now in construction or being planned, offer orders of magnitudes higher brilliance than rings of conventional designs. Several light sources around the world are now implementing or planning to implement this MBA concept. This article touches on the science drivers for higher brilliance. We will then describe the MBA concept with its advantages as well as its challenges. A short survey of the MBA activity around the world will also be presented. The author apologies for focusing on the MAX IV project regarding technical solutions. This is motivated by that MAX IV is the facility he knows best and it might be regarded as a fore-runner for the MBA concept.

  3. Forming and bending of metal foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nebosky, Paul; Tyszka, Daniel; Niebur, Glen; Schmid, Steven

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the formability of a porous tantalum foam, known as trabecular metal (TM). Used as a bone ingrowth surface on orthopedic implants, TM is desirable due to its combination of high strength, low relative density, and excellent osteoconductive properties. This research aims to develop bend and stretch forming as a cost-effective alternative to net machining and EDM for manufacturing thin parts made of TM. Experimentally, bending about a single axis using a wiping die was studied by observing cracking and measuring springback. It was found that die radius and clearance strongly affect the springback properties of TM, while punch speed, embossings, die radius and clearance all influence cracking. Depending on the various combinations of die radius and clearance, springback factor ranged from .70-.91. To examine the affect of the foam microstructure, bending also was examined numerically using a horizontal hexagonal mesh. As the hexagonal cells were elongated along the sheet length, elastic springback decreased. This can be explained by the earlier onset of plastic hinging occurring at the vertices of the cells. While the numerical results matched the experimental results for the case of zero clearance, differences at higher clearances arose due to an imprecise characterization of the post-yield properties of tantalum. By changing the material properties of the struts, the models can be modified for use with other open-cell metallic foams

  4. Emittance growth of bunched beams in bends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsten, B.E.; Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1995-01-01

    Talman [Phys. Rev. Lett. 56, 1429 (1986)] has proposed a novel relativistic effect that occurs when a charged particle beam is bent in the magnetic field from an external dipole. The consequence of this effect is that the space-charge forces from the particles do not exhibit the usual inverse-square energy dependence and some part of them are, in fact, independent of energy. This led to speculation that this effect could introduce significant emittance growth for a bending electron beam. Subsequently, it was shown that this effect's influence on the beam's transverse motion is canceled for a dc beam by a potential depression within the beam (to first order in the beam radius divided by the bend radius). In this paper, we extend the analysis to include short bunch lengths (as compared to the beam pipe dimensions) and find that there is no longer the cancellation for forces both transverse to and in the direction of motion. We provide an estimate for the emittance growth as a function of bend angle, beam radius, and current, and for magnetic compression of an electron bunch

  5. Effect of platelet-rich plasma combined with demineralised bone matrix on bone healing in rabbit ulnar defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanis, Vasilios; Fiska, Alice; Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Kazakos, Konstantinos; Demetriou, Thespis

    2017-09-01

    This study evaluates the effect of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) combined with xenogeneic demineralised bone matrix (DBM) on bone healing of critical-size ulnar defects (2-2.5 times the ulnar diameter) in New Zealand White rabbits. Critical-size defects were created unilaterally in the ulna of 36 rabbits, while keeping the contralateral limb intact. They were divided into three groups. In Group A, the defect was filled with autologous PRP and in Group B, with autologous PRP combined with DBM; in Group C, the defect remained empty. The rabbits were euthanised 12 weeks postoperatively. Radiological, biomechanical and histological assessments were carried out and statistical analysis of the results was performed. Group B had significantly higher radiological and histological scores than Groups A and C. Defects in Group B showed significant new bone formation, whereas there was minimal or no new bone formation in Groups A and C. Only specimens in Group B showed macroscopic bone union. Biomechanical evaluation of the treated and intact contralateral limbs in Group B showed significant differences. In this study, statistically significant enhancement of bone healing was found in critical-size defects treated with PRP and DBM, as shown by radiological findings, gross assessment, and biomechanical and histopathological results. Defects in the two other groups remained unbridged. Therefore, PRP was effective only when it was used in combination with a bone graft. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association

  6. Variable stiffness and damping MR isolator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X Z; Wang, X Y; Li, W H; Kostidis, K [University of Wollongong, School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, NSW 2522 (Australia)], E-mail: weihuali@uow.edu.au

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents the development of a magnetorheological (MR) fluid-based variable stiffness and damping isolator for vibration suppressions. The MR fluid isolator used a sole MR control unit to achieve the variable stiffness and damping in stepless and relative large scope. A mathematical model of the isolator was derived, and a prototype of the MR fluid isolator was fabricated and its dynamic behavior was measured in vibration under various applied magnetic fields. The parameters of the model under various magnetic fields were identified and the dynamic performances of isolator were evaluated.

  7. Fabrication of topology optimized photonic crystal waveguide Z-bend displaying large bandwidth with very low bend loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpøth, Anders; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Kristensen, Martin

    2004-01-01

    We have designed, simulated and fabricated a photonic crystal waveguide Z-bend, which displays a total bend loss of ~1dB per bend in a wavelength range of more than 200nm. The fabricated component performs in excellent agreement with 3D finite-difference time-domain calculations....

  8. 76 FR 81992 - PPL Bell Bend, LLC; Combined License Application for Bell Bend Nuclear Power Plant; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... License Application for Bell Bend Nuclear Power Plant; Exemption 1.0 Background PPL Bell Bend, LLC... for Nuclear Power Plants.'' This reactor is to be identified as Bell Bend Nuclear Power Plant (BBNPP... based upon the U.S. EPR reference COL (RCOL) application for UniStar's Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power...

  9. LSODE, 1. Order Stiff or Non-Stiff Ordinary Differential Equations System Initial Value Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindmarsh, A.C.; Petzold, L.R.

    2005-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: LSODE (Livermore Solver for Ordinary Differential Equations) solves stiff and non-stiff systems of the form dy/dt = f. In the stiff case, it treats the Jacobian matrix df/dy as either a dense (full) or a banded matrix, and as either user-supplied or internally approximated by difference quotients. It uses Adams methods (predictor-corrector) in the non-stiff case, and Backward Differentiation Formula (BDF) methods (the Gear methods) in the stiff case. The linear systems that arise are solved by direct methods (LU factor/solve). The LSODE source is commented extensively to facilitate modification. Both a single-precision version and a double-precision version are available. 2 - Methods: It is assumed that the ODEs are given explicitly, so that the system can be written in the form dy/dt = f(t,y), where y is the vector of dependent variables, and t is the independent variable. LSODE contains two variable-order, variable- step (with interpolatory step-changing) integration methods. The first is the implicit Adams or non-stiff method, of orders one through twelve. The second is the backward differentiation or stiff method (or BDF method, or Gear's method), of orders one through five. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The differential equations must be given in explicit form, i.e., dy/dt = f(y,t). Problems with intermittent high-speed transients may cause inefficient or unstable performance

  10. Recent developments in bend-insensitive and ultra-bend-insensitive fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, David; de Montmorillon, Louis-Anne; Provost, Lionel; Montaigne, Nelly; Gooijer, Frans; Aldea, Eugen; Jensma, Jaap; Sillard, Pierre

    2010-02-01

    Designed to overcome the limitations in case of extreme bending conditions, Bend- and Ultra-Bend-Insensitive Fibers (BIFs and UBIFs) appear as ideal solutions for use in FTTH networks and in components, pigtails or patch-cords for ever demanding applications such as military or sensing. Recently, however, questions have been raised concerning the Multi-Path-Interference (MPI) levels in these fibers. Indeed, they are potentially subject to interferences between the fundamental mode and the higher-order mode that is also bend resistant. This MPI is generated because of discrete discontinuities such as staples, bends and splices/connections that occur on distance scales that become comparable to the laser coherent length. In this paper, we will demonstrate the high MPI tolerance of all-solid single-trench-assisted BIFs and UBIFs. We will present the first comprehensive study combining theoretical and experimental points of view to quantify the impact of fusion splices on coherent MPI. To be complete, results for mechanical splices will also be reported. Finally, we will show how the single-trench- assisted concept combined with the versatile PCVD process allows to tightly control the distributions of fibers characteristics. Such controls are needed to massively produce BIFs and to meet the more stringent specifications of the UBIFs.

  11. Influence of flock coating on bending rigidity of woven fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, O.; Kesimci, M. O.

    2017-10-01

    This work presents the preliminary results of our efforts that focused on the effect of the flock coating on the bending rigidity of woven fabrics. For this objective, a laboratory scale flocking unit is designed and flocked samples of controlled flock density are produced. Bending rigidity of the samples with different flock densities are measured on both flocked and unflocked sides. It is shown that the bending rigidity depends on both flock density and whether the side to be measured is flocked or not. Adhesive layer thickness on the bending rigidity is shown to be dramatic. And at higher basis weights, flock density gets less effective on bending rigidity.

  12. A preliminary bending fatigue spectrum for steel monostrand cables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Jan; Fischer, Gregor; Georgakis, Christos T.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the experimental study on the bending fatigue resistance of high-strength steel monostrand cables. From the conducted fatigue tests in the high-stress, low-cycle region, a preliminary bending fatigue spectrum is derived for the estimation of monostrand cable...... service life expectancy. The presented preliminary bending fatigue spectrum of high-strength monostrands is currently unavailable in the published literature. The presented results provide relevant information on the bending mechanism and fatigue characteristics of monostrand steel cables in tension...... and flexure and show that localized cable bending has a pronounced influence on the fatigue resistance of cables under dynamic excitations....

  13. Permanent bending and alignment of ZnO nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borschel, Christian; Spindler, Susann; Oertel, Michael; Ronning, Carsten [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Lerose, Damiana [MPI fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle/Saale (Germany); Institut fuer Photonische Technologien, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Bochmann, Arne [Institut fuer Photonische Technologien, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Christiansen, Silke H. [Institut fuer Photonische Technologien, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); MPI fuer die Physik des Lichts, Guenther-Scharowsky-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Nietzsche, Sandor [Zentrum fuer Elektronenmikroskopie, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Ziegelmuehlenweg 1, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Ion beams can be used to bend or re-align nanowires permanently, after they have been grown. We have irradiated ZnO nanowires with ions of different species and energy, achieving bending and alignment in various directions. We study the bending of single nanowires as well as the simultaneous alignment of large ensembles of ZnO nanowires in detail. Computer simulations show that the bending is initiated by ion beam induced damage. Dislocations are identified to relax stresses and make the bending and alignment permanent and resistant against annealing procedures.

  14. Tunable waveguide bends with graphene-based anisotropic metamaterials

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zhao-xian; Chen, Ze-guo; Ming, Yang; Wu, Ying; Lu, Yan-qing

    2016-01-01

    We design tunable waveguide bends filled with graphene-based anisotropic metamaterials to achieve a nearly perfect bending effect. The anisotropic properties of the metamaterials can be described by the effective medium theory. The nearly perfect bending effect is demonstrated by finite element simulations of various structures with different bending curvatures and shapes. This effect is attributed to zero effective permittivity along the direction of propagation and matched effective impedance at the interfaces between the bending part and the dielectric waveguides. We envisage that the design will be applicable in the far-infrared and terahertz frequency ranges owing to the tunable dielectric responses of graphene.

  15. Tunable waveguide bends with graphene-based anisotropic metamaterials

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zhao-xian

    2016-01-15

    We design tunable waveguide bends filled with graphene-based anisotropic metamaterials to achieve a nearly perfect bending effect. The anisotropic properties of the metamaterials can be described by the effective medium theory. The nearly perfect bending effect is demonstrated by finite element simulations of various structures with different bending curvatures and shapes. This effect is attributed to zero effective permittivity along the direction of propagation and matched effective impedance at the interfaces between the bending part and the dielectric waveguides. We envisage that the design will be applicable in the far-infrared and terahertz frequency ranges owing to the tunable dielectric responses of graphene.

  16. Fortalecimento dos músculos da mão em pacientes submetidos a neurorrafia do ulnar com videogame/Strengthening of hand muscles in patients submitted to neurorrhaphy of ulnar nerve through the videogame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Goto Kimura

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar se o fortalecimento muscular com o uso do videogame E-link promove aumento da força para os músculos da mão em pacientes com lesão de nervo ulnar. Resultados: Comparando a média das forças de preensão e pinças antes e após o fortalecimento, houve um aumento de força para todos os movimentos. Na força de preensão palmar houve em média um aumento de 50%, na pinça polpa-lateral houve na média um aumento de 24%, na pinça polpa-trípode a média foi de 8% de ganho de força e na pinça polpa-polpa a média foi de 10% de aumento na força. Discussão: A realidade virtual tem sido utilizada atualmente para modificar as terapias tradicionais com o intuito de aumentar a motivação no tratamento, como forma de entretenimento para o paciente, aumentando assim o seu desempenho na realização dos exercícios. Conclusão: Este estudo demonstrou houve ganho de força de preensão e das pinças, após o programa de fortalecimento com o uso do videogame para os músculos intrínsecos e extrínsecos da mão de pacientes após neurorrafia do nervo ulnar. AbstractThe objective of this study was to verify if muscle strengthening using the E-link videogame promotes increased strength for the hand muscles in patients with ulnar nerve injury. Results: Comparing the average grip and pinch strength before and after strengthening, there was an increase in strength for all movements. In the palmar grip strength there was an increase of 50%, in key pinch there was an increase of 24%, in tripod pinch the average was 8% and tip-to-tip pinch the increase was 10% in strength. Discussion: Virtual reality has been use most frequently to modify traditional therapies in order to improve treatment motivation as a form of entertainment for the patient, thus increasing their performance in performing the exercises. Conclusion: This study demonstrated an increase in grip and pinch strength. After the program of strengthening

  17. Standard test methods for bend testing of material for ductility

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover bend testing for ductility of materials. Included in the procedures are four conditions of constraint on the bent portion of the specimen; a guided-bend test using a mandrel or plunger of defined dimensions to force the mid-length of the specimen between two supports separated by a defined space; a semi-guided bend test in which the specimen is bent, while in contact with a mandrel, through a specified angle or to a specified inside radius (r) of curvature, measured while under the bending force; a free-bend test in which the ends of the specimen are brought toward each other, but in which no transverse force is applied to the bend itself and there is no contact of the concave inside surface of the bend with other material; a bend and flatten test, in which a transverse force is applied to the bend such that the legs make contact with each other over the length of the specimen. 1.2 After bending, the convex surface of the bend is examined for evidence of a crack or surface irregu...

  18. Surface effects on static bending of nanowires based on non-local elasticity theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Wu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The surface elasticity and non-local elasticity effects on the elastic behavior of statically bent nanowires are investigated in the present investigation. Explicit solutions are presented to evaluate the surface stress and non-local elasticity effects with various boundary conditions. Compared with the classical Euler beam, a nanowire with surface stress and/or non-local elasticity can be either stiffer or less stiff, depending on the boundary conditions. The concept of surface non-local elasticity was proposed and its physical interpretation discussed to explain the combined effect of surface elasticity and non-local elasticity. The effect of the nanowire size on its elastic bending behavior was investigated. The results obtained herein are helpful to characterize mechanical properties of nanowires and aid nanowire-based devices design.

  19. Novel quadrilateral elements based on explicit Hermite polynomials for bending of Kirchhoff-Love plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti, Alireza

    2018-03-01

    The contribution addresses the finite element analysis of bending of plates given the Kirchhoff-Love model. To analyze the static deformation of plates with different loadings and geometries, the principle of virtual work is used to extract the weak form. Following deriving the strain field, stresses and resultants may be obtained. For constructing four-node quadrilateral plate elements, the Hermite polynomials defined with respect to the variables in the parent space are applied explicitly. Based on the approximated field of displacement, the stiffness matrix and the load vector in the finite element method are obtained. To demonstrate the performance of the subparametric 4-node plate elements, some known, classical examples in structural mechanics are solved and there are comparisons with the analytical solutions available in the literature.

  20. A dissipated energy comparison to evaluate fatigue resistance using 2-point bending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Maggiore

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue is the main failure mode in pavement engineering. Typically, micro-cracks originate at the bottom of asphalt concrete layer due to horizontal tensile strains. Micro-cracks start to propagate towards the upper layers under repeated loading which can lead to pavement failure. Different methods are usually used to describe fatigue behavior in asphalt materials such as: phenomenological approach, fracture mechanics approach and dissipated energy approach. This paper presents a comparison of fatigue resistances calculated for different dissipated energy models using 2-point bending (2PB at IFSTTAR in Nantes. 2PB tests have been undertaken under different loading and environmental conditions in order to evaluate the properties of the mixtures (stiffness, dissipated energy, fatigue life and healing effect.

  1. Elastin in large artery stiffness and hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenseil, Jessica E.; Mecham, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Large artery stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV), is correlated with high blood pressure and may be a causative factor in essential hypertension. The extracellular matrix components, specifically the mix of elastin and collagen in the vessel wall, determine the passive mechanical properties of the large arteries. Elastin is organized into elastic fibers in the wall during arterial development in a complex process that requires spatial and temporal coordination of numerous proteins. The elastic fibers last the lifetime of the organism, but are subject to proteolytic degradation and chemical alterations that change their mechanical properties. This review discusses how alterations in the amount, assembly, organization or chemical properties of the elastic fibers affect arterial stiffness and blood pressure. Strategies for encouraging or reversing alterations to the elastic fibers are addressed. Methods for determining the efficacy of these strategies, by measuring elastin amounts and arterial stiffness, are summarized. Therapies that have a direct effect on arterial stiffness through alterations to the elastic fibers in the wall may be an effective treatment for essential hypertension. PMID:22290157

  2. Diagram of state of stiff amphiphilic macromolecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markov, Vladimir A.; Vasilevskaya, Valentina V.; Khalatur, Pavel G.; ten Brinke, Gerrit; Khokhlov, Alexei R.

    2007-01-01

    We studied coil-globule transitions in stiff-chain amphiphilic macromolecules via computer modeling and constructed phase diagrams for such molecules in terms of solvent quality and persistence length. We showed that the shape of the phase diagram essentially depends on the macromolecule degree of

  3. Advanced damper with negative structural stiffness elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Liang; Lakes, Roderic S

    2012-01-01

    Negative stiffness is understood as the occurrence of a force in the same direction as the imposed deformation. Structures and composites with negative stiffness elements enable a large amplification in damping. It is shown in this work, using an experimental approach, that when a flexible flat-ends column is aligned in a post-buckled condition, a negative structural stiffness and large hysteresis (i.e., high damping) can be achieved provided the ends of the column undergo tilting from flat to edge contact. Stable axial dampers with initial modulus equivalent to that of the parent material and with enhanced damping were designed and built using constrained negative stiffness effects entailed by post-buckled press-fit flat-ends columns. Effective damping of approximately 1 and an effective stiffness–damping product of approximately 1.3 GPa were achieved in such stable axial dampers consisting of PMMA columns. This is a considerable improvement for this figure of merit (i.e., the stiffness–damping product), which generally cannot exceed 0.6 GPa for currently used damping layers. (paper)

  4. Rupture prediction for induction bends under opening mode bending with emphasis on strain localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuya, Masaki; Sakanoue, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the opening mode of induction bends; this mode represents the deformation outside a bend. Bending experiments on induction bends are shown and the manner of failure of these bends was investigated. Ruptures occur at the intrados of the bends, which undergo tensile stress, and accompany the local reduction of wall thickness, i.e., necking that indicates strain localization. By implementing finite element analysis (FEA), it was shown that the rupture is dominated not by the fracture criterion of material but by the initiation of strain localization that is a deformation characteristic of the material. These ruptures are due to the rapid increase of local strain after the initiation of strain localization and suddenly reach the fracture criterion. For the evaluation of the deformability of the bends, a method based on FEA that can predict the displacement at the rupture is proposed. We show that the yield surface shape and the true stress–strain relationship after uniform elongation have to be defined on the basis of the actual properties of the bend material. The von Mises yield criterion, which is commonly used in cases of elastic–plastic FEA, could not predict the rupture and overestimated the deformability. In contrast, a yield surface obtained by performing tensile tests on a biaxial specimen could predict the rupture. The prediction of the rupture was accomplished by an inverse calibration method that determined the true stress-strain relationship after uniform elongation. As an alternative to the inverse calibration, a simple extrapolation method of the true stress-strain relationship after uniform elongation which can predict the rupture is proposed. - Highlights: • A method based on FEA that can predict the displacement at the rupture is proposed. • The yield surface shape and the true stress–strain have to be defined precisely. • The von Mises yield criterion overestimated the deformability. • The ruptures are due to the

  5. Neurophysiological localisation of ulnar neuropathy at the elbow: validation of diagnostic criteria developed by a taskforce of the Danish Society of Clinical Neurophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pugdahl, Kirsten; Beniczky, Sándor; Wanscher, Benedikte

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study validates consensus criteria for localisation of ulnar neuropathy at elbow (UNE) developed by a taskforce of the Danish Society of Clinical Neurophysiology and compares them to the existing criteria from the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine...

  6. Comparison between open and arthroscopic-assisted foveal triangular fibrocartilage complex repair for post-traumatic distal radio-ulnar joint instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchetti, R; Atzei, A; Cozzolino, R; Fairplay, T; Badur, N

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the objective and subjective functional outcomes after foveal reattachment of proximal or complete ulnar-sided triangular fibrocartilage complex lesions by two surgical procedures: an open technique or an arthroscopically assisted repair. The study was done prospectively on 49 wrists affected by post-traumatic distal radio-ulnar joint instability. Twenty-four patients were treated with the open technique (Group 1) and 25 by the arthroscopically assisted technique (Group 2). Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a clear foveal detachment of the triangular fibrocartilage complex in 67% of the cases. Arthroscopy showed a positive ulnar-sided detachment of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (positive hook test) in all cases. Distal radio-ulnar joint stability was obtained in all but five patients at a mean follow-up of 6 months. Both groups had improvement of all parameters with significant differences in wrist pain scores, Mayo wrist score, Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire and Patient-Rated Wrist/Hand Evaluation questionnaire scores. There were no significant post-operative differences between the two groups in the outcome parameters except for the Disability of the Arm Shoulder and Hand questionnaire score, which was significantly better in Group 2 (p < 0.001). © The Author(s) 2013.

  7. Surface orientation effects on bending properties of surgical mesh are independent of tensile properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, David D; Andrews, Sharon M; Robinson-Zeigler, Rebecca; Valdes, Thelma; Woods, Terry O

    2018-02-01

    Current mechanical testing of surgical mesh focuses primarily on tensile properties even though implanted devices are not subjected to pure tensile loads. Our objective was to determine the flexural (bending) properties of surgical mesh and determine if they correlate with mesh tensile properties. The flexural rigidity values of 11 different surgical mesh designs were determined along three textile directions (machine, cross-machine, and 45° to machine; n = 5 for each) using ASTM D1388-14 while tracking surface orientation. Tensile testing was also performed on the same specimens using ASTM D882-12. Linear regressions were performed to compare mesh flexural rigidity to mesh thickness, areal mass density, filament diameter, ultimate tensile strength, and maximum extension. Of 33 mesh specimen groups, 30 had significant differences in flexural rigidity values when comparing surface orientations (top and bottom). Flexural rigidity and mesh tensile properties also varied with textile direction (machine and cross-machine). There was no strong correlation between the flexural and tensile properties, with mesh thickness having the best overall correlation with flexural rigidity. Currently, surface orientation is not indicated on marketed surgical mesh, and a single mesh may behave differently depending on the direction of loading. The lack of correlation between flexural stiffness and tensile properties indicates the need to examine mesh bending stiffness to provide a more comprehensive understanding of surgical mesh mechanical behaviors. Further investigation is needed to determine if these flexural properties result in the surgical mesh behaving mechanically different depending on implantation direction. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 106B: 854-862, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Parametric study of roof diaphragm stiffness requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, W.D.; Tenbus, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    A common assumption made in performing a dynamic seismic analysis for a building is that the roof/floor system is open-quotes rigidclose quotes. This assumption would appear to be reasonable for many of the structures found in nuclear power plants, since many of these structures are constructed of heavily reinforced concrete having floor/roof slabs at least two feet in thickness, and meet the code requirements for structural detailing for seismic design. The roofs of many Department of Energy (DOE) buildings at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, have roofs constructed of either metal, precast concrete or gypsum plank deck overlaid with rigid insulation, tar and gravel. In performing natural phenomena hazard assessments for one such facility, it was assumed that the existing roof performed first as a flexible diaphragm (zero stiffness) and then, rigid (infinitely stiff). For the flexible diaphragm model it was determined that the building began to experience significant damage around 0.09 g's. For the rigid diaphragm model it was determined that no significant damage was observed below 0.20 g's. A Conceptual Design Report has been prepared for upgrading/replacing the roof of this building. The question that needed to be answered here was, open-quotes How stiff should the new roof diaphragm be in order to satisfy the rigid diaphragm assumption and, yet, be cost effective?close quotes. This paper presents a parametric study of a very simple structural system to show that the design of roof diaphragms needs to consider both strength and stiffness (frequency) requirements. This paper shows how the stiffness of a roof system affects the seismically induced loads in the lateral, vertical load resisting elements of a building and provides guidance in determining how open-quotes rigidclose quotes a roof system should be in order to accomplish a cost effective design

  9. Lamb wave characterization of the effects of long-term thermal-mechanical aging on composite stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, M. D.; Madaras, E. I.

    1999-01-01

    Lamb waves offer a promising method of evaluating damage in composite materials. The Lamb wave velocity is directly related to the material parameters, so an effective tool exists to monitor damage in composites by measuring the velocity of these waves. The Lamb Wave Imager (LWI) uses a pulse/receive technique that excites an antisymmetric Lamb mode and measures the time-of-flight over a wide frequency range. Given the material density and plate thickness, the bending and out-of-plane shear stiffnesses are calculated from a reconstruction of the dispersion curve. In this study, the time-of-flight as well as the elastic stiffnesses D11, D22, A44, and A55 for composite samples which have undergone combined thermal and mechanical aging are obtained. The samples examined include a baseline specimen with 0 cycles, specimens which have been aged 2350 and 3530 cycles at high strain levels, and one specimen aged 3530 cycles at low strain levels.

  10. Limit loads for pipe bends under combined pressure and in-plane bending based on finite element limit analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Chang Sik; Kim, Yun Jae

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper, approximate plastic limit load solutions for pipe bends under combined internal pressure and bending are obtained from detailed three-dimensional (3-D) FE limit analyses based on elastic-perfectly plastic materials with the small geometry change option. The present FE results show that existing limit load solutions for pipe bends are lower bounds but can be very different from the present FE results in some cases, particularly for bending. Accordingly closed-form approximations are proposed for pipe bends under combined pressure and in-plane bending based on the present FE results. The proposed limit load solutions would be a basis of defective pipe bends and be useful to estimate non-linear fracture mechanics parameters based on the reference stress approach

  11. Bending of light in quantum gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N E J; Donoghue, John F; Holstein, Barry R; Planté, Ludovic; Vanhove, Pierre

    2015-02-13

    We consider the scattering of lightlike matter in the presence of a heavy scalar object (such as the Sun or a Schwarzschild black hole). By treating general relativity as an effective field theory we directly compute the nonanalytic components of the one-loop gravitational amplitude for the scattering of massless scalars or photons from an external massive scalar field. These results allow a semiclassical computation of the bending angle for light rays grazing the Sun, including long-range ℏ contributions. We discuss implications of this computation, in particular, the violation of some classical formulations of the equivalence principle.

  12. Structural analysis of suerconducting bending magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meuser, R.B.

    1980-05-01

    Mechanical stresses, displacements, and the effects of displacements upon aberrations of the magnetic field in the aperture have been calculated for a class of superconducting bending-magnet configurations. The analytical model employed for the coil is one in which elements are free to slide without restraint upon each other, and upon the surrounding structure. Coil configurations considered range from an idealized one in which the current density varies as cosine theta to more realistic ones consisting of regions of uniform current density. With few exceptions, the results for the more realistic coils closely match those of the cos theta coil

  13. Extension versus Bending for Continuum Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Grimes

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we analyze the capabilities of a novel class of continuous-backbone ("continuum" robots. These robots are inspired by biological "trunks, and tentacles". However, the capabilities of established continuum robot designs, which feature controlled bending but not extension, fall short of those of their biological counterparts. In this paper, we argue that the addition of controlled extension provides dual and complementary functionality, and correspondingly enhanced performance, in continuum robots. We present an interval-based analysis to show how the inclusion of controllable extension significantly enhances the workspace and capabilities of continuum robots.

  14. Minimum emittance of three-bend achromats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaoyu; Xu Gang

    2012-01-01

    The calculation of the minimum emittance of three-bend achromats (TBAs) made by Mathematical software can ignore the actual magnets lattice in the matching condition of dispersion function in phase space. The minimum scaling factors of two kinds of widely used TBA lattices are obtained. Then the relationship between the lengths and the radii of the three dipoles in TBA is obtained and so is the minimum scaling factor, when the TBA lattice achieves its minimum emittance. The procedure of analysis and the results can be widely used in achromats lattices, because the calculation is not restricted by the actual lattice. (authors)

  15. Mixed, Nonsplit, Extended Stability, Stiff Integration of Reaction Diffusion Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Alzahrani, Hasnaa H.

    2016-01-01

    A tailored integration scheme is developed to treat stiff reaction-diffusion prob- lems. The construction adapts a stiff solver, namely VODE, to treat reaction im- plicitly together with explicit treatment of diffusion. The second-order Runge

  16. Validity of F-wave minimal latency of median and ulnar nerves for diagnosis and severity assessment of carpal tunnel syndrome in type II diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, A.; Habib, S.S.; Omar, S.A.; Drees, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus is a common problem and is sometimes associated with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) due to compression of median nerve at wrist. Electrophysiological tests are frequently used for its diagnosis. In this work, F-wave minimal latency (FWML) difference between median and ulnar nerve and F-ratio is used to facilitate the diagnosis and severity of CTS in type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods: Thirty control cases were selected who were physically fit for normal electrophysiological values. Thirty-two patients with a long history of type II diabetes mellitus were studied for electro-diagnostic tests. All patients had clinical evidence of CTS. Among all diabetics about 20 cases had poor glycaemic control (HbA1c>7.5). F-wave minimal latency (FWML) were measured in median and ulnar nerves and F-ratio of median nerve were also noted. The mean values in different groups were compared using t-test and p greater or equal to 0.05 was considered significant. Results: In control group, the ulnar FWML was either equal or slightly longer that the median FWML value. In CTS group with type II diabetes mellitus the FWML value of median nerve were significantly longer than FWML of the ulnar nerve. Moreover, in uncontrolled diabetic patients the FWML values was very much longer than controlled group. Similarly the F-ratio of median nerve was significantly low. Conclusion: In addition to the specific criteria for CTS diagnosis, the parameters like FWML difference in median and ulnar nerve with reduced F-ratio of median nerve can be useful in establishing the diagnosis and severity of CTS in type II diabetes mellitus. (author)

  17. The stable stiffness triangle - drained sand during deformation cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabaliauskas, Tomas; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2017-01-01

    Cyclic, drained sand stiffness was observed using the Danish triaxial appa- ratus. New, deformation dependant soil property (the stable stiffness triangle) was detected. Using the the stable stiffness triangle, secant stiffness of drained sand was plausible to predict (and control) even during ir...... findings can find application in off-shore, seismic and other engi- neering practice, or inspire new branches of research and modelling wherever dynamic, cyclic or transient loaded sand is encountered....

  18. Is chronic obstructive pulmonary disease associated with increased arterial stiffness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janner, Julie H; McAllister, David A; Godtfredsen, Nina S

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesize that airflow limitation is associated with increasing arterial stiffness and that having COPD increases a non-invasive measure of arterial stiffness - the aortic augmentation index (AIx) - independently of other CVD risk factors.......We hypothesize that airflow limitation is associated with increasing arterial stiffness and that having COPD increases a non-invasive measure of arterial stiffness - the aortic augmentation index (AIx) - independently of other CVD risk factors....

  19. A Rapid Aeroelasticity Optimization Method Based on the Stiffness characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Zhe; Huo, Shihui; Ren, Jianting

    2018-01-01

    A rapid aeroelasticity optimization method based on the stiffness characteristics was proposed in the present study. Large time expense in static aeroelasticity analysis based on traditional time domain aeroelasticity method is solved. Elastic axis location and torsional stiffness are discussed firstly. Both torsional stiffness and the distance between stiffness center and aerodynamic center have a direct impact on divergent velocity. The divergent velocity can be adjusted by changing the cor...

  20. Peripheral Protein Unfolding Drives Membrane Bending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siaw, Hew Ming Helen; Raghunath, Gokul; Dyer, R Brian

    2018-06-20

    Dynamic modulation of lipid membrane curvature can be achieved by a number of peripheral protein binding mechanisms such as hy-drophobic insertion of amphipathic helices and membrane scaffolding. Recently, an alternative mechanism was proposed in which crowding of peripherally bound proteins induces membrane curvature through steric pressure generated by lateral collisions. This effect was enhanced using intrinsically disordered proteins that possess high hydrodynamic radii, prompting us to explore whether membrane bending can be triggered by the folding-unfolding transition of surface-bound proteins. We utilized histidine-tagged human serum albumin bound to Ni-NTA-DGS containing liposomes as our model system to test this hypothesis. We found that reduction of the disulfide bonds in the protein resulted in unfolding of HSA, which subsequently led to membrane tubule formation. The frequency of tubule formation was found to be significantly higher when the proteins were unfolded while being localized to a phase-separated domain as opposed to randomly distributed in fluid phase liposomes, indicating that the steric pressure generated from protein unfolding is directly responsible for membrane deformation. Our results are critical for the design of peripheral membrane protein-immobilization strategies and open new avenues for exploring mechanisms of membrane bending driven by conformational changes of peripheral membrane proteins.

  1. Bending stress modeling of dismountable furniture joints applied with a use of finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Šimek

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Presented work focuses on bending moment stress modeling of dismountable furniture joints with a use of Finite Element Method. The joints are created from Minifix and Rondorfix cams combined with non-glued wooden dowels. Laminated particleboard 18 mm of thickness is used as a connected material. The connectors were chosen such as the most applied kind in furniture industry for the case furniture. All gained results were reciprocally compared to each other and also in comparison to experimental testing by the mean of stiffness. The non-linear numerical model of chosen joints was successfully created using the software Ansys Workbench. The detailed analysis of stress distribution in the joint was achieved with non-linear numerical simulation. A relationship between numerical si­mu­la­tion and experimental testing was showed by comparison stiffness tangents. A numerical simulation of RTA joint loads also demonstrated the important role of non-glued dowels in the tested joints. The low strength of particleboard in the tension parallel to surface (internal bond is the most likely the cause of the joint failure. Results are applicable for strength designing of furniture with the aid of Computer Aided Engineering.

  2. Competition between Bending and Internal Pressure Governs the Mechanics of Fluid Nanovesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorselen, Daan; MacKintosh, Fred C; Roos, Wouter H; Wuite, Gijs J L

    2017-03-28

    Nanovesicles (∼100 nm) are ubiquitous in cell biology and an important vector for drug delivery. Mechanical properties of vesicles are known to influence cellular uptake, but the mechanism by which deformation dynamics affect internalization is poorly understood. This is partly due to the fact that experimental studies of the mechanics of such vesicles remain challenging, particularly at the nanometer scale where appropriate theoretical models have also been lacking. Here, we probe the mechanical properties of nanoscale liposomes using atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation. The mechanical response of the nanovesicles shows initial linear behavior and subsequent flattening corresponding to inward tether formation. We derive a quantitative model, including the competing effects of internal pressure and membrane bending, that corresponds well to these experimental observations. Our results are consistent with a bending modulus of the lipid bilayer of ∼14k b T. Surprisingly, we find that vesicle stiffness is pressure dominated for adherent vesicles under physiological conditions. Our experimental method and quantitative theory represents a robust approach to study the mechanics of nanoscale vesicles, which are abundant in biology, as well as being of interest for the rational design of liposomal vectors for drug delivery.

  3. A novel energy-efficient rotational variable stiffness actuator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rao, S.; Carloni, Raffaella; Stramigioli, Stefano

    This paper presents the working principle, the design and realization of a novel rotational variable stiffness actuator, whose stiffness can be varied independently of its output angular position. This actuator is energy-efficient, meaning that the stiffness of the actuator can be varied by keeping

  4. Direct measurement of the intrinsic ankle stiffness during standing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlutters, Mark; Vlutters, M.; Boonstra, Tjitske; Schouten, Alfred Christiaan; van der Kooij, Herman

    2015-01-01

    Ankle stiffness contributes to standing balance, counteracting the destabilizing effect of gravity. The ankle stiffness together with the compliance between the foot and the support surface make up the ankle-foot stiffness, which is relevant to quiet standing. The contribution of the intrinsic

  5. Treatment of Atypical Ulnar Fractures Associated with Long-Term Bisphosphonate Therapy for Osteoporosis: Autogenous Bone Graft with Internal Fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Shimada

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term bisphosphonate use has been suggested to result in decreased bone remodelling and an increased risk of atypical fractures. Fractures of this nature commonly occur in the femur, and relatively few reports exist to show that they occur in other bones. Among eight previous reports of atypical ulnar fractures associated with bisphosphonate use, one report described nonunion in a patient who was treated with cast immobilization and another described ulna nonunion in one of three patients, all of whom were treated surgically with a locking plate. The remaining two surgical patients achieved bone union uneventfully following resection of the osteosclerotic lesion and iliac bone grafting before rigid fixation. We hypothesized that the discontinuation of bisphosphonate therapy, the use of teriparatide treatment, and low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS might have been associated with fracture healing.

  6. Ulnar digits contribution to grip strength in patients with thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis is less than in normal controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafañe, Jorge H; Valdes, Kristin; Angulo-Diaz-Parreño, Santiago; Pillastrini, Paolo; Negrini, Stefano

    2015-06-01

    Grip testing is commonly used as an objective measure of strength in the hand and upper extremity and is frequently used clinically as a proxy measure of function. Increasing knowledge of hand biomechanics, muscle strength, and prehension patterns can provide us with a better understanding of the functional capabilities of the hand. The objectives of this study were to determine the contribution of ulnar digits to overall grip strength in individuals with thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) osteoarthritis (OA). Thirty-seven subjects participated in the study. This group consisted of 19 patients with CMC OA (aged 60-88 years) and 18 healthy subjects (60-88 years). Three hand configurations were used by the subjects during grip testing: use of the entire hand (index, middle, ring, and little fingers) (IMRL); use of the index, middle, and ring fingers (IMR); and use of only the index and middle fingers (IM). Grip strength findings for the two groups found that compared to their healthy counterparts, CMC OA patients had, on average, a strength deficiency of 45.6, 35.5, and 28.8 % in IMRL, IMR, and IM, respectively. The small finger contribution to grip is 14.3 % and the ring and small finger contribute 34 % in subjects with CMC OA. Grip strength decreases as the number of digits contributing decreased in both groups. The ulnar digits contribution to grip strength is greater than one third of total grip strength in subjects with CMC OA. Individuals with CMC OA demonstrate significantly decreased grip strength when compared to their healthy counterparts.

  7. The Stress and Stiffness Analysis of Diaphragm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qu Dongyue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diaphragm coupling with its simple structure, small size, high reliability, which can compensate for its input and output displacement deviation by its elastic deformation, is widely used in aerospace, marine, and chemical etc. This paper uses the ANSYS software and its APDL language to analysis the stress distribution when the diaphragm under the load of torque, axial deviation, centrifugal force, angular deviation and multiple loads. We find that the value of maximum stress usually appears in the outer or inner transition region and the axial deviation has a greater influence to the distribution of the stress. Based on above, we got three kinds of stiffness for axial, angular and torque, which the stiffness of diaphragm is nearly invariable. The results can be regard as an important reference for design and optimization of diaphragm coupling.

  8. Electrothermally Actuated Microbeams With Varying Stiffness

    KAUST Repository

    Tella, Sherif Adekunle

    2017-11-03

    We present axially loaded clamped-guided microbeams that can be used as resonators and actuators of variable stiffness, actuation, and anchor conditions. The applied axial load is implemented by U-shaped electrothermal actuators stacked at one of the beams edges. These can be configured and wired in various ways, which serve as mechanical stiffness elements that control the operating resonance frequency of the structures and their static displacement. The experimental results have shown considerable increase in the resonance frequency and mid-point deflection of the microbeam upon changing the end conditions of the beam. These results can be promising for applications requiring large deflection and high frequency tunability, such as filters, memory devices, and switches. The experimental results are compared to multi-physics finite-element simulations showing good agreement among them.

  9. Stiff-Person Syndrome and Graves’ Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lais Moreira Medeiros MD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A 9-year-old female child presented with a history of falls, weight loss, diffuse leg pain, and progressive gait disorder, following 1 previous event described as a tonic–clonic seizure. She had increased thyroid volume, brisk symmetric reflexes, abnormal gait, and painful spasms of the paraspinal musculature. Thyroid function tests indicated biochemical hyperthyroidism, and thyrotropin receptor antibodies were positive. Her electromyography showed continuous activation of normal motor units of the paraspinal and proximal lower extremity muscles. The patient had a diagnosis of Graves’ disease with associated stiff-person syndrome, with elevated anti–glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody levels. After intravenous immunoglobulin therapy, her ambulation was substantially improved and the symptoms of stiff-person syndrome decreased dramatically.

  10. Music decreases aortic stiffness and wave reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Aggelakas, Angelos; Ioakeimidis, Nikolaos; Xaplanteris, Panagiotis; Terentes-Printzios, Dimitrios; Abdelrasoul, Mahmoud; Lazaros, George; Tousoulis, Dimitris

    2015-05-01

    Music has been related to cardiovascular health and used as adjunct therapy in patients with cardiovascular disease. Aortic stiffness and wave reflections are predictors of cardiovascular risk. We investigated the short-term effect of classical and rock music on arterial stiffness and wave reflections. Twenty healthy individuals (22.5±2.5 years) were studied on three different occasions and listened to a 30-min music track compilation (classical, rock, or no music for the sham procedure). Both classical and rock music resulted in a decrease of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) immediately after the end of music listening (all pclassical or rock music in a more sustained way (nadir by 6.0% and 5.8%, respectively, at time zero post-music listening, all pmusic preference was taken into consideration, both classical and rock music had a more potent effect on PWV in classical aficionados (by 0.20 m/s, p=0.003 and 0.13 m/s, p=0.015, respectively), whereas there was no effect in rock aficionados (all p=NS). Regarding wave reflections, classical music led to a more potent response in classical aficionados (AIx decrease by 9.45%), whereas rock led to a more potent response to rock aficionados (by 10.7%, all pMusic, both classical and rock, decreases aortic stiffness and wave reflections. Effect on aortic stiffness lasts for as long as music is listened to, while classical music has a sustained effect on wave reflections. These findings may have important implications, extending the spectrum of lifestyle modifications that can ameliorate arterial function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. On the elastic stiffness of grain boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tongyi; Hack, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The elastic softening of grain boundaries is evaluated from the starting point of grain boundary energy. Several examples are given to illustrate the relationship between boundary energy and the extent of softening. In general, a high grain boundary energy is associated with a large excess atomic volume in the boundary region. The consequent reduction in grain boundary stiffness can represent a significant fraction of that observed in bulk crystals. (orig.)

  12. Arthrodiastasis for stiff hips in young patients

    OpenAIRE

    Cañadell, J.M. (J. M.); Gonzales, F. (F.); Barrios, R.H. (Raúl H.); Amillo, S. (Santiago)

    1993-01-01

    Joint distraction (arthrodiastasis) with a unilateral fixator was used to treat 9 patients with stiffness of the hip which had followed Perthes' disease (3), epiphysiolysis (2), congenital dysplasia (2), tuberculosis (1) and idiopathic chondrolysis (1). Their average age was 14 years, and they all had pain, limp and shortening of the leg. Distraction of 0.5 to 1 cm was maintained for an average of 94 days. The average range of movement subsequently was 65 degrees compared with 20 degrees befo...

  13. Stiff modes in spinvalve simulations with OOMMF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitropoulos, Spyridon [Department of Computer and Informatics Engineering, TEI of Eastern Macedonia and Thrace, Kavala (Greece); Tsiantos, Vassilis, E-mail: tsianto@teikav.edu.gr [Department of Electrical Engineering, TEI of Eastern Macedonia and Thrace, Kavala, 65404 Greece (Greece); Ovaliadis, Kyriakos [Department of Electrical Engineering, TEI of Eastern Macedonia and Thrace, Kavala, 65404 Greece (Greece); Kechrakos, Dimitris [Department of Education, ASPETE, Heraklion, Athens (Greece); Donahue, Michael [Applied and Computational Mathematics Division, NIST, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Micromagnetic simulations are an important tool for the investigation of magnetic materials. Micromagnetic software uses various techniques to solve differential equations, partial or ordinary, involved in the dynamic simulations. Euler, Runge-Kutta, Adams, and BDF (Backward Differentiation Formulae) are some of the methods used for this purpose. In this paper, spinvalve simulations are investigated. Evidence is presented showing that these systems have stiff modes, and that implicit methods such as BDF are more effective than explicit methods in such cases.

  14. Water retention properties of stiff silt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Likar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent research into the behaviour of soils has shown that it is in fact much more complex than can be described by the mechanics of saturated soils. Nowadays the trend of investigations has shifted towards the unsaturated state. Despite the signifiant progress that has been made so far, there are still a lot of unanswered questions related to the behaviour of unsaturated soils. For this reason, in the fild of geotechnics some new concepts are developed, which include the study of soil suction. Most research into soil suction has involved clayey and silty material, whereas up until recently no data have been available about measurements in very stiff preconsolidated sandy silt. Very stiff preconsolidated sandy silt is typical of the Krško Basin, where it is planned that some very important geotechnical structures will be built, so that knowledge about the behaviour of such soils at increased or decreased water content is essential. Several different methods can be used for soil suction measurements. In the paper the results of measurements carried out on very stiff preconsolidated sandy silt in a Bishop - Wesley double-walled triaxial cell are presented and compared with the results of soil suction measurements performed by means of a potentiometer (WP4C. All the measurement results were evaluated taking into account already known results given in the literature, using the three most commonly used mathematical models. Until now a lot of papers dealing with suction measurements in normal consolidated and preconsolidated clay have been published. Measurements on very stiff preconsolidated sandy silt, as presented in this paper were not supported before.

  15. Usage of information safety requirements in improving tube bending process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livshitz, I. I.; Kunakov, E.; Lontsikh, P. A.

    2018-05-01

    This article is devoted to an improvement of the technological process's analysis with the information security requirements implementation. The aim of this research is the competition increase analysis in aircraft industry enterprises due to the information technology implementation by the example of the tube bending technological process. The article analyzes tube bending kinds and current technique. In addition, a potential risks analysis in a tube bending technological process is carried out in terms of information security.

  16. The stiffness change and the increase in the ultimate capacity for a stiff pile resulting from a cyclic loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lada, Aleksandra; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Nicolai, Giulio

    In the paper the experimental results of small-scale tests on a stiff monopile are presented to outline the change in stiffness during the cyclic loading and the change in the ultimate pile capacity. The results confirm the increase of stiffness and the increase in bearing capacity resulting from...

  17. Cryotherapy induces an increase in muscle stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Point, M; Guilhem, G; Hug, F; Nordez, A; Frey, A; Lacourpaille, L

    2018-01-01

    Although cold application (ie, cryotherapy) may be useful to treat sports injuries and to prevent muscle damage, it is unclear whether it has adverse effects on muscle mechanical properties. This study aimed to determine the effect of air-pulsed cryotherapy on muscle stiffness estimated using ultrasound shear wave elastography. Myoelectrical activity, ankle passive torque, shear modulus (an index of stiffness), and muscle temperature of the gastrocnemius medialis were measured before, during an air-pulsed cryotherapy (-30°C) treatment of four sets of 4 minutes with 1-minute recovery in between and during a 40 minutes postcryotherapy period. Muscle temperature significantly decreased after the second set of treatment (10 minutes: 32.3±2.5°C; Pcryotherapy induces an increase in muscle stiffness. This acute change in muscle mechanical properties may lower the amount of stretch that the muscle tissue is able to sustain without subsequent injury. This should be considered when using cryotherapy in athletic practice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Exchange stiffness of Ca-doped YIG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avgin, I.; Huber, D. L.

    1994-05-01

    An effective medium theory for the zero-temperature exchange stiffness of uncompensated Ca-doped YIG is presented. The theory is based on the assumption that the effect of the Ca impurities is to produce strong, random ferromagnetic interactions between spins on the a and d sublattices. In the simplest version of the theory, a fraction, x, of the ad exchange integrals are large and positive, x being related to the Ca concentration. The stiffness is calculated as function of x for arbitrary perturbed ad exchange integral, Jxad. For Jxad≳(1/5)‖8Jaa+3Jdd‖, with Jaa and Jdd denoting the aa and dd exchange integrals, respectively, there is a critical concentration, Xc, such that when x≳Xc, the stiffness is complex. It is suggested that Xc delineates the region where there are significant departures from colinearity in the ground state of the Fe spins. Extension of the theory to a model where the Ca doping is assumed to generate Fe4+ ions on the tetrahedral sites is discussed. Possible experimental tests of the theory are mentioned.

  19. Static stiffness modeling of a novel hybrid redundant robot machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ming; Wu Huapeng; Handroos, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a modeling method to study the stiffness of a hybrid serial-parallel robot IWR (Intersector Welding Robot) for the assembly of ITER vacuum vessel. The stiffness matrix of the basic element in the robot is evaluated using matrix structural analysis (MSA); the stiffness of the parallel mechanism is investigated by taking account of the deformations of both hydraulic limbs and joints; the stiffness of the whole integrated robot is evaluated by employing the virtual joint method and the principle of virtual work. The obtained stiffness model of the hybrid robot is analytical and the deformation results of the robot workspace under certain external load are presented.

  20. Lower Body Stiffness Modulation Strategies in Well Trained Female Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, Emma L; Moresi, Mark P; Watsford, Mark L; Taylor, Paul G; Greene, David A

    2016-10-01

    Millett, EL, Moresi, MP, Watsford, ML, Taylor, PG, and Greene, DA. Lower body stiffness modulation strategies in well trained female athletes. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2845-2856, 2016-Lower extremity stiffness quantifies the relationship between the amount of leg compression and the external load to which the limb are subjected. This study aimed to assess differences in leg and joint stiffness and the subsequent kinematic and kinetic control mechanisms between athletes from various training backgrounds. Forty-seven female participants (20 nationally identified netballers, 13 high level endurance athletes and 14 age and gender matched controls) completed a maximal unilateral countermovement jump, drop jump and horizontal jump to assess stiffness. Leg stiffness, joint stiffness and associated mechanical parameters were assessed with a 10 camera motion analysis system and force plate. No significant differences were evident for leg stiffness measures between athletic groups for any of the tasks (p = 0.321-0.849). However, differences in joint stiffness and its contribution to leg stiffness, jump performance outcome measures and stiffness control mechanisms were evident between all groups. Practitioners should consider the appropriateness of the task utilised in leg stiffness screening. Inclusion of mechanistic and/or more sports specific tasks may be more appropriate for athletic groups.

  1. Bending of pipes with inconel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nachpitz, Leonardo; Menezes, Carlos Eduardo B; Vieira, Carlos R. Tavares [Primus Processamento de Tubos S.A. (PROTUBO), Macae, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The high-frequency induction bending process, using API pipes coated with Inconel 625 reconciled to a mechanical transformation for a higher degree of resistance, was developed through a careful specification and control of the manufacturing parameters and inherent heat treatments. The effects of this technology were investigated by a qualification process consisting of a sequence of tests and acceptance criteria typically required by the offshore industry, and through the obtained results was proved the effectiveness of this entire manufacturing process, without causing interference in the properties and the quality of the inconel cladding, adding a gain of resistance to the base material, guaranteed by the requirements of the API 5L Standard. (author)

  2. Design Study: ELENA Bending Magnet Prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Schoerling, D

    2013-01-01

    The ELENA bending magnet prototype shall prove that the proposed design meets the requirements set by the ELENA beam dynamics. The following points will be discussed in detail: (i) production process of a magnetic yoke diluted with stainless steel plates, (ii) the stability and repeatability of the field homogeneity of such a yoke over the full working range, (iii) choice of soft magnetic steel, (iv) hysteresis effects, (v) mechanical deformations, (vi) thermal insulation to intercept heat load from baking for activation of NEG coating in the vacuum chamber, (vii) end shim design. In order to verify these points the following measurements will be performed: (i) Hall probe scanning, (ii) integrated field homogeneity measurement (DC), (iii) integrated field homogeneity measurement (AC).

  3. Strength tests of thin-walled elliptic duralumin cylinders in pure bending and in combined pure bending and torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Eugene E; Stowell, Elbridge Z

    1942-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the results of tests made by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics on an investigation of the strength of thin-walled circular and elliptic cylinders in pure bending and in combined torsion and bending. In each of the loading conditions, the bending moments were applied in the plane of the major axis of the ellipse.

  4. Load tests with a pipe bend DN 425, applying slowly changing bending loads up to occurrence of leak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlmann, D.; Hunger, H.

    1990-01-01

    The experimental program deals with the formation of incipient cracks and subsequent crack growth of axially oriented cracks at a pipe bend with a nominal width of DN 425. The pipe bend consists of the ferritic material 20MnMoNi55. The numerical experiments by means of 3 D-FE analyses concentrate on determining the influence of the asymmetric crack depths at the two bend halves, and of the multiple crack fields, on the effective crack strain. (DG) [de

  5. On the accuracy of analyses for in-plane bending of smooth pipe bends with end constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, G.; Spence, J.

    1985-01-01

    The accuracy of theoretical analyses for in-plane bending of smooth pipebends with end constraints is discussed and investigated with a view to explaining and reducing the differences between the major works. An earlier theory of the authors is improved to give more accurate answers for bends with rigid flanges. Flanged bends are then examined in some detail, quantifying for the first time the important influence of the flange rigidity on the bend flexibility and stresses. A summary of some finite element analyses is presented from which it is clear that further work is desirable. (orig.)

  6. Development of vehicle model test-bending of a simple structural surfaces model for automotive vehicle sedan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor, M. K. Mohd; Noordin, A.; Ruzali, M. F. S.; Hussen, M. H.; Mustapa@Othman, N.

    2017-04-01

    Simple Structural Surfaces (SSS) method is offered as a means of organizing the process for rationalizing the basic vehicle body structure load paths. The application of this simplified approach is highly beneficial in the development of modern passenger car structure design. In Malaysia, the SSS topic has been widely adopted and seems compulsory in various automotive programs related to automotive vehicle structures in many higher education institutions. However, there is no real physical model of SSS available to gain considerable insight and understanding into the function of each major subassembly in the whole vehicle structures. Based on this motivation, a real physical SSS of sedan model and the corresponding model vehicle tests of bending is proposed in this work. The proposed approach is relatively easy to understand as compared to Finite Element Method (FEM). The results prove that the proposed vehicle model test is useful to physically demonstrate the importance of providing continuous load path using the necessary structural components within the vehicle structures. It is clearly observed that the global bending stiffness reduce significantly when more panels are removed from the complete SSS model. The analysis shows the front parcel shelf is an important subassembly to sustain bending load.

  7. The effect of cracks on the limit load of pipe bends under in-plane bending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, J.E.

    1976-06-01

    The limit analysis of the in-plane bending of curved tubes had received attention previously, but the effect of defects in the tube has not been considered. A lower bound has been established which, with no defects present, is in agreement with previous theoretical work. The method of linear programming allows cracks to be introduced into analysis, and results have been obtained for various geometries of defect. The results show that the presence of cracks in the pipe bend can have a marked effect on the theoretical limit load: a part-through crack penetrating only half the wall thickness will reduce the limit moment by up to 10%. The worst possible case of a through-crack may reduce the limit load by 60%. (author)

  8. The effect of cracks on the limit load of pipe bends under in-plane bending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, J.E.

    1976-06-01

    The limit analysis of the in-plane bending of curved tubes had received attention previously, but the effect of defects in the tube has not been considered. A lower bound is established, which, with no defects present, is in agreement with previous theoretical work. The method of linear programming allows cracks to be introduced into the analysis. and results have been obtained for various geometries of defect. The results show that the presence of cracks in the pipe bend can have a marked effect on the theoretical limit load: a part-through crack penetrating only half the wall thickness will reduce the limit moment by up to 10%. The worst possible case of a through-crack may reduce the limit load by 60% (author)

  9. VCODE, Ordinary Differential Equation Solver for Stiff and Non-Stiff Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Scott D.; Hindmarsh, Alan C.

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: CVODE is a package written in ANSI standard C for solving initial value problems for ordinary differential equations. It solves both stiff and non stiff systems. In the stiff case, it includes a variety of options for treating the Jacobian of the system, including dense and band matrix solvers, and a preconditioned Krylov (iterative) solver. 2 - Method of solution: Integration is by Adams or BDF (Backward Differentiation Formula) methods, at user option. Corrector iteration is by functional iteration or Newton iteration. For the solution of linear systems within Newton iteration, users can select a dense solver, a band solver, a diagonal approximation, or a preconditioned Generalized Minimal Residual (GMRES) solver. In the dense and band cases, the user can supply a Jacobian approximation or let CVODE generate it internally. In the GMRES case, the pre-conditioner is user-supplied

  10. Effect of Bend Radius on Magnitude and Location of Erosion in S-Bend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quamrul H. Mazumder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid particle erosion is a mechanical process that removes material by the impact of solid particles entrained in the flow. Erosion is a leading cause of failure of oil and gas pipelines and fittings in fluid handling industries. Different approaches have been used to control or minimize damage caused by erosion in particulated gas-solid or liquid-solid flows. S-bend geometry is widely used in different fluid handling equipment that may be susceptible to erosion damage. The results of a computational fluid dynamic (CFD simulation of diluted gas-solid and liquid-solid flows in an S-bend are presented in this paper. In addition to particle impact velocity, the bend radius may have significant influence on the magnitude and the location of erosion. CFD analysis was performed at three different air velocities (15.24 m/s–45.72 m/s and three different water velocities (0.1 m/s–10 m/s with entrained solid particles. The particle sizes used in the analysis range between 50 and 300 microns. Maximum erosion was observed in water with 10 m/s, 250-micron particle size, and a ratio of 3.5. The location of maximum erosion was observed in water with 10 m/s, 300-micron particle size, and a ratio of 3.5. Comparison of CFD results with available literature data showed reasonable and good agreement.

  11. Analysis of elastic stiffness for the leaf type holddown spring assembly with uniformly tapered thickness considering the point of taper runout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ki Nam [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daeduk (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-04-01

    In the case that the point of taper runout is outside the bent region of spring base, a formula to evaluate the elastic stiffness of the leaf type holddown spring (HDS) assembly with uniformly tapered thickness from t{sub 0} to t{sub 1} (t{sub 0}>t{sub 1}) has been analytically derived by applying the engineering beam theory and Casiliano`s theorem based on strain energy. It has found that taper runouts for the 14x14 and 17x17 type KOFA HDS were up to 2.2 mm and effects on their elastic stiffnesses were about 3.70%, and that the elastic stiffness of the HDS was mainly caused by bending moment. And in addition, for the HDS designed/manufactured from Westinghouse, elastic stiffnesses from the derived formula were in good agreement with those from the Westinghouse`s empirical formula. Therefore, the derived formula could be applicable to evaluating the elastic stiffness of any HDS with tapered thickness only with the informations of the geometric data and material properties of leaf springs regardness of the manufacturing companies. 11 tabs., 4 figs., 25 refs. (Author) .new.

  12. Gender differences in variability patterns of forward bending

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Morten; Madeleine, Pascal; Jørgensen, Marie Birk

    2016-01-01

    The variability pattern is highly relevant in the analysis of occupational physical exposures. It is hypothesized that gender differences exist in the variability pattern of forward bending between work and leisure.......The variability pattern is highly relevant in the analysis of occupational physical exposures. It is hypothesized that gender differences exist in the variability pattern of forward bending between work and leisure....

  13. Disk-bend ductility tests for irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Braski, D.N.

    1984-01-01

    We modified the HEDL disk-bend test machine and are using it to qualitatively screen alloys that are susceptible to embrittlement caused by irradiation. Tests designed to understand the disk-bend test in relation to a uniaxial test are discussed. Selected results of tests of neutron-irradiated material are also presented

  14. System effects influencing the bending strength of timber beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager; Källsner, B.

    1998-01-01

    A stochastic model of hierarchical series system type for the bending strength of spruce beams isdefined from the anticipation that the bending failure takes place at a cross-section with a defect cluster formed by knots or grain irregularities. The parameters of the model are estimated from meas...

  15. Bends in nanotubes allow electric spin control and coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flensberg, Karsten; Marcus, Charles Masamed

    2010-01-01

    We investigate combined effects of spin-orbit coupling and magnetic field in carbon nanotubes containing one or more bends along their length. We show how bends can be used to provide electrical control of confined spins, while spins confined in straight segments remain insensitive to electric...

  16. Spontaneous bending of 2D molecular bottle-brush

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subbotin, A; Jong, J; ten Brinke, G

    Using a scaling approach we consider a 2D comb copolymer brush under bending deformations. We show that the rectilinear brush is locally stable and can be characterized by a persistence length lambda increasing with the molecular weight of grafting side chains as lambda similar to M-3. A bending

  17. High-sensitivity bend angle measurements using optical fiber gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauf, Abdul; Zhao, Jianlin; Jiang, Biqiang

    2013-07-20

    We present a high-sensitivity and more flexible bend measurement method, which is based on the coupling of core mode to the cladding modes at the bending region in concatenation with optical fiber grating serving as band reflector. The characteristics of a bend sensing arm composed of bending region and optical fiber grating is examined for different configurations including single fiber Bragg grating (FBG), chirped FBG (CFBG), and double FBGs. The bend loss curves for coated, stripped, and etched sections of fiber in the bending region with FBG, CFBG, and double FBG are obtained experimentally. The effect of separation between bending region and optical fiber grating on loss is measured. The loss responses for single FBG and CFBG configurations are compared to discover the effectiveness for practical applications. It is demonstrated that the sensitivity of the double FBG scheme is twice that of the single FBG and CFBG configurations, and hence acts as sensitivity multiplier. The bend loss response for different fiber diameters obtained through etching in 40% hydrofluoric acid, is measured in double FBG scheme that resulted in a significant increase in the sensitivity, and reduction of dead-zone.

  18. The link between exercise and titin passive stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalande, Sophie; Mueller, Patrick J; Chung, Charles S

    2017-09-01

    What is the topic of this review? This review focuses on how in vivo and molecular measurements of cardiac passive stiffness can predict exercise tolerance and how exercise training can reduce cardiac passive stiffness. What advances does it highlight? This review highlights advances in understanding the relationship between molecular (titin-based) and in vivo (left ventricular) passive stiffness, how passive stiffness modifies exercise tolerance, and how exercise training may be therapeutic for cardiac diseases with increased passive stiffness. Exercise can help alleviate the negative effects of cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular co-morbidities associated with sedentary behaviour; this may be especially true in diseases that are associated with increased left ventricular passive stiffness. In this review, we discuss the inverse relationship between exercise tolerance and cardiac passive stiffness. Passive stiffness is the physical property of cardiac muscle to produce a resistive force when stretched, which, in vivo, is measured using the left ventricular end diastolic pressure-volume relationship or is estimated using echocardiography. The giant elastic protein titin is the major contributor to passive stiffness at physiological muscle (sarcomere) lengths. Passive stiffness can be modified by altering titin isoform size or by post-translational modifications. In both human and animal models, increased left ventricular passive stiffness is associated with reduced exercise tolerance due to impaired diastolic filling, suggesting that increased passive stiffness predicts reduced exercise tolerance. At the same time, exercise training itself may induce both short- and long-term changes in titin-based passive stiffness, suggesting that exercise may be a treatment for diseases associated with increased passive stiffness. Direct modification of passive stiffness to improve exercise tolerance is a potential therapeutic approach. Titin passive stiffness itself may

  19. Constitutive Modelling of Resins in the Stiffness Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasztorny, M.

    2004-09-01

    An analytic method for inverting the constitutive compliance equations of viscoelasticity for resins is developed. These equations describe the HWKK/H rheological model, which makes it possible to simulate, with a good accuracy, short-, medium- and long-term viscoelastic processes in epoxy and polyester resins. These processes are of first-rank reversible isothermal type. The time histories of deviatoric stresses are simulated with three independent strain history functions of fractional and normal exponential types. The stiffness equations are described by two elastic and six viscoelastic constants having a clear physic meaning (three long-term relaxation coefficients and three relaxation times). The time histories of axiatoric stresses are simulated as perfectly elastic. The inversion method utilizes approximate constitutive stiffness equations of viscoelasticity for the HWKK/H model. The constitutive compliance equations for the model are a basis for determining the exact complex shear stiffness, whereas the approximate constitutive stiffness equations are used for determining the approximate complex shear stiffness. The viscoelastic constants in the stiffness domain are derived by equating the exact and approximate complex shear stiffnesses. The viscoelastic constants are obtained for Epidian 53 epoxy and Polimal 109 polyester resins. The accuracy of the approximate constitutive stiffness equations are assessed by comparing the approximate and exact complex shear stiffnesses. The constitutive stiffness equations for the HWKK/H model are presented in uncoupled (shear/bulk) and coupled forms. Formulae for converting the constants of shear viscoelasticity into the constants of coupled viscoelasticity are given as well.

  20. Arterial stiffness assessment in patients with phenylketonuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermida-Ameijeiras, Alvaro; Crujeiras, Vanesa; Roca, Iria; Calvo, Carlos; Leis, Rosaura; Couce, María-Luz

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In patients with phenylketonuria (PKU) compliant to diet greater tendency to overweight and higher inflammatory biomarkers levels than controls were reported. Although this could lead to atherogenesis, the elastic properties of large arteries in PKU patients have never been assessed. The aim of this study was to assess arterial stiffness measured by applanation tonometry in PKU patients compared to healthy controls. We carried out a cross-sectional study in 41 PKU patients (range age: 6–50 years old) and 41 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Evaluated data included pharmacological treatment with sapropterin, clinical, and biochemical parameters. Aortic stiffness was assessed noninvasively by applanation tonometry measuring central blood pressure, aortic augmentation index (Aix@HR75), augmentation pressure (AP), and pulse wave velocity (PWV). We found higher PWV in classic PKU patients (6.60 m/second vs 5.26 m/second; P: .044). Percentage of PKU patients with PWV above 90 percentile was higher than controls (14.63% vs 2.32%; P: .048). A positive relationship was observed between the annual Phe median and PWV (r: 0.496; P: .012). PKU subjects with lower Phe tolerance showed more body weight (67.6 kg vs 56.8 kg; P: .012) and more PWV than those with higher Phe tolerance (6.55 m/second vs 5.42 m/second; P: .044). Our data show increased aortic stiffness in PKU patients, measured by applanation tonometry, when compared to healthy controls. Higher Phe levels are associated with a bigger PWV increase, which is not present in those subjects compliant to diet or under sapropterin treatment. These results could have marked effects in both research and clinical daily practice for a proper evaluation of cardiovascular risk in PKU subjects. PMID:29390507

  1. Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Indexes in Cushing's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battocchio, Marialberta; Rebellato, Andrea; Grillo, Andrea; Dassie, Francesca; Maffei, Pietro; Bernardi, Stella; Fabris, Bruno; Carretta, Renzo; Fallo, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    Long-standing exposure to endogenous cortisol excess is associated with high cardiovascular risk. The aim of our study was to investigate arterial stiffness, which has been recognized as an independent predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcome, in a group of patients with Cushing's syndrome. Twenty-four patients with Cushing's syndrome (3 males, mean age 49±13 years; 20 pituitary-dependent Cushing's disease and 4 adrenal adenoma) underwent 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and evaluation of cardiovascular risk factors. The Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Index (AASI) and symmetric AASI (sAASI) were derived from ABPM tracings. Cushing patients were divided into 8 normotensive (NOR-CUSH) and 16 hypertensive (HYP-CUSH) patients, and were compared with 8 normotensive (NOR-CTR) and 16 hypertensive (HYP-CTR) control subjects, matched for demographic characteristics, 24-h ABPM and cardiometabolic risk factors. The AASI and sAASI indexes were significantly higher in Cushing patients than in controls, either in the normotensive (p=0.048 for AASI and p=0.013 for sAASI) or in the hypertensive (p=0.004 for AASI and p=0.046 for sAASI) group. No difference in metabolic parameters was observed between NOR-CUSH and NOR-CTR or between HYP-CUSH and HYP-CTR groups. AASI and sAASI were both correlated with urinary cortisol in patients with endogenous hypercortisolism (Spearman's rho=0.40, p=0.05, and 0.61, p=0.003, respectively), while no correlation was found in controls. Both AASI and sAASI are increased in Cushing syndrome, independent of BP elevation, and may represent an additional cardiovascular risk factor in this disease. The role of excess cortisol in arterial stiffness has to be further clarified. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Formulation of Forming Load in V-Bending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koumura Yuki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method is described to calculate the forming load in V-bending by a press brake. The data of forming load are collected by FEM analysis. With an increase of the punch stroke in V-bending, the forming load increases gradually after the elastic limit, and then decreases after showing the maximum value. The proposal formulation to trace the variations in the forming load curve includes the calculating method of the load of the elastic limit, the maximum load in air bending and the variations of the forming load before/after the bending stroke of the maximum load. The calculated precision is confirmed by comparing with the measured load-stroke curves in V-bending with a press brake.

  3. Prevalence of ulnar-to-median nerve motor fiber anastomosis (Riché-Cannieu communicating branch) in hand: An electrophysiological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahadi, Tannaz; Raissi, Gholam Reza; Yavari, Masood; Majidi, Lobat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Two main muscles studied in the hand for evaluation of median nerve injuries are opponens pollicis (OP) and abductor pollicis brevis (APB). However, Riché-Cannieu communicating branch (RCCB) may limit the use of these muscles in electrodiagnosis. This condition is confusing in the case of median nerve injuries. This study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of RCCB. Methods: Twenty-three consecutive cases of complete median nerve injury were studied. Evoked responses via stimulation of median and ulnar nerves in the wrist and recording with needle in the thenar area were studied. Results: Of the patients, 82.6% exhibited RCCB. In 14 (60.8%) cases the OP and in 19(82.6%) cases APB was supplied by the ulnar nerve. Conclusion: RCCB was detected to be 60.8% in OP and 82.6% in APB, so OP is preferable to APB in the study of median nerve. PMID:27390694

  4. Application of monosymmetrical I-beams in light metal frames with variable stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.O. Sklyarov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to effectiveness of using of monosymmetrical I-beams with flexible wall frame structures of variable section, features of their calculation and design. Aim: The aim of research is to confirm the feasibility of I-beams with flexible wall bearing as light metal skeletons for buildings of the universal assignment. Materials and Methods: In order to reduce the metal consumption a frame is conventionally divided into several sections according to bending moment diagrams so that in the more compressed zone section the belt of great area was located, and in the stretched or less intense zone the lesser belt was installed. The resulting sections have smaller area in compare to symmetric profiles. Additional reduce bending moments provided as a result of displacement of elements axes with variable cross section. Results: The calculations and selection of sections of the frame have shown that it can be achieved the reducing of bearing elements weight by 10% compared to the symmetrical profiles of variable stiffness due to using monosymmetrical sections. The effectiveness of the proposed constructive solution is confirmed by compare of the projected weight frame construction with existing analogue. The symmetrical frame profile is 15.3% lighter; the monosymmetrical frame profile is 27% lighter. Conclusions: Analysis of stress-strain state structures shown: first, through asymmetrical profile there is a shifting of the center of gravity section, which leads to a redistribution of internal forces in the frame; secondly, because of the small cross-sectional area of the stretched zones more difficult to ensure the stability of the plane form of bending beams, which leads to the necessity to disconnect areas curtain beams by constraints of smaller steps.

  5. Intestinal lymphangiectasia and reversible high liver stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, Laura; Peri, Anna Maria; Lodi, Lucia; Gubertini, Guido; Ridolfo, Anna Lisa; Antinori, Spinello

    2014-08-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is a protein-losing enteropathy characterized by tortuous and dilated lymph channels of the small bowel. The main symptoms are bilateral lower limb edema, serosal effusions, and vitamin D malabsorption resulting in osteoporosis. We report here a case of long-lasting misdiagnosed PIL with a peculiar liver picture, characterized by a very high stiffness value at transient elastography, which decreased with clinical improvement. The complex interplay between lymphatic and hepatic circulatory system is discussed. © 2014 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  6. A bend thickness sensitivity study of Candu feeder piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, M.; Aggarwal, M.L.; Meysner, A.; Micelotta, C.

    2005-01-01

    In CANDU reactors, feeder bends close to the connection at the fuel channel may be subjected to the highest Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) and stresses. Feeder pipe stress analysis is crucial in the life extension of aging CANDU plants. Typical feeder pipes are interconnected by upper link plates and spacers. It is well known that the stresses at the bends are sensitive to the local bend thicknesses. It is also known from the authors' study (Li and et al, 2005) that feeder inter linkage effect is significant and cannot be ignored. The field measurement of feeder bend thickness is difficult and may be subjected to uncertainty in accuracy. Hence, it is desirable to know how the stress on a subject feeder could be affected by the bend thickness variation of the neighboring feeders. This effect cannot be evaluated by the traditional 'single' feeder model approach. In this paper, the 'row' and 'combined' models developed in the previous study (Li and et al, 2005), which include the feeder interactions, are used to investigate the sensitivity of bend thickness. A series of random thickness bounded by maximum and minimum measured values were applied to feeders in the model. The results show that an individual feeder is not sensitive to the bend thickness variation of the remaining feeders in the model, but depends primarily on its own bend thickness. The highest stress at a feeder always occurs when the feeder has the smallest possible bend thickness. A minimum acceptable bend thickness for individual feeders can be computed by an iterative computing process. The dependency of field thickness measurement and the amount of required analysis work can be greatly reduced. (authors)

  7. Guyon's canal syndrome due to tortuous ulnar artery with DeQuervain stenosing tenosynovitis, ligamentous injuries and dorsal intercalated segmental instability syndrome, a rare presentation: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Zeeshan, Muhammad; Ahmed, Farhan; Kanwal, Darakhshan; Khalid, Qazi Saad Bin; Ahmed, Muhammad Nadeem

    2009-01-01

    The Guyon's canal syndrome is a well known clinical entity and may have significant impact on patient's quality of life. We report a case of 43-year-old male who presented with complaints of pain and numbness in right hand and difficulty in writing for past one month. On imaging diagnosis of Guyon's canal syndrome because of tortuous ulnar artery was made with additional findings of DeQuervain's stenosing tenosynovitis and dorsal intercalated segmental instability syndrome with ligamentous in...

  8. Diagnostic Performance of the Extensor Carpi Ulnaris (ECU) Synergy Test to Detect Sonographic ECU Abnormalities in Chronic Dorsal Ulnar-Sided Wrist Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Junko; Ishii, Yoshinori; Noguchi, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    The extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendon synergy test is a simple and unique diagnostic maneuver for evaluation of chronic dorsal ulnar-sided wrist pain, which applies isolated tension to the ECU without greatly stressing other structures. This study aimed to investigate the diagnostic performance of the ECU synergy test to detect ECU abnormalities on sonography. Forty affected wrists from 39 consecutive patients with chronic dorsal ulnar-sided wrist pain that continued for greater than 1 month were examined with the ECU synergy test and sonography. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the ECU synergy test to detect ECU abnormalities were evaluated. We compared the results of the ECU synergy test between groups with and without ECU abnormalities and also compared the ages, sexes, and symptomatic durations of the patients between groups with positive and negative ECU synergy test results and between the groups with and without ECU abnormalities. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 73.7%, 85.7%, 82.4%, and 78.3%, respectively. There was significant difference in the ECU synergy test results between the groups with and without ECU abnormalities (P synergy test could be a useful provocative maneuver to detect ECU abnormalities in patients with chronic dorsal ulnar-sided wrist pain. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  9. Large Deformation Dynamic Bending of Composite Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derian, E. J.; Hyer, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were conducted on the large deformation response of composite beams subjected to a dynamic axial load. The beams were loaded with a moderate eccentricity to promote bending. The study was primarily experimental but some finite element results were obtained. Both the deformation and the failure of the beams were of interest. The static response of the beams was also studied to determine potential differences between the static and dynamic failure. Twelve different laminate types were tested. The beams were loaded dynamically with a gravity driven impactor traveling at 19.6 ft/sec and quasi-static tests were conducted on identical beams in a displacement controlled manner. For laminates of practical interest, the failure modes under static and dynamic loadings were identical. Failure in most of the laminate types occurred in a single event involving 40% to 50% of the plies. However, failure in laminates with 30 deg or 15 deg off-axis plies occured in several events. All laminates exhibited bimodular elastic properties. Using empirically determined flexural properties, a finite element analysis was reasonably accurate in predicting the static and dynamic deformation response.

  10. Field measurement for large bending magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazzaro, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cunsolo, A.; Cavallaro, M.; Foti, A.; Orrigo, S.E.A.; Rodrigues, M.R.D.; Winfield, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    The results of magnetic field measurements of the large bending magnet of the MAGNEX spectrometer are presented. The experimental values are used to build an Enge function by the least-squares method. The resulting field is compared to the measured one, showing too large deviation for application to ray reconstruction techniques. Similarly, the experimental values are compared with results from a three-dimensional finite elements calculation. Again the deviations between measured and calculated field are too large for a direct application of the latter to ray reconstruction, while its reliability is sufficient for analysis purposes. In particular, it has been applied to study the effect of the inaccuracies in the probe location and orientation on the precision of field reconstruction, and to establish the requirements for the field interpolation. These inaccuracies are found to be rather important, especially for the transversal components of the field, with the consequence that their effect on the reconstructed field should be minimized by special interpolation algorithms

  11. Occipital bending (Yakovlevian torque) in bipolar depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maller, Jerome J; Anderson, Rodney; Thomson, Richard H; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2015-01-30

    Differing levels of occipital lobe asymmetry and enlarged lateral ventricles have been reported within patients with bipolar disorder (BD) compared with healthy controls, suggesting different rates of occipital bending (OB). This may exert pressure on subcortical structures, such as the hippocampus, reduced among psychiatric patients. We investigated OB prevalence in 35 patients with BD and 36 healthy controls, and ventricular and occipital volumes. Prevalence was four times higher among BD patients (12/35 [34.3%]) than in control subjects (3/36 [8.3%]), as well as larger lateral ventricular volumes (LVVs). Furthermore, we found OB to relate to left-to-right ventricular and occipital lobe volume (OLV) ratios. Those with OB also had reduced left-to-right hippocampal volume ratios. The results suggest that OB is more common among BD patients than healthy subjects, and prevalent in both BD Type I and Type II patients. We posit that anomalies in neural pruning or ventricular enlargement may precipitate OB, consequently resulting in one occipital lobe twisting around the other. Although the clinical implications of these results are unclear, the study suggests that asymmetrical ventricular volume matched with a pattern of oppositely asymmetrical occipital volume is related to OB and may be a marker of psychiatric illness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of tanalith-e impregnation substance on bending strengths and modulus of elasticity in bending of some wood types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Keskin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of impregnation with Tanalith-E on the bending strengths and modulus of elasticity in bending of some wood types. The test samples prepared from beech, oak, walnut, poplar, ash and pine wood materials - that are of common use in the forest products industry of TURKEY - according to TS 345, were treated with according to ASTM D 1413-76 substantially. Un-impregnated samples according to impregnated wood materials, the bending strengths in beech to 6.83%, 5.12% in ash, 5.93% in pine, the elasticity module values to 7.15% in oak and ash, at a rate of 6.58% in the higher were found. The highest values of bending strengths and modulus of elasticity in bending were obtained in beech and ash woods impregnated with Tanalith-E, whereas the lowest values were obtained in the poplar wood.

  13. Stiffness Evolution in Frozen Sands Subjected to Stress Changes

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Sheng; Santamarina, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Sampling affects all soils, including frozen soils and hydrate-bearing sediments. The authors monitor the stiffness evolution of frozen sands subjected to various temperature and stress conditions using an oedometer cell instrumented with P-wave transducers. Experimental results show the stress-dependent stiffness of freshly remolded sands, the dominant stiffening effect of ice, creep after unloading, and the associated exponential decrease in stiffness with time. The characteristic time for stiffness loss during creep is of the order of tens of minutes; therefore it is inevitable that frozen soils experience sampling disturbances attributable to unloading. Slow unloading minimizes stiffness loss; conversely, fast unloading causes a pronounced reduction in stiffness probably attributable to the brittle failure of ice or ice-mineral bonding.

  14. Stiffness Evolution in Frozen Sands Subjected to Stress Changes

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Sheng

    2017-04-21

    Sampling affects all soils, including frozen soils and hydrate-bearing sediments. The authors monitor the stiffness evolution of frozen sands subjected to various temperature and stress conditions using an oedometer cell instrumented with P-wave transducers. Experimental results show the stress-dependent stiffness of freshly remolded sands, the dominant stiffening effect of ice, creep after unloading, and the associated exponential decrease in stiffness with time. The characteristic time for stiffness loss during creep is of the order of tens of minutes; therefore it is inevitable that frozen soils experience sampling disturbances attributable to unloading. Slow unloading minimizes stiffness loss; conversely, fast unloading causes a pronounced reduction in stiffness probably attributable to the brittle failure of ice or ice-mineral bonding.

  15. Analysis of Dynamic Stiffness of Bridge Cap-Pile System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhui Chu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the applicability of dynamic stiffness for bridge cap-pile system, a laboratory test was performed. A numerical model was also built for this type of system. The impact load was applied on the cap top and the dynamic stiffness was analysed. Then, the effect of the effective friction area between pile and soil was also considered. Finally, the dynamic stiffness relationship between the single pile and the cap-pile system was also compared. The results show that the dynamic stiffness is a sensitive index and can well reflect the static characteristics of the pile at the elastic stage. There is a significant positive correlation between the vertical dynamic stiffness index and bearing capacity of the cap-pile system in the similar formation environment. For the cap-pile system with four piles, the dynamic stiffness is about four times as large as the single pile between 10 and 20 Hz.

  16. Impact of matrix stiffness on fibroblast function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Mohri, Hichem; Wu, Yang; Mohanty, Swetaparna; Ghosh, Gargi, E-mail: gargi@umich.edu

    2017-05-01

    Chronic non-healing wounds, caused by impaired production of growth factors and reduced vascularization, represent a significant burden to patients, health care professionals, and health care system. While several wound dressing biomaterials have been developed, the impact of the mechanical properties of the dressings on the residing cells and consequently on the healing of the wounds is largely overlooked. The primary focus of this study is to explore whether manipulation of the substrate mechanics can regulate the function of fibroblasts, particularly in the context of their angiogenic activity. A photocrosslinkable hydrogel platform with orthogonal control over gel modulus and cell adhesive sites was developed to explore the quantitative relationship between ECM compliance and fibroblast function. Increase in matrix stiffness resulted in enhanced fibroblast proliferation and stress fiber formation. However, the angiogenic activity of fibroblasts was found to be optimum when the cells were seeded on compliant matrices. Thus, the observations suggest that the stiffness of the wound dressing material may play an important role in the progression of wound healing. - Highlights: • Proliferation and stress fiber formation of fibroblasts increase with increasing matrix mechanics. • Cell area correlates with the growth of fibroblasts. • Angiogenic activity of fibroblasts optimum when cells seeded on compliant gels.

  17. Multifunctional Stiff Carbon Foam Derived from Bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ye; Ding, Yujie; Wang, Chunhui; Xu, Fan; Lin, Zaishan; Qin, Yuyang; Li, Ying; Yang, Minglong; He, Xiaodong; Peng, Qingyu; Li, Yibin

    2016-07-06

    The creation of stiff yet multifunctional three-dimensional porous carbon architecture at very low cost is still challenging. In this work, lightweight and stiff carbon foam (CF) with adjustable pore structure was prepared by using flour as the basic element via a simple fermentation and carbonization process. The compressive strength of CF exhibits a high value of 3.6 MPa whereas its density is 0.29 g/cm(3) (compressive modulus can be 121 MPa). The electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness measurements (specific EMI shielding effectiveness can be 78.18 dB·cm(3)·g(-1)) indicate that CF can be used as lightweight, effective shielding material. Unlike ordinary foam structure materials, the low thermal conductivity (lowest is 0.06 W/m·K) with high resistance to fire makes CF a good candidate for commercial thermal insulation material. These results demonstrate a promising method to fabricate an economical, robust carbon material for applications in industry as well as topics regarding environmental protection and improvement of energy efficiency.

  18. Direct measurement of the intrinsic ankle stiffness during standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlutters, M; Boonstra, T A; Schouten, A C; van der Kooij, H

    2015-05-01

    Ankle stiffness contributes to standing balance, counteracting the destabilizing effect of gravity. The ankle stiffness together with the compliance between the foot and the support surface make up the ankle-foot stiffness, which is relevant to quiet standing. The contribution of the intrinsic ankle-foot stiffness to balance, and the ankle-foot stiffness amplitude dependency remain a topic of debate in the literature. We therefore developed an experimental protocol to directly measure the bilateral intrinsic ankle-foot stiffness during standing balance, and determine its amplitude dependency. By applying fast (40 ms) ramp-and-hold support surface rotations (0.005-0.08 rad) during standing, reflexive contributions could be excluded, and the amplitude dependency of the intrinsic ankle-foot stiffness was investigated. Results showed that reflexive activity could not have biased the torque used for estimating the intrinsic stiffness. Furthermore, subjects required less recovery action to restore balance after bilateral rotations in opposite directions compared to rotations in the same direction. The intrinsic ankle-foot stiffness appears insufficient to ensure balance, ranging from 0.93±0.09 to 0.44±0.06 (normalized to critical stiffness 'mgh'). This implies that changes in muscle activation are required to maintain balance. The non-linear stiffness decrease with increasing rotation amplitude supports the previous published research. With the proposed method reflexive effects can be ruled out from the measured torque without any model assumptions, allowing direct estimation of intrinsic stiffness during standing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The influence of end constraints on smooth pipe bends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, G.; Spence, J.

    1981-01-01

    With present trends in the power industries towards higher operating temperatures and pressures, problems associated with the design and safety assessment of pipework systems have become increasingly complex. Within such systems, the importance of smooth pipe bends is well established. The work which will be presented will attempt to clarify the situation and unify the results. An analytical solution of the problem of a linear elastic smooth pipe bend with end constraints under in-plane bending will be presented. The analysis will deal with constraints in the form of flanged tangents of any length. The analysis employs the theorem of minimum total potential energy with suitable kinematically admissible displacements in the form of Fourier series. The integrations and minimisation were performed numerically, thereby permitting the removal of several of the assumptions made by previous authors. Typical results for flexibilities will be given along with comparisons with other works. The differences in some earlier theory are clarified and other more recent work using different solution techniques is substantiated. The bend behaviour is shown to be strongly influenced by the pipe bend parameter, the bend angle, the tangent pipe length and the bend/cross-sectional radius ratio. (orig./GL)

  20. Bending-Tolerant Anodes for Lithium-Metal Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aoxuan; Tang, Shan; Kong, Debin; Liu, Shan; Chiou, Kevin; Zhi, Linjie; Huang, Jiaxing; Xia, Yong-Yao; Luo, Jiayan

    2018-01-01

    Bendable energy-storage systems with high energy density are demanded for conformal electronics. Lithium-metal batteries including lithium-sulfur and lithium-oxygen cells have much higher theoretical energy density than lithium-ion batteries. Reckoned as the ideal anode, however, Li has many challenges when directly used, especially its tendency to form dendrite. Under bending conditions, the Li-dendrite growth can be further aggravated due to bending-induced local plastic deformation and Li-filaments pulverization. Here, the Li-metal anodes are made bending tolerant by integrating Li into bendable scaffolds such as reduced graphene oxide (r-GO) films. In the composites, the bending stress is largely dissipated by the scaffolds. The scaffolds have increased available surface for homogeneous Li plating and minimize volume fluctuation of Li electrodes during cycling. Significantly improved cycling performance under bending conditions is achieved. With the bending-tolerant r-GO/Li-metal anode, bendable lithium-sulfur and lithium-oxygen batteries with long cycling stability are realized. A bendable integrated solar cell-battery system charged by light with stable output and a series connected bendable battery pack with higher voltage is also demonstrated. It is anticipated that this bending-tolerant anode can be combined with further electrolytes and cathodes to develop new bendable energy systems. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Stiffness and the automatic selection of ODE codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shampine, L.F.

    1984-01-01

    The author describes the basic ideas behind the most popular methods for the numerical solution of ordinary differential equations (ODEs). He takes up the qualitative behavior of solutions of ODEs and its relation ot the propagation of numerical error. Codes for ODEs are intended either for stiff problems or for non-stiff problems. The difference is explained. Users of codes do not have the information needed to recognize stiffness. A code, DEASY, which automatically recognizes stiffness and selects a suitable method is described

  2. Fatigue crack paths under the influence of changes in stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kullmer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available An important topic of the Collaborative Research Centre TRR 30 of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG is the crack growth behaviour in graded materials. In addition, the growth of cracks in the neighbourhood of regions and through regions with different material properties belongs under this topic. Due to the different material properties, regions with differing stiffness compared to the base material may arise. Regions with differing stiffness also arise from ribs, grooves or boreholes. Since secure findings on the propagation behaviour of fatigue cracks are essential for the evaluation of the safety of components and structures, the growth of cracks near changes in stiffness has to be considered, too. Depending on the way a crack penetrates the zone of influence of such a change in stiffness and depending on whether this region is more compliant or stiffer than the surrounding area the crack may grow towards or away from this region. Both cases result in curved crack paths that cannot be explained only by the global loading situation. To evaluate the influence of regions with differing stiffness on the path of fatigue cracks the paths and the stress intensity factors of cracks growing near and through regions with differing stiffness are numerically determined with the program system ADAPCRACK3D. Therefore, arrangements of changes in stiffness modelled as material inclusions with stiffness properties different from the base material or modelled as ribs and grooves are systematically varied to develop basic conclusions about the crack growth behaviour near and through changes in stiffness.

  3. On prestress stiffness analysis of bolt-plate contact assemblies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard; Pedersen, Pauli

    2008-01-01

    , but with finite element (FE) and contact analysis, it is possible to find the stiffness of the member. In the case of many connections and for practical applications, it is not suitable to make a full FE analysis. The purpose of the present paper is to find simplified expressions for the stiffness of the member......, including the case when the width of the member is limited. The calculation of the stiffness is based on the FE, including the solution to the contact problem, and we express the stiffness as a function of the elastic energy in the structure, whereby the definition of the displacements related...

  4. Ball Bearing Stiffnesses- A New Approach Offering Analytical Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Pascal; Frikha, Ahmed

    2015-09-01

    Space mechanisms use preloaded ball bearings in order to withstand the severe vibrations during launch.The launch strength requires the calculation of the bearing stiffness, but this calculation is complex. Nowadays, there is no analytical expression that gives the stiffness of a bearing. Stiffness is computed using an iterative algorithm such as Newton-Raphson, to solve the nonlinear system of equations.This paper aims at offering a simplified analytical approach, based on the assumption that the contact angle is constant. This approach gives analytical formulas of the stiffness of preloaded ball bearing.

  5. Low frequency noise reduction using stiff light composite panels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Yongchang; LIN Weizheng

    2003-01-01

    The experiment presented in this paper is to investigate and analyze the noise reduction at low frequency using stiff light composite panels. Since these composite panels are made of lightweight and stiff materials, this actuation strategy will enable the creation of composite panels for duct noise control without using traditional heavy structural mass. The results suggest that the mass-spring resonance absorption in the case of a comparatively stiff thick panel with a thin flexible plate is more efficient with minimum weight, when subjected to low-frequency (<500 Hz). The efficiency of the panel absorber depends on the mass of the thin flexible plate and the stiffness of the panel.

  6. Piezo films with adjustable anisotropic strain for bending actuators with tunable bending profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wapler, Matthias C; Stürmer, Moritz; Brunne, Jens; Wallrabe, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    We present a method to produce in-plane polarized piezo films with a freely adjustable ratio of the strains in orthogonal in-plane directions. They can be used in piezo bending actuators with a tunable curvature profile. The strains are obtained as mean strains from a periodic polarization pattern produced by a suitable doubly interdigitated electrode structure. This mechanism is demonstrated for several examples using PZT sheets. We further discuss how this tuning and the parameters of the electrode layout affect the overall magnitude of the displacement. (paper)

  7. Numerical simulation of laser bending of AISI 304 plate with a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: laser bending; process modeling; bending angle; response surface models. ... (Shi et al., 2007) presented numerical simulation of bending for with different shapes of laser ..... Matlab 2011a application code is used to develop and.

  8. Flow patterns and hydraulic losses in quasi-coil pipes : The effects of configuration of bend cross section, curvature ratio and bend angle

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, Yukimaru; Sugino, Koichi; Yasui, Masaji; Hayakawa, Yukitaka; Kuzuhara, Sadao

    1985-01-01

    Pipes with bend combinations are much used in the heat exchangers, since the curved path in the bends promotes the mixing in flow for active heat transfer. In the present paper, one of the pipes with bend combinations, namely, quasi-coiled pipes composed of many bend elements are investigated, and the relationships between the hydraulic loss and the secondary flow are studied experimentally. The configurations of the cross sections, the bent angles and the curvature ratios of the bend element...

  9. Elasticity Theory Solution of the Problem on Plane Bending of a Narrow Layered Cantilever Beam by Loads at Its Free End

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryk, A. V.; Koval'chuk, S. B.

    2018-05-01

    An exact elasticity theory solution for the problem on plane bending of a narrow layered composite cantilever beam by tangential and normal loads distributed on its free end is presented. Components of the stress-strain state are found for the whole layers package by directly integrating differential equations of the plane elasticity theory problem by using an analytic representation of piecewise constant functions of the mechanical characteristics of layer materials. The continuous solution obtained is realized for a four-layer beam with account of kinematic boundary conditions simulating the rigid fixation of its one end. The solution obtained allows one to predict the strength and stiffness of composite cantilever beams and to construct applied analytical solutions for various problems on the elastic bending of layered beams.

  10. Development of a subset of forelimb muscles and their attachment sites requires the ulnar-mammary syndrome gene Tbx3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary P. Colasanto

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the vertebrate limb over 40 muscles are arranged in a precise pattern of attachment via muscle connective tissue and tendon to bone and provide an extensive range of motion. How the development of somite-derived muscle is coordinated with the development of lateral plate-derived muscle connective tissue, tendon and bone to assemble a functional limb musculoskeletal system is a long-standing question. Mutations in the T-box transcription factor, TBX3, have previously been identified as the genetic cause of ulnar-mammary syndrome (UMS, characterized by distinctive defects in posterior forelimb bones. Using conditional mutagenesis in mice, we now show that TBX3 has a broader role in limb musculoskeletal development. TBX3 is not only required for development of posterior forelimb bones (ulna and digits 4 and 5, but also for a subset of posterior muscles (lateral triceps and brachialis and their bone eminence attachment sites. TBX3 specification of origin and insertion sites appears to be tightly linked with whether these particular muscles develop and may represent a newly discovered mechanism for specification of anatomical muscles. Re-examination of an individual with UMS reveals similar previously unrecognized muscle and bone eminence defects and indicates a conserved role for TBX3 in regulating musculoskeletal development.

  11. Stress sonography of the ulnar collateral ligament of the elbow in professional baseball pitchers: a 10-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccotti, Michael G; Atanda, Alfred; Nazarian, Levon N; Dodson, Christopher C; Holmes, Laurens; Cohen, Steven B

    2014-03-01

    An injury to the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) of the elbow is potentially career threatening for elite baseball pitchers. Stress ultrasound (US) of the elbow allows for evaluation of both the UCL and the ulnohumeral joint space at rest and with stress. Stress US can identify morphological and functional UCL changes and may predict the risk of a UCL injury in elite pitchers. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 368 asymptomatic professional baseball pitchers underwent preseason stress US of their dominant and nondominant elbows over a 10-year period (2002-2012). Stress US examinations were performed in 30° of flexion at rest and with 150 N of valgus stress by a single musculoskeletal radiologist. Ligament thickness, ulnohumeral joint space width, and ligament abnormalities (hypoechoic foci and calcifications) were documented. There were 736 stress US studies. The mean UCL thickness in the dominant elbow (6.15 mm) was significantly greater than that in the nondominant elbow (4.82 mm) (P .05) increases in baseline ligament thickness, ulnohumeral joint space gapping with stress, and incidence of hypoechoic foci and calcifications. More than 1 stress US examination was performed in 131 players, with a mean increase of 0.78 mm in joint space gapping with subsequent evaluations. Stress US indicates that the UCL in the dominant elbow of elite pitchers is thicker, is more likely to have hypoechoic foci and/or calcifications, and has increased laxity with valgus stress over time.

  12. Creep relaxation of fuel pin bending and ovalling stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, D.P.; Jackson, R.J.

    1979-06-01

    Analytical methods for calculating fuel pin cladding bending and ovalling stresses due to pin bundle-duct mechanical interaction taking into account nonlinear creep are presented. Calculated results are in close agreement with finite element results by MARC-CDC program. The methods are used to investigate the effect of creep on the FTR fuel cladding bending and ovalling stresses. It is concluded that the cladding of 316 SS 20% CW and reference design has high creep rates in the FTR core region to keep the bending and ovalling stresses to low levels

  13. Localized bending fatigue behavior of high-strength steel monostrands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Jan; Fischer, Gregor; Georgakis, Christos T.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the localized bending fatigue behavior of pretensioned high strength steel monostrands is investigated. Furthermore, a new methodology using an optical photogrammetry system, which can quantify surface deformations on the strand is presented. The system allows measurement of the st......In this paper, the localized bending fatigue behavior of pretensioned high strength steel monostrands is investigated. Furthermore, a new methodology using an optical photogrammetry system, which can quantify surface deformations on the strand is presented. The system allows measurement...... displacement (opening/closing and sliding) of the helically wound wires. Moreover, the results are a step towards understanding the bending fatigue damage mechanisms of monostrand cables....

  14. Bending-active reciprocal structures based on equilateral polyhedral geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovic Larsen, Olga; BRANCART, Stijn; DE TEMMERMAN, Niels

    2017-01-01

    As mutually supported beam structures, reciprocal frames limit the number of components that are joined at each connection to two. However, this system of intermediate connections introduces undesirable bending moments in the beam elements. By utilising elastic deformation to create curved...... of parts of reciprocal bending-active components based on a selection of polyhedral dome types. To simplify the assembly of the structures and avoid the manual bending of the components on site, we introduce the concept of a double-layered, pre-bent component. Finally, this paper presents the development...

  15. "Bending the cost curve" in gastroenterology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, E; Harewood, G C; Murray, F; Patchett, S

    2013-12-01

    Increasing attention is being focused on reigning in escalating costs of healthcare, i.e. trying to 'bend the cost curve'. In gastroenterology (GI), inpatient hospital care represents a major component of overall costs. This study aimed to characterize the trend in cost of care for GI-related hospitalizations in recent years and to identify the most costly diagnostic groups. All hospital inpatients admitted between January 2008 and December 2009 with a primary diagnosis of one of the six most common GI-related Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs) in this hospital system were identified; all DRGs contained at least 40 patients during the study period. Patient Level Costing (PLC) was used to express the total cost of hospital care for each patient; PLC comprised a weighted daily bed cost plus cost of all medical services provided (e.g., radiology, pathology tests) calculated according to an activity-based costing approach; cost of medications were excluded. All costs were discounted to 2009 values. Mean length of stay (LOS) was also calculated for each DRG. Over 2 years, 470 patients were admitted with one of the six most common GI DRGs. Mean cost of care increased from 2008 to 2009 for all six DRGs with the steepest increases seen in 'GI hemorrhage (non-complex)' (31 % increase) and 'Cirrhosis/Alcoholic hepatitis (non-complex)' (45 % increase). No differences in readmission rates were observed over time. There was a strong correlation between year-to-year change in costs and change in mean LOS, r = 0.93. The cost of GI-related inpatient care appears to be increasing in recent years with the steepest increases observed in non-complex GI hemorrhage and non-complex Cirrhosis/Alcoholic hepatitis. Efforts to control the increasing costs should focus on these diagnostic categories.

  16. Numerical identification of secondary buckling phenomena of elastic rectangular plate under pure bending; Tomage wo ukeru dansei kukeiban ni shojiru niji zakutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakazawa, M.; Ikeda, K. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Wachi, S. [NKK Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Kuranishi, S. [Kanto Gakuin University, Yokohama (Japan)

    1995-07-21

    In this paper, the secondary buckling phenomena of the elastic rectangular plate subject to the pure bending moment are investigated. The bifurcation points are classified numerically based on the determinant of tangential stiffness matrix and of its diagonal blocks obtained by means of the group-theoretic bifurcation theory. By using the sub-matrices within the whole block-diagonalized one, the informations of the instability points and equilibrium paths after bifurcation are easily obtained. The quantitative influence of the initial imperfections are investigated based on the asymptotic laws and the Monte Carlo simulations. 30 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Pulling a polymer with anisotropic stiffness near a sticky wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabbara, R; Owczarek, A L

    2012-01-01

    We solve exactly a two-dimensional partially directed walk model of a semi-flexible polymer that has one end tethered to a sticky wall, while a pulling force away from the adsorbing surface acts on the free end of the walk. This model generalizes a number of previously considered adsorption models by incorporating individual horizontal and vertical stiffness effects, in competition with a variable pulling angle. A solution to the corresponding generating function is found by means of the kernel method. While the phases and related phase transitions are similar in nature to those found previously the analysis of the model in terms of its physical variables highlights various novel structures in the shapes of the phase diagrams and related behaviour of the polymer. We review the results of previously considered sub-cases, augmenting these findings to include analysis with respect to the model’s physical variables—namely, temperature, pulling force, pulling angle away from the surface, stiffness strength and the ratio of vertical to horizontal stiffness potentials, with our subsequent analysis for the general model focusing on the effect that stiffness has on this pulling angle range. In analysing the model with stiffness we also pay special attention to the case where only vertical stiffness is included. The physical analysis of this case reveals behaviour more closely resembling that of an upward pulling force acting on a polymer than it does of a model where horizontal stiffness acts. The stiffness–temperature phase diagram exhibits re-entrance for low temperatures, previously only seen for three-dimensional or co-polymer models. For the most general model we delineate the shift in the physical behaviour as we change the ratio of vertical to horizontal stiffness between the horizontal-only and the vertical-only stiffness regimes. We find that a number of distinct physical characteristics will only be observed for a model where the vertical stiffness dominates

  18. Advantages of customer/supplier involvement in the upgrade of River Bend`s IST program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Womack, R.L.; Addison, J.A.

    1996-12-01

    At River Bend Station, IST testing had problems. Operations could not perform the test with the required repeatability; engineering could not reliably trend test data to detect degradation; licensing was heavily burdened with regulatory concerns; and maintenance could not do preventative maintenance because of poor prediction of system health status. Using Energy`s Total Quality principles, it was determined that the causes were: lack of ownership, inadequate test equipment usage, lack of adequate procedures, and lack of program maintenance. After identifying the customers and suppliers of the IST program data, Energy management put together an upgrade team to address these concerns. These customers and suppliers made up the IST upgrade team. The team`s mission was to supply River Bend with a reliable, functional, industry correct and user friendly IST program. The IST program in place went through a verification process that identified and corrected over 400 individual program discrepancies. Over 200 components were identified for improved testing methods. An IST basis document was developed. The operations department was trained on ASME Section XI testing. All IST tests have been simplified and shortened, due to heavy involvement by operations in the procedure development process. This significantly reduced testing time, resulting in lower cost, less dose and greater system availability.

  19. Salt-induced aggregation of stiff polyelectrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazli, Hossein; Mohammadinejad, Sarah; Golestanian, Ramin

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation techniques are used to study the process of aggregation of highly charged stiff polyelectrolytes due to the presence of multivalent salt. The dominant kinetic mode of aggregation is found to be the case of one end of one polyelectrolyte meeting others at right angles, and the kinetic pathway to bundle formation is found to be similar to that of flocculation dynamics of colloids as described by Smoluchowski. The aggregation process is found to favor the formation of finite bundles of 10-11 filaments at long times. Comparing the distribution of the cluster sizes with the Smoluchowski formula suggests that the energy barrier for the aggregation process is negligible. Also, the formation of long-lived metastable structures with similarities to the raft-like structures of actin filaments is observed within a range of salt concentration.

  20. Discrete computational mechanics for stiff phenomena

    KAUST Repository

    Michels, Dominik L.

    2016-11-28

    Many natural phenomena which occur in the realm of visual computing and computational physics, like the dynamics of cloth, fibers, fluids, and solids as well as collision scenarios are described by stiff Hamiltonian equations of motion, i.e. differential equations whose solution spectra simultaneously contain extremely high and low frequencies. This usually impedes the development of physically accurate and at the same time efficient integration algorithms. We present a straightforward computationally oriented introduction to advanced concepts from classical mechanics. We provide an easy to understand step-by-step introduction from variational principles over the Euler-Lagrange formalism and the Legendre transformation to Hamiltonian mechanics. Based on such solid theoretical foundations, we study the underlying geometric structure of Hamiltonian systems as well as their discrete counterparts in order to develop sophisticated structure preserving integration algorithms to efficiently perform high fidelity simulations.

  1. Effect of exercise on arterial stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montero, David; Andersen, Andreas Breenfeldt; Oberholzer, Laura

    2017-01-01

    points (P = 0.196) although a linear decreasing trend was detected (P = 0.016). CONCLUSIONS: Central AS augments during a conventional ET intervention that effectively enhances aerobic exercise capacity in young individuals. This suggests that normal, healthy elastic arteries are not amendable......BACKGROUND: Whether arterial stiffness (AS) can be improved by regular exercise in healthy individuals remains equivocal according to cross-sectional and longitudinal studies assessing arterial properties at discrete time points. The purpose of the present study was to pinpoint the time course......), in 9 previously untrained healthy normotensive adults (27 ± 4 years) with no history of cardiovascular disease. Exercise capacity was assessed by maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) elicited by incremental ergometry. RESULTS: VO2max increased throughout the ET intervention (+12% from week 0 to week 8...

  2. Effect of centrifugal transverse wakefield for microbunch in bend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stupakov, G.V.

    1999-01-01

    We calculate centrifugal force for a short bunch in vacuum moving in a circular orbit and estimate the emittance growth of the beam in a bend due to this force. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  3. experimental and analytical comparison of torsion, bending moment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    In structural analysis and design, the effects of torsion are usually neglected ... bending and torsion, using these codes and experimental work; and validates the ..... [7] Kharagpur, I. Structural Analysis: Civil Engineering. Course Material (Vol.

  4. Computational Strategies for the Architectural Design of Bending Active Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Nicholas, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Active bending introduces a new level of integration into the design of architectural structures, and opens up new complexities for the architectural design process. In particular, the introduction of material variation reconfigures the design space. Through the precise specification...

  5. Low Cycle Fatigue of Steel in Strain Controled Cyclic Bending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulesa Anna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a comparison of the fatigue life curves based on test of 15Mo3 steel under cyclic, pendulum bending and tension-compression. These studies were analyzed in terms of a large and small number of cycles where strain amplitude is dependent on the fatigue life. It has been shown that commonly used Manson-Coffin-Basquin model cannot be used for tests under cyclic bending due to the impossibility of separating elastic and plastic strains. For this purpose, some well-known models of Langer and Kandil and one new model of authors, where strain amplitude is dependent on the number of cycles, were proposed. Comparing the results of bending with tension-compression it was shown that for smaller strain amplitudes the fatigue life for both test methods were similar, for higher strain amplitudes fatigue life for bending tests was greater than for tension-compression.

  6. kantorovich-euler lagrange-galerkin's method for bending analysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    OF CIVIL ENGINEERING, ENUGU STATE UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, ... In this work, the Kantorovich method is applied to solve the bending problem of thin ... Lagrange differential equation is determined for this functional.

  7. Turbulent flow computation in a circular U-Bend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloud Abdelkrim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Turbulent flows through a circular 180° curved bend with a curvature ratio of 3.375, defined as the the bend mean radius to pipe diameter is investigated numerically for a Reynolds number of 4.45×104. The computation is performed for a U-Bend with full long pipes at the entrance and at the exit. The commercial ANSYS FLUENT is used to solve the steady Reynolds–Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS equations. The performances of standard k-ε and the second moment closure RSM models are evaluated by comparing their numerical results against experimental data and testing their capabilities to capture the formation and extend this turbulence driven vortex. It is found that the secondary flows occur in the cross-stream half-plane of such configurations and primarily induced by high anisotropy of the cross-stream turbulent normal stresses near the outer bend.

  8. Turbulent flow computation in a circular U-Bend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloud, Abdelkrim; Aounallah, Mohammed; Belkadi, Mustapha; Adjlout, Lahouari; Imine, Omar; Imine, Bachir

    2014-03-01

    Turbulent flows through a circular 180° curved bend with a curvature ratio of 3.375, defined as the the bend mean radius to pipe diameter is investigated numerically for a Reynolds number of 4.45×104. The computation is performed for a U-Bend with full long pipes at the entrance and at the exit. The commercial ANSYS FLUENT is used to solve the steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. The performances of standard k-ɛ and the second moment closure RSM models are evaluated by comparing their numerical results against experimental data and testing their capabilities to capture the formation and extend this turbulence driven vortex. It is found that the secondary flows occur in the cross-stream half-plane of such configurations and primarily induced by high anisotropy of the cross-stream turbulent normal stresses near the outer bend.

  9. Mathematical model of polyethylene pipe bending stress state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrennikov, Anatoly; Serebrennikov, Daniil

    2018-03-01

    Introduction of new machines and new technologies of polyethylene pipeline installation is usually based on the polyethylene pipe flexibility. It is necessary that existing bending stresses do not lead to an irreversible polyethylene pipe deformation and to violation of its strength characteristics. Derivation of the mathematical model which allows calculating analytically the bending stress level of polyethylene pipes with consideration of nonlinear characteristics is presented below. All analytical calculations made with the mathematical model are experimentally proved and confirmed.

  10. Design and Construction of the Plat Bending Machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edy Sumarno; Abdul Hafid; Ismu H; Joko P W; Bambang Heru

    2003-01-01

    The plat-bending machine has been fabricated. The type is manual. That machine was made by plate, cylinder and U plat material. The machine has dimensions 110 mm in height, 650 mm in width, and 1200 mm in height. The capability of this machine is bending the plat with 2 mm in thickness and 1000 mm in width. This machine has the advantage to operate without electrical supply and easy to operate. (author)

  11. Theory of bending waves with applications to disk galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1982-01-01

    A theory of bending waves is surveyed which provides an explanation for the required amplification of the warp in the Milky Way. It also provides for self-generated warps in isolated external galaxies. The shape of observed warps and partly their existence in isolated galaxies are indicative of substantial spheroidal components. The theory also provides a plausible explanation for the bending of the inner disk (<2 kpc) of the Milky Way

  12. NRC concerns about steam generator tube U-bend failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillon, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    This paper concerns itself with genralized NRC regulatory policy regarding SGT failures and staff reports and opinions which may tend to influence the developing policy specific to U-bend failures. The most significant analysis at hand in predicting NRC policy on SGT U-bend failures is Marsh's Evaluation of Steam Generator Tube Rupture Events. Marsh sets out to describe and analyze the five steam generator tube ruptures that are known to NRC. All have occurred in the period 1975 to 1980

  13. Mechanically stiff, electrically conductive composites of polymers and carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Kucheyev, Sergei O.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Hamza, Alex V.

    2017-10-17

    Using SWNT-CA as scaffolds to fabricate stiff, highly conductive polymer (PDMS) composites. The SWNT-CA is immersing in a polymer resin to produce a SWNT-CA infiltrated with a polymer resin. The SWNT-CA infiltrated with a polymer resin is cured to produce the stiff and electrically conductive composite of carbon nanotube aerogel and polymer.

  14. Mechanically stiff, electrically conductive composites of polymers and carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Kucheyev, Sergei O.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Hamza, Alex V.

    2015-07-21

    Using SWNT-CA as scaffolds to fabricate stiff, highly conductive polymer (PDMS) composites. The SWNT-CA is immersing in a polymer resin to produce a SWNT-CA infiltrated with a polymer resin. The SWNT-CA infiltrated with a polymer resin is cured to produce the stiff and electrically conductive composite of carbon nanotube aerogel and polymer.

  15. A prototype of a novel energy efficient variable stiffness actuator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L.C.; Carloni, Raffaella; Klijnstra, F.; Stramigioli, Stefano

    In this work, we present a proof of concept of a novel variable stiffness actuator. The actuator design is based on the conceptual design proposed in earlier work, and is such that the apparent output stiffness of the actuator can be changed independently of the output position and without any

  16. Current front stiffness of European vehicles with regard to compatibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huibers, J.; Beer, E. de

    2001-01-01

    EuroNCAP tests are carried out since 1997. The test procedure in general is comparable to the EC Directive 96/79 with a test speed of 64 km/h. This increased test speed implies a higher frontal stiffness for new vehicle designs in order to achieve a high ranking. This frontal stiffness is one of the

  17. Optimization of a quasi-zero-stiffness isolator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrella, A.; Brennan, M. J.; Waters, T. P.

    2007-01-01

    The frequency range over which a mount can isolate a mass from a vibrating base (or vice versa) is often limited by the mount stiffness required to support the weight of the mass. This compromise can be made more favourable by employing non-linear mounts with a softening spring characteristic such that small excursions about the static equilibrium position result in small dynamic spring forces and a correspondingly low natural frequency. This paper concerns the force-displacement characteristic of a so-called quasi-zero-stiffness (QZS) mechanism which is characterised by an appreciable static stiffness but very small (theoretically zero) dynamic stiffness. The mechanism studied comprises a vertical spring acting in parallel with two further springs which, when inclined at an appropriate angle to the vertical, produce a cancelling negative stiffness effect. Analysis of the system shows that a QZS characteristic can be obtained if the systems parameters (angle of inclination and ratio of spring stiffness) are opportunely chosen. By introducing the additional criterion that the displacement of the system be largest without exceeding a desired (low) value of stiffness an optimal set of parameter values is derived. Under sufficiently large displacements the stiffness of the QZS mechanism can eventually exceed that of the simple mass-spring system and criteria for this detrimental scenario to arise are presented

  18. Bending spring rate investigation of nanopipette for cell injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yajing; Zhang, Zhenhai; Fukuda, Toshio

    2015-04-01

    Bending of nanopipette tips during cell penetration is a major cause of cell injection failure. However, the flexural rigidity of nanopipettes is little known due to their irregular structure. In this paper, we report a quantitative method to estimate the flexural rigidity of a nanopipette by investigating its bending spring rate. First nanopipettes with a tip size of 300 nm are fabricated from various glass tubes by laser pulling followed by focused ion beam (FIB) milling. Then the bending spring rate of the nanopipettes is investigated inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Finally, a yeast cell penetration test is performed on these nanopipettes, which have different bending spring rates. The results show that nanopipettes with a higher bending spring rate have better cell penetration capability, which confirms that the bending spring rate may well reflect the flexural rigidity of a nanopipette. This method provides a quantitative parameter for characterizing the mechanical property of a nanopipette that can be potentially taken as a standard specification in the future. This general method can also be used to estimate other one-dimensional structures for cell injection, which will greatly benefit basic cell biology research and clinical applications.

  19. Bending spring rate investigation of nanopipette for cell injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Yajing; Zhang, Zhenhai; Fukuda, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Bending of nanopipette tips during cell penetration is a major cause of cell injection failure. However, the flexural rigidity of nanopipettes is little known due to their irregular structure. In this paper, we report a quantitative method to estimate the flexural rigidity of a nanopipette by investigating its bending spring rate. First nanopipettes with a tip size of 300 nm are fabricated from various glass tubes by laser pulling followed by focused ion beam (FIB) milling. Then the bending spring rate of the nanopipettes is investigated inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Finally, a yeast cell penetration test is performed on these nanopipettes, which have different bending spring rates. The results show that nanopipettes with a higher bending spring rate have better cell penetration capability, which confirms that the bending spring rate may well reflect the flexural rigidity of a nanopipette. This method provides a quantitative parameter for characterizing the mechanical property of a nanopipette that can be potentially taken as a standard specification in the future. This general method can also be used to estimate other one-dimensional structures for cell injection, which will greatly benefit basic cell biology research and clinical applications. (paper)

  20. Study of laser bending of a preloaded Titanium alloy sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiufeng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser bending of sheet metals with preload offers some attractive characteristics/merits, comparing to laser free bending without prestressing on the metals. The study reported in this paper was focused on a Titanium alloy which finds widespread applications in aerospace manufacturing. FE simulation of laser bending with prestressing on the Titanium alloy sheet was conducted for the analysis of the bending process and experiment carried out to verify the model and the result. It was shown that the simulation result is close to that measured in the experiment. Based on the computed result, the load-displacement curve was analysed and transmission efficiency of the elastic energy defined to evaluate the bending effect. These enhanced understanding of the mechanism of laser bending with a preload. A method for the optimization on technological parameters was further proposed. Referring to the deformation targeted, the preload value was determined through the FE simulation. The result showed that, on the premise that the specimen surface can be prevented from damaging, transmission efficiency of the elastic energy could reach to the maximum value through adjusting technological parameters of the laser system and deformation accuracy of the specimen could also be improved through this approach. The work presented in this paper may find its application in the manufacture of Titanium alloy sheets with a more cost-effective and a more precise way.