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Sample records for ulcerans buruli ulcer

  1. Buruli Ulcer (Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... detail/buruli-ulcer-(mycobacterium-ulcerans-infection)","@context":"http://schema.org","@type":"Article"}; العربية 中文 français русский español ... Buruli ulcer on a regular basis to share information, coordinate disease control and research efforts, and monitor ...

  2. Buruli Ulcer (Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... oedema will ulcerate within 4 weeks with the classical, undermined borders. Occasionally, bone is affected causing gross ... has not been proven by randomized trial. Morbidity management, disability prevention and rehabilitation Interventions such as wound ...

  3. Environmental transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans drives dynamics of Buruli ulcer in endemic regions of Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garchitorena, Andrés; Ngonghala, Calistus N.; Texier, Gaëtan; Landier, Jordi; Eyangoh, Sara; Bonds, Matthew H.; Guégan, Jean-François; Roche, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    Buruli Ulcer is a devastating skin disease caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans. Emergence and distribution of Buruli ulcer cases is clearly linked to aquatic ecosystems, but the specific route of transmission of M. ulcerans to humans remains unclear. Relying on the most detailed field data in space and time on M. ulcerans and Buruli ulcer available today, we assess the relative contribution of two potential transmission routes -environmental and water bug transmission- to the dynamics of Buruli ulcer in two endemic regions of Cameroon. The temporal dynamics of Buruli ulcer incidence are explained by estimating rates of different routes of transmission in mathematical models. Independently, we also estimate statistical models of the different transmission pathways on the spatial distribution of Buruli ulcer. The results of these two independent approaches are corroborative and suggest that environmental transmission pathways explain the temporal and spatial patterns of Buruli ulcer in our endemic areas better than the water bug transmission.

  4. On the origin of Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer

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    Doig Kenneth D

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium ulcerans is an unusual bacterial pathogen with elusive origins. While closely related to the aquatic dwelling M. marinum, M. ulcerans has evolved the ability to produce the immunosuppressive polyketide toxin mycolactone and cause the neglected tropical disease Buruli ulcer. Other mycolactone-producing mycobacteria (MPM have been identified in fish and frogs and given distinct species designations (M. pseudoshottsii, M. shinshuense, M. liflandii and M. marinum, however the evolution of M. ulcerans and its relationship to other MPM has not been defined. Here we report the comparative analysis of whole genome sequences from 30 MPM and five M. marinum. Results A high-resolution phylogeny based on genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs showed that M. ulcerans and all other MPM represent a single clonal group that evolved from a common M. marinum progenitor. The emergence of the MPM was driven by the acquisition of the pMUM plasmid encoding genes for the biosynthesis of mycolactones. This change was accompanied by the loss of at least 185 genes, with a significant overrepresentation of genes associated with cell wall functions. Cell wall associated genes also showed evidence of substantial adaptive selection, suggesting cell wall remodeling has been critical for the survival of MPM. Fine-grain analysis of the MPM complex revealed at least three distinct lineages, one of which comprised a highly clonal group, responsible for Buruli ulcer in Africa and Australia. This indicates relatively recent transfer of M. ulcerans between these continents, which represent the vast majority of the global Buruli ulcer burden. Our data provide SNPs and gene sequences that can differentiate M. ulcerans lineages, suitable for use in the diagnosis and surveillance of Buruli ulcer. Conclusions M. ulcerans and all mycolactone-producing mycobacteria are specialized variants of a common Mycobacterium marinum progenitor that have

  5. Amoebae as potential environmental hosts for Mycobacterium ulcerans and other mycobacteria, but doubtful actors in Buruli ulcer epidemiology.

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    Sophie Gryseels

    Full Text Available The reservoir and mode of transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, remain unknown. Ecological, genetic and epidemiological information nonetheless suggests that M. ulcerans may reside in aquatic protozoa.We experimentally infected Acanthamoeba polyphaga with M. ulcerans and found that the bacilli were phagocytised, not digested and remained viable for the duration of the experiment. Furthermore, we collected 13 water, 90 biofilm and 45 detritus samples in both Buruli ulcer endemic and non-endemic communities in Ghana, from which we cultivated amoeboid protozoa and mycobacteria. M. ulcerans was not isolated, but other mycobacteria were as frequently isolated from intracellular as from extracellular sources, suggesting that they commonly infect amoebae in nature. We screened the samples as well as the amoeba cultures for the M. ulcerans markers IS2404, IS2606 and KR-B. IS2404 was detected in 2% of the environmental samples and in 4% of the amoeba cultures. The IS2404 positive amoeba cultures included up to 5 different protozoan species, and originated both from Buruli ulcer endemic and non-endemic communities.This is the first report of experimental infection of amoebae with M. ulcerans and of the detection of the marker IS2404 in amoeba cultures isolated from the environment. We conclude that amoeba are potential natural hosts for M. ulcerans, yet remain sceptical about their implication in the transmission of M. ulcerans to humans and their importance in the epidemiology of Buruli ulcer.

  6. Impact of Mycobacterium ulcerans biofilm on transmissibility to ecological niches and Buruli ulcer pathogenesis.

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    Laurent Marsollier

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of biofilms in the pathogenesis of mycobacterial diseases remains largely unknown. Mycobacterium ulcerans, the etiological agent of Buruli ulcer, a disfiguring disease in humans, adopts a biofilm-like structure in vitro and in vivo, displaying an abundant extracellular matrix (ECM that harbors vesicles. The composition and structure of the ECM differs from that of the classical matrix found in other bacterial biofilms. More than 80 proteins are present within this extracellular compartment and appear to be involved in stress responses, respiration, and intermediary metabolism. In addition to a large amount of carbohydrates and lipids, ECM is the reservoir of the polyketide toxin mycolactone, the sole virulence factor of M. ulcerans identified to date, and purified vesicles extracted from ECM are highly cytotoxic. ECM confers to the mycobacterium increased resistance to antimicrobial agents, and enhances colonization of insect vectors and mammalian hosts. The results of this study support a model whereby biofilm changes confer selective advantages to M. ulcerans in colonizing various ecological niches successfully, with repercussions for Buruli ulcer pathogenesis.

  7. Mycobacterium ulcerans low infectious dose and mechanical transmission support insect bites and puncturing injuries in the spread of Buruli ulcer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallace, John R.; Mangas, Kirstie M.; Porter, Jessica L.; Marcsisin, Renee; Pidot, Sacha J.; Howden, Brian; Omansen, Till F.; Zeng, Weiguang; Axford, Jason K.; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Stinear, Timothy P.

    2017-01-01

    Addressing the transmission enigma of the neglected disease Buruli ulcer (BU) is a World Health Organization priority. In Australia, we have observed an association between mosquitoes harboring the causative agent, Mycobacterium ulcerans, and BU. Here we tested a contaminated skin model of BU

  8. Antimycobacterial activity of medicinal plants against the causative agent of buruli ulcer: Mycobacterium ulcerans

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    R Keumoe

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The obtained results further strengthened the exploitation of these extracts as potent hits in the treatment of Buruli ulcer. Meanwhile, further studies are required to fully characterize the bioactive compounds.

  9. Single nucleotide polymorphism typing of Mycobacterium ulcerans reveals focal transmission of buruli ulcer in a highly endemic region of Ghana.

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    Katharina Röltgen

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer (BU is an emerging necrotizing disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissue caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. While proximity to stagnant or slow flowing water bodies is a risk factor for acquiring BU, the epidemiology and mode of M. ulcerans transmission is poorly understood. Here we have used high-throughput DNA sequencing and comparisons of the genomes of seven M. ulcerans isolates that appeared monomorphic by existing typing methods. We identified a limited number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and developed a real-time PCR SNP typing method based on these differences. We then investigated clinical isolates of M. ulcerans on which we had detailed information concerning patient location and time of diagnosis. Within the Densu river basin of Ghana we observed dominance of one clonal complex and local clustering of some of the variants belonging to this complex. These results reveal focal transmission and demonstrate, that micro-epidemiological analyses by SNP typing has great potential to help us understand how M. ulcerans is transmitted.

  10. A comparison of DNA extraction procedures for the detection of Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, in clinical and environmental specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durnez, Lies; Stragier, Pieter; Roebben, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans is the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, the third most common mycobacterial disease in humans after tuberculosis and leprosy. Although the disease is associated with aquatic ecosystems, cultivation of the bacillus from the environment is difficult to achieve. Therefore...

  11. Mycobacterium ulcerans low infectious dose and mechanical transmission support insect bites and puncturing injuries in the spread of Buruli ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, John R; Mangas, Kirstie M; Porter, Jessica L; Marcsisin, Renee; Pidot, Sacha J; Howden, Brian; Omansen, Till F; Zeng, Weiguang; Axford, Jason K; Johnson, Paul D R; Stinear, Timothy P

    2017-04-01

    Addressing the transmission enigma of the neglected disease Buruli ulcer (BU) is a World Health Organization priority. In Australia, we have observed an association between mosquitoes harboring the causative agent, Mycobacterium ulcerans, and BU. Here we tested a contaminated skin model of BU transmission by dipping the tails from healthy mice in cultures of the causative agent, Mycobacterium ulcerans. Tails were exposed to mosquito (Aedes notoscriptus and Aedes aegypti) blood feeding or punctured with sterile needles. Two of 12 of mice with M. ulcerans contaminated tails exposed to feeding A. notoscriptus mosquitoes developed BU. There were no mice exposed to A. aegypti that developed BU. Eighty-eight percent of mice (21/24) subjected to contaminated tail needle puncture developed BU. Mouse tails coated only in bacteria did not develop disease. A median incubation time of 12 weeks, consistent with data from human infections, was noted. We then specifically tested the M. ulcerans infectious dose-50 (ID50) in this contaminated skin surface infection model with needle puncture and observed an ID50 of 2.6 colony-forming units. We have uncovered a biologically plausible mechanical transmission mode of BU via natural or anthropogenic skin punctures.

  12. Mycobacterium ulcerans low infectious dose and mechanical transmission support insect bites and puncturing injuries in the spread of Buruli ulcer.

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    John R Wallace

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Addressing the transmission enigma of the neglected disease Buruli ulcer (BU is a World Health Organization priority. In Australia, we have observed an association between mosquitoes harboring the causative agent, Mycobacterium ulcerans, and BU. Here we tested a contaminated skin model of BU transmission by dipping the tails from healthy mice in cultures of the causative agent, Mycobacterium ulcerans. Tails were exposed to mosquito (Aedes notoscriptus and Aedes aegypti blood feeding or punctured with sterile needles. Two of 12 of mice with M. ulcerans contaminated tails exposed to feeding A. notoscriptus mosquitoes developed BU. There were no mice exposed to A. aegypti that developed BU. Eighty-eight percent of mice (21/24 subjected to contaminated tail needle puncture developed BU. Mouse tails coated only in bacteria did not develop disease. A median incubation time of 12 weeks, consistent with data from human infections, was noted. We then specifically tested the M. ulcerans infectious dose-50 (ID50 in this contaminated skin surface infection model with needle puncture and observed an ID50 of 2.6 colony-forming units. We have uncovered a biologically plausible mechanical transmission mode of BU via natural or anthropogenic skin punctures.

  13. Molecular detection of Mycobacterium ulcerans in the environment and its relationship with Buruli ulcer occurrence in Zio and Yoto districts of maritime region in Togo.

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    Maman, Issaka; Tchacondo, Tchadjobo; Kere, Abiba Banla; Beissner, Marcus; Badziklou, Kossi; Tedihou, Ekanao; Nyaku, Edith; Amekuse, Komi; Wiedemann, Franz Xaver; Karou, Damintoti Simplice; Bretzel, Gisela

    2018-05-01

    Buruli Ulcer (BU) is a neglected tropical skin infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Residence near aquatic areas has been identified as an important source of transmission of M. ulcerans with increased risk of contracting Buruli ulcer. However, the reservoir and the mode of transmission are not yet well known. The aim of this study was to identify the presence of M. ulcerans in the environment and its relationship with Buruli ulcer occurrence in Zio and Yoto districts of the maritime region in south Togo. A total of 219 environmental samples including soil (n = 119), water (n = 65), biofilms/plants (n = 29) and animals' feces (n = 6) were collected in 17 villages of Zio and Yoto districts of the maritime region in Togo. DNA of M. ulcerans including IS2404 and IS2606 insertions sequences and mycolactone ketoreductase-B gene (KR-B) was detected using real time PCR amplification (qPCR) technique. In parallel, clinical samples of patients were tested to establish a comparison of the genetic profile of M. ulcerans between the two types of samples. A calibration curve was generated for IS2404 from a synthetic gene of M. ulcerans Transposase pMUM001, the plasmid of virulence. In the absence of inhibition of the qPCR, 6/219 (2.7%) samples were tested positive for M. ulcerans DNA containing three sequences (IS2404/IS2606/KR-B). Positive samples of M. ulcerans were consisting of biofilms/plants (3/29; 10.3%), water (1/65; 1.7%) and soil (2/119; 1.5%). Comparative analysis between DNA detected in environmental and clinical samples from BU patients showed the same genetic profile of M. ulcerans in the same environment. All these samples were collected in the environment of Haho and Zio rivers in the maritime region. This study confirms the presence of M. ulcerans in the environment of the Zio and Yoto districts of the maritime region of Togo. This may explain partially, the high rates of Buruli ulcer patients in this region. Also, water, plants and soil along the rivers

  14. Mycobacterium ulcerans DNA not detected in faecal samples from Buruli ulcer patients: results of a pilot study.

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    Fred S Sarfo

    Full Text Available It has recently been shown that in a Buruli ulcer (BU endemic region of southeastern Australia, significant numbers of possums (native tree-dwelling marsupials have clinical BU disease. Furthermore, based on quantitative PCR (qPCR analysis, animals with BU lesions (and some without shed M. ulcerans DNA in their faeces, indicative of bacterial loads of up to 10(8 organisms/gram. These findings led us to propose that humans might also harbour M. ulcerans in their gastrointestinal tract and shed the bacterium in their faeces. We conducted a pilot study and collected faecal swabs from 26 patients with confirmed BU and 31 healthy household controls. Faecal samples were also collected from 10 healthy controls from non-endemic regions in Ghana. All 67 specimens were negative when tested by IS2404 PCR. The detection sensitivity of this method was ≥10(4 bacteria per gram (wet-weight of human faecal material. We conclude that the human gastrointestinal tract is unlikely to be a significant reservoir of M. ulcerans.

  15. Support needs of people living with Mycobacterium ulcerans (Buruli ulcer) disease in a Ghana rural community: a grounded theory study.

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    Effah, Alex; Ersser, Steven J; Hemingway, Ann

    2017-12-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans (also known as Buruli ulcer) disease is a rare skin disease which is prevalent in rural communities in the tropics mostly in Africa. Mortality rate is low, yet morbidity and consequent disabilities affect the quality of life of sufferers. The aim of this paper is to use the grounded theory method to explore the support needs of people living with the consequences of Buruli ulcer in an endemic rural community in Ghana. We used the grounded theory research approach to explore the experiences of people living with Mycobacterium ulcerans in a rural district in Ghana and provide a basis to understand the support needs of this group. The key support needs identified were: functional limitations, fear and frequency of disease recurrence, contracture of limbs and legs, loss of sensation and numbness in the affected body area, lack of information from health professionals about self-care, feeling tired all the time, insomnia, lack of good diet, lack of access to prostheses, having to walk long distances to access health services, and loss of educational opportunities. The study discusses how the systematically derived qualitative data has helped to provide a unique insight and advance our understanding of the support needs of people living with BU and how they live and attempt to adapt their lives with disability. We discuss how the availability of appropriate interventions and equipment could help them self-manage their condition and improve access to skin care services. The support needs of this vulnerable group were identified from a detailed analysis of how those living with BU coped with their lives. A key issue is the lack of education to assist self-management and prevent deterioration. Further research into the evaluation of interventions to address these support needs is necessary including self-management strategies. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  16. Immunogenetic determinants of susceptibility/resistance to Mycobacterium ulcerans infection: a population based study – Benin biological bank on Buruli ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    Capela, Carlos Alberto Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Tese de Doutoramento - Doutoramento em Medicina Buruli ulcer (BU) is an infectious disease found in tropical regions of Africa, America, Asia, and Australia. Most of the cases are reported in West Africa and BU is considered a neglected tropical disease by the World Health Organization (WHO). This necrotising skin infection is caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans that secretes the exotoxin mycolactone as its main virulence factor. There is emerging evidence for a major role of g...

  17. [Micronecta sp (Corixidae) and Diplonychus sp (Belostomatidae), two aquatic Hemiptera hosts and/or potential vectors of Mycobacterium ulcerans (pathogenic agent of Buruli ulcer) in Cote d'Ivoire].

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    Doannio, J M C; Konan, K L; Dosso, F N; Koné, A B; Konan, Y L; Sankaré, Y; Ekaza, E; Coulibaly, N D; Odéhouri, K P; Dosso, M; Sess, E D; Marsollier, L; Aubry, J

    2011-02-01

    Buruli ulcer is currently a major public health problem in Côte d'Ivoire. It is a neglected tropical disease closely associated with aquatic environments. Aquatic insects of the Hemiptera order have been implicated in human transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans, the pathogenic agent of Buruli ulcer. The purpose of this preliminary study using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was to evaluate aquatic insects in Sokrogbo, a village in the Tiassalé sanitary district where Buruli ulcer is endemic. Findings identified two water bugs hosting Mycobacterium ulcerans, i.e., one of the Micronecta genus in the Corixidae family and another of the Diplonychus genus in the Belostomatidae family. The PCR technique used revealed the molecular signatures of M. ulcerans in tissue from these two insects. Based on these findings, these two water bugs can be considered as potential hosts and/or vectors of M. ulcerans in the study zone. Unlike Diplonychus sp., this is the first report to describe Micronecta sp as a host of M. ulcerans. Further investigation will be needed to assess the role of these two water bugs in human transmission of M. ulcerans in Côte d'Ivoire.

  18. Burden of Mycobacterium ulcerans disease (Buruli ulcer and the underreporting ratio in the territory of Songololo, Democratic Republic of Congo.

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    Delphin Mavinga Phanzu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cutaneous infection by Mycobacterium ulcerans, also known as Buruli ulcer (BU, represents the third most common mycobacterial disease in the world after tuberculosis and leprosy. Data on the burden of BU disease in the Democratic Republic of Congo are scanty. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence rate and the distribution of BU in the Songololo Territory, and to assess the coverage of the existing hospital-based reporting system. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey (July-August 2008 using the door-to-door method simultaneously in the two rural health zones (RHZ of the Songololo Territory (RHZ of Kimpese and Nsona-Mpangu, each containing twenty health areas. Cases were defined clinically as active BU and inactive BU in accordance with WHO-case definitions. RESULTS: We detected 775 BU patients (259 active and 516 inactive in a total population of 237,418 inhabitants. The overall prevalence of BU in Songololo Territory was 3.3/1000 inhabitants, varying from 0 to 27.5/1000 between health areas. Of the 259 patients with active BU, 18 (7% had been reported in the hospital-based reporting system at Kimpese in the 6-8 months prior to the survey. CONCLUSION: The survey demonstrated a huge variation of prevalence between health areas in Songololo Territory and gross underreporting of BU cases in the hospital-based reporting system. Data obtained may contribute to better targeted and improved BU control interventions, and serve as a baseline for future assessments of the control program.

  19. A Landscape-based model for predicting Mycobacterium ulcerans infection (Buruli Ulcer disease) presence in Benin, West Africa.

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    Wagner, Tyler; Benbow, M Eric; Burns, Meghan; Johnson, R Christian; Merritt, Richard W; Qi, Jiaguo; Small, Pamela L C

    2008-03-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans infection (Buruli ulcer [BU] disease) is an emerging tropical disease that causes severe morbidity in many communities, especially those in close proximity to aquatic environments. Research and control efforts are severely hampered by the paucity of data regarding the ecology of this disease; for example, the vectors and modes of transmission remain unknown. It is hypothesized that BU presence is associated with altered landscapes that perturb aquatic ecosystems; however, this has yet to be quantified over large spatial scales. We quantified relationships between land use/land cover (LULC) characteristics surrounding individual villages and BU presence in Benin, West Africa. We also examined the effects of other village-level characteristics which we hypothesized to affect BU presence, such as village distance to the nearest river. We found that as the percent urban land use in a 50-km buffer surrounding a village increased, the probability of BU presence decreased. Conversely, as the percent agricultural land use in a 20-km buffer surrounding a village increased, the probability of BU presence increased. Landscape-based models had predictive ability when predicting BU presence using validation data sets from Benin and Ghana, West Africa. Our analyses suggest that relatively small amounts of urbanization are associated with a decrease in the probability of BU presence, and we hypothesize that this is due to the increased availability of pumped water in urban environments. Our models provide an initial approach to predicting the probability of BU presence over large spatial scales in Benin and Ghana, using readily available land use data.

  20. In the case of transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans in Buruli ulcer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Also, Acanthamoeba-pathogen association has a long evolutionary history because the same set of bacterial genes and gene products e.g. in L. pneumophila are required for survival in both mammalian and protozoan host cells. We suggest that the involvement of Acanthamoeba in the transmission of M. ulcerans to ...

  1. Genetic Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus in Buruli Ulcer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amissah, Nana Ama; Glasner, Corinna; Ablordey, Anthony; Tetteh, Caitlin S.; Kotey, Nana Konama; Prah, Isaac; van der Werf, Tjip; Rossen, John W.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Stienstra, Ymkje

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Previous studies have shown that wounds of BU patients are colonized with M. ulcerans and several other microorganisms, including Staphylococcus aureus, which may interfere with wound healing. The present

  2. BURULI ULCER THE (1)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a 22 years old female patient from Southern Ethiopia with ulcerative form of Buruli ulcer on the left leg. The case suffered for more ... general, there is no difference in the infection rate among males and ... 'Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, College of Public Health and Medical Sciences, Jimma University.

  3. Risk factors for Mycobacterium ulcerans infection (Buruli Ulcer) in Togo ─ a case-control study in Zio and Yoto districts of the maritime region.

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    Maman, Issaka; Tchacondo, Tchadjobo; Kere, Abiba Banla; Piten, Ebekalisai; Beissner, Marcus; Kobara, Yiragnima; Kossi, Komlan; Badziklou, Kossi; Wiedemann, Franz Xaver; Amekuse, Komi; Bretzel, Gisela; Karou, Damintoti Simplice

    2018-01-19

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a neglected mycobacterial skin infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. This disease mostly affects poor rural populations, especially in areas with low hygiene standards and sanitation coverage. The objective of this study was to identify these risk factors in the districts of Zio and Yoto of the Maritime Region in Togo. We conducted a case-control study in Zio and Yoto, two districts proved BU endemic from November 2014 to May 2015. BU cases were diagnosed according to the WHO clinical case definition at the Centre Hospitalier Régional de Tsévié (CHR Tsévié) and confirmed by Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) microscopy and IS2404 polymerase chain reaction (PCR). For each case, up to two controls matched by sex and place of residence were recruited. Socio-demographic, environmental or behavioral data were collected and conditional logistic regression analysis was used to identify and compare risk factors between BU cases and controls. A total of 83 cases and 128 controls were enrolled. The median age was 15 years (range 3-65 years). Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis after adjustment for potential confounders identified age (Maritime Region in south Togo.

  4. Buruli ulcer: wound care and rehabilitation

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    Frimpong M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Michael Frimpong,1 Fred Stephen Sarfo,2 Mabel Sarpong Duah,1 Mark Wansbrough-Jones,3 Richard O Phillips2 1Kumasi Centre for Collaborative Research in Tropical Medicine, 2Department of Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana; 3Institute for Infection and Immunity, St George’s University of London, London, UK Abstract: Buruli ulcer caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans is a neglected tropical disease characterized by extensive ulceration involving predominantly the upper and lower limbs of patients. The disease is common in rural tropical communities in West and Central Africa, where access to proper health care is limited. Pathogenesis of the characteristic painless ulcers is linked to the elaboration by M. ulcerans of a lipid toxin called mycolactone that has potent cytopathic, immunosuppressive, and analgesic effects on a host of cells in cutaneous tissues. Mycolactone is known to profoundly inhibit secretion of a plethora of proteins that are essential for wound healing. Even though a combination antibacterial therapy of streptomycin and rifampicin for 8 weeks is effective for treatment, it relies on good and appropriate wound management to prevent secondary bacterial infections and improve healing. Evidence-based interventions for wound care in Buruli ulcer disease are often lacking and have relied on expert advice and recommendations. Surgical interventions are limited to debridement of necrotic tissue and grafting of extensive ulcers, usually after antibiotic therapy. Patients’ rehabilitation is an important component of care to reduce disabilities associated with the disease and proper integration into the community after treatment. Keywords: Buruli ulcer, Mycobacterium ulcerans disease, Mycobacterium ulcerans, wound care, rehabilitation, disability

  5. Overexpression of a Mycobacterium ulcerans Ag85B-EsxH Fusion Protein in Recombinant BCG Improves Experimental Buruli Ulcer Vaccine Efficacy.

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    Bryan E Hart

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer (BU vaccine design faces similar challenges to those observed during development of prophylactic tuberculosis treatments. Multiple BU vaccine candidates, based upon Mycobacterium bovis BCG, altered Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU cells, recombinant MU DNA, or MU protein prime-boosts, have shown promise by conferring transient protection to mice against the pathology of MU challenge. Recently, we have shown that a recombinant BCG vaccine expressing MU-Ag85A (BCG MU-Ag85A displayed the highest level of protection to date, by significantly extending the survival time of MU challenged mice compared to BCG vaccination alone. Here we describe the generation, immunogenicity testing, and evaluation of protection conferred by a recombinant BCG strain which overexpresses a fusion of two alternative MU antigens, Ag85B and the MU ortholog of tuberculosis TB10.4, EsxH. Vaccination with BCG MU-Ag85B-EsxH induces proliferation of Ag85 specific CD4+ T cells in greater numbers than BCG or BCG MU-Ag85A and produces IFNγ+ splenocytes responsive to whole MU and recombinant antigens. In addition, anti-Ag85A and Ag85B IgG humoral responses are significantly enhanced after administration of the fusion vaccine compared to BCG or BCG MU-Ag85A. Finally, mice challenged with MU following a single subcutaneous vaccination with BCG MU-Ag85B-EsxH display significantly less bacterial burden at 6 and 12 weeks post-infection, reduced histopathological tissue damage, and significantly longer survival times compared to vaccination with either BCG or BCG MU-Ag85A. These results further support the potential of BCG as a foundation for BU vaccine design, whereby discovery and recombinant expression of novel immunogenic antigens could lead to greater anti-MU efficacy using this highly safe and ubiquitous vaccine.

  6. Virulence potential of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from Buruli ulcer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amissah, Nana Ama; Chlebowicz, Monika A.; Ablordey, Anthony; Tetteh, Caitlin S.; Prah, Isaac; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Friedrich, Alex W.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Stienstra, Ymkje; Rossen, John W.

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissue caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. BU wounds may also be colonized with other microorganisms including Staphylococcus aureus. This study aimed to characterize the virulence factors of S. aureus isolated from BU patients.

  7. Mycolactone cytotoxicity in Schwann cells could explain nerve damage in Buruli ulcer.

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    Junichiro En

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer is a chronic painless skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. The local nerve damage induced by M. ulcerans invasion is similar to the nerve damage evoked by the injection of mycolactone in a Buruli ulcer mouse model. In order to elucidate the mechanism of this nerve damage, we tested and compared the cytotoxic effect of synthetic mycolactone A/B on cultured Schwann cells, fibroblasts and macrophages. Mycolactone induced much higher cell death and apoptosis in Schwann cell line SW10 than in fibroblast line L929. These results suggest that mycolactone is a key substance in the production of nerve damage of Buruli ulcer.

  8. The "Buruli Score": Development of a Multivariable Prediction Model for Diagnosis of Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection in Individuals with Ulcerative Skin Lesions, Akonolinga, Cameroon.

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    Yolanda K Mueller

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Access to laboratory diagnosis can be a challenge for individuals suspected of Buruli Ulcer (BU. Our objective was to develop a clinical score to assist clinicians working in resource-limited settings for BU diagnosis.Between 2011 and 2013, individuals presenting at Akonolinga District Hospital, Cameroon, were enrolled consecutively. Clinical data were collected prospectively. Based on a latent class model using laboratory test results (ZN, PCR, culture, patients were categorized into high, or low BU likelihood. Variables associated with a high BU likelihood in a multivariate logistic model were included in the Buruli score. Score cut-offs were chosen based on calculated predictive values. Of 325 patients with an ulcerative lesion, 51 (15.7% had a high BU likelihood. The variables identified for the Buruli score were: characteristic smell (+3 points, yellow color (+2, female gender (+2, undermining (+1, green color (+1, lesion hyposensitivity (+1, pain at rest (-1, size >5cm (-1, locoregional adenopathy (-2, age above 20 up to 40 years (-3, or above 40 (-5. This score had AUC of 0.86 (95%CI 0.82-0.89, indicating good discrimination between infected and non-infected individuals. The cut-off to reasonably exclude BU was set at scores <0 (NPV 96.5%; 95%CI 93.0-98.6. The treatment threshold was set at a cut-off ≥4 (PPV 69.0%; 95%CI 49.2-84.7. Patients with intermediate BU probability needed to be tested by PCR.We developed a decisional algorithm based on a clinical score assessing BU probability. The Buruli score still requires further validation before it can be recommended for wide use.

  9. The impact of community health workers (CHWs) on Buruli ulcer in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a cutaneous neglected tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Participation of Community Health Workers (CHWs) is an integral part of the management of BU, yet their impact has not been systematically evaluated in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods: Our objectives were to summarize the ...

  10. Molecular Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates Transmitted between Patients with Buruli Ulcer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amissah, Nana Ama; Chlebowicz, Monika A.; Ablordey, Anthony; Sabat, Artur J.; Tetteh, Caitlin S.; Prah, Isaac; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Friedrich, Alex W.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Rossen, John W.; Stienstra, Ymkje

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is a skin infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. The wounds of most BU patients are colonized with different microorganisms, including Staphylococcus aureus. Methodology This study investigated possible patient-to-patient transmission events of S. aureus during

  11. Former Buruli Ulcer Patients' Experiences and Wishes May Serve as a Guide to Further Improve Buruli Ulcer Management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Velink

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer (BU, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a neglected tropical disease frequently leading to permanent disabilities. The ulcers are treated with rifampicin and streptomycin, wound care and, if necessary surgical intervention. Professionals have exclusively shaped the research agenda concerning management and control, while patients' perspective on priorities and preferences have not explicitly been explored or addressed.To get insight into patient perception of the management and control of Buruli ulcer a mixed methods research design was applied with a questionnaire and focus group discussions among former BU patients. Data collection was obtained in collaboration with a local team of native speakers in Ghana. A questionnaire was completed by 60 former patients and four focus group discussions were conducted with eight participants per group. Former patients positively evaluated both the effectiveness of the treatment and the financial contribution received for the travel costs to the hospitals. Pain experienced during treatment procedures, in particular wound care and the streptomycin injections, and the side-effects of the treatment were negatively evaluated. Former patients considered the development of preventive measures and knowledge on the transmission as priorities. Additionally, former patients asked for improved accessibility of health services, counselling and economic support.These findings can be used to improve clinical management and to guide the international research agenda.

  12. Former Buruli Ulcer Patients' Experiences and Wishes May Serve as a Guide to Further Improve Buruli Ulcer Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velink, Anita; Woolley, Rebecca J; Phillips, Richard O; Abass, Kabiru M; van der Werf, Tjip S; Agumah, Emmanuel; de Zeeuw, Janine; Klis, Sandor; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2016-12-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU), caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a neglected tropical disease frequently leading to permanent disabilities. The ulcers are treated with rifampicin and streptomycin, wound care and, if necessary surgical intervention. Professionals have exclusively shaped the research agenda concerning management and control, while patients' perspective on priorities and preferences have not explicitly been explored or addressed. To get insight into patient perception of the management and control of Buruli ulcer a mixed methods research design was applied with a questionnaire and focus group discussions among former BU patients. Data collection was obtained in collaboration with a local team of native speakers in Ghana. A questionnaire was completed by 60 former patients and four focus group discussions were conducted with eight participants per group. Former patients positively evaluated both the effectiveness of the treatment and the financial contribution received for the travel costs to the hospitals. Pain experienced during treatment procedures, in particular wound care and the streptomycin injections, and the side-effects of the treatment were negatively evaluated. Former patients considered the development of preventive measures and knowledge on the transmission as priorities. Additionally, former patients asked for improved accessibility of health services, counselling and economic support. These findings can be used to improve clinical management and to guide the international research agenda.

  13. Genetic diversity of Staphylococcus aureus in Buruli ulcer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Ama Amissah

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer (BU is a necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Previous studies have shown that wounds of BU patients are colonized with M. ulcerans and several other microorganisms, including Staphylococcus aureus, which may interfere with wound healing. The present study was therefore aimed at investigating the diversity and topography of S. aureus colonizing BU patients during treatment.We investigated the presence, diversity, and spatio-temporal distribution of S. aureus in 30 confirmed BU patients from Ghana during treatment. S. aureus was isolated from nose and wound swabs, and by replica plating of wound dressings collected bi-weekly from patients. S. aureus isolates were characterized by multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat fingerprinting (MLVF and spa-typing, and antibiotic susceptibility was tested.Nineteen (63% of the 30 BU patients tested positive for S. aureus at least once during the sampling period, yielding 407 S. aureus isolates. Detailed analysis of 91 isolates grouped these isolates into 13 MLVF clusters and 13 spa-types. Five (26% S. aureus-positive BU patients carried the same S. aureus genotype in their anterior nares and wounds. S. aureus isolates from the wounds of seven (37% patients were distributed over two different MLVF clusters. Wounds of three (16% patients were colonized with isolates belonging to two different genotypes at the same time, and five (26% patients were colonized with different S. aureus types over time. Five (17% of the 30 included BU patients tested positive for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA.The present study showed that the wounds of many BU patients were contaminated with S. aureus, and that many BU patients from the different communities carried the same S. aureus genotype during treatment. This calls for improved wound care and hygiene.

  14. Genetic diversity of Staphylococcus aureus in Buruli ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amissah, Nana Ama; Glasner, Corinna; Ablordey, Anthony; Tetteh, Caitlin S; Kotey, Nana Konama; Prah, Isaac; van der Werf, Tjip S; Rossen, John W; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2015-02-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Previous studies have shown that wounds of BU patients are colonized with M. ulcerans and several other microorganisms, including Staphylococcus aureus, which may interfere with wound healing. The present study was therefore aimed at investigating the diversity and topography of S. aureus colonizing BU patients during treatment. We investigated the presence, diversity, and spatio-temporal distribution of S. aureus in 30 confirmed BU patients from Ghana during treatment. S. aureus was isolated from nose and wound swabs, and by replica plating of wound dressings collected bi-weekly from patients. S. aureus isolates were characterized by multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat fingerprinting (MLVF) and spa-typing, and antibiotic susceptibility was tested. Nineteen (63%) of the 30 BU patients tested positive for S. aureus at least once during the sampling period, yielding 407 S. aureus isolates. Detailed analysis of 91 isolates grouped these isolates into 13 MLVF clusters and 13 spa-types. Five (26%) S. aureus-positive BU patients carried the same S. aureus genotype in their anterior nares and wounds. S. aureus isolates from the wounds of seven (37%) patients were distributed over two different MLVF clusters. Wounds of three (16%) patients were colonized with isolates belonging to two different genotypes at the same time, and five (26%) patients were colonized with different S. aureus types over time. Five (17%) of the 30 included BU patients tested positive for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The present study showed that the wounds of many BU patients were contaminated with S. aureus, and that many BU patients from the different communities carried the same S. aureus genotype during treatment. This calls for improved wound care and hygiene.

  15. Virulence potential of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from Buruli ulcer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amissah, Nana Ama; Chlebowicz, Monika A; Ablordey, Anthony; Tetteh, Caitlin S; Prah, Isaac; van der Werf, Tjip S; Friedrich, Alex W; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Stienstra, Ymkje; Rossen, John W

    2017-06-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissue caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. BU wounds may also be colonized with other microorganisms including Staphylococcus aureus. This study aimed to characterize the virulence factors of S. aureus isolated from BU patients. Previously sequenced genomes of 21 S. aureus isolates from BU patients were screened for the presence of virulence genes. The results show that all S. aureus isolates harbored on their core genomes genes for known virulence factors like α-hemolysin, and the α- and β-phenol soluble modulins. Besides the core genome virulence genes, mobile genetic elements (MGEs), i.e. prophages, genomic islands, pathogenicity islands and a Staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) were found to carry different combinations of virulence factors, among them genes that are known to encode factors that promote immune evasion, superantigens and Panton-Valentine Leucocidin. The present observations imply that the S. aureus isolates from BU patients harbor a diverse repertoire of virulence genes that may enhance bacterial survival and persistence in the wound environment and potentially contribute to delayed wound healing. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  16. A Genomic Approach to Resolving Relapse versus Reinfection among Four Cases of Buruli Ulcer.

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    Miriam Eddyani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased availability of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS techniques allows, for the first time, to distinguish relapses from reinfections in patients with multiple Buruli ulcer (BU episodes.We compared the number and location of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs identified by genomic screening between four pairs of Mycobacterium ulcerans isolates collected at the time of first diagnosis and at recurrence, derived from a collection of almost 5000 well characterized clinical samples from one BU treatment center in Benin.The findings suggest that after surgical treatment-without antibiotics-the second episodes were due to relapse rather than reinfection. Since specific antibiotics were introduced for the treatment of BU, the one patient with a culture available from both disease episodes had M. ulcerans isolates with a genomic distance of 20 SNPs, suggesting the patient was most likely reinfected rather than having a relapse.To our knowledge, this study is the first to study recurrences in M. ulcerans using NGS, and to identify exogenous reinfection as causing a recurrence of BU. The occurrence of reinfection highlights the contribution of ongoing exposure to M. ulcerans to disease recurrence, and has implications for vaccine development.

  17. Beliefs and attitudes toward Buruli ulcer in Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stienstra, Y; van der Graaf, WTA; Asamoa, K; van der Werf, TS

    Buruli ulcer is a devastating emerging disease in tropical countries. Quantitative and qualitative data were obtained by interviewing patients with this disease and control subjects in Ghana. Common perceived causes were witchcraft and curses. Other reported causes were personal hygiene,

  18. Family relationship, water contact and occurrence of Buruli ulcer in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopoh, Ghislain Emmanuel; Barogui, Yves Thierry; Johnson, Roch Christian; Dossou, Ange Dodji; Makoutodé, Michel; Anagonou, Sévérin Y; Kestens, Luc; Portaels, Françoise

    2010-07-13

    Mycobacterium ulcerans disease (Buruli ulcer) is the most widespread mycobacterial disease in the world after leprosy and tuberculosis. How M. ulcerans is introduced into the skin of humans remains unclear, but it appears that individuals living in the same environment may have different susceptibilities. This study aims to determine whether frequent contacts with natural water sources, family relationship or the practice of consanguineous marriages are associated with the occurrence of Buruli ulcer (BU). Case control study. Department of Atlantique, Benin. BU-confirmed cases that were diagnosed and followed up at the BU detection and treatment center (CDTUB) of Allada (Department of the Atlantique, Benin) during the period from January 1st, 2006, to June 30th, 2008, with three matched controls (persons who had no signs or symptoms of active or inactive BU) for age, gender and village of residence per case. Contact with natural water sources, BU history in the family and the practice of consanguineous marriages. A total of 416 participants were included in this study, including 104 cases and 312 controls. BU history in the family (pconsanguineous marriage was not associated with the occurrence of BU (p = 0.40). Mendelian disorders could explain this finding, which may influence individual susceptibility by impairing immunity. This study suggests that a combination of genetic factors and behavioral risk factors may increase the susceptibility for developing BU.

  19. Antimicrobial treatment for early, limited Mycobacterium ulcerans infection : a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienhuis, Willemien A.; Stienstra, Ymkje; Thompson, William A.; Awuah, Peter C.; Abass, K. Mohammed; Tuah, Wilson; Awua-Boateng, Nana Yaa; Ampadu, Edwin O.; Siegmund, Vera; Schouten, Jan P.; Adjei, Ohene; Bretzel, Gisela; van der Werf, Tjip S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Surgical debridement was the standard treatment for Mycobacterium ulcerans infection (Buruli ulcer disease) until WHO issued provisional guidelines in 2004 recommending treatment with antimicrobial drugs (streptomycin and rifampicin) in addition to surgery. These recommendations were

  20. Socio-environmental factors associated with the risk of contracting Buruli ulcer in Tiassalé, South Côte d'Ivoire : a case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    N'krumah, Raymond T. A. S.; Koné, Brama; Tiembre, Issaka; Cissé, Guéladio; Pluschke, Gerd; Tanner, Marcel; Utzinger, Jürg

    2016-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is a cutaneous infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. The exact mode of transmission remains elusive; yet, some studies identified environmental, socio-sanitary, and behavioral risk factors. The purpose of this study was to assess the association of such factors to contracting BU in Tiassal?, south C?te d?Ivoire. Methodology A case-control study was conducted in 2012. Cases were BU patients diagnosed according to clinical definition put forth by the ...

  1. Molecular Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates Transmitted between Patients with Buruli Ulcer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Ama Amissah

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer (BU is a skin infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. The wounds of most BU patients are colonized with different microorganisms, including Staphylococcus aureus.This study investigated possible patient-to-patient transmission events of S. aureus during wound care in a health care center. S. aureus isolates from different BU patients with overlapping visits to the clinic were whole-genome sequenced and analyzed by a gene-by-gene approach using SeqSphere(+ software. In addition, sequence data were screened for the presence of genes that conferred antibiotic resistance.SeqSphere(+ analysis of whole-genome sequence data confirmed transmission of methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA and methicillin susceptible S. aureus among patients that took place during wound care. Interestingly, our sequence data show that the investigated MRSA isolates carry a novel allele of the fexB gene conferring chloramphenicol resistance, which had thus far not been observed in S. aureus.

  2. Molecular Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates Transmitted between Patients with Buruli Ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amissah, Nana Ama; Chlebowicz, Monika A; Ablordey, Anthony; Sabat, Artur J; Tetteh, Caitlin S; Prah, Isaac; van der Werf, Tjip S; Friedrich, Alex W; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Rossen, John W; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a skin infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. The wounds of most BU patients are colonized with different microorganisms, including Staphylococcus aureus. This study investigated possible patient-to-patient transmission events of S. aureus during wound care in a health care center. S. aureus isolates from different BU patients with overlapping visits to the clinic were whole-genome sequenced and analyzed by a gene-by-gene approach using SeqSphere(+) software. In addition, sequence data were screened for the presence of genes that conferred antibiotic resistance. SeqSphere(+) analysis of whole-genome sequence data confirmed transmission of methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and methicillin susceptible S. aureus among patients that took place during wound care. Interestingly, our sequence data show that the investigated MRSA isolates carry a novel allele of the fexB gene conferring chloramphenicol resistance, which had thus far not been observed in S. aureus.

  3. [Community-based approaches in the fight against Buruli ulcer : review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndongo, Paule Yolande; Fond-Harmant, Laurence; Deccache, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is an infectious skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. It mainly affects poor communities living close to bodies of water. In the absence of early treatment, this "neglected" disease can cause lasting deformities and may require limb amputation. It is reported in 34 countries and is the third most common mycobacterial disease in immunocompetent patients. Considerable progress has been made in treatment and prevention. The Cotonou Declaration (2009) describes the recommended control strategies. Although effective, current control strategies are limited because they do not take into account all the factors that influence emergence, prevention and cure of the disease. The control of Buruli ulcer mainly depends on intervention on social, cultural and psychosocial factors that influence preventive and self-care behaviour. The health promotion approach requires collaboration with populations in order to perform simultaneous actions on BU factors in the community setting. Although effective on many health problems, health promotion is not applied in the fight against BU due to the absence of action on all factors such as poverty. This article presents a review of the literature on BU strategies and community approaches. 407 relevant articles published in 1998-2013 period were examined. Eleven programmes are based on a top-down approach, which does not include populations in decision-making processes, unlike the bottom-up participatory approaches recommended in health promotion. Three health promotion programmes and 6 community-based participatory approaches were identified and examined. Community participation and empowerment constitute the basis for a community approach in the fight against Buruli ulcer.

  4. Family relationship, water contact and occurrence of Buruli ulcer in Benin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghislain Emmanuel Sopoh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mycobacterium ulcerans disease (Buruli ulcer is the most widespread mycobacterial disease in the world after leprosy and tuberculosis. How M. ulcerans is introduced into the skin of humans remains unclear, but it appears that individuals living in the same environment may have different susceptibilities. OBJECTIVES: This study aims to determine whether frequent contacts with natural water sources, family relationship or the practice of consanguineous marriages are associated with the occurrence of Buruli ulcer (BU. DESIGN: Case control study. SETTING: Department of Atlantique, Benin. SUBJECTS: BU-confirmed cases that were diagnosed and followed up at the BU detection and treatment center (CDTUB of Allada (Department of the Atlantique, Benin during the period from January 1st, 2006, to June 30th, 2008, with three matched controls (persons who had no signs or symptoms of active or inactive BU for age, gender and village of residence per case. MAIN OUTCOMES MEASURED: Contact with natural water sources, BU history in the family and the practice of consanguineous marriages. RESULTS: A total of 416 participants were included in this study, including 104 cases and 312 controls. BU history in the family (p<0.001, adjusted by daily contact with a natural water source (p = 0.007, was significantly associated with higher odds of having BU (OR; 95% CI = 5.5; 3.0-10.0. The practice of consanguineous marriage was not associated with the occurrence of BU (p = 0.40. Mendelian disorders could explain this finding, which may influence individual susceptibility by impairing immunity. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that a combination of genetic factors and behavioral risk factors may increase the susceptibility for developing BU.

  5. Knowledge and attitude towards Buruli ulcer disease in Adjumani ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The consequences of the disease include social isolation and economic problems in family life. Objective: To explore the knowledge and attitude of the people affected by Buruli ulcer disease in Adjumani district, in northwestern Uganda. Design: A semi-structured questionnaire was administered to all the selected patients.

  6. Functional limitations after surgical or antibiotic treatment for buruli ulcer in benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barogui, Y.; Johnson, R.C.; van der Werf, T.S.; Sopoh, G.; Dossou, A.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Stienstra, Y.

    Almost half of patients have functional limitations after treatment of Buruli ulcer disease. Antibiotic treatment (along with surgery) was introduced in the National Program for Buruli ulcer in Benin in 2005. The aim of this study was to compare functional limitations in patients who were treated by

  7. Systemic and local interferon-gamma production following Mycobacterium ulcerans infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, H. S.; Rutgers, B.; Huitema, M. G.; Etuaful, S. N.; Westenbrink, B. D.; Limburg, P. C.; Timens, W.; van der Werf, T. S.

    2007-01-01

    Buruli ulcer disease (BUD) is an emerging predominantly tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. The initial pre-ulcerative skin lesion often breaks down into an ulcer with undermined edges. Healing is common but may require considerable time, and scarring often results in functional

  8. Exploring the Buruli Ulcer Incidence across a socio-ecological landscape in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naithani, K. J.; Konzelman, C.; Tschakert, P.; Smithwick, E. A. H.

    2016-12-01

    The Buruli Ulcer (BU) disease is one of the most prevalent, but poorly understood mycobacterial infections in the world. Fundamental ecological aspects of the disease causing bacteria (Mycobacterium ulcerans) are not understood completely, but its emergence is attributed to unidentified thresholds in human and natural systems. We explored the network of these interactions across socio-ecological landscapes of Ghana to understand the movement of bacteria and the emergence of BU in response to climate, disturbance, social and economic factors. We chose five communities, three endemic and two control, and explored the correlations of disease incidence with climate, landscape disturbance, water quality and social factors using path analysis. Our results show that water quality is strongly linked to disease emergence with high alkalinity, PO43-, NH4+, F, Mn, S, Cd, Fe, Pb, and Se were associated with higher disease incidents and high Cu concentration was associated with low or healthy communities. Contrary to previous studies, arsenic concentration in water was not linked to higher disease incidence. Water quality was linked to climate, type of mining, and agricultural practices. Higher annual precipitation and lower air temperature were found linked to higher disease incidence across communities. Our exploratory work provides insight into how human land use, social practices, demographics, and climatic factors influence the BU disease spread.

  9. Spatial analysis of factors implicated in Mycobacterium ulcerans infection in Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duker, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    Buruliulcer (BU), the common terminology for the disease caused by Mycobacteriumulcerans (MU) infection manifests as disfiguring skin ulceration which is difficult to treat. In its advanced

  10. The puzzle of Buruli ulcer transmission, ethno-ecological history and the end of "love" in the Akonolinga district, Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles-Vernick, Tamara; Owona-Ntsama, Joseph; Landier, Jordi; Eyangoh, Sara

    2015-03-01

    The "One World One Health Initiative" has attended little to the priorities, concepts and practices of resource-poor communities confronting disease and the implications of these concerns for its biomedical, ecological and institutional approach to disease surveillance and control. Using the example of Buruli ulcer (BU) and its bacterial etiology, Mycobacterium ulcerans, in south-central Cameroon, we build on debates about the contributions of "local knowledge" and "alternative models" to biomedical knowledge of disease transmission. BU's mode of transmission remains poorly understood. Our approach employs ethno-ecological histories - local understandings of the putative emergence and expansion of a locally important, neglected disease. We develop these histories from 52 individual and small group interviews, group discussions, and participant-observation of daily and seasonal activities, conducted in 2013-2013. These histories offer important clues about past environmental and social change that should guide further ecological, epidemiological research. They highlight a key historical moment (the late 1980s and 1990s); specific ecological transformations; new cultivation practices in unexploited zones that potentially increased exposure to M. ulcerans; and ecological degradation that may have lowered nutritional standards and heightened susceptibility to BU. They also recast transmission, broadening insight into BU and its local analog, atom, by emphasizing the role of social change and economic crisis in its emergence and expansion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Risk factors for Buruli ulcer in Côte d'Ivoire: Results of a case-control ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case-control study was carried out in 3 highly endemic regions of Côte d'Ivoire to study risk factors for Buruli ulcer. A case was defined as a Buruli ulcer occurring less than one year before the date of survey, resident in one of the regions investigated and there was no history of Buruli ulcer illness. Controls were selected ...

  12. Protection against Mycobacterium ulcerans lesion development by exposure to aquatic insect saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsollier, Laurent; Deniaux, Estelle; Brodin, Priscille; Marot, Agnès; Wondje, Christelle Mbondji; Saint-André, Jean-Paul; Chauty, Annick; Johnson, Christian; Tekaia, Fredj; Yeramian, Edouard; Legras, Pierre; Carbonnelle, Bernard; Reysset, Gilles; Eyangoh, Sara; Milon, Geneviève; Cole, Stewart T; Aubry, Jacques

    2007-02-01

    Buruli ulcer is a severe human skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. This disease is primarily diagnosed in West Africa with increasing incidence. Antimycobacterial drug therapy is relatively effective during the preulcerative stage of the disease, but surgical excision of lesions with skin grafting is often the ultimate treatment. The mode of transmission of this Mycobacterium species remains a matter of debate, and relevant interventions to prevent this disease lack (i) the proper understanding of the M. ulcerans life history traits in its natural aquatic ecosystem and (ii) immune signatures that could be correlates of protection. We previously set up a laboratory ecosystem with predatory aquatic insects of the family Naucoridae and laboratory mice and showed that (i) M. ulcerans-carrying aquatic insects can transmit the mycobacterium through bites and (ii) that their salivary glands are the only tissues hosting replicative M. ulcerans. Further investigation in natural settings revealed that 5%-10% of these aquatic insects captured in endemic areas have M. ulcerans-loaded salivary glands. In search of novel epidemiological features we noticed that individuals working close to aquatic environments inhabited by insect predators were less prone to developing Buruli ulcers than their relatives. Thus we set out to investigate whether those individuals might display any immune signatures of exposure to M. ulcerans-free insect predator bites, and whether those could correlate with protection. We took a two-pronged approach in this study, first investigating whether the insect bites are protective in a mouse model, and subsequently looking for possibly protective immune signatures in humans. We found that, in contrast to control BALB/c mice, BALB/c mice exposed to Naucoris aquatic insect bites or sensitized to Naucoris salivary gland homogenates (SGHs) displayed no lesion at the site of inoculation of M. ulcerans coated with Naucoris SGH components. Then using

  13. Protection against Mycobacterium ulcerans lesion development by exposure to aquatic insect saliva.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Marsollier

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Buruli ulcer is a severe human skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. This disease is primarily diagnosed in West Africa with increasing incidence. Antimycobacterial drug therapy is relatively effective during the preulcerative stage of the disease, but surgical excision of lesions with skin grafting is often the ultimate treatment. The mode of transmission of this Mycobacterium species remains a matter of debate, and relevant interventions to prevent this disease lack (i the proper understanding of the M. ulcerans life history traits in its natural aquatic ecosystem and (ii immune signatures that could be correlates of protection. We previously set up a laboratory ecosystem with predatory aquatic insects of the family Naucoridae and laboratory mice and showed that (i M. ulcerans-carrying aquatic insects can transmit the mycobacterium through bites and (ii that their salivary glands are the only tissues hosting replicative M. ulcerans. Further investigation in natural settings revealed that 5%-10% of these aquatic insects captured in endemic areas have M. ulcerans-loaded salivary glands. In search of novel epidemiological features we noticed that individuals working close to aquatic environments inhabited by insect predators were less prone to developing Buruli ulcers than their relatives. Thus we set out to investigate whether those individuals might display any immune signatures of exposure to M. ulcerans-free insect predator bites, and whether those could correlate with protection. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We took a two-pronged approach in this study, first investigating whether the insect bites are protective in a mouse model, and subsequently looking for possibly protective immune signatures in humans. We found that, in contrast to control BALB/c mice, BALB/c mice exposed to Naucoris aquatic insect bites or sensitized to Naucoris salivary gland homogenates (SGHs displayed no lesion at the site of inoculation of M. ulcerans

  14. Health services for Buruli ulcer control: lessons from a field study in Ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercy M Ackumey

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Buruli ulcer (BU, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans infection, is a debilitating disease of the skin and underlying tissue. The first phase of a BU prevention and treatment programme (BUPaT was initiated from 2005-2008, in the Ga-West and Ga-South municipalities in Ghana to increase access to BU treatment and to improve early case detection and case management. This paper assesses achievements of the BUPaT programme and lessons learnt. It also considers the impact of the programme on broader interests of the health system. METHODS: A mixed-methods approach included patients' records review, review of programme reports, a stakeholder forum, key informant interviews, focus group discussions, clinic visits and observations. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Extensive collaboration existed across all levels, (national, municipality, and community, thus strengthening the health system. The programme enhanced capacities of all stakeholders in various aspects of health services delivery and demonstrated the importance of health education and community-based surveillance to create awareness and encourage early treatment. A patient database was also created using recommended World Health Organisation (WHO forms which showed that 297 patients were treated from 2005-2008. The proportion of patients requiring only antibiotic treatment, introduced in the course of the programme, was highest in the last year (35.4% in the first, 23.5% in the second and 42.5% in the third year. Early antibiotic treatment prevented recurrences which was consistent with programme aims. CONCLUSIONS: To improve early case management of BU, strengthening existing clinics to increase access to antibiotic therapy is critical. Intensifying health education and surveillance would ultimately increase early reporting and treatment for all cases. Further research is needed to explain the role of environmental factors for BU contagion. Programme strategies reported in our study: collaboration

  15. Buruli Ulcer Disease and Its Association with Land Cover in Southwestern Ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyong Wu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer (BU, one of 17 neglected tropical diseases, is a debilitating skin and soft tissue infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. In tropical Africa, changes in land use and proximity to water have been associated with the disease. This study presents the first analysis of BU at the village level in southwestern Ghana, where prevalence rates are among the highest globally, and explores fine and medium-scale associations with land cover by comparing patterns both within BU clusters and surrounding landscapes.We obtained 339 hospital-confirmed BU cases in southwestern Ghana between 2007 and 2010. The clusters of BU were identified using spatial scan statistics and the percentages of six land cover classes were calculated based on Landsat and Rapid Eye imagery for each of 154 villages/towns. The association between BU prevalence and each land cover class was calculated using negative binomial regression models. We found that older people had a significantly higher risk for BU after considering population age structure. BU cases were positively associated with the higher percentage of water and grassland surrounding each village, but negatively associated with the percent of urban. The results also showed that BU was clustered in areas with high percentage of mining activity, suggesting that water and mining play an important and potentially interactive role in BU occurrence.Our study highlights the importance of multiple land use changes along the Offin River, particularly mining and agriculture, which might be associated with BU disease in southwestern Ghana. Our study is the first to use both medium- and high-resolution imagery to assess these changes. We also show that older populations (≥ 60 y appear to be at higher risk of BU disease than children, once BU data were weighted by population age structures.

  16. The urgent need for clinical, diagnostic, and operational research for management of Buruli ulcer in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Daniel P; Comte, Eric; Serafini, Micaela; Ehounou, Geneviève; Antierens, Annick; Vuagnat, Hubert; Christinet, Vanessa; Hamani, Mitima D; du Cros, Philipp

    2014-05-01

    Despite great advances in the diagnosis and treatment of Buruli ulcer, it is one of the least studied major neglected tropical diseases. In Africa, major constraints in the management of Buruli ulcer relate to diagnosis and treatment, and accessibility, feasibility, and delivery of services. In this Personal View, we outline key areas for clinical, diagnostic, and operational research on this disease in Africa and propose a research agenda that aims to advance the management of Buruli ulcer in Africa. A model of care is needed to increase early case detection, to diagnose the disease accurately, to simplify and improve treatment, to reduce side-effects of treatment, to deal with populations with HIV and tuberculosis appropriately, to decentralise care, and to scale up coverage in populations at risk. This approach will require commitment and support to strategically implement research by national Buruli ulcer programmes and international technical and donor organisations, combined with adaptations in programme design and advocacy. A critical next step is to build consensus for a research agenda with WHO and relevant groups experienced in Buruli ulcer care or related diseases, and we call on on them to help to turn this agenda into reality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessment and Treatment of Pain during Treatment of Buruli Ulcer.

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    Janine de Zeeuw

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer (BU is described as a relatively painless condition; however clinical observations reveal that patients do experience pain during their treatment. Knowledge on current pain assessment and treatment in BU is necessary to develop and implement a future guideline on pain management in BU.A mixed methods approach was used, consisting of information retrieved from medical records on prescribed pain medication from Ghana and Benin, and semi-structured interviews with health care personnel (HCP from Ghana on pain perceptions, assessment and treatment. Medical records (n = 149 of patients treated between 2008 and 2012 were collected between November 2012 and August 2013. Interviews (n = 11 were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim and qualitatively analyzed.In 113 (84% of the 135 included records, pain medication, mostly simple analgesics, was prescribed. In 48% of the prescriptions, an indication was not documented. HCP reported that advanced BU could be painful, especially after wound care and after a skin graft. They reported not be trained in the assessment of mild pain. Pain recognition was perceived as difficult, as patients were said to suppress or to exaggerate pain, and to have different expectations regarding acceptable pain levels. HCP reported a fear of side effects of pain medication, shortage and irregularities in the supply of pain medication, and time constraints among medical doctors for pain management.Professionals perceived BU disease as potentially painful, and predominantly focused on severe pain. Our study suggests that pain in BU deserves attention and should be integrated in current treatment.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of the Frog Pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans Ecovar Liflandii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tobias, Nicholas J.; Doig, Kenneth D.; Medema, Marnix H.; Chen, Honglei; Haring, Volker; Moore, Robert; Seemann, Torsten; Stinear, Timothy P.

    In 2004, a previously undiscovered mycobacterium resembling Mycobacterium ulcerans (the agent of Buruli ulcer) was reported in an outbreak of a lethal mycobacteriosis in a laboratory colony of the African clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis. This mycobacterium makes mycolactone and is one of several

  19. Using Bioluminescence To Monitor Treatment Response in Real Time in Mice with Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection▿

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Tianyu; Li, Si-Yang; Converse, Paul J.; Almeida, Deepak V.; Grosset, Jacques H.; Nuermberger, Eric L.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans causes Buruli ulcer, a potentially disabling ulcerative skin disease. Only recently was antimicrobial therapy proven effective. Treatment for 2 months with rifampin plus streptomycin was first proposed after experiments in the mouse footpad model demonstrated bactericidal activity. This treatment is now considered the treatment of choice, although larger ulcers may require adjunctive surgery. Shorter, oral regimens are desired, but evaluating drug activity in mice is ha...

  20. [Ecology and transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans].

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    Marsollier, L; Aubry, J; Saint-André, J-P; Robert, R; Legras, P; Manceau, A-L; Bourdon, S; Audrain, C; Carbonnelle, B

    2003-10-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans is an environmental pathogen concerning mainly the tropical countries; it is the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, which has become the third most important mycobacterial disease. In spite of water-linked epidemiological studies to identify the sources of M. ulcerans, the reservoir and the mode of transmission of this organism remain elusive. To determine the ecology and the mode of transmission of M. ulcerans we have set up an experimental model. This experimental model demonstrated that water bugs were able to transmit M. ulcerans by bites. In insects, the bacilli were localized exclusively within salivary glands, where it could both multiply contrary to other mycobacteria species. In another experimental study, we report that the crude extracts from aquatic plants stimulate in vitro the growth of M. ulcerans as much as the biofilm formation by M. ulcerans has been observed on aquatic plants. Given that the water bugs are essentially carnivorous, it is difficult to imagine a direct contact in the contamination of aquatic bugs and plants. It seems very likely that an intermediate host exists. In an endemic area of Daloa in Côte d'Ivoire, our observations were confirmed.

  1. A Cutaneous Ulcer Resulting from Mycobacterium ulcerans—Leishmania braziliensis Coinfection in South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougin, Benjamin; Avenel-Audran, Martine; Hasseine, Lilia; Martin, Ludovic; Cottin, Jane; Pomares, Christelle; Delaunay, Pascal; Marty, Pierre; Ravel, Christophe; Chabasse, Dominique; Abgueguen, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Buruli ulcer is a tropical skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Its mode of transmission is not yet clearly understood. We report here a cutaneous ulcer in a European traveler in South America resulting from a coinfection detected specifically for Mycobacterium ulcerans and Leishmania braziliensis DNA with real-time polymerase chain reaction. This observation of a unique cutaneous ulcer raises the issue about possible modes of transmission of those two pathogens by the same vector. PMID:22049045

  2. Ethnopharmacological reports on anti-Buruli ulcer medicinal plants in three West African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsouh Fokou, Patrick Valere; Nyarko, Alexander Kwadwo; Appiah-Opong, Regina; Tchokouaha Yamthe, Lauve Rachel; Addo, Phyllis; Asante, Isaac K; Boyom, Fabrice Fekam

    2015-08-22

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is the third most common mycobacterial infection in the world, after tuberculosis and leprosy and has recently been recognized as an important emerging disease. This disease is common in West Africa where more than 99% of the burden is felt and where most affected people live in remote areas with traditional medicine as primary or only option. Reports indicate that the ethnopharmacological control approach of the disease in such settings has shown promise. However, no or very few compilations of traditional knowledge in using medicinal plants to treat BU have been attempted so far. This review aimed to record medicinal plants used traditionally against BU in three countries in West Africa: Ivory Coast, Ghana and Benin and for which ethnopharmacological knowledge supported by pharmacological investigations has been reported. The information recorded in this review will support further pharmacological research to develop appropriate drugs for a better BU control. A systematic review of the literature on ethnobotanical use and anti-BU activity of plants reported for BU treatment was performed. The approach consisted to search several resources, including Technical Reports, Books, Theses, Conference proceedings, web-based scientific databases such as publications on PubMed, Science direct, Springer, ACS, Scielo, PROTA, Google and Google scholar reporting ethnobotanical surveys and screening of natural products against Mycobacterium ulcerans. This study was limited to papers and documents published either in English or French reporting ethnopharmacological knowledge in BU treatment or pharmacological potency in vitro. This review covered the available literature up to December 2014. The majority of reports originated from the three most affected West African countries (Cote d'Ivoire, Ghana and Benin). Though, 98 plant species belonging to 48 families have been identified as having anti-BU use, many have received no or little attention. Most of the

  3. Mycobacterium ulcerans disease, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Humberto; Palomino, Juan Carlos; Falconí, Eduardo; Bravo, Francisco; Donaires, Ninoska; Van Marck, Eric; Portaels, Françoise

    2008-03-01

    Eight adult patients (ages 18-58, 5 women) with Buruli ulcer (BU) confirmed by at least 2 diagnostic methods were seen in a 10-year period. Attempts to culture Mycobacterium ulcerans failed. Five patients came from jungle areas, and 3 from the swampy northern coast of Peru. The patients had 1-5 lesions, most of which were on the lower extremities. One patient had 5 clustered gluteal lesions; another patient had 2 lesions on a finger. Three patients were lost to follow-up. All 5 remaining patients had moderate disease. Diverse treatments (antituberculous drugs, World Health Organization [WHO] recommended antimicrobial drug treatment for BU, and for 3 patients, excision surgery) were successful. Only 1 patient (patient 7) received the specific drug treatment recommended by WHO. BU is endemic in Peru, although apparently infrequent. Education of populations and training of health workers are first needed to evaluate and understand the full extent of BU in Peru.

  4. Mycolactone-Dependent Depletion of Endothelial Cell Thrombomodulin Is Strongly Associated with Fibrin Deposition in Buruli Ulcer Lesions.

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    Joy Ogbechi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A well-known histopathological feature of diseased skin in Buruli ulcer (BU is coagulative necrosis caused by the Mycobacterium ulcerans macrolide exotoxin mycolactone. Since the underlying mechanism is not known, we have investigated the effect of mycolactone on endothelial cells, focussing on the expression of surface anticoagulant molecules involved in the protein C anticoagulant pathway. Congenital deficiencies in this natural anticoagulant pathway are known to induce thrombotic complications such as purpura fulimans and spontaneous necrosis. Mycolactone profoundly decreased thrombomodulin (TM expression on the surface of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMVEC at doses as low as 2 ng/ml and as early as 8 hrs after exposure. TM activates protein C by altering thrombin's substrate specificity, and exposure of HDMVEC to mycolactone for 24 hours resulted in an almost complete loss of the cells' ability to produce activated protein C. Loss of TM was shown to be due to a previously described mechanism involving mycolactone-dependent blockade of Sec61 translocation that results in proteasome-dependent degradation of newly synthesised ER-transiting proteins. Indeed, depletion from cells determined by live-cell imaging of cells stably expressing a recombinant TM-GFP fusion protein occurred at the known turnover rate. In order to determine the relevance of these findings to BU disease, immunohistochemistry of punch biopsies from 40 BU lesions (31 ulcers, nine plaques was performed. TM abundance was profoundly reduced in the subcutis of 78% of biopsies. Furthermore, it was confirmed that fibrin deposition is a common feature of BU lesions, particularly in the necrotic areas. These findings indicate that there is decreased ability to control thrombin generation in BU skin. Mycolactone's effects on normal endothelial cell function, including its ability to activate the protein C anticoagulant pathway are strongly associated with this

  5. Seasonal and regional dynamics of M. ulcerans transmission in environmental context: deciphering the role of water bugs as hosts and vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Estelle; Eyangoh, Sara; Yeramian, Edouard; Doannio, Julien; Landier, Jordi; Aubry, Jacques; Fontanet, Arnaud; Rogier, Christophe; Cassisa, Viviane; Cottin, Jane; Marot, Agnès; Eveillard, Matthieu; Kamdem, Yannick; Legras, Pierre; Deshayes, Caroline; Saint-André, Jean-Paul; Marsollier, Laurent

    2010-07-06

    Buruli ulcer, the third mycobacterial disease after tuberculosis and leprosy, is caused by the environmental mycobacterium M. ulcerans. Various modes of transmission have been suspected for this disease, with no general consensus acceptance for any of them up to now. Since laboratory models demonstrated the ability of water bugs to transmit M. ulcerans, a particular attention is focused on the transmission of the bacilli by water bugs as hosts and vectors. However, it is only through detailed knowledge of the biodiversity and ecology of water bugs that the importance of this mode of transmission can be fully assessed. It is the objective of the work here to decipher the role of water bugs in M. ulcerans ecology and transmission, based on large-scale field studies. The distribution of M. ulcerans-hosting water bugs was monitored on previously unprecedented time and space scales: a total of 7,407 water bugs, belonging to large number of different families, were collected over one year, in Buruli ulcer endemic and non endemic areas in central Cameroon. This study demonstrated the presence of M. ulcerans in insect saliva. In addition, the field results provided a full picture of the ecology of transmission in terms of biodiversity and detailed specification of seasonal and regional dynamics, with large temporal heterogeneity in the insect tissue colonization rate and detection of M. ulcerans only in water bug tissues collected in Buruli ulcer endemic areas. The large-scale detection of bacilli in saliva of biting water bugs gives enhanced weight to their role in M. ulcerans transmission. On practical grounds, beyond the ecological interest, the results concerning seasonal and regional dynamics can provide an efficient tool in the hands of sanitary authorities to monitor environmental risks associated with Buruli ulcer.

  6. First cultivation and characterization of Mycobacterium ulcerans from the environment.

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    Françoise Portaels

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mycobacterium ulcerans disease, or Buruli ulcer (BU, is an indolent, necrotizing infection of skin, subcutaneous tissue and, occasionally, bones. It is the third most common human mycobacteriosis worldwide, after tuberculosis and leprosy. There is evidence that M. ulcerans is an environmental pathogen transmitted to humans from aquatic niches; however, well-characterized pure cultures of M. ulcerans from the environment have never been reported. Here we present details of the isolation and characterization of an M. ulcerans strain (00-1441 obtained from an aquatic Hemiptera (common name Water Strider, Gerris sp. from Benin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: One culture from a homogenate of a Gerris sp. in BACTEC became positive for IS2404, an insertion sequence with more than 200 copies in M. ulcerans. A pure culture of M. ulcerans 00-1441 was obtained on Löwenstein-Jensen medium after inoculation of BACTEC culture in mouse footpads followed by two other mouse footpad passages. The phenotypic characteristics of 00-1441 were identical to those of African M. ulcerans, including production of mycolactone A/B. The nucleotide sequence of the 5' end of 16S rRNA gene of 00-1441 was 100% identical to M. ulcerans and M. marinum, and the sequence of the 3' end was identical to that of the African type except for a single nucleotide substitution at position 1317. This mutation in M. ulcerans was recently discovered in BU patients living in the same geographic area. Various genotyping methods confirmed that strain 00-1441 has a profile identical to that of the predominant African type. Strain 00-1441 produced severe progressive infection and disease in mouse footpads with involvement of bone. CONCLUSION: Strain 00-1441 represents the first genetically and phenotypically identified strain of M. ulcerans isolated in pure culture from the environment. This isolation supports the concept that the agent of BU is a human pathogen with an environmental

  7. A Field Study in Benin to Investigate the Role of Mosquitoes and Other Flying Insects in the Ecology of Mycobacterium ulcerans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zogo, Barnabas; Djenontin, Armel; Carolan, Kevin; Babonneau, Jeremy; Guegan, Jean-François; Eyangoh, Sara; Marion, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer, the third mycobacterial disease after tuberculosis and leprosy, is caused by the environmental mycobacterium M. ulcerans. There is at present no clear understanding of the exact mode(s) of transmission of M. ulcerans. Populations affected by Buruli ulcer are those living close to humid and swampy zones. The disease is associated with the creation or the extension of swampy areas, such as construction of dams or lakes for the development of agriculture. Currently, it is supposed that insects (water bugs and mosquitoes) are host and vector of M. ulcerans. The role of water bugs was clearly demonstrated by several experimental and environmental studies. However, no definitive conclusion can yet be drawn concerning the precise importance of this route of transmission. Concerning the mosquitoes, DNA was detected only in mosquitoes collected in Australia, and their role as host/vector was never studied by experimental approaches. Surprisingly, no specific study was conducted in Africa. In this context, the objective of this study was to investigate the role of mosquitoes (larvae and adults) and other flying insects in ecology of M. ulcerans. This study was conducted in a highly endemic area of Benin. Mosquitoes (adults and larvae) were collected over one year, in Buruli ulcer endemic in Benin. In parallel, to monitor the presence of M. ulcerans in environment, aquatic insects were sampled. QPCR was used to detected M. ulcerans DNA. DNA of M. ulcerans was detected in around 8.7% of aquatic insects but never in mosquitoes (larvae or adults) or in other flying insects. This study suggested that the mosquitoes don't play a pivotal role in the ecology and transmission of M. ulcerans in the studied endemic areas. However, the role of mosquitoes cannot be excluded and, we can reasonably suppose that several routes of transmission of M. ulcerans are possible through the world.

  8. Buruli ulcer disease prevalence in Benin, West Africa: associations with land use/cover and the identification of disease clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Tyler; Benbow, M Eric; Brenden, Travis O; Qi, Jiaguo; Johnson, R Christian

    2008-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) disease, caused by infection with the environmental mycobacterium M. ulcerans, is an emerging infectious disease in many tropical and sub-tropical countries. Although vectors and modes of transmission remain unknown, it is hypothesized that the transmission of BU disease is associated with human activities in or around aquatic environments, and that characteristics of the landscape (e.g., land use/cover) play a role in mediating BU disease. Several studies performed at relatively small spatial scales (e.g., within a single village or region of a country) support these hypotheses; however, if BU disease is associated with land use/cover characteristics, either through spatial constraints on vector-host dynamics or by mediating human activities, then large-scale (i.e., country-wide) associations should also emerge. The objectives of this study were to (1) investigate associations between BU disease prevalence in villages in Benin, West Africa and surrounding land use/cover patterns and other map-based characteristics, and (2) identify areas with greater and lower than expected prevalence rates (i.e., disease clusters) to assist with the development of prevention and control programs. Results Our landscape-based models identified low elevation, rural villages surrounded by forest land cover, and located in drainage basins with variable wetness patterns as being associated with higher BU disease prevalence rates. We also identified five spatial disease clusters. Three of the five clusters contained villages with greater than expected prevalence rates and two clusters contained villages with lower than expected prevalence rates. Those villages with greater than expected BU disease prevalence rates spanned a fairly narrow region of south-central Benin. Conclusion Our analyses suggest that interactions between natural land cover and human alterations to the landscape likely play a role in the dynamics of BU disease. For example, urbanization

  9. Local Heat Application for the Treatment of Buruli Ulcer: Results of a Phase II Open Label Single Center Non Comparative Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Moritz; Bayi, Pierre F; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Bratschi, Martin W; Bolz, Miriam; Um Boock, Alphonse; Zwahlen, Marcel; Pluschke, Gerd; Junghanss, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing skin disease most prevalent among West African children. The causative organism, Mycobacterium ulcerans, is sensitive to temperatures above 37°C. We investigated the safety and efficacy of a local heat application device based on phase change material. In a phase II open label single center noncomparative clinical trial (ISRCTN 72102977) under GCP standards in Cameroon, laboratory confirmed BU patients received up to 8 weeks of heat treatment. We assessed efficacy based on the endpoints 'absence of clinical BU specific features' or 'wound closure' within 6 months ("primary cure"), and 'absence of clinical recurrence within 24 month' ("definite cure"). Of 53 patients 51 (96%) had ulcerative disease. 62% were classified as World Health Organization category II, 19% each as category I and III. The average lesion size was 45 cm(2). Within 6 months after completion of heat treatment 92.4% (49 of 53, 95% confidence interval [CI], 81.8% to 98.0%) achieved cure of their primary lesion. At 24 months follow-up 83.7% (41 of 49, 95% CI, 70.3% to 92.7%) of patients with primary cure remained free of recurrence. Heat treatment was well tolerated; adverse effects were occasional mild local skin reactions. Local thermotherapy is a highly effective, simple, cheap and safe treatment for M. ulcerans disease. It has in particular potential as home-based remedy for BU suspicious lesions at community level where laboratory confirmation is not available. ISRCT 72102977. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  10. Implementation of a decentralized community-based treatment program to improve the management of Buruli ulcer in the Ouinhi district of Benin, West Africa.

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    Arnaud Setondji Amoussouhoui

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium ulcerans infection, commonly known as Buruli ulcer (BU, is a debilitating neglected tropical disease. Its management remains complex and has three main components: antibiotic treatment combining rifampicin and streptomycin for 56 days, wound dressings and skin grafts for large ulcerations, and physical therapy to prevent functional limitations after care. In Benin, BU patient care is being integrated into the government health system. In this paper, we report on an innovative pilot program designed to introduce BU decentralization in Ouinhi district, one of Benin's most endemic districts previously served by centralized hospital-based care.We conducted intervention-oriented research implemented in four steps: baseline study, training of health district clinical staff, outreach education, outcome and impact assessments. Study results demonstrated that early BU lesions (71% of all detected cases could be treated in the community following outreach education, and that most of the afflicted were willing to accept decentralized treatment. Ninety-three percent were successfully treated with antibiotics alone. The impact evaluation found that community confidence in decentralized BU care was greatly enhanced by clinic staff who came to be seen as having expertise in the care of most chronic wounds.This study documents a successful BU outreach and decentralized care program reaching early BU cases not previously treated by a proactive centralized BU program. The pilot program further demonstrates the added value of integrated wound management for NTD control.

  11. Phage therapy is effective against infection by Mycobacterium ulcerans in a murine footpad model.

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    Gabriela Trigo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Buruli Ulcer (BU is a neglected, necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Currently, there is no vaccine against M. ulcerans infection. Although the World Health Organization recommends a combination of rifampicin and streptomycin for the treatment of BU, clinical management of advanced stages is still based on the surgical resection of infected skin. The use of bacteriophages for the control of bacterial infections has been considered as an alternative or to be used in association with antibiotherapy. Additionally, the mycobacteriophage D29 has previously been shown to display lytic activity against M. ulcerans isolates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used the mouse footpad model of M. ulcerans infection to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of treatment with mycobacteriophage D29. Analyses of macroscopic lesions, bacterial burdens, histology and cytokine production were performed in both M. ulcerans-infected footpads and draining lymph nodes (DLN. We have demonstrated that a single subcutaneous injection of the mycobacteriophage D29, administered 33 days after bacterial challenge, was sufficient to decrease pathology and to prevent ulceration. This protection resulted in a significant reduction of M. ulcerans numbers accompanied by an increase of cytokine levels (including IFN-γ, both in footpads and DLN. Additionally, mycobacteriophage D29 treatment induced a cellular infiltrate of a lymphocytic/macrophagic profile. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our observations demonstrate the potential of phage therapy against M. ulcerans infection, paving the way for future studies aiming at the development of novel phage-related therapeutic approaches against BU.

  12. [International cooperation with the neglected tropical disease Buruli ulcer in Togo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niiyama, Tomoki

    2013-12-01

    The objectives of this paper are to grasp the current status of an endemic disease, known as Buruli ulcer (BU), in the Republic of Togo and the expansion of international assistance in the field. By adopting the explicit support model, this paper also compares the obtained research results with those of the Republic of Ghana and Benin, to clarify the primary functions played among respective governments, WHO, and NGO. Under the auspices of the WHO Global Buruli Ulcer Initiative (GBUI, 1998-), National Buruli Ulcer Control Programme (NBUCP) in the Togo was initiated in 1999. However, due to the shortage of national budget and politico-economic instabilities of the nation, the actual implementation of NBUCP proved to be problematic. It was after 2007 that the programme began to move forward with the interventions of NGOs like DAHW and Handicap International. Currently, major players involved in the implementation of the policies provided by the GBUI are WHO, NGOs and the targeted governments. In other words, the organizations involved in BU treatment work together by fulfilling their functions. Unlike the neighboring countries, the Togolese government encountered much difficulty in materializing its national programme. Largely due to the political instability and the severe shortage of national budget, stronger assistances from NGOs were required at various levels of the national health measures from formulating to implementing the programme. As the programmes in Togo and Ghana/Benin expanded over the years, the respective support model revealed to be unique and different. In Ghana and Benin, intimate cooperation among WHO, government and NGOs has been established. In Togo, strengthening of collaboration among the three players is expected.

  13. Geographic distribution, age pattern and sites of lesions in a cohort of Buruli ulcer patients from the Mapé Basin of Cameroon.

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    Martin W Bratschi

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer (BU, a neglected tropical disease of the skin, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, occurs most frequently in children in West Africa. Risk factors for BU include proximity to slow flowing water, poor wound care and not wearing protective clothing. Man-made alterations of the environment have been suggested to lead to increased BU incidence. M. ulcerans DNA has been detected in the environment, water bugs and recently also in mosquitoes. Despite these findings, the mode of transmission of BU remains poorly understood and both transmission by insects or direct inoculation from contaminated environment have been suggested. Here, we investigated the BU epidemiology in the Mapé basin of Cameroon where the damming of the Mapé River since 1988 is believed to have increased the incidence of BU. Through a house-by-house survey in spring 2010, which also examined the local population for leprosy and yaws, and continued surveillance thereafter, we identified, till June 2012, altogether 88 RT-PCR positive cases of BU. We found that the age adjusted cumulative incidence of BU was highest in young teenagers and in individuals above the age of 50 and that very young children (<5 were underrepresented among cases. BU lesions clustered around the ankles and at the back of the elbows. This pattern neither matches any of the published mosquito biting site patterns, nor the published distribution of small skin injuries in children, where lesions on the knees are much more frequent. The option of multiple modes of transmission should thus be considered. Analyzing the geographic distribution of cases in the Mapé Dam area revealed a closer association with the Mbam River than with the artificial lake.

  14. A Community Based Study on the Mode of Transmission, Prevention and Treatment of Buruli Ulcers in Southwest Cameroon: Knowledge, Attitude and Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoachere, Jane-Francis K T; Nsai, Frankline S; Ndip, Roland N

    2016-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a neglected tropical disease affecting the skin, tissues and in some cases the bones, caused by the environmental pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans (M. ulcerans). Its mode of transmission is still elusive. Delayed treatment may cause irreversible disabilities with consequent social and economic impacts on the victim. Socio-cultural beliefs, practices and attitudes in endemic communities have been shown to influence timely treatment causing disease management, prevention and control a great challenge. An assessment of these factors in endemic localities is important in designing successful intervention strategies. Considering this, we assessed the knowledge, attitude and practices regarding BU in three endemic localities in the South West region, Cameroon to highlight existing misconceptions that need to be addressed to enhance prompt treatment and facilitate effective prevention and control. A cross-sectional study was executed in three BU endemic health districts. Using qualitative and quantitative approaches we surveyed 320 randomly selected household heads, interviewed BU patients and conducted three focus group discussions (FGDs) to obtain information on awareness, beliefs, treatment, and attitudes towards victims. The influence of socio-demographic factors on these variables was investigated. Respondents (84.4%) had a good knowledge of BU though only 65% considered it a health problem while 49.4% believed it is contagious. Socio-demographic factors significantly (P<0.05) influenced awareness of BU, knowledge and practice on treatment and attitudes towards victims. Although the majority of respondents stated the hospital as the place for appropriate treatment, FGDs and some BU victims preferred witchdoctors/herbalists and prayers, and considered the hospital as the last option. We documented beliefs about the disease which could delay treatment. Though we are reporting a high level of knowledge of BU, there exist fallacies about BU and

  15. A Community Based Study on the Mode of Transmission, Prevention and Treatment of Buruli Ulcers in Southwest Cameroon: Knowledge, Attitude and Practices.

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    Jane-Francis K T Akoachere

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer (BU is a neglected tropical disease affecting the skin, tissues and in some cases the bones, caused by the environmental pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans (M. ulcerans. Its mode of transmission is still elusive. Delayed treatment may cause irreversible disabilities with consequent social and economic impacts on the victim. Socio-cultural beliefs, practices and attitudes in endemic communities have been shown to influence timely treatment causing disease management, prevention and control a great challenge. An assessment of these factors in endemic localities is important in designing successful intervention strategies. Considering this, we assessed the knowledge, attitude and practices regarding BU in three endemic localities in the South West region, Cameroon to highlight existing misconceptions that need to be addressed to enhance prompt treatment and facilitate effective prevention and control.A cross-sectional study was executed in three BU endemic health districts. Using qualitative and quantitative approaches we surveyed 320 randomly selected household heads, interviewed BU patients and conducted three focus group discussions (FGDs to obtain information on awareness, beliefs, treatment, and attitudes towards victims. The influence of socio-demographic factors on these variables was investigated.Respondents (84.4% had a good knowledge of BU though only 65% considered it a health problem while 49.4% believed it is contagious. Socio-demographic factors significantly (P<0.05 influenced awareness of BU, knowledge and practice on treatment and attitudes towards victims. Although the majority of respondents stated the hospital as the place for appropriate treatment, FGDs and some BU victims preferred witchdoctors/herbalists and prayers, and considered the hospital as the last option. We documented beliefs about the disease which could delay treatment.Though we are reporting a high level of knowledge of BU, there exist fallacies about

  16. Attitudes toward clinical and traditional treatment for the Buruli ulcer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Satisfaction with clinical treatment is not higher than with traditional medicine; people tend to turn to clinical medicine after traditional treatments fail. Few social stigmas result from the disease other than avoidance of the unsightly ulcer and the unpleasant smell, and among children, some teasing. The major concern ...

  17. Some heavy metals levels in drinking water and social characteristics in buruli ulcer endemic and non-endemic communities in the Amansie West district

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odeh-Agbozo, Francis

    2009-06-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a skin disease caused by mycobacterium ulcerans(MU). It is often associated with slow flowing or stagnant water and increase in the incidence of disease is also associated with the ecological transformation. Several risk factors have been identified and a number of transmission mechanisms suggested. However, the exact mechanism of transmission and development of Buruli ulcer through water related human activities are unknown. A study was carried out to compare concentrations of cadmium, lead and aluminium in drinking water samples and some social characteristics from endemic and non-endemic communities in the Amansie- West District of Ghana. Ninety-six drinking water sources were sampled from boreholes and hand-dug wells in the study area. The analysis of the samples showed that the average concentration of cadmium was significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) in endemic communities than in non-endemic communities even though all the values were below the WHO guideline values of 0.003mg/L. The average concentration of Lead and Aluminium were lower in endemic communities than in non-endemic communities, but the differences between the average concentrations were not statistically significant ( p≥ 0.95 for Lead, p≥ 0.30 for Aluminium). Aluminium concentrations in all the samples were however lower than the WHO recommended guideline value of 0.1mg/L, whilst the concentration of lead was higher than the recommended guideline value of several communities. It was therefore concluded that Cadmium, Lead and Aluminium may not contribute to the occurrence and transmission of BU. In relation to the social characteristics, the educational level was generally poorer in endemic areas than in the non-endemic areas. The endemic communities used poorer source of water which include streams and hand-dug wells, unlike non-endemic communities which had better sources of water- boreholes and pipe-borne water only. Field observation showed that people in the endemic

  18. Clinical Epidemiology of Buruli Ulcer from Benin (2005-2013: Effect of Time-Delay to Diagnosis on Clinical Forms and Severe Phenotypes.

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    Carlos Capela

    Full Text Available Buruli Ulcer (BU is a neglected infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans that is responsible for severe necrotizing cutaneous lesions that may be associated with bone involvement. Clinical presentations of BU lesions are classically classified as papules, nodules, plaques and edematous infiltration, ulcer or osteomyelitis. Within these different clinical forms, lesions can be further classified as severe forms based on focality (multiple lesions, lesions' size (>15 cm diameter or WHO Category (WHO Category 3 lesions. There are studies reporting an association between delay in seeking medical care and the development of ulcerative forms of BU or osteomyelitis, but the effect of time-delay on the emergence of lesions classified as severe has not been addressed. To address both issues, and in a cohort of laboratory-confirmed BU cases, 476 patients from a medical center in Allada, Benin, were studied. In this laboratory-confirmed cohort, we validated previous observations, demonstrating that time-delay is statistically related to the clinical form of BU. Indeed, for non-ulcerated forms (nodule, edema, and plaque the median time-delay was 32.5 days (IQR 30.0-67.5, while for ulcerated forms it was 60 days (IQR 20.0-120.0 (p = 0.009, and for bone lesions, 365 days (IQR 228.0-548.0. On the other hand, we show here that time-delay is not associated with the more severe phenotypes of BU, such as multi-focal lesions (median 90 days; IQR 56-217.5; p = 0.09, larger lesions (diameter >15 cm (median 60 days; IQR 30-120; p = 0.92 or category 3 WHO classification (median 60 days; IQR 30-150; p = 0.20, when compared with unifocal (median 60 days; IQR 30-90, small lesions (diameter ≤15 cm (median 60 days; IQR 30-90, or WHO category 1+2 lesions (median 60 days; IQR 30-90, respectively. Our results demonstrate that after an initial period of progression towards ulceration or bone involvement, BU lesions become stable regarding size and focal

  19. Mycolactone-mediated neurite degeneration and functional effects in cultured human and rat DRG neurons: Mechanisms underlying hypoalgesia in Buruli ulcer.

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    Anand, U; Sinisi, M; Fox, M; MacQuillan, A; Quick, T; Korchev, Y; Bountra, C; McCarthy, T; Anand, P

    2016-01-01

    Mycolactone is a polyketide toxin secreted by the mycobacterium Mycobacterium ulcerans, responsible for the extensive hypoalgesic skin lesions characteristic of patients with Buruli ulcer. A recent pre-clinical study proposed that mycolactone may produce analgesia via activation of the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R). In contrast, AT2R antagonist EMA401 has shown analgesic efficacy in animal models and clinical trials for neuropathic pain. We therefore investigated the morphological and functional effects of mycolactone in cultured human and rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and the role of AT2R using EMA401. Primary sensory neurons were prepared from avulsed cervical human DRG and rat DRG; 24 h after plating, neurons were incubated for 24 to 96 h with synthetic mycolactone A/B, followed by immunostaining with antibodies to PGP9.5, Gap43, β tubulin, or Mitotracker dye staining. Acute functional effects were examined by measuring capsaicin responses with calcium imaging in DRG neuronal cultures treated with mycolactone. Morphological effects: Mycolactone-treated cultures showed dramatically reduced numbers of surviving neurons and non-neuronal cells, reduced Gap43 and β tubulin expression, degenerating neurites and reduced cell body diameter, compared with controls. Dose-related reduction of neurite length was observed in mycolactone-treated cultures. Mitochondria were distributed throughout the length of neurites and soma of control neurons, but clustered in the neurites and soma of mycolactone-treated neurons. Functional effects: Mycolactone-treated human and rat DRG neurons showed dose-related inhibition of capsaicin responses, which were reversed by calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine and phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-Methylxanthine, indicating involvement of cAMP/ATP reduction. The morphological and functional effects of mycolactone were not altered by Angiotensin II or AT2R antagonist EMA401. Mycolactone induces toxic effects in DRG

  20. Mycobacterium ulcerans ecological dynamics and its association with freshwater ecosystems and aquatic communities : results from a 12-month environmental survey in Cameroon

    OpenAIRE

    Garchitorena, Andres; Roche, Benjamin; Kamgang, R.; Ossomba, J.; Babonneau, J.; Landier, J.; Fontanet, A.; Flahault, A.; Eyangoh, S.; Guégan, Jean-François; Marsollier, L.

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Background: Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU) is the agent responsible for Buruli Ulcer (BU), an emerging skin disease with dramatic socioeconomic and health outcomes, especially in rural settings. BU emergence and distribution is linked to aquatic ecosystems in tropical and subtropical countries, especially to swampy and flooded areas. Aquatic animal organisms are likely to play a role either as host reservoirs or vectors of the bacilli. However, information on MU ecologica...

  1. Risk factors for buruli ulcer in Ghana-a case control study in the Suhum-Kraboa-Coaltar and Akuapem South Districts of the eastern region.

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    Ernest Kenu

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer (BU is a skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Its exact mode of transmission is not known. Previous studies have identified demographic, socio-economic, health and hygiene as well as environment related risk factors. We investigated whether the same factors pertain in Suhum-Kraboa-Coaltar (SKC and Akuapem South (AS Districts in Ghana which previously were not endemic for BU.We conducted a case control study. A case of BU was defined as any person aged 2 years or more who resided in study area (SKC or AS District diagnosed according to the WHO clinical case definition for BU and matched with age- (+/-5 years, gender-, and community controls. A structured questionnaire on host, demographic, environmental, and behavioural factors was administered to participants.A total of 113 cases and 113 community controls were interviewed. Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis identified presence of wetland in the neighborhood (OR=3.9, 95% CI=1.9-8.2, insect bites in water/mud (OR=5.7, 95% CI=2.5-13.1, use of adhesive when injured (OR=2.7, 95% CI=1.1-6.8, and washing in the Densu river (OR=2.3, 95% CI=1.1-4.96 as risk factors associated with BU. Rubbing an injured area with alcohol (OR=0.21, 95% CI=0.008-0.57 and wearing long sleeves for farming (OR=0.29, 95% CI=0.14-0.62 showed protection against BU.This study identified the presence of wetland, insect bites in water, use of adhesive when injured, and washing in the river as risk factors for BU; and covering limbs during farming as well as use of alcohol after insect bites as protective factors against BU in Ghana. Until paths of transmission are unraveled, control strategies in BU endemic areas should focus on these known risk factors.

  2. Enhancing Buruli ulcer control in Ghana through social interventions: a case study from the Obom sub-district

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    Ahorlu Collins K

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Buruli ulcer is considered a re-emerging disease in West Africa where it has suffered neglect over the years, though children below the age of 16 years are the worst affected in most endemic regions. Due to delayed health seeking, the disease leads to disabilities resulting from amputation and loss of vital organs like the eye leading to school dropout and other social and economic consequences for the affected family. Early treatment with antibiotics is effective; however, this involves daily oral and intramuscular injection at distant health facilities for 56 days making it a challenge among poor rural folks living on daily subsistence work. The mode of transmission of Buruli ulcer is not known and there is no effective preventive vaccine for Buruli ulcer. Thus the only effective control tool is early case detection and treatment to reduce morbidity and associated disabilities that occurs as a result of late treatment. It is therefore essential to implement interventions that remove impediments that limit early case detection; access to early effective treatment and this paper reports one such effort where the feasibility of social interventions to enhance Buruli ulcer control was assessed. Methods This was a qualitative study using in-depth interviews to generate information to ascertain the benefit or otherwise of the intervention implemented. Clinical records of patients to generate data to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of social interventions in the fight against Buruli ulcer was examined. In all, 56 in-depth interviews (28 at baseline and 28 at evaluation were conducted for this report. Results At full implementation, treatment default and dropout reduced significantly from 58.8% and 52.9% at baseline to 1.5% and 1.5% respectively. The number of early case detection went up significantly. Affected families were happy with social interventions such as provision of transportation and breakfast to patients

  3. Buruli Ulcer in Cameroon: The Development and Impact of the National Control Programme.

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    Earnest Njih Tabah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cameroon is endemic for Buruli ulcer (BU and organised institutional BU control began in 2002. The objective was to describe the evolution, achievements and challenges of the national BU control programme (NBUCP and to make suggestions for scaling up the programme.We analysed collated data on BU from 2001 to 2014 and reviewed activity reports NBUCP in Cameroon. Case-detection rates and key BU control indicators were calculated and plotted on a time scale to determine trends in performance. A linear regression analysis of BU detection rate from 2005-2014 was done. The regression coefficient was tested statistically for the significance in variation of BU detection rate.In 14 years of BU control, 3700 cases were notified. The BU detection rate dropped significantly from 3.89 to 1.45 per 100 000 inhabitants. The number of BU endemic health districts rose from two to 64. Five BU diagnostic and treatment centres are functional and two more are planned for 2015. The health system has been strengthened and BU research and education has gained more interest in Cameroon.Although institutional BU control Cameroon only began 30 years after the first cases were reported in 1969, a number of milestones have been attained. These would serve as stepping stones for charting the way forward and improving upon control activities in the country if the major challenge of resource allocation is dealt with.

  4. A Sero-epidemiological Approach to Explore Transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans.

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    Kobina Assan Ampah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The debilitating skin disease Buruli ulcer (BU is caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans. While various hypotheses on potential reservoirs and vectors of M. ulcerans exist, the mode of transmission has remained unclear. Epidemiological studies have indicated that children below the age of four are less exposed to the pathogen and at lower risk of developing BU than older children. In the present study we compared the age at which children begin to develop antibody responses against M. ulcerans with the age pattern of responses to other pathogens transmitted by various mechanisms. A total of 1,352 sera from individuals living in the BU endemic Offin river valley of Ghana were included in the study. While first serological responses to the mosquito transmitted malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and to soil transmitted Strongyloides helminths emerged around the age of one and two years, sero-conversion for M. ulcerans and for the water transmitted trematode Schistosoma mansoni occurred at around four and five years, respectively. Our data suggest that exposure to M. ulcerans intensifies strongly at the age when children start to have more intense contact with the environment, outside the small movement range of young children. Further results from our serological investigations in the Offin river valley also indicate ongoing transmission of Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of yaws.

  5. Evolution of two distinct phylogenetic lineages of the emerging human pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans

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    Portaels Francoise

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genomics has greatly improved our understanding of the evolution of pathogenic mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Here we have used data from a genome microarray analysis to explore insertion-deletion (InDel polymorphism among a diverse strain collection of Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of the devastating skin disease, Buruli ulcer. Detailed analysis of large sequence polymorphisms in twelve regions of difference (RDs, comprising irreversible genetic markers, enabled us to refine the phylogenetic succession within M. ulcerans, to define features of a hypothetical M. ulcerans most recent common ancestor and to confirm its origin from Mycobacterium marinum. Results M. ulcerans has evolved into five InDel haplotypes that separate into two distinct lineages: (i the "classical" lineage including the most pathogenic genotypes – those that come from Africa, Australia and South East Asia; and (ii an "ancestral" M. ulcerans lineage comprising strains from Asia (China/Japan, South America and Mexico. The ancestral lineage is genetically closer to the progenitor M. marinum in both RD composition and DNA sequence identity, whereas the classical lineage has undergone major genomic rearrangements. Conclusion Results of the InDel analysis are in complete accord with recent multi-locus sequence analysis and indicate that M. ulcerans has passed through at least two major evolutionary bottlenecks since divergence from M. marinum. The classical lineage shows more pronounced reductive evolution than the ancestral lineage, suggesting that there may be differences in the ecology between the two lineages. These findings improve the understanding of the adaptive evolution and virulence of M. ulcerans and pathogenic mycobacteria in general and will facilitate the development of new tools for improved diagnostics and molecular epidemiology.

  6. Rapid, serial, non-invasive assessment of drug efficacy in mice with autoluminescent Mycobacterium ulcerans infection.

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    Tianyu Zhang

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer (BU caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans is the world's third most common mycobacterial infection. There is no vaccine against BU and surgery is needed for patients with large ulcers. Although recent experience indicates combination chemotherapy with streptomycin and rifampin improves cure rates, the utility of this regimen is limited by the 2-month duration of therapy, potential toxicity and required parenteral administration of streptomycin, and drug-drug interactions caused by rifampin. Discovery and development of drugs for BU is greatly hampered by the slow growth rate of M. ulcerans, requiring up to 3 months of incubation on solid media to produce colonies. Surrogate markers for evaluating antimicrobial activity in real-time which can be measured serially and non-invasively in infected footpads of live mice would accelerate pre-clinical evaluation of new drugs to treat BU. Previously, we developed bioluminescent M. ulcerans strains, demonstrating proof of concept for measuring luminescence as a surrogate marker for viable M. ulcerans in vitro and in vivo. However, the requirement of exogenous substrate limited the utility of such strains, especially for in vivo experiments.For this study, we engineered M. ulcerans strains that express the entire luxCDABE operon and therefore are autoluminescent due to endogenous substrate production. The selected reporter strain displayed a growth rate and virulence similar to the wild-type parent strain and enabled rapid, real-time monitoring of in vitro and in vivo drug activity, including serial, non-invasive assessments in live mice, producing results which correlated closely with colony-forming unit (CFU counts for a panel of drugs with various mechanisms of action.Our results indicate that autoluminescent reporter strains of M. ulcerans are exceptional tools for pre-clinical evaluation of new drugs to treat BU due to their potential to drastically reduce the time, effort, animals, compound

  7. Assessment of water, sanitation, and hygiene practices and associated factors in a Buruli ulcer endemic district in Benin (West Africa).

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    Johnson, Roch Christian; Boni, Gratien; Barogui, Yves; Sopoh, Ghislain Emmanuel; Houndonougbo, Macaire; Anagonou, Esai; Agossadou, Didier; Diez, Gabriel; Boko, Michel

    2015-08-19

    Control of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) requires multiple strategic approaches including water, sanitation and hygiene services (WASH). Buruli ulcer (BU), one of the 17 NTDs, remains a public health issue in Benin particularly in the district of Lalo. The availability of water as well as good hygiene are important for the management of Buruli ulcer particularly in the area of wound care one of the main component of the treatment of BU lesions. Given the growing importance of WASH in controlling NTDs and in order to assess the baseline for future cross-cutting interventions, we report here on the first study evaluating the level of WASH and associated factors in Lalo, one of the most BU-endemic districts in Benin. A cross-sectional study was carried to assess WASH practices and associated factors in the district of Lalo. Data were collected from 600 heads of household using structured pretested questionnaire and observations triangulated with qualitative information obtained from in-depth interviews of patients, care-givers and community members. Univariate and multivariate analysis were carried to determine the relationships between the potential associated factors and the sanitation as well as hygiene status. BU is an important conditions in the district of Lalo with 917 new cases detected from 2006 to 2012. More than 49 % of the household surveyed used unimproved water sources for their daily needs. Only 8.7 % of the investigated household had improved sanitation facilities at home and 9.7 % had improved hygiene behavior. The type of housing as an indicator of the socioeconomic status, the permanent availability of soap and improved hygiene practices were identified as the main factors positively associated with improved sanitation status. In the district of Lalo in Benin, one of the most endemic for BU, the WASH indicators are very low. This study provides baseline informations for future cross-cutting interventions in this district.

  8. In Vitro Activity of Selected West African Medicinal Plants against Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease.

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    Tsouh Fokou, Patrick Valere; Kissi-Twum, Abena Adomah; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Appiah-Opong, Regina; Addo, Phyllis; Tchokouaha Yamthe, Lauve Rachel; Ngoutane Mfopa, Alvine; Fekam Boyom, Fabrice; Nyarko, Alexander Kwadwo

    2016-04-13

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is the third most prevalent mycobacteriosis, after tuberculosis and leprosy. The currently recommended combination of rifampicin-streptomycin suffers from side effects and poor compliance, which leads to reliance on local herbal remedies. The objective of this study was to investigate the antimycobacterial properties and toxicity of selected medicinal plants. Sixty-five extracts from 27 plant species were screened against Mycobacterium ulcerans and Mycobacterium smegmatis, using the Resazurin Microtiter Assay (REMA). The cytotoxicity of promising extracts was assayed on normal Chang liver cells by an MTT assay. Twenty five extracts showed activity with minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 16 µg/mL to 250 µg/mL against M. smegmatis, while 17 showed activity against M. ulcerans with MIC values ranging from 125 µg/mL to 250 µg/mL. In most of the cases, plant extracts with antimycobacterial activity showed no cytotoxicity on normal human liver cells. Exception were Carica papaya, Cleistopholis patens, and Polyalthia suaveolens with 50% cell cytotoxic concentrations (CC50) ranging from 3.8 to 223 µg/mL. These preliminary results support the use of some West African plants in the treatment of Buruli ulcer. Meanwhile, further studies are required to isolate and characterize the active ingredients in the extracts.

  9. In Vitro Activity of Selected West African Medicinal Plants against Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease

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    Patrick Valere Tsouh Fokou

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer (BU is the third most prevalent mycobacteriosis, after tuberculosis and leprosy. The currently recommended combination of rifampicin-streptomycin suffers from side effects and poor compliance, which leads to reliance on local herbal remedies. The objective of this study was to investigate the antimycobacterial properties and toxicity of selected medicinal plants. Sixty-five extracts from 27 plant species were screened against Mycobacterium ulcerans and Mycobacterium smegmatis, using the Resazurin Microtiter Assay (REMA. The cytotoxicity of promising extracts was assayed on normal Chang liver cells by an MTT assay. Twenty five extracts showed activity with minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC values ranging from 16 µg/mL to 250 µg/mL against M. smegmatis, while 17 showed activity against M. ulcerans with MIC values ranging from 125 µg/mL to 250 µg/mL. In most of the cases, plant extracts with antimycobacterial activity showed no cytotoxicity on normal human liver cells. Exception were Carica papaya, Cleistopholis patens, and Polyalthia suaveolens with 50% cell cytotoxic concentrations (CC50 ranging from 3.8 to 223 µg/mL. These preliminary results support the use of some West African plants in the treatment of Buruli ulcer. Meanwhile, further studies are required to isolate and characterize the active ingredients in the extracts.

  10. Multiple Introductions and Recent Spread of the Emerging Human Pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans across Africa

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    Meehan, Conor J.; Eddyani, Miriam; Affolabi, Dissou; Phanzu, Delphin Mavinga; Eyangoh, Sara; Jordaens, Kurt; Portaels, Françoise; Mangas, Kirstie; Seemann, Torsten; Marsollier, Laurent; Marion, Estelle; Chauty, Annick; Landier, Jordi; Fontanet, Arnaud; Leirs, Herwig; Stinear, Timothy P.; de Jong, Bouke C.

    2017-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is an insidious neglected tropical disease. Cases are reported around the world but the rural regions of West and Central Africa are most affected. How BU is transmitted and spreads has remained a mystery, even though the causative agent, Mycobacterium ulcerans, has been known for more than 70 years. Here, using the tools of population genomics, we reconstruct the evolutionary history of M. ulcerans by comparing 165 isolates spanning 48 years and representing 11 endemic countries across Africa. The genetic diversity of African M. ulcerans was found to be restricted due to the bacterium’s slow substitution rate coupled with its relatively recent origin. We identified two specific M. ulcerans lineages within the African continent, and inferred that M. ulcerans lineage Mu_A1 existed in Africa for several hundreds of years, unlike lineage Mu_A2, which was introduced much more recently, approximately during the 19th century. Additionally, we observed that specific M. ulcerans epidemic Mu_A1 clones were introduced during the same time period in the three hydrological basins that were well covered in our panel. The estimated time span of the introduction events coincides with the Neo-imperialism period, during which time the European colonial powers divided the African continent among themselves. Using this temporal association, and in the absence of a known BU reservoir or—vector on the continent, we postulate that the so-called "Scramble for Africa" played a significant role in the spread of the disease across the continent. PMID:28137745

  11. Multiple Introductions and Recent Spread of the Emerging Human Pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans across Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandelannoote, Koen; Meehan, Conor J; Eddyani, Miriam; Affolabi, Dissou; Phanzu, Delphin Mavinga; Eyangoh, Sara; Jordaens, Kurt; Portaels, Françoise; Mangas, Kirstie; Seemann, Torsten; Marsollier, Laurent; Marion, Estelle; Chauty, Annick; Landier, Jordi; Fontanet, Arnaud; Leirs, Herwig; Stinear, Timothy P; de Jong, Bouke C

    2017-03-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is an insidious neglected tropical disease. Cases are reported around the world but the rural regions of West and Central Africa are most affected. How BU is transmitted and spreads has remained a mystery, even though the causative agent, Mycobacterium ulcerans, has been known for more than 70 years. Here, using the tools of population genomics, we reconstruct the evolutionary history of M. ulcerans by comparing 165 isolates spanning 48 years and representing 11 endemic countries across Africa. The genetic diversity of African M. ulcerans was found to be restricted due to the bacterium's slow substitution rate coupled with its relatively recent origin. We identified two specific M. ulcerans lineages within the African continent, and inferred that M. ulcerans lineage Mu_A1 existed in Africa for several hundreds of years, unlike lineage Mu_A2, which was introduced much more recently, approximately during the 19th century. Additionally, we observed that specific M. ulcerans epidemic Mu_A1 clones were introduced during the same time period in the three hydrological basins that were well covered in our panel. The estimated time span of the introduction events coincides with the Neo-imperialism period, during which time the European colonial powers divided the African continent among themselves. Using this temporal association, and in the absence of a known BU reservoir or-vector on the continent, we postulate that the so-called "Scramble for Africa" played a significant role in the spread of the disease across the continent. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  12. Cultural Understanding of Wounds, Buruli Ulcers and Their Management at the Obom Sub-district of the Ga South Municipality of the Greater Accra Region of Ghana.

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    Eric Koka

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted with the aim to understand some of the cultural belief systems in the management of wounds and patients practices that could contaminate wounds at the Obom sub-district of the Ga South Municipality of Ghana.This was an ethnographic study using in-depth interviews, Focus Group Discussions and participant observation techniques for data collection. Observations were done on Buruli ulcer patients to document how they integrate local and modern wound management practices in the day-to-day handling of their wounds. Content analysis was done after the data were subjected to thematic coding and representative narratives selected for presentation.It was usually believed that wounds were caused by charms or spirits and, therefore, required the attention of a native healer. In instances where some patients' wounds were dressed in the hospital by clinicians whose condition/age/sex contradict the belief of the patient, the affected often redress the wounds later at home. Some of the materials often used for such wound dressing include urine and concoctions made of charcoal and gunpowder with the belief of driving out evil spirits from the wounds.Clinicians must therefore be aware of these cultural beliefs and take them into consideration when managing Buruli ulcer wounds to prevent redressing at home after clinical treatment. This may go a long way to reduce secondary infections that have been observed in Buruli ulcer wounds.

  13. Spatiotemporal Co-existence of Two Mycobacterium ulcerans Clonal Complexes in the Offin River Valley of Ghana.

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    Araceli Lamelas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, comparative genome sequence analysis of African Mycobacterium ulcerans strains isolated from Buruli ulcer (BU lesion specimen has revealed a very limited genetic diversity of closely related isolates and a striking association between genotype and geographical origin of the patients. Here, we compared whole genome sequences of five M. ulcerans strains isolated in 2004 or 2013 from BU lesions of four residents of the Offin river valley with 48 strains isolated between 2002 and 2005 from BU lesions of individuals residing in the Densu river valley of Ghana. While all M. ulcerans isolates from the Densu river valley belonged to the same clonal complex, members of two distinct clonal complexes were found in the Offin river valley over space and time. The Offin strains were closely related to genotypes from either the Densu region or from the Asante Akim North district of Ghana. These results point towards an occasional involvement of a mobile reservoir in the transmission of M. ulcerans, enabling the spread of bacteria across different regions.

  14. Photodegradation of the Mycobacterium ulcerans toxin, mycolactones: considerations for handling and storage.

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    Estelle Marion

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mycolactones are toxins secreted by M. ulcerans, the etiological agent of Buruli ulcer. These toxins, which are the main virulence factors of the bacilli, are responsible for skin lesions. Considering their specificity for M. ulcerans and their presence in skin lesions even at early stages, mycolactones are promising candidates for the development of a diagnostic tool for M. ulcerans infection. Stability of purified mycolactones towards light and heat has not yet been investigated, despite the importance of such parameters in the selection of strategies for a diagnosis tool development. In this context, the effects of UV, light and temperature on mycolactone stability and biological activity were studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate the effect of these physical parameters, mycolactones were exposed to different wavelengths in several solvents and temperatures. Structural changes and biological activity were monitored. Whilst high temperature had no effect on mycolactones, UV irradiation (UV-A, UV-B and UV-C and sunlight exposure caused a considerable degradation, as revealed by LC-MS and NMR analysis, correlated with a loss of biological activity. Moreover, effect of UVs on mycolactone caused a photodegradation rather than a phototransformation due to the identification of degradation product. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates the high sensitivity of mycolactones to UVs as such it defines instructions for storage and handling.

  15. Steps Toward Creating A Therapeutic Community for Inpatients Suffering from Chronic Ulcers: Lessons from Allada Buruli Ulcer Treatment Hospital in Benin.

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    Arnaud Setondji Amoussouhoui

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Reducing social distance between hospital staff and patients and establishing clear lines of communication is a major challenge when providing in-patient care for people afflicted by Buruli ulcer (BU and chronic ulcers. Research on hospitals as therapeutic communities is virtually non-existent in Africa and is currently being called for by medical anthropologists working in the field of health service and policy planning. This paper describes a pioneering attempt to establish a therapeutic community for patients suffering from BU and other chronic ulcers requiring long term hospital care in Benin.A six-month pilot project was undertaken with the objectives of establishing a therapeutic community and evaluating its impact on practitioner and patient relations. The project was designed and implemented by a team of social scientists working in concert with the current and previous director of a hospital serving patients suffering from advanced stage BU and other chronic ulcers. Qualitative research initially investigated patients' understanding of their illness and its treatment, identified questions patients had about their hospitalization, and ascertained their level of social support. Newly designed question-answer health education sessions were developed. Following these hospital wide education sessions, open forums were held each week to provide an opportunity for patients and hospital staff to express concerns and render sources of discontent transparent. Patient group representatives then met with hospital staff to problem solve issues in a non-confrontational manner. Psychosocial support for individual patients was provided in a second intervention which took the form of drop-in counseling sessions with social scientists trained to serve as therapy facilitators and culture brokers.Interviews with patients revealed that most patients had very little information about the identity of their illness and the duration of their treatment. This

  16. "It is me who endures but my family that suffers": social isolation as a consequence of the household cost burden of Buruli ulcer free of charge hospital treatment.

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    Koen Peeters Grietens

    Full Text Available Despite free of charge biomedical treatment, the cost burden of Buruli ulcer disease (Bu hospitalisation in Central Cameroon accounts for 25% of households' yearly earnings, surpassing the threshold of 10%, which is generally considered catastrophic for the household economy, and calling into question the sustainability of current Bu programmes. The high non-medical costs and productivity loss for Bu patients and their households make household involvement in the healing process unsustainable. 63% of households cease providing social and financial support for patients as a coping strategy, resulting in the patient's isolation at the hospital. Social isolation itself was cited by in-patients as the principal cause for abandonment of biomedical treatment. These findings demonstrate that further research and investment in Bu are urgently needed to evaluate new intervention strategies that are socially acceptable and appropriate in the local context.

  17. Source tracking Mycobacterium ulcerans infections in the Ashanti region, Ghana.

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    Charles A Narh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although several studies have associated Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU infection, Buruli ulcer (BU, with slow moving water bodies, there is still no definite mode of transmission. Ecological and transmission studies suggest Variable Number Tandem Repeat (VNTR typing as a useful tool to differentiate MU strains from other Mycolactone Producing Mycobacteria (MPM. Deciphering the genetic relatedness of clinical and environmental isolates is seminal to determining reservoirs, vectors and transmission routes. In this study, we attempted to source-track MU infections to specific water bodies by matching VNTR profiles of MU in human samples to those in the environment. Environmental samples were collected from 10 water bodies in four BU endemic communities in the Ashanti region, Ghana. Four VNTR loci in MU Agy99 genome, were used to genotype environmental MU ecovars, and those from 14 confirmed BU patients within the same study area. Length polymorphism was confirmed with sequencing. MU was present in the 3 different types of water bodies, but significantly higher in biofilm samples. Four MU genotypes, designated W, X, Y and Z, were typed in both human and environmental samples. Other reported genotypes were only found in water bodies. Animal trapping identified 1 mouse with lesion characteristic of BU, which was confirmed as MU infection. Our findings suggest that patients may have been infected from community associated water bodies. Further, we present evidence that small mammals within endemic communities could be susceptible to MU infections. M. ulcerans transmission could involve several routes where humans have contact with risk environments, which may be further compounded by water bodies acting as vehicles for disseminating strains.

  18. Economic inequality caused by feedbacks between poverty and the dynamics of a rare tropical disease: the case of Buruli ulcer in sub-Saharan Africa.

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    Garchitorena, Andrés; Ngonghala, Calistus N; Guegan, Jean-Francois; Texier, Gaëtan; Bellanger, Martine; Bonds, Matthew; Roche, Benjamin

    2015-11-07

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) have received increasing attention in recent years by the global heath community, as they cumulatively constitute substantial burdens of disease as well as barriers for economic development. A number of common tropical diseases such as malaria, hookworm or schistosomiasis have well-documented economic impacts. However, much less is known about the population-level impacts of diseases that are rare but associated with high disability burden, which represent a great number of tropical diseases. Using an individual-based model of Buruli ulcer (BU), we demonstrate that, through feedbacks between health and economic status, such NTDs can have a significant impact on the economic structure of human populations even at low incidence levels. While average wealth is only marginally affected by BU, the economic conditions of certain subpopulations are impacted sufficiently to create changes in measurable population-level inequality. A reduction of the disability burden caused by BU can thus maximize the economic growth of the poorest subpopulations and reduce significantly the economic inequalities introduced by the disease in endemic regions. © 2015 The Author(s).

  19. Clinical, microbiological and pathological findings of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection in three Australian Possum species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn R O'Brien

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Buruli ulcer (BU is a skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, with endemicity predominantly in sub-Saharan Africa and south-eastern Australia. The mode of transmission and the environmental reservoir(s of the bacterium and remain elusive. Real-time PCR investigations have detected M. ulcerans DNA in a variety of Australian environmental samples, including the faeces of native possums with and without clinical evidence of infection. This report seeks to expand on previously published findings by the authors' investigative group with regards to clinical and subclinical disease in selected wild possum species in BU-endemic areas of Victoria, Australia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Twenty-seven clinical cases of M. ulcerans infection in free-ranging possums from southeastern Australia were identified retrospectively and prospectively between 1998-2011. Common ringtail possums (Pseudocheirus peregrinus, a common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula and a mountain brushtail possum (Trichosurus cunninghami were included in the clinically affected cohort. Most clinically apparent cases were adults with solitary or multiple ulcerative cutaneous lesions, generally confined to the face, limbs and/or tail. The disease was minor and self-limiting in the case of both Trichosurus spp. possums. In contrast, many of the common ringtail possums had cutaneous disease involving disparate anatomical sites, and in four cases there was evidence of systemic disease at post mortem examination. Where tested using real-time PCR targeted at IS2404, animals typically had significant levels of M. ulcerans DNA throughout the gut and/or faeces. A further 12 possums without cutaneous lesions were found to have PCR-positive gut contents and/or faeces (subclinical cases, and in one of these the organism was cultured from liver tissue. Comparisons were made between clinically and subclinically affected possums, and 61 PCR-negative, non-affected individuals

  20. What role do traditional beliefs play in treatment seeking and delay for Buruli ulcer disease?--insights from a mixed methods study in Cameroon.

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    Koen Peeters Grietens

    Full Text Available Victims of Buruli ulcer disease (BUD frequently report to specialized units at a late stage of the disease. This delay has been associated with local beliefs and a preference for traditional healing linked to a reportedly mystical origin of the disease. We assessed the role beliefs play in determining BUD sufferers' choice between traditional and biomedical treatments.Anthropological fieldwork was conducted in community and clinical settings in the region of Ayos and Akonolinga in Central Cameroon. The research design consisted of a mixed methods study, triangulating a qualitative strand based on ethnographic research and quantitative data obtained through a survey presented to all patients at the Ayos and Akonolinga hospitals (N = 79 at the time of study and in four endemic communities (N = 73 belonging to the hospitals' catchment area.The analysis of BUD sufferers' health-seeking behaviour showed extremely complex therapeutic itineraries, including various attempts and failures both in the biomedical and traditional fields. Contrary to expectations, nearly half of all hospital patients attributed their illness to mystical causes, while traditional healers admitted patients they perceived to be infected by natural causes. Moreover, both patients in hospitals and in communities often combined elements of both types of treatments. Ultimately, perceptions regarding the effectiveness of the treatment, the option for local treatment as a cost prevention strategy and the characteristics of the doctor-patient relationship were more determinant for treatment choice than beliefs.The ascription of delay and treatment choice to beliefs constitutes an over-simplification of BUD health-seeking behaviour and places the responsibility directly on the shoulders of BUD sufferers while potentially neglecting other structural elements. While more efficacious treatment in the biomedical sector is likely to reduce perceived mystical involvement in the

  1. Bactericidal activity does not predict sterilizing activity: the case of rifapentine in the murine model of Mycobacterium ulcerans disease.

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    Deepak V Almeida

    Full Text Available Since 2004, treatment of Mycobacterium ulcerans disease, or Buruli ulcer, has shifted from surgery to daily treatment with streptomycin (STR + rifampin (RIF for 8 weeks. For shortening treatment duration, we tested the potential of daily rifapentine (RPT, a long-acting rifamycin derivative, as a substitute for RIF.BALB/c mice were infected with M. ulcerans in the right hind footpad and treated either daily (7/7 with STR+RIF or five days/week (5/7 with STR+RIF or STR+RPT for 4 weeks, beginning 28 days after infection when CFU counts were 4.88±0.51. The relative efficacy of the drug treatments was compared by footpad CFU counts during treatment and median time to footpad swelling after treatment cessation as measure of sterilizing activity. All drug treatments were bactericidal. After 1 week of treatment, the decline in CFU counts was significantly greater in treated mice but not different between the three treated groups. After 2 weeks of treatment, the decline in CFU was greater in mice treated with STR+RPT 5/7 than in mice treated with STR+RIF 7/7 and STR+RIF 5/7. After 3 and 4 weeks of treatment, CFU counts were nil in mice treated with STR+RPT and reduced by more than 3 and 4 logs in mice treated with STR+RIF 5/7 and STR+RIF 7/7, respectively. In sharp contrast to the bactericidal activity, the sterilizing activity was not different between all drug regimens although it was in proportion to the treatment duration.The better bactericidal activity of daily STR+RIF and especially of STR+RPT did not translate into better prevention of relapse, possibly because relapse-freecure after treatment of Buruli ulcer is more related to the reversal of mycolactone-induced local immunodeficiency by drug treatment rather than to the bactericidal potency of drugs.

  2. Proteomic analysis of the action of the Mycobacterium ulcerans toxin mycolactone: targeting host cells cytoskeleton and collagen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José B Gama

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer (BU is a neglected tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. The tissue damage characteristic of BU lesions is known to be driven by the secretion of the potent lipidic exotoxin mycolactone. However, the molecular action of mycolactone on host cell biology mediating cytopathogenesis is not fully understood. Here we applied two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE to identify the mechanisms of mycolactone's cellular action in the L929 mouse fibroblast proteome. This revealed 20 changed spots corresponding to 18 proteins which were clustered mainly into cytoskeleton-related proteins (Dync1i2, Cfl1, Crmp2, Actg1, Stmn1 and collagen biosynthesis enzymes (Plod1, Plod3, P4ha1. In line with cytoskeleton conformational disarrangements that are observed by immunofluorescence, we found several regulators and constituents of both actin- and tubulin-cytoskeleton affected upon exposure to the toxin, providing a novel molecular basis for the effect of mycolactone. Consistent with these cytoskeleton-related alterations, accumulation of autophagosomes as well as an increased protein ubiquitination were observed in mycolactone-treated cells. In vivo analyses in a BU mouse model revealed mycolactone-dependent structural changes in collagen upon infection with M. ulcerans, associated with the reduction of dermal collagen content, which is in line with our proteomic finding of mycolactone-induced down-regulation of several collagen biosynthesis enzymes. Our results unveil the mechanisms of mycolactone-induced molecular cytopathogenesis on exposed host cells, with the toxin compromising cell structure and homeostasis by inducing cytoskeleton alterations, as well as disrupting tissue structure, by impairing the extracellular matrix biosynthesis.

  3. Proteomic analysis of the action of the Mycobacterium ulcerans toxin mycolactone: targeting host cells cytoskeleton and collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, José B; Ohlmeier, Steffen; Martins, Teresa G; Fraga, Alexandra G; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Carvalho, Maria A; Proença, Fernanda; Silva, Manuel T; Pedrosa, Jorge; Ludovico, Paula

    2014-08-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a neglected tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. The tissue damage characteristic of BU lesions is known to be driven by the secretion of the potent lipidic exotoxin mycolactone. However, the molecular action of mycolactone on host cell biology mediating cytopathogenesis is not fully understood. Here we applied two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) to identify the mechanisms of mycolactone's cellular action in the L929 mouse fibroblast proteome. This revealed 20 changed spots corresponding to 18 proteins which were clustered mainly into cytoskeleton-related proteins (Dync1i2, Cfl1, Crmp2, Actg1, Stmn1) and collagen biosynthesis enzymes (Plod1, Plod3, P4ha1). In line with cytoskeleton conformational disarrangements that are observed by immunofluorescence, we found several regulators and constituents of both actin- and tubulin-cytoskeleton affected upon exposure to the toxin, providing a novel molecular basis for the effect of mycolactone. Consistent with these cytoskeleton-related alterations, accumulation of autophagosomes as well as an increased protein ubiquitination were observed in mycolactone-treated cells. In vivo analyses in a BU mouse model revealed mycolactone-dependent structural changes in collagen upon infection with M. ulcerans, associated with the reduction of dermal collagen content, which is in line with our proteomic finding of mycolactone-induced down-regulation of several collagen biosynthesis enzymes. Our results unveil the mechanisms of mycolactone-induced molecular cytopathogenesis on exposed host cells, with the toxin compromising cell structure and homeostasis by inducing cytoskeleton alterations, as well as disrupting tissue structure, by impairing the extracellular matrix biosynthesis.

  4. Identification of Ser/Thr kinase and forkhead associated domains in Mycobacterium ulcerans: characterization of novel association between protein kinase Q and MupFHA.

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    Gunjan Arora

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer in humans, is unique among the members of Mycobacterium genus due to the presence of the virulence determinant megaplasmid pMUM001. This plasmid encodes multiple virulence-associated genes, including mup011, which is an uncharacterized Ser/Thr protein kinase (STPK PknQ.In this study, we have characterized PknQ and explored its interaction with MupFHA (Mup018c, a FHA domain containing protein also encoded by pMUM001. MupFHA was found to interact with PknQ and suppress its autophosphorylation. Subsequent protein-protein docking and molecular dynamic simulation analyses showed that this interaction involves the FHA domain of MupFHA and PknQ activation loop residues Ser170 and Thr174. FHA domains are known to recognize phosphothreonine residues, and therefore, MupFHA may be acting as one of the few unusual FHA-domain having overlapping specificity. Additionally, we elucidated the PknQ-dependent regulation of MupDivIVA (Mup012c, which is a DivIVA domain containing protein encoded by pMUM001. MupDivIVA interacts with MupFHA and this interaction may also involve phospho-threonine/serine residues of MupDivIVA.Together, these results describe novel signaling mechanisms in M. ulcerans and show a three-way regulation of PknQ, MupFHA, and MupDivIVA. FHA domains have been considered to be only pThr specific and our results indicate a novel mechanism of pSer as well as pThr interaction exhibited by MupFHA. These results signify the need of further re-evaluating the FHA domain -pThr/pSer interaction model. MupFHA may serve as the ideal candidate for structural studies on this unique class of modular enzymes.

  5. Corynebacterium ulcerans cutaneous diphtheria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Luke S P; Leslie, Asuka; Meltzer, Margie; Sandison, Ann; Efstratiou, Androulla; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2015-09-01

    We describe the case of a patient with cutaneous diphtheria caused by toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans who developed a right hand flexor sheath infection and symptoms of sepsis such as fever, tachycardia, and elevated C-reactive protein, after contact with domestic cats and dogs, and a fox. We summarise the epidemiology, clinical presentation, microbiology, diagnosis, therapy, and public health aspects of this disease, with emphasis on improving recognition. In many European countries, C ulcerans has become the organism commonly associated with cutaneous diphtheria, usually seen as an imported tropical disease or resulting from contact with domestic and agricultural animals. Diagnosis relies on bacterial culture and confirmation of toxin production, with management requiring appropriate antimicrobial therapy and prompt administration of antitoxin, if necessary. Early diagnosis is essential for implementation of control measures and clear guidelines are needed to assist clinicians in managing clinical diphtheria. This case was a catalyst to the redrafting of the 2014 national UK interim guidelines for the public health management of diphtheria, released as final guidelines in March, 2015. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of Ser/Thr kinase and Forkhead Associated Domains in Mycobacterium ulcerans: Characterization of Novel Association between Protein Kinase Q and MupFHA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Anshika; Joshi, Jayadev; Virmani, Richa; Gupta, Meetu; Verma, Nupur; Maji, Abhijit; Misra, Richa; Baronian, Grégory; Pandey, Amit K.; Molle, Virginie; Singh, Yogendra

    2014-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer in humans, is unique among the members of Mycobacterium genus due to the presence of the virulence determinant megaplasmid pMUM001. This plasmid encodes multiple virulence-associated genes, including mup011, which is an uncharacterized Ser/Thr protein kinase (STPK) PknQ. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we have characterized PknQ and explored its interaction with MupFHA (Mup018c), a FHA domain containing protein also encoded by pMUM001. MupFHA was found to interact with PknQ and suppress its autophosphorylation. Subsequent protein-protein docking and molecular dynamic simulation analyses showed that this interaction involves the FHA domain of MupFHA and PknQ activation loop residues Ser170 and Thr174. FHA domains are known to recognize phosphothreonine residues, and therefore, MupFHA may be acting as one of the few unusual FHA-domain having overlapping specificity. Additionally, we elucidated the PknQ-dependent regulation of MupDivIVA (Mup012c), which is a DivIVA domain containing protein encoded by pMUM001. MupDivIVA interacts with MupFHA and this interaction may also involve phospho-threonine/serine residues of MupDivIVA. Conclusions/Significance Together, these results describe novel signaling mechanisms in M. ulcerans and show a three-way regulation of PknQ, MupFHA, and MupDivIVA. FHA domains have been considered to be only pThr specific and our results indicate a novel mechanism of pSer as well as pThr interaction exhibited by MupFHA. These results signify the need of further re-evaluating the FHA domain –pThr/pSer interaction model. MupFHA may serve as the ideal candidate for structural studies on this unique class of modular enzymes. PMID:25412098

  7. Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the stomach and intestines. In certain circumstances stress can help cause ulcers. But this usually only happens when illness involving severe emotional or physical stress is involved — such as when someone too sick ...

  8. Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... These include both regular and decaffeinated coffee, tea, chocolate, meat extracts, alcohol, black pepper, chili powder, mustard ... Disease, peptic ulcers, proton pump inhibitor, sucralfate, triple therapy January 1, 1996 Copyright © American Academy of Family ...

  9. Buruli Ulcer: Treatment Challenges at Three Centres in Ghana

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    Pius Agbenorku

    2012-01-01

    . Duration of hospital stay was clearly correlated with the time spent at home prior to admission; spearman’s rank correlation coefficient was 0.72 (95% CI 0.42–0.87. Conclusion. Delays in seeking treatment among BU patients were the main factor which resulted in most of the other factors contributing to the challenges in treatment. A combination of psychosocial and biomedical approach was proposed as holistic method to alleviate the challenges in BU treatment.

  10. THE SOCIOECONOMIC BURDEN OF BURULI ULCER DISEASE IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Apusigah

    Ghana Journal of Development Studies, 9(1): May 2012. Page 5 ... We highlight the social and economic burden of 86 BU patients studied in a Ghanaian district in .... Some of the emotion-focused strategies they noted included rationalization.

  11. Clinical efficacy of Rifampicin and Streptomycin in combination ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a cutaneous neglected tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Synthesizing the evidence on their efficacy of antibiotic in the management of BU can help to better define their roles, identify weaknesses and inform clinicians on relevant measures than can be used to control BU.

  12. Toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans isolated from a free-roaming red fox (Vulpes vulpes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sting, Reinhard; Ketterer-Pintur, Sandra; Contzen, Matthias; Mauder, Norman; Süss-Dombrowski, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium (C.) ulcerans could be isolated from the spleen of a red fox (Vulpes vulpes) that had been found dead in the state of Baden-Württemberg, Germany. Pathohistological examination suggested that the fox had died of distemper, as was confirmed by PCR. The isolate was identified biochemically, by MALDI-TOF MS, FT-IR and by partial 16S rRNA, rpoB and tox gene sequencing. Using the Elek test the C. ulcerans isolate demonstrated diphtheria toxin production. FT-IR and sequencing data obtained from the C. ulcerans isolate from the red fox showed higher similarity to isolates from humans than to those from wild game.

  13. A Simple PCR Method for Rapid Genotype Analysis of Mycobacterium ulcerans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinear, Timothy; Davies, John K.; Jenkin, Grant A.; Portaels, Françoise; Ross, Bruce C.; OppEdIsano, Frances; Purcell, Maria; Hayman, John A.; Johnson, Paul D. R.

    2000-01-01

    Two high-copy-number insertion sequences, IS2404 and IS2606, were recently identified in Mycobacterium ulcerans and were shown by Southern hybridization to possess restriction fragment length polymorphism between strains from different geographic origins. We have designed a simple genotyping method that captures these differences by PCR amplification of the region between adjacent copies of IS2404 and IS2606. We have called this system 2426 PCR. The method is rapid, reproducible, sensitive, and specific for M. ulcerans, and it has confirmed previous studies suggesting a clonal population structure of M. ulcerans within a geographic region. M. ulcerans isolates from Australia, Papua New Guinea, Malaysia, Surinam, Mexico, Japan, China, and several countries in Africa were easily differentiated based on an array of 4 to 14 PCR products ranging in size from 200 to 900 bp. Numerical analysis of the banding patterns suggested a close evolutionary link between M. ulcerans isolates from Africa and southeast Asia. The application of 2426 PCR to total DNA, extracted directly from M. ulcerans-infected tissue specimens without culture, demonstrated the sensitivity and specificity of this method and confirmed for the first time that both animal and human isolates from areas of endemicity in southeast Australia have the same genotype. PMID:10747130

  14. Peptic Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people of any age — even kids — can develop ulcers. About Peptic Ulcers An ulcer is a sore, which means it's ... that most people can be cured. Causes of Peptic Ulcers in Kids Although stress and certain foods may ...

  15. [Skin and Soft Tissue Infections Due to Corynebacterium ulcerans - Case Reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenssen, Christian; Schwede, Ilona; Neumann, Volker; Pietsch, Cristine; Handrick, Werner

    2017-10-01

    History and clinical findings  We report on three patients suffering from skin and soft tissue infections of the legs due to toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans strains. In all three patients, there was a predisposition due to chronic diseases. Three patients had domestic animals (cat, dog) in their households. Investigations and diagnosis  A mixed bacterial flora including Corynebacterium ulcerans was found in wound swab samples. Diphtheric toxin was produced by the Corynebacterium ulcerans strains in all three cases. Treatment and course  In all three patients, successful handling of the skin and soft tissue infections was possible by combining local treatment with antibiotics. Diphtheria antitoxin was not administered in any case. Conclusion  Based on a review of the recent literature pathogenesis, clinical symptoms and signs, diagnostics and therapy of skin and soft tissue infections due to Corynebacterium ulcerans are discussed. Corynebacterium ulcerans should be considered as a potential cause of severe skin and soft tissue infections. Occupational or domestic animal contacts should be evaluated. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Difteria pelo Corynebacterium ulcerans: uma zoonose emergente no Brasil e no mundo

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    Alexandre Alves de Souza de Oliveira Dias

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O artigo revisa a literatura sobre a emergência de infecções humanas causadas por Corynebacterium ulcerans em diversos países, incluindo o Brasil. Foi realizada análise de artigos publicados entre 1926 e 2011 nas bases Medline/PubMed e SciELO, bem como artigos e informes do Ministério da Saúde. Apresenta-se um esquema de triagem, rápido, econômico e de fácil execução, capaz de permitir a realização do diagnóstico presuntivo de C. ulcerans e C. diphtheriae na maioria dos laboratórios brasileiros públicos e privados. A circulação de C. ulcerans em vários países, aliada aos recentes casos de isolamento do patógeno no Rio de Janeiro, é um alerta a clínicos, veterinários e microbiologistas sobre a ocorrência de difteria zoonótica e a circulação do C. ulcerans em regiões urbanas e rurais do território nacional e/ou da América Latina.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of Rifampin and Clarithromycin in Patients Treated for Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alffenaar, J. W. C.; Nienhuis, W. A.; de Velde, F.; Zuur, A. T.; Wessels, A. M. A.; Almeida, D.; Grosset, J.; Adjei, O.; Uges, D. R. A.; van der Werf, T. S.

    In a randomized controlled trial in Ghana, treatment of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection with streptomycin (SM)-rifampin (RIF) for 8 weeks was compared with treatment with SM-RIF for 4 weeks followed by treatment with RIF-clarithromycin (CLA) for 4 weeks. The extent of the interaction of RIF and CLA

  18. Peptic Ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A peptic ulcer is a sore in the lining of your stomach or your duodenum, the first part of your ... Comes and goes for several days or weeks Peptic ulcers happen when the acids that help you digest ...

  19. Stomach ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... erode the stomach wall. A major cause of stomach ulcers is the bacteria called Helicobacter pylori . Treatment regimens for ulcers caused this bacterium usually include medications to suppress the stomach acid as well as antibiotics to eradicate the ...

  20. Ugh! Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... believed that ulcers were caused by stress and spicy foods. Then, in 1982, two doctors (Barry Marshall and ... not develop ulcers. Doctors still aren't sure why, but they think that part ... of pain relievers , like aspirin or ibuprofen, can cause ulcers in some ...

  1. Mycobacterium ulcerans in the Elderly: More Severe Disease and Suboptimal Outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P O'Brien

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The clinical presentation of M. ulcerans disease and the safety and effectiveness of treatment may differ in elderly compared with younger populations related to relative immune defficiencies, co-morbidities and drug interactions. However, elderly populations with M. ulcerans disease have not been comprehensively studied.A retrospective analysis was performed on an observational cohort of all confirmed M. ulcerans cases managed at Barwon Health from 1/1/1998-31/12/2014. The cohort included 327 patients; 131(40.0% ≥65 years and 196(60.0% <65 years of age. Patients ≥65 years had a shorter median duration of symptoms prior to diagnosis (p<0.01, a higher proportion with diabetes (p<0.001 and immune suppression (p<0.001, and were more likely to have lesions that were multiple (OR 4.67, 95% CI 1.78-12.31, p<0.001 and WHO category 3 (OR 4.59, 95% CI 1.98-10.59, p<0.001. Antibiotic complications occurred in 69(24.3% treatment episodes at an increased incidence in those aged ≥65 years (OR 5.29, 95% CI 2.81-9.98, p<0.001. There were 4(1.2% deaths, with significantly more in the age-group ≥65 years (4 compared with 0 deaths, p = 0.01. The overall treatment success rate was 92.2%. For the age-group ≥65 years there was a reduced rate of treatment success overall (OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.14-0.80, p = <0.01 and when surgery was used alone (OR 0.21, 95% CI 0.06-0.76, p<0.01. Patients ≥65 years were more likely to have a paradoxical reaction (OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.17-3.62, p = 0.01.Elderly patients comprise a significant proportion of M. ulcerans disease patients in Australian populations and present with more severe and advanced disease forms. Currently recommended treatments are associated with increased toxicity and reduced effectiveness in elderly populations. Increased efforts are required to diagnose M. ulcerans earlier in elderly populations, and research is urgently required to develop more effective and less toxic treatments for this age-group.

  2. Pressure Ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Monfre, Jill M.

    2016-01-01

    Unrelieved pressure or friction of the skin, particularly over bony prominences, can lead to pressure ulcers, which affect up to one third of people in hospitals or community care, and one fifth of nursing home residents. Pressure ulcers are more likely in people with reduced mobility and poor skin condition, such as older people or those with vascular disease.

  3. Antibiotic complications during the treatment of Mycobacterium ulcerans disease in Australian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Daniel P; Friedman, Deborah; Hughes, Andrew; Walton, Aaron; Athan, Eugene

    2017-09-01

    Antibiotics are the recommended first-line treatment for Mycobacterium ulcerans disease. Antibiotic toxicity is common in Australian patients, yet antibiotic complication rates and their risk factors have not been determined. To determine the incidence rate and risk factors for antibiotic toxicity in Australian patients treated for M. ulcerans disease. An analysis of severe antibiotic complications was performed using data from a prospective cohort of M. ulcerans cases managed at Barwon Health from 1 January 1998 to 30 June 2016. A severe antibiotic complication was defined as an antibiotic adverse event that required its cessation. Antibiotic complication rates and their associations were assessed using a Poisson regression model. A total of 337 patients was included; 184 (54.6%) males and median age 57 years (interquartile range (IQR) 36-73 years). Median antibiotic treatment duration was 56 days (IQR 49-76 days). Seventy-five (22.2%) patients experienced severe antibiotic complications after a median 28 days (IQR 17-45 days) at a rate of 141.53 per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval (CI) 112.86-177.47). Eleven (14.7%) patients required hospitalisation. Compared with rifampicin/clarithromycin combinations, severe complication rates were not increased for rifampicin/ciprofloxacin (rate ratio (RR) 1.49, 95% CI 0.89-2.50, P = 0.13) or rifampicin/moxifloxacin (RR 2.54, 95% CI 0.76-8.50, P = 0.13) combinations, but were significantly increased for 'other' combinations (RR 2.53, 95% CI 1.13-5.68, P = 0.03). In a multivariable analysis, severe complication rates were significantly increased with reduced estimated glomerular filtration rates (EGFR) (adjusted rate ratio (aRR) 2.65, 95% CI 1.24-5.65 for EGFR 60-89 mL/min and aRR 1.31, 95% CI 0.49-3.53 for EGFR 0-59 mL/min compared with EGFR ≥90 mL/min, P antibiotic complications during M. ulcerans treatment are high with increased rates independently associated with reduced renal function and female

  4. Ulcerative Proctitis

    OpenAIRE

    Whitlow, Charles B.

    2004-01-01

    Ulcerative proctitis is an idiopathic mucosal inflammatory disease involving only the rectum and is therefore an anatomically limited form of ulcerative colitis. Diagnosis is made based on clinical presentation, endoscopic appearance, and histopathology. Additionally, other etiologies of proctitis are excluded. The course of the disease is variable ranging from complete resolution to easily maintained remission to frequent relapses or refractory disease. Extension of inflammatory changes invo...

  5. Successful outcomes with oral fluoroquinolones combined with rifampicin in the treatment of Mycobacterium ulcerans: an observational cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P O'Brien

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization currently recommends combined streptomycin and rifampicin antibiotic treatment as first-line therapy for Mycobacterium ulcerans infections. Alternatives are needed when these are not tolerated or accepted by patients, contraindicated, or neither accessible nor affordable. Despite in vitro effectiveness, clinical evidence for fluoroquinolone antibiotic use against Mycobacterium ulcerans is lacking. We describe outcomes and tolerability of fluoroquinolone-containing antibiotic regimens for Mycobacterium ulcerans in south-eastern Australia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Analysis was performed of prospectively collected data including all primary Mycobacterium ulcerans infections treated at Barwon Health between 1998 and 2010. Medical treatment involved antibiotic use for more than 7 days; surgical treatment involved surgical excision of a lesion. Treatment success was defined as complete lesion healing without recurrence at 12 months follow-up. A complication was defined as an adverse event attributed to an antibiotic that required its cessation. A total of 133 patients with 137 lesions were studied. Median age was 62 years (range 3-94 years. 47 (34% had surgical treatment alone, and 90 (66% had combined surgical and medical treatment. Rifampicin and ciprofloxacin comprised 61% and rifampicin and clarithromycin 23% of first-line antibiotic regimens. 13/47 (30% treated with surgery alone failed treatment compared to 0/90 (0% of those treated with combination medical and surgical treatment (p<0.0001. There was no difference in treatment success rate for antibiotic combinations containing a fluoroquinolone (61/61 cases; 100% compared with those not containing a fluoroquinolone (29/29 cases; 100%. Complication rates were similar between ciprofloxacin and rifampicin (31% and rifampicin and clarithromycin (33% regimens (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.27-2.99. Paradoxical reactions during treatment were observed in 8 (9% of

  6. Screening of antifungal azole drugs and agrochemicals with an adapted alamarBlue-based assay demonstrates antibacterial activity of croconazole against Mycobacterium ulcerans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Nicole; Röltgen, Katharina; Witschel, Matthias; Pluschke, Gerd

    2012-12-01

    An alamarBlue-based growth inhibition assay has been adapted for the thermosensitive and slow-growing pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans. The standardized test procedure enables medium-throughput screening of preselected compound libraries. Testing of a set of 48 azoles with known antifungal activity led to the identification of an imidazole antifungal displaying an inhibitory dose (ID) of 9 μM for M. ulcerans.

  7. Antibody-Mediated Neutralization of the Exotoxin Mycolactone, the Main Virulence Factor Produced by Mycobacterium ulcerans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Dangy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycolactone, the macrolide exotoxin produced by Mycobacterium ulcerans, causes extensive tissue destruction by inducing apoptosis of host cells. In this study, we aimed at the production of antibodies that could neutralize the cytotoxic activities of mycolactone.Using the B cell hybridoma technology, we generated a series of monoclonal antibodies with specificity for mycolactone from spleen cells of mice immunized with the protein conjugate of a truncated synthetic mycolactone derivative. L929 fibroblasts were used as a model system to investigate whether these antibodies can inhibit the biological effects of mycolactone. By measuring the metabolic activity of the fibroblasts, we found that anti-mycolactone mAbs can completely neutralize the cytotoxic activity of mycolactone.The toxin neutralizing capacity of anti-mycolactone mAbs supports the concept of evaluating the macrolide toxin as vaccine target.

  8. Mouth ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gingivostomatitis Herpes simplex ( fever blister ) Leukoplakia Oral cancer Oral lichen planus Oral thrush A skin sore caused by histoplasmosis may ... mouth Images Oral thrush Canker sore (aphthous ulcer) Lichen planus on the oral mucosa Mouth sores References Daniels TE, Jordan RC. ...

  9. Venous Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprini, J.A.; Partsch, H.; Simman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence. PMID:26236636

  10. Oropharynx Ulceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Sylwanowicz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 31-year-old male presented to the emergency department (ED with worsening constant left sided throat pain over the past four months. The patient reports that he was brushing his teeth when his dog jumped onto his back causing his toothbrush to puncture the back of his throat, resulting in immediate bleeding and discomfort. The bleeding subsided and the patient did not seek medical care. The pain radiated to his left ear and the back of the neck. He also noted a change in his voice. The day before presenting to the ED the patient noted subjective fevers, hemoptysis and drooling, which led him to seek medical care. Significant findings: The photograph demonstrates an area of ulcerative tissue at the left palatine tonsil without surrounding erythema or purulent drainage. The computed tomography (CT scan shows a large ulceration of the left soft palate and palatine tonsil (red arrow. There is no evidence of skull base osteomyelitis. There is suppurative lymphadenopathy with partial left jugular vein compression due to mass effect (yellow highlight. There is mild nasopharyngeal airway narrowing with architectural distortion (blue arrow, but no other evidence of airway obstruction. Discussion: The oral cavity is prone to trauma leading to the formation of superficial ulcerations. There are many causes of mechanical trauma, most commonly accidental biting. Chemical, electrical and thermal insults are also possibilities. Poor fitting dental devices and fractured or malformed teeth can also be etiologies.1 Traumatic ulcerations are most common in children given bruxism and thumb sucking. However, a broad differential must be considered including malignant and premalignant lesions, infections of the oral mucosa, aphthous ulcerations and autoimmune diseases.2, 3 Chronic ulcerations are associated with superimposed infection, but there has not been established an association of malignant transformation of the oral mucosa after

  11. Vécu et représentation de l'ulcère de Buruli dans le district sanitaire ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ulcère de Buruli et de déterminer le vécu de la maladie. Il s'est agi d'une étude prospective qui s'est déroulée dans le District Sanitaire de Sotouboua d'Août à septembre 2008. Les 35 malades inclus dans l'étude ont été identifiés à partir des ...

  12. Risk factors for Buruli ulcer in Côte d'Ivoire: Results of a case-control ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    history of BCG vaccination (ORa = 5.0, CI 1.7 - 14.3), presence of a case ≤15 years (ORa = 8.3, CI 2.8 -. 24.1), having a .... Twenty nine (25%) cases did not have a pro- fession. ..... the early 90's, this association was not con-firmed even.

  13. Stasis dermatitis and ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ulcers; Ulcers - venous; Venous ulcer; Venous insufficiency - stasis dermatitis; Vein - stasis dermatitis ... veins. Some people with venous insufficiency develop stasis dermatitis. Blood pools in the veins of the lower ...

  14. Anti-ulcer Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explains the procedure of ethanol-induced ulcer to check the protective effect of drugs over induced ulcer in rats. Ulcer is defined as the erosion in the lining of the stomach or duodenum and is caused by the disruptions of the gastric mucosal defence and repair systems. Ulceration of stomach is called gastric ulcer and that of duodenum is called duodenal ulcer and together peptic ulcer. In clinical practice, peptic ulcer is one of the most prevalent gastrointestinal disorders, which commonly occurs in developed countries.

  15. Ulcers of stomach body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oster, A.N.; Rizaev, M.N.

    1986-01-01

    Symptoms of the roentgenologic image in differential diagnosis of nonmalignant ulcers and stomach carcinomas ulcerated are presented. Problems on X-ray semiotics of ulcerations, data on X-ray represenetation of ulcer evolution as well as postulcer changes in the stomach are interpreted

  16. Diabetic foot disease: impact of ulcer location on ulcer healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pickwell, KM; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Kars, M

    2013-01-01

    Healing of heel ulcers in patients with diabetes is considered to be poor, but there is relatively little information on the influence of ulcer location on ulcer healing.......Healing of heel ulcers in patients with diabetes is considered to be poor, but there is relatively little information on the influence of ulcer location on ulcer healing....

  17. Peptic ulcer perforation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FinePrint

    2015-06-01

    Jun 1, 2015 ... Peptic ulcer perforation is one of the surgical complications of peptic ulcer ... Treatment can be operative or non-operative followed by proton .... chronic gastritis without evidence of ... inhibits pancreatic bicarbonate secretion.

  18. Marjolin's Ulcers: A Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alasia Datonye

    remains a feature of this pathology even in recent times. Prognosis ... marjolin's ulcers such as chronic leg ulcers and poorly managed burns ... the distribution of the disease. ..... Squamous cell carcinoma complicating chronic venous leg.

  19. Peptic Ulcer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Site ACG Patients Home / Digestive Health Topic / Peptic Ulcer Disease Peptic Ulcer Disease Basics Overview An “ulcer” is an open ... for pain in patients at risk for peptic ulcer disease. Peptic – caused by acid. PPIs – P roton P ump ...

  20. Peptic ulcer disease - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or raw area in the lining of the stomach (gastric ulcer) or upper part of the small intestine (duodenal ... You have peptic ulcer disease (PUD). You may have had tests to help diagnose your ulcer. One of these tests may have ...

  1. Definition and Facts for Peptic Ulcers (Stomach Ulcers)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an H. pylori infection never develop a peptic ulcer. Peptic ulcers caused by H. pylori are uncommon in ... saliva or other bodily fluids. 3 Who develops peptic ulcers caused by tumors? People who have Zollinger-Ellison ...

  2. Screening for Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Corynebacterium ulcerans in patients with upper respiratory tract infections 2007-2008: a multicentre European study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wagner, K S

    2011-04-01

    Diphtheria is now rare in most European countries but, when cases do arise, the case fatality rate is high (5-10%). Because few countries continue to routinely screen for the causative organisms of diphtheria, the extent to which they are circulating amongst different European populations is largely unknown. During 2007-2008, ten European countries each screened between 968 and 8551 throat swabs from patients with upper respiratory tract infections. Six toxigenic strains of Corynebacterium diphtheriae were identified: two from symptomatic patients in Latvia (the country with the highest reported incidence of diphtheria in the European Union) and four from Lithuania (two cases, two carriers); the last reported case of diphtheria in Lithuania was in 2002. Carriage rates of non-toxigenic organisms ranged from 0 (Bulgaria, Finland, Greece, Ireland, Italy) to 4.0 per 1000 (95% CI 2.0-7.1) in Turkey. A total of 28 non-toxigenic strains were identified during the study (26 C. diphtheriae, one Corynebacterium ulcerans, one Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis). The non-toxigenic C. ulcerans strain was isolated from the UK, the country with the highest reported incidence of cases due to C. ulcerans. Of the eleven ribotypes detected, Cluj was seen most frequently in the non-toxigenic isolates and, amongst toxigenic isolates, the major epidemic clone, Sankt-Petersburg, is still in circulation. Isolation of toxigenic C. diphtheriae and non-toxigenic C. diphtheriae and C. ulcerans in highly-vaccinated populations highlights the need to maintain microbiological surveillance, laboratory expertise and an awareness of these organisms amongst public health specialists, microbiologists and clinicians.

  3. Symptoms and Causes of Peptic Ulcer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ulcer. How do H. pylori cause a peptic ulcer and peptic ulcer disease? H. pylori are spiral-shaped bacteria that ... peptic ulcer. How do tumors from ZES cause peptic ulcers? Zollinger-Ellison syndrome is a rare disorder that ...

  4. Gastroduodenal ulceration in foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becht, J L; Byars, T D

    1986-07-01

    Gastroduodenal ulceration is becoming recognised as an important disease in foals during the first few months of life. Aetiopathogenesis is presumed to be similar to peptic disease in humans associated with back diffusion of hydrogen ions into the mucosa. Many factors have been incriminated as predisposing foals to ulceration but few have been proven. To date, use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents has been the only documented cause of gastroduodenal ulceration in foals. The clustering of affected foals on certain farms suggests an infectious aetiology but attempts to identify a causative organism have been unsuccessful. Four clinical syndromes defined for foals with gastroduodenal ulceration include: silent ulcers, which occur most often in the non-glandular stomach along the margo plicatus and are identified as incidental findings at necropsy; active ulcers which are often manifested by abdominal pain, excessive salivation and bruxism; perforating ulcers which usually result in a severe, diffuse peritonitis; and pyloric or duodenal obstruction from a healing ulcer. General approaches to therapy of a foal with active ulceration consist of reduction of gastric acidity and enhancement of mucosal protection. Antacids and type 2 histamine receptor antagonists are used most often to neutralise or decrease acid secretion, respectively. Sucralfate, a locally active sulphated sucrose preparation, is commonly used as a cytoprotective agent. The efficacy and safety of many products used have not been evaluated adequately in foals. Perforating ulcers are usually associated with death or humane destruction of the foal because of fulminating peritonitis. Surgical intervention and bypass procedures are indicated in foals that develop pyloric or duodenal obstructions from healing ulcers.

  5. Treatment of peptic ulcer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G. N.

    1998-01-01

    The current therapy of choice for all Helicobacter pylori-associated ulcer disease is eradication therapy. Although adequate therapeutic regimens are currently available, often still ineffective therapies are tried. Cure of the infection essentially eliminates the ulcer diathesis. Cure of the

  6. The stress ulcer syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.A. van Essen

    1986-01-01

    textabstractThe stress ulcer syndrome is described in this thesis. This syndrome is seen in patients admitted to intensive care departments or being treated in field hospitals, in disaster areas, or battle fields. Acute mucosal lesions associated with burns (Curling's ulcers) and central nervous

  7. Neonatal Pressure Ulcer Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheans, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of pressure ulcers in acutely ill infants and children ranges up to 27 percent in intensive care units, with a range of 16-19 percent in NICUs. Anatomic, physiologic, and developmental factors place ill and preterm newborns at risk for skin breakdown. Two case studies illustrate these factors, and best practices for pressure ulcer prevention are described.

  8. Pressure Ulcers Surveillance Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Esin Gencer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pressure ulcer is a chronic wound. It reduces the quality of life of the elderly and individuals with restricted range of motion. It prolongs hospital stay and increases the risk of complications. The cost is quite high. Preventive actions for the prevention of pressure ulcers should be developed. Planning protocols and standards of care are among the main targets. Material and Method: Research was conducted in one-year period between 2012 May and 2013 May on patients who were followed up in Akdeniz University Hospital clinics and intensive care unit with pressure ulcers. The research population consisted of 569 patients. Patient data were recorded in SPSS 16 for Windows program. Statistical analyzes were performed with retrospective methods. The demographic characteristics of patients with pressure ulcers were analyzed as frequency and descriptive statistics. Prevalence and incidence of one year were calculated. Results: Of the patients, 58% were males, 42% were females. Of the patients, 36% were in the age range of 61-80 years, and their average length of stay was 42,9 days. Of the patients, 70% were at stage 2 and 3. In 15% of patients pressure ulcers occurred on the first day of hospitalization. Pressure ulcers were developed between days 2 and 10 in 59% of the patients. Prevalence rate was 2.5%, the incidence was 1.9%, the prevalence rate was 5.9% in the intensive care unit. Conclusion: It is easier to prevent pressure ulcers than treating.

  9. Superficial skin ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samaila, Modupeola O.; Rafindadi, Abdulmumini H.; Oluwole, Olabode P.; Adewuyi, Sunday A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective was to determine the underlying cause of superficial skin ulcers over a 15-year period. A retrospective histopathological analysis of 670 cases of superficial skin ulcers diagnosed in the Dept. of Pathology, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Nigeria from January 1991 to December 2005. A total of 670 superficial skin ulcers were analyzed. The mail to female gender ratio was 409:261(1.5:1.0) and a peakage frequency of 44.3 %( 297) in the 5th and 6th decades. Spectrum of lesions encountered was categorized into inflammatory, infections, benign and malignant diseases. The malignant lesions were 309 (46.1%), non-specific inflammation 302 (45.1%), granulation tissue 25 (3.7%) and pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia 14 (2.1%). A total of 18(2.7%) specific infections were encountered, which included bacterial, fungal and viral infection. Benign lesions were 2(0.3%), comprising of neurofibroma and Bowen's disease. The most common malignant lesion was squamous cell carcinoma 203 (30.3%) with a male to female ratio of 128:75 (1.7:1.0). Of these 161 were well differentiated tumors. The lower limb was the prevalent site distribution of all the ulcers. Superficial ulcers may be harbinger of malignant diseases. Squamous cell carcinoma remains the most common malignant lesion arising from chronic superficial ulcers from our setting. Adequate tissue biopsy and early diagnosis may reduce the attendant morbidity of these ulcers. (author)

  10. Peripheral Ulcerative Keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... oval in shape. Diagnosis A doctor's evaluation Sometimes culture The diagnosis of peripheral ulcerative keratitis is suspected when the doctor sees the affected cornea in a person who also has a severe and/or long- ...

  11. Giant duodenal ulcers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric Benjamin Newton; Mark R Versland; Thomas E Sepe

    2008-01-01

    Giant duodenal ulcers (GDUs) are a subset of duodenal ulcers that have historically resulted in greater morbidity than usual duodenal ulcers. Until recently,few cases had been successfully treated with medical therapy. However, the widespread use of endoscopy,the introduction of H-2 receptor blockers and proton pump inhibitors, and the improvement in surgical techniques all have revolutionized the diagnosis,treatment and outcome of this condition. Nevertheless,GDUs are still associated with high rates of morbidity,mortality and complications. Thus, surgical evaluation of a patient with a GDU should remain an integral part of patient care. These giant variants, while usually benign, can frequently harbor malignancy. A careful review of the literature highlights the important differences when comparing GDUs to classical peptic ulcers and why they must be thought of differently than their more common counterpart.

  12. Perforated peptic ulcer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søreide, Kjetil; Thorsen, Kenneth; Harrison, Ewen M

    2015-01-01

    Perforated peptic ulcer is a common emergency condition worldwide, with associated mortality rates of up to 30%. A scarcity of high-quality studies about the condition limits the knowledge base for clinical decision making, but a few published randomised trials are available. Although Helicobacter...... need further assessment. Adequate trials with low risk of bias are urgently needed to provide better evidence. We summarise the evidence for perforated peptic ulcer management and identify directions for future clinical research....

  13. Radiation induced esophageal ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Tatsuyuki; Endo, Mitsuo; Yamazaki, Shigeru

    1990-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman was referred to us on Dec. 22, 1986 because of dysphagia and esophageal ulcer. She had a previous history of left radical mastectomy for breast cancer, followed by postoperative 60 Co irradiation to parasternal and supraclavicular regions with 50 Gy about 15 years before. UGIs and endoscopy showed a small ulcer surrounded by submucosal tumor-like protrusion in the esophagus at the thoracic inlet. Examination one month later revealed the ulcer which became larger despite medical treatment, now measuring 1 cm in diameter. Severe dysphagia continued. Right thoractomy and subtotal esophagectomy were performed on Jan 13, 1987. Histological examination revealed nonspecific ulcer, 5 cm in diameter, surrounded by fibrous granulation tissue. Proliferation of dilated capillary vessels was also seen in the bottom of the ulcer, the surrounding wall of which was free from remarkable infiltration of inflammatory cells. Based on these findings and previous medical history, the patient was diagnosed as having a postirradiation ulcer which appeared 15 years after irradiation. Dysphagia was considered due to esophageal dysfunction caused by severe fibrosis of the proper muscle layer. (author)

  14. Yaws

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... programmes such as Buruli ulcer, cutaneous leishmaniasis and leprosy, as well as sexually transmitted infections programmes, will ... programmes such as Buruli ulcer, cutaneous leishmaniasis and leprosy, as well as sexually transmitted infections programmes, will ...

  15. Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis (anticipated pubicstion date - mid-2009) Purpose A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, or bedsore, is defined as a localized injury to the skin/and or underlying tissue occurring most often over a bony prominence and caused by pressure, shear, or friction, alone or in combination. (1) Those at risk for developing pressure ulcers include the elderly and critically ill as well as persons with neurological impairments and those who suffer conditions associated with immobility. Pressure ulcers are graded or staged with a 4-point classification system denoting severity. Stage I represents the beginnings of a pressure ulcer and stage IV, the severest grade, consists of full thickness tissue loss with exposed bone, tendon, and or muscle. (1) In a 2004 survey of Canadian health care settings, Woodbury and Houghton (2) estimated that the prevalence of pressure ulcers at a stage 1 or greater in Ontario ranged between 13.1% and 53% with nonacute health care settings having the highest prevalence rate (Table 1). Executive Summary Table 1: Prevalence of Pressure Ulcers* Setting Canadian Prevalence,% (95% CI) Ontario Prevalence,Range % (n) Acute care 25 (23.8–26.3) 23.9–29.7 (3418) Nonacute care† 30 (29.3–31.4) 30.0–53.3 (1165) Community care 15 (13.4–16.8) 13.2 (91) Mixed health care‡ 22 (20.9

  16. Management of parastomal ulcers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heather Yeo; Farshad Abir; Walter E Longo

    2006-01-01

    Management of surgically placed ostomies is an important aspect of any general surgical or colon and rectal surgery practice. Complications with surgically placed ostomies are common and their causes are multifactorial. Parastomal ulceration, although rare, is a particularly difficult management problem. We conducted a literature search using MD Consult, Science Direct,OVID, Medline, and Cochrane Databases to review the causes and management options of parastomal ulceration. Both the etiology and treatments are varied.Different physicians and ostomy specialists have used a large array of methods to manage parastomal ulcers;these including local wound care; steroid creams;systemic steroids; and, when conservative measures fail, surgery. Most patients with parastomal ulcers who do not have associated IBD or peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum (PPG) often respond quickly to local wound care and conservative management. Patients with PPG,IBD,or other systemic causes of their ulceration need both systemic and local care and are more likely to need long term treatment and possibly surgical revision of the ostomy. The treatment is complicated, but improved with the help of ostomy specialists.

  17. Helicobacter pylori and Peptic Ulcers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this podcast, CDC's Dr. David Swerdlow discusses the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcer disease and trends in hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease in the United States between 1998 and 2005.

  18. Pathophysiology diabetic foot ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syafril, S.

    2018-03-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is known to have many complications. Diabetes and its complications are rapidly becoming the world’s most significant cause of morbidity and mortality, and one of the most distressing is Diabetic Foot Ulcer (DFU). Chronic wound complications are a growing concern worldwide, and the effect is a warning to public health and the economy. The etiology of a DFU is multifaceted, and several components cause added together create a sufficient impact on ulceration: neuropathy, vasculopathy, immunopathy, mechanical stress, and neuroarthropathy. There are many classifications of the diabetic foot. About 50% of patients with foot ulcers due to DM present clinical signs of infection. It is essential to manage multifactorial etiology of DFU to get a good outcome.

  19. Identifying the Achilles heel of multi-host pathogens: the concept of keystone ‘host’ species illustrated by Mycobacterium ulcerans transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, Benjamin; Eric Benbow, M; Merritt, Richard; Kimbirauskas, Ryan; McIntosh, Mollie; Small, Pamela L C; Williamson, Heather; Guégan, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Pathogens that use multiple host species are an increasing public health issue due to their complex transmission, which makes them difficult to mitigate. Here, we explore the possibility of using networks of ecological interactions among potential host species to identify the particular disease-source species to target to break down transmission of such pathogens. We fit a mathematical model on prevalence data of Mycobacterium ulcerans in western Africa and we show that removing the most abundant taxa for this category of pathogen is not an optimal strategy to decrease the transmission of the mycobacterium within aquatic ecosystems. On the contrary, we reveal that the removal of some taxa, especially Oligochaeta worms, can clearly reduce rates of pathogen transmission, and these should be considered as keystone organisms for its transmission because they lead to a substantial reduction in pathogen prevalence regardless of the network topology. Besides their potential application for the understanding of M. ulcerans ecology, we discuss how networks of species interactions can modulate transmission of multi-host pathogens. (letter)

  20. Venous ulcers -- self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery to improve blood flow through your veins. Prevention If you are at risk for venous ulcers, take the steps listed above under Wound Care. ... weight if you are overweight. Manage your blood pressure and cholesterol levels. ... Venous leg ulcers - self-care; Venous insufficiency ulcers - self-care; Stasis ...

  1. Giant Ulcerative Dermatofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgut Karlidag

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatofibroma is a slowly growing common benign cutaneous tumor characterized by hard papules and nodules. The rarely seen erosions and ulcerations may cause difficulties in the diagnosis. Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, which is clinically and histopathologically of malignant character, displays difficulties in the diagnosis since it has similarities with basal cell carcinoma, epidermoid carcinoma, and sarcomas. Head and neck involvement is very rare. In this study, a giant dermatofibroma case, which is histopathologically, ulcerative dermatofibroma, the biggest lesion of the head and neck region and seen rarely in the literature that has characteristics similar to dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, has been presented.

  2. Pentazocine Induced Ulceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Rashmi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A 28 year old woman, presented with woody indurations of the skin over the buttocks with multiple, well defined punched out ulcers with a rim of hyper pigmentation surrounding them. She used to receive intramuscular pentazocine injections over her buttocks for recurrent abdominal pain. This is one of the few reports of pentazocine abuse resulting in cutaneous manifestations from India.

  3. Ulcers and gastritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G. N.

    2000-01-01

    Once again this year, developments in the field of ulcers and gastritis have been entirely dominated by findings relating to Helicobacter pylori. However, interest in H. pylori can be expected to decline, since the prevalence of the infection is rapidly decreasing in the developing world - to the

  4. Lithium Battery Diaper Ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maridet, Claire; Taïeb, Alain

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of lithium battery diaper ulceration in a 16-month-old girl. Gastrointestinal and ear, nose, and throat lesions after lithium battery ingestion have been reported, but skin involvement has not been reported to our knowledge. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Genital ulcers in women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruisten, Sylvia M.

    2003-01-01

    Women who are in a low socioeconomic status are most vulnerable to genital ulcer disease (GUD). GUD is recognized as an important co-factor for acquisition of HIV. GUD etiology has been elucidated in the past decade, with the availability of multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Worldwide, herpes

  6. Venous leg ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 80 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids, pentoxifylline, rutosides, stanozolol, sulodexide, thromboxane alpha2 antagonists, zinc), peri-ulcer

  7. Etiopathogenetic principles and peptic ulcer disease classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G. N. J.

    2011-01-01

    Ulceration corresponds to tissue loss, breaching the muscularis mucosae. When ulcers develop in the acid-peptic environment of the gastroduodenum, they are traditionally called peptic ulcer (PUD). Ulcers never develop spontaneously in a healthy gastroduodenal mucosa. Ulceration is the ultimate

  8. Radiography of pressure ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgstroem, P.S.; Ekberg, O.; Lasson, A.

    1988-01-01

    In patients with longstanding and/or deep pressure ulcers radiology is usually consulted. Survey radiography and sinography in 14 patients with pressure ulcers (6 over the tuber ischii and 8 over the femoral trochanter) were evaluated. Osteomyelitic involvement of adjacent bone was revealed in 9 patients on survey radiography. However, it was usually impossible to assess whether or not bony involvement represents healed or active osteomyelitis. Sinography did not contribute to the assessment of whether or not adjacent cortical bone was involved. However, when a fistulation to an adjacent joint was revealed this contributed substantially to the preoperative planning of resection. We therefore recommend that survey radiography and sinography should be included in the evaluation of these patients but that the results from such examinations are critically evaluated. Joint involvement should be taken seriously as progression of septic arthritis usually occurs rapidly. (orig.)

  9. Management of radiation ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shack, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    Despite more efficient and safer technics of radiation therapy, the problem of radiation-induced injury to the skin and soft tissue persists. The problem of adequate coverage of these painful, ischemic, and fibrotic ulcers remains challenging. Split-thickness skin grafts are seldom sufficient coverage, as the graft almost always has areas that do not take. Although these areas may eventually heal by epithelialization, the result is never ideal. Most often flap coverage is required, but elevation of local flaps is jeopardized because the tissue surrounding the ulcer crater frequently has been sufficiently compromised to cause loss of at least part of the flap. In the past, this necessitated use of pedicled flaps, tubed and transposed from a distance. With the development of axial-pattern musculocutaneous and muscle flaps, as well as microvascular free flaps, the difficulty in dealing with these ulcers has been decreased. Surgeons can now recommend earlier use of adequate debridement, many times of the entire irradiated area, and immediate coverage with a well vascularized axial-pattern musculocutaneous flap or revascularized free flap

  10. [Prevention of pressure ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Kenichi

    2009-12-01

    Even though they have not been diagnosed with a recognized disease, many people have or are at risk of contracting debilitating conditions. They can be referred to as being in the "ill-health zone." For example, many bedridden elderly develop pressure ulcers. The prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers should focus on two main factors: the role of pressure in the development of circulatory disorders; and increased dermal pH. In preventing the development of circulatory disorders resulting in pressure ulcers, using an air or polyurethane mattress is helpful. However, changing the mattress has little effect if the position of the bedridden person is not also changed regularly. To avoid an increase in dermal pH, caregivers should apply moisture-repellent cream and/or oil to the sacral region after careful cleansing. It is important that such preventive measures and treatment be performed daily, and caregivers should be educated on this need and subsequently monitored. Pharmacists have a role in caring for those in the ill-health zone.

  11. Contact Lens Related Corneal Ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    Loh, KY; Agarwal, P

    2010-01-01

    A corneal ulcer caused by infection is one of the major causes of blindness worldwide. One of the recent health concerns is the increasing incidence of corneal ulcers associated with contact lens user especially if the users fail to follow specific instruction in using their contact lenses. Risk factors associated with increased risk of contact lens related corneal ulcers are: overnight wear, long duration of continuous wear, lower socio-economic classes, smoking, dry eye and poor hygiene. Th...

  12. [Peptic ulcer disease and stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herszényi, László; Juhász, Márk; Mihály, Emese; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2015-08-30

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori infection is the major cause of peptic ulcer disease revolutionised our views on the etiology and treatment of the disease. This discovery has tempted many experts to conclude that psychological factors and, specifically, stress are unimportant. However, Helicobacter pylori infection alone does not explain fully the incidence and prevalence of peptic ulcer disease. It has been demonstrated that stress can cause peptic ulcer disease even in the absence of Helicobacter pylori infection, supporting a multicausal model of peptic ulcer etiology. Psychological stress among other risk factors can function as a cofactor with Helicobacter pylori infection.

  13. Prognostic stratification of ulcerated melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønnelykke-Behrndtz, Marie L; Schmidt, Henrik; Christensen, Ib J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: For patients with melanoma, ulceration is an important prognostic marker and interestingly also a predictive marker for the response of adjuvant interferon. A consensual definition and accurate assessment of ulceration are therefore crucial for proper staging and clinical management. We...

  14. Helicobacter pylori and Peptic Ulcers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-17

    In this podcast, CDC's Dr. David Swerdlow discusses the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcer disease and trends in hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease in the United States between 1998 and 2005.  Created: 8/17/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 8/17/2010.

  15. Leg ulcers due to hyperhomocysteinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupa Shankar D

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic leg ulcers are rare in young adults and generally indicate a vascular cause. We report a case of a 26-year-old man with leg ulcers of eight months duration. Doppler study indicated venous incompetence and a postphlebitic limb. However, as the distribution and number of ulcers was not consistent with stasis alone and no features of collagen vascular disease were noted, a hyperviscosity state was considered and confirmed with significantly elevated homocysteine level in the serum. Administration of vitamins B1, B2, B6 and B12, trimethyl-glycine, mecobalamine, folic acid and povidone iodine dressings with culture-directed antibiotic therapy led to a satisfactory healing of ulcers over a period of one month. Hyperhomocysteinemia must be considered in the differential diagnosis of leg ulcers in young individuals.

  16. Perforated peptic ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søreide, Kjetil; Thorsen, Kenneth; Harrison, Ewen M; Bingener, Juliane; Møller, Morten H; Ohene-Yeboah, Michael; Søreide, Jon Arne

    2015-09-26

    Perforated peptic ulcer is a common emergency condition worldwide, with associated mortality rates of up to 30%. A scarcity of high-quality studies about the condition limits the knowledge base for clinical decision making, but a few published randomised trials are available. Although Helicobacter pylori and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are common causes, demographic differences in age, sex, perforation location, and underlying causes exist between countries, and mortality rates also vary. Clinical prediction rules are used, but accuracy varies with study population. Early surgery, either by laparoscopic or open repair, and proper sepsis management are essential for good outcome. Selected patients can be managed non-operatively or with novel endoscopic approaches, but validation of such methods in trials is needed. Quality of care, sepsis care bundles, and postoperative monitoring need further assessment. Adequate trials with low risk of bias are urgently needed to provide better evidence. We summarise the evidence for perforated peptic ulcer management and identify directions for future clinical research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Perforated Duodenal Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessa Baker

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 53-year-old male with a history of daily alcohol abuse presented with sudden onset epigastric pain. The pain radiated to the right upper abdominal quadrant and was associated with shortness of breath and nausea. The patient’s vitals were notable for blood pressure of 181/107 and a heart rate of 124. He was in moderate distress and had a firm, distended abdomen with diffuse tenderness to palpation, without rebound or guarding. Significant findings: In the chest radiograph, there was obvious free air under the both the right diaphragm (above the liver and the left diaphragm, consistent with pneumoperitoneum. Discussion: A perforated ulcer is a surgical emergency. Overall mortality has been shown to be approximately 6.2%.1 Rapid diagnosis is essential as prognosis improves if treatment is initiated within the first six hours and worsens after 12 hours.2 The sensitivity for detecting pneumoperitoneum on plain radiography ranges from 50%-80%3-8 with specificity of 53%.7 An upright chest radiograph can detect as little as one to two milliliters of air.9,10 If free air is not seen on a posteroanterior (PA upright chest radiograph, an upright lateral chest radiograph can be obtained, which is more sensitive (98% sensitivity.8,11 About 10%-20% of ruptured ulcers will not present with visible free-air under the diaphragm on plain x-ray.12 In this case, given the free air seen on chest radiograph and peritoneal signs on exam, the patient was taken straight to the operating room for general surgery.

  18. [Etiological diagnosis of leg ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debure, Clélia

    2010-09-20

    Etiological diagnosis of leg ulcers must be the first step of treatment, even if we know that veinous disease is often present. We can build a clinical decisional diagram, which helps us to understand and not forget the other causes of chronic wounds and choose some basic examination, like ultrasound and histological findings. This diagnosis helps to choose the right treatment in order to cure even the oldest venous ulcers. Educational programs should be improved to prevent recurrence.

  19. Improving venous leg ulcer management

    OpenAIRE

    Weller, Carolina Dragica

    2017-01-01

    This thesis reports several different methods to develop and evaluate complex interventions designed to improve venous leg ulcer management. Chronic venous leg ulcers (VLU) are the most common chronic wound problem in the community. Its health and economic burden is predicted to increase due to ageing of the community and increase in prevalence of diabetes and obesity. Although many patients seek health care for VLU, most do not receive the most effective management. Patients with this condi...

  20. [Drug-induced oral ulcerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madinier, I; Berry, N; Chichmanian, R M

    2000-06-01

    Different side effects of drugs have been described in the oral cavity, including oral ulcerations. Direct contact between drugs and oral mucosa may induce chemical burn or local hypersensitivity. Less frequently, these drug-induced oral ulcerations are part of a complex reaction with cutaneous or systemic manifestations. Sometimes, one or more oral ulcerations appear as the main side-effect of a drug, or exceptionally as solitary lesions. Solitary oral ulcerations usually appear after few weeks of treatment. In most of cases, these lesions resist to conventional treatments, with a rapid healing following the suppression of the responsible drug. This diagnosis is usually difficult, particularly with patients receiving multiple drug therapy. Besides, special attention must be paid to new drugs. Oral ulcerations following symptoms of burning mouth, metallic taste, dysgueusia or agueusia are strongly suggestive of a pharmacological origin. Most of the molecules able to induce solitary oral ulcerations are commonly prescribed in a) rheumatology: NSAI (diclofenac, flurbiprofen, indomethacin, naproxen), long-term rheumatoid arthritis therapy (azathioprine, methotrexate, penicillamine, gold compounds, tiopronin); b) cardiology: angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (captopril, enalapril), angiotensin 2-receptor antagonist (losartan), anti-angorous (nicorandil), c) psychiatry: antidepressants (fluoxetine, lithium), d) AIDS therapy (foscarnet, zalcitabine).

  1. Perforated peptic ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søreide, Kjetil; Thorsen, Kenneth; Harrison, Ewen M.; Bingener, Juliane; Møller, Morten H.; Ohene-Yeboah, Michael; Søreide, Jon Arne

    2015-01-01

    Summary Perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) is a frequent emergency condition worldwide with associated mortality up to 30%. A paucity of studies on PPU limits the knowledge base for clinical decision-making, but a few randomised trials are available. While Helicobacter pylori and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are frequent causes of PPU, demographic differences in age, gender, perforation location and aetiology exist between countries, as do mortality rates. Clinical prediction rules are used, but accuracy varies with study population. Early surgery, either by laparoscopic or open repair, and proper sepsis management are essential for good outcome. Selected patients can perhaps be managed non-operatively or with novel endoscopic approaches, but validation in trials is needed. Quality of care, sepsis care-bundles and postoperative monitoring need further evaluation. Adequate trials with low risk of bias are urgently needed for better evidence. Here we summarize the evidence for PPU management and identify directions for future clinical research. PMID:26460663

  2. Medical management of venous ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascarella, Luigi; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2015-03-01

    Venous disease is the most common cause of chronic leg ulceration and represents an advanced clinical manifestation of venous insufficiency. Due to their frequency and chronicity, venous ulcers have a high socioeconomic impact, with treatment costs accounting for 1% of the health care budget in Western countries. The evaluation of patients with venous ulcers should include a thorough medical history for prior deep venous thrombosis, assessment for an hypercoagulable state, and a physical examination. Use of the CEAP (clinical, etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology) Classification System and the revised Venous Clinical Severity Scoring System is strongly recommended to characterize disease severity and assess response to treatment. This venous condition requires lifestyle modification, with affected individuals performing daily intervals of leg elevation to control edema; use of elastic compression garments; and moderate physical activity, such as walking wearing below-knee elastic stockings. Meticulous skin care, treatment of dermatitis, and prompt treatment of cellulitis are important aspects of medical management. The pharmacology of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers include essentially two medications: pentoxifylline and phlebotropic agents. The micronized purified flavonoid fraction is an effective adjunct to compression therapy in patients with large, chronic ulceration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nutritional care in peptic ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    VOMERO, Nathália Dalcin; COLPO, Elisângela

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer is a lesion of the mucosal lining of the upper gastrointestinal tract characterized by an imbalance between aggressive and protective factors of the mucosa, having H. pylori as the main etiologic factor. Dietotherapy is important in the prevention and treatment of this disease. Aim To update nutritional therapy in adults' peptic ulcer. Methods Exploratory review without restrictions with primary sources indexed in Scielo, PubMed, Medline, ISI, and Scopus databases. Results Dietotherapy, as well as caloric distribution, should be adjusted to the patient's needs aiming to normalize the nutritional status and promote healing. Recommended nutrients can be different in the acute phase and in the recovery phase, and there is a greater need of protein and some micronutrients, such as vitamin A, zinc, selenium, and vitamin C in the recovery phase. In addition, some studies have shown that vitamin C has a beneficial effect in eradication of H. pylori. Fibers and probiotics also play a important role in the treatment of peptic ulcer, because they reduce the side effects of antibiotics and help reduce treatment time. Conclusion A balanced diet is vital in the treatment of peptic ulcer, once food can prevent, treat or even alleviate the symptoms involving this pathology. However, there are few papers that innovate dietotherapy; so additional studies addressing more specifically the dietotherapy for treatment of peptic ulcer are necessary. PMID:25626944

  4. Review : Pressure Ulcer and Its treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijan Khorasani

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Pressure ulcer is a signifcant problem in elderly and critically ill patients, causing pain, decreasing quality of life and leading to prolonged hospital stay. Treatment of pressure ulcer to improve health status is a cost-effective approach. So, preventing the ulcers will be economical. Pressure ulcer is considered as a damage or necrosis of skin and its layers, which happens when there is a considerable pressure over the tissues. If the capillary arterie's pressure reaches 70 mmHg (2 times more than the normal pressure pressure ulcer happens and depending on the depth of the ulcer, will be divided into 4 stages. The most important point for preventing the ulcers is reducing the pressure. Patients should be repositioned to relieve or minimize the tissue pressure. Considering the type of the ulcer, the necessary treatment (dressing, Antibiotic Therapy, debridement or surgery should be performed.

  5. The effects of antidepressants on gastric ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Latif Güneş

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In their daily practice, psychiatrists often experience gastriccomplaints in patients beside psychiatric disorders.Peptic ulcer is one of the diseases, which accompanyto psychiatric disorders including mainly depression. Itis shown that antidepressants can inflame the bleedingsincluding gastrointestinal (GI bleedings, while they havepositive effect on ulcer healing. In this review, studies,which conducted about the positive or negative effects ofantidepressant drugs on ulcer treatment were examined.Accordingly; it was found that opipramol, amitriptyline,imipramine that of tricyclic antidepressants was found tobe helpful in healing of the ulcer. It was stated that SelectiveSerotonin Reuptake Inhibitors generally inflamedulcers, exceptionally fluvoxamine and fluoxetine reducedulcer; moclobemide that of monoamine-oxidase inhibitorand tianeptine and mirtazapine that of atypical antidepressantshad positive effect in ulcer healing. To be carefulin choosing the appropriate antidepressant in psychiatricpatients with gastric ulcer is important in the prognosisof both ulcer and depression.Key words: peptic ulcer; depression; antidepressant drugs

  6. Nonhealing Ulcer: Acroangiodermatitis of Mali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Varyani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An 18-year-old male presented with a nonhealing wound on left lower limb, pain and swelling over multiple joints, weight loss, and yellowish discoloration of eyes and urine for the past 4 years. On examination, the patient had pallor, icterus, and generalized lymphadenopathy with a nonhealing unhealthy ulcer over left medial malleolus. He had deformed joints with hepatomegaly and splenomegaly. His laboratory investigations were positive for antinuclear antibody (ANA and anticardiolipin antibody (ACLA. Synovial fluid analysis showed inflammatory findings. Biopsy of margin of the ulcer showed findings consistent with Acroangiodermatitis of Mali. The patient was treated with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs and aspirin for juvenile idiopathic arthritis and secondary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS, respectively. The ulcer was managed conservatively with systemic antibiotics and topical steroids along with limb elevation and compression elastic stockings. The patient's symptoms improved significantly, and he is in our followup.

  7. Review : Pressure Ulcer and Its treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Bijan Khorasani; Ali Ghafouri

    2004-01-01

    Pressure ulcer is a signifcant problem in elderly and critically ill patients, causing pain, decreasing quality of life and leading to prolonged hospital stay. Treatment of pressure ulcer to improve health status is a cost-effective approach. So, preventing the ulcers will be economical. Pressure ulcer is considered as a damage or necrosis of skin and its layers, which happens when there is a considerable pressure over the tissues. If the capillary arterie's pressure reaches 70 mmHg (2 ti...

  8. Diabetic foot ulcers. Pathophysiology, assessment, and therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Bowering, C. K.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review underlying causes of diabetic foot ulceration, provide a practical assessment of patients at risk, and outline an evidence-based approach to therapy for diabetic patients with foot ulcers. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search was conducted for the period from 1979 to 1999 for articles relating to diabetic foot ulcers. Most studies found were case series or small controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Foot ulcers in diabetic patients are common and frequently lead to lower limb...

  9. Diabetes: foot ulcers and amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Dereck L

    2011-08-26

    Diabetic foot ulceration is full-thickness penetration of the dermis of the foot in a person with diabetes. Severity is classified using the Wagner system, which grades it from 1 to 5. The annual incidence of ulcers among people with diabetes is 2.5% to 10.7% in resource-rich countries, and the annual incidence of amputation for any reason is 0.25% to 1.8%. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions to prevent foot ulcers and amputations in people with diabetes? What are the effects of treatments in people with diabetes with foot ulceration? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 50 systematic reviews and RCTs that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: debridement, human cultured dermis, human skin equivalent, patient education, pressure off-loading with felted foam or pressure-relief half-shoe, pressure off-loading with total-contact or non-removable casts, screening and referral to foot-care clinics, systemic hyperbaric oxygen for non-infected ulcers, systemic hyperbaric oxygen in infected ulcers, therapeutic footwear, topical growth factors, and wound dressings.

  10. Giant lower oesophageal ulcer Bushman baby

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-02-26

    Feb 26, 1983 ... The case of a giant, penetrating lower oesophageal ulcer in a 14-month-old Bushman baby is reported. This would probably be classified as a Barrett's ulcer. Histological examination showed that the ulcer developed in columnar epithelium and that there was normal stratified squamous oesophageal.

  11. Computed tomographic findings in penetrating peptic ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madrazo, B.L.; Halpert, R.D.; Sandler, M.A.; Pearlberg, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Four cases of peptic ulcer penetrating the head of the pancreas were diagnosed by computed tomography (CT). Findings common to 3 cases included (a) an ulcer crater, (b) a sinus tract, and (c) enlargement of the head of the pancreas. Unlike other modalities, the inherent spatial resolution of CT allows a convenient diagnosis of this important complication of peptic ulcer disease

  12. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term “peptic ulcer” is not sufficiently specific for rating purposes. Manifest differences in ulcers of the stomach... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section 4...

  13. Pressure ulcer research : current and future perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bader, D.L.; Bouten, C.V.C.; Colin, D.; Oomens, C.W.J.

    2005-01-01

    This book provides an up-to-date scientific account of all aspects related to pressure ulcers and pressure ulcer research, as well as evidence-based knowledge of pressure ulcer aetiology. Further, it describes current and future tools for evaluating patients at risk. It comprises 20 chapters by

  14. Pressure ulcers in four Indonesian hospitals: prevalence, patient characteristics, ulcer characteristics, prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Yufitriana; Lohrmann, Christa; Halfens, Ruud Jg; Schols, Jos Mga

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this article was to study characteristics of pressure ulcer patients and their ulcers, pressure ulcer preventive and treatment measures in four Indonesian general hospitals. A multicentre cross-sectional design was applied to assess pressure ulcers and pressure ulcer care in adult patients in medical, surgical, specialised and intensive care units. Ninety-one of the 1132 patients had a total of 142 ulcers. Half (44·0%) already had pressure ulcers before admission. The overall prevalence of category I-IV pressure ulcers was 8·0% (95% CI 6·4-9·6), and the overall nosocomial pressure ulcer prevalence was 4·5% (95% CI 3·3-5·7). Most pressure ulcer patients had friction and shear problems, were bedfast, had diabetes and had more bedridden days. Most ulcers (42·3%) were category III and IV. One third of the patients had both pressure ulcers and moisture lesions (36·3%) and suffered from pain (45·1%). The most frequently used prevention measures were repositioning (61·5%), skin moisturising (47·3%), patient education (36·3%) and massage (35·2%). Most pressure ulcer dressings involved saline-impregnated or antimicrobial gauzes. This study shows the complexities of pressure ulcers in Indonesian general hospitals and reveals that the quality of pressure ulcer care (prevention and treatment) could be improved by implementing the recent evidence-based international guideline. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: ulcerative colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are some genetic conditions more common in particular ethnic groups? Genetic Changes A variety of genetic and environmental factors are likely involved in the development of ulcerative colitis . Recent studies have identified variations in dozens of genes that may be linked ...

  16. Mucosal healing in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob Benedict; Coskun, Mehmet; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2013-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a colonic inflammatory condition with a substantial impact on the quality of life of affected persons. The disease carries a cumulative risk of need of colectomy of 20-30% and an estimated cumulative risk of colorectal cancer of 18% after 30 years of disease duration. W...

  17. CONTACT LENS RELATED CORNEAL ULCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AGARWAL P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A corneal ulcer caused by infection is one of the major causes of blindness worldwide. One of the recent health concerns is the increasing incidence of corneal ulcers associated with contact lens user especially if the users fail to follow specific instruction in using their contact lenses. Risk factors associated with increased risk of contact lens related corneal ulcers are:overnight wear, long duration of continuous wear, lower socio-economic classes, smoking, dry eye and poor hygiene. The presenting symptoms of contact lens related corneal ulcers include eye discomfort, foreign body sensation and lacrimation. More serious symptoms are redness (especially circum-corneal injection, severe pain, photophobia, eye discharge and blurring of vision. The diagnosis is established by a thorough slit lamp microscopic examination with fluorescein staining and corneal scraping for Gram stain and culture of the infective organism. Delay in diagnosing and treatment can cause permanent blindness, therefore an early referral to ophthalmologist and commencing of antimicrobial therapy can prevent visual loss.

  18. Management of pediatric ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turner, Dan; Levine, Arie; Escher, Johanna C

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) shares many features with adult-onset disease but there are some unique considerations; therefore, therapeutic approaches have to be adapted to these particular needs. We aimed to formulate guidelines for managing UC in children based on a systematic review (SR...

  19. Challenges in pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dealey, Carol; Brindle, C Tod; Black, Joyce; Alves, Paulo; Santamaria, Nick; Call, Evan; Clark, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Although this article is a stand-alone article, it sets the scene for later articles in this issue. Pressure ulcers are considered to be a largely preventable problem, and yet despite extensive training and the expenditure of a large amount of resources, they persist. This article reviews the current understanding of pressure ulcer aetiology: pressure, shear and microclimate. Individual risk factors for pressure ulceration also need to be understood in order to determine the level of risk of an individual. Such an assessment is essential to determine appropriate prevention strategies. The main prevention strategies in terms of reducing pressure and shear and managing microclimate are studied in this article. The problem of pressure ulceration related to medical devices is also considered as most of the standard prevention strategies are not effective in preventing this type of damage. Finally, the possibility of using dressings as an additional preventive strategy is raised along with the question: is there enough evidence to support their use? © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Perforated Peptic Ulcer: new insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.O.E. Bertleff (Marietta)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractMuch has been written on perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) during the last hundred years. In 1500, when necropsies were first allowed, often a small hole was found in the anterior wall of the stomach, giving an explanation for symptoms of acute abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting which often

  1. Characterization of Fusobacterium varium Fv113-g1 isolated from a patient with ulcerative colitis based on complete genome sequence and transcriptome analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Sekizuka

    Full Text Available Fusobacterium spp. present in the oral and gut flora is carcinogenic and is associated with the risk of pancreatic and colorectal cancers. Fusobacterium spp. is also implicated in a broad spectrum of human pathologies, including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (UC. Here we report the complete genome sequence of Fusobacterium varium Fv113-g1 (genome size, 3.96 Mb isolated from a patient with UC. Comparative genome analyses totally suggested that Fv113-g1 is basically assigned as F. varium, in particular, it could be reclassified as notable F. varium subsp. similar to F. ulcerans because of partial shared orthologs. Compared with the genome sequences of F. varium ATCC 27725 (genome size, 3.30 Mb and other strains of Fusobacterium spp., Fv113-g1 possesses many accessary pan-genome sequences with noteworthy multiple virulence factors, including 44 autotransporters (type V secretion system, T5SS and 13 Fusobacterium adhesion (FadA paralogs involved in potential mucosal inflammation. Indeed, transcriptome analysis demonstrated that Fv113-g1-specific accessary genes, such as multiple T5SS and fadA paralogs, showed notably increased expression with D-MEM cultivation than with brain heart infusion broth. This implied that growth condition may enhance the expression of such potential virulence factors, leading to remarkable survival against other gut microorganisms and to the pathogenicity to human intestinal epithelium.

  2. [Diagnosis of gastric ulcer in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Kiyoshi; Fukuchi, Takumi; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2010-11-01

    It is well known that gastric ulcers are most often found at anglus and upper corpus in the elderly. The number of gastric ulcer found at upper corpus hold half of all cases in the elderly patients with bleeding ulcer. Sixty percent of the elderly patients with bleeding ulcer took NSAIDs including low-dose aspirin in authors' hospital. Now it is easy to treat and cure bleeding ulcers due to development of endoscopic hemostasis and antiulcer drugs such as proton pump inhibitor(PPI). However, the elderly patients sometimes result in fatal outcome on bleeding from gastric ulcer. Therefore, it is important to prevent ulcer complications by PPI for the high-risk group such as elderly patients taking NSAIDs.

  3. Maintenance therapy with sucralfate in duodenal ulcer: genuine prevention or accelerated healing of ulcer recurrence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynum, T E; Koch, G G

    1991-08-08

    We sought to compare the efficacy of sucralfate to placebo for the prevention of duodenal ulcer recurrence and to determine that the efficacy of sucralfate was due to a true reduction in ulcer prevalence and not due to secondary effects such as analgesic activity or accelerated healing. This was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel groups, multicenter clinical study with 254 patients. All patients had a past history of at least two duodenal ulcers with at least one ulcer diagnosed by endoscopic examination 3 months or less before the start of the study. Complete ulcer healing without erosions was required to enter the study. Sucralfate or placebo were dosed as a 1-g tablet twice a day for 4 months, or until ulcer recurrence. Endoscopic examinations once a month and when symptoms developed determined the presence or absence of duodenal ulcers. If a patient developed an ulcer between monthly scheduled visits, the patient was dosed with a 1-g sucralfate tablet twice a day until the next scheduled visit. Statistical analyses of the results determined the efficacy of sucralfate compared with placebo for preventing duodenal ulcer recurrence. Comparisons of therapeutic agents for preventing duodenal ulcers have usually been made by testing for statistical differences in the cumulative rates for all ulcers developed during a follow-up period, regardless of the time of detection. Statistical experts at the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and on the FDA Advisory Panel expressed doubts about clinical study results based on this type of analysis. They suggested three possible mechanisms for reducing the number of observed ulcers: (a) analgesic effects, (b) accelerated healing, and (c) true ulcer prevention. Traditional ulcer analysis could miss recurring ulcers due to an analgesic effect or accelerated healing. Point-prevalence analysis could miss recurring ulcers due to accelerated healing between endoscopic examinations. Maximum ulcer

  4. Management of ulcers in lymphoedematous limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnu M Karnasula

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphoedema is a progressive condition that can have a marked physical and psychological impact on affected patients and significantly reduce the quality of life. The ulcers on chronic lymphoedema patient, which often also makes it impossible for them to work. If left untreated, tends to progress or worsen. Ulcers in lymphoedema patients, therefore, represent not only a medical but also a psychological problem. The treatment is often regarded as being worse than it actually is. In our study of more than 25 years shows around 10% cases are due to chronic lymphodema. Ulcers of chronic lymphoedema are classified into four stages according to their presentation. Their management depends upon their stage of presentation. Patients with chronic lymphoedema and ulceration require a different approach to treatment. The specific issues associated with managing the patient with lymphoedematous ulceration include, limb shape distortion i.e., elephantiasis, care of the skin creases and folds, and swelling of the toes and fore foot. Stage I ulcers will heal with conservative treatment without any surgical intervention. Stage II ulcers needs debridement of the wound and split-thickness skin grafting. The most difficult to treat are the stage III and IV ulcers, due to associated skin changes and reduced vascularity. These cases need debulking along with excision of the ulcer. In order to prevent recurrence of the ulcer in all the four stages needs prolonged follow-up and limb care.

  5. Hydroxyurea-induced oral ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Maha; Almazrooa, Soulafa; Azher, Fatima; Alsayes, Fatin

    2015-12-01

    Hydroxyurea is an antimetabolite that is widely used in the treatment of many benign and malignant conditions. This drug is usually well tolerated but has a number of side effects that vary in incidence. In cases of clinically significant adverse events, hydroxyurea is usually discontinued either temporarily or permanently, depending on treatment need versus harm caused by side effects. Here, we report a case of oral ulceration associated with hydroxyurea treatment in a patient who had chronic myelogenous leukemia. The patient rapidly developed an oral ulcer 12 days after administration of the drug. Hydroxyurea was discontinued, and the oral lesion appreciably decreased in size and severity. Physicians and dentists should be aware of the association between hydroxyurea and oral lesions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B

    2012-01-01

    Description: A multidisciplinary group of Danish experts developed this guideline on management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers. Sources of data included published studies up to March 2011. Quality of evidence and strength of recommendations have been graded. The guideline was approved by the D......Description: A multidisciplinary group of Danish experts developed this guideline on management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers. Sources of data included published studies up to March 2011. Quality of evidence and strength of recommendations have been graded. The guideline was approved......) again as soon as cardiovascular risks outweigh gastrointestinal risks. Patients in need of continued treatment with ASA or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug should be put on prophylactic treatment with PPI at standard dosage. The combination of 75mg ASA and PPI should be preferred to monotherapy...

  7. Perforated peptic ulcer - an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kin Tong; Shelat, Vishalkumar G

    2017-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) affects 4 million people worldwide annually. The incidence of PUD has been estimated at around 1.5% to 3%. Perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) is a serious complication of PUD and patients with PPU often present with acute abdomen that carries high risk for morbidity and mortality. The lifetime prevalence of perforation in patients with PUD is about 5%. PPU carries a mortality ranging from 1.3% to 20%. Thirty-day mortality rate reaching 20% and 90-d mortality rate of up to 30% have been reported. In this review we have summarized the current evidence on PPU to update readers. This literature review includes the most updated information such as common causes, clinical features, diagnostic methods, non-operative and operative management, post-operative complications and different scoring systems of PPU. With the advancement of medical technology, PUD can now be treated with medications instead of elective surgery. The classic triad of sudden onset of abdominal pain, tachycardia and abdominal rigidity is the hallmark of PPU. Erect chest radiograph may miss 15% of cases with air under the diaphragm in patients with bowel perforation. Early diagnosis, prompt resuscitation and urgent surgical intervention are essential to improve outcomes. Exploratory laparotomy and omental patch repair remains the gold standard. Laparoscopic surgery should be considered when expertise is available. Gastrectomy is recommended in patients with large or malignant ulcer. PMID:28138363

  8. Perforated peptic ulcer - an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kin Tong; Shelat, Vishalkumar G

    2017-01-27

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) affects 4 million people worldwide annually. The incidence of PUD has been estimated at around 1.5% to 3%. Perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) is a serious complication of PUD and patients with PPU often present with acute abdomen that carries high risk for morbidity and mortality. The lifetime prevalence of perforation in patients with PUD is about 5%. PPU carries a mortality ranging from 1.3% to 20%. Thirty-day mortality rate reaching 20% and 90-d mortality rate of up to 30% have been reported. In this review we have summarized the current evidence on PPU to update readers. This literature review includes the most updated information such as common causes, clinical features, diagnostic methods, non-operative and operative management, post-operative complications and different scoring systems of PPU. With the advancement of medical technology, PUD can now be treated with medications instead of elective surgery. The classic triad of sudden onset of abdominal pain, tachycardia and abdominal rigidity is the hallmark of PPU. Erect chest radiograph may miss 15% of cases with air under the diaphragm in patients with bowel perforation. Early diagnosis, prompt resuscitation and urgent surgical intervention are essential to improve outcomes. Exploratory laparotomy and omental patch repair remains the gold standard. Laparoscopic surgery should be considered when expertise is available. Gastrectomy is recommended in patients with large or malignant ulcer.

  9. Gastric Ulcers Syndrome in Donkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abelardo Morales Briceño

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to describe gastric ulcer in donkeys. 10 donkeys (Equus asinus were studied in Bodonal de la Sierra, Badajoz-Extremadura, Spain. They were referred for necropsy and dead due to non-digestive causes. 4 males and 6 females were examined. The ages were classified of 4-16 years old. The stomach and gastric mucosa was evaluated for classified Merrit, 2003. Samples of gastric tissue were collected. The samples fixed in formalin were processed by conventional histological techniques and examined by histopathology. None of the donkeys presented clinical signs for gastric ulcers syndrome. Of the 10 donkeys studied, 10% had Grade 0; 30% Grade 1; 40% Grade 2; 10% Grade 3; and 10% Grade 4. In 30% (3/10 parasites such as Gasterophilus sp. were observed. The histological slices revealed severe damage on the gastric mucosa, a loss of continuity of the gastric mucosa with corium exposure, and subchorionic edema with parakeratotic hyperkeratosis, together with a mixed lymphoplasmocytic mononuclear infiltrate. In conclusion, we reported gastric ulcers syndrome in donkeys in Spain.

  10. Laparoscopic pyloroplasty for perforated peptic ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grišin, Edvard; Mikalauskas, Saulius; Poškus, Tomas; Jotautas, Valdemaras; Strupas, Kęstutis

    2017-09-01

    Peptic ulcer is a common disease affecting millions of people every year. Despite improved understanding and treatment of the disease, the number of patients admitted with duodenal peptic ulcer perforation has not decreased. Deaths from peptic ulcer disease overcome other common emergency situations. Laparoscopic repair of the perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) is the gold standard approach for simple perforation. However, in patients with large perforated chronic ulcers laparotomy with pyloroplasty is the standard treatment. It is generally accepted to perform open surgery in PPU emergencies because of the greater knowledge and experience gathered over the past decades and less potential harm for the patient or surgical complications. We present a case of successful laparoscopic pyloroplasty of a perforated duodenal ulcer with stenosis.

  11. Engaging patients in pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudgell, Lynne; Dalphinis, Julie; Blunt, Chris; Zonouzi, Maryam; Procter, Susan

    2015-05-06

    As patients increasingly care for themselves at home, they require accessible information to enable informed self-care. This article describes the development of an educational electronic application (app) designed for use by patients at risk of pressure ulcers, and their carers. The app can be downloaded to Windows, Android or Apple smartphones or tablets. The app is based on the current pressure ulcer prevention and management guidelines from the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, and is designed to educate patients and carers about how to prevent a pressure ulcer, how to recognise a pressure ulcer, and what to do if they suspect they are developing a pressure ulcer. We hope the app will be used to help with educational conversations among patients, carers and healthcare professionals.

  12. [Having trouble with pressure ulcers care?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Masako; Noda, Yasuhiro; Nohara, Yoko; Fujii, Keiko; Sato, Noriko; Renda, Akiyoshi; Yuasa, Takashi; Muramatsu, Shuichi; Furuta, Katsunori

    2004-12-01

    Since 1997, we, the community pharmacists, have established this society, Aichi Prefecture Society for the Study of Pressure Ulcers Care, in order to furnish drug information about pressure ulcers care. Moist atmosphere is required for the healing of pressure ulcers. The moist environment that could be regulated depends on the physicochemical property of ointment bases. Therefore, ointment should reasonably be chosen to adjust the moisture. Since 2000, we have been committed to providing pharmacists, who work on home care, with a booklet to instruct how to choose ointments for pressure ulcers treatment. In 2002, when the Aichi pharmaceutical association held a training conference held at various hospitals using the booklet as a teaching material, hospital pharmacists cooperated by making a field study trip to observe pressure ulcers treatments. Nowadays researchers at pharmaceutical colleges have also cooperated in studying the efficacy and economical effect of the method of blending different ointments to improve the healing process of pressure ulcers.

  13. Enhancing Documentation of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Interventions: A Quality Improvement Strategy to Reduce Pressure Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Therese M; Thompson, Susan L; Halvorson, Anna M; Zeitler, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers requires the implementation of evidence-based interventions. A quality improvement project was conducted to provide nurses with data on the frequency with which pressure ulcer prevention interventions were performed as measured by documentation. Documentation reports provided feedback to stakeholders, triggering reminders and reeducation. Intervention reports and modifications to the documentation system were effective both in increasing the documentation of pressure ulcer prevention interventions and in decreasing the number of avoidable hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

  14. Trophic ulcers in the carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abelardo Q.-C. Araújo

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available A patient with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS and trophic ulcers is described. Despite the healing of the ulcers after surgery for CTS, the severe sensory deficit and the electrophysiological tests have not shown any significant improvement. We think these findings argue against the hypothesis of the sensory deficit being responsible for the trophic ulcers. We favor a major role for the sympathetic disturbances as the main cause for those lesions.

  15. A Hydroxyurea-induced Leg Ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Seon-Wook; Hong, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Seo, Jong-Keun; Lee, Deborah; Sung, Ho-Suk

    2009-01-01

    Hydroxyurea is a cytostatic agent that has recently become the drug of choice in the treatment of various myeloproliferative diseases. The cutaneous side effects of hydroxyurea include xerosis, hyperpigmentation, nail discoloration, and scaling. Leg ulcers have only rarely been reported in association with hydroxyurea treatment. A 75-year-old woman presented with leg ulcers, nail discoloration, and xerosis. The leg ulcers were refractory to conventional treatment. She had been taking oral hyd...

  16. [Treatment for patients who have arterial ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolínez de Abia, Noelia

    2009-01-01

    Arterial ulcers are produced due to chronic ischemia in lower limbs. This causes a progressive, slow decrease in blood flow and oxygen supply to lower limbs. The main symptom consists of an intermittent claudication, or muscle pain while walking which ceases upon resting, but, when these symptoms appear; this wound usually is advanced and medical professionals basically use surgical, pharmaceutical and local treatments to cure this ulcer. In this article, the author presents a guide to diagnosis, treatment and prevention of arterial ulcers.

  17. Gastric ulcer bleeding: diagnosis by computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voloudaki, Argyro; Tsagaraki, Kaliopi; Mouzas, John; Gourtsoyiannis, Nickolas

    1999-06-01

    A case of CT demonstration of a bleeding gastric ulcer is presented, in a patient with confusing clinical manifestations. Abdominal CT was performed without oral contrast medium administration, and showed extravasation of intravenous contrast into a gastric lumen distended with material of mixed attenuation. It is postulated that if radiopaque oral contrast had been given, peptic ulcer bleeding would probably have been masked. CT demonstration of gastric ulcer bleeding, may be of value in cases of differential diagnostic dilemmas.

  18. Gastric ulcer bleeding: diagnosis by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voloudaki, Argyro; Tsagaraki, Kaliopi; Mouzas, John; Gourtsoyiannis, Nickolas

    1999-01-01

    A case of CT demonstration of a bleeding gastric ulcer is presented, in a patient with confusing clinical manifestations. Abdominal CT was performed without oral contrast medium administration, and showed extravasation of intravenous contrast into a gastric lumen distended with material of mixed attenuation. It is postulated that if radiopaque oral contrast had been given, peptic ulcer bleeding would probably have been masked. CT demonstration of gastric ulcer bleeding, may be of value in cases of differential diagnostic dilemmas

  19. High cost of stage IV pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brem, Harold; Maggi, Jason; Nierman, David; Rolnitzky, Linda; Bell, David; Rennert, Robert; Golinko, Michael; Yan, Alan; Lyder, Courtney; Vladeck, Bruce

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to calculate and analyze the cost of treatment for stage IV pressure ulcers. A retrospective chart analysis of patients with stage IV pressure ulcers was conducted. Hospital records and treatment outcomes of these patients were followed up for a maximum of 29 months and analyzed. Costs directly related to the treatment of pressure ulcers and their associated complications were calculated. Nineteen patients with stage IV pressure ulcers (11 hospital-acquired and 8 community-acquired) were identified and their charts were reviewed. The average hospital treatment cost associated with stage IV pressure ulcers and related complications was $129,248 for hospital-acquired ulcers during 1 admission, and $124,327 for community-acquired ulcers over an average of 4 admissions. The costs incurred from stage IV pressure ulcers are much greater than previously estimated. Halting the progression of early stage pressure ulcers has the potential to eradicate enormous pain and suffering, save thousands of lives, and reduce health care expenditures by millions of dollars. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Roentgenologic image of penetrating duodenal bulb ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strunin, A.E.

    1986-01-01

    When studying a series of aimed roentgenograms in patients with peptic ulcer a gas bubble of irregular spherical configuration or two-layer niche were determined near the bulb medial contour. Gas bubble was from 0.5-0.7 to 3.5 cm in diameter. In such cases penetrating ulcers were determined in operations. Along with other signs gas bubble symptom, sometimes two-layer signs may be used for timely and exact roentgenological diagnosis of penetrating duodenal bulb ulcer in peptic ulcer disease

  1. Therapeutics for Equine Gastric Ulcer Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavoshti, Fereydon Rezazadeh; Andrews, Frank M

    2017-04-01

    Equine gastric ulcer syndrome (EGUS) is an umbrella term used to describe ulcers in the nonglandular squamous and glandular mucosa, terminal esophagus, and proximal duodenum. Gastric ulcers in the squamous and glandular regions occur more often than esophageal or duodenal ulcers and likely have a different pathogenesis. At present, omeprazole is accepted globally as the best pharmacologic therapy for both regions of the stomach; however, the addition of coating agents and synthetic prostaglandins could add to its effectiveness in treatment of EGUS. Dietary and environmental management are necessary for prevention of recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ulcerative colitis masked by giant urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroselli, C; Plocco, M; Pratticò, F; Bruno, C; Antonaglia, C; Rota, F; Curreli, I; Caroselli, A; Bruno, G

    2007-01-01

    The occurrence of giant urticaria and ulcerative colitis is very infrequent. A 23 year-old female reported the initial eruption of short-lived cutaneous itchy weals on her arms. Then lesions ran together and became confluent, extending to her legs, followed by undefined abdominal pain and a slight increase of body temperature. Exams showed hystologically confirmed ulcerative colitis, with perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody positivity. Ulcerative colitis therapy led not only to the remission of the colitic symptoms, but also to the prompt recovery of skin manifestations. Urticaria was the epiphenomenon of ulcerative colitis.

  3. Gastric emptying abnormal in duodenal ulcer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, S.; Heading, R.C.; Taylor, T.V.; Forrest, J.A.; Tothill, P.

    1986-07-01

    To investigate the possibility that an abnormality of gastric emptying exists in duodenal ulcer and to determine if such an abnormality persists after ulcer healing, scintigraphic gastric emptying measurements were undertaken in 16 duodenal ulcer patients before, during, and after therapy with cimetidine; in 12 patients with pernicious anemia, and in 12 control subjects. No difference was detected in the rate or pattern of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer patients before and after ulcer healing with cimetidine compared with controls, but emptying of the solid component of the test meal was more rapid during treatment with the drug. Comparison of emptying patterns obtained in duodenal ulcer subjects during and after cimetidine treatment with those obtained in pernicious anemia patients and controls revealed a similar relationship that was characterized by a tendency for reduction in the normal differentiation between the emptying of solid and liquid from the stomach. The similarity in emptying patterns in these groups of subjects suggests that gastric emptying of solids may be influenced by changes in the volume of gastric secretion. The failure to detect an abnormality of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer subjects before and after ulcer healing calls into question the widespread belief that abnormally rapid gastric emptying is a feature with pathogenetic significance in duodenal ulcer disease.

  4. Pressure ulcer prevention in frail older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Maree; Nugent, Linda

    2015-12-16

    Pressure ulcers are painful and cause discomfort, have a negative effect on quality of life, and are costly to treat. The incidence and severity of preventable pressure ulcers is an important indicator of quality of care; it is essential that healthcare providers monitor prevalence and incidence rates to ensure that care strategies implemented are effective. Frail older people are at increased risk of developing pressure ulcers. This article discusses the complexities of preventing pressure ulcers in frail older people and emphasises the importance of structured educational programmes that incorporate effective clinical leadership and multidisciplinary teamwork.

  5. Gastric emptying abnormal in duodenal ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, S.; Heading, R.C.; Taylor, T.V.; Forrest, J.A.; Tothill, P.

    1986-01-01

    To investigate the possibility that an abnormality of gastric emptying exists in duodenal ulcer and to determine if such an abnormality persists after ulcer healing, scintigraphic gastric emptying measurements were undertaken in 16 duodenal ulcer patients before, during, and after therapy with cimetidine; in 12 patients with pernicious anemia, and in 12 control subjects. No difference was detected in the rate or pattern of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer patients before and after ulcer healing with cimetidine compared with controls, but emptying of the solid component of the test meal was more rapid during treatment with the drug. Comparison of emptying patterns obtained in duodenal ulcer subjects during and after cimetidine treatment with those obtained in pernicious anemia patients and controls revealed a similar relationship that was characterized by a tendency for reduction in the normal differentiation between the emptying of solid and liquid from the stomach. The similarity in emptying patterns in these groups of subjects suggests that gastric emptying of solids may be influenced by changes in the volume of gastric secretion. The failure to detect an abnormality of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer subjects before and after ulcer healing calls into question the widespread belief that abnormally rapid gastric emptying is a feature with pathogenetic significance in duodenal ulcer disease

  6. Peptic Ulcer Disease in Bangladesh: A Multi-centre Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, C K; Khan, M R; Alam, F; Shil, B C; Kabir, M S; Mahmuduzzaman, M; Das, S C; Masud, H; Roy, P K

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of peptic ulcer has steadily declined through out the world. This decreasing trend is also noticeable in this subcontinent. The point prevalence of peptic ulcer (PUD) in Bangladesh was around 15% in eighties. The aim of this study was to see the present prevalence of peptic ulcer at endoscopy and to identify changing trends in the occurrence of peptic ulcer in Bangladesh. This retrospective analysis of the endoscopic records of multiple tertiary referral centres of Dhaka city were done from January 2012 to July 2013. A total of 5608 subjects were the study samples. We included those patients having peptic ulcer in the form of duodenal ulcer, benign gastric ulcer including pre-pyloric ulcer and gastric outlet obstruction due to peptic ulcer. Duodenal ulcer and benign gastric ulcer were found in 415(7.4%) and 184(3.28%) patients respectively and gastric outlet obstruction due to peptic ulcer was found in 23(0.40%) patients.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of wound management in France: pressure ulcers and venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaume, S; Gemmen, E

    2002-06-01

    This study set out to define realistic protocols of care for the treatment of chronic venous leg ulcers and pressure ulcers in France and, by developing cost-effectiveness models, to compare the different protocols of care for the two ulcer groups, enabling a calculation of direct medical costs per ulcer healed in a typical French health insurance plan. Clinical outcomes and some treatment patterns were obtained from published literature. Validations of different treatment patterns were developed using an expert consensus panel similar to the Delphi approach. Costs were calculated based on national averages and estimates from the UK and Germany. The models were used to measure costs per healed ulcer over a 12-week period. For both the pressure ulcer and venous leg ulcer models, three protocols of care were identified. For pressure ulcers and venous leg ulcers, the hydrocolloid DuoDERM (ConvaTec, also known as Granuflex in the UK and Varihesive in Germany) was most cost-effective in France. The combination of published data and expert consensus opinion is a valid technique, and in this case suggests that treating pressure ulcers and venous leg ulcers with hydrocolloid dressings is more cost-effective than treating them with saline gauze, in spite of the lower unit cost of the latter.

  8. Association between ulcer site and outcome in complicated peptic ulcer disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lolle, Ida; Møller, Morten Hylander; Rosenstock, Steffen Jais

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mortality rates in complicated peptic ulcer disease are high. This study aimed to examine the prognostic importance of ulcer site in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) and perforated peptic ulcer (PPU). MATERIALS AND METHODS: DESIGN: a nationwide cohort study with prospective...... and adjusted association between ulcer site (gastric and duodenal) and the outcome measures of interest were assessed by binary logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Some 20,059 patients with PUB and 4273 patients with PPU were included; 90-d mortality was 15.3% for PUB and 29.8% for PPU; 30-d mortality...... was 10.2% and 24.7%, respectively. Duodenal bleeding ulcer, as compared to gastric ulcer (GU), was associated with a significantly increased risk of all-cause mortality within 90 and 30 d, and with re-intervention: adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.47 (95% confidence interval 1.30-1.67); p 

  9. Pulmonary Function in Ulcerative Colitis

    OpenAIRE

    A.H. Faghihi-Kashani; A. Kabir; S.A. Javad-Moosavi

    2008-01-01

    Background:Pulmonary involvement in ulcerative colitis (UC) is thought to be rare. There is not a definite document about the question that "Is the lung a target organ in inflammatory bowel disease?"The aim of the present study is to compare lung function between cases with UC and healthy controls. This study will also be of interest about searching the outbreak of pulmonary function abnormalities in a sample of Iranian patients with UC and factors associated with severity of UC. Me...

  10. Probiotics and prebiotics in ulcerative colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derikx, L.A.A.P.; Dieleman, L.A.; Hoentjen, F.

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is one of the key players in the etiology of ulcerative colitis. Manipulation of this microflora with probiotics and prebiotics is an attractive strategy in the management of ulcerative colitis. Several intervention studies for both the induction and maintenance of

  11. Helicobacter pylori infection and duodenal ulcer disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G. N.; Noach, L. A.; Rauws, E. A.

    1993-01-01

    H. pylori is undoubtedly the dominant factor in the multifactorial peptic ulcer diathesis. We should not ignore the other contributing factors but rather try to identify how they interact with the organism and initiate the ulcerative process. The interplay of acid attack and mucosal defence is

  12. Pressure ulcers: Back to the basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Karoon; Chauhan, Neha

    2012-05-01

    Pressure ulcer in an otherwise sick patient is a matter of concern for the care givers as well as the medical personnel. A lot has been done to understand the disease process. So much so that USA and European countries have established advisory panels in their respective continents. Since the establishment of these organizations, the understanding of the pressure ulcer has improved significantly. The authors feel that the well documented and well publicized definition of pressure ulcer is somewhat lacking in the correct description of the disease process. Hence, a modified definition has been presented. This disease is here to stay. In the process of managing these ulcers the basic pathology needs to be understood well. Pressure ischemia is the main reason behind the occurrence of ulceration. Different extrinsic and intrinsic factors have been described in detail with review of literature. There are a large number of risk factors causing ulceration. The risk assessment scales have eluded the surgical literature and mostly remained in nursing books and websites. These scales have been reproduced for completion of the basics on decubitus ulcer. The classification of the pressure sores has been given in a comparative form to elucidate that most of the classifications are the same except for minor variations. The management of these ulcers is ever evolving but the age old saying of "prevention is better than cure" suits this condition the most.

  13. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D.M.; Assendelft, W.J.; Valk, G.D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS: We

  14. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D.M.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Valk, G.D.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS:

  15. Vulval Ulcers | Rogers | Obstetrics and Gynaecology Forum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The vulval ulcers that are seen in obstetrics and gynaecological practice in South Africa are most commonly caused by sexually transmitted diseases, especially herpes simplex infection. These ulcers have become more common due to the Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic, and are also responsible for ...

  16. Corynebacterium macginleyi isolated from a corneal ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Ruoff

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the isolation of Corynebacterium macginleyi from the corneal ulcer culture of a patient, later enrolled in the Steroids for Corneal Ulcer Trial (SCUT. To our knowledge this is the first published report from North America of the recovery of C. macginleyi from a serious ocular infection.

  17. Pressure ulcer risk in hip fracture patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwing, R. H.; Rozendaal, M; Wouters-Wesseling, W; Buskens, E.; Keller, P; Haalboom, JRE

    Hip fracture patients have a high risk of pressure ulcers (PU). We followed 121 hip fracture patients for the development of pressure ulcers and evaluated a risk assessment tool for sensitivity and specificity. More than half of the patients presented with PU, mostly stage I. Risk factors for PU

  18. Computed tomography and complicated peptic ulcer disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pun, E.; Firkin, A.

    2004-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) can present with many complications including inflammation, ulceration and perforation. Improvements in CT have enabled better imaging of the gastroduodenal area. Three cases of complicated PUD detected on CT are presented with a brief review of the current literature. Copyright (2004) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  19. Clinical quality indicators of venous leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Monica L; Mainz, Jan; Soernsen, Lars T

    2005-01-01

    In the clinical setting, diagnosis and treatment of venous leg ulcers can vary considerably from patient to patient. The first step to reducing this variation is to document venous leg ulcer care through use of quantitative scientific documentation principles. This requires the development of val...

  20. Lymphogranuloma venereum causing a persistent genital ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotte, Terrence; Lee, Yer; Pandori, Mark; Jain, Vivek; Cohen, Stephanie Elise

    2014-04-01

    Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) is a sexually transmitted cause of inguinal lymphadenopathy and proctocolitis. We report a patient with a persistent genital ulcer due to LGV (serovar L2b), an unusual presentation among US men who have sex with men. Lymphogranuloma venereum should be considered when evaluating persistent genital ulcers, and LGV-specific testing should be sought.

  1. Pressure ulcers: Back to the basics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoon Agrawal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressure ulcer in an otherwise sick patient is a matter of concern for the care givers as well as the medical personnel. A lot has been done to understand the disease process. So much so that USA and European countries have established advisory panels in their respective continents. Since the establishment of these organizations, the understanding of the pressure ulcer has improved significantly. The authors feel that the well documented and well publicized definition of pressure ulcer is somewhat lacking in the correct description of the disease process. Hence, a modified definition has been presented. This disease is here to stay. In the process of managing these ulcers the basic pathology needs to be understood well. Pressure ischemia is the main reason behind the occurrence of ulceration. Different extrinsic and intrinsic factors have been described in detail with review of literature. There are a large number of risk factors causing ulceration. The risk assessment scales have eluded the surgical literature and mostly remained in nursing books and websites. These scales have been reproduced for completion of the basics on decubitus ulcer. The classification of the pressure sores has been given in a comparative form to elucidate that most of the classifications are the same except for minor variations. The management of these ulcers is ever evolving but the age old saying of "prevention is better than cure" suits this condition the most.

  2. Pressure ulcers: Back to the basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Karoon; Chauhan, Neha

    2012-01-01

    Pressure ulcer in an otherwise sick patient is a matter of concern for the care givers as well as the medical personnel. A lot has been done to understand the disease process. So much so that USA and European countries have established advisory panels in their respective continents. Since the establishment of these organizations, the understanding of the pressure ulcer has improved significantly. The authors feel that the well documented and well publicized definition of pressure ulcer is somewhat lacking in the correct description of the disease process. Hence, a modified definition has been presented. This disease is here to stay. In the process of managing these ulcers the basic pathology needs to be understood well. Pressure ischemia is the main reason behind the occurrence of ulceration. Different extrinsic and intrinsic factors have been described in detail with review of literature. There are a large number of risk factors causing ulceration. The risk assessment scales have eluded the surgical literature and mostly remained in nursing books and websites. These scales have been reproduced for completion of the basics on decubitus ulcer. The classification of the pressure sores has been given in a comparative form to elucidate that most of the classifications are the same except for minor variations. The management of these ulcers is ever evolving but the age old saying of “prevention is better than cure” suits this condition the most. PMID:23162223

  3. Preventing Ischial Pressure Ulcers: II. Biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilton M. Kaplan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pressure ulcers (PUs are common and debilitating wounds that arise when immobilized patients cannot shift their weight. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES has been investigated for Pressure Ulcer Prevention (PUP for over 20 years. Historically gluteus maximus (GM has been considered an important actuator in attempting to redistribute seated pressures through NMES.

  4. Single nucleotide polymorphism markers for low-dose aspirin-associated peptic ulcer and ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiotani, Akiko; Murao, Takahisa; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Fujimura, Yoshinori; Sakakibara, Takashi; Nishio, Kazuto; Haruma, Ken

    2014-12-01

    In our previous study, the SLCO1B1 521TT genotype and the SLCO1B1*1b haplotype were significantly associated with the risk of peptic ulcer in patients taking low-dose aspirin (LDA). The aim of the present study was to investigate pharmacogenomic profile of LDA-induced peptic ulcer and ulcer bleeding. Patients taking 100 mg of enteric-coated aspirin for cardiovascular diseases and with a peptic ulcer or ulcer bleeding and patients who also participated in endoscopic surveillance were studied. Genome-wide analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was performed using the Affymetrix DME Plus Premier Pack. SLCO1B1*1b haplotype and candidate genotypes of genes associated with ulcer bleeding or small bowel bleeding identified by genome-wide analysis were determined using TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assay kits, polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism, and direct sequencing. Of 593 patients enrolled, 111 patients had a peptic ulcer and 45 had ulcer bleeding. The frequencies of the SLCO1B1*1b haplotype and CHST2 2082 T allele were significantly greater in patients with peptic ulcer and ulcer bleeding compared to the controls. After adjustment for significant factors, the SLCO1B1*1b haplotype was associated with peptic ulcer (OR 2.20, 95% CI 1.24-3.89) and CHST2 2082 T allele with ulcer bleeding (2.57, 1.07-6.17). The CHST2 2082 T allele as well as SLCO1B1*1b haplotype may identify patients at increased risk for aspirin-induced peptic ulcer or ulcer bleeding. © 2014 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Growth factors for treating diabetic foot ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Gluud, Christian; Nicola, Susana

    2015-01-01

    following treatment for diabetic foot ulcers (RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.14 to 2.94; P value 0.56, low quality of evidence)Although 11 trials reported time to complete healing of the foot ulcers in people with diabetes , meta-analysis was not possible for this outcome due to the unique comparisons within each trial...... (minimum of one toe), complete healing of the foot ulcer, and time to complete healing of the diabetic foot ulcer as the primary outcomes. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Independently, we selected randomised clinical trials, assessed risk of bias, and extracted data in duplicate. We estimated risk ratios......BACKGROUND: Foot ulcers are a major complication of diabetes mellitus, often leading to amputation. Growth factors derived from blood platelets, endothelium, or macrophages could potentially be an important treatment for these wounds but they may also confer risks. OBJECTIVES: To assess...

  6. Probiotics and prebiotics in ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derikx, Lauranne A A P; Dieleman, Levinus A; Hoentjen, Frank

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal microbiota is one of the key players in the etiology of ulcerative colitis. Manipulation of this microflora with probiotics and prebiotics is an attractive strategy in the management of ulcerative colitis. Several intervention studies for both the induction and maintenance of remission in ulcerative colitis patients have been performed. Most of these studies evaluated VSL#3 or E. Coli Nissle 1917 and in general there is evidence for efficacy of these agents for induction and maintenance of remission. However, studies are frequently underpowered, lack a control group, and are very heterogeneous investigating different probiotic strains in different study populations. The absence of well-powered robust randomized placebo-controlled trials impedes the widespread use of probiotics and prebiotics in ulcerative colitis. However, given the promising results that are currently available, probiotics and prebiotics may find their way to the treatment algorithm for ulcerative colitis in the near future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. PRESSURE ULCER PREVENTION: FUNDAMENTALS FOR BEST PRACTICE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This introduction has highlighted both the complex nature of the aetiology of pressure ulcer development and the complex nature of the assessment process intended to identify those patients who are or might be at an enhanced risk of pressure ulcer development. The latter statement assumes that all patients cared for in any healthcare setting are vulnerable to pressure ulcer development. Whilst it is acknowledged that the use of a risk assessment tool can be important in an overall pressure ulcer prevention strategy, it is important that the limitations of these tools are acknowledged and that they are not an finite assessment in themselves and that they should be used by a practitioner with a fundamental breadth of relevant knowledge and an appreciation of the range of appropriate preventative equipment/techniques available and the role of the multi-disciplinary team in the prevention of all avoidable pressure ulcers.

  8. The Steroids for Corneal Ulcers Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Muthiah; Mascarenhas, Jeena; Rajaraman, Revathi; Ravindran, Meenakshi; Lalitha, Prajna; Glidden, David V.; Ray, Kathryn J.; Hong, Kevin C.; Oldenburg, Catherine E.; Lee, Salena M.; Zegans, Michael E.; McLeod, Stephen D.; Lietman, Thomas M.; Acharya, Nisha R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To provide comprehensive trial methods and baseline data for the Steroids for Corneal Ulcers Trial and to present epidemiological characteristics such as risk factors, causative organisms, and ulcer severity. Methods Baseline data from a 1:1 randomized, placebo-controlled, double-masked clinical trial comparing prednisolone phosphate, 1%, with placebo as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of bacterial corneal ulcers. Eligible patients had a culture-positive bacterial corneal ulcer and had been taking moxifloxacin for 48 hours. The primary outcome for the trial is best spectacle-corrected visual acuity at 3 months from enrollment. This report provides comprehensive baseline data, including best spectacle-corrected visual acuity, infiltrate size, microbio-logical results, and patient demographics, for patients enrolled in the trial. Results Of 500 patients enrolled, 97% were in India. Two hundred twenty patients (44%) were agricultural workers. Median baseline visual acuity was 0.84 logMAR (Snellen, 20/125) (interquartile range, 0.36-1.7; Snellen, 20/50 to counting fingers). Baseline visual acuity was not significantly different between the United States and India. Ulcers in India had larger infiltrate/scar sizes (P=.04) and deeper infiltrates (P=.04) and were more likely to be localized centrally (P=.002) than ulcers enrolled in the United States. Gram-positive bacteria were the most common organisms isolated from the ulcers (n=366, 72%). Conclusions The Steroids for Corneal Ulcers Trial will compare the use of a topical corticosteroid with placebo as adjunctive therapy for bacterial corneal ulcers. Patients enrolled in this trial had diverse ulcer severity and on average significantly reduced visual acuity at presentation. PMID:21987581

  9. History of venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianfaldoni, S; Wollina, U; Lotti, J; Gianfaldoni, R; Lotti, T; Fioranelli, M; Roccia, M G

    To retrieve the history of venous ulcers and of skin lesions in general, we must go back to the appearance of human beings on earth. It is interesting to note that cutaneous injuries evolved parallel to human society. An essential first step in the pathogenesis of ulcers was represented by the transition of the quadruped man to Homo Erectus. This condition was characterized by a greater gravitational pressure on the lower limbs, with consequences on the peripheral venous system. Furthermore, human evolution was characterized by an increased risk of traumatic injuries, secondary to his natural need to create fire and hunt (e.g. stones, iron, fire, animal fighting). Humans then began to fight one another until they came to real wars, with increased frequency of wounds and infectious complications. The situation degraded with the introduction of horse riding, introduced by the Scites, who first tamed animals in the 7th century BC. This condition exhibited iliac veins at compression phenomena, favouring the venous stasis. With time, man continued to evolve until the modern age, which is characterized by increased risk factors for venous wounds such as poor physical activity and dietary errors (1, 2).

  10. Support surfaces for pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Elizabeth; Jammali-Blasi, Asmara; Bell-Syer, Sally E M; Dumville, Jo C; Middleton, Victoria; Cullum, Nicky

    2015-09-03

    Pressure ulcers (i.e. bedsores, pressure sores, pressure injuries, decubitus ulcers) are areas of localised damage to the skin and underlying tissue. They are common in the elderly and immobile, and costly in financial and human terms. Pressure-relieving support surfaces (i.e. beds, mattresses, seat cushions etc) are used to help prevent ulcer development. This systematic review seeks to establish:(1) the extent to which pressure-relieving support surfaces reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers compared with standard support surfaces, and,(2) their comparative effectiveness in ulcer prevention. In April 2015, for this fourth update we searched The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 15 April 2015) which includes the results of regular searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 3). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomised trials, published or unpublished, that assessed the effects of any support surface for prevention of pressure ulcers, in any patient group or setting which measured pressure ulcer incidence. Trials reporting only proxy outcomes (e.g. interface pressure) were excluded. Two review authors independently selected trials. Data were extracted by one review author and checked by another. Where appropriate, estimates from similar trials were pooled for meta-analysis. For this fourth update six new trials were included, bringing the total of included trials to 59.Foam alternatives to standard hospital foam mattresses reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers in people at risk (RR 0.40 95% CI 0.21 to 0.74). The relative merits of alternating- and constant low-pressure devices are unclear. One high-quality trial suggested that alternating-pressure mattresses may be more cost effective than alternating-pressure overlays in a UK context.Pressure-relieving overlays on the operating table reduce postoperative pressure ulcer incidence

  11. Heel ulcers - Pressure ulcers or symptoms of peripheral arterial disease? An exploratory matched case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twilley, Heidi; Jones, Sarahjane

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the relationship between pressure ulcers of the heel and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and determine the feasibility of conducting a statistically powered matched case control study. Evidence indicates a relationship between chronic leg ulcers and vascular disease. The relationship between pressure ulcers of the heel and vascular disease is less well established. A matched case control study. Data were collected between March 2014 and January 2015. 15 patients identified as having a grade 2, 3 or 4 pressure ulcer of the heel were compared with 15 matched controls without pressure ulcers of the heel. The primary clinical outcome measure was the ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI), where an ABPI 1.3 was considered clinically indicative of PAD. The primary feasibility outcome measure was the rate of recruitment. Eighty seven patients were reported as having foot and heel ulcers; 36 of whom were identified as having pressure ulcers of the heel, 15 (42%) of whom were recruited to the study. Patients presenting with pressure ulcers of the heel were significantly more likely to simultaneously have previously undiagnosed PAD compared with age, gender and ethnicity matched controls without pressure ulcers of the heel (odds ratio: 11, 95% confidence interval 1.99-60.57). The formation of pressure ulcers of the heel could, in some patients, be related to the presence of PAD rather than a consequence of poor quality care. Healthcare professionals should assess the patient to exclude or confirm PAD. Copyright © 2016 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Helicobacter pylori : the causative agent of peptic ulcer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review examines Helicobacter pylori as an organism and as the causative agent of peptic ulcers. The review also examined the classification of ulcers, ... Elimination of Helicobacter pylori by treatment with antibiotics in peptic ulcer patients resulted in the healing of the ulcer. Prevention of Helicobacter pylori infections is ...

  13. Recurring pressure ulcers: identifying the definitions. A National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel white paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tew, Cindy; Hettrick, Heather; Holden-Mount, Sarah; Grigsby, Rebekah; Rhodovi, Julie; Moore, Lyn; Ghaznavi, Amir M; Siddiqui, Aamir

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is a lack of consensus regarding the accepted terminology pertaining to the pressure ulcer healing progression and recidivism. This lack of uniformity can negatively impact initiation of treatment pathways, completion of appropriate interventions, clinical documentation, medical coding, patient education, discharge planning and healthcare revenue through out the healthcare system. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a standard nomenclature as it pertains to pressure ulcer healing progression and any recidivism that may occur. The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel has formulated a framework of terms regarding pressure ulcer progression. We also developed a clearer nomenclature for lack of progress and recidivism of pressure ulcers. This document should serve as a starting point for the discussion of the pressure ulcer care, research, and terminology. © 2014 by the Wound Healing Society.

  14. Surgical management of perforated peptic ulcer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, K J; Faolain, M O; Gannon, D; Gorey, T F; Kerin, M J

    2006-01-01

    Surgery for perforated peptic ulcer disease is one of the most common emergency procedures carried out in the western world. The role of postoperative empiric Helicobacter Pylori eradication therapy is controversial. The clinical, operative and postoperative surveillance details of 84 consecutive patients who underwent surgery for perforated peptic ulcer were reviewed. All patients underwent omentopexy +/- simple closure followed by proton pump therapy. Patients were followed-up for an average of 44 +/- 19 months. Females were older than male patients (59 +/- 20 vs. 46 + 17 years; pperforated peptic ulcer is associated with a significant perioperative mortality rate. Elderly female patients are particularly at risk.

  15. Diabetic foot ulcers: Part II. Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Sibbald, R Gary; Mayer, Dieter; Goodman, Laurie; Botros, Mariam; Armstrong, David G; Woo, Kevin; Boeni, Thomas; Ayello, Elizabeth A; Kirsner, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    The management of diabetic foot ulcers can be optimized by using an interdisciplinary team approach addressing the correctable risk factors (ie, poor vascular supply, infection control and treatment, and plantar pressure redistribution) along with optimizing local wound care. Dermatologists can initiate diabetic foot care. The first step is recognizing that a loss of skin integrity (ie, a callus, blister, or ulcer) considerably increases the risk of preventable amputations. A holistic approach to wound assessment is required. Early detection and effective management of these ulcers can reduce complications, including preventable amputations and possible mortality. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A Clinical Approach to Vulvar Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Kristen M A

    2017-09-01

    This article discusses the differential diagnosis of vulvar ulcers and describes a general clinical approach to this common but nonspecific examination finding. The differential diagnosis includes sexually and nonsexually transmitted infections, dermatitides, trauma, neoplasms, hormonally induced ulcers, and drug reactions. Patient history and physical examination provide important clues to the cause of a vulvar ulcer. However, laboratory testing is usually required for accurate diagnosis because the clinical presentation is often nonspecific and may be atypical due to secondary conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Gastric ulceration in dog: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Parrah

    Full Text Available The common acid related diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract could be considered as primarily due to the defect in barrier function either of the gastric mucosal or duodenal epithelium leading to the formation of gastric or duodenal ulcers. An attempt was made in this review to discuss the classification, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of gastric ulcer in dogs. Early surgical advances in the management of peptic ulcers are emphasized that were then subsequently replaced by pharmacological treatment (histamine H2-receptor antagonists, proton pump inhibitors and considered as the major strategy against the acid disorders. [Vet World 2013; 6(7.000: 449-454

  18. Absorption of pentacaine from ulcerous rat stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomcikova, O.; Babulova, A.; Durisova, M.; Trnovec, T.; Benes, L.

    1985-01-01

    Pentacaine is a local anaesthetic which exhibited positive effects on healing of model ulcers in the rat stomach. The in situ disappearance of pentacaine from the ulcerous and intact rat stomach was studied. Gastric ulcers were produced by oral administration of phenylbutazone (200 mg/kg) 3.5 h before absorption experiment. Pentacaine exhibited a biexponential decrease from the lumen of the stomach, the rate of which was essentially the same in both groups. The total amount of pentacaine absorbed was small because of extremly low absorption rate. (author)

  19. Specific immunotherapy ameliorates ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Min; Zeng, Lu; Li, Lin-Jing; Mo, Li-Hua; Xie, Rui-Di; Feng, Bai-Sui; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Zhan-Ju; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reaction to certain allergens plays a role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This study aims to observe the effect of specific immunotherapy in a group of IBD patients. Patients with both ulcerative colitis (UC) and food allergy were recruited into this study. Food allergy was diagnosed by skin prick test and serum specific IgE. The patients were treated with specific immunotherapy (SIT) and Clostridium butyricum (CB) capsules. After treating with SIT and CB, the clinical symptoms of UC were markedly suppressed as shown by reduced truncated Mayo scores and medication scores. The serum levels of specific IgE, interleukin (IL)-4 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were also suppressed. Treating with SIT alone or CB alone did not show appreciable improvement of the clinical symptoms of UC. UC with food allergy can be ameliorated by administration with SIT and butyrate-production probiotics.

  20. Contemporary Management of Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanga, Rohini; Long, Millie D

    2018-03-27

    We discuss the newest evidence-based data on management of ulcerative colitis (UC). We emphasize risk-stratification, optimizing medical therapies, and surgical outcomes of UC. Recent medical advances include introduction of novel agents for UC. Vedolizumab, an anti-adhesion molecule, has demonstrated efficacy in moderate to severe UC. Tofacitinib, a small molecule, has also demonstrated efficacy. Data on optimization of infliximab show the superiority of combination therapy with azathioprine over monotherapy with infliximab or azathioprine alone. Data on anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (anti-TNF) therapeutic drug monitoring also hold promise, as do preliminary data on the dose escalation of infliximab in severe hospitalized UC. Surgical outcome data are reassuring, with new fertility data showing the effectiveness of in vitro fertilization. UC management is multi-disciplinary and changing. While novel therapies hold promise, better optimization of our current arsenal will also improve outcomes.

  1. PERFORATED PEPTIC ULCER: A CLINICAL ANALYSIS AND OUTCOME

    OpenAIRE

    Bijit

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The incidence of perforated peptic ulcer is approximately 7-10 cases per one lakh population per year. Perforation is seen in about 7% of patients hospitalized for peptic ulcer disease. Peptic ulcer perforation, which can be gastric/duodenal perforation can be a serious life-threatening condition if not detected early and treated urgently. Peptic ulcer disease has decreased considerably worldwide with the advent of potent anti-ulcer medicines, but its complication l...

  2. Location-dependent depth and undermining formation of pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshiko; Isogai, Zenzo; Mizokami, Fumihiro; Furuta, Katsunori; Nemoto, Tetsuya; Kanoh, Hiroyuki; Yoneda, Masahiko

    2013-08-01

    We examined the location-specific properties of pressure ulcers, focusing on depth and undermining formation, which are often unfavorable factors for ulcer healing. We conducted a retrospective observational study of 2 independent databases on pressure ulcers. Databases from a 200-bed hospital (database A) and a 300-bed hospital (database B) were collected during different time periods. Relationships between ulcer location, ulcer depth, and undermining formation were analyzed. All pressure ulcers were accurately diagnosed and classified according to their locations. A total of 282 pressure ulcers in 189 patients from database A and 232 pressure ulcers in 154 patients from database B were analyzed. It was found that pressure ulcers primarily developed over the sacrum. Ratio of stages III and IV pressure ulcers was high in pressure ulcers of the foot, ankle, and crus on the lower leg. Among the deep pressure ulcers, undermining formation was frequently observed on the greater trochanter, ilium, and sacrum. In contrast, pressure ulcers of the foot, ankle, and crus did not exhibit undermining formation. Our results revealed marked differences in pressure ulcer properties depending on their location. Factors affecting depth and undermining of pressure ulcers appear to be related to anatomical and physical properties of the bone and subcutaneous tissue. Copyright © 2013 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Lower extremity arterial and venous ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieggreen, Mary

    2005-06-01

    The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in the general population is high, but the awareness of primary care providers of the disease process is low. The disease is not recognized by primary care providers. Early recognition and treatment of venous diseases that progress to postphlebotic syndrome, such as after a deep vein thrombosis, will prevent venous ulcers that add considerable expense to the health care system. Vascular assessment, including routine ABI measurement of patients who are in risk categories for vascular disease will identify those patients so that prevention programs can be put into place early. Major contributions to the understanding and management of leg ulcers and wound healing have been made in the last decade. However, there is still confusion as to the exact mechanism behind ulcer development and the best method to manage, cure,and prevent these ulcers has yet to be found.

  4. The Treatment of Chronic Peptic Ulceration

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-10-23

    Oct 23, 1971 ... tain cases, the primary treatment for peptic ulcers. Today few .... thoroughly satisfactory long-term results in about 95%." However, when ... It must be remembered that gastric carcinoma may .... rule in subsequent years.

  5. Perforated peptic ulcer: How to improve outcome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten Hylander; Adamsen, Sven; Wøjdemann, Morten

    2008-01-01

    Despite the introduction of histamine H(2)-receptor antagonists, proton-pump inhibitors and the discovery of Helicobacter pylori, both the incidence of emergency surgery for perforated peptic ulcer and the mortality rate for patients undergoing surgery for peptic ulcer perforation have increased...... with an emphasis on risks that are preventable. A systematic review including randomized studies was carried out. There are a limited number of studies of patients with peptic ulcer perforation. Most of these studies are of low evidential status. Only a few randomized, controlled trials have been published...... to improve the outcome of patients with peptic ulcer perforation, sepsis needs to be factored into the existing knowledge and treatment Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8/27...

  6. Pressure ulcer prevention program: a journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmore, Barbara; Lebovits, Sarah; Baldock, Philip; Suggs, Barbara; Ayello, Elizabeth A

    2011-01-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' regulations regarding nonpayment for hospital-acquired conditions such as pressure ulcers have prompted a marked increase in focus on preventive care. Our hospital also used this change in payment policy as an opportunity to strengthen our pressure ulcer prevention practices. We used an 8-spoke prevention wheel to develop and implement practice changes that reduced pressure ulcer incidence from 7.3% to 1.3% in 3 years. Because it is about the journey, we will describe the mechanisms we designed and implemented, and identify strategies that worked or did not work as we promulgated a quality improvement process for pressure ulcer prevention in our large urban hospital center.

  7. Pressure ulcer prevention in care home settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael

    2017-03-31

    Pressure ulcer prevention in the care home setting can be challenging and is often compromised by a lack of access to education and resources. There are measures that have been shown to consistently improve outcomes in pressure ulcer prevention including assessment of the patient and their individual risks, delivery of a consistent plan of care that meets patients' needs, and regular evaluation to identify shortfalls. In addition, there should be a robust approach to investigating events that lead to a person developing a pressure ulcer and that information should be used to improve future practice. Pressure ulcer prevention in care homes is achievable and nurses should all be aware of the necessary measures detailed in this article.

  8. Support surfaces for pressure ulcer prevention

    OpenAIRE

    McInnes, E; Bell-Syer, SE; Dumville, JC; Legood, R; Cullum, NA

    2008-01-01

    Background Pressure ulcers (also known as bedsores, pressure sores, decubitus ulcers) are areas of localised damage to the skin and underlying tissue due to pressure, shear or friction. They are common in the elderly and immobile and costly in financial and human terms. Pressure-relieving beds, mattresses and seat cushions are widely used as aids to prevention in both institutional and non-institutional settings. Objectives This systematic review seeks to answer the following questions: (1) t...

  9. Pressure ulcers : predicting factors, prevention and costs

    OpenAIRE

    Demarré, Liesbet

    2014-01-01

    The research outline pursued with this thesis can be divided in three parts. In the first part, studies to compare the effectiveness of several interventions for the prevention of pressure ulcers were conducted. Pressure ulcer prevention focusses on the reduction of the amount and duration of pressure and shear. An alternating device intermittently removes pressure and shear from vulnerable areas. It provides pressure relief via cyclic inflating and deflating air cells. Systematic reviews an...

  10. Perforated pyloroduodenal peptic ulcer and sonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmich, Siarhei; Harvey, Chris J; Fascia, Daniel T M; Kuzmich, Tatsiana; Neriman, Deena; Basit, Rizwan; Tan, Kai Lee

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to illustrate the spectrum of sonographic findings in perforated pyloroduodenal peptic ulcer and discuss the potential role of sonography in the diagnosis. Although sonography is not the first-line investigation of choice in suspected perforated peptic ulcer, understanding of the characteristic appearances seen during general abdominal sonography may aid the reader in the diagnosis of this important and sometimes overlooked cause of nonspecific abdominal pain. This may shorten time to the diagnosis and ultimate surgical management.

  11. The economics of adalimumab for ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Feng

    2015-06-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory disease, characterized by diffuse mucosal inflammation in the colon. Adalimumab, as a TNF-α blocker, offers a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with moderate to severe ulcerative colitis and refractory or intolerant to conventional medications; however, its cost-effectiveness profile has not yet been well established. Future economic evaluations should choose appropriate comparators in the context of target-reimbursement decision making and focus on cost-effectiveness over a long time horizon.

  12. Solitary ulcerated congenital giant juvenile xanthogranuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Yuen Ng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-month-old female patient with a giant ulcerated nodule over the back since birth was diagnosed as congenital giant juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG based on clinical and histopathological examination. Congenital giant JXG with ulceration at birth is a rare presentation of JXG and commonly misdiagnosed. This case emphasizes the importance of being aware of the myriad presentations of JXG in order to make a correct diagnosis and avoid unnecessary investigations or treatment.

  13. Stress Ulcer Disease in the Burned Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    appearance of gastritis and duodenitis and their morphologic and histologic characteristics point to impaired mucosal blood flow and focal is...Gastric Duodenal disease disease study study Total number of patients 54 37 Gastritis 45 18 Duodenitis 34 15 Acute gastric ulcer 14 6...early mucosai slough, which ap- peared to be incipient ulcerations, showed in- farction necrosis on histologic examination. The le- sions of each of

  14. General problems of roentgenology of stomach ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizaev, M.N.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that differential X-ray semiotics should be considered with regard to ulcer localization in one or another part of the stomach. Differential radiodiagnosis of tumoral and non-tumoral nature of ulcerations is based on analyzing the combination of X-ray symptoms, because every separate symptom doesn't reflect the whole variety and complexity of X-ray semiotics of the disease

  15. Serum ferritin in recurrent oral ulceration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Challacombe, S.J.; Scully, C.; Keevil, B.; Lehner, T.

    1983-01-01

    A sensitive radio-assay for ferritin was developed and used to examine serum ferritin levels in 105 patients with recurrent oral ulceration (ROU), 41 patients with Behcet's syndrome (BS), 42 with other ulcerative oral lesions, 35 patients with non-ulcerative oral lesions and in 78 controls. Ferritin levels increased with age and were significantly higher in males than females. The mean ferritin concentrations in male patients with ROU, BS or with other oral ulcers were significantly reduced in comparison with controls, and in female patients were significantly reduced in those with major aphthous ulcers. The prevalence of low serum ferritin levels was about 8% in patients with ROU, 15% in BS and 9.5% in patients with other ulcerative oral lesions, compared with less than 3% in patients with non-ulcerative oral disorders and in controls. Most of the iron-deficient patients were female. Serum ferritin levels did not directly correlate with serum iron levels and may be a more accurate indicator of iron deficiency. Furthermore, serum ferritin can distinguish between patients with true iron deficiency and those with secondary sideropenia. It is suggested that in a small number of patients, oral ulceration may be a presenting sign of iron deficiency, and that in a further small proportion of patients, ROU already present will be exacerbated by concurrent iron deficiency. Both groups will show a therapeutic response to correction of the iron deficiency. The results suggest that serum ferritin levels are a useful part of the haematological investigatons in patients with ROU. (author)

  16. Non-contact ulcer area calculation system for neuropathic foot ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Parth; Mahajan, Siddaram; Nageswaran, Sharmila; Paul, Sathish Kumar; Ebenzer, Mannam

    2017-08-11

    Around 125,785 new cases in year 2013-14 of leprosy were detected in India as per WHO report on leprosy in September 2015 which accounts to approximately 62% of the total new cases. Anaesthetic foot caused by leprosy leads to uneven loading of foot leading to ulcer in approximately 20% of the cases. Much efforts have gone in identifying newer techniques to efficiently monitor the progress of ulcer healing. Current techniques followed in measuring the size of ulcers, have not been found to be so accurate but are still is followed by clinicians across the globe. Quantification of prognosis of the condition would be required to understand the efficacy of current treatment methods and plan for further treatment. This study aims at developing a non contact technique to precisely measure the size of ulcer in patients affected by leprosy. Using MATLAB software, GUI was designed to process the acquired ulcer image by segmenting and calculating the pixel area of the image. The image was further converted to a standard measurement using a reference object. The developed technique was tested on 16 ulcer images acquired from 10 leprosy patients with plantar ulcers. Statistical analysis was done using MedCalc analysis software to find the reliability of the system. The analysis showed a very high correlation coefficient (r=0.9882) between the ulcer area measurements done using traditional technique and the newly developed technique, The reliability of the newly developed technique was significant with a significance level of 99.9%. The designed non-contact ulcer area calculating system using MATLAB is found to be a reliable system in calculating the size of ulcers. The technique would help clinicians have a reliable tool to monitor the progress of ulcer healing and help modify the treatment protocol if needed. Copyright © 2017 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. History of Helicobacter pylori, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, David Y

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection underlies gastric ulcer disease, gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer disease. The disease expression reflects the pattern and extent of gastritis/gastric atrophy (i.e., duodenal ulcer with non-atrophic and gastric ulcer and gastric cancer with atrophic gastritis). Gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer have been known for thousands of years. Ulcers are generally non-fatal and until the 20th century were difficult to diagnose. However, the presence and pattern of gastritis in past civilizations can be deduced based on the diseases present. It has been suggested that gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer both arose or became more frequent in Europe in the 19th century. Here, we show that gastric cancer and gastric ulcer were present throughout the 17th to 19th centuries consistent with atrophic gastritis being the predominant pattern, as it proved to be when it could be examined directly in the late 19th century. The environment before the 20th century favored acquisition of H. pylori infection and atrophic gastritis (e.g., poor sanitation and standards of living, seasonal diets poor in fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in winter, vitamin deficiencies, and frequent febrile infections in childhood). The latter part of the 19th century saw improvements in standards of living, sanitation, and diets with a corresponding decrease in rate of development of atrophic gastritis allowing duodenal ulcers to become more prominent. In the early 20th century physician's believed they could diagnose ulcers clinically and that the diagnosis required hospitalization for "surgical disease" or for "Sippy" diets. We show that while H. pylori remained common and virulent in Europe and the United States, environmental changes resulted in changes of the pattern of gastritis producing a change in the manifestations of H. pylori infections and subsequently to a rapid decline in transmission and a rapid decline in all H. pylori-related diseases.

  18. Pulmonary Function in Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Faghihi-Kashani

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Background:Pulmonary involvement in ulcerative colitis (UC is thought to be rare. There is not a definite document about the question that "Is the lung a target organ in inflammatory bowel disease?"The aim of the present study is to compare lung function between cases with UC and healthy controls. This study will also be of interest about searching the outbreak of pulmonary function abnormalities in a sample of Iranian patients with UC and factors associated with severity of UC. Methods: In an analytic cross sectional study between July 2006 and September 2007, we evaluated 70 patients with histologically confirmed UC and 70 matched healthy people. Our checklist addressed demographic variables, symptoms, smoking behavior, drugs, laboratory findings and pulmonary function tests. Results: None of the lung volumes and capacities were significantly different in cases as compared to controls. Severity of UC was mild in 65.7%. It was correlated with smoking (P=0.019 and allergy (P=0.017. Patients with moderate UC had lower hemoglobin (P<.001, MCH (P=0.002, MCV (P=0.047, MCHC (P=0.028 and higher REFF (P=0.032 and BF (P=0.01. Conclusion: The controversies about the relation between UC and lung disease can be due to different sample sizes, activity of UC at the time of measurement of lung volumes, methods of measuring lung capacities at the time of PFT and different nationalities.

  19. Golimumab in unresponsive ulcerative colitis

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    Lippert E

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Elisabeth Lippert, Martina Müller, Claudia Ott University Hospital Regensburg, Department of Internal Medicine I, Regensburg, Germany Abstract: Ulcerative colitis (UC is a chronic inflammation mainly affecting the colon mucosa. It predominantly occurs in younger patients. Until recently, the main goals in the treatment of UC were to temper the symptoms, such as diarrhea, pain, and weight loss, by using mesalazine and steroids. With newer medications, such as immunomodulators (thiopurines and the biologics providing blockade of tumor necrosis factor (TNF, the goals of the therapy in UC have changed to long-term remission and mucosal healing. The first available anti-TNF therapy in UC included infusion therapy with infliximab every few weeks. In 2012, subcutaneously administered adalimumab gained approval for the treatment of UC in Germany. In patients with a mild disease, therapy with mesalazine, orally or topically, can be sufficient. In patients with moderate to severe disease, therapy with azathioprine or anti-TNF is often required to reach disease control; however, this is only efficient in about two-thirds of patients. Some patients either show no response or a lost response while on treatment. So, further medical options are warranted in the treatment of UC. With golimumab, a new approach in the treatment of mild to moderate UC recently became available in Germany and is a promising new option in the therapy regimen for patients with UC. Keywords: anti-TNF, biological therapy, inflammatory bowel disease

  20. Golimumab in unresponsive ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, Elisabeth; Müller, Martina; Ott, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammation mainly affecting the colon mucosa. It predominantly occurs in younger patients. Until recently, the main goals in the treatment of UC were to temper the symptoms, such as diarrhea, pain, and weight loss, by using mesalazine and steroids. With newer medications, such as immunomodulators (thiopurines) and the biologics providing blockade of tumor necrosis factor (TNF), the goals of the therapy in UC have changed to long-term remission and mucosal healing. The first available anti-TNF therapy in UC included infusion therapy with infliximab every few weeks. In 2012, subcutaneously administered adalimumab gained approval for the treatment of UC in Germany. In patients with a mild disease, therapy with mesalazine, orally or topically, can be sufficient. In patients with moderate to severe disease, therapy with azathioprine or anti-TNF is often required to reach disease control; however, this is only efficient in about two-thirds of patients. Some patients either show no response or a lost response while on treatment. So, further medical options are warranted in the treatment of UC. With golimumab, a new approach in the treatment of mild to moderate UC recently became available in Germany and is a promising new option in the therapy regimen for patients with UC.

  1. Dietary Phytosterols Protective Against Peptic Ulceration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovey, Frank I; Capanoglu, Doga; Langley, G. John; Herniman, Julie M; Bor, Serhat; Ozutemiz, Omer; Hobsley, Michael; Bardhan, Karna Dev; Linclau, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Background In developing countries the prevalence of duodenal ulceration is related to the staple diet and not to the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori. Experiments using animal peptic ulcer models show that the lipid fraction in foods from the staple diets of low prevalence areas gives protection against ulceration, including ulceration due to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and also promotes healing of ulceration. The lipid from the pulse Dolichos biflorus (Horse gram) was highly active and used for further investigations. Further experiments showed the phospholipids, sterol esters and sterols present in Horse gram lipid were gastroprotective. Dietary phospholipids are known to be protective, but the nature of protective sterols in staple diets is not known. The present research investigates the nature of the protective phytosterols. Methods Sterol fractions were extracted from the lipid in Dolichos biflorus and tested for gastroprotection using the rat ethanol model. The fractions showing protective activity were isolated and identification of the components was investigated by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). Results The protective phytosterol fraction was shown to consist of stigmasterol, β-sitosterol and a third as yet unidentified sterol, isomeric with β-sitosterol. Conclusions Dietary changes, affecting the intake of protective phospholipids and phytosterols, may reduce the prevalence of duodenal ulceration in areas of high prevalence and may reduce the incidence of recurrent duodenal ulceration after healing and elimination of Helicobacter pylori infection. A combination of phospholipids and phytosterols, such as found in the lipid fraction of ulceroprotecive foods, may be of value in giving protection against the ulcerogenic effect of NSAIDs. PMID:27942332

  2. Massage therapy for preventing pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinhong; Sun, Zhongren; Yue, Jinhuan

    2015-06-17

    Pressure ulcers affect approximately 10% of patients in hospitals and the elderly are at highest risk. Several studies have suggested that massage therapy may help to prevent the development of pressure ulcers, but these results are inconsistent. To assess the evidence for the effects of massage compared with placebo, standard care or other interventions for prevention of pressure ulcers in at-risk populations.The review sought to answer the following questions:Does massage reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers of any grade?Is massage safe in the short- and long-term? If not, what are the adverse events associated with massage? We searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (8 January 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2015, Issue 1), Ovid MEDLINE (1946 to 8 January 2015), Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process Other Non-Indexed Citations 8 January 2015), Ovid EMBASE (1974 to 8 January 2015), and EBSCO CINAHL (1982 to 8 January 2015). We did not apply date or language restrictions. We planned to include all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomised controlled trials (Q-RCTs) that evaluated the effects of massage therapy for the prevention of pressure ulcers. Our primary outcome was the proportion of people developing a new pressure ulcer of any grade. Two review authors independently carried out trial selection. Disagreements were resolved by discussion. No studies (RCTs or Q-RCTs) met the inclusion criteria. Therefore, neither a meta-analysis nor a narrative description of studies was possible. There are currently no studies eligible for inclusion in this review. It is, therefore, unclear whether massage therapy can prevent pressure ulcers.

  3. CLINICOMICROBIOLOGICAL STUDY OF DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS

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    Nirmal Kumar Palaniappan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease caused by a combination of lifestyle and genetic factors affecting all organs in the body. Foot ulcers are one of the common and serious long-term complications of diabetes leads to recurrent and chronic infections, which results in limb loss when treatment is delayed. The aim of this study is to find out the clinical outcome and microbiological profile in patients admitted with diabetic foot ulcers. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study conducted between November 2008 to November 2009 over 50 patients with history of foot ulceration and diabetes. 50 patients were admitted with diabetic foot ulcer over a period of one year between November 2008-2009. They were studied after getting written consent. A predesigned pro forma was used to get the parameters comprising age, gender, duration, type of diabetes mellitus, presence of neuropathy, nephropathy (serum creatinine, urine albumin, retinopathy (screening funduscopy by ophthalmologist. RESULTS Among 50 patients admitted and treated for diabetic foot ulcers with mean stay of 18 days, 29 (58% had complete healing on conservative management, 18 (36% underwent minor amputation (toes, 3 (6% had major amputation (below knee/above knee. No mortality among the study groups encountered. Gram-negative aerobes E. coli (36%, Pseudomonas (52%, Klebsiella (28%, Proteus vulgaris (20% and Acinetobacter (16% were most frequently isolated followed by gram-positive aerobes MRSA (14%, Enterococcus (6%, Strep pyogenes (4% and no anaerobic growth. CONCLUSION Diabetic foot infections are frequently polymicrobial and predominantly gram-negative aerobic bacteria at presentation. Multidrug resistance pseudomonas aeruginosa and MRSA in diabetic foot ulcer is at its emergence and life threatening. Initial aggressive multimodal approach with surgical intervention, culture specific and sensitive targeted combined broad-spectrum antibiotics decreases the morbidity and mortality

  4. EFFECTS OF PLUMERIA OBTUSA LINN. IN PEPTIC ULCER INDUCED BY PYLORUS LIGATION & INDOMETHACIN

    OpenAIRE

    Amit Pratap Singh; Vaibhav Shukla; Piuesh Khare

    2012-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease refers to pathological lesions and ulcers of any portion of gastrointestinal tract exposed to acid activated pepsin. Gastric ulcer refers to ulcer in the stomach where as duodenal ulcer is a ulcer found in duodenum of small intestine. Helicobacter pylori infection, a spiral shaped type of bacteria, is present in more than 90% of the patients with intestinal ulcers and more than 80% of patients with stomach ulcers. Helicobacter pylori weaken the protective mucous coating o...

  5. Current management of peptic ulcer perforations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menakuru, S.R.

    2004-01-01

    Perforation is a life-threatening complication of peptic ulcer disease. Smoking and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are important risk factors for perforation. Diagnosis is made clinically and confirmed by the presence of pneumoperitoneum on radiographs. Nonoperative management is successful in patients identified to have a spontaneously sealed perforation proven by water-soluble contrast gastroduodenogram. Operative management consists of the time-honoured practice of mental patch closure, but now this can be done by laparoscopic methods. The practice of addition of acid-reducing procedures is currently being debated though it continues to be recommended in good-risk patients. Laparoscopic approaches to closure of duodenal perforation are now being applied widely and may become the gold standard in the future especially in patients with < 10 mm perforation size presenting within the first 24 hours of onset of pain. The role of Helicobacter pylori in duodenal ulcer perforation is controversial and more studies are needed to answer this question though recent indirect evidence suggests that eradicating H pylori may reduce the necessity for adding acid reducing procedures and the associated morbidity. Perforation is a life-threatening complication of peptic ulcer disease. The management of peptic ulcer disease has evolved over the decades, due to advances in operative techniques, bacteriology and pharmacology. While the recognition of the role of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in peptic ulceration has resulted in a paradigm shift in the management of uncomplicated peptic ulcers, debate continues about the appropriate management of perforated duodenal bulb and prepyloric ulcers. A new dimension has been added to this controversy by the advent of laparoscopic techniques for closing the perforation. A Medline search of all articles dealing with the management of peptic ulcer perforation published after 1985 was undertaken. The short listed articles were

  6. Medical device-related pressure ulcers

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    Black JM

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Joyce M Black,1 Peggy Kalowes2 1Adult Health and Illness Department, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 2Nursing Research and Innovation, Long Beach Memorial Miller Children’s & Women’s Hospital, Long Beach, CA, USA Abstract: Pressure ulcers from medical devices are common and can cause significant morbidity in patients of all ages. These pressure ulcers appear in the shape of the device and are most often found from the use of oxygen delivery devices. A hospital program designed to reduce the number of pressure ulcers from medical devices was successful. The program involved the development of a team that focused on skin, the results were then published for the staff to track their performance, and it was found that using foam dressings helped reduce the pressure from the device. The incidence of ulcers from medical devices has remained at zero at this hospital since this program was implemented. Keywords: pressure ulcer, medical device related

  7. Yttrium-90 microsphere induced gastrointestinal tract ulceration

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    Rikabi Ali A

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiomicrosphere therapy (RT utilizing yttrium-90 (90Y microspheres has been shown to be an effective regional treatment for primary and secondary hepatic malignancies. We sought to determine a large academic institution's experience regarding the extent and frequency of gastrointestinal complications. Methods Between 2004 and 2007, 27 patients underwent RT for primary or secondary hepatic malignancies. Charts were subsequently reviewed to determine the incidence and severity of GI ulceration. Results Three patients presented with gastrointestinal bleeding and underwent upper endoscopy. Review of the pretreatment angiograms showed normal vascular anatomy in one patient, sclerosed hepatic vasculature in a patient who had undergone prior chemoembolization in a second, and an aberrant left hepatic artery in a third. None had undergone prophylactic gastroduodenal artery embolization. Endoscopic findings included erythema, mucosal erosions, and large gastric ulcers. Microspheres were visible on endoscopic biopsy. In two patients, gastric ulcers were persistent at the time of repeat endoscopy 1–4 months later despite proton pump inhibitor therapy. One elderly patient who refused surgical intervention died from recurrent hemorrhage. Conclusion Gastrointestinal ulceration is a known yet rarely reported complication of 90Y microsphere embolization with potentially life-threatening consequences. Once diagnosed, refractory ulcers should be considered for aggressive surgical management.

  8. Radiodiagnosis of peptic ulcer in the present period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonovich, V.B.

    1986-01-01

    Problems on application of roentgenology to detect sizes and state of ulcer niches are considered. Indirect morphologic and functional signs of peptic ulcer, detected by means of roentgeno-endoscopic methods, are described

  9. Vedolizumab as induction and maintenance therapy for ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feagan, Brian G; Rutgeerts, Paul; Sands, Bruce E

    2013-01-01

    Gut-selective blockade of lymphocyte trafficking by vedolizumab may constitute effective treatment for ulcerative colitis.......Gut-selective blockade of lymphocyte trafficking by vedolizumab may constitute effective treatment for ulcerative colitis....

  10. Topical phenytoin for treating pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiang Yong; Li, Hong Ling; Su, He; Cai, Hui; Guo, Tian Kang; Liu, Ruifeng; Jiang, Lei; Shen, Yan Fei

    2017-02-22

    Pressure ulcers are common in clinical practice and pose a significant health problem worldwide. Apart from causing suffering to patients, they also result in longer hospital stays and increase the cost of health care. A variety of methods are used for treating pressure ulcers, including pressure relief, patient repositioning, biophysical strategies, nutritional supplementation, debridement, topical negative pressure, and local treatments including dressings, ointments and creams such as bacitracin, silver sulphadiazine, neomycin, and phenytoin. Phenytoin is a drug more commonly used in the treatment of epilepsy, but may play an important role in accelerating ulcer healing. To assess the effects of topical phenytoin on the rate of healing of pressure ulcers of any grade, in any care setting. In September 2016, we searched the following electronic databases to identify relevant randomized clinical trials: the Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; the Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid Embase; and EBSCO CINAHL Plus. We handsearched conference proceedings from the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, European Wound Management Association and the Tissue Viability Society for all available years. We searched the references of the retrieved trials to identify further relevant trials. We also searched clinical trials registries to identify ongoing and unpublished studies. There were no restrictions with respect to language, date of publication or study setting. We included all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) addressing the effects (both benefits and harms) of topical phenytoin on the healing of pressure ulcers of any grade compared with placebo or alternative treatments or no therapy, irrespective of blinding, language, and publication status. Two review authors independently selected studies, extracted information on participants, interventions, methods and results and assessed risk of bias using

  11. [Physical treatment modalities for chronic leg ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissemond, J

    2010-05-01

    An increasing numbers of physical treatment options are available for chronic leg ulcer. In this review article, compression therapy, therapeutic ultrasound, negative pressure therapy, extracorporeal shock wave therapy, electrostimulation therapy, electromagnetic therapy, photodynamic therapy, water-filtered infrared-A-radiation and hydrotherapy are discussed in terms of their practical applications and the underlying evidence. With the exception of compression therapy for most of these treatments, good scientific data are not available. However this is a widespread problem in the treatment of chronic wounds. Nevertheless, several of the described methods such as negative pressure therapy represent one of the gold standards in practical treatment of patients with chronic leg ulcers. Although the use of physical treatment modalities may improve healing in patients with chronic leg ulcers, the diagnosis and treatment of the underlying causes are essential for long-lasting success.

  12. Gastric emptying in patients with gastric ulcer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, L.K.; Anselmi, M.; Donovan, I.A.; Alexander-Williams, J. (Dudley Road Hospital, Birmingham (UK); Birmingham General Hospital (UK))

    1982-06-01

    The estimated volume of meal in the stomach 30 mins after sup(113m)In-DTPA administration was determined in patients with gastric ulcer and normal controls by 1) relating counts in the stomach to those in the whole field of view of the gamma camera and 2) aspirations. In the normal controls there was no significant difference between the two methods but in the gastric ulcer patients, the gamma camera method predicted significantly more meal in the stomach than was recovered by aspiration. It was suggested that the large low lying stomach found in gastric ulcer disease causes extensive overlap of the small bowel and invalidates measurements of gastric emptying made by a gamma camera.

  13. Thyroid storm precipitated by duodenal ulcer perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsuda, Shoko; Nakashima, Yomi; Horie, Ichiro; Ando, Takao; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare and life-threatening complication of thyrotoxicosis that requires prompt treatment. Thyroid storm is also known to be associated with precipitating events. The simultaneous treatment of thyroid storm and its precipitant, when they are recognized, in a patient is recommended; otherwise such disorders, including thyroid storm, can exacerbate each other. Here we report the case of a thyroid storm patient (a 55-year-old Japanese male) complicated with a perforated duodenal ulcer. The patient was successfully treated with intensive treatment for thyroid storm and a prompt operation. Although it is believed that peptic ulcer rarely coexists with hyperthyroidism, among patients with thyroid storm, perforation of a peptic ulcer has been reported as one of the causes of fatal outcome. We determined that surgical intervention was required in this patient, reported despite ongoing severe thyrotoxicosis, and reported herein a successful outcome.

  14. Thyroid Storm Precipitated by Duodenal Ulcer Perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoko Natsuda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid storm is a rare and life-threatening complication of thyrotoxicosis that requires prompt treatment. Thyroid storm is also known to be associated with precipitating events. The simultaneous treatment of thyroid storm and its precipitant, when they are recognized, in a patient is recommended; otherwise such disorders, including thyroid storm, can exacerbate each other. Here we report the case of a thyroid storm patient (a 55-year-old Japanese male complicated with a perforated duodenal ulcer. The patient was successfully treated with intensive treatment for thyroid storm and a prompt operation. Although it is believed that peptic ulcer rarely coexists with hyperthyroidism, among patients with thyroid storm, perforation of a peptic ulcer has been reported as one of the causes of fatal outcome. We determined that surgical intervention was required in this patient, reported despite ongoing severe thyrotoxicosis, and reported herein a successful outcome.

  15. Use of Axathioprine for Nongranulomatous Ulcerative Jejunoileitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Enns

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Nongranulomatous ulcerative jejunoileitis (NGUJI is a rare, often fatal disorder that produces multiple nonmalignant small bowel ulcerations. A 55-year-old woman with presumed celiac disease presented with steroid-refractory diarrhea, weight loss and abdominal pain. A laparotomy was performed to exclude the possibility of a lymphomatous disorder, and multiple nonmalignant small bowel ulcerations were discovered. Despite a combination of treatment with total parenteral nutrition (TPN and prednisone 30 mg/day she continued to deteriorate. The addition of azathioprine to her treatment regimen resulted in marked clinical and biochemical improvement. Her enteroscopy normalized, and she was able to discontinue TPN and reduce her steroid requirements. Although azathioprine has been used occasionally to treat refractory sprue, there have been no reports of its use in NGUJI. In this case, azathioprine played a key role in the management of NGUJI and should be considered a treatment option for patients with this disorder.

  16. Gastric emptying in patients with gastric ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, L.K.; Anselmi, M.; Donovan, I.A.; Alexander-Williams, J.

    1982-01-01

    The estimated volume of meal in the stomach 30 mins after sup(113m)In-DTPA administration was determined in patients with gastric ulcer and normal controls by 1) relating counts in the stomach to those in the whole field of view of the gamma camera and 2) aspirations. In the normal controls there was no significant difference between the two methods but in the gastric ulcer patients, the gamma camera method predicted significantly more meal in the stomach than was recovered by aspiration. It was suggested that the large low lying stomach found in gastric ulcer disease causes extensive overlap of the small bowel and invalidates measurements of gastric emptying made by a gamma camera. (U.K.)

  17. Amyloid Goiter Secondary to Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunyamin Aydin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse amyloid goiter (AG is an entity characterized by the deposition of amyloid in the thyroid gland. AG may be associated with either primary or secondary amyloidosis. Secondary amyloidosis is rarely caused by inflammatory bowel diseases. Secondary amyloidosis is relatively more common in the patients with Crohn’s disease, whereas it is highly rare in patients with ulcerative colitis. Diffuse amyloid goiter caused by ulcerative colitis is also a rare condition. In the presence of amyloid in the thyroid gland, medullary thyroid cancer should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis. Imaging techniques and biochemical tests are not very helpful in the diagnosis of secondary amyloid goiter and the definitive diagnosis is established based on the histopathologic analysis and histochemical staining techniques. In this report, we present a 35-year-old male patient with diffuse amyloid goiter caused by secondary amyloidosis associated with ulcerative colitis.

  18. Drug induced neutropenia manifesting as oral ulcerations

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    Rachna Kaul

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available As dental practitioners, we often come across oral ulcerations of varied etiology. Among all the causes of oral ulcers, those due to neutropenia are significant. Neutropenia can occur in many systemic conditions and also in patients on long-term therapy of certain drugs like phenytoin. The diagnosis of neutropenia in time leads to early recognition of the cause of this fatal condition. Here, we report a case of a 50-year-old female patient who developed oral ulcerations secondary to phenytoin-induced neutropenia. Early diagnosis of the condition led to discontinuation of the offending drug and significant improvement in her blood picture and also prevented her from falling prey to many other systemic infections that neutropenia can cause.

  19. Antibiotics and antiseptics for pressure ulcers:Version 1: Protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Norman, Gillian; Dumville, Jo; Moore, Zena; Tanner, Judith; Christie, Janice; Goto, Saori

    2015-01-01

    Background Pressure ulcers, also known as bedsores, decubitus ulcers and pressure injuries, are localised areas of injury to the skin or the underlying tissue, or both. A range of treatments with antimicrobial properties, including impregnated dressings, are widely used in the treatment of pressure ulcers. A clear and current overview is required to facilitate decision making regarding use of antiseptic or antibiotic therapies in the treatment of pressure ulcers. This review is one of a suite...

  20. Accuracy of endoscopic ultrasonography for diagnosing ulcerative early gastric cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Seok; Kim, Hyungkil; Bang, Byongwook; Kwon, Kyesook; Shin, Youngwoon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is the first-choice imaging modality for predicting the invasion depth of early gastric cancer (EGC), the prediction accuracy of EUS is significantly decreased when EGC is combined with ulceration. The aim of present study was to compare the accuracy of EUS and conventional endoscopy (CE) for determining the depth of EGC. In addition, the various clinic-pathologic factors affecting the diagnostic accuracy of EUS, with a particular focus on endoscopic ulcer shapes, were evaluated. We retrospectively reviewed data from 236 consecutive patients with ulcerative EGC. All patients underwent EUS for estimating tumor invasion depth, followed by either curative surgery or endoscopic treatment. The diagnostic accuracy of EUS and CE was evaluated by comparing the final histologic result of resected specimen. The correlation between accuracy of EUS and characteristics of EGC (tumor size, histology, location in stomach, tumor invasion depth, and endoscopic ulcer shapes) was analyzed. Endoscopic ulcer shapes were classified into 3 groups: definite ulcer, superficial ulcer, and ill-defined ulcer. The overall accuracy of EUS and CE for predicting the invasion depth in ulcerative EGC was 68.6% and 55.5%, respectively. Of the 236 patients, 36 patients were classified as definite ulcers, 98 were superficial ulcers, and 102 were ill-defined ulcers, In univariate analysis, EUS accuracy was associated with invasion depth (P = 0.023), tumor size (P = 0.034), and endoscopic ulcer shapes (P = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, there is a significant association between superficial ulcer in CE and EUS accuracy (odds ratio: 2.977; 95% confidence interval: 1.255–7.064; P = 0.013). The accuracy of EUS for determining tumor invasion depth in ulcerative EGC was superior to that of CE. In addition, ulcer shape was an important factor that affected EUS accuracy. PMID:27472672

  1. Pressure Ulcer Prevention : Performance and Implementation in Hospital Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Sving, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pressure ulcers are related to reduced quality of life for patients and high costs for health care. Guidelines for pressure ulcer prevention have been available for many years but the problem remains. Aim: The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate hospital setting factors that are important to the performance of pressure ulcer prevention and to evaluate an intervention focused on implementing evidence-based pressure ulcer prevention. Methods: Four studies with a qualitativ...

  2. Management of patients with ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Loren; Jensen, Dennis M

    2012-03-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the step-wise management of patients with overt upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Hemodynamic status is first assessed, and resuscitation initiated as needed. Patients are risk-stratified based on features such as hemodynamic status, comorbidities, age, and laboratory tests. Pre-endoscopic erythromycin is considered to increase diagnostic yield at first endoscopy. Pre-endoscopic proton pump inhibitor (PPI) may be considered to decrease the need for endoscopic therapy but does not improve clinical outcomes. Upper endoscopy is generally performed within 24h. The endoscopic features of ulcers direct further management. Patients with active bleeding or non-bleeding visible vessels receive endoscopic therapy (e.g., bipolar electrocoagulation, heater probe, sclerosant, clips) and those with an adherent clot may receive endoscopic therapy; these patients then receive intravenous PPI with a bolus followed by continuous infusion. Patients with flat spots or clean-based ulcers do not require endoscopic therapy or intensive PPI therapy. Recurrent bleeding after endoscopic therapy is treated with a second endoscopic treatment; if bleeding persists or recurs, treatment with surgery or interventional radiology is undertaken. Prevention of recurrent bleeding is based on the etiology of the bleeding ulcer. H. pylori is eradicated and after cure is documented anti-ulcer therapy is generally not given. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are stopped; if they must be resumed low-dose COX-2-selective NSAID plus PPI is used. Patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin should start PPI and generally re-institute aspirin soon after bleeding ceases (within 7 days and ideally 1-3 days). Patients with idiopathic ulcers receive long-term anti-ulcer therapy.

  3. A new pressure ulcer conceptual framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Susanne; Nixon, Jane; Keen, Justin; Wilson, Lyn; McGinnis, Elizabeth; Dealey, Carol; Stubbs, Nikki; Farrin, Amanda; Dowding, Dawn; Schols, Jos MGA; Cuddigan, Janet; Berlowitz, Dan; Jude, Edward; Vowden, Peter; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Bader, Dan L; Gefen, Amit; Oomens, Cees WJ; Nelson, E Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Aim This paper discusses the critical determinants of pressure ulcer development and proposes a new pressure ulcer conceptual framework. Background Recent work to develop and validate a new evidence-based pressure ulcer risk assessment framework was undertaken. This formed part of a Pressure UlceR Programme Of reSEarch (RP-PG-0407-10056), funded by the National Institute for Health Research. The foundation for the risk assessment component incorporated a systematic review and a consensus study that highlighted the need to propose a new conceptual framework. Design Discussion Paper. Data Sources The new conceptual framework links evidence from biomechanical, physiological and epidemiological evidence, through use of data from a systematic review (search conducted March 2010), a consensus study (conducted December 2010–2011) and an international expert group meeting (conducted December 2011). Implications for Nursing A new pressure ulcer conceptual framework incorporating key physiological and biomechanical components and their impact on internal strains, stresses and damage thresholds is proposed. Direct and key indirect causal factors suggested in a theoretical causal pathway are mapped to the physiological and biomechanical components of the framework. The new proposed conceptual framework provides the basis for understanding the critical determinants of pressure ulcer development and has the potential to influence risk assessment guidance and practice. It could also be used to underpin future research to explore the role of individual risk factors conceptually and operationally. Conclusion By integrating existing knowledge from epidemiological, physiological and biomechanical evidence, a theoretical causal pathway and new conceptual framework are proposed with potential implications for practice and research. PMID:24684197

  4. Appraising and comparing pressure ulcer guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimpenny, Peter; van Zelm, Ruben

    2007-01-01

    Whilst considerable activity has been related to guideline development for nurses regarding pressure ulcer prevention and management, no attempt has been made to comparatively evaluate these guidelines against some form of quality indicators. To compare and contrast four national pressure ulcer guidelines, and identify similarities and differences in their quality and content. An international comparative appraisal method, using the AGREE (Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation) instrument, was undertaken to appraise four published pressure ulcer guidelines. Two further domains were added to the AGREE instrument to assess comparability of the guidelines and their perceived contribution to practice. An international group undertook the comparative appraisal. The domain scores for each guideline show some but not total agreement among reviewers. One particular set of guidelines was identified as scoring highest in a majority of AGREE domains. Overall, evidence of variability exists between pressure ulcer guidelines and common areas of development to consider for all guidelines. The results raise many questions concerning the "best" pressure ulcer guideline to use, particularly related to the AGREE scoring. Some notable shortcomings exist in all the pressure ulcer guidelines reviewed and these shortcomings need to be addressed from a quality perspective. However, other issues such as style of reporting and potential contribution to practice might more fully affect choice by practitioners as opposed to guideline developers. Notable differences exist among the four guidelines that are possibly explained by different approaches to development and also because of different cultural factors and intentions for use. Whilst the AGREE tool identifies the quality of the guideline development process it still requires local engagement with practitioners to determine which guideline should be implemented.

  5. A new pressure ulcer conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Susanne; Nixon, Jane; Keen, Justin; Wilson, Lyn; McGinnis, Elizabeth; Dealey, Carol; Stubbs, Nikki; Farrin, Amanda; Dowding, Dawn; Schols, Jos M G A; Cuddigan, Janet; Berlowitz, Dan; Jude, Edward; Vowden, Peter; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Bader, Dan L; Gefen, Amit; Oomens, Cees W J; Nelson, E Andrea

    2014-10-01

    This paper discusses the critical determinants of pressure ulcer development and proposes a new pressure ulcer conceptual framework. Recent work to develop and validate a new evidence-based pressure ulcer risk assessment framework was undertaken. This formed part of a Pressure UlceR Programme Of reSEarch (RP-PG-0407-10056), funded by the National Institute for Health Research. The foundation for the risk assessment component incorporated a systematic review and a consensus study that highlighted the need to propose a new conceptual framework. Discussion Paper. The new conceptual framework links evidence from biomechanical, physiological and epidemiological evidence, through use of data from a systematic review (search conducted March 2010), a consensus study (conducted December 2010-2011) and an international expert group meeting (conducted December 2011). A new pressure ulcer conceptual framework incorporating key physiological and biomechanical components and their impact on internal strains, stresses and damage thresholds is proposed. Direct and key indirect causal factors suggested in a theoretical causal pathway are mapped to the physiological and biomechanical components of the framework. The new proposed conceptual framework provides the basis for understanding the critical determinants of pressure ulcer development and has the potential to influence risk assessment guidance and practice. It could also be used to underpin future research to explore the role of individual risk factors conceptually and operationally. By integrating existing knowledge from epidemiological, physiological and biomechanical evidence, a theoretical causal pathway and new conceptual framework are proposed with potential implications for practice and research. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Posterior perforation of gastric ulcer: a rare surgical emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND:Gastric ulcer perforation is a rare surgical emergency.Posterior gastric ulcer is even rarer and usually has a delayed presentation with attendant greater morbidity and mortality. AIM:To report a case of posterior perforation of gastric ulcer and review the literature. CASE REPORT:A 65yr old driver was seen in ...

  7. Giant lower oesophageal ulcer in a Bushman baby | Heydenrych ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The case of a giant, penetrating lower oesophageal ulcer in a 14-month-old Bushman baby is reported. This would probably be classified as a Barrett's ulcer. Histological examination showed that the ulcer developed in columnar epithelium and that there was normal stratified squamous oesophageal mucosa both ...

  8. Current X-ray diagnosis of peptic ulcer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonovich, V.B. (Tsentral' nyj Inst. Usovershenstvovaniya Vrachej, Moscow (USSR))

    Classification of peptic ulcer symptoms is suggested on the basis of practical experience. The data on advisability of preserving direct symptom of peptic ulcer - ''niche'' and indirect symptoms are presented. Morphological and functional characteristics must be distinguished in the group of indrect symptoms. The scheme of X-ray semiotics of peptic ulcer is presented.

  9. Current X-ray diagnosis of peptic ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonovich, V.B.

    1984-01-01

    Classification of peptic ulcer symptoms is suggested on the basis of practical experience. The data on advisability of preserving direct symptom of peptic ulcer - ''niche'' and indirect symptoms are presented. Morphological and functional characteristics must be distinguished in the group of indrect symptoms. The scheme of X-ray semiotics of peptic ulcer is presented

  10. Perforated duodenal ulcer: an unusual complication of gastroenteritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, J M; Darby, C R

    1990-01-01

    A 7 year old boy was admitted to hospital with gastroenteritis, which was complicated by an acute perforated duodenal ulcer. After oversewing of the perforation he made an uncomplicated recovery. Peptic ulceration is under-diagnosed in childhood and this leads to delay in diagnosis and appropriate management. Ulceration is associated with severe illness and viral infections, but perforation is rare.

  11. [Marjolin ulcer; malignant degeneration in a chronic wound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, W.C.C. de; Walbeehm, E.T.; Wagner, T.; Gerritsen, M.J.P.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A chronic ulcerating wound may turn malignant. The term 'Marjolin ulcer' is used to describe any skin malignancy which develops in an area of chronic ulceration, irritation or inflammation. It is generally a squamous cell carcinoma. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 66-year-old woman was admitted

  12. Case Report Meleney's Ulcer; A Rare but Fatal Abdominal Wall ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KIGZ

    Meleney's Ulcer; A Rare but Fatal Abdominal Wall Disease Complicating ... Meleney's ulcer or post operative synergistic bacterial gangrene is a rare form of ... Central venous catheterization and parenteral ... is no record of full recovery from the intra-abdominal pathology before the ... chronic undermining ulcer of Meleney.

  13. The Demographic and Clinical Presentation of Ulcerative Keratitis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Ulcerative keratitis and subsequent corneal scarring is at present the leading cause of ocular morbidity and unilateral blindness in developing countries. In developed countries, HIV infection has been associated with severe ulcerative keratitis. The demographic and clinical presentation of Ulcerative keratitis ...

  14. Ulcers of anthral and pyloric section of stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oster, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    Roentgenological symptoms of the ulcer of anthral and pyloric sections of the stomach, as well as the roentgenological image of the topography of the mucous membrane of these sections during ulcerations are given. Complexity of ulcer differentiation of these sections and their roentgenological detection are emphasized

  15. Hybrid treatment of penetrating aortic ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara, Juan Antonio Herrero; Martins-Romeo, Daniela de Araujo; Escudero, Carlos Caparros; Falcon, Maria del Carmen Prieto; Batista, Vinicius Bianchi; Vazquez, Rosa Maria Lepe

    2015-01-01

    Penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer is a rare entity with poor prognosis in the setting of acute aortic syndrome. In the literature, cases like the present one, located in the aortic arch, starting with chest pain and evolving with dysphonia, are even rarer. The present report emphasizes the role played by computed tomography in the diagnosis of penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer as well as in the differentiation of this condition from other acute aortic syndromes. Additionally, the authors describe a new therapeutic approach represented by a hybrid endovascular surgical procedure for treatment of the disease. (author)

  16. Hybrid treatment of penetrating aortic ulcer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara, Juan Antonio Herrero; Martins-Romeo, Daniela de Araujo; Escudero, Carlos Caparros; Falcon, Maria del Carmen Prieto; Batista, Vinicius Bianchi, E-mail: jaherrero5@hotmail.com [Unidade de Gestao Clinica (UGC) de Diagnostico por Imagem - Hosppital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilha (Spain); Vazquez, Rosa Maria Lepe [Unit of Radiodiagnosis - Hospital Nuestra Senora de la Merced, Osuna, Sevilha (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    Penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer is a rare entity with poor prognosis in the setting of acute aortic syndrome. In the literature, cases like the present one, located in the aortic arch, starting with chest pain and evolving with dysphonia, are even rarer. The present report emphasizes the role played by computed tomography in the diagnosis of penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer as well as in the differentiation of this condition from other acute aortic syndromes. Additionally, the authors describe a new therapeutic approach represented by a hybrid endovascular surgical procedure for treatment of the disease. (author)

  17. Endoscopic management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yidan; Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan

    2014-12-01

    This review discusses the indications, technical aspects, and comparative effectiveness of the endoscopic treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by peptic ulcer. Pre-endoscopic considerations, such as the use of prokinetics and timing of endoscopy, are reviewed. In addition, this article examines aspects of postendoscopic care such as the effectiveness, dosing, and duration of postendoscopic proton-pump inhibitors, Helicobacter pylori testing, and benefits of treatment in terms of preventing rebleeding; and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiplatelet agents, and oral anticoagulants, including direct thrombin and Xa inhibitors, following acute peptic ulcer bleeding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Laparoscopic surgery for perforated peptic ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Kitano, Seigo

    2004-03-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has become the treatment of choice for the management of perforated peptic ulcer. The advantages of laparoscopic repair for perforated peptic ulcer include less pain, a short hospital stay, and an early return to normal activity. Although the operation time of laparoscopic surgery is significantly longer than that of open surgery, laparoscopic technique is safe, feasible, and with morbidity and mortality comparable to that of the conventional open technique. To benefit from the advantages offered by minimally invasive laparoscopic technique, further study will need to determine whether laparoscopic surgery is safe in patients with generalized peritonitis or sepsis.

  19. Confocal laser endomicroscopy in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstensen, John Gásdal; Săftoiu, Adrian; Brynskov, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Confocal laser endomicroscopy enables real-time in vivo microscopy during endoscopy and can predict relapse in patients with inflammatory bowel disease in remission. However, little is known about how endomicroscopic features change with time. The aim of this longitudinal study...... was to correlate colonic confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) in ulcerative colitis with histopathology and macroscopic appearance before and after intensification of medical treatment. METHODS: Twenty-two patients with ulcerative colitis in clinical relapse and 7 control subjects referred for colonoscopy were...

  20. [The use of papain in plantar ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otuka, E S; Pedrazzani, E S; Pioto, M P

    1996-01-01

    This work has as a goal to contribute to decrease the inability in leprosy and continuous recurrence of plantar ulcers, through the use of a treatment method using papaine and actions of health education. This work has been done in a health centre with patients that presented plantar ulcers and agreed to participate in the proposed treatment. Analysing and comparing the obtained data before and after treatment, a greater adhesion of patients to this treatment, a quicker healing in relation to other methods used before and a greater interaction with the patient has been observed.

  1. The VCU Pressure Ulcer Summit: Collaboration to Operationalize Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcer Prevention Best Practice Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindle, C Tod; Creehan, Sue; Black, Joyce; Zimmermann, Deb

    2015-01-01

    This executive summary reports outcomes of an interprofessional collaboration between experts in pressure ulcer prevention, bedside clinicians, regulatory agencies, quality improvement, informatics experts, and professional nursing organizations. The goal of the collaboration was to develop a framework to assist facilities to operationalize best practice recommendations to sustain organizational culture change in hospital-acquired pressure ulcer prevention, to develop a hospital-acquired pressure ulcer severity score, and to address topics related to the unavoidable pressure ulcer.

  2. The Mycotic Ulcer Treatment Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajna, N. Venkatesh; Krishnan, Tiruvengada; Mascarenhas, Jeena; Rajaraman, Revathi; Prajna, Lalitha; Srinivasan, Muthiah; Raghavan, Anita; Oldenburg, Catherine E.; Ray, Kathryn J.; Zegans, Michael E.; McLeod, Stephen D.; Porco, Travis C.; Acharya, Nisha R.; Lietman, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare topical natamycin vs voriconazole in the treatment of filamentous fungal keratitis. Methods This phase 3, double-masked, multicenter trial was designed to randomize 368 patients to voriconazole (1%) or natamycin (5%), applied topically every hour while awake until reepithelialization, then 4 times daily for at least 3 weeks. Eligibility included smear-positive filamentous fungal ulcer and visual acuity of 20/40 to 20/400. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was best spectacle-corrected visual acuity at 3 months; secondary outcomes included corneal perforation and/or therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty. Results A total of 940 patients were screened and 323 were enrolled. Causative organisms included Fusarium (128 patients [40%]), Aspergillus (54 patients [17%]), and other filamentous fungi (141 patients [43%]). Natamycin-treated cases had significantly better 3-month best spectacle-corrected visual acuity than voriconazole-treated cases (regression coefficient=−0.18 logMAR; 95% CI, −0.30 to −0.05; P=.006). Natamycin-treated cases were less likely to have perforation or require therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty (odds ratio=0.42; 95% CI, 0.22 to 0.80; P=.009). Fusarium cases fared better with natamycin than with voriconazole (regression coefficient=−0.41 logMAR; 95% CI, −0.61 to −0.20; P<.001; odds ratio for perforation=0.06; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.28; P<.001), while non-Fusarium cases fared similarly (regression coefficient=−0.02 logMAR; 95% CI, −0.17 to 0.13; P=.81; odds ratio for perforation=1.08; 95% CI, 0.48 to 2.43; P=.86). Conclusions Natamycin treatment was associated with significantly better clinical and microbiological outcomes than voriconazole treatment for smear-positive filamentous fungal keratitis, with much of the difference attributable to improved results in Fusarium cases. Application to Clinical Practice Voriconazole should not be used as monotherapy in filamentous keratitis. Trial Registration

  3. Longitudinal study of influence of Helicobacter pylori on current risk of duodenal ulcer relapse. The Hvidovre Ulcer Project Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M R; Franzmann, M B; Holst, C

    1992-01-01

    acid output, time of healing of the preceding ulcer, treatment of the present ulcer (cimetidine, antacids, or no treatment), or type and degree of gastritis. Thus, although H. pylori is prevalent in patients with duodenal ulcer disease, the present study indicates that H. pylori does not have...

  4. The personality pattern of duodenal ulcer patients in relation to spontaneous ulcer healing and relapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jess, P; von der Lieth, L; Matzen, Peter

    1989-01-01

    One hundred consecutive out-patients with duodenal ulceration from a hospital and a gastroenterological clinic were tested with the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). This was carried out in order to investigate whether neuroticism or other personality disorders were characterist......One hundred consecutive out-patients with duodenal ulceration from a hospital and a gastroenterological clinic were tested with the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). This was carried out in order to investigate whether neuroticism or other personality disorders were...

  5. Association between ulcer site and outcome in complicated peptic ulcer disease: a Danish nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolle, Ida; Møller, Morten Hylander; Rosenstock, Steffen Jais

    2016-10-01

    Mortality rates in complicated peptic ulcer disease are high. This study aimed to examine the prognostic importance of ulcer site in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) and perforated peptic ulcer (PPU). a nationwide cohort study with prospective and consecutive data collection. all patients treated for PUB and PPU at Danish hospitals between 2003 and 2014. demographic and clinical data reported to the Danish Clinical Registry of Emergency Surgery. 90- and 30-d mortality and re-intervention. the crude and adjusted association between ulcer site (gastric and duodenal) and the outcome measures of interest were assessed by binary logistic regression analysis. Some 20,059 patients with PUB and 4273 patients with PPU were included; 90-d mortality was 15.3% for PUB and 29.8% for PPU; 30-d mortality was 10.2% and 24.7%, respectively. Duodenal bleeding ulcer, as compared to gastric ulcer (GU), was associated with a significantly increased risk of all-cause mortality within 90 and 30 d, and with re-intervention: adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.47 (95% confidence interval 1.30-1.67); p ulcers (DUs) in PPU patients: adjusted OR 0.99 (0.84-1.16); p = 0.698, OR 0.93 (0.78 to 1.10); p = 0.409, and OR 0.97 (0.80-1.19); p = 0.799, respectively. DU site is a significant predictor of death and re-intervention in patients with PUB, as compared to GU site. This does not seem to be the case for patients with PPU.

  6. THE CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS AND COURSE OF DUODENAL ULCER DISEASE AFTER PERFORATED ULCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Lyubskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to compare clinical manifestations, course, mental status in duodenal ulcer (DU patients with a history of perforated ulcer and its uncomplicated course.Subjects and methods. One hundred and thirteen patents with DU were examined. Group 1 included 61 patients with uncomplicated DUand Group 2 comprised 52 patients with a history of perforated ulcer. A comparison group consisted of 20 patients who had undergone laparotomy. Physical and mental status examinations, esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGDS, and 24-hour pH-metry were performed.Results. Classical pain syndrome was observed in 75 % of the patients with uncomplicated DU. Prior to perforation, the pain and dyspeptic syndromes were distinguished only by a significantly lower degree in Group 2; following perforation, the pain syndrome was recorded more frequently, it was more extensive, meal-unrelated, and similar to that in the patients who had undergone laparotomy and had diminished appetite (36.5 %. EGDS showed that the complicated course was accompanied by the significantly higher incidence of erosive esophagitis (21.2 %, gastritis (51.9 %, duodenitis (25.0 %, multiple ulcers (28.8 %, and larger ulcers. 24-hour pH-metry indicated that the level of hyperacidity in Group 2 was higher and the circadian intragastric pH variations were less marked than those in uncomplicated DU. The patients with a history of perforated ulcer showed a high rate of anxiety and depressive changes. Conclusion. In complicated DU, marked monotonic hyperacidity causes common erosive-ulcerative lesions in the gastroduodenal area in relatively mild pain syndrome, late referrals, and long-term ulcer healing. After perforation followed by wound closure, the pain and dyspeptic syndromes become more pronounced, which is associated with anxiety and depressive changes in the mental status, as well as with early referrals and less healing time.

  7. Effect of Plantago australis leaves on different gastric ulcer models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. Bürger

    Full Text Available The anti-ulcerogenic effect of the crude ethanolic extract (CEE of Plantago australis leaves was tested against ethanol-, indomethacin-, and cold restrain-induced stress ulcers. The CEE (500 and 1000 mg/kg reduced the lesion index (LI and the ulcer index in ethanol-induced ulcers, and the dose of 1000 mg/kg increased the amount of mucous. The highest dose of the CEE reduced the LI of cold restraint-induced stress ulcers when compared to the control group. The indomethacin-induced ulcers were not affected by this extract.

  8. Unusual presentation of ulcerative postauricular swelling as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The swelling became ulcerative and associated with progressive tinnitus and hoarseness of voice. The patient was investigated. Fine‑needle aspiration cytology suggested sebaceous cell carcinoma. Then excision biopsy was done, and histopathological examination of excised tissue confirmed the diagnosis. Extraorbital ...

  9. Pressure ulcers management: an economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglia, E; Restelli, U; Napoletano, A M; Coclite, D; Porazzi, E; Bonfanti, M; Croce, D

    2012-03-01

    Pressure ulcer management represents a growing problem for medical and social health care systems all over the world, particularly in European Union countries where the incidence of pressure ulcers in older persons (> 60 years of age) is predicted to rise. The aim of this study was to provide evidence for the lower impact on economic resources of using advanced dressings for the treatment of pressure ulcers with respect to conventional simple dressings. Two different models of analysis, derived from Activity Based Costing and Health Technology Assessment, were used to measure, over a 30-day period, the direct costs incurred by pressure ulcer treatment for community-residing patients receiving integrated home care. Although the mean cost per home care visit was higher in the advanced dressings patient group than in the simple dressings patient one (E 22.31 versus E 16.03), analysis of the data revealed that the cost of using advanced dressings was lower due to fewer home care visits (22 versus 11). The results underline the fact that decision-makers need to improve their understanding of the advantages of taking a long-term view with regards to the purchase and use of materials. This could produce considerable savings of resources in addition to improving treatment efficacy for the benefit of patients and the health care system.

  10. Ulcerative chickenpox in an immunocompetent child

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most common complications were skin/soft-tissue infections (33 ... vitamin A. The ulcers healed slowly and the patient was discharged from hospital after ... e alth. Fatema Thawer / Esmail, MD. S Jessop, MB ChB, FFDerm (SA). Division of ...

  11. EAMJ Dec Presure Ulcer 09.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... Geriatric surgery, comprehensive care of the elderly ... Galdin, J.E. Sepsis associated with decubitus ulcer. Amer. J. Med. 1976 ... Ann. Platy. ... A multisite study of the predictive validity of the. Braden scale. Nurs. Res. 1998; 47: ...

  12. Marginal ulcer perforation: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, S K; Chua, D; Anbalakan, K; Shelat, V G

    2017-10-01

    Marginal ulcer (MU) is defined as ulcer on the jejunal side of the gastrojejunostomy (GJ) anastomosis. Most MUs are managed medically but those with complications like bleeding or perforation require intervention. It is recommended that GJ anastomosis be revised in patients with MU perforation (MUP). The aim of this case series is to study the clinical presentation and management of MUP. Three hundred and thirty-two patients who underwent emergency surgery for perforated peptic ulcer at a single center were studied over a period of 5 years. Nine patients (2.7 %) presented with MUP. GJ was previously done for either complicated peptic ulcer (n = 4) or for suspected gastric malignancy (n = 5). Two patients had previously completed H. pylori therapy. None of the patients presented with septic shock. MU was on the jejunal side of GJ in all patients. The median MUP size was 10 mm. Four patients (44.4 %) had omental patch repair, three (33.3 %) had primary closure, and one each had revision of GJ and jejunal serosal patch repair. There were no leaks, intra-abdominal abscess or reoperation and no malignancies. MUP patients do not present with septic shock. Omental patch repair or primary closure is sufficient enough. Revision of Billroth-II-GJ into Roux-en-Y-GJ is not mandatory.

  13. Golimumab for the treatment of ulcerative colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löwenberg, Mark; de Boer, Nanne K. H.; Hoentjen, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of therapeutic antibodies against tumor necrosis factor (TNF) had a major impact on the treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC). Infliximab and adalimumab are powerful agents that are used for remission induction and maintenance therapy in UC and have an acceptable safety profile.

  14. Golimumab for moderate to severe ulcerative colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strik, Anne S.; Berends, Sophie E.; Mathôt, Ron A.; D'Haens, Geert R.; Löwenberg, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Golimumab (GLM) is a subcutaneously administered human anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agent that has been approved by the regulatory authorities for the treatment of moderate to severe ulcerative colitis (UC) in 2013. Areas covered: Maintained clinical remission rates up to 50% have been shown in

  15. Ulcerative colitis: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and current treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffel, L H; Das, K M

    1996-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the colon that affects the rectum and a variable length of contiguous colon. The disease is characterized by rectal bleeding and diarrhea during periods of exacerbation; these symptoms usually abate with treatment. The pathogenic mechanism of ulcerative colitis is believed to be an aberrant immune response in which antibodies are formed against colonic epithelial protein(s). The disease usually presents during the second and third decades of life, with a smaller peak after the age of 60 years. There is a genetic component to ulcerative colitis, with a higher incidence among family members and, particularly, first-degree relatives. Diagnosis depends on several factors, most notably symptoms, demonstration of uniformly inflamed mucosa beginning in the rectum, and exclusion of other causes of colitis, such as infection. There is no medical cure for ulcerative colitis, but medical therapy is effective and can improve or eliminate symptoms in more than 80% of patients. Surgery offers a cure but carries the high price of total colectomy. New surgical methods, such as ileoanal anastomosis, allow for maintenance of bowel continuity and better patient satisfaction.

  16. Surgery for Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... life improves because the pain, inflammation, and other symptoms of ulcerative colitis are gone. Prior to surgery, patients should speak ... loop of intestine or organ (bladder, vagina, or skin). Because they ... be necessary if its symptoms do not respond to medications. In some cases, ...

  17. Chronic leg ulcer caused by Mycobacterium immunogenum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loots, Miriam A. M.; de Jong, Menno D.; van Soolingen, Dick; Wetsteyn, José C. F. M.; Faber, William R.

    2005-01-01

    Rare tropical skin diseases are seen more frequently in Western countries because of the increased popularity of visiting tropical regions. A 55-year-old white man developed a painless leg ulcer after traveling in Guatemala and Belize. A mycobacterium was cultured from a biopsy specimen and was

  18. [Complicated gastroduodenal ulcers in rheumatology patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barashkov, V G; Shemerovskaia, T G; Sergeev, P V; Bokovanov, V E

    1998-01-01

    An analysis of observations of 250 patients with different rheumatological diseases has shown that 18% of the patients had ulcer disease with complications. The greatest risk of bleedings and perforations took place during the first year of treatment with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. The main risk factors of complications were determined. They are: male sex, high parameters of gastric secretion.

  19. Microarray Assisted Gene Discovery in Ulcerative Colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brusgaard, Klaus

    Inflammatory Bowel disease (IBD) is a condition characterised by chronic recidivous inflammation of the bowel and intestine. IBD includes chron´s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). The combined prevalence of CD and UC are app. 1 in 500 in the general Caucasian population. In 25% of the cas...

  20. Pressure ulcers presentations and management at Kenyatta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the presentation and management of patients with pressure ulcers. Design: A prospective study. Setting: The Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) and National Spinal Injury Hospital (NSIH). Subjects: One hundred and thirteen patients were evaluated. Ninety six patients from KNH and seventeen from ...

  1. Neonatal pressure ulcers: prevention and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Molina P

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pablo García-Molina,1,2 Alba Alfaro-López,1 Sara María García-Rodríguez,1 Celia Brotons-Payá,1 Mari Carmen Rodríguez-Dolz,1,2 Evelin Balaguer-López1,2 1Department of Nursing, University of Valencia, 2Research Group of Pediatric Nutrition, INCLIVA Foundation, Valencia, Spain Abstract: Health professionals should be prepared to respond to the needs of hospitalized neonates. The health team must consider multiple situations, where the neonate is at risk of having an adverse effect. One of the main interventions that health professionals must practice when interacting with hospitalized newborns is skin care. Neonates often suffer from diaper rash or intravenous drugs extravasation. Recently, hospitalized neonates and especially those in an unstable clinical situation are also at a risk of developing pressure ulcers. The presence of a pressure ulcer in a neonate can lead to serious problems to survival (eg, sepsis, clinical instability. This is the reason why, with this literature review, we attempt to answer questions from health professionals caring for neonates about the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers. Keywords: infant, pressure ulcer, treatment, prevention, wound, assessment

  2. Intestinal Giardiasis Disguised as Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasite-associated colitis is quite rare in clinical practice of Ulcerative Colitis (UC. Here we reported an intestinal giardiasis case that has been diagnosed with UC. Further examination of stool revealed cysts of Giardia. This case completely responded to Albendazole. Giardiasis should be included for the differential diagnosis of UC.

  3. Development and Improvement of Simple Colonic Mucosal Ulcer during Treatment of Severe Ulcerative Colitis with Tacrolimus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayumi Ito

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Diarrhea, melena, and lower abdominal pain developed in a male in his 20s and colonoscopy showed pancolitis-type severe ulcerative colitis (UC. Treatment was initiated with 4,000 mg of 5-aminosalicylic acid and 60 mg/day of prednisolone, but the symptoms and inflammatory reaction worsened with prednisolone dose reduction. Tacrolimus was added to the treatment, which subsequently induced remission. Serial colonoscopies during the treatment showed improvement in ulcer and mucosal edema throughout the entire large intestine, but a new solitary round ulcer appeared at the end of the ileum. Since no signs of Behçet’s disease were noted, it was considered as a simple ulcer, a complication of UC. Tacrolimus treatment was continued based on continued improvement in clinical features and colonic mucosa, excluding the end of the ileum. Colonoscopy at 6 months after initiation of tacrolimus showed healing of the large intestinal mucosa, although mild congestion was still noted. The solitary round ulcer at the end of the ileum improved to a small erosion. We report the improvement of a simple ulcer that developed during tacrolimus treatment.

  4. Evaluation of Anti-ulcer Activity of Echinops Persicus on Experimental Gastric Ulcer Models in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Farajzadeh-Sheikh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Extract of Echinops persicus is traditionally used for a long time in Iran for treatment of cough and constipation. This extract is produced by activity of bug (Situphilus spp. on the plant. We documented its anti-tussive effect in rats in our previous study.The aim of this study was to assess the anti-ulcer effect of Echinops persicus in an animal model. In this study we evaluated anti-ulcer effect of Echinops persicus by Shay's method in rats. In 3 groups of rats, pylorus was ligatured under anesthesia. The rats were euthanized after 19 hours later and number and level of ulcer in stomach was measured. In group 2 the extract was orally administered 45 minutes before pyloric ligature, and in group 3, it was administered intraperitoneally 20 minutes before pyloric ligature. The number of ulcers in stomach was significantly low in group 2 (P = 0.01 and 3 (P = 0.037 in comparison with group 1. The level of ulcer was significantly decreased in group 2 (P = 0.047 with comparison to group 1. We conclude that, Echinops extract can exhibit potentially cytoprotective and anti-ulcer activity.

  5. Total contact cast for neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, R.; Yaqoob, M.Y.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the outcome of diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers treated with Total Contact Cast (TCC) in terms of percentage of ulcers healed and time to heal. The study included diabetic patients with non-ischemic neuropathic foot ulcers of upto grade 2 of Wagner's classification. Ulcers were debrided off necrotic tissues and Total Contact Cast (TCC) was applied. TCC was renewed every 2 weeks till healing. Cases were labeled as cast failure when there was no reduction in wound size in 4 consecutive weeks or worsening to a higher grade. Main outcome measures were the percentage of ulcers healed and time to heal in the cast. Thirty four (87.17%) patients were males and 5(12.82%) were females. The mean age was 62 +- 13.05 years. All patients had NIDDM. Out of the 52 ulcers, 41(78.84%) healed with TCC in an average 2 casts duration (mean 32 days). There were 11(21.15%) cast failure. Majority (63.63%) of cast failure ulcers were located on pressure bearing area of heel. Most (90%) of the ulcers on forefoot and midsole region healed with TCC (p<0.001). Longer ulcer duration (mean 57.45 +- 29.64 days) significantly reduced ulcer healing (p<0.001). Total contact cast was an effective treatment modality for neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers of Wagner's grade 2, located on forefoot and midsole region. (author)

  6. [Weight loss and healing of ulcers - case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seremet, Jasmina; Laginja, Stanislava; Marinović, Marin

    2013-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 is one of the most common diseases with a prevalence increasing with age. If blood sugar is not controlled, complications arise and diabetic foot ulcer occurs. Depending on the blood vessels involved, we distinguish venous and arterial ulcers. Venous ulcers respond very well to modern methods of treatment such as compression therapy and hydrocolloid dressings, but for arterial ulcer prevention is most significant, e.g. weight loss, dietary modification, etc. The aim of this study was to show that despite all the available therapeutic options, we cannot cure ulcers completely because the patient's readiness to change his lifestyle plays a decisive role. Therefore, we present a patient having suffered from venous ulcers for several years and arterial ulcer that healed only after the patient had lost about 20 pounds.

  7. Behaviour and stress responses in horses with gastric ulceration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmkvist, Jens; Poulsen, Janne Møller; Luthersson, Nanna

    2012-01-01

    Only little is known about behaviour and stress responses in horses with gastric ulceration, despite the high prevalence of this condition. Our objectives in the present study was to (i) describe the severity of gastric ulceration in horses, housed under relatively standardised conditions, and (ii......) to investigate whether horses with severe glandular gastric ulceration have increased baseline and response concentration of stress hormones and behave differently than control horses. We investigated stomachs of 96 horses at one stud, and compared an ulcer group (n = 30; with severe lesions in the glandular...... conclude that the prevalence of gastric ulcers was high, and our results suggest different factors affecting ulceration in the glandular versus the nonglandular region of the horse stomach. Obvious external signs (e.g. poor body condition) identifying ulcer horses were absent. Horses with severe glandular...

  8. Actovegin administration in patients with ulcerated gout tophuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M S Eliseev

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study actovegin efficacy in the treatment of chronic skin ulcers due to ulceration of tophuses in pts with chronic tophaceous gout. Materials and methods. 6 pts with chronic tophaceous gout aged 52 to 77 years with disease duration from 6 to 20 years with longstanding persisting skin ulcers due to tophuses ulceration were included. In addition to allopuri- nol, steroid and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs they were treated with actovegin 20% intravenously and local applications of 2% actovegin gel. Clinical examination was performed before and after the course of therapy- Results. Two from six pts showed healing of single chronic ulcers to the end of the treatment course. In the remaining pts ulcer count and size decrease was achieved. Conclusion. Actovegin administration in combined therapy of chronic skin ulcers in pts with chronic tophaceous gout promoted healing of the defects in all cases.

  9. Become the PPUPET Master: Mastering Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment With the Pediatric Pressure Ulcer Prediction and Evaluation Tool (PPUPET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterken, David J; Mooney, JoAnn; Ropele, Diana; Kett, Alysha; Vander Laan, Karen J

    2015-01-01

    Hospital acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU) are serious, debilitating, and preventable complications in all inpatient populations. Despite evidence of the development of pressure ulcers in the pediatric population, minimal research has been done. Based on observations gathered during quarterly HAPU audits, bedside nursing staff recognized trends in pressure ulcer locations that were not captured using current pressure ulcer risk assessment tools. Together, bedside nurses and nursing leadership created and conducted multiple research studies to investigate the validity and reliability of the Pediatric Pressure Ulcer Prediction and Evaluation Tool (PPUPET). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Longitudinal study of influence of Helicobacter pylori on current risk of duodenal ulcer relapse. The Hvidovre Ulcer Project Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M R; Franzmann, M B; Holst, C

    1992-01-01

    acid output, time of healing of the preceding ulcer, treatment of the present ulcer (cimetidine, antacids, or no treatment), or type and degree of gastritis. Thus, although H. pylori is prevalent in patients with duodenal ulcer disease, the present study indicates that H. pylori does not have.......052-0.133), 0.123 (0.096-0.157), and 0.069 (0.041-0.116), respectively. No significant differences in incidence rates across H. pylori scores were observed when taking into account the observation period after healing of the first ulcer, number of ulcer recurrence (1st, 2nd, 3rd), sex, age, smoking habits, peak...

  11. Peptic ulcer frequency differences related to h. Pylori or aines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carli, Diego Michelon de; Pires, Rafael Cardoso; Rohde, Sofia Laura; Kavalco, Caroline Mayara; Fagundes, Renato Borges

    2015-01-01

    Peptic ulcer etiology has been changing because of H. pylori decline. To estimate peptic ulcer prevalence in 10 years-interval and compare the association with H. pylori and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Methods Records assessment in two periods: A (1997-2000) and B (2007-2010), searching for peptic ulcer, H. pylori infection and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs use. Peptic ulcer occurred in 30.35% in A and in 20.19% in B. H. pylori infection occurred in 73.3% cases in A and in 46.4% in B. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs use was 3.5% in A and 13.3% in B. Neither condition occurred in 10.4% and 20.5% in A and B respectively. Comparing both periods, we observed reduction of peptic ulcer associated to H. pylori (P=0.000), increase of peptic ulcer related to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (P=0.000) and idiopathic peptic ulcer (P=0.002). The concurrent association of H. pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was also higher in B (P=0.002). Rates of gastric ulcer were higher and duodenal ulcer lower in the second period. After 10 years, the prevalence of peptic ulcer decreased, as well as ulcers related to H. pylori whereas ulcers associated to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs increased. There was an inversion in the pattern of gastric and duodenal ulcer and a rise of idiopathic peptic ulcer.

  12. PEPTIC ULCER FREQUENCY DIFFERENCES RELATED TO H. PYLORI OR AINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Michelon de CARLI

    Full Text Available Background Peptic ulcer etiology has been changing because of H. pylori decline. Objectives To estimate peptic ulcer prevalence in 10 years-interval and compare the association with H. pylori and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Methods Records assessment in two periods: A (1997-2000 and B (2007-2010, searching for peptic ulcer, H. pylori infection and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs use. Results Peptic ulcer occurred in 30.35% in A and in 20.19% in B. H. pylori infection occurred in 73.3% cases in A and in 46.4% in B. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs use was 3.5% in A and 13.3% in B. Neither condition occurred in 10.4% and 20.5% in A and B respectively. Comparing both periods, we observed reduction of peptic ulcer associated to H. pylori (P=0.000, increase of peptic ulcer related to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (P=0.000 and idiopathic peptic ulcer (P=0.002. The concurrent association of H. pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was also higher in B (P=0.002. Rates of gastric ulcer were higher and duodenal ulcer lower in the second period. Conclusions After 10 years, the prevalence of peptic ulcer decreased, as well as ulcers related to H. pylori whereas ulcers associated to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs increased. There was an inversion in the pattern of gastric and duodenal ulcer and a rise of idiopathic peptic ulcer.

  13. Helical CT findings of gastric wall thickening by peptic ulcer : compared with gastric adenocarcinoma with ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Won Jung; Choi, Jong Chul; Seo, Keum Soo; Koo, Bon Sik; Park, Byeong Ho; Kim, Chung Ku; Lee, Ki Nam; Nam, Kyung Jin

    2000-01-01

    To compare on the basis of helical CT findings gastric wall thickening of peptic gastric ulcer with that of gastric adenocarcinoma with ulcer. Thirty-eight patients with pathologically proven gastric lesion (17 cases of peptic ulcer and 21 cases of ulcerative or ulceroinfiltrative gastric cancer (Borrman type II, III) underwent helical CT, and the findings were retrospectively reviewed in terms of maximum abnormal wall thickness, preservation of the inner enhancing layer, the presence three discriminate layers of gastric wall, and enhancement pattern. The enhancement pattern of abnormally thick wall was compared with that of the portal phase of back muscle, and was defined as low, iso, or high. The Chi-square test and Student t test were used for statistical analysis. In cases of peptic ulcer and gastric cancer with ulceration, maximum abnormal wall thickness was 7-30 (mean, 16.1)mm, and 11-33 (mean, 21.8)mm, respectively. The inner enhancing layer was preserved in 15 of 17 patients (88.2%) and one of 21 (4.8%); three discriminate layers of gastric wall were observed in 8 of 17 patients (47.0%), and one of 21 (4.8%). The enhancement pattern was low in 12 of 17 patients (70.5%), and 3 of 21 (14.3%); iso in 4 of 17 (23.5%), and 4 of 21 (19.0%), and high in one of 17 (5.9%), and 14 of 21 (66.7%). All figures refer, respectively, to the two distinct conditions. In terms of preservation of the inner enhancing layer, three discriminate layers of gastric wall, and a low enhancement pattern, there were statistically significant differences between peptic ulcer and gastric adenocarcinoma with ulcer. Where the enhancement was high, however, the statistically significant difference between the two conditions was even greater. There was no statistically significant difference in terms of gastric wall thickness or iso-attenuation of thickened gastric. Helical CT findings of gastric wall thickening, preservation of the inner enhancing layer, and three discriminate layers of

  14. Helical CT findings of gastric wall thickening by peptic ulcer : compared with gastric adenocarcinoma with ulcer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Won Jung; Choi, Jong Chul; Seo, Keum Soo; Koo, Bon Sik; Park, Byeong Ho; Kim, Chung Ku; Lee, Ki Nam; Nam, Kyung Jin [College of Medicine, Dong A University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-02-01

    To compare on the basis of helical CT findings gastric wall thickening of peptic gastric ulcer with that of gastric adenocarcinoma with ulcer. Thirty-eight patients with pathologically proven gastric lesion (17 cases of peptic ulcer and 21 cases of ulcerative or ulceroinfiltrative gastric cancer (Borrman type II, III)) underwent helical CT, and the findings were retrospectively reviewed in terms of maximum abnormal wall thickness, preservation of the inner enhancing layer, the presence three discriminate layers of gastric wall, and enhancement pattern. The enhancement pattern of abnormally thick wall was compared with that of the portal phase of back muscle, and was defined as low, iso, or high. The Chi-square test and Student t test were used for statistical analysis. In cases of peptic ulcer and gastric cancer with ulceration, maximum abnormal wall thickness was 7-30 (mean, 16.1)mm, and 11-33 (mean, 21.8)mm, respectively. The inner enhancing layer was preserved in 15 of 17 patients (88.2%) and one of 21 (4.8%); three discriminate layers of gastric wall were observed in 8 of 17 patients (47.0%), and one of 21 (4.8%). The enhancement pattern was low in 12 of 17 patients (70.5%), and 3 of 21 (14.3%); iso in 4 of 17 (23.5%), and 4 of 21 (19.0%), and high in one of 17 (5.9%), and 14 of 21 (66.7%). All figures refer, respectively, to the two distinct conditions. In terms of preservation of the inner enhancing layer, three discriminate layers of gastric wall, and a low enhancement pattern, there were statistically significant differences between peptic ulcer and gastric adenocarcinoma with ulcer. Where the enhancement was high, however, the statistically significant difference between the two conditions was even greater. There was no statistically significant difference in terms of gastric wall thickness or iso-attenuation of thickened gastric. Helical CT findings of gastric wall thickening, preservation of the inner enhancing layer, and three discriminate layers of

  15. Correlates of Bacterial Ulcers and Acute HSV-2 Infection among Men with Genital Ulcer Disease in South Africa: Age, Recent Sexual Behaviors, and HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Leichliter, Jami S.; Lewis, David A.; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Data from baseline surveys and STI/HIV laboratory tests (n=615 men) were used to examine correlates of bacterial ulcers (Treponema pallidum, Haemophilus ducreyi, or Chlamydia trachomatis L1–L3 detected in ulcer) and acute HSV-2 ulcers (HSV-2 positive ulcer specimen, HSV-2 sero-negative, and negative for bacterial pathogens) vs. recurrent HSV-2 ulcers (sero-positive), separately. Compared to men with recurrent HSV-2 ulcers, men with bacterial ulcers had larger ulcers but were less likely to be...

  16. Pressure ulcers: effectiveness of risk-assessment tools. A randomised controlled trial (the ULCER trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Joan; Coleman, Kerrie; Mudge, Alison; Marquart, Louise; Gardner, Glenn; Stankiewicz, Monica; Kirby, Julie; Vellacott, Catherine; Horton-Breshears, Margaret; McClymont, Alice

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of two pressure-ulcer screening tools against clinical judgement in preventing pressure ulcers. A single blind randomised controlled trial. A large metropolitan tertiary hospital. 1231 patients admitted to internal medicine or oncology wards. Patients were excluded if their hospital stay was expected to be 2 days or less. Participants allocated to either a Waterlow (n=410) or Ramstadius (n=411) screening tool group or to a clinical judgement group (n=410) where no formal risk screening instrument was used. Incidence of hospital acquired pressure ulcers ascertained by regular direct observation. Use of any devices for the prevention of pressure ulcers, documentation of a pressure plan and any dietetic or specialist skin integrity review were recorded. On admission, 71 (5.8%) patients had an existing pressure ulcer. The incidence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers was similar between groups (clinical judgement 28/410 (6.8%); Waterlow 31/411 (7.5%); Ramstadius 22/410 (5.4%), p=0.44). Significant associations with pressure injury in regression modelling included requiring a dietetic referral, being admitted from a location other than home and age over 65 years. The authors found no evidence to show that two common pressure-ulcer risk-assessment tools are superior to clinical judgement to prevent pressure injury. Resources associated with use of these tools might be better spent on careful daily skin inspection and improving management targetted at specific risks. The trial was registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinicat Trials Registry (ACTRN 12608000541303).

  17. Comparison of TAK-438 (Vonoprazan) to Lansoprazole in the Treatment of Gastric Ulcer Participants With or Without Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-24

    Gastric Ulcer; Peptic Ulcer; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Digestive System Diseases; Lansoprazole; Anti-Ulcer Agents; Gastrointestinal Agents; Proton Pump Inhibitors; Enzyme Inhibitors; Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action

  18. [Effect of heijiang pill on radiation skin ulcer in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qi; Yang, Yang; Xu, Yong-Mei

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the relationship between single dosage of 60Co radiation and the degree of radiation-induced skin ulcers, and to evaluate the curative effect of Heijiang Pill (HJP) on skin ulcer induced by various dosages of radiation in rats. Sixty-six Wistar female rats were randomly divided into three groups, the blank control group (n = 6) and the two radiation groups, each 30 rats, with their right hind leg exposed respectively to 60 Gy and 40 Gy of 60 Co radiation. The time of emergence and degree of skin ulcer were recorded. Then rats in the two radiation groups were subdivided into the HJP group, the Ethacridine group and the model group, 10 in each group, they received corresponding treatment after ulceration, and the incidence, pathology, cure rate and cure time of skin ulcer were observed in the 90 days of observation. The incidence of skin ulcer was higher and occurred earlier in rats radiated with 60 Gy than that with 40 Gy (P ulcer healing rate in rats treated with HJP was higher than that treated with Ethacridine (P cure time in the HJP group was shorter (P ulcers. HJP can effectively cure radiation skin ulcer, and the effect is especially significant on the ulcer induced by low dose radiation.

  19. The prevalence of foot ulceration in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, Jill; Hale, Claire; Helliwell, Philip; Hill, Jackie; Nelson, E Andrea

    2008-02-15

    To establish the prevalence of foot ulceration in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in secondary care. A postal survey of all patients with RA (n = 1,130) under the care of rheumatologists in Bradford, West Yorkshire, UK was performed. The prevalence data were validated through clinical examination, case-note review, and contact with health professionals. The false-negative rate was investigated in a subsample of patients (n = 70) who denied any history of ulceration. The postal survey achieved a 78% response rate. Following validation, the point prevalence of foot ulceration was 3.39% and the overall prevalence was 9.73%. The false-positive rate was initially high at 21.21%, but use of diagrammatic questionnaire data to exclude leg ulceration reduced the rate to 10.76%. The false-negative rate was 11.76%. The most common sites for ulceration were the dorsal aspect of hammer toes, the metatarsal heads, and the metatarsophalangeal joint in patients with hallux abducto valgus, with 33% of patients reporting multiple sites of ulceration. Patients with open-foot and healed-foot ulceration had significantly longer RA disease duration, reported significantly greater use of special footwear, and had a higher prevalence of foot surgery than ulcer-free patients. Foot ulceration affects a significant proportion of patients with RA. Further work is needed to establish risk factors for foot ulceration in RA and to target foot health provision more effectively.

  20. Protocols for pressure ulcer prevention: are they evidence-based?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Lidice M; Grypdonck, Mieke H F; Defloor, Tom

    2010-03-01

    This study is a report of a study to determine the quality of protocols for pressure ulcer prevention in home care in the Netherlands. If pressure ulcer prevention protocols are evidence-based and practitioners use them correctly in practice, this will result a reduction in pressure ulcers. Very little is known about the evidence-based content and quality of the pressure ulcer prevention protocols. In 2008, current pressure ulcer prevention protocols from 24 home-care agencies in the Netherlands were evaluated. A checklist developed and validated by two pressure ulcer prevention experts was used to assess the quality of the protocols, and weighted and unweighted quality scores were computed and analysed using descriptive statistics. The 24 pressure ulcer prevention protocols had a mean weighted quality score of 63.38 points out of a maximum of 100 (sd 5). The importance of observing the skin at the pressure points at least once a day was emphasized in 75% of the protocols. Only 42% correctly warned against the use of materials that were 'less effective or that could potentially cause harm'. Pressure ulcer prevention commands a reasonable amount of attention in home care, but the incidence of pressure ulcers and lack of a consistent, standardized document for use in actual practice indicate a need for systematic implementation of national pressure ulcer prevention standards in the Netherlands to ensure adherence to the established protocols.

  1. Care planning for pressure ulcers in hospice: the team effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberger, Andrew; Zeleznik, Jomarie

    2004-09-01

    The standards of care for patients at risk for or with a pressure ulcer in hospitals and nursing homes focus on prevention and ulcer healing using an interdisciplinary approach. Although not a primary hospice condition, pressure ulcers are not uncommon in dying patients. Their management in hospices, particularly the involvement of family caregivers, has not been studied. The objective of this study is to identify the factors that influence care planning for the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers in hospice patients and develop a taxonomy to use for further study. A telephone survey was conducted with 18 hospice directors of clinical services and 10 direct-care nurses. Descriptive qualitative data analysis using grounded theory was utilized. The following three themes were identified: (1) the primary role of the hospice nurse is an educator rather than a wound care provider; (2) hospice providers perceive the barriers and burdens of family caregiver involvement in pressure ulcer care to be bodily location of the pressure ulcer, unpleasant wound characteristics, fear of causing pain, guilt, and having to acknowledge the dying process when a new pressure ulcer develops; and (3) the "team effect" describes the collaboration between family caregivers and the health care providers to establish individualized achievable goals of care ranging from pressure ulcer prevention to acceptance of a pressure ulcer and symptom palliation. Pressure ulcer care planning is a model of collaborative decision making between family caregivers and hospice providers for a condition that occurs as a secondary condition in hospice. A pressure ulcer places significant burdens on family caregivers distinct from common end-of-life symptoms whose treatment is directed at the patient. Because the goals of pressure ulcer care appear to be individualized for a dying patient and their caregivers, the basis of quality-of-care evaluations should be the process of care rather than the outcome

  2. Anabolic steroids for treating pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naing, Cho; Whittaker, Maxine A

    2017-06-20

    Pressure ulcers, also known as bed sores, pressure sores or decubitus ulcers develop as a result of a localised injury to the skin or underlying tissue, or both. The ulcers usually arise over a bony prominence, and are recognised as a common medical problem affecting people confined to a bed or wheelchair for long periods of time. Anabolic steroids are used as off-label drugs (drugs which are used without regulatory approval) and have been used as adjuvants to usual treatment with dressings, debridement, nutritional supplements, systemic antibiotics and antiseptics, which are considered to be supportive in healing of pressure ulcers. Anabolic steroids are considered because of their ability to stimulate protein synthesis and build muscle mass. Comprehensive evidence is required to facilitate decision making, regarding the benefits and harms of using anabolic steroids. To assess the effects of anabolic steroids for treating pressure ulcers. In March 2017 we searched the Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); Ovid MEDLINE (including In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid Embase and EBSCO CINAHL Plus. We also searched clinical trials registries for ongoing and unpublished studies, and scanned reference lists of relevant included studies as well as reviews, meta-analyses and health technology reports to identify additional studies. There were no restrictions with respect to language, date of publication or study setting. Published or unpublished randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effects of anabolic steroids with alternative treatments or different types of anabolic steroids in the treatment of pressure ulcers. Two review authors independently carried out study selection, data extraction and risk of bias assessment. The review contains only one trial with a total of 212 participants, all with spinal cord injury and open pressure ulcers classed as stage III and IV. The participants were

  3. Recurrent peptic ulcers in patients following successful Helicobacter pylori eradication: a multicenter study of 4940 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Hiroto; Sakaki, Nobuhiro; Sugano, Kentaro; Sekine, Hitoshi; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Uemura, Naomi; Kato, Mototsugu; Murakami, Kazunari; Kato, Chieko; Shiotani, Akiko; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Takagi, Atsushi; Aoyama, Nobuo; Haruma, Ken; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Kusugami, Kazuo; Suzuki, Masayuki; Joh, Takashi; Azuma, Takeshi; Yanaka, Akinori; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Kawai, Takashi; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2004-02-01

    Although curative treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection markedly reduces the relapse of peptic ulcers, the details of the ulcers that do recur is not well characterized. The aim of this study is to describe the recurrence rate and specific features of peptic ulcers after cure of H. pylori infection. This was a multicenter study involving 4940 peptic ulcer patients who were H. pylori negative after successful eradication treatment and were followed for up to 48 months. The annual incidence of ulcer relapse in H. pylori-cured patients, background of patients with relapsed ulcers, time to relapse, ulcer size, and site of relapsed ulcers were investigated. Crude peptic ulcer recurrence rate was 3.02% (149/4940). The annual recurrence rates of gastric, duodenal and gastroduodenal ulcer were 2.3%, 1.6%, and 1.6%, respectively. Exclusion of patients who took NSAIDs led annual recurrence rates to 1.9%, 1.5% and 1.3%, respectively. The recurrence rate was significantly higher in gastric ulcer. Recurrence rates of patients who smoked, consumed alcohol, and used NSAIDs were significantly higher in those with gastric ulcer recurrence compared to duodenal ulcer recurrence (e.g. 125 of 149 [83.9%] relapsed ulcers recurred at the same or adjacent sites as the previous ulcers). Curative treatment of H. pylori infection is useful in preventing ulcer recurrence. Gastric ulcer is more likely to relapse than duodenal ulcer. Recurrent ulcer tended to recur at the site of the original ulcers.

  4. Maximizing microscopy as a diagnostic tool in peripheral health centres of BU endemic areas in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu, Enid; Newman, Mercy Jemima; Akumwena, Amos; Ofosu-Appiah, Lawrence; Pluschke, Gerd

    2015-09-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) disease, a skin condition caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans (M. ulcerans) is endemic in remote rural areas. Disease diagnosis on clinical basis alone can be misleading, requiring definitive diagnosis based on laboratory tests. Resource constraints in BU endemic areas make microscopy for the detection of acid fast bacilli (AFB) an important and useful method. It is rapid, user-friendly, convenient and cheap. Despite its usefulness, its performance is relatively low. This study investigated modifications of the current method aimed at improving its performance. Forty (IS) 2404 polymerase chain reactions (PCR) positive BU samples were processed by eight physical (centrifugation and overnight sedimentation) and chemical (phenol ammonium sulphate and sodium hypochlorite) modifications of the current direct method. Assessments were based on standard AFB evaluation coupled with in house criteria; positivity (P), clarity and contrast (C) release of bacilli from specimen (R). Overall AFB positivity rate was 64% (409/640). Each protocol had 80 smears. The percentage positivity (P) for the conventional method was 58% (46/80) smears. The highest positivity rate of 57/80 (%) was by protocol 7 (5% phenol in 4% ammonium sulphate (PhAS) and concentrated by overnight gravitational sedimentation). The least positivity rate at 35% (28/80) was by protocol 1 (smears from direct application of swab tips). The differences in performance between the two chemical tested; 5% phenol in 4% ammonium sulphate (PhAS) and 3.5% NaHOCl was significant (p0.05). This study concluded that BU samples treated with a solution of 5% phenol in 4% ammonium sulphate and concentrated by either centrifugation or overnight sedimentation is useful for maximizing AFB detection by bright field microscopy. This can be useful in rural health facilities with resource constraints. Copyright © 2015 Asian-African Society for Mycobacteriology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Maximizing microscopy as a diagnostic tool in peripheral health centres of BU endemic areas in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enid Owusu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Buruli ulcer (BU disease, a skin condition caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans (M. ulcerans is endemic in remote rural areas. Disease diagnosis on clinical basis alone can be misleading, requiring definitive diagnosis based on laboratory tests. Resource constraints in BU endemic areas make microscopy for the detection of acid fast bacilli (AFB an important and useful method. It is rapid, user-friendly, convenient and cheap. Despite its usefulness, its performance is relatively low. This study investigated modifications of the current method aimed at improving its performance. Forty (IS 2404 polymerase chain reactions (PCR positive BU samples were processed by eight physical (centrifugation and overnight sedimentation and chemical (phenol ammonium sulphate and sodium hypochlorite modifications of the current direct method. Assessments were based on standard AFB evaluation coupled with in house criteria; positivity (P, clarity and contrast (C release of bacilli from specimen (R. Overall AFB positivity rate was 64% (409/640. Each protocol had 80 smears. The percentage positivity (P for the conventional method was 58% (46/80 smears. The highest positivity rate of 57/80 (% was by protocol 7 (5% phenol in 4% ammonium sulphate (PhAS and concentrated by overnight gravitational sedimentation. The least positivity rate at 35% (28/80 was by protocol 1 (smears from direct application of swab tips. The differences in performance between the two chemical tested; 5% phenol in 4% ammonium sulphate (PhAS and 3.5% NaHOCl was significant (p 0.05. This study concluded that BU samples treated with a solution of 5% phenol in 4% ammonium sulphate and concentrated by either centrifugation or overnight sedimentation is useful for maximizing AFB detection by bright field microscopy. This can be useful in rural health facilities with resource constraints.

  6. A Diabetic Elderly Man with Finger Ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Noraini; Badrin, Salziyan; Wan Abdullah, Wan Noor Hasbee

    2018-03-01

    Fixed cutaneous sporotrichosis is a differential diagnosis that can be considered in diabetic patients who present with a poorly healing ulcer. Although its prevalence is low, it can occur in patients with immunocompromised status. Here we report a case of a 70-year-old man with diabetes mellitus who presented with a 1-month history of an unhealed ulcer over the tip of his left middle finger. He experienced a cat bite over his left middle finger 1 month prior to the appearance of the lesion. A skin biopsy revealed the presence of Sporothrix schenckii . Oral itraconazole 200 mg twice daily was started empirically and the patient showed marked improvement in the skin lesion after 2 months of therapy.

  7. Perforated peptic ulcer in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, C Y; Hsu, W M; Chen, Y

    2001-02-01

    We describe a case of perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) in a 9-month-old boy. Abdominal distension was the first clinical sign of PPU. Before he developed abdominal distension, the patient had suffered from an upper respiratory tract infection with fever for about 2 weeks, which was treated intermittently with ibuprofen. A plain abdominal radiograph revealed pneumoperitoneum with a football sign. At laparotomy, a 0.8-cm perforated hole was found over the prepyloric area. Simple closure with omental patching was performed after debridement of the perforation. Pathologic examination showed chronic peptic ulcer with Helicobacter pylori infection. The postoperative course and outcome were satisfactory. The stress of underlying disease, use of ibuprofen, blood type (A), and H. pylori infection might have contributed to the development of PPU in this patient. PPU in infancy is rare and has a high mortality rate; early recognition and prompt surgical intervention are key to successful management.

  8. Penile paraffinoma and ulcers of penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobik, O; Bobik, O

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a case of 33 year old Caucasian married man with an irregular 6 cm penile mass associated with multiple penile ulcers. He reluctantly admitted that 10 years ago he had multiple mineral oil (Vaseline) self injections into the penis, for penile enlargement purposes. The patient had a surgical intervention 10 years ago, but he has recurrent ulcers on his penis. We have administered an intravenous antibiotic therapy combined with local therapy. The term paraffinoma describes a distinct histopathological finding that results from the injection of foreign oily substances into the skin. Although such procedure may be considered rare, they are still performed in some countries. The major point we want emphasis is following: a lot of people seek penile augmentations, it is necessary to remind physicians and the public that nonscientific and inadequate procedure such as Vaseline may lead to debilitating and destructive consequences (Tab. 1, Ref. 12).

  9. Atypical disease phenotypes in pediatric ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levine, Arie; de Bie, Charlotte I; Turner, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Definitive diagnosis of pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) may be particularly challenging since isolated colitis with overlapping features is common in pediatric Crohn's disease (CD), while atypical phenotypes of UC are not uncommon. The Paris classification allows more accurate phenotyping...... of atypical inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Our aim was to identify the prevalence of atypical disease patterns in new-onset pediatric UC using the Paris classification....

  10. Healed corneal ulcer with keloid formation

    OpenAIRE

    Alkatan, Hind M.; Al-Arfaj, Khalid M.; Hantera, Mohammed; Al-Kharashi, Soliman

    2012-01-01

    We are reporting a 34-year-old Arabic white female patient who presented with a white mass covering her left cornea following multiple ocular surgeries and healed corneal ulcer. The lesion obscured further view of the iris, pupil and lens. The patient underwent penetrating keratoplasty and the histopathologic study of the left corneal button showed epithelial hyperplasia, absent Bowman’s layer and subepithelial fibrovascular proliferation. The histopathologic appearance was suggestive of a co...

  11. Management of pressure ulcers - What is new?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip Gude

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressure ulcers (PUs are an important aspect of geriatrics and palliative care that amplifies morbidity of the chronically bed-ridden patients posing a threat to health-care economy and resources. PUs can interfere with functional recovery, may be complicated by pain and infection and can prolong hospital length of stay. Their presence may be a marker of poor overall prognosis and premature mortality. The pathogenesis and progress in the management of PUs is discussed.

  12. Management of pressure ulcers - What is new?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gude, Dilip

    2011-07-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) are an important aspect of geriatrics and palliative care that amplifies morbidity of the chronically bed-ridden patients posing a threat to health-care economy and resources. PUs can interfere with functional recovery, may be complicated by pain and infection and can prolong hospital length of stay. Their presence may be a marker of poor overall prognosis and premature mortality. The pathogenesis and progress in the management of PUs is discussed.

  13. Surgical therapeutic management of perforated peptic ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Karla de Sousa Almeida; Clara Rafael Silva Xavier; Lucas de Faria Barros Medeiros; Joanna de Andrade Cordeiro; Amália Cínthia Menezes Rêgo; Irami Araújo-Filho

    2016-01-01

    Perforated peptic ulcer is an emergency should be readily corrected by surgical approach to reduce potential damage and the risk of mortality associated with the extension frame. The option of handling most commonly used by surgeons is laparotomy, however, there is evidence pointing to approach laparoscopically like a viable, safe and with good results for their treatment. Therefore, it is appropriate to evaluate the data about each management and minimally invasive procedure, lap...

  14. Foam dressings for treating pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Rachel M; Gillespie, Brigid M; Thalib, Lukman; Higgins, Niall S; Whitty, Jennifer A

    2017-10-12

    Pressure ulcers, also known as pressure injuries and bed sores, are localised areas of injury to the skin or underlying tissues, or both. Dressings made from a variety of materials, including foam, are used to treat pressure ulcers. An evidence-based overview of dressings for pressure ulcers is needed to enable informed decision-making on dressing use. This review is part of a suite of Cochrane Reviews investigating the use of dressings in the treatment of pressure ulcers. Each review will focus on a particular dressing type. To assess the clinical and cost effectiveness of foam wound dressings for healing pressure ulcers in people with an existing pressure ulcer in any care setting. In February 2017 we searched: the Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); Ovid MEDLINE (including In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid Embase; EBSCO CINAHL Plus and the NHS Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED). We also searched clinical trials registries for ongoing and unpublished studies, and scanned reference lists of relevant included studies as well as reviews, meta-analyses and health technology reports to identify additional studies. There were no restrictions with respect to language, date of publication or study setting. Published or unpublished randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster-RCTs, that compared the clinical and cost effectiveness of foam wound dressings for healing pressure ulcers (Category/Stage II or above). Two review authors independently performed study selection, risk of bias and data extraction. A third reviewer resolved discrepancies between the review authors. We included nine trials with a total of 483 participants, all of whom were adults (59 years or older) with an existing pressure ulcer Category/Stage II or above. All trials had two arms, which compared foam dressings with other dressings for treating pressure ulcers.The certainty of evidence ranged from low to very low due

  15. Pneumorrhachis Secondary From Sacral Decubitus Ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    Moayedi, Siamak; Babin, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    An elderly woman with a chronic decubitus sacral ulcer presented to the emergency department with sepsis. A computed tomography of her abdomen showed diffuse gas extending throughout the thoracolumbar spinal canal. Pneumorrhachis is a rare radiographic finding defined as gas within the spinal canal. There are many causes of pneumorrhachis ranging from trauma to infection. In this case the pneumorrhachis was caused by direct spread of gas-forming organisms from vertebral osteomyelitis. Emergen...

  16. Evaluation of Repositioning in Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Källman, Ulrika

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To reduce the risk for pressure ulcers, repositioning of immobile patients is an important standard nursing practice. However, knowledge on how this preventive intervention is carried out among elderly immobile patients is limited and to what extent patients perform minor movements between nursing staff-induced repositionings is largely unknown, but these movements might have implications for the repositioning intervention. Different lying positions are used in repositioning sch...

  17. Cutaneous ulcers associated with hydroxyurea therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrone, Filippo; Dini, Valentina; Barbanera, Sabrina; Zerbinati, Nicola; Romanelli, Marco

    2013-11-01

    Hydroxyurea is an antitumoral drug mainly used in the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative syndromes and sickle-cell disease. Ulcers represent a rare but severe long-term adverse effect of hydroxyurea therapy. Hydroxyurea-induced ulcers are often multiple and bilateral, typically developing in the perimalleolar region, although any cutaneous district is potentially affected. They generally look small, well-defined, shallow with an adherent, yellow, fibrinous necrotic base. A constant finding is also an extremely intense, treatment-resistant pain accompanying these ulcerations. Withdrawal of the drug generally leads to spontaneous healing of these lesions. Care providers tend to show insufficient awareness of this highly debilitating cutaneous side effect, and late or missed diagnoses are frequent. Instead, regular dermatologic screening should be performed on hydroxyurea-treated patients. This article will present a comprehensive review of indexed case reports and clinical studies, followed by a discussion about treatment options aiming at increasing knowledge about this specific topic. Copyright © 2013 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Endoscopic management of bleeding peptic ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooqi, J.I.; Farooqi, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    Peptic ulcers account for more than half of the cases of non variceal upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and therefore, are the focus of most of the methods of endoscopic hemostasis. Surgical intervention is now largely reserved for patients in whom endoscopic hemostasis has failed. A variety of endoscopic techniques have been employed to stop bleeding and reduce the risk of rebleeding, with no major differences in outcome between these methods. These include injection therapy, fibrin injection, heater probe, mono polar electrocautery, bipolar electrocautery, lasers and mechanical hemo clipping. The most important factor in determining outcome after gastrointestinal bleeding is rebleeding or persistent bleeding. The endoscopic appearance of an ulcer, however, provides the most useful prognostic information for bleeding. Recurrent bleeding after initial endoscopic hemostasis occurs in 15-20% of patients with a bleeding peptic ulcer. The best approach to these patients remains controversial; the current options are repeat endoscopic therapy with the same or a different technique, emergency surgery or semi elective surgery after repeat endoscopic hemostasis. The combination of epinephrine injection with thermal coagulation may be more effective than epinephrine injection alone. Newer modalities such as fibrin injection or the application of hemo clips appear promising and comparative studies are awaited. (author)

  19. Pyoderma gangrenosum: A commonly overlooked ulcerative condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Zunsheng Tay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pyoderma ga ngrenosum (PG is a rare, inflammatory, destructive neutrophilic dermatosis, which mimics other ulcerative conditions. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective study based on patients diagnosed with PG over a 3-year period (2010-2013, we evaluated demographics, anatomical sites, number of lesions, subtypes, histopathology, associated conditions, treatment regimens, healing time, and recurrence. Results: Of our five patients, there were three males and two females, age ranging between 19 and 58 years (mean age 38 years. Four had single lesions localized to the lower limbs while one had multiple lesions (more than five over bilateral hands and legs. Ulcerative subtype was observed in all the patients. One exhibited pathergy. Skin biopsies were done in four patients, revealing dense neutrophilic infiltrates in three cases and leukocytoclastic vasculitis in one. Associated systemic diseases were observed in all patients, four having inflammatory bowel disease and one having both systemic lupus erythematosus and anti-phospholipid syndrome. The patients were all treated with systemic corticosteroids either alone or in combination with immunosuppressants (e.g., azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus, and wound dressing. Split-thickness skin graft was done in one patient. Complete healing was achieved in all patients, ranging from one to 3 months after diagnosis. No recurrence was reported. Conclusions: Systemic corticosteroids, either alone or in combination with steroid-sparing agents are the mainstay of treatment. Should family physicians encounter a rapidly progressing ulcer that has poor response to usual wound management, timely referral to dermatology should be made.

  20. Bipolar aphthosis presenting as mutilating genital ulcers in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Somesh

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Three women with large, mutilating genital ulcers of long duration, destroying almost the lower half of the external genitalia, are reported. They had a history of recurrent oral ulcers as well. All patients had been diagnosed as having ′genital ulcer syndrome′ in the past and had been treated with antimicrobials. Histopathology of the biopsy from the margin of the ulcer revealed features of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Considering the history, clinical features and histology, a diagnosis of bipolar aphthosis was made in all patients. All patients responded well to immunosuppressive therapy. The cases are reported because of the presence of genital ulcers of an unusually large size, mutilating character and their close similarity to genital ulcers due to sexually transmitted diseases, especially genital herpes and donovanosis.

  1. A Case of Nonhealing Leg Ulcer: Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didem Didar Balcı

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A 75-year-old woman was admitted to our outpatient clinic with a three-year history of a painless, nonhealing ulcer located on the left lower leg. She had no response to previous therapy with local wound care. Skin examination revealed an ulcer 2.7 x 3.7 cm in size, and the surrounding skin showed minimal erythema. The surface of the ulcer demonstrated shiny granulation tissue. Biopsy of the ulcer edge and base showed basal cell carcinoma. Venous Doppler ultrasonography and dermatological examination did not reveal chronic venous insufficiency. Basal cell carcinomas rarely arise from previous long-term ulcers or developing de novo. We suggest that patients who develop non-healing leg ulcers, should be examined for basal cell carcinoma.

  2. Bipolar aphthosis presenting as mutilating genital ulcers in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Somesh

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Three women with large, mutilating genital ulcers of long duration, destroying almost the lower half of the external genitalia, are reported. They had a history of recurrent oral ulcers as well. All patients had been diagnosed as having ′genital ulcer syndrome′ in the past and had been treated with antimicrobials. Histopathology of the biopsy from the margin of the ulcer revealed features of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Considering the history, clinical features and histology, a diagnosis of bipolar aphthosis was made in all patients. All patients responded well to immunosuppressive therapy. The cases are reported because of the presence of genital ulcers of an unusually large size, mutilating character and their close similarity to genital ulcers due to sexually transmitted diseases, especially genital herpes and donovanosis.

  3. The personality pattern of duodenal ulcer patients in relation to spontaneous ulcer healing and relapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jess, P; von der Lieth, L; Matzen, Peter

    1989-01-01

    stressful life events before entrance to the study (P less than 0.05) and, like the neurotic patients, they had lower ego-strength to cope with such events (P less than 0.05). The results indicate that personality assessments make it possible to distinguish between subgroups of duodenal ulcer patients......One hundred consecutive out-patients with duodenal ulceration from a hospital and a gastroenterological clinic were tested with the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). This was carried out in order to investigate whether neuroticism or other personality disorders were...... characteristics of duodenal ulcer patients, and whether the presence of such possible personality disorders might influence the prognosis of the disease. Neuroticism occurred in 53% of the patients, but only in 5% of controls (P less than 0.0001). Overall, personality disorders were present in 69% of the patients...

  4. Radiologic features of the solitary rectal ulcer syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castagnone, D.; Ranzi, T.; Velio, P.; Polli, E.E.; Bianchi, P.

    1984-05-01

    A radiologic study of 4 biopsy-proven cases of the solitary rectal ulcer (S.R.U.) syndrome was undertaken. The radiologic findings of S.R.U. were rectal stenosis (one with ulcer), polypoid rectal mass, and multiple sub-mucosal defects with shallow ulcers. The S.R.U., which is benign and requires only dietetic treatment, must be differentiated from other more serious entities such as neoplastic and inflammatory bowel disease.

  5. Skin aspergillosis induced in the region of radiation ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niimura, Yumiko; Nakauchi, Yohichi; Ushijima, Tsugako

    1980-01-01

    A case of skin aspergillosis in the region of radiation ulcer which was caused by Aspergillus fumigatus was reported. The patient was a 51 year-old man. This fungal infection was probably induced by a local factor, that is, chronic radiation ulcer. Histological findings suggested that Aspergillus fumigatus which increased saprophytically at the beginning possessed parasitic nature gradually, invaded into connective tissues in the deep layer of true skin, and made radiation ulcer more intractable. (Tsunoda, M.)

  6. Pinch grafting for chronic venous leg ulcers in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Steele, Keith

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with chronic venous leg ulcers were treated in general practice by pinch grafting. Fifteen of the ulcers (60%) were completely healed one year after grafting. Prior to grafting 19 patients (76%) complained of daily pain in the ulcer. These patients experienced complete relief from pain after grafting. Pinch grafting is a simple, safe and effective therapy when applied in a domiciliary environment.

  7. Simultaneous Onset of Ulcerative Colitis and Disseminated Pyoderma Gangrenosum

    OpenAIRE

    Albrecht Neesse; Patrick Michl; Steffen Kunsch; Volker Ellenrieder; Thomas M. Gress; Martin Steinkamp

    2007-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is an immune-mediated inflammatory skin condition representing one of the most distinct extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). PG occurs independently from intestinal disease activity in about 1–2% of patients suffering from ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease and is characterized by chronic deep skin ulcers whose exact pathogenesis is still unknown. So far, patients with ulcerative colitis have only been reported to develop PG during t...

  8. Determinants of mortality among older adults with pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, Hui Min; Tan, Juan; Saedon, Nor Izzati; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul B; Chin, Ai Vyrn; Poi, Philip J H; Tan, Maw Pin

    2014-01-01

    The presence of pressure ulcers imposes a huge burden on the older person's quality of life and significantly increases their risk of dying. The objective of this study was to determine patient characteristics associated with the presence of pressure ulcers and to evaluate the risk factors associated with mortality among older patients with pressure ulcers. A prospective observational study was performed between Oct 2012 and May 2013. Patients with preexisting pressure ulcers on admission and those with hospital acquired pressure ulcers were recruited into the study. Information on patient demographics, functional status, nutritional level, stages of pressure ulcer and their complications were obtained. Cox proportional hazard analysis was used to assess the risk of death in all patients. 76/684 (11.1%) patients had pre-existing pressure ulcers on admission and 30/684 (4.4%) developed pressure ulcers in hospital. There were 68 (66%) deaths by the end of the median follow-up period of 12 (IQR 2.5-14) weeks. Our Cox regression model revealed that nursing home residence (Hazard Ratio, HR=2.33, 95% confidence interval, CI=1.30, 4.17; p=0.005), infected deep pressure ulcers (HR=2.21, 95% CI=1.26, 3.87; p=0.006) and neutrophilia (HR=1.76; 95% CI 1.05, 2.94; p=0.031) were independent predictors of mortality in our elderly patients with pressure ulcers. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in our setting is comparable to previously reported figures in Europe and North America. Mortality in patients with pressure ulcer was high, and was predicted by institutionalization, concurrent infection and high neutrophil counts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pressure Ulcer Prevention: Where Practice and Education Meet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Brenda S; Wangen, Tina M; Elbing, Carl E; Rowekamp, Debra J; Kruggel, Heather A; Conlon, Patricia M; Scroggins, Leann M; Schad, Shauna P; Neumann, Julie A; Barth, Melissa M; Grubbs, Pamela L; Sievers, Beth A

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the processes used to implement a pressure ulcer management program in a Midwest academic medical center, which led to a decrease in reportable pressure ulcers. A learning needs assessment was completed, and a workgroup was formed to address the learning needs. Methods, materials, and processes included lectures, technology-enhanced learning, and interactive stations with mannequins and pressure ulcer moulages. The processes and outcome measures used to measure effectiveness of the program are discussed.

  10. Perforated marginal ulcers after laparoscopic gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Edward L; Kettelle, John; Mobley, Elijah; Swartz, Daniel

    2008-10-01

    Perforated marginal ulcer (PMU) after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) is a serious complication, but its incidence and etiology have rarely been investigated. Therefore, a retrospective review of all patients undergoing LRYGB at the authors' center was conducted to determine the incidence of PMU and whether any causative factors were present. A prospectively kept database of all patients at the authors' bariatric center was retrospectively reviewed. The complete records of patients with a PMU were examined individually for accuracy and analyzed for treatment, outcome, and possible underlying causes of the marginal perforation. Between April 1999 and August 2007, 1% of the patients (35/3,430) undergoing laparoscopic gastric bypass experienced one or more perforated marginal ulcers 3 to 70 months (median, 18 months) after LRYGB. The patients with and without perforation were not significantly different in terms of mean age (37 vs 41 years), weight (286 vs 287 lb), body mass index (BMI) (46 vs 47), or female gender (89% vs 83%). Of the patients with perforations, 2 (6%) were taking steroids, 10 (29%) were receiving nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) at the time of the perforation, 18 (51%) were actively smoking, and 6 of the smokers also were taking NSAIDs. Eleven of the patients (31%) who perforated did not have at least one of these possible risk factors, but 4 (36%) of the 11 patients in this group had been treated after bypass for a marginal ulcer. Only 7 (20%) of the 35 patients who had laparoscopic bypass, or 7 (0.2%) in the entire group of 3,430 patients, perforated without any warning. There were no deaths, but three patients reperforated. The incidence of a marginal ulcer perforating after LRYGB was significant (>1%) and appeared to be related to smoking or the use of NSAIDs or steroids. Because only 0.2% of all patients acutely perforated without some risk factor or warning, long-term ulcer prophylaxis or treatment may be necessary

  11. Challenging Ulcerative Vulvar Conditions: Hidradenitis Suppurativa, Crohn Disease, and Aphthous Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Kristen M A

    2017-09-01

    This article discusses the clinical evaluation and approach to patients with 3 complex ulcerative vulvar conditions: hidradenitis suppurativa, metastatic Crohn disease of the vulva, and aphthous ulcers. These conditions are particularly challenging to medical providers because, although each is known to present with nonspecific examination findings that vary in morphology, the predominance of the diagnosis is based on clinical examination and exclusion of a wide variety of other conditions. Care of patients with these conditions is further complicated by the lack of therapeutic data and the significant impact these conditions have on quality of life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The meaning of living with malodorous exuding ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Elisabeth; Norberg, Astrid; Söderberg, Anna

    2007-03-01

    This study illuminates the meaning of living with malodorous, exuding ulcers. Difficulties for patients with chronic ulcers and the ulcers' impact on patients' daily life are described in the literature. Suffering and consolation are also addressed in the literature as important issues in nursing care. The first author interviewed seven women and two men, aged 41-95, with various diagnoses. We interpreted the transcribed interviews using a phenomenological hermeneutic method. Two processes were identified: 'being struck down'- themes: feeling dirty, being trapped, losing confidence, losing hope, becoming frustrated and protecting oneself; and 'finding consolation'- themes: experiencing kinship, encountering genuineness and gaining control. The meaning of living with malodorous and exuding ulcers can be understood as being trapped in a debilitating process that slowly strikes one down. There is a longing for purity and wholeness and for one's life to improve. When people with malodorous, exuding ulcers encounter genuineness and feel loved, regarded and respected as fully human despite their ulcers, they feel purified. The contaminated body no longer contaminates their self-image and self-esteem and they feel restored and fully human again. Only when they feel fully human can they regain control and see life beyond their ulcers. Although nurses cannot make ulcers or smell disappear, they can contribute significantly to improve the patients' life. Finding consolation makes patients feel purified despite their contaminated body. This study points to the importance of seeing the human being beyond the ulcer and considering not only the body but the whole person.

  13. Age Features Of Peptic And Duodenal Ulcer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е.А. Islamova

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Peptic ulcer disease is one of the most widespread diseases. 6-10 % of adult population in Russia suffer from it. Demographic processes in the Russian Federation determine the increase of patients' number aged over 60 with peptic ulcer disease. It counts 10-35 % of all patients with this disease. The modern views on pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease, including factor of Helicobacter pylori, in patients of different age groups have been highlighted in the article. Pathogenetic features and clinical morphological manifestations of peptic ulcer disease in young and aged patients have been considered

  14. Acyclovir in the prevention of duodenal ulcer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rune, S J; Linde, J; Bonnevie, O

    1990-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that reactivation of a latent herpes simplex virus infection may be a cause of recurrent duodenal ulceration. Patients with recently healed duodenal ulcer were entered into a double blind, randomised study of maintenance treatment with the antiviral drug acyclovir...... (400 mg bid) versus placebo, to determine if suppression of herpes virus infection would influence the natural history of the ulcer disease. One hundred and fifteen patients entered the trial and 76 patients completed it according to the protocol. Endoscopy was performed when ulcer symptoms recurred...

  15. Reconstruction of radionecrotic ulcer using a myocutaneous flap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Okano, Shinji; Iwasaki, Yasumasa; Mori, Tamotsu; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Shigeki, Sadayuki

    1990-01-01

    Problems in the surgical treatment of radionecrotic ulcers, using a myocutaneous flap, have been reviewed in 21 patients. These problems included poor wound healing, radiation damage to important nerves and vessels there by making dissection difficult, malignant changes, infections, continuing necrosis of the tissue, and bleeding during surgery and secondary hemorrhaging. The use of a myocutaneous flap has many advantages when compared with conventional flaps and free skin grafts in the reconstruction of radionecrotic ulcers. Flap survival was good, but an incomplete excision of the ulcer delayed primary wound healing. Therefore, complete excision of the radionecrotic ulcer is imperative. (author)

  16. Peculiarities of roentgenosemiotics of ulcerous disease in different age groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshenko, Yu.T.; Reztsova, N.S.

    1984-01-01

    Roentgenomorphological and functional signs of stomach and duodenum ulcer disease was studied in different age groups in 382 patients that were subjected to a complex of clinico-laboratory and roentgenological examinations. It is concluded that in different age groups ulcerous disease of stomach and duodenum is characterized by a considerable peculiarities of roengenomorphologic characters. In some age groups disclosed are characteristic symptomocomplexes of roentgenofunctional shifts typical of ulcers of different localisations. It is shown that there is a regular relation between the type of functional shifts, age of a patient and location of ulcers

  17. Case report 379: 'Ulcer osteoma' associated with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiggins, T.; Bohrer, S.P.

    1986-01-01

    In summary, a 32-year-old black man with homozygous sickle cell anemia has been presented. The patient developed bilateral ulcers of the leg which never completely healed. In one leg he demonstrated a focal, fusiform, periosteal reaction which probably in time would become incorporated into the cortex, resulting in the formation of an ulcer osteoma of the tibia associated with sickle cell disease. The ulcer osteoma has the same radiological appearance as the ulcer osteoma in individuals in Africa without sickle cell disease. (orig./SHA)

  18. Pressure ulcer prevention is everyone's business: the PUPS project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blenman, Juliet; Marks-Maran, Di

    2017-03-23

    Prevention of pressure ulcers is one of the greatest healthcare challenges in terms of reducing patient harm. The literature shows that although numerous reports and policy documents have been published, pressure ulcer prevention remains an ongoing challenge. A number of innovations have been published offering practising nurses and managers ideas for raising awareness of skin care and preventing pressure ulcers. The majority of these have focused on patients in hospital settings with very little in the literature related to care-home and community initiatives. This article reports on an innovative approach to education for pressure ulcer prevention through collaboration between patients, carers and health and social care professionals.

  19. A Study of Changes in Stomach Wall at Sites Other Than the Ulcer in Chronic Duodenal Ulcer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Jagmohan; Panigrahi, Souvagya

    2011-01-01

    It is known that at least 90% of duodenal ulcers are caused by infection with the bacterium Helicobacter pylori. Eradicating this organism usually results in complete resolution of the disease (Rosengren, Br J Gen Pract 46(409):491–492, 1996). To study the different changes if any in stomach wall at sites other than the ulcer in chronic duodenal ulcer patients by upper Gastro-Intenstinal Endoscopy followed by histopathological examination of different parts of stomach. This study was a retros...

  20. Pressure ulcers: development and psychometric evaluation of the attitude towards pressure ulcer prevention instrument (APuP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeckman, D; Defloor, T; Demarré, L; Van Hecke, A; Vanderwee, K

    2010-11-01

    Pressure ulcers continue to be a significant problem in hospitals, nursing homes and community care settings. Pressure ulcer incidence is widely accepted as an indicator for the quality of care. Negative attitudes towards pressure ulcer prevention may result in suboptimal preventive care. A reliable and valid instrument to assess attitudes towards pressure ulcer prevention is lacking. Development and psychometric evaluation of the Attitude towards Pressure ulcer Prevention instrument (APuP). Prospective psychometric instrument validation study. A literature review was performed to design the instrument. Content validity was evaluated by nine European pressure ulcer experts and five experts in psychometric instrument validation in a double Delphi procedure. A convenience sample of 258 nurses and 291 nursing students from Belgium and The Netherlands participated in order to evaluate construct validity and stability reliability of the instrument. The data were collected between February and May 2008. A factor analysis indicated the construct of a 13 item instrument in a five factor solution: (1) attitude towards personal competency to prevent pressure ulcers (three items); (2) attitude towards the priority of pressure ulcer prevention (three items); (3) attitude towards the impact of pressure ulcers (three items); (4) attitude towards personal responsibility in pressure ulcer prevention (two items); and (5) attitude towards confidence in the effectiveness of prevention (two items). This five factor solution accounted for 61.4% of the variance in responses related to attitudes towards pressure ulcer prevention. All items demonstrated factor loadings over 0.60. The instrument produced similar results during stability testing [ICC=0.88 (95% CI=0.84-0.91, Ppressure ulcer prevention in patient care, education, and research. In further research, the association between attitude, knowledge and clinical performance should be explored. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  1. [Anterior seromyotomy of the body and the functional part of the stomach combined with posterior truncal vagotomy and ulcer excision in the surgical treatment of complicated stomach ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, V I; Sytnik, A P; Gorbunov, V N; KOrenev, N N; Naumov, B A; Gordeev, S A

    1990-07-01

    Anterior seromyotomy of the body and fundus of the stomach was combined with posterior truncal vagotomy and excision of the ulcer in 23 patients with gastric ulcer complicated by bleeding or perforation. Seventeen patients had chronic ulcers of the body of the stomach (type I), 3 patients had concurrent ulcers (type II), and 3 more patients had acute ulcers of the body of the stomach. Operation was undertaken for active bleeding from the ulcer in 20 patients and for perforating ulcer in 3 patients. One patient died. Mild disorders of evacuation of an aqueous barium sulfate suspension from the stomach were noted in 4 patients.

  2. Correlates of Bacterial Ulcers and Acute HSV-2 Infection among Men with Genital Ulcer Disease in South Africa: Age, Recent Sexual Behaviors, and HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichliter, Jami S; Lewis, David A; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Data from baseline surveys and STI/HIV laboratory tests (n=615 men) were used to examine correlates of bacterial ulcers ( Treponema pallidum , Haemophilus ducreyi , or Chlamydia trachomatis L1-L3 detected in ulcer) and acute HSV-2 ulcers (HSV-2 positive ulcer specimen, HSV-2 sero-negative, and negative for bacterial pathogens) vs. recurrent HSV-2 ulcers (sero-positive), separately. Compared to men with recurrent HSV-2 ulcers, men with bacterial ulcers had larger ulcers but were less likely to be HIV-positive whereas men with acute HSV-2 ulcers were younger with fewer partners. Acute HIV was higher among men with bacterial and acute HSV-2 ulcers; the difference was not statistically significant.

  3. Medical versus surgical treatment for refractory or recurrent peptic ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Pallari, Elena

    2016-03-29

    Refractory peptic ulcers are ulcers in the stomach or duodenum that do not heal after eight to 12 weeks of medical treatment or those that are associated with complications despite medical treatment. Recurrent peptic ulcers are peptic ulcers that recur after healing of the ulcer. Given the number of deaths due to peptic ulcer-related complications and the long-term complications of medical treatment (increased incidence of fracture), it is unclear whether medical or surgical intervention is the better treatment option in people with recurrent or refractory peptic ulcers. To assess the benefits and harms of medical versus surgical treatment for people with recurrent or refractory peptic ulcer. We searched the specialised register of the Cochrane Upper GI and Pancreatic Diseases group, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, and trials registers until September 2015 to identify randomised trials and non-randomised studies, using search strategies. We also searched the references of included studies to identify further studies. We considered randomised controlled trials and non-randomised studies comparing medical treatment with surgical treatment in people with refractory or recurrent peptic ulcer, irrespective of language, blinding, or publication status for inclusion in the review. Two review authors independently identified trials and extracted data. We planned to calculate the risk ratio, mean difference, standardised mean difference, or hazard ratio with 95% confidence intervals using both fixed-effect and random-effects models with Review Manager 5 based on intention-to-treat analysis. We included only one non-randomised study published 30 years ago in the review. This study included 77 participants who had gastric ulcer and in whom medical therapy (histamine H2 receptor blockers, antacids, and diet) had failed after an average duration of treatment of 29 months. The

  4. Plantar pressure in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients with active foot ulceration, previous ulceration and no history of ulceration: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Malindu Eranga; Crowther, Robert George; Pappas, Elise; Lazzarini, Peter Anthony; Cunningham, Margaret; Sangla, Kunwarjit Singh; Buttner, Petra; Golledge, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Elevated dynamic plantar pressures are a consistent finding in diabetes patients with peripheral neuropathy with implications for plantar foot ulceration. This meta-analysis aimed to compare the plantar pressures of diabetes patients that had peripheral neuropathy and those with neuropathy with active or previous foot ulcers. Published articles were identified from Medline via OVID, CINAHL, SCOPUS, INFORMIT, Cochrane Central EMBASE via OVID and Web of Science via ISI Web of Knowledge bibliographic databases. Observational studies reporting barefoot dynamic plantar pressure in adults with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, where at least one group had a history of plantar foot ulcers were included. Interventional studies, shod plantar pressure studies and studies not published in English were excluded. Overall mean peak plantar pressure (MPP) and pressure time integral (PTI) were primary outcomes. The six secondary outcomes were MPP and PTI at the rear foot, mid foot and fore foot. The protocol of the meta-analysis was published with PROPSERO, (registration number CRD42013004310). Eight observational studies were included. Overall MPP and PTI were greater in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients with foot ulceration compared to those without ulceration (standardised mean difference 0.551, 95% CI 0.290-0.811, pdiabetic peripheral neuropathy with a history of foot ulceration compared to those with diabetic neuropathy without a history of ulceration. More homogenous data is needed to confirm these findings.

  5. Healing ulcers and preventing their recurrences in the diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Raja Sabapathy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen percent of people with diabetes develop an ulcer in the course of their lifetime. Eighty-five percent of the major amputations in diabetes mellitus are preceded by an ulcer. Management of ulcers and preventing their recurrence is important for the quality of life of the individual and reducing the cost of care of treatment. The main causative factors of ulceration are neuropathy, vasculopathy and limited joint mobility. Altered bio-mechanics due to the deformities secondary to neuropathy and limited joint mobility leads to focal points of increased pressure, which compromises circulation leading to ulcers. Ulcer management must not only address the healing of ulcers but also should correct the altered bio-mechanics to reduce the focal pressure points and prevent recurrence. An analysis of 700 patients presenting with foot problems to the Diabetic Clinic of Ganga Hospital led to the stratification of these patients into four classes of incremental severity. Class 1 – the foot at risk, Class 2 – superficial ulcers without infection, Class 3 – the crippled foot and Class 4 – the critical foot. Almost 77.5% presented in either Class 3 or 4 with complicated foot ulcers requiring major reconstruction or amputation. Class 1 foot can be managed conservatively with foot care and appropriate foot wear. Class 2 in addition to measures for ulcer healing would need surgery to correct the altered bio-mechanics to prevent the recurrence. The procedures called surgical offloading would depend on the site of the ulcer and would need an in-depth clinical study of the foot. Class 3 would need major reconstructive procedures and Class 4 would need amputation since it may be life-threatening. As clinicians, our main efforts must be focused towards identifying patients in Class 1 and offer advice on foot care and Class 2 where appropriate surgical offloading procedure would help preserve the foot.

  6. Impact of Facial Conformation on Canine Health: Corneal Ulceration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Rowena M. A.; Hendricks, Anke; Burn, Charlotte C.

    2015-01-01

    Concern has arisen in recent years that selection for extreme facial morphology in the domestic dog may be leading to an increased frequency of eye disorders. Corneal ulcers are a common and painful eye problem in domestic dogs that can lead to scarring and/or perforation of the cornea, potentially causing blindness. Exaggerated juvenile-like craniofacial conformations and wide eyes have been suspected as risk factors for corneal ulceration. This study aimed to quantify the relationship between corneal ulceration risk and conformational factors including relative eyelid aperture width, brachycephalic (short-muzzled) skull shape, the presence of a nasal fold (wrinkle), and exposed eye-white. A 14 month cross-sectional study of dogs entering a large UK based small animal referral hospital for both corneal ulcers and unrelated disorders was carried out. Dogs were classed as affected if they were diagnosed with a corneal ulcer using fluorescein dye while at the hospital (whether referred for this disorder or not), or if a previous diagnosis of corneal ulcer(s) was documented in the dogs’ histories. Of 700 dogs recruited, measured and clinically examined, 31 were affected by corneal ulcers. Most cases were male (71%), small breed dogs (mean± SE weight: 11.4±1.1 kg), with the most commonly diagnosed breed being the Pug. Dogs with nasal folds were nearly five times more likely to be affected by corneal ulcers than those without, and brachycephalic dogs (craniofacial ratio dogs. A 10% increase in relative eyelid aperture width more than tripled the ulcer risk. Exposed eye-white was associated with a nearly three times increased risk. The results demonstrate that artificially selecting for these facial characteristics greatly heightens the risk of corneal ulcers, and such selection should thus be discouraged to improve canine welfare. PMID:25969983

  7. Helicobacter pylori eradication in complicated peptic ulcer: Beneficial in most?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subair Mohsina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy has a role in minimizing the complications of peptic ulcer disease, namely, bleeding, perforation, and obstruction. However, the precise role of H. pylori eradication therapy in the complicated ulcers remains inconclusive, especially in perforation and gastric outlet obstruction. The prevalence of H. pylori in peptic ulcer bleeding patients has been widely underestimated owing to the differences in diagnostic tests and patient characteristics, and hence, it is recommended that an initial negative test should be followed up by a delayed repeat testing to rule out false negativity. It is well established now that eradication of H. pylori in patients with bleeding ulcers reduces rebleeding and ulcer recurrence. Multiple studies have attributed high recurrence rates of duodenal ulcer following simple closure to a high prevalence of H. pylori infection. Eradication therapy decreases the recurrence rate of perforated ulcers, thus justifying the role of H. pylori eradication therapy following the primary surgical management of perforated ulcers. The role of H. pylori in duodenal ulcer with gastric outlet obstruction is yet to be evaluated clearly. There are some reports of resolution of gastric outlet obstruction following therapy for H. pylori, obviating the need for surgery. Clarithromycin-containing regimens are recommended as first-line in areas of low resistance, whereas bismuth-containing quadruple therapy is the first-line empirical treatment in areas of high clarithromycin resistance. Treatment of H. pylori is beneficial in most of the patients with complicated peptic ulcer disease, especially in reducing recurrence of ulcer with or without complications.

  8. Compression stockings for treating venous leg ulcers: measurement of interface pressure under a new ulcer kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partsch, B; Partsch, H

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the interface pressure of a newly designed two-layer compression stocking (Mediven ulcer kit Medi QMBH, Bayreuth, Germany) in different body positions and to compare the values with those obtained with another two-layer product. Interface pressure was measured on the distal medial leg in 16 legs of volunteers, with the basic layer alone and with the whole stocking kit in the supine, sitting and standing position for both stocking systems. The literature concerning ulcer-healing rates is reviewed. Mediven ulcerkit produced statistically significant higher pressure values than the ulcer stocking with a median resting value of 35.5 mmHg in the supine and 42.5 mmHg in the standing position. The pressure while standing comes close to values exerted by bandages. The basic layer alone applies a pressure of 20.5 mmHg. Especially designed compression stockings exerting sufficient interface pressure may be indicated in patients with small ulcers of short duration.

  9. Increased Mortality in Diabetic Foot Ulcer Patients: The Significance of Ulcer Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chammas, N. K.; Hill, R. L. R.; Edmonds, M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) patients have a greater than twofold increase in mortality compared with nonulcerated diabetic patients. We investigated (a) cause of death in DFU patients, (b) age at death, and (c) relationship between cause of death and ulcer type. This was an eleven-year retrospective study on DFU patients who attended King's College Hospital Foot Clinic and subsequently died. A control group of nonulcerated diabetic patients was matched for age and type of diabetes mellitus. The cause of death was identified from death certificates (DC) and postmortem (PM) examinations. There were 243 DFU patient deaths during this period. Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) was the major cause of death in 62.5% on PM compared to 45.7% on DC. Mean age at death from IHD on PM was 5 years lower in DFU patients compared to controls (68.2 ± 8.7 years versus 73.1 ± 8.0 years, P = 0.015). IHD as a cause of death at PM was significantly linked to neuropathic foot ulcers (OR 3.064, 95% CI 1.003–9.366, and P = 0.049). Conclusions. IHD is the major cause of premature mortality in DFU patients with the neuropathic foot ulcer patients being at a greater risk. PMID:27213157

  10. [Emerging infectious diseases: complex, unpredictable processes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guégan, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    In the light of a double approach, at first empirical, later theoretical and comparative, illustrated by the example of the Buruli ulcer and its mycobacterial agent Mycobacterium ulcerans on which I focused my research activity these last ten years by studying determinants and factors of emerging infectious or parasitic diseases, the complexity of events explaining emerging diseases will be presented. The cascade of events occurring at various levels of spatiotemporal scales and organization of life, which lead to the numerous observed emergences, nowadays requires better taking into account the interactions between host(s), pathogen(s) and the environment by including the behavior of both individuals and the population. In numerous research studies on emerging infectious diseases, microbial hazard is described rather than infectious disease risk, the latter resulting from the confrontation between an association of threatening phenomena, or hazards, and a susceptible population. Beyond, the theme of emerging infectious diseases and its links with global environmental and societal changes leads to reconsider some well-established knowledge in infectiology and parasitology. © Société de Biologie, 2017.

  11. A Bacterial Toxin with Analgesic Properties: Hyperpolarization of DRG Neurons by Mycolactone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ok-Ryul; Kim, Han-Byul; Jouny, Samuel; Ricard, Isabelle; Vandeputte, Alexandre; Deboosere, Nathalie; Marion, Estelle; Queval, Christophe J; Lesport, Pierre; Bourinet, Emmanuel; Henrion, Daniel; Oh, Seog Bae; Lebon, Guillaume; Sandoz, Guillaume; Yeramian, Edouard; Marsollier, Laurent; Brodin, Priscille

    2017-07-18

    Mycolactone, a polyketide molecule produced by Mycobacterium ulcerans , is the etiological agent of Buruli ulcer. This lipid toxin is endowed with pleiotropic effects, presents cytotoxic effects at high doses, and notably plays a pivotal role in host response upon colonization by the bacillus. Most remarkably, mycolactone displays intriguing analgesic capabilities: the toxin suppresses or alleviates the pain of the skin lesions it inflicts. We demonstrated that the analgesic capability of mycolactone was not attributable to nerve damage, but instead resulted from the triggering of a cellular pathway targeting AT₂ receptors (angiotensin II type 2 receptors; AT₂R), and leading to potassium-dependent hyperpolarization. This demonstration paves the way to new nature-inspired analgesic protocols. In this direction, we assess here the hyperpolarizing properties of mycolactone on nociceptive neurons. We developed a dedicated medium-throughput assay based on membrane potential changes, and visualized by confocal microscopy of bis-oxonol-loaded Dorsal Root Ganglion (DRG) neurons. We demonstrate that mycolactone at non-cytotoxic doses triggers the hyperpolarization of DRG neurons through AT₂R, with this action being not affected by known ligands of AT₂R. This result points towards novel AT₂R-dependent signaling pathways in DRG neurons underlying the analgesic effect of mycolactone, with the perspective for the development of new types of nature-inspired analgesics.

  12. Time latencies of Helicobacter pylori eradication after peptic ulcer and risk of recurrent ulcer, ulcer adverse events, and gastric cancer: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverdén, Emma; Brusselaers, Nele; Wahlin, Karl; Lagergren, Jesper

    2017-12-09

    Helicobacter pylori is associated with peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Therefore we wanted to test how various lengths of delays in H pylori eradication therapy influence the risk of recurrent peptic ulcer, ulcer adverse events, and gastric cancer. This population-based nationwide Swedish cohort study included 29,032 patients receiving H pylori eradication therapy after peptic ulcer disease in 2005 to 2013. Predefined time intervals between date of peptic ulcer diagnosis and date of eradication therapy were analyzed in relation to study outcomes. Cox regression provided hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs), adjusted for age, sex, comorbidity, history of ulcer disease, use of ulcerogenic drugs, and use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Compared with eradication therapy within 7 days of peptic ulcer diagnosis, eradication therapy within 8 to 30, 31 to 60, 61 to 365, and >365 days corresponded with HRs of recurrent ulcer of 1.17 (95% CI, 1.08-1.25), 2.37 (95% CI, 2.16-2.59), 2.96 (95% CI, 2.76-3.16), and 3.55 (95% CI, 3.33-3.79), respectively. The corresponding HRs for complicated ulcer were 1.55 (95% CI, 1.35-1.78), 3.19 (95% CI, 2.69-3.78), 4.00 (95% CI, 3.51-4.55), and 6.14, (95% CI, 5.47-6.89), respectively. For gastric cancer the corresponding HRs were .85 (95% CI, .32-2.23), 1.31 (95% CI, .31-5.54), 3.64 (95% CI, 1.55-8.56), and 4.71 (95% CI, 2.36-9.38), respectively. Delays in H pylori eradication therapy after peptic ulcer diagnosis time-dependently increase the risk of recurrent ulcer, even more so for complicated ulcer, starting from delays of 8 to 30 days. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mycotic corneal ulcers in upper Assam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reema Nath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To study the association of various risk factors and epidemiological variables of mycotic keratitis treated at a tertiary referral hospital of upper Assam. Materials and Methods: In this hospital-based prospective study a total of 310 consecutive corneal ulcer cases attending the ophthalmology outpatient department of Assam Medical College were enrolled between April 2007 and March 2009. After clinical and slit-lamp biomicroscopic examination in all suspected cases, smears and culture examination for fungus was done to establish the etiology. Demographic information and associated probable risk factors of individual cases were noted in a predesigned questionnaire. Results: In 188 (60.6% cases fungal etiology could be established. Out of them 67.6% were males. The most commonly affected age group was 41-50 years (25.5%. The maximum (23.4% cases were reported during the paddy harvesting season in Assam (January and February. Fungal element could be demonstrated in 65.2% cases in direct potassium hydroxide (KOH mount. The commonest predisposing factor was corneal injury (74.5%. While diabetes was a significant systemic predisposing factor in mixed bacterial and fungal infections in 11.1% cases, blocked naso-lacrimal duct was the local predisposing factor in 11.1% of cases. Fusarium solani (25% was the commonest isolate followed by Aspergillus species (19%, Curvularia species (18.5% and Penicillium species (15.2%. Yeasts were isolated in 2.7% (n=5 cases. Conclusions : Ocular trauma was the commonest cause of fungal corneal ulcer in Assam and Fusarium solani was the commonest species responsible for it. Most of the mycotic ulcer cases come from rural areas including the tea gardens.

  14. Duodenal ulcer promoting gene of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hong; Hsu, Ping-I; Graham, David Y; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2005-04-01

    Identification of a disease-specific H pylori virulence factors predictive of the outcome of infection remains unachieved. We used the polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot to compare the presence of 14 vir homologue genes with clinical presentation of H pylori infection, mucosal histology, and mucosal interleukin (IL)-8 levels. We examined 500 H pylori strains from East Asia and South America, including 120 with gastritis, 140 with duodenal ulcer (DU), 110 with gastric ulcer (GU), and 130 with gastric cancer. Only 1 gene that encompassed both jhp0917 and jhp0918 called dupA (duodenal ulcer promoting gene) was associated with a specific clinical outcome. dupA was present in 42% of DU vs. 21% of gastritis (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 3.1, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.7-5.7). Its presence was also associated with more intense antral neutrophil infiltration and IL-8 levels and was a marker for protection against gastric atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and gastric cancer (OR for gastric cancer = 0.42, 95% CI: 0.2-0.9 compared with gastritis). In vitro studies in gastric epithelial cells using dupA -deleted and -complemented mutants showed that the dupA plays roles in IL-8 production, in activation of transcription factors responsible for IL-8 promoter activity, and in increased survivability at low pH. dupA is a novel marker associated with an increased risk for DU and reduced risk for gastric atrophy and cancer. Its association with DU-promoting and -protective effects against atrophy/cancer was evident in both Asian and Western countries.

  15. Solitary Rectal Ulcer Syndrome: A Biopsychosocial Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Daghaghzadeh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS is a chronic disorder of the gastrointestinal tract and its etiology is not well understood. There is no specific treatment for this syndrome and patients with SRUS may, for years, experience many complications. The aim of the present research was the biopsychosocial study of patients with SRUS.Methods: The study participants consisted of 16 patients with SRUS (7 men and 9 women. Their medical records were reviewed retrospectively to evaluate the clinical spectrum of the patients along with the endoscopic and histological findings. Moreover, psychiatric and personality disorders [based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed, Text Revision (DSM IV-TR], psychosocial stressors, early life traumas, and coping mechanisms were assessed through structured interviews.Results: At presentation, mean age of the patients was 39 years (16 to 70. Common symptoms reported included rectal bleeding (93.8%, rectal self-digitations (81.2%, passage of mucous (75%, anal pain (75%, and straining (75%. Endoscopically, solitary and multiple lesions were present in 9 (60% and 4 (26.7% patients, respectively, and 87% of lesions were ulcerative and 13.3% polypoidal. The most common histological findings were superficial ulceration (92.85% and intercryptic fibromuscular obliteration (87.71%. Common psychosocial findings included anxiety disorders (50%, depression (37.5%, obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD or traits (62.5%, interpersonal problems (43.75%, marital conflicts (43.75%, occupational stress (37.5%, early life traumas, physical abuse (31.25%, sexual abuse (31.25%, dysfunctional coping mechanisms, emotional inhibition (50%, and non-assertiveness (37.5%.Conclusion: Given the evidence in this study, we cannot ignore the psychosocial problems of patients with SRUS and biopsychosocial assessment of SRUS is more appropriate than biomedical evaluation alone.

  16. Life style and peptic ulcer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegen, Berrak C

    2018-05-09

    The risk of developing peptic ulcer disease (PUD) was shown to be associated with genetic inheritance, life-style and social status of the patients. Unhealthy lifestyle habits and failure in coping with stress have been closely associated with the occurrence of PUD. In contrary, limiting the use of analgesic drugs and glucocorticoids, controlling environmental and socioeconomic factors that predispose to H. Pylori infection, having a balanced diet, exercising regularly, coping successfully with stress, avoiding smoking, limiting alcohol intake and getting sufficient night sleep are essential in prevention and healing of PUD. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Surgical therapeutic management of perforated peptic ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Karla de Sousa Almeida

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Perforated peptic ulcer is an emergency should be readily corrected by surgical approach to reduce potential damage and the risk of mortality associated with the extension frame. The option of handling most commonly used by surgeons is laparotomy, however, there is evidence pointing to approach laparoscopically like a viable, safe and with good results for their treatment. Therefore, it is appropriate to evaluate the data about each management and minimally invasive procedure, laparoscopy if overcomes the open surgical approach regarding the laparotomy regarding the treatment of patients with this condition.

  18. [Thermometric diagnostics of chronic ulcerous pulpitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvetkova, P; Mostrova, I

    1989-01-01

    Thermometric measurements were performed of 408 teeth of the upper and lower jaw with clinically confirmed initial and advanced stage of chronic ulcerous pulpitis in 398 subjects, aged from 18 to 30. Temperature elevation within the range from 1.4 to 3.2 degrees C was established in the initial form of chronic pulpitis and from 1 to 2.5 degrees C in advanced form of chronic pulpitis as compared with the norm. Significant difference in the temperature deviations exists in both forms of chronic pulpitis between the teeth of the upper and lower jaw.

  19. Pneumorrhachis Secondary to a Sacral Decubitus Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siamak Moayedi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An elderly woman with a chronic decubitus sacral ulcer presented to the emergency department with sepsis. A computed tomography of her abdomen showed diffuse gas extending throughout the thoracolumbar spinal canal. Pneumorrhachis is a rare radiographic finding defined as gas within the spinal canal. There are many causes of pneumorrhachis ranging from trauma to infection. In this case the pneumorrhachis was caused by direct spread of gas-forming organisms from vertebral osteomyelitis. Emergency physicians should know about the implication of gas in the spinal canal in the setting of sepsis. [West J Emerg Med. 2016;17(4:466-468.

  20. Peripheral lymphocyte subpopulations in recurrent aphthous ulceration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A; Klausen, B; Hougen, H P

    1991-01-01

    Peripheral lymphocyte subsets--T-helper (CD4+), T-suppressor/cytotoxic (CD8+), and naive/virgin T cells/natural killer cells (CD45RA)--were studied quantitatively in 30 patients with recurrent aphthous ulceration (RAU) and 29 sex- and age-matched RAU-free control donors. The CD4+ percentage...... was significantly lower in the patients than in the control group (P less than 0.0001), whereas CD8+ and CD4/CD8 ratio figures did not differ significantly between patients and controls. The CD45RA+ counts were significantly higher in the patient group (P less than 0.01). The study supports previous investigations...

  1. Preventing pressure ulcers on the heel: a Canadian cost study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torra I Bou, Joan-Enric; Rueda López, Justo; Camañes, Gemma; Herrero Narváez, Elias; Blanco Blanco, Joan; Ballesté Torralba, Jordi; Martinez-Esparza, Elvira Hernández; García, Lorena San Miguel; Soriano, José Verdú

    2009-01-01

    An adaptation of a clinical study of 130 patients at risk of developing a pressure ulcer on the heels was performed using Canadian costs. The aim of the study was to compare the cost effectiveness of a specially shaped hydrocellular dressing (Allevyn Heel) versus that of a protective heel bandage (Soffban and gauze) in pressure ulcer prevention over an 8-week period.

  2. Pressure ulcer prevention in high-risk postoperative cardiovascular patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Melissa; McKenney, Teresa; Drumm, Jennifer; Merrick, Brian; LeMaster, Tamara; VanGilder, Catherine

    2011-08-01

    Little has been published about how to prevent pressure ulcers in severely debilitated, immobile patients in intensive care units. To present a possible prevention strategy for postoperative cardiovascular surgery patients at high risk for development of pressure ulcers. Staff chose to implement air fluidized therapy beds, which provide maximal immersion and envelopment as a measure for preventing pressure ulcers in patients who (1) required vasopressors for at least 24 hours and (2) required mechanical ventilation for at least 24 hours postoperatively. Only 1 of 27 patients had a pressure ulcer develop while on the air fluidized therapy bed (February 2008 through August 2008), and that ulcer was only a stage I ulcer, compared with 40 ulcers in 25 patients before the intervention. Patients spent a mean of 7.9 days on the mattress, and the cost of bed rental was approximately $18000, which was similar to the cost of treatment of 1 pressure ulcer in stage III or IV (about $40000) and was considered cost-effective.

  3. Diabetic foot ulcers – evidence-based wound management: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetic foot ulcers have a significant impact on the individual patient's quality of life, potential morbidity and even mortality. Diabetic foot ulcers also consume a gradually increasing portion of our health care budget. Whenever possible the focus should be on prevention rather than cure. All diabetic patients must have both ...

  4. Risk factors, ulcer grade and management outcome of diabetic foot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Risk factors, ulcer grade and management outcome of diabetic foot ulcers in a Tropical Tertiary Care Hospital. ... Data documented included age, gender, type of DM, duration of DM, risk factors of DFU, duration of DFU ... 85.2% had type 2 DM.

  5. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with peptic ulcer disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Helicobacter pylori infection has been identified as an important risk factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease and is probably the most important cause of relapse in those previously treated for peptic ulcer disease. The aim of this study was to determine the association of Helicobacter pylori infection as ...

  6. Changing trend in emergency surgery for perforated duodenal ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurteyik, E.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate changes in the emergency surgery of the duodenal ulcer. Subjects and Methods: Hospital records of 523 surgically treated patients, with duodenal ulcer perforation, during the period of 25 years 91975-1999) in the same surgical department, was retrospectively analysed. Changing aspects of emergency surgery of peptic ulcer disease, in the recent period, were determined in respect to number of operations per year and in the choice of operative methods. Results: The average number of patients and emergency operations per year was 21. No significant change was observed during the study period. Elective operations gradually decreased in the last ten years, and none was performed in the last 4 years. On the other hand, 226 emergency interventions for duodenal ulcer perforation were performed in the last ten years and 84 interventions in the last 4 years. Definitive anti-ulcer surgery was performed in 42% of patients between 1985 and 1994. Simple closure of the perforation plus treatment with proton pump inhibitors and with anti-Helicobacter pylori medication was the method in 80% during the last year. Conclusion: Emergency surgery for perforated duodenal ulcer preserves its steady rate despite disappearance of elective operations after tremendous progress in medical control of peptic ulcer disease. There is an obvious return from definitive anti-ulcer surgery to simple closure of the perforation followed by antisecretory and antibacterial medications in the recent years. (author)

  7. Campylobacter pylori as possible factor in peptic ulcer recurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rauws, E. A.

    1989-01-01

    The author reviews the literature up to 1988 about the close association of Campylobacter pylori with chronic active gastritis, duodenitis and peptic ulcer disease. No firm data however demonstrate that Campylobacter pylori causes duodenal ulcer but long term eradication of this bacterium prevents

  8. Mindfulness May Be Helpful for People with Ulcerative Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... homework. This was compared to a “time/attention” control—a course on mind and body medicine that was similar in format but did not include coping skills, practice, or any information on ulcerative ... the MBSR and control groups in the course of ulcerative colitis disease, ...

  9. Acute necrotising ulcerative gingivitis in an immunocompromised young adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jessie; Kent, Paul; Lennon, Joshua M; Logan, Latania K

    2015-01-01

    Acute necrotising ulcerative gingivitis is an acute onset disease characterised by ulceration, necrosis, pain and bleeding in gingival surfaces. It is predominantly seen in severely malnourished children and young adults with advanced HIV infection. We present a unique presentation in a young adult with high-grade osteogenic sarcoma. PMID:26376700

  10. The role of aminosalicylates in the treatment of ulcerative colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Assche, Gert; Baert, Filip; de Reuck, Marc; de Vos, Martine; de Wit, Olivier; Hoang, Pierre; Louis, Edouard; Mana, Fazia; Pelckmans, Paul; Rutgeerts, Paul; van Gossum, Andre; D'Haens, Geert

    2002-01-01

    Aminosalicylates (5-ASA, sulfasalazine and mesalazine) play a central role in the treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC). For acute treatment of mild to moderate flares and in maintenance treatment, their efficacy has been established. Since ulcerative colitis is limited to the distal colon in two

  11. [AETIOLOGY AND PATHOGENESIS GASTRO-DUODENALES ULCERATIVE LESIONS IN ELDERLY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernekhovskaya, N E; Povalayev, A V; Layshenko, G A

    2015-01-01

    In review today conceptions of view to aetiology and pathogenesis gastro-duodenales ulcerative lesions in elderly. Atherosclerosis, ischemic disease of the heart and hypertension are reasons of acute ulcers and erosions in elderly. The breaking of microcirculation are very importance.

  12. Chronic cutaneous ulcers secondary to Haemophilus ducreyi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, Trisha N; Bhatti, Deepak; De Boer, Jim C; Stratov, Ivan; Spelman, Denis W

    2010-03-15

    Haemophilus ducreyi is a well recognised causative agent of genital ulcers and chancroid. We report two unusual cases of non-sexually transmitted H. ducreyi infection leading to chronic lower limb ulcers. Both patients were Australian expatriates visiting Australia from the Pacific Islands--one from Papua New Guinea and the other from Vanuatu.

  13. The treatment of late radiation skin ulcers by laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yu.A.; Klimanov, M.E.; Bardychev, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    There are presented the results of laser stimulation of reparation processes in 25 patients with late radiation skin ulcers. Short-term therapeutic results turned out to be favorable in 18 (72%) patients, a complete cicatrization of ulcers was observed in 9 patients, significant improvement in 9

  14. The management of pelvic pressure ulcers by myocutaneous flaps ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pressure ulcers or ischaemic necrosis of tissues over bony eminences due to pressure, heal very slowly. Vascularised tissues such as myocutaneous flaps are necessary to cover the ulcer and accelerate healing. This study was done to share our experience with methods of myocutaneous flaps in the treatment of pressure ...

  15. Perioperative factors associated with pressure ulcer development after major surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Background Postoperative pressure ulcers are important indicators of perioperative care quality, and are serious and expensive complications during critical care. This study aimed to identify perioperative risk factors for postoperative pressure ulcers. Methods This retrospective case-control study evaluated 2,498 patients who underwent major surgery. Forty-three patients developed postoperative pressure ulcers and were matched to 86 control patients based on age, sex, surgery, and comorbidities. Results The pressure ulcer group had lower baseline hemoglobin and albumin levels, compared to the control group. The pressure ulcer group also had higher values for lactate levels, blood loss, and number of packed red blood cell (pRBC) units. Univariate analysis revealed that pressure ulcer development was associated with preoperative hemoglobin levels, albumin levels, lactate levels, intraoperative blood loss, number of pRBC units, Acute Physiologic and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, Braden scale score, postoperative ventilator care, and patient restraint. In the multiple logistic regression analysis, only preoperative low albumin levels (odds ratio [OR]: 0.21, 95% CI: 0.05–0.82; P pressure ulcer development. A receiver operating characteristic curve was used to assess the predictive power of the logistic regression model, and the area under the curve was 0.88 (95% CI: 0.79–0.97; P pressure ulcer development after surgery. PMID:29441175

  16. Prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers using electrical stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Thomas; Smit, Christof; Hopman, Maria

    2005-01-01

    Skin-related secondary disabilities, especially pressure ulcers, are a common problem for wheelchair users such as individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI), resulting in great discomfort and significant medical care costs. Pressure ulcers typically arise in areas of the body where prolonged

  17. Pressure ulcer prevention and treatment knowledge of Jordanian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Mohammad Y N; Al-Hussami, Mahmoud; Anthony, Denis

    2013-02-01

    The aims of the study were to determine: (1) Jordanian nurses' level of knowledge of pressure ulcer prevention and treatment of hospitalized patients based on guidelines for pressure ulcer prevention and treatment. (2) Frequency of utilization of pressure ulcer prevention and treatment interventions in clinical practice. (3) Variables that are associated with nurses' utilization of pressure ulcer prevention and treatment interventions. Pressure ulcers are common and previous studies have shown education, knowledge and attitude affect implementation of interventions. A cross-sectional survey design was used to collect data from 460 nurses between June 2010 and November 2010. We used a questionnaire, which was informed by earlier work and guidelines, to collect data about nurses' knowledge and practice of pressure ulcer prevention and treatment. Knowledge and education show an association with implementation of prevention, and demographic variables do not. Similarly knowledge and type of hospital showed an association with implementing treatment. Of concern the use of "donuts" and massage are reported in use. Although pressure ulcer care is well known by nurses, inappropriate pressure ulcer interventions were reported in use. Copyright © 2013 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Severe recurrent oral ulceration secondary to erosive lichen planus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeem, A.; Khan, S.; Satti, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    A case of recurrent progressively severe ulceration secondary to erosive lichen planus is reported. The patient developed marked malnutrition as a result of extensive involvement of the oral cavity. In addition to the oral ulcerations, she also had violaceous spots present over her forearm. Treatment administered in view of histopathological report and clinical presentation, resulted in marked improvement in symptoms and weight gain. (author)

  19. Secondary hyperparathyroidism: Uncommon cause of a leg ulcer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijssen, L. B.; Brenninkmeijer, E. E. A.; Nieveen van Dijkum, E. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Most leg ulcers are vascular based. Only if vascular therapy fails other causes are considered. We report the case of a female with incapacitating leg ulcers caused by a rare condition which was only diagnosed after failing treatment. PRESENTATION OF CASE: The female had an extensive previous

  20. Early detection of foot ulcers through asymmetry analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaabouch, Naima; Chen, Yi; Hu, Wen-Chen; Anderson, Julie; Ames, Forrest; Paulson, Rolf

    2009-02-01

    Foot ulcers affect millions of Americans annually. Areas that are likely to ulcerate have been associated with increased local skin temperatures due to inflammation and enzymatic autolysis of tissue. Conventional methods to assess skin, including inspection and palpation, may be valuable approaches, but usually they do not detect changes in skin integrity until an ulcer has already developed. Conversely, infrared imaging is a technology able to assess the integrity of the skin and its many layers, thus having the potential to index the cascade of physiological events in the prevention, assessment, and management of foot ulcers. In this paper, we propose a technique, asymmetry analysis, to automatically analyze the infrared images in order to detect inflammation. Preliminary results show that the proposed technique can be reliable and efficient to detect inflammation and, hence, predict potential ulceration.

  1. A resource-efficient planning for pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostadabbas, Sarah; Yousefi, Rasoul; Nourani, Mehrdad; Faezipour, Miad; Tamil, Lakshman; Pompeo, Matthew Q

    2012-11-01

    Pressure ulcer is a critical problem for bed-ridden and wheelchair-bound patients, diabetics, and the elderly. Patients need to be regularly repositioned to prevent excessive pressure on a single area of body, which can lead to ulcers. Pressure ulcers are extremely costly to treat and may lead to several other health problems, including death. The current standard for prevention is to reposition at-risk patients every two hours. Even if it is done properly, a fixed schedule is not sufficient to prevent all ulcers. Moreover, it may result in nurses being overworked by turning some patients too frequently. In this paper, we present an algorithm for finding a nurse-effort optimal repositioning schedule that prevents pressure ulcer formation for a finite planning horizon. Our proposed algorithm uses data from a commercial pressure mat assembled on the beds surface and provides a sequence of next positions and the time of repositioning for each patient.

  2. Peptic ulcer pathophysiology: acid, bicarbonate, and mucosal function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, L; Mertz Nielsen, A; Rune, S J

    1996-01-01

    The previously accepted role of gastric acid hypersecretion in peptic ulcer disease has been modified by studies showing no correlation between acid output and clinical outcome of ulcer disease, or between ulcer recurrence rate after vagotomy and preoperative acid secretion. At the same time......, studies have been unable to demonstrate increased acidity in the duodenal bulb in patients with duodenal ulcer, and consequently more emphasis has been given to the mucosal protecting mechanisms. The existence of an active gastric and duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion creates a pH gradient from...... cell removal and repair regulated by epidermal growth factor. Sufficient mucosal blood flow, including a normal acid/base balance, is important for subepithelial protection. In today's model of ulcer pathogenesis, gastric acid and H. pylori work in concert as aggressive factors, with the open question...

  3. Tactics of a roentgenoendoscopic study in gastric and duodenal ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strunin, A.E.

    1986-01-01

    During an X-ray study the niche symptom was established in 244 patients with peptic ulcer. The X-ray findings were compared with those of gastroduodenofibroscopy (GDFS) in 111 patients (45.5 %), and with those of operation in 84 (34.2 %). By the operative findings X-ray and GDFS results coincided in all cases of gastric ulcer. With ulcer in the pyloroduodenal zone, X-ray errors were found in 2 (2.3 %) patients whereas in GDFS in 8(5.8 %). The X-ray method was shown to be the most important in the diagnosis of penetration and stenosis of ulcer. The tactics of a roentgenoendoscopic study in peptic ulcer should be based on the diagnostic potentialities of these methods taking a stage into account

  4. Dual pathology: cervicofacial actinomycosis and nicorandil-induced oral ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupples, H E V; McGahey, D T

    2008-04-01

    Oral ulceration has many causes and is a common presenting symptom in otolaryngology. This article presents an unusual case of dual pathology oral ulceration in an elderly patient. Oral malignancy was initially suspected, but the history, examination and investigation showed that the oral ulceration was caused by actinomycosis infection and by nicorandil use. Cervicofacial acinomycosis is a rare, suppurative bacterial disease in which abscesses can form in the tissues and break through the skin, creating pus-discharging lesions. Nicorandil is a potassium channel blocker used in the treatment of ischaemic heart disease. It has been recently recognised as a cause of persistent ulcerative stomatitis. This case highlights the importance of a high index of suspicion for unusual and reversible causes of oral ulceration, and of dual pathology as a cause. Such vigilance enables early recognition and treatment of potentially reversible conditions.

  5. [Pressure ulcers in surgery patients: incidence and associated factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlatti, Kelly Cristina; Michel, Jeanne Liliane Marlene; Gamba, Mônica Antar; de Gutiérrez, Maria Gaby Rivero

    2011-12-01

    Pressure ulcers are an important perioperatory care quality indicator This is a longitudinal case series study, performed with the following objectives: to estimate the incidence of pressure ulcers in patients submitted to medium and large surgeries; rate them according to the stage and location; verify the association with the variables: gender, age, body mass index (BMI), co-morbidities, surgical position, duration of surgery, anesthesia type and use of positioning devices, with presence or absence of pressure ulcers. Data collection took place in 2007 in São Paulo, with 199 patients, 20.6% of which presented pressure ulcers, and most (98.6%) in stages I and II, and the main location was the trunk (35.1%). The variables: position, surgery time, general anesthesia, and device use had a statistically significant association. In conclusion, there is a high incidence of pressure ulcers among surgical patients, requiring actions aimed at reducing this type of injury.

  6. Malignant change of chronic ulcerative colitis: report of a case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Tae; Lee, Han Jin; Kang, Si Won; Bahk, Yong Whee

    1988-01-01

    Since the original report of Crohn and Rosenberg (1928) the association between long-standing ulcerative colitis and later development of colonic malignancy has been well known. There are many risk factors for the development of malignancy such as duration, extent, severity and age of the onset of ulcerative colitis, drugs and diagnostic radiation. The dysplasia of the colonic mucosa as a precancerous change are seen not only in the area of malignant focus but also in distant locations in long-standing ulcerative colitis. We present a case of malignant change occurred in a patient with long-standing ulcerative colitis in the rectosigmoid junction. This is probably the first documentation of malignant transformation of ulcerative colitis in the Korean literature.

  7. Pressure ulcers and Charcot's definitions: report on two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Pressure ulcers are lesions caused by inadequate blood flow and tissue malnourishment secondary to prolonged pressure on skin, soft connective tissues, muscle and/or bones. The authors report two distinct clinical situations of severely compromised neurological patients who shared several predisposing factors for pressure ulcers, but with opposite outcomes regarding the development of pressure ulcers. CASE REPORTS: The first case was a young patient in a persistent vegetative state who developed pressure ulcers that resulted in secondary sepsis and death. The second case was a patient with a diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who, in spite of being bedridden for several months with severe immobility, never developed pressure ulcers. These intriguing contrary clinical situations had already been defined by Charcot in the nineteenth century, with his creation of the expression "decubitus ominosus". He indicated that patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis usually did not develop this form of complication, as was illustrated by the cases presented here.

  8. Malignant melanoma misdiagnosed as diabetic foot ulcer: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Chen, Dawei; Ran, Xingwu

    2017-07-01

    Acral lentiginous melanoma (AML) does not exhibit the classic signs of malignant melanoma. ALM is frequently misdiagnosed because of its unusual sites and atypical clinical morphologies, which lead to poor prognosis. A female patient aged 78 years was presented to our center with two ulcers on her right foot. Diabetic foot ulcer was considered as the primary diagnosis. The ulcers failed to improve after 2 weeks' therapy. An incisional biopsy of the lesion revealed malignant melanoma. The patient received wide excision, skin grafting as well as biotherapy. The lesion was healed and no other metastasis has been founded until now. Clinicians must maintain a high level of suspicion in distinguishing malignant melanoma from other more benign skin lesions of the foot. The need for early biopsy of ulcer, even when clinical suspicion is low, can not be overemphasized. Only in this way can we reduce misdiagnosis rate and improve survival rate in patients with foot ulcer.

  9. Temporal comorbidity of mental disorder and ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawthorpe, David; Davidson, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis is an inflammatory bowel disease that rarely exists in isolation in affected patients. We examined the association of ulcerative colitis and International Classification of Diseases mental disorder, as well as the temporal comorbidity of three broad International Classification of Diseases groupings of mental disorders in patients with ulcerative colitis to determine if mental disorder is more likely to occur before or after ulcerative colitis. We used physician diagnoses from the regional health zone of Calgary, Alberta, for patient visits from fiscal years 1994 to 2009 for treatment of any presenting concern in that Calgary health zone (763,449 patients) to identify 5113 patients age younger than 1 year to age 92 years (2120 males, average age = 47 years; 2993 females, average age = 48 years) with a diagnosis of ulcerative colitis. The 16-year cumulative prevalence of ulcerative colitis was 0.0058%, or 58 cases per 10,000 persons (95% confidence interval = 56-60 per 10,000). Although the cumulative prevalence of mental disorder in the overall sample was 5390 per 10,000 (53.9%), we found that 4192 patients with ulcerative colitis (82%) also had a diagnosis of a mental disorder. By annual rate of ulcerative colitis, patients with mental disorder had a significantly higher annual prevalence. The mental disorder grouping neuroses/depressive disorders was most likely to arise before ulcerative colitis (odds ratio = 1.87 for males; 2.24 for females). A temporal association was observed between specific groups of International Classification of Diseases mental disorder and ulcerative colitis, indicating a possible etiologic relationship between the disorders or their treatments, or both.

  10. Potential of Jatropha multifida sap against traumatic ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basri A. Gani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic ulcer is a lesion in oral mucosa as a result of physical and mechanical trauma, as well as changes in salivary pH. Jatropha multifida sap can act as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and re-epithelialization, and can also trigger the healing process of ulcers. Purpose: Research was aimed to determine the potential of Jatropha multifida sap against traumatic ulcer base on clinical and histopathological healing process. Method: This research was conducted laboratory experimental model, with rats (Rattus norvegicus as the subject as well as Jatropha multifida sap for ulcer healing. Those subjects were divided into four groups: two treatment groups administrated with pellet and Jatropha multifida sap, one group as the positive control group administrated with 0.1% triamcinolone acetonide, and one group as the negative control group administrated with 0.9% NaCl. Ulcer manipulation was used 30% H2O2, and evaluation of ulcer healing was used clinical and histopathological approach. Result: Clinically, the healing process of ulcers in the treatment group with Jatropha multifida sap was faster than that in the positive control group with 0.1% triamcinolone acetonide, indicated with the reduction of the ulcer size until the missing of the ulcers started from the third day to the seventh one (p≤0.05. Histopathologically inflammatory cells (lymphocytes, and plasma cells declined started from the third day, and the formation of collagen and re-epithelialization then occurred. On the seventh day, the epithelial cells thickened, and the inflammatory cells infiltrated. Statistically, those groups were significant (p≤0.05. Conclusion: Jatropha multifida sap has a significant potential to cure traumatic ulcers on oral mucosa clinically and histopathologically.

  11. Immunosuppressive agents are associated with peptic ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Hasegawa, Rumiko; Shirai, Yoshinori; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2017-05-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding can be fatal. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents are administered for long-term usage. The present study assessed the association between peptic ulcer bleeding and administration of NSAIDs, corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents. Furthermore, the efficacy of lowering the risk of peptic ulcer bleeding with proton pump inhibitors (PPI) and histamine 2 receptor antagonists (H2RA) was evaluated. Medical records were retrospectively analyzed for patients subjected to an upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy performed at the National Hospital Organization Shimoshizu Hospital (Yotsukaido, Japan) from October 2014 to September 2015. During this period, a total of 1,023 patients underwent an upper GI endoscopy. A total of 1,023 patients, including 431 males (age, 68.1±12.9 years) and 592 females (age, 66.4±12.3 years), who had been administered NSAIDs, corticosteroids, immunosuppressive agents, PPIs and H2RAs, were respectively enrolled. Endoscopic findings of the patients were reviewed and their data were statistically analyzed. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the odds ratio of peptic ulcer bleeding for each medication; immunosuppressive agents had an odds ratio of 5.83, which was larger than that for NSAIDs (4.77). The Wald test was applied to confirm the correlation between immunosuppressive agents and peptic ulcer bleeding. Furthermore, χ 2 tests were applied to the correlation between peptic ulcer bleeding and administration of PPIs or H2RAs. Immunosuppressive agents had the largest χ 2 , and the P-value was 0.03. Administration of PPIs was significantly correlated with non-peptic ulcer bleeding (P=0.02); furthermore, a tendency toward non-peptic ulcer bleeding with administration of H2RA was indicated, but it was not statistically significant (P=0.12). In conclusion, immunosuppressive agents were correlated with peptic ulcer bleeding and PPIs were effective at

  12. Nurses' attitudes towards pressure ulcer prevention in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Arzu; Yavuz van Giersbergen, Meryem

    2016-02-01

    Pressure ulcers remain a major problem in healthcare system. Pressure ulcer incidence is widely accepted as an indicator for the quality of care. Positive attitudes towards pressure ulcer prevention have positive impacts on preventive care. The aim of this study was to identify nurses' attitude towards pressure ulcer prevention. The study design was descriptive. The study was carried out in a university hospital in Izmir, Turkey. The study population consisted of 660 nurses who work in medical and surgical clinics and intensive care units. The study sample consisted of 426 nurses who agreed to participate. Attitude towards Pressure Ulcer Prevention Instrument was used in order to evaluate nurses' attitudes. Written permissions for ethical considerations and Attitude towards Pressure Ulcer Prevention Instrument permission were obtained. Data were collected between June and July 2014. The statistics program SPSS 18 packaged software was used in the analyses of data. The average age of the nurses who took part in the study was 31.86 ± 7.09 years and the average work experience was 8.88 ± 7.41 years; 36.9% (n: 157) were working in intensive care units. The nurses' average score on the Attitude towards Pressure Ulcer Prevention Instrument was 43.74 ± 4.29 (84.12%). It was seen that the attitudes of the nurses towards the prevention of pressure ulcers was positive. To read guidelines and training time about pressure ulcer prevention affect positively attitudes towards the prevention of pressure ulcers. Copyright © 2015 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Helicobacter pylori Eradication within 120 Days Is Associated with Decreased Complicated Recurrent Peptic Ulcers in Peptic Ulcer Bleeding Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shen Shong; Hu, Hsiao-Yun

    2015-05-23

    The connection between Helicobacter pylori and complicated peptic ulcer disease in peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) patients taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has not been established. In this study, we sought to determine whether delayed H. pylori eradication therapy in PUB patients increases complicated recurrent peptic ulcers. We identified inpatient PUB patients using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. We categorized patients into early (time lag ≤120 days after peptic ulcer diagnosis) and late H. pylori eradication therapy groups. The Cox proportional hazards model was used. The primary outcome was rehospitalization for patients with complicated recurrent peptic ulcers. Our data indicated that the late H. pylori eradication therapy group had a higher rate of complicated recurrent peptic ulcers (hazard ratio [HR], 1.52; p=0.006), with time lags of more than 120 days. However, our results indicated a similar risk of complicated recurrent peptic ulcers (HR, 1.20; p=0.275) in time lags of more than 1 year and (HR, 1.10; p=0.621) more than 2 years. H. pylori eradication within 120 days was associated with decreased complicated recurrent peptic ulcers in patients with PUB. We recommend that H. pylori eradication should be conducted within 120 days in patients with PUB.

  14. Ulcer-related problems and health care needs in patients with venous leg ulceration: a descriptive, cross-sectional study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, M.M.; Persoon, J.W.B.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Kooijmans-Otero, M.E.; Achterberg, T. van

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with leg ulceration often have long lasting and recurrent wounds. The treatment exists mainly of wound-care and compression therapy. International literature shows several indications of problems in relation to leg ulceration, but no studies were performed to give a

  15. The VCU Pressure Ulcer Summit-Developing Centers of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence: A Framework for Sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creehan, Sue; Cuddigan, Janet; Gonzales, Dana; Nix, Denise; Padula, William; Pittman, Joyce; Pontieri-Lewis, Vicky; Walden, Christine; Wells, Belinda; Wheeler, Robinetta

    2016-01-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure ulcer occurrences have declined over the past decade as reimbursement policies have changed, evidence-based practice guidelines have been implemented, and quality improvement initiatives have been launched. However, the 2006-2008 Institute for Healthcare Improvement goal of zero pressure ulcers remains difficult to achieve and even more challenging to sustain. Magnet hospitals tend to have lower hospital-acquired pressure ulcer rates than non-Magnet hospitals, yet many non-Magnet hospitals also have robust pressure ulcer prevention programs. Successful programs share commonalities in structure, processes, and outcomes. A national summit of 55 pressure ulcer experts was convened at the Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center in March 2014. The group was divided into 3 focus groups; each was assigned a task to develop a framework describing components of a proposed Magnet-designated Center of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence. Systematic literature reviews, analysis of exemplars, and nominal group process techniques were used to create the framework. This article presents a framework describing the proposed Magnet-designated Centers of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence. Critical attributes of Centers of Excellence are identified and organized according to the 4 domains of the ANCC model for the Magnet Recognition Program: transformational leadership; structural empowerment; exemplary professional practice; and new knowledge innovation and improvements. The structures, processes, and outcome measures necessary to become a proposed Center of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence are discussed.

  16. Treatment and prognosis in peptic ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg

    2014-01-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is a frequent cause of admission. Despite several advances in treatment the 30-day mortality seems unchanged at a level around 11%. Use of risk scoring systems is shown to be advantageous in the primary assessment of patients presenting with symptoms of peptic ulcer bleeding. Studies performed outside Denmark have demonstrated that use of risk scoring systems facilitates identification of low-risk patients suitable for outpatient management. Nevertheless, these systems have not been implemented for routine use in Denmark. This is mainly explained by concerns about the external validity due to considerable inter-country variation in patients' characteristics. In recent years, transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) has become increasingly used for achievement of hemostasis in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding not responding to endoscopic therapy. As rebleeding is associated with poor outcome TAE could, in theory, also be beneficial as a supplementary treatment in patients with ulcer bleeding responding to endoscopic therapy. This has not been examined previously. Several studies have concluded that peptic ulcer bleeding is associated with excess long-term mortality. These findings are, however, questioned as the studies were based on life-table analysis, unmatched control groups, or did not perform adequate adjustment for comorbidity. Treatment with blood transfusion is, among patients undergoing cardiac bypass surgery, shown to increase the long-term mortality. Despite frequent use of blood transfusion in treatment of peptic ulcer bleeding a possible adverse effect of on long-term survival has not been examined in these patients. The aims of the present thesis were: 1. To examine which risk scoring system is best at predicting need of hospital-based intervention, rebleeding, and mortality in patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (Study I) 2. To evaluate if supplementary transcatheter arterial embolization (STAE) after

  17. Management and treatment of distal ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Calafiore

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Ulcerative colitis (UC is a chronic inflammatory condition that is confined to the colonic mucosa. Its main symptoms include diarrhea, rectal bleeding and abdominal pain. Approximately two-thirds of UC patients have disease confined distal to the splenic flexure, which can be treated effectively with topical therapy. This means the active drug can be delivered directly to the site of inflammation, limiting the systemic absorption and potential side effects. Topical treatment with aminosalicylates is the most effective approach in the treatment of these forms, provided that the formulation reaches the upper margin of the disease. Given this, the suppository formulation is the treatment of choice for proctitis and distal sigmoiditis. Thanks to their proximal spread, enemas, foams and gels represent the treatment of choice for proctosigmoiditis and for distal ulcerative colitis. Oral aminosalicylates are less effective than topical therapies in patients with active disease, while the combination of topical and oral treatment is more effective in patients refractory to topical or oral mono-therapy. Topically administered aminosalicylates play an important role in the maintenance of remission, but the long-term adhesion to therapy is poor. For this reason, the oral formulation is the first-line therapy in the maintenance of remission. Refractory patients can be treated with topical steroids or systemic steroids and TNF-alpha inhibitors in severe forms.

  18. Repositioning for pressure ulcer prevention in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Brigid M; Chaboyer, Wendy P; McInnes, Elizabeth; Kent, Bridie; Whitty, Jennifer A; Thalib, Lukman

    2014-04-03

    A pressure ulcer (PU), also referred to as a 'pressure injury', 'pressure sore', or 'bedsore' is defined as an area of localised tissue damage that is caused by unrelieved pressure, friction or shearing forces on any part of the body. PUs commonly occur in patients who are elderly and less mobile, and carry significant human and economic impacts. Immobility and physical inactivity are considered to be major risk factors for PU development and the manual repositioning of patients in hospital or long-term care is a common pressure ulcer prevention strategy. The objectives of this review were to:1) assess the effects of repositioning on the prevention of PUs in adults, regardless of risk or in-patient setting;2) ascertain the most effective repositioning schedules for preventing PUs in adults; and3) ascertain the incremental resource consequences and costs associated with implementing different repositioning regimens compared with alternate schedules or standard practice. We searched the following electronic databases to identify reports of the relevant randomised controlled trials: the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 06 September 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2013, Issue 8); Ovid MEDLINE (1948 to August, Week 4, 2013); Ovid EMBASE (1974 to 2013, Week 35); EBESCO CINAHL (1982 to 30 August 2013); and the reference sections of studies that were included in the review. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), published or unpublished, that assessed the effects of any repositioning schedule or different patient positions and measured PU incidence in adults in any setting. Two review authors independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction. We included three RCTs and one economic study representing a total of 502 randomised participants from acute and long-term care settings. Two trials compared the 30º and 90º tilt positions using similar repositioning frequencies (there was a

  19. Cohort study of atypical pressure ulcers development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaul, Efraim

    2014-12-01

    Atypical pressure ulcers (APU) are distinguished from common pressure ulcers (PU) with both unusual location and different aetiology. The occurrence and attempts to characterise APU remain unrecognised. The purpose of this cohort study was to analyse the occurrence of atypical location and the circumstances of the causation, and draw attention to the prevention and treatment by a multidisciplinary team. The cohort study spanned three and a half years totalling 174 patients. The unit incorporates two weekly combined staff meetings. One concentrates on wound assessment with treatment decisions made by the physician and nurse, and the other, a multidisciplinary team reviewing all patients and coordinating treatment. The main finding of this study identified APU occurrence rate of 21% within acquired PU over a three and a half year period. Severe spasticity constituted the largest group in this study and the most difficult to cure wounds, located in medial aspects of knees, elbows and palms. Medical devices caused the second largest occurrence of atypical wounds, located in the nape of the neck, penis and nostrils. Bony deformities were the third recognisable atypical wound group located in shoulder blades and upper spine. These three categories are definable and time observable. APU are important to be recognisable, and can be healed as well as being prevented. The prominent role of the multidisciplinary team is primary in identification, prevention and treatment. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Golimumab for the treatment of ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Löwenberg M

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mark Löwenberg,1 Nanne KH de Boer,2 Frank Hoentjen3 1Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 2Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 3Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands Abstract: The introduction of therapeutic antibodies against tumor necrosis factor (TNF had a major impact on the treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC. Infliximab and adalimumab are powerful agents that are used for remission induction and maintenance therapy in UC and have an acceptable safety profile. However, a proportion of UC patients for whom therapy with anti-TNF agents is indicated fail or become intolerant to treatment with infliximab or adalimumab. Hence, there remains an unmet need for novel anti-TNF agents. Golimumab (Simponi®, a human anti-TNF antibody that is administered by monthly subcutaneous injections, is the most recently introduced TNF blocker for the treatment of UC. Here, we will discuss recent literature on clinical efficacy and safety of golimumab induction and maintenance treatment in patients with UC. Furthermore, we will discuss the positioning of golimumab for UC in current treatment algorithms. Keywords: ulcerative colitis, UC, antitumor necrosis factor, TNF, antibodies, golimumab

  1. Prebiotics and synbiotics in ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurell, Axel; Sjöberg, Klas

    2017-04-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the colon with unclear pathogenesis. A dysbiotic intestinal microbiota is regarded as a key component in the disease process and there has been significant interest in developing new treatments which target the microbiota. To give an overview of the studies to date investigating prebiotics and synbiotics for the treatment of UC. A literature search of PubMed and related search engines was carried out using the terms "ulcerative colitis" in combination with "prebiotic", "synbiotic" or "dietary fibre". In total 17 studies on humans examining the effect of prebiotics in UC were found. Five major groups could be distinguished. Fructo-oligosaccharides were tried in six studies (mean 35 patients included, range 9-121). One study found a clinical response while two demonstrated indirect evidence of an effect. Germinated barley foodstuff was used in 8 studies (mean 38 patients, range 10-63). One study found an endoscopic response, while four noted a clinical response and two some indirect effects. Galacto-oligosaccharides, lactulose and resveratrol were used in one study each (mean 48 patients, range 41-52). One study found an endoscopic response and one a clinical response. There is yet inadequate evidence - especially in humans - to support any particular prebiotic in the clinical management of UC. However, due to the bulk of evidence supporting the effect of the microbiota on colonic inflammation, there is enough potential to justify further high-quality clinical trials investigating this subject.

  2. Radiologic changes of ulcerated foot in leprosy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jung Hyun; Ahn, Eun Joo; Chung, Eun Chul; Rhee, Chung Sik [Ewha Woman' s University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sung Jun [Institute for Leprosy Research, KLCA, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-12-15

    There are radiologically characteristic bone changes on the foot and tarsus in leprosy. The bone changes are primarily due to Mycobacterium leprae infection and secondarily to the injurious effect, such as trauma, and infection on the denervated tissue. 117 bone changes of 100 leprosy patients with plantar ulcerations from Jan. 1984 to Oct. 1989 in the Korean Leprosy Control Center were analyzed. Male to female ratio was about 2 : 1 and the most prevalent age was 41 to 60 years, and according to Ridley-Jopling's classification. L-type was most common (46%). One hundred and eleven cases (94.9%) showed bone changes, suggesting high incidence of bone changes in patients with plantar ulcers. Specific findings were observed in two cases(1.7%). One hundred and nine cases showed nonspecific bone changes, which were osteomyelitis(23.1%), neurotrophic changes(39.3%), periostitis(5.1%) and arthritis(12.8%). Extensive bone involvement was seen in neurotrophic changes involving forefoot and metatarsal in 22 of 46 cases, and in secondary changes involving metatarsal bone in 23, tarsus in 20 of 49 cases.

  3. Adjuvant Biological Therapies in Chronic Leg Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Burgos-Alonso

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Current biological treatments for non-healing wounds aim to address the common deviations in healing mechanisms, mainly inflammation, inadequate angiogenesis and reduced synthesis of extracellular matrix. In this context, regenerative medicine strategies, i.e., platelet rich plasmas and mesenchymal stromal cell products, may form part of adjuvant interventions in an integral patient management. We synthesized the clinical experience on ulcer management using these two categories of biological adjuvants. The results of ten controlled trials that are included in this systematic review favor the use of mesenchymal stromal cell based-adjuvants for impaired wound healing, but the number and quality of studies is moderate-low and are complicated by the diversity of biological products. Regarding platelet-derived products, 18 controlled studies investigated their efficacy in chronic wounds in the lower limb, but the heterogeneity of products and protocols hinders clinically meaningful quantitative synthesis. Most patients were diabetic, emphasizing an unmet medical need in this condition. Overall, there is not sufficient evidence to inform routine care, and further clinical research is necessary to realize the full potential of adjuvant regenerative medicine strategies in the management of chronic leg ulcers.

  4. Assessment of ulceration risk in diabetic individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Marina Alfonso Dutra

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To identify the risk factors for foot ulceration through the tracing of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and peripheral arterial disease in individuals with type I and II diabetes, who were assisted in reference centers of the Federal District, Brazil. Method: a cross-sectional and analytical study, with the assessment of 117 individuals in outpatient clinics of the Federal District. Continuous variables were compared through Mann-Whitney test, and categorized variables, through Chi-square test for univariate analysis and Logistics regression test for multivariate analysis. Results: painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy was present in 37 (75.5% of the individuals with neuropathy. Deformities and loss of protective plant sensibility were related to neuropathy (p=0.014 and p=0.001, respectively. Of the 40 (34.2% individuals in the sample who presented peripheral arterial disease, 26 (65% presented calcification risk. Conclusion: signs of painful peripheral polyneuropathy, peripheral arterial disease, deformities, loss of protective plantar sensibility, and dry skin were identified as risk factors for ulceration.

  5. Radiologic changes of ulcerated foot in leprosy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Jung Hyun; Ahn, Eun Joo; Chung, Eun Chul; Rhee, Chung Sik; Choi, Sung Jun

    1990-01-01

    There are radiologically characteristic bone changes on the foot and tarsus in leprosy. The bone changes are primarily due to Mycobacterium leprae infection and secondarily to the injurious effect, such as trauma, and infection on the denervated tissue. 117 bone changes of 100 leprosy patients with plantar ulcerations from Jan. 1984 to Oct. 1989 in the Korean Leprosy Control Center were analyzed. Male to female ratio was about 2 : 1 and the most prevalent age was 41 to 60 years, and according to Ridley-Jopling's classification. L-type was most common (46%). One hundred and eleven cases (94.9%) showed bone changes, suggesting high incidence of bone changes in patients with plantar ulcers. Specific findings were observed in two cases(1.7%). One hundred and nine cases showed nonspecific bone changes, which were osteomyelitis(23.1%), neurotrophic changes(39.3%), periostitis(5.1%) and arthritis(12.8%). Extensive bone involvement was seen in neurotrophic changes involving forefoot and metatarsal in 22 of 46 cases, and in secondary changes involving metatarsal bone in 23, tarsus in 20 of 49 cases

  6. Management of ulcerative colitis: a clinical update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Vieira Teixeira

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the consensus of expert societies and published guidelines on the management of ulcerative colitis, and to compare with the experience of the authors, in order to standardize procedures that would help the reasoning and decision-making process of the physician. A search was performed in scientific literature, specifically in electronic databases: Medline/Pubmed, SciELO, EMBASE and Cochrane, and the following descriptors were used: ulcerative colitis, acute colitis, clinical treatment, surgery and randomized trial. It can be concluded that the goals of therapy in ulcerative colitis are clinical and endoscopic remission, deep, sustained remission without corticosteroids, prevention of hospitalizations and surgeries, and improved quality of life. The surgical indications are reserved for selected cases, ranging from medical intractability, complications (severe refractory acute colitis, toxic megacolon, perforation and hemorrhage and malignancy. Information in this review article must be submitted to evaluation and criticism of the specialist responsible for the conduct to be followed, in the face of his/her reality and the clinical status of each patient.The degree of recommendation and strength of evidence were based using the GRADE system (The Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation described below:1. A: Experimental or observational studies of higher consistency.2. B: Experimental or observational studies of lower consistency.3. C: Case reports (non-controlled studies.4. D: Opinion without critical evaluation, based on consensus, physiological studies or animal models. Resumo: O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar os consensos de sociedades de especialistas e guidelines publicados sobre o manejo da retocolite ulcerativa, e confrontar com a experiência dos autores, a fim de padronizar condutas que auxiliem o raciocínio e a tomada de decisão do médico. Foi realizada busca

  7. Differentiation of benign and malignant ulcers of the stomach on computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Im Jeong; Kim, Suk; Lee, Jun Woo; Jeong, Yeon Joo; Choo, Ki Seok; Lee, Suk Hong; Kim, Gwang Ha; Kim, Tae Oh; Jo, Hong Jae [Pusan National University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-10-15

    We wanted to determine the multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) findings for differentiating benign ulcers from malignant ones. 18 clinicopathologically proven benign ulcers that had been detected by both endoscopy and MDCT were the focus of this study. 26 ulcerative advanced gastric cancers and 26 early gastric cancers with ulceration, all of which had been surgically proven, were selected as a control group. Five of the 26 early gastric cancers that were confined to the mucosa and that were not detected on CT were excluded in this study. The following CT findings were reviewed by two radiologists; ulcer size, the degree of enhancement and the thickness of inner enhancing layer in the ulcer base, the total thickness and the enhancing inner layer thickness in the largest part of the thickened ulcer mound, the presence of ulcer that projected beyond the healthy lumen, and the presence of perigastric fat infiltration and perigastric lymphadenopathy. An indiscernible thin-walled ulcer base (less than 1.5 mm) and suboptimal enhancement of the ulcer base for the discrimination of benign gastric ulcers from the malignant gastric ulcers showed sensitivities of 100% (18/18) and 78% (14/18), respectively, with specificities of 98% (46/47) and 92% (43/47), respectively. Ulcer projection was more significantly present in benign ulcer (13/18, 72%) than in the malignant gastric ulcers (7/47, 15%). The enhancing inner layer thickness in the ulcer mound was significantly greater in the AGC (mean; 7.4 mm) than in the benign gastric ulcers (mean, 2.2 mm). There were insignificant differences for ulcer size, total thickness of the ulcer mound, the perigastric fat infiltration and perigastric lymphadenopathy between the benign and malignant gastric ulcers. MDCT is an additional helpful diagnostic tool when benign gastric ulcers are histologically difficult to distinguish from malignant gastric ones.

  8. Differentiation of benign and malignant ulcers of the stomach on computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Im Jeong; Kim, Suk; Lee, Jun Woo; Jeong, Yeon Joo; Choo, Ki Seok; Lee, Suk Hong; Kim, Gwang Ha; Kim, Tae Oh; Jo, Hong Jae

    2006-01-01

    We wanted to determine the multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) findings for differentiating benign ulcers from malignant ones. 18 clinicopathologically proven benign ulcers that had been detected by both endoscopy and MDCT were the focus of this study. 26 ulcerative advanced gastric cancers and 26 early gastric cancers with ulceration, all of which had been surgically proven, were selected as a control group. Five of the 26 early gastric cancers that were confined to the mucosa and that were not detected on CT were excluded in this study. The following CT findings were reviewed by two radiologists; ulcer size, the degree of enhancement and the thickness of inner enhancing layer in the ulcer base, the total thickness and the enhancing inner layer thickness in the largest part of the thickened ulcer mound, the presence of ulcer that projected beyond the healthy lumen, and the presence of perigastric fat infiltration and perigastric lymphadenopathy. An indiscernible thin-walled ulcer base (less than 1.5 mm) and suboptimal enhancement of the ulcer base for the discrimination of benign gastric ulcers from the malignant gastric ulcers showed sensitivities of 100% (18/18) and 78% (14/18), respectively, with specificities of 98% (46/47) and 92% (43/47), respectively. Ulcer projection was more significantly present in benign ulcer (13/18, 72%) than in the malignant gastric ulcers (7/47, 15%). The enhancing inner layer thickness in the ulcer mound was significantly greater in the AGC (mean; 7.4 mm) than in the benign gastric ulcers (mean, 2.2 mm). There were insignificant differences for ulcer size, total thickness of the ulcer mound, the perigastric fat infiltration and perigastric lymphadenopathy between the benign and malignant gastric ulcers. MDCT is an additional helpful diagnostic tool when benign gastric ulcers are histologically difficult to distinguish from malignant gastric ones

  9. Sole ulcers in dairy-cattle - associations with season, cow characteristics, disease, and production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Carsten; Grohn, Y T; Thysen, Iver

    1991-01-01

    lactation and body weight were positively associated with sole ulcer. Heel erosion was associated with sole ulcer depending on season of trimming and parity. Presence of sole ulcer but not heel erosion in a lactation increased the risk of sole ulcer in the subsequent lactation. The interval between...

  10. Gastroprotective and ulcer healing effects of Piptadeniastrum Africanum on experimentally induced gastric ulcers in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateufack, Gilbert; Domgnim Mokam, Elisabeth Carol; Mbiantcha, Marius; Dongmo Feudjio, Rostand Breuil; David, Nana; Kamanyi, Albert

    2015-07-08

    Gastric peptic ulcer is one of the common disorders of gastrointestinal tract, which occur due to an imbalance between the offensive and defensive factors. It is an illness that affects a considerable number of people worldwide. This study was conducted to evaluate the antiulcerogenic and antiulcer effects and recognize the basic mechanism of action of Piptadeniastrum africanum stem bark extracts. The aqueous and methanol extracts of Piptadeniastrum africanum were administered at the doses 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg to evaluate their effects on gastric ulcer induced by the HCl/ethanol mixture, indomethacin and acetic acid in Wistar strain male adult rats, aged between 12 and 16 weeks and weighing between 180 and 220 g. Ranitidine, Maalox and Misoprostol were used as standard drugs. Histopathological examination and nitric oxide level were performed to evaluate the basic mechanism of action of Piptadeniastrum africanum. Phytochemical screening was carried out to identify known phytochemicals present in these extracts. The aqueous and methanol extracts of stem bark of Piptadeniastrum africanum significantly inhibited (p ulceration induced by HCl/ethanol to the percentages of inhibition of 81.38; 98.75 and 100 % for the aqueous extract and then 75.83, 89.76 and 96.52 % for the methanol extract, and with the Indomethacin-induced ulcers, aqueous and methanol extracts of bark of Piptadeniastrum africanum reduce significantly (p cure 35.75; 52.33 and 98.58 % for the aqueous extract, and 33.7; 51.97; and 65.93 to the methanol extract. The results revealed a significant reduction of ulcerated surface in both extracts and increase of nitric oxide (NO) level with methanol extract. When compared to methanol extract, aqueous extract showed more pronounced effects, corresponding to percentages of healing of 59. 92; 84.12 and 59.65 % for the aqueous extract; and 70.43; 55.49 and 57.59 % for the methanol extract in the ulcer induced by acetic acid, all at the respective doses of

  11. Update on the surgical management of ulcerative colitis and ulcerative proctitis: current controversies and problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, P M; Pemberton, J H

    1995-01-01

    : The surgical management of ulcerative colitis has been revolutionized in recent years by the development of the ileal pouch-anal procedure. Although it is now the operation of choice for most patients, there remain several controversies. A variety of designs of ileal pouch are available each with advantages and disadvantages. The technique used to anastomose the pouch to the anal canal is also open to debate with some surgeons favoring distal mucosectomy with eradication of all disease and others choosing to perform a stapled anastomosis to achieve better functional results. The main concern for gastroenterologists, however, is the risk of development of pouchitis. The etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of this condition will also be discussed in this review as well as the more classical options for the surgical treatment of ulcerative colitis.

  12. The cost of pressure ulcers in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dealey, C; Posnett, J; Walker, A

    2012-06-01

    To provide an estimate of the costs of treating pressure ulcers in the UK at August 2011 prices, as a means of highlighting the importance of pressure ulcer prevention. Resource use was derived from a bottom-up methodology, based on the daily resources required to deliver protocols of care reflecting good clinical practice, with prices reflecting costs to the health and social care system in the UK. This approach was used to estimate treatment costs per episode of care and per patient for ulcers of different severity and level of complications. The cost of treating a pressure ulcer varies from £1,214 (category 1) to £14,108 (category IV). Costs increase with ulcer severity because the time to heal is longer and the incidence of complications is higher in more severe cases. Pressure ulcers represent a significant cost burden in the UK, both to patients and to health-care providers. Without concerted effort, this cost is likely to increase in the future as the population ages. The estimates reported here provide a basis for assessment of the cost-effectiveness of measures to reduce the incidence of hospital-acquired ulcers. Heron Evidence Development Ltd. was funded for this work by Mölnlycke Health Care (UK). The authors have no other conflicts of interest to declare.

  13. The cost of pressure ulcers in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Gerry; Dealey, Carol; Posnett, John

    2004-05-01

    To estimate the annual cost of treating pressure ulcers in the UK. Costs were derived from a bottom-up methodology, based on the daily resources required to deliver protocols of care reflecting good clinical practice. Health and social care system in the UK. Patients developing a pressure ulcer. A bottom-up costing approach is used to estimate treatment cost per episode of care and per patient for ulcers of different grades and level of complications. Also, total treatment cost to the health and social care system in the UK. The cost of treating a pressure ulcer varies from pound 1,064 (Grade 1) to pound 10,551 (Grade 4). Costs increase with ulcer grade because the time to heal is longer and because the incidence of complications is higher in more severe cases. The total cost in the UK is pound 1.4- pound 2.1 billion annually (4% of total NHS expenditure). Most of this cost is nurse time. Pressure ulcers represent a very significant cost burden in the UK. Without concerted effort this cost is likely to increase in the future as the population ages. To the extent that pressure ulcers are avoidable, pressure damage may be indicative of clinical negligence and there is evidence that litigation could soon become a significant threat to healthcare providers in the UK, as it is in the USA.

  14. Evaluation of treatment with carboxymethylcellulose on chronic venous ulcers*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januário, Virginia; de Ávila, Dione Augusto; Penetra, Maria Alice; Sampaio, Ana Luisa Bittencourt; Noronha Neta, Maria Isabel; Cassia, Flavia de Freire; Carneiro, Sueli

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Among the chronic leg ulcers, venous ulcers are the most common and constitute a major burden to public health. Despite all technology available, some patients do not respond to established treatments. In our study, carboxymethylcellulose was tested in the treatment of refractory chronic venous ulcers. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of carboxymethylcellulose 20% on the healing of chronic venous ulcers refractory to conventional treatments. METHODS: This is an analytical, pre-experimental study. Thirty patients were included with refractory venous ulcers, and applied dressings with carboxymethylcellulose 20% for 20 weeks. The analysis was based on measurement of the area of ulcers, performed at the first visit and after the end of the treatment. RESULTS: There was a reduction of 3.9 cm2 of lesion area (p=0.0001), corresponding to 38.8% (p=0.0001). There was no interruption of treatment and no increase in lesion area in any patient. CONCLUSIONS: Carboxymethylcellulose 20% represents a low cost and effective therapeutic alternative for the treatment of refractory chronic venous ulcers. However, controlled studies are necessary to prove its efficacy. PMID:26982773

  15. Percutaneous drainage in conservative therapy for perforated gastroduodenal ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oida, Takatsugu; Kano, Hisao; Mimatsu, Kenji; Kawasaki, Atsushi; Kuboi, Youichi; Fukino, Nobutada; Kida, Kazutoshi; Amano, Sadao

    2012-01-01

    The management of peptic ulcers has dramatically changed and the incidence of elective surgery for gastroduodenal peptic ulcers has markedly decreased; hence, the incidence of emergency surgery for perforated peptic ulcers has slightly increased. In select cases, conservative therapy can be used as an alternative for treating perforated gastroduodenal ulcers. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of percutaneous abdominal drainage for the conservative treatment of perforated gastroduodenal ulcers. We retrospectively studied 51 patients who had undergone conservative therapy for perforated gastroduodenal ulcers. These patients were divided into 2 groups on the basis of the initial treatment with conservative therapy with or without percutaneous drainage: group PD included patients who had undergone percutaneous drainage and group NPD, patients who had undergone non-percutaneous drainage. In the PD group, 14.3% (n=3) of the patients did not respond to conservative therapy, while this value was 43.3% (n=13) in the NPD group. The 2 groups differed significantly with respect to conversion from conservative therapy to surgery (pperforated gastroduodenal ulcers should be performed only in the case of patients meeting the required criteria; its combination with percutaneous intraperitoneal drainage is effective as initial conservative therapy.

  16. Importance of nutrition in preventing and treating pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Carolyn

    2017-06-30

    Pressure ulcers are painful, and affect patients' health, mobility and well-being. They also cost the NHS between £1.4-2.1 billion a year. Although a large proportion of pressure ulcers are avoidable, many still occur and, because pressure ulcer incidence is an indicator of care quality, it can put carers under scrutiny. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence states that adequate risk assessment of pressure ulcer development, including the role of malnutrition, improves care. Adequate nutrition is vital for the prevention of pressure ulcers and malnutrition can hinder healing when pressure ulcers have developed. The risk of malnutrition should be assessed with a recognised tool, such as the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool, and appropriate treatment plans should be drawn up for patients identified as being at risk of malnutrition to improve their nutritional state. For example, the dietary intake of people with poor appetite can be supplemented with nutritious snacks between meals. The aims of this article are to help readers understand risk factors for malnutrition and how dietary intake can be manipulated to improve patients' nutritional state. It also aims to highlight how improving nutritional intake helps to prevent pressure ulcers. On completing the article, readers will be able to consider and review their own practice.

  17. Factors Associated With Pressure Ulcers in Individuals With Spina Bifida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunkyung; Ward, Elisabeth; Dicianno, Brad E.; Clayton, Gerald H.; Sawin, Kathleen J.; Beierwaltes, Patricia; Thibadeau, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe factors associated with pressure ulcers in individuals with spina bifida (SB) enrolled in the National Spina Bifida Patient Registry (NSBPR). Design Unbalanced longitudinal multicenter cohort study. Setting Nineteen SB clinics. Participants Individuals with SB (N=3153) enrolled in 19 clinic sites that participate in the NSBPR. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Pressure ulcer status (yes/no) at the annual visit between 2009 and 2012. Results Of 3153 total participants, 19% (n=603) reported ulcers at their most recent annual clinic visit. Seven factors–level of lesion, wheelchair use, urinary incontinence, shunt presence, above the knee orthopedic surgery, recent surgery, and male sex–were significantly associated with the presence of pressure ulcers. Of these factors, level of lesion, urinary incontinence, recent surgery, and male sex were included in the final logistic regression model. The 3 adjusting variables–SB type, SB clinic, and age group–were significant in all analyses (all Ppressure ulcers. Identifying key factors associated with the onset of pressure ulcers can be incorporated into clinical practice in ways that prevent and enhance treatment of pressure ulcers in the population with SB. PMID:25796136

  18. The role of blood flow in chronic duodenal ulcer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gompertz, R.H.K.; Mathie, R.T.; Michalowski, A.S.; Spencer, J.; Baron, J.H.; Williamson, R.C.N.

    1996-01-01

    Changes in gastroduodenal blood flow have been implicated in the pathogenesis of duodenal ulcer. The authors have studied duodenal blood flow during the development of an acute to chronic duodenal ulcer by using the abscopal model, in which ulcers are generated as an indirect effect of lower mediastinal irradiation. Female CFLP mice were randomly allocated to one of three groups. Irradiated ``controls`` received 18 Gy 250 kV X-rays to the upper mediastinum. The lower mediastinum group received the same dose of irradiation, which has been shown to induce typical chronic duodenal ulcers in 45% of animals so treated. Animals were studied by means of radiolabelled microspheres 3 or 7 days later. Proximal duodenal blood flow specifically was reduced by 32% in the lower mediastinum group compared with irradiated controls at 7 days. There was no significant difference in blood flow to the stomach and to the distal duodenum. The decrease in proximal duodenal blood flow in the lower mediastinum group did not differ in the five animals that developed ulcer compared with the seven that did not. Although, there is an overall decrease in duodenal blood flow associated with chronic duodenal ulcer, reduced blood flow may not explain individual susceptibility to ulceration. 21 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  19. Nurses' attitude and perceived barriers to pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etafa, Werku; Argaw, Zeleke; Gemechu, Endalew; Melese, Belachew

    2018-01-01

    The presence or absence of pressure ulcers has been generally regarded as a performance measure of quality nursing care and overall patient health. The aim of this study- wasto explorenurses' attitude about pressure ulcer prevention'and to identify staff nurses' perceived barriers to pressure ulcer prevention public hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A self-reported multi-center institutional based cross sectional study design was employed to collect data from staff nurses ( N  = 222) working in six (6) selected public hospitals in Addis Ababa, from April 01-28/2015. Majority of the nurses had ( n  = 116, 52.2%) negative attitude towards pressure ulcer prevention. The mean scores of the test for all participants was 3.09out of 11(SD =0.92, range = 1-5). Similarly, the study revealed several barriers need to be resolved to put in to practice the strategies of pressure ulcer prevention; Heavy workload and inadequate staff (lack of tie) (83.1%), shortage of resources/equipment (67.7%) and inadequate training (63.2%) were among the major barriers identified in the study. The study finding suggests that Addis Ababa nurses have negative attitude to pressure ulcer prevention. Also several barriers exist for implementing pressure ulcer prevention protocols in public hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Suggestion for improving this situation is attractive.

  20. Neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers – evidence-to-practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndip A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Agbor Ndip1–3, Leonard Ebah3,4, Aloysius Mbako51Department of Diabetes and Medicine, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Central Manchester Foundation Trust, UK; 2Department of Medicine, Royal Bolton Hospital, Bolton, UK; 3Cardiovascular Research Group, School of Biomedicine, University of Manchester, UK; 4Department of Renal Medicine, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Central Manchester Foundation Trust, UK; 5Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Wrexham Maelor Hospital, Wales, UKAbstract: Foot ulcers and their attendant complications are disquietingly high in people with diabetes, a majority of whom have underlying neuropathy. This review examines the evidence base underpinning the prevention and management of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers in order to inform best clinical practice. Since it may be impractical to ask patients not to weight-bear at all, relief of pressure through the use of offloading casting devices remains the mainstay for management of neuropathic ulcers, whilst provision of appropriate footwear is essential in ulcer prevention. Simple non-surgical debridement and application of hydrogels are both effective in preparing the wound bed for healthy granulation and therefore enhancing healing. Initial empirical antibiotic therapy for infected ulcers should cover the most common bacterial flora. There is limited evidence supporting the use of adjunctive therapies such as hyperbaric oxygen and cytokines or growth factors. In selected cases, recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor has been shown to enhance healing; however, its widespread use cannot be advised due to the availability of more cost-effective approaches. While patient education may be beneficial, the evidence base remains thin and conflicting. In conclusion, best management of foot ulcers is achieved by what is taken out of the foot (pressure, callus, infection, and slough rather than what is put on the foot (adjuvant treatment.Keywords: diabetic foot ulcers, neuropathic

  1. Optimal management of peptic ulcer disease in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilotto, Alberto; Franceschi, Marilisa; Maggi, Stefania; Addante, Filomena; Sancarlo, Daniele

    2010-07-01

    Recent data report that the incidence of peptic ulcer is decreasing in the general population; conversely, the rates of gastric and duodenal ulcer hospitalization and mortality remain very high in older patients. Two major factors that might explain this epidemiological feature in the elderly population are the high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and the increasing prescriptions of gastroduodenal damaging drugs, including NSAIDs and/or aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid). The main goals for treating peptic ulcer disease in old age are to reduce recurrence of the disease and to prevent complications, especially bleeding and perforation. The available treatments for peptic ulcer are essentially based on gastric acid suppression with antisecretory drugs and the eradication of H. pylori infection. The aim of this article is to report the available data on clinical efficacy and tolerability of peptic ulcer treatments in elderly patients and provide recommendations for their optimal use in this special population. Proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-based triple therapies for 7 days are highly effective for the cure of H. pylori-positive peptic ulcers as well as for reducing ulcer recurrence. Antisecretory drugs are also the treatment of choice for NSAID- or aspirin-related peptic ulcers and are useful as preventive therapy in chronic users of NSAIDs and low-dose aspirin as antiplatelet therapy. Antisecretory PPI therapy has a favourable tolerability profile in geriatric patients; however, monitoring is suggested in older patients with frequent pulmonary infections, gastrointestinal malabsorption, unexplained chronic diarrhoea, osteoporosis or those taking concomitant cytochrome P450 2C19-metabolized medications. The overall approach to the geriatric patient should include a comprehensive geriatric assessment that ensures multidimensional evaluation of the patient in order to better define the clinical risk of adverse outcomes in the older patient with peptic ulcer and

  2. Role of dietary polyphenols in the management of peptic ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Rahimi, Roja

    2015-06-07

    Peptic ulcer disease is a multifactorial and complex disease involving gastric and duodenal ulcers. Despite medical advances, the management of peptic ulcer and its complications remains a challenge, with high morbidity and death rates for the disease. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that, among a broad reach of natural molecules, dietary polyphenols with multiple biological mechanisms of action play a pivotal part in the management of gastric and duodenal ulcers. The current review confirmed that dietary polyphenols possess protective and therapeutic potential in peptic ulcer mediated by: improving cytoprotection, re-epithelialization, neovascularization, and angiogenesis; up-regulating tissue growth factors and prostaglandins; down-regulating anti-angiogenic factors; enhancing endothelial nitric oxide synthase-derived NO; suppressing oxidative mucosal damage; amplifying antioxidant performance, antacid, and anti-secretory activity; increasing endogenous mucosal defensive agents; and blocking Helicobacter pylori colonization associated gastric morphological changes and gastroduodenal inflammation and ulceration. In addition, anti-inflammatory activity due to down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and cellular and intercellular adhesion agents, suppressing leukocyte-endothelium interaction, inhibiting nuclear signaling pathways of inflammatory process, and modulating intracellular transduction and transcription pathways have key roles in the anti-ulcer action of dietary polyphenols. In conclusion, administration of a significant amount of dietary polyphenols in the human diet or as part of dietary supplementation along with conventional treatment can result in perfect security and treatment of peptic ulcer. Further well-designed preclinical and clinical tests are recommended in order to recognize higher levels of evidence for the confirmation of bioefficacy and safety of dietary polyphenols in the management of peptic ulcer.

  3. The Impacts of Peptic Ulcer on Stroke Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zongliang; Wang, Ling; Lin, Ying; Wang, Zhaojun; Zhang, Yun; Li, Junrong; Li, Shenghua; Ye, Zusen; Yuan, Kunxiong; Shan, Wanying; Liu, Xinfeng; Fan, Xinying; Xu, Gelin

    2018-04-10

    Peptic ulcer has been associated with an increased risk of stroke. This study aimed to evaluate the impacts of peptic ulcer on stroke recurrence and mortality. Patients with first-ever ischemic stroke were retrospectively confirmed with or without a history of peptic ulcer. The primary end point was defined as fatal and nonfatal stroke recurrence. Risks of 1-year fatal and nonfatal stroke recurrence were analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method. Predictors of fatal and nonfatal stroke recurrence were evaluated with the Cox proportional hazards model. Among the 2577 enrolled patients with ischemic stroke, 129 (5.0%) had a history of peptic ulcer. The fatal and nonfatal stroke recurrence within 1 year of the index stroke was higher in patients with peptic ulcer than in patients without peptic ulcer (12.4% versus 7.2%, P = .030). Cox proportional hazards model detected that age (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.018, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.005-1.031, P = .008), hypertension (HR = 1.397, 95% CI 1.017-1.918, P = .039), and history of peptic ulcer (HR = 1.853, 95% CI 1.111-3.091, P = .018) were associated with stroke recurrence. Ischemic stroke patients with peptic ulcer may have an increased risk of stroke recurrence. The results emphasize the importance of appropriate prevention and management of peptic ulcer for secondary stroke prevention. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Selective plantar fascia release for nonhealing diabetic plantar ulcerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J Young; Hwang, Seungkeun; Lee, Yoonjung

    2012-07-18

    Achilles tendon lengthening can decrease plantar pressures, leading to resolution of forefoot ulceration in patients with diabetes mellitus. However, this procedure has been reported to have a complication rate of 10% to 30% and can require a long period of postoperative immobilization. We have developed a new technique, selective plantar fascia release, as an alternative to Achilles tendon lengthening for managing these forefoot ulcers. We evaluated sixty patients with diabetes for a mean of 23.5 months after selective plantar fascia release for the treatment of nonhealing diabetic neuropathic ulcers in the forefoot. Preoperative and postoperative dorsiflexion range of motion of the affected metatarsophalangeal joint and wound-healing data were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the procedure and to determine the relationship between plantar fascia release and ulcer healing. Complications were recorded. Thirty-six (56%) of the ulcers healed within six weeks, including twenty-nine (60%) of the plantar toe ulcers and seven (44%) of the metatarsophalangeal joint ulcers. The mean range of motion of the affected metatarsophalangeal joint increased from 15.3° ± 7.8° to 30.6° ± 14.1° postoperatively (p plantar fascia release. Our results suggest that selective plantar fascia release can lead to healing of neuropathic plantar forefoot ulcers in diabetic patients. Ulcers in patients in whom the preoperative dorsiflexion angle of the affected metatarsophalangeal joint is between 5° and 30° and in whom the increase in range of motion is ≥13° postoperatively have the greatest chance of being cured. Therapeutic level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of the levels of evidence.

  5. Gastric ulcer localization: Potential use of in vivo labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pera, A.; Rose, H.; Seavers, R.; Bekerman, C.; Pinsky, S.

    1984-01-01

    A previous work suggests that sucralfate labeled by binding to Tc-99m HSA permits the visualization of gastric ulcers. Potential problems with this technique are: 1) decreased binding of sucralfate to ulcer sites due to the labeling method of binding to exogenous protein (HSA); 2) overlying activity that may obscure identification of the ulcer. Because of these problems we have examined the possibility of direct in vivo Tc-99m labeling of sucralfate after it has already bound to the ulcer. In vitro studies were done to determine the binding of Tc-99m pertechnetate to sucralfate in the presence of tin in HCl solution at pHs comparable to those found in the stomach. Rapid and efficient labeling was achieved with 75-95% of the label bound to sucralfate at 30 minutes. In vivo studies were performed in rabbits with aspirin induced ulcers and in ulcer free human volunteers. The animal studies confirm that orally administered Tc-99m pertechnetate will bind to previously ingested sucralfate and that the labeled material will bind to the ulcers. Tc-99m pertechnetate was also shown to bind well to previously ingested sucralfate in humans. The results suggest that it is possible to label sucralfate in vivo. This method would offer the following advantages: 1) a simpler labeling procedure; 2) the potential of increased sensitivity by delaying the labeling until much of the sucralfate not bound to ulcer has passed, and thus decreasing the activity that remains in the stomach; and also by leaving the protein binding sites of the sucralfate free to interact with the ulcer since no exogenous protein is involved in labeling

  6. Nicorandil, Gastrointestinal Adverse Drug Reactions and Ulcerations: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, Umberto; Deosaran, Jordanna; Leslie, Stephen J; Rushworth, Gordon F; Stewart, Derek; Ford, Ian; Watson, Angus J M

    2016-03-01

    Nicorandil is a popular anti-anginal drug in Europe and Japan. Apart from some common adverse drug reactions (ADR), its safety is satisfactory. Several reports have suggested a link between nicorandil, gastrointestinal (GI) ulceration and fistulas. The review aims to critically appraise, synthesize and present the available evidence of all known GI ADR per anatomical location. The study complied with the PRISMA statement. Literature and pharmacovigilance databases were used to provide rate and/or calculate parameters (median age, median dose, history of symptoms, length of therapy and healing time after withdrawal of the drug). Differences in distribution of quantitative variables were analyzed via Mann-Whitney test. Correlation between quantitative variables was assessed with a Spearman's correlation coefficient. A p value <0.05 was significant. Oral ulcerations occur in 0.2% of the subjects, anal ulcerations are present between 0.07% and 0.37% of patients. Oral and distal GI involvements are the most common ADR (28-29% and 27-31% of all GI ADR, respectively). The hepatobiliary system, the pancreas and salivary glands are not affected by nicorandil exposure. The time to develop oral ulcerations is 74 weeks among people on <30 mg/day compared to only 7.5 weeks in individuals on higher regimens (p = 0.47). There is a significant correlation between dose and ulcer healing time (Spearman's 0.525, p < 0.001). Ulcerative disease is a very commonly reported GI ADR. A delayed ulcerative tendency supports the hypothesis of an ulcerogenic metabolite. Nicorandil seems to act as a cause of the ulcerations, but appears to also work in synergy with other promoting factors. Whether the action of the metabolites relies on a specific mechanism or a simple chemical ulceration is still to be established.

  7. The effects of polarized light therapy in pressure ulcer healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurović Aleksandar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Neglecting polarized light as an adjuvant therapy for pressure ulcers and methodology distinctions in the trials engaging polarized light are the reasons for many dilemmas and contradictions. The aim of this study was to establish the effects of polarized light therapy in pressure ulcer healing. Methods. This prospective randomized single-blind study involved 40 patients with stage I-III of pressure ulcer. The patients in the experimental group (E were subjected, besides polarized light therapy, to standard wound cleaning and dressing. Standard wound cleaning and dressing were the only treatment used in the control group (C. A polarized light source was a Bioptron lamp. Polarized light therapy was applied for six min daily, five times a week, four weeks. The Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH was used in the assessment of outcome. Statistic analysis included Mann Whitney Test, Fisher Exact Test, Wilcoxon Signed Rank test. Results. There were significant differences between the groups at the end of the treatment regarding the surface of pressure ulcer (E: 10.80±19.18; C: 22,97±25,47; p = 0.0005, rank of pressure ulcer (E: 5.90±2.48; C: 8.6±1.05; p = 0.0005 and total PUSH score (E: 7.35±3.17; C: 11.85±2.35; p = 0,0003. The patients in the experimental group had significantly better values of the parameters monitored than the patients in the control group. Conclusion. After a four-week polarized light therapy 20 patients with stage I-III ulcer had significant improvement in pressure ulcer healing, so it could be useful to apply polarized light in the treatment of pressure ulcers.

  8. The effects of polarized light therapy in pressure ulcer healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durović, Aleksandar; Marić, Dragan; Brdareski, Zorica; Jevtić, Miodrag; Durdević, Slavisa

    2008-12-01

    Neglecting polarized light as an adjuvant therapy for pressure ulcers and methodology distinctions in the trials engaging polarized light are the reasons for many dilemmas and contradictions. The aim of this study was to establish the effects of polarized light therapy in pressure ulcer healing. This prospective randomized single-blind study involved 40 patients with stage I-III of pressure ulcer. The patients in the experimental group (E) were subjected, besides polarized light therapy, to standard wound cleaning and dressing. Standard wound cleaning and dressing were the only treatment used in the control group (C). A polarized light source was a Bioptron lamp. Polarized light therapy was applied for six min daily, five times a week, four weeks. The Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) was used in the assessment of outcome. Statistic analysis included Mann Whitney Test, Fisher Exact Test, Wilcoxon Signed Rank test. There were significant differences between the groups at the end of the treatment regarding the surface of pressure ulcer (E: 10.80 +/- 19.18; C: 22,97 +/- 25,47; p = 0.0005), rank of pressure ulcer (E: 5.90 +/- 2.48; C: 8.6 +/- 1.05; p = 0.0005) and total PUSH score (E: 7.35 +/- 3.17; C: 11.85 +/- 2.35; p = 0,0003). The patients in the experimental group had significantly better values of the parameters monitored than the patients in the control group. After a four-week polarized light therapy 20 patients with stage I-III ulcer had significant improvement in pressure ulcer healing, so it could be useful to apply polarized light in the treatment of pressure ulcers.

  9. [Evaluation of the Charing Cross Venous Ulcer Questionnaire in patients with chronic venous ulcers in Uruguay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafernaberry, Gabriela; Otero, Gabriela; Agorio, Caroline; Dapueto, Juan J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous ulcers (CVU) represent a frequent condition, with difficult therapeutic approaches, that impact on patients’ quality of life, and generate an economic burden to patients and health systems. To perform the cultural adaptation and initial evaluation of the Charing Cross Venous Ulcer Questionnaire (CCVUQ) for Uruguay, and to study the health-related quality of life (HRQL) of patients with CVU. The translated and culturally adapted version of the CCVUQ was applied to a convenience sample of 50 patients. In addition, the PROMIS Global Health Survey was included in the assessment. Both questionnaires showed good internal consistency (Cronbach alfa > 0.70). A statistically significant association was observed between the CCVUQ total scores, its subscales and both dimensions of the PROMIS: Global Physical (GPH) and Global Mental Health (GMH) (rho ≥ 0.40). The CCVUQ mean score was 54.9 ± 42 points while GPH and GMH mean scores were 37.9 ± 29 points, and 43.1 ± 35.1 points respectively. Simple linear regression showed that patients with higher income reported better emotional well-being, while in younger patients, ulcers had a higher impact on Emotional Status and Cosmetics. The translated and adapted version of the CCVUQ was easy to comprehend and apply, showing good psychometric properties. When used in association with the PROMIS Global Health Measure it provides complementary information. HRQL was severely affected in the study sample.

  10. Anti-ulcer activity of African walnut Tetracarpidium conophorum nuts against gastric ulcers in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Maduabuchi Ezealisiji

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the anti-ulcer activity of methanol extract of Tetracarpidium conophorum (Mull. Arg. (METC nuts in albino Wistar rats. Methods: METC was investigated in pylorus ligation and ethanol induced models in experimental animals. Parameters such as gastric volume, pH, total and free acidity, and ulcer index were used as indicator for antiulcerogenic activity in both models. METC at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg orally was used to determine whether the extract could produce significant protection of the gastric lesions by pylorus ligation and ethanol. Results: The extract at dose levels of 250 and 500 mg/kg exhibited significant (P<0.05 decrease in the gastric volume, total and free acidity while the pH of gastric juice was significantly (P<0.05 increased in both models. Conclusions: The result showed that METC possesses anti-ulcer as well as cytoprotective properties which could be attributed to the presence of secondary metabolites.

  11. Unavoidable Pressure Ulcers: Development and Testing of the Indiana University Health Pressure Ulcer Prevention Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Joyce; Beeson, Terrie; Terry, Colin; Dillon, Jill; Hampton, Charity; Kerley, Denise; Mosier, Judith; Gumiela, Ellen; Tucker, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Despite prevention strategies, hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) continue to occur in the acute care setting. The purpose of this study was to develop an operational definition of and an instrument for identifying avoidable/unavoidable HAPUs in the acute care setting. The Indiana University Health Pressure Ulcer Prevention Inventory (PUPI) was developed and psychometric testing was performed. A retrospective pilot study of 31 adult hospitalized patients with an HAPU was conducted using the PUPI. Overall content validity index of 0.99 and individual item content validity index scores (0.9-1.0) demonstrated excellent content validity. Acceptable PUPI criterion validity was demonstrated with no statistically significant differences between wound specialists' and other panel experts' scoring. Construct validity findings were acceptable with no statistically significant differences among avoidable or unavoidable HAPU patients and their Braden Scale total scores. Interrater reliability was acceptable with perfect agreement on the total PUPI score between raters (κ = 1.0; P = .025). Raters were in total agreement 93% (242/260) of the time on all 12 individual PUPI items. No risk factors were found to be significantly associated with unavoidable HAPUs. An operational definition of and an instrument for identifying avoidable/unavoidable HAPUs in the acute care setting were developed and tested. The instrument provides an objective and structured method for identifying avoidable/unavoidable HAPUs. The PUPI provides an additional method that could be used in root-cause analyses and when reporting adverse pressure ulcer events.

  12. Skin assessment of patients at risk of pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteing, Nicola L

    The incidence of pressure ulcers in the community and in acute settings is a concern for patients and healthcare professionals. The high cost to healthcare services of treating individuals with pressure ulcers means prevention is much cheaper than cure. Nurses have a responsibility to implement and participate in prevention programmes to decrease the incidence of pressure ulcers. Assessment is the first stage in prevention. This article focuses on the assessment of pressure areas, providing the reader with the knowledge of where and when skin assessment should take place and what needs to be assessed.

  13. Ulcer detection with /sup 99m/Tc-sucralfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tietze, P.; Gratz, K.F.; Hundeshagen, H.; Freise, J.

    1988-02-01

    Sucralfate is an agent commonly used in the therapy of gastrointestinal ulcers. It binds itself to proteins in the ulcer crater. A selective labeling with pure /sup 99m/Tc-pertechnetate is possible. For an unequivocal ulcer localization or exclusion, images have to be taken in the upright and supine positions. Encouragement of gastric emptying is useful. Images should be taken at least twice, the last one 4 h after ingestion. The method might be used when endoscopy is difficult, incomplete or contraindicated, and for follow-up during therapy. We recommend it also in the search for the cause of intermittent bleeding.

  14. Ulcer detection with 99mTc-sucralfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tietze, P.; Gratz, K.F.; Hundeshagen, H.; Freise, J.

    1988-01-01

    Sucralfate is an agent commonly used in the therapy of gastrointestinal ulcers. It binds itself to proteins in the ulcer crater. A selective labeling with pure 99m Tc-pertechnetate is possible. For an unequivocal ulcer localization or exclusion, images have to be taken in the upright and supine positions. Encouragement of gastric emptying is useful. Images should be taken at least twice, the last one 4 h after ingestion. The method might be used when endoscopy is difficult, incomplete or contraindicated, and for follow-up during therapy. We recommend it also in the search for the cause of intermittent bleeding. (orig.) [de

  15. Diagnosis of the ulcerous and erosive gastroduodenal lesions with radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuccaro, A.M.; Rocha, A.F.G. da; Palencia, I.I.B.

    1989-01-01

    The use of gastric scintigraphy with technetium 99-m labeled sucralfate is analysed in a study of 25 cases evolving: controls (five), duodenal ulcer (six case), gastric ulcer (four), gastric and duodenal ulcer (two) and gastric mucous acute erosive lesion (eight). All patients were previously submitted to endoscopy and biopsy. Changes in the techniques of other authors were performed. An accurate diagnosis was achieved in 95% of the cases with a specificity of 100%. It is concluded that the method is indicated for the investigation of critical patients, elderly patients, children for the control of lesions identified through endoscopy. (author)

  16. [A case of skin autograft for skin ulcers in ichthyosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiwei; Yang, Xiaodong; Liu, Lijun; Tang, Xueyang

    2017-10-28

    Ichthyosis refers to a group of skin diseases characterized by abnormal keratinization of the epidermis, resulting in dryness, roughness and scale of the skin. A girl with ichthyosis, who presented with skin ulcers and infection of the right dorsal foot, was admitted to our department. An autologous razor-thin skin grafting procedure was performed to repair the skin ulcers after debridement and vacuum sealing drain. After 8 months of follow-up, both the donor and recipient site healed well and there were no newly formed ulcers or infections. Although the skin quality of ichthyosis is poor, the lesion area can still be used as donor or recipient cite.

  17. Nutritional interventions for preventing and treating pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Gero; Fink, Astrid

    2014-06-12

    Pressure ulcers affect approximately 10% of people in hospitals and older people are at highest risk. A correlation between inadequate nutritional intake and the development of pressure ulcers has been suggested by several studies, but the results have been inconsistent. To evaluate the effects of enteral and parenteral nutrition on the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers. In March 2014, for this first update, we searched The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Trials Register, the Cochrane Central register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library), the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) (The Cochrane Library), the Health Technology Assessment Database (HTA) (The Cochrane Library), the Cochrane Methodology Register (The Cochrane Library), NHS Economic Evaluation Database (The Cochrane Library), Ovid Medline, Ovid Embase and EBSCO CINAHL. No date, language or publication status limits were applied. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effects of enteral or parenteral nutrition on the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers, which measured the incidence of new ulcers, ulcer healing or changes in pressure ulcer severity. There were no restrictions on types of patient, setting, date, publication status or language. Two review authors independently screened for inclusion, and disagreement was resolved by discussion. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed quality using the Cochrane Collaboration tool for assessing risk of bias. We included 23 RCTs, many were small (between 9 and 4023 participants, median 88) and at high risk of bias.Eleven trials compared a combination of nutritional supplements, consisting of a minimum of energy and protein in different dosages, for the prevention of pressure ulcers. A meta-analysis of eight trials (6062 participants) that compared the effects of mixed nutritional supplements with standard hospital diet found no clear evidence of an effect of supplementation on pressure

  18. Management of NSAID-associated peptic ulcer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcarne, Luigi; García-Iglesias, Pilar; Calvet, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use increases the risk of gastrointestinal complications such as ulcers or bleeding. The presence of factors like advanced age, history of peptic ulcer, Helicobacter pylori infection and the use of anticoagulants or antiplatelet agents increase this risk further. COX-2 inhibitors and antisecretory drugs, particularly proton pump inhibitors, help to minimize the risk of gastrointestinal complications in high-risk patients. This review presents a practical approach to the prevention and treatment of NSAID-associated peptic ulcer disease and examines the new advances in the rational use of NSAIDs.

  19. Oculocutaneous albinism complicated with an ulcerated plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokanatha Keshavalu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A 32-year-old male with a history of albinism and farmer by occupation presented with an ulcerated plaque on the right wrist. The patient had light eyes, hair, and skin. Physical examination showed extensive photodamage. A skin biopsy specimen from the plaque revealed a well-differentiated squamous-cell carcinoma. Wide surgical excision was done. The most common types of oculocutaneous albinism (OCA, OCA 1 and OCA 2, are autosomal recessive disorders of pigmentation that commonly affect the skin, hair and eyes. Photodamage and skin cancers plague patients with albinism. Albinos face a myriad of social and medical issues. Importance of photoprotection, skin cancer surveillance and treatment has been stressed upon in this report.

  20. Healed corneal ulcer with keloid formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkatan, Hind M; Al-Arfaj, Khalid M; Hantera, Mohammed; Al-Kharashi, Soliman

    2012-04-01

    We are reporting a 34-year-old Arabic white female patient who presented with a white mass covering her left cornea following multiple ocular surgeries and healed corneal ulcer. The lesion obscured further view of the iris, pupil and lens. The patient underwent penetrating keratoplasty and the histopathologic study of the left corneal button showed epithelial hyperplasia, absent Bowman's layer and subepithelial fibrovascular proliferation. The histopathologic appearance was suggestive of a corneal keloid which was supported by further ultrastructural study. The corneal graft remained clear 6 months after surgery and the patient was satisfied with the visual outcome. Penetrating keratoplasty may be an effective surgical option for corneal keloids in young adult patients.