WorldWideScience

Sample records for uk research councils

  1. Hewitt launches Research Councils UK

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Trade and Industry Secretary Patricia Hewitt today launched 'Research Councils UK' - a new strategic partnership that will champion research in science, engineering and technology across the UK" (1 page).

  2. Questions raised over future of UK research council

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2010-02-01

    Five senior physicists have written to the UK science minister, Lord Drayson, about the "dismal future" for researchers in the country in the wake of a £40m shortfall in the budget of the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC). The physicists, who chair the STFC's five advisory panels, have also called for structural reforms to be made to the council. They warn that unless the government takes action to reverse the situation, the UK will be "perceived as an untrustworthy partner in global projects" and predict that a brain drain of the best UK scientists to positions overseas will ensue.

  3. Open Letter to Research Councils UK: Rebuttal of ALPSP Critique

    OpenAIRE

    Berners-Lee, Tim; De Roure, Dave; Harnad, Stevan; Shadbolt, Nigel

    2005-01-01

    The Research Councils of the UK (RCUK) propose to require that the authors of all journal articles resulting from RCUK-funded research must make them openly accessible by self-archiving them on the web in order maximise their usage and impact. ALPSP (Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers) claim that this will have a negative effect on journals, but the only evidence they provide fails to support their claim and all existing evidence is to the contrary: Journal publication...

  4. Research use and support needs, and research activity in social care: a cross-sectional survey in two councils with social services responsibilities in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Jo; Bacigalupo, Ruth; Halladay, Linsay; Norwood, Hayley

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of research activity, research use, research interests and research skills in the social care workforce in two UK councils with social service responsibilities (CSSRs). A cross-sectional survey was conducted of the social care workforce in two CSSRs (n = 1512) in 2005. The sample was identified in partnership with the councils, and included employees with professional qualifications (social workers and occupational therapists); staff who have a role to assess, plan and monitor care; service managers; commissioners of services; and those involved with social care policy, information management and training. The survey achieved a response rate of 24% (n = 368). The Internet was reported as an effective source of research information; conversely, research-based guidelines were reported to have a low impact on practice. Significant differences were found in research use, by work location, and postgraduate training. Most respondents saw research as useful for practice (69%), and wanted to collaborate in research (68%), but only 11% were planning to do research within the next 12 months. Having a master's degree was associated with a greater desire to lead or collaborate in research. A range of research training needs, and the preferred modes of delivery were identified. Support to increase research activity includes protected time and mentorship. The study concludes that a range of mechanisms to make research available for the social care workforce needs to be in place to support evidence-informed practice. Continual professional development to a postgraduate level supports the use and production of evidence in the social care workforce, and promotes the development of a research culture. The term research is used to include service user consultations, needs assessment and service evaluation. The findings highlight a relatively large body of the social care workforce willing to collaborate and conduct research

  5. The Medical Research Council (UK)/Uganda Virus Research Institute Uganda Research Unit on AIDS--'25 years of research through partnerships'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleebu, P; Kamali, A; Seeley, J; Elliott, A M; Katongole-Mbidde, E

    2015-02-01

    For the past 25 years, the Medical Research Council/Uganda Virus Research Institute Uganda Research Unit on AIDS has conducted research on HIV-1, coinfections and, more recently, on non-communicable diseases. Working with various partners, the research findings of the Unit have contributed to the understanding and control of the HIV epidemic both in Uganda and globally, and informed the future development of biomedical HIV interventions, health policy and practice. In this report, as we celebrate our silver jubilee, we describe some of these achievements and the Unit's multidisciplinary approach to research. We also discuss the future direction of the Unit; an exemplar of a partnership that has been largely funded from the north but led in the south. © 2014 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. International fusion research council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belozerov, A.N.

    1977-01-01

    A brief history of the International Fusion Research Council (IFRC) is given and the minutes of the 1976 meeting in Garching are summarized. At the Garching meeting, the IFRC evaluated the quality of papers presented at recent IAEA conferences on plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear research, and made recommendations on the organization and timing of future meetings on nuclear fusion

  7. Late Gastrointestinal Toxicity After Dose-Escalated Conformal Radiotherapy for Early Prostate Cancer: Results From the UK Medical Research Council RT01 Trial (ISRCTN47772397)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syndikus, Isabel; Morgan, Rachel C.; Sydes, Matthew R.; Graham, John D.; Dearnaley, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In men with localized prostate cancer, dose-escalated conformal radiotherapy (CFRT) improves efficacy outcomes at the cost of increased toxicity. We present a detailed analysis to provide further information about the incidence and prevalence of late gastrointestinal side effects. Methods and Materials: The UK Medical Research Council RT01 trial included 843 men with localized prostate cancer, who were treated for 6 months with neoadjuvant radiotherapy and were randomly assigned to either 64-Gy or 74-Gy CFRT. Toxicity was evaluated before CFRT and during long-term follow-up using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading, the Late Effects on Normal Tissue: Subjective, Objective, Management (LENT/SOM) scale, and Royal Marsden Hospital assessment scores. Patients regularly completed Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy--Prostate (FACT-P) and University of California, Los Angeles, Prostate Cancer Index (UCLA-PCI) questionnaires. Results: In the dose-escalated group, the hazard ratio (HR) for rectal bleeding (LENT/SOM grade ≥2) was 1.55 (95% CI, 1.17-2.04); for diarrhea (LENT/SOM grade ≥2), the HR was 1.79 (95% CI, 1.10-2.94); and for proctitis (RTOG grade ≥2), the HR was 1.64 (95% CI, 1.20-2.25). Compared to baseline scores, the prevalence of moderate and severe toxicities generally increased up to 3 years and than lessened. At 5 years, the cumulative incidence of patient-reported severe bowel problems was 6% vs. 8% (standard vs. escalated, respectively) and severe distress was 4% vs. 5%, respectively. Conclusions: There is a statistically significant increased risk of various adverse gastrointestinal events with dose-escalated CFRT. This remains at clinically acceptable levels, and overall prevalence ultimately decreases with duration of follow-up.

  8. Lord Sainsbury announces outcome of Research Council review

    CERN Multimedia

    Dept. Trade & Industry

    2002-01-01

    Science and Innovation Minister, Lord Sainsbury, today announced the outcome of a review of the Council for the Central Laboratory of the Research Councils (CCLRC). The report is the second stage of a five-yearly review, which outlines ways to strengthen and promote greater value for money from the UK's investment in science (1 page).

  9. Wood Protection Research Council: Research Priorities 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol A Clausen; Frederick Green III; Grant T. Kirker; Stan T. Lebow

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes presentations and comments from the inaugural Wood Protection Research Council meeting. Research needs for the wood protection industry were identified and prioritized. Methods for successfully addressing research needs were discussed by industry, academia, and association representatives.

  10. Cancer Research UK | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Cancer Research UK. Cancer Research UK. https://www.cancerresearchuk.org/. The Economics of Tobacco Control Research Initiative. The Economics of Tobacco Control Research Initiative funds innovative fiscal policy research supporting tobacco control in low and middle-income countries. View more. The Economics ...

  11. Report of the Science and Engineering Research Council, 1 April 1993 - 31 March 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This final Annual Report of the Science and Engineering Research Council (SERC) covers the work of the organization for 1993-1994 and explains the structures and missions of the organizations which replace it. SERC funds and supports United Kingdom research programs covering many aspects of science and engineering. Its work will be split between the new Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council, the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council and the Natural Environment Research Council. Research achievements and training initiatives are reported for each of SERC's current Boards. (UK)

  12. Section 4: National Research Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arseneau, R.; Zelle, J.

    1991-01-01

    A study was carried out to produce a compendium of electric and magnetic field levels in various environments throughout Canada. The contribution of the National Research Council of Canada in cooperation with Ottawa Hydro was to study the magnetic field environment of 29 sites in the Ottawa area, including private residences, place of employment, distribution and transmission lines, and close to padmount transformers. At most sites the electric fields were too low to be measured. Magnetic fields near padmount transformers can be larger than 300 mG, however this rapidly decreases and at 3 feet from the transformers is below 20 mG. Magnetic fields of unbalanced distribution lines can be larger than the fields of balanced lines. The magnetic fields of a high voltage transmission line were measurable at distances up to 100 m from the line. Electric fields were low outside the right-of-way. 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  13. A versatile phantom for quality assurance in the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) RT01 trial (ISRCTN47772397) in conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollo Moore, A.; Jim Warrington, A.P.; Aird, Edwin G.A.; Margaret Bidmead, A.; Dearnaley, David P.

    2006-01-01

    Within the UK RT01 trial the MRC also funded a quality assurance (QA) programme. This included a planning and dosimetry audit at participating centres using a purpose built phantom. Geometrical setup was visually assessed via field shaping around the phantom GTV (to within the order of 1 mm). Within the phantom, ion chamber positional uncertainties were estimated as 0.6 mm (95% CL, k = 2). This was the basis for ion chamber measurements in a variety of dose gradients around the PTV closely simulating a patient case. The design provides a representative but reproducible system for QA in the prostate radiotherapy process, from CT scan to treatment. Setup errors are not eliminated, but minimised and estimated

  14. Research council faces financial ‘catastrophe’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catanzaro, Michele

    2013-08-01

    Spain’s biggest scientific institution - the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) - has announced it is in financial difficulty and that it has already clawed back unspent cash for research projects funded before 2012 in order to survive until October.

  15. IRIS and the National Research Council (NRC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since the 2011 National Academies’ National Research Council (NRC) review of the IRIS Program's assessment of Formaldehyde, EPA and NRC have had an ongoing relationship into the improvements of developing the IRIS Assessments.

  16. EPERC: The European Pressure Equipment Research Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darlaston, J.; McAllister, S.

    1998-01-01

    The European Pressure Equipment Research Council (EPERC) is a European Network of industries, research laboratories, inspection bodies and governmental institutions set up to foster co-operative research for the greater benefit of the European industry. The concept of a European Research Council originated at the PVRC meeting in Cannes in 1989 and since this time volunteers from the industry, research laboratories and of the European Commission Joint Research Centre, Petten have worked together to create a Statute for EPERC. In the context of the pressure equipment industry, the creation of EPERC is extremely pertinent, since in the near future, a Council directive on pressure equipment will replace the existing national regulations. In parallel to this, work is in progress for the elaboration of European Standards. It is useful to recall that ''Harmonised Standards'' will be the privileged means of complying with the Essential Safety Requirements of the directive. (author)

  17. 78 FR 30847 - Forestry Research Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ..., Forestry Research Advisory Council, USDA Forest Service Research and Development, Mail Stop 1120, 1400... Service Office of the Deputy Chief for Research and Development, 202-205-1665. Individuals who use telecommunication devices for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-800-877-8339...

  18. 78 FR 2950 - Forestry Research Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    ... Advisory Council, USDA Forest Service Research and Development, Mail Stop 1120, 1400 Independence Ave. SW... of the Deputy Chief for Research and Development, 202-205-1665. Individuals who use telecommunication devices for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-800-877-8339 between...

  19. 77 FR 26734 - Forestry Research Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... and proposals by May 31, 2012 to Daina Apple, Designated Federal Officer, Forestry Research Advisory...: Daina Apple, Forest Service, Office of the Deputy Chief for Research and Development, (202) 205-1665. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The meeting is open to the public. Council discussion is limited to Forest Service...

  20. Foresight and strategy in national research councils and research programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Per Dannemand; Borup, Mads

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of foresight and strategy processes of national research councils and research programmes. It is based on a study of strategy processes in national research councils and programmes and the challenges faced by their strategy activities. We analysed the strategy...... processes of two organisations: the Danish Technical Research Council and the Danish Energy Research Programme. We analysed the mechanisms of the strategy processes and studied the actors involved. The actors’ understanding of strategy was also included in the analysis. Based on these analyses we argue...... that the impact of foresight exercises can be improved if we have a better understanding of the traditions and new challenges faced by the research councils. We also argue that a more formal use of foresight elements might improve the legitimacy and impact of the strategic considerations of research councils...

  1. Annual report of the Science and Engineering Research Council 1992-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Details of expenditure and reports of the activities of the four Boards which operate as the Science and Engineering Research Council are given. These are the Astronomical and Planetry Science Board, the Engineering Board, the Nuclear Physics Board and the Science Board. There is also a report on the optical physics and optoelectronic research supported by the Council. Committee membership, studentship, fellowships research grants and administration details are reported. (UK)

  2. 76 FR 43651 - Forestry Research Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... send their names and proposals by August 1, 2011 to Daina Apple, Designated Federal Officer, Forestry... INFORMATION CONTACT: Daina Apple, Forest Service Office of the Deputy Chief for Research and Development, (202) 205-1665. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The meeting is open to the public. Council discussion is limited...

  3. Writing a Research Proposal to The Research Council of Oman

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Shukaili, Ahmed; Al-Maniri, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    Writing a research proposal can be a challenging task for young researchers. This article explains how to write a strong research proposal to apply for funding, specifically, a proposal for The Research Council (TRC) of Oman. Three different research proposal application forms are currently used in TRC, including Open Research Grant (ORG), Graduate Research Support Program (GRSP), and Faculty-mentored Undergraduate Research Award Program (FURAP). The application forms are filled and submitted...

  4. Public health research in the UK: a report with a European perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Mark; Dyakova, Mariana; Clarke, Aileen

    2014-06-01

    Public health research is of growing interest within Europe. Bibliometric research shows the UK with a high absolute output of public health publications, although lower per capita than Nordic countries. UK contributed to a European Union (EU) project PHIRE to assess public health research and innovation. UK health research structures, and programmes funded in 2010, were determined from internet search. Expert informants were asked to comment on national uptake of eight projects EU collaborative health projects. The Faculty of Public Health and the UK Society for Social Medicine discussed the findings at a meeting with stakeholders. Health research in UK is funded by research councils, the National Health Service (NHS) and independent foundations. Reviews and reports on public health research have encouraged diversified funding. There were 15 programmes and calls in 2010. The UK participated in all eight EU projects, and there was uptake of results for four. Strategic coordination between public health researchers and practitioners, and the UK research councils, ministries of health and medical charities would strengthen research for policy and practice. With growing expertise and capacity across other EU countries, the UK should take more active leadership in European collaboration. © The Author 2013, Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved.

  5. 78 FR 15928 - Forestry Research Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    ... apportionment of funds. Advisory Council Organization The Council will be comprised of not more than 20 members. The members appointed to the Council will be fairly balanced in terms of the points of view... relevancy to a membership category. Geographic balance and a balanced distribution among the categories are...

  6. The Swedish Research Councils' Laboratory progress report for 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudstam, G.

    1976-01-01

    The Swedish Research Councils' Laboratory herewith presents its progress report for 1975. The report summarizes the current projects carried out by the research groups working at the laboratory. The very efficient assistance of the staff of the laboratory is greatfully acknowledged. The laboratory has been financially supported by the Atomic Research Council, the Medical Research Council, the Natural Science Research Council, and the Board of Technical Development. Valuable support in various ways has also been given by the Atomic Energy Company (AB Atomenergi). (author)

  7. The value of Internet research to Danish council reporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the findings from qualitative interviews with nine Danish council reporters on how they use the Internet for research on council affairs. Through qualitative interviews, the article aims to qualify and expand findings from survey research on journalists' use of the Internet...... for research and asks how much value journalists add to information found on the Internet and how important Internet research is compared to other types of research. The journalists interviewed found that the council website was useful as a provider of factual information about the council and a searchable...

  8. Open Science Strategies in Research Policies: A Comparative Exploration of Canada, the US and the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasthiotakis, Helen; Kretz, Andrew; Sá, Creso

    2015-01-01

    Several movements have emerged related to the general idea of promoting "openness" in science. Research councils are key institutions in bringing about changes proposed by these movements, as sponsors and facilitators of research. In this paper we identify the approaches used in Canada, the US and the UK to advance open science, as a…

  9. A Proposal for a UK Ethics Council for Animal Policy: The Case for Putting Ethics Back into Policy Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Steven P; Reiss, Michael J

    2018-06-07

    Substantial controversy is a consistent feature of UK animal health and welfare policy. BSE, foot and mouth disease, bovine TB and badger culling, large indoor dairies, and wild animals in circuses are examples. Such policy issues are inherently normative; they include a substantial moral dimension. This paper reviews UK animal welfare advisory bodies such as the Animal Health and Welfare Board of England, the Farm Animal Welfare Council and the Animals in Science Committee. These bodies play a key advisory role, but do not have adequate expertise in ethics to inform the moral dimension of policy. We propose an "Ethics Council for Animal Policy" to inform the UK government on policy that significantly impacts sentient species. We review existing Councils (e.g., the Nuffield Council on Bioethics and The Netherlands Council on Animal Affairs) and examine some widely used ethical frameworks (e.g., Banner's principles and the ethical matrix). The Ethics Council for Animal Policy should be independent from government and members should have substantial expertise in ethics and related disciplines. A pluralistic six-stage ethical framework is proposed: (i) Problematisation of the policy issue, (ii) utilitarian analysis, (iii) animal rights analysis, (iv) virtue-based analysis, (v) animal welfare ethic analysis, and (vi) integrated ethical analysis. The paper concludes that an Ethics Council for Animal Policy is necessary for just and democratic policy making in all societies that use sentient nonhuman species.

  10. Report of The Science and Engineering Research Council for the year 1989-90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This twenty-fifth anniversary issue of the Science and Engineering Research Council's (SERC) Annual Report opens by reemphasizing the continuing need to plan research expenditure on a greater than annual basis. Exciting developments in every branch and discipline continue to emerge. This year has seen advances in public relations for SERC with the plans for a science centre on the Royal Observatory, Edinburgh site, and a national essay competition for school children. (UK)

  11. Science Granting Councils Initiative: Research uptake | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Science Granting Councils Initiative in sub-Saharan Africa aims to ... The strategy identifies a wide range of activities to collect, package, and share lessons ... Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSD), IDRC is ...

  12. Report of the Science and Engineering Research Council for the year 1987-88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    The paper presents the Annual Report of the Science and Engineering Research Council (SERC), United Kingdom 1987/8. The contents contains the reports of the four Boards of the Council - the Astronomy and Planetary Science Board, the Engineering Board, the Nuclear Physics Board and the Science Board. The SERC report also contains eleven review articles on major advances in Science in recent years, including high temperature superconductivity and the supernova in the Large Magellanic Cloud, as well as details of fourteen ''highlights'' of 1987/8 including the dating of the Turin Shroud. (U.K.)

  13. UK creates new funding super-body

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The UK government has passed its higher-education and research bill, which includes the creation of UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) - a new umbrella organization that will oversee the country’s seven research councils such as the Science and Technology Facilities Council and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

  14. A Proposal for a UK Ethics Council for Animal Policy: The Case for Putting Ethics Back into Policy Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven P. McCulloch

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Substantial controversy is a consistent feature of UK animal health and welfare policy. BSE,~foot and mouth disease, bovine TB and badger culling, large indoor dairies, and wild animals in circuses are examples. Such policy issues are inherently normative; they include a substantial moral dimension. This paper reviews UK animal welfare advisory bodies such as the Animal Health and Welfare Board of England, the Farm Animal Welfare Committee and the Animals in Science Committee. These bodies play a key advisory role, but do not have adequate expertise in ethics to inform the moral dimension of policy. We propose an “Ethics Council for Animal Policy” to inform the UK government on policy that significantly impacts sentient species. We review existing Councils (e.g., the Nuffield Council on Bioethics and The Netherlands Council on Animal Affairs and examine some widely used ethical frameworks (e.g., Banner’s principles and the ethical matrix. The Ethics Council for Animal Policy should be independent from government and members should have substantial expertise in ethics and related disciplines. A pluralistic six-stage ethical framework is proposed: (i Problematisation of the policy issue, (ii utilitarian analysis, (iii animal rights analysis, (iv virtue-based analysis, (v animal welfare ethic analysis, and (vi integrated ethical analysis. The~paper concludes that an Ethics Council for Animal Policy is necessary for just and democratic policy making in all societies that use sentient nonhuman species.

  15. Writing a Research Proposal to The Research Council of Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shukaili, Ahmed; Al-Maniri, Abdullah

    2017-05-01

    Writing a research proposal can be a challenging task for young researchers. This article explains how to write a strong research proposal to apply for funding, specifically, a proposal for The Research Council (TRC) of Oman. Three different research proposal application forms are currently used in TRC, including Open Research Grant (ORG), Graduate Research Support Program (GRSP), and Faculty-mentored Undergraduate Research Award Program (FURAP). The application forms are filled and submitted electronically on TRC website. Each of the proposals submitted to TRC is selected through a rigorous reviewing and screening process. Novelty and originality of the research idea is the most crucial element in writing a research proposal. Performing an in-depth review of the literature will assist you to compose a good researchable question and generate a strong hypothesis. The development of a good hypothesis will offer insight into the specific objectives of a study. Research objectives should be focused, measurable, and achievable by a specific time using the most appropriate methodology. Moreover, it is essential to select a proper study design in-line with the purpose of the study and the hypothesis. Furthermore, social/economic impact and reasonable budget of proposed research are important criteria in research proposal evaluation by TRC. Finally, ethical principles should be observed before writing a research proposal involving human or animal subjects.

  16. Writing a Research Proposal to The Research Council of Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al-Shukaili

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Writing a research proposal can be a challenging task for young researchers. This article explains how to write a strong research proposal to apply for funding, specifically, a proposal for The Research Council (TRC of Oman. Three different research proposal application forms are currently used in TRC, including Open Research Grant (ORG, Graduate Research Support Program (GRSP, and Faculty-mentored Undergraduate Research Award Program (FURAP. The application forms are filled and submitted electronically on TRC website. Each of the proposals submitted to TRC is selected through a rigorous reviewing and screening process. Novelty and originality of the research idea is the most crucial element in writing a research proposal. Performing an in-depth review of the literature will assist you to compose a good researchable question and generate a strong hypothesis. The development of a good hypothesis will offer insight into the specific objectives of a study. Research objectives should be focused, measurable, and achievable by a specific time using the most appropriate methodology. Moreover, it is essential to select a proper study design in-line with the purpose of the study and the hypothesis. Furthermore, social/economic impact and reasonable budget of proposed research are important criteria in research proposal evaluation by TRC. Finally, ethical principles should be observed before writing a research proposal involving human or animal subjects.

  17. [Antibiotic resistance: recommendations from the Advisory Council for Health Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogkamp-Korstanje, J.A.A.

    2001-01-01

    The Advisory Council for Health Research (RGO) advised the Dutch Minister of Health on research into the epidemiology, prevention and research of antibiotic resistance in the Netherlands. Good antimicrobial practice, insight into antibiotic use, implementation of measures to prevent development of

  18. Funding infectious disease research: a systematic analysis of UK research investments by funders 1997-2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R Fitchett

    Full Text Available Research investments are essential to address the burden of disease, however allocation of limited resources is poorly documented. We systematically reviewed the investments awarded by funding organisations to UK institutions and their global partners for infectious disease research.Public and philanthropic investments for the period 1997 to 2010 were included. We categorised studies by infectious disease, cross-cutting theme, and by research and development value chain, reflecting the type of science. We identified 6165 funded studies, with a total research investment of UK £2.6 billion. Public organisations provided £1.4 billion (54.0% of investments compared with £1.1 billion (42.4% by philanthropic organisations. Global health studies represented an investment of £928 million (35.7%. The Wellcome Trust was the leading investor with £688 million (26.5%, closely followed by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC with £673 million (25.9%. Funding over time was volatile, ranging from ∼£40 million to ∼£160 million per year for philanthropic organisations and ∼£30 million to ∼£230 million for public funders.Infectious disease research funding requires global coordination and strategic long-term vision. Our analysis demonstrates the diversity and inconsistent patterns in investment, with volatility in annual funding amounts and limited investment for product development and clinical trials.

  19. Funding Infectious Disease Research: A Systematic Analysis of UK Research Investments by Funders 1997–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitchett, Joseph R.; Head, Michael G.; Cooke, Mary K.; Wurie, Fatima B.; Atun, Rifat

    2014-01-01

    Background Research investments are essential to address the burden of disease, however allocation of limited resources is poorly documented. We systematically reviewed the investments awarded by funding organisations to UK institutions and their global partners for infectious disease research. Methodology/Principal Findings Public and philanthropic investments for the period 1997 to 2010 were included. We categorised studies by infectious disease, cross-cutting theme, and by research and development value chain, reflecting the type of science. We identified 6165 funded studies, with a total research investment of UK £2.6 billion. Public organisations provided £1.4 billion (54.0%) of investments compared with £1.1 billion (42.4%) by philanthropic organisations. Global health studies represented an investment of £928 million (35.7%). The Wellcome Trust was the leading investor with £688 million (26.5%), closely followed by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) with £673 million (25.9%). Funding over time was volatile, ranging from ∼£40 million to ∼£160 million per year for philanthropic organisations and ∼£30 million to ∼£230 million for public funders. Conclusions/Significance Infectious disease research funding requires global coordination and strategic long-term vision. Our analysis demonstrates the diversity and inconsistent patterns in investment, with volatility in annual funding amounts and limited investment for product development and clinical trials. PMID:25162631

  20. Funding infectious disease research: a systematic analysis of UK research investments by funders 1997-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitchett, Joseph R; Head, Michael G; Cooke, Mary K; Wurie, Fatima B; Atun, Rifat

    2014-01-01

    Research investments are essential to address the burden of disease, however allocation of limited resources is poorly documented. We systematically reviewed the investments awarded by funding organisations to UK institutions and their global partners for infectious disease research. Public and philanthropic investments for the period 1997 to 2010 were included. We categorised studies by infectious disease, cross-cutting theme, and by research and development value chain, reflecting the type of science. We identified 6165 funded studies, with a total research investment of UK £2.6 billion. Public organisations provided £1.4 billion (54.0%) of investments compared with £1.1 billion (42.4%) by philanthropic organisations. Global health studies represented an investment of £928 million (35.7%). The Wellcome Trust was the leading investor with £688 million (26.5%), closely followed by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) with £673 million (25.9%). Funding over time was volatile, ranging from ∼£40 million to ∼£160 million per year for philanthropic organisations and ∼£30 million to ∼£230 million for public funders. Infectious disease research funding requires global coordination and strategic long-term vision. Our analysis demonstrates the diversity and inconsistent patterns in investment, with volatility in annual funding amounts and limited investment for product development and clinical trials.

  1. Forging Links for Health Research: Perspectives from the Council on ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    As part of the lead up to the October 2000 International Conference on Health Research for Development in Bangkok, the Council on Health Research for Development (COHRED) called upon its associates around the world to reflect on achievements and setbacks in the 1990s. This book is the result of those reflections.

  2. Research reactor fuel transport in the U.K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panter, R [U.K. Atomic Energy Authority, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1983-09-01

    This paper describes the containers currently used for transport of fresh or spent fuel elements for Research and Materials Test Reactors in the U.K., their status, operating procedures and some of the practical difficulties. In the U.K., MTR fuel cycle work is almost entirely the responsibility of the U.K. Atomic Energy Authority.

  3. Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ca/index_eng.asp. International Research Initiative on Adaptation to Climate Change. The International Research Initiative on Adaptation to Climate Change aims to help vulnerable populations in Canada and in developing countries adapt to ...

  4. A rescue plan for UK physics funding

    CERN Multimedia

    Brumfiel, Geoff

    2010-01-01

    "Britain's most troubled research council is about to undergo radical surgery. On 4 March, UK science minister Paul Drayson unveiled his plan to reform the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC)" (0.5 page)

  5. Science Granting Councils Initiative: Research uptake | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The initiative's activities include training, regional exchanges and forums, online training, on-site coaching, and collaborative research. The initiative was developed jointly by IDRC, the United Kingdom's Department for International Development, and South Africa's National Research Foundation. Its ultimate goal is ...

  6. Modifying the Medical Research Council grading system through Rasch analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhoutte, Els Karla; Faber, Catharina Gerritdina; van Nes, Sonja Ingrid; Jacobs, Bart Casper; van Doorn, Pieter Antoon; van Koningsveld, Rinske; Cornblath, David Reid; van der Kooi, Anneke Jelly; Cats, Elisabeth Aviva; van den Berg, Leonard Hendrik; Notermans, Nicolette Claudia; van der Pol, Willem Lodewijk; Hermans, Mieke Catharina Elisabeth; van der Beek, Nadine Anna Maria Elisabeth; Gorson, Kenneth Craig; Eurelings, Marijke; Engelsman, Jeroen; Boot, Hendrik; Meijer, Ronaldus Jacobus; Lauria, Giuseppe; Tennant, Alan; Merkies, Ingemar Sergio José; Barreira, A. A.; Bennett, D.; van den Bergh, P. Y. K.; Bril, V.; Devigili, G.; Hadden, R. D.; Hahn, A. F.; Hartung, H.-P.; Hughes, R. A. C.; Illa, I.; Katzberg, H.; Léger, J.-M.; Lewis, R. A.; Lunn, M. P. T.; Nascimento, O. J. M.; Nobile-Orazio, E.; Padua, L.; Pouget, J.; Reilly, M. M.; van Schaik, I.; Smith, B.; de Visser, M.; Walk, D.

    2012-01-01

    The Medical Research Council grading system has served through decades for the evaluation of muscle strength and has been recognized as a cardinal feature of daily neurological, rehabilitation and general medicine examination of patients, despite being respectfully criticized due to the unequal

  7. Modifying the Medical Research Council grading system through Rasch analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.K. Vanhoutte (Els); C.G. Faber (Carin); S.I. van Nes (Sonja); B.C. Jacobs (Bart); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter); R. van Koningsveld (Rinske); D.R. Cornblath (David); A.J. Kooj (Anneke); E.A. Cats (Elisabeth); L.H. van den Berg (Leonard); N.C. Notermans (Nicolette); W.L. van der Pol (Ludo); M.C.E. Hermans; N.A.M.E. van der Beek (Nadine); K.C. Gorson (Kenneth); M. Eurelings (Marijke); L. Engelsman (Lyda); H. Boot (Hendrik); R.J. Meijer (Ron); G. Lauria (Giuseppe); C. Tennant (Christopher); I.S.J. Merkies (Ingemar)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe Medical Research Council grading system has served through decades for the evaluation of muscle strength and has been recognized as a cardinal feature of daily neurological, rehabilitation and general medicine examination of patients, despite being respectfully criticized due to the

  8. 75 FR 55634 - National Research Advisory Council; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS National Research Advisory Council; Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) gives notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act... Phoenix Park Hotel, Federal City Room, 520 North Capitol Street, NW., Washington, DC. The meeting will...

  9. 75 FR 46903 - Forestry Research Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-04

    ... Development, 1400 Independence Ave., SW., Washington, DC 20250-1120, or fax their names and proposed agenda... Deputy Chief for Research and Development, (202) 205-1665. Individuals who use telecommunication devices for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-800-877-8339 between 8 a...

  10. Council of Energy Engineering Research. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, Richard J.

    2003-08-22

    The Engineering Research Program, a component program of the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), was established in 1979 to aid in resolving the numerous engineering issues arising from efforts to meet U.S. energy needs. The major product of the program became part of the body of knowledge and data upon which the applied energy technologies are founded; the product is knowledge relevant to energy exploration, production, conversion and use.

  11. Report of the Science and Engineering Research Council for the year 1986-87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The report covers the year to March 31 1987. The expenditure of the Council over the year is given. Highlights of the year are summarized -these include laser holography, supercomputers and aerodynamic design, achievements in the Alvey programme, the compact synchrotron X-ray source, observation of the w-boson decay, results form Giotto, fish farming and genetic fingerprinting. Reports of the four boards -astronomy and planetary science, engineering, nuclear physics and science -are presented. Twelve articles then review major advances in recent years. These include the UK at CERN, scanning tunnelling microscopy, recent research using synchrotron x radiation, the European X-ray observatory EXOSAT and global solar oscillations. (U.K.)

  12. Research investments for UK infectious disease research 1997-2013: A systematic analysis of awards to UK institutions alongside national burden of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Michael G; Brown, Rebecca J; Clarke, Stuart C

    2018-01-01

    Infectious disease remains a significant burden in the UK and the focus of significant amounts of research investment each year. The Research Investments in Global Health study has systematically assessed levels of funding for infection research, and here considers investment alongside UK burden of individual infectious diseases. The study included awards to UK institutions between 1997 and 2013 that were related to infectious disease. Awards related to global health projects were excluded here. UK burden data (mortality, years lived with disability, and disability adjusted life years) was sourced from the Global Burden of Disease study (IHME, USA). Awards were categorised by pathogen, disease, disease area and by type of science along the research pipeline (pre-clinical, phase I-III trials, product development, public health, cross-disciplinary research). New metrics present relative levels of funding by comparing sum investment with measures of disease burden. There were 5685 relevant awards comprising investment of £2.4 billion. By disease, HIV received most funding (£369.7m; 15.6% of the total investment). Pre-clinical science was the predominant type of science (£1.6 billion, 68.7%), with the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) the largest funder (£714.8 million, 30.1%). There is a broad temporal trend to increased fundingper annum. Antimicrobial resistance received (£102.8 million, 4.2%), whilst sepsis received £23.6 million (1.0%). Compared alongside disease burden, acute hepatitis C and measles typically were relatively well-funded, whilst pneumonia, syphilis and gonorrhoea were poorly-funded. The UK has a broad research portfolio across a wide range of infectious diseases and disciplines. There are notable strengths including HIV, some respiratory infections and in pre-clinical science, though there was less funding for UK-relevant trials and public health research. Compared to the UK burden of disease, syphilis, gonorrhoea and pneumonia appear

  13. Building Digital Economy - The Research Councils Programme and the Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, John

    We at the Research Councils believe that there are many aspects of society and business that could be transformed by the innovative design and use of digital technologies. This has led to the Digital Economy Programme. The Digital Economy is an RCUK Cross-Research Council Programme, led by the EPSRC, but working closely with ESRC, MRC, AHRC and TSB. What is Digital Economy? Digital Economy is the novel design or use of information and communication technology to help transform the lives of individuals, society or business. All Digital Economy research involves the user community. This can include industry, government, society, charities or other groups as applicable. The research will understand the technologies and also why change is needed, what the impacts will be and who will benefit. Research in this cross-research council area can be driven by economic, social or technical need. The early involvement of the user community is vital if new technologies are to be integrated successfully into business opportunities, technical solutions or commercial products and processes. Challenges in the Digital Economy will require multi-disciplinary academic input, including, but not limited to, the arts and humanities, economic and social sciences and medical sciences, in addition to engineering and physical sciences.

  14. News and Views: Research council resource allocations: managing demand; e-MERLIN radio telescope network is up and running

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    The research councils discovered in December the allocation of money from the UK government's Comprehensive Spending Review, and have set out their delivery plans outlining how they will spend it. Details and decisions will follow consultation in the coming months. The first image from eMerlin, the UK's national radio astronomy facility, shows the power of the enhanced network of radio telescopes spread over 220 km and now linked by fibre optics. These links and advanced receivers will allow astronomers to see in a single day what would have previously taken them more than a year of observations.

  15. Provision of undergraduate otorhinolaryngology teaching within General Medical Council approved UK medical schools: what is current practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M M; Saeed, S R

    2012-04-01

    Despite longstanding concern, provision of undergraduate ENT teaching has not improved in response to the aims of the UK General Medical Council's initiative Tomorrow's Doctors. Previous studies have demonstrated poor representation of ENT within the undergraduate curriculum. We aimed to identify current practice in order to establish undergraduate ENT experience across UK medical schools, a timely endeavour in light of the General Medical Council's new 2011-2013 education strategy. Questionnaires were sent to ENT consultants, medical school deans and students. All schools with a clinical curriculum were anonymously represented. Our outcome measures were the provision of mandatory or optional ENT placements, and their duration and content. A compulsory ENT placement was available to over half (53 per cent) of the students. Ten of the 26 participating schools did not offer an ENT attachment. The mean mandatory placement was 8 days. Overall, 38 per cent of students reported a satisfactory compulsory ENT placement. Most ENT consultants questioned considered that newly qualified doctors were not proficient in managing common ENT problems that did not require specialist referral. Little improvement in the provision of undergraduate ENT teaching was demonstrated. An increase in the proportion of students undertaking ENT training is necessary. Time and curriculum constraints on medical schools mean that optimisation of available resources is required.

  16. Systematic analysis of funding awarded for mycology research to institutions in the UK, 1997-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Michael G; Fitchett, Joseph R; Atun, Rifat; May, Robin C

    2014-01-09

    Fungal infections cause significant global morbidity and mortality. We have previously described the UK investments in global infectious disease research, and here our objective is to describe the investments awarded to UK institutions for mycology research and outline potential funding gaps in the UK portfolio. Systematic analysis. UK institutions carrying out infectious disease research. Primary outcome is the amount of funding and number of studies related to mycology research. Secondary outcomes are describing the investments made to specific fungal pathogens and diseases, and also the type of science along the R&D value chain. We systematically searched databases and websites for information on research studies from public and philanthropic funding institutions awarded between 1997 and 2010, and highlighted the mycology-related projects. Of 6165 funded studies, we identified 171 studies related to mycology (total investment £48.4 million, 1.9% of all infection research, with mean annual funding £3.5 million). Studies related to global health represented 5.1% of this funding (£2.4 million, compared with 35.6% of all infectious diseases). Leading funders were the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (£14.8 million, 30.5%) and Wellcome Trust (£12.0 million, 24.7%). Preclinical studies received £42.2 million (87.3%), with clinical trials, intervention studies and implementation research in total receiving £6.2 million (12.7%). By institution, University of Aberdeen received most funding (£16.9 million, 35%). Studies investigating antifungal resistance received £1.5 million (3.2%). There is little translation of preclinical research into clinical trials or implementation research in spite of substantial disease burden globally, and there are few UK institutions that carry out significant quantities of mycology research of any type. In the context of global health and the burden of disease in low-income countries, more investment is

  17. Gender equality observations and actions by the European Research Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydin, Claudia Alves de Jesus; Farina Busto, Luis; Penny, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Women have historically been underrepresented in science. Much positive progress in attracting women to research careers has been achieved in recent years; however, the most influential and high profile positions in most countries are still predominantly occupied by men. The European Research Council (ERC), Europe's premiere funding agency for frontier research, views gender equality as an important challenge. The ERC monitors closely gender figures on every call and has taken actions to tackle gender imbalances and potential unconscious biases. The ERC talk is focused on efforts made to understand and ensure equal treatment of all candidates, with particular focus on gender balance and with specific attention to geosciences. Data and statistics collected from ERC's internationally recognised funding schemes are presented.

  18. 75 FR 14131 - Effect on Propane Consumers of the Propane Education and Research Council's Operations, Market...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... Propane Education and Research Council's Operations, Market Changes and Federal Programs AGENCY... Education and Research Council (PERC), in conjunction with the cumulative effects of market changes and... requirements under the Propane Education and Research Act of 1996 that established PERC and requires the...

  19. Cancer Research UK | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Cancer Research UK. https://www.cancerresearchuk.org/. Initiative de recherche sur la dimension économique de la lutte antitabac. L'Initiative de recherche sur la dimension économique de la lutte antitabac finance la recherche novatrice sur les politiques fiscales qui appuient la lutte antitabac dans les pays à faible revenu ...

  20. Systematic analysis of funding awarded for mycology research to institutions in the UK, 1997–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Michael G; Fitchett, Joseph R; Atun, Rifat; May, Robin C

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Fungal infections cause significant global morbidity and mortality. We have previously described the UK investments in global infectious disease research, and here our objective is to describe the investments awarded to UK institutions for mycology research and outline potential funding gaps in the UK portfolio. Design Systematic analysis. Setting UK institutions carrying out infectious disease research. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcome is the amount of funding and number of studies related to mycology research. Secondary outcomes are describing the investments made to specific fungal pathogens and diseases, and also the type of science along the R&D value chain. Methods We systematically searched databases and websites for information on research studies from public and philanthropic funding institutions awarded between 1997 and 2010, and highlighted the mycology-related projects. Results Of 6165 funded studies, we identified 171 studies related to mycology (total investment £48.4 million, 1.9% of all infection research, with mean annual funding £3.5 million). Studies related to global health represented 5.1% of this funding (£2.4 million, compared with 35.6% of all infectious diseases). Leading funders were the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (£14.8 million, 30.5%) and Wellcome Trust (£12.0 million, 24.7%). Preclinical studies received £42.2 million (87.3%), with clinical trials, intervention studies and implementation research in total receiving £6.2 million (12.7%). By institution, University of Aberdeen received most funding (£16.9 million, 35%). Studies investigating antifungal resistance received £1.5 million (3.2%). Conclusions There is little translation of preclinical research into clinical trials or implementation research in spite of substantial disease burden globally, and there are few UK institutions that carry out significant quantities of mycology research of any type. In the context

  1. Science or public relations? The inside story of the Asbestosis Research Council, 1957-1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweedale, G

    2000-12-01

    In 1957, the leading British asbestos companies (Turner & Newall, Cape Asbestos, and British Belting & Asbestos) founded the Asbestosis Research Council (ARC). This was a response to rising asbestosis and asbestos cancer mortality in the UK and the attendant political and social problems that threatened the existence of the asbestos industry. An ARC research program was launched, that by the 1970s was mainly based within the Institute of Occupational Medicine at Edinburgh University. By the end of the 1980s, well over a hundred papers had been published with ARC support. The bulk of the work involved animal experiments and the chemical analysis of fibers, but the asbestos companies showed little enthusiasm for wider epidemiological studies or for exploring the cancer threat. The sponsoring companies dictated the ARC's research strategy and also vetted (and sometimes censored) publications; while using the ARC as a counterweight to government regulation and media attacks. The ARC's history highlights the compromises that were made by individual scientists and demonstrates the dilemmas inherent in industry-controlled research. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. 75 FR 24773 - Research and Innovative Technology Administration Advisory Council on Transportation Statistics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Bureau of Transportation Statistics Research and Innovative Technology Administration Advisory Council on Transportation Statistics; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Research... Transportation, Research and Innovative Technology Administration, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, Attention...

  3. Educating for a Critical Democracy: Civic Participation Reimagined in the Council of Youth Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirra, Nicole; Morrell, Ernest D.; Cain, Ebony; Scorza, D'Artagnan; Ford, Arlene

    2013-01-01

    This article explores civic learning, civic participation, and the development of civic agency within the Council of Youth Research (the Council), a program that engages high school students in youth participatory action research projects that challenge school inequalities and mobilize others in pursuit of educational justice. We critique the…

  4. EPRI/Alberta Research Council Clean Soil Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spear, C.E.

    1992-12-01

    The EPRI/Alberta Research Council Clean Soil Process can remove hydrocarbon contamination from waste material from manufactured gas plants. The process uses coal as an absorbent to remove hydrocarbons. For petroleum contaminated soils, the process can bring residual concentration of petroleum below 0.1 percent and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentration to 1--5 ppM. For coal tar contaminated soils, the process can reduce tar concentrations to about 0.05-0.5 percent and the PAH concentration to about 10--60 ppM. Additional post-treatment may be required for some precleaned soils. The process yields by-product agglomerates suitable for combustion in industrial boilers. Light hydrocarbons such as benzene are vaporized from the soil, condensed and collected in the Process and disposed of off-site. The Clean Soil Process has been tested at pilot-plant scale. A conceptual design for a 200-tons-per-day plant yielded a capital cost estimated at $3.1 million with a per-ton operating cost of $40

  5. Radiotherapy physics research in the UK: challenges and proposed solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, R I; Burnet, N G; Green, S; Illidge, T M; Staffurth, J N

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the Clinical and Translational Radiotherapy Research Working Group (CTRad) of the National Cancer Research Institute brought together UK radiotherapy physics leaders for a think tank meeting. Following a format that CTRad had previously and successfully used with clinical oncologists, 23 departments were asked to complete a pre-meeting evaluation of their radiotherapy physics research infrastructure and the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats within their own centre. These departments were brought together with the CTRad Executive Group and research funders to discuss the current state of radiotherapy physics research, perceived barriers and possible solutions. In this Commentary, we summarise the submitted materials, presentations and discussions from the meeting and propose an action plan. It is clear that there are challenges in both funding and staffing of radiotherapy physics research. Programme and project funding streams sometimes struggle to cater for physics-led work, and increased representation on research funding bodies would be valuable. Career paths for academic radiotherapy physicists need to be examined and an academic training route identified within Modernising Scientific Careers; the introduction of formal job plans may allow greater protection of research time, and should be considered. Improved access to research facilities, including research linear accelerators, would enhance research activity and pass on developments to patients more quickly; research infrastructure could be benchmarked against centres in the UK and abroad. UK National Health Service departments wishing to undertake radiotherapy research, with its attendant added value for patients, need to develop a strategy with their partner higher education institution, and collaboration between departments may provide enhanced opportunities for funded research. PMID:22972972

  6. Radiotherapy physics research in the UK: challenges and proposed solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, R I; Burnet, N G; Green, S; Illidge, T M; Staffurth, J N

    2012-10-01

    In 2011, the Clinical and Translational Radiotherapy Research Working Group (CTRad) of the National Cancer Research Institute brought together UK radiotherapy physics leaders for a think tank meeting. Following a format that CTRad had previously and successfully used with clinical oncologists, 23 departments were asked to complete a pre-meeting evaluation of their radiotherapy physics research infrastructure and the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats within their own centre. These departments were brought together with the CTRad Executive Group and research funders to discuss the current state of radiotherapy physics research, perceived barriers and possible solutions. In this Commentary, we summarise the submitted materials, presentations and discussions from the meeting and propose an action plan. It is clear that there are challenges in both funding and staffing of radiotherapy physics research. Programme and project funding streams sometimes struggle to cater for physics-led work, and increased representation on research funding bodies would be valuable. Career paths for academic radiotherapy physicists need to be examined and an academic training route identified within Modernising Scientific Careers; the introduction of formal job plans may allow greater protection of research time, and should be considered. Improved access to research facilities, including research linear accelerators, would enhance research activity and pass on developments to patients more quickly; research infrastructure could be benchmarked against centres in the UK and abroad. UK National Health Service departments wishing to undertake radiotherapy research, with its attendant added value for patients, need to develop a strategy with their partner higher education institution, and collaboration between departments may provide enhanced opportunities for funded research.

  7. UK Institute of Physics (IOP) President Sir Gareth Roberts (right) at CERN on 9 July with (right to left) IOP council vice-president and distinguished physicist Peter Kalmus, CERN engineer Tim Watson and IOP director of science Peter Cooper

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    UK Institute of Physics (IOP) President Sir Gareth Roberts (right) at CERN on 9 July with (right to left) IOP council vice-president and distinguished physicist Peter Kalmus, CERN engineer Tim Watson and IOP director of science Peter Cooper

  8. 75 FR 57520 - NASA Advisory Council; Planetary Science Subcommittee; Supporting Research and Technology Working...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-112)] NASA Advisory Council; Planetary Science Subcommittee; Supporting Research and Technology Working Group; Meeting AGENCY: National... announces a meeting of the Supporting Research and Technology Working Group of the Planetary Science...

  9. Globalisation of Researcher Mobility within the UK Higher Education: Explaining the Presence of Overseas Academics in the UK Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattab, Nabil; Fenton, Steve

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we argue that the power structure that lies within the UK elite universities dictates a division of labour through which the inflows of overseas academics into the UK academic labour markets are skewed towards these elite academic institutions where they are employed primarily in research-only posts. These posts, are less valued and…

  10. Fusion research in the UK 1945-1960

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendry, J.; Lawson, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    Two workers, involved in the research programmes themselves, document the developments in fusion research in the United Kingdom from 1945 until 1960. Started as part of the official history of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, the text is drawn from work by various teams of scientists at laboratories around the United Kingdom. This previewing of the research programmes lead to an inevitable evaluation of their worth, an assessment of their political implications and speculation on whether certain changes might have advanced scientific progress more readily. (U.K.)

  11. Disposition of recommendations of the National Research Council in the report ''Revitalizing Nuclear Safety Research''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    On December 8, 1986, the Committee on Nuclear Safety Research of the National Research Council submitted its report, ''Revitalizing Nuclear Safety Research,'' to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The Commission and its staff have carefully reviewed the Committee's report and have extensively examined the planning, implementation, and management of NRC research programs in order to respond most effectively to the Committee's recommendations. This report presents the Commission's view of the Committee's report and describes the actions that are under way in response to its recommendations

  12. Data publication activities in the Natural Environment Research Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadbetter, A.; Callaghan, S.; Lowry, R.; Moncoiffé, G.; Donnegan, S.; Pepler, S.; Cunningham, N.; Kirsch, P.; Ault, L.; Bell, P.; Bowie, R.; Harrison, K.; Smith-Haddon, B.; Wetherby, A.; Wright, D.; Thorley, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) is implementing its Science Information Strategy in order to provide a world class service to deliver integrated data for earth system science. One project within this strategy is Data Citation and Publication, which aims to put the promotion and recognition stages of the data lifecycle into place alongside the traditional data management activities of NERC's Environmental Data Centres (EDCs). The NERC EDCs have made a distinction between the serving of data and its publication. Data serving is defined in this case as the day-to-day data management tasks of: • acquiring data and metadata from the originating scientists; • metadata and format harmonisation prior to database ingestion; • ensuring the metadata is adequate and accurate and that the data are available in appropriate file formats; • and making the data available for interested parties. Whereas publication: • requires the assignment of a digital object identifier to a dataset which guarantees that an EDC has assessed the quality of the metadata and the file format and will maintain an unchanged version of the data for the foreseeable future • requires the peer-review of the scientific quality of the data by a scientist with knowledge of the scientific domain in which the data were collected, using a framework for peer-review of datasets such as that developed by the CLADDIER project. • requires collaboration with journal publishers who have access to a well established peer-review system The first of these requirements can be managed in-house by the EDCs, while the remainder require collaboration with the wider scientific and publishing communities. It is anticipated that a scientist may achieve a lower level of academic credit for a dataset which is assigned a DOI but does not follow through to the scientific peer-review stage, similar to publication in a report or other non-peer reviewed publication normally described as grey literature, or

  13. UK pulls out of plans for ILC

    CERN Multimedia

    Durrani, Matin

    2007-01-01

    "A funding crisis at one of the UK's leading research councils has forced the country to pull out of plans for the International Linear Collider (ILC). The science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) says in a report published today that it does not see "a practicable path towards the realization of this facility as currently conceived on a reasonable timescale". (1 page)

  14. Research activities of the nuclear graphite research group at the University of Manchester, UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.; Fok, A.S.L.; Marrow, J.; Mummery, P.

    2004-01-01

    In 2001 the Nuclear Safety Division (NSD) of the UK Health and Safety Executive (HSE) decided to underwrite the Nuclear Graphite Research Group (NGRG) at the University of Manchester, UK with the aim of providing a source of independent research and advice to the HSE (NSD). Since then the group has rapidly expanded to 16 members and attracted considerable funding from the nuclear power industry and the regulator for a wide range of research and consultancy work. It is now also part of the Material Performance Centre within the BNFL Universities Research Alliance. Extensive collaboration exists between the group and other nuclear research institutes, both in the UK and overseas. This paper briefly describes some of the research programmes being carried out by the NGRG at Manchester. (author)

  15. The ethics of animal research: a UK perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Pauline

    2007-01-01

    The Nuffield Council on Bioethics, an independent body in the United Kingdom, has published a 2005 report titled The Ethics of Research Involving Animals. The Report, produced by a Working Party that represented a wide range of views, seeks to clarify the debate that surrounds this topic and aims to help people identify and analyze the relevant scientific and ethical issues. The Working Party considered the arguments surrounding whether animal research yields useful results, and recommends that its predictability and transferability should be evaluated more fully, particularly in controversial areas. Commonly encountered ethical questions and arguments were considered in order to understand what lies behind disagreement on the moral justification of animal research. Four possible ethical positions on animal research, which represent points on a continuum, are described. Despite the range of views that exist among members of the Working Party, the Report presents a "Consensus Statement" that identifies agreement on several important issues. Building on this statement, recommendations are made for improving the quality of the debate and promoting the 3Rs (refinement, reduction, and replacement).

  16. Exploring the Best Practices of Nursing Research Councils in Magnet® Organizations: Findings From a Qualitative Research Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Jennifer; Lindauer, Cathleen; Parks, Joyce; Scala, Elizabeth

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this descriptive qualitative study was to identify best practices of nursing research councils (NRCs) at Magnet®-designated hospitals. Nursing research (NR) is essential, adding to the body of nursing knowledge. Applying NR to the bedside improves care, enhances patient safety, and is an imperative for nursing leaders. We interviewed NR designees at 26 Magnet-recognized hospitals about the structure and function of their NRCs and used structural coding to identify best practices. Most organizations link NR and evidence-based practice. Council membership includes leadership and clinical nurses. Councils conduct scientific reviews for nursing studies, supporting nurse principal investigators. Tracking and reporting of NR vary widely and are challenging. Councils provide education, sponsor research days, and collaborate interprofessionally, including with academic partners. Findings from this study demonstrate the need to create formal processes to track and report NR and to develop outcome-focused NR education.

  17. Digital Games and the US National Research Council's Science Proficiency Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Garza, Mario; Clark, Douglas B.; Nelson, Brian C.

    2013-01-01

    This review synthesises research on digital games and science learning as it supports the goals for science proficiency outlined in the report by the US National Research Council on science education reform. The review is organised in terms of these research-based goals for science proficiency in light of their alignment with current science…

  18. National Research Council Research Associateships Program with Methane Hydrates Fellowships Program/National Energy Technology Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basques, Eric O. [National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-03-20

    This report summarizes work carried out over the period from July 5, 2005-January 31, 2014. The work was carried out by the National Research Council Research Associateships Program of the National Academies, under the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) program. This Technical Report consists of a description of activity from 2005 through 2014, broken out within yearly timeframes, for NRC/NETL Associateships researchers at NETL laboratories which includes individual tenure reports from Associates over this time period. The report also includes individual tenure reports from associates over this time period. The report also includes descriptions of program promotion efforts, a breakdown of the review competitions, awards offered, and Associate's activities during their tenure.

  19. Science and Engineering Research Council Central Laser Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    This report covers the work done at, or in association with, the Central Laser Facility during the year April 1980 to March 1981. In the first chapter the major reconstruction and upgrade of the glass laser, which has been undertaken in order to increase the versatility of the facility, is described. The work of the six groups of the Glass Laser Scientific Progamme and Scheduling Committee is described in further chapters entitled; glass laser development, laser plasma interactions, transport and particle emission studies, ablative acceleration and compression studies, spectroscopy and XUV lasers, and theory and computation. Publications based on the work of the facility which have either appeared or been accepted for publication during the year are listed. (U.K.)

  20. Council for Scientific and Industrial Research annual report 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    The CSIR undertakes and manages broadly based scientific research, development and technology transfer in South Africa. The organisation is divided into four groups: Corporate Finance Management; Research Development and Implementation; Foundation for Research Development and Corporate Support Services. Research on coal is carried out by the Energy Technology Division which is part of the Research, Development and Implementation Group. This annual report reviews the work of the CSIR during 1987.

  1. UK investments in global infectious disease research 1997-2010: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Michael G; Fitchett, Joseph R; Cooke, Mary K; Wurie, Fatima B; Hayward, Andrew C; Atun, Rifat

    2013-01-01

    Infectious diseases account for 15 million deaths per year worldwide, and disproportionately affect young people, elderly people, and the poorest sections of society. We aimed to describe the investments awarded to UK institutions for infectious disease research. We systematically searched databases and websites for information on research studies from funding institutions and created a comprehensive database of infectious disease research projects for the period 1997-2010. We categorised studies and funding by disease, cross-cutting theme, and by a research and development value chain describing the type of science. Regression analyses were reported with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient to establish the relation between research investment, mortality, and disease burden as measured by disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). We identified 6170 funded studies, with a total research investment of UK£2·6 billion. Studies with a clear global health component represented 35·6% of all funding (£927 million). By disease, HIV received £461 million (17·7%), malaria £346 million (13·3%), tuberculosis £149 million (5·7%), influenza £80 million (3·1%), and hepatitis C £60 million (2·3%). We compared funding with disease burden (DALYs and mortality) to show low levels of investment relative to burden for gastrointestinal infections (£254 million, 9·7%), some neglected tropical diseases (£184 million, 7·1%), and antimicrobial resistance (£96 million, 3·7%). Virology was the highest funded category (£1 billion, 38·4%). Leading funding sources were the Wellcome Trust (£688 million, 26·4%) and the Medical Research Council (£673 million, 25·8%). Research funding has to be aligned with prevailing and projected global infectious disease burden. Funding agencies and industry need to openly document their research investments to redress any inequities in resource allocation. None. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. How the Recovery Act's Federal Coordinating Council paved the way for the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Patrick H

    2010-11-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 provided $1.1 billion for comparative effectiveness research and established the Federal Coordinating Council for Comparative Effectiveness Research to direct that investment. The council laid a critical foundation for comparative effectiveness research in the steps it took to gather information, invite public input, set priorities, coordinate project solicitations, and stress the importance of evaluating research investments. Although the council has been superseded by a successor--the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute--the experiences of the council can and should inform the work of the new institute as it begins its operations.

  3. New roles and strategies of a research council: intermediation of the principal-agent relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meulen, Barend

    2003-01-01

    Research councils have mediated the principal-agent relation between government and science: they are expected to mediate the political and policy interests in scientific research into the world of science and technology and promote the interests of science and technology in the policy world.

  4. Writing a Research Paper for Journal of Nepal Agricultural Research Council

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal Krishna Joshi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural research findings are required to reach soon to the farmers, extensionists, media, researchers, policy makers, businessperson, students, teachers and so many other stakeholders. Among different types of publications, research paper is generally published in journal considered as standard type of publication in term of quality and recognition. Most of the journals follow similar pattern and framework; however, the style, format and process may be different with each other. A research (scientific paper is a written describing original research result using standard methods and materials. The major sections in a journal paper are abstract, introduction, materials and methods, results, discussion, conclusion, and references. Accordingly Journal of Nepal Agricultural Research Council has its own style and format. Author needs to follow guidelines strictly on the use of punctuation marks such as comma (,, period (., space, justification etc; otherwise submitted manuscripts could be immediately return to author without considering in review process. In general, we received manuscripts with many errors on citation and references, poor elaboration of results of experiments, weak discussion, missing to acknowledge funding agencies, submitting non-editable figures, very few numbers of citations of Nepalese researchers, statements not in logical order, etc. In general, the scientific papers should be written in simple way with new but sufficient justification backed up by data in the form of tables, graphs, flow diagrams etc so that readers can understand easily with high readability. The submitted manuscript in the journal office are sent to two to three reviewers for specific recommendation on the originality of the work, appropriateness of the approach and experimental design, adequacy of experimental techniques, soundness of conclusions and interpretations, relevance of discussion and importance of the research. The language clarity and

  5. Investments in cancer research awarded to UK institutions and the global burden of cancer 2000–2013: a systematic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthappu, Mahiben; Head, Michael G; Zhou, Charlie D; Gilbert, Barnabas J; El-Harasis, Majd A; Raine, Rosalind; Fitchett, Joseph R; Atun, Rifat

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To systematically categorise cancer research investment awarded to United Kingdom (UK) institutions in the period 2000–2013 and to estimate research investment relative to disease burden as measured by mortality, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and years lived with disability (YLDs). Design Systematic analysis of all open-access data. Setting and participants Public and philanthropic funding to all UK cancer research institutions, 2000–2013. Main outcome measures Number and financial value of cancer research investments reported in 2013 UK pounds (UK£). Mortality, DALYs and YLDs data were acquired from the Global Burden of Disease Study. A compound metric was adapted to estimate research investment relative to disease burden as measured by mortality, DALYs and YLDs. Results We identified 4299 funded studies with a total research investment of £2.4 billion. The highest fundings by anatomical sites were haematological, breast, prostate, colorectal and ovarian cancers. Relative to disease burden as determined by a compound metric combining mortality, DALYs and YLDs, gender-specific cancers were found to be highest funded—the five sites that received the most funding were prostate, ovarian, breast, mesothelioma and testicular cancer; the least well-funded sites were liver, thyroid, lung, upper gastrointestinal (GI) and bladder. Preclinical science accounted for 66.2% of award numbers and 62.2% of all funding. The top five areas of primary research focus by funding were pathogenesis, drug therapy, diagnostic, screening and monitoring, women's health and immunology. The largest individual funder was the Medical Research Council. In combination, the five lowest funded site-specific cancers relative to disease burden account for 47.9%, 44.3% and 20.4% of worldwide cancer mortality, DALYs and YLDs. Conclusions Research funding for cancer is not allocated according to relative disease burden. These findings are in line with earlier published studies

  6. The Geotechnical Board National Research Council. [Annual] activities report, March 1, 1991--June 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smeallie, P.H.

    1993-08-11

    This report covers the activities of the Geotechnical Board and its two national committees, the US National Committee for Rock Mechanics (USNC/RM) and the US National Committee on Tunneling Technology (USNC/TT), for the period from March 1, 1991 to June 30, 1992. The report covers a 16-month period, through June of this year, to bring the reporting period in line with the National Research Council`s (NRC) fiscal year. Subsequent reports will cover the 12-month period July 1--June 30, unless individual contracts require otherwise. A description of the Geotechnical Board and its committees within the context of the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council, as well as lists of current members of the board and national committees can be found in Attachment A.

  7. Testing a model of research intention among U.K. clinical psychologists: a logistic regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eke, Gemma; Holttum, Sue; Hayward, Mark

    2012-03-01

    Previous research highlights barriers to clinical psychologists conducting research, but has rarely examined U.K. clinical psychologists. The study investigated U.K. clinical psychologists' self-reported research output and tested part of a theoretical model of factors influencing their intention to conduct research. Questionnaires were mailed to 1,300 U.K. clinical psychologists. Three hundred and seventy-four questionnaires were returned (29% response-rate). This study replicated in a U.K. sample the finding that the modal number of publications was zero, highlighted in a number of U.K. and U.S. studies. Research intention was bimodally distributed, and logistic regression classified 78% of cases successfully. Outcome expectations, perceived behavioral control and normative beliefs mediated between research training environment and intention. Further research should explore how research is negotiated in clinical roles, and this issue should be incorporated into prequalification training. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Research investments in global infectious diseases - a systematic analysis of the UK research portfolio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Head, M.G.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis considers investments in infectious disease research awarded to UK institutions between 1997 and 2010. It considers awards by pathogen and disease area, and by the type of science along the R&D pipeline (from pre-clinical and basic science, through clinical trials and product development

  9. Lively Bureaucracy? The ESRC's Doctoral Training Centres and UK Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunt, Ingrid; McAlpine, Lynn; Mills, David

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the changing relationships between the UK government, its research councils and universities, focusing on the governing, funding and organisation of doctoral training. We use the Doctoral Training Centres (DTCs) funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as a prism through which to study the shifting nature of…

  10. Vascular surgery research in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Jawas

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: The quality and quantity of vascular surgery research in the GCC countries should be improved to answer important local questions related to vascular diseases. This needs better strategic planning and more collaboration between various institutions.

  11. Publication patterns in UK research assessment 1992-2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, J.; Loach, T.; Szomszor, M.

    2016-07-01

    For 30 years, outputs published by UK researchers have been submitted for cyclical assessment by peer panels, creating a unique longitudinal dataset. This is the first analysis covering 921,254 submitted outputs and 36,244 case study references across 25 years, five assessment cycles and both academic impact and economic/societal impact. For submitted outputs, document types shift towards journal articles across time. The time-spread of outputs is skewed to the most recent publication years in early RAE cycles, a pattern not reported at the time but one that then changes synchronously for science and engineering but not for social science or humanities. The skew and later changes are cohesive across disciplines and institutions. For impact case study references, the time-spread of the earliest of the six references for each study is uniform for science and engineering, although the overall timespread for references is skewed. About 42% of case study references with DOIs can be identified as RAE/REF submitted outputs, at about the same rate in every publication year for 1996-2013. Implications for assessment are discussed. (Author)

  12. The National Research Council study: "Making sense of ballistic missile defense"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkening, Dean A.

    2014-05-01

    This chapter explains and summarizes the main findings of a recent National Research Council study entitled Making Sense of Ballistic Missile Defense: An Assessment of Concepts and Systems for U.S. Boost-Phase Missile Defense in Comparison to Other Alternatives.

  13. New chair for the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Peter Warry has been appointed as Chair of PPARC for the next 4 years. Chairman of Victrex plc, whose business is in speciality chemicals, he has been an Industrial Professor at the University of Warwick since 1993. PPARC pursues a programme of high quality basic research in particle physics, astronomy, cosmology and space science and its budget for 2002 is approximately 220 million GBP.

  14. A National Research Agenda for Virtual Reality: Report by the National Research Council Committee on VR R&D

    OpenAIRE

    Pausch, Randy; Aviles, Walter; Durlach, Nathaniel; Robinett, Warren; Zyda, Michael

    1995-01-01

    In 1992, at the request of a consortium of federal agencies, the National Research Council established a committee to "recommand a national research and development agenda in the area of virtual reality" to set U.S. government R&D funding priorities for virtual reality (VR) for the next decade....

  15. Involvement of consumers in studies run by the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit: Results of a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vale Claire L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to establish levels of consumer involvement in randomised controlled trials (RCTs, meta-analyses and other studies carried out by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC Clinical Trials Unit across the range of research programs, predominantly in cancer and HIV. Methods Staff responsible for studies that were included in a Unit Progress Report (MRC CTU, April 2009 were asked to complete a semi-structured questionnaire survey regarding consumer involvement. This was defined as active involvement of consumers as partners in the research process and not as subjects of that research. The electronic questionnaires combined open and closed questions, intended to capture quantitative and qualitative information on whether studies had involved consumers; types of activities undertaken; recruitment and support; advantages and disadvantages of involvement and its perceived impact on aspects of the research. Results Between October 2009 and April 2010, 138 completed questionnaires (86% were returned. Studies had been conducted over a 20 year period from 1989, and around half were in cancer; 30% in HIV and 20% were in other disease areas including arthritis, tuberculosis and blood transfusion medicine. Forty-three studies (31% had some consumer involvement, most commonly as members of trial management groups (TMG [88%]. A number of positive impacts on both the research and the researcher were identified. Researchers generally felt involvement was worthwhile and some felt that consumer involvement had improved the credibility of the research. Benefits in design and quality, trial recruitment, dissemination and decision making were also perceived. Researchers felt they learned from consumer involvement, albeit that there were some barriers. Conclusions Whilst most researchers identified benefits of involving consumers, most of studies included in the survey had no involvement. Information from this survey will inform the development

  16. Involvement of consumers in studies run by the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit: results of a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Claire L; Thompson, Lindsay C; Murphy, Claire; Forcat, Silvia; Hanley, Bec

    2012-01-13

    We aimed to establish levels of consumer involvement in randomised controlled trials (RCTs), meta-analyses and other studies carried out by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) Clinical Trials Unit across the range of research programs, predominantly in cancer and HIV. Staff responsible for studies that were included in a Unit Progress Report (MRC CTU, April 2009) were asked to complete a semi-structured questionnaire survey regarding consumer involvement. This was defined as active involvement of consumers as partners in the research process and not as subjects of that research. The electronic questionnaires combined open and closed questions, intended to capture quantitative and qualitative information on whether studies had involved consumers; types of activities undertaken; recruitment and support; advantages and disadvantages of involvement and its perceived impact on aspects of the research. Between October 2009 and April 2010, 138 completed questionnaires (86%) were returned. Studies had been conducted over a 20 year period from 1989, and around half were in cancer; 30% in HIV and 20% were in other disease areas including arthritis, tuberculosis and blood transfusion medicine. Forty-three studies (31%) had some consumer involvement, most commonly as members of trial management groups (TMG) [88%]. A number of positive impacts on both the research and the researcher were identified. Researchers generally felt involvement was worthwhile and some felt that consumer involvement had improved the credibility of the research. Benefits in design and quality, trial recruitment, dissemination and decision making were also perceived. Researchers felt they learned from consumer involvement, albeit that there were some barriers. Whilst most researchers identified benefits of involving consumers, most of studies included in the survey had no involvement. Information from this survey will inform the development of a unit policy on consumer involvement, to guide future

  17. The impact of European research ethics legislation on UK radiology research activity: a bibliometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.A.; Toms, A.P.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether there is evidence of a reduction in radiology research activity in the UK following the implementation of the European research ethics legislation, which came in to force in 2001 and has been widely criticised as an impediment to research. Materials and methods: A bibliometric analysis was performed by searching PubMed for all first-author publications from UK departments of 'radiology' or 'medical imaging' between 1995 and 2007. Results were subcategorized into those papers published in the highest cited general radiology journals and by publication type: original research, reviews, and case reports. Results: From 1995 to 2007 the total number of publications rose by 6.5% from 137 to 146 with the increase occurring in non-general radiology journals. Original articles fell from 18 in 1995 to 12 in 2003, but then rose to 24 by 2007 (33% rise). This dip was paralleled by a fall and then recovery in case report publications. The most dramatic change has been in the number of review articles, which has increased more than eightfold from seven in 1995 to 65 in 2007 to become the most common form of publication. Conclusion: The overall number of original scientific articles, published by first-author UK radiologists, has increased slightly over the last 12 years despite a temporary fall associated with the introduction of new research ethics legislation.

  18. Where do counselling psychologists based in the UK disseminate their research? A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Hanley, Terry; Ruth, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Research is frequently cited as core to counselling psychology. Yet we know little about where counselling psychologists publish their own findings. The present study aims to answer the following two research questions: (1) Where do UK-based counselling psychologists disseminate their research? (2) To what extent do counselling psychologists disseminate their research in British Psychological Society outlets? Method: A systematic review examining research by UK-based counselling psycholo...

  19. Research from therapeutic radiographers: An audit of research capacity within the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probst, H.; Harris, R.; McNair, H.A.; Baker, A.; Miles, E.A.; Beardmore, C.

    2015-01-01

    Research from Allied Health Professionals (AHPs) is anecdotally known to lag behind that of other professions. The developing research landscape within other therapies and internationally led us to question how UK practice in therapeutic radiography was developing. The aim of the survey was to audit research capacity across therapy radiography in the UK. Method: An electronic survey was sent to Radiotherapy Service Managers (RSM) and research leads in each of the radiotherapy centres in the UK. An adapted version of the ‘Auditing Research Capacity’ tool (ARC © tool) was used as the basis of the questionnaire. Results: A total of 45 RSM responded to the survey (67% response rate) and 30 Research radiographers (RR) (45% response rate). A total of 51 RR were in post equating to 40.3 whole time equivalents and averaging 1 RR per centre. Variation was evident in the commitment to the development of a research culture identified by practices such as linking research to the business planning cycle, inclusion of research in recruitment and advertising materials, or having a nominated therapeutic radiographer lead on research for the department. Over a third of responding centres did not have a research strategy and training for RRs was limited; specifically in areas such as writing funding bids, writing for publication and the research and governance process. Conclusion: A number of short and long-term strategies are proposed that should enhance a positive research culture and improve research capacity for therapeutic radiography led research. These include utilisation of the existing infrastructure provided by the National Institute for Health Research, a lead or co-ordinator for research activity with a remit to motivate others. Development of links and networks, and the development of a research strategy linked to wider Trust research priorities. The research strategy should include mentoring or developing appropriate research skills for those engaged in research

  20. Introduction to Medical Research Council Delivery Plan during 2009 to 2014

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Introduction The Medical Research Foundation is the Medical Research Council's (MRC) independently managed charity.It receives funds from the giving public to support medical research, training, public engagement and dissemination of knowledge.Since it was first established in 1920, the MRC has been able to accept charitable bequests, endowments and donations from the public to contribute towards the costs of the research that it undertakes.The MRC registered these charitable funds with the Charity Commission in the late 1960's and its charity - the Medical Research Foundation-has been successfully supporting medical research for over 80 years.

  1. Undergraduate Research as a Primary Pathway to STEM Careers: Perspectives from the Council on Undergraduate Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, P. L.; Ambos, E. L.

    2012-12-01

    Undergraduate research (UR) is one of the most authentic and effective ways to promote student learning, and is a high-impact educational practice that can lead to measurable gains in student retention and graduation rates, as well as career aspirations. In recent years, UR has expanded from intensive summer one-on-one faculty-student mentored experiences to application in a variety of educational settings, including large lower division courses. The Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR), founded in 1978, is a national organization of individual (8000) and institutional members (650) within a divisional structure that includes geosciences, as well as 10 other thematic areas. CUR's main mission is to support and promote high-quality undergraduate student-faculty collaborative research and scholarship that develops learning through research. CUR fulfills this mission through extensive publication offerings, faculty and student-directed professional development events, and outreach and advocacy activities that share successful models and strategies for establishing, institutionalizing, and sustaining undergraduate research programs. Over the last decade, CUR has worked with hundreds of academic institutions, including two-year colleges, to develop practices to build undergraduate research into campus cultures and operations. As documented in CUR publications such as Characteristics of Excellence in Undergraduate Research (COEUR), strategies institutions may adopt to enhance and sustain UR often include: (1) the establishment of a central UR campus office, (2) extensive student and faculty participation in campus-based, as well as regional UR celebration events, (3) development of a consistent practice of assessment of UR's impact on student success, and, (4) establishment of clear policies for recognizing and rewarding faculty engagement in UR, particularly with respect to mentorship and publication with student scholars. Three areas of current focus within the

  2. National research council report and its impact on nuclear engineering education at the University of Michigan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    A recent report by the National Research Council raised a number of important issues that will have an impact on nuclear engineering departments across the country. The report has been reviewed in the context of its relevance to the Department of Nuclear Engineering at the University of Michigan (UM), and some observations and conclusions have been drawn. This paper focuses on those portions of Ref. 1 concerning undergraduate and graduate curricula, research facilities and laboratories, faculty research interests, and funding for research and graduate student support because these topics have a direct impact on current and future directions for the department

  3. Investments in sexually transmitted infection research, 1997-2013: a systematic analysis of funding awarded to UK institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Michael G; Fitchett, Joseph R; Cassell, Jackie A; Atun, Rifat

    2015-12-01

    We report the first study that analyses public and philanthropic investments awarded to UK institutions for research related to sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We systematically searched award data from the major funders for information on all infectious disease research funding awarded in 1997-2013. The STI-related projects were identified and categorised by pathogen, disease and type of science along the research pipeline from preclinical to translational research. We identified 7393 infection-related awards with total investment of GBP 3.5 billion. Of these, 1238 awards (16.7%) covering funding of GBP 719.1 million (20.5%) were for STI research. HIV as an STI received GBP 465 million across 719 studies; non-HIV STIs received GBP 139 million across 378 studies. The Medical Research Council provided greatest investment (GBP 193 million for HIV, GBP 45 million for non-HIV STIs). Preclinical awards totalled GBP 233 million (37.1%), whilst translational research received GBP 286 million (39.7%). Substantial proportions of HIV investment addressed global health research (GBP 265 million), vaccinology (GBP 110 million) and therapeutics (GBP 202 million). For other STIs, investments focused on diagnostics (GBP 45 million) and global health (GBP 27 million). Human Papilloma Virus research received GBP 58 million and chlamydia GBP 24 million. Funding for non-HIV STIs has declined in the three most recent years of this data set. The investment for HIV research awarded to UK institutions correlates with the high global burden, but other STIs are relatively neglected, including gonorrhoea and syphilis. Future STI funding should be better aligned with burden while addressing the emerging risk of antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae and outbreaks of other pathogens.

  4. Investments in sexually transmitted infection research, 1997–2013: a systematic analysis of funding awarded to UK institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Head

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the first study that analyses public and philanthropic investments awarded to UK institutions for research related to sexually transmitted infections (STIs. We systematically searched award data from the major funders for information on all infectious disease research funding awarded in 1997–2013. The STI–related projects were identified and categorised by pathogen, disease and type of science along the research pipeline from preclinical to translational research. We identified 7393 infection–related awards with total investment of GBP 3.5 billion. Of these, 1238 awards (16.7% covering funding of GBP 719.1 million (20.5% were for STI research. HIV as an STI received GBP 465 million across 719 studies; non–HIV STIs received GBP 139 million across 378 studies. The Medical Research Council provided greatest investment (GBP 193 million for HIV, GBP 45 million for non–HIV STIs. Preclinical awards totalled GBP 233 million (37.1%, whilst translational research received GBP 286 million (39.7%. Substantial proportions of HIV investment addressed global health research (GBP 265 million, vaccinology (GBP 110 million and therapeutics (GBP 202 million. For other STIs, investments focused on diagnostics (GBP 45 million and global health (GBP 27 million. Human Papilloma Virus research received GBP 58 million and chlamydia GBP 24 million. Funding for non–HIV STIs has declined in the three most recent years of this data set. Conclusions The investment for HIV research awarded to UK institutions correlates with the high global burden, but other STIs are relatively neglected, including gonorrhoea and syphilis. Future STI funding should be better aligned with burden while addressing the emerging risk of antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae and outbreaks of other pathogens.

  5. Review of the National Research Council report: Physics through the 1990's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    The report of the National Research Council (NRC), Physics through the 1990s, highlights past developments and research opportunities in the various subfields of physics and addresses general issues concerning the present state of the discipline in the United States. At the request of the Secretary of Energy, the Energy Research Advisory Board (ERAB) reviewed this report and identified the areas that relate to the programs and objectives of the Department of Energy (DOE). The present report provides the conclusions of this review and the recommendations for the Department's actions

  6. The medline UK filter: development and validation of a geographic search filter to retrieve research about the UK from OVID medline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayiku, Lynda; Levay, Paul; Hudson, Tom; Craven, Jenny; Barrett, Elizabeth; Finnegan, Amy; Adams, Rachel

    2017-07-13

    A validated geographic search filter for the retrieval of research about the United Kingdom (UK) from bibliographic databases had not previously been published. To develop and validate a geographic search filter to retrieve research about the UK from OVID medline with high recall and precision. Three gold standard sets of references were generated using the relative recall method. The sets contained references to studies about the UK which had informed National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance. The first and second sets were used to develop and refine the medline UK filter. The third set was used to validate the filter. Recall, precision and number-needed-to-read (NNR) were calculated using a case study. The validated medline UK filter demonstrated 87.6% relative recall against the third gold standard set. In the case study, the medline UK filter demonstrated 100% recall, 11.4% precision and a NNR of nine. A validated geographic search filter to retrieve research about the UK with high recall and precision has been developed. The medline UK filter can be applied to systematic literature searches in OVID medline for topics with a UK focus. © 2017 Crown copyright. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2017 Health Libraries GroupThis article is published with the permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Queen's Printer for Scotland.

  7. Researching primary engineering education: UK perspectives, an exploratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Robin; Andrews, Jane

    2010-10-01

    This paper draws attention to the findings of an exploratory study that critically identified and analysed relevant perceptions of elementary level engineering education within the UK. Utilising an approach based upon grounded theory methodology, 30 participants including teachers, representatives of government bodies and non-profit providers of primary level engineering initiatives were interviewed. Three main concepts were identified during the analysis of findings, each relevant to primary engineering education. These were pedagogic issues, exposure to engineering within the curriculum and children's interest. The paper concludes that the opportunity to make a real difference to children's education by stimulating their engineering imagination suggests this subject area is of particular value.

  8. The hazards to man of nuclear and allied radiations. A second report to the Medical Research Council

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-12-01

    In March, 1955, the Prime Minister requested that the Medical Research Council should appoint an independent committee to report on the medical and genetic aspects of nuclear radiation and in the following month the Council appointed us members of such a committee, under the chairmanship of Sir Harold Himsworth, to undertake this task. In June, 1956, our Report to the Medical Research Council (Cmd. 9780) was presented to Parliament by the Lord President of the Council. In the following months our Genetics Panel met twice for the primary purpose of putting forward further recommendations for research and in June, 1958, we ourselves, at the Council's request, met again in full session to prepare a statement (Cmnd. 508) on the Report of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. During the whole of this period the subject has been kept under regular review by various standing committees of the Council. We ourselves met again in November, 1959, following a request from the Medical Research Council that we should prepare a further considered statement of the position in this field and the report which follows is the result of this request.

  9. The hazards to man of nuclear and allied radiations. A second report to the Medical Research Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-12-01

    In March, 1955, the Prime Minister requested that the Medical Research Council should appoint an independent committee to report on the medical and genetic aspects of nuclear radiation and in the following month the Council appointed us members of such a committee, under the chairmanship of Sir Harold Himsworth, to undertake this task. In June, 1956, our Report to the Medical Research Council (Cmd. 9780) was presented to Parliament by the Lord President of the Council. In the following months our Genetics Panel met twice for the primary purpose of putting forward further recommendations for research and in June, 1958, we ourselves, at the Council's request, met again in full session to prepare a statement (Cmnd. 508) on the Report of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. During the whole of this period the subject has been kept under regular review by various standing committees of the Council. We ourselves met again in November, 1959, following a request from the Medical Research Council that we should prepare a further considered statement of the position in this field and the report which follows is the result of this request

  10. Observations and actions to ensure equal treatment of all candidates by the European Research Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydin, Claudia Alves de Jesus; Farina Busto, Luis; El Mjiyad, Nadia; Kota, Jhansi; Thelen, Lionel

    2017-04-01

    The European Research Council (ERC), Europe's premiere funding agency for frontier research, views equality of opportunities as an important challenge. The ERC monitors closely gender figures on every call and has taken actions to tackle imbalances and potential unconscious biases. The ERC talk is focused on efforts made to understand and ensure equal treatment of all candidates, with particular focus on gender balance and with specific attention to geosciences. Data and statistics collected in running highly competitive and internationally recognised funding schemes are presented. Recent initiatives to tackle geographical imbalances will also be presented.

  11. Investments in cancer research awarded to UK institutions and the global burden of cancer 2000-2013: a systematic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthappu, Mahiben; Head, Michael G; Zhou, Charlie D; Gilbert, Barnabas J; El-Harasis, Majd A; Raine, Rosalind; Fitchett, Joseph R; Atun, Rifat

    2017-04-20

    To systematically categorise cancer research investment awarded to United Kingdom (UK) institutions in the period 2000-2013 and to estimate research investment relative to disease burden as measured by mortality, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and years lived with disability (YLDs). Systematic analysis of all open-access data. Public and philanthropic funding to all UK cancer research institutions, 2000-2013. Number and financial value of cancer research investments reported in 2013 UK pounds (UK£). Mortality, DALYs and YLDs data were acquired from the Global Burden of Disease Study. A compound metric was adapted to estimate research investment relative to disease burden as measured by mortality, DALYs and YLDs. We identified 4299 funded studies with a total research investment of £2.4 billion. The highest fundings by anatomical sites were haematological, breast, prostate, colorectal and ovarian cancers. Relative to disease burden as determined by a compound metric combining mortality, DALYs and YLDs, gender-specific cancers were found to be highest funded-the five sites that received the most funding were prostate, ovarian, breast, mesothelioma and testicular cancer; the least well-funded sites were liver, thyroid, lung, upper gastrointestinal (GI) and bladder. Preclinical science accounted for 66.2% of award numbers and 62.2% of all funding. The top five areas of primary research focus by funding were pathogenesis, drug therapy, diagnostic, screening and monitoring, women's health and immunology. The largest individual funder was the Medical Research Council. In combination, the five lowest funded site-specific cancers relative to disease burden account for 47.9%, 44.3% and 20.4% of worldwide cancer mortality, DALYs and YLDs. Research funding for cancer is not allocated according to relative disease burden. These findings are in line with earlier published studies. Funding agencies and industry should openly document their research investments to

  12. Mental illness research in the Gulf Cooperation Council: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Jason E; Pryjmachuk, Steven; Waterman, Heather

    2016-08-04

    Rapid growth and development in recent decades has seen mental health and mental illness emerge as priority health concerns for the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates). As a result, mental health services in the region are being redefined and expanded. However, there is a paucity of local research to guide ongoing service development. Local research is important because service users' experience of mental illness and mental health services are linked to their sociocultural context. In order for service development to be most effective, there is a need for increased understanding of the people who use these services.This article aims to review and synthesize mental health research from the Gulf Cooperation Council. It also seeks to identify gaps in the literature and suggest directions for future research. A scoping framework was used to conduct this review. To identify studies, database searches were undertaken, regional journals were hand-searched, and reference lists of included articles were examined. Empirical studies undertaken in the Gulf Cooperation Council that reported mental health service users' experience of mental illness were included. Framework analysis was used to synthesize results. Fifty-five studies met inclusion criteria and the following themes were identified: service preferences, illness (symptomology, perceived cause, impact), and recovery (traditional healing, family support, religion). Gaps included contradictory findings related to the supportive role of the Arabic extended family and religion, under-representation of women in study samples, and limited attention on illness management outside of the hospital setting.From this review, it is clear that the sociocultural context in the region is linked to service users' experience of mental illness. Future research that aims to fill the identified gaps and develop and test culturally appropriate interventions will aid practice

  13. Food allergy - science and policy needs - The UK Food Standards Agency Research Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, Joelle; Hattersley, Sue; Kimber, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Food allergy is a significant health issue in the UK, affecting between 1 and 2% of adults and 5 and 8% of children. The UK Food Standards Agency seeks to ensure the safety of food allergic consumers by providing them with information and guidance on food choices. Since 1995, with the aim of addressing important policy issues and improving the quality of the support and guidance available for food allergic consumers, the Agency (and before that the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food), has had a programme of research dedicated to investigating the causes and mechanisms of food allergy and delivering benefits for UK consumers. In this paper, we outline some of the major scientific challenges that the programme has sought to address. We reflect on how the findings have been used as a basis for the development of sound, evidence-based policy and advice for UK consumers, and the current direction of research being supported by the programme.

  14. Infectious disease research investments: systematic analysis of immunology and vaccine research funding in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitchett, Joseph R; Head, Michael G; Atun, Rifat

    2013-12-05

    Financing for global health is a critical element of research and development. Innovations in new vaccines are critically dependent on research funding given the large sums required, however estimates of global research investments are lacking. We evaluate infectious disease research investments, focusing on immunology and vaccine research by UK research funding organisations. In 1997-2010, £2.6 billion were spent by public and philanthropic organisations, with £590 million allocated to immunology and vaccine research. Preclinical studies received the largest funding amount £505 million accounting for 85.6% of total investment. In terms of specific infection, "the big three" infections dominated funding: HIV received £127 million (21.5% of total), malaria received £59 million (10.0% of total) and tuberculosis received £36 million (6.0% of total). We excluded industry funding from our analysis, as open-access data were unavailable. A global investment surveillance system is needed to map and monitor funding and guide allocation of scarce resources. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Electron Bio-Imaging Centre (eBIC): the UK national research facility for biological electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Daniel K; Siebert, C Alistair; Hecksel, Corey; Hagen, Christoph; Mordhorst, Valerie; Grange, Michael; Ashton, Alun W; Walsh, Martin A; Grünewald, Kay; Saibil, Helen R; Stuart, David I; Zhang, Peijun

    2017-06-01

    The recent resolution revolution in cryo-EM has led to a massive increase in demand for both time on high-end cryo-electron microscopes and access to cryo-electron microscopy expertise. In anticipation of this demand, eBIC was set up at Diamond Light Source in collaboration with Birkbeck College London and the University of Oxford, and funded by the Wellcome Trust, the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) to provide access to high-end equipment through peer review. eBIC is currently in its start-up phase and began by offering time on a single FEI Titan Krios microscope equipped with the latest generation of direct electron detectors from two manufacturers. Here, the current status and modes of access for potential users of eBIC are outlined. In the first year of operation, 222 d of microscope time were delivered to external research groups, with 95 visits in total, of which 53 were from unique groups. The data collected have generated multiple high- to intermediate-resolution structures (2.8-8 Å), ten of which have been published. A second Krios microscope is now in operation, with two more due to come online in 2017. In the next phase of growth of eBIC, in addition to more microscope time, new data-collection strategies and sample-preparation techniques will be made available to external user groups. Finally, all raw data are archived, and a metadata catalogue and automated pipelines for data analysis are being developed.

  16. Design and development of a film-based intervention about teenage men and unintended pregnancy: Applying the Medical Research Council framework in practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Aventin, Aine

    2014-11-15

    Following the UK Medical Research Council\\'s (MRC) guidelines for the development and evaluation of complex interventions, this study aimed to design, develop and optimise an educational intervention about young men and unintended teenage pregnancy based around an interactive film. The process involved identification of the relevant evidence base, development of a theoretical understanding of the phenomenon of unintended teenage pregnancy in relation to young men, and exploratory mixed methods research. The result was an evidence-based, theory-informed, user-endorsed intervention designed to meet the much neglected pregnancy education needs of teenage men and intended to increase both boys\\' and girls\\' intentions to avoid an unplanned pregnancy during adolescence. In prioritising the development phase, this paper addresses a gap in the literature on the processes of research-informed intervention design. It illustrates the application of the MRC guidelines in practice while offering a critique and additional guidance to programme developers on the MRC prescribed processes of developing interventions. Key lessons learned were: (1) know and engage the target population and engage gatekeepers in addressing contextual complexities; (2) know the targeted behaviours and model a process of change; and (3) look beyond development to evaluation and implementation.

  17. Research funding systems in Australia, New Zealand and the UK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis, Jenny; Ross, S

    2011-01-01

    The funding of research in universities is increasingly based on direction of resources in support of 'excellence'. Funding decisions are linked to evaluation through research funding systems, but there has so far been little comparative empirical research on the perceived effects of these system...

  18. Can UK NHS research ethics committees effectively monitor publication and outcome reporting bias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Rasheda; Kolstoe, Simon

    2015-07-25

    Publication and outcome reporting bias is often caused by researchers selectively choosing which scientific results and outcomes to publish. This behaviour is ethically significant as it distorts the literature used for future scientific or clinical decision-making. This study investigates the practicalities of using ethics applications submitted to a UK National Health Service (NHS) research ethics committee to monitor both types of reporting bias. As part of an internal audit we accessed research ethics database records for studies submitting an end of study declaration to the Hampshire A research ethics committee (formerly Southampton A) between 1st January 2010 and 31st December 2011. A literature search was used to establish the publication status of studies. Primary and secondary outcomes stated in application forms were compared with outcomes reported in publications. Out of 116 studies the literature search identified 57 publications for 37 studies giving a publication rate of 32%. Original Research Ethics Committee (REC) applications could be obtained for 28 of the published studies. Outcome inconsistencies were found in 16 (57%) of the published studies. This study showed that the problem of publication and outcome reporting bias is still significant in the UK. The method described here demonstrates that UK NHS research ethics committees are in a good position to detect such bias due to their unique access to original research protocols. Data gathered in this way could be used by the Health Research Authority to encourage higher levels of transparency in UK research.

  19. Alberta Research Council 1999 annual report: innovation for a new millennium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Alberta Research Council (ARC) develops and commercializes technologies to give its clients a competitive advantage. It carries out applied R and D on a contract or fee basis, and co-ventures with others to develop new technologies, deriving a return on investment from the commercialization of new products and services. ARC carries out research in the following sectors: 1) agriculture and biotechnology; 2) energy: conventional and heavy oil recovery and production technologies, reservoir management processes and protocols, novel downhole oilfield equipment, speciality sensors and instrumentation, and upgrading technologies for improved recovery and cost efficiency; and as well industrial processes and technologies related to water and land management and climate change to ensure sustainable development; 3) forestry; 4) environment: research to comprehend and mitigate the impact of industrial activities on air, water and land resources, including climate change, greenhouse gases and carbon dioxide management strategies; clean process and waste minimization technologies; and advanced environmental analyses and toxicology

  20. Ocean Science for Decision-Making: Current Activities of the National Research Council's Ocean Studies Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, S.; Glickson, D.; Mengelt, C.; Forrest, S.; Waddell, K.

    2012-12-01

    The National Research Council is a private, nonprofit organization chartered by Congress in 1916 as an expansion of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. Its mission is to improve the use of science in government decision making and public policy, increase public understanding, and promote the acquisition and dissemination of knowledge in matters involving science, engineering, technology, and health. Within the National Research Council, the Ocean Studies Board (OSB) mission is to explore the science, policies, and infrastructure needed to understand, manage, and conserve coastal and marine environments and resources. OSB undertakes studies and workshops on emerging scientific and policy issues at the request of federal agencies, Congress, and others; provides program reviews and guidance; and facilitates communication on oceanographic issues among different sectors. OSB also serves as the U.S. National Committee to the international, nongovernmental Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR). OSB has produced reports on a wide range of topics of interest to researchers and educators, the federal government, the non-profit sector, and industry. Recent reports have focused on ecosystem services in the Gulf of Mexico after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, sea level rise on the U.S. west coast, scientific ocean drilling needs and accomplishments, requirements for sustained ocean color measurements, critical infrastructure for ocean research, tsunami warning and preparedness, ocean acidification, and marine and hydrokinetic power resource assessments. Studies that are currently underway include responding to oil spills in the Arctic, evaluating the effectiveness of fishery stock rebuilding plans, and reviewing the National Ocean Acidification Research Plan. OSB plays an important role in helping create policy decisions and disseminating important information regarding various aspects of ocean science.

  1. The application of contrast explanation to energy policy research: UK nuclear energy policy 2002–2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heffron, Raphael J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper advances the application of the methodology, contrast explanation, to energy policy research. Research in energy policy is complex and often involves inter-disciplinary work, which traditional economic methodologies fail to capture. Consequently, the more encompassing methodology of contrast explanation is assessed and its use in other social science disciplines explored in brief. It is then applied to an energy policy research topic—in this case, nuclear energy policy research in the UK. Contrast explanation facilitates research into policy and decision-making processes in energy studies and offers an alternative to the traditional economic methods used in energy research. Further, contrast explanation is extended by the addition of contested and uncontested hypotheses analyses. This research focuses on the methods employed to deliver the new nuclear programme of the UK government. In order to achieve a sustainable nuclear energy policy three issues are of major importance: (1) law, policy and development; (2) public administration; and (3) project management. Further, the research identifies that policy in the area remains to be resolved, in particular at an institutional and legal level. However, contrary to the literature, in some areas, the research identifies a change of course as the UK concentrates on delivering a long-term policy for the nuclear energy sector and the overall energy sector. - Highlights: ► Energy policy research is interdisciplinary and needs additional methodological approaches. ► New method of contrast explanation advanced for energy policy research. ► This methodology is based on dialectical learning which examines conflict between sources of data. ► Research example used here is of UK nuclear energy policy. ► Major issues in UK nuclear energy policy are planning law, public administration, and project management

  2. Scientists' coping strategies in an evolving research system: the case of life scientists in the UK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morris, Norma; Rip, Arie

    2006-01-01

    Scientists in academia have struggled to adjust to a policy climate of uncertain funding and loss of freedom from direction and control. How UK life scientists have negotiated this challenge, and with what consequences for their research and the research system, is the empirical entrance point of

  3. Can teaching philosophy in schools count towards the Research Excellence Framework (UK?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Fisher

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Even though critical thinking is carried out in schools across the country, there is no attempt to take high-level published philosophical research into schools. This paper reports on a pilot where this was attempted. The findings suggest that this can be done successfully and moreover that the results can be contextualised so as to count towards “impact” in the Research Excellence Framework (UK. The paper suggests that this means philosophers have not only a way of developing children’s confidence and reasoning, but also a way of meeting the requirements on Higher Education Institutions within the UK.

  4. The Geosciences Division of the Council on Undergraduate Research (GeoCUR): Supporting Faculty that Mentor Undergraduate Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, L. K.; Guertin, L. A.; Manley, P. L.; Fortner, S. K.

    2012-12-01

    Undergraduate research is a proven effective pedagogy that has a number of benefits including: enhancing student learning through mentoring relationships with faculty; increasing retention; increasing enrollment in graduate programs; developing critical thinking, creativity, problem solving and intellectual independence; and, developing an understanding of research methodology. Undergraduate research also has been demonstrated in preparing students for careers. In addition to developing disciplinary and technical expertise, participation in undergraduate research helps students improve communication skills (written, oral, and graphical) and time management. Early involvement in undergraduate research improves retention and, for those engaged at the 2YC level, helps students successfully transfers to 4YC. The Geosciences Division of the Council on Undergraduate Research (GeoCUR) supports faculty in their development of undergraduate research programs at all levels. GeoCUR leads workshops for new and future faculty covering all aspects of undergraduate research including incorporating research into coursework, project design, mentoring students, sustaining programs, and funding sources. GeoCUR members support new faculty by providing a range of services including: peer-review of grant proposals; advice on establishing an undergraduate research program; balancing teaching and research demands; and networking with other geoscientist. GeoCUR has also developed web resources that support faculty and departments in development of undergraduate research programs (http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/undergraduate_research/index.html). This presentation will describe the services provided by GeoCUR and highlight examples of programs and resources available to geoscientists in all career stages for effective undergraduate research mentoring and development.

  5. The Nairobi Report: Frameworks for Africa-UK Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Journal of Language, Technology & Entrepreneurship in Africa, Vol. ... with her motor and electronic industries edging out erstwhile European and American ... academic promotion must produce incontrovertible evidence of research and ...

  6. Research priorities in Maternal, Newborn, & Child Health & Nutrition for India: An Indian Council of Medical Research-INCLEN Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra K Arora

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In India, research prioritization in Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health and Nutrition (MNCHN themes has traditionally involved only a handful of experts mostly from major cities. The Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR-INCLEN collaboration undertook a nationwide exercise engaging faculty from 256 institutions to identify top research priorities in the MNCHN themes for 2016-2025. The Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative method of priority setting was adapted. The context of the exercise was defined by a National Steering Group (NSG and guided by four Thematic Research Subcommittees. Research ideas were pooled from 498 experts located in different parts of India, iteratively consolidated into research options, scored by 893 experts against five pre-defined criteria (answerability, relevance, equity, investment and innovation and weighed by a larger reference group. Ranked lists of priorities were generated for each of the four themes at national and three subnational (regional levels [Empowered Action Group & North-Eastern States, Southern and Western States, & Northern States (including West Bengal]. Research priorities differed between regions and from overall national priorities. Delivery domain of research which included implementation research constituted about 70 per cent of the top ten research options under all four themes. The results were endorsed in the NSG meeting. There was unanimity that the research priorities should be considered by different governmental and non-governmental agencies for investment with prioritization on implementation research and issues cutting across themes.

  7. National Safety Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... work, in homes and communities, and on the road through leadership, research, education and advocacy. NSC Newsletter Sign up for our newsletter! Like Us on Facebook National Safety Council © National Safety Council. All rights reserved. Contact ...

  8. The case for a new energy research, development and promotion policy for the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamasb, Tooraj; Nuttall, William J.; Pollitt, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This paper is a critical assessment of the current balance of efforts towards energy research and development (R and D) and the promotion of low-carbon electricity technologies in the UK. We review the UK's main technological options and their estimated cost ranges in the medium term. We contrast the energy R and D spending with the current and expected future cost of renewable promotion policies and point out the high cost of carbon saving through existing renewable promotion arrangements. We also note that liberalisation of the electricity sector has had significant implications for the landscape of energy R and D in the UK. We argue that there is a need for reappraisal of the soundness and balance of the energy R and D and renewable capacity deployment efforts towards new energy technologies. We suggest that the cost-effectiveness of UK deployment policies needs to be more closely analysed as associated costs are non-trivial and expected to rise. We also make a case for considering increasing the current low level of energy R and D expenditure. Much of energy R and D is a public good and we should consider whether the current organisation of R and D effort is fit for purpose. We argue that it is important to build and maintain the research capability in the UK in order to absorb spillovers of technological progress elsewhere in the world. Against this background, the recent signs that an energy R and D renaissance could be underway are therefore positive and welcome

  9. Environmental health research in the UK and European Union : research priorities in water and air pollution control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ince, M; Wheatley, A [Loughborough Univ. of Technology (United Kingdom). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1997-12-31

    The contents are involvement of the European community, integration of research and development programmes ; surface water quality and pollution incidents; surface water pollution in the UK ; eutrophication ; drinking water quality ; causes and current treatment for removal of pollutants ; future causes of water pollution ; and , water and wastewater research.

  10. Environmental health research in the UK and European Union : research priorities in water and air pollution control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ince, M.; Wheatley, A.

    1996-01-01

    The contents are involvement of the European community, integration of research and development programmes ; surface water quality and pollution incidents; surface water pollution in the UK ; eutrophication ; drinking water quality ; causes and current treatment for removal of pollutants ; future causes of water pollution ; and , water and wastewater research

  11. Cohort Profile : The National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council Twin Registry (NAS-NRC Twin Registry)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gatz, Margaret; Harris, Jennifer R.; Kaprio, Jaakko; McGue, Matt; Smith, Nicholas L.; Snieder, Harold; Spiro, Avron; Butler, David A.

    The National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council Twin Registry (NAS-NRC Twin Registry) is a comprehensive registry of White male twin pairs born in the USA between 1917 and 1927, both of the twins having served in the military. The purpose was medical research and ultimately improved

  12. Systematic analysis of funding awarded for antimicrobial resistance research to institutions in the UK, 19972010

    OpenAIRE

    Head, Michael G.; Fitchett, Joseph R.; Cooke, Mary K.; Wurie, Fatima B.; Atun, Rifat; Hayward, Andrew C.; Holmes, Alison; Johnson, Alan P.; Woodford, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the level of research funding awarded to UK institutions specifically for antimicrobial resistance-related research and how closely the topics funded relate to the clinical and public health burden of resistance.Methods: Databases and web sites were systematically searched for information on how infectious disease research studies were funded for the period 1997–2010. Studies specifically related to antimicrobial resistance, including bacteriology, virology, mycology and...

  13. The UK clinical research network - has it been a success for dermatology clinical trials?

    OpenAIRE

    Charlesworth Lisa; Perdue Jo; Foster Katharine; Koller Karin; Thomas Kim S; Chalmers Joanne R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Following the successful introduction of five topic-specific research networks in the UK, the Comprehensive Local Research Network (CLRN) was established in 2008 in order to provide a blanket level of support across the whole country regardless of the clinical discipline. The role of the CLRN was to facilitate recruitment into clinical trials, and to encourage greater engagement in research throughout the National Health Service (NHS). Methods This report evaluates the imp...

  14. Reflections on Teaching Research Ethics in Education for International Postgraduate Students in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Research ethics in education is a challenging topic to teach and to learn. As the staff and student body in UK higher education and elsewhere diversifies, the challenges increase as shared reference points diminish. My teaching reflections focus on a key tension explored in this article: how the imperative of internationalising the curriculum…

  15. Opportunities for Research in the UK for decommissioning and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, N.

    2008-01-01

    The NDA remit as set out within the Energy Act includes - 'promote, and where necessary fund, research relevant to nuclear clean up'. The NDA need to underpin delivery and / or accelerate programmes to fulfil the overall mission and technical underpinning of these activities is critical. In this paper we will present consideration of the investment required in nuclear waste Research and Development. Firstly, NDA set the requirement for nuclear sites to write down within the Life Time Plans (LTP), at a high level, the proposed technical baseline underpinning the LTP activities; furthermore we required technology gaps / opportunities in the technical baselines to be outlined in a R and D requirements section to the LTP. Criteria were established to categorise the R and D in three areas: - 'needs' - those development activities needed to underpin the proposed technical solutions - 'risks' - those activities required to reduce / eliminate key risks to the proposed technical solutions - 'opportunities' - innovations / changes to the technical baselines The purpose of production of the technical baselines and underpinning R and D requirements is to establish an auditable trail through the LTP from programme components into how the programme will be delivered. NDA believes the production of the technical baselines and R and D requirements will be of benefit to the Site License Companies (SLC) in terms of ensuring a focus on overall programme delivery and not just short term activities. Furthermore, we can ensure that investment in technology is targeted at priority areas, with common issues and requirements identified and solutions on a broader scale will be achievable. (authors)

  16. Introduction-Epilepsy Research UK expert workshop 2014: SUDEP: Time for prevention-evidence and clinical translation Proceedings from the Epilepsy Research UK 2014 Expert Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashef, Lina; Richardson, Mark P

    2016-01-01

    We offer Epilepsia readers this supplement based on the proceedings of an international workshop on sudden death in epilepsy (SUDEP) held in 2014 at St Anne's College at Oxford and hosted by Epilepsy Research UK (ERUK). This is the second Epilepsia supplement dedicated to SUDEP and its focus is on prevention. As workshop co-chairs, in this introduction we outline why we believe we are on the threshold of a new era of prevention in SUDEP. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  17. Evolution of primary care databases in UK: a scientometric analysis of research output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezyridis, Paraskevas; Timmons, Stephen

    2016-10-11

    To identify publication and citation trends, most productive institutions and countries, top journals, most cited articles and authorship networks from articles that used and analysed data from primary care databases (CPRD, THIN, QResearch) of pseudonymised electronic health records (EHRs) in UK. Descriptive statistics and scientometric tools were used to analyse a SCOPUS data set of 1891 articles. Open access software was used to extract networks from the data set (Table2Net), visualise and analyse coauthorship networks of scholars and countries (Gephi) and density maps (VOSviewer) of research topics co-occurrence and journal cocitation. Research output increased overall at a yearly rate of 18.65%. While medicine is the main field of research, studies in more specialised areas include biochemistry and pharmacology. Researchers from UK, USA and Spanish institutions have published the most papers. Most of the journals that publish this type of research and most cited papers come from UK and USA. Authorship varied between 3 and 6 authors. Keyword analyses show that smoking, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and mental illnesses, as well as medication that can treat such medical conditions, such as non-steroid anti-inflammatory agents, insulin and antidepressants constitute the main topics of research. Coauthorship network analyses show that lead scientists, directors or founders of these databases are, to various degrees, at the centre of clusters in this scientific community. There is a considerable increase of publications in primary care research from EHRs. The UK has been well placed at the centre of an expanding global scientific community, facilitating international collaborations and bringing together international expertise in medicine, biochemical and pharmaceutical research. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. The impact of CFD on development test facilities - A National Research Council projection. [computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkegi, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a National Research Council study on the effect that advances in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) will have on conventional aeronautical ground testing are reported. Current CFD capabilities include the depiction of linearized inviscid flows and a boundary layer, initial use of Euler coordinates using supercomputers to automatically generate a grid, research and development on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations, and preliminary research on solutions to the full N-S equations. Improvements in the range of CFD usage is dependent on the development of more powerful supercomputers, exceeding even the projected abilities of the NASA Numerical Aerodynamic Simulator (1 BFLOP/sec). Full representation of the Re-averaged N-S equations will require over one million grid points, a computing level predicted to be available in 15 yr. Present capabilities allow identification of data anomalies, confirmation of data accuracy, and adequateness of model design in wind tunnel trials. Account can be taken of the wall effects and the Re in any flight regime during simulation. CFD can actually be more accurate than instrumented tests, since all points in a flow can be modeled with CFD, while they cannot all be monitored with instrumentation in a wind tunnel.

  19. List of publications resulting from the Neutron Beam Scattering Programme supported by the Science and Engineering Research Council for 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    The paper lists the references of publications resulting from the Neutron Beam Scattering Programme supported by the Science and Engineering Research Council, covering the year 1984, but also including publications from 1983 not given in the previous issue of this listing. (author)

  20. Modern Trends in Continuous Professional Development of Foreign Language Teachers (On the Basis of the British Council Research)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovets, Olesia

    2017-01-01

    Research conducted by the British Council concerning modern continuous professional development of teachers has been analyzed. The issue concerning foreign language teachers' professional development has been considered. Productive approach to this process that gives a teacher the opportunities to define aspects of their professional activities…

  1. European Research Council supports an extensive study of the astrophysical p-process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyuerky, Gy.

    2008-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The astrophysical p-process, the production mechanism of the heavy proton rich isotopes (the so-called p-nuclei) is still one of the least understood processes of nucleosynthesis. The modeling of the process requires a huge network of thousands of reactions where the rates of the involved reactions represent one of the biggest uncertainty in the resulting abundances of p-nuclei. In lack of experimental data the required reaction rates are taken from statistical model calculations which proved to be inaccurate in the mass and energy range relevant for the p-process. The systematic experimental study of the relevant reactions is therefore crucial to test the calculated reaction rates, to select the best input parameters for the calculations and, consequently, to contribute to a better understanding of the astrophysical p-process. The European Research Council (ERC) has acknowledged this need for experimental data when they decided to support a project devoted to this subject. In 2007 the first call of the ERC Frontier Research Scheme (Starting Grants) has been launched within the FP7 Specific Programme 'IDEAS'. From the very high number of applications, the peer reviewers of the ERC Scientific Council has recommended for funding the proposal entitled 'Nuclear reaction studies relevant to the astrophysical p-process nucleosynthesis'. An amount of 750,000 Euro has been allocated to the project for a 5 year duration. The starting date of the project was 1st July, 2008. With the ERC support, an extensive experimental study of the p-process is being carried out. The experiments will be carried out almost exclusively with the accelerators of the ATOMKI. The financial support allows to largely improve the available experimental technique. The purchase of two large volume HPGe detectors is in progress as a result of a public procurement. The upgrade of the nuclear electronics and data acquisition system used for p-process related

  2. Exploring the Experiences of International Students in UK Higher Education: Possibilities and Limits of Interculturality in University Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweisfurth, Michele; Gu, Qing

    2009-01-01

    This article is based on a two-year multi-method research project, funded by the UK Economic and Social Research Council, investigating the experiences of international undergraduate students in UK higher education. In investigating the influences on their experiences and the strategies that students employ, the study has also revealed something…

  3. Strategies on Technology Transfer and Patents Commercialization for Nanotechnology at the Spanish National Research Council.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maira, Javier; Etxabe, Javier; Serena, Pedro A

    2018-02-14

    Nanoscience and nanotechnology made their appearance in the scientific scene at a time when both the economy of Spain and the Spanish Research and Innovation System were experiencing strong growth. This circumstance resulted in a remarkable development of nanoscience and nanotechnology especially in universities and public research institutions such as the Spanish National Research Council (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas-CSIC). However, this development in academia has not been reflected in a similar increment in the transfer of knowledge to the productive sector despite several efforts and initiatives were launched. The CSIC, the main generator of scientific knowledge in Spain, has designed and implemented a series of actions in order to take advantage of the knowledge generated in nanotechnology by its research groups by mean of an appropriate transfer to both the Spanish and the international industry. Internal methodologies used in CSIC in order to protect and commercialize nanotechnology based intellectual property as well as their effects are reviewed. The evolution of CSIC nanotechnology patents portfolio is also analyzed. There has been a clear increase in the patent license agreements of CSIC in the period 2002- 2015 in the field of nanotechnology. This increase is correlated to these facts: (i) Highly qualified team managing Intellectual Property issues, (ii) The presence of CSIC in international fairs, and (iii) Proactive search of companies and investors. Successful results can be achieved in technology transfer when the appropriate resources are available and properly organized with an adequate combination of efforts in knowledge protection, promotion and commercialization of technologies and support to the scientific entrepreneurs of the institution. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. L130-million cut to grants hits UK physical scientists

    CERN Multimedia

    Cressey, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    "UK physicists, still reeling from massive funding cuts announced earlier this year, have learnt of worse to come. Roughly L130 million (US$260 million)is being slashed from research grants awarded by the Engineering and Physical Scienes Research Council (EPSRC), it announced on 17 March." (2 pages)

  5. Council dinner

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Jean Teillac (President of the Council) gives the speech. The occasion was the end-of-term of Leon Van Hove and John Adams as Research and Executive Director-General, respectively, to be succeeded by Herwig Schopper. The venue was the Hotel Beau-Rivage in Geneva. Beside Jean Teillac are (on the left) G.H. Stafford and Mme Van Hove, (on the right) Mme Schopper.

  6. SYNBIOCHEM Synthetic Biology Research Centre, Manchester – A UK foundry for fine and speciality chemicals production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Feuvre RA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The UK Synthetic Biology Research Centre, SYNBIOCHEM, hosted by the Manchester Institute of Biotechnology at the University of Manchester is delivering innovative technology platforms to facilitate the predictable engineering of microbial bio-factories for fine and speciality chemicals production. We provide an overview of our foundry activities that are being applied to grand challenge projects to deliver innovation in bio-based chemicals production for industrial biotechnology.

  7. Simulation Performance and National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses Outcomes: Field Research Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackney, Dana E; Lane, Susan Hayes; Dawson, Tyia; Koontz, Angie

    2017-11-01

    This descriptive field study examines processes used to evaluate simulation for senior-level Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) students in a capstone course, discusses challenges related to simulation evaluation, and reports the relationship between faculty evaluation of student performance and National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) first-time passing rates. Researchers applied seven terms used to rank BSN student performance (n = 41, female, ages 22-24 years) in a senior-level capstone simulation. Faculty evaluation was correlated with students' NCLEX-RN outcomes. Students evaluated as "lacking confidence" and "flawed" were less likely to pass the NCLEX-RN on the first attempt. Faculty evaluation of capstone simulation performance provided additional evidence of student preparedness for practice in the RN role, as evidenced by the relationship between the faculty assessment and NCLEX-RN success. Simulation has been broadly accepted as a powerful educational tool that may also contribute to verification of student achievement of program outcomes and readiness for the RN role.

  8. Mapping pneumonia research: A systematic analysis of UK investments and published outputs 1997–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Head

    2015-09-01

    Research in context: Pneumonia continues to be a high-burden illness around the globe. This paper shows that although research funding is increasing in the UK (between 1997 and 2013, it remains poorly funded compared to other important respiratory infectious diseases such as tuberculosis and influenza. Publications about pneumonia have been steadily increasing over time, indicating continuing academic and clinical interest in the topic. Though global mortality of pneumonia is declining, it should still be an area of high priority for funders, policymakers and researchers.

  9. Advances in cardiovascular research. 15th Annual Meeting of the European Council for Cardiovascular Research (ECCR). La Colle sur Loup, France, 8–10 October 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steckelings, U. Muscha; de Mey, Jo G. R.; Pinto-Sietsma, Sara-Joan; Henrion, Daniel; Unger, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The 15th Annual Meeting of the European Council of Cardiovascular Research brought together basic and clinical scientists working in the cardiovascular field in La Colle sur Loup, France. Upfront basic and clinical research addressing the mechanisms of disease, identification of biomarkers or

  10. The UK clinical research network--has it been a success for dermatology clinical trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kim S; Koller, Karin; Foster, Katharine; Perdue, Jo; Charlesworth, Lisa; Chalmers, Joanne R

    2011-06-16

    Following the successful introduction of five topic-specific research networks in the UK, the Comprehensive Local Research Network (CLRN) was established in 2008 in order to provide a blanket level of support across the whole country regardless of the clinical discipline. The role of the CLRN was to facilitate recruitment into clinical trials, and to encourage greater engagement in research throughout the National Health Service (NHS). This report evaluates the impact of clinical research networks in supporting clinical trials in the UK, with particular reference to our experiences from two non-commercial dermatology trials. It covers our experience of engaging with the CLRN (and other research networks) using two non-commercial dermatology trials as case studies. We present the circumstances that led to our approach to the research networks for support, and the impact that this support had on the delivery of these trials. In both cases, recruitment was boosted considerably following the provision of additional support, although other factors such as the availability of experienced personnel, and the role of advertising and media coverage in promoting the trials were also important in translating this additional resource into increased recruitment. Recruitment into clinical trials is a complex task that can be influenced by many factors. A world-class clinical research infrastructure is now in place in England (with similar support available in Scotland and Wales), and it is the responsibility of the research community to ensure that this unique resource is used effectively and responsibly.

  11. Design and development of a film-based intervention about teenage men and unintended pregnancy: applying the Medical Research Council framework in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aventin, Áine; Lohan, Maria; O'Halloran, Peter; Henderson, Marion

    2015-04-01

    Following the UK Medical Research Council's (MRC) guidelines for the development and evaluation of complex interventions, this study aimed to design, develop and optimise an educational intervention about young men and unintended teenage pregnancy based around an interactive film. The process involved identification of the relevant evidence base, development of a theoretical understanding of the phenomenon of unintended teenage pregnancy in relation to young men, and exploratory mixed methods research. The result was an evidence-based, theory-informed, user-endorsed intervention designed to meet the much neglected pregnancy education needs of teenage men and intended to increase both boys' and girls' intentions to avoid an unplanned pregnancy during adolescence. In prioritising the development phase, this paper addresses a gap in the literature on the processes of research-informed intervention design. It illustrates the application of the MRC guidelines in practice while offering a critique and additional guidance to programme developers on the MRC prescribed processes of developing interventions. Key lessons learned were: (1) know and engage the target population and engage gatekeepers in addressing contextual complexities; (2) know the targeted behaviours and model a process of change; and (3) look beyond development to evaluation and implementation. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Domestic and commercial solar energy in the UK: an ECSC research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, K.; Bunge, T.; Wright, S.

    1999-01-01

    It is argued that in the UK there is a lack of appreciation of the potential of solar energy at both government and public level. It is claimed that the government has made insufficient effort to stimulate the solar energy sector and provided little support for research: the UK solar market is therefore underdeveloped and systems are expensive. A survey to identify the reasons for the lack of awareness of solar potential, and how this might be rectified was carried out. The survey identified four particular points: (i) how to make solar energy more attractive to consumers, (ii) initiatives for Local Authorities, (iii) availability and quality of information from Energy Advice Centres and Local Authorities and (iv) actions to make Local Authorities more pro-active

  13. Energy research, development and demonstration in the UK. Minutes of evidence, Wednesday 11 April 1984, session 1983-84

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The following aspects of nuclear power research in the UK were discussed: expenditure by UKAEA; fast reactor research and development to commercial scale, including cooperation with other European countries, and assessment of FBR budget over the next 5 to 10 years; JET project and the Next Step; work for the AGR reactors, including economics and safety aspects; present and future role of the UKAEA, having regard to nuclear and non-nuclear research programmes. (U.K.)

  14. Surgeon length of service and risk-adjusted outcomes: linked observational analysis of the UK National Adult Cardiac Surgery Audit Registry and General Medical Council Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Graeme L; Grant, Stuart W; Freemantle, Nick; Cunningham, David; Munsch, Christopher M; Livesey, Steven A; Roxburgh, James; Buchan, Iain; Bridgewater, Ben

    2014-09-01

    To explore the relationship between in-hospital mortality following adult cardiac surgery and the time since primary clinical qualification for the responsible consultant cardiac surgeon (a proxy for experience). Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected national registry data over a 10-year period using mixed-effects multiple logistic regression modelling. Surgeon experience was defined as the time between the date of surgery and award of primary clinical qualification. UK National Health Service hospitals performing cardiac surgery between January 2003 and December 2012. All patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafts and/or valve surgery under the care of a consultant cardiac surgeon. All-cause in-hospital mortality. A total of 292,973 operations performed by 273 consultant surgeons (with lengths of service from 11.2 to 42.0 years) were included. Crude mortality increased approximately linearly until 33 years service, before decreasing. After adjusting for case-mix and year of surgery, there remained a statistically significant (p=0.002) association between length of service and in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 1.013; 95% CI 1.005-1.021 for each year of 'experience'). Consultant cardiac surgeons take on increasingly complex surgery as they gain experience. With this progression, the incidence of adverse outcomes is expected to increase, as is demonstrated in this study. After adjusting for case-mix using the EuroSCORE, we observed an increased risk of mortality in patients operated on by longer serving surgeons. This finding may reflect under-adjustment for risk, unmeasured confounding or a real association. Further research into outcomes over the time course of surgeon's careers is required. © The Royal Society of Medicine.

  15. Mapping pneumonia research: A systematic analysis of UK investments and published outputs 1997–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Michael G.; Fitchett, Joseph R.; Newell, Marie-Louise; Scott, J. Anthony G.; Harris, Jennifer N.; Clarke, Stuart C.; Atun, Rifat

    2015-01-01

    Background The burden of pneumonia continues to be substantial, particularly among the poorest in global society. We describe here the trends for UK pneumonia R&D investment and published outputs, and correlate with 2013 global mortality. Methods Data related to awards to UK institutions for pneumonia research from 1997 to 2013 were systematically sourced and categorised by disease area and type of science. Investment was compared to mortality figures in 2010 and 2013 for pneumonia, tuberculosis and influenza. Investment was also compared to publication data. Results Of all infectious disease research between 2011 and 2013 (£917.0 million), £28.8 million (3.1%) was for pneumonia. This was an absolute and proportionate increase from previous time periods. Translational pneumonia research (33.3%) received increased funding compared with 1997–2010 where funding was almost entirely preclinical (87.5%, here 30.9%), but high-burden areas such as paediatrics, elderly care and antimicrobial resistance received little investment. Annual investment remains volatile; publication temporal trends show a consistent increase. When comparing investment to global burden with a novel ‘investment by mortality observed’ metric, tuberculosis (£48.36) and influenza (£484.21) receive relatively more funding than pneumonia (£43.08), despite investment for pneumonia greatly increasing in 2013 compared to 2010 (£7.39). Limitations include a lack of private sector data and the need for careful interpretation of the comparisons with burden, plus categorisation is subjective. Conclusions There has been a welcome increase for pneumonia funding awarded to UK institutions in 2011–2013 compared with 1997–2010, along with increases for more translational research. Published outputs relating to pneumonia rose steadily from 1997 to 2013. Investment relative to mortality for pneumonia has increased, but it remains low compared to other respiratory infections and clear inequities remain

  16. At the crossroads of anthropology and epidemiology: current research in cultural psychiatry in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dein, Simon; Bhui, Kamaldeep Singh

    2013-12-01

    Cultural psychiatry research in the UK comprises a broad range of diverse methodologies, academic disciplines, and subject areas. Methodologies range from epidemiological to anthropological/ethnographic to health services research; mixed methods research is becoming increasingly popular, as are public health and health promotional topics. After briefly outlining the history of cultural psychiatry in the UK we will discuss contemporary research. Prominent themes include: the epidemiology of schizophrenia among Africans/Afro-Caribbeans, migration and mental health, racism and mental health, cultural identity, pathways to care, explanatory models of mental illness, cultural competence, and the subjective experiences of healthcare provision among specific ethnic groups such as Bangladeshis and Pakistanis. Another strand of research that is attracting increasing academic attention focuses upon the relationship between religion, spirituality, and mental health, in particular, the phenomenology of religious experience and its mental health ramifications, as well as recent work examining the complex links between theology and psychiatry. The paper ends by appraising the contributions of British cultural psychiatrists to the discipline of cultural psychiatry and suggesting promising areas for future research.

  17. Research priorities for respiratory nursing: a UK-wide Delphi study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkington, Melissa; Hodson, Matthew; Welch, Lindsay; Yorke, Janelle

    2018-01-01

    Respiratory nurses make a significant contribution to the delivery of respiratory healthcare, but there is a dearth of nurse-led, practice-focused, published research. Using a modified three-round Delphi, this study sought to identify research priorities for respiratory nursing to inform a national research strategy. Study information and the survey link were sent electronically to members of UK professional respiratory organisations. Round 1 had 78 items across 16 topics, informed by a systematic literature review. Respondents suggested additional items which were content analysed to inform Round 2. Respondents rated all items and ranked the topics in all rounds. To ensure rigour, rounds had an explicit focus with pre-determined criteria for consensus (70%). In total, 363 responses were received across Rounds 1, 2 and 3 (n=183, 95 and 85, respectively). The top five research priorities were: 1) “Patient understanding of asthma control”; 2) “The clinical and cost-effectiveness of respiratory nurse interventions”; 3) “The impact of nurse-led clinics on patient care”; 4) “Inhaler technique”; and 5) two topics jointly scored: “Prevention of exacerbations” and “Symptom management”. With potential international significance, this is the first UK study to identify research priorities for respiratory nursing, providing direction for those planning or undertaking research. PMID:29692999

  18. Mapping pneumonia research: A systematic analysis of UK investments and published outputs 1997-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Michael G; Fitchett, Joseph R; Newell, Marie-Louise; Scott, J Anthony G; Harris, Jennifer N; Clarke, Stuart C; Atun, Rifat

    2015-09-01

    The burden of pneumonia continues to be substantial, particularly among the poorest in global society. We describe here the trends for UK pneumonia R&D investment and published outputs, and correlate with 2013 global mortality. Data related to awards to UK institutions for pneumonia research from 1997 to 2013 were systematically sourced and categorised by disease area and type of science. Investment was compared to mortality figures in 2010 and 2013 for pneumonia, tuberculosis and influenza. Investment was also compared to publication data. Of all infectious disease research between 2011 and 2013 (£917.0 million), £28.8 million (3.1%) was for pneumonia. This was an absolute and proportionate increase from previous time periods. Translational pneumonia research (33.3%) received increased funding compared with 1997-2010 where funding was almost entirely preclinical (87.5%, here 30.9%), but high-burden areas such as paediatrics, elderly care and antimicrobial resistance received little investment. Annual investment remains volatile; publication temporal trends show a consistent increase. When comparing investment to global burden with a novel 'investment by mortality observed' metric, tuberculosis (£48.36) and influenza (£484.21) receive relatively more funding than pneumonia (£43.08), despite investment for pneumonia greatly increasing in 2013 compared to 2010 (£7.39). Limitations include a lack of private sector data and the need for careful interpretation of the comparisons with burden, plus categorisation is subjective. There has been a welcome increase for pneumonia funding awarded to UK institutions in 2011-2013 compared with 1997-2010, along with increases for more translational research. Published outputs relating to pneumonia rose steadily from 1997 to 2013. Investment relative to mortality for pneumonia has increased, but it remains low compared to other respiratory infections and clear inequities remain. Analyses that measure investments in pneumonia

  19. Funding bombshell hits UK physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael; Durrani, Matin

    2008-01-01

    Physicists and astronomers in the UK are coming to terms with a massive funding crisis that engulfed one of the country's main funding agencies last month. As a result of an £80m black hole in the budget of the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), it has decided to stop funding research into the International Linear Collider (ILC), withdraw from the Gemini telescopes in Hawaii and Chile, and cease all support for high-energy gamma-ray astronomy and ground-based solar-terrestrial physics. Research grants in particle physics and astronomy could also be cut by up to 25%, which may lead to job losses at university departments.

  20. The Status of Vocational Teacher Education in University Council for Vocational Education Member Institutions. Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. Harold

    The purpose of the study reported in this document was to describe the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of the vocational teacher education programs among institutions that are members of the University Council for Vocational Education. A questionnaire was mailed to representatives of each member institution in October 1985, with a 100…

  1. The effect of recent amblyopia research on current practice in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsham, D

    2010-10-01

    Several studies have recently provided insights into how amblyopia may be most effectively managed. Despite the new evidence, a US study reported that a recent randomised controlled trial had made little influence on clinical practice. The aims of this research are to assess current practice of amblyopia management in the UK and to determine the comparability with the evidence-based recommendations. A questionnaire was constructed to assess current amblyopia management practice, particularly in relation to areas investigated by recent research and emailed to every head orthoptist within the UK. There was a great deal of variability in the amount of occlusion that was prescribed for moderate and severe amblyopia. Sixty per cent of clinicians indicated that the maximum they would prescribe was in excess of the 6 h recommended by research. Atropine was rarely recommended as a first-line treatment, with occlusion generally being considered to be more effective. Despite recommendations regarding education as a means of reducing non-compliance, only 39% of clinicians always gave written information, although various other methods of enhancing compliance were used. A period of refractive adaptation was allowed by most clinicians but often far less than recommended. The uptake of recent research evidence into clinical practice is sporadic and incomplete with one-third of respondents indicating that following the studies, they had made no changes whatsoever to their practice. This is similar to other areas of medicine; the reasons are likely to be varied, and is an area that would benefit from greater attention.

  2. Science councils in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scholes, RJ

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available for Scien- tific and Industrial Research (CSIR), the Medical Research Council, Agricultural Research Council, Human Sciences Research Council, Council for Geosciences, Mintek, and the Nuclear Energy Corporation of SA. Legally, it includes the National... with social or commercial impact is long and uncer- tain, and becomes more and more expen- sive the closer the development gets to implementation. It is hard for a single organization to span this entire contin- uum effectively—it requires ‘interfacial...

  3. A National Research Council Evaluation of the Department of Energy's Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickson, D.; Holmes, K. J.; Cooke, D.

    2012-12-01

    Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) resources are increasingly becoming part of energy regulatory, planning, and marketing activities in the U.S. and elsewhere. In particular, state-based renewable portfolio standards and federal production and investment tax credits have led to an increased interest in the possible deployment of MHK technologies. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-58) directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to estimate the size of the MHK resource base. In order to help DOE prioritize its overall portfolio of future research, increase the understanding of the potential for MHK resource development, and direct MHK device and/or project developers to locations of greatest promise, the DOE Wind and Water Power Program requested that the National Research Council (NRC) provide an evaluation of the detailed assessments being conducted by five individual resource assessment groups. These resource assessment groups were contracted to estimate the amount of extractable energy from wave, tidal, ocean current, ocean thermal energy conversion, and riverine resources. Performing these assessments requires that each resource assessment group estimate the average power density of the resource base, as well as the basic technology characteristics and spatial and temporal constituents that convert power into electricity for that resource. The NRC committee evaluated the methodologies, technologies, and assumptions associated with each of these resource assessments. The committee developed a conceptual framework for delineating the processes used to develop the assessment results requested by the DOE, with definitions of the theoretical, technical, and practical resource to clarify elements of the overall resource assessment process. This allowed the NRC committee to make a comparison of different methods, terminology, and processes among the five resource assessment groups. The committee concluded that the overall approach taken by the wave resource and

  4. Retention of young female post-doc physics researchers in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitelegg, Elizabeth

    2004-03-01

    The talk will describe the results of a research project to investigate the problems young women physics researchers encountered during early stages of their careers and their perceptions of the longer-term difficulties they anticipated were they to pursue a career in physics research. The project examined quantitative data from a large sample of female members of the UK Institute of Physics (IOP) and qualitative data from intensive interviews with 27 young female doctoral and post-doctoral researchers at an early stage in their careers. In the survey of women PhD members of the IOP, only 15% of the younger women (aged under 30) said they had encountered gender barriers compared with 45% of older women. However, within a few years of completing their PhDs only 25% of the young women remained in physics research although they had previously aspired to work in this area. The reasons given for leaving physics included a dislike of the male culture or atmosphere in research labs, the fact that few of the young women thought that they would ever attain a senior physics post, concerns about balancing a research career with raising a young family and anticipating a need to relocate to match a partners career moves. These are clearly gender-related barriers and constraints although these young women often did not perceive them in this way. This research examines the notion of direct and indirect gender barriers. It addresses the idea of subtle discrimination by examining both institutional employment practices and the prevalent male culture or atmosphere in physics research, which contribute to the leaky pipeline in womens physics employment in the UK.

  5. Burden of disease, research funding and innovation in the UK: Do new health technologies reflect research inputs and need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Derek; Martino, Orsolina; Packer, Claire; Simpson, Sue; Stevens, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    New and emerging health technologies (innovation outputs) do not always reflect conditions representing the greatest disease burden. We examine the role of research and development (R&D) funding in this relationship, considering whether areas with fewer innovative outputs receive an appropriate share of funding relative to their disease burden. We report a retrospective observational study, comparing burden of disease with R&D funding and innovation output. UK disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and deaths came from the World Health Organization (WHO) 2004 Global Burden of Disease estimates; funding estimates from the UK Clinical Research Collaboration's 2006 Health Research Analysis; and innovation output was estimated by the number of new and emerging technologies reported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Horizon Scanning Centre between 2000 and 2009. Disease areas representing the biggest burden were generally associated with the most funding and innovation output; cancer, neuropsychiatric conditions and cardiovascular disease together comprised approximately two-thirds of DALYs, funding and reported technologies. Compared with DALYs, funding and technologies were disproportionately high for cancer, and technologies alone were disproportionately high for musculoskeletal conditions and endocrine/metabolic diseases. Neuropsychiatric conditions had comparatively few technologies compared to both DALYs and funding. The relationship between DALYs and innovation output appeared to be mediated by R&D funding. The relationship between burden of disease and new and emerging health technologies for different disease areas is partly dependent on the associated level of R&D funding (input). Discrepancies among key groups may reflect differential focus of research funding across disease areas. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  6. The UK clinical research network - has it been a success for dermatology clinical trials?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlesworth Lisa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following the successful introduction of five topic-specific research networks in the UK, the Comprehensive Local Research Network (CLRN was established in 2008 in order to provide a blanket level of support across the whole country regardless of the clinical discipline. The role of the CLRN was to facilitate recruitment into clinical trials, and to encourage greater engagement in research throughout the National Health Service (NHS. Methods This report evaluates the impact of clinical research networks in supporting clinical trials in the UK, with particular reference to our experiences from two non-commercial dermatology trials. It covers our experience of engaging with the CLRN (and other research networks using two non-commercial dermatology trials as case studies. We present the circumstances that led to our approach to the research networks for support, and the impact that this support had on the delivery of these trials. Results In both cases, recruitment was boosted considerably following the provision of additional support, although other factors such as the availability of experienced personnel, and the role of advertising and media coverage in promoting the trials were also important in translating this additional resource into increased recruitment. Conclusions Recruitment into clinical trials is a complex task that can be influenced by many factors. A world-class clinical research infrastructure is now in place in England (with similar support available in Scotland and Wales, and it is the responsibility of the research community to ensure that this unique resource is used effectively and responsibly.

  7. UK and European Union public and charitable funding from 2008 to 2013 for bacteriology and antibiotic research in the UK: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragginton, Eilis C; Piddock, Laura J V

    2014-09-01

    Since the 1990s, the number of new antibacterial drugs has plummeted and the number of antibiotic-resistant infections has risen, which has decreased the effective treatment of many disorders, including sepsis. We aimed to assess whether funding for bacteriology and antibiotic research to UK researchers had increased in response to this global crisis. We systematically searched websites and databases of agencies that fund research in the UK to identify publicly and charitably funded projects from financial years 2008 to 2013 within the specialties of bacteriology and antibiotic research. We created a database to identify the projects funded. Grants awarded in euros were converted to pounds sterling (€1=£0·86). We identified 609 projects within the specialty of bacteriology, 196 (32·2%) of which were on antibiotics. Of £13 846·1 million of available research funding, £269·2 million (1·9%) was awarded to bacteriology projects and £95·0 million (0·7%) was awarded for research on antibiotics. Additionally, £181·4 million in European Union (EU) funding was awarded to antibiotic research consortia including researchers based within the UK, including two EU Innovative Medicines Initiative awards, totalling £85·2 million. To increase awareness of who funds antibiotic research and to facilitate priority setting and funding decisions, funding organisations need to be aware of the breadth and depth of present funding as a baseline by which funding from 2014 onwards can be measured and so that informed decisions about the future level of funding can be made. To resolve the crisis of antibiotic resistance, present levels of funding are inadequate and should be increased substantially. British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Basic Blue Skies Research in the UK: Are we losing out?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Belinda

    2008-02-29

    The term blue skies research implies a freedom to carry out flexible, curiosity-driven research that leads to outcomes not envisaged at the outset. This research often challenges accepted thinking and introduces new fields of study. Science policy in the UK has given growing support for short-term goal-oriented scientific research projects, with pressure being applied on researchers to demonstrate the future application of their work. These policies carry the risk of restricting freedom, curbing research direction, and stifling rather than stimulating the creativity needed for scientific discovery. This study tracks the tortuous routes that led to three major discoveries in cardiology. It then investigates the constraints in current research, and opportunities that may be lost with existing funding processes, by interviewing selected scientists and fund providers for their views on curiosity-driven research and the freedom needed to allow science to flourish. The transcripts were analysed using a grounded theory approach to gather recurrent themes from the interviews. The results from these interviews suggest that scientists often cannot predict the future applications of research. Constraints such as lack of scientific freedom, and a narrow focus on relevance and accountability were believed to stifle the discovery process. Although it was acknowledged that some research projects do need a clear and measurable framework, the interviewees saw a need for inquisitive, blue skies research to be managed in a different way. They provided examples of situations where money allocated to 'safe' funding was used for more innovative research. This sample of key UK scientists and grant providers acknowledge the importance of basic blue skies research. Yet the current evaluation process often requires that scientists predict their likely findings and estimate short-term impact, which does not permit freedom of research direction. There is a vital need for prominent scientists

  9. Pharmaceutical HIV prevention technologies in the UK: six domains for social science research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Peter; Dodds, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The development of pharmaceutical HIV prevention technologies (PPTs) over the last five years has generated intense interest from a range of stakeholders. There are concerns that these clinical and pharmaceutical interventions are proceeding with insufficient input of the social sciences. Hence key questions around implementation and evaluation remain unexplored whilst biomedical HIV prevention remains insufficiently critiqued or theorised from sociological as well as other social science perspectives. This paper presents the results of an expert symposium held in the UK to explore and build consensus on the role of the social sciences in researching and evaluating PPTs in this context. The symposium brought together UK social scientists from a variety of backgrounds. A position paper was produced and distributed in advance of the symposium and revised in the light this consultation phase. These exchanges and the emerging structure of this paper formed the basis for symposium panel presentations and break-out sessions. Recordings of all sessions were used to further refine the document which was also redrafted in light of ongoing comments from symposium participants. Six domains of enquiry for the social sciences were identified and discussed: self, identity and personal narrative; intimacy, risk and sex; communities, resistance and activism; systems, structures and institutions; economic considerations and analyses; and evaluation and outcomes. These are discussed in depth alongside overarching consensus points for social science research in this area as it moves forward.

  10. A systematic analysis of UK cancer research funding by gender of primary investigator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Charlie D; Head, Michael G; Marshall, Dominic C; Gilbert, Barnabas J; El-Harasis, Majd A; Raine, Rosalind; O'Connor, Henrietta; Atun, Rifat; Maruthappu, Mahiben

    2018-04-30

    To categorically describe cancer research funding in the UK by gender of primary investigator (PIs). Systematic analysis of all open-access data. Data about public and philanthropic cancer research funding awarded to UK institutions between 2000 and 2013 were obtained from several sources. Fold differences were used to compare total investment, award number, mean and median award value between male and female PIs. Mann-Whitney U tests were performed to determine statistically significant associations between PI gender and median grant value. Of the studies included in our analysis, 2890 (69%) grants with a total value of £1.82 billion (78%) were awarded to male PIs compared with 1296 (31%) grants with a total value of £512 million (22%) awarded to female PIs. Male PIs received 1.3 times the median award value of their female counterparts (Pfunding than their male counterparts in terms of total investment, the number of funded awards, mean funding awarded and median funding awarded. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Investments in respiratory infectious disease research 1997-2010: a systematic analysis of UK funding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Michael G; Fitchett, Joseph R; Cooke, Mary K; Wurie, Fatima B; Hayward, Andrew C; Lipman, Marc C; Atun, Rifat

    2014-03-26

    Respiratory infections are responsible for a large global burden of disease. We assessed the public and philanthropic investments awarded to UK institutions for respiratory infectious disease research to identify areas of underinvestment. We aimed to identify projects and categorise them by pathogen, disease and position along the research and development value chain. The UK. Institutions that host and carry out infectious disease research. The total amount spent and number of studies with a focus on several different respiratory pathogens or diseases, and to correlate these against the global burden of disease; also the total amount spent and number of studies relating to the type of science, the predominant funder in each category and the mean and median award size. We identified 6165 infectious disease studies with a total investment of £2·6 billion. Respiratory research received £419 million (16.1%) across 1192 (19.3%) studies. The Wellcome Trust provided greatest investment (£135.2 million; 32.3%). Tuberculosis received £155 million (37.1%), influenza £80 million (19.1%) and pneumonia £27.8 million (6.6%). Despite high burden, there was relatively little investment in vaccine-preventable diseases including diphtheria (£0.1 million, 0.03%), measles (£5.0 million, 1.2%) and drug-resistant tuberculosis. There were 802 preclinical studies (67.3%) receiving £273 million (65.2%), while implementation research received £81 million (19.3%) across 274 studies (23%). There were comparatively few phase I-IV trials or product development studies. Global health research received £68.3 million (16.3%). Relative investment was strongly correlated with 2010 disease burden. The UK predominantly funds preclinical science. Tuberculosis is the most studied respiratory disease. The high global burden of pneumonia-related disease warrants greater investment than it has historically received. Other priority areas include antimicrobial resistance (particularly within

  12. Emerging Good Practice in Managing Research Data and Research Information within UK Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidson, Joy; Jones, Sarah; Molloy, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Sound data intensive science depends upon effective research data and information management. Efficient and interoperable research information systems will be crucial for enabling and exploiting data intensive research however it is equally important that a research ecosystem is cultivated within...... institutions prepare to meet funding body mandates relating to research data management and sharing and to engage fully in the digital agenda.......Sound data intensive science depends upon effective research data and information management. Efficient and interoperable research information systems will be crucial for enabling and exploiting data intensive research however it is equally important that a research ecosystem is cultivated within...... research-intensive institutions that foster sustainable communication, cooperation and support of a diverse range of research-related staff. Researchers, librarians, administrators, ethics advisors, and IT professionals all have a vital contribution to make in ensuring that research data and related...

  13. Why students leave in the UK: an integrative review of the international research literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Joan; Roxburgh, Michelle; Taylor, Julie; Lauder, William

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this integrative review of the literature was to find and review international research studies that explored student attrition to determine what is known about the topic and to identify gaps in the research with a view to addressing the situation in the UK. Attrition from nursing programmes is a serious problem in the UK. It is recognised as a complex phenomenon, not attributable to a single cause. Regardless of actual attrition rates and trends, departments of nursing are challenged to perform in a business-like manner. Consequently, every student lost to a programme of study equates to a financial penalty for the department and to the future workforce and community.   Integrative review of the literature. Using electronic databases and specific search terms, 18 articles were identified and reviewed. Findings from the identified international research literature were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Four broad themes that accounted for factors of relevance to attrition were identified: Social, Prediction, Programme and Personal. Retention studies are fraught with methodological problems. These include incomplete or inaccurate data and low response rates. Attrition early in programmes may be attributed to a failure to understand the roles of nurses in contemporary societies. This has led to dissatisfaction with programmes and academic failure, as students may underestimate the intellectual demands of their programmes. Attrition later in the programme may be attributed to a combination of personal factors that culminate in a personal crisis. The research literature suggests that stereotyping of nurses is a major factor in attrition. Both professions need to find ways of communicating contemporary roles to wider society. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Identification of Translational Dermatology Research Priorities in the UK; Results of an e-Delphi Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, E.; Reynolds, N.J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Translational research is the direct application of basic and applied research to patient care. It is estimated that there are at least 2,000 different skin diseases, thus there are considerable challenges in seeking to undertake research on each of these disorders. Objective This eDelphi exercise was conducted in order to generate a list of translational dermatology research questions which are regarded as a priority for further investigations. Results During the first phase of the eDelphi, 228 research questions were generated by an expert panel which included clinical academic dermatologists, clinical dermatologists, non-clinical scientists, dermatology trainees and representatives from patient support groups. Following completion of the second and third phases, 40 questions on inflammatory skin disease, 20 questions on structural skin disorders / genodermatoses, 37 questions on skin cancer and 8 miscellaneous questions were designated as priority translational dermatology research questions (PRQs). In addition to PRQs on a variety of disease areas (including multiple PRQs on psoriasis, eczema, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and melanoma), there were a number of cross-cutting themes which identified a need to investigate mechanisms / pathogenesis of disease and the necessity to improve treatments for patients with skin disease. Conclusion It is predicted that this list of PRQs will help to provide a strategic direction for translational dermatology research in the UK and that addressing this list of questions will ultimately provide clinical benefit for substantial numbers of subjects with skin disorders. PMID:26149834

  15. Alcohol industry influence on UK alcohol policy: A new research agenda for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Benjamin; Holden, Chris; McCambridge, Jim

    2012-09-01

    The British government has been criticised for according industry interests too much weight in alcohol policy-making. Consequently, it has been argued that alcohol strategy in the UK is built around policies for which the evidence base is weak. This has clear implications for public health. The purpose of this commentary is to map recent developments in UK alcohol policy and related debates within the alcohol policy literature, thus laying the foundations for a systematic examination of the influence of the alcohol industry on alcohol policy. It highlights the changing structure of the industry and summarises what is known about the positions and strategies of industry actors towards alcohol policy. In so doing, it aims to contribute not just to debates about alcohol policy, but to a broader understanding of health policy processes and the relationships between government and other stakeholders. It advances a new research agenda focused on the role of corporate actors in the field of alcohol policy and public health more broadly.

  16. Increasing Capacity for Stewardship of Oceans and Coasts: Findings of the National Research Council Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, S. J.; Feeley, M. H.

    2008-05-01

    With the increasing stress on ocean and coastal resources, ocean resource management will require greater capacity in terms of people, institutions, technology and tools. Successful capacity-building efforts address the needs of a specific locale or region and include plans to maintain and expand capacity after the project ends. In 2008, the US National Research Council published a report that assesses past and current capacity-building efforts to identify barriers to effective management of coastal and marine resources. The report recommends ways that governments and organizations can strengthen marine conservation and management capacity. Capacity building programs instill the tools, knowledge, skills, and attitudes that address: ecosystem function and change; processes of governance that influence societal and ecosystem change; and assembling and managing interdisciplinary teams. Programs require efforts beyond traditional sector-by-sector planning because marine ecosystems range from the open ocean to coastal waters and land use practices. Collaboration among sectors, scaling from local community-based management to international ocean policies, and ranging from inland to offshore areas, will be required to establish coordinated and efficient governance of ocean and coastal ecosystems. Barriers Most capacity building activities have been initiated to address particular issues such as overfishing or coral reef degradation, or they target a particular region or country facing threats to their marine resources. This fragmentation inhibits the sharing of information and experience and makes it more difficult to design and implement management approaches at appropriate scales. Additional barriers that have limited the effectiveness of capacity building programs include: lack of an adequate needs assessment prior to program design and implementation; exclusion of targeted populations in decision- making efforts; mismanagement, corruption, or both; incomplete or

  17. Measuring the Impact of Research: Lessons from the UK's Research Excellence Framework 2014.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gobinda Chowdhury

    Full Text Available Impactful academic research plays a stellar role in society, pressing to ask the question of how one measures the impact created by different areas of academic research. Measuring the societal, cultural, economic and scientific impact of research is currently the priority of the National Science Foundation, European Commission and several research funding agencies. The recently concluded United Kingdom's national research quality exercise, the Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014, which piloted impact assessment as part of the overall evaluation offers a lens to view how impact of research in different disciplines can be measured. Overall research quality was assessed through quality of outputs, 'impact' and research environment. We performed two studies using the REF 2014 as a case study. The first study on 363 Impact Case Studies (ICSs submitted in 5 research areas (UoAs reveals that, in general, the impact scores were constructed upon a combination of factors i.e. quantity of quartile-one (Q1 publications, quantity and value of grants/income, number of researchers stated in the ICSs, spin-offs created, discoveries/patents and presentation of esteem data, informing researchers/ academics of the factors to consider in order to achieve a better impact score in research impact assessments. However, there were differences among disciplines in terms of the role played by the factors in achieving their overall scores for the ICSs. The outcome of this study is thus a set of impact indicators, and their relationship with the overall score of impact of research in different disciplines as determined in REF2014, which would in the first instance provide some answers to impact measures that would be useful for researchers in different disciplines. The second study extracts the general themes of impact reported by universities by performing a word frequency analysis in all the ICSs submitted in the five chosen research areas, which were substantially

  18. Intentionality and Developing Researcher Competence on a UK Master's Course: An Ecological Perspective on Research Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelma, Juup; Fay, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an ecological perspective on the developing researcher competence of participants in the research education component of a professionally oriented master's course. There is a particular focus on the intentionality (as in "purpose") of the participants' research education activity. The data used to develop the…

  19. Adult Education Research in the U.K.: An Overview of What Researchers Are Talking About.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordham, Paul

    1978-01-01

    Describes the growth of adult education and adult education research in Britain and outlines four government-financed educational research programs: survey of non-vocational provision, adult literacy program, new communities project, and paid educational leave. Notes the importance of international contacts in pursuing adult education research.…

  20. The UK Ecosystem for Fostering Innovation in the Earth & Space Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, V. E.

    2015-12-01

    The UK national government supports an ecosystem of government-funded organisations that carry a specific remit for innovation. By specifically cultivating the commercialisation of research where appropriate, the UK demonstrates a forward-thinking and coordinated approach to deriving economic and societal impact from scientific research activities. This presentation provides an overview of innovation activities at government-backed organisations that support the Earth and space science communities. At the broadest and highest levels, the UK has a whole-of-government approach to fostering innovation. The government also has a designated innovation agency - Innovate UK - which works with people, companies, and partner organisations to find and drive the science & technology innovations that will grow the UK economy. A primary source of scientific funding to UK-based researchers comes from the Research Councils UK (RCUK), which has seven constituent Research Councils. Along with funding activities that support basic research, innovation is supported through a variety of activities. The National Environmental Research Council (NERC), the UK's leading public funder for Earth & environmental science, has brought to market a wide variety of ideas and innovations, including by helping to register patents, negotiating licensing deals, and setting up spin-out companies or joint ventures with commercial organisations. Case studies of NERC commercialization successes will be given, as well as an overview of mechanisms by which NERC supports innovation. These include 'Pathfinder' awards that help enable researchers to develop a greater understanding of the commercial aspects and possibilities of their research. Complementary 'Follow-on Fund' awards provide proof-of-concept funding to support the commercialisation of ideas arising from NERC-funded research. Early-career researchers are also eligible for NERC's Environment Young Entrepreneurs Scheme. Innovation activity, like

  1. Worldwide open access: UK leadership?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevan Harnad

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The web is destined to become humankind's cognitive commons, where digital knowledge is jointly created and freely shared. The UK has been a leader in the global movement toward open access (OA to research but recently its leadership has been derailed by the joint influence of the publishing industry lobby from without and well-intentioned but premature and unhelpful over-reaching from within the OA movement itself. The result has been the extremely counterproductive ‘Finch Report’ followed by a new draft of the Research Councils UK (RCUK OA mandate, downgrading the role of cost-free OA self-archiving of research publications (‘green OA’ in favor of paying subscription publishers over and above subscriptions, out of scarce research funds, in exchange for making single articles OA (‘hybrid gold OA’. The motivation of the new policy is to reform publication and to gain certain re-use rights (CC-BY, but the likely effect would be researcher resistance, very little OA and a waste of research funds. There is still time to fix the RCUK mandate and restore the UK's leadership by taking a few very specific steps to clarify and strengthen the green component by adding a mechanism for monitoring and verifying compliance, with consequences for non-compliance, along lines also being adopted in the EC and the US.

  2. E-Portfolios and Personalized Learning: Research in Practice with Two Dyslexic Learners in UK Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Julie; Herrington, Margaret; McDonald, Tess; Rhodes, Amy

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses the use of an e-portfolio system in contributing to the personalized learning of two dyslexic learners at the University of Wolverhampton, UK. The rationale for this research rests at the intersection of generic findings from e-portfolio (and wider e-learning) research and the still challenging project in higher education (HE)…

  3. Characterising groundwater-dominated lowland catchments: the UK Lowland Catchment Research Programme (LOCAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a major UK initiative to address deficiencies in understanding the hydro-ecological response of groundwater-dominated lowland catchments. The scope and objectives of this national programme are introduced and focus on one of three sets of research basins – the Pang/Lambourn Chalk catchments, tributaries of the river Thames in southern England. The motivation for the research is the need to support integrated management of river systems that have high ecological value and are subject to pressures that include groundwater abstraction for water supply, diffuse pollution, and land use and climate change. An overview of the research programme is provided together with highlights of some current research findings concerning the hydrological functioning of these catchments. Despite the importance of the Chalk as a major UK aquifer, knowledge of the subsurface movement of water and solutes is poor. Solute transport in the dual porosity unsaturated zone depends on fracture/matrix interactions that are difficult to observe; current experimental and modelling research supports the predominance of matrix flow and suggests that slow migration of a time-history of decades of nutrient loading is occurring. Groundwater flows are complex; catchments vary seasonally and are ill-defined and karst features are locally important. Groundwater flow pathways are being investigated using natural and artificial geochemical tracers based on experimental borehole arrays; stream-aquifer interaction research is using a combination of geophysics, borehole array geochemistry and longitudinal profiles of stream flow and solutes. A complex picture of localised subsurface inflows, linked to geological controls and karst features, and significant longitudinal groundwater flow below the river channel is emerging. Management implications are discussed. Strategies to control surface application of nutrients are expected to have little effect on groundwater

  4. Children's views on research without prior consent in emergency situations: a UK qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, Louise; Sherratt, Frances C; Young, Bridget; McNamara, Paul; Dawson, Angus; Appleton, Richard; Crawley, Esther; Frith, Lucy; Gamble, Carrol; Woolfall, Kerry

    2018-06-09

    We explored children's views on research without prior consent (RWPC) and sought to identify ways of involving children in research discussions. Qualitative interview study. Participants were recruited through a UK children's hospital and online advertising. 16 children aged 7-15 years with a diagnosis of asthma (n=14) or anaphylaxis (n=2) with recent (<12 months) experience of emergency care. Children were keen to be included in medical research and viewed RWPC as acceptable in emergency situations if trial interventions were judged safe. Children trusted that doctors would know about their trial participation and act in their best interests. All felt that children should be informed about the research following their recovery and involved in discussions with a clinician or their parent(s) about the use of data already collected as well as continued participation in the trial (if applicable). Participants suggested methods to inform children about their trial participation including an animation. Children supported, and were keen to be involved in, clinical trials in emergency situations. We present guidance and an animation that practitioners and parents might use to involve children in trial discussions following their recovery. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Designing and recruiting to UK autism spectrum disorder research databases: do they include representative children with valid ASD diagnoses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnell, F; George, B; McConachie, H; Johnson, M; Hardy, R; Parr, J R

    2015-09-04

    (1) Describe how the Autism Spectrum Database-UK (ASD-UK) was established; (2) investigate the representativeness of the first 1000 children and families who participated, compared to those who chose not to; (3) investigate the reliability of the parent-reported Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) diagnoses, and present evidence about the validity of diagnoses, that is, whether children recruited actually have an ASD; (4) present evidence about the representativeness of the ASD-UK children and families, by comparing their characteristics with the first 1000 children and families from the regional Database of children with ASD living in the North East (Dasl(n)e), and children and families identified from epidemiological studies. Recruitment through a network of 50 UK child health teams and self-referral. Parents/carers with a child with ASD, aged 2-16 years, completed questionnaires about ASD and some gave professionals' reports about their children. 1000 families registered with ASD-UK in 30 months. Children of families who participated, and of the 208 who chose not to, were found to be very similar on: gender ratio, year of birth, ASD diagnosis and social deprivation score. The reliability of parent-reported ASD diagnoses of children was very high when compared with clinical reports (over 96%); no database child without ASD was identified. A comparison of gender, ASD diagnosis, age at diagnosis, school placement, learning disability, and deprivation score of children and families from ASD-UK with 1084 children and families from Dasl(n)e, and families from population studies, showed that ASD-UK families are representative of families of children with ASD overall. ASD-UK includes families providing parent-reported data about their child and family, who appear to be broadly representative of UK children with ASD. Families continue to join the databases and more than 3000 families can now be contacted by researchers about UK autism research. Published by the BMJ

  6. The role of neuropsychology in UK pediatric HIV care: Relevance to clinical practice and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Anita

    2017-11-01

    There has been a dramatic improvement in the survival of children with perinatally-acquired HIV (PHIV) following the introduction of effective treatment in 1990s. The care for children living with PHIV is now focused on more accurately understanding the effects of both HIV and HIV treatment on the developing body and brain. An evaluation of current HIV neuroimaging, and neurocognitive research, when combined with clinical experience in the area of HIV, could help to inform United Kingdom (UK) PHIV service provision. This paper argues that an understanding from a neuropsychological perspective will help these young people to optimize their health, quality of life, and future functioning. The aim of the paper is to bring together research and clinical understanding of HIV and its treatment effects on the developing brain, together with an understanding of other potential neurological risk factors. It is argued here that there is a need for targeted neuropsychology assessment and preventative interventions, supported by clinical and preliminary research on the neurocognitive effects of HIV and its treatments.

  7. Researching Pupil Well-Being in UK Secondary Schools: Community Psychology and the Politics of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckett, Paul; Sixsmith, Judith; Kagan, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    This study explores the relationships between a school, its staff and its pupils and the impact of these relationships on school pupils' well-being. The authors adopted a community psychological perspective and applied critical, social constructionist epistemologies and participatory, multi-method research tools. The article discusses the…

  8. The Supply of Part-Time Higher Education in the UK. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callender, Claire; Birkbeck, Anne Jamieson; Mason, Geoff

    2010-01-01

    This report explores the supply of part-time higher education in the UK, with particular consideration to the study of part-time undergraduate provision in England. It is the final publication in the series of reports on individual student markets that were commissioned by Universities UK following the publication of the reports on the Future size…

  9. Advances in cardiovascular research. 15th Annual Meeting of the European Council for Cardiovascular Research (ECCR). La Colle sur Loup, France, 8–10 October 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckelings, U Muscha; De Mey, Jo G R; Pinto-Sietsma, Sara-Joan; Henrion, Daniel; Unger, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The 15th Annual Meeting of the European Council of Cardiovascular Research brought together basic and clinical scientists working in the cardiovascular field in La Colle sur Loup, France. Upfront basic and clinical research addressing the mechanisms of disease, identification of biomarkers or development of new treatments was communicated in 101 presentations, 35 of them as a part of five on-topic oral sessions and three workshops. Three keynote lectures reviewed current knowledge and the latest data about mechanosensitive channels in pressure regulation, cell therapy in cardiovascular disease and mechanisms of cardiovascular risk associated with diabetic nephropathy. This article summarizes highlights of the oral sessions, workshops and keynote lectures.

  10. UK Library and Information Science Research is Having a Significant Influence on Research in Other Subject Disciplines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Lee Stone

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To quantify the value of librarianship and information science (LIS exports knowledge to other subject disciplines. Design – Bibliometric study. Setting – LIS departments in U.K. universities. Subjects – 232 LIS research articles published between 2001 and 2007. Methods – Data from the 2008 U.K. Research Assessment Exercise were checked to identify 405 research articles submitted by 10 selected university departments (out of a total of 21, which submitted research in the LIS category. The Web of Science database was then searched to see how many of these articles had been cited in other articles (n=232. If the citing article was published in a non-LIS journal it was considered a knowledge export. Journals were defined as non-LIS if they had not been assigned the subject category of Information Science & Library Science by the Journal of Citation Reports. The journal Impact Factors (IFs of citing journals were then normalized to measure the value of individual knowledge exports to their respective subject disciplines. This was done by comparing a citing journal’s IF with the median journal IF within that subject category. If the citing journal’s IF was above this median it was considered to be a valuable knowledge export. Main Results – The sample of LIS research articles produced a total of 1,061 knowledge exports in 444 unique non-LIS journals. These non-LIS journals covered 146 unique subject categories of which those related to computer science and chemistry/pharmacology cited LIS research with the greatest frequency. Just over three-quarters (n=798 of these citations were considered to be valuable knowledge exports. A sub-analysis showed that LIS articles published in non-LIS journals were significantly more valuable than the knowledge exports published in LIS journals. Conclusion – The validity of bibliometric studies can be improved by adopting the two methodological innovations presented in this study. The

  11. Methodological challenges of cross-language qualitative research with South Asian communities living in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manbinder S. Sidhu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We investigate (1 the influence of ethnic, gender, and age concordance with interviewers and (2 how expression of qualitative data varies between interviews delivered in English and community languages (Punjabi/Urdu with monolingual and bilingual participants across three generations of the Indian Sikh and Pakistani Muslim communities living in the UK. Methods: We analyzed and interpreted semi-structured interview transcripts that were designed to collect data about lifestyles, disease management, community practices/beliefs, and social networks. First, qualitative content analysis was applied to transcripts. Second, a framework was applied as a guide to identify cross-language illustrations where responses varied in length, expression and depth. Results: Participant responses differed by language and topic. First-generation migrants when discussing religion, culture, or family practice were far likelier to use group or community narratives and give a longer response, indicating familiarity with or importance of such issues. Ethnic and gender concordance generated greater rapport between researchers and participants centered on community values and practices. Further, open-ended questions that were less direct were better suited for first-generation migrants. Conclusion: Community-based researchers need more time to complete interviews in second languages, need to acknowledge that narratives can be contextualized in both personal and community views, and reframe questions that may lead to greater expression. Furthermore, we detail a number of recommendations with regard to validating the translation of interviews from community languages to English as well as measures for testing language proficiency.

  12. Establishing and sustaining research partnerships in Africa: a case study of the UK-Africa Academic Partnership on Chronic Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de-Graft Aikins, Ama; Arhinful, Daniel K.; Pitchforth, Emma; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Allotey, Pascale; Agyemang, Charles

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the challenges and opportunities in establishing and sustaining north-south research partnerships in Africa through a case study of the UK-Africa Academic Partnership on Chronic Disease. Established in 2006 with seed funding from the British Academy, the partnership aimed to

  13. Comparison of Indian Council for Medical Research and Lunar Databases for Categorization of Male Bone Mineral Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Surya K; Patel, Vivek H; Gupta, Balram

    2017-06-19

    The mainstay of diagnosis of osteoporosis is dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan measuring areal bone mineral density (BMD) (g/cm 2 ). The aim of the present study was to compare the Indian Council of Medical Research database (ICMRD) and the Lunar ethnic reference database of DXA scans in the diagnosis of osteoporosis in male patients. In this retrospective study, all male patients who underwent a DXA scan were included. The areal BMD (g/cm 2 ) was measured at either the lumbar spine (L1-L4) or the total hip using the Lunar DXA machine (software version 8.50) manufactured by GE Medical Systems (Shanghai, China). The Indian Council of Medical Research published a reference data for BMD in the Indian population derived from the population-based study conducted in healthy Indian individuals, which was used to analyze the BMD result by Lunar DXA scan. The 2 results were compared for various values using statistical software SPSS for Windows (version 16; SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL). A total 238 male patients with a mean age of 57.2 yr (standard deviation ±15.9) were included. Overall, 26.4% (66/250) and 2.8% (7/250) of the subjects were classified in the osteoporosis group according to the Lunar database and the ICMRD, respectively. Out of the 250 sites of the DXA scan, 28.8% (19/66) and 60.0% (40/66) of the cases classified as osteoporosis by the Lunar database were reclassified as normal and osteopenia by ICMRD, respectively. In conclusion, the Indian Council of Medical Research data underestimated the degree of osteoporosis in male subjects that might result in deferring of treatment. In view of the discrepancy, the decision on the treatment of osteoporosis should be based on the multiple fracture risk factors and less reliably on the BMD T-score. Copyright © 2017 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Knowledge generation about care-giving in the UK: a critical review of research paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Alisoun; Larkin, Mary

    2015-01-01

    While discourse about care and caring is well developed in the UK, the nature of knowledge generation about care and the research paradigms that underpin it have been subjected to limited critical reflection and analysis. An overarching synthesis of evidence - intended to promote debate and facilitate new understandings - identifies two largely separate bodies of carer-related research. The first body of work - referred to as Gathering and Evaluating - provides evidence of the extent of care-giving, who provides care to whom and with what impact; it also focuses on evaluating policy and service efficacy. This type of research tends to dominate public perception about caring, influences the type and extent of policy and support for carers and attracts funding from policy and health-related sources. However, it also tends to be conceptually and theoretically narrow, has limited engagement with carers' perspectives and adopts an atomistic purview on the care-giving landscape. The second body of work - Conceptualising and Theorising - explores the conceptual and experiential nature of care and aims to extend thinking and theory about caring. It is concerned with promoting understanding of care as an integral part of human relationships, embedded in the life course, and a product of interdependence and reciprocity. This work conceptualises care as both an activity and a disposition and foregrounds the development of an 'ethic of care', thereby providing a perspective within which to recognise both the challenges care-giving may present and the significance of care as a normative activity. It tends to be funded from social science sources and, while strong in capturing carers' experiences, has limited policy and service-related purchase. Much could be gained for citizens, carers and families, and the generation of knowledge advanced, if the two bodies of research were integrated to a greater degree. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Challenging Racist Violence and Racist Hostility in 'Post-Racial' Times: Research and Action in Leeds, UK, 2006–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Law

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasing understanding of, information about and official commitment to challenge these patterns, racist hostility and violence continue to have an enduring presence in urban and rural life in the UK. This indicates the paradoxical nature of this racial crisis and challenges for antiracism as a political project. This paper charts how these issues play out at the local level through an examination of a five year process from problem identification through to research, response, action and aftermath from 2006 to 2012 in the city of Leeds, UK, with a focus on two predominantly white working class social housing estates in the city. We explore how embedded tensions and antagonisms can begin to be challenged, while examining how the contemporary climate of austerity and cuts in services, together with prevailing post-racial thinking, make the likelihood of such concerted action in the UK increasingly remote.

  16. Fiscal councils and economic volatility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Geršl, A.; Jašová, M.; Zápal, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 3 (2014), s. 190-212 ISSN 0015-1920 Grant - others:UK(CZ) UNCE 204005/2012 Institutional support: PRVOUK-P23 Keywords : dynamic inconsistency * fiscal and monetary policy interaction * independent fiscal council Subject RIV: AH - Economic s Impact factor: 0.420, year: 2014 http://journal.fsv.cuni.cz/storage/1298_jasova.pdf

  17. Research Data Management at the University of Warwick: recent steps towards a joined-up approach at a UK university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Delasalle

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper charts the steps taken and possible ways forward for the University of Warwick in its approach to research data management, providing a typical example of a UK research university’s approach in two strands: requirements and support. The UK government approach and funding landscape in relation to research data management provided drivers for the University of Warwick to set requirements and provide support, and examples of good practice at other institutions, support from a central national body (the UK Digital Curation Centre and learning from other universities’ experiences all proved valuable to the University of Warwick. Through interviews with researchers at Warwick, various issues and challenges are revealed: perhaps the biggest immediate challenges for Warwick going forward are overcoming scepticism amongst researchers, overcoming costs, and understanding the implications of involving third party companies in research data management. Building technical infrastructure could sit alongside and beyond those immediate steps and beyond the challenges that face one University are those that affect academia as a whole. Researchers and university administrators need to work together to address the broader challenges, such as the accessibility of data for future use and the reward for researchers who practice data management in exemplary ways, and indeed it may be that a wider, national or international but disciplinary technical infrastructure affects what an individual university needs to achieve. As we take these steps, universities and institutions are all learning from each other.

  18. Implementing falls prevention research into policy and practice: an overview of a new National Health and Medical Research Council Partnership Grant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Stephen R; Delbaere, Kim; Tiedemann, Anne; Smith, Stuart T; Sturnieks, Daina L

    2011-06-01

    Preventing falls and fall-related injuries among older people is an urgent public health challenge. This paper provides an overview of the background to and research planned for a 5-year National Health and Medical Research Council Partnership Grant on implementing falls prevention research findings into policy and practice. This program represents a partnership between key Australian falls prevention researchers, policy makers and information technology companies which aims to: (1) fill gaps in evidence relating to the prevention of falls in older people, involving new research studies of risk factor assessment and interventions for falls prevention; (2) translate evidence into policy and practice, examining the usefulness of new risk-identification tools in clinical practice; and (3) disseminate evidence to health professionals working with older people, via presentations, new evidence-based guidelines, improved resources and learning tools, to improve the workforce capacity to prevent falls and associated injuries in the future.

  19. Metric-based vs peer-reviewed evaluation of a research output: Lesson learnt from UK's national research assessment exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushwanth Koya

    Full Text Available There is a general inquisition regarding the monetary value of a research output, as a substantial amount of funding in modern academia is essentially awarded to good research presented in the form of journal articles, conferences papers, performances, compositions, exhibitions, books and book chapters etc., which, eventually leads to another question if the value varies across different disciplines. Answers to these questions will not only assist academics and researchers, but will also help higher education institutions (HEIs make informed decisions in their administrative and research policies.To examine both the questions, we applied the United Kingdom's recently concluded national research assessment exercise known as the Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014 as a case study. All the data for this study is sourced from the openly available publications which arose from the digital repositories of REF's results and HEFCE's funding allocations.A world leading output earns between £7504 and £14,639 per year within the REF cycle, whereas an internationally excellent output earns between £1876 and £3659, varying according to their area of research. Secondly, an investigation into the impact rating of 25315 journal articles submitted in five areas of research by UK HEIs and their awarded funding revealed a linear relationship between the percentage of quartile-one journal publications and percentage of 4* outputs in Clinical Medicine, Physics and Psychology/Psychiatry/Neuroscience UoAs, and no relationship was found in the Classics and Anthropology/Development Studies UoAs, due to the fact that most publications in the latter two disciplines are not journal articles.The findings provide an indication of the monetary value of a research output, from the perspectives of government funding for research, and also what makes a good output, i.e. whether a relationship exists between good quality output and the source of its publication. The

  20. Metric-based vs peer-reviewed evaluation of a research output: Lesson learnt from UK's national research assessment exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koya, Kushwanth; Chowdhury, Gobinda

    2017-01-01

    There is a general inquisition regarding the monetary value of a research output, as a substantial amount of funding in modern academia is essentially awarded to good research presented in the form of journal articles, conferences papers, performances, compositions, exhibitions, books and book chapters etc., which, eventually leads to another question if the value varies across different disciplines. Answers to these questions will not only assist academics and researchers, but will also help higher education institutions (HEIs) make informed decisions in their administrative and research policies. To examine both the questions, we applied the United Kingdom's recently concluded national research assessment exercise known as the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 as a case study. All the data for this study is sourced from the openly available publications which arose from the digital repositories of REF's results and HEFCE's funding allocations. A world leading output earns between £7504 and £14,639 per year within the REF cycle, whereas an internationally excellent output earns between £1876 and £3659, varying according to their area of research. Secondly, an investigation into the impact rating of 25315 journal articles submitted in five areas of research by UK HEIs and their awarded funding revealed a linear relationship between the percentage of quartile-one journal publications and percentage of 4* outputs in Clinical Medicine, Physics and Psychology/Psychiatry/Neuroscience UoAs, and no relationship was found in the Classics and Anthropology/Development Studies UoAs, due to the fact that most publications in the latter two disciplines are not journal articles. The findings provide an indication of the monetary value of a research output, from the perspectives of government funding for research, and also what makes a good output, i.e. whether a relationship exists between good quality output and the source of its publication. The findings may also

  1. Learning from the UK Research Excellence Framework: Ends and Means in Research Quality Assessment, and the Reliability of Results in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNay, Ian

    2015-01-01

    This article first reviews the objectives/ends of research quality assessment in several countries to draw lessons for the UK Research Excellence Framework and similar exercises. It then reviews work on performance management as a framework for reviewing the views of participants on the means to the ends--the management of their experience in…

  2. Utility of Recent Studies to Assess the National Research Council 2001 Estimates of Cancer Risk from Ingested Arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, Herman; Haver, Cary; Gaylor, David; Ramasamy, Santhini; Lee, Janice S.; Lobdell, Danelle; Wade, Timothy; Chen, Chao; White, Paul; Sams, Reeder

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this review is to evaluate the impact of recent epidemiologic literature on the National Research Council (NRC) assessment of the lung and bladder cancer risks from ingesting low concentrations (ecologic nature of the Taiwanese studies on which the NRC estimates are based present certain limitations, the data from these studies have particular strengths in that they describe lung and bladder cancer risks resulting from lifetime exposure in a large population and remain the best data on which to conduct quantitative risk assessment. Continued follow-up of a population in northeastern Taiwan, however, offers the best opportunity to improve the cancer risk assessment for arsenic in drinking water. Future studies of arsenic < 100 μg/L in drinking water and lung and bladder cancer should consider adequacy of the sample size, the synergistic relationship of arsenic and smoking, duration of arsenic exposure, age when exposure began and ended, and histologic subtype. PMID:21030336

  3. Coeducational or Single-Sex Schools? A Review of the Literature. New Zealand Council for Educational Research, Set 76, Number 1 Item 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, James

    This article is part of an informational kit for teachers published by the New Zealand Council for Educational Research. The focus of this article is on the advantages and disadvantages of co-educational and single-sex secondary schools as discussed in research efforts from England and New Zealand. (JLL)

  4. Undergraduate Research as a Process for STEM Teaching and Learning Systemic Change: Lessons Learned from the Council on Undergraduate Research NSF CCLI and TUES Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambos, E. L.; Havholm, K. G.; Malachowski, M.; Osborn, J.; Karukstis, K.

    2013-12-01

    For more than seven years, the Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR), the primary organization supporting programs, services, and advocacy for undergraduate research, has been working with support from the NSF's Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) to enhance, sustain, and institutionalize undergraduate research in diverse STEM disciplines and higher education settings. The Council on Undergraduate Research comprises more than 9000 individual and 670 institutional members within a divisional structure that includes geosciences, as well as 11 other thematic areas. Through its most recent grant: 'Transformational Learning through Undergraduate Research: Comprehensive Support for Faculty, Institutions, State Systems and Consortia' (NSF DUE CCLI III Award #09-20275), CUR has been collaborating with six higher education systems, each selected after a rigorous national application process in 2010 and 2011. These six systems, which collectively represent 79 individual institutions, are the Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges (COPLAC), University of Wisconsin System (UWS), California State University System (CSU), City University of New York (CUNY), Great Lakes Colleges Association (GLCA), and Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE). The more than 350 participants of faculty and senior-level administrators from the six systems are engaged in shared multi-faceted and multi-year professional development experiences. Teams from each system attended customized institutes facilitated by CUR experts in 2011-2012, during which the teams developed specific action plans focused on institutionalizing undergraduate research on their campus and within their system. The systems were reconvened as a group a year after the first institute, to chart progress toward achieving their goals. Based on interviews and surveys with participants, campus teams are making substantial progress toward implementation of robust undergraduate research programs, and are making

  5. Spent fuel reprocessing and minor actinide partitioning safety related research at the UK National Nuclear Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrott, Michael; Flint, Lauren; Gregson, Colin; Griffiths, Tamara; Hodgson, Zara; Maher, Chris; Mason, Chris; McLachlan, Fiona; Orr, Robin; Reilly, Stacey; Rhodes, Chris; Sarsfield, Mark; Sims, Howard; Shepherd, Daniel; Taylor, Robin; Webb, Kevin; Woodall, Sean; Woodhead, David

    2015-01-01

    The development of advanced separation processes for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing and minor actinide recycling is an essential component of international R and D programmes aimed at closing the nuclear fuel cycle around the middle of this century. While both aqueous and pyrochemical processes are under consideration internationally, neither option will gain broad acceptance without significant advances in process safety, waste minimisation, environmental impact and proliferation resistance; at least when compared to current reprocessing technologies. The UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) is developing flowsheets for innovative aqueous separation processes. These include advanced PUREX options (i.e. processes using tributyl phosphate as the extractant for uranium, plutonium and possibly neptunium recovery) and GANEX (grouped actinide extraction) type processes that use diglycolamide based extractants to co-extract all transuranic actinides. At NNL, development of the flowsheets is closely linked to research on process safety, since this is essential for assessing prospects for future industrialisation and deployment. Within this context, NNL is part of European 7. Framework projects 'ASGARD' and 'SACSESS'. Key topics under investigation include: hydrogen generation from aqueous and solvent phases; decomposition of aqueous phase ligands used in separations prior to product finishing and recycle of nitric acid; dissolution of carbide fuels including management of organics generated. Additionally, there is a strong focus on use of predictive process modelling to assess flowsheet sensitivities as well as engineering design and global hazard assessment of these new processes. (authors)

  6. Radon Remediation and Protective Measures in UK Buildings: The Work of the Building Research Establishment Ltd. (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scivyer, C.; Woolliscroft, M.

    1998-01-01

    The scope is described of work carried out by the Building Research Establishment Ltd (BRE) in the UK. BRE, funded by the UK Department of the Environment and the Regions (DETR), have been carrying out research into radon in UK buildings for over 10 years. Research has resulted in the successful development of a range of reliable, practical and cost effective radon remedial measures. The measures, which are described in a series of practical guides, are applicable to almost all building types found in the UK, and would be appropriate for use in many buildings found in other countries. The principal aims of this work have been to develop practical, cost effective and appropriate methods for reducing radon levels in existing buildings and to develop protective measures for new buildings. It is considered particularly important to ensure that measures recommended not only reduce radon levels, but that they do not cause adverse effects to the structure or indoor environment, whilst also being cost effective. A comprehensive series of field trials has been undertaken to test a variety of different solutions in more than 300 existing buildings and protective measures in more than 500 new buildings. To support the field trials BRE have a test house located in the South West of England which allows researchers access to a real house without causing considerable disruption to householders in conducting experiments. BRE have also carried out computer modelling work to try to understand the processes which cause radon entry, and how measures taken might affect these processes. A comprehensive database of work carried out in some 300 UK houses is also maintained. (author)

  7. 78 FR 20696 - NASA Advisory Council; Human Exploration and Operations Committee; Research Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... topics: --Overview of Research in Space Life and Physical Sciences --Space Station and Future Exploration... Exploration and Operations Committee; Research Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... of the Research Subcommittee of the Human Exploration and Operations Committee (HEOC) of the NASA...

  8. AERA Code of Ethics: American Educational Research Association Approved by the AERA Council February 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Educational Researcher, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Code of Ethics of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) articulates a common set of values upon which education researchers build their professional and scientific work. The Code is intended to provide both the principles and the rules to cover professional situations encountered by education researchers. It has as its primary…

  9. 75 FR 68599 - Solicitation for Membership to the Forestry Research Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-08

    ... nomination packages to Daina Dravnieks Apple, Senior Staff Assistant, U.S. Forest Service; Research and... Dravnieks Apple, Senior Staff Assistant, U.S. Forest Service; Research and Development, Forestry Research... eligible institutions, and State agricultural experiment stations; and (4) Volunteer public groups...

  10. Council Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Cary, North Carolina — View the location of the Town of Cary’s four Town Council districts.Please note that one district, District A, is split into two geo-spatial areas. One area is in...

  11. Profile and scientific production of Brazilian National Council of Technological and Scientific Development researchers in Pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Christina L. Oliveira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the profile and the scientific production of researchers in Pediatrics with scholarship from the National Counsel of Technological and Scientific Development. METHODS: The Lattes curricula of 34 researchers in Pediatrics with active scholarships, from 2006 to 2008 were included in the analysis. The variables of interest were: gender, affiliation, time since PHD, tutoring of undergraduate students, mentorship of masters and doctors, scientific production and the papers' impact. RESULTS: In a total of 411 researchers in Medicine, 34 (8% belonged to Pediatrics. Males (77% and scholars in the category 2 of productivity (62% prevailed. Three states of Brazil were responsible for approximately 90% of the researchers: São Paulo (53%, Minas Gerais (21%, and Rio Grande do Sul (15%. During their academic career, the Pediatrics researchers have published 3,122 articles with a median of 89 articles per researcher (interquartile range - IQ=51-119. Of the total, 40 and 59% articles were indexed in the Web of Science and Scopus databases, respectively. The Pediatrics researchers have published papers in 599 journals with a median impact factor of 2.35 (IQ=1.37-3.73 for the 323 indexed journals. CONCLUSIONS: The Pediatrics researchers have a relevant scientific output from the quantity point of the view, but there is a need to improve quality.

  12. Profile and scientific production of Brazilian National Council of Technological and Scientific Development researchers in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Maria Christina L; Martelli, Daniella Reis B; Pinheiro, Sergio Veloso; Miranda, Debora Marques; Quirino, Isabel Gomes; Leite, Barbara Gusmão L; Colosimo, Enrico Antonio; e Silva, Ana Cristina S; Martelli-Júnior, Hercílio; Oliveira, Eduardo Araujo

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the profile and the scientific production of researchers in Pediatrics with scholarship from the National Counsel of Technological and Scientific Development. The Lattes curricula of 34 researchers in Pediatrics with active scholarships, from 2006 to 2008 were included in the analysis. The variables of interest were: gender, affiliation, time since PHD, tutoring of undergraduate students, mentorship of masters and doctors, scientific production and the papers' impact. In a total of 411 researchers in Medicine, 34 (8%) belonged to Pediatrics. Males (77%) and scholars in the category 2 of productivity (62%) prevailed. Three states of Brazil were responsible for approximately 90% of the researchers: São Paulo (53%), Minas Gerais (21%), and Rio Grande do Sul (15%). During their academic career, the Pediatrics researchers have published 3,122 articles with a median of 89 articles per researcher (interquartile range - IQ=51-119). Of the total, 40 and 59% articles were indexed in the Web of Science and Scopus databases, respectively. The Pediatrics researchers have published papers in 599 journals with a median impact factor of 2.35 (IQ=1.37-3.73) for the 323 indexed journals. The Pediatrics researchers have a relevant scientific output from the quantity point of the view, but there is a need to improve quality.

  13. Making restorative justice work for women who have offended: A Restorative Justice Council research report

    OpenAIRE

    Osterman, Linnéa; Masson, Isla

    2016-01-01

    This study addresses a major gap in research and knowledge regarding female offenders' experiences of, and access to, restorative justice. The research was funded by Barrow Cadbury Trust and conducted with the support of the RJC, in association with Coventry University.

  14. Does dissemination extend beyond publication: a survey of a cross section of public funded research in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calnan Michael W

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the UK, most funding bodies now expect a commitment or effort on the part of grant holders to disseminate the findings of their research. The emphasis is on ensuring that publicly funded research is made available, can be used to support decision making, and ultimately improve the quality and delivery of healthcare provided. In this study, we aimed to describe the dissemination practices and impacts of applied and public health researchers working across the UK. Methods We conducted a survey of 485 UK-based principal investigators of publicly funded applied and public health research. Participants were contacted by email and invited to complete an online questionnaire via an embedded URL. Gift vouchers were given to all participants who completed the questionnaire. Four reminder emails were sent out to non-respondents at one, two, three, and four weeks; a fifth postal reminder was also undertaken. Results A total of 243/485 (50% questionnaires were returned (232 completed, 11 declining to participate. Most researchers recognise the importance of and appear committed to research dissemination. However, most dissemination activity beyond the publishing of academic papers appears to be undertaken an ad hoc fashion. There is some evidence that access to dissemination advice and support may facilitate more policy interactions; though access to such resources is lacking at an institutional level, and advice from funders can be variable. Although a minority of respondents routinely record details about the impact of their research, when asked about impact in relation to specific research projects most were able to provide simple narrative descriptions. Conclusions Researchers recognise the importance of and appear committed to disseminating the findings of their work. Although researchers are focussed on academic publication, a range of dissemination activities are being applied albeit in an ad hoc fashion. However, what

  15. Application of the Ionizing Radiations Regulations 1985 to a research establishment in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashton, I.; Walker, J.M.G.

    1988-01-01

    Three important reasons for the UK Health and Safety Executive to embark on the preparation of the Ionising Radiation Regulations were: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 26 revised the basic recommendations for radiation protection on which national provisions are based; As members of the European Commission the UK is bound by the Euratom Directives to align its national legislation with other member states. The Directives lay down the basic safety standards for the health protection of the general public and workers against the dangers of ionising radiation; The UK Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 allows outdated legislation to be progressively replaced by a system of regulations and approved codes of practice designed to maintain or improve the standards of health, safety and welfare in the workplace

  16. Establishing and sustaining research partnerships in Africa: a case study of the UK-Africa Academic Partnership on Chronic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de-Graft Aikins Ama

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper examines the challenges and opportunities in establishing and sustaining north–south research partnerships in Africa through a case study of the UK-Africa Academic Partnership on Chronic Disease. Established in 2006 with seed funding from the British Academy, the partnership aimed to bring together multidisciplinary chronic disease researchers based in the UK and Africa to collaborate on research, inform policymaking, train and support postgraduates and create a platform for research dissemination. We review the partnership’s achievements and challenges, applying established criteria for developing successful partnerships. During the funded period we achieved major success in creating a platform for research dissemination through international meetings and publications. Other goals, such as engaging in collaborative research and training postgraduates, were not as successfully realised. Enabling factors included trust and respect between core working group members, a shared commitment to achieving partnership goals, and the collective ability to develop creative strategies to overcome funding challenges. Barriers included limited funding, administrative support, and framework for monitoring and evaluating some goals. Chronic disease research partnerships in low-income regions operate within health research, practice, funding and policy environments that prioritise infectious diseases and other pressing public health and developmental challenges. Their long-term sustainability will therefore depend on integrated funding systems that provide a crucial capacity building bridge. Beyond the specific challenges of chronic disease research, we identify social capital, measurable goals, administrative support, creativity and innovation and funding as five key ingredients that are essential for sustaining research partnerships.

  17. Establishing and sustaining research partnerships in Africa: a case study of the UK-Africa Academic Partnership on Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the challenges and opportunities in establishing and sustaining north–south research partnerships in Africa through a case study of the UK-Africa Academic Partnership on Chronic Disease. Established in 2006 with seed funding from the British Academy, the partnership aimed to bring together multidisciplinary chronic disease researchers based in the UK and Africa to collaborate on research, inform policymaking, train and support postgraduates and create a platform for research dissemination. We review the partnership’s achievements and challenges, applying established criteria for developing successful partnerships. During the funded period we achieved major success in creating a platform for research dissemination through international meetings and publications. Other goals, such as engaging in collaborative research and training postgraduates, were not as successfully realised. Enabling factors included trust and respect between core working group members, a shared commitment to achieving partnership goals, and the collective ability to develop creative strategies to overcome funding challenges. Barriers included limited funding, administrative support, and framework for monitoring and evaluating some goals. Chronic disease research partnerships in low-income regions operate within health research, practice, funding and policy environments that prioritise infectious diseases and other pressing public health and developmental challenges. Their long-term sustainability will therefore depend on integrated funding systems that provide a crucial capacity building bridge. Beyond the specific challenges of chronic disease research, we identify social capital, measurable goals, administrative support, creativity and innovation and funding as five key ingredients that are essential for sustaining research partnerships. PMID:22897937

  18. Appraisal of the Effectiveness of CODE; The Coordinated Delivery System for the South Central Research Library Council, January to December 1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faibisoff, Sylvia G.

    A major concern of the South Central Research Library Council in establishing an interlibrary loan network was the development of a Coordinated Delivery system (CODE). Several means of delivery were considered--the U.S. mails, commercial trucking (Greyhound, United Parcel Service), and use of the public library system's delivery services. A…

  19. A Linguistic Analysis of the Sample Numeracy Skills Test Items for Pre-Service Teachers Issued by the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, Lisa; O'Halloran, Kay L.; Wignell, Peter; Tan, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) was tasked with developing literacy and numeracy skills testing for pre-service teachers. All undergraduate and postgraduate trainee teachers are now required to pass these literacy and numeracy tests at some stage on their journey to becoming a teacher; for commencing students from…

  20. 78 FR 61362 - Advisory Council on Alzheimer's Research, Care, and Services; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... welcome new members and discuss the timeline for the 2014 recommendations. The subcommittees will discuss... harness ``big data'' to address Alzheimer's research. DATES: The meeting will be held on October 28, 2013... welcome new members and discuss the timeline for the 2014 recommendations. The subcommittees will discuss...

  1. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario (CAHO) Adopting Research to Improve Care (ARTIC) Program: Reach, Sustainability, Spread and Lessons Learned from an Implementation Funding Model

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Julia E.; Grouchy, Michelle; Graham, Ian D.; Shandling, Maureen; Doyle, Winnie; Straus, Sharon E.

    2016-01-01

    Despite evidence on what works in healthcare, there is a significant gap in the time it takes to bring research into practice. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario's Adopting Research to Improve Care program addresses this research-to-practice gap by incorporating the following components into its funding program: strategic selection of evidence for implementation, education and training for implementation, implementation supports, executive champions and governance, and evaluation. F...

  2. 1984 CRC (Coordinating Research Council, Inc.) Octane Number Requirement Rating Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-01

    Richard J . Tither Mobil Oil Corporation Sam D. Vallas Amoco Oil Company Douglas A. Voss Chevron Research Company Andy Vukovic Shell Canada Dave G...Instrumentation, * Preparation a Test Fuels: Procurement of Fuels and Cans, and Coordina- tion of On-Site Handling e Data Handling and Analysis j 2 nI |S 0- B-2 V...Doug McCorkell Union Oil Company of California James D. Merritt Amoco Oil Company Michael J . Mlotkowski Mobil Oil Corporation John Pandosh Sun Tech

  3. Radioactivity in the terrestrial environment; review of UK research 1993-1996 and recommendations for future work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    The national Radioactivity Research and Environmental Monitoring Committee (RADREM) provides a forum for liaison on UK research and monitoring in the radioactive substances and radioactive waste management fields. It is subscribed to by Government departments, national regulatory bodies, the UK nuclear industry and other bodies with relevant research sponsorship and monitoring interests. A key function of the RADREM committee is to ensure that there is no unnecessary overlap between or significant omission from the research sponsored by the organisations represented upon it. To this end periodic reviews of research sector programmes are carried out. This report covers a review which was carried out by the Terrestrial Environment Sub-Committee (TESC) of RADREM for the period 1993-1996. In particular possible future research requirements are considered and evaluated. Such omissions are as identified do not reflect Sub-Committee views on the adequacy of any individual organisations research programme. Rather they should be seen as areas where gaps in knowledge may exist, which all organisations are free to consider and prioritise in the formulation of their future research requirements. (author)

  4. The UK Human Genome Mapping Project online computing service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rysavy, F R; Bishop, M J; Gibbs, G P; Williams, G W

    1992-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of computing and networking facilities developed by the Medical Research Council to provide online computing support to the Human Genome Mapping Project (HGMP) in the UK. The facility is connected to a number of other computing facilities in various centres of genetics and molecular biology research excellence, either directly via high-speed links or through national and international wide-area networks. The paper describes the design and implementation of the current system, a 'client/server' network of Sun, IBM, DEC and Apple servers, gateways and workstations. A short outline of online computing services currently delivered by this system to the UK human genetics research community is also provided. More information about the services and their availability could be obtained by a direct approach to the UK HGMP-RC.

  5. Comparative Study of Milk Production and Feed Efficiency Based on Farmers Best Practices and National Research Council

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Lestari

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare local dairy farmer ration formula with national research council in producing higher feed efficiency and milk production. This study had two stages. The first stage was in vitro study of dairy farmer rations which have different raw materials (R3, R4, and R5 with NRC based ration (R2 and Demo Farm ration (R1. The variables measured in this stage were proximate composition, volatile fatty acid, ammonia, dry matter and organic matter digestibility. The first stage used a randomized block design with five treatments, three groups of ruminal fluid, and three replications. The second stage used nine lactating cows with three periods of lactation (one, three, and other and used a randomized block design with three treatments, three groups, and one replication. Parameters measured were dry matter intake, manure score, milk production, body weight gain, body condition score, and technical and economical efficiencies. The first stage result showed that R1, R2, and R3 were three best rations in nutrient composition and fermentability (ammonia and volatile fatty acid concentrations were optimum for microbial growth and high digestibility, so in conclusion those three rations were the best rations and should be compared by in vivo method. The result of the second stage showed that all tested rations were not significantly different in milk production, performance and efficiency, so in conclusion those three rations have the same quality.

  6. Comparative analysis of the Cancer Council of Victoria and the online Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation FFQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardener, Samantha L; Rainey-Smith, Stephanie R; Macaulay, S Lance; Taddei, Kevin; Rembach, Alan; Maruff, Paul; Ellis, Kathryn A; Masters, Colin L; Rowe, Christopher C; Ames, David; Keogh, Jennifer B; Martins, Ralph N

    2015-11-28

    FFQ are commonly used to examine the association between diet and disease. They are the most practical method for usual dietary data collection as they are relatively inexpensive and easy to administer. In Australia, the Cancer Council of Victoria FFQ (CCVFFQ) version 2 and the online Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation FFQ (CSIROFFQ) are used. The aim of our study was to establish the level of agreement between nutrient intakes captured using the online CSIROFFQ and the paper-based CCVFFQ. The CCVFFQ and the online CSIROFFQ were completed by 136 healthy participants. FFQ responses were analysed to give g per d intake of a range of nutrients. Agreement between twenty-six nutrient intakes common to both FFQ was measured by a variety of methods. Nutrient intake levels that were significantly correlated between the two FFQ were carbohydrates, total fat, Na and MUFA. When assessing ranking of nutrients into quintiles, on average, 56 % of the participants (for all nutrients) were classified into the same or adjacent quintiles in both FFQ, with the highest percentage agreement for sugar. On average, 21 % of participants were grossly misclassified by three or four quintiles, with the highest percentage misclassification for fibre and Fe. Quintile agreement was similar to that reported by other studies, and we concluded that both FFQ are suitable tools for dividing participants' nutrient intake levels into high- and low-consumption groups. Use of either FFQ was not appropriate for obtaining accurate estimates of absolute nutrient intakes.

  7. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) assessment test scores corresponding to modified Medical Research Council grades among COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Jinwoo; Park, Young Sik; Lee, Sang-Min; Yim, Jae-Joon; Kim, Young Whan; Han, Sung Koo; Yoo, Chul-Gyu

    2015-09-01

    In assigning patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) to subgroups according to the updated guidelines of the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease, discrepancies have been noted between the COPD assessment test (CAT) criteria and modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) criteria. We investigated the determinants of symptom and risk groups and sought to identify a better CAT criterion. This retrospective study included COPD patients seen between June 20, 2012, and December 5, 2012. The CAT score that can accurately predict an mMRC grade ≥ 2 versus COPD patients, the percentages of patients classified into subgroups A, B, C, and D were 24.5%, 47.2%, 4.2%, and 24.1% based on CAT criteria and 49.3%, 22.4%, 8.9%, and 19.4% based on mMRC criteria, respectively. More than 90% of the patients who met the mMRC criteria for the 'more symptoms group' also met the CAT criteria. AUROC and CART analyses suggested that a CAT score ≥ 15 predicted an mMRC grade ≥ 2 more accurately than the current CAT score criterion. During follow-up, patients with CAT scores of 10 to 14 did not have a different risk of exacerbation versus those with CAT scores COPD patients.

  8. PV value analysis: Progress report on PV-Compact Coordinating Council's consensus research agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppenheim, J.

    1995-01-01

    A survey of published and ongoing valuation research indicates that grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) technology is at or close to cost-effectiveness, from the utility or end-user point of view, in an increasing but carefully selected array of distributed utility applications. This conclusion is based on conventional analyses of utility avoided costs (energy, effective load carrying capability, and transmission and distribution costs including line losses) and customer benefits (energy and demand bill savings, tax benefits). It may provide the basis for regulatory review of utility transmission or distribution investments to test prudence or usefulness. The conclusion would be stronger with consideration of the values of risk mitigation, power quality, strategic value to utilities, and satisfaction of customer preference. Further work would therefore be useful in quantifying these factors. The economic conclusions prevail irrespective of the structure of the utility industry. However, the analysis is site-specific so its broad application depends on development of easily operated models and other analytical tools for use in the field and by the regulatory process

  9. Survey of Laser Markets Relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy Drivers, information for National Research Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayramian, A.J.; Deri, R.J.; Erlandson, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    Development of a new technology for commercial application can be significantly accelerated by leveraging related technologies used in other markets. Synergies across multiple application domains attract research and development (R and D) talent - widening the innovation pipeline - and increases the market demand in common components and subsystems to provide performance improvements and cost reductions. For these reasons, driver development plans for inertial fusion energy (IFE) should consider the non-fusion technology base that can be lveraged for application to IFE. At this time, two laser driver technologies are being proposed for IFE: solid-state lasers (SSLs) and KrF gas (excimer) lasers. This document provides a brief survey of organizations actively engaged in these technologies. This is intended to facilitate comparison of the opportunities for leveraging the larger technical community for IFE laser driver development. They have included tables that summarize the commercial organizations selling solid-state and KrF lasers, and a brief summary of organizations actively engaged in R and D on these technologies.

  10. Indian Council of Medical Research consensus document for the management of gall bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Hari Shankar; Sirohi, Bhawna; Behari, Anu; Sharma, Atul; Majumdar, Jahar; Ganguly, Manomoy; Tewari, Mallika; Kumar, Sandeep; Saini, Sunil; Sahni, Peush; Singh, Tomcha; Kapoor, Vinay Kumar; Sucharita, V.; Kaur, Tanvir; Shukla, Deepak Kumar; Rath, Goura Kishor

    2015-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The document is based on consensus among the experts and best available evidence pertaining to Indian population and is meant for practice in India.All postcholecystectomy gallbladder specimens should be opened and examined carefully by the operating surgeon and be sent for histopathological examination.All “incidental” gall bladder cancers (GBCs) picked up on histopathological examination should have an expert opinion.Evaluation of a patient with early GBC should include essential tests: A computed tomography (CT) scan (multi-detector or helical) of the abdomen and pelvis for staging with a CT chest or chest X-ray, and complete blood counts, renal and liver function tests. magnetic resonance imaging/positron emission tomography (PET)-CT are not recommended for all patients.For early stage disease (up to Stage IVA), surgery is recommended. The need for adjuvant treatment would be guided by the histopathological analysis of the resected specimen.Patients with Stage IVB/metastatic disease must be assessed for palliative e.g. endoscopic or radiological intervention, chemotherapy versus best supportive care on an individual basis. These patients do not require extensive workup outside of a clinical trial setting.There is an urgent need for multicenter trials from India covering various aspects of epidemiology (viz., identification of population at high-risk, organized follow-up), clinical management (viz., bile spill during surgery, excision of all port sites, adjuvant/neoadjuvant therapy) and basic research (viz., what causes GBC). PMID:26157282

  11. From bricks to buildings: adapting the Medical Research Council framework to develop programs of research in simulation education and training for the health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji, Faizal A; Da Silva, Celina; Daigle, Delton T; Dubrowski, Adam

    2014-08-01

    Presently, health care simulation research is largely conducted on a study-by-study basis. Although such "project-based" research generates a plethora of evidence, it can be chaotic and contradictory. A move toward sustained, thematic, theory-based programs of research is necessary to advance knowledge in the field. Recognizing that simulation is a complex intervention, we present a framework for developing research programs in simulation-based education adapted from the Medical Research Council (MRC) guidance. This framework calls for an iterative approach to developing, refining, evaluating, and implementing simulation interventions. The adapted framework guidance emphasizes: (1) identification of theory and existing evidence; (2) modeling and piloting interventions to clarify active ingredients and identify mechanisms linking the context, intervention, and outcomes; and (3) evaluation of intervention processes and outcomes in both the laboratory and real-world setting. The proposed framework will aid simulation researchers in developing more robust interventions that optimize simulation-based education and advance our understanding of simulation pedagogy.

  12. Research in Nursing Practice, Education, and Administration: Collaborative, Methodological, and Ethical Implications. Proceedings of the Research Conference of the Southern Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing (3rd, Baltimore, Maryland, December 2-3, 1983).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Ora L., Ed.; Damrosch, Shirley P., Ed.

    Collaborative research in nursing is discussed in five papers from the 1983 conference of the Southern Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing. Also included are 32 abstracts of nursing research, focusing on clinical practice, as well as nursing education and research models. Paper titles and authors are as follows: "Building a Climate…

  13. Council Session

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    From face, 1st raw: Erich Lohrmann, Sergio Fubini, Léon Van Hove, John Adams (Directors-General), Paul Levaux (President of the Council) Hans-Otto Wüster, Franco Bonaudi, Robert Lévy-Mandel and 2nd raw, centre: Patrick Mollet, Eliane de Modzelewska, Jean-Marie Dufour

  14. News UK public libraries offer walk-in access to research Atoms for Peace? The Atomic Weapons Establishment and UK universities Students present their research to academics: CERN@school Science in a suitcase: Marvin and Milo visit Ethiopia Inspiring telescopes A day for everyone teaching physics 2014 Forthcoming Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    UK public libraries offer walk-in access to research Atoms for Peace? The Atomic Weapons Establishment and UK universities Students present their research to academics: CERN@school Science in a suitcase: Marvin and Milo visit Ethiopia Inspiring telescopes A day for everyone teaching physics 2014 Forthcoming Events

  15. What are the priorities for future success in critical care research in the UK? Report from a national stakeholder meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Tim; Brett, Stephen J

    2015-11-01

    Critical care in the United Kingdom is now well-established in terms of professional status, standards of clinical practice and training, and national audit through professional bodies and government representation. Research is fundamental to the further development and maturation of the specialty, to develop new therapies and technologies, more efficient and effective service organisation, and to improve patient and family experience and outcomes. Critical care research has expanded rapidly in the UK, and now has established organisations and infrastructure to share and develop ideas, through the UK Critical Care Research Forum and similar meetings. In September 2014, the Intensive Care Foundation and Critical Care Leadership Forum hosted a research colloquium to reflect, in part, on achievements, but more importantly plan for the future. With an invited list of participants the meeting explored firstly - the practical delivery of clinical research and secondly - the future financing landscape, from both academic funders' and commercial developers' perspectives. The following article summarises the important 'take home' messages from this meeting and suggests key issues for future strategy.

  16. Theory of Change: a theory-driven approach to enhance the Medical Research Council's framework for complex interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Mary J; Breuer, Erica; Lee, Lucy; Asher, Laura; Chowdhary, Neerja; Lund, Crick; Patel, Vikram

    2014-07-05

    The Medical Research Councils' framework for complex interventions has been criticized for not including theory-driven approaches to evaluation. Although the framework does include broad guidance on the use of theory, it contains little practical guidance for implementers and there have been calls to develop a more comprehensive approach. A prospective, theory-driven process of intervention design and evaluation is required to develop complex healthcare interventions which are more likely to be effective, sustainable and scalable. We propose a theory-driven approach to the design and evaluation of complex interventions by adapting and integrating a programmatic design and evaluation tool, Theory of Change (ToC), into the MRC framework for complex interventions. We provide a guide to what ToC is, how to construct one, and how to integrate its use into research projects seeking to design, implement and evaluate complex interventions using the MRC framework. We test this approach by using ToC within two randomized controlled trials and one non-randomized evaluation of complex interventions. Our application of ToC in three research projects has shown that ToC can strengthen key stages of the MRC framework. It can aid the development of interventions by providing a framework for enhanced stakeholder engagement and by explicitly designing an intervention that is embedded in the local context. For the feasibility and piloting stage, ToC enables the systematic identification of knowledge gaps to generate research questions that strengthen intervention design. ToC may improve the evaluation of interventions by providing a comprehensive set of indicators to evaluate all stages of the causal pathway through which an intervention achieves impact, combining evaluations of intervention effectiveness with detailed process evaluations into one theoretical framework. Incorporating a ToC approach into the MRC framework holds promise for improving the design and evaluation of complex

  17. Models and impact of patient and public involvement in studies carried out by the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit at University College London: findings from ten case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Annabelle; Hanley, Bec; Gafos, Mitzy; Cromarty, Ben; Stephens, Richard; Sturgeon, Kate; Scott, Karen; Cragg, William J; Tweed, Conor D; Teera, Jacqueline; Vale, Claire L

    2016-07-29

    Patient and public involvement (PPI) in studies carried out by the UK Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit (MRC CTU) at University College London varies by research type and setting. We developed a series of case studies of PPI to document and share good practice. We used purposive sampling to identify studies representing the scope of research at the MRC CTU and different approaches to PPI. We carried out semi-structured interviews with staff and patient representatives. Interview notes were analysed descriptively to categorise the main aims and motivations for involvement; activities undertaken; their impact on the studies and lessons learned. We conducted 19 interviews about ten case studies, comprising one systematic review, one observational study and 8 randomised controlled trials in HIV and cancer. Studies were either open or completed, with start dates between 2003 and 2011. Interviews took place between March and November 2014 and were updated in summer 2015 where there had been significant developments in the study (i.e. if the study had presented results subsequent to the interview taking place). A wide range of PPI models, including representation on trial committees or management groups, community engagement, one-off task-focused activities, patient research partners and participant involvement had been used. Overall, interviewees felt that PPI had a positive impact, leading to improvements, for example in the research question; study design; communication with potential participants; study recruitment; confidence to carry out or complete a study; interpretation and communication of results; and influence on future research. A range of models of PPI can benefit clinical studies. Researchers should consider different approaches to PPI, based on the desired impact and the people they want to involve. Use of multiple models may increase the potential impacts of PPI in clinical research.

  18. Cyberfraud and the implications for effective risk-based responses: themes from UK research

    OpenAIRE

    Levi, Michael; Doig, Alan; Gundur, Rajeev; Wall, David; Williams, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    The nature of the risk or threat posed by ‘cyberfraud’ - fraud with a cyber dimension – is examined empirically based on data reported by the public and business to Action Fraud. These are used to examine the implications for a more effective risk-based response, both by category of fraud and also responding to cyberfraud generally, not just in the UK. A key characteristics of cyberfraud is that it can be globalised, unless there are major national differences in attractiveness of targets or ...

  19. Prevalence of hypercalcemia of malignancy among pediatric cancer patients in the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jick S

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Susan Jick,1 Lin Li,1 Victor M Gastanaga,2 Alexander Liede,2 Rohini K Hernandez2 1Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program, Boston University School of Public Health, Lexington, MA, USA; 2Center for Observational Research, Amgen Inc., Thousand Oaks and South San Francisco, CA, USA Background: The reported proportion of cancer patients who experience hypercalcemia of malignancy (HCM is low, particularly in the pediatric population, ranging between <1% and 5%. HCM can be observed with any type of tumor in children and occurs most commonly with leukemia. While HCM is a potentially fatal condition, the prevalence of HCM is not well understood in pediatric cancer patients. Methods: Using the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink, we identified pediatric cancer patients with recorded corrected serum calcium (CSC from 2003 through 2014. Hypercalcemic patients (CSC ≥10.8 mg/dL were classified into 4 CSC levels. We estimated the annual prevalence of HCM using Byar’s method. Results: Among 517 pediatric cancer patients, leukemia, lymphoma, and brain tumors were the most frequent cancer types. The prevalence of HCM overall (grade 1 or higher ranged from 0.24% to 0.81% between 2003 and 2014. There were too few cases to compare prevalence by type of cancer. Conclusion: We provide the first systematic analysis using a UK population-based data source to estimate the number of pediatric cancer patients affected with HCM by grade. Our findings showed that the prevalence of pediatric HCM was very low (0.24%–0.81% over the 12-year study period, which is consistent with previous study of adult cancer patients in the UK (0.20%–0.67%. Keywords: hypercalcemia, pediatric, cancer, prevalence, Clinical Practice Research Datalink

  20. Councils of Urgent Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellarius, Richard A.; Platt, John

    1972-01-01

    Discusses the role of national or international coordinating councils in focusing research on solutions of major human problems. Presents a taxonomy of 25 areas under the major heading: Physical Technology and Engineering; Biotechnology; Behavior and Personal Relations; National Social Structures; World Structure; and Channels of Effectiveness.…

  1. Research Investments in Global Health: A Systematic Analysis of UK Infectious Disease Research Funding and Global Health Metrics, 1997–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Head

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation: Most infections have received increases in research investment, alongside decreases in global burden of disease in 2013. The UK demonstrates research strengths in some neglected tropical diseases such as African trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis, but syphilis, cholera, shigellosis and pneumonia remain poorly funded relative to their global burden. Acute hepatitis C appears well funded but the figures do not adequately take into account projected future chronic burdens for this condition. These findings can help to inform global policymakers on resource allocation for research investment.

  2. Turning the tide : tidal power in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Sustainable Development Commission

    2007-01-01

    Contents: Turning the tide : tidal power in the UK -- Executive summary -- Tidal power in the UK : research report 1 : UK tidal resource assessment -- Tidal power in the UK : research report 2 : tidal technologies overview -- Tidal power in the UK : research report 3 : Severn barrage proposals -- Tidal power in the UK : research report 4 : Severn non-barrage options -- Tidal power in the UK : research report 5 : UK case studies. Summarised in the Welsh language version of the executive ...

  3. Systematic analysis of funding awarded for antimicrobial resistance research to institutions in the UK, 1997-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Michael G; Fitchett, Joseph R; Cooke, Mary K; Wurie, Fatima B; Atun, Rifat; Hayward, Andrew C; Holmes, Alison; Johnson, Alan P; Woodford, Neil

    2014-02-01

    To assess the level of research funding awarded to UK institutions specifically for antimicrobial resistance-related research and how closely the topics funded relate to the clinical and public health burden of resistance. Databases and web sites were systematically searched for information on how infectious disease research studies were funded for the period 1997-2010. Studies specifically related to antimicrobial resistance, including bacteriology, virology, mycology and parasitology research, were identified and categorized in terms of funding by pathogen and disease and by a research and development value chain describing the type of science. The overall dataset included 6165 studies receiving a total investment of £2.6 billion, of which £102 million was directed towards antimicrobial resistance research (5.5% of total studies, 3.9% of total spend). Of 337 resistance-related projects, 175 studies focused on bacteriology (40.2% of total resistance-related spending), 42 focused on antiviral resistance (17.2% of funding) and 51 focused on parasitology (27.4% of funding). Mean annual funding ranged from £1.9 million in 1997 to £22.1 million in 2009. Despite the fact that the emergence of antimicrobial resistance threatens our future ability to treat many infections, the proportion of the UK infection-research spend targeting this important area is small. There are encouraging signs of increased investment in this area, but it is important that this is sustained and targeted at areas of projected greatest burden. Two areas of particular concern requiring more investment are tuberculosis and multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

  4. The Transformative Impact of Undergraduate Research Mentoring on Students and the Role of the Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) in Supporting Faculty Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, L. K.; Singer, J.

    2015-12-01

    Undergraduate Research (UR) is broadly accepted as a high impact educational practice. Student participation in UR contributes to measurable gains in content knowledge and skills/methodology, oral and written communication skills, problem solving and critical thinking, self-confidence, autonomy, among others. First-generation college students and students from underrepresented minorities that participate in UR are more likely to remain in STEM majors, persist to graduation, and pursue graduate degrees. While engagement in the research process contributes to these outcomes, the impact of the interaction with the faculty mentor is critical. A number of studies provide evidence that it is the relationship that forms with the faculty mentor that is most valued by students and strongly contributes to their career development. Faculty mentors play an important role in student development and the relationship between mentor and student evolves from teacher to coach to colleague. Effective mentoring is not an inherent skill and is generally not taught in graduate school and generally differs from mentoring of graduate students. Each UR mentoring relationship is unique and there are many effective mentoring models and practices documented in the literature. The Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) has a long history of supporting faculty who engage in research with undergraduates and offers resources for establishing UR programs at individual, departmental, and institutional levels. The Geosciences Division of CUR leads faculty development workshops at professional meetings and provides extensive resources to support geosciences faculty as UR mentors (http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/undergraduate_research/index.html). Examples of effective mentoring strategies are highlighted, including a model developed by SUNY- Buffalo State that integrates mentoring directly into the evaluation of UR.

  5. Challenges in collecting clinical samples for research from pregnant women of South Asian origin: evidence from a UK study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelotpol, Sharmind; Hay, Alastair W M; Jolly, A Jim; Woolridge, Mike W

    2016-08-31

    To recruit South Asian pregnant women, living in the UK, into a clinicoepidemiological study for the collection of lifestyle survey data and antenatal blood and to retain the women for the later collection of cord blood and meconium samples from their babies for biochemical analysis. A longitudinal study recruiting pregnant women of South Asian and Caucasian origin living in the UK. Recruitment of the participants, collection of clinical samples and survey data took place at the 2 sites within a single UK Northern Hospital Trust. Pregnant women of South Asian origin (study group, n=98) and of Caucasian origin (comparison group, n=38) living in Leeds, UK. Among the participants approached, 81% agreed to take part in the study while a 'direct approach' method was followed. The retention rate of the participants was a remarkable 93.4%. The main challenges in recruiting the ethnic minority participants were their cultural and religious conservativeness, language barrier, lack of interest and feeling of extra 'stress' in taking part in research. The chief investigator developed an innovative participant retention method, associated with the women's cultural and religious practices. The method proved useful in retaining the participants for about 5 months and in enabling successful collection of clinical samples from the same mother-baby pairs. The collection of clinical samples and lifestyle data exceeded the calculated sample size required to give the study sufficient power. The numbers of samples obtained were: maternal blood (n=171), cord blood (n=38), meconium (n=176), lifestyle questionnaire data (n=136) and postnatal records (n=136). Recruitment and retention of participants, according to the calculated sample size, ensured sufficient power and success for a clinicoepidemiological study. Results suggest that development of trust and confidence between the participant and the researcher is the key to the success of a clinical and epidemiological study involving

  6. Pseudoislets as primary islet replacements for research: report on a symposium at King's College London, London UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, Shanta J; Arden, Catherine; Bergsten, Peter; Bone, Adrian J; Brown, James; Dunmore, Simon; Harrison, Moira; Hauge-Evans, Astrid; Kelly, Catriona; King, Aileen; Maffucci, Tania; Marriott, Claire E; McClenaghan, Neville; Morgan, Noel G; Reers, Christina; Russell, Mark A; Turner, Mark D; Willoughby, Emma; Younis, Mustafa Y G; Zhi, Z L; Jones, Peter M

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory-based research aimed at understanding processes regulating insulin secretion and mechanisms underlying β-cell dysfunction and loss in diabetes often makes use of rodents, as these processes are in many respects similar between rats/mice and humans. Indeed, a rough calculation suggests that islets have been isolated from as many as 150,000 rodents to generate the data contained within papers published in 2009 and the first four months of 2010. Rodent use for islet isolation has been mitigated, to a certain extent, by the availability of a variety of insulin-secreting cell lines that are used by researchers world-wide. However, when maintained as monolayers the cell lines do not replicate the robust, sustained secretory responses of primary islets which limits their usefulness as islet surrogates. On the other hand, there have been several reports that configuration of MIN6 β-cells, derived from a mouse insulinoma, as three-dimensional cell clusters termed ‘pseudoislets’ largely recapitulates the function of primary islet β-cells. The Diabetes Research Group at King’s College London has been using the MIN6 pseudoislet model for over a decade and they hosted a symposium on “Pseudoislets as primary islet replacements for research”, which was funded by the UK National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs), in London on 15th and 16th April 2010. This small, focused meeting was conceived as an opportunity to consolidate information on experiences of working with pseudoislets between different UK labs, and to introduce the theory and practice of pseudoislet culture to laboratories working with islets and/or β-cell lines but who do not currently use pseudoislets. This short review summarizes the background to the development of the cell line-derived pseudoislet model, the key messages arising from the symposium and emerging themes for future pseudoislet research.

  7. Recruiting to cohort studies in specialist healthcare services: Lessons learned from clinical research nurses in UK cleft services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchelli, Fabio; Rumsey, Nichola; Humphries, Kerry; Bennett, Rhiannon; Davies, Amy; Sandy, Jonathan; Stock, Nicola Marie

    2018-03-01

    To explore the experiences of clinical research nurses recruiting patients in a large specialist care-based cohort study. Longitudinal studies are vital to better understand the aetiology and moderators of health conditions. This need is especially salient for congenital conditions, such as cleft lip and/or palate, where establishing large, comprehensive data sets from birth is vital to improve understanding and to inform interventions. Various barriers exist in recruiting patients to large cohort studies. The role of clinical research nurses embedded within health settings has grown over past decades to facilitate data collection, yet challenges remain. Qualitative descriptive study. Individual semi-structured interviews with 12 clinical research nurses based in 10 National Health Service cleft services across the UK, recruiting to the Cleft Collective Birth Cohort Study. Of seven emergent themes, three highlighted challenges to recruiting patients, another three described facilitative factors, and one theme overlapped challenges and facilitators. Challenges included the life circumstances of potential participants; language barriers; and limited clinical research nurse time for study. Facilitative factors included integrating research into clinical practice; patient information shared with clinical research nurses; and support from the university-based research study team. The theme "Method of data collection" related to both challenges and facilitators. The qualitative data from clinical research nurses recruiting to a large birth cohort study provide helpful practical detail for specialist healthcare teams, specialist nurses, clinical research nurses and researchers looking to optimise recruitment and data collection in longitudinal studies. The findings suggest the importance of specialist clinical services and research study teams cooperating to embed research into everyday clinical practice, without compromising care. This should facilitate patients

  8. Identification of translational dermatology research priorities in the U.K.: results of an electronic Delphi exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, E; Brown, S J; Langan, S M; Nicholls, S G; Shams, K; Reynolds, N J

    2015-11-01

    Translational research is the direct application of basic and applied research to patient care. It is estimated that there are at least 2000 different skin diseases; thus, there are considerable challenges in seeking to undertake research on each of these disorders. This electronic Delphi (e-Delphi) exercise was conducted in order to generate a list of translational dermatology research questions that are regarded as a priority for further investigations. During the first phase of the e-Delphi exercise, 228 research questions were generated by an expert panel that included clinical academic dermatologists, clinical dermatologists, nonclinical scientists, dermatology trainees and representatives from patient support groups. Following completion of the second and third phases, 40 questions on inflammatory skin disease, 20 questions on structural skin disorders/genodermatoses, 37 questions on skin cancer and eight miscellaneous questions were designated as priority translational dermatology research questions (PRQs). In addition to PRQs on a variety of disease areas (including multiple PRQs on psoriasis, eczema, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma), there were a number of cross-cutting themes that identified a need to investigate mechanisms/pathogenesis of disease and the necessity to improve treatments for patients with skin disease. It is predicted that this list of PRQs will help to provide a strategic direction for translational dermatology research in the U.K. and that addressing this list of questions will ultimately provide clinical benefit for substantial numbers of patients with skin disorders. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  9. Identifying primary care patient safety research priorities in the UK: a James Lind Alliance Priority Setting Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Rebecca Lauren; Stocks, Susan Jill; Alam, Rahul; Taylor, Sian; Rolfe, Carly; Glover, Steven William; Whitcombe, Joanne; Campbell, Stephen M

    2018-02-28

    To identify the top 10 unanswered research questions for primary care patient safety research. A modified nominal group technique. UK. Anyone with experience of primary care including: patients, carers and healthcare professionals. 341 patients and 86 healthcare professionals submitted questions. A top 10, and top 30, future research questions for primary care patient safety. 443 research questions were submitted by 341 patients and 86 healthcare professionals, through a national survey. After checking for relevance and rephrasing, a total of 173 questions were collated into themes. The themes were largely focused on communication, team and system working, interfaces across primary and secondary care, medication, self-management support and technology. The questions were then prioritised through a national survey, the top 30 questions were taken forward to the final prioritisation workshop. The top 10 research questions focused on the most vulnerable in society, holistic whole-person care, safer communication and coordination between care providers, work intensity, continuity of care, suicide risk, complex care at home and confidentiality. This study was the first national prioritisation exercise to identify patient and healthcare professional priorities for primary care patient safety research. The research priorities identified a range of important gaps in the existing evidence to inform everyday practice to address primary care patient safety. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Speech to be delivered by Mr. François de Rose, president of Council of the european organization for nuclear research on the occasion of the inauguration of the CERN proton synchrotron on 5 february 1960

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    1960-01-01

    Speech to be delivered by Mr. François de Rose, president of Council of the european organization for nuclear research on the occasion of the inauguration of the CERN proton synchrotron on 5 february 1960

  11. 30 March 2009 - Representatives of the Danish Council for Independent Research Natural Sciences visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti, Former Spokesperson P. Jenni and Transition Radiation Tracker Project Leader C. Rembser.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2009-01-01

    30 March 2009 - Representatives of the Danish Council for Independent Research Natural Sciences visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti, Former Spokesperson P. Jenni and Transition Radiation Tracker Project Leader C. Rembser.

  12. Physics loses out in UK budget

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartlidge, E

    1998-01-01

    British astronomers are angry that the budget for the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council will receive only a 0.5% rise above inflation. All the other research councils will get increases of at least 3% (1 page).

  13. Research Investments in Global Health: A Systematic Analysis of UK Infectious Disease Research Funding and Global Health Metrics, 1997–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Michael G.; Fitchett, Joseph R.; Nageshwaran, Vaitehi; Kumari, Nina; Hayward, Andrew; Atun, Rifat

    2015-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases account for a significant global burden of disease and substantial investment in research and development. This paper presents a systematic assessment of research investments awarded to UK institutions and global health metrics assessing disease burden. Methods We systematically sourced research funding data awarded from public and philanthropic organisations between 1997 and 2013. We screened awards for relevance to infection and categorised data by type of science, disease area and specific pathogen. Investments were compared with mortality, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and years lived with disability (YLD) across three time points. Findings Between 1997–2013, there were 7398 awards with a total investment of £3.7 billion. An increase in research funding across 2011–2013 was observed for most disease areas, with notable exceptions being sexually transmitted infections and sepsis research where funding decreased. Most funding remains for pre-clinical research (£2.2 billion, 59.4%). Relative to global mortality, DALYs and YLDs, acute hepatitis C, leishmaniasis and African trypanosomiasis received comparatively high levels of funding. Pneumonia, shigellosis, pertussis, cholera and syphilis were poorly funded across all health metrics. Tuberculosis (TB) consistently attracts relatively less funding than HIV and malaria. Interpretation Most infections have received increases in research investment, alongside decreases in global burden of disease in 2013. The UK demonstrates research strengths in some neglected tropical diseases such as African trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis, but syphilis, cholera, shigellosis and pneumonia remain poorly funded relative to their global burden. Acute hepatitis C appears well funded but the figures do not adequately take into account projected future chronic burdens for this condition. These findings can help to inform global policymakers on resource allocation for research investment

  14. Research Investments in Global Health: A Systematic Analysis of UK Infectious Disease Research Funding and Global Health Metrics, 1997-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Michael G; Fitchett, Joseph R; Nageshwaran, Vaitehi; Kumari, Nina; Hayward, Andrew; Atun, Rifat

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases account for a significant global burden of disease and substantial investment in research and development. This paper presents a systematic assessment of research investments awarded to UK institutions and global health metrics assessing disease burden. We systematically sourced research funding data awarded from public and philanthropic organisations between 1997 and 2013. We screened awards for relevance to infection and categorised data by type of science, disease area and specific pathogen. Investments were compared with mortality, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and years lived with disability (YLD) across three time points. Between 1997-2013, there were 7398 awards with a total investment of £3.7 billion. An increase in research funding across 2011-2013 was observed for most disease areas, with notable exceptions being sexually transmitted infections and sepsis research where funding decreased. Most funding remains for pre-clinical research (£2.2 billion, 59.4%). Relative to global mortality, DALYs and YLDs, acute hepatitis C, leishmaniasis and African trypanosomiasis received comparatively high levels of funding. Pneumonia, shigellosis, pertussis, cholera and syphilis were poorly funded across all health metrics. Tuberculosis (TB) consistently attracts relatively less funding than HIV and malaria. Most infections have received increases in research investment, alongside decreases in global burden of disease in 2013. The UK demonstrates research strengths in some neglected tropical diseases such as African trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis, but syphilis, cholera, shigellosis and pneumonia remain poorly funded relative to their global burden. Acute hepatitis C appears well funded but the figures do not adequately take into account projected future chronic burdens for this condition. These findings can help to inform global policymakers on resource allocation for research investment.

  15. Contracting knowledge: the organizational limits to interdisciplinary energy efficiency research and development in the US and the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutzenhiser, Loren [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Shove, Elizabeth [Lancaster Univ., Centre for Science Studies, Lancaster (United Kingdom)

    1999-04-01

    Comparison of the organization and management of government funded energy efficiency research and development in the United States and the United Kingdom reveals a number of common features as well as as some important differences. The UK pattern is one of centralized agenda-setting and competition in which rival research contractors bid for small, pre-determined, ``bite-sized`` pieces of work. By contrast, the US approach involves complex negotiations between federal energy and environmental policy agencies and semi-entrepreneurial national laboratories. How do these differing research environments influence the knowledge we have of energy efficiency? How do these organizational features affect the shaping of research agendas, the definition of research problems and the management and dissemination of resulting expertise? More specifically, what consequences do these arrangements have for the conduct of needed social science studies within this conventionally technical field? In exploring these questions, the paper identifies a variety of ways in which opportunities for inter-disciplinarity are inadvertently structured by the mechanics of research management. (Author)

  16. UK Announces Intention to Join ESO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-11-01

    Summary The Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC) , the UK's strategic science investment agency, today announced that the government of the United Kingdom is making funds available that provide a baseline for this country to join the European Southern Observatory (ESO) . The ESO Director General, Dr. Catherine Cesarsky , and the ESO Community warmly welcome this move towards fuller integration in European astronomy. "With the UK as a potential member country of ESO, our joint opportunities for front-line research and technology will grow significantly", she said. "This announcement is a clear sign of confidence in ESO's abilities, most recently demonstrated with the construction and operation of the unique Very Large Telescope (VLT) on Paranal. Together we will look forward with confidence towards new, exciting projects in ground-based astronomy." It was decided earlier this year to place the 4-m UK Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope (VISTA) at Paranal, cf. ESO Press Release 03/00. Following negotiations between ESO and PPARC, a detailed proposal for the associated UK/ESO Agreement with the various entry modalities will now be presented to the ESO Council for approval. Before this Agreement can enter into force, the ESO Convention and associated protocols must also be ratified by the UK Parliament. Research and key technologies According to the PPARC press release, increased funding for science, announced by the UK government today, will enable UK astronomers to prepare for the next generation of telescopes and expand their current telescope portfolio through membership of the European Southern Observatory (ESO). The uplift to its baseline budget will enable PPARC to enter into final negotiations for UK membership of the ESO. This will ensure that UK astronomers, together with their colleagues in the ESO member states, are actively involved in global scale preparations for the next generation of astronomy facilities. among these are ALMA

  17. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: The Alcohol & Drug Abuse Research Unit at the South African Medical Research Council - strengthening substance abuse research and policy in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Charles; Morojele, Neo; Myers, Bronwyn; Plüddemann, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Unit (ADARU) was established at the South African Medical Research Council (MRC) at the beginning of 2001, although its origins lie in the activities of the Centre for Epidemiological Research in Southern Africa and other MRC entities. Initial challenges included attracting external funding, recruiting new staff, developing the skills of junior staff, publishing in international journals and building national and international collaborative networks. ADARU currently comprises a core staff of 33 members who work on 22 projects spanning substance use epidemiology and associated consequences, intervention studies with at-risk populations and services research. A large component of this portfolio focuses on the link between alcohol and other drug use and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behaviour, with funding from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Junior staff members are encouraged to develop independent research interests and pursue PhD studies. Research outputs, such as the 20 papers that were published in 2010 and the 35 conference presentations from that year, form an important part of the unit's research translation activities. We engage actively with policy processes at the local, provincial, national and international levels, and have given particular attention to alcohol policy in recent years. The paper includes an analysis of major challenges currently facing the unit and how we are attempting to address them. It ends with some thoughts on what the unit intends doing to enhance the quality of its research, the capacity of its staff and its international standing. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  18. Workforce issues and training programmes - A UK perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, Warren

    2007-01-01

    Over the past 20 years under-investment has led to the UK's nuclear skills base being run down to the point where it is now very fragile and the cracks are showing. As a result a number of key nuclear science and engineering disciplines are now showing signs of shortages developing which is being reflected in both industry and academia. Fortunately, the skills gap has been recognised and the trend of under-investment is being reversed. Industry, Government and the Research Councils are starting to take steps to address the issue and new nuclear education and research initiatives are underway including the Dalton Nuclear Institute and the plans to create a National Nuclear Laboratory. The concern over a skills gap still exists but hopefully with the realisation of high profile projects such as new nuclear build, the establishment of a National Nuclear Laboratory and continued support from the UK's Research Councils, involvement in the nuclear field will prove to be an attractive career option for a greater number of people which will put the UK back in the position of having a vibrant and sustainable world class nuclear skills base. (author)

  19. COPD exacerbations associated with the modified Medical Research Council scale and COPD assessment test among Humana Medicare members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale MK

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Margaret K Pasquale,1 Yihua Xu,1 Christine L Baker,2 Kelly H Zou,3 John G Teeter,4 Andrew M Renda,5 Cralen C Davis,1 Theodore C Lee,6 Joel Bobula2 1Comprehensive Health Insights, Inc., Humana Inc., Louisville, KY, 2Outcomes and Evidence, Global Health & Value, Pfizer Inc., 3Statistical Center for Outcomes, Real-World and Aggregate Data, Global Innovative Pharma Business, Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, 4Global Medical Development, Global Innovative Pharma Business, Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT, 5Retail Strategy & Execution, Humana Inc., Louisville, KY, 6Global Medical Affairs, Global Innovative Pharma Business, Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, USA Background: The Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines recommend assessment of COPD severity, which includes symptomatology using the modified Medical Research Council (mMRC or COPD assessment test (CAT score in addition to the degree of airflow obstruction and exacerbation history. While there is great interest in incorporating symptomatology, little is known about how patient reported symptoms are associated with future exacerbations and exacerbation-related costs.Methods: The mMRC and CAT were mailed to a randomly selected sample of 4,000 Medicare members aged >40 years, diagnosed with COPD (≥2 encounters with International Classification of Dis­eases-9th Edition Clinical Modification: 491.xx, 492.xx, 496.xx, ≥30 days apart. The exacerbations and exacerbation-related costs were collected from claims data during 365-day post-survey after exclusion of members lost to follow-up or with cancer, organ transplant, or pregnancy. A logistic regression model estimated the predictive value of exacerbation history and symptomatology on exacerbations during follow-up, and a generalized linear model with log link and gamma distribution estimated the predictive value of exacerbation history and symptomatology on exacerbation-related costs.Results: Among a total of 1,159 members who returned the

  20. 7α-methyl-19-nortestosterone (MENTR): the population council's contribution to research on male contraception and treatment of hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieschlag, Eberhard; Kumar, Narender; Sitruk-Ware, Régine

    2013-03-01

    Testosterone is an essential part of all regimens for hormonal male contraception tested to date. Initial efficacy trials revealed that the half-life of the testosterone preparations available at that time was too short to be used for male contraception. The ensuing search for long-acting preparations yielded testosterone buciclate and undecanoate as well as 7α-methyl-19-nortestosterone (MENT). Following description of the principle of male hormonal contraception and the efficacy trials performed to date, the systematic development of MENT for substitution of male hypogonadism and use in male contraception by the Population Council is reviewed here. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC) members, United Kingdom, visiting the ATLAS semiconductor tracker (SCT) module tests.

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Photo 01: Mr Peter Warry, PPARC Chairman, Victrex Plc, United Kingdom visiting the ATLAS SCT module tests with Dr Joleen Pater, SCT (Manchester). Photo 02: PPARC Council Members, United Kingdom, visiting the ATLAS SCT module tests. L.t to r.: Mrs Judith Scott, Chief Executive, British Computer Society, Prof. George Efstathiou, Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Mr Peter Warry, PPARC Chairman, Victrex Plc, Prof. Martin Ward, Director X-Ray Astronomy, of Leicester, Prof. James Stirling, Director, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, University of Durham and Prof. Brian Foster, University of Bristol.

  2. Government Research Evaluations and Academic Freedom: A UK and Australian Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Sardesai, Ann; Irvine, Helen; Tooley, Stuart; Guthrie, James

    2017-01-01

    Performance management systems have been an inevitable consequence of the development of government research evaluations (GREs) of university research, and have also inevitably affected the working life of academics. The aim of this paper is to track the development of GREs over the past 25 years, by critically evaluating their adoption in the UK…

  3. Mapping Music Education Research in the USA: A Response to the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Harry E.

    2004-01-01

    The research enterprise in the United States is a vast one, with at least 15 music education and two music therapy research journals. This is in addition to the multitude of papers presented at a myriad of state, regional and national conferences, including the hundreds of papers presented at the biannual meetings of the Music Educators National…

  4. Comparison between Radiology Science Laboratory, Brazil (LCR) and National Research Council, Canada (NRC) of the absorbed dose in water using Fricke dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salata, Camila; David, Mariano Gazineu; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de

    2014-01-01

    The absorbed dose to water standards for HDR brachytherapy dosimetry developed by the Radiology Science Laboratory, Brazil (LCR) and the National Research Council, Canada (NRC), were compared. The two institutions have developed absorbed dose standards based on the Fricke dosimetry system. There are significant differences between the two standards as far as the preparation and readout of the Fricke solution and irradiation geometry of the holder. Measurements were done at the NRC laboratory using a single Ir-192 source. The comparison of absorbed dose measurements was expressed as the ratio Dw(NRC)/Dw(LCR), which was found to be 1.026. (author)

  5. Que faire? A Bioeconomy and Solar Energy Institute at Italy's Research Council in the Context of the Global Transition to the Solar Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliaro, Mario; Meneguzzo, Francesco

    2017-11-02

    Driven by insight for which new research and education requires new institutional organisation, and drawing on two decades of research and educational efforts, we devise the profile and activities of a new bioeconomy and solar energy institute at Italy's Research Council. We further articulate the institute's activities suggesting avenues on how to deploy sound and giving more useful research, education and policy advice in these crucial fields for making tomorrow's common development sustainable. The outcomes of the study are of general interest, because the transition to a solar economy is of intrinsic global nature and the challenges involved are similar in many countries. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Recent UK research and the development of high temperature design methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, R.T.; Tomkins, B.; Townley, C.H.A.

    1987-01-01

    The paper outlines recent research and development activities on high temperature design methods and criteria for high temperature components as utilized by liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors. (orig.)

  7. Five Key Changes for the Management of UK Defence - An Agenda for Research?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tatham, Peter; Taylor, Trevor

    2008-01-01

    .... Given the paucity of academic research into the general area of defence management, it is suggested that there is considerable potential for focused application of ideas and concepts from a broad...

  8. Radioactivity in the aquatic environment. A review of UK research 1994-1997 and recommendations for future work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    The national Radioactivity Research and Environmental Monitoring Committee (RADREM) provides a forum for liaison on UK research and monitoring in the radioactive substances and radioactive waste management fields. The committee aims to ensure that there is no unnecessary overlap between, or significant omission from, the research programmes of the various parts of Government, the regulatory bodies or industry. This report has been produced by the Aquatic Environment Sub-Committee (AESC) of RADREM. AESC is responsible for providing RADREM with scientific advice in the field of research relating to radionuclides in the aquatic environment, for reporting on the progress of research in this field and on future research requirements. The objectives of this report are presented in Section 2, and the membership of AESC given in Section 3. This report describes a review of research undertaken in the field of radioactivity in aquatic systems over the last three years (Section 4). The review updates previous reviews, the most recent of which being in 1993 (AESC, 1994). Future research requirements have been identified by AESC, considering past work and work in progress, and are presented in Section 5. Specific research requirements are discussed in Section 5, whilst Section 6 summarises the main areas where future research is identified as a priority. These areas are as follows: the movement and uptake of 99 Tc and 14 C in aquatic systems and biota; geochemical processes; off-shore sediments; non-equilibrium systems; radiation exposure during civil engineering works; further work on movement of radionuclides in salt marshes; development and validation of models. The specific objectives of this report are as follows: 1. To provide a summary of research undertaken in this field over the last three years. 2. To identify future research requirements. 3. To attach priorities to the future research requirements. It should be noted that the purpose of the report is to identify

  9. Clinical governance and research ethics as barriers to UK low-risk population-based health research?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Flora

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the Helsinki Declaration was introduced in 1964 as a code of practice for clinical research, it has generally been agreed that research governance is also needed in the field of public health and health promotion research. Recently, a range of factors led to the development of more stringent bureaucratic procedures, governing the conduct of low-risk population-based health research in the United Kingdom. Methods Our paper highlights a case study of the application process to medical research ethics committees in the United Kingdom for a study of the promotion of physical activity by health care providers. The case study presented here is an illustration of the challenges in conducting low-risk population-based health research. Results Our mixed-methods approach involved a questionnaire survey of and semi-structured interviews with health professionals (who were all healthy volunteers. Since our study does not involve the participation of either patients or the general population, one would expect the application to the relevant research ethics committees to be a formality. This proved not to be the case! Conclusion Research ethics committees could be counter-productive, rather than protecting the vulnerable in the research process, they can stifle low-risk population-based health research. Research ethics in health services research is first and foremost the responsibility of the researcher(s, and we need to learn to trust health service researchers again. The burden of current research governance regulation to address the perceived ethical problems is neither appropriate nor adequate. Senior researchers/academics need to educate and train students and junior researchers in the area of research ethics, whilst at the same time reducing pressures on them that lead to unethical research, such as commercial funding, inappropriate government interference and the pressure to publish. We propose that non-invasive low

  10. Do television and electronic games predict children's psychosocial adjustment? Longitudinal research using the UK Millennium Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Alison; Sweeting, Helen; Wight, Daniel; Henderson, Marion

    2013-05-01

    Screen entertainment for young children has been associated with several aspects of psychosocial adjustment. Most research is from North America and focuses on television. Few longitudinal studies have compared the effects of TV and electronic games, or have investigated gender differences. To explore how time watching TV and playing electronic games at age 5 years each predicts change in psychosocial adjustment in a representative sample of 7 year-olds from the UK. Typical daily hours viewing television and playing electronic games at age 5 years were reported by mothers of 11 014 children from the UK Millennium Cohort Study. Conduct problems, emotional symptoms, peer relationship problems, hyperactivity/inattention and prosocial behaviour were reported by mothers using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Change in adjustment from age 5 years to 7 years was regressed on screen exposures; adjusting for family characteristics and functioning, and child characteristics. Watching TV for 3 h or more at 5 years predicted a 0.13 point increase (95% CI 0.03 to 0.24) in conduct problems by 7 years, compared with watching for under an hour, but playing electronic games was not associated with conduct problems. No associations were found between either type of screen time and emotional symptoms, hyperactivity/inattention, peer relationship problems or prosocial behaviour. There was no evidence of gender differences in the effect of screen time. TV but not electronic games predicted a small increase in conduct problems. Screen time did not predict other aspects of psychosocial adjustment. Further work is required to establish causal mechanisms.

  11. The incidence of eating disorders in the UK in 2000-2009: findings from the General Practice Research Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micali, Nadia; Hagberg, Katrina W; Petersen, Irene; Treasure, Janet L

    2013-05-28

    Few studies have investigated the incidence of eating disorders (EDs). Important questions about changes in the incidence of diagnosed disorders in recent years, disorder and gender-specific onset and case detection remain unanswered. Understanding changes in incidence is important for public health, clinical practice and service provision. The aim of this study was to estimate the annual (age-specific, gender-specific and subtype-specific) incidence of diagnosed ED: anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN) and eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) in primary care over a 10-year period in the UK (2000-2009); to examine the changes within the study period; and to describe peak age at diagnosis. Register-based study. Primary care. Data were obtained from a primary care register, the General Practice Research Database, which contains anonymised records representing about 5% of the UK population. All patients with a first-time diagnosis of AN, BN and EDNOS were identified. Annual crude and age-standardised incidence rates were calculated. A total of 9072 patients with a first-time diagnosis of an ED were identified. The age-standardised annual incidence rate of all diagnosed ED for ages 10-49 increased from 32.3 (95% CI 31.7 to 32.9) to 37.2 (95% CI 36.6 to 37.9) per 100 000 between 2000 and 2009. The incidence of AN and BN was stable; however, the incidence of EDNOS increased. The incidence of the diagnosed ED was highest for girls aged 15-19 and for boys aged 10-14. The age-standardised incidence of ED increased in primary care between 2000 and 2009. New diagnoses of EDNOS increased, and EDNOS is the most common ED in primary care.

  12. The incidence of eating disorders in the UK in 2000–2009: findings from the General Practice Research Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micali, Nadia; Hagberg, Katrina W; Petersen, Irene; Treasure, Janet L

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Few studies have investigated the incidence of eating disorders (EDs). Important questions about changes in the incidence of diagnosed disorders in recent years, disorder and gender-specific onset and case detection remain unanswered. Understanding changes in incidence is important for public health, clinical practice and service provision. The aim of this study was to estimate the annual (age-specific, gender-specific and subtype-specific) incidence of diagnosed ED: anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN) and eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) in primary care over a 10-year period in the UK (2000–2009); to examine the changes within the study period; and to describe peak age at diagnosis. Design Register-based study. Setting Primary care. Data were obtained from a primary care register, the General Practice Research Database, which contains anonymised records representing about 5% of the UK population. Participants All patients with a first-time diagnosis of AN, BN and EDNOS were identified. Primary outcome Annual crude and age-standardised incidence rates were calculated. Results A total of 9072 patients with a first-time diagnosis of an ED were identified. The age-standardised annual incidence rate of all diagnosed ED for ages 10–49 increased from 32.3 (95% CI 31.7 to 32.9) to 37.2 (95% CI 36.6 to 37.9) per 100 000 between 2000 and 2009. The incidence of AN and BN was stable; however, the incidence of EDNOS increased. The incidence of the diagnosed ED was highest for girls aged 15–19 and for boys aged 10–14. Conclusions The age-standardised incidence of ED increased in primary care between 2000 and 2009. New diagnoses of EDNOS increased, and EDNOS is the most common ED in primary care. PMID:23793681

  13. UK victims of trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Burgoyne

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of court cases shows how hard it is forvictims of trafficking to win the right to remain in the UK. Case law is inconsistent and more research and data collection are urgently needed.

  14. E-portfolios and personalized learning: research in practice with two dyslexic learners in UK higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Julie; Herrington, Margaret; McDonald, Tess; Rhodes, Amy

    2011-02-01

    This paper analyses the use of an e-portfolio system in contributing to the personalized learning of two dyslexic learners at the University of Wolverhampton, UK. The rationale for this research rests at the intersection of generic findings from e-portfolio (and wider e-learning) research and the still challenging project in higher education (HE) of creating inclusive curricula. A qualitative, ethnographic approach was employed in a piece of collaborative research between academic staff and dyslexic learners. Two retrospective learner narratives were constructed and then reviewed by all co-authors in terms of the 'personalized fit' which they allowed with dyslexic thinking, learning and writing experience. The findings suggest a potential refinement of the general pedagogical claims about e-portfolio-based learning when considering dyslexic learners and thence the value of an enhanced prioritization of e-portfolio learning practices within inclusive HE curricula. The review and analysis also allow a 'critical' discussion of the practical and theoretical issues arising within this work. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Does the Law on Compensation for Research-Related Injury in the UK, Australia, and New Zealand Meet Ethical Requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Joanna M

    2017-08-01

    Despite a consensus that society owes an ethical obligation to compensate for research-related injury, and that no-fault is the best ethical response, an assessment of the compensation arrangements in place in the UK, Australia and New Zealand shows that in general compensation arrangements fall below this ethical expectation. Most subjects rely on ex gratia payment or an unenforceable assurance of payment in the event of injury. It is also likely that, given significant deficiencies in participant information about compensation arrangements in place for trials recommended by the supervisory ethics agencies in each jurisdiction, subjects only find out about their financial exposure in the event of injury. Industry-drafted guidelines governing compensation in commercially sponsored trials do not protect subjects' interests, but operate primarily to protect the interests of industry. The article considers potential solutions to the ethical deficiency of the compensation arrangements, and argues that the ethical corollary of the fact that society is the ultimate beneficiary of its members' participation in clinical research, is that society as a whole should bear the cost of participant injuries, through establishment of a central no-fault compensation fund financed either by the state or those directly involved in biomedical research. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press; all rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Political representation for social justice in nursing: lessons learned from participant research with destitute asylum seekers in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthill, Fiona

    2016-09-01

    The concept of social justice is making a revival in nursing scholarship, in part in response to widening health inequalities and inequities in high-income countries. In particular, critical nurse scholars have sought to develop participatory research methods using peer researchers to represent the 'voice' of people who are living in marginalized spaces in society. The aim of this paper is to report on the experiences of nurse and peer researchers as part of a project to explore the experiences of people who find themselves destitute following the asylum process in the UK. In seeking to explore social injustice, three challenges are identified: lack of a robust political theory, institutional/professional constraints and an absence of skills to engage with the politics of social (in)justice. Each challenge is presented, opposing voices outlined and some possible solutions are suggested. The work of political theorist Nancy Fraser is used as a conceptual framework, in particular her focus on mis/framing and political representation for social justice. In addition, it is suggested that social justice needs to be further embedded in nursing policy and curriculum. Finally, nurses are encouraged to develop practical political skills to engage with both politics and the media in a neoliberal globalizing world. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Defining Priorities for Future Research: Results of the UK Kidney Transplant Priority Setting Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Simon R; Metcalfe, Leanne; O'Donoghue, Katriona; Ball, Simon T; Beale, Angela; Beale, William; Hilton, Rachel; Hodkinson, Keith; Lipkin, Graham W; Loud, Fiona; Marson, Lorna P; Morris, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that the research priorities of those funding and performing research in transplantation may differ from those of end service users such as patients, carers and healthcare professionals involved in day-to-day care. The Kidney Transplant Priority Setting Partnership (PSP) was established with the aim of involving all stakeholders in prioritising future research in the field. The PSP methodology is as outlined by the James Lind Alliance. An initial survey collected unanswered research questions from patients, carers and clinicians. Duplicate and out-of-scope topics were excluded and the existing literature searched to identify topics answered by current evidence. An interim prioritisation survey asked patients and professionals to score the importance of the remaining questions to create a ranked long-list. These were considered at a final consensus workshop using a modified nominal group technique to agree a final top ten. The initial survey identified 497 questions from 183 respondents, covering all aspects of transplantation from assessment through to long-term follow-up. These were grouped into 90 unanswered "indicative" questions. The interim prioritisation survey received 256 responses (34.8% patients/carers, 10.9% donors and 54.3% professionals), resulting in a ranked list of 25 questions that were considered during the final workshop. Participants agreed a top ten priorities for future research that included optimisation of immunosuppression (improved monitoring, choice of regimen, personalisation), prevention of sensitisation and transplanting the sensitised patient, management of antibody-mediated rejection, long-term risks to live donors, methods of organ preservation, induction of tolerance and bioengineering of organs. There was evidence that patient and carer involvement had a significant impact on shaping the final priorities. The final list of priorities relates to all stages of the transplant process, including access to

  18. Geotechnical aspects of the UK DOE-sponsored radioactive waste disposal research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooling, C.M.; Hudson, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    One of the crucial factors for underground repository design is understanding the engineering properties and behaviour of the host rock. To develop this understanding, the Department of the Environment has sponsored a continuing programme of geotechnical research from 1979 to the present day. The authors describe the structure of the research programme, highlight some of the individual projects, indicate the most important conclusions and provide an overview of both the current state of knowledge and 'the way ahead'. 9 refs.; 9 figs.; 1 table

  19. Researching emotional labour among Public Relations consultants in the UK: a social phenomenological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz Yeomans

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ‘Social phenomenology’ (Schütz, 1970; 1978 and its concept of the ‘lifeworld’ has received limited attention in the research methods literature. Few contemporary researchers, with the exception of Aspers (2006a; 2006b; 2009 and Svensson (2007 have developed procedures for undertaking social phenomenological research in occupational settings. I developed a social phenomenological approach to explore, from an emotional labour perspective, how public relations (PR consultants experienced, practised and understood their everyday interactions with clients, colleagues and journalists (Hochschild, 1983. If emotion is understood as a relational practice, the analysis of socially-constructed discourse is essential to access emotional meaning structures within occupational cultures such as public relations. I adopted an iterative analytical process whereby I interviewed, twice, a sample of six participants. From transcript analysis I produced a ‘description of practice’ document for participants to check (Aspers, 2006a; 2009. ‘Bracketing’ (Husserl, 1963/1913 involved writing self-memos throughout the research process, and finally, a self-reflexive account. Thematic analysis of findings resulted in a rich understanding of emotion management and identity work in public relations. This paper demonstrates that an iterative and reflexive analytical process that involves participants in cocreating social reality, is a compelling approach to understand the ‘lifeworld’ of social actors in occupational settings.

  20. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario (CAHO) Adopting Research to Improve Care (ARTIC) Program: Reach, Sustainability, Spread and Lessons Learned from an Implementation Funding Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Julia E; Grouchy, Michelle; Graham, Ian D; Shandling, Maureen; Doyle, Winnie; Straus, Sharon E

    2016-05-01

    Despite evidence on what works in healthcare, there is a significant gap in the time it takes to bring research into practice. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario's Adopting Research to Improve Care program addresses this research-to-practice gap by incorporating the following components into its funding program: strategic selection of evidence for implementation, education and training for implementation, implementation supports, executive champions and governance, and evaluation. Funded projects have been sustained (76% reported full sustainability) and spread to over 200 new sites. Lessons learned include the following: assess readiness, develop tailored implementation materials, consider characteristics of implementation supports, protect champion time and consider evaluation feasibility. Copyright © 2016 Longwoods Publishing.

  1. Report of the panel to review the future of radio astronomy in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-02-01

    The panel was appointed by the Astronomy, Space and Radio Board of the Science Research Council, to review the present scientific position in radio (including millimetre) astronomy, to consider the likely future development of the field over the next 10 to 15 years taking account of facilities being planned in other countries and to advise on a programme to enable the present UK position to be maintained, indicating the facilities needed. The report deals with all these items and recommends the implementation of a proposal for a National Millimetre Wavelength Astronomy Facility. Detailed recommendations are made for financing and organizing the project. (U.K.)

  2. Report on the proposal for a Council directive (EURATOM) on the management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste - Committee on Industry, External Trade, Research and Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    By letter of 13 May 2003 the Council consulted Parliament, pursuant to Articles 31 and 32 of the EURATOM Treaty, on the proposal for a Council directive (EURATOM) on the management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste (COM(2003) 32 - 2003/0022(CNS)). At the sitting of 15 May 2003 the President of Parliament announced that he had referred the proposal to the Committee on Industry, External Trade, Research and Energy as the committee responsible and the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Consumer Policy for its opinion (C5-0229/2003). The Committee on Industry, External Trade, Research and Energy appointed Alejo Vidal-Quadras Roca Rapporteur at its meeting of 22 May 2003. The committee considered the Commission proposal and draft report at its meetings of 9 July, 9 September, 6 October, 3 November and 27 November 2003. At the last meeting it adopted the draft legislative resolution by 36 votes to 7, with 2 abstentions. The opinion of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Consumer Policy is attached. The report was tabled on 1 December 2003

  3. Reflective Drawing as a Tool for Reflection in Design Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Mirian

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the role of drawing as a tool for reflection. It reports on a PhD research project that aims to identify and analyse the value that co-design processes can bring to participants and their communities. The research is associated with Leapfrog, a three-year project funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC).…

  4. Determinants of personal protective equipment (PPE) use in UK motorcyclists: exploratory research applying an extended theory of planned behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Emma; Myers, Lynn

    2013-11-01

    Despite evident protective value of motorcycle personal protective equipment (PPE), no research has assessed considerations behind its uptake in UK riders. A cross-sectional online questionnaire design was employed, with riders (n=268) recruited from online motorcycle forums. Principal component analysis found four PPE behavioural outcomes. Theoretical factors of intentions, attitudes, injunctive and descriptive subjective norms, risk perceptions, anticipated regret, benefits and habit were also identified for further analysis. High motorcycle jacket, trousers and boots wear, middling high-visibility wear and low non-Personal Protective Equipment wear were found. Greater intentions, anticipated regret and perceived benefits were significantly associated with increased motorcycle jacket, trousers and boots wear, with habit presence and scooter use significantly associated with increased high-visibility wear. Lower intentions, anticipated regret and risk perceptions, being female, not holding a car licence and urban riding were significantly associated with increased non-PPE wear. A need for freedom of choice and mixed attitudes towards PPE use were evident in additional comments. PPE determinants in this sample provide a preliminary basis for future uptake interventions. Larger scale and qualitative research is needed to further investigate relevant constructs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Radon remediation of dwellings with suspended timber floors -case studies from the Building Research Establishment (UK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsh, P.; Stephen, R.

    1994-01-01

    Dwellings with suspended floors and high radon levels are proving difficult to remediate. This paper reports on the experience of the Building Research Establishment in dealing with such dwellings. Brief details of the remediation of 14 houses are given, and comparisons are made between the effectiveness of the different techniques adopted. Natural ventilation, mechanical supply ventilation and mechanical extract ventilation are three techniques that have been used successfully as radon remedial measures. Preliminary results suggest that supply ventilation is more effective than extract ventilation. (author)

  6. The Impact of Role Conflict, Role Ambiguity and Organizational Climate on the Job Satisfaction of Academic Staff in Research-Intensive Universities in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, John

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on academics in research-intensive universities in the UK and explores their perceptions of organizational climate, role conflict, role ambiguity and job satisfaction. The findings suggest that the universities have multiple organizational climates. Three organizational climate types -- the Clan, the Hierarchy and the Adhocracy…

  7. High risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus in the UK, a cohort study using the General Practice Research Database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Fuller, J.H.; Mulnier, H.E.; Raleigh, V.S.; Lawrenson, R.A.; Colhoun, H.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To estimate the absolute and relative risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with type 1 diabetes in the U.K. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Subjects with type 1 diabetes (n = 7,479) and five age- and sex-matched subjects without diabetes (n = 38,116) and free of CVD at baseline

  8. Council Chamber exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    To complete the revamp of CERN’s Council Chamber, a new exhibition is being installed just in time for the June Council meetings.   Panels will showcase highlights of CERN’s history, using some of the content prepared for the exhibitions marking 50 years of the PS, which were displayed in the main building last November. The previous photo exhibition in the Council Chamber stopped at the 1970s. To avoid the new panels becoming quickly out of date, photos are grouped together around specific infrastructures, rather than following a classic time-line. “We have put the focus on the accelerators – the world-class facilities that CERN has been offering researchers over the years, from the well-known large colliders to the lesser-known smaller facilities,” says Emma Sanders, who worked on the content. The new exhibition will be featured in a future issue of the Bulletin with photos and an interview with Fabienne Marcastel, designer of the exhibit...

  9. How policy can help develop and sustain workforce capacity in UK dementia research: insights from a career tracking analysis and stakeholder interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, Sonja; Lichten, Catherine A; Robin, Enora; Parks, Sarah; Harte, Emma; MacLure, Calum; Walton, Clare; Pickett, James

    2016-08-31

    To identify research support strategies likely to be effective for strengthening the UK's dementia research landscape and ensuring a sustainable and competitive workforce. Interviews and qualitative analysis; systematic internet search to track the careers of 1500 holders of UK doctoral degrees in dementia, awarded during 1970-2013, to examine retention in this research field and provide a proxy profile of the research workforce. 40 interviewees based in the UK, whose primary role is or has been in dementia research (34 individuals), health or social care (3) or research funding (3). Interviewees represented diverse fields, career stages and sectors. While the UK has diverse strengths in dementia research, needs persist for multidisciplinary collaboration, investment in care-related research, supporting research-active clinicians and translation of research findings. There is also a need to better support junior and midlevel career opportunities to ensure a sustainable research pipeline and future leadership. From a sample of 1500 UK doctorate holders who completed a dementia-related thesis in 1970-2013, we identified current positions for 829 (55%). 651 (43% of 1500) could be traced and identified as still active in research (any field) and 315 (21%) as active in dementia research. Among recent doctoral graduates, nearly 70% left dementia research within 4-6 years of graduation. A dementia research workforce blueprint should consider support for individuals, institutions and networks. A mix of policy interventions are needed, aiming to attract and retain researchers; tackle bottlenecks in career pathways, particularly at early and midcareer stages (eg, scaling-up fellowship opportunities, rising star programmes, bridge-funding, flexible clinical fellowships, leadership training); and encourage research networks (eg, doctoral training centres, succession and sustainability planning). Interventions should also address the need for coordinated investment to improve

  10. Investigating the Experiences of Childhood Cancer Patients and Parents Participating in Optional Nontherapeutic Clinical Research Studies in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errington, Julie; Malik, Ghada; Evans, Julie; Baston, Jenny; Parry, Annie; Price, Lisa; Johnstone, Hina; Peters, Selena; Oram, Victoria; Howe, Karen; Whiteley, Emma; Tunnacliffe, Jane; Veal, Gareth J

    2016-07-01

    While the majority of childhood cancer clinical trials are treatment related, additional optional research investigations may be carried out that do not directly impact on treatment. It is essential that these studies are conducted ethically and that the experiences of families participating in these studies are as positive as possible. A questionnaire study was carried out to investigate the key factors that influence why families choose to participate in optional nontherapeutic research studies, the level of understanding of the trials involved, and the experiences of participation. A total of 100 participants from six UK centers were studied; 77 parents, 10 patients >16 years, and 13 patients aged 8-15 years. Ninety-seven percent of parents and 90% of patients felt that information provided prior to study consent was of the right length, with 52% of parents and 65% of patients fully understanding the information provided. Seventy-four percent of parents participated in research studies in order to "do something important", while 74% of patients participated "to help medical staff". Encouragingly, <5% of participants felt that their clinical care would be negatively affected if they did not participate. Positive aspects of participation included a perception of increased attention from medical staff. Negative aspects included spending longer periods in hospital and the requirement for additional blood samples. Ninety-six percent of parents and 87% of patients would participate in future studies. The study provides an insight into the views of childhood cancer patients and their parents participating in nontherapeutic clinical research studies. Overwhelmingly, the findings suggest that participation is seen as a positive experience. © 2016 The Authors. Pediatric Blood & Cancer, published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Session 1984-85. Radioactive waste. Minutes of evidence, Wednesday 19 June 1985. Natural Environment Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The Environment Select Committee of the House of Commons received a memorandum from the Natural Environment Research Council, on the management and disposal of radioactive waste, under the headings: introduction; role of NERC in research relating to radioactive waste disposal; current NERC research; disposal of wastes in geological strata on land; disposal of wastes in the deep oceans; general comments on high level wastes; effluents discharged to the Irish Sea (dispersion in the Irish Sea; dispersion from the Irish Sea into other environments); concluding observations. Representatives of NERC were examined on the subject of the memorandum and the Minutes of Evidence are recorded. (U.K.)

  12. Measuring Research Competitiveness in UK Universities: Introducing the Herfindahl Index to the 2008 and 2014 Research Assessment Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Like its 2008 predecessor, the, 2014 Research Excellence Framework was a high-stakes exercise. For universities and their constituent departments, it had zero-sum implications for league table position in a way that the 2001 exercise did not, and "post facto" it is having a significant effect on investment and disinvestment as…

  13. Do research studies in the UK reporting child neurodevelopment adjust for the variability of assessors: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Rahila; Willatts, Peter; Williams, Fiona L R

    2016-02-01

    Neurodevelopment is a key outcome for many childhood trials and observational studies. Clinically important decisions may rest on finding relatively small differences in neurodevelopment between groups receiving complex and costly interventions. Our purpose was to determine whether studies which measure neurodevelopment report the numbers, training, and auditing of assessors and, for multiple assessor studies, whether the results were adjusted and if so by which method? Electronic searches were conducted using Medline, Embase, Cinahl, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library. A study was eligible if it reported neurodevelopmental outcome in children resident in the UK, less than or equal to 18 years and was published between 2000 and 2015. Trials and observational studies were included. Three hundred and seven full papers were reviewed: 52% of papers did not report the number of assessors used; 21% used a single assessor; and 27% used multiple assessors. Thirty-five per cent mentioned that assessors were trained in the use of the neurodevelopmental tool; 13% of assessors were audited; and only 1% of studies adjusted statistically for the number of assessors. At the very least, the quality of reporting the use of assessors in these research publications is poor, while at worst, the variability of assessors may mask the true relationship between an intervention/observation and neurodevelopmental outcome. © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  14. How Does Paying for Ecosystem Services Contribute to Sustainable Development? Evidence from Case Study Research in Germany and the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Nicolaus

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Payments for ecosystem services (PES are currently being discussed as one of the most promising tools in environmental and sustainability governance. However, much criticism has been voiced against overly optimistic assumptions of PES’ management potential towards sustainability. Several contributions to the debate show that PES fail both in reducing poverty and strengthening social justice. Additionally, they neglect problems of deliberation in decision-making, as well as the legitimacy of the applied environmental practices. Our empirical investigation on participatory and deliberative structures in already existing PES initiated by non-state actors contributes to the latter body of research. Based on the assumption that playing an active part in scheme design facilitates the consideration of justice and fairness, our case studies from Germany and the UK. present interesting results on the involvement of conflicting interests and their argumentation in the design process. Summing up these findings, we conclude that paying for ES rarely contributes to sustainable development in and of itself, but deliberatively designed schemes provide a formal setting to take aspects of justice into account.

  15. Family Pet Ownership during Childhood: Findings from a UK Birth Cohort and Implications for Public Health Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgarth, Carri; Heron, Jon; Ness, Andy R.; Bundred, Peter; Gaskell, Rosalind M.; Coyne, Karen P.; German, Alexander J.; McCune, Sandra; Dawson, Susan

    2010-01-01

    In developed nations, approximately half of household environments contain pets. Studies of Human-Animal Interaction (HAI) have proposed that there are health benefits and risks associated with pet ownership. However, accurately demonstrating and understanding these relationships first requires a better knowledge of factors associated with ownership of different pet types. A UK birth cohort, the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), were used to collect pet ownership data from the mothers, from gestation to child age 10 years old. 14,663 children were included in the study, of which mothers of 13,557 reported pet information at gestation, and 7,800 by age 10. Pet types recorded include cat, dog, rabbit, rodent, bird, fish and tortoise/turtle. The dataset also contains a number of demographic, socioeconomic and behavioural variables relevant to human health behaviour. Logistic regression was used to build multivariable models for ownership of each pet type at age 7 years. Family pet ownership increased during childhood, in particular rabbits, rodents and fish. A number of socioeconomic and demographic factors were associated with ownership of different pet types and the effects differed depending on the pet type studied. Variables which require consideration by researchers include gender, presence of older siblings, ethnicity, maternal and paternal education, maternal and paternal social class, maternal age, number of people in the household, house type, and concurrent ownership of other pets. Whether the mother had pets during her childhood was a strong predictor of pet ownership in all models. In HAI studies, care should be taken to control for confounding factors, and to treat each pet type individually. ALSPAC and other similar birth cohorts can be considered a potential resource for research into the effects of pet ownership during childhood. PMID:21139856

  16. Family Pet Ownership during Childhood: Findings from a UK Birth Cohort and Implications for Public Health Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Heron

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In developed nations, approximately half of household environments contain pets. Studies of Human-Animal Interaction (HAI have proposed that there are health benefits and risks associated with pet ownership. However, accurately demonstrating and understanding these relationships first requires a better knowledge of factors associated with ownership of different pet types. A UK birth cohort, the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC, were used to collect pet ownership data from the mothers, from gestation to child age 10 years old. 14,663 children were included in the study, of which mothers of 13,557 reported pet information at gestation, and 7,800 by age 10. Pet types recorded include cat, dog, rabbit, rodent, bird, fish and tortoise/turtle. The dataset also contains a number of demographic, socioeconomic and behavioural variables relevant to human health behaviour. Logistic regression was used to build multivariable models for ownership of each pet type at age 7 years. Family pet ownership increased during childhood, in particular rabbits, rodents and fish. A number of socioeconomic and demographic factors were associated with ownership of different pet types and the effects differed depending on the pet type studied. Variables which require consideration by researchers include gender, presence of older siblings, ethnicity, maternal and paternal education, maternal and paternal social class, maternal age, number of people in the household, house type, and concurrent ownership of other pets. Whether the mother had pets during her childhood was a strong predictor of pet ownership in all models. In HAI studies, care should be taken to control for confounding factors, and to treat each pet type individually. ALSPAC and other similar birth cohorts can be considered a potential resource for research into the effects of pet ownership during childhood.

  17. The UK-SEA-ME Psychosocial-Cultural Cancer Research Network: setting the stage for applied qualitative research on cancer health behaviour in southeast Asia and the Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jennifer N W

    2011-01-01

    Psychosocial and cultural factors influencing cancer health behaviour have not been systematically investigated outside the western culture, and qualitative research is the best approach for this type of social research. The research methods employed to study health problems in Asia predominantly are quantitative techniques. The set up of the first psychosocial cancer research network in Asia marks the beginning of a collaboration to promote and spearhead applied qualitative healthcare research in cancer in the UK, Southeast Asia and the Middle East. This paper sets out the rationale, objectives and mission for the UK-SEA-ME Psychosocial-Cultural Cancer Research Network. The UK-SEA-ME network is made up of collaborators from the University of Leeds (UK), the University of Malaya (Malaysia), the National University of Singapore (Singapore) and the University of United Arab Emirates (UAE). The network promotes applied qualitative research to investigate the psychosocial and cultural factors influencing delayed and late presentation and diagnosis for cancer (breast cancer) in partner countries, as well as advocating the use of the mixed-methods research approach. The network also offers knowledge transfer for capacity building within network universities. The mission of the network is to improve public awareness about the importance of early management and prevention of cancer through research in Asia.

  18. Personality and culture, the Social Science Research Council, and liberal social engineering: the Advisory Committee on Personality and Culture, 1930-1934.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    The field of personality and culture was given a significant impetus during the 1930s with the establishment of the Advisory Committee on Personality and Culture (1930-1934) by the Social Science Research Council. This committee provided an early formulation of personality and culture that emphasized the interdisciplinary focus on the processes of personality formation within small-scale social settings. The committee's formulation also coupled personality and culture with a liberal social engineering approach geared toward cultural reconstruction. Major social scientists and clinicians were involved in the activities of the committee, including Edward Sapir, W. I. Thomas, E. W. Burgess, E. A. Bott, Robert S. Woodworth, Harry Stack Sullivan, C. M. Hincks, and Adolf Meyer.

  19. Profile and scientific production of the Brazilian Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq) researchers in the field of Hematology/Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Maria Christina Lopes Araujo; Martelli, Daniella Reis; Quirino, Isabel Gomes; Colosimo, Enrico Antônio; Silva, Ana Cristina Simões e; Martelli Júnior, Hercílio; Oliveira, Eduardo Araujo de

    2014-01-01

    several studies have examined the academic production of the researchers at the CNPq, in several areas of knowledge. The aim of this study was to evaluate the scientific production of researchers in Hematology/Oncology who hold scientific productivity grants from the Brazilian Council for Scientific and Technological Development. the Academic CVs of 28 researchers in Hematology/Oncology with active grants in the three-year period from 2006 to 2008 were included in the analysis. The variables of interest were: institution, researchers' time after doctorate, tutoring of undergraduate students, masters and PhD degree, scientific production and its impact. from a total of 411 researchers in Medicine, 28 (7%) were identified as being in the area of Hematology/Oncology. There was a slight predominance of males (53.6%) and grant holders in category 1. Three Brazilian states are responsible for approximately 90% of the researchers: São Paulo (21,75%), Rio de Janeiro (3,11%), and Minas Gerais (2, 7%). During their academic careers, the researchers published 2,655 articles, with a median of 87 articles per researcher (IQR = 52 to 122). 65 and 78% of this total were indexed on the Web of Science and Scopus databases, respectively. The researchers received 14,247 citations on the WoS database with a median of 385 citations per researcher. The average number of citations per article was 8.2. in this investigation, it was noted that researchers in the field of Hematology/Oncology have a relevant scientific output from the point of view of quantity and quality compared to other medical specialties.

  20. Differences in research funding for women scientists: a systematic comparison of UK investments in global infectious disease research during 1997-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Michael G; Fitchett, Joseph R; Cooke, Mary K; Wurie, Fatima B; Atun, Rifat

    2013-12-09

    There has not previously been a systematic comparison of awards for research funding in infectious diseases by sex. We investigated funding awards to UK institutions for all infectious disease research from 1997 to 2010, across disease categories and along the research and development continuum. Systematic comparison. Data were obtained from several sources for awards from the period 1997 to 2010 and each study assigned to-disease categories; type of science (preclinical, phases I-III trials, product development, implementation research); categories of funding organisation. Fold differences and statistical analysis were used to compare total investment, study numbers, mean grant and median grant between men and women. 6052 studies were included in the final analysis, comprising 4357 grants (72%) awarded to men and 1695 grants (28%) awarded to women, totalling £2.274 billion. Of this, men received £1.786 billion (78.5%) and women £488 million (21.5%). The median value of award was greater for men (£179 389; IQR £59 146-£371 977) than women (£125 556; IQR £30 982-£261 834). Awards were greater for male principal investigators (PIs) across all infectious disease systems, excepting neurological infections and sexually transmitted infections. The proportion of total funding awarded to women ranged from 14.3% in 1998 to 26.8% in 2009 (mean 21.4%), and was lowest for preclinical research at 18.2% (£285.5 million of £1.573 billion) and highest for operational research at 30.9% (£151.4 million of £489.7 million). There are consistent differences in funding received by men and women PIs: women have fewer funded studies and receive less funding in absolute and in relative terms; the median funding awarded to women is lower across most infectious disease areas, by funder, and type of science. These differences remain broadly unchanged over the 14-year study period.

  1. Epidemiological pathology of dementia: attributable-risks at death in the Medical Research Council Cognitive Function and Ageing Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona E Matthews

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Dementia drug development aims to modulate pathological processes that cause clinical syndromes. Population data (epidemiological neuropathology will help to model and predict the potential impact of such therapies on dementia burden in older people. Presently this can only be explored through post mortem findings. We report the attributable risks (ARs for dementia at death for common age-related degenerative and vascular pathologies, and other factors, in the MRC Cognitive Function and Ageing Study (MRC CFAS.A multicentre, prospective, longitudinal study of older people in the UK was linked to a brain donation programme. Neuropathology of 456 consecutive brain donations assessed degenerative and vascular pathologies. Logistic regression modelling, with bootstrapping and sensitivity analyses, was used to estimate AR at death for dementia for specific pathologies and other factors. The main contributors to AR at death for dementia in MRC CFAS were age (18%, small brain (12%, neocortical neuritic plaques (8% and neurofibrillary tangles (11%, small vessel disease (12%, multiple vascular pathologies (9%, and hippocampal atrophy (10%. Other significant factors include cerebral amyloid angiopathy (7% and Lewy bodies (3%.Such AR estimates cannot be derived from the living population; rather they estimate the relative contribution of specific pathologies to dementia at death. We found that multiple pathologies determine the overall burden of dementia. The impact of therapy targeted to a specific pathology may be profound when the dementia is relatively "pure," but may be less impressive for the majority with mixed disease, and in terms of the population. These data justify a range of strategies, and combination therapies, to combat the degenerative and vascular determinants of cognitive decline and dementia. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  2. APA Council Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    At the fall component meetings of the American Psychiatric Association in Arlington, Va., September 13-16, 2017, the APA councils heard reports from their components. Following are summaries of the activities of the councils and their components.

  3. Representativeness and optimal use of body mass index (BMI) in the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskaran, Krishnan; Forbes, Harriet J; Douglas, Ian; Leon, David A; Smeeth, Liam

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess the completeness and representativeness of body mass index (BMI) data in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD), and determine an optimal strategy for their use. Design Descriptive study. Setting Electronic healthcare records from primary care. Participants A million patient random sample from the UK CPRD primary care database, aged ≥16 years. Primary and secondary outcome measures BMI completeness in CPRD was evaluated by age, sex and calendar period. CPRD-based summary BMI statistics for each calendar year (2003–2010) were age-standardised and sex-standardised and compared with equivalent statistics from the Health Survey for England (HSE). Results BMI completeness increased over calendar time from 37% in 1990–1994 to 77% in 2005–2011, was higher among females and increased with age. When BMI at specific time points was assigned based on the most recent record, calendar–year-specific mean BMI statistics underestimated equivalent HSE statistics by 0.75–1.1 kg/m2. Restriction to those with a recent (≤3 years) BMI resulted in mean BMI estimates closer to HSE (≤0.28 kg/m2 underestimation), but excluded up to 47% of patients. An alternative strategy of imputing up-to-date BMI based on modelled changes in BMI over time since the last available record also led to mean BMI estimates that were close to HSE (≤0.37 kg/m2 underestimation). Conclusions Completeness of BMI in CPRD increased over time and varied by age and sex. At a given point in time, a large proportion of the most recent BMIs are unlikely to reflect current BMI; consequent BMI misclassification might be reduced by employing model-based imputation of current BMI. PMID:24038008

  4. News from Council

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    With this message I would like to share with you some highlights of this week’s Council meetings.   A major topic was the approval of CERN’s Medium Term Plan (MTP) 2017-2021, along with the budget for 2017. In approving the document, Council expressed its very strong support for the research programme the MTP outlines for the coming years.  Another important topic this week was the formal approval of the High Luminosity LHC project, HL-LHC. This comes as extremely good news not only for CERN, but also for particle physics globally. HL-LHC is the top priority of the European Strategy for Particle Physics in its 2013 update, and is part of the 2016 roadmap of the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures, ESFRI. It was also identified as a priority in the US P5 strategy process, and in Japan’s strategic vision for the field. It secures CERN’s future until 2035, and ensures that we will achieve the maximum scientific return on the investment...

  5. Networking Africa's science granting councils | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Networking Africa's science granting councils ... to support research and evidence-based policies that contribute to social and economic development. ... exchanges and forums, online training, on-site coaching, and collaborative research.

  6. The UK ME/CFS Biobank for biomedical research on Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) and Multiple Sclerosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Lacerda, EM; Bowman, EW; Cliff, JM; Kingdon, CC; King, EC; Lee, JS; Clark, TG; Dockrell, HM; Riley, EM; Curran, H; Nacul, L

    2017-01-01

    : The UK ME/CFS Biobank was launched in August 2011 following extensive consultation with professionals and patient representatives. The bioresource aims to enhance research on myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), related to pathophysiology, biomarkers and therapeutic approaches. The cohort includes 18-60 year olds, encompassing 284 clinically-confirmed ME/CFS cases, 60 neurologist-diagnosed multiple sclerosis (MS) cases, and 135 healthy individuals. The Biobank contai...

  7. 7 CFR 1230.6 - Council.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Council. 1230.6 Section 1230.6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... CONSUMER INFORMATION Pork Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Definitions § 1230.6 Council...

  8. Reducing symbolic-violence in the research encounter: collaborating with a survivor of domestic abuse in a qualitative study in UK primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malpass, Alice; Sales, Kim; Feder, Gene

    2016-03-01

    This paper explores ideas of symbolic violence inherent in the research encounter (Bourdieu 1999). After defining symbolic violence and how the concept enters into domestic violence and abuse (DVA) research, we discuss the challenges arising from a (DVA) survivor taking on the role of interviewer in a qualitative study nested within a UK primary care based trial: IRIS (Identification and Referral to Improve Safety). KS, a survivor of DVA, conducted interviews with 12 women who had been referred to a domestic violence agency by primary care clinicians taking part in the IRIS trial in two UK cities (Bristol and east London) during 2009. Field notes were kept during all of the research meetings with KS and these were included in analysis. Our analysis maps the research pathway of 'non-violent communication' and discusses the role of social symmetry and proximity in the research encounter. We conclude that while a welcoming disposition, empathy and active listening are all generic skills to qualitative research; if a researcher can enter fieldwork with a claim of social proximity and symmetry, their use of these generic skills is enhanced through a process of shared objectification and empowerment talk. We explore the limitations of social proximity, its relationship to feminist and anthropological theories of 'insider' research and its relevance to primary care research. © 2015 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  9. UDOT research peer exchange, October 12-13, 2016 : implementation, state DOT library, national committees, and state transportation innovation council.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) held a Research Peer Exchange on October 12-13, 2016, in downtown Salt Lake City. The focus topics or themes for the peer exchange included the following: : Supporting Implementation During and A...

  10. From principles to action: Applying the National Research Council's principles for effective decision support to the Federal Emergency Management Agency's watch office

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison M. Meadow

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The National Research Council (NRC proposed six principles for effective decision support in its 2009 report Informing Decisions in a Changing Climate. We structured a collaborative project between the Federal Emergency Management Agency Region R9 (FEMA R9, the Western Region Headquarters of the National Weather Service (WR-NWS, and the Climate Assessment of the Southwest (CLIMAS at the University of Arizona around the application of the NRC principles. The goal of the project was to provide FEMA R9's Watch Office with climate information scaled to their temporal and spatial interests to aid them in assessing the potential risk of flood disasters. We found that we needed specific strategies and activities in order to apply the principles effectively. By using a set of established collaborative research approaches we were better able to assess FEMA R9's information needs and WR-NWS's capacity to meet those needs. Despite our diligent planning of engagement strategies, we still encountered some barriers to transitioning our decision support tool from research to operations. This paper describes our methods for planning and executing a three-party collaborative effort to provide climate services, the decision support tool developed through this process, and the lessons we will take from this deliberate collaborative process to our future work and implications of the NRC principles for the broader field of climate services. Keywords: Climate services, Emergency management, Flood risk, Decision support

  11. The UK High Power RF Faraday Partnership Industrial, Academia, and Public Collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, A.D.R.; Carter, R.G.; Clunie, D.; Bowater, S.P.; Ellis, D.; Gamble, D.; Large, T.; Lucas, W.; Pettit, C.; Poole, M. W.; Smith, H.; Smith, P.W.; Wilcox, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    The High Power Radio Frequency (HPRF) Faraday Partnership is a UK technology forum for all users, designers, developers and researchers of RF and microwave devices and systems. High power RF and microwave engineering are key enabling technologies in a wide range of industrial sectors. Formed in October 2001 and funded initially by the UK Department of Trade and Industry and the UK Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council, the purpose of the HPRF Faraday Partnership is the development of a vibrant research, development and manufacturing base capable of exploiting opportunities in high power radio-frequency engineering. The partnership includes the key UK industrial companies, research laboratories and university research groups. The number of partners is constantly growing and already numbers over thirty. The partnership provides the enabling technology for future high power RF systems and their power supplies through its research programme. It is training people for the sector through PhD studentships and employment as Research Associates. It is planned to develop a Masters Training program. Support and involvement in research for companies in the supply chain is provided through a Partnership Office, a web site and through a range of government funded research schemes. The HPRF Faraday Partnership is seeking to establish more long term international research and development collaborations

  12. Risk of stroke in people with type 2 diabetes in the UK: a study using the General Practice Research Database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulnier, H.E.; Seaman, H.E.; Raleigh, V.S.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Colhoun, H.M.; Lawrenson, R.A.; Vries, de C.S.

    2006-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Risk estimates for stroke in patients with diabetes vary. We sought to obtain reliable risk estimates for stroke and the association with diabetes, comorbidity and lifestyle in a large cohort of type 2 diabetic patients in the UK. Materials and methods Using the General Practice

  13. Automated Mobility Transitions: Governing Processes in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie Hopkins

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary systems of mobility are undergoing a transition towards automation. In the UK, this transition is being led by (often new partnerships between incumbent manufacturers and new entrants, in collaboration with national governments, local/regional councils, and research institutions. This paper first offers a framework for analyzing the governance of the transition, adapting ideas from the Transition Management (TM perspective, and then applies the framework to ongoing automated vehicle transition dynamics in the UK. The empirical analysis suggests that the UK has adopted a reasonably comprehensive approach to the governing of automated vehicle innovation but that this approach cannot be characterized as sufficiently inclusive, democratic, diverse and open. The lack of inclusivity, democracy, diversity and openness is symptomatic of the post-political character of how the UK’s automated mobility transition is being governed. The paper ends with a call for a reconfiguration of the automated vehicle transition in the UK and beyond, so that much more space is created for dissent and for reflexive and comprehensive big picture thinking on (automated mobility futures.

  14. [The Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (National Research Council - C. N. R.) and the Italian medicine during fascism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canali, S

    2001-01-01

    The foundation of C. N. R. in 1923 created in Italy a new public system of research, different from the university one. During fascism, the contribution of C. N. R. to the development of medical research in Italy was very poor. This was mainly due to insufficient means: structures and money. Moreover, the scientists who carried on medical research within the C. N. R. were the same who already held strong university positions, which mean a complete dependence on the academic system. The ideology of fascism also contribute to the weakness of the Italian medical research promoted by the C. N. R.. According to fascist view, science, and for its nature and aims above all medicine, had to addressed to technical, practical, or much better, social achievements. Consequently, the policy of medical research at the C.N.R. was to improve social or political medicine, mainly hygiene. This was in harmony with the demographic policy, which means the policy of reinforcement of "Italian race", and positive eugenics that fascism tried to pursue.

  15. Systematic thematic review of e-health research in the Gulf Cooperation Council (Arabian Gulf): Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Alan S; Turjoman, Rebal; Shaheen, Yanal; Al Sayyed, Farah; Hwang, Mu Ji; Malick, Faryal

    2017-05-01

    Introduction The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC or 'Arabian Gulf'), comprising Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates, is a political organization sharing a common history and culture. All GCC nations have made substantial investments in telecommunications and electronic health infrastructure since 2000. Methods We conducted a literature search in English and Arabic on peer-reviewed e-health research up to December 2014 originating in the GCC. The objective was to retrieve all research on e-health in the GCC and to categorize and analyse it qualitatively to reveal the current state of e-health research and development in the region. Inclusion criteria included peer-reviewed articles, books, book chapters, conference papers and graduate theses written on e-health in the GCC. Blogs, health websites and non-peer-reviewed literature were excluded. Results Three hundred and six articles were retrieved, categorized and analysed qualitatively to reveal the state of e-health research in the GCC. Both country-specific and GCC-wide major themes were identified using NVivo 10.0 qualitative software and summarized. The most common type of study was an overview (35.0%), with common study designs of case studies (26.8%) and descriptive articles (46.4%). Significant themes were: prospective national benefits from e-health, implementation and satisfaction with electronic health records, online technologies in medical education, innovative systems (case studies), and information security and personal health information. Discussion This is the first comprehensive analytical literature review of e-health in the GCC. Important research gaps were identified: few cost-benefit analyses, controlled interventional studies, or research targeting gender and religious issues were retrieved.

  16. UK science plans spending spree

    CERN Multimedia

    Loder, N

    2000-01-01

    The science budget will grow by more than 4 per cent over the previous year in each of the next three years. Over the next three months the research councils will battle it out to see how much of these extra funds each will receive. The areas identified by the councils for the extra money include bioinformatics, information technology, nanotechnology and post-genomic research (1 page).

  17. Folio Assessment or External Examinations? An Investigation into Alternative Means of Assessing SCE Ordinary Grade English. Report to the Scottish Certificate of Education Examination Board from the Scottish Council for Research in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Ernest

    From 1974 through 1978, three methods of assessing Scottish high school students' (O level) English achievement were studied: (1) Ordinary (O level) examinations; (2) assessment of writing skills (folio assessment); and (3) criterion referenced tests developed by the Scottish Council for Research in Education (SCRE) to measure the objectives of…

  18. Investigating sensitivity, specificity, and area under the curve of the Clinical COPD Questionnaire, COPD Assessment Test, and Modified Medical Research Council scale according to GOLD using St George's Respiratory Questionnaire cutoff 25 (and 20) as reference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsiligianni, Ioanna G.; Alma, Harma J.; de Jong, Corina; Jelusic, Danijel; Wittmann, Michael; Schuler, Michael; Schultz, Konrad; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; van der Molen, Thys; Kocks, Janwillem W. H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the GOLD (Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease) strategy document, the Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ), COPD Assessment Test (CAT), or modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) scale are recommended for the assessment of symptoms using the cutoff points of CCQ >= 1,

  19. Research councils facing new science and technology : the case of nanotechnology in Finland, the Netherlands, Norway and Switzerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Most, F.V.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis investigates how research funding organizations (RFOs) respond to a new emerging field of science and technology. It takes nanoscience and nanotechnology (nanotechnology for short) as its case and compares the responses of RFOs in Finland, the Netherlands, Norway and Finland.

  20. Contributions of Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) in the area of Medicinal plants/Traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Neeraj; Yadav, Satyapal Singh

    2017-02-02

    Medicinal plants belong to the oldest known health care products that have been used by human beings all over the world and are major components of the formulations used in indigenous system of medicine practiced in many countries. Besides, finding place as health supplements, nutraceuticals, cosmetics, herbal tea etc. there has been a global insurgence of interest, including India, leading to enormous research/activities in the area of medicinal plants. The article is aimed to provide the effort and initiatives of ICMR towards research on medicinal plants and its contributions on consolidation of Indian research on medicinal plants that are very relevant and important in the national context. The various initiatives undertaken by ICMR on research on traditional medicines/medicinal plants in the past are reviewed and documented in this article. The multi-disciplinary, multicentric research initiatives of ICMR have resulted in validation of traditional treatment Kshaarasootra (medicated Ayurvedic thread) for anal fistula, Vijayasar (heart wood of Pterocarpus marsupium Roxb.) for diabetes mellitus, encouraging micro- and macrofilaricidal activity of Shakotak (stem bark of Streblus asper Lour.) in experimental studies an iridoid glycosides fraction isolated from root/rhizomes of Picrorhiza kurroa Royle ex Benth. (designated as Picroliv) for viral hepatitis. Other developmental and compilation of research works on Indian medicinal plants have resulted in publications of the thirteen volumes of quality standards, comprising of 449 Indian medicinal plants; three volumes of 90 phytochemical reference standards; fifteen volumes of review monographs on 4167 medicinal plant species; and one publication each on perspectives of Indian medicinal plants for management of liver disorders, lymphatic filariasis and diabetes mellitus (details available at http://www.icmr.nic.in/mpsite). The ICMR efforts assume special significance in the light of multifaceted use of medicinal plants

  1. Theory of Change: a theory-driven approach to enhance the Medical Research Council's framework for complex interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The Medical Research Councils’ framework for complex interventions has been criticized for not including theory-driven approaches to evaluation. Although the framework does include broad guidance on the use of theory, it contains little practical guidance for implementers and there have been calls to develop a more comprehensive approach. A prospective, theory-driven process of intervention design and evaluation is required to develop complex healthcare interventions which are more likely to be effective, sustainable and scalable. Methods We propose a theory-driven approach to the design and evaluation of complex interventions by adapting and integrating a programmatic design and evaluation tool, Theory of Change (ToC), into the MRC framework for complex interventions. We provide a guide to what ToC is, how to construct one, and how to integrate its use into research projects seeking to design, implement and evaluate complex interventions using the MRC framework. We test this approach by using ToC within two randomized controlled trials and one non-randomized evaluation of complex interventions. Results Our application of ToC in three research projects has shown that ToC can strengthen key stages of the MRC framework. It can aid the development of interventions by providing a framework for enhanced stakeholder engagement and by explicitly designing an intervention that is embedded in the local context. For the feasibility and piloting stage, ToC enables the systematic identification of knowledge gaps to generate research questions that strengthen intervention design. ToC may improve the evaluation of interventions by providing a comprehensive set of indicators to evaluate all stages of the causal pathway through which an intervention achieves impact, combining evaluations of intervention effectiveness with detailed process evaluations into one theoretical framework. Conclusions Incorporating a ToC approach into the MRC framework holds promise for

  2. Building a recruitment database for asthma trials: a conceptual framework for the creation of the UK Database of Asthma Research Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwaru, Bright I; Soyiri, Ireneous N; Simpson, Colin R; Griffiths, Chris; Sheikh, Aziz

    2016-05-26

    Randomised clinical trials are the 'gold standard' for evaluating the effectiveness of healthcare interventions. However, successful recruitment of participants remains a key challenge for many trialists. In this paper, we present a conceptual framework for creating a digital, population-based database for the recruitment of asthma patients into future asthma trials in the UK. Having set up the database, the goal is to then make it available to support investigators planning asthma clinical trials. The UK Database of Asthma Research Volunteers will comprise a web-based front-end that interactively allows participant registration, and a back-end that houses the database containing participants' key relevant data. The database will be hosted and maintained at a secure server at the Asthma UK Centre for Applied Research based at The University of Edinburgh. Using a range of invitation strategies, key demographic and clinical data will be collected from those pre-consenting to consider participation in clinical trials. These data will, with consent, in due course, be linkable to other healthcare, social, economic, and genetic datasets. To use the database, asthma investigators will send their eligibility criteria for participant recruitment; eligible participants will then be informed about the new trial and asked if they wish to participate. A steering committee will oversee the running of the database, including approval of usage access. Novel communication strategies will be utilised to engage participants who are recruited into the database in order to avoid attrition as a result of waiting time to participation in a suitable trial, and to minimise the risk of their being approached when already enrolled in a trial. The value of this database will be whether it proves useful and usable to researchers in facilitating recruitment into clinical trials on asthma and whether patient privacy and data security are protected in meeting this aim. Successful recruitment is

  3. Utilizing the National Research Council's (NRC) Conceptual Framework for the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS): A Self-Study in My Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvo, Arthur Francis

    Given the reality that active and competitive participation in the 21 st century requires American students to deepen their scientific and mathematical knowledge base, the National Research Council (NRC) proposed a new conceptual framework for K--12 science education. The framework consists of an integration of what the NRC report refers to as the three dimensions: scientific and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and core ideas in four disciplinary areas (physical, life and earth/spaces sciences, and engineering/technology). The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS ), which are derived from this new framework, were released in April 2013 and have implications on teacher learning and development in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM). Given the NGSS's recent introduction, there is little research on how teachers can prepare for its release. To meet this research need, I implemented a self-study aimed at examining my teaching practices and classroom outcomes through the lens of the NRC's conceptual framework and the NGSS. The self-study employed design-based research (DBR) methods to investigate what happened in my secondary classroom when I designed, enacted, and reflected on units of study for my science, engineering, and mathematics classes. I utilized various best practices including Learning for Use (LfU) and Understanding by Design (UbD) models for instructional design, talk moves as a tool for promoting discourse, and modeling instruction for these designed units of study. The DBR strategy was chosen to promote reflective cycles, which are consistent with and in support of the self-study framework. A multiple case, mixed-methods approach was used for data collection and analysis. The findings in the study are reported by study phase in terms of unit planning, unit enactment, and unit reflection. The findings have implications for science teaching, teacher professional development, and teacher education.

  4. Prevalence of eating disorders in males: a review of rates reported in academic research and UK mass media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeting, Helen; Walker, Laura; MacLean, Alice; Patterson, Chris; Räisänen, Ulla; Hunt, Kate

    Media presentations of health issues affect evaluations of personal susceptibility to particular illnesses and hence help-seeking behaviours. We examined data on prevalence of eating disorders (EDs - which are often characterised as 'female') among males in: scientific literature; readily-accessible web-based information; and UK newspaper articles (published 7/12/2002-7/12/2012). This revealed conflicting statistics. Academic papers suggest men comprise around 25% of community-based samples, but much lower proportions (10% or less) of clinic samples. Websites and newspapers present widely differing statistics both on prevalence overall (numbers with EDs in the UK ranged from 60,000 to 2.7 million), and in men (generally suggesting they constituted 10-25% of those with EDs), rarely distinguishing between diagnosed and non-diagnosed samples. By 2011, newspapers were more consistent on overall numbers with EDs in the UK (1.6 million) and the proportion who were men (20%), drawing on one website as the authoritative source. Conflicting statistics may confuse men searching for ED (or other) health-related information, lead to underestimations of male susceptibility to EDs and/or reinforce inappropriate stereotypes of EDs as confined to adolescent girls.

  5. Solar energy: a UK assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    A panel convened by UK-ISES to analyze all aspects of solar energy systems and to assess the potential for solar energy utilization and research and development needs in the UK and for export is reported. Topics covered include: solar energy in relation to other energy sources; international solar energy research and development program; the physical nature of solar energy and its availability in the UK and other countries; thermal collection, storage, and low-temperature applications; solar energy and architecture; solar thermal power systems; solar cells; agricultural and biological systems; photochemical systems; social, legal, and political considerations with particular reference to the UK; and future policy on solar research and development for the UK. (WDM)

  6. Definition of Terms Used in Limitation of Treatment and Providing Palliative Care at the End of Life: The Indian Council of Medical Research Commission Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salins, Naveen; Gursahani, Roop; Mathur, Roli; Iyer, Shivakumar; Macaden, Stanley; Simha, Nagesh; Mani, Raj Kumar; Rajagopal, M. R.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Indian hospitals, in general, lack policies on the limitation of inappropriate life-sustaining interventions at the end of life. To facilitate discussion, preparation of guidelines and framing of laws, terminologies relating to the treatment limitation, and providing palliative care at the end-of-life care (EOLC) need to be defined and brought up to date. Methodology: This consensus document on terminologies and definitions of terminologies was prepared under the aegis of the Indian Council of Medical Research. The consensus statement was created using Nominal Group and Delphi Method. Results: Twenty-five definitions related to the limitations of treatment and providing palliative care at the end of life were created by reviewing existing international documents and suitably modifying it to the Indian sociocultural context by achieving national consensus. Twenty-five terminologies defined within the scope of this document are (1) terminal illness, (2) actively dying, (3) life-sustaining treatment, (4) potentially inappropriate treatment, (5) cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), (6) do not attempt CPR, (7) withholding life-sustaining treatment, (8) withdrawing life-sustaining treatment, (9) euthanasia (10) active shortening of the dying process, (11) physician-assisted suicide, (12) palliative care, (13) EOLC, (14) palliative sedation, (15) double effect, (16) death, (17) best interests, (18) health-care decision-making capacity, (19) shared decision-making, (20) advance directives, (21) surrogates, (22) autonomy, (23) beneficence, (24) nonmaleficence, and (25) justice.

  7. Professor Sir Mark Walport Government Chief Scientific Adviser Head of Government Science and Engineering Profession Chief Executive Designate of UK Research and Innovation United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

    CERN Multimedia

    Bennett, Sophia Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Professor Sir Mark Walport Government Chief Scientific Adviser Head of Government Science and Engineering Profession Chief Executive Designate of UK Research and Innovation United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

  8. Children Researching Their Urban Environment: Developing a Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacking, Elisabeth Barratt; Barratt, Robert

    2009-01-01

    "Listening to children: environmental perspectives and the school curriculum" (L2C) was a UK research council project based in schools in a socially and economically deprived urban area in England. It focused on 10/12 year old children's experience of their local community and environment, and how they made sense of this in relation both…

  9. Digital pathology access and usage in the UK: results from a national survey on behalf of the National Cancer Research Institute's CM-Path initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Bethany Jill; Lee, Jessica; Oien, Karin A; Treanor, Darren

    2018-05-01

    To canvass the UK pathology community to ascertain current levels of digital pathology usage in clinical and academic histopathology departments, and prevalent attitudes to digital pathology. A 15-item survey was circulated to National Health Service and academic pathology departments across the UK using the SurveyMonkey online survey tool. Responses were sought at a departmental or institutional level. Where possible, departmental heads were approached and asked to complete the survey, or forward it to the most relevant individual in their department. Data were collected over a 6-month period from February to July 2017. 41 institutes from across the UK responded to the survey. 60% (23/39) of institutions had access to a digital pathology scanner, and 60% (24/40) had access to a digital pathology workstation. The most popular applications of digital pathology in current use were undergraduate and postgraduate teaching, research and quality assurance. Investigating the deployment of digital pathology in their department was identified as a high or highest priority by 58.5% of institutions, with improvements in efficiency, turnaround times, reporting times and collaboration in their institution anticipated by the respondents. Access to funding for initial hardware, software and staff outlay, pathologist training and guidance from the Royal College of Pathologists were identified as factors that could enable respondent institutions to increase their digital pathology usage. Interest in digital pathology adoption in the UK is high, with usage likely to increase in the coming years. In light of this, pathologists are seeking more guidance on safe usage. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Digital pathology access and usage in the UK: results from a national survey on behalf of the National Cancer Research Institute’s CM-Path initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Bethany Jill; Lee, Jessica; Oien, Karin A; Treanor, Darren

    2018-01-01

    Aim To canvass the UK pathology community to ascertain current levels of digital pathology usage in clinical and academic histopathology departments, and prevalent attitudes to digital pathology. Methods A 15-item survey was circulated to National Health Service and academic pathology departments across the UK using the SurveyMonkey online survey tool. Responses were sought at a departmental or institutional level. Where possible, departmental heads were approached and asked to complete the survey, or forward it to the most relevant individual in their department. Data were collected over a 6-month period from February to July 2017. Results 41 institutes from across the UK responded to the survey. 60% (23/39) of institutions had access to a digital pathology scanner, and 60% (24/40) had access to a digital pathology workstation. The most popular applications of digital pathology in current use were undergraduate and postgraduate teaching, research and quality assurance. Investigating the deployment of digital pathology in their department was identified as a high or highest priority by 58.5% of institutions, with improvements in efficiency, turnaround times, reporting times and collaboration in their institution anticipated by the respondents. Access to funding for initial hardware, software and staff outlay, pathologist training and guidance from the Royal College of Pathologists were identified as factors that could enable respondent institutions to increase their digital pathology usage. Conclusion Interest in digital pathology adoption in the UK is high, with usage likely to increase in the coming years. In light of this, pathologists are seeking more guidance on safe usage. PMID:29317516

  11. Energy in transition, 1985-2010. Final report of the Committee on Nuclear and Alternative Energy Systems, National Research Council

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    This exhaustive study, in assessing the roles of nuclear and alternative energy systems in the nation's energy future, focuses on the period between 1985 and 2010. Its intent is to illuminate the kinds of options the nation may wish to keep open in the future and to describe the actions, policies, and R and D programs that may be required to do so. The timing and the context of these decisions depend not only on the technical, social, and economic features of energy-supply technologies, but also on assumptions about future demand for energy and the possibilities for energy conservation through changes in consumption patterns and improved efficiency of the supply and end-use systems. The committee developed a three-tiered functional structure for the project. The first tier was CONAES itself, whose report embodies the ultimate findings, conclusions, and judgments of the study. To provide scientific and engineering data and economic analyses for the committee, a second tier of four panels was appointed by the committee to examine (1) energy demand and conservation, (2) energy supply and delivery systems, (3) risks and impacts of energy supply and use, and (4) various models of possible future energy systems and decision making. Each panel in turn established a number of resource groups - some two dozen in all - to address in detail an array of more particular matters. Briefly stated, recommended strategies are: (1) increased energy conservation; (2) expansion of the nation's balanced coal and nuclear electrical generation base; (3) retention of the breeder option; (4) stimulation of fluid energy development; and (5) immediate increase in research and development of new energy options to ensure availability over the long term.

  12. News from Council - September 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    I would like to inform you of the main news from the Council this week. First of all, the Council congratulated CERN and the Collaborations on the superb performance of the accelerator complex and experiments. It has been a great year so far, with important physics results across the whole spectrum of the CERN research programme.   Looking forward, one of the main accomplishments from this week’s meetings is that the Council has approved the opening of a credit facility with the European Investment Bank (EIB) to cover the cash shortage during the peak years of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) construction. This is very good news since it will allow us to carry out the work necessary for the HL-LHC without compromising the rest of the Laboratory’s scientific programme. Turning to the scientific and geographical enlargement, the Council approved the admission of India as an Associate Member State, and I very much hope that the agreement can be signed in the near future so that Indi...

  13. ITER council proceedings: 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Records of the 10. ITER Council Meeting (IC-10), held on 26-27 July 1996, in St. Petersburg, Russia, and the 11. ITER Council Meeting (IC-11) held on 17-18 December 1996, in Tokyo, Japan, are presented, giving essential information on the evolution of the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA) and the cost review and safety analysis. Figs, tabs

  14. European works councils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Herman Lyhne

    2004-01-01

    The theme addressed by this artcle is the opportunities for European Works Councils of gaining influence on corporate decisions in multinational companies.......The theme addressed by this artcle is the opportunities for European Works Councils of gaining influence on corporate decisions in multinational companies....

  15. ITER council proceedings: 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    At the signing of the ITER EDA Agreement on July, 1992, each of the Parties presented to the Director General the names of their designated members of the ITER Council. Upon receiving those names, the Director General stated that the ITER Engineering Design Activities were ''ready to begin''. The next step in this process was the convening of the first meeting of the ITER Council. The first meeting of the Council, held in Vienna, was opened by Director General Hans Blix. The second meeting was held in Moscow, the formal seat of the Council. This volume presents records of these first two Council meetings and, together with the previous volumes on the text of the Agreement and Protocol 1 and the preparations for their signing respectively, represents essential information on the evolution of the ITER EDA

  16. Council of Scientific & Industrial Research

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    KalyanNetti

    2007-09-26

    Sep 26, 2007 ... gene in Deccani breed of sheep, to increase lamb production and ... higher productivity called 'NARI Suwarna' has thus been developed. ... and business of innovation for rural development in the country not only to accelerate.

  17. Meeting of the ITER Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drew, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: A meeting of the ITER Council took place in Toronto, Canada, on 27-28 February 2001 (Canada participates in the ITER EDA as an associate of the EU Party). The delegations to the Council were led by Dr. U. Finzi, Principal Advisor in charge of Fusion R and D in the Directorate-General for Research of the European Commission, Mr. T. Sugawa, Deputy Director-General of the Research and Development Bureau of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, Science and Technology of Japan, and Academician E. Velikhov, President of the RRC ''Kurchatov Institute''. The European delegation was joined by Canadian experts including a representative from the Canadian Department of Natural Resources. The Council heard presentations from Dr. H. Kishimoto on the successful completion of the Explorations concerning future joint implementation of ITER, and from Dr. J.-P. Rager on the ITER International Industry Liaison Meeting held in Toronto in November 2000. Having noted statements of Parties' status, in particular concerning the readiness to start negotiations and the progress toward site offers, the Council encouraged the Parties to pursue preparations toward future implementation of ITER along the general lines proposed in the Explorers' final report. The Council also noted the readiness the of the RF and EU Parties to instruct specified current JCT members to remain at their places of assignment after the end of the EDA, in preparation for a transition to the Co-ordinated Technical Activities foreseen as support to ITER negotiations. The Council was pleased to hear that meetings with the Director of the ITER Parties' Designated Safety Representatives had started, and commended the progress toward achieving timely licensing processes with a good common understanding. The Council noted with appreciation the Director's view that no difficulties of principle in the licensing approach had been identified during the informal discussions with the regulatory representatives and

  18. Faculty Development for Medical School Community-Based Faculty: A Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance Study Exploring Institutional Requirements and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drowos, Joanna; Baker, Suzanne; Harrison, Suzanne Leonard; Minor, Suzanne; Chessman, Alexander W; Baker, Dennis

    2017-08-01

    Community-based faculty play a large role in training medical students nationwide and require faculty development. The authors hypothesized that positive relationships exist between clerkships paying preceptors and requiring faculty development, and between protected clerkship directors' time and delivering face-to-face preceptor training, as well as with the number or length of community-based preceptor visits. Through under standing the quantity, delivery methods, barriers, and institutional support for faculty development provided to community-based preceptors teaching in family medicine clerkships, best practices can be developed. Data from the 2015 Council of Academic Family Medicine's Educational Research Alliance survey of Family Medicine Clerkship Directors were analyzed. The cross-sectional survey of clerkship directors is distributed annually to institutional representatives of U.S. and Canadian accredited medical schools. Survey questions focused on the requirements, delivery methods, barriers, and institutional support available for providing faculty development to community-based preceptors. Paying community-based preceptors was positively correlated with requiring faculty development in family medicine clerkships. The greatest barrier to providing faculty development was community-based preceptor time availability; however, face-to-face methods remain the most common delivery strategy. Many family medicine clerkship directors perform informal or no needs assessment in developing faculty development topics for community-based faculty. Providing payment to community preceptors may allow schools to enhance faculty development program activities and effectiveness. Medical schools could benefit from constructing a formal curriculum for faculty development, including formal preceptor needs assessment and program evaluation. Clerkship directors may consider recruiting and retaining community-based faculty by employing innovative faculty development delivery

  19. Time-Line in HFEA Developments and Regulatory Challenges: 20 Years of Overseeing Fertility Practices and Research in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Rina; Burt, Elizabeth; Homburg, Roy

    2013-12-01

    In the wake of political upheaval, the Human Fertilisation and Embryo Authority (HFEA) has faced increasing insecurity over its future as a pivotal regulatory body of fertility practices in the UK. HFEA regulates activities by means of licensing, audit, and inspection of fertility centers and maintaining the Code of Practice, which ensures the optimum undertaking of licensed activities by fertility centers. In 2009, amendments to the 1990 Act came into force representing an amalgamation of cumulative proposals, debates, and changes in legislation, which have shaped the world of reproductive medicine. The medical world has, in many cases, adapted to righteous political and social demands, and continues to evolve at a rapid rate. The HFEA has faced many regulatory challenges and changes, and through this study, we aim to provide an overview of some of these changes, particularly those during the last 10 years and the implications that they may have had to fertility practices.

  20. Gaddum and LSD: the birth and growth of experimental and clinical neuropharmacology research on 5-HT in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, A R

    2008-01-01

    The vasoconstrictor substance named serotonin was identified as 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) by Maurice Rapport in 1949. In 1951, Rapport gave Gaddum samples of 5-HT substance allowing him to develop a bioassay to both detect and measure the amine. Gaddum and colleagues rapidly identified 5-HT in brain and showed that lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) antagonized its action in peripheral tissues. Gaddum accordingly postulated that 5-HT might have a role in mood regulation. This review examines the role of UK scientists in the first 20 years following these major discoveries, discussing their role in developing assays for 5-HT in the CNS, identifying the enzymes involved in the synthesis and metabolism of 5-HT and investigating the effect of drugs on brain 5-HT. It reviews studies on the effects of LSD in humans, including Gaddum's self-administration experiments. It outlines investigations on the role of 5-HT in psychiatric disorders, including studies on the effect of antidepressant drugs on the 5-HT concentration in rodent and human brain, and the attempts to examine 5-HT biochemistry in the brains of patients with depressive illness. It is clear that a rather small group of both preclinical scientists and psychiatrists in the UK made major advances in our understanding of the role of 5-HT in the brain, paving the way for much of the knowledge now taken for granted when discussing ways that 5-HT might be involved in the control of mood and the idea that therapeutic drugs used to alleviate psychiatric illness might alter the function of cerebral 5-HT. PMID:18516072

  1. Gaddum and LSD: the birth and growth of experimental and clinical neuropharmacology research on 5-HT in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, A R

    2008-08-01

    The vasoconstrictor substance named serotonin was identified as 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) by Maurice Rapport in 1949. In 1951, Rapport gave Gaddum samples of 5-HT substance allowing him to develop a bioassay to both detect and measure the amine. Gaddum and colleagues rapidly identified 5-HT in brain and showed that lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) antagonized its action in peripheral tissues. Gaddum accordingly postulated that 5-HT might have a role in mood regulation. This review examines the role of UK scientists in the first 20 years following these major discoveries, discussing their role in developing assays for 5-HT in the CNS, identifying the enzymes involved in the synthesis and metabolism of 5-HT and investigating the effect of drugs on brain 5-HT. It reviews studies on the effects of LSD in humans, including Gaddum's self-administration experiments. It outlines investigations on the role of 5-HT in psychiatric disorders, including studies on the effect of antidepressant drugs on the 5-HT concentration in rodent and human brain, and the attempts to examine 5-HT biochemistry in the brains of patients with depressive illness. It is clear that a rather small group of both preclinical scientists and psychiatrists in the UK made major advances in our understanding of the role of 5-HT in the brain, paving the way for much of the knowledge now taken for granted when discussing ways that 5-HT might be involved in the control of mood and the idea that therapeutic drugs used to alleviate psychiatric illness might alter the function of cerebral 5-HT.

  2. [International regulation of ethics committees on biomedical research as protection mechanisms for people: analysis of the Additional Protocol to the Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine, concerning Biomedical Research of the Council of Europe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lecuona, Itziar

    2013-01-01

    The article explores and analyses the content of the Council of Europe's Additional Protocol to the Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine concerning Biomedical Research regarding the standard legal instrument in biomedical research, issued by an international organization with leadership in bioethics. This implies ethics committees are mechanisms of protection of humans in biomedical research and not mere bureaucratic agencies and that a sound inescapable international regulatory framework exists for States to regulate biomedical research. The methodology used focuses on the analysis of the background, the context in which it is made and the nature and scope of the Protocol. It also identifies and analyses the characteristics and functions of ethics committees in biomedical research and, in particular, the information that should be provided to this bodies to develop their functions previously, during and at the end of research projects. This analysis will provide guidelines, suggestions and conclusions for the awareness and training of members of these committees in order to influence the daily practice. This paper may also be of interest to legal practitioners who work in different areas of biomedical research. From this practical perspective, the article examines the legal treatment of the Protocol to meet new challenges and classic issues in research: the treatment of human biological samples, the use of placebos, avoiding double standards, human vulnerability, undue influence and conflicts of interest, among others. Also, from a critical view, this work links the legal responses to develop work procedures that are required for an effective performance of the functions assigned of ethics committees in biomedical research. An existing international legal response that lacks doctrinal standards and provides little support should, however, serve as a guide and standard to develop actions that allow ethics committees -as key bodies for States- to advance in

  3. ITER council proceedings: 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Continuing the ITER EDA, two further ITER Council Meetings were held since the publication of ITER EDA documentation series no, 20, namely the ITER Council Meeting on 27-28 February 2001 in Toronto, and the ITER Council Meeting on 18-19 July in Vienna. That Meeting was the last one during the ITER EDA. This volume contains records of these Meetings, including: Records of decisions; List of attendees; ITER EDA status report; ITER EDA technical activities report; MAC report and advice; Final report of ITER EDA; and Press release

  4. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Saff Association

    2013-01-01

    2013 Elections to Staff Council   Vote! Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site (https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2013).   Timetable elections Monday 28 October to Monday 11 November, 12:00 am voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November, Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee.

  5. Ethnicity-specific factors influencing childhood immunisation decisions among Black and Asian Minority Ethnic groups in the UK: a systematic review of qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Alice S; Rockliffe, Lauren; Chorley, Amanda J; Marlow, Laura A V; Bedford, Helen; Smith, Samuel G; Waller, Jo

    2017-06-01

    Uptake of some childhood immunisations in the UK is lower among those from some Black and Asian Minority Ethnic (BAME) backgrounds. This systematic review of qualitative research sought to understand the factors that are associated with ethnicity that influence the immunisation decisions of parents from BAME backgrounds living in the UK. Databases were searched on 2 December 2014 for studies published at any time using the terms 'UK' and 'vaccination' and 'qualitative methods' (and variations of these). Included articles comprised participants who were parents from BAME backgrounds. Thematic synthesis methods were used to develop descriptive and higher order themes. Themes specific to ethnicity and associated factors are reported. Eight papers were included in the review. Most participants were from Black (n=62) or Asian (n=38) backgrounds. Two ethnicity-related factors affected immunisation decisions. First, factors that are related to ethnicity itself (namely religion, upbringing and migration, and language) affected parents' perceived importance of immunisations, whether immunisations were permitted or culturally acceptable and their understanding of immunisation/the immunisation schedule. Second, perceived biological differences affected decision-making and demand for information. Factors related to ethnicity must be considered when seeking to understand immunisation decisions among parents from BAME backgrounds. Where appropriate and feasible, vaccination information should be targeted to address beliefs about ethnic differences held by some individuals from some BAME backgrounds. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Council tax valuation bands and contacts with a GP out-of-hours service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, Norman; Taylor, Gordon; Gwynne, Mark; Peart, Carole

    2006-04-01

    UK GPs are no longer responsible for the organisation of out-of-hours care for their patients, but resources remains capitation-based. This cross-sectional study tests whether council tax valuation bands can predict the demand for such services. All out-of-hours contacts made by patients in North Wiltshire over 4 months were classified by council tax band; frequencies compared with official population statistics. Council tax band predicts out-of-hours GP workload irrespective of age and sex: the more modest the home, the higher the GP contact rate. It may prove more difficult to sustain out-of-hours services in deprived parts of the UK.

  7. Medicare Appeals Council Decisions

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Decisions of the Departmental Appeals Board's Medicare Appeals Council involving claims for entitlement to Medicare and individual claims for Medicare coverage and...

  8. Allegheny County Council Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset portrays the boundaries of the County Council Districts in Allegheny County. The dataset is based on municipal boundaries and City of Pittsburgh ward...

  9. ITER council proceedings: 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Records of the 8. ITER Council Meeting (IC-8), held on 26-27 July 1995, in San Diego, USA, and the 9. ITER Council Meeting (IC-9) held on 12-13 December 1995, in Garching, Germany, are presented, giving essential information on the evolution of the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA) and the ITER Interim Design Report Package and Relevant Documents. Figs, tabs

  10. ITER council proceedings: 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This volume contains documents of the 13th and the 14th ITER council meeting as well as of the 1st extraordinary ITER council meeting. Documents of the ITER meetings held in Vienna and Yokohama during 1998 are also included. The contents include an outline of the ITER objectives, the ITER parameters and design overview as well as operating scenarios and plasma performance. Furthermore, design features, safety and environmental characteristics are given

  11. Vested Interests in Addiction Research and Policy The challenge corporate lobbying poses to reducing society’s alcohol problems: insights from UK evidence on minimum unit pricing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCambridge, Jim; Hawkins, Benjamin; Holden, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Background There has been insufficient research attention to alcohol industry methods of influencing public policies. With the exception of the tobacco industry, there have been few studies of the impact of corporate lobbying on public health policymaking more broadly. Methods We summarize here findings from documentary analyses and interview studies in an integrative review of corporate efforts to influence UK policy on minimum unit pricing (MUP) of alcohol 2007–10. Results Alcohol producers and retailers adopted a long-term, relationship-building approach to policy influence, in which personal contacts with key policymakers were established and nurtured, including when they were not in government. The alcohol industry was successful in achieving access to UK policymakers at the highest levels of government and at all stages of the policy process. Within the United Kingdom, political devolution and the formation for the first time of a Scottish National Party (SNP) government disrupted the existing long-term strategy of alcohol industry actors and created the conditions for evidence-based policy innovations such as MUP. Conclusions Comparisons between policy communities within the United Kingdom and elsewhere are useful to the understanding of how different policy environments are amenable to influence through lobbying. Greater transparency in how policy is made is likely to lead to more effective alcohol and other public policies globally by constraining the influence of vested interests. PMID:24261642

  12. Vested interests in addiction research and policy. The challenge corporate lobbying poses to reducing society's alcohol problems: insights from UK evidence on minimum unit pricing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCambridge, Jim; Hawkins, Benjamin; Holden, Chris

    2014-02-01

    There has been insufficient research attention to alcohol industry methods of influencing public policies. With the exception of the tobacco industry, there have been few studies of the impact of corporate lobbying on public health policymaking more broadly. We summarize here findings from documentary analyses and interview studies in an integrative review of corporate efforts to influence UK policy on minimum unit pricing (MUP) of alcohol 2007-10. Alcohol producers and retailers adopted a long-term, relationship-building approach to policy influence, in which personal contacts with key policymakers were established and nurtured, including when they were not in government. The alcohol industry was successful in achieving access to UK policymakers at the highest levels of government and at all stages of the policy process. Within the United Kingdom, political devolution and the formation for the first time of a Scottish National Party (SNP) government disrupted the existing long-term strategy of alcohol industry actors and created the conditions for evidence-based policy innovations such as MUP. Comparisons between policy communities within the United Kingdom and elsewhere are useful to the understanding of how different policy environments are amenable to influence through lobbying. Greater transparency in how policy is made is likely to lead to more effective alcohol and other public policies globally by constraining the influence of vested interests. ©2013 The Authors. Addiction published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Society for the Study of Addiction.

  13. News from Council

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Today concludes a very busy week for Council. As you’ll have seen from the press release this morning, Council elected a new President, who will take up his mandate on 1 January along with the new management team, which was also approved by Council yesterday.   You’ll find full details of the incoming Director-General’s management team and structures here. Completing the configuration for the immediate future, Council also approved the medium term plan, along with the budget for 2016. In other Council business, two complete applications for Associate Membership were discussed. Following an earlier letter, India’s complete application was received and considered by Council. Consequently, a fact-finding mission has been established to report back before the end of the year. A new application was also received from Azerbaijan, with a fact-finding mission to be established. India’s involvement with CERN goes back to the 1970s, and the country...

  14. Factors influencing the decision to attend screening for cancer in the UK: a meta-ethnography of qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, B; Bedford, L; Kendrick, D; Vedhara, K; Robertson, J F R; das Nair, R

    2017-05-09

    This review aimed to better understand experiences of being invited to cancer screening and associated decision-making. Qualitative evidence explaining UK cancer screening attendance decisions was systematically identified. Data were extracted and meta-ethnography used to identify shared themes, synthesize findings and generate higher level interpretations. Thirty-four studies met inclusion criteria. They related to uptake of breast, cervical, colorectal, prostate, ovarian and lung cancer screening. Three primary themes emerged from the synthesis. 'Relationships with the health service' shaped decisions, influenced by trust, compliance with power, resistance to control or surveillance and perceived failures to meet cultural, religious and language needs. 'Fear of cancer screening' was both a motivator and barrier in different ways and to varying degrees. Strategies to negotiate moderate fear levels were evident. 'Experiences of risk' included the creation of alternative personal risk discourses and the use of screening as a coping strategy, influenced by disease beliefs and feelings of health and wellness. The findings highlight the importance of the provider-patient relationship in screening uptake and enrich our understanding of how fear and risk are experienced and negotiated. This knowledge can help promote uptake and improve the effectiveness of cancer screening. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  15. 26th May 2011 -Delegate to CERN Open Council sessions and European Commission Head of Unit for Joint Programming European Research Area, DG Research and Innovation R. Lečbychová visiting the CERN Control Centre with M. Pojer, accompanied by CERN S. Stavrev.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    26th May 2011 -Delegate to CERN Open Council sessions and European Commission Head of Unit for Joint Programming European Research Area, DG Research and Innovation R. Lečbychová visiting the CERN Control Centre with M. Pojer, accompanied by CERN S. Stavrev.

  16. 10 March 2008 - Swedish Minister for Higher Education and Research L. Leijonborg signing the guest book with CERN Chef Scientific Officer J. Engelen, followed by the signature of the Swedish Computing Memorandum of Understanding by the Director General of the Swedish Research Council P. Ömling.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    10 March 2008 - Swedish Minister for Higher Education and Research L. Leijonborg signing the guest book with CERN Chef Scientific Officer J. Engelen, followed by the signature of the Swedish Computing Memorandum of Understanding by the Director General of the Swedish Research Council P. Ömling.

  17. Research report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitley, J.E.

    1990-07-01

    The SURRC (Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre) is a multidisciplinary research centre shared by a consortium of Scottish Universities. Funding is jointly by the University Funding Committee and commercially from Research Councils, government departments and industry. The focus of research lies in earth, environmental and biomedical sciences. The research activities are discussed under the following headings: environmental radioactivity and nuclear geochemistry, neutron activation analysis, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, body composition studies, stable isotopes in biological sciences, nuclear physics, luminescence dating and dosimetry radiation effects in electrical insulation, gamma-ray irradiation processing, radiogenic isotopes in geology, stable isotope geology, laser microprobe mass spectrometry for geology and NERC Radiocarbon Laboratory work. There are also reports on the reactor itself; reactor operation, production of radioactive isotopes and application of radioactive tracers. The educational aspects of the Centre, safety aspects, staffing, funding and all publications are reported. (UK)

  18. Evaluation of the National Research Council (2001) dairy model and derivation of new prediction equations. 1. Digestibility of fiber, fat, protein, and nonfiber carbohydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R R; Roman-Garcia, Y; Firkins, J L; VandeHaar, M J; Armentano, L E; Weiss, W P; McGill, T; Garnett, R; Hanigan, M D

    2017-05-01

    Evaluation of ration balancing systems such as the National Research Council (NRC) Nutrient Requirements series is important for improving predictions of animal nutrient requirements and advancing feeding strategies. This work used a literature data set (n = 550) to evaluate predictions of total-tract digested neutral detergent fiber (NDF), fatty acid (FA), crude protein (CP), and nonfiber carbohydrate (NFC) estimated by the NRC (2001) dairy model. Mean biases suggested that the NRC (2001) lactating cow model overestimated true FA and CP digestibility by 26 and 7%, respectively, and under-predicted NDF digestibility by 16%. All NRC (2001) estimates had notable mean and slope biases and large root mean squared prediction error (RMSPE), and concordance (CCC) ranged from poor to good. Predicting NDF digestibility with independent equations for legumes, corn silage, other forages, and nonforage feeds improved CCC (0.85 vs. 0.76) compared with the re-derived NRC (2001) equation form (NRC equation with parameter estimates re-derived against this data set). Separate FA digestion coefficients were derived for different fat supplements (animal fats, oils, and other fat types) and for the basal diet. This equation returned improved (from 0.76 to 0.94) CCC compared with the re-derived NRC (2001) equation form. Unique CP digestibility equations were derived for forages, animal protein feeds, plant protein feeds, and other feeds, which improved CCC compared with the re-derived NRC (2001) equation form (0.74 to 0.85). New NFC digestibility coefficients were derived for grain-specific starch digestibilities, with residual organic matter assumed to be 98% digestible. A Monte Carlo cross-validation was performed to evaluate repeatability of model fit. In this procedure, data were randomly subsetted 500 times into derivation (60%) and evaluation (40%) data sets, and equations were derived using the derivation data and then evaluated against the independent evaluation data. Models

  19. Studies project development off U.K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that capital spending on U.K. Continental Shelf (UKCS) oil and gas development in 1992-94 will reach about $36 billion, Arthur Andersen Petroleum Services (AAPS) predicts. Expenditures during the 3 year period would be about 55% more than capital spending for UKCS development in 1989-91 AAPS noted. Another industry forecast, by Grampian Regional Council, Aberdeen, estimates more than 90 new fields could be developed on the UKCS during the next 20 years

  20. Renewable energy respecting nature. A synthesis of knowledge on environmental impacts of renewable energy financed by the Research Council for Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Roel; Bevanger, Kjetil; Dijk, Jiska Van; Petrin, Zlatko; Brende, Hege

    2012-07-01

    Renewable energy production is seen as a key factor for reduction of climate emissions; however further development of landscapes and seascapes may impact the environment on top of existing pressures. Norway has committed to reduce emissions, and major efforts are put into technological and environmental research to provide knowledge and solutions to meet these challenges. This report synthesizes the knowledge on environmental impacts of renewable energy acquired through the EFFEN, EFFEKT and RENERGI programmes run by the Research Council of Norway; especially from the Centre for Environmental Design of Renewable Energy (CEDREN), as one of the centres for environmental-friendly energy research (CEER). Due to extensive water resources Norway was among the first countries to base its energy system on hydropower; already from the late 19th century. Today, approximately 62% of Norway's energy supply comes from hydropower. Norway has ratified EUs Renewables Directive and committed to a target of generating 67.5% from renewable sources. Because the majority of the large river systems were already regulated in the 1960s, wind power is expected to grow extensively to reach this target. With the current development of onshore and offshore wind power and the extension of associated power transmission, environmental considerations will evolve rapidly. Research on environmental impacts of hydropower production prioritized the Atlantic salmon for many years, also due to its value for recreation and tourism. Currently Norway is at the very front of generating knowledge on salmon, empirical studies and development of mitigation measures. Research on hydropower production in regulated rivers has revealed major bottlenecks for salmon production and survival, with varying impacts at different life stages. Research results from EnviDORR and EnviPEAK have provided solutions to ensure production of salmon despite hydropower development. This shows the possibility of reconciling

  1. Implementing health promotion in schools: protocol for a realist systematic review of research and experience in the United Kingdom (UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearson Mark

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background School-based interventions and campaigns are used to promote health and address a wide variety of public health problems. Schools are considered to be key sites for the implementation of health promotion programmes for their potential to reach the whole population in particular age-groups and instil healthy patterns of behavior early in life. However, evidence for the effectiveness of school-based health promotion interventions is highly variable. Systematic reviews of the evidence of school-based interventions tend to be highly problem- or intervention- specific, thereby missing potential generic insights into implementation and effectiveness of such programmes across problems. Methods/design A realist systematic review will be undertaken to explain how, why and in what circumstances schools can provide feasible settings for effective health promotion programmes in the United Kingdom (UK. The review will be conducted in two phases. Phase 1 will identify programme theories about implementation (ideas about what enables or inhibits effective health promotion to be delivered in a school setting. Phase 2 will test the programme theories so that they can be challenged, endorsed and/or refined. A Review Advisory Group of education and health professionals will be convened to help identify and choose potential programme theories, provide a ‘reality check’ on the clarity and explanatory strength of the mechanisms to be tested, and help shape the presentation of findings to be usable by practitioners and decision-makers. Review findings will be disseminated through liaison with decision-makers, and voluntary and professional groups in the fields of education and health.

  2. BrisSynBio: a BBSRC/EPSRC-funded Synthetic Biology Research Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgley, Kathleen R; Race, Paul R; Woolfson, Derek N

    2016-06-15

    BrisSynBio is the Bristol-based Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)/Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)-funded Synthetic Biology Research Centre. It is one of six such Centres in the U.K. BrisSynBio's emphasis is on rational and predictive bimolecular modelling, design and engineering in the context of synthetic biology. It trains the next generation of synthetic biologists in these approaches, to facilitate translation of fundamental synthetic biology research to industry and the clinic, and to do this within an innovative and responsible research framework. © 2016 The Author(s).

  3. Give UK nursing bigger global voice by rejoining ICN, college is urged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, Chris

    2015-08-26

    The next chief executive of the International Council of Nurses should encourage the RCN to rejoin the organisation and ensure the UK has a greater say on nursing at a global level, a former college president believes.

  4. UK to train 100 PhD students in data science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michael

    2017-12-01

    A new PhD programme to develop techniques to handle the vast amounts of data being generated by experiments and facilities has been launched by the UK's Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC).

  5. Changing trend of viral hepatitis -- 'A twenty one year report from Pakistan medical research council research centre, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, W.; Qureshi, H.; Arif, A.; Alam, S.E.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the frequency and pattern of Hepatitis B and C over the past twenty one years, in a liver research unit of Karachi. Retrospective analysis of the records of PMRC, Research Centre, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from 1987 to 2007 were reviewed. A special flow sheet was made where information of all patients with viral liver disease was entered. Patients having complete information of viral markers were included in the analysis. Cases with HBsAg, Anti HBc IgM positive and raised ALT were considered as acute Hepatitis B. HBs Ag/ Anti HBc IgG positive were considered as chronic Hepatitis B. Delta antibody positive with or without HBsAg were considered as Delta Hepatitis. Anti HCV positive and raised ALT more than ten times for less than 6 months were considered as acute Hepatitis C, whereas Anti HCV and HCV-RNA positive with or without raised ALT for more than six months were considered as chronic Hepatitis C. Anti HEV IgM and Anti HAV IgM positive were considered as acute Hepatitis E and A respectively. A total of 5193 cases fulfilling all criteria of viral hepatitis were seen in the past 21 years. Of the total 3247 (62.5 %) were males and 1946 (37.5 %) females giving a male to female ratio of 1.7:1 Hepatitis C was the most common infection seen in 2896 cases (55.8 %), followed by Hepatitis B in 1691 cases (32.6 %). Seventy five percent cases of Hepatitis B were males and 25 % females while 55% Hepatitis C cases were males and 45 % females. Hepatitis B was seen a decade earlier in different age groups than hepatitis C. Overall, out of the total 5193 cases, 2294 (44.2%) were of chronic hepatitis, 1430 (27.5%) cirrhosis, 1083 (20.8%) carriers and 346 (6.7%) had acute hepatitis (hepatitis B; 214 (61.8%), hepatitis C; 21 (6.0%). While hepatitis B and hepatitis C both were present in 3 (1.3%). Hepatitis E was 70 (20.2%) hepatitis A 12 (3.5%) and all markers were negative in 26 (7.5%) cases). Forty cases (0.8%) were of Hepatocellular carcinoma

  6. Comparison of DNA quantification methodology used in the DNA extraction protocol for the UK Biobank cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Samantha; Peakman, Tim; Sheard, Simon; Almond, Rachael

    2017-01-05

    UK Biobank is a large prospective cohort study in the UK established by the Medical Research Council (MRC) and the Wellcome Trust to enable approved researchers to investigate the role of genetic factors, environmental exposures and lifestyle in the causes of major diseases of late and middle age. A wide range of phenotypic data has been collected at recruitment and has recently been enhanced by the UK Biobank Genotyping Project. All UK Biobank participants (500,000) have been genotyped on either the UK Biobank Axiom® Array or the Affymetrix UK BiLEVE Axiom® Array and the workflow for preparing samples for genotyping is described. The genetic data is hoped to provide further insight into the genetics of disease. All data, including the genetic data, is available for access to approved researchers. Data for two methods of DNA quantification (ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy [UV/Vis]) measured on the Trinean DropSense™ 96 and PicoGreen®) were compared by two laboratories (UK Biobank and Affymetrix). The sample processing workflow established at UK Biobank, for genotyping on the custom Affymetrix Axiom® array, resulted in high quality DNA (average DNA concentration 38.13 ng/μL, average 260/280 absorbance 1.91). The DNA generated high quality genotype data (average call rate 99.48% and pass rate 99.45%). The DNA concentration measured on the Trinean DropSense™ 96 at UK Biobank correlated well with DNA concentration measured by PicoGreen® at Affymetrix (r = 0.85). The UK Biobank Genotyping Project demonstrated that the high throughput DNA extraction protocol described generates high quality DNA suitable for genotyping on the Affymetrix Axiom array. The correlation between DNA concentration derived from UV/Vis and PicoGreen® quantification methods suggests, in large-scale genetic studies involving two laboratories, it may be possible to remove the DNA quantification step in one laboratory without affecting downstream analyses. This would result in

  7. Is it worth it? Patient and public views on the impact of their involvement in health research and its assessment: a UK-based qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Joanna C; Boylan, Anne-Marie; Bostock, Jennifer; Locock, Louise

    2017-06-01

    There are mounting calls for robust, critical evaluation of the impact of patient and public involvement (PPI) in health research. However, questions remain about how to assess its impact, and whether it should be assessed at all. The debate has thus far been dominated by professionals. To explore the views of PPI contributors involved in health research regarding the impact of PPI on research, whether and how it should be assessed. Qualitative interview study. Thirty-eight PPI contributors involved in health research across the UK. Participants felt that PPI has a beneficial impact on health research. They described various impactful roles, which we conceptualize as the 'expert in lived experience', the 'creative outsider', the 'free challenger', the 'bridger', the 'motivator' and the 'passive presence'. Participants generally supported assessing the impact of PPI, while acknowledging the challenges and concerns about the appropriateness and feasibility of measurement. They expressed a range of views about what impacts should be assessed, by whom and how. Individual feedback on impact was seen as an important driver of improved impact and motivation to stay involved. While there appears to be widespread support for PPI impact assessment among PPI contributors, their views on what to assess and how are diverse. PPI contributors should be involved as equal partners in debates and decisions about these issues. Individual feedback on impact may increase PPI contributors' potential impact and their motivation to stay involved. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Entries for the UK Business Plan Competition 2003

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    PPARC is supporting the Research Councils' Business Plan Competition 2003, for which outline (one page) entries should be submitted by 31.1.03. The competition is open to CERN staff and visiting academics from UK establishments. The main condition on entry for CERN staff is that there should be intent to commercialise the technology in the UK. Postgraduates, postdocs and academic staff who have a business idea arising from their research and want to develop this further are encouraged to participate. There is a £25,000 first prize and advice and training along the way. The first step is simple - just prepare a one page summary of your business idea - without giving away any potential business secrets and fill in your details on the short application form. The training element will provide a comprehensive coverage on the issues you need to know about with case studies and special sessions on specific issues of relevance to different research areas. Staff from CERN EP division submitted an entry last year, w...

  9. A report from Council

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The June meeting of Council is always a very busy one, having approval of the next year’s budget and the MTP as fixed agenda points. This year in addition, we had discussions on enlargement, as well as on the pension fund. I’d like to use this message to bring you up to date on all of those matters.   I’ll begin with the good news that the 2015 budget and MTP were recommended for approval by Finance Committee on Wednesday, and approved by Council on Thursday. This is extremely good news, and a solid vote of confidence from Council in the current economic situation. Coupled with that, I am pleased to report that at the half way stage of 2014, some 89% of budget contributions for the year have been received. Turning now to enlargement, I can inform you that the task force that went to Pakistan came back with a positive report, and as a consequence Council has authorised us to finalise discussion with Pakistan for Associate Membership. Council also authoris...

  10. "A sound track of your life": music in contemporary UK funerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Sue; Holloway, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    This article considers the role that music plays in contemporary UK funerals and the meaning that the funeral music has for bereaved families. It is based on findings from a recently completed study of 46 funerals funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council. Music contributes to the public ceremony and the personal existential quest of the bereaved. It is important to both the content and process of the contemporary funeral, an event of deep cultural significance in our response as individuals and communities to death and the loss of a significant relationship. There is evidence that for many people, the music chosen and used also evokes and conveys their spirituality. Spirituality may not be intrinsic to the music but spiritual experience may result from the meaning that the music has for that particular person.

  11. ITER Council proceedings: 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Records of the third ITER Council Meeting (IC-3), held on 21-22 April 1993, in Tokyo, Japan, and the fourth ITER Council Meeting (IC-4) held on 29 September - 1 October 1993 in San Diego, USA, are presented, giving essential information on the evolution of the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA), such as the text of the draft of Protocol 2 further elaborated in ''ITER EDA Agreement and Protocol 2'' (ITER EDA Documentation Series No. 5), recommendations on future work programmes: a description of technology R and D tasks; the establishment of a trust fund for the ITER EDA activities; arrangements for Visiting Home Team Personnel; the general framework for the involvement of other countries in the ITER EDA; conditions for the involvement of Canada in the Euratom Contribution to the ITER EDA; and other attachments as parts of the Records of Decision of the aforementioned ITER Council Meetings

  12. ITER council proceedings: 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Records of the third ITER Council Meeting (IC-3), held on 21-22 April 1993, in Tokyo, Japan, and the fourth ITER Council Meeting (IC-4) held on 29 September - 1 October 1993 in San Diego, USA, are presented, giving essential information on the evolution of the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA), such as the text of the draft of Protocol 2 further elaborated in ``ITER EDA Agreement and Protocol 2`` (ITER EDA Documentation Series No. 5), recommendations on future work programmes: a description of technology R and D tastes; the establishment of a trust fund for the ITER EDA activities; arrangements for Visiting Home Team Personnel; the general framework for the involvement of other countries in the ITER EDA; conditions for the involvement of Canada in the Euratom Contribution to the ITER EDA; and other attachments as parts of the Records of Decision of the aforementioned ITER Council Meetings.

  13. Synthetic biology in the UK - An outline of plans and progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, L J; Kitney, R I

    2016-12-01

    Synthetic biology is capable of delivering new solutions to key challenges spanning the bioeconomy, both nationally and internationally. Recognising this significant potential and the associated need to facilitate its translation and commercialisation the UK government commissioned the production of a national Synthetic Biology Roadmap in 2011, and subsequently provided crucial support to assist its implementation. Critical infrastructural investments have been made, and important strides made towards the development of an effectively connected community of practitioners and interest groups. A number of Synthetic Biology Research Centres, DNA Synthesis Foundries, a Centre for Doctoral Training, and an Innovation Knowledge Centre have been established, creating a nationally distributed and integrated network of complementary facilities and expertise. The UK Synthetic Biology Leadership Council published a UK Synthetic Biology Strategic Plan in 2016, increasing focus on the processes of translation and commercialisation. Over 50 start-ups, SMEs and larger companies are actively engaged in synthetic biology in the UK, and inward investments are starting to flow. Together these initiatives provide an important foundation for stimulating innovation, actively contributing to international research and development partnerships, and helping deliver useful benefits from synthetic biology in response to local and global needs and challenges.

  14. 75 FR 52719 - South Atlantic Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-27

    ... will receive a report on outreach and research activities associated with the Oculina Bank Experimental...-Based Management Committee will receive an overview of the actions and alternatives currently in draft... documents, review the Council's research plan, develop recommendations relative to Council stock assessment...

  15. Nutritional value of foods sold in vending machines in a UK University: Formative, cross-sectional research to inform an environmental intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hanla; Papadaki, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    Vending machine use has been associated with low dietary quality among children but there is limited evidence on its role in food habits of University students. We aimed to examine the nutritional value of foods sold in vending machines in a UK University and conduct formative research to investigate differences in food intake and body weight by vending machine use among 137 University students. The nutrient content of snacks and beverages available at nine campus vending machines was assessed by direct observation in May 2014. Participants (mean age 22.5 years; 54% males) subsequently completed a self-administered questionnaire to assess vending machine behaviours and food intake. Self-reported weight and height were collected. Vending machine snacks were generally high in sugar, fat and saturated fat, whereas most beverages were high in sugar. Seventy three participants (53.3%) used vending machines more than once per week and 82.2% (n 60) of vending machine users used them to snack between meals. Vending machine accessibility was positively correlated with vending machine use (r = 0.209, P = 0.015). Vending machine users, compared to non-users, reported a significantly higher weekly consumption of savoury snacks (5.2 vs. 2.8, P = 0.014), fruit juice (6.5 vs. 4.3, P = 0.035), soft drinks (5.1 vs. 1.9, P = 0.006), meat products (8.3 vs. 5.6, P = 0.029) and microwave meals (2.0 vs. 1.3, P = 0.020). No between-group differences were found in body weight. Most foods available from vending machines in this UK University were of low nutritional quality. In this sample of University students, vending machine users displayed several unfavourable dietary behaviours, compared to non-users. Findings can be used to inform the development of an environmental intervention that will focus on vending machines to improve dietary behaviours in University students in the UK. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nuclear skills and education training in the UK through the Dalton nuclear institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard Clegg

    2006-01-01

    -level nuclear training called NTEC (Nuclear Technology Education Consortium). The consortium has received funding from the UK research councils and industry. Its first student intake was in October 2005 and eventually the modules on offer will cover the broad spectrum from reactor systems and fuel cycles through to decommissioning and clean-up, with modules also on offer covering fusion, nuclear medicine and socio-economics. A key aim of NTEC is to forge international teaching collaborations to share material as well as student exchanges. (author)

  17. ITER council proceedings: 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This volume of the ITER EDA Documentation Series presents records of the 12th ITER Council Meeting, IC-12, which took place on 23-24 July, 1997 in Tampere, Finland. The Council received from the Parties (EU, Japan, Russia, US) positive responses on the Detailed Design Report. The Parties stated their willingness to contribute to fulfil their obligations in contributing to the ITER EDA. The summary discussions among the Parties led to the consensus that in July 1998 the ITER activities should proceed for additional three years with a general intent to enable an efficient start of possible, future ITER construction

  18. Interval between onset of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis comparing the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink with a hospital-based cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillett, William; Charlton, Rachel; Nightingale, Alison; Snowball, Julia; Green, Amelia; Smith, Catherine; Shaddick, Gavin; McHugh, Neil

    2017-12-01

    To describe the time interval between the onset of psoriasis and PsA in the UK primary care setting and compare with a large, well-classified secondary care cohort. Patients with PsA and/or psoriasis were identified in the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). The secondary care cohort comprised patients from the Bath PsA longitudinal observational cohort study. For incident PsA patients in the CPRD who also had a record of psoriasis, the time interval between PsA diagnosis and first psoriasis record was calculated. Comparisons were made with the time interval between diagnoses in the Bath cohort. There were 5272 eligible PsA patients in the CPRD and 815 in the Bath cohort. In both cohorts, the majority of patients (82.3 and 61.3%, respectively) had psoriasis before their PsA diagnosis or within the same calendar year (10.5 and 23.8%), with only a minority receiving their PsA diagnosis first (7.1 and 14.8%). Excluding those who presented with arthritis before psoriasis, the median time between diagnoses was 8 years [interquartile range (IQR) 2-15] in the CPRD and 7 years (IQR 0-20) in the Bath cohort. In the CPRD, 60.1 and 75.1% received their PsA diagnosis within 10 and 15 years of their psoriasis diagnosis, respectively; this was comparable with 57.2 and 67.7% in the Bath cohort. A similar distribution for the time interval between psoriasis and arthritis was observed in the CPRD and secondary care cohort. These data can inform screening strategies and support the validity of data from each cohort. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  19. UK school visit: Alfriston School for girls

    CERN Multimedia

    Sophie Louise Hetherton

    2014-01-01

    Pupils with learning disabilities from Alfriston School in the UK visited the CMS detector last week. This visit was funded by the UK's Science and Technologies Facilities Council (STFC) as part of a grant awarded to support activities that will help to build the girls’ self-esteem and interest in physics.   Alfriston School students at CMS. On Friday, 10 October, pupils from Alfriston School – a UK secondary school catering for girls with a wide range of special educational needs and disabilities – paid a special visit to CERN. Dave Waterman, a science teacher at the school, recently received a Public Engagement Small Award from the STFC, which enabled the group of girls and accompanying teachers to travel to Switzerland and visit CERN. The awards form part of a project to boost the girls’ confidence and interest in physics. The aim is to create enthusiastic role models with first-hand experience of science who can inspire their peers back hom...

  20. What Triggers the Establishment of a Works Council?

    OpenAIRE

    Jens Mohrenweiser; Paul Marginson; Uschi Backes-Gellner

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyses events that trigger the establishment of a works council and the actor or agent who triggers it. The paper extends previous research in two dimensions. First, we examine specific events that motivate workers to establish a works council, such as a change of owner, founding a spin-off, a firm-acquisition or a radical restructuring. These events express risk protection as workers’ primary motivation for establishing a works council. Second, we analyse the actor or agent who ...

  1. Selection of population controls for a Salmonella case-control study in the UK using a market research panel and web-survey provides time and resource savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook, P; Kanagarajah, S; Maguire, H; Adak, G K; Dabrera, G; Waldram, A; Freeman, R; Charlett, A; Oliver, I

    2016-04-01

    Timely recruitment of population controls in infectious disease outbreak investigations is challenging. We evaluated the timeliness and cost of using a market research panel as a sampling frame for recruiting controls in a case-control study during an outbreak of Salmonella Mikawasima in the UK in 2013. We deployed a web-survey by email to targeted members of a market research panel (panel controls) in parallel to the outbreak control team interviewing randomly selected public health staff by telephone and completing paper-based questionnaires (staff controls). Recruitment and completion of exposure history web-surveys for panel controls (n = 123) took 14 h compared to 15 days for staff controls (n = 82). The average staff-time cost per questionnaire for staff controls was £13·13 compared to an invoiced cost of £3·60 per panel control. Differences in the distribution of some exposures existed between these control groups but case-control studies using each group found that illness was associated with consumption of chicken outside of the home and chicken from local butchers. Recruiting market research panel controls offers time and resource savings. More rapid investigations would enable more prompt implementation of control measures. We recommend that this method of recruiting controls is considered in future investigations and assessed further to better understand strengths and limitations.

  2. Online market research panel members as controls in case-control studies to investigate gastrointestinal disease outbreaks: early experiences and lessons learnt from the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook, P; McCormick, J; Kanagarajah, S; Adak, G K; Cleary, P; Elson, R; Gobin, M; Hawker, J; Inns, T; Sinclair, C; Trienekens, S C M; Vivancos, R; McCarthy, N D

    2018-03-01

    Established methods of recruiting population controls for case-control studies to investigate gastrointestinal disease outbreaks can be time consuming, resulting in delays in identifying the source or vehicle of infection. After an initial evaluation of using online market research panel members as controls in a case-control study to investigate a Salmonella outbreak in 2013, this method was applied in four further studies in the UK between 2014 and 2016. We used data from all five studies and interviews with members of each outbreak control team and market research panel provider to review operational issues, evaluate risk of bias in this approach and consider methods to reduce confounding and bias. The investigators of each outbreak reported likely time and cost savings from using market research controls. There were systematic differences between case and control groups in some studies but no evidence that conclusions on the likely source or vehicle of infection were incorrect. Potential selection biases introduced by using this sampling frame and the low response rate are unclear. Methods that might reduce confounding and some bias should be balanced with concerns for overmatching. Further evaluation of this approach using comparisons with traditional methods and population-based exposure survey data is recommended.

  3. Experimental asbestos studies in the UK: 1912-1950.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Morris

    2017-11-01

    The asbestos industry originated in the UK in the 1870s. By 1898, asbestos had many applications and was reported to be one of the four leading causes of severe occupational disease. In 1912, the UK government sponsored an experimental study that reported that exposure to asbestos produced no more than a modicum of pulmonary fibrosis in guinea pigs. In the 1930s, the newly established Medical Research Council, with assistance from industry, sponsored a study of the effects of exposing animals to asbestos by injection (intratracheal and subcutaneous) and by inhalation in the factory environment. Government reports, publications, and contemporary records obtained by legal discovery have been reviewed in the context of the stage of scientific development and the history of the times. Experimenters were engaged in a learning process during the 1912-1950 period, and their reports of the effects of asbestos were inconsistent. Pathologists who studied the effects of asbestos experimentally, at whole animal, tissue and cellular levels, advanced experimental methodology and mechanistic knowledge. In the hands of public relations experts, however, research was exploited to preserve an industry and perpetuate preventable diseases, a practice that continues to this day. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Setting the top 10 research priorities to improve the health of people with Type 2 diabetes: a Diabetes UK-James Lind Alliance Priority Setting Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finer, S; Robb, P; Cowan, K; Daly, A; Shah, K; Farmer, A

    2018-07-01

    To describe processes and outcomes of a priority setting partnership to identify the 'top 10 research priorities' in Type 2 diabetes, involving people living with the condition, their carers, and healthcare professionals. We followed the four-step James Lind Alliance Priority Setting Partnership process which involved: gathering uncertainties using a questionnaire survey distributed to 70 000 people living with Type 2 diabetes and their carers, and healthcare professionals; organizing the uncertainties; interim priority setting by resampling of participants with a second survey; and final priority setting in an independent group of participants, using the nominal group technique. At each step the steering group closely monitored and guided the process. In the first survey, 8227 uncertainties were proposed by 2587 participants, of whom 18% were from black, Asian and minority ethnic groups. Uncertainties were formatted and collated into 114 indicative questions. A total of 1506 people contributed to a second survey, generating a shortlist of 24 questions equally weighted to the contributions of people living with diabetes and their carers and those of healthcare professionals. In the final step the 'top 10 research priorities' were selected, including questions on cure and reversal, risk identification and prevention, and self-management approaches in Type 2 diabetes. Systematic and transparent methodology was used to identify research priorities in a large and genuine partnership of people with lived and professional experience of Type 2 diabetes. The top 10 questions represent consensus areas of research priority to guide future research, deliver responsive and strategic allocation of research resources, and improve the future health and well-being of people living with, and at risk of, Type 2 diabetes. © 2018 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK.

  5. REFLEXIONES SOBRE SABER , REVISTA CIENTÍFICA DEL CONSEJO DE INVESTIGACION DE LA UNIVERSIDAD DE ORIENTE I REFLECTIONS ON SABER , SCIENTIFIC JOURNAL OF THE RESEARCH COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSIDAD DE ORIENTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GERÓNIMO OJEDA CRESPO

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Presents a brief account of the beginnings of the Universidad de Oriente, higher education institution seated in the eastern territory of Venezuela; as well as also related to attempts to establish a “editorial policy” in the different campuses university, periodical publications of scientific character. In describing the path of SABER periodical publication, multidisciplinary, financed and edited by the Research Council , presents a sequence of events that have marked both their presence and their contribution to the university community. Finally we suggest a number of actions to continue the important work of SABER as scientific journal of the Universidad de Oriente.

  6. Statewide Suicide Prevention Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    State Employees Statewide Suicide Prevention Council DHSS State of Alaska Home Divisions and Agencies National Suicide Prevention Lifeline Alaska Community Mental Health Centers National Survivors of Suicide Meetings Presentations 2010 Alaska Statewide Suicide Prevention Summit: Mending the Net Connect with us on

  7. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 31st of October to the 14th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months and will keep the next Staff Council very busy. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to vote * * * * * * * Vote Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the election...

  8. Council Membership Directory 1969.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council of Organizations Serving the Deaf, Washington, DC.

    Information is provided on the purposes, goals, functions, membership, board of directors, calendar of events, publications, and names and addresses of the officers or executive committees of 19 national organizations serving the deaf. Organizations included are the Council of Organizations Serving the Deaf, Alexander Graham Bell Association for…

  9. Report from Council

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This week’s Council meeting was dominated by discussions about the long-term, sustainable future of CERN. Key points are progress on the Medium-Term Plan, the successful LHC restart, and enlargement.   The budget proposed by management for 2016 was well received, as were the measures to mitigate against the recent change in exchange rates. These items will be put to the vote in September. Discussions on CERN staff employment conditions were conducted in a constructive atmosphere this week, and will continue in future Council meetings. The Council also clearly voiced its congratulations for the smooth and successful start of LHC run 2, coming on top of a clear run of spectacular scientific and technological successes over recent years. In the current climate of austerity, these developments are a strong endorsement from the Council. Nevertheless, it would be disingenuous of me to pretend that everything is rosy. There has been an air of unease at CERN over recent months, which was v...

  10. Using the Medical Research Council framework for the development and evaluation of complex interventions in a theory-based infant feeding intervention to prevent childhood obesity: the baby milk intervention and trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshman, Rajalakshmi; Griffin, Simon; Hardeman, Wendy; Schiff, Annie; Kinmonth, Ann Louise; Ong, Ken K

    2014-01-01

    We describe our experience of using the Medical Research Council framework on complex interventions to guide the development and evaluation of an intervention to prevent obesity by modifying infant feeding behaviours. We reviewed the epidemiological evidence on early life risk factors for obesity and interventions to prevent obesity in this age group. The review suggested prevention of excess weight gain in bottle-fed babies and appropriate weaning as intervention targets; hence we undertook systematic reviews to further our understanding of these behaviours. We chose theory and behaviour change techniques that demonstrated evidence of effectiveness in altering dietary behaviours. We subsequently developed intervention materials and evaluation tools and conducted qualitative studies with mothers (intervention recipients) and healthcare professionals (intervention deliverers) to refine them. We developed a questionnaire to assess maternal attitudes and feeding practices to understand the mechanism of any intervention effects. In addition to informing development of our specific intervention and evaluation materials, use of the Medical Research Council framework has helped to build a generalisable evidence base for early life nutritional interventions. However, the process is resource intensive and prolonged, and this should be taken into account by public health research funders. This trial is registered with ISRTCN: 20814693 Baby Milk Trial.

  11. Using the Medical Research Council Framework for the Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions in a Theory-Based Infant Feeding Intervention to Prevent Childhood Obesity: The Baby Milk Intervention and Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajalakshmi Lakshman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We describe our experience of using the Medical Research Council framework on complex interventions to guide the development and evaluation of an intervention to prevent obesity by modifying infant feeding behaviours. Methods. We reviewed the epidemiological evidence on early life risk factors for obesity and interventions to prevent obesity in this age group. The review suggested prevention of excess weight gain in bottle-fed babies and appropriate weaning as intervention targets; hence we undertook systematic reviews to further our understanding of these behaviours. We chose theory and behaviour change techniques that demonstrated evidence of effectiveness in altering dietary behaviours. We subsequently developed intervention materials and evaluation tools and conducted qualitative studies with mothers (intervention recipients and healthcare professionals (intervention deliverers to refine them. We developed a questionnaire to assess maternal attitudes and feeding practices to understand the mechanism of any intervention effects. Conclusions. In addition to informing development of our specific intervention and evaluation materials, use of the Medical Research Council framework has helped to build a generalisable evidence base for early life nutritional interventions. However, the process is resource intensive and prolonged, and this should be taken into account by public health research funders. This trial is registered with ISRTCN: 20814693 Baby Milk Trial.

  12. 77 FR 2275 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Manufacturing Council AGENCY... candidate's proven experience in promoting, developing and marketing programs in support of manufacturing... participating in Council meetings and events are responsible for their travel, living and other personal...

  13. 76 FR 33244 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Manufacturing Council AGENCY... experience in promoting, developing and marketing programs in support of manufacturing industries, in job... Council meetings and events are responsible for their travel, living and other personal expenses. Meetings...

  14. Implementation of the basic safety standards directive in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bines, W.

    2003-01-01

    Implementation of the European Council BSS Directive 96/29/Euratom in the UK is not achieved through any one piece of legislation (though the majority of the provisions are implemented by the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1999) but by a mosaic of provisions, supported by codes of practice, non-statutory guidance and administrative arrangements. The paper describes some of the features of UK occupational radiation protection and the reason for the apparent differences between the UK and other EU Member States in their approach to agreeing the precise provisions of European legislation. (author)

  15. The Aspiration and Access to Higher Education of Teenage Refugees in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Jacqueline; Willott, John

    2007-01-01

    Refugee young people are an educationally diverse group. However, unlike groups such as Gypsy/Roma and Travellers, in the UK they do not attract targeted educational funding. In addition, neither the UK integration or refugee educational strategies nor the Higher Education Funding Council for England's strategic plan refer to higher education as a…

  16. PLAB and UK graduates' performance on MRCP(UK) and MRCGP examinations: data linkage study

    OpenAIRE

    McManus, I. C.; Wakeford, R.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess whether international medical graduates passing the two examinations set by the Professional and Linguistic Assessments Board (PLAB1 and PLAB2) of the General Medical Council (GMC) are equivalent to UK graduates at the end of the first foundation year of medical training (F1), as the GMC requires, and if not, to assess what changes in the PLAB pass marks might produce equivalence. DESIGN: Data linkage of GMC PLAB performance data with data from the Royal Colleges of Phys...

  17. UK MOD research on H{sub 2} storage and generation methods for soldier-portable fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browning, D.J. [Defence Evaluation Research Agency, Hampshire (United Kingdom)

    2000-05-01

    The research which the Defence Evaluation and Research Agency (DERA) has conducted on hydrogen storage and production methods was presented and their applicability to soldier portable applications was discussed. Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are considered to be the future power source for solider-portable equipment such as army radios. Advances in fuel cell technology has resulted in improvements in specific power and power density as well as reductions in Pt loading and cost. However, a viable in-service power source is still required. This fuel source is likely to be hydrogen because it has a high energy per unit weight and has a simple reaction with oxygen to produce water as the only by-product. In the future, methanol may be used as the fuel source but currently methanol fuel cells demonstrate poorer performance than those running on hydrogen. A vital part of a fuel cell system, therefore, is hydrogen storage, of which there are two basic types; physical and chemical storage. In addition to weight, other important factors to be considered in a storage system are cost, reliability and safety. This paper described each physical storage method including hydrogen stored as a compressed gas, as a cryogenic liquid, reversibly absorbed in intermetallic alloys and reversibly adsorbed onto carbon materials such as nonofibres. Liquid hydrogen storage is only feasible for larger scale applications such as electric vehicles and is not practical for portable applications. A man-portable fuel cell is likely to be either pressure cylinders or reversible metal hydrides. 6 refs., 1 tab., 10 figs.

  18. Neuroscience and Values: A Case Study Illustrating Developments in Policy, Training and Research in the UK and Internationally**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulford, K. W. M

    2011-01-01

    In the current climate of dramatic advances in the neurosciences, it has been widely assumed that the diagnosis of mental disorder is a matter exclusively for value-free science. Starting from a detailed case history, this paper describes how, to the contrary, values come into the diagnosis of mental disorders, directly through the criteria at the heart of psychiatry’s most scientifically grounded classification, the American Psychiatric Association’s DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual). Various possible interpretations of the prominence of values in psychiatric diagnosis are outlined. Drawing on work in the Oxford analytic tradition of philosophy, it is shown that, properly understood, the prominence of psychiatric diagnostic values reflects the necessary engagement of psychiatry with the diversity of individual human values. This interpretation opens up psychiatric diagnostic assessment to the resources of a new skills-based approach to working with complex and conflicting values (also derived from analytic philosophy) called ‘values-based practice.’ Developments in values-based practice in training, policy and research in mental health are briefly outlined. The paper concludes with an indication of how the integration of values-based with evidence-based approaches provides the basis for psychiatric practice in the twenty-first century that is both science-based and person-centred. PMID:21694963

  19. A RWMAC commentary on the Science Policy Research Unit Report: UK Nuclear Decommissioning Policy: time for decision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-04-01

    The Radioactive Waste Management Advisory Committee (RWMAC) is an independent body which advises the Secretaries of State for the Environment, Scotland and Wales, on civil radioactive waste management issues. Chapter 4 of the RWMAC's Twelfth Annual Report discussed nuclear power plant decommissioning strategy. One of the RWMAC's conclusions was that the concept of financial provisioning for power station decommissioning liabilities, which might be passed on to society several generations into the future, deserved further study. A specification for such a study was duly written (Annex 2) and, following consideration of tendered responses, the Science Policy Research Unit (SPRU) at Sussex University, was contracted to carry out the work. The SPRU report stands as a SPRU analysis of the subject. This separate short RWMAC report, which is being released at the same time as the SPRU report, presents the RWMAC's own commentary on the SPRU study. The RWMAC has identified five main issues which should be addressed when deciding on a nuclear plant decommissioning strategy. These are: the technical approach to decommissioning, the basis of financial provisions, treatment of risk, segregation of management of funds, and the need for a wider environmental view. (author)

  20. A RWMAC commentary on the Science Policy Research Unit report: UK nuclear decommissioning policy: time for decision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    Chapter 4 of the RWMAC's Twelfth Annual Report discussed nuclear power plant decommissioning strategy. One of the RWMAC's conclusions was that the concept of financial provisioning for power station decommissioning liabilities, which might be passed on to society several generations into the future, deserved further study. A specification for such a study was duly written (Annex 2) and, following consideration of tendered responses, the Science Policy Research Unit (SPRU) at Sussex University, was contracted to carry out the work. The SPRU report stands as a SPRU analysis of the subject. This separate short RWMAC report, which is being released at the same time as the SPRU report, presents the RWMAC's own commentary on the SPRU study. The RWMAC has identified five main issues which should be addressed when deciding on a nuclear plant decommissioning strategy. These are: the technical approach to decommissioning, the basis of financial provisions, treatment of risk, segregation of management of funds, and the need for a wider environmental view. These issues are addressed in this RWMAC report. (author)

  1. Science Granting Councils Initiative in Sub-Saharan Africa ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This initiative seeks to strengthen the capacities of science granting councils in East Africa and other selected sub-Saharan African countries. The goal is to contribute to economic and social development in the region through research and evidence-based policies. About the science granting councils initiative The Science ...

  2. 78 FR 54868 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ..., spawning areas and/or dedicated habitat research areas. Prior to a lunch break, the Council will receive an... plaice rebuilding plans, and small-mesh accountability measures (AMs) for the Georges Bank yellowtail... will be addressed. After a lunch break, the Scallop Committee will update the Council on the...

  3. UN human rights council

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuksanović Mlrjana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the structure, mechanisms, practices and perspectives of the Human Rights Council, the UN body that, at universal level is the most important body in this area. Introductory section provides for a brief overview of the origins of human rights and the work of the Commission on Human Rights, in whose jurisdiction were questions of human rights before the establishment of the Council. After the introductory section the author gives an analysis of the structure, objectives, mandate and main procedures for the protection of human rights within the united Nations. In the final section the authorpoints out the advantages of this authority and criticism addressed to it, with emphasis on the possibility and the need for its reform.

  4. What is the impact of research champions on integrating research in mental health clinical practice? A quasiexperimental study in South London, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oduola, Sherifat; Wykes, Til; Robotham, Dan; Craig, Tom K J

    2017-09-11

    Key challenges for mental health healthcare professionals to implement research alongside clinical activity have been highlighted, such as insufficient time to apply research skills and lack of support and resources. We examined the impact of employing dedicated staff to promote research in community mental health clinical settings. Quasiexperiment before and after study. South London and Maudsley National Health Service Foundation Trust. 4455 patients receiving care from 15 community mental health teams between 1 December 2013 and 31 December 2014. The proportion of patients approached for research participation in clinical services where research champions were present (intervention group), and where research champions were not present (comparison group). Patients in the intervention group were nearly six times more likely to be approached for research participation (Adj. OR=5.98; 95% CI 4.96 to 7.22). Investing in staff that promote and drive research in clinical services increases opportunities for patients to hear about and engage in clinical research studies. However, investment needs to move beyond employing short-term staff. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Perfil dos pesquisadores com bolsa de produtividade em pesquisa do CNPq da área de saúde coletiva A profile of researchers in public health with productivity grants from the Brazilian National Research Council (CNPq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Barradas Barata

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available O artigo analisa, com base nas informações do currículo Lattes, o perfil dos pesquisadores com bolsa de produtividade em pesquisa do CNPq na área de Saúde Coletiva. A análise levou em conta a formação graduada e pós-graduada, área de atuação, produção e divulgação científica. As comparações são feitas entre as classes de pesquisadores e com dados do diretório de grupos de pesquisa. A maioria dos pesquisadores (70% são formados em Ciências da Saúde, principalmente em Medicina, ou em Ciências Humanas (18%, principalmente Sociologia. Sessenta por cento fizeram mestrado e doutorado em Saúde Coletiva, mas há entre 20 e 30% de pesquisadores, dependendo da classe, sem formação específica na área. A maioria atua em Epidemiologia. A produção científica, expressa em produtos bibliográficos, varia de 10,56 produtos/ano de obtenção do doutorado para os pesquisadores 2C a 6,60 produtos/ano para os pesquisadores 1A. Para artigos completos publicados em periódicos os valores são 3,56 e 2,87, respectivamente. A produção é divulgada principalmente em periódicos A internacional e, A e B nacional. Os periódicos que concentram a publicação são Cadernos de Saúde Pública e Revista de Saúde Pública.Based on information provided by the Lattes curriculum, this study analyzes the profile of researchers in public health with productivity grants from the Brazilian National Research Council (CNPq. The analysis considered the researcher’s undergraduate and graduate degrees, field of expertise, scientific output, and publications. The article discusses comparisons between different categories of researchers and data provided by the CNPq Research Group Directory. Most of the researchers (70% received their undergraduate degrees either in health sciences, mainly medicine, or the humanities (18%, mainly sociology. 60% have Master’s or PhDs in collective health, but some 20 to 30% of researchers, depending on the category

  6. Highlights: Spring Council Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council members present at the May 24, 1981, meeting were Keiiti Aki, Steven Burges (for Jim Wallis), Peter S. Eagleson, E. R. Engdahl, Charles E. Helsley, James R. Heirtzler, Carl Kisslinger, Leslie H. Meredith, Chris N. K. Mooers, Norman F. Ness, Marcia M. Neugebauer, James J. O'Brien, Richard Rapp, Carl Sagan, James C. Savage, Joseph V. Smith, Fred Spilhaus, Donald L. Turcotte, James A. Van Allen, J. Tuzo Wilson, and Jay Winston (for Elmar R. Reiter until his arrival at 6:50 P.M.). David Strangway, representing the Canadian Geophysical Union, and Peter Steinhauser, representing the European Geophysical Society, were special observers at the meeting. Council meetings are open, and a number of section secretaries, committee chairmen, journal editors, and other members attended. The following major actions were adopted by the Council:The experiment of publishing oceanography and lower-atmosphere papers in JGR Green issues alternate to those containing upper-atmosphere papers will be continued through 1982. From preliminary indications the experiment seems to be working, but a full year of data, including a renewal cycle, is needed to assess the success of the experiment. Final decision will be made prior to the 1983 dues notices.

  7. DECLARATION TO COUNCIL

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    One year ago, the Staff Association, together with the CERN-ESO Pensioners' Association, organized a staff meeting in front of this building to express our concern about certain actions of this Committee. Today we deem it necessary to come before you and convey in person, dear delegates, the concerns and worries of the staff. Indeed, the last 18 months we have observed a tendency of Council to take matters, in particular in the field of pensions, into its own hands, bypassing established governance structures, which Council has itself put into place. As a result, the Director General was prevented from playing his essential role of intermediary between staff and Council, an essential element of the established social dialogue. The creation of CERN in 1954 was very much based on the willingness of many countries of the old Continent to share resources to create a joint fundamental physics laboratory. The emphasis was on sharing resources for the common good to allow European scientists to engage in...

  8. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 28 of October to the 11th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months, and in particular the Five-yearly-Review 2015, subject of the questionnaire that you probably recently filled out. All this will keep the next Staff Council very busy indeed. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to v...

  9. Agenda Responsiveness in the European Council

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandrova, Petya; Rasmussen, Anne; Toshkov, Dimiter

    2016-01-01

    The existence of political responsiveness in multi-level systems like the EU remains an open question despite significant recent research on the topic. This article studies whether the European Council responds to the shifting policy priorities of European citizens. More specifically, it explores......, a detailed examination of the shifts in prioritisation of single issues over time reveals little evidence for dynamic issue responsiveness. Recently the European Council has paid more attention to the issues that the public considered the most pressing problems but the convergence could possibly be driven...

  10. A survey of the images used on the Arthritis Research UK (ARUK) Osteomalacia Mind-Map in relation to cultural background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, David; Robinson, Sandra; Jagatsinh, Yogen; Adebajo, Ade; Helliwell, Philip; Rahman, Anisur

    2011-06-01

    To explore the appropriateness of the images in the Arthritis Research UK Mind-Map for Osteomalacia with people for whom it was intended (Bengali; Gujarati; Hindi; Punjabi and Urdu). Participants were identified in a convenient sample from contacts within their communities. They were asked to comment on the images for meaning, suitability and offence to people from their culture. A total of 56 people were surveyed. Appropriateness responses were either generic: Images of bone metabolism were confusing [31/56]; muscle weakness "looked like knee pain" [16/56]; a bending and cracking bone "looked like a dog's bone" [22/56] and that the bone pain man "looked like he had toothache" [21/56]; or culture-specific the depiction of food and the Burqa as below. Only 3 images caused any offence, phrased as "may offend someone". The Burqa was described as stereotyping. The images on the current Osteomalacia Mind-Map are largely appropriate and have little capacity to offend. Some may be improved upon in terms of conveying meaning. One set of images can suit all of the cultures. Images can cross cultural barriers. The revised Mind-Map should be more useful in conveying meaning to a wider selection of patients.

  11. Trends in the incidence of chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia in the UK, 2001-2013: a Clinical Practice Research Datalink study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Simon M; Bakken, Inger J; Nazareth, Irwin; Crawley, Esther; White, Peter D

    2017-06-01

    Objective Trends in recorded diagnoses of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS, also known as 'myalgic encephalomyelitis' (ME)) and fibromyalgia (FM) in the UK were last reported more than ten years ago, for the period 1990-2001. Our aim was to analyse trends in incident diagnoses of CFS/ME and FM for the period 2001-2013, and to investigate whether incidence might vary by index of multiple deprivation (IMD) score. Design Electronic health records cohort study. Setting NHS primary care practices in the UK. Participants Participants: Patients registered with general practices linked to the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) primary care database from January 2001 to December 2013. Main outcome measure Incidence of CFS/ME, FM, post-viral fatigue syndrome (PVFS), and asthenia/debility. Results The overall annual incidence of recorded cases of CFS/ME was 14.8 (95% CI 14.5, 15.1) per 100,000 people. Overall annual incidence per 100,000 people for FM was 33.3 (32.8-33.8), for PVFS 12.2 (11.9, 12.5), and for asthenia/debility 7.0 (6.8, 7.2). Annual incidence rates for CFS/ME diagnoses decreased from 17.5 (16.1, 18.9) in 2001 to 12.6 (11.5, 13.8) in 2013 (annual percent change -2.8% (-3.6%, -2.0%)). Annual incidence rates for FM diagnoses decreased from 32.3 (30.4, 34.3) to 27.1 (25.5, 28.6) in 2007, then increased to 38.2 (36.3, 40.1) per 100,000 people in 2013. Overall annual incidence of recorded fatigue symptoms was 2246 (2242, 2250) per 100,000 people. Compared with the least deprived IMD quintile, incidence of CFS/ME in the most deprived quintile was 39% lower (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 0.61 (0.50, 0.75)), whereas rates of FM were 40% higher (IRR 1.40 (0.95, 2.06)). Conclusion These analyses suggest a gradual decline in recorded diagnoses of CFS/ME since 2001, and an increase in diagnoses of fibromyalgia, with opposing socioeconomic patterns of lower rates of CFS/ME diagnoses in the poorest areas compared with higher rates of FM diagnoses.

  12. Prospective drug safety monitoring using the UK primary-care General Practice Research Database: theoretical framework, feasibility analysis and extrapolation to future scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Saga; Wallander, Mari-Ann; de Abajo, Francisco J; García Rodríguez, Luis Alberto

    2010-03-01

    Post-launch drug safety monitoring is essential for the detection of adverse drug signals that may be missed during preclinical trials. Traditional methods of postmarketing surveillance such as spontaneous reporting have intrinsic limitations, many of which can be overcome by the additional application of structured pharmacoepidemiological approaches. However, further improvement in drug safety monitoring requires a shift towards more proactive pharmacoepidemiological methods that can detect adverse drug signals as they occur in the population. To assess the feasibility of using proactive monitoring of an electronic medical record system, in combination with an independent endpoint adjudication committee, to detect adverse events among users of selected drugs. UK General Practice Research Database (GPRD) information was used to detect acute liver disorder associated with the use of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (hepatotoxic) or low-dose aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid [non-hepatotoxic]). Individuals newly prescribed these drugs between 1 October 2005 and 31 March 2006 were identified. Acute liver disorder cases were assessed using GPRD computer records in combination with case validation by an independent endpoint adjudication committee. Signal generation thresholds were based on the background rate of acute liver disorder in the general population. Over a 6-month period, 8148 patients newly prescribed amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and 5577 patients newly prescribed low-dose aspirin were identified. Within this cohort, searches identified 11 potential liver disorder cases from computerized records: six for amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and five for low-dose aspirin. The independent endpoint adjudication committee refined this to four potential acute liver disorder cases for whom paper-based information was requested for final case assessment. Final case assessments confirmed no cases of acute liver disorder. The time taken for this study was 18 months (6 months for

  13. Mortality rates and causes of death in children with epilepsy prescribed antiepileptic drugs: a retrospective cohort study using the UK General Practice Research Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackers, Ruth; Besag, Frank M C; Hughes, Elaine; Squier, Waney; Murray, Macey L; Wong, Ian C K

    2011-05-01

    Patients with epilepsy, including children, have an increased risk of mortality compared with the general population. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) were the most frequent class of drugs reported in a study looking at fatal suspected adverse drug reactions in children in the UK. The objective of the study was to identify cases and causes of death in a paediatric patient cohort prescribed AEDs with an associated epilepsy diagnosis. This was a retrospective cohort study supplemented with general practitioner-completed questionnaires, post-mortem reports and death certificates. The setting was UK primary care practices contributing to the General Practice Research Database. Participants were children and adolescents aged 0-18 years prescribed AEDs between 1993 and 2005. Causality assessment was undertaken by a consensus panel comprising paediatric specialists in neuropathology, neurology, neuropsychiatry, paediatric epilepsy, pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacy to determine crude mortality rate (CMR) and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs), and the likelihood of an association between AED(s) and the event of death. There were 6190 subjects in the cohort (contributing 26,890 person-years of data), of whom 151 died. Median age at death was 8.0 years. CMR was 56.2 per 10,000 person-years and the SMR was 22.4 (95% CI 18.9, 26.2). The majority of deceased subjects had severe underlying disorders. Death was attributable to epilepsy in 18 subjects; in 9 the cause of death was sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) [3.3 per 10 000 person-years (95% CI 1.5, 6.4)]. AEDs were probably (n = 2) or possibly (n = 3) associated causally with death in five subjects. Two status epilepticus deaths were associated causally with AED withdrawal. Children prescribed AEDs have an increased risk of mortality relative to the general population. Most of the deaths were in children with serious underlying disorders. A small number of SUDEP cases were identified. AEDs are not a major

  14. 7 CFR 1209.4 - Council.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Council. 1209.4 Section 1209.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... CONSUMER INFORMATION ORDER Mushroom Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Definitions § 1209...

  15. The Council of Psychological Advisers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunstein, Cass R

    2016-01-01

    Findings in behavioral science, including psychology, have influenced policies and reforms in many nations. Choice architecture can affect outcomes even if material incentives are not involved. In some contexts, default rules, simplification, and social norms have had even larger effects than significant economic incentives. Psychological research is helping to inform initiatives in savings, finance, highway safety, consumer protection, energy, climate change, obesity, education, poverty, development, crime, corruption, health, and the environment. No nation has yet created a council of psychological advisers, but the role of behavioral research in policy domains is likely to grow in the coming years, especially in light of the mounting interest in promoting ease and simplification ("navigability"); in increasing effectiveness, economic growth, and competitiveness; and in providing low-cost, choice-preserving approaches.

  16. The future of UK/Irish surgery: A European solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varzgalis, M; Kerin, M J; Sweeney, K J

    2015-11-01

    The United Kingdom (UK) and Republic of Ireland (ROI) hospital systems are dependent on junior doctors for their functionality however it is increasingly difficult to recruit UK/ROI trained doctors to fill these posts. Directive 2005/36/EC, which came into force in 2007, is the principal European legislation on the recognition of equivalence of professional qualifications across Europe. European trained doctors are therefore attractive candidates for junior doctor posts. However, although their training is recognised as equivalent by the Irish Medical Council (IMC) and General Medical Council (GMC) they are not being appointed to equivalent posts by the Health Service Executive (HSE) or National Health Service (NHS). With the influence of European Union (EU) centralisation, modification of UK/ROI consultant grade is imminent, possibly to pyramidal structure of the Continental European model with clearer lines of corporate responsibility. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Critical Care Health Informatics Collaborative (CCHIC): Data, tools and methods for reproducible research: A multi-centre UK intensive care database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Steve; Shi, Sinan; Brealey, David; MacCallum, Niall S; Denaxas, Spiros; Perez-Suarez, David; Ercole, Ari; Watkinson, Peter; Jones, Andrew; Ashworth, Simon; Beale, Richard; Young, Duncan; Brett, Stephen; Singer, Mervyn

    2018-04-01

    To build and curate a linkable multi-centre database of high resolution longitudinal electronic health records (EHR) from adult Intensive Care Units (ICU). To develop a set of open-source tools to make these data 'research ready' while protecting patient's privacy with a particular focus on anonymisation. We developed a scalable EHR processing pipeline for extracting, linking, normalising and curating and anonymising EHR data. Patient and public involvement was sought from the outset, and approval to hold these data was granted by the NHS Health Research Authority's Confidentiality Advisory Group (CAG). The data are held in a certified Data Safe Haven. We followed sustainable software development principles throughout, and defined and populated a common data model that links to other clinical areas. Longitudinal EHR data were loaded into the CCHIC database from eleven adult ICUs at 5 UK teaching hospitals. From January 2014 to January 2017, this amounted to 21,930 and admissions (18,074 unique patients). Typical admissions have 70 data-items pertaining to admission and discharge, and a median of 1030 (IQR 481-2335) time-varying measures. Training datasets were made available through virtual machine images emulating the data processing environment. An open source R package, cleanEHR, was developed and released that transforms the data into a square table readily analysable by most statistical packages. A simple language agnostic configuration file will allow the user to select and clean variables, and impute missing data. An audit trail makes clear the provenance of the data at all times. Making health care data available for research is problematic. CCHIC is a unique multi-centre longitudinal and linkable resource that prioritises patient privacy through the highest standards of data security, but also provides tools to clean, organise, and anonymise the data. We believe the development of such tools are essential if we are to meet the twin requirements of

  18. Translational research needs us to go back to basics and collaborate: interview with Lars Sundstrom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundstrom, Lars

    2016-09-01

    Lars Sundstrom is Director of Enterprise and Translation at the West of England Academic Health Sciences Network [1] (UK), a Professor of Practice in Translational Medicine and Co-Director of the Elizabeth Blackwell Institute for Health Research at Bristol University [2] (UK), and an honorary Professor of Medicine at Cardiff University (UK). He has extensive experience in translational medicine and clinical neurosciences, holding positions at several eminent universities. He has also held executive and board-level positions at several SMEs, developing new therapeutics for neurological conditions and tools for drug discovery. He has also been an advisor to several UK and local government task forces and to the European Commission and the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industry Associations. He was a founding member of the European Brain Council in Brussels, and set up the Severnside Alliance for Translational Research, developing a regional network partnership to link clinical and basic scientists. He was also involved in the creation of Health Research Wales.

  19. Public health council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The internal matters of the council are reported followed by reports from the individual committees. These include committees of radiation hygiene, food irradiation, the disposal of radioactive waste and the classification of isotope laboratories, guide-lines for radiation protection in hospitals and clinics, isotope laboratories, legal liability for radiation accidents, nuclear heart stimulators, computer tomography, supplementary advice about nuclear energy, combustion furnace for radioactive waste, and experiments with radioactive materials on testees. Each report describes the setting up of the committee, the members, its function with a short description of the work completed in 1977. (Auth.)

  20. Session 1984-85. Radioactive waste. Minutes of evidence, Wednesday 26 June 1985. Association of Metropolitan Authorities; Association of County Councils; Bedford County Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The Environment Select Committee of the House of Commons received a memorandum from the Association of Metropolitan Authorities on radioactive waste management, including: government policy; local authorities; administrative procedures; public opinion and public relations; planning; transport; NIREX; legal aspects; identification of specific disposal sites. Representatives of the Association were examined on the subject of the memorandum and the Minutes of Evidence are recorded. The Committee also received a memorandum from the Association of County Councils on planning, transportation and waste disposal considerations, including kinds and quantities of radioactive waste; safety and security; financial, administrative and political aspects; counties as planning authorities and waste disposal authorities. Representatives of the Association were examined on the subject of the memorandum. The Committee also received a memorandum from Bedford County Council on intermediate and low level radioactive waste management in the UK. Representatives of the County Council were examined on the subject of the memorandum. The Minutes of Evidence are recorded. (U.K.)

  1. PLAB and UK graduates’ performance on MRCP(UK) and MRCGP examinations: data linkage study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeford, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess whether international medical graduates passing the two examinations set by the Professional and Linguistic Assessments Board (PLAB1 and PLAB2) of the General Medical Council (GMC) are equivalent to UK graduates at the end of the first foundation year of medical training (F1), as the GMC requires, and if not, to assess what changes in the PLAB pass marks might produce equivalence. Design Data linkage of GMC PLAB performance data with data from the Royal Colleges of Physicians and the Royal College of General Practitioners on performance of PLAB graduates and UK graduates at the MRCP(UK) and MRCGP examinations. Setting Doctors in training for internal medicine or general practice in the United Kingdom. Participants 7829, 5135, and 4387 PLAB graduates on their first attempt at MRCP(UK) Part 1, Part 2, and PACES assessments from 2001 to 2012 compared with 18 532, 14 094, and 14 376 UK graduates taking the same assessments; 3160 PLAB1 graduates making their first attempt at the MRCGP AKT during 2007-12 compared with 14 235 UK graduates; and 1411 PLAB2 graduates making their first attempt at the MRCGP CSA during 2010-12 compared with 6935 UK graduates. Main outcome measures Performance at MRCP(UK) Part 1, Part 2, and PACES assessments, and MRCGP AKT and CSA assessments in relation to performance on PLAB1 and PLAB2 assessments, as well as to International English Language Testing System (IELTS) scores. MRCP(UK), MRCGP, and PLAB results were analysed as marks relative to the pass mark at the first attempt. Results PLAB1 marks were a valid predictor of MRCP(UK) Part 1, MRCP(UK) Part 2, and MRCGP AKT (r=0.521, 0.390, and 0.490; all PIELTS scores correlated significantly with later performance, multiple regression showing that the effect of PLAB1 (β=0.496) was much stronger than the effect of IELTS (β=0.086). Changes to PLAB pass marks that would result in international medical graduate and UK medical graduate equivalence were assessed in two

  2. PLAB and UK graduates' performance on MRCP(UK) and MRCGP examinations: data linkage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, I C; Wakeford, Richard

    2014-04-17

    To assess whether international medical graduates passing the two examinations set by the Professional and Linguistic Assessments Board (PLAB1 and PLAB2) of the General Medical Council (GMC) are equivalent to UK graduates at the end of the first foundation year of medical training (F1), as the GMC requires, and if not, to assess what changes in the PLAB pass marks might produce equivalence. Data linkage of GMC PLAB performance data with data from the Royal Colleges of Physicians and the Royal College of General Practitioners on performance of PLAB graduates and UK graduates at the MRCP(UK) and MRCGP examinations. Doctors in training for internal medicine or general practice in the United Kingdom. 7829, 5135, and 4387 PLAB graduates on their first attempt at MRCP(UK) Part 1, Part 2, and PACES assessments from 2001 to 2012 compared with 18,532, 14,094, and 14,376 UK graduates taking the same assessments; 3160 PLAB1 graduates making their first attempt at the MRCGP AKT during 2007-12 compared with 14,235 UK graduates; and 1411 PLAB2 graduates making their first attempt at the MRCGP CSA during 2010-12 compared with 6935 UK graduates. Performance at MRCP(UK) Part 1, Part 2, and PACES assessments, and MRCGP AKT and CSA assessments in relation to performance on PLAB1 and PLAB2 assessments, as well as to International English Language Testing System (IELTS) scores. MRCP(UK), MRCGP, and PLAB results were analysed as marks relative to the pass mark at the first attempt. PLAB1 marks were a valid predictor of MRCP(UK) Part 1, MRCP(UK) Part 2, and MRCGP AKT (r=0.521, 0.390, and 0.490; all PIELTS scores correlated significantly with later performance, multiple regression showing that the effect of PLAB1 (β=0.496) was much stronger than the effect of IELTS (β=0.086). Changes to PLAB pass marks that would result in international medical graduate and UK medical graduate equivalence were assessed in two ways. Method 1 adjusted PLAB pass marks to equate median performance of PLAB

  3. Radiographers as doctors: A profile of UK doctoral achievement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snaith, B.; Harris, M.A.; Harris, R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Radiography aspires to be a research active profession, but there is limited information regarding the number of individuals with, or studying for, a doctoral award. This study aims to profile UK doctoral radiographers; including their chosen award, approach and employment status. Method: This was a prospective cohort study utilising an electronic survey. No formal database of doctoral radiographers existed therefore a snowball sampling method was adopted. The study sample was radiographers (diagnostic and therapeutic) based in the UK who were registered with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and who held, or were studying for, a doctoral award. Results: A total of 90 unique responses were received within the timescale. The respondents comprised 58 females (64.4%) and the majority were diagnostic radiographers (n = 71/90; 78.9%). The traditional PhD was the most common award, although increasing numbers were pursuing Education or Professional Doctorates. An overall increase in doctoral studies is observed over time, but was greatest amongst those working in academic institutions, with 63.3% of respondents (n = 57/90) working solely within a university, and a further 10% employed in a clinical–academic role (n = 9/90). Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that radiography is emerging as a research active profession, with increasing numbers of radiographers engaged in study at a doctoral level. This should provide a platform for the future development of academic and clinical research. - Highlights: • 90 radiographers were identified as holding, or studying for, a doctoral award. • The PhD is the most common award. • EdD and professional doctorates are increasing in popularity. • Academic staff were more likely to pursue such research training.

  4. Are first rib fractures a marker for other life-threatening injuries in patients with major trauma? A cohort study of patients on the UK Trauma Audit and Research Network database

    OpenAIRE

    Sammy, Ian Ayenga; Chatha, Hridesh; Lecky, Fiona; Bouamra, Omar; Fragoso-I?iguez, Marisol; Sattout, Abdo; Hickey, Michael; Edwards, John E

    2017-01-01

    Background: First rib fractures are considered indicators of increased morbidity and mortality in major trauma. However, this has not been definitively proven. With an increased use of CT and the potential increase in detection of first rib fractures, re-evaluation of these injuries as a marker for life-threatening injuries is warranted.\\ud \\ud Methods: Patients sustaining rib fractures between January 2012 and December 2013 were investigated using data from the UK Trauma Audit and Research N...

  5. Development and initial cohort validation of the Arthritis Research UK Musculoskeletal Health Questionnaire (MSK-HQ) for use across musculoskeletal care pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jonathan C; Kang, Sujin; Benedetto, Elena; Myers, Helen; Blackburn, Steven; Smith, Stephanie; Dunn, Kate M; Hay, Elaine; Rees, Jonathan; Beard, David; Glyn-Jones, Sion; Barker, Karen; Ellis, Benjamin; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Price, Andrew

    2016-08-05

    Current musculoskeletal outcome tools are fragmented across different healthcare settings and conditions. Our objectives were to develop and validate a single musculoskeletal outcome measure for use throughout the pathway and patients with different musculoskeletal conditions: the Arthritis Research UK Musculoskeletal Health Questionnaire (MSK-HQ). A consensus workshop with stakeholders from across the musculoskeletal community, workshops and individual interviews with a broad mix of musculoskeletal patients identified and prioritised outcomes for MSK-HQ inclusion. Initial psychometric validation was conducted in four cohorts from community physiotherapy, and secondary care orthopaedic hip, knee and shoulder clinics. Stakeholders (n=29) included primary care, physiotherapy, orthopaedic and rheumatology patients (n=8); general practitioners, physiotherapists, orthopaedists, rheumatologists and pain specialists (n=7), patient and professional national body representatives (n=10), and researchers (n=4). The four validation cohorts included 570 participants (n=210 physiotherapy, n=150 hip, n=150 knee, n=60 shoulder patients). Outcomes included the MSK-HQ's acceptability, feasibility, comprehension, readability and responder burden. The validation cohort outcomes were the MSK-HQ's completion rate, test-retest reliability and convergent validity with reference standards (EQ-5D-5L, Oxford Hip, Knee, Shoulder Scores, and the Keele MSK-PROM). Musculoskeletal domains prioritised were pain severity, physical function, work interference, social interference, sleep, fatigue, emotional health, physical activity, independence, understanding, confidence to self-manage and overall impact. Patients reported MSK-HQ items to be 'highly relevant' and 'easy to understand'. Completion rates were high (94.2%), with scores normally distributed, and no floor/ceiling effects. Test-retest reliability was excellent, and convergent validity was strong (correlations 0.81-0.88). A new

  6. 40 CFR 1508.6 - Council.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Council. 1508.6 Section 1508.6 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY TERMINOLOGY AND INDEX § 1508.6 Council. Council means the Council on Environmental Quality established by title II of the Act. ...

  7. Risk of myocardial infarction in men and women with type 2 diabetes in the UK: a cohort study using the General Practice Research Database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulnier, H.E.; Seaman, H.E.; Raleigh, V.S.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Colhoun, H.M.; Lawrenson, R.A.; Vries, de C.S.

    2008-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Our primary aim was to establish reliable and generalisable estimates of the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) for men and women with type 2 diabetes in the UK compared with people without diabetes. Our secondary aim was to investigate how the MI risk associated with diabetes

  8. Bridging Gaps and Jumping through Hoops: First-Year History Students' Expectations and Perceptions of Assessment and Feedback in a Research-Intensive UK University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Kate

    2014-01-01

    The wider context of arts and humanities education in the UK has demanded that university teachers and administrators focus on "end points." Increased emphasis on the generic and transferable skills attained through arts and humanities programmes, along with intense concern to raise students' reported levels of satisfaction, do not…

  9. ITER council proceedings: 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    No ITER Council Meetings were held during 2000. However, two ITER EDA Meetings were held, one in Tokyo, January 19-20, and one in Moscow, June 29-30. The parties participating in these meetings were those that partake in the extended ITER EDA, namely the EU, the Russian Federation, and Japan. This document contains, a/o, the records of these meetings, the list of attendees, the agenda, the ITER EDA Status Reports issued during these meetings, the TAC (Technical Advisory Committee) reports and recommendations, the MAC Reports and Advice (also for the July 1999 Meeting), the ITER-FEAT Outline Design Report, the TAC Reports and Recommendations both meetings), Site requirements and Site Design Assumptions, the Tentative Sequence of technical Activities 2000-2001, Report of the ITER SWG-P2 on Joint Implementation of ITER, EU/ITER Canada Proposal for New ITER Identification

  10. Trump revives National Space Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Hamish

    2017-08-01

    US president Donald Trump has signed an executive order to re-establish the US National Space Council. The 12-member council will include key government officials with an interest in space exploration, including NASA’s acting administrator Robert Lightfoot and the secretaries of state, commerce and defence.

  11. Myeloid malignancies in the real-world: Occurrence, progression and survival in the UK's population-based Haematological Malignancy Research Network 2004-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Eve; Smith, Alex; Appleton, Simon; Crouch, Simon; Kelly, Richard; Kinsey, Sally; Cargo, Catherine; Patmore, Russell

    2016-06-01

    Population-based information on cancer incidence, prevalence and outcome are required to inform clinical practice and research; but contemporary data are lacking for many myeloid malignancy subtypes. Set within a socio-demographically representative UK population of ∼4 million, myeloid malignancy data (N=5231 diagnoses) are from an established patient cohort. Information on incidence, survival (relative & overall), transformation/progression, and prevalence is presented for >20 subtypes. The median diagnostic age was 72.4years (InterQuartile Range 61.6-80.2), but there was considerable subtype heterogeneity, particularly among the acute myeloid leukaemias (AML) where medians ranged from 20.3 (IQR 13.9-43.8) for AML 11q23 through to 73.7 (IQR 57.3-79.1) for AML with no recurrent genetic changes. Five-year Relative Survival (RS) estimates varied hugely; from 85% for indolent/treatable conditions like chronic myeloid leukaemia (89.8%, 95% CI 84.0-93.6). With a couple of notable exceptions, males experienced higher rates and worse survival than females: the age-standardized incidence rates of several conditions was 2-4 higher in males than females, and the 5-year RS for all subtypes combined was 48.8% (95% CI 46.5-51.2) and 60.4% (95% CI 57.7-62.9) for males and females respectively. During follow-up (potential minimum 2 years and maximum 11years) myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) progression to AML ranged from 25% for refractory anaemia with excess blasts through to 5% for refractory anaemia with ring sideroblasts: the median interval between MDS and AML diagnosis was 9.0 months (IQR 4.8-17.4months). The marked incidence and outcome variations seen by subtype, sex and age, confirm the requirement for "real-world" longitudinal data to inform aetiological hypotheses, healthcare planning, and future monitoring of therapeutic change. Several challenges for routine cancer registration were identified, including the need to link more effectively to diagnostic and clinical

  12. A study of grandparents and grandchildren as visitors to museums and art galleries in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ela Beaumont

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses one aspect of a major research project funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council of family group visitors to museums and galleries in the UK. Grandparents visiting with their grandchildren are a little understood phenomenon in terms of visitor research and this paper aims to address that balance. The research project focuses on three art galleries and museums in the UK where 44 sets of grandparents were interviewed during the initial stages of the research. Findings have shown a number of interesting facets, some of which are presented in this paper. Grandparents are motivated to visit the museum with their grandchildren in the main because they are seeking an entertaining visit, a day out that is also educational and linked to school projects. They are likely to be the children’s primary carers as parents are out to work and the destination might not link with their own interests but those of the parents. They have social roles to play in their grandchildren’s lives. They often seek activity or workshops in the museum/art gallery that will be of benefit for their grandchildren and encourage them to explore the activities provided. These and other aspects are discussed within the paper. We conclude by suggesting how the findings can be used to inform more sophisticated approaches to ‘family friendly’ initiatives in museums and art galleries.

  13. An eye for the green top : an independent voice for green roofs in the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frith, M.; Gedge, D. [Livingroofs.org, England (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    Livingroofs.org is a non-profit organization that was established to provide a resource for promoting green roofs in the United Kingdom (UK). Current policies in the UK related to the planning and development of green roofs are a constraint to their uptake. The emerging emphasis on sustainable development is bringing about a revision of planning policies that may make green roofs more desirable. However, green roof design standards are still being developed by a largely unmonitored industry furthering a product with which most people are unfamiliar. This paper reviewed a number of issues that need to be addressed to assist in the wider adoption of green roofs, including increased awareness; an identification of the real benefits of green roofs; guidance and research; planning policies; fiscal incentives; industry standards and codes of practice. Details of the current policy frameworks for construction, urban design and climate change were also outlined. Two specific projects were reviewed to provide an insight into the way in which Livingroofs.org intends to promote green roof technology: a roof owned by the Birmingham city council and a collaboration with a Swiss partner to design a roof for the Komodo Dragon House at the London Zoo. It was concluded that there is now a real likelihood that the widespread adoption of green roofs will occur in the UK within the next 5 years, both in terms of new developments and the vast potential for retro-fitting on existing buildings. 47 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. EPA Response to the National Research Council (NRC) Report - A Review of the Technical Basis of the Chemical and Pathogen Regulations for Biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NRC published two reports over a twenty year span. They concluded that there is no documented scientific evidence that sewage sludge regulations have failed to protect public health, but identified areas of research.

  15. The UK biomass industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billins, P.

    1998-01-01

    A brief review is given of the development of the biomass industry in the UK. Topics covered include poultry litter generation of electricity, gasification plants fuelled by short-rotation coppice, on-farm anaerobic digestion and specialized combustion systems, e.g. straw, wood and other agricultural wastes. (UK)

  16. Online Shopping In The UK

    OpenAIRE

    K. K. Ramachandran; K. K. Karthick; M. Saravana Kumar

    2011-01-01

    This paper will contribute to current academic literature in the area of online retailing and consumer behaviour. Our research outlines a survey conducted with respondents from the UK to ascertain their attitudes to grocery shopping both off and online. The findings indicate that, whilst the vast majority of our sample has experience of online shopping, few actively engage in online grocery shopping. Some of the reasons for this are highlighted and the key issues relate to consumer trust and ...

  17. Indian Diaspora In The UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Kulik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The author traces the history of formation of the Indian diaspora in the UK, evaluates the key trends that characterize the current state of diaspora. The article highlights the level of involvement and participation of diaspora in the evolution of the bilateral relations, as well as the influence of diaspora over home and foreign policy in the UK and India. The diaspora today is not just a unique vibrant connection between the two countries, it has also become a factor of influence over domestic, social and economic affairs in both the UK and India. There is a growing number of Indians among British statesmen and politicians. Indians occupy significant posts in various sectors in Britain, including business and finance. This contributes to strengthening of economic ties between the two countries, particularly important considering Britain’s forthcoming exit from the EU. As to internal political matters, though potential issues exist (those include, for instance, the possible transfer from India into Britain of problematic inter-caste relations, India’s criticism over unbalanced approach to teaching colonial history in British schools, the Indian diaspora due to its’ inherent tolerance and moderation generally plays a stabilizing role in the UK, especially on the background of radicalization of other ethnic communities. For the new India the diaspora today is not just an important source of financing, competences and know-how, it is also a significant lobbying and soft-power instrument. This article is part of a broader research, related to the contemporary relations between the United Kingdom and India. Indian diaspora in the UK is an integral part of the unique centuries-long history that connects the two countries. It is poised to remain a strong factor contributing to interdependence and cooperation between Britain and India in the XXI century.

  18. Research in cardiovascular care : A position statement of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professionals of the European Society of Cardiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, T.; Deaton, C.; Fitzsimmons, D.; Fridlund, B.; Hardig, B.M.; Mahrer-Imhof, R.; Moons, P.; Noureddine, S.; O'Donnell, S.; Pedersen, S.S.; Stewart, S.; Stromberg, A.; Thompson, D.R.; Tokem, Y.; Kjellstrom, B.

    2014-01-01

    To deliver optimal patient care, evidence-based care is advocated and research is needed to support health care staff of all disciplines in deciding which options to use in their daily practice. Due to the increasing complexity of cardiac care across the life span of patients combined with the

  19. News from the CERN Council

    CERN Multimedia

    The CERN Council today thanked the Organization’s outgoing management, and welcomed in the new. Outgoing Director General Robert Aymar, looked back on his five years at the helm, while new Director General, Rolf Heuer, presented his vision for the future. In other Council business, Romania was welcomed as a Candidate for Accession as Member State of CERN; and the groundwork was laid for a study of geographical and scientific extension of the role of CERN. Council also established the practical procedures for following projects relevant to the European Strategy for Particle Physics. Consult the complete Press Release.

  20. Strategic Environmental Research & Development Program (SERDP): Phase I and Phase II Strategic Investment Plans FY 1992 and Interim Status Report of the Council.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Federal Agencies and improve the data available to the research community. -4- MILESTONES: • Field verification and ground truth establishment...knowledge of subsurface properties, linking sampling schemes to new models incorporating this information. New ( Bayesian -like) approaches would be...but with L-glutamine and supplemented with 10% each of fetal calf and calf serum and antibiotics. As an initial step in the work, it is proposed

  1. Policy Writing as Dialogue: Drafting an Aboriginal Chapter for Canada's Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Reading

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Writing policy that applies to First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples in Canada has become more interactive as communities and their representative organizations press for practical recognition of an Aboriginal right of self-determination. When the policy in development is aimed at supporting “respect for human dignity” as it is in the case of ethics of research involving humans, the necessity of engaging the affected population becomes central to the undertaking.

  2. 75 FR 12507 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-16

    ... in the selection of Council members include candidates' proven experience in developing and marketing... contact information such as mailing address, fax, e-mail, fixed and mobile phone numbers and support staff...

  3. UK ignores treaty obligations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, P.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed critique is offered of United Kingdom (UK) political policy with respect to the Non-Proliferation Treaty, an interim agreement valid while nuclear disarmament was supposed to occur, by a representative of Greenpeace, the anti-nuclear campaigning group. The author argues that the civil and military nuclear programmes are still firmly linked, and emphasises his opinions by quoting examples of how UK politicians have broken treaty obligations in order to pursue their own political, and in some cases financial, goals. It is argued that the treaty has failed to force nuclear countries to disarm because of its promoted civil nuclear power programmes. (U.K.)

  4. GeoBus: bringing Earth science learning to secondary schools in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ruth; Roper, Kathryn; Pike, Charlotte

    2015-04-01

    GeoBus (www.geobus.org.uk) is an educational outreach project that was developed in 2012 by the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of St Andrews, and it is sponsored jointly by industry and the UK Research Councils (NERC and EPSRC). The aims of GeoBus are to support the teaching of Earth Science in secondary (middle and high) schools by providing teaching support to schools that have no or little expertise of teaching Earth science, to share the outcomes of new science research and the experiences of young researchers with school pupils, and to provide a bridge between industry, higher education institutions, research councils and schools. Since its launch, GeoBus has visited over 160 different schools across the length and breadth of Scotland. Almost 35,000 pupils will have been involved in experiential Earth science learning activities by April 2015, including many in remote and disadvantaged regions. The challenge with secondary school experiential learning as outreach is that activities need to be completed in either 50 or 80 minutes to fit within the school timetables in the UK, and this can limit the amount of hands-on activities that pupils undertake in one session. However, it is possible to dedicate a whole or half day of linked activities to Earth science learning within the Scotland Curriculum for Excellence, and this provides a long enough period to undertake field work, conduct group projects, or complete more complicated experiments. GeoBus has developed a suite of workshops that all involve experiential learning and are targeted for shorter and longer time slots, and the lessons learned in developing and refining these workshops to maximise the learning achieved will be presented. A key aim of GeoBus is to incorporate research outcomes directly into workshops, and to involve early career researchers in project development. One example that is currently in progress is a set of hydrology workshops that focus on the water

  5. National Safety Council Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, Karen; Shannon, Tom

    2005-01-01

    In December 1995, the National Safety Council (NSC) entered into Cooperative Agreement No.DE-FC02-96EW 12729 with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to work together over the next few years on safety and health initiatives surrounding the management of radioactive materials. As a result, three publications, including print and non-print deliverables, were developed and distributed: (1) Series of Backgrounders, Web Services for WIPP; (2) A Guide to Foreign Research Reactor Spent Fuel; and (3) A Guide to the US Department of Energy's Low-Level Radioactive Waste. DOE and its predecessor agencies have maintained a record of safe transportation of radioactive materials for more than 50 years. Thousands of shipments involving three million packages of radioactive materials are shipped each year in the United States. Historically, DOE shipments constitute less than one percent of the total radioactive material shipments; however, they comprise a significant portion (approaching 75 percent) of the curies, or amounts of radioactivity shipped annually. DOE operations and field offices are responsible for detailed planning and for ensuring full regulatory compliance for their shipments. Packaging is designed to protect workers and limit the risk to the public during transportation. DOE headquarters and program offices provide policy direction and oversight for packaging and transportation activities for their respective offices. The publications NSC produced under the agreement also included primary points of contact for external audiences, including the press, the public, and stakeholders who would not have access to DOE regulations, manuals, and practices

  6. 78 FR 16505 - Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation; Advisory Council on Alzheimer's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-15

    ... Evaluation; Advisory Council on Alzheimer's Research, Care, and Services AGENCY: Department of Health and... Alzheimer's Research, Care, and Services to fill the position of representative of a voluntary health... Council on Alzheimer's Research, Care, and Services meets quarterly to discuss programs that impact people...

  7. Proposal for a decision of the Council concerning the planning of a research- and education-program (1982-1986) on the field of thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermonuclear fusion is in an early development state and has however in principle possible advantages which could be especially valuable for Europe. The primary fusion fuels (D, Li) are plentiful existent, wide spread and cheap (1 g natural Lithium could generate 15 MHW); both fuels and the end product of the reactions - Helium - are stable. From the nuclear-technological point of view a thermonuclear reactor could be built with high safety; the doubling time for breeding of new fuels in principle could be very short. These potential advantages however are balanced by certain disadvantages, e.g. high costs for the construction of a thermonuclear reactor etc. The research program, other possibilities and the costs are outlined. (orig./HT) [de

  8. Proposal for a decision of the EC Council concerning the planning of a research- and education-program (1982-1986) on the field of controlled thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The thermonuclear fusion is in a early development state and has, however, in principle possible advantages which could be especially valuable for Europe: the primary fusion fuels (D, Li) are plentiful existent, wide spread and cheap (1 g natural Lithium could generate 15 MWh); both fuels and the end product of the reactions - Helium - are stable. From the nuclear-technological point of view a thermonuclear reactor could be built with high safety; the doubling time for breeding of new fuels in principle could be very short. These potential advantages, however, are balanced by certain disadvantages, e.g. high costs for the construction of a thermonuclear reactor etc. The research program, other possibilities and the costs are outlined. (orig./HT) [de

  9. The culture of scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joynson, Catherine; Leyser, Ottoline

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, the UK-based Nuffield Council on Bioethics carried out a series of engagement activities, including an online survey to which 970 people responded, and 15 discussion events at universities around the UK to explore the culture of research in the UK and its effect on ethical conduct in science and the quality of research. The findings of the project were published in December 2014 and the main points are summarised here. We found that scientists are motivated in their work to find out more about the world and to benefit society, and that they believe collaboration, multidisciplinarity, openness and creativity are important for the production of high quality science. However, in some cases, our findings suggest, the culture of research in higher education institutions does not support or encourage these goals or activities. For example, high levels of competition and perceptions about how scientists are assessed for jobs and funding are reportedly contributing to a loss of creativity in science, less collaboration and poor research practices. The project led to suggestions for action for funding bodies, research institutions, publishers and editors, professional bodies and individual researchers.

  10. Soil-related geohazard assessments for maintaining the UK's minor road network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Oliver; Hallett, Stephen; Farewell, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    authority level, to provide a series of regional risk assessments. Case studies are drawn from the UK administrative counties of Lincolnshire and Worcestershire. Data from observed road assessments, obtained from the respective local authorities have been analysed and intersected with clay-related subsidence risk. Lincolnshire County Council have already implemented this research to prioritise approximately £600,000 of road maintenance fund to their minor road network. Further appreciation of the spatial distribution and understanding of soil-related hazards has also led Lincolnshire County Council to trial new resurfacing strategies; these new techniques helping to reduce carbon outputs in the form of materials and transport. A reduction in the amount of potential hazardous (bituminous) waste to landfill is also being achieved through re-inclusion of waste material back into the road foundation where areas are particularly prone to soil shrinkage. Our research shows that soil-related geohazard assessments have a part to play in the asset management of the UK's local highways network. The study supports the ICE's recommendation for a regime which moves towards planned, preventative maintenance and achieving Defra's (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs) aim of a climate resilient UK infrastructure. The methodology introduced here also has applicability to other countries, where appropriate soils and infrastructure data are available.

  11. 78 FR 44187 - National Women's Business Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION National Women's Business Council ACTION: Notice of open Federal..., and agenda for the next meeting of the National Women's Business Council (NWBC). The meeting will be... the meeting of the National Women's Business Council. The National Women's Business Council is tasked...

  12. 77 FR 40400 - National Women's Business Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-09

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION National Women's Business Council AGENCY: U.S. Small Business... Business Council (NWBC). The meeting will be open to the public. DATES: The meeting will be held on July 17... Business Council. The National Women's Business Council is tasked with providing policy recommendations on...

  13. Council | About IASc | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Council. The affairs and property of the Academy are administered by a Council of 20, consisting of a President, four Vice-Presidents, a Treasurer, two Secretaries, and twelve other members. The Council, with a term of three years, is elected by the Fellows triennially. Members of the Council for the period 2016 to 2018:.

  14. UK nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronow, W.S.

    Regulations and conditions for the commissioning of nuclear power plants in the UK, their siting, licence conditions, design safety assessment, inspection during construction and conditions for safety in operation are listed. (J.P.)

  15. 76 FR 55363 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Pacific Council) Groundfish Management Team (GMT) [[Page 55364... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National...; telephone: (206) 526-6150. Council address: Pacific Fishery Management Council, 7700 NE Ambassador Place...

  16. 77 FR 75614 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Pacific Council) Highly Migratory Species Management Team (HMSMT... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National.... Council address: Pacific Fishery Management Council, 7700 NE. Ambassador Place, Suite 101, Portland, OR...

  17. 75 FR 80470 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-22

    ... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Council) Groundfish Management Team (GMT) will hold a working... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National.... Council address: Pacific Fishery Management Council, 7700 NE. Ambassador Place, Suite 101, Portland, OR...

  18. "Conclusions about exposure to ETS and health that will be unhelpful to us": how the tobacco industry attempted to delay and discredit the 1997 Australian National Health and Medical Research Council report on passive smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, L; Chapman, S

    2003-12-01

    Major reviews of the health effects of passive smoking have been subjected to tobacco industry campaigns to refute the scientific evidence. Following the 1992 US Environmental Protection Agency review, the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) initiated a review of the health effects of passive smoking. At the time of this review, evidence that environmental tobacco smoke causes disease was being increasingly accepted in courts of law and voluntary adoption of smoking restrictions was rapidly growing. To demonstrate how the tobacco industry attempted to delay and discredit the publication of a report on passive smoking that the tobacco industry anticipated to contain recommendations that would be unfavourable to their business. A search of tobacco industry documents on the Master Settlement Agreement websites was conducted using the terms and acronyms representative of the NHMRC review. The tobacco industry sought to impede the progress of the NHMRC Working Party by launching an intensive campaign to delay and discredit the report. The main strategies used were attempts to criticise the science, extensive use of Freedom of Information provisions to monitor all activity of the group, legal challenges, ad hominem attacks on the credibility of the Working Party members, rallying support from industry allies, and influencing public opinion through the media. The Australian tobacco industry deliberately impeded the NHMRC Working Party's progress and successfully prevented the publication of the report's recommendations. The tobacco industry's motivation and capacity to disrupt the advancement of scientific knowledge and policy in tobacco control should be recognised and anticipated.

  19. 77 FR 69869 - National Advisory Council on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Advisory Council on Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-21

    ... Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse, and National Cancer Advisory Board... Advisory Council on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse, and National...: National Advisory Council on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse, and...

  20. Age and Gender Variations in Cancer Diagnostic Intervals in 15 Cancers: Analysis of Data from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafees U Din

    Full Text Available Time from symptomatic presentation to cancer diagnosis (diagnostic interval is an important, and modifiable, part of the patient's cancer pathway, and can be affected by various factors such as age, gender and type of presenting symptoms. The aim of this study was to quantify the relationships of diagnostic interval with these variables in 15 cancers diagnosed between 2007 and 2010 using routinely collected data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD in the UK.Symptom lists for each cancer were prepared from the literature and by consensus amongst the clinician researchers, which were then categorised into either NICE qualifying (NICE or not (non-NICE based on NICE Urgent Referral Guidelines for Suspected Cancer criteria. Multivariable linear regression models were fitted to examine the relationship between diagnostic interval (outcome and the predictors: age, gender and symptom type.18,618 newly diagnosed cancer patients aged ≥40 who had a recorded symptom in the preceding year were included in the analysis. Mean diagnostic interval was greater for older patients in four disease sites (difference in days per 10 year increase in age; 95% CI: bladder (10.3; 5.5 to 15.1; P<0.001, kidney (11.0; 3.4 to 18.6; P=0.004, leukaemia (18.5; 8.8 to 28.1; P<0.001 and lung (10.1; 6.7 to 13.4; P<0.001. There was also evidence of longer diagnostic interval in older patients with colorectal cancer (P<0.001. However, we found that mean diagnostic interval was shorter with increasing age in two cancers: gastric (-5.9; -11.7 to -0.2; P=0.04 and pancreatic (-6.0; -11.2 to -0.7; P=0.03. Diagnostic interval was longer for females in six of the gender non-specific cancers (mean difference in days; 95% CI: bladder (12.2; 0.8 to 23.6; P=0.04, colorectal (10.4; 4.3 to 16.5; P=0.001, gastric (14.3; 1.1 to 27.6; P=0.03, head and neck (31.3; 6.2 to 56.5; P=0.02, lung (8.0; 1.2 to 14.9; P=0.02, and lymphoma (19.2; 3.8 to 34.7; P=0.01. Evidence of longer

  1. Nutritional Knowledge of UK Coaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Cockburn

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Athletes obtain nutritional information from their coaches, yet their competency in this area is lacking. Currently, no research exists in the UK which has a different coach education system to many other countries. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the sports nutrition knowledge of UK coaching certificate (UKCC level 2 and 3, hockey and netball qualified coaches. All coaches (n = 163 completed a sports nutrition questionnaire to identify: (a if they provided nutritional advice; (b their level of sport nutrition knowledge; and (c factors that may have contributed to their level of knowledge. Over half the coaches provided advice to their athletes (n = 93, 57.1%, even though they were not competent to do so. Coaches responded correctly to 60.3 ± 10.5% of all knowledge questions with no differences between those providing advice and those who did not (p > 0.05. Those coaches who had undertaken formal nutrition training achieved higher scores than those who had not (p < 0.05. In conclusion, UK sports coaches would benefit from continued professional development in sports nutrition to enhance their coaching practice.

  2. Providing Access to Census-based Interaction Data in the UK: That's WICID!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Stillwell

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The Census Interaction Data Service (CIDS is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council in the UK to provide access for social science researchers and students to the detailed migration and journey-to-work statistics that are collected by the national statistical agencies. These interaction data sets are known collectively as the Special Migration Statistics (SMS and the Special Workplace Statistics (SWS. This paper outlines how problems of user access to these data have been tackled through the development of a web-based system known as WICID (Web-based Interface to Census Interaction Data. The paper illustrates various interface features including some of the query building facilities that enable users to extract counts of flows of particular groups of individuals between selected origin and destination areas. New tools are outlined for assisting area selection using digital maps of census geographies, for planning output and for adding value to the data through analysis. Mapping of flows of migrants between London boroughs and the rest of the UK demonstrates the value of the data. The paper begins with a summary of the data sets that are contained within the system and an outline of the system architecture.

  3. 76 FR 54216 - Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council); Work Session To Review Proposed Salmon Methodology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    ... Fishery Management Council (Council); Work Session To Review Proposed Salmon Methodology Changes AGENCY.... ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management Council's Salmon Technical Team (STT), Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC) Salmon Subcommittee, and Model Evaluation...

  4. The Prevalence of Intellectual Disability in a Major UK Prison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Susan; Shackell, Phil; Mottram, Pat; Lancaster, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    Over-representation of people with learning disability in prisons has been demonstrated in many Western jurisdictions. This was the first comprehensive research in a UK prison. The research used a random 10% sample of a prison population (n = 140). A semi-structured interview, the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (UK version) and the Vineland…

  5. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Vote Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. Voting will begin on Monday 31 October. Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will  represent you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site. (http://association.web.cern.ch) Elections Timetable Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee. 

  6. Class Councils in Switzerland: Citizenship Education in Classroom Communities?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Wyss

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Democracy depends on the participation of citizens. Citizenship educationis taking place in classroom communities to prepare pupils for their role ascitizens. Class councils are participatory forms of citizenship educationguaranteeing the children’s right to form and express their views freely aswritten down in the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Theoreticaldeficiencies and empirical objections have been formulated againstparticipation in the school setting. Despite widespread practices, empiricaldata about class councils in Switzerland barely exists. In our researchproject we video-recorded fourteen class councils in secondary schools, weinterviewed the teacher and four pupils of each class, and all the pupilsfilled in a standardized questionnaire. Class councils are very popular formsof education with pupils although the actual power to influence decisions bydeliberation is doubted to some extent. Quantitative analysis of the videorecordingsshows the wide range of forms of class councils that exist inrespect to the talking time of the pupils. To express one’s own viewpointand to understand the standpoint of other discussants, constructarguments and counterarguments, participate, and lead discussions aredifficult tasks. Based on the empirical research the project describes threeforms of class councils that differ in the degree of favouring thedevelopment of communicative competences as a part of citizenshipeducation.

  7. [Municipal Health Councils: activity and representation of grassroots communities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerschman, Silvia

    2004-01-01

    This article was based on the results of research concerning health policy in municipalities that achieved the most extensive development of decentralization and innovation in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The study applied a questionnaire for health system users' representatives in Municipal Health Councils. The central issues were: the Councils' political role; social control by the Councils, viewed as surveillance by organized society over government actions; the nature of social representation exercised by the Council members; and the type of mandate they serve. Community representatives in the Councils reinforce aspects pertaining to the exercise of representation in unequal societies. There is a predominance of a differentiated elite consisting of older males with more schooling and higher income than the community average. The notion of "social control" as the basis for the Councils is difficult for the members to grasp. Exercise of representation is diffuse, occurring by way of designation by community associations, election in assemblies, or designation by institutional health policy agencies.

  8. Report of the Materials Research Council (1975)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-01

    into oil. Large feed lots in which cattle can be concentrated are expected to reduce beef costs significantly, but have not yet been constructed...second on Chemical Feed - stocks. By telephone it was agreed by the Steering Committee that small studies would be held on these topics. Hawthorne...relation to mechanical property characterization of fracture, creep , etc. Our purpose is to explore two related areas: I. Institutional Aspects of

  9. 76 FR 34074 - Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation; Advisory Council on Alzheimer's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... Evaluation; Advisory Council on Alzheimer's Research, Care, and Services AGENCY: Office of the Assistant... establishment of the Advisory Council on Alzheimer's Research, Care, and Services and request for nominations. SUMMARY: The National Alzheimer's Project Act, Public Law 111-375 (42 U.S.C. 11225), requires that the...

  10. Comparing German and Danish industrial relations actors on European works councils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bicknell, Helen; Knudsen, Herman Lyhne

    The paper brings together recent research carried out by the two authors on German and Danish representatives and representation systems within the context of European Works Councils (EWCs).......The paper brings together recent research carried out by the two authors on German and Danish representatives and representation systems within the context of European Works Councils (EWCs)....

  11. GeoBus: bringing experiential Earth science learning to secondary schools in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, C. J.; Robinson, R. A. J.; Roper, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    GeoBus (www.geobus.org.uk) is an educational outreach project that was developed in 2012 by the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of St Andrews, and it is sponsored jointly by industry and the UK Research Councils (NERC and EPSRC). The aims of GeoBus are to support the teaching of Earth Science in secondary (middle and high) schools by providing teaching support to schools that have no or little expertise of teaching Earth science, to share the outcomes of new science research and the experiences of young researchers with school pupils, and to provide a bridge between industry, higher education institutions, research councils and schools. Since its launch, GeoBus has visited over 160 different schools across the length and breadth of Scotland. Over 30,000 pupils will have been involved in experiential Earth science learning activities by December 2014, including many in remote and disadvantaged regions. The challenge with secondary school experiential learning as outreach is that activities need to be completed in either 50 or 80 minutes to fit within the school timetables in the UK, and this can limit the amount of hands-on activities that pupils undertake in one session. However, it is possible to dedicate a whole or half day of linked activities to Earth science learning in Scotland and this provides a long enough period to undertake field work, conduct group projects, or complete more complicated experiments. GeoBus has developed a suite of workshops that all involve experiential learning and are targeted for shorter and longer time slots, and the lessons learned in developing and refining these workshops to maximise the learning achieved will be presented. Three potentially unsurprising observations hold true for all the schools that GeoBus visits: young learners like to experiment and use unfamiliar equipment to make measurements, the element of competition stimulates learners to ask questions and maintain focus and enthusiasum

  12. 77 FR 52067 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [12-069] NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space.... DATES: Tuesday, September 18, 2012, 11:45 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), The Showroom, Building M-3, NASA Ames Conference Center, 500 Severyns Road, NASA Research...

  13. An investigation of whether factors associated with short-term attrition change or persist over ten years: data from the Medical Research Council Cognitive Function and Ageing Study (MRC CFAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatfield Mark

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Factors associated with the loss of participants in long-term longitudinal studies of ageing, due to refusal or moves, have been discussed less than those with short term follow-up. Methods In a population-based study of cognition and ageing (the Medical Research Council Cognitive Function and Ageing Study (MRC CFAS, factors associated with dropout due to refusal and moving in the first follow-up period (over two years are compared with factors associated with dropout over ten years. Participants at 10-year follow-up are compared with their age-standardised baseline contemporaries. Results Some consistent trends are found over the longer term. Refusers tended to have poorer cognition, less years of education, not have a family history of dementia and be women. Characteristics of people who moved differed between waves, but the oldest and people in worse health moved more. When surviving and responding individuals at ten years are compared with those of the same age at baseline many differences are found. Individuals of lower social class, education, cognitive ability, in residential care, with sight/hearing problems and poor/fair self-reported health are less likely to be seen after 10 years of follow-up. Individuals report more health problems when they participate in multiple interviews. Conclusion The characteristics of refusers in the longer term are similar to those refusing to participate over the shorter term. Long-term follow-up studies will under represent the disadvantaged and disabled but represent full health status of participating individuals better. There are advantages and disadvantages to both short-term and long-term follow-up.

  14. Members of the State Council of Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Luncheon hosted by the Director-General for members of the State Council of Geneva: From left to right A. Naudi; J. May; M. Carlo Lamprecht, State Council - Employement, Foreign Office and Economic Departement; M. Robert Hensler, State Chancellor; L. Maiani, CERN Director General; H.F. Hoffmann; M. Robert Cramer, State Council - Environment, Agriculture and Interior Departement; J.Van Der Boon; M. Laurent Moutinot, State Council - Installation, equipment and housing Departement; C. Détraz; C. Wyss; P. Jenni; G. Hentsch; M. Pierre-François Unger, State Council - Health and Social Action Departement; G. Stassinakis; M. Bourquin, CERN Council President.

  15. Governance systems in family SMEs: the substitution effects between family councils and corporate governance mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    L. Gnan; D. Montemerlo; M. Huse

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to explore the role of family councils vis-à-vis corporate governance mechanisms. Particularly, the paper explores whether family councils perform only their distinctive family governance role or if they also substitute for the roles performed by corporate governance control mechanisms. Based on a sample of 243 Italian family SMEs, our research findings show that the family council partially substitutes the shareholders' meeting and the board of directors i...

  16. Lignite coal council update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwyer, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    The proceedings contain an outline only of the paper presented at the conference, but major points are distinguishable. The discussion included a summary of major programs, government action programs, public relations and the education program, research and development programs, and challenges of the future

  17. A busy week for Council

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    This has been a busy week for the CERN Council, and there is much to report. Firstly, I’m pleased to say that Council approved the Organization’s Medium Term Plan, and with it the budget for financial year 2010. In a time of global recession, this is a strong vote of confidence from the Member States. This meeting of Council provided an opportunity for the working group on the scientific and geographical enlargement of CERN to set out a roadmap towards its final report, which is to be made at Council’s December session this year. One part of the process over the coming months is to bring the major players in particle physics from beyond the European region into the discussion, ensuring that the working group’s recommendations lead to an optimum position for CERN and European particle physics in the global context. An indicator of the continuing attractiveness of CERN is the fact that Council has received four new applications...

  18. Council celebrates CERN Control Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    With the unveiling of its new sign, the CERN Control Centre was officially inaugurated on Thursday 16 March. To celebrate its startup, CERN Council members visited the sleek centre, a futuristic-looking room filled with a multitude of monitoring screens.

  19. A survey of costs incurred in U.K. X-ray diffraction research laboratories as a consequence of proposed regulations for radiological safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blow, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    A small survey of British X-ray diffraction laboratories was undertaken, with the aim of discovering the effects of the Health and Safety at Work Act (1974) and the draft regulations on radiological protection and ionising radiations (1978) on the practice of X-ray crystallography. The responses lead to the conclusion that the average cost incurred in bringing X-ray diffraction equipment to a safety standard compatible with the draft regulations (as judged by the respondents) will exceed Pound2,000 per X-ray generator. The safety costs will represent an overhead charge of at least 15-18% on the purchase of an X-ray generator, requiring additional capital outlay of over Pound5m to maintain the current level of X-ray diffraction activity in the U.K. There seems to be no evidence of a high accident rate with diffraction equipment, and the cost of the safety precautions bears no relation to the risks involved. (author)

  20. Evaluating the usability of a single UK community acquired brain injury (ABI) rehabilitation service website: implications for research methodology and website design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, Gavin; Groom, Christina

    2010-04-01

    Information provision is an important resource for those living with acquired brain injury (ABI) and their families. Web-based health information services are now common additions to health service provision. Ideally, they should be easy to use and provide useful, relevant and accurate information. ABI injuries do not affect individuals in the same way, and survivors can have a wide range of abilities and impairments. Therefore, any informational resource intended for this group should take account of their needs and help to compensate for their limitations. This pilot study recruited a group of individuals with ABI (of a median Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale rating of "lower moderate disability") who were clients of a UK National Health Service rehabilitation service and asked them to assess a specialised website provided by that service and hosted by their employing Primary Care Trust organisation. Participants completed a practical task and then gave their opinions on various aspects of website design, and content. They were also asked to suggest improvements and recommend additions. Overall the results were favourable. However, improvements in the legibility, layout and writing style were identified. There were also requests to add more information on the existing topics and add additional topics. The discussion also evaluates the utility of the methodology and the implications of the results for others considering constructing their own website.

  1. Modelling UK energy demand to 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.D.

    1980-01-01

    A recent long-term demand forecast for the UK was made by Cheshire and Surrey. (SPRU Occasional Paper Series No.5, Science Policy Research Unit, Univ. Of Sussex, 1978.) Although they adopted a sectoral approach their study leaves some questions unanswered. Do they succeed in their aim of making all their assumptions fully explicit. How sensitive are their estimates to changes in assumptions and policies. Are important problems and 'turning points' fully identified in the period up to and immediately beyond their time horizon of 2000. The author addresses these questions by using a computer model based on the study by Cheshire and Surrey. This article is a shortened version of the report, S.D. Thomas, 'Modelling UK Energy Demand to 2000', Operational Research, Univ. of Sussex, Brighton, UK, 1979, in which full details of the author's model are given. Copies are available from the author. (author)

  2. Modelling UK energy demand to 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, S D [Sussex Univ., Brighton (UK)

    1980-03-01

    A recent long-term demand forecast for the UK was made by Cheshire and Surrey. (SPRU Occasional Paper Series No.5, Science Policy Research Unit, Univ. Of Sussex, 1978.) Although they adopted a sectoral approach their study leaves some questions unanswered. Do they succeed in their aim of making all their assumptions fully explicit. How sensitive are their estimates to changes in assumptions and policies. Are important problems and 'turning points' fully identified in the period up to and immediately beyond their time horizon of 2000. The author addresses these questions by using a computer model based on the study by Cheshire and Surrey. This article is a shortened version of the report, S.D. Thomas, 'Modelling UK Energy Demand to 2000', Operational Research, Univ. of Sussex, Brighton, UK, 1979, in which full details of the author's model are given. Copies are available from the author.

  3. UK Mission to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    At the end of June, nine experts from UK industry visited CERN to study techniques for developing distributed computing systems and to look at some specific applications. In a packed three-day programme, almost 40 CERN experts presented a comprehensive survey of achievements.

  4. Geothermal resources of the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, A.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that geothermal energy applications and research are being actively pursued in the United Kingdom despite the relatively normal heat flow regime. The cumulative expenditure on geothermal activity from 1975 to 1989 has been approximately Brit-pounds 46 million of 32% of the Renewable Energy Research Budget to date. The first practical application is a 2 MWt scheme at Southampton as part of a district heating scheme. Commercial operation started in February 1988 and further expansion is planned. The UK's enthusiasm for Hot Dry Rock has dimmed slightly as the entire program is reappraised and the long heralded deep exploration hole has yet to materialize. Future activity looks likely to focus on geothermal opportunities that have multiple uses or applications for the fluids in small scale schemes and Hot Dry Rock research will probably be linked to a pan-European program based in France

  5. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    2011-07-28

    Jul 28, 2011 ... We describe the epidemiology of this atopic condition among school children in Tunisia. ... diagnosis of AD was based on the U.K. Working Party diagnostic criteria. .... U.K., northern Europe, Australia, Japan and Hong Kong.

  6. 77 FR 61466 - National Women's Business Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION National Women's Business Council AGENCY: U.S. Small Business... Business Council (NWBC). The meeting will be open to the public. DATES: The meeting will be held on October... [[Page 61467

  7. National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Month NCADD National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence Addiction is a Disease - Treatment is Available - Recovery ... years, The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc. (NCADD) has been a valuable resource for ...

  8. Mentoring Children of Incarcerated Parents: A Synthesis of Research and Input from the Listening Session Held by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention and the White House Domestic Policy Council and Office of Public Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarjoura, G. Roger; DuBois, David L.; Shlafer, Rebecca J.; Haight, Konrad A.

    2013-01-01

    In September 2013, a Listening Session on Mentoring Children of Incarcerated Parents was held in Washington, DC. This session was organized by the U.S. Department of Justice's Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention in partnership with the White House Domestic Policy Council and Office of Public Engagement. It continues the…

  9. CERN: Council Session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    The coming years will be dominated by the building of LEP and the preparation for the four approved experiments. Construction of the underground ring tunnel to house the electron-positron collider will begin very soon and about half of the contracts for machine components have been placed. The four experiments, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL have been designed and costed in detail. Over 900 physicists are involved and contracts with the participating research centres are being drawn up specifying responsibilities and financial commitments. Thus the whole timescale and expenditure profile of the LEP project is now much clearer

  10. New Ways of Delivering Marine Scientific Evidence for Policy Needs in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrington, T.

    2016-12-01

    The UK Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs (Defra) is responsible for safeguarding the natural environment, supporting a world-leading food and farming industry, and sustaining a thriving rural economy. This includes the marine environment which makes a significant contribution to the economy of the UK through fisheries, aquaculture, transport, leisure and recreation, energy (including renewable), coastal tourism, and naval defence. The overall vision for the Defra marine programme is to therefore achieve clean, healthy, safe, productive and biologically diverse oceans and seas. In order to attain this it is essential that the decisions that government makes can be justified and that these decisions use the best available evidence and allow for any uncertainty. However, reductions across the budgets of departments such as Defra means that new ways of delivering evidence for policy needs must be sought. To do this we must consider marine monitoring efficiencies including the use of novel technologies, more integrated monitoring programmes, and greater collaboration with the research councils, industry, and academia. We must also seek to leverage other sources of funding from the European Union and other international partners. This presentation will address the main policy drivers (e.g. EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive) and future needs of the marine programme, the Defra Evidence Action Plan (EAP), and how we plan to use new avenues of gaining high quality marine scientific evidence in an era of declining budgets.

  11. What have we learnt? A year on from the first UK Community Partner Summit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Aumann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Following an observed need to build community partner infrastructure and support to enhance community-university partnerships, a successful bid was made to the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council. This funding provided an opportunity for community partners to come together with engaged academics at the first ever UK Community Partner Summit. They resolved to set up a community partner network to help build capacity for effective community-university partnerships, and to influence the policy environment which supports this work. This article reflects on the activity of the working group in seeking to establish the network, and introduces some of the concepts that have proved critical to its development. Drawing on a wealth of perspectives from a range of sources including academic and grey literature, community partner experiences, and international work, we open up some of the challenges that we have faced, and explore some of the implications of our first year’s work together. We reflect on the time it takes to establish any form of network, the need to be clear about definitions and boundaries, and the challenge of changing cultures. We conclude that the progress with the network to date is encouraging, and we look forward to building on our learning thus far, to develop stronger community-university partnerships of the future. Keywords: community partner infrastructure and networks, partnership resilience, community-university partnership

  12. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation standards for clinical practice and training in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbott, David; Smith, Gary; Mitchell, Sarah; Colquhoun, Michael; Nolan, Jerry; Soar, Jasmeet; Pitcher, David; Perkins, Gavin; Phillips, Barbara; King, Ben; Spearpoint, Ken

    2005-07-01

    The Royal College of Anaesthetists, the Royal College of Physicians, the Intensive Care Society and the Resuscitation Council (UK) have published new resuscitation standards. The document provides advice to UK healthcare organisations, resuscitation committees and resuscitation officers on all aspects of the resuscitation service. It includes sections on resuscitation training, resuscitation equipment, the cardiac arrest team, cardiac arrest prevention, patient transfer, post-resuscitation care, audit and research. The document makes several recommendations. Healthcare institutions should have, or be represented on, a resuscitation committee that is responsible for all resuscitation issues. Every institution should have at least one resuscitation officer responsible for teaching and conducting training in resuscitation techniques. Staff with patient contact should be given regular resuscitation training appropriate to their expected abilities and roles. Clinical staff should receive regular training in the recognition of patients at risk of cardiopulmonary arrest and the measures required for the prevention of cardiopulmonary arrest. Healthcare institutions admitting acutely ill patients should have a resuscitation team, or its equivalent, available at all times. Clear guidelines should be available indicating how and when to call for the resuscitation team. Cardiopulmonary arrest should be managed according to current national guidelines. Resuscitation equipment should be available throughout the institution for clinical use and for training. The practice of resuscitation should be audited to maintain and improve standards of care. A do not attempt resuscitation (DNAR) policy should be compiled, communicated to relevant members of staff, used and audited regularly. Funding must be provided to support an effective resuscitation service.

  13. Using the Medical Research Council framework for development and evaluation of complex interventions in a low resource setting to develop a theory-based treatment support intervention delivered via SMS text message to improve blood pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrow, Kirsten; Farmer, Andrew; Cishe, Nomazizi; Nwagi, Ntobeko; Namane, Mosedi; Brennan, Thomas P; Springer, David; Tarassenko, Lionel; Levitt, Naomi

    2018-01-23

    Several frameworks now exist to guide intervention development but there remains only limited evidence of their application to health interventions based around use of mobile phones or devices, particularly in a low-resource setting. We aimed to describe our experience of using the Medical Research Council (MRC) Framework on complex interventions to develop and evaluate an adherence support intervention for high blood pressure delivered by SMS text message. We further aimed to describe the developed intervention in line with reporting guidelines for a structured and systematic description. We used a non-sequential and flexible approach guided by the 2008 MRC Framework for the development and evaluation of complex interventions. We reviewed published literature and established a multi-disciplinary expert group to guide the development process. We selected health psychology theory and behaviour change techniques that have been shown to be important in adherence and persistence with chronic medications. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups with various stakeholders identified ways in which treatment adherence could be supported and also identified key features of well-regarded messages: polite tone, credible information, contextualised, and endorsed by identifiable member of primary care facility staff. Direct and indirect user testing enabled us to refine the intervention including refining use of language and testing of interactive components. Our experience shows that using a formal intervention development process is feasible in a low-resource multi-lingual setting. The process enabled us to pre-test assumptions about the intervention and the evaluation process, allowing the improvement of both. Describing how a multi-component intervention was developed including standardised descriptions of content aimed to support behaviour change will enable comparison with other similar interventions and support development of new interventions. Even in low

  14. UK Royal Navy WWII Logbooks

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006, the UK and NOAA's Climate Database Modernization Program (CDMP) funded the imaging of approximately 8,000 Royal Navy logbooks in the UK National Archives...

  15. A political perspective on business elites and institutional embeddedness in the UK code-issuing process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haxhi, I.; van Ees, H.; Sorge, A.

    2013-01-01

    Manuscript Type: Perspective Research Question/Issue: What is the role of institutional actors and business elites in the development of UK corporate governance codes? In the current paper, we explore the UK code-issuing process by focusing on the UK actors, their power and interplay. Research

  16. A Political Perspective on Business Elites and Institutional Embeddedness in the UK Code-Issuing Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haxhi, Ilir; van Ees, Hans; Sorge, Arndt

    2013-01-01

    Manuscript TypePerspective Research Question/IssueWhat is the role of institutional actors and business elites in the development of UK corporate governance codes? In the current paper, we explore the UK code-issuing process by focusing on the UK actors, their power and interplay. Research

  17. A Political Perspective on Business Elites and Institutional Embeddedness in the UK Code-Issuing Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haxhi, Ilir; van Ees, Hans; Sorge, Arndt

    Manuscript TypePerspective Research Question/IssueWhat is the role of institutional actors and business elites in the development of UK corporate governance codes? In the current paper, we explore the UK code-issuing process by focusing on the UK actors, their power and interplay. Research

  18. 76 FR 62133 - National Women's Business Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION National Women's Business Council AGENCY: U.S. Small Business... Business Council (NWBC). The meeting will be open to the public. DATES: The meeting will be held on Monday...., Appendix 2), SBA announces the meeting of the National Women's Business Council. The National Women's...

  19. Governor's Council on Disabilities and Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    State Employees Governor's Council on Disabilities and Special Education DHSS State of Alaska Home ; Governor's Council on Disabilities and Special Education Page Content Untitled Document Patrick Reinhart : follow GCDSE to 40404 The Governor's Council on Disabilities & Special Education is pleased to award

  20. Parent-School Councils in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Wayne D.; Bjork, Lars G.; Zhao, Yuru; Chi, Bin

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study examines how schools in Beijing have responded to a Chinese national policy mandate to establish and maintain parent councils. We surveyed principals and parent council members across schools in the Beijing municipality about the establishment and functions of their schools' parent councils. Survey results provide insights…