WorldWideScience

Sample records for uk hospitality industry

  1. A Conceptual Model for Analysing Management Development in the UK Hospitality Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual, contingent model of management development. It explains the nature of the UK hospitality industry and its potential influence on MD practices, prior to exploring dimensions and relationships in the model. The embryonic model is presented as a model that can enhance our understanding of the complexities of the…

  2. The UK biomass industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billins, P.

    1998-01-01

    A brief review is given of the development of the biomass industry in the UK. Topics covered include poultry litter generation of electricity, gasification plants fuelled by short-rotation coppice, on-farm anaerobic digestion and specialized combustion systems, e.g. straw, wood and other agricultural wastes. (UK)

  3. Sustainability in the UK construction minerals industry

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Clive

    2015-01-01

    Sustainability in the UK construction minerals industry Clive Mitchell, Industrial Minerals Specialist, British Geological Survey, Nottingham, UK Email: Sustainability is not just about environmental protection it also concerns biodiversity, community relations, competence, employment, geodiversity, health and safety, resource efficiency, restoration and stakeholder accountability. The UK construction minerals industry aims to supply essential materials in a sustainabl...

  4. The UK nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, J. G.

    1995-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, nuclear power plants are operated by three companies: Nuclear Electric (NE), Scottish Nuclear (SN), and British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL). The state-operated power industry was privatized in 1989 with the exception of nuclear power generation activities, which were made part of the newly founded (state-owned) NE and SN. At the same time, a moratorium on the construction of new nuclear power plants was agreed. Only Sizewell B, the first plant in the UK to be equipped with a pressurized water reactor, was to be completed. That unit was first synchronized with the power grid on February 14, 1995. Another decision in 1989 provided for a review to be conducted in 1994 of the future of the peaceful uses of nuclear power in the country. The results of the review were presented by the government in a white paper on May 9, 1995. Accordingly, NE and SN will be merged and privatized in 1996; the headquarters of the new holding company will be in Scotland. The review does not foresee the construction of more nuclear power plants. However, NE hopes to gain a competitive edge over other sources of primary energy as a result of this privatization, and advocates construction of a dual-unit plant identical with Sizewell B so as to avoid recurrent design and development costs. Outside the UK, the company plans to act jointly with the reactor vendor, Westinghouse, especially in the Pacific region; a bid submitted by the consortium has been shortisted by the future operator of the Lungmen nuclear power plant project in Taiwan. In upgrading the safety of nuclear power plants in Eastern Europe, the new company will be able to work through existing contacts of SN. (orig.) [de

  5. Food production and service in UK hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohamed; Jones, Eleri; Redmond, Elizabeth; Hewedi, Mahmoud; Wingert, Andreas; Gad El Rab, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to apply value stream mapping holistically to hospital food production/service systems focused on high-quality food. Multiple embedded case study of three (two private-sector and one public-sector) hospitals in the UK. The results indicated various issues affecting hospital food production including: the menu and nutritional considerations; food procurement; food production; foodservice; patient perceptions/expectations. Value stream mapping is a new approach for food production systems in UK hospitals whether private or public hospitals. The paper identifies opportunities for enhancing hospital food production systems. The paper provides a theoretical basis for process enhancement of hospital food production and the provision of high-quality hospital food.

  6. Innovations in Hospitality Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhandzhugazova, Elena A.; Blinova, Ekaterina A.; Orlova, Liubov N.; Romanova, Marianna M.

    2016-01-01

    The article focuses on the study of the role and importance of innovation, its classification, the problems of its application in the hotel industry with emphasis on the application of sensory marketing tools in the development of the innovative marketing mix within the hospitality industry. The article provides an analysis of the "seven…

  7. Offshore wind industry capabilities in the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    This report summarises the results of a questionnaire survey distributed to companies and organisations interested in opportunities in offshore wind energy industries that may results in the improved competitiveness of the industry. The potential areas of advantage for the UK offshore industry are examined including resource and design conditions, turbine design and manufacture, electrical systems, operation and maintenance, project management and finance. Networking and communications are considered.

  8. UK strategy for nuclear industry LLW - 16393

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Matthew; Fisher, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    In March 2007 the UK Government and devolved administrations (for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, from here on referred to as 'Government') published their policy for the management of solid low level waste ('the Policy'). The Policy sets out a number of core principles for the management of low level waste (LLW) and charges the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority with developing a UK-wide strategy in the case of LLW from nuclear sites. The UK Nuclear Industry LLW Strategy has been developed within the framework of the principles set out in the policy. A key factor in the development of this strategy has been the strategic partnership the NDA shares with the Low Level Waste Repository near Drigg (LLWR), who now have a role in developing strategy as well as delivering an optimised waste management service at the LLWR. The strategy aims to support continued hazard reduction and decommissioning by ensuring uninterrupted capability and capacity for the management and disposal of LLW in the UK. The continued availability of a disposal route for LLW is considered vital by both the nuclear industry and non-nuclear industry low level waste producers. Given that the UK will generate significantly more low level waste (∼ 3.1 million m 3 ) than there is capacity at the LLWR (∼0.75 million m 3 ), developing alternative effective ways to manage LLW is critical. The waste management hierarchy is central to the strategy, which includes strategic goals at all levels of the hierarchy to improve its application across the industry. (authors)

  9. Strategic marketing in the UK tobacco industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Susan; Hastings, Gerard; MacFadyen, Lynn

    2002-08-01

    Tobacco-industry marketing has played a central part in the global spread of tobacco use and addiction. Although the absolute size of the tobacco market has dwindled, the industry is still immensely successful, largely due to sophisticated and manipulative marketing strategies. The UK tobacco industry identifies target groups and builds enduring relationships based on careful brand management. Potential customers are exposed to brands which are likely to appeal to them most. Tobacco companies tailor their products to target markets by altering the content of tar and nicotine, and by adding flavourings to produce a distinctive taste. Marketing strategies ensure that the products are promoted heavily at the point of sale, and directed advertising and sponsorship agreements are used to increase the visibility of the brand and strengthen its image. Tobacco companies also target non-consumer organisations such as retailers and policy makers with the aim of creating the best possible business environment for tobacco sales. We review published evidence, internal-advertising-agency documents, and observational data about tobacco promotion, and discuss the use of targeted marketing strategies in the UK.

  10. Survey of employment in the UK wind energy industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, G.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of employment in the UK wind energy industry has been carried out. It related to the financial years 1993-4 and 1994-5. A questionnaire was sent to all organisations working in wind energy in the UK. Some 249 replies were received. The paper reports on the findings regarding overall employment in the industry, employment in the major sectors of the industry, jobs by type of organisation, the major employers, the location of jobs, and the overall impact on employment in the UK economy. (Author)

  11. The relationship between workers’ self-reported changes in health and their attitudes towards a workplace intervention: lessons from smoke-free legislation across the UK hospitality industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacCalman Laura

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evaluation of smoke-free legislation (SFL in the UK examined the impacts on exposure to second-hand smoke, workers’ attitudes and changes in respiratory health. Studies that investigate changes in the health of groups of people often use self-reported symptoms. Due to the subjective nature it is of interest to determine whether workers’ attitudes towards the change in their working conditions may be linked to the change in health they report. Methods Bar workers were recruited before the introduction of the SFL in Scotland and England with the aim of investigating their changes to health, attitudes and exposure as a result of the SFL. They were asked about their attitudes towards SFL and the presence of respiratory and sensory symptoms both before SFL and one year later. Here we examine the possibility of a relationship between initial attitudes and changes in reported symptoms, through the use of regression analyses. Results There was no difference in the initial attitudes towards SFL between those working in Scotland and England. Bar workers who were educated to a higher level tended to be more positive towards SFL. Attitude towards SFL was not found to be related to change in reported symptoms for bar workers in England (Respiratory, p = 0.755; Sensory, p = 0.910. In Scotland there was suggestion of a relationship with reporting of respiratory symptoms (p = 0.042, where those who were initially more negative to SFL experienced a greater improvement in self-reported health. Conclusions There was no evidence that workers who were more positive towards SFL reported greater improvements in respiratory and sensory symptoms. This may not be the case in all interventions and we recommend examining subjects’ attitudes towards the proposed intervention when evaluating possible health benefits using self-reported methods.

  12. The relationship between workers' self-reported changes in health and their attitudes towards a workplace intervention: lessons from smoke-free legislation across the UK hospitality industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCalman, Laura; Semple, Sean; Galea, Karen S; Van Tongeren, Martie; Dempsey, Scott; Hilton, Shona; Gee, Ivan; Ayres, Jon G

    2012-05-02

    The evaluation of smoke-free legislation (SFL) in the UK examined the impacts on exposure to second-hand smoke, workers' attitudes and changes in respiratory health. Studies that investigate changes in the health of groups of people often use self-reported symptoms. Due to the subjective nature it is of interest to determine whether workers' attitudes towards the change in their working conditions may be linked to the change in health they report. Bar workers were recruited before the introduction of the SFL in Scotland and England with the aim of investigating their changes to health, attitudes and exposure as a result of the SFL. They were asked about their attitudes towards SFL and the presence of respiratory and sensory symptoms both before SFL and one year later. Here we examine the possibility of a relationship between initial attitudes and changes in reported symptoms, through the use of regression analyses. There was no difference in the initial attitudes towards SFL between those working in Scotland and England. Bar workers who were educated to a higher level tended to be more positive towards SFL. Attitude towards SFL was not found to be related to change in reported symptoms for bar workers in England (Respiratory, p = 0.755; Sensory, p = 0.910). In Scotland there was suggestion of a relationship with reporting of respiratory symptoms (p = 0.042), where those who were initially more negative to SFL experienced a greater improvement in self-reported health. There was no evidence that workers who were more positive towards SFL reported greater improvements in respiratory and sensory symptoms. This may not be the case in all interventions and we recommend examining subjects' attitudes towards the proposed intervention when evaluating possible health benefits using self-reported methods.

  13. The alcohol industry, charities and policy influence in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyness, Sarah M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Charities exist to pursue a public benefit, whereas corporations serve the interests of their shareholders. The alcohol industry uses corporate social responsibility activities to further its interests in influencing alcohol policy. Many charities also seek to influence alcohol and other policy. The aim of this study was to explore relationships between the alcohol industry and charities in the UK and whether these relationships may be used as a method of influencing alcohol policy. Methods: The charity regulator websites for England and Wales and for Scotland were the main data sources used to identify charities involved in UK alcohol policy making processes and/or funded by the alcohol industry. Results: Five charities were identified that both receive alcohol industry funding and are active in UK alcohol policy processes: Drinkaware; the Robertson Trust; British Institute of Innkeeping; Mentor UK and Addaction. The latter two are the sole remaining non-industry non-governmental members of the controversial responsibility deal alcohol network, from which all other public health interests have resigned. Conclusion: This study raises questions about the extent to which the alcohol industry is using UK charities as vehicles to further their own interests in UK alcohol policy. Mechanisms of industry influence in alcohol policy making globally is an important target for further investigations designed to assist the implementation of evidenced-based policies. PMID:24913316

  14. HSMR : Comparing Death Rates Across UK Hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ben Teeuwen; Thuy Ngo; Frans Nauta

    2011-01-01

    The Hospital Standardized Mortality Ratio (HSMR) is a measurement tool that shows hospitals’ death rates. The HSMR compares deaths that occur in hospitals with death ratios that one would normally expect based on patients’ diseases. It is used as a benchmark for adjusted hospital death rates. These

  15. Motivation Types and Mental Health of UK Hospitality Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotera, Yasuhiro; Adhikari, Prateek; Van Gordon, William

    2018-01-01

    The primary purposes of this study were to (i) assess levels of different types of work motivation in a sample of UK hospitality workers and make a cross-cultural comparison with Chinese counterparts and (ii) identify how work motivation and shame-based attitudes towards mental health explain the variance in mental health problems in UK hospitality workers. One hundred three UK hospitality workers completed self-report measures, and correlation and multiple regression analyses were conducted to identify significant relationships. Findings demonstrate that internal and external motivation levels were higher in UK versus Chinese hospitality workers. Furthermore, external motivation was more significantly associated with shame and mental health problems compared to internal motivation. Motivation accounted for 34-50% of mental health problems. This is the first study to explore the relationship between motivation, shame, and mental health in UK hospitality workers. Findings suggest that augmenting internal motivation may be a novel means of addressing mental health problems in this worker population.

  16. Trends in occupational exposure within the UK civil nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    The UK civil nuclear industry was established in the 1950s and workers in the industry have received occupational radiation exposures since that time. Data on occupational exposures over this period show a reduction in annual doses. This trend was initiated by more restrictive statutory dose limitation requirements, and was achieved by greater emphasis on radiation protection methods. (Author)

  17. Performance clustering and incentives in the UK pension fund industry

    OpenAIRE

    David Blake; Bruce N. Lehmann; Allan Timmermann

    2002-01-01

    Despite pension fund managers being largely unconstrained in their investment decisions, this paper reports evidence of clustering in the performance of a large cross-section of UK pension fund managers around the median fund manager. This finding is explained in terms of the predominance of a single investment style (balanced management), the fee structures and incentives operating in the UK pension fund industry to maximise relative rather than absolute performance, the high concentration i...

  18. The UK oil industry in 1992-93

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, John

    1993-01-01

    A review is presented of the fortunes of the United Kingdom oil industry for the year 1992-1993. Recent achievements in dealing with competition and growing costs are noted. Relationships between the oil industry and policy makers, both at national and European Community level will need to be based on realistic understanding of the industry and the complex issues it faces. Although the offshore oil and gas industry has enjoyed considerable success since the mid-1960s, recent structural change and market liberalization means that it now faces challenges which require even closer cooperation between government and the industry itself to be achieved. (UK)

  19. CURRENT TRENDS IN HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivica Batinić

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hospitality industry is a complex product-service economic activity which besides accommodation, food and beverages offers a variety of complementary and ancillary services in order to meet modern needs, demands and desires of tourists consumers. Contemporary needs, demands and desires of tourists consumers (increased need for security and preservation of health; emphasis on ecology and healthy food; pure nature stay; growing demand for adventure activities and excitement; convention facilities and incentive offerings; visits to towns, big sports, cultural, religious, business events; new travel motivation have led to the emergence of new trends in hospitality offering design. Wellness and spa hotels, boutique hotels, all inclusive hotels, slow-food restaurants, and wine and lounge bars are just some of the main trends, and successful hoteliers and caterers will examine each of the trends and devise development politics in accordance with the new requirements and global market needs.

  20. Industry fights energy tax; UK Negotiates agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, M.

    1996-01-01

    Europe''s energy-intensive industries have banded together to attack the European Commission''s latest proposal for a carbon-energy tax. Instead of passing a new directive--which the commission has been trying to do for five years--it now wants to expand existing duties on mineral oils to cover coal, natural gas, and electricity. The commission also aims to increase the mineral oil duties. Energy-intensive industries--including producers of chemicals, cars, cement, lime, iron, steel, and other metals--say the plans would destroy their competitiveness. They say they are improving energy efficiency voluntarily and urge the commission to focus on liberalizing Europe''s gas and electricity markets, which would reduce prices

  1. Self-Confidence in the Hospitality Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Oshins

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Few industries rely on self-confidence to the extent that the hospitality industry does because guests must feel welcome and that they are in capable hands. This article examines the results of hundreds of student interviews with industry professionals at all levels to determine where the majority of the hospitality industry gets their self-confidence.

  2. The status of ISI in the UK nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bann, T.; Rogerson, A. [AEA Technology, Risley (United Kingdom). Nuclear NDE Services

    1999-08-01

    This paper reviews the status of in-service inspection (ISI) in UK nuclear power generation industry through the experience of its nuclear utilities. The paper is intended to be a summary of some of the most recent and relevant ISI issues facing the utilities and the solutions devised to address those issues. (orig.)

  3. Privatisation of the UK's nuclear power industry: nuclear's triple challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, W.R.I.

    1997-01-01

    At the British Nuclear Congress in December 1996, Lord Fraser of Caryllie, then UK energy minister, set out the three key issues the nuclear industry must tackle for a successful future: (1) increased competition from other energy sources, (2) a growing world market for its skills and (3) a continuing tough regulatory regime. Nuclear power, with electricity generated in the UK rising to 25%, has responded well to competition from other energy sources, and also to the further competition generated by privatisation which has already generated benefits for the public. As other countries with nuclear programmes diversify and upgrade their technology this will create new export opportunities for Britain over and above those already in existence, notably by BNFL in Japan. Other areas that Britain has to offer relate to safety improvements, notably in eastern Europe, and decommissioning, in which Magnox Electric is one of the few operators in the world with experience in decommissioning a full scale commercial reactor. The regulatory framework for the nuclear industry will continue to be as rigorous as ever, but, however the industry is structured, it should be noted that commercial success and continued safe operations are inextricably linked. The industry must operate within the framework of the development of international treaties and agreements in the nuclear field. The Government will continue to take a close interest in the safety, security and prosperity of the nuclear industry, and help Britain as a whole to be a successful and influential player in the international nuclear community. (UK)

  4. Improving environmental strategies of the UK oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanega, J.

    1992-01-01

    The paper is a strategic review of the current environmental policies and practices of the UK Oil and Gas Industry. It begins with an analysis of the current environmental impacts of the UK Oil and Gas Industry, including air emissions, effluents to sea and industrial wastes. The importance of environmental issues to UK operators is related to financial conseqeunces of environmental damage to the North Sea, poor public opinion and the spectre of increased government regulations. There is a survey of the best practices of environmental management programmes, including environmental assessment, monitoring auditing and contingency planning and emergency response, with historical lessons from Cadiz to Valdez and the industry's reaction to Exxon Valdez. After critically assessing the weaknesses of environmental management programmes, the author calls for systematic environmental assessment, employing inventory, monitoring, risk assessment and quantified risk assessment. There are recommendations on how to minimise the impact on the environment through the use of existing technology, training, incident response and crisis management, auditing, testing and industry-wide collaboration. (Author)

  5. Hospitality Management: Perspectives from Industry Advisor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Roginsky

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In prior quarterly reports, Pinnacle Advisory Group presented timely updates about the New England lodging industry, which included focused profiles on particular cities. In this issue, the firm offers more general insight about the hospitality industry. Several Pinnacle executives recently participated in a panel discussion about investment, management, and careers in the hospitality industry.

  6. Guest loyalty in hospitality industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagić Snježana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous growth of competition in the hospitality sector has created the need to retain guests and prevent them from switching company due to better offer or saturation. Loyal customers are a valuable asset for catering companies, not only because of the awareness of the effects of customer loyalty. They tend to spread word-of-mouth advertising, more tolerant to price changes, as well as they casually create a linkage to their friends, relatives, colleagues, and other probable consumers and thus enable businesses to uphold a guest's base. By recognizing loyalty guests' importance, the global hospitality industry created monetary and non-monetary rewards for loyal visitors, delayed gratification (points collection and immediate rewards, as well as numerous other reward systems that try to keep them. To win customer loyalty, together with all benefits arising from it, caterers need to become familiar with factors, which determine guests' loyalty. The paper will show the results of research regarding the impact of the service quality and guests' satisfaction to their loyalty. Many authors have confirmed that employees' satisfaction affected customers' satisfaction, so this paper will give an answer does it influence on customers' loyalty as well.

  7. Technology in Hospitality Industry: Prospects and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Kansakar, Prasanna; Munir, Arslan; Shabani, Neda

    2017-01-01

    The leisure and hospitality industry is one of the driving forces of the global economy. The widespread adoption of new technologies in this industry over recent years has fundamentally reshaped the way in which services are provided and received. In this paper, we explore some of the state-of-the-art technologies currently employed in the hospitality industry and how they are improving guest experiences and changing the hospitality service platform. We also envision some potential future hos...

  8. Potential for energy-conserving capital equipment in UK industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fawkes, S D

    1986-01-01

    A summary is given of recent research into the potential for energy-conserving capital equipment in UK industries. The research had significant findings regarding the feasibility of achieving low-energy scenarios. It also stressed the importance of site specific factors in inhibiting incremental technical change such as that common in energy-conservation investments, developed a soft systems model of energy-management activities and investigated current progress and management styles in the brewing, malting, distilling and dairy sectors.

  9. A Panel Analysis Of UK Industrial Company Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia Isachenkova; John Hunter

    2002-01-01

    We examine the failure determinants for large quoted UK industrials using a panel data set comprising 539 firms observed over the period 1988-93. The empirical design employs data from company accounts and is based on Chamberlain’s conditional binomial logit model, which allows for unobservable, firm-specific, time-invariant factors associated with failure risk. We find a noticeable degree of heterogeneity across the sample companies. Our panel results show that, after controll...

  10. Carbon soundings: greenhouse gas emissions of the UK music industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottrill, C.; Liverman, D.; Boykoff, M.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, questions regarding how to reduce human contributions to climate change have become more commonplace and non-nation state actors—such as businesses, non-government organizations, celebrities—have increasingly become involved in climate change mitigation and adaptation initiatives. For these dynamic and rapidly expanding spaces, this letter provides an accounting of the methods and findings from a 2007 assessment of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the UK music industry. The study estimates that overall GHG emissions associated with the UK music market are approximately 540 000 t CO2e per annum. Music recording and publishing accounted for 26% of these emissions (138 000 t CO2e per annum), while three-quarters (74%) derived from activities associated with live music performances (400 000 t CO2e per annum). These results have prompted a group of music industry business leaders to design campaigns to reduce the GHG emissions of their supply chains. The study has also provided a basis for ongoing in-depth research on CD packaging, audience travel, and artist touring as well as the development of a voluntary accreditation scheme for reducing GHG emissions from activities of the UK music industry.

  11. Carbon soundings: greenhouse gas emissions of the UK music industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottrill, C [Centre for Environmental Strategy, School of Engineering (D3), University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Liverman, D [Institute of the Environment, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Boykoff, M, E-mail: c.bottrill@surrey.ac.u, E-mail: liverman@u.arizona.ed, E-mail: boykoff@colorado.ed [CIRES Center for Science and Technology Policy, Environmental Studies and Geography, University of Colorado - Boulder, 1333 Grandview Ave, Campus Box 488, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Over the past decade, questions regarding how to reduce human contributions to climate change have become more commonplace and non-nation state actors-such as businesses, non-government organizations, celebrities-have increasingly become involved in climate change mitigation and adaptation initiatives. For these dynamic and rapidly expanding spaces, this letter provides an accounting of the methods and findings from a 2007 assessment of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the UK music industry. The study estimates that overall GHG emissions associated with the UK music market are approximately 540 000 t CO{sub 2}e per annum. Music recording and publishing accounted for 26% of these emissions (138 000 t CO{sub 2}e per annum), while three-quarters (74%) derived from activities associated with live music performances (400 000 t CO{sub 2}e per annum). These results have prompted a group of music industry business leaders to design campaigns to reduce the GHG emissions of their supply chains. The study has also provided a basis for ongoing in-depth research on CD packaging, audience travel, and artist touring as well as the development of a voluntary accreditation scheme for reducing GHG emissions from activities of the UK music industry.

  12. Carbon soundings: greenhouse gas emissions of the UK music industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottrill, C; Liverman, D; Boykoff, M

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, questions regarding how to reduce human contributions to climate change have become more commonplace and non-nation state actors-such as businesses, non-government organizations, celebrities-have increasingly become involved in climate change mitigation and adaptation initiatives. For these dynamic and rapidly expanding spaces, this letter provides an accounting of the methods and findings from a 2007 assessment of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the UK music industry. The study estimates that overall GHG emissions associated with the UK music market are approximately 540 000 t CO 2 e per annum. Music recording and publishing accounted for 26% of these emissions (138 000 t CO 2 e per annum), while three-quarters (74%) derived from activities associated with live music performances (400 000 t CO 2 e per annum). These results have prompted a group of music industry business leaders to design campaigns to reduce the GHG emissions of their supply chains. The study has also provided a basis for ongoing in-depth research on CD packaging, audience travel, and artist touring as well as the development of a voluntary accreditation scheme for reducing GHG emissions from activities of the UK music industry.

  13. Quality of coroner's post-mortems in a UK hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mahdy, Husayn

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper was, principally, to look at the coroner's post-mortem report quality regarding adult medical patients admitted to an English hospital; and to compare results with Royal College of Pathologists guidelines. Hospital clinical notes of adult medical patients dying in 2011 and who were referred to the coroner's office to determine the cause of death were scrutinised. Their clinical care was also reviewed. There needs to be a comprehensive approach to coroner's post-mortems such as routinely taking histological and microbiological specimens. Acute adult medical patient care needs to improve. Steps should be taken to ensure that comprehensive coroner's post-mortems are performed throughout the UK, including with routine histological and microbiological specimens examination. Additionally, closer collaboration between clinicians and pathologists needs to occur to improve emergency adult medical patient clinical care. The study highlights inadequacies in coroner's pathology services.

  14. The development of the UK landfill gas industry: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, H.

    1996-01-01

    The UK's landfill gas research started in 1978 and led to the first commercial scheme in 1981 where the gas was used to fire a brick kiln. Electricity generation followed in 1984. Although by 1990 there were nearly two dozen operational schemes, the real impetus to usage was given by the NFFO. Here all electricity generated could be sold irrespective of the demand. Although the Department of Energy - and latterly the Department of Trade and Industry - invested substantial monies in the early research and development, the greatest factor in the success of the industry has been willingness to take its own risks. The industry must now learn to live with lower revenues and heightened environmental requirements. (Author)

  15. [Health, hospitality sector and tobacco industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella Pons, Francesc; Córdoba Garcia, Rodrigo; Suárez Bonel, Maria Pilar

    2012-11-01

    To present the strategies used by the tobacco industry to meet government regulatory measures of its products. To demonstrate the relationship between tobacco industry and the hospitality sector. Note that the arguments and strategies used routinely by the hospitality industry have been previously provided by the tobacco industry. Location of key documents by meta-search, links to declassified documents, specific websites of the tobacco and hospitality industry, news sources and published articles in health journals. This review reveals the close relationship between tobacco industry and hospitality sector. It highlights the strategies carried out by the tobacco industry, including strategic hoarding of information, public relations, lobbying, consultation program, smoker defence groups, building partnerships, intimidation and patronage. The arguments and strategies used by the hospitality industry to match point by point that used by the tobacco industry. These arguments are refutable from the point of view of public health as it is scientifically proven that totally smoke-free environments are the only way to protect non-smokers from tobacco smoke exposure and its harmful effects on health. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Zero carbon homes: Perceptions from the UK construction industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heffernan, Emma; Pan, Wei; Liang, Xi; Wilde, Pieter de

    2015-01-01

    The take-up of the many voluntary energy efficiency standards which exist in the UK and internationally has been limited. As a result, governments have recognised the need to introduce mandatory schemes through legislation, e.g. from 2016 all new build homes in the UK will be required to achieve zero carbon in regulated energy consumption. However, as 2016 approaches, very few zero carbon homes are being delivered. This paper explores the drivers and barriers for zero carbon homebuilding. The perceptions of the wider construction industry were gathered through a series of semi-structured interviews with professionals involved in commissioning, designing, constructing and regulating housing. The results show that, whilst drivers for zero carbon homebuilding exist, the barriers are currently perceived to be greater than the drivers. The barriers are categorised into five groups: economic, skills and knowledge, industry, legislative and cultural. Mechanisms for policy and industry support for the delivery of zero carbon homes are identified to address these barriers. The research findings highlight the need for a clear and robust policy framework for the forthcoming standard. The Government and industry must prioritise raising public awareness of the need for and benefits of zero carbon homes to help develop market demand. - Highlights: • The strongest drivers were perceived to be in the legislative and economic themes. • More barriers were identified than drivers or potential support mechanisms. • Economic and skills and knowledge barriers were perceived as the most significant. • Uncertainty in zero carbon homes policy is a barrier to zero carbon homebuilding. • Proposed support mechanisms include zero carbon champions and self-build homes

  17. COMPETITIVENESS IN HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY: ROMANIAN STYLE

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia-Elena TUCLEA; Ana-Mihaela PADUREAN

    2008-01-01

    In this paper is presented one of the important sectors of the national economy, at least from its potential for development perspective: the hospitality industry. The research interest is related to finding out the main factors of competitiveness in this field. This research attempts to identify the essential aspects of competitiveness in the hospitality industry. The objectives pursued refer to: discovering the degree to which the concept of competitiveness is understood and capitalized on ...

  18. COMPETITIVENESS IN HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY: ROMANIAN STYLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia-Elena TUCLEA

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is presented one of the important sectors of the nationaleconomy, at least from its potential for development perspective: thehospitality industry. The research interest is related to finding out the mainfactors of competitiveness in this field. This research attempts to identify theessential aspects of competitiveness in the hospitality industry. Theobjectives pursued refer to: discovering the degree to which the concept ofcompetitiveness is understood and capitalized on by the managers in theRomanian hospitality industry; identifying a set of factors considered decisivein raising the competitiveness of Romanian firms in the hospitality industry;identifying the strategic concerns of firms operating in the Romanianhospitality industry, in order to establish the connection between strategy andthe competitiveness of the firms belonging to this sector.As a result, the hypotheses are: in the hospitality industry there areparticularities which influence the firms’ competitiveness and strategicorientation; preoccupation towards raising competitiveness and strategicorientation is influenced by the type of exploitation and the number of stars(level of comfort; in the hospitality industry, managers focus on cost controland service quality as decisive factors of competitiveness.

  19. Comparison of 201Tl solution sources in UK hospitals, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, M.; Woods, M.

    2001-01-01

    During recent years, concerns have been raised within the nuclear medicine field about the accuracy of activity measurements for 201 Tl. And indeed, NPL calibrations repeatedly indicated that the level of impurities present in such samples and the significant amount of activity adsorbed onto the glass wall of the container could produce erroneous results. In addition, the standard P6 vials, in which 201 Tl solution had been previously supplied, were recently replaced with the new ''10R Type 1 plus'' Schott vials. To assess the magnitude of these effects on the accuracy of clinical measurements of the activity of 201 Tl, an intercomparison exercise was conducted between the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Nycomed-Amersham (NA) and the UK hospital physics community. The majority of the 273 reported results were within the ± 10 % limit of accuracy that hospitals aim to achieve for diagnosis, biased high. The tendency to overestimate the activity was more evident for syringe measurements. The exercise also revealed that the adsorption losses experienced with P6 vials had been solved by the introduction of the 10R vials, but individual calibrators need to be recalibrated for this new container. (author)

  20. Analisa Penerapan Sistem pada Hospitality Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steeve Haryanto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Analysis on the application of the system hospitality industry aims to determine whether the system from outside has a considerable influence on the number of luxury hotels in Jakarta as well as the factors that influence in picking the hospitality industry service system. The results of this survey are expected to be a consideration in implementing an information system in the field of hospitality industry. The method used in this paper is a literature review and analysis. The initial step in the analysis is to conduct a survey on the current system in hotels in Jakarta, and analysis of the survey results and the identification of the need for local companies to compete with foreign companies. Implementation of the system is no longer measured by how many facilities are available but the system is measured by how stable revenue generated calculations per dayrunning at a hotel with no lost posts.

  1. Development opportunities for the UK offshore wind industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This report summarises the results of a study investigating the UK's ability to compete for the construction of offshore wind farms. The European offshore wind farm market is examined, and the UK offshore construction equipment and wind farm construction methods are analysed, and recommendations for a purpose build or modified construction vessel are presented. The appendix gives UK construction companies addresses and contact names

  2. The prevalence of occupational dermatitis in the UK printing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livesley, E J; Rushton, L; English, J S; Williams, H C

    2002-07-01

    To quantify occupational ill health resulting from dermatitis in the UK printing industry and to explore links with particular processes and activities. Approximately 2600 members of the Graphical, Paper and Media Union living in Nottinghamshire were sent a self completion questionnaire. A sample of respondents, both those who reported current skin problems and those who did not, were invited for a short dermatological examination. The overall response rate was 62%. A total of 1189 respondents were directly involved in the printing industry and categorised according to work in pre-press (25%), printing (46%), or finishing (42%) processes. A total of 490 respondents (41%) self reported having a skin complaint at some time. Prevalence was highest in males (43%) and those working in printing (49%), in particular those who cleaned rollers and cylinders or who came into contact with substances containing isocyanates on a daily basis. The most commonly affected areas reported were the fingers and webs between the fingers. Twenty six per cent of the 490 reported a current problem on the hand. Reported symptoms included itching (61%), rash (58%), and dry skin (56%). Although certain printing industry substances were thought by respondents to aggravate their condition, constant washing and friction was most often cited. Reported use of protective equipment and cleansing products was generally high, particularly by printers. Clinical examination confirmed the high self reported prevalence and also identified a substantial proportion of mild cases which were not reported. The overall prevalence of occupationally related skin complaints is estimated to be 40%. A much higher prevalence of dermatitis has been identified than from routine surveillance schemes. The use of good quality records from unions with high membership facilitated access to workers across a range of company sites and printing processes. Validation of self reported symptoms through clinical examination was

  3. Lessons from America? US magnet hospitals and their implications for UK nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, J

    1994-02-01

    This paper examines possible implications of the US 'magnet hospital' concept for the UK nursing labour market. Magnet hospitals have been researched in the US and have been demonstrated to exhibit lower nurse turnover and higher levels of reported job satisfaction than other hospitals. Key characteristics include a decentralized organizational structure, a commitment to flexible working hours, an emphasis on professional autonomy and development, and systematic communication between management and staff. The paper examines the labour market characteristics of UK nurses and US nurses and finds many similarities. Detailed case studies of employment practice in 10 US hospitals and 10 Scottish hospitals are reported, with specific attention to remuneration practice, methods of organizing nursing care, establishment-setting and flexible hours. The paper concludes that there are features of the magnet hospital concept which are of relevance and applicable to the UK nursing labour market, but that piecemeal importation of ideas is unlikely to be beneficial.

  4. Implementation of IRR99 and IRMER2000 in UK hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beddoe, A.; Temperton, D.; Rafiqi, E.; Larkin, E.; Jones, T.

    2004-01-01

    (ME)R must be clearly established. This paper examines the implications of implementing IRR99 and IR(ME)R2000 in hospitals and medical practices in the UK for both diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The costs of this implementation have been significant, both in terms of increased work, and therefore staffing costs, and increased bureaucracy, but the benefits in terms of reduced medical exposure (from diagnostic sources) have also been clearly achieved. Although fewer patients are inappropriately exposed and more radiographs are actually reported, would the resources expended to achieve these improvements have been better spent on other more pressing public health and medical issues? Copyright (2004) Australasian Radiation Protection Society Inc

  5. The UK solar water heating industry: a period of development and growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blower, John

    2001-01-01

    This 2001 edition of the guide to UK renewable energy companies examines the solar water heating sector in the UK and presents an illustration of the layout of a typical solar water heating system. The rising demand for solar water heating and growth in sales especially in the export market are noted. Developments within the UK solar water heating manufacturing industry are considered, and details are given of design and development in innovative policy infrastructure, and the SHINE 21 project supported by the EU's ADAPT programme and the UK Department of Trade and Industry involving collaboration between the solar water heating and plumbing industries. Developments in the new build sectors including in-roof solar collector products and the increasing number of solar water heating systems installed in UK houses are discussed along with the promising future for the market

  6. Social Responsibility of Hospitality Industry Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuray Türker

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study is to determine the views of employees and managers working at the hospitality industry in Safranbolu towards the social responsibility of tourism enterprises, social responsibility activities carried out by the hotel enterprises, and their views on the advantages and contributions of social responsibility projects to the hotel business. This study will make contributions to the related literature on social responsibility at the hospitality industry by means of identifying the social responsibility activities of hotel enterprises, of which there is relatively limited number of studies.Within this context, a structured survey was conducted with 152 respondents including employees, managers and owners of the hotel enterprises through face to face interviews in order to determine the perceptions of employees towards social responsibility. SPSS 15 for Windows was used to analyze the data. The research has found that the employees working at hospitality industry in Safranbolu are sensitive to the social responsibilities and they act socially responsible in their activities. Additionally the results show that the respondents behave socially responsible towards guests, society and natural environment, but that they are less responsible towards the suppliers.

  7. Promotion of an indigenous manufacturing industry in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, C.

    1998-01-01

    Of the large European wind energy markets, that of the UK is uniquely dominated by imported technology. An indigenous manufacturing base is desirable for strategic reasons, and to create employment and export opportunities. Analysis of the wind energy policies of other countries indicates the factors required to stimulate local manufacture. This paper examines how UK wind energy policy may be shaped for this purpose, taking account of the lessons learned under NFFO/SRO, and elsewhere in Europe. (Author)

  8. Profitability analysis in the hospital industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleverley, W O

    1978-01-01

    Measures of marginal profit are derived for the two payment classes--cost payers and charge payers--that the hospital industry must consider in profitability analysis, i.e., prediction of the excess of revenue over expenses. Two indexes of profitability, use when payment mix is constant and when it is nonconstant, respectively, are derived from the two marginal profit measures, and one of them is shown to be a modification of the contribution margin, the conventional measure of profitability used in general industry. All three measures--the contribution margin and the two new indexes of profitability--are used to estimate changes in net income resulting from changes in patient volume with and without accompanying changes in payment mix. The conventional measure yields large overestimates of expected excess revenue. PMID:632101

  9. [Muskuloskeletal disorders in construction industry: hospital cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, M; Riva, M M; Mosconi, G

    2012-01-01

    The authors analyse 493 hospital cases in 356 workers from the construction industry, came to observation for musculoskeletal disorders (average age 48, 2 years, SD 9; work seniority 32, 2 years, SD 9, 7; work seniority in construction industry 27, 3 years, SD 12, 4). The evaluation was required in 305 subjects (85.7% of the sample) to investigate one or more suspected WMDS; in 51 subjects (14.3% of the sample) to express an opinion on fitness to work or residual work capacity. Investigations led to diagnosis of 479 musculoskeletal disorders; the districts most affected are spine and upper limb. 64.7% of the musculoskeletal disorders was evaluated to be work-related, the percentage rises to 68% when considering only cases sent for evaluation of suspected WMDS. The most frequent reasons to exclude relation between the musculoskeletal disorders and work were an high age at diagnosis, presence of comorbidity or outcome of trauma, a disease mismatch exposure.

  10. Relational Capabilities to Leverage New Knowledge: Managing Directors' Perceptions in UK and Portugal Old Industrial Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Jorge Tiago

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Focusing on the specific context of two European old industrial regions--South Yorkshire (UK) and North Region of Portugal--this paper aims to identify and conceptualise a set of relational capabilities that business leaders perceive to play a key role in industrial rejuvenation. Design/Methodology/Approach: A qualitative research design…

  11. Needs Assessment of Hospitality/Tourism Industry in Kentucky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Shirley

    This report of an assessment of the hospitality/tourism industry in Kentucky begins with a history/description of the hospitality/tourism industry written from research; the hospitality/tourism training programs conducted by various institutions in the state are also described. For the assessment itself, two survey instruments were prepared and…

  12. Exchange Rate Exposure and Its Determinants: A Firm and Industry Analysis of the UK Companies

    OpenAIRE

    He, Jiao

    2010-01-01

    This study assesses whether the unexpected exchange rate movements volatilize the UK firms’ stock return based on the firm- and industry-level analysis, and examines whether the magnitude of the exchange rate exposure is determined by the firm-specific factors. Using a sample of 244 UK companies listed in the FTSE 350 during the test period between December 1999 and December 2009, the result documents that the exchange rate fluctuation does affect the firm value. Among the five introduced ex...

  13. UK public attitudes to the nuclear industry: the effect of the Sellafield visitor centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.; Rogers, J.

    1993-01-01

    Public support for the nuclear industry appears to be growing in the UK at a time when environmental awareness is also prominent. Perceived advantages from nuclear power range from conservation of scare fossil reserves through to maintaining a worldwide technical competitiveness. Within the UK, the Sellafield Visitors Centre has proved to be a large tourist attraction, as well as successfully presenting information in a form that is easy to understand. (author)

  14. "Folk" Understandings of Quality in UK Higher Hospitality Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the evolution of "folk" understandings of quality in higher hospitality education and the consequent implications of these understandings for current quality concerns in the field. Design/methodology/approach: The paper combines a historical survey of the stated topic…

  15. Collective doses from airborne discharges by the UK nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, G.N.

    1981-01-01

    Small quantities of radionuclides are discharged in airborne effluents during the normal operation of nuclear installations. The dispersion of these nuclides in the atmosphere and their subsequent transfer through various sectors of the environment leads to the irradiation of the population. The collective dose to the UK population from airborne discharges in one particular year, 1978, from UK nuclear installations is estimated. The discharges in that year are typical of those in the recent past. Consideration is given to the contribution made by each type of establishment (eg, nuclear power stations, reprocessing plants) and the nuclides which contribute significantly to the collective dose are identified. The distributions of the collective dose in time and among individuals in the exposed population are important features in determining the significance attached to it and both aspects are discussed. The collective dose can be used as a measure of the health detriment associated with the discharge practices considered and is one of several quantities to be taken into account in assessing them. The collective doses from airborne discharges are finally contrasted with those from other sources of exposure of the population. (author)

  16. Private wind powered electricity generators for industry in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabit, S. S.; Stark, J.

    This paper investigates the impact of the provisions of the new Energy Act, 1983 on industrial wind-powered private generators of electricity and the effects of published tariffs on various industrial working patterns. Up to 30 percent savings can be achieved in annual electricity bill costs for an industrial generator/user of electricity working a single daily shift, if located in a favorable, 7 m/s mean annual wind speed regime. Variation of the availability charge between Electricity Boards about a base value of 0.70 pounds sterling/kVA was found to have insignificant (+ or - 1.3 percent) impact on total electricity bill costs. It was also shown that for industrial users of electricity, the simpler two-rate purchase terms were commercially adequate when compared with the four-rate alternative where expensive metering becomes necessary.

  17. Building new hospitals: a UK infection control perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockley, J M; Constantine, C E; Orr, K E

    2006-03-01

    Infection control input is vital throughout the planning, design and building stages of a new hospital project, and must continue through the commissioning (and decommissioning) process, evaluation and putting the facility into full clinical service. Many hospitals continue to experience problems months or years after occupying the new premises; some of these could have been avoided by infection control involvement earlier in the project. The importance of infection control must be recognized by the chief executive of the hospital trust and project teams overseeing the development. Clinical user groups and contractors must also be made aware of infection control issues. It is vital that good working relationships are built up between the infection control team (ICT) and all these parties. ICTs need the authority to influence the process. This may require their specific recognition by the Private Finance Initiative National Unit, the Department of Health or other relevant authorities. ICTs need training in how to read design plans, how to write effective specifications, and in other areas with which they may be unfamiliar. The importance of documentation and record keeping is paramount. External or independent validation of processes should be available, particularly in commissioning processes. Building design in relation to infection control needs stricter national regulations, allowing ICTs to focus on more local usage issues. Further research is needed to provide evidence regarding the relationship between building design and the prevalence of infection.

  18. 'Greenfields' and 'Brownfields': automotive industrial development in the UK and in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Vale

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available The industrial policy in the UK and in Portugal, as in most EU countries, seeks to attract new investment capacity, to create jobs and to promote the impact of the so-called "demonstration efect" of "greenfield" development strategies pursued in the new plants of inward investors on existing or "brownfield" plants. This industrial policy focus is particularly evident in the automobile industry.This paper compares the industrial policy oriented towards the automobile industry in the UK and in Portugal. Two recent "greenfield" investments are analised: Nissan in the North-East region (UK and Ford/VW in the Setúbal Peninsula (Portugal, as well as three "brownfield" plants: Ford Halewood and GM Vauxhall Ellesmere Port in the North-West region (UK and Renault in Setúbal (Portugal. The first part starts with a discussion of industrial policy in the automobile sector, the role of "greenfield" development strategies and the "demonstration effect" on "brownfield" plants. Then, the limits of new inward investment are pointed out, basically their problems and restrictions. Afterwards, the structural barriers to the "demonstration effect" within "brownfield" plants are outlined and some possabilities for alternative "brownfield" development strategies are presented.

  19. Isocyanate exposure and asthma in the UK vehicle repair industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, S J; Jones, K; Piney, M; Agius, R M

    2015-12-01

    Organic diisocyanates are a common cause of occupational asthma, particularly in motor vehicle repair (MVR) workers. The UK Health & Safety Laboratory provides screening for urinary hexamethylenediamine (UHDA), a biomarker of exposure to 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI). The UK Surveillance of Work-related and Occupational Respiratory Disease scheme (SWORD) has collected reports of occupational asthma since 1996. To compare trends in HDI exposure with trends in the incidence of work-related asthma attributed to isocyanates or paint spraying in MVR workers reported to SWORD. Two-level regression models were used to estimate trends in UHDA levels and work-related asthma in MVR workers reported to SWORD. The direction and magnitude of the trends were compared descriptively. From 2006 to 2014, there was a significant decline in the number of urine samples with detectable levels of UHDA (odds ratio = 0.96; 95% confidence intervals 0.94-0.98) and minimal change in those over the guidance value (1.03; 1.00-1.06). Over the same period, there was a significant decline in all asthma cases attributed to isocyanates or paint spraying reported to SWORD (0.90; 0.86-0.94) and a non-significant decline among MVR workers (0.94; 0.86-1.02). The simultaneous decrease in HDI exposure and incident cases of asthma reported to SWORD is temporally consistent with a reduction in exposure to airborne isocyanate leading to a reduction in asthma. Although this is not direct evidence of a causal relationship between the two trends, it is suggestive. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine.

  20. Supply Chain Risk Management and Frameworks in the UK Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Ratanak

    2011-01-01

    This research aims to study the supply chain risk management in the retail industry. The risen in level of risks in the supply chain and the increasing role of retailers in the supply chain have driven this research to be conducted. Four important objectives of this research are: to identify and categorise retail supply chain risks, to present which principal risks have been concerned by most retailers, to build the supply chain risk mitigation framework in the retail supply chain, and to d...

  1. Energy and capital: substitutes or complements. Some results for the UK industrial sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, L.C.

    1984-10-01

    This paper investigates the substitutability or complementarity possibilities between capital, labor, and energy in the UK industrial sector, with particular attention to the capital-energy relationship. It is found, using the translog-cost-function approach, that capital and labor as well as energy and labor are substitutes. However, capital and energy are found to be complements. 11 references, 3 tables.

  2. Credentialism, National Targets, and the Learning Society: Perspectives on Educational Attainment in the UK Steel Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Alison; Unwin, Lorna

    1999-01-01

    The UK's National Learning Targets for Education and Training, embracing 11- to 21-year-olds, adults, and employers, promote a credentialist approach to economic and social development. This article shows how the steel industry measures up. Using qualifications-based targets as a proxy for adult workforce capability is misguided. (Contains 40…

  3. A Suitable Software Process Improvement Model for the UK Healthcare Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tien D.; Guo, Hong; Naguib, Raouf N. G.

    Over the recent years, the UK Healthcare sector has been the prime focus of many reports and industrial surveys, particularly in the field of software development and management issues. This signals the importance of growing concerns regarding quality issues in the Healthcare domain. In response to this, a new tailored Healthcare Process Improvement (SPI) model is proposed, which takes into consideration both signals from the industry and insights from literature.

  4. The Influence of the Economy on Hospitality Industry in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Influence of the Economy on Hospitality Industry in Nigeria. ... Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management ... contributions of the hospitality industry (represented by Hotels and Restaurants) to the Nigerian economy (represented by the Gross Domestic Products – GDP) and the GDP itself from 1980 ...

  5. Analysis of Big Data Maturity Stage in Hospitality Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Shabani, Neda; Munir, Arslan; Bose, Avishek

    2017-01-01

    Big data analytics has an extremely significant impact on many areas in all businesses and industries including hospitality. This study aims to guide information technology (IT) professionals in hospitality on their big data expedition. In particular, the purpose of this study is to identify the maturity stage of the big data in hospitality industry in an objective way so that hotels be able to understand their progress, and realize what it will take to get to the next stage of big data matur...

  6. Employee assistance programs in the hospital industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, J C; Szczerbacki, D

    1988-01-01

    The health care literature describes the industry's need for employee assistance programs (EAPs). New research results show the degree to which EAPs are used in the industry and ways to determine their success.

  7. The UK High Power RF Faraday Partnership Industrial, Academia, and Public Collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, A.D.R.; Carter, R.G.; Clunie, D.; Bowater, S.P.; Ellis, D.; Gamble, D.; Large, T.; Lucas, W.; Pettit, C.; Poole, M. W.; Smith, H.; Smith, P.W.; Wilcox, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    The High Power Radio Frequency (HPRF) Faraday Partnership is a UK technology forum for all users, designers, developers and researchers of RF and microwave devices and systems. High power RF and microwave engineering are key enabling technologies in a wide range of industrial sectors. Formed in October 2001 and funded initially by the UK Department of Trade and Industry and the UK Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council, the purpose of the HPRF Faraday Partnership is the development of a vibrant research, development and manufacturing base capable of exploiting opportunities in high power radio-frequency engineering. The partnership includes the key UK industrial companies, research laboratories and university research groups. The number of partners is constantly growing and already numbers over thirty. The partnership provides the enabling technology for future high power RF systems and their power supplies through its research programme. It is training people for the sector through PhD studentships and employment as Research Associates. It is planned to develop a Masters Training program. Support and involvement in research for companies in the supply chain is provided through a Partnership Office, a web site and through a range of government funded research schemes. The HPRF Faraday Partnership is seeking to establish more long term international research and development collaborations

  8. Wythenshawe boiler rig. Thirty years of support to the UK nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudge, Andy; Woolsey, Ian S.; Moore, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The Wythenshawe Boiler Rig in Manchester, UK, recently celebrated thirty years of operation in support of the UK nuclear power industry. The Boiler Rig, owned by EDF Energy and operated on EDF Energy's behalf by Serco plc, is a full scale once-through boiler test facility for the investigation of chemistry and corrosion related topics. This paper presents an overview of the design and operation of the Boiler Rig together with some of the technical highlights from its thirty years of operation, many of which have relevance to power plant operations beyond those plants for which the work was performed. (orig.)

  9. A Critical Assessment on SPC Implementation in the UK Food Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarina Abdul Halim Lim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Statistical process control (SPC is one of the most widely applied techniques to control and improve processes in manufacturing industry, but very few studies have reported on the successful application of SPC in the food industry. This paper aims to critically assess the status of SPC in the UK food manufacturing industry and suggests avenues for future research. By surveying the UK food-manufacturing companies, forty-five percent of them were identified implemented SPC, with x-R and x-S charts found to be the most commonly applied SPC charts in this industry. Top management commitment was identified as the most critical factor, while lack of SPC training is the most significant challenge and lack of awareness of SPC as the main reason for food manufacturing companies not implementing SPC. The paper provides information to food companies in the UK on most common practiced and useful quality tools, SPC charts and critical success factors in the food industry. Furthermore, based on the process performance parameters, SPC companies were observed to achieving better results compared to non-SPC companies.

  10. Privatisation and regulation - the effect on the U.K. gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, C.

    1991-01-01

    The U.K. gas industry is a monopolist, privatised in 1986 and subject to partial regulation and general monopoly policy. From April 1992 a new regulatory regime will be applied. This paper explores the impact of privatisation and partial regulation in the gas industry during the first quinquennium and illustrates the issues for regulation and pricing where costs are common to regulated and unregulated sectors. Attributable costs of gas supply are derived and a 'marginal cost' based tariff suggested. This is used as a basis for examining the industry's pricing policy in its several markets, and to analyse its response to privatisation and the regulation it has experienced. (Author)

  11. Howard Feiertag receives hospitality industry award

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Sookhan

    2004-01-01

    Howard Feiertag, of Blacksburg, an instructor in hospitality and tourism management at Virginia Tech's Pamplin College of Business, received the inaugural Excellence in Sales and Marketing Strategy Award at the Hospitality Sales and Marketing Association/New York University Strategy Conference in New York recently.

  12. Preservation and re-use of nuclear knowledge in the UK nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Workman, R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses the need for the UK nuclear industry to preserve knowledge generated during the 6 decades of its existence for re-use by future generations. It outlines the major government restructuring of the industry and its impact on knowledge preservation. Work within British Nuclear Fuels plc to meet the knowledge preservation requirements of its business is described. The focus is shown to be the alignment of tacit knowledge - gained through interviews with key specialists - with the explicit knowledge contained within the major knowledge base (Corporate Memory). The creation of knowledge packages to hold key knowledge on core technologies and nuclear plants is described. The paper also covers developments in securing the nuclear skill base through University Research Alliances and the Dalton Nuclear Institute. Returning to the major new challenges ahead it is shown how a knowledge portal could be implemented, linking the knowledge repositories present within the organisations that will feature in the restructured UK nuclear industry in 2005. The UK nuclear industry is facing its greatest challenge in terms of its organisation and commercial interests, at a time when the technical challenges presented by the decommissioning of old nuclear plants and the remediation of its nuclear sites are building up. In terms of knowledge preservation there has never been a greater need to ensure that knowledge associated with the key technologies that underpin the nuclear plants, and the plants themselves, is made available for use now and in the future. The Nuclear Decommissioning Authority [NDA] - a new government body that will come into being in April 2005 - will own the liabilities (the nuclear plants). Those organisations bidding to operate and decommission plants on the UK nuclear sites will utilise the assets to best effect as Site Licensing Companies [SLC] under contract to the NDA. The key asset is knowledge. Knowledge is present in explicit forms within

  13. Recording of hospitalizations for acute exacerbations of COPD in UK electronic health care records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rothnie KJ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Kieran J Rothnie,1,2 Hana Müllerová,3 Sara L Thomas,2 Joht S Chandan,4 Liam Smeeth,2 John R Hurst,5 Kourtney Davis,3 Jennifer K Quint1,2 1Respiratory Epidemiology, Occupational Medicine and Public Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, UK; 2Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK; 3Respiratory Epidemiology, GlaxoSmithKline R&D, Uxbridge, London; 4Medical School, 5UCL Respiratory, University College London, London, UK Background: Accurate identification of hospitalizations for acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD within electronic health care records is important for research, public health, and to inform health care utilization and service provision. We aimed to develop a strategy to identify hospitalizations for AECOPD in secondary care data and to investigate the validity of strategies to identify hospitalizations for AECOPD in primary care data. Methods: We identified patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD with linked Hospital Episodes Statistics (HES data. We used discharge summaries for recent hospitalizations for AECOPD to develop a strategy to identify the recording of hospitalizations for AECOPD in HES. We then used the HES strategy as a reference standard to investigate the positive predictive value (PPV and sensitivity of strategies for identifying AECOPD using general practice CPRD data. We tested two strategies: 1 codes for hospitalization for AECOPD and 2 a code for AECOPD other than hospitalization on the same day as a code for hospitalization due to unspecified reason. Results: In total, 27,182 patients with COPD were included. Our strategy to identify hospitalizations for AECOPD in HES had a sensitivity of 87.5%. When compared with HES, using a code suggesting hospitalization for AECOPD in CPRD resulted in a PPV of 50.2% (95

  14. QUALITY ASSURANCE IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY: QUALITATIVE ASSESMENT OF NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OFOBRUKU SYLVESTER ABOMEH

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Hospitality is currently the fasted growing economic activity in Abuja-Nigeria. It has also been instrumental in creating jobs and has significant impact on other sectors of economic growth. Based on the above factors much attention need to be placed on the quality of the hospitality industry in Abuja-Nigeria in other to systematic compete with other destinations. Quality assurance is becoming an increasing integral component of the service industry. However, despite some indication that quality assurances are receiving attention in the hospitality industry, its adoption continues to be very slow. This paper examine the usefulness of quality assurance in hospitality operations and how to encourage it’s observances in the industry.

  15. Labor and Management Build Skills in the Hospitality Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Debbie

    1998-01-01

    The San Francisco Hotels Partnership is a consortium of hotel operators and unions that addresses skill-development needs in the hospitality industry. Participating workers were very satisfied with the opportunity to learn communication, problem solving, and teamwork skills. (SK)

  16. QUALITY ASSURANCE IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY: QUALITATIVE ASSESMENT OF NIGERIA

    OpenAIRE

    OFOBRUKU SYLVESTER ABOMEH; Amagbakhan Omoghan Roland

    2013-01-01

    Hospitality is currently the fasted growing economic activity in Abuja-Nigeria. It has also been instrumental in creating jobs and has significant impact on other sectors of economic growth. Based on the above factors much attention need to be placed on the quality of the hospitality industry in Abuja-Nigeria in other to systematic compete with other destinations. Quality assurance is becoming an increasing integral component of the service industry. However, despite some indication that qual...

  17. Technology Integration for Restaurants & Hospitality Industry in the Year 2025

    OpenAIRE

    Jasonos, Michael; McCormick , Richard

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research is to serve the reader with an experience that evaluates the direction of how technology in restaurants and the overall hospitality industry will change throughout the coming decade and how it will look in the year 2025. The key concepts pertaining to the restaurant and hospitality industries growth through technological integration is based primarily on trends that have helped define today’s society. Everything moves faster and that is a direct reflection as t...

  18. Making the link: climate policy and the reform of the UK construction industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorrell, Steve

    2003-01-01

    This paper explores the barriers to energy efficiency in the construction of non-domestic buildings in the UK. The source of the barriers is argued to lie in the organisation of the construction industry, including the linear design process, the reliance on cost-based competitive tendering and the incentives placed upon different actors. The consequences include oversizing of equipment, reduced quality, neglect of whole life costs and lack of integrated design. Each of these problems can usefully be interpreted using concepts from the new institutional economics. While the barriers are well known to construction industry specialists, they are relatively neglected in the academic literature on energy policy. Furthermore, conventional policy measures such as building regulations leave these barriers largely untouched. The UK construction industry is currently undergoing a series of reforms which aim to change the relationship between different actors and to achieve improvements in product quality and productivity. While these reforms have the potential to address many of the barriers, the reform agenda makes practically no reference to sustainability. This paper argues that climate policy objectives must be integrated into the reform agenda if the UK is to begin the transition to a low carbon built environment

  19. Nuclear industry calls on UK to avoid disruption of 'disorderly' withdrawal from Euratom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, David [NucNet, Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-07-15

    The UK will need to set priorities for Brexit talks if it is to avoid disruption in the nuclear sector and the possibility of a disorderly withdrawal from the Euratom Treaty affecting ambitious plans to build new nuclear reactors, Tom Greatrex, chief executive of the London-based Nuclear Industry Association (NIA), said. Mr Greatrex, a former Labour MP and shadow energy minister, warned that a lack of prioritisation in Brexit talks could lead to problems related to moving nuclear-purpose components and difficulties collaborating with counties in nuclear R and D projects with significant economic, industrial and scientific impact.

  20. Policies and strategies for meeting emission abatement targets in the UK electricity supply industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyte, W S [Powergen, Solihull (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    A new electricity industry structure was created in the UK on 31 March 1990 and this was launched into the private sector during 1990/91. This structure differs considerably from the public corporations that preceeded it. Public awareness of the environment has grown during this period and the newly privatised electricity supply industry is having to implement new pollution controls. Legislation increasingly comes from the European Commission and is interpreted by HM Inspectorate of Pollution having regard to Best Practicable Environmental Option (BPEO) and Best Available Technology Not Entailing Excessive Cost (BATNEEC). Issues of particular importance include acid rain, and global warming - especially CO{sub 2} reduction. 3 figs.

  1. Tobacco industry manipulation of the hospitality industry to maintain smoking in public places

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearlove, J; Bialous, S; Glantz, S

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe how the tobacco industry used the "accommodation" message to mount an aggressive and effective worldwide campaign to recruit hospitality associations, such as restaurant associations, to serve as the tobacco industry's surrogate in fighting against smoke-free environments. Methods: We analysed tobacco industry documents publicly available on the internet as a result of litigation in the USA. Documents were accessed between January and November 2001. Results: The tobacco industry, led by Philip Morris, made financial contributions to existing hospitality associations or, when it did not find an association willing to work for tobacco interests, created its own "association" in order to prevent the growth of smoke-free environments. The industry also used hospitality associations as a vehicle for programmes promoting "accommodation" of smokers and non-smokers, which ignore the health risks of second hand smoke for employees and patrons of hospitality venues. Conclusion: Through the myth of lost profits, the tobacco industry has fooled the hospitality industry into embracing expensive ventilation equipment, while in reality 100% smoke-free laws have been shown to have no effect on business revenues, or even to improve them. The tobacco industry has effectively turned the hospitality industry into its de facto lobbying arm on clean indoor air. Public health advocates need to understand that, with rare exceptions, when they talk to organised restaurant associations they are effectively talking to the tobacco industry and must act accordingly. PMID:12034999

  2. Labour Market Segmentation: An Investigation into the Dutch Hospitality Industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Bispo

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAlmost 42,000 establishments, over 310,000 employees and approximately 13 billion Euro annual turnover (including VAT). This, in a nutshell, captures the Dutch hospitality industry in 2005. The aim of this study is to examine the functioning of the labour market in the Dutch hospitality

  3. Hospitality & Tourism--Linking Industry to the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkley, Darron

    2013-01-01

    This article provides information on the requirement of career and technical education (CTE) in the hospitality and tourism industry of South Carolina. It focuses on educating future employees during high school to fill the gap between industry and education. It also mentions career opportunities available for students in such positions as hotel…

  4. Study rates U.S. hospitals vs. other nations, industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burda, D

    1991-10-07

    American hospitals generally are further along with their total quality management programs than their Canadian counterparts but lag behind companies in other U.S. industries, according to a comprehensive international study that examined four industries--healthcare, automotive, banking and computer--in four countries--the United States, Canada, Germany and Japan.

  5. AN INVESTIGATION INTO THE BARRIERS FACING BLACK AND MINORITY ETHNICS WITHIN THE UK CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vian Ahmed

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The UK construction industry is one of the largest employers, positioned as the country’s top employer with over two million employees and projected to continue growth as far as 2011. However, it is facing ongoing skills shortages in a number of professional areas and tends to lack an ethnic diversity of workers compared to the White community of workers across the whole economy. The government’s Ethnic Minority Employment Task Force shows that for any given level of qualification, a Black or ethnic minority person is less likely to be employed, than a similarly qualified White person. Current research into issues surrounding ethnicity, from academia to employment is scarce, particularly in entry and process development within the construction industry. The aim of this paper is to outline the findings from perceptional and experiential barriers of Black and Minority Ethnics (BMEs students and employees, in order to identify perceptional and actual barriers that lead to the under-representation of BMEs within the construction industry; and also to suggest how better knowledge flow mechanisms could lead to a more balanced development, particularly in terms of ethnic diversification in the UK construction industry. The aim was achieved by adopting qualitative and quantitative methods including questionnaire surveys of undergraduate students in a construction related program, employees working within the construction industry and interviews with company directors and human resource managers. The image of the construction industry is found to be one of the major barriers for entry into the industry. Language and cultures form additional barriers for a range of ethnic groupings. Support, in the form of recruitment events, training, mentoring, professional networking, as well as work placement and experience schemes, can smooth entry, retention and progression within the construction industry.

  6. Bureaucracy, institutional theory and institutionaucracy: applications to the hospital industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolon, D S

    1998-01-01

    The health care industry is experiencing rapid change and uncertainty. Hospitals, in particular, are redesigning structures and processes in order to maximize efficiencies and remain economically viable. This article uses two organizational theory perspectives (bureaucracy and institutional theory) to examine many of the trends and transitions which are occurring throughout the hospital industry. It suggests that many of the key tenets of bureaucracy (rationality, efficiency, productivity, control, etc.) have been incorporated into the institutional environment as normative expectations. This synthesis or blending of these two perspectives is labeled institutionaucracy, implying that, as productivity and efficiency considerations become institutionalized, hospitals conforming to such operational standards will gain legitimacy and additional resources from their environment.

  7. Development of consensus guidance to facilitate service redesign around pharmacist prescribing in UK hospital practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonna, Antonella; McCaig, Dorothy; Diack, Lesley; West, Bernice; Stewart, Derek

    2014-10-01

    The last decade has seen a drive towards non-medical prescribing in the United Kingdom (UK). However, there is a dearth of any published literature on applying the principles of service redesign to support pharmacist prescribing in any sphere of practice. To develop consensus guidance to facilitate service redesign around pharmacist prescribing. UK hospital practice. The Delphi technique was used to measure consensus of a panel of expert opinion holders in Scotland. Individuals with key strategic and operational roles in implementing initiatives of pharmacy practice and medicines management were recruited as experts. An electronic questionnaire consisting of 30 statements related to pharmacist prescribing service redesign was developed. These were presented as five-point Likert scales with illustrative quotes. Consensus, defined as 70 % of panel members agreeing (ranked strongly agree/agree) with each statement. Responses were obtained from 35/40 (87.5 %) experts in round one and 29 (72.5 %) in round two. Consensus in round one was achieved for 27/30 of statements relating to aspects of generic 'service development' (e.g. succession planning, multidisciplinary working, quality evaluation, practice development and outcome measures) and 'pharmacist prescribing role development' (e.g. education and future orientation of service). Issues of disagreement were around targeting of pharmacist prescribing to clinical specialities and financial remuneration for prescribing in the hospital setting. Consensus guidance has been developed to facilitate service redesign around hospital pharmacist prescribing.

  8. AN APPLICATION OF ANALYTIC HIERARCHY PROCESS IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DEMET BAYRAKTAR

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available AHP is introduced as a decision making tool for the evaluation of investment alternatives in the hospitality industry. Services are intangible and perishable outputs that are created and consumed simultaneously or nearly simultaneously. The AHP, as a systematic approach that encompasses subjective criteria, alleviates the difficulties encountered in the evaluation of service industry operations. The proposed hierarchical structure in this paper deals with a minor investment project of the holiday village. However, it is possible to extend and apply it for larger investment projects in the hospitality industry as a decision making tool through clustering. Expert Choice for Windows (Version 9.0 is used to solve the decision problem.

  9. The accuracy of surface-contamination measurements; survey of UK hospitals, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    In response to a number of concerns expressed at both national and international levels, the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) conducted a survey of UK hospitals and associated Regional Radiation Protection Services. Sources of surface contamination were distributed and participants were requested to measure these and interpret the relevant responses in terms of emission and activity per unit area. The analysis of the returns demonstrates that the vast majority of results was significantly in error and that the quality of radiation protection may be impaired. (author)

  10. Alcohol industry influence on UK alcohol policy: A new research agenda for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Benjamin; Holden, Chris; McCambridge, Jim

    2012-09-01

    The British government has been criticised for according industry interests too much weight in alcohol policy-making. Consequently, it has been argued that alcohol strategy in the UK is built around policies for which the evidence base is weak. This has clear implications for public health. The purpose of this commentary is to map recent developments in UK alcohol policy and related debates within the alcohol policy literature, thus laying the foundations for a systematic examination of the influence of the alcohol industry on alcohol policy. It highlights the changing structure of the industry and summarises what is known about the positions and strategies of industry actors towards alcohol policy. In so doing, it aims to contribute not just to debates about alcohol policy, but to a broader understanding of health policy processes and the relationships between government and other stakeholders. It advances a new research agenda focused on the role of corporate actors in the field of alcohol policy and public health more broadly.

  11. Alcohol industry sponsorship and hazardous drinking in UK university students who play sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Kerry S; Ferris, Jason; Greenlees, Ian; Jowett, Sophia; Rhind, Daniel; Cook, Penny A; Kypri, Kypros

    2014-10-01

    To examine whether receipt of alcohol industry sponsorship is associated with problematic drinking in UK university students who play sport. University students (n = 2450) participating in sports were invited to complete a pen-and-paper questionnaire by research staff approaching them at sporting facilities and in university settings. Respondents were asked whether they, personally, their team and/or their club were currently in receipt of sponsorship (e.g. money, free or subsidized travel or sporting products) from an alcohol-related industry (e.g. bars, liquor stores, wholesalers), and whether they had solicited the sponsorship. Drinking was assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). Questionnaires were completed by 2048 of those approached (response rate = 83%). Alcohol industry sponsorship was reported by 36% of the sample. After accounting for confounders (age, gender, disposable income and location) in multivariable models, receipt of alcohol sponsorship by a team (adjusted βadj  = 0.41, P = 0.013), club (βadj  = 0.73, P = 0.017), team and club (βadj  = 0.79, P = 0.002) and combinations of individual and team or club sponsorships (βadj  = 1.27, P 8). Respondents who sought out sponsorship were not at greater risk than respondents, or whose teams or clubs, had been approached by the alcohol industry. University students in the United Kingdom who play sport and who personally receive alcohol industry sponsorship or whose club or team receives alcohol industry sponsorship appear to have more problematic drinking behaviour than UK university students who play sport and receive no alcohol industry sponsorship. Policy to reduce or cease such sponsorship should be considered. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  12. Implications of genetic testing for the insurance industry: the UK example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeburn, Sandy

    2002-01-01

    This report summarises the controversy of genetic tests and insurance, with a focus on the UK situation during the past decade. UK experience provides insight for future strategies to help people with genetic disadvantages make insurance provision for themselves and their families. Non-disclosure of genetic test results (already carried out for clinical purposes) may not benefit people at risk of genetic disorders or with positive genetic tests. The pressure of geneticists over a decade to prevent disclosure to insurers may have masked opportunities to use insurance to provide help for people with genetic disadvantages. To seize the opportunities now, there must be collaboration, not conflict. Politicians, geneticists, social scientists and all elements of the insurance industry can contribute to wise solutions.

  13. The UK electricity market and the wind industry - a perspective of 1998 proposals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batley, S.L.; Twidell, J.W.; Gibbons, C.

    1997-01-01

    After April 1st 1998, the Public Electricity Supplier monopoly ( in England, Wales and Scotland) over their local franchise market will cease and all customers, regardless of size, will be able to choose their supplier. These changes will have a major impact on the UK wind energy industry. An increased number of Second Tier Suppliers will compete with existing market players for electricity purchase from generators and sale of electricity to consumers. Market changes should improve possibilities for wind generators to obtain a Second Tier Supplier licence and serve the domestic, small demand, market. There may also be market opportunities to sell to specialist 'green' suppliers. The post 1998 changes are of importance to the European Union 'Guarantee of Result' project, which aims to promote small scale wind systems through guaranteed quality and performance of systems. For the Guarantee of Results to be utilised in the UK, all markets for the generated electricity from a wind system must be considered and evaluated. (Author)

  14. Survey of employment in the UK wind energy industry 1993-95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, G.

    1996-01-01

    Employment opportunities in the United Kingdom wind power industry are reviewed and compared to job availability in Europe, Canada and the USA, using a postal questionnaire. Most jobs were in manufacturing with consultancy and contract research forming another large group; with over two-thirds being in medium to microsized organizations, a size distribution similar to the manufacturing sector of the United Kingdom economy. Professional and management occupations account for over half of the total jobs making the wind industry a highly skilled area. Estimates suggest that, taking account of direct jobs, and those indirectly associated with the wind power industry, only about 2200 full-time equivalent jobs currently exist in the United Kingdom. (UK)

  15. Attitudes to coping with radiologically suspect or contaminated milk in the UK: a dairy industry viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komorowski, E.S.

    2005-01-01

    The attitudes of the UK milk processing industry to a nuclear incident which resulted in milk supplies being suspected of being contaminated, or actually being contaminated, with radioactivity is examined. The factors influencing these attitudes are discussed, together with their implications. In the event of a nuclear incident in which part of the United Kingdom's milk supply is possibly contaminated, the milk processing industry will want to ensure that consumers and retailers maintain complete confidence in dairy products. As a consequence the industry will require that solutions are not adopted merely to avoid wastage of milk, or awkward milk disposal problems. In the early history of the BSE crisis the government wrongly assured consumers that beef was completely safe to eat. It will be necessary to ensure that any assurances that milk is safe, following a nuclear incident, are well founded

  16. Fighting lung cancer in the developed world - a model of care in a UK hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baig, I.M.; Milroy, R.

    2010-01-01

    To highlight the initial management approach for Lung Cancer in a UK Hospital with the aim of translating the principles of such methodology to a developing country, such as Pakistan. A descriptive observational study was carried out at Stobhill Hospital , Glasgow, UK. The investigator (IMB) observed the Lung Cancer Service, attending the weekly 'New patients Clinic', 'Results Clinic', and 'Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings'. The process observations and the factual data describing the details of the service were recorded on a pre designed proforma. Observations relating to two aspects of this service (Results Clinic and MDT) are included in this report. The methodology of communicating results of lung cancer investigations to patients in a pre-planned and staged manner at a dedicated 'Results Clinic' was identified as a useful approach. A format of communication was consistently followed. The MDT consisted of a Respiratory Physician, Clinical Oncologist, Thoracic Surgeon, Radiologist, Pathologist and Palliative Care Specialist. Each patient's case was discussed on an individual basis and the team developed a consensus regarding diagnosis, staging of the disease, further need for diagnostic procedures and treatment options, bearing in mind the patient's performance status, co-morbidity and their wishes. This approach has improved the initial part of the lung cancer patient journey and components of this approach could easily be transferred to a developing country (JPMA 60:93; 2010). (author)

  17. Managing for safety and safety culture within the UK nuclear industry. A regulator's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyrer, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper outlines the basis of the legal system for the regulation of health and safety at work within the United Kingdom (UK), and in particular, the regulation of the nuclear industry. The framework, formulated by the regulator, which has been published as a practical guide for directors, managers, health and safety professionals and employee representatives for the successful management of health and safety is explained. This guidance, however, concentrates, to a large extent, on management systems and only addresses in part the types of issues, such as behaviours, values, attitudes and beliefs which contribute to the safety culture of an organization. The regulator of the UK nuclear industry has considered research, and other work, carried out by several organizations in this area, notably the Advisory Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (ACSNI) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and produced its own framework for managing for safety at nuclear installations. As a regulator, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), and its inspectorate responsible for regulation of the nuclear industry, HM Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (HMNII), are not the appropriate organization to assess the safety culture of an organization, but positively encourage organizations to both carry out this assessment themselves and to monitor their performance. To this end, HSE has developed, and made available, the Health and Safety Climate Tool which is aimed at providing organizations with information which can be used as part of a continuous improvement process. (author)

  18. Strategies for Implementing Activity-Based Costing in the UK Manufacturing Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Wai Ming; Tan, Kian; Tan, Swee; Sutton, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the findings with a case study on why activity based costing lacks impact in the UK manufacturing industry. Activity based costing was performed on selected MT range subsystems of an electrical power generator to compare with the current UNN UK’s conven-tional costing system. The results have found that the current costing system works well for the MT products and thus change of costing system is not necessary for these products. The activity based costi...

  19. Customer Contribution to improving Service Quality in the Hospitality Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Dragos Constantin Vasile

    2009-01-01

    The actors on the today business stage have no more well-defined roles with clear and rigid borders between them. Hospitality industry in particular is a good example how it has been blurred the roles that customers play in dealing with service providers. The study reveals that customers can influence the quality of hospitality service through performing a qualitycontrol function. This involves a series of activities to be achieved by them: (1) on-the-spot quality control, (2) service failure...

  20. Preparation to care for confused older patients in general hospitals: a study of UK health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Amanda; Knight, Alec; Harwood, Rowan; Gladman, John R F

    2014-07-01

    in the UK, two-thirds of patients in general hospitals are older than 70, of whom half have dementia or delirium or both. Our objective was to explore doctors, nurses and allied health professionals' perceptions of their preparation to care for confused older patients on general hospital wards. : using a quota sampling strategy across 11 medical, geriatric and orthopaedic wards in a British teaching hospital, we conducted 60 semi-structured interviews with doctors, nurses and allied healthcare professionals and analysed the data using the Consensual Qualitative Research approach. : there was consensus among participants that education, induction and in-service training left them inadequately prepared and under-confident to care for confused older patients. Many doctors reported initial assessments of confused older patients as difficult. They admitted inadequate knowledge of mental health disorders, including the diagnostic features of delirium and dementia. Handling agitation and aggression were considered top priorities for training, particularly for nurses. Multidisciplinary team meetings were highly valued but were reported as too infrequent. Participants valued specialist input but reported difficulties gaining such support. Communication with confused patients was regarded as particularly challenging, both in terms of patients making their needs known, and staff conveying information to patients. Participants reported emotional and behavioural responses including frustration, stress, empathy, avoidance and low job satisfaction. : our findings indicate that a revision of training across healthcare professions in the UK is required, and that increased specialist support should be provided, so that the workforce is properly prepared to care for older patients with cognitive problems. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.

  1. Company's Benefits in Corporate Social Responsibility in Hospitality Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Wijaya, Aditya Suryadinata

    2014-01-01

    The application of CSR in service oriented industries like tourism, restaurant and hotel are considered important because of their direct relation with the environment or their high energy consumption. Through this thesis, author wants to encourage managers in hospitality industries to adopt CSR in its business, by giving an explanation and clearance of how company can received many benefits by applying CSR into its business. The goal of this thesis is determine a real connection between impl...

  2. A study on sustainability practices in the Malaysian Hospitality Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur, Jasvinder

    2014-01-01

    The hospitality industry encompasses an extensive variety of services that include food service, tourism and hotels. It can be considered a major service sector in the world economy today and described as an industry that has a great impact on the environment, discharging a huge amount of raw and solid waste, constituting a threat to the environment. While much as been done to promote tourism in Malaysia through activities such as Visit Malaysia Year (VMY), very little is done to ensure a sus...

  3. Sexual Harassment in the Dutch Hospitality Industry : From Students' Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Harte, Ashley

    2017-01-01

    The hospitality industry is seen as one of the industries with the highest number of sexual harassment incidents happening at the work floor. Research discussed reasons for its occurrence, stating reasons as power, vulnerability, but also misinterpretation of one party to another based on body language. One may claim that this industry’s image and having the bedroom as work floor are playing important roles as trigger for sexual harassment to happen casually. To add, the division between sexu...

  4. The industrial application requirement for biotech inventions in light of recent EPO & UK case law:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo; Nilsson, David

    2012-01-01

    In this study we illuminate and discuss the most recent developments in respect of the interpretation of the “industrial application” requirement with respect to gene and protein related inventions in Europe. The analysis will focus on the relevant provisions of the EPC and decisional practice from...... the European Patent Organisation (“EPO”), particularly decisions from the Technical Board of Appeal 3.3.08 (the “Board”). To get a glimpse of the national dimension, we will also look at the first patent judgment from the "new" UK Supreme Court, i.e. the groundbreaking decision in HGS v Eli Lilly, In the final...... discussion, we will elaborate on two issues in particular; (i) determine which types of qualities an invention should have in order to meet the industrial application requirement in the first place; and (ii) what type of evidence an applicant is expected to present in respect of (potential) applications...

  5. Perceptions of job and industry characteristics on career decisions in the hospitality industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blomme, R.J.; Tromp, D.M.; Rheede, van A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the initial results of a case study on management-level turnover in the hospitality industry and on factors influencing the career decisions of highly educated employees to stay or leave the industry. This issue is considered using an interpretative paradigm and the conclusion

  6. Measuring innovation in a 'low-tech' service industry: the case of the Dutch hospitality industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hertog, P.; Gallouj, F.; Segers, J.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a survey among 613 firms in the Dutch hospitality industry adopting a demarcation perspective. The paper illustrates that innovation in this service industry is much higher and more varied than regularly reported. It further indicates that innovation activities

  7. Trend of electricity prices in privatised industry: UK compared to other european countries 1985-1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzoni, A.

    1995-01-01

    Great efforts are devoted nowadays in many countries to reform the electric power system in order to achieve higher efficiency. The model under consideration is, more or less overtly, the new Electricity Supply Industry (ESI) in England and Wales which first transformed the vertically integrated state monopoly and introduced as the same time competition in electricity generation and supply. This paper analyses the trend of the final prices in UK during the ESI structural transformation between 1985 and 1994, since the final price of electricity is acknowledge as a good indicator of the performance of an ESI, and highlights the impact of privatisation on the different classes of consumers. It is investigated the evolution of the ratio between regulated-prices and free-market prices to further understand who profited from the new structure of the industry; the study continues with a comparison among the prices in UK, Italy and France. The analysis applies first to the nominal prices, and secondly to the deflated prices, in order to compare different years at constant purchase power

  8. Future of the UK nuclear industry...and a review of the principal alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    A report on the 'Future of the UK Nuclear Industry and a Review of the Principal Alternatives' was published by the Institution in December 1992. It was circulated widely including the major participants in the UK power industry and its fuel suppliers, the professional institutions, engineering consultancies in the field, academics, local and national government, opposition politicians, government departments, agencies and individuals known to be involved. Criticisms and comments on the report have been received from a considerable number of such sources. These have been collected together and edited as a supplement to the original report which considered not only nuclear power but also power generation by burning coal, oil and gas, the prospects for hydroelectric power, wind power, tidal power waste, incineration and other renewables. The comments and contributions are listed in simple numerical order of paragraphs, against the chapter concerned, for easy identification and reference. Energy Board comments are indicated clearly throughout. They are interposed mainly to offer a linkage throughout, with further technical comment restricted severely. (Author)

  9. A Review of the Case of a Levy-Grant Scheme (LGS) in the UK Construction Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Wahab, Mohamed; Dainty, Andrew; Ison, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    A Levy-Grant Scheme (LGS) has existed in the UK construction industry since 1964 to provide financial support for companies undertaking training activities. Despite the support of the LGS for various training activities, notably apprenticeships, the construction industry continues to suffer from both labour shortages and an under-investment in…

  10. Patient satisfaction and non-UK educated nurses: a cross-sectional observational study of English National Health Service Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germack, Hayley D; Griffiths, Peter; Sloane, Douglas M; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Ball, Jane E; Aiken, Linda H

    2015-12-02

    To examine whether patient satisfaction with nursing care in National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in England is associated with the proportion of non-UK educated nurses providing care. Cross-sectional analysis using data from the 2010 NHS Adult Inpatient Survey merged with data from nurse and hospital administrator surveys. Logistic regression models with corrections for clustering were used to determine whether the proportions of non-UK educated nurses were significantly related to patient satisfaction before and after taking account of other hospital, nursing and patient characteristics. 31 English NHS trusts. 12,506 patients 16 years of age and older with at least one overnight stay that completed a satisfaction survey; 2962 bedside care nurses who completed a nurse survey; and 31 NHS trusts. Patient satisfaction. The percentage of non-UK educated nurses providing bedside hospital care, which ranged from 1% to 52% of nurses, was significantly associated with patient satisfaction. After controlling for potential confounding factors, each 10-point increase in the percentage of non-UK educated nurses diminished the odds of patients reporting good or excellent care by 12% (OR=0.88), and decreased the odds of patients agreeing that they always had confidence and trust in nurses by 13% (OR=0.87). Other indicators of patient satisfaction also revealed lower satisfaction in hospitals with higher percentages of non-UK educated nurses. Use of non-UK educated nurses in English NHS hospitals is associated with lower patient satisfaction. Importing nurses from abroad to substitute for domestically educated nurses may negatively impact quality of care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Pregnancy outcomes of women with HIV in a district general hospital in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, L; Desouza, C; Moorcroft, A; Elgalib, A

    2018-03-12

    The aim of this study was to describe the obstetrical and virological outcomes in HIV-infected pregnant women who delivered at a district general hospital in south London in the period from 2008 to 2014. Our review identified 137 pregnancies; most (60%, 63/105) of them were unplanned. The commonest mode of delivery was spontaneous vaginal delivery (SVD) (42%, 48/114) followed by emergency Caesarean section (32%, 36/114). Gestational age at delivery was ≥37 weeks in most (84%, 91/106) of the cases. Maternal HIV VL at or closest to delivery was undetectable (1000 copies/mL in 73% (94/129), 90% (116/129) and 6% (8/129) of the pregnancies, respectively. None of the infants were infected with HIV making the rate of MTCT of HIV 0% (zero). Our study shows that favourable virological and obstetrical outcomes of HIV-infected pregnant women are achievable in non-tertiary HIV treatment centres. Impact Statement What is already known on this subject: Prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV has been one of the major public health successes in the last decades. This success was evident by the reduction of MTCT of HIV in the UK from 25.6% in the 1993 to only 0.46% in 2011. Furthermore, many reports from individual providers, mainly from tertiary centres, of HIV care in the UK also showed very low rates MTCT of HIV. What the results of this study add: Our study shows that favourable virological and obstetrical outcomes of HIV-infected pregnant women are achievable in non-tertiary HIV treatment centres. The MTCT of HIV rate in our hospital was zero in the period from 2008 to 2014. What the implications are of these findings for clinical practice and/or further research: Staff caring for pregnant HIV positive women in general hospitals and small-to-medium HIV clinics should liaise closely with each other and utilise the skill-mix within their hospital in order to provide a quality care that is similar to what is achieved in large teaching centres; however, a

  12. ESL for Hotel/Hospitality Industry. Level: Beginner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Suffolk County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Northport, NY.

    This document contains eight lesson plans for a beginning course in work-related English for non-English or limited-English speaking entry-level employees in the hotel and hospitality industry. Course objectives include the following: helping participants understand and use job-specific vocabulary; receive and understand job-related instructions;…

  13. The Importance of Foreign Language Education to the Hospitality Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, E. Alan

    In the hospitality industry there are three major needs for study of a foreign language: (1) the need to communicate with non-English speaking employees, (2) the need to assist foreign travelers; and (3) the need to work in a non-English speaking country. The strength of the need to know a foreign language depends on the employee's level within…

  14. The proprietary hospital industry: a financial analysis 1972-1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, A; Shaked, I; Daley, J

    1985-01-01

    This paper evaluates the performance of both specific firms within the American for-profit hospital industry and the industry as a whole. First, traditional financial analysis is used to evaluate individual publicly traded for-profit chains. Then, industry performance from 1973 to 1982 is evaluated using a set of measures based on Modern Portfolio Theory. The traditional financial analysis indicates that the industry seems increasingly profitable as well as increasingly healthy from the perspective of utilizing its assets and reducing its collection period. However, the industry's rapid growth rate has strained its ability to use additional debt funding and has created a potentially dangerous liquidity position. Measures based on Modern Portfolio Theory indicate that the average return of the industry has improved over the past 5 years. However, its risk has also increased. Nevertheless, the increase in risk is more than offset by the increased average return. In addition, recent legislation designed 'to reward the efficient' has introduced a significant degree of uncertainty into the industry's performance for the coming years. Thus, hospitals' ability to maintain the substantial profitability and rate of growth they have experienced over the past decade will depend on how well they will adapt to the changing environment.

  15. Large scale organisational intervention to improve patient safety in four UK hospitals: mixed method evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benning, Amirta; Ghaleb, Maisoon; Suokas, Anu; Dixon-Woods, Mary; Dawson, Jeremy; Barber, Nick; Franklin, Bryony Dean; Girling, Alan; Hemming, Karla; Carmalt, Martin; Rudge, Gavin; Naicker, Thirumalai; Nwulu, Ugochi; Choudhury, Sopna

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To conduct an independent evaluation of the first phase of the Health Foundation’s Safer Patients Initiative (SPI), and to identify the net additional effect of SPI and any differences in changes in participating and non-participating NHS hospitals. Design Mixed method evaluation involving five substudies, before and after design. Setting NHS hospitals in the United Kingdom. Participants Four hospitals (one in each country in the UK) participating in the first phase of the SPI (SPI1); 18 control hospitals. Intervention The SPI1 was a compound (multi-component) organisational intervention delivered over 18 months that focused on improving the reliability of specific frontline care processes in designated clinical specialties and promoting organisational and cultural change. Results Senior staff members were knowledgeable and enthusiastic about SPI1. There was a small (0.08 points on a 5 point scale) but significant (Porganisational climate). Qualitative evidence showed only modest penetration of SPI1 at medical ward level. Although SPI1 was designed to engage staff from the bottom up, it did not usually feel like this to those working on the wards, and questions about legitimacy of some aspects of SPI1 were raised. Of the five components to identify patients at risk of deterioration—monitoring of vital signs (14 items); routine tests (three items); evidence based standards specific to certain diseases (three items); prescribing errors (multiple items from the British National Formulary); and medical history taking (11 items)—there was little net difference between control and SPI1 hospitals, except in relation to quality of monitoring of acute medical patients, which improved on average over time across all hospitals. Recording of respiratory rate increased to a greater degree in SPI1 than in control hospitals; in the second six hours after admission recording increased from 40% (93) to 69% (165) in control hospitals and from 37% (141) to 78% (296

  16. Large scale organisational intervention to improve patient safety in four UK hospitals: mixed method evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benning, Amirta; Ghaleb, Maisoon; Suokas, Anu; Dixon-Woods, Mary; Dawson, Jeremy; Barber, Nick; Franklin, Bryony Dean; Girling, Alan; Hemming, Karla; Carmalt, Martin; Rudge, Gavin; Naicker, Thirumalai; Nwulu, Ugochi; Choudhury, Sopna; Lilford, Richard

    2011-02-03

    To conduct an independent evaluation of the first phase of the Health Foundation's Safer Patients Initiative (SPI), and to identify the net additional effect of SPI and any differences in changes in participating and non-participating NHS hospitals. Mixed method evaluation involving five substudies, before and after design. NHS hospitals in the United Kingdom. Four hospitals (one in each country in the UK) participating in the first phase of the SPI (SPI1); 18 control hospitals. The SPI1 was a compound (multi-component) organisational intervention delivered over 18 months that focused on improving the reliability of specific frontline care processes in designated clinical specialties and promoting organisational and cultural change. Senior staff members were knowledgeable and enthusiastic about SPI1. There was a small (0.08 points on a 5 point scale) but significant (P organisational climate). Qualitative evidence showed only modest penetration of SPI1 at medical ward level. Although SPI1 was designed to engage staff from the bottom up, it did not usually feel like this to those working on the wards, and questions about legitimacy of some aspects of SPI1 were raised. Of the five components to identify patients at risk of deterioration--monitoring of vital signs (14 items); routine tests (three items); evidence based standards specific to certain diseases (three items); prescribing errors (multiple items from the British National Formulary); and medical history taking (11 items)--there was little net difference between control and SPI1 hospitals, except in relation to quality of monitoring of acute medical patients, which improved on average over time across all hospitals. Recording of respiratory rate increased to a greater degree in SPI1 than in control hospitals; in the second six hours after admission recording increased from 40% (93) to 69% (165) in control hospitals and from 37% (141) to 78% (296) in SPI1 hospitals (odds ratio for "difference in difference" 2

  17. Uncertainty in geohazard understanding and communicating hazards and risk between scientists and the UK Insurance industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawley, Russell; Lee, Kathryn; Lark, Murray

    2015-04-01

    At BGS, expert elicitation has been used to evaluate the relative impacts arising from multiple geohazards that can affect UK housing stock. In turn this 'consensus' understanding has been developed into a tool to assist the UK insurance industry underwrite the domestic property market. BGS models six geohazards deemed relevant to UK Housing: Landslides, Shrink-swell (heave), Compressibles, Dissolution (Karst), collapsibles and running sand. The models are widely used and have been developed over 2 decades of research. However, stakeholders such as the insurance industry are not well equipped to managed geohazard models directly and need the information to be categorised in a meaningful way, appropriate to their business models. Creating terminologies to communicate the relative threats for each geohazard has been relatively straightforward, but communicating the impacts of multiple geohazards, or comparing the relative risks of one geohazard against another has proved more difficult. Expert elicitation has been used since 2010 to try and build a consensus model for geohazards and to help BGS communicate its knowledge to stakeholders. Typically, the BGS geohazard models are provided with 5 levels of susceptibility: A (low or absent) ,B, C, D and E (high). Resolving individual models is relatively simple, but the insurance market is extremely dynamic and a need to simplify and convey the possible threats from all geohazards into a single 'rating' of susceptibility has emerged. This poses a problem when trying to convey the geological understanding behind the models. For example, how do you convey the combined (or comparative) susceptibility of a high susceptibility to Dissolution, with a moderate susceptibility to Landslides. This complexity is further hampered when needing to consider that stakeholders resolve spatial distributions via use of frameworks such as 'Postcode' sectors, and that the outputs of most geohazard models are sensitive to scope and scale of

  18. A comparative study of radiation safety practices at selected hospitals in the UK and USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, D.R.; Showalter, C.K.; Hamilton, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation safety practices in a group of 25 UK and USA hospitals have recently been assessed. This took the form of detailed inspections of some 62 medical radiation departments, including Diagnostic X-ray, Radiotherapy, Nuclear Medicine and Pathology/Research (Radionuclide) Departments. Empirical expressions called ''Radiation Safety Indices'' were devised to evaluate the incidence of personal doses and radiological incidents occurring from 1977-82 and to characterise the safety facilities, procedures, supervision and educational techniques in each department. An outline is given of national legislative material and voluntary codes of conduct, together with the results of the departmental inspections. The computed indices are presented graphically and an analysis given of apparent national trends. (author)

  19. NEW DETERMINANT FACTORS OF CHANGE MANAGEMENT IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia ALECU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The factors that we took into account the following important elements: for goods and capital (brand promotion, reliable predictions against risk factors, knowledge capital, intangible values for hotels, for health and safety (the easily with which diseases can cross oceans and borders and multiplying rows of old and new infections, some impossible to treat, strict control of food and non-food products entering in the hotel, for new management (planning education and training process in hospitality industry, demographic problem, New trends in the workplace. One of the most dramatic changes in this industry is the way to sold products and services for public hotels. New technology, development of hospitality industry and social problems are very important, also in this process of change management to hotels.

  20. Cleavages and co-operation in the UK alcohol industry: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holden Chris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is widely believed that corporate actors exert substantial influence on the making of public health policy, including in the alcohol field. However, the industry is far from being monolithic, comprising a range of producers and retailers with varying and diverse interests. With a focus on contemporary debates concerning the minimum pricing of alcohol in the UK, this study examined the differing interests of actors within the alcohol industry, the cleavages which emerged between them on this issue and how this impacted on their ability to organise themselves collectively to influence the policy process. We conducted 35 semi-structured interviews between June and November 2010 with respondents from all sectors of the industry as well as a range of non-industry actors who had knowledge of the alcohol policy process, including former Ministers, Members of the UK Parliament and the Scottish Parliament, civil servants, members of civil society organisations and professionals. Methods The paper draws on an analysis of publicly available documents and 35 semi-structured interviews with respondents from the alcohol industry (on- and off-trade including retailers, producers of wines, spirits and beers and trade associations and a range of non-industry actors with knowledge of the alcohol policy process (including former Ministers, Members of Parliament and of the Scottish Parliament, civil servants, members of civil society organisations and professional groups. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using Nvivo qualitative analysis software. Processes of triangulation between data sources and different types of respondent sought to ensure we gained as accurate a picture as possible of industry participation in the policy process. Results Divergences of interest were evident between producers and retailers and within the retail sector between the on and off trade. Divisions within the alcohol industry, however, existed

  1. LIMITING FACTORS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SERBIAN HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolina Kosar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity and complexity determine multidisciplinary approach to the hospitality research. Identification and analysis of limited hospitality development factors imply very complex scientific approach. Case study methodology is applied on Republic of Serbia, which is transition country and candidate for EU accession. Research results identified key factors which had impact on lag, stagnation and contemporary level of hospitality development. Firstly, way of executed privatization process of hospitality companies in Serbia i.e. only ownership transformation, as part of business transformation, was done (organizational, management, technological, financial and human resources parts of business transformation didn’t implement. Secondly, non-acceptable terms and conditions of credit lines for financing privatization and future business of privatized hospitality companies. Furthermore, buyers of privatized hospitality companies didn’t prepared adequate projections of cash flow and sources of financing (owned and borrowed. Finally, technological development and human resources were result of the first mentioned limited factor. In order to improve business in hospitality industry in transition economies, all stakeholders should be involved. State should improve business environment. Educational institutions should create applicable programs on market. Investors should be ready to invest in technological and human resource development. Banks should implement the best financing practice from headquarters in EU.

  2. Exemption and clearance of radioactive waste from non-nuclear industry: A UK regulator's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, J.O.

    1997-01-01

    In the UK radioactive substances are regulated by means of registrations and authorizations issued under the Radioactive Substances Act. For certain practices and types of radioactive materials, there are orders which allow exemption from registration/authorization, conditionally or unconditionally. The seventeen Exemption Orders in force cover a wide variety of types of radioactive materials and practices. Conditional Exemption Orders allow a degree of regulatory control without imposing undue burdens on users of radioactivity. For most orders, radiation doses to individuals would be about 1OμSv or less, and collective doses would be less than 1 man - Sievert. The UK is reviewing the exemption orders against the requirements of the 1996 Euratom Basic Safety Standards Directive. It intends to develop a coherent strategy for exemption and to rationalize the current orders. Recently there has been a degree of public concern over the release of items from the nuclear industry. Careful presentation of exemption and clearance concepts is necessary if public confidence in the regulatory system is to be maintained. (author)

  3. Retrospective audit of the acute management of stroke in two district general hospitals in the uk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faluyi, O O; Omodara, J A; Tay, K H; Muhiddin, K

    2008-06-01

    There is some evidence to suggest that the standard of acute medical care provided to patients with cerebrovascular disease is a major determinant of the eventual outcome. Consequently, the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) of London issues periodic guidelines to assist healthcare providers in the management of patients presenting with stroke. An audit of the acute management of stroke in two hospitals belonging to the same health care trust in the UK. Retrospective review of 98 randomly selected case-notes of patients managed for cerebrovascular disease in two acute hospitals in the UK between April and June 2004. The pertinent guidelines of RCP (London) are highlighted while audit targets were set at 70%. 84% of patients presenting with cerebrovascular disease had a stroke rather than a TIA, anterior circulation strokes were commonest. All patients with stroke were admitted while those with TIAs were discharged on the same day but most patients with TIA were not followed up by Stroke specialists. Most CT-imaging of the head was done after 24 hours delaying the commencement of anti-platelets for patients with ischaemic stroke or neurosurgical referral for haemorrhagic stroke. Furthermore, there was a low rate of referral for carotid ultrasound in patients with anterior circulation strokes. Anti-platelets and statins were commenced for most patients with ischaemic stroke while diabetes was well controlled in most of them. However, ACE-inhibitors and diuretics such as indapamide were under-utilized for secondary prevention in such patients. Warfarin anti-coagulation was underutilized in patients with ischaemic stroke who had underlying chronic atrial fibrillation. While there was significant multi-disciplinary team input, dysphagia and physiotherapy assessments were delayed. Similarly, occupational therapy input and psychological assesment were omitted from the care of most patients. Hospital service provision for the management of cerebrovascular disease needs to

  4. Hospital administrator's perspectives regarding the health care industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, D R; Little, M W

    1988-01-01

    Based on responses from 52 hospital administrators, four areas of managerial concern have been addressed, including: (1) decision-making factors; (2) hospital service offerings: current and future; (3) marketing strategy and service priorities; and (4) health care industry challenges. Of the total respondents, 35 percent indicate a Director of Marketing has primary responsibility for making marketing-related decisions in their hospital, and 19 percent, a Vice-President of Marketing, thus demonstrating the increased priority of the marketing function. The continued importance of the physician being the primary market target is highlighted by 70 percent of the administrators feeling physician referrals will be more important regarding future admissions than in the past, compared to only two percent feeling the physicians' role will be less important. Of primary importance to patients selecting a hospital, as perceived by the administrators, are the physician's referral, the patient's previous experience, the hospital's reputation, and the courtesy of the staff. The clear majority of the conventional-care hospitals surveyed offer out-patient surgery, a hospital pharmacy, obstetrics/maternity care, and diabetic services. The future emphasis on expanding services is evidenced by some 50 percent of the hospital administrators indicating they either possibly or definitely plan to offer long-term nursing care, out-patient substance abuse programs, and cancer clinics by 1990. In addition, some one-third of the respondents are likely to expand their offerings to include wellness/fitness centers, in-patient substance abuse programs, remote or satellite primary care clinics, and diabetic services. Other areas having priority for future offerings include services geared specifically toward women and the elderly. Perceived as highest in priority by the administrators regarding how their hospital can achieve its goals in the next three years are market development strategies

  5. Introduction to Papers 3-5. The UK industry's strategy for radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passant, F.H.

    1989-01-01

    The waste management policies and strategies of the main radioactive waste producers in the UK, namely the CEGB, BNFL and the UKAEA are summarised. Three papers will be published in the Proceedings of this Conference, giving details, for the CEGB, BNFL and the UKAEA of individual policies and strategies outlining how they have developed and are being implemented. An overview of the strategy for each type of waste with some examples of the approach being followed, is given. The key elements of radioactive waste management policy and strategy are set down by the Government, in various White Papers, and the detailed Industry strategy is consistent with these, indeed it is determined largely by them. (author)

  6. The development and evaluation of options for improving future U.K. blood component labelling--outcome of the 2013 U.K. hospital survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, M J; Brazier, A M; McArthur, K; Jones, J; Cardigan, R; Lodge, L; Maclennan, S

    2014-04-01

    U.K. blood component labels have evolved to accommodate a plethora of information. Concern has, however, been expressed that current U.K. labelling is too 'cluttered', detracting from the clarity of critical information. This prompted a holistic review of labelling and available information technology (IT) with the aim of improving the situation. A survey was circulated requiring U.K. hospital participants to rank each item of information on the label according to its 'criticality' and assess three novel 'future' and one 'transition' prototype labels. Prototypes were based on applicable regulatory standards, best practice guidance, international benchmark data and U.K. expert input. The prototypes support steps towards 'full face' label printing and utilise 2D and quick response (QR) barcodes. Two-hundred eleven completed surveys were received identifying 110 contributing hospitals with 41% from clinical staff, 37% from transfusion laboratory staff and 22% from transfusion practitioners. There was excellent agreement between the three groups on the critical information, i.e., blood group, expiry date, blood component name, unique donation identification number (DIN) and blood component volume but far less on the other information, especially the various warning messages. Of the 'future' labels, option 3 (closest to the current 'quadrant model') was most popular. Option 1, with its additional inverted section replicating critical information was least popular and prompted significant safety concerns. The prototype labels correctly identified the critical items of information and extensive comments confirmed that this was more prominently and clearly displayed. Laboratory staff commented that the transition label was essential to enable IT systems to be adapted. © 2014 The Authors. Transfusion Medicine © 2014 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  7. Winter excess in hospital admissions, in-patient mortality and length of acute hospital stay in stroke: a hospital database study over six seasonal years in Norfolk, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Phyo K; Vowler, Sarah L; Woodhouse, Peter R; Redmayne, Oliver; Fulcher, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Several studies have examined the incidence and mortality of stroke in relation to season. However, the evidence is conflicting partly due to variation in the populations (community vs. hospital-based), and in climatic conditions between studies. Moreover, they may not have been able to take into account the age, sex and stroke type of the study population. We hypothesized that the age, sex and type of stroke are major determinants of the presence or absence of winter excess in morbidity and mortality associated with stroke. We analyzed a hospital-based stroke register from Norfolk, UK to examine our prior hypothesis. Using Curwen's method, we performed stratified sex-specific analyses by (1) seasonal year and (2) quartiles of patients' age and stroke subtype and calculated the winter excess for the number of admissions, in-patient deaths and length of acute hospital stay. There were 5,481 patients (men=45%). Their ages ranged from 17 to 105 years (median=78 years). There appeared to be winter excess in hospital admissions, deaths and length of acute hospital stay overall accounting for 3/100,000 extra admissions (winter excess index of 3.4% in men and 7.6% in women) and 1/100,000 deaths (winter excess index of 4.7 and 8.6% in women) due to stroke in winter compared to non-winter periods. Older patients with non-haemorrhagic stroke mainly contribute to this excess. If our findings are replicated throughout England and Wales, it is estimated that there are 1,700 excess admissions, 600 excess in-patient deaths and 24,500 extra acute hospital bed days each winter, related to stroke within the current population of approximately 60 million. Further research should be focused on the determinants of winter excess in morbidity and mortality associated with stroke. This may subsequently reduce the morbidity and mortality by providing effective preventive strategies in future. (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. GLOBAL CRISIS’ IMPACT UPON THE EMPLOYED NUMBER IN HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    MARIAN ZAHARIA; ANIELA BALACESCU; RODICA MANUELA GOGONEA

    2014-01-01

    TThe globalization, complex interconnection process of the economies of states, is a reality of the XXI century. However, at the end of the first decade of this century, besides the positive effects of this process, due to the economic interconnections created, it has favored also a rapid propagation of a negative economic phenomenon: the global economic crisis. Its impact significantly influenced the hospitality industry, important component of modern economies. This paper examines over a pe...

  9. How to Become a Better Salesperson in the Hospitality Industry

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In the lodging and hospitality industry, it is quite common to have very busy times of the year and also times when business is slow. When a big convention comes to Las Vegas, occupancy rates soar and it can be very hard to find a room. During the period of time between Thanksgiving and Christmas, the visitor count to Las Vegas drops and hotel soffer great deals to try and fill their empty rooms.

  10. An Overview of Franchising In The Hospitality Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Pranoto, Ersan Suria

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, franchising is the most significant part of the hospitality industry through hotels and fast food restaurant. Franchisor gives the right to the franchisee to sell their product and service also to sub-franchise it and worked under their brand name. Furthermore, in franchising, there must be a contract between the franchisor and the franchisee which include the term and condition. Franchises include some aspects such as screening, site selection, operating manuals and the pre-opening...

  11. An Overview of Franchising in the Hospitality Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Pranoto, Ersan Suria

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, franchising is the most significant part in the hospitality industry through hotels and fast food restaurant. Franchisor gives the right to the franchisee to sell their product and service also to sub franchise it and worked under their brand name. Furthermore, in franchising there must be a contract between the franchisor and the franchisee which include the term and condition. Franchises include some aspects such as, screening, site selection, operating manuals and the pre opening...

  12. THE RELEVANCE OF MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING FOR THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briciu Sorin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the contemporary period the tourism and hospitality industry has experienced dynamic growth despite the challenges facing not only the global crisis, but also market changes, consumer behavior and technological trends. Accounting, the language of business is required to keep up with changes made to each particular area of activity so that they can provide timely relevant information to be managed by an efficient information system. Our article focuses on presenting the importance of management accounting and cost information system in the hospitality industry, then consider identifying features of this sector and their impact on accounting. The methodology of our research falls within the economic research, being theoretical, aiming primarily to knowledge objectives and the relevance of management accounting for economic entities, and then we have the characteristics of hospitality industry and possible organizational management accounting in this sector. In our perspective cost calculation for services, packages or travel benefits must take into account the development of the accounts from Class 9, so we propose a possible method to customize them according to the Direct Costing and CVP analysis. Our research will also be explanatory descriptive, trying to answer the questions How? and Why?

  13. Leukaemia mortality in three UK nuclear industry workforces: comparison with the BEIR V model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, Lucy; Higgins, Craig; Douglas, Allison; Fraser, Patricia; Smith, Peter; Omar, Rumana; Beral, Valerie

    1995-01-01

    Our previous comparison of risk of death from leukaemia associated with external radiation dose in over 75000 UK nuclear industry workers with that for adult Japanese atomic bomb survivors reported by UNSCEAR in 1988, suggested that the estimated excess relative risk per Sv in the two populations was similar (ratio of risks = 1.1, 90% confidence interval +0.2 to +3.1). The further analysis described here, which compares leukaemia risk in the workers with that predicted by the linear term of the BEIR V model for leukaemia, resulted in a ratio of 1.3 (90% confidence interval -0.2 to +4.5). Leukaemia risk in this population of nuclear industry workers is therefore consistent with that predicted by the BEIR V model. That our data are also compatible with risks from zero to around five times those predicted by this model demonstrates that even a very substantial occupational cohort such as ours can provide only a limited amount of information about the magnitude of leukaemia risks in adults exposed to low doses of external radiation relative to those exposed to high doses and high dose rates. (author)

  14. Solid waste management in the hospitality industry: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirani, Sanaa I; Arafat, Hassan A

    2014-12-15

    Solid waste management is a key aspect of the environmental management of establishments belonging to the hospitality sector. In this study, we reviewed literature in this area, examining the current status of waste management for the hospitality sector, in general, with a focus on food waste management in particular. We specifically examined the for-profit subdivision of the hospitality sector, comprising primarily of hotels and restaurants. An account is given of the causes of the different types of waste encountered in this sector and what strategies may be used to reduce them. These strategies are further highlighted in terms of initiatives and practices which are already being implemented around the world to facilitate sustainable waste management. We also recommended a general waste management procedure to be followed by properties of the hospitality sector and described how waste mapping, an innovative yet simple strategy, can significantly reduce the waste generation of a hotel. Generally, we found that not many scholarly publications are available in this area of research. More studies need to be carried out on the implementation of sustainable waste management for the hospitality industry in different parts of the world and the challenges and opportunities involved. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A comparison of patients' perceptions and an audit of health promotion practice within a UK hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cook Gary A

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background UK hospitals are required to monitor the health promotion services they provide for patients. We compared the use of audit and patient questionnaires as appropriate tools for monitoring whether patients are screened for modifiable risk factors (smoking, alcohol use, obesity, diet, and physical activity, whether staff correctly identify risk factor presence and deliver health promotion when a risk factor is identified. Methods We sent a questionnaire post-discharge to 322 hospitalised adult patients discharged alive between January and March 2006, and audited their hospital case notes for evidence of screening for risk factors, identification of risk factors, and delivery of health promotion to change risk factors. Agreement between the audit and questionnaire findings was assessed by Kappa statistic. Results There was little relationship between what was written in the case notes and what patients thought had happened. Agreement between the audit and questionnaire for screening of risk factors was at best fair. For the delivery of health promotion agreement was moderate for alcohol, poor for exercise, and no different from chance for smoking and diet. Agreement on identifying risk factors was very good for obesity, good for smoking, and moderate for alcohol misuse. The identification of diet quality and level of physical activity was too low in the audit to allow statistical comparison with self-reported diet and activity. Conclusion A direct comparison of data gathered in the audit and patient questionnaires provides a comprehensive picture of health promotion practice within hospitals. Poor screening agreement is likely to be due to errors in patients' recall of screening activities. Audit is therefore the preferred method for evaluating screening of risk factors, but further insight into screening practice can be gained by using the questionnaire in conjunction with audit. If a patient does not recognise that they received

  16. Fitting the Needs of an Industry: An Examination of Games Design, Development, and Art Courses in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Barry

    2012-01-01

    There have been growing criticisms in recent years among the computer and video games community on the apparent lack of graduates capable of meeting the industry's employment needs. Following the sharp rise in the number of computer and video games courses across higher education (HE) institutions in the UK and across the globe, this article…

  17. Determination of risk identification process employed by NHS for a PFI hospital project in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. E. Mohamed Ghazali

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Long-term concession contracts associated with Private Finance Initiative (PFI projects, such as National Health Service (NHS hospitals, are subject to substantial risks, which may not only emerge from project activities such as design and construction, but also from global issues beyond the control of project parties, such as commercial, legal and political risks. Therefore, the principal parties involved must manage risks effectively and efficiently, as early as the project initiation stage, in order to ensure a successful delivery. The aim of this paper is to examine the risk identification process of the NHS PFI hospital in the UK, as a case study, in order to determine the techniques used in risk identification, and their significance, based on estimated probabilities of occurrence. These objectives were achieved through interviews with key personnel within the NHS Trust involved. Results found the sole technique used in risk identification to be brainstorming, through which more than thirty risks were identified and classified under six risk categories: planning, pre-commissioning, design, land purchasing, construction and operation. Thirteen risks were identified as significant based on their estimated probability of occurrence had the project been developed via public procurement. The results of this research will enable public sector clients like the NHS Trust to not only identify the significant risks, which will allow them to focus more attention on developing appropriate mitigation strategies and contingency plans, but also to improve its risk identification process through the use of other techniques in order to support findings from the brainstorming process.

  18. Early risk assessment for viral haemorrhagic fever: experience at the Hospital for Tropical Diseases, London, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodrow, Charles J; Eziefula, Alice C; Agranoff, Dan; Scott, Geoffrey M; Watson, Julie; Chiodini, Peter L; Lockwood, Diana N J; Grant, Alison D

    2007-01-01

    To implement a policy of systematic screening for viral haemorrhagic fever (VHF) among travellers returning from African countries with fever, commencing at initial clinical contact. A protocol based on UK Advisory Committee on Dangerous Pathogens guidance was developed collaboratively by medical, nursing and laboratory staff. Audit was carried out to quantify resource demands and effects on time to diagnose malaria, the main differential diagnosis. A protocol is now implemented for all patients presenting to HTD with fever, with clear guidelines for interaction with clinical and laboratory staff at each stage. The protocol required moderate amounts of clinical and laboratory staff time and resulted in some additional hospital admissions. The time to a diagnosis of malaria increased from a median of 90 (range 50-125) min in patients without VHF risk to a median of 140 (range 101-225) min (p=0.0025) in those assessed as at risk. Although all acute medical services need to have robust procedures for early detection of patients with serious transmissible conditions, few implement such a policy. Our protocol requires increased human and other resources but has no important impact on the rapidity of diagnosis of malaria, and is now embedded in local practice.

  19. Inside 'bed management': ethnographic insights from the vantage point of UK hospital nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Davina

    2015-03-01

    In the face of unprecedented financial and demographic challenges, optimising acute bed utilisation by the proactive management of patient flows is a pressing policy concern in high-income countries. Despite the growing literature on this topic, bed management has received scant sociological attention. Drawing on practice-based approaches, this article deploys ethnographic data to examine bed management from the perspective of UK hospital nurses. While the nursing contribution to bed management is recognised formally in their widespread employment in patient access and discharge liaison roles, nurses at all levels in the study site were enrolled in this organisational priority. Rather than the rational, centrally controlled processes promulgated by policymakers, bed management emerges as a predominantly distributed activity, described here as match-making. An example of micro-level rationing, for the most part, match-making was not informed by explicit criteria nor did it hinge on clearly identifiable decisions to grant or deny access. Rather it was embedded in the everyday practices and situated rationalities through which nurses accomplished the accommodations necessary to balance demand with resources. © 2014 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  20. MEMBANGUN SERVICE QUALITY UNTUK MENCAPAI KEPUASAN KONSUMEN DI INDUSTRI HOSPITALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sienny Thio

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Service quality is necessary especially in the hospitality industry, remembering that consumers have expectations that must be fulfilled and satisfied. Consumers often expect to get maximal service from the service providers and wish to be treated professionally and as a unique individual. This paper seeks to give a further idea about service quality which can be developed and done by service providers with the hope of fulfilling consumer expectations and finally to satisfy all consumers, both internal and external to the company. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Service Quality sangat dibutuhkan terutama di industri hospitality mengingat konsumen yang mempunyai ekspektasi yang selalu ingin dipenuhi dan dipuaskan. Konsumen selalu mengharapkan untuk mendapatkan service yang maksimal dari para penyedia jasa dalam hal ingin diperlakukan secara professional, dan diperlakukan sebagai individu yang unik. Tulisan ini dimaksudkan untuk memberikan gambaran yang lebih jauh mengenai service quality yang dapat dibangun dan dilakukan oleh para penyedia jasa yang diharapkan dapat memenuhi ekspektasi dari konsumen yang pada akhirnya dapat memuaskan eksternal konsumen maupun internal konsumen. Kata kunci: hospitality, service quality, ekspektasi, kepuasan, penyedia jasa.

  1. The Real Cost of Childcare: Motherhood and Flexible Creative Labour in the UK Film Industry - Review Essay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Wreyford

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available There is one clear factor that leads to women's inequality in the labour market: "becoming mothers" (The Commission for Equalities and Human Rights, 2007. It is difficult to talk about women and work without talking about childcare. The same would not be true about a discussion of men and work and this is still one of the most obvious difficulties to be managed by working women, even those who choose not to have children. It is the potential of all women to have children and the associated disruption to their career that can lead to women being perceived as less worthy of investment – of time, of career advice, of promotion and even of pay (Fitt and Newton, 1981, Groysberg, 2008, McGuire, 2002, Wajcman, 1998. In the UK film industry, only 14% of women have children compared to 40% of men (Skillset and UK Film Council, 2008. Work in the UK film industry shares many traits of other creative professions such as flexible working hours, project-based employment, uncertainty, precariousness and irregular and often unreliable payment. Skillset's report on the status of women in the creative industries in the UK found that representation is highest in sectors comprising larger employers in which more stable, permanent employment models are common, such as terrestrial television (48%, broadcast radio (47%, cinema exhibition (43%, and book publishing (61% (Skillset, 2010. This paper considers the hidden inequalities in the apparent freedom of a creative professions such as the UK film industry, paying particular attention to the role of the screenwriter in order to illustrate how continued gendered assumptions about a women's role as a mother and the primary carer for children can impact on their career opportunities in a creative industry.

  2. Hospitalizations among employees in the Danish hotel and restaurant industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannerz, Harald; Tüchsen, Finn; Kristensen, Tage S

    2002-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to provide a broad picture of the morbidity among employees in the Danish hotel and restaurant industry. Cohorts of all 20-59-year-old employees in the Danish hotel and restaurant industry in the years 1981, 1986, 1991 and 1994 were formed to calculate age-standardized hospitalization ratios (SHR) and time trends (1981-1997) for many different diagnoses. Both for women and men, significantly higher SHRs were found for infectious and parasitic diseases, neoplasms, diseases in the nervous system and sense organs, diseases of the circulatory system, diseases of the respiratory system, diseases of the digestive system and diseases of the musculoskeletal system among employees in hotels and restaurants than in the digestive system and diseases of the musculoskeletal system among employees in hotels and restaurants than in the working population at large. Furthermore, among women a significantly elevated risk was found for injuries in the lower extremities, injuries in the upper extremities and head injuries, and among men a high risk was found for head injuries and a low risk for ruptures in ligaments and muscles. The trend assessments did not detect any significant changes in SHRs over time. Employment in the Danish hotel and restaurant industry is associated with an elevated hospitalization risk due to many diseases, which may be related to occupation and lifestyle. In line with the official policy of reducing inequality in health, focus should be placed on the health problems in this group.

  3. Evolution of hospital industrial engineering: from scientific management to total quality management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahney, V K

    1993-01-01

    Industrial engineering applications in the hospital industry first began in 1910. This paper traces the evolution of hospital industrial engineering in five distinct phases. For each of the major phases, this paper presents the contributions made by industrial engineers. Many of the techniques advocated by industrial engineers are now being taught to hospital employees as hospitals introduce total quality management (TQM) within the health-care industry. TQM introduction has meant a new role for industrial engineers, as that of a teacher, coach, and a facilitator. This new role holds much promise for the improvement of quality and productivity in health care.

  4. A Comparative Quantitative Analysis of Contemporary Big Data Clustering Algorithms for Market Segmentation in Hospitality Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Bose, Avishek; Munir, Arslan; Shabani, Neda

    2017-01-01

    The hospitality industry is one of the data-rich industries that receives huge Volumes of data streaming at high Velocity with considerably Variety, Veracity, and Variability. These properties make the data analysis in the hospitality industry a big data problem. Meeting the customers' expectations is a key factor in the hospitality industry to grasp the customers' loyalty. To achieve this goal, marketing professionals in this industry actively look for ways to utilize their data in the best ...

  5. Bereaved parents' experience of stillbirth in UK hospitals: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downe, Soo; Schmidt, Ellie; Kingdon, Carol; Heazell, Alexander E P

    2013-01-01

    To obtain the views of bereaved parents about their interactions with healthcare staff when their baby died just before or during labour. Qualitative in-depth interview study, following an earlier national survey. All interviews took place during 2011, either face-to-face or on the telephone. Data analysis was informed by the constant comparative technique from grounded theory. Every National Health Service (NHS) region in the UK was represented. Bereaved parents who had completed an e-questionnaire, via the website of Sands (Stillbirth and Neonatal Death Society). Of the 304 survey respondents who gave provisional consent, 29 families were approached to take part, based on maximum variation sampling and data saturation. 22 families (n=25) participated. Births took place between 2002 and 2010. Specific practices were identified that were particularly helpful to the parents. Respondents talked about their interactions with hospital staff as having profound effects on their capacity to cope, both during labour and in the longer term. The data generated three key themes: 'enduring and multiple loss': 'making irretrievable moments precious'; and the 'best care possible to the worst imaginable'. The overall synthesis of findings is encapsulated in the meta-theme 'One chance to get it right.' This pertains to the parents and family themselves, clinical and support staff who care for them directly, and the NHS organisations that indirectly provide the resources and governance procedures that may (or may not) foster a caring ethos. Positive memories and outcomes following stillbirth depend as much on genuinely caring staff attitudes and behaviours as on high-quality clinical procedures. All staff who encounter parents in this situation need to see each meeting as their one chance to get it right.

  6. Understanding patients' behavioral intentions: evidence from Iran's private hospitals industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Ehsan; Arab, Mohammad; Tabatabaei, Seyed Mahmoud Ghazi; Rashidian, Arash; Forushani, Abbas Rahimi; Khabiri, Roghayeh

    2014-01-01

    In the ever-increasing competitive market of private hospital industry, creating a strong relationship with the customers that shapes patients' loyalty has been considered a key factor in obtaining market share. The purpose of this paper is to test a model of customer loyalty among patients of private hospitals in Iran. This cross-sectional study was carried out in Tehran, the capital of the Islamic Republic of Iran in 2010. The study samples composed of 969 patients who were consecutively selected from eight private hospitals. The survey instrument was designed based on a review of the related literature and included 36 items. Data analysis was performed using structural equation modeling. For the service quality construct, three dimensions extracted: Process, interaction, and environment. Both process and interaction quality had significant effects on perceived value. Perceived value along with the process and interaction quality were the most important antecedents of patient overall satisfaction. The direct effect of the process and interaction quality on behavioral intentions was insignificant. Perceived value and patient overall satisfaction were the direct antecedents of patient behavioral intentions and the mediators between service quality and behavioral intentions. Environment quality of service delivery had no significant effect on perceived value, overall satisfaction, and behavioral intentions. Contrary to previous similar studies, the role of service quality was investigated not in a general sense, but in the form of three types of qualities including quality of environment, quality of process, and quality of interaction.

  7. General Considerations on Leadership in the Hospitality Industry. Conceptual Analysis and Practical Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Andreia ISPAS

    2010-01-01

    Leadership in the hospitality industry is still an open research field especially in describing the effects of leadership style on hotel employees. The purpose of the paper is to present and analyze the following concepts: leadership and leadership style, hospitality industry; the practical aspects of leadership in the hospitality industry and to identify relevant studies regarding the importance of leadership styles applied in this industry. The research methodology consists of analyzing the...

  8. Tobacco industry manipulation of data on and press coverage of the illicit tobacco trade in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, A; Evans-Reeves, K; Gilmore, A B

    2014-05-01

    In the UK, transnational tobacco companies (TTCs) have been arguing that levels of illicit trade are high and increasing and will rise further if standardised packaging is implemented. This paper examines trends in and accuracy of media reporting of, and industry data on, illicit tobacco in the UK. Quantification of the volume, nature and quality of press articles citing industry data on illicit tobacco in UK newspapers from March 2008 to March 2013. Examination of published TTC data on illicit, including a comparison with independent data and of TTC reporting of Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs data on illicit. Media stories citing industry data on illicit tobacco began in June 2011, 2 months after the Tobacco Control Plan for England, which heralded standardised packaging, was published. The majority of data cited are based on industry Empty Pack Surveys for which no methodology is available. For almost all parts of the country where repeat data were cited in press stories, they indicated an increase, often substantial, in non-domestic/illicit cigarettes that is not supported by independent data. Similarly, national data from two published industry sources show a sudden large increase in non-domestic product between 2011 and 2012. Yet the methodology of one report changes over this period and the other provides no published methodology. In contrast, independent data show steady declines in non-domestic and illicit cigarette penetration from 2006 to 2012 and either a continued decline or small increase to 2013. Industry claims that use of Non-UK Duty Paid/illicit cigarettes in the UK is sharply increasing are inconsistent with historical trends and recent independent data. TTCs are exaggerating the threat of illicit tobacco by commissioning surveys whose methodology and validity remain uncertain, planting misleading stories and misquoting government data. Industry data on levels of illicit should be treated with extreme caution. Published by the BMJ Publishing

  9. Patterns of hospital admission with epistaxis for 26,725 patients over an 18-year period in Wales, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishpool, SJC; Tomkinson, A

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Epistaxis is the one of the most common otorhinolaryngology emergencies. This study examined the age and sex distribution of all patients admitted with epistaxis to National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in Wales, UK, over a period of 18 years and 9 months. METHODS The Patient Episode Database for Wales was examined for all patient admissions with a diagnosis of epistaxis between April 1991 and December 2009. The age and sex of these patients was recorded and the proportion of the underlying population affected was calculated by comparing admission rates to the population data derived from the 1991 and 2001 national population censuses for Wales. RESULTS A total of 26,725 patients were admitted to NHS hospitals in Wales with epistaxis over the period studied. The proportion of the population admitted with epistaxis increased from the age of 40 onwards. For all ages except patients in the 10–14 years group, a higher proportion of the male population was admitted with epistaxis than the comparable female population. This discrepancy was most pronounced between the ages of 15 and 49 years, with the female-to-male ratio of hospital admissions with epistaxis being 0.55. These ages (15 and 49 years) approximate the average age of menarche and menopause respectively in the UK. CONCLUSIONS Women of menstrual age have fewer hospital admissions with epistaxis. This may be due to oestrogens providing protection to the nasal vasculature (as they do to other areas of the vascular tree). PMID:23131225

  10. An Overview of Franchising In The Hospitality Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersan Suria Pranoto

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, franchising is the most significant part in the hospitality industry through hotels and fast food restaurant. Franchisor gives the right to the franchisee to sell their product and service also to sub franchise it and worked under their brand name. Furthermore, in franchising there must be a contract between the franchisor and the franchisee which include the term and condition. Franchises include some aspects such as, screening, site selection, operating manuals and the pre opening. However, there are some advantages and disadvantages for both the franchisor and the franchisee. The expansion of franchise can be achieved through different strategies of distribution and the knowledge of the targeted market. The future of franchise can be gained through strategies of distribution system, which could emerge the entrepreneur into the majority economy and business. 

  11. Application of Target Costing method in the Hospitality Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andor Pajrok

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditional approaches to managing costs are based on the costs that are the result of existing capabilities and resources in the company. Adding to these costs a specified margin or profit, leads to the sales price. If the market is not ready to accept such a selling price, managers need to find opportunities for rationalization and cost reduction. Target cost management begins the process of managing the sales price and the planned profit that the market can accept, and only then is it possible to determine the cost of the product. In the planning phase of the product and the manufacturing process the approach is to finding a method to lower costs and to reduce them as much as possible. The aim this of study is to investigate the application of target (strategy cost accounting methods in the Hospitality Industry.

  12. Hospital CEOs' priorities and perceptions regarding industry issues and the Virginia Hospital Association's activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, D R; Gerardo, E F; Duguid, D A; Cooning, P J

    1991-01-01

    Based on a survey of Virginia hospital CEOs, it was revealed that four industry issues are causing a high degree of concern, namely Medicare/Medicaid reimbursement policies, personnel shortages, indigent care, and increased operating expenses. Each of these issues will be discussed regarding the VHA's activities to devise possible solutions. Regarding Medicare, the VHA has worked closely with the American Hospital Association in their federal advocacy efforts encouraging members to write, call, and visit their Congressional representatives to persuade them to pass legislation increasing the Medicare budget. Regarding Medicaid, which is administered by each state and in Virginia involves a 50/50 sharing of the funding between the federal and state governments, the VHA has challenged what it believes to be an illegal hospital reimbursement system through the federal judicial system. While the process is continuing, the VHA is encouraged by the U.S. Supreme Court's decision (July 1990) affirming hospitals' and all other health care providers' right, to pursue via the judicial process their allegation that a state is violating federal law by setting inadequate and inequitable Medicaid reimbursement rates to hospitals. In order to address the personnel shortages issue, the VHA has actively addressed recruitment and retention challenges by establishing a Health Manpower Resource Center and hiring a full-time director. This office targets high school students, second-career adults, and current health care professionals through communication and education programs. The area of indigent care represents one of the VHA's most notable achievements to date. This entails the recent Virginia legislation creating the Indigent Care Trust Fund. This fund's initial amount is some $15 million and represents an approximate 60/40 contribution ratio involving both the State of Virginia and hospitals in Virginia. A formula has been developed for each hospital in Virginia to assess how

  13. Hospital catering systems and their impact on the sensorial profile of foods provided to older patients in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrommatis, Yiannis; Moynihan, Paula J; Gosney, Margot A; Methven, Lisa

    2011-08-01

    Impaired sensorial perception is very common in older people and low sensorial quality of foods is associated with decreased appetite and dietary intake. Hospital undernutrition in older patients could be linked to sensorial quality of hospital food if the quality were low or inappropriate for older people. The aim of this study was to examine changes in the sensorial quality of different foods that occur as a result of the food journey (i.e. freezing, regeneration, etc.) in the most common hospital catering systems in the UK. A trained sensory panel assessed sensorial descriptors of certain foods with and without the hospital food journey as it occurs in the in-house and cook/freeze systems. The results showed effects of the food journey on a small number of sensorial descriptors related to flavour, appearance and mouthfeel. The majority of these effects were due to temperature changes, which caused accumulation of condensation. A daily variation in sensorial descriptors was also detected and in some cases it was greater than the effect of the food journey. This study has shown that changes occur in the sensory quality of meals due to hospital food journeys, however these changes were small and are not expected to substantially contribute to acceptability or have a major role in hospital malnutrition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A survey of doctors at a UK teaching hospital to assess understanding of recent changes to consent law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, J W; Natarajan, M; Shaikh, I

    2017-06-01

    The UK Supreme Court recently ruled that when consenting patients for treatments or procedures, clinicians must also discuss any associated material risks. We surveyed medical staff at a large UK teaching hospital in order to ascertain knowledge of consent law and current understanding of this change. Email survey sent to medical staff in all specialities at Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital in February 2016. 245 responses (141 Consultants and 104 junior doctors, response rate 32%). 82% consent patients for procedures at least monthly and 23% daily. 31% were not familiar with the concept of material risk. 35% were familiar with the recent change in consent law, 41% were not. 18% were "very uncertain" and 64% "a little uncertain" that their consenting process meets current legal requirements. >92% think that landmark cases and changes in law should be discussed through professional bodies and circulated better locally. The majority were not familiar with the concept of material risk and recent legal changes. A majority were not confident that their practice meets current requirements, suggesting that recent changes in consent law may not be widely understood at this hospital. We suggest more guidance and education may be necessary than is currently available. Increased understanding of recent changes to consent law will reduce the risk taken by NHS trusts and offer patients a service compliant with Supreme Court guidance.

  15. Hospitality industry veteran to lead workshop on boosting sales and business

    OpenAIRE

    Crumbley, Liz

    2009-01-01

    Hospitality industry expert Howard Feiertag will teach participants how to energize sales and boost business during the "Hospitality Sales" workshop, April 27 and 28 at the Hotel Roanoke and Conference Center in Roanoke, Va.

  16. UK and Italian EIA systems: A comparative study on management practice and performance in the construction industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassi, Andrea; Howard, Robert; Geneletti, Davide; Ferrari, Simone

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates and contrasts the management practice and the performance that characterise Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA) in Italy and in the UK. The methodology relies on the investigation of six carefully selected case studies, critically reviewed by referring to EIA and project design information, as well as collecting the opinion of key project participants. The study focuses on the construction industry and on specific key sectors like infrastructure for transport and renewable energy and commercial and tourism development. A main term of reference for the analyses has been established by critically reviewing international literature so as to outline common good practice, requirements for the enhancement of sustainability principles and typically incurred drawbacks. The proposed approach enhances transfer of knowledge and of experiences between the analyzed contexts and allows the provision of guidelines for practitioners. Distinctive differences between the UK and the Italian EIA systems have been detected for pivotal phases and elements of EIA, like screening, scoping, analysis of alternatives and of potential impacts, definition of mitigation strategies, review, decision making, public participation and follow up. - Highlights: ► The Italian and the UK Environmental Impact Assessment systems are compared. ► The research is centred on the construction industry. ► Issues and shortcomings are analysed by investigating six case studies. ► Integration of EIA with sustainability principles is appraised. ► General guidelines are provided to assist practitioners in the two national contexts.

  17. Performance measurement in the UK construction industry and its role in supporting the application of lean construction concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Sarhan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Performance measurement has received substantial attention from researchers and the construction industry over the past two decades. This study sought to assess UK practitioners’ awareness of the importance of the use of appropriate performance measures and its role in supporting the application of Lean Construction (LC concepts. To enable the study to achieve its objectives, a review of a range of measurements developed to evaluate project performance including those devoted to support LC efforts was conducted. Consequently a questionnaire survey was developed and sent to 198 professionals in the UK construction industry as well as a small sample of academics with an interest in LC. Results indicated that although practitioners recognise the importance of the selection of non-financial performance measures, it has not been properly and widely implemented. The study identified the most common techniques used by UK construction organisations for performance measurement, and ranked a number of non-financial key performance indicators as significant. Some professed to have embraced the Last Planner System methodology as a means for performance measurement and organisational learning, while further questioning suggested otherwise. It was also suggested that substance thinking amongst professionals could be a significant hidden barrier that militates against the successful implementation of LC.

  18. UK and Italian EIA systems: A comparative study on management practice and performance in the construction industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassi, Andrea, E-mail: ab395@bath.co.uk [University of Bath, Faculty of Engineering and Design, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Howard, Robert, E-mail: robhoward@constcom.demon.co.uk [Construction Communications, 8 Cotton& #x27; s Field, Dry Drayton, Cambridge CB23 8DG (United Kingdom); Geneletti, Davide, E-mail: davide.geneletti@ing.unitn.it [Sustainability Science Program, Harvard University, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Trento, Via Mesiano, 77 38123 Trento (Italy); Ferrari, Simone, E-mail: simone.ferrari@polimi.it [Dept. BEST, Building Environment Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, Via Bonardi, 3 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2012-04-15

    This study evaluates and contrasts the management practice and the performance that characterise Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA) in Italy and in the UK. The methodology relies on the investigation of six carefully selected case studies, critically reviewed by referring to EIA and project design information, as well as collecting the opinion of key project participants. The study focuses on the construction industry and on specific key sectors like infrastructure for transport and renewable energy and commercial and tourism development. A main term of reference for the analyses has been established by critically reviewing international literature so as to outline common good practice, requirements for the enhancement of sustainability principles and typically incurred drawbacks. The proposed approach enhances transfer of knowledge and of experiences between the analyzed contexts and allows the provision of guidelines for practitioners. Distinctive differences between the UK and the Italian EIA systems have been detected for pivotal phases and elements of EIA, like screening, scoping, analysis of alternatives and of potential impacts, definition of mitigation strategies, review, decision making, public participation and follow up. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Italian and the UK Environmental Impact Assessment systems are compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The research is centred on the construction industry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Issues and shortcomings are analysed by investigating six case studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integration of EIA with sustainability principles is appraised. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer General guidelines are provided to assist practitioners in the two national contexts.

  19. Comparing Antonovsky's sense of coherence scale across three UK post-industrial cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, David; McCartney, Gerry; McCullough, Sarah; Buchanan, Duncan; Jones, Russell

    2014-11-25

    High levels of 'excess' mortality (ie, that seemingly not explained by deprivation) have been shown for Scotland compared to England and Wales and, especially, for its largest city, Glasgow, compared to the similarly deprived English cities of Liverpool and Manchester. It has been suggested that this excess may be related to differences in 'Sense of Coherence' (SoC) between the populations. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether levels of SoC differed between these cities and whether, therefore, this could be a plausible explanation for the 'excess'. Three post-industrial UK cities: Glasgow, Liverpool and Manchester. A representative sample of more than 3700 adults (over 1200 in each city). SoC was measured using Antonovsky's 13-item scale (SOC-13). Multivariate linear regression was used to compare SoC between the cities while controlling for characteristics (age, gender, SES etc) of the samples. Additional modelling explored whether differences in SoC moderated city differences in levels of self-assessed health (SAH). SoC was higher, not lower, among the Glasgow sample. Fully adjusted mean SoC scores for residents of Liverpool and Manchester were, respectively, 5.1 (-5.1 (95% CI -6.0 to -4.1)) and 8.1 (-8.1 (-9.1 to -7.2)) lower than those in Glasgow. The additional modelling confirmed the relationship between SoC and SAH: a 1 unit increase in SoC predicted approximately 3% lower likelihood of reporting bad/very bad health (OR=0.97 (95% CI 0.96 to 0.98)): given the slightly worse SAH in Glasgow, this resulted in slightly lower odds of reporting bad/very bad health for the Liverpool and Manchester samples compared to Glasgow. The reasons for the high levels of 'excess' mortality seen in Scotland and particularly Glasgow remain unclear. However, on the basis of these analyses, it appears unlikely that a low SoC provides any explanation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go

  20. Profile of ocular trauma in industries-related hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashikala, P; Sadiqulla, Mohammed; Shivakumar, D; Prakash, K H

    2013-05-01

    Ocular trauma is a worldwide cause of visual morbidity, a significant proportion of which occurs in the industrial workplace and includes a spectrum of simple ocular surface foreign bodies, abrasions to devastating perforating injuries causing blindness. Being preventable is of social and medical concern. A prospective case series study, to know the profile of ocular trauma at a hospital caters exclusively to factory employees and their families, to co-relate their demographic and clinical profile and to identify the risk factors. Patients with ocular trauma who presented at ESIC Model hospital, Rajajinagar, Bangalore, from June 2010 to May 2011 were taken a detailed demographic data, nature and cause of injury, time interval between the time of injury and presentation along with any treatment received. Ocular evaluation including visual acuity, anterior and posterior segment findings, intra-ocular pressure and gonio-scopy in closed globe injuries, X-rays for intraocular foreign body, B-scan and CT scan were done. Data analyzed as per the ocular trauma classification group. The rehabilitation undertaken medically or surgically was analyzed. At follow-up, the final best corrected visual acuity was noted. A total of 306 cases of ocular trauma were reported; predominantly in 20-40 year age group (72.2%) and in men (75%). The work place related cases were 50.7%and of these, fall of foreign bodies led the list. Visual prognosis was poorer in road traffic accidents rather than work place injuries owing to higher occurrence of open globe injuries and optic neuropathy. Finally, 11% of injured cases ended up with poor vision. Targeting groups most at risk, providing effective eye protection, and developing workplace safety cultures may together reduce occupational eye injuries.

  1. Implementation of the Environmental Management Concept in the Hospitality Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Dora Orboi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Globally, the concern for the environment is continually growing, among travel and tourism industry operators. Each unit hotel has its identity, its characteristics, and therefore, it is necessary to use and apply specific information about the environment, so as to create their own proactive environment protection policies. It must be performed an overview of environmental issues affecting the company and the performance that it has. Each unit hotel policy must be based on actual consumer demand for tourist services - as an active and conscious part - along with unit staff. Environmental action planning of a hotel unit has to go through several stages. The preparation of environmental actions of a hotel unit, involves biological control, which should help in making decisions on the most important measures that would benefit. Implementing the concept of environmental management in the hospitality unit requires including and taking the following steps: motivation, actions planning, analyze their performance and progress. They form an annual cycle of environmental management, which will go each year, to identify both the difficulties that have arisen and achievements and recommendations for the future.

  2. The case for the UK nuclear power industry and the implications of its closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locke, D.H.; Caley, J.R.

    1987-04-01

    The Chernobyl accident has produced calls for a moratorium on further nuclear power development and construction in the UK or, in the extreme, a phasing out of existing nuclear power stations. Some suggestions as to how to counteract these demands have been collected using published information wherever possible. (author)

  3. Understanding tobacco industry pricing strategy and whether it undermines tobacco tax policy: the example of the UK cigarette market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Anna B; Tavakoly, Behrooz; Taylor, Gordon; Reed, Howard

    2013-07-01

    Tobacco tax increases are the most effective means of reducing tobacco use and inequalities in smoking, but effectiveness depends on transnational tobacco company (TTC) pricing strategies, specifically whether TTCs overshift tax increases (increase prices on top of the tax increase) or undershift the taxes (absorb the tax increases so they are not passed onto consumers), about which little is known. Review of literature on brand segmentation. Analysis of 1999-2009 data to explore the extent to which tax increases are shifted to consumers, if this differs by brand segment and whether cigarette price indices accurately reflect cigarette prices. UK. UK smokers. Real cigarette prices, volumes and net-of-tax- revenue by price segment. TTCs categorise brands into four price segments: premium, economy, mid and 'ultra-low price' (ULP). TTCs have sold ULP brands since 2006; since then, their real price has remained virtually static and market share doubled. The price gap between premium and ULP brands is increasing because the industry differentially shifts tax increases between brand segments; while, on average, taxes are overshifted, taxes on ULP brands are not always fully passed onto consumers (being absorbed at the point each year when tobacco taxes increase). Price indices reflect the price of premium brands only and fail to detect these problems. Industry-initiated cigarette price changes in the UK appear timed to accentuate the price gap between premium and ULP brands. Increasing the prices of more expensive cigarettes on top of tobacco tax increases should benefit public health, but the growing price gap enables smokers to downtrade to cheaper tobacco products and may explain smoking-related inequalities. Governments must monitor cigarette prices by price segment and consider industry pricing strategies in setting tobacco tax policies. © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  4. Understanding tobacco industry pricing strategy and whether it undermines tobacco tax policy: the example of the UK cigarette market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Anna B; Tavakoly, Behrooz; Taylor, Gordon; Reed, Howard

    2013-01-01

    Aims Tobacco tax increases are the most effective means of reducing tobacco use and inequalities in smoking, but effectiveness depends on transnational tobacco company (TTC) pricing strategies, specifically whether TTCs overshift tax increases (increase prices on top of the tax increase) or undershift the taxes (absorb the tax increases so they are not passed onto consumers), about which little is known. Design Review of literature on brand segmentation. Analysis of 1999–2009 data to explore the extent to which tax increases are shifted to consumers, if this differs by brand segment and whether cigarette price indices accurately reflect cigarette prices. Setting UK. Participants UK smokers. Measurements Real cigarette prices, volumes and net-of-tax- revenue by price segment. Findings TTCs categorise brands into four price segments: premium, economy, mid and ‘ultra-low price’ (ULP). TTCs have sold ULP brands since 2006; since then, their real price has remained virtually static and market share doubled. The price gap between premium and ULP brands is increasing because the industry differentially shifts tax increases between brand segments; while, on average, taxes are overshifted, taxes on ULP brands are not always fully passed onto consumers (being absorbed at the point each year when tobacco taxes increase). Price indices reflect the price of premium brands only and fail to detect these problems. Conclusions Industry-initiated cigarette price changes in the UK appear timed to accentuate the price gap between premium and ULP brands. Increasing the prices of more expensive cigarettes on top of tobacco tax increases should benefit public health, but the growing price gap enables smokers to downtrade to cheaper tobacco products and may explain smoking-related inequalities. Governments must monitor cigarette prices by price segment and consider industry pricing strategies in setting tobacco tax policies. PMID:23445255

  5. Electricity consumers under the state and the private sector: comparing the price performance of the French and UK electricity industries 1990-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percebois, Jacques; Wright, Philip

    2001-01-01

    Particularly because a preoccupation with process has tended to dominate the debate about electricity privatisation and liberalisation, this paper focuses on price outcomes by comparing the relative price performance of the French and UK electricity industries between 1990 and 2000. The main conclusion is that in 1990 the state-owned French electricity industry was performing better for most consumers than the state-owned UK industry, and a decade later it was still doing so with respect to the privately-owned UK industry. While this conclusion could be qualified by saying that, heavily prompted or assisted by the Regulator, the UK privately-owned industry has shown itself capable of achieving faster reductions in prices to close the gap between itself and the French, this achievement has been concentrated in the industrial market and even there the very significant gains were mainly restricted to the very largest consumers. In the context of the European Union the UK is shown to have performed relatively poorly for the smallest domestic consumers and, while both countries did much better in the rankings of industrial prices, they were still a long way behind the top performers. (Author)

  6. How appropriate are the English language test requirements for non-UK-trained nurses? A qualitative study of spoken communication in UK hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgwick, Carole; Garner, Mark

    2017-06-01

    Non-native speakers of English who hold nursing qualifications from outside the UK are required to provide evidence of English language competence by achieving a minimum overall score of Band 7 on the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) academic test. To describe the English language required to deal with the daily demands of nursing in the UK. To compare these abilities with the stipulated levels on the language test. A tracking study was conducted with 4 nurses, and focus groups with 11 further nurses. The transcripts of the interviews and focus groups were analysed thematically for recurrent themes. These findings were then compared with the requirements of the IELTS spoken test. The study was conducted outside the participants' working shifts in busy London hospitals. The participants in the tracking study were selected opportunistically;all were trained in non-English speaking countries. Snowball sampling was used for the focus groups, of whom 4 were non-native and 7 native speakers of English. In the tracking study, each of the 4 nurses was interviewed on four occasions, outside the workplace, and as close to the end of a shift as possible. They were asked to recount their spoken interactions during the course of their shift. The participants in the focus groups were asked to describe their typical interactions with patients, family members, doctors, and nursing colleagues. They were prompted to recall specific instances of frequently-occurring communication problems. All interactions were audio-recorded, with the participants' permission,and transcribed. Nurses are at the centre of communication for patient care. They have to use appropriate registers to communicate with a range of health professionals, patients and their families. They must elicit information, calm and reassure, instruct, check procedures, ask for and give opinions,agree and disagree. Politeness strategies are needed to avoid threats to face. They participate in medical

  7. Radiological impact on the UK population of industries which use or produce materials containing enhanced levels of naturally occurring radionuclides. Part II: the steel production industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crockett, G.M.; Smith, K.R.; Oatway, W.B.; Mobbs, S.F.

    2003-01-01

    This report contains an assessment of the radiological impact on the UK population of the steel production industry within the UK. The radiological impact of the primary industry, the waste streams produced and the use of by-product slag have been considered. Individual doses from atmospheric releases from ail currently operating integrated steel plants in the UK are less than 10 μSv y -1 for all age groups. The per caput dose rate in the UK population from 500 years of continuous steel production at the current levels is estimated to be 0.1 μSv y -1 . Estimated maximum doses to workers at the steel production plant, landfill workers, and workers manufacturing and using building materials containing slag were generally less than 20 μSv y -1 . The estimated radon concentrations in buildings constructed from concrete containing slag depend upon the radon emanation fraction assumed for the material. Experimental data in this area is sparse, and thus a range was considered. The estimated radon concentrations in buildings constructed from concrete containing slag ranged between 7.0 and 10.8 Bq m -3 , compared with 9.9 Bq m -3 when slag-free concrete is assumed. The estimated dose from radon exposure ranges between 363 μSv y -1 and 559 μSv y -1 , compared with 510 μSv y -1 when slag-free concrete is used. The estimated external dose to an individual in a house constructed using concrete containing slag is 790 μSv y -1 compared with 758 μSv y -1 for slag-free concrete. The overall effect of the use of the slag in building materials therefore ranges between a reduction in dose of 115 μSv y -1 and an increase of 81 μSv y -1 . Other scenarios involving exposure of members of the public to slag resulted in doses of less than 5 μSv y -1 . The estimated peak individual risk from landfill disposal of steel industry waste is less than approximately 1 10 -8 y -1 . Currently, radiological controls on the operation of steel production sites are confined to the

  8. Essential dimensions of a marketing strategy in the hospital industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlwain, T F; McCracken, M J

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews existing literature and defines essential dimensions of a hospital's marketing strategy for each of two business strategies; using the results of a national survey, this study confirms that hospitals make different marketing decisions based on the type of business strategy adopted by the hospital.

  9. Financial impacts of UK's energy and climate change policies on commercial and industrial businesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, Chye Peng; Toper, Bruce; Gambhir, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    This study provides a detailed case study assessment of two business sites in the UK, to understand the policy drivers of increases to their energy costs and energy bills, considering all current UK energy and climate change policies. We compare our findings to more generalised, theoretical calculations of the policy cost impact on energy costs and bills – we have found no other studies as comprehensive as ours in terms of policy coverage. We find that for one site the government has over-estimated the likely energy savings due to energy efficiency options. Such differences in estimates should be taken into account when considering the efficacy of climate change policies on future energy savings. The overall impact of energy and climate change policies on costs will be of the order 0.4% of total business costs by 2020. This provides an important metric for the near-term cost of mitigation to meet longer-term climate change goals. - Highlights: •Cumulative impacts of policies on energy prices and bills were studied. •Projected bills for one site are higher than those projected by the UK government. •Results of existing theoretical studies may not be fully representative. •Impact of policies is not considered significant with respect to competitiveness.

  10. Theoretical Aspects of the Building Professional Competences of the Hospitality Industry Specialists

    OpenAIRE

    Silicka, Inese; Ļubkina, Velta

    2015-01-01

    The theoretical aspects of the concept of the professional competences of future hospitality industry specialists are examined and analysed in the paper. The study is carried out within the framework of development of the doctoral thesis “Interrelation of the professional competence theories and the practice in the hospitality industry”. The components and constituent elements of the professional competences of the hospitality industry specialists are defined in the research; the concepts “pr...

  11. Time for a real shift to relations: appraisal of Social Network Analysis applications in the UK construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximing Ruan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Social Network Analysis (SNA has been adopted in the UK construction management research and generated meaningful insights in analysing project management organisations from network perspectives. As an effective tool, social network analysis has been used to analyse information and knowledge flow between construction project teams which is considered as foundation for collaborative working and subsequently improving overall performance. Social network analysis is based on an assumption of the importance of relationships among interacting units. The social network perspective encompasses theories, models and applications that are expressed in terms of relational concepts or processes. Many believe, moreover, that the success or failure of organisations often depends on the patterning of their internal structure. This paper reviewed existing literatures on SNA applications in construction industry from three leading construction management journals.  From the review, the research proposed some advance in the application of SNA in the construction industry

  12. Time for a real shift to relations: appraisal of Social Network Analysis applications in the UK construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximing Ruan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Social Network Analysis (SNA has been adopted in the UK construction management research and generated meaningful insights in analysing project management organisations from network perspectives. As an effective tool, social network analysis has been used to analyse information and knowledge flow between construction project teams which is considered as foundation for collaborative working and subsequently improving overall performance. Social network analysis is based on an assumption of the importance of relationships among interacting units. The social network perspective encompasses theories, models and applications that are expressed in terms of relational concepts or processes. Many believe, moreover, that the success or failure of organisations often depends on the patterning of their internal structure. This paper reviewed existing literatures on SNA applications in construction industry from three leading construction management journals.  From the review, the research proposed some advance in the application of SNA in the construction industry.

  13. Prevalence, Nature, Severity and Risk Factors for Prescribing Errors in Hospital Inpatients: Prospective Study in 20 UK Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcroft, Darren M; Lewis, Penny J; Tully, Mary P; Farragher, Tracey M; Taylor, David; Wass, Valerie; Williams, Steven D; Dornan, Tim

    2015-09-01

    It has been suggested that doctors in their first year of post-graduate training make a disproportionate number of prescribing errors. This study aimed to compare the prevalence of prescribing errors made by first-year post-graduate doctors with that of errors by senior doctors and non-medical prescribers and to investigate the predictors of potentially serious prescribing errors. Pharmacists in 20 hospitals over 7 prospectively selected days collected data on the number of medication orders checked, the grade of prescriber and details of any prescribing errors. Logistic regression models (adjusted for clustering by hospital) identified factors predicting the likelihood of prescribing erroneously and the severity of prescribing errors. Pharmacists reviewed 26,019 patients and 124,260 medication orders; 11,235 prescribing errors were detected in 10,986 orders. The mean error rate was 8.8 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 8.6-9.1) errors per 100 medication orders. Rates of errors for all doctors in training were significantly higher than rates for medical consultants. Doctors who were 1 year (odds ratio [OR] 2.13; 95 % CI 1.80-2.52) or 2 years in training (OR 2.23; 95 % CI 1.89-2.65) were more than twice as likely to prescribe erroneously. Prescribing errors were 70 % (OR 1.70; 95 % CI 1.61-1.80) more likely to occur at the time of hospital admission than when medication orders were issued during the hospital stay. No significant differences in severity of error were observed between grades of prescriber. Potentially serious errors were more likely to be associated with prescriptions for parenteral administration, especially for cardiovascular or endocrine disorders. The problem of prescribing errors in hospitals is substantial and not solely a problem of the most junior medical prescribers, particularly for those errors most likely to cause significant patient harm. Interventions are needed to target these high-risk errors by all grades of staff and hence

  14. Deficiencies in provision of integrated multidisciplinary podiatry care for patients with inflammatory arthritis: a UK district general hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, M; Price, E; Collins, D; Williamson, L

    2010-01-01

    Foot problems are highly prevalent in inflammatory arthritis (IA), especially rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Chronic inflammation can lead to permanent structural changes, deformity and disability. Early podiatry intervention in RA improves long term outcomes. National guidelines recommend that patients should be treated by a multidisciplinary team with dedicated podiatry services. In clinical practice funding constraints limit availability of these services. To assess prevalence of foot problems and quality and availability of foot care services at a UK district general hospital. 1200 IA patients in Swindon (Wiltshire, UK) were invited to complete an anonymised questionnaire regarding access to foot care services and education/information on foot problems. 448 patients. Prevalence of foot problems: 68%. Only 31% of patients had access to appropriate foot specialist. 24% had received foot assessment within 3 months of diagnosis of IA and 17% yearly review thereafter. Despite high prevalence of foot problems in our population we identified significant deficiencies in provision of integrated multidisciplinary podiatry care. The data we present could be used by others to support business cases to obtain funding to improve the links between rheumatology and podiatry services. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Coding accuracy for Parkinson's disease hospital admissions: implications for healthcare planning in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzerengi, S; Rick, C; Begaj, I; Ives, N; Evison, F; Woolley, R L; Clarke, C E

    2017-05-01

    Hospital Episode Statistics data are used for healthcare planning and hospital reimbursements. Reliability of these data is dependent on the accuracy of individual hospitals reporting Secondary Uses Service (SUS) which includes hospitalisation. The number and coding accuracy for Parkinson's disease hospital admissions at a tertiary centre in Birmingham was assessed. Retrospective, routine-data-based study. A retrospective electronic database search for all Parkinson's disease patients admitted to the tertiary hospital over a 4-year period (2009-2013) was performed on the SUS database using International Classification of Disease codes, and on the local inpatient electronic prescription database, Prescription and Information Communications System, using medication prescriptions. Capture-recapture methods were used to estimate the number of patients and admissions missed by both databases. From the two databases, between July 2009 and June 2013, 1068 patients with Parkinson's disease accounted for 1999 admissions. During these admissions, the Parkinson's disease was coded as a primary or secondary diagnosis. Ninety-one percent of these admissions were recorded on the SUS database. Capture-recapture methods estimated that the number of Parkinson's disease patients admitted during this period was 1127 patients (95% confidence interval: 1107-1146). A supplementary search of both SUS and Prescription and Information Communications System was undertaken using the hospital numbers of these 1068 patients. This identified another 479 admissions. SUS database under-estimated Parkinson's disease admissions by 27% during the study period. The accuracy of disease coding is critical for healthcare policy planning and must be improved. If the under-reporting of Parkinson's disease admissions on the SUS database is repeated nationally, expenditure on Parkinson's disease admissions in England is under-estimated by approximately £61 million per year. Copyright © 2016 The Royal

  16. Psychotropic prescribing in seriously violent men with schizophrenia or personality disorder in a UK high security hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone-Brown, Keir; Naji, Mahmood; Francioni, Alex; Myers, Kyle; Samarendra, Harsh; Mushtaq-Chaudhry, Haseeb; Heslop, Stephen; Sengupta, Samrat; Ross, Callum C; Larkin, Fintan; Das, Mrigendra

    2016-02-01

    To analyze antipsychotic prescribing patterns in a UK high security hospital (HSH) that treats seriously violent men with either schizophrenia or personality disorder and examine how different groups consented to treatment and prescribing for metabolic conditions. We hypothesized that there would be high prevalence of antipsychotic polypharmacy, and high-dose antipsychotic and clozapine prescribing. HSHs treat seriously violent, mentally disordered offenders, and the extant literature on prescribing patterns in forensic settings is sparse. Prescribing and clinical data on all 189 patients in a UK HSH were collected from the hospital's databases. Data were analyzed using SPSS. The population was split into the following groups: schizophrenia spectrum disorder (SSD-only), personality disorder (PD-only), and comorbid schizophrenia spectrum disorder and PD. The majority (93.7%) of all patients were prescribed at least one antipsychotic, and (27.5%) were on clozapine. Polypharmacy was prevalent in 22.2% and high-dose antipsychotic in 27.5%. Patients on clozapine were more likely to be prescribed antidiabetic, statins, or antihypertensive medication. Patients in the PD-only group were more likely to be deemed to have the capacity to consent to treatment and be prescribed clozapine in contrast to the SSD-only group. Rates of clozapine and high-dose antipsychotic prescribing were higher than in other psychiatric settings, while polypharmacy prescribing rates were lower. Higher clozapine prescribing rates may be a function of a treatment-resistant and aggressive population. A higher proportion of PD-only patients consented to treatment and received clozapine compared with in-house SSD-only as well as other psychiatric settings. Implications of the findings are discussed.

  17. A Study on the Impact of Marketing Capability, Operations Capability, Environmental Capability and Diversification Strategy on the Performance of Hotel Industry in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, YUBO

    2009-01-01

    Hotel industry has been an increasingly significant service industry across the whole world. The performance measurement method is crucial for hotels’ operations. This study examines the impacts of marketing capability, operations capability, environmental capability and diversification strategy on the business performance of hotel industry in the UK. Based on the financial archival data in the database and information obtained in the firm websites from 2004 to 2007, the investigation is carr...

  18. The social cost of fuel cycles. Report to the UK Department of Trade and Industry (Department of Industry)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearce, D; Bann, C; Georgiou, S

    1992-09-01

    CSERGE was commissioned by the then UK Department of Energy to survey the available literature on the monetary estimation of the social costs of energy production and use. It focuses on the social costs of electricity production. The report assesses 'externality adders' defined as a surcharge that may be added to the marginal private cost of electricity in order to reflect the non-market damages or benefits that given electricity-generating technology creates. These 'adders' arise from environmental damages, such as the production of greenhouse gases, and from non-environmental externalities such as subsidies. Fuel cycles considered are: coal fired systems, both with and without emission control, oil-fired systems without FGD and low NO[sub x] burners; combined cycle gas turbines; nuclear energy (PWR), wind energy, landfill gas, geothermal energy, tidal power, hydroelectric power, wave energy, solar energy and combined heat and power. Types of adder considered fall into categories including: air pollution, building damage; catastrophic risks/discount rates; crop damage; energy and environment valuation; forest damage; principles of monetary valuation; global damage; health effects; land damage; noise pollution; non-environmental externalities; radiation damage; transmission; visibility; water pollution and biological diversity. 500 refs.

  19. The application of intangible asset accounting and discretionary policy choices in the UK football industry

    OpenAIRE

    Rowbottom, Nicholas

    2002-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of intangible asset accounting and the selection of accounting policies in the football industry, an environment where discretionary choices were available concerning accounting for transfer fees. Additionally, companies in this dynamic and socially influential industry are unique in recognising investments in human resources on the balance sheet. Proxies representing the level of tax costs, equity depletion, underwriter pressure and auditors used are found to ...

  20. The relationship between UK hospital nurse staffing and emotional exhaustion and job dissatisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheward, Louisa; Hunt, Jennifer; Hagen, Suzanne; Macleod, Margaret; Ball, Jane

    2005-01-01

    To explore the relationship between nurse outcomes (dissatisfaction and emotional exhaustion) and nurse workload, nurse characteristics and hospital variables. Concern about the impact of restructuring of nurse staffing, and reports of nurse shortages, on nurse and patient outcomes led to the research being reported on in this article. A questionnaire survey of registered nurses in Scotland and England. A questionnaire survey of the hospitals in which these nurses worked. Respondents in the two countries were similar in terms of demographic, work and employment characteristics. Significant relationships were found using the combined English and Scottish data between nurse patient ratios and (1) emotional exhaustion and (2) dissatisfaction with current job reported by nurses. Increasing numbers of patients to nurses was associated with increasing risk of emotional exhaustion and dissatisfaction with current job.

  1. Exploring gender differences in the working lives of UK hospital consultants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, Laura; Bloor, Karen; Spilsbury, Karen

    2015-05-01

    Internationally, increasing numbers of women are practising medicine. Gender differences in doctors' working hours, specialty choices and communication styles are well documented, but studies often neglect contextual factors such as the role of socialised gender expectations on behaviours in the workplace and the medical profession. These may be important as recent studies have reported gender differences in doctors' activity rates that cannot be explained by specialty or contracted hours, suggesting other sources of variation. This study sought to explore the working lives of hospital doctors and how their work is negotiated according to gender and context. Gender differences in the day-to-day work of hospital specialists (consultants) in the NHS were investigated using a qualitative approach, including observation and interview methods. Data were analysed inductively using qualitative observation and interview methods. Two NHS hospital trusts in England. Data were collected from 13 participants working in a variety of specialties and in a range of clinical and non-clinical settings. Various behaviours, attitudes and experiences were explored, such as doctor-patient communication, interactions with colleagues and workload. Influences at both individual and situational levels, appear to affect differentially the work of male and female doctors. Female consultants described awareness of the impact of behaviours on relationships with colleagues, and their interactions appeared to be more carefully performed. Nurses and other colleagues tend to demonstrate less cooperation with female consultants. Gender differences also exist in patient communication, feelings of work-family conflict and barriers to career progression. These variations in hospital consultants' work may have implications for both the quantity and quality of care provided by male and female consultants. This is timely and of importance to the medical workforce as the gender composition approaches

  2. Determinants of the cost of capital for privately financed hospital projects in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colla, Paolo; Hellowell, Mark; Vecchi, Veronica; Gatti, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    Many governments make use of private finance contracts to deliver healthcare infrastructure. Previous work has shown that the rate of return to investors in these markets often exceeds the efficient level. Our focus is on the factors that influence that return. We examine the effect of macroeconomic, project- and firm-level variables using a detailed sample of 84 UK private finance initiative (PFI) contracts signed between 1997 and 2010. Of the above variables, macroeconomic conditions and lead sponsor size are related to the investor return. However, our results show a remarkable degree of stability in the return to investors over the 14-year period. We find evidence of a 'prevailing norm' that is robust to project- and firm-level variation. The sustainability of excess returns over a long period is indicative of a concentrated market structure. We argue that policymakers should consider new mechanisms for increasing competition in the equity market, while ensuring that authorities have the specialist resources required to negotiate efficient contract prices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hospital prices and market structure in the hospital and insurance industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Asako S; Vogt, William B; Gaynor, Martin

    2010-10-01

    There has been substantial consolidation among health insurers and hospitals, recently, raising questions about the effects of this consolidation on the exercise of market power. We analyze the relationship between insurer and hospital market concentration and the prices of hospital services. We use a national US dataset containing transaction prices for health care services for over 11 million privately insured Americans. Using three years of panel data, we estimate how insurer and hospital market concentration are related to hospital prices, while controlling for unobserved market effects. We find that increases in insurance market concentration are significantly associated with decreases in hospital prices, whereas increases in hospital concentration are non-significantly associated with increases in prices. A hypothetical merger between two of five equally sized insurers is estimated to decrease hospital prices by 6.7%.

  4. Hospitality industry veteran and Hampton Roads Center team up to present workshop on ensuring success

    OpenAIRE

    Felker, Susan B.

    2008-01-01

    Hospitality industry veteran Howard Feiertag is hosting a workshop aimed at novice and experienced hotel sales managers, directors and general managers looking for ways to reinvigorate their team's efforts and ensuring success during economic shifts.

  5. The interpretability of doctor identification badges in UK hospitals: a survey of nurses and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickerton, Bethan C; Fitzgerald, Daniel John; Perry, Elizabeth; De Bolla, Alan R

    2014-07-01

    Hospital badges have multiple important purposes, but their essential role remains the clear identification of the bearer, including their professional status. The modernisation of medical careers in the National Health Service has changed terminology dramatically, resulting in a plethora of new job titles emerging among both doctors and nurses. To determine whether the new or old terminology allowed clearer identification of medical doctors by patients and nurses. We replicated 11 identification badges used in the Royal Cornwall Hospital and Wrexham Maelor Hospital, both current and before the introduction of new medical training terminology. Data were collected from 114 patients and 67 nurses, by asking them to (1) identify which name badges represented doctors and (2) rank them in order of seniority. Only 11% of patients and 60% of nurses identified a 'Foundation Year 1 Trainee' as a qualified medical doctor. Indeed, only 'General Practice Vocational Trainee' and 'Consultant' were both readily identifiable as qualified doctors to both patients and nurses. Ranking was also a problem, with only 19% of patients and 45% of nurses able to correctly grade medical doctors using the current terminology. The old terminology allowed more accurate identification by nurses, with over 80% successfully ranking and marking the title appropriately. Current terminology is a source of confusion to both patients and members of the immediate medical care team, with nurses unable to correctly identify medical doctors. Our study indicates that a review of terminology is necessary to ensure patients, and staff, are able to communicate effectively. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. THE TOURIST PERCEPTION OF THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY: ROMANIA VERSUS EUROPEAN UNION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pârjol Florentina

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Automatically when we talk about tourism, tourism industry and hospitality industry we refer to the term also increasingly mentioned. Through this work we describe the hotel, restaurant business and other travel related activity services, which since 2008 have been continuously developed and represent a source of benefit to the economy of any country. The paper aims to assess the perception of tourists based on a questionnaire about the quality of hospitality services in Romania compared to European Union countries.

  7. THE IMPACT OF SERVICE QUALITY ON BEHAVIORAL INTENTION IN HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    KURUUZUM, Ayse; KOKSAL, Can Deniz

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of service quality on behavioral intention in hospitality industry. In order to measure service quality, five-dimensional and twenty two-itemed scale which adapted for hospitality industry by Tsaur, Lin and Wu from Parasuraman, Zeithaml and Berry’s SERVQUAL scale, was used. Together with this scale, five-dimensional and thirteenitemed scale which developed by Parasuraman, Zeithaml and Berry was used in order to measure behavioral intention....

  8. Trends in the Food and Beverage Sector of the Hospitality Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Melia, Detta

    2011-01-01

    The hospitality sector in Ireland represents an important part of the tourism industry and comprises hotels, restaurants, pubs and clubs, guesthouses and self-catering operations. The largest component within the Irish hospitality sector is hotels. In addition to hotels, food and beverage operations comprise a significant proportion of the industry. These businesses operate in a highly competitive environment as a consequence of a number of factors. First, there is a downturn in the global an...

  9. Job Satisfaction in the Hospitality Industry Focus: Greece Case Study: Porto Carras Grand Resort

    OpenAIRE

    Salpisti, Elisavet

    2004-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the notion of Job Satisfaction in the Hospitality Industry. The organisational single-case study has been chosen as a research method, with research taking place in Porto Carras Grand Resort in Northern Greece. The purpose of this research has been to demonstrate the importance of employee job satisfaction in the hospitality industry in particular, since the quality of its services is greatly subject to the 'human chemistry' between employees and customers. Job...

  10. Co-Branding as a Market-Driven Strategic Financial Investment Option in the Hospitality Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Hahm, Sung-Pil

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the trends in co-branding, especially when one brand is linked with another brand through a business strategy, in order to investigate the factors that lead to co-branding as a strategic investment option in the hospitality industry. Of primary interest was whether co-branding strategies are significant issues in the hospitality industry. This study also investigated the relationship between explicit and implicit requirements and timing of entry for co...

  11. BUSINESS MODEL IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY, FROM TRADITIONAL TO OPEN INNOVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela DIACONU

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper highlights the importance of information and communication technology in valorising the behavior of the tourism consumer by including it in new business models.The business model is considered a form of innovation to gain value for all stakeholders in the hospitality industry. On the basis of the very rich specialty literature, the paper presents the particularities of the model of hospitality industry, both the traditional model and the innovative business model.

  12. Measuring patient safety in a UK dental hospital: development of a dental clinical effectiveness dashboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemberton, M N; Ashley, M P; Shaw, A; Dickson, S; Saksena, A

    2014-10-01

    Patient safety is an important marker of quality for any healthcare organisation. In 2008, the British Government white paper entitled High quality care for all, resulting from a review led by Lord Darzi, identified patient safety as a key component of quality and discussed how it might be measured, analysed and acted upon. National and local clinically curated metrics were suggested, which could be displayed via a 'clinical dashboard'. This paper explains the development of a clinical effectiveness dashboard focused on patient safety in an English dental hospital and how it has helped us identify relevant patient safety issues in secondary dental care.

  13. Supporting newly qualified nurse transition: A case study in a UK hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Bill; Owen, Patricia; Henshaw, Lorraine; Beddingham, Elaine; Simmons, Maxine

    2016-01-01

    Nurse education in the United Kingdom (UK) has been university based since the mid-1990s but despite careful preparation and assessment of student nurses it has been considered necessary to provide a period of additional support for newly qualified nurses (NQNs) to help them settle into their new role and responsibilities. Preceptorship is the process of supporting NQNs over the transition from student to registered nurse (RN) and it is recognised that this can be a difficult time for NQNs. A systematic review was conducted as part of this project and has been published in an earlier edition of Nurse Education Today (Whitehead et al, 2013). This suggests that preceptorship is a positive and essential experience for NQNs. Lincoln and Guba's Naturalistic Inquiry (1985) was used. A qualitative case study method was developed and consisted of a multi-stage approach including semi-structured interviews with key personnel; documentary analysis of preceptorship material; and focus groups with key actors. Ethical approval was attained for the project. The aim was to interpret the social phenomena and to produce an evidence based tool to improve preceptorship. Findings are grouped under the headings indicated by the research design. In addition a further 11 themes emerged, including: the need for specific time for preceptors and preceptees; formal recognition of the role and a culture of support; selection and preparation of preceptors and the management structure to support preceptorship. The findings indicate that there are a range of factors which are reported to affect the successful transition from student to NQN. Based on these factors recommendations are made for practice and for further research. Practice recommendations: to provide supported preceptorship following the recommendations of the research findings. to concentrate on enhancing preceptorship as preceptorship in any form is better than none. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Women in the Construction Industry in the U.K.: a Cultural Discord?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagilhole, Barbara M.; Dainty, Andrew R. J.; Neale, Richard H.

    The construction industry is the most male dominated of all industrial sectors in the United Kingdom. This article reports on a study that explored women's and men's experiences of working in the industry, focusing on how the cultural aspects of the workplace environment impinged upon women's career development. We interviewed more than 80 male and female construction professionals from large construction organizations, and compared their career accounts in order to establish the aspects of the workplace culture that had a gender-differentiated impact on progression. We found that construction organizations formed competitive "power" cultures where women's contributions were marginalized and their careers impeded through a combination of inflexible work practices and discriminatory behavior. These barriers to women's careers were maintained in small project teams by autonomous male operational managers. Their locus of control embraced recruitment, promotion, and staff development, which allowed them to sustain a workplace culture intolerant of nontraditional entrants. We conclude that this cultural environment is likely to remain problematic for women unless it can be changed in a way that values their contribution. This requires a radical shift in middle management attitudes, a departure from current organizational human resource management systems, and a wider acceptance of the need for cultural change within the industry.

  15. National Audit of Seizure management in Hospitals (NASH): results of the national audit of adult epilepsy in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Peter A; Kirkham, Jamie J; Marson, Anthony G; Pearson, Mike G

    2015-03-31

    About 100,000 people present to hospitals each year in England with an epileptic seizure. How they are managed is unknown; thus, the National Audit of Seizure management in Hospitals (NASH) set out to assess prior care, management of the acute event and follow-up of these patients. This paper describes the data from the second audit conducted in 2013. 154 emergency departments (EDs) across the UK. Data from 4544 attendances (median age of 45 years, 57% men) showed that 61% had a prior diagnosis of epilepsy, 12% other neurological problems and 22% were first seizure cases. Each ED identified 30 consecutive adult cases presenting due to a seizure. Details were recorded of the patient's prior care, management at hospital and onward referral to neurological specialists onto an online database. Descriptive results are reported at national level. Of those with epilepsy, 498 (18%) were on no antiepileptic drug therapy and 1330 (48%) were on monotherapy. Assessments were often incomplete and witness histories were sought in only 759 (75%) of first seizure patients, 58% were seen by a senior doctor and 57% were admitted. For first seizure patients, advice on further seizure management was given to 264 (27%) and only 55% were referred to a neurologist or epilepsy specialist. For each variable, there was wide variability among sites that was not explicable. For the sites who partook in both audits, there was a trend towards better care in 2013, but this was small and dwarfed by the intersite variability. These results have parallels with the Sentinel Audit of Stroke performed a decade earlier. There is wide intersite variability in care covering the entire care pathway, and a need for better organised and accessible care for these patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Private psychiatric hospitals, mental health care management, and wellness: an interface with industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, J W

    1986-01-01

    Hospitals doing business is good business. Hospitals that use their professional staff to enhance their interface with industry are usually pleased with the outcome. Health care professionals must reach beyond their doors and be willing to understand the needs of a large corporate bureaucracy and the aspiring entrepreneur. Using hospital professionals in a consultative model with gatekeepers of industry is an ideal way to market and enhance the hospital's image in the community. Professionals employed by private hospitals are usually quite willing to expand their roles into the community as trainers, consultants, educators, diagnosticians, and treatment resource consultants to the business world. Business people understand business problems, and health care is a business issue as well as a humanitarian issue. In the current climate of cost containment, the hospital's ability to help the business work with paying for health care, if properly presented, will be welcomed.

  17. Resort loan securities as a source of investing the hospitality industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Yu. Baranova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective to prove the possibility of attracting funds of population and corporate organizations to invest into hospitality industry. Methods the basis of the study was the methods of logical and structural analysis the dialectical method which determined the main regularities of financial relations development in hospitality industry. Results basing on the study of formation and use of financial resources of organizations we have revealed the following at the present stage attention is paid to the functioning and investment of the hospitality industry in accordance with federal and regional target programs measures are proposed for the effective financing from the budget and resources of various funds the creation of tourist and recreational clusters is proposed but the savings of the population and corporate entities are not attracted as sources of investment in hospitality industry. Scientific novelty the measures are proposed aimed at involving the financial resources of the population and organizations through corporate bonds by the creation of a resort consortium to promote investment in hospitality industry. Practical significance the proposed recommendations will contribute to enhance the financing of hospitality industry due to the source which is currently not being used. nbsp

  18. The effect of smoke-free policies on hospitality industry revenues in Cyprus: an econometric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talias, Michael A; Savva, Christos S; Soteriades, Elpidoforos S; Lazuras, Lambros

    2015-10-01

    Smoke-free policies aiming to improve quality of indoor air and significantly reduce exposure to secondhand smoke in the hospitality industry are faced with strong opposition from the tobacco industry and hospitality venue owners claiming that they lead to reductions of revenues. The objective of our study was to examine the impact of a recently introduced smoke-free legislation on the revenues of the hospitality industry in Cyprus. Anonymous information on revenues was obtained from the Cyprus government value added tax office for the entire hospitality industry in Cyprus including hotels, bars, restaurants and cafeterias between 2005 and 2011. Panel data methodology was used to examine the effect of a smoke-free legislation, on tourism, businesses' revenues adjusting for gross domestic product, inflation, unemployment rate, tourists' arrivals, seasonal variation and the economic crisis. Our study showed that the implementation of the smoke-free policy did not have negative effects on the hospitality industry profitability. We conclude that even in regions with relatively high smoking rates, pro-smoking societal attitudes and weak social norms against tobacco control, and even during periods of economic crisis, smoke-free legislation does not impact negatively on hospitality industry revenues and if anything may lead to a small positive increase. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Delivering a quality-assured fracture liaison service in a UK teaching hospital-is it achievable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, K E; Stammers, J; Doyle, A; Gittoes, N

    2016-10-01

    To determine whether new national guidance on the specifications of a fracture liaison service are realistically deliverable, 1 year of data on the performance of such a service were audited. Audit targets were mostly met. This audit demonstrates that these standards are deliverable in a real world setting. UK service specifications for a fracture liaison service (FLS) have been produced (National Osteoporosis Society, NOS) to promote effective commissioning and delivery of the highest quality care to patients with fragility fractures. How deliverable these standards are has not as yet been methodically reported. Our FLS was modelled on the ten NOS standards; performance was audited after 1 year to determine whether these standards could be delivered and to describe the lessons learnt. Performance was audited against the NOS FLS Service Standards, with management based on the Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX®), the four-item Falls Risk Assessment Tool (FRAT), National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and the National Osteoporosis Guideline Groups (NOGG) guidance. Data were recorded prospectively on a database. The FLS commenced in May 2014, was fully operational in August 2014 and data were captured from 1 September 2014 to 1 September 2015. The FLS detected 1773 patients and standards were largely achieved. Most, 94 %, patients were seen within 6 weeks, 533 DXA requests were generated, 804 outpatient FRAT assessments were recorded (134 required falls intervention) and 773 patients had bone treatments started. On follow-up at 3 months, between 78-79 % were still taking medication. Preliminary evaluation of a FLS implemented according to UK NOS standards demonstrates that the model is practical to apply to a large teaching hospital population. Collection and review of outcome and cost effectiveness data is required to determine the performance of this model in comparison with existing models.

  20. Acquiring Pharmaceutical Industry Assets in the UK: 1 + 1 = 1?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanavos, Panos; Angelis, Aris

    2014-01-01

    The recent AstraZeneca takeover bid from Pfizer puts pharmaceutical R&D once again on the public agenda. Three pertinent questions are (a) what can be expected from this acquisition, (b) what are the implications for the UK economy and science base, and (c) whether such a deal should go ahead. Although the key driver behind this acquisition would be an improvement in company performance and shareholder value, past evidence suggests that mergers and acquisitions (M&A) of large pharmaceutical companies imply a neutral net effect on productivity, if not a decline, with employment decreasing and R&D spend following a similar trend. Similarities between the two companies include dropping sales; however, relative to its size, AstraZeneca has a more promising R&D pipeline, especially in therapeutic areas where Pfizer's strength is currently limited (e.g. oncology). Ensuring a portfolio diversification would make Pfizer's takeover proposal a knight's one, but history points towards a knave-like behavior.

  1. Predictors of turnover intentions of highly educated employees in the hospitality industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blomme, R.J.; Tromp, D.M.; Rheede, van A.

    2008-01-01

    As management-level turnover is increasing rapidly, one of the major challenges for the hospitality industry is to retain highly educated and highly skilled employees. As the psychological contract approach to the employment relationship had not been investigated with regard to the hospitality

  2. Significant Trends Are Now Reshaping the Industry Training for Foodservice and Hospitality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, Tyrus

    1984-01-01

    The hospitality industry is one that is not adversely affected by the information revolution. As tourism is stimulated by government economic development efforts, opportunities in the food service and hospitality occupations are increasing, both for the young and for the unemployed who need retraining. (SK)

  3. Best Practices in School-to-Careers: The Hospitality Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospitality Business Alliance, Chicago, IL.

    This booklet highlights the efforts of four hospitality employers and one "intermediary" organization connecting workplace experiences to classroom learning for secondary school students. The introduction presents a series overview and lists the names, locations, and featured practice of the employers and organizations. The next sections…

  4. The UK Nuclear Industry Code of Practice on Clearances and Exemptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, D.

    2004-01-01

    In 2001, the major nuclear organisations in the United Kingdom started development of a document that would identify and facilitate consistent the application of good practice within the industry for clearing and sentencing of articles, substances and wastes which may be clean, or radioactive at very low levels below thresholds of regulatory control. The document includes: (i) Clarification of the industry's interpretation of legislation associated with the clearance and sentencing of articles, substances and wastes which are or have the potential to have been contaminated by radioactivity or activated by nuclear radiations; (ii) Industry agreement on what is considered to be the good practice where legislation is imprecise or unclear, (iii) A standard management framework, adopted by all organisations within the nuclear industry, that should justify safe and efficient clearance of potentially radioactive articles, substances and wastes; and (IV) Agreed guidance on the principles, processes and practices which should be followed for clearances and sentencing The Document mandates a system that allows articles and substances to be released from further control, where this is appropriate, using robust radiological protection principles. The need to avoid sentencing of clean materials as radioactive waste where this is not appropriate, the primacy of bulk, rather than surface radioactivity clearance criteria, and the need to disallow such clearances until all relevant legislation has been satisfied, are all clear principles contained within the document. An interim issue of the Code of Practice was issued in May 2003. This version has been formally adopted by all of the major users of radioactive material in the United Kingdom, and has two main objectives: -Trial use of the concepts at the working level, and - As a basis for further discussion with interested stakeholders. The paper summarises: - How the interim version of the Code of Practice was developed; - The

  5. Opinions of UK rescue shelter and rehoming center workers on the problems facing their industry

    OpenAIRE

    Stavisky, Jenny; Brennan, Marnie L.; Downes, Martin J.; Dean, Rachel S.

    2017-01-01

    Animal shelters exist worldwide to care for and rehome unwanted or straying pets. Previous studies have examined why owners breed unwanted animals, or relinquish their pets to shelters. However, the views of shelter workers, who receive and care for these animals, have previously been largely unexplored. The aim of this study was to investigate the perceptions of animal shelter workers on the problems facing their industry. A sampling frame was constructed, consisting of every identified shel...

  6. Marketing: Events as marketing tools in Thai Hospitality Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Wenzhuo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Thailand is a developing country in Southeast Asia. It is one of the top tourist destinations in the world. The tourism industry has a big impact on this country’s economy, largely from foreign tourism. Tourism Authority Thailand as a marketing tool promotes Tai tourism industry and as a new concept to develop policy and marketing plan in tourism market in Thailand. However, the most of previous studies just have focused on foreigner travel in Thailand but only a few studies ment...

  7. Developments in the application of underground battery vehicles in the UK coal mining industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortune, J A.B.; Crawshaw, S A.M. [Long-Airdox International Ltd. (United Kingdom)

    1996-10-01

    Trackless battery powered haulage vehicles have been in operation in British coal mines principally for longwall face transfer and personnel transportation. Changes within the industry have resulted in the introduction of room and pillar coal mining methods and the introduction of increasingly heavier longwall roof supports. This has resulted in the introduction of: battery powered coal haulage machines, which, without the need for trailing cables, increase productivity within room and pillar mining; and battery powered longwall shield haulers which are capable of carrying the heaviest shield supports currently being utilised within the British coal mining industry. The conventional machines have been adapted from an American design to meet the requirements of European legislation. This has seen the emphasis being placed upon the supplier with the European Machinery Directive being introduced, necessitating the assigning of a `CE` mark to each vehicle. Battery vehicle technology has advanced to meet the demands of the ever changing market and will no doubt be further adapted to meet the requirement of the British coal mining industry. 1 ref., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Employment in the Catering & Hospitality Industry--Employee Attitudes and Career Expectations. Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotel and Catering Training Co., London (England).

    A study examined the attitudes and career expectations of a random sample of catering and hospitality industry employees in the United Kingdom. The survey focused on the following: aspiration and career intentions, factors causing job satisfaction/dissatisfaction, employment patterns in the industry, satisfaction with/access to…

  9. Governing transitions: Cases and insights from two periods in the history of the UK gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arapostathis, Stathis; Carlsson-Hyslop, Anna; Pearson, Peter J G; Thornton, Judith; Gradillas, Maria; Laczay, Scott; Wallis, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    The paper aims to inform historically the analyses of future sociotechnical transition pathways in the electricity sector, particularly those developed by the Transition Pathways to a Low Carbon Economy project. It also aims to inform the theoretical approach to transitions by focusing on key decisions at ‘branching points’ that led to transitions in the UK gas energy services regime, which occurred under different governance patterns. The first historical case study covers the market-led transformation of the manufactured gas regime from 1877 to 1914, which developed the end-uses of gas beyond lighting to include cooking, and extended access to working class consumers. The second case study covers the period from 1948 to 1977, historically reconstructing the transition from town gas to natural gas. This state-led and coordinated conversion to natural gas was preceded by a period of destabilisation of the manufactured gas regime, the co-existence of several niche technologies and the hybridisation of the key actors and technological infrastructures of the incumbent regime. Comparing the cases provides insights for future energy service transitions by addressing the significance of power, trust and networking in the decision making processes involved in the governance of energy transitions. - Highlights: ► Historical work is useful in understanding socio-technical energy transitions. ► Different governance modes have led to transitions with different characteristics. ► Gas regimes operating under market and state ‘logics’ took decisions differently. ► Decisions at key branching points led to path dependency, affecting later decisions. ► Agency, governance and trust were important elements in the transitions analysed.

  10. industrial hand injuries as seen at avenue hospital, nairobi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The first 4 hours of the shift accounted for 39 (52%) of the injuries. ... the body in traumatic occupational injuries (1). Work-. Related Hand Injuries (WRHI) result in functional impairment .... textile industries accounting for 16.8%. Crushing was ...

  11. Careers Canada, Volume 9: Careers in the Hospitality Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Manpower and Immigration, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This booklet, designed for prospective job seekers, describes occupational opportunities within the food service, food preparation and hotel/motel industries in Canada. The preparatory training and job descriptions of cooks, chefs, tourist guides, waiters, hotel and restaurant managers, bartenders and front desk clerks are highlighted.…

  12. The role of employee wellness programme in the hospitality industry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, this study offers a detailed review and synthesis of key concepts and existing knowledge in the industry, which produces a framework for further research, as well as managerial implications. Keywords: corporate wellness, corporate social responsibility (CSR), employee engagement, customer engagement, ...

  13. EdF in the core of UK's nuclear industry... before expecting more

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moal, C.

    2008-01-01

    With the announcement at the end of September 2008 of EdF's friendly takeover bid on British Energy, the French group confirms its will of dominating the European nuclear industry before going back to the assault of the US market. Together, EdF and British Energy (owner of 8 NPPs (9.5 GW) and 1 coal-fired power plant (2 GW)) will make a turnover of 11.9 billion euro with 19800 employees and 85.6 TWh of production. Short paper. (J.S.)

  14. Failure Mode and Effects Analysis: views of hospital staff in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebl, Nada; Franklin, Bryony; Barber, Nick; Burnett, Susan; Parand, Anam

    2012-01-01

    To explore health care professionals' experiences and perceptions of Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA), a team-based, prospective risk analysis technique. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 operational leads (20 pharmacists, one nurse) in medicines management teams of hospitals participating in a national quality improvement programme. Interviews were transcribed, coded and emergent themes identified using framework analysis. Themes identified included perceptions and experiences of participants with FMEA, validity and reliability issues, and FMEA's use in practice. FMEA was considered to be a structured but subjective process that helps health care professionals get together to identify high risk areas of care. Both positive and negative opinions were expressed, with the majority of interviewees expressing positive views towards FMEA in relation to its structured nature and the use of a multidisciplinary team. Other participants criticised FMEA for being subjective and lacking validity. Most likely to restrict its widespread use were its time consuming nature and its perceived lack of validity and reliability. FMEA is a subjective but systematic tool that helps identify high risk areas, but its time consuming nature, difficulty with the scores and perceived lack of validity and reliability may limit its widespread use.

  15. Clinical examinations to validate self-completion questionnaires: dermatitis in the UK printing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livesley, E J; Rushton, L; English, J S C; Williams, H C

    2002-07-01

    A self-completion questionnaire sent to 2600 Nottinghamshire members of the Graphical Paper and Media Union elicited a 62% response. Forty one per cent of respondents reported suffering a skin complaint at some time and 11% had a current skin problem on the hand. This paper reports the validation stage of the study. Samples of 45 'cases' of self-reported dermatitis and 60 'controls', who reported they had never suffered a skin complaint, were clinically examined. All 45 self-reported cases were clinically confirmed as dermatitis. Occupationally related irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) was diagnosed in 20 (44%); 26 (58%) complaints were thought to be induced or exacerbated by occupation. Of the controls, 21 (35%) were also diagnosed with a skin complaint, the majority being mild, with an occupational association in 17, the majority (15) being ICD. Sixteen ICD cases were patch tested resulting in positive reactions to colophony, neomycin, nickel and potassium dichromate (2 of each). Two cases of basal cell carcinoma on the face were also identified, of which the participants were unaware. Although there was no false positive self-reporting there was a considerable number of false negatives, demonstrating the importance of clinical validation of questionnaires relating to industrial skin disease. This study has highlighted the need for improvement in skin care provision in the printing industry.

  16. Opportunities for low-grade heat recovery in the UK food processing industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Richard; Harvey, Adam; Reay, David

    2013-01-01

    Energy efficiency in the process industry is becoming an increasingly important issue due to the rising costs of both electricity and fossil fuel resources, as well as the tough targets for the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions outlined in the Climate Change Act 2008. Utilisation of waste heat sources is key to improving industrial energy efficiency, with an estimated 11.4 TWh of recoverable heat being wasted each year, a quarter of which is from the food and drinks processing sector. This paper examines the low-grade waste heat sources common to the food and drinks processing sector and the various opportunities for the use of this heat. A review of the best available technologies for recovery of waste heat is provided, ranging from heat transfer between source and sink, to novel technologies for the generation of electricity and refrigeration. Generally, the most economic option for waste heat recovery is heat exchange between nearby/same process source and sink, with a number of well-developed heat exchangers widely available for purchase. More novel options, such as the use of organic Rankine cycles for electricity generation prove to be less economical due to high capital outlays. However, with additional funding provision for demonstration of such projects and development of modular units, such technologies would become more common

  17. Safety of working patterns among UK neuroradiologists: what can we learn from the aviation industry and cognitive science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reicher, John; Currie, Stuart; Birchall, Daniel

    2018-04-01

    As the volume and complexity of imaging in the UK continues to rise, there is pressure on radiologists to spend increasing lengths of time reporting to cope with the growing workload. However, there is limited guidance for radiologists about structuring the working day to strike the necessary balance between achieving satisfactory reporting volume and maintaining quality and safety. We surveyed 86 neuroradiologists (receiving 59 responses), regarding time spent reporting, frequency and duration of work breaks, and break activities. Our results demonstrate that some neuroradiologists report for up to 12 h a day and for 4 h before taking a break. Mean duration of breaks is less than 15 min and these often consist of computer screen-based or cognitively demanding tasks. Many areas of medicine have looked to the aviation industry to develop improvements in safety through regulated, standardised practices. There are parallels between the work of air traffic controllers (ATCs) and radiologists. We review the legislation that controls the working hours of UK ATCs to minimise fatigue-related errors, and its scientific basis. We also consider the vigilance decrement, a concept in cognitive science which describes the reduction in performance with increasing time-on-task. We conclude that, in comparison with ATCs, work patterns among radiologists are poorly standardised and potentially dangerous. Evidence suggests that placing limits on reporting time and minimum break duration, as well as ensuring appropriate break activities, can benefit reporting quality. It is imperative that radiologists and managers heed these lessons, to improve standards and protect patients from error.

  18. A decision analytical cost analysis of offering ECV in a UK district general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burr Robin

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To determine the care pathways and implications of offering mothers the choice of external cephalic version (ECV at term for singleton babies who present with an uncomplicated breech pregnancy versus assisted breech delivery or elective caesarean. Design A prospective observational audit to construct a decision analysis of uncomplicated full term breech presentations. Setting The North Staffordshire NHS Trust. Subjects All women (n = 176 who presented at full term with a breech baby without complications during July 1995 and June 1997. Main outcome measures The study determined to compare the outcome in terms of the costs and cost consequences for the care pathways that resulted from whether a women chose to accept the offer of ECV or not. All the associated events were then mapped for the two possible pathways. The costs were considered only within the hospital setting, from the perspective of the health care provider up to the point of delivery. Results The additional costs for ECV, assisted breech delivery and elective caesarean over and above a normal birth were £186.70, £425.36 and £1,955.22 respectively. The total expected cost of the respective care pathways for "ECV accepted" and "ECV not accepted" (including the probability of adverse events were £1,452 and £1,828 respectively, that is the cost of delivery through the ECV care pathways is less costly than the non ECV delivery care pathway. Conclusions Implementing an ECV service may yield cost savings in secondary care over and above the traditional delivery methods for breech birth of assisted delivery or caesarean section. The scale of these expected cost savings are in the range of £248 to £376 per patient. This converts to a total expected cost saving of between £43,616 and £44,544 for the patient cohort considered in this study.

  19. Twelve-year analysis of microbial keratitis trends at a UK tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S Z; Walkden, A; Au, L; Fullwood, C; Hamilton, A; Qamruddin, A; Armstrong, M; Brahma, A K; Carley, F

    2017-08-01

    PurposeTo investigate the frequencies, trends, and in vitro drug susceptibilities of the causative pathogens in microbial keratitis in Manchester Royal Eye Hospital.Patients and methodsCorneal scrape results recorded by the microbiology service between 2004 and 2015 were extracted from an established database. A total of 4229 corneal scrape specimens were identified from an established database. First-line antibiotic treatment in our centre during the study period was ofloxacin and second line was cefuroxime and gentamicin.ResultsMean age was 45.9±21.0. A total of 1379 samples (32.6%) were culture positive. One hundred forty-eight (10.7%) specimens cultured multiple organisms. Of the 1539 organisms identified, 63.3% were Gram-positive bacteria, 27.3% Gram-negative bacteria, 7.1% fungi, and 2.3% Acanthamoebae. A decreasing trend in Gram-positive isolates was found together with a stable trend in Gram negatives and an increasing trend in Acanthamoeba and fungi. There appeared to be a significant increasing trend of Moraxella infection (P=0.001). In all, 83.1 and 90.8% of Gram-positive and -negative isolates tested were susceptible to ofloxacin, respectively. Cefuroxime covered 86.6% of Gram-positive and 61.4% of Gram-negative isolates, whereas gentamicin covered 88.8 and 96.5% of Gram-positive and -negative isolates, respectively.ConclusionWe found a change in the type of Gram-negative organisms isolated over time, with the Moraxella species on the rise. Reassuringly, no significant increase in resistance was observed in vitro for any of the commonly used antibiotics. Ofloxacin remains a good first-line antibiotic treatment but duo-therapy does have broader coverage and should be considered in non-responsive cases.

  20. The blending and segregation of coal for the U.K. industrial market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGlinchey, D.; Jones, M.G.; Marjanovic, P. [Glasgow Caledonian Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physical Sciences

    1999-09-01

    The two most common methods of 'blending' industrial coals is either by use of feeder belts discharging onto a central conveyor belt, or by a compartment hopper discharging onto a common belt. These two methodologies were shown to give very similar levels of variance in the proportioning of component coals, over a wide range of discharge conditions. Limited work suggested that belt sampling from the end of the belt gave similar results to the stopped belt and frame technique. The segregation found in heaps formed from binary mixtures of coals was quantified by various statistical methods. These results demonstrated that very high levels of segregation can be expected in almost any heap formed when material is discharged from the belt in either of the two 'blending' methods described above. This can reasonably be expected to be a major factor in the inconsistent supply of a specified blend to a consumer. (orig.)

  1. Overview Michelin Star Reputation Restaurant in Hospitality Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agung Gita Subakti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available For most chefs and Restaurateur, having his restaurant being awarded one or more stars in the famous Michelin Guide Rouge represents a major achievement, recognition of their work, and also important publicity generating increased notoriety. In this specific industry, experts play a decisive role, and reputation of restaurants and chefs are basically established according to their opinions. The aim of this paper is to overview some of the Restaurants achieving the Michelin Star Reputation and able to sustain it for years. Moreover, how these reputations are made and to understand better the development of gaining such a high reputation.

  2. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in the clinical management of acute COPD in 233 UK hospitals: results from the RCP/BTS 2003 National COPD Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Sundeep; Pearson, Michael; Coutts, Ian; Lowe, Derek; Roberts, Michael

    2009-06-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is a clinically proven, cost-effective intervention for acidotic exacerbations of COPD that is recommended by UK national guidelines. This study examines the extent to which these recommendations are being followed in the UK. Between August and October 2003 a national audit of COPD exacerbations was conducted by the Royal College of Physicians and the British Thoracic Society. 233 (94%) UK hospitals submitted data for 7,529 prospectively recruited acute COPD admissions, documenting process of care and outcomes from a retrospective case note audit. They also completed a resources and organisation of care proforma. Nineteen hospitals (8%) reported they did not offer NIV. There was no access to NIV in 92 (39%) intensive care units in 88 (36%), high-dependency units or on general wards of 85 (34%) hospitals. In 74 (30%) NIV was available on all 3 sites. A low pH (hospital mortality (26% v 14%) and at 90 days (37% v 24%) and longer hospital stays (median 9 v 7 days) than those not receiving NIV. Hospitals with least usage of NIV had similar mortality rates to those using NIV more often. A comprehensive NIV service is not available in many hospitals admitting patients with acute respiratory failure secondary to COPD. Access to acute NIV is inadequate and does not conform with NICE and BTS guidelines. These observational audit data do not demonstrate benefits of NIV on survival when compared to conventional management, contrary to results from randomised trials. Reasons for this are unclear but unmeasured confounding factors and poor patient selection for NIV are likely explanations.

  3. Investigating GHGs and VOCs emissions from a shale gas industry in Germany and the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremonese, L.; Weger, L.; Denier Van Der Gon, H.; Bartels, M. P.; Butler, T. M.

    2017-12-01

    The shale gas and shale oil production boom experienced in the US led the country to a significant reduction of foreign fuel imports and an increase in domestic energy security. Several European countries are considering to extract domestic shale gas reserves that might serve as a bridge in the transition to renewables. Nevertheless, the generation of shale gas leads to emissions of CH4 and pollutants such as PM, NOx and VOCs, which in turn impact local and regional air quality and climate. Results from numerous studies investigating greenhouse gas and pollutant emissions from shale oil and shale gas extraction in North America can help in estimating the impact of such industrial activity elsewhere, when local regulations are taken into consideration. In order to investigate the extent of emissions and their distribution from a potential shale gas industry in Germany and the United Kingdom, we develop three drilling scenarios compatible with desired national gas outputs based on available geological information on potential productivity ranges of the reservoirs. Subsequently we assign activity data and emissions factors to wells under development, as well as to producing wells (from activities at the well site up until processing plants) to enable emissions quantification. We then define emissions scenarios to explore different shale gas development pathways: 1) implementation of "high-technology" devices and recovery practices (low emissions); 2) implementation of "low-technology" devices and recovery practices (high emissions), and 3) intermediate scenarios reflecting assumptions on local and national settings, or extremely high emission events (e.g. super-emitters); all with high and low boundaries of confidence driven by uncertainties. A comparison of these unconventional gas production scenarios to conventional natural gas production in Germany and the United Kingdom is also planned. The aim of this work is to highlight important variables and their ranges, to

  4. The structure and operation of the privatised UK electricity supply industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerss, W.

    1991-01-01

    The National Grid Company has just over a years experience in running the England and Wales Grid System as a public limited company (plc) in a market led environment. The industry has been restructured for privatisation with NGC Holdings, owner of NGC plc, being jointly owned by the 12 Regional Electricity Companies. The successful flotation of the 12 Regional Electricity Companies at the end of 1990 included the businesses and assets of NGC. The role of NGC is twofold; firstly to operate and maintain the HV transmission grid for England and Wales and secondly to facilitate competition in the market for electricity. To meet the requirements for facilitating competition NGC is responsible for the arrangements which will enable new players to enter the market. Under its Transmission Licence NGC has to respond swiftly to a request for connections and the charges levied must be seen to be fair. The publishing of service charges and opportunities identified in the Seven Year Statement enable existing and potential users of the Grid System to identify new connection opportunities. To ensure impartiality in its operation, the pooling and settlement system is administered NGC Settlements Limited, a wholly owned subsidiary of NGC, with strict rules on commercial security. Separate in-house businesses have also been set up to administer the other commercial activities of NGC; the Pumped Storage Business, the Interconnection Business (France and Scotland) and the Ancillary Services Business for the provision of system reserve and other services to ensure the stability and security of the system. (author)

  5. A comparative review of the effectiveness of radon remediation programmes in hospitals, schools and homes in Northamptonshire, UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, A.R.; Phillips, P.S.; Tornberg, R.

    2000-01-01

    are found and remediated. The total cost of each programme per man-sievert saved annually was estimated to be pound 195,400 for NHS, pound 20,400 for Schools, and currently pound 144,200 for houses, dropping to pound 27,000 if all houses are remediated. Comparisons between the programmes in schools, hospitals and domestic properties, show that it is most cost effective to conduct radon remediation in schools in a radon Affected Area. It is almost as cost effective to remediate domestic properties in the same area, but only if all householders can be encouraged to undertake any necessary remediation. In the UK with only 10% of such households having so far organised remediation, a review of current strategy is required. The exemption of remediation work from VAT would be a simple means of reducing costs, and demonstrating government commitment to reducing radon health risks. Despite this the domestic programme is already achieving a greater reduction in collective dose. It may be appropriate to consider a graduated approach to radon mitigation, with schools being remediated over a wider area than either domestic properties or the over-ground workplace. (author)

  6. HRM practices and knowledge processes outcomes: empirical evidence from a quasi-experiment on UK SMEs in the tourism hospitality and leisure sector

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas Georgiadis; Christos N. Pitelis

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents empirical evidence of the relationship between human resources practices and the effectiveness of a firm to capitalise on investment in knowledge as measured by the returns to innovation and business development expenditure. The empirical design is based on exploiting a natural experiment provided by a policy intervention that offers human resources-related support to small and medium sized enterprises in the UK Tourism Hospitality and Leisure sector. Our findings suggest ...

  7. Employee Perceptions of HIV & AIDS on the Hospitality Industry in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forbes Kabote

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV & AIDS prevalence is causing lots of deaths in the hospitality industry affecting the most productive population. The study was conducted to explore employee perceptions of HIV & AIDS on the hospitality industry. Using qualitative research philosophy data was collected using semi-structured questionnaires from employees at selected hotel establishments. The data was analyzed thematically. Two critical themes emerged from the study. Firstly HIV & AIDS was being treated as a taboo subject and secondly; there are no clear organizational policies on HIV & AIDS. The researchers concluded that hospitality organizations are still ignorant of devastating existence of HIV & AIDS. Three recommendations were made from the study. Hospitality establishments should embrace the fact that HIV & AIDS exist, Organizations should work with employees to produce workable policies and that organizations should take heed of government efforts in tackling HIV & AIDS and do their part in this international cause

  8. Acquisitions and shareholder wealth effects : the case of the hospitality industry

    OpenAIRE

    Kwansa, Francis A.

    1994-01-01

    The phenomenon of acquisitions has attracted research interest in the finance literature partly because of its impact on the u.s economy during the decade of the eighties. Whereas an impressive body of knowledge has been accumulated on this subject thus far, the hospitality literature has no empirical studies that seek to explain the nature of this phenomenon in the hospitality industry. Of particular interest in this study was the impact of acquisitions on the shareho...

  9. COST VOLUME PROFIT MODEL, THE BREAK -EVEN POINT AND THE DECISION MAKING PROCESS IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scorte Carmen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Management accounting and cost calculation in the hospitality industry is a pathless land. The prezent article is a starting point of a long scientific approach on the domain of the hospitality industry and on the managerial accounting in this area. Our intention is to put the spot light back on the thorny problem of applying Financial Accounting and specifically its implementation in the hospitality industry. One aim of this article is to provide a picture of CVP analysis in decision making with customizing the hospitality industry. To cope with the crisis period, the competition and to achieve the expected profits of the hospitality industry ,managers have the possibility to apply CVP analysis, one of the most simple and useful analytical tools. This paper will address the basic version of the CVP model, exemplifying the main indicators of the particular model for the hospitality industry that can help guide decision-making.

  10. Cancer incidence in cohorts of workers in the rubber manufacturing industry first employed since 1975 in the UK and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniol, M; Koechlin, A; Sorahan, T; Jakobsson, K; Boyle, P

    2017-06-01

    Increased cancer risks have been reported among workers in the rubber manufacturing industry employed before the 1960s, but it is unclear for workers hired subsequently. The present study focused on cancer incidence among rubber workers first employed after 1975 in Sweden and the UK. Two cohorts of rubber workers employed for at least 1 year were analysed. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs), based on country-specific and period-specific incidence rates, were analysed for all cancers combined (except non-melanoma skin), bladder, lung, stomach cancer, leukaemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Exploratory analyses were conducted for other cancers with a minimum of 10 cases in both genders combined. 16 026 individuals (12 441 men; 3585 women) contributed to 397 975 person-years of observation, with 846 cancers observed overall (437 in the UK, 409 in Sweden). No statistically significant increased risk was observed for any site of cancer. A reduced risk was evident for all cancers combined (SIR=0.83, 95% CI (0.74 to 0.92)), lung cancer (SIR=0.74, 95% CI (0.59 to 0.93)), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (SIR=0.67, 95% CI (0.45 to 1.00)) and prostate cancer (SIR=0.77, 95% CI (0.64 to 0.92)). For stomach cancer and multiple myeloma, SIRs were 0.93 (95% CI (0.61 to 1.43)) and 0.92 (95% CI 0.44 to 1.91), respectively. No increased risk of bladder cancer was observed (SIR=0.88, 95% CI (0.61 to 1.28)). No significantly increased risk of cancer incidence was observed in the combined cohort of rubber workers first employed since 1975. Continued surveillance of the present cohorts is required to confirm absence of long-term risk and confirmatory findings from other cohorts would be important. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. The Franchising Decision: The Perspective Of The Franchisee In The Hospitality Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Ramon Diaz-Bernardo

    2011-01-01

    Franchising is a major trend in the hotel industry. Despite the fact that almost two-thirds of branded hotels in the U.S. are franchised, there is a lack of empirical research on franchising in the hospitality industry. In this article, I reviewed one of the most relevant lines of research in franchising literature, usually referred as creating franchising systems, and we have concentrated on analyzing the reasons and motivations to use franchising from franchisee perspective within the hospi...

  12. Validation of the Hospitality Culture Scale in the context of hotel industry

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, A.; Alturas, B.; Laureano, R.

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to validate the final factors for the Organizational Culture of the Hospitality Culture Scale which consists of the following four dimensions: management principles, customer relationships, job variety, and job satisfaction in the context of hotel industry organizations both in Brazil and Portugal. To this end, a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was performed, where two hundred and fifty-nine hotel industry professionals were rated. The presented results support a structure ...

  13. Using Multimedia to Enhance Knowledge of Service Attitude in the Hospitality Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chun Min

    2012-01-01

    Having used a quasi-experimental research model and the ADDIE (Analyze, Design, Develop, Implement, and Evaluate) calibration method to gather and implement data, the researcher developed an interactive multimedia assisted learning (MAL) program promoting proper service attitudes in the hospitality industry. In order to gauge MAL program's…

  14. Work-Family conflict as a cause for e turnover intentions in the hospitality industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blomme, R.J.; Rheede, van A.; Tromp, D.M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the work-family conflict approach to the turnover intentions of highly educated employees within the hospitality industry. The purpose was to investigate the relation between workplace flexibility, organizational support, work-family conflict and the intention to leave among

  15. Competing Values in the Culinary Arts and Hospitality Industry: Leadership Roles and Managerial Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Michael W.; Hughey, Aaron W.

    2011-01-01

    It is important that education and training programmes align with the needs of the professions they are designed to support. The culinary arts and hospitality industry is a vocational area that needs to be examined more closely to ensure that the skills and competencies taught are those that will actually be needed when students matriculate from…

  16. Career Preparation Program Curriculum Guide for: Hospitality/Tourism Industry (Food Services).

    Science.gov (United States)

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria. Curriculum Development Branch.

    This curriculum outline provides secondary and postsecondary instructors with detailed information on student learning outcomes for completion of the food services program requirements in the hospitality/tourism industry. A program overview discusses the aims of education; secondary school philosophy; and career preparation programs and their…

  17. Information System Training, Usage, and Satisfaction: An Exploratory Study of the Hospitality Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, William L., III; Gundersen, David E.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses use of a mail survey to study the extent to which the hospitality industry employs various information technologies, including computer-mediated communication systems. Finds that hotel/motel size and chain affiliation are related to information system complexity, and that chain-affiliated hotels provide less computer and…

  18. Older Workers in the Hospitality Industry: Valuing Experience and Informal Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Roy

    2011-01-01

    The research sets out to identify the learning processes adopted by older workers in the hospitality and visitor attraction industry in Scotland, with a view to determining how employers may better support their education and training within enterprises. The study was undertaken as part of the ESRC project on "Sustaining the employability of…

  19. ESL for Hotel/Hospitality Industry. Level: Advanced Beginner/Intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Suffolk County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Northport, NY.

    This document contains 16 lesson plans for an advanced beginning and intermediate course in work-related English for non-English- or limited-English-speaking entry-level employees in the hotel and hospitality industry. Course objectives are as follows: helping participants understand and use job-specific vocabulary; receive and understand…

  20. An Empirical Study of Kirkpatrick's Evaluation Model in the Hospitality Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ya-Hui Elegance

    2010-01-01

    This study examined Kirkpatrick's training evaluation model (Kirkpatrick & Kirkpatrick, 2006) by assessing a sales training program conducted at an organization in the hospitality industry. The study assessed the employees' training outcomes of knowledge and skills, job performance, and the impact of the training upon the organization. By…

  1. Career Preparation Program Curriculum Guide for: Hospitality/Tourism Industry (Tourist Services).

    Science.gov (United States)

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria. Curriculum Development Branch.

    This career preparation curriculum outline for the hospitality/tourism industry is intended to provide secondary and postsecondary learning outcomes for completion of program requirements. The guide is organized into four sections. Section one presents an overview of the program, of the philosophy of career education, and of the organization and…

  2. Accountability as Measured by Employer Satisfaction in Hawaii's Tourist/Hospitality Industry: 1993-1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, William A.

    During 1993 and 94, the University of Hawaii performed a study of local organizations in the tourist/hospitality industry, assessing employer satisfaction with the graduates and products of the public school system and community colleges. Specifically, the study aimed to determine if participants of training programs were making a successful…

  3. The Role of Sustainable Service Innovation in Crafting the Vision of the Hospitality Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeou-Shyan Horng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the key characteristics of sustainable service innovation in the hospitality industry. We conducted a content analysis based on the interview records for 17 experts (including three academic scholars, three government officers and 11 top-level managers with an average of 20 years of experience in the hospitality management domain in Taiwan. The analytical results conform to Amabile’s (1988 componential theory of creativity and innovation and show that 11 characteristics are major indicators of sustainable service innovation in the hotel management field. These include the following characteristics: market position, customer satisfaction, service orientation, environmental thinking, employee involvement, incentive mechanism, human resource development, environmental services, cultural resource management, government policy and school education. Accordingly, using the integrated theory of sustainable service innovation and professional opinions from experts, we provide theoretical and practical implications for current and future trends on sustainability and innovation in the hospitality industry.

  4. Macroeconomic effects of efficiency policies for energy-intensive industries: the case of the UK Climate Change Agreements, 2000-2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, T.; Foxon, T.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports a study modeling the UK Climate Change Agreements (CCAs) and related energy-efficiency policies for energy-intensive industrial sectors. Bottom-up estimates of the effects of these policies are introduced into the energy-demand equations of a top-down dynamic econometric model of the UK economy with fifty industrial sectors, MDM-E3. This allowed estimation of the effects of the reduced energy use for the outputs from the sectors, i.e. the reductions in unit costs of the energy-intensive industries, on the demand for their outputs (both in the UK and in the export markets). The model is solved as a counterfactual 2000-2005 and as a projection 2005-2010 in a series of scenarios to allow estimation of the effects of the policies on inflation and growth, as well as on overall energy demand and CO 2 emissions. The system-wide final energy reductions is estimated to be 4.2 mtoe, or 2.6%, of total final demand for energy by 2010, including a rebound effect of 19%, with negligible effects on inflation and a slight increase in economic growth through improved international competitiveness. (author)

  5. Competition and regulation in the gas industry: an evaluation of the MMC report on gas in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoppard, M.

    1993-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of a more competitive gas market in the UK are examined, and the Monopolies and Mergers Commission (MMC) references and recommendations are outlined. An assessment of the findings of the MMC report is given covering the structure of British Gas, the monopoly threshold, setting charges for the tariff market and transportation, services, market share targets, the regulatory system, and guarantees to shareholders. (UK)

  6. Titanium in UK rural, agricultural and urban/industrial rivers: Geogenic and anthropogenic colloidal/sub-colloidal sources and the significance of within-river retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neal, Colin; Jarvie, Helen; Rowland, Philip; Lawler, Alan; Sleep, Darren; Scholefield, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Operationally defined dissolved Titanium [Ti] (the 1 kDa i.e. > c. 1-2 nm) for the rural areas, but as low as 28% for the urban/industrial rivers. This raises fundamental issues of the pollutant inputs of Ti, with the possibility of significant complexation of Ti in the sewage effluents and subsequent breakdown within the rivers, as well as the physical dispersion of fine colloids down to the macro-molecular scale. Although not directly measured, the particulate Ti can make an important contribution to the net Ti flux. - Research Highlights: → Filtered Ti in agricultural, urban and industrial UK rivers described. → Highest concentrations occur just downstream of STWs. → The urban/industrial inputs increased background [Ti] by up to 11 fold. → Anthropogenic Ti input lowered by within-river retention. → Up to 79% of Ti colloidal/NP for rural, down to 28% for urban/industrial rivers.

  7. Hewitt launches Research Councils UK

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Trade and Industry Secretary Patricia Hewitt today launched 'Research Councils UK' - a new strategic partnership that will champion research in science, engineering and technology across the UK" (1 page).

  8. Innovative UK Approaches to Acquisition Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Financial and Operational Imperatives Size of UK armed forces UK Industry ? Political influence PFI / PPP Increased Scrutiny - NAO “ Commercialisation “ of the...acquisition KNOWLEDGE (EXPERIENCE – Lessons learned) KNOWLEDGE (Training) KNOWLEDGE ( Education ) OPTIMAL OPERATIONAL PERFORMANCE Operational Capability UK

  9. Tour of the stands at the UK@CERN industrial exhibition with the Director-General and H.E. Mr Simon Featherstone, HM Ambassador to Switzerland, hosted by Mrs. Jan Fillingham MBE, Head of Exhibitions, BEAMA

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2006-01-01

    Tour of the stands at the UK@CERN industrial exhibition with the Director-General and H.E. Mr Simon Featherstone, HM Ambassador to Switzerland, hosted by Mrs. Jan Fillingham MBE, Head of Exhibitions, BEAMA

  10. A contribution to sustainability in the hospitality industry : Energetic analysis in a four star hotel

    OpenAIRE

    Heitjan, Vivien

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research based thesis is to analyse the energy saving issues within the hospitality industry. The thesis is based on the fact that the energy costs of around 6-8 % of the total turnover, are often perceived as unimportant and do not stay in high focus of a hotel manager. However they do represent a great number of controllable costs. In order to get a general understanding about the current situation in the travel- and hospitality business as well as the negative effects o...

  11. Bond-market skepticism and stock-market exuberance in the hospital industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James C

    2002-01-01

    The hospital industry needs funds to refurbish physical facilities, upgrade clinical and information technologies, and rebuild financial positions weakened by past external challenges and unwise organizational strategies. The financial markets offer a marked contrast in capital access, as bond creditors remain skeptical while stock investors plunge back into the once-shunned industry. Ironically, high stock prices may drive the for-profit chains to repeat past cycles of overexpansion, while weak bond ratings may save non-profit systems from a comparable loss of focus on the core business of operating and improving inpatient facilities. This turbulence has implications for public payment, antitrust, and financial disclosure policies.

  12. Responsible Sales and Service of Alcohol for the Tourism, Hospitality and Retail Industries

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, James Peter

    2015-01-01

    The safe service of alcohol is of vital importance to those in the food and beverage industry - failure to act responsibly can result in fines, loss of license and the potential closure of the business. Responsible sale and service of alcohol (RSA) is important for all levels of the hospitality, tourism and retail service industries to minimise the risk of alcohol-related problems associated with the use and abuse of alcohol by any person. Management and all staff who sell or supply alcohol m...

  13. Environmental impacts of waste management in the hospitality industry: Creating a waste management plan for Bergvik Kartano

    OpenAIRE

    Adigwe, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Many hospitality industries find it difficult to control or manage solid wastes, such as food, containers, paper, cardboard and scrap metals, which are waste generated on a daily basis depending on the industry. Most hospitality industries tend to lag behind when it comes to the collection of waste. Only a fraction of the¬¬ waste collected receives proper disposal. When waste is not collected sufficiently and the disposal is inappropriate the waste can accumulate and cause water, land and air...

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCIES OF HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY SPECIALISTS WITHIN THE FRAMEWORK OF ACQUISITION OF EDUCATIONAL MODULE “ORGANIZATION OF HOSPITALITY SERVICES”

    OpenAIRE

    Silicka, Inese; Dembovska, Iveta

    2015-01-01

    According to the SWOT analysis on the Latvian Tourism Marketing Strategy 2010-2015 carried out by the Tourism Development Agency in 2010, the lack of skilled labour force in tourism and hospitality industry, as well as the low level of professional qualifications are mentioned as one of the potential threats. The aim of the research is to examine and analyse the development of professional competencies of hospitality industry specialists within the framework of completion of the interactive e...

  15. AN EXPLORATORY RESEARCH REGARDING CUSTOMER ORIENTATION AND PERFORMANCE IN HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FLAVIA DANA OLTEAN

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research is to present the importance of the customer orientation from themanagerial perspective and to analyze the influence of customer orientation over the performance indicators in thehotels from Mures county (Romania . For achieving this objective, the data have been collected by means of 42surveys addressed to managers and owners who are active in the industry of hospitability, and the results indicated apartial confirmation of the tested hypotheses and the results from previous international research. The conclusions ofthe study present importance for the decisional authorities associated with hotel units which desire to achieve thesatisfaction of the customers, gaining the brand loyalty and implicitly the desired economic efficiency and add to theinternational literature aspects referring to the industry of hospitality from Romania.

  16. Experiences in the monitoring of radiation workers in industry and hospitals in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateo, A.J.

    1976-08-01

    The task of monitoring of radiation doses among radiation workers employed either in industry and hospitals in the Philippines is presently being undertaken by the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission. These radiation monitoring devices cover not only radioactive materials or sources but also x-ray machines. The most common dosimetry used is the film badge. This paper presents some of the experiences gained in the use of the film badge and other dosimeters

  17. Abusive supervision - a form of workplace harassment: an exploratory study in the ecuadorian hospitality industry

    OpenAIRE

    Hoof, Hubert B. Van; Serrano, Ana-Lucia; Torres, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    In light of the conspicuous absence of workplace harassment (“acoso laboral”) in the Ecuadorian Constitution and the country’s Labor and Penal Codes, this article reports on an exploratory study about abusive supervision, a form of workplace harassment, in the country’s hospitality industry. Based on a review of the literature on various forms of workplace harassment, the study investigated employee opinions about their supervisors’ behaviors and found that abusive supervision ...

  18. Exploring the Linkage between Work Flexibility and Work-life Balance in the Hospitality industry

    OpenAIRE

    Farrell, Kathleen

    2007-01-01

    A debate within the hospitality industry currently centres around the question as to whether human resource policies are progressing and developing. In the context of work flexibility and work-life balance programmes, the question arises as to whether work flexibility is a mutual gains enterprise for employers and employees. The thesis extends the debate on the flexible firm to incorporate the work-life balance agenda. The extent of numerical and functional flexibility is correlated with the ...

  19. Sexual harassment in the hospitality industry --- A study on a Chinese state-owned hotel

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, LULU

    2006-01-01

    Based on literature reviews, methodologies, and findings, this paper presents an empirical study of sexual harassment in the hospitality industry. Zhongjing Grand Hotel is used as a case study of sexual harassment in the context of China. The similarities and differences from literatures and research findings are indicated. The research proposes two main arguments: (1) the definitions of sexual harassment need to be improved and specific. (2) sexual harassment can happen every places and ever...

  20. Edit Change in the Hospitality Industry: New Paradigms, Frames, and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Oshins

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 15-20 years, changes in hotel ownership and management, the growth and development of online reservation systems and the proliferation of lodging alternatives have altered the hospitality landscape, bringing new complexity to the industry. Dr. Oshins shares examples that highlight the ways one can learn to be more successful in thinking about and capitalizing on the opportunities presented by change.

  1. Measuring Service Quality in the Hospitality Industry: A Case Study in Hue City, Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Ngoc Liem; Inaba, Yushi

    2015-01-01

    This research is a study on service quality in the hospitality industry in the context of a developing country. The key purposes of this study are twofold. First, it examines the conceptualization and measurement of service quality in the hotel setting. Second, the relationships between service quality, customer satisfaction, and repurchase intention are taken into considerations. The findings from this study confirm that there are three determinants affecting statistically on service quality...

  2. The Different Types of Delinquent Behavior in the Hospitality Industry. Case Study from Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Polyxeni Moira; Dimitrios Mylonopoulos; Panagiota Vasilopoulou

    2013-01-01

    Delinquent behavior in hotels is well known both to the hotel industry professionals as well as to the customers. The particularity of hotels being considered to provide a "hospitable" and discreet environment, tranquility and security, prevents the disclosure of the incidents of delinquency that occur in them. In Greece, as well as abroad, despite the fact that delinquent acts are known to occur constantly in hotels, nonetheless the facts do not easily go public, and there seems to exist no ...

  3. Analysis of Factors Influencing Activity-Based Costing Applications in the Hospitality Industry in Yenagoa, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Appah, Ebimobowei; Bariweni Binaebi

    2013-01-01

    This research examines the factors influencing activity-based costing application in the hospitality industry in Yenagoa, Nigeria. To achieve this objective, primary and secondary data were used. The secondary data include books, journals, periodicals, unpublished research materials and the internet and the primary data include interview and a well structured questionnaire administered to one hundred and 165 respondents in the 50 hotels sampled from the population. The data collected from the...

  4. Understanding customer satisfaction in the UK quick service restaurant industry: The influence of the tangible attributes of perceived service quality

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Q.; Nisar, T.; Knox, D.; Prabhakar, G.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of the five dimensions of service quality on customer satisfaction in the UK fast food market and to indicate which factors among the five dimensions have a main role in driving overall customer satisfaction.\\ud Primary data in the form of 147 questionnaire responses werebeen collected from a variety of quick service fast food restaurants in the UK. Likert seven-point rating scales were used to structure the questionnaire. Data were collected...

  5. In the interest of food safety: a qualitative study investigating communication and trust between food regulators and food industry in the UK, Australia and New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha B Meyer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Food regulatory bodies play an important role in public health, and in reducing the costs of food borne illness that are absorbed by both industry and government. Regulation in the food industry involves a relationship between regulators and members of the industry, and it is imperative that these relationships are built on trust. Research has shown in a variety of contexts that businesses find the most success when there are high levels of trust between them and their key stakeholders. An evidence-based understanding of the barriers to communication and trust is imperative if we are to put forward recommendations for facilitating the (rebuilding of trusting and communicative relationships. Methods We present data from 72 interviews with regulators and industry representatives regarding their trust in and communication with one another. Interviews were conducted in the UK, New Zealand, and Australia in 2013. Results Data identify a variety of factors that shape the dynamic and complex relationships between regulators and industry, as well as barriers to communication and trust between the two parties. Novel in our approach is our emphasis on identifying solutions to these barriers from the voices of industry and regulators. Conclusions We provide recommendations (e.g., development of industry advisory boards to facilitate the (rebuilding of trusting and communicative relationships between the two parties.

  6. In the interest of food safety: a qualitative study investigating communication and trust between food regulators and food industry in the UK, Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Samantha B; Wilson, Annabelle M; Calnan, Michael; Henderson, Julie; Coveney, John; McCullum, Dean; Pearce, Alex R; Ward, Paul; Webb, Trevor

    2017-02-13

    Food regulatory bodies play an important role in public health, and in reducing the costs of food borne illness that are absorbed by both industry and government. Regulation in the food industry involves a relationship between regulators and members of the industry, and it is imperative that these relationships are built on trust. Research has shown in a variety of contexts that businesses find the most success when there are high levels of trust between them and their key stakeholders. An evidence-based understanding of the barriers to communication and trust is imperative if we are to put forward recommendations for facilitating the (re)building of trusting and communicative relationships. We present data from 72 interviews with regulators and industry representatives regarding their trust in and communication with one another. Interviews were conducted in the UK, New Zealand, and Australia in 2013. Data identify a variety of factors that shape the dynamic and complex relationships between regulators and industry, as well as barriers to communication and trust between the two parties. Novel in our approach is our emphasis on identifying solutions to these barriers from the voices of industry and regulators. We provide recommendations (e.g., development of industry advisory boards) to facilitate the (re)building of trusting and communicative relationships between the two parties.

  7. The role of the University in relation to the nuclear industry is apparently very different in the U.S. and U.K. - is this appropriate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, R.S.; Young, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    We do not set out to provide answers but hope to stimulate discussion in those areas where we think that there could be a change in the role of the University in relation to the Nuclear Industry. The development of the U.S. and U.K. Nuclear Industries is briefly reviewed to illustrate differences in the funding, organisation and implementation of the research, design and construction, operation and regulation functions in the two countries. The centralised British scene contrasts strongly with the American one, and it is suggested that in limited but important technical areas there is scope for significantly closer association between the Industry and the Universities in the country. This would lead to a broader based national framework with which to meet the growing pressures for independent assessment, comment and advice. There are potential dangers in an indiscriminate or unbalanced association, and these are identified. (author)

  8. Information Sharing, Cooperative Behaviour and Hotel Performance: A Survey of the Kenyan Hospitality Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammy Odari Namusonge

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Information sharing is the life blood of supply chain collaboration. Its role in achieving operational performance of supply chains has been widely acclaimed. However whether information sharing would result in improved performance in the context of the hospitality industry has not been empirically determined. This study sought to find out the role of information sharing on hotel performance when the relationship was mediated by cooperative behaviour. A survey design was employed where proportionate stratified sampling was used to select 50 out of 57 town hotels. Data was collected through the use of questionnaires as well interview guides to the procurement\\supply chain departments of these hotels. Logarithmic transformations were used in conjunction with multiple regression analysis to determine the relationship between information sharing, cooperative behaviour and hotel performance. The study concludes that information sharing in the Kenyan hospitality industry does not directly relate to hotel performance. Its relationship is mediated by cooperative behaviour (trust and attitude with supply chain partners. This suggests that information sharing is essential but insufficient by itself to bring significant performance improvements in hotels in the Kenyan hospitality industry. A possible reason for this is that this collaborative practice is highly dependent on information sharing capability, structure of the information as well as culture. Through quadrant analysis the study identifies and recommends the sharing of information about long term strategic plans and events such as entering new markets and acquiring a new customer base as an area of primary priority for improvement.

  9. Institutional traps in the hospitality industry financing (by the example of Krasnodar region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Yu. Baranova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective to determine and classify the institutional traps in financing the hospitality industry in Russia. Methods abstractlogical generalization and observation. Results basing on the analysis of statistics and regional program of tourism development in Krasnodar region the challenges and obstacles were identified to the development and improvement of tourist services quality. The research result is the identification and systematization of institutional traps in the financing of tourism expressed in the increased public support of the sector. In particular a significant proportion of touristrecreational sector funding is still taken from the budget though the specific weight of profitable health resort organizations amounted to 60 over the past three years. In the process of research the author formulated a general concept of the institutional structure of the hospitality industry in Russia and the model of the sector financing through a system of incentives and benefits for vacationers forming the tourist clusters and forming a mechanism of dialogue between the authorities and representatives of tourist business. Scientific novelty the institutional traps are defined and systematized which are formed in the system of tourism financing measures to overcome them are proposed. Practical significance the proposed recommendations can be used by the entities of the hospitality industry to enhance business activities and by authorities to implement tasks outlined in the state programs.

  10. Referral bias in hospital register studies of geographical and industrial differences in health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soll-Johanning, Helle; Hannerz, Harald; Tüchsen, Finn

    2004-05-01

    The Danish National Hospital Register contains four patient types: full-time inpatients, part-time inpatients, outpatients and emergency ward patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether results from comparative hospital register studies depend on which patient types we choose to include in the analysis. The hospital register was linked to the centralised civil register and the employment classification module. All economically active persons in Denmark aged 20-59 years 1st January 1995 (N = 2,281,480) were followed for six years. We calculated SIRs, first by county then by industry and finally by industry adjusted for county, for a variety of diagnostic groups and for each of the following types of cases: A) full-time inpatients, B) all inpatients, C) all inpatients and outpatients, D) all patients. The ratio between the maximum and the minimum of the four types of SIRs was calculated for each combination of the examined population groups and diseases. A max/min ratio was regarded as a sign of referral bias if it was above 1.2 and statistically significant. When calculating SIRs by county 46.7 percent of the max/min ratios signified referral bias. The percentage was 5.5 when calculating SIRs by industry and only 1.7 when they were calculated by industry adjusted for county. Estimates of geographical health differences are often distorted by differences in the health care organisation. Estimates of industrial health differences tend to be robust with a few identifiable exceptions. Standardisation for county will eliminate bias.

  11. Between a rock and a hard place: Economic expansion and social responsibility in UK media discourses on the global alcohol industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Mary; Hawkins, Benjamin

    2017-02-01

    Transnational alcohol corporations (TACs) employ a range of strategies to achieve their business objectives, including attempts to frame perceptions of their activities in media debates. TACs aim to achieve a favourable regulatory environment by presenting themselves as socially responsible actors. However, the need to secure financial investment means they must also emphasise their potential for growth. This article investigates tensions between these objectives in coverage of the global alcohol industry in the UK print media. This article examines coverage of the world's four largest TACs in five British daily newspapers and one industry publication between March 2012 and February 2013. 477 articles were identified for analysis through keyword searches of the LexisNexis database. Thematic coding of articles was conducted using Nvivo software. Two conflicting framings of the alcohol industry emerge from our analysis. The first presents TACs as socially responsible actors; key partners to government in reducing alcohol-related harms. This is targeted at policy-makers and the public in an attempt to shape policy debates. The second framing highlights TACs' potential for economic growth by establishing new markets and identifying new customer bases. This is targeted at an audience of potential investors. A fundamental contradiction lies at the heart of these framings, reflecting the tensions that exist between TACs' political and financial strategies. Alcohol industry involvement in policy-making thus involves a fundamental conflict of interests. Consequently, the UK government should reassess the prominence it currently affords to the industry in the development and delivery of alcohol policy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Role of China in the UK Relative Imports from Three Selected Trading Regions: The Case of Textile Raw Material Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junqian

    2017-01-01

    The UK textile industry was very prosperous in the past but in the 1970s Britain started to import textile materials from abroad. Since 1990, half of its textile materials have been imported from the EEA (European Economic Area), ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) and North America countries. Meanwhile, UK imports from China have increased dramatically. Through comparisons, this paper calculates the trade competitiveness index and relative competitive advantages of regions and investigates the impact of Chinese textiles on UK imports from three key free trade regions across the textile sectors in the period 1990–2016 on the basis of United Nation Comtrade Rev. 3. We find that China’s textile prices, product techniques, political trade barriers and even tax system have made a varied impact on the UK’s imports across related sectors in the context of green trade and the strengthening of barriers, which helps us recognize China’s competitiveness in international trading and also provides advice on China’s sustainable development of textile exports. PMID:29189756

  13. Budget impact model of Mydrane®, a new intracameral injectable used for intra-operative mydriasis, from a UK hospital perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Keith; Chang, Bernard; Purslow, Christine; Clay, Emilie; Vataire, Anne-Lise

    2018-04-19

    During cataract surgery, maintaining an adequate degree of mydriasis throughout the entire operation is critical to allow for visualisation of the capsulorhexis and the crystalline lens. Good anaesthesia is also essential for safe intraocular surgery. Mydrane® is a new injectable intracameral solution containing two mydriatics (tropicamide 0.02% and phenylephrine 0.31%) and one anaesthetic (lidocaine 1%) that was developed as an alternative to the conventional topical pre-operative mydriatics used in cataract surgery. This study aimed to estimate the budget impact across a one year time frame using Mydrane® instead of topical dilating eye drops, for a UK hospital performing 3,000 cataract operations a year. A budget impact model (BIM) was developed to compare the economic outcomes associated with the use of Mydrane® versus topical drops (tropicamide 0.5% and phenylephrine 10%) in patients undergoing cataract surgery in a UK hospital. The outcomes of interest included costs and resource use (e.g. clinician time, mydriasis failures, operating room time, number of patients per vial of therapy etc.) associated with management of mydriasis in patients undergoing cataract surgery. All model inputs considered the UK hospital perspective without social or geographical variables. Deterministic sensitivity analyses were also performed to assess the model uncertainty. Introduction of Mydrane® is associated with a cost saving of £6,251 over 3,000 cataract surgeries in one year. The acquisition costs of the Mydrane® (£18,000 by year vs. £3,330 for eye drops) were balanced by substantial reductions in mainly nurses' costs and time, plus a smaller contribution from savings in surgeons' costs (£20,511) and lower costs associated with auxiliary dilation (£410 due to avoidance of additional dilation methods). Results of the sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of the model to the variation of inputs. Except for the duration of one session of eye drop instillation

  14. Support for smoke-free policies in the Cyprus hospitality industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazuras, Lambros; Savva, Christos S; Talias, Michael A; Soteriades, Elpidoforos S

    2015-12-01

    The present study used attitudinal and behavioural indicators to measure support for smoke-free policies among employers and employees in the hospitality industry in Cyprus. A representative sample of 600 participants (95 % response rate) completed anonymous structured questionnaires on demographic variables, smoking status, exposure to second-hand smoke at work and related health beliefs, social norms, and smoke-free policy support. Participants were predominantly males (68.3 %), with a mean age of 40 years (SD = 12.69), and 39.7 % were employers/owners of the hospitality venue. Analysis of variance showed that employers and smokers were less supportive of smoke-free policies, as compared to employees and non-smokers. Linear regression models showed that attitudes towards smoke-free policy were predicted by smoking status, SHS exposure and related health beliefs, and social norm variables. Logistic regression analysis showed that willingness to confront a policy violator was predicted by SHS exposure, perceived prevalence of smoker clients, and smoke-free policy attitudes. SHS exposure and related health beliefs, and normative factors should be targeted by interventions aiming to promote policy support in the hospitality industry in Cyprus.

  15. Possibilities for Hospital Treatment of Industrial Accident Victims in Military Medical Academy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorovic, V.; Jevtic, M.; Jovanovic, D.; Jovic-Stosic, J.

    2007-01-01

    Possibility of mass injuries in traffic, industrial accidents or terrorist attack is every day reality. Management of victims may need complex measures including activities on the site, transportation, and hospital care. Preparedness for hospital treatment of mass trauma or poisoning is among the main duties of Military Medical Academy (MMA). It is medical institution of tertiary level with the capacity of 1214 beds in 13 surgical clinics, 12 internal medicine clinics, 2 neuropsychiatry clinics, poison control centre and organ transplantation centre. National Poison Control Centre is the only specialized institution for treatment of adult's acute poisonings in the country. Centre includes: 1. Clinic of Toxicology and Clinical Pharmacology with Intensive Care Unit and Toxicology Information Department; 2. Institute of Experimental Toxicology and Pharmacology; 3. Mobile Toxicological - Chemical Squad. Being a part of MMA, Centre benefits from all advantages of central type hospital, including possibilities for contemporary diagnostic and therapeutic procedures of different specialities, and other necessary medical and logistic support. Except hospital organization and preparedness for admission of mass injuries victims, one of strategic goals of MMA is functional integration in civilian health care system including more detailed planning for collaboration in case of chemical accidents.(author)

  16. The Perception of Employee Wellness in the Hospitality Industry : A survey research among hotel employers in the Black Forest, Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Overbeck, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    This thesis deals with the research on the actual perception of employee wellness and employee wellness programs in the context of the hospitality industry. The author’s formulated objectives in order to realize the research were primarily to determine to what extent the employers within the hospitality industry perceive health and wellness of staff as their responsibility. Secondly, to find out whether health and well- being benefits like “employee wellness programs” have any imp...

  17. Necessity of Changes in the System of Hospitality Industry and Tourism Training in Terms of Import Substitution

    OpenAIRE

    Zaitseva, Natalia A.; Goncharova, Irina V.; Androsenko, Marina E.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the authors in this study was to prove the relevance of research identifying the necessity of changes in the system of training for hospitality industry and tourism in terms of import substitution. The aim of this research was to assess the significance of tourism in the framework of import substitution, to justify the need for changes in the system of training for hospitality and tourism industry in recent situation. It is also essential to give practical recommendations on tr...

  18. Assessment of Energy-Saving Practices of the Hospitality Industry in Macau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Macau is building a world tourism and leisure center. In the context of flourishing hospitality development, energy issues have attracted more and more attention in recent years. On the basis of the field survey of 28 hotels, an evaluation index system is built to assess the status of energy-saving and environmental protection practices in the hospitality industry in Macau. This system is built by selecting some credits from Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED and adding several new indices according to the social and economic characteristics of Macau. The results show that the hotels have made significant efforts to improve the energy efficiency in recent years. A total of 71.4% of the hotels have formulated and implemented the energy-saving and environmental protection programs. However, there is an apparent gap in energy and environmental performance between different star-level hotels. The higher is the star-level of a hotel, the higher enthusiasm on energy-saving a hotel has, e.g., 63.6% of the 5-star hotels carried out the carbon auditing and energy management measures, but there is no 2-star hotel that adopted them. The energy-saving performance can be great improved if more efforts are made in the future, especially for the 2-star hotels. Finally, we put forward some suggestions for how to bridge this gap and present a possible roadmap for the further improvement of energy efficiency of the hotel industry in Macau. The results from this work are useful to help the government and hotel managers to take actions for improving the energy utilization and efficiency of the hospitality industry in Macau.

  19. Mobile technologies and supply chain management - lessons for the hospitality industry

    OpenAIRE

    Car, Tomislav; Pilepić, Ljubica; Šimunić, Mislav

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to define preconditions and integration capabilities of the mobile business in supply chain management (SCM) in the hospitality industry via mobile devices and mobile applications. The aims of this paper are to reflect on what mobile technology has to offer and to draw attention to the role of mobile applications and their use in the SCM. Although mobile technologies are present in almost all areas, they are not used to their full potential. Design – The...

  20. Coordinating Education & Industry in the 1990's: A Strategy for Managing a Food Service/Hospitality Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalla, Edward V.

    Research was conducted to determine areas of strengths and weaknesses of the Food Service/Hospitality Management program of Ferris State University (Michigan). The study examined graduates' perceptions of the preparation they received and of the adequacy of their preparation for the hospitality industry. A literature review focused on strategies…

  1. Titanium in UK rural, agricultural and urban/industrial rivers: Geogenic and anthropogenic colloidal/sub-colloidal sources and the significance of within-river retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neal, Colin; Jarvie, Helen [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Wallingford, Crowmarsh Gifford, Wallingford, OXON, OX10 8BB (United Kingdom); Rowland, Philip, E-mail: apr@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Lawler, Alan; Sleep, Darren; Scholefield, Paul [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    Operationally defined dissolved Titanium [Ti] (the < 0.45 {mu}m filtered fraction) in rivers draining rural, agricultural, urban and industrial land-use types in the UK averaged 2.1 {mu}g/l with a range in average of 0.55 to 6.48 {mu}g/l. The lowest averages occurred for the upland areas of mid-Wales the highest just downstream of major sewage treatment works (STWs). [Ti] in rainfall and cloud water in mid-Wales averaged 0.2 and 0.7 {mu}g/l, respectively. Average, baseflow and stormflow [Ti] were compared with two markers of sewage effluent and thus human population: soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) and boron (B). While B reflects chemically conservative mixing, SRP declined downstream of STW inputs due to in-stream physico-chemical and biological uptake. The results are related to colloidal and sub-colloidal Ti inputs from urban/industrial conurbations coupled with diffuse background (geological) sources and within-river removal/retention under low flows as a result of processes of aggregation and sedimentation. The urban/industrial inputs increased background [Ti] by up to eleven fold, but the total anthropogenic Ti input might well have been underestimated owing to within-river retention. A baseline survey using cross-flow ultrafiltration revealed that up to 79% of the [Ti] was colloidal/nanoparticulate (> 1 kDa i.e. > c. 1-2 nm) for the rural areas, but as low as 28% for the urban/industrial rivers. This raises fundamental issues of the pollutant inputs of Ti, with the possibility of significant complexation of Ti in the sewage effluents and subsequent breakdown within the rivers, as well as the physical dispersion of fine colloids down to the macro-molecular scale. Although not directly measured, the particulate Ti can make an important contribution to the net Ti flux. - Research Highlights: {yields} Filtered Ti in agricultural, urban and industrial UK rivers described. {yields} Highest concentrations occur just downstream of STWs. {yields} The urban/industrial

  2. An evaluation of the benefits to a UK Health Care Trust working in a partnership with a hospital in Northern Uganda: International partnership working in mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hague, Ben; Sills, Jenny; Thompson, Andrew R

    2015-12-22

    Despite the worthy intentions of international health partnerships between high-income countries and countries with developing economies, the tangible benefits are rarely evaluated, limiting the assessment of the achievements of such collaborations. The present study used longitudinal qualitative methods to examine the individual and organisational benefits of a partnership between a National Health Service (NHS) mental health Trust in the United Kingdom and a mental health referral hospital in Northern Uganda. Benefits to UK staff and organisational development were benchmarked against an existing framework of healthcare competencies. Partnership involvement was beneficial to UK staff, by increasing awareness of diversity, and in enhancing ability to work flexibly and as a team. There were clear benefits expressed with regards to the partnership having the potential to enhance organisational reputation and staff morale. The findings from this study demonstrate that international partnerships are experienced as being of tangible value for healthcare staff from high-income countries, providing opportunities for the development of recognised healthcare competencies. In this study there was also some evidence that staff involvement might also provide wider organisational benefits.

  3. Achieving Excellence through Memorable Traveler Experience and Challenges,Opportunities and Solutions for Romanian Travel and Hospitality Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    THEODOR VALENTIN PURCAREA

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Hospitality industry is probably the fastest growing one in the world. The tourism company should endeavour to shape the overall perception of value in this industry. What matters is the provision of experiences, but not services. To meet international standards the Romanian tourism should consider challenges, opportunities and solutions to cope with the specific requirements in this field.

  4. Can't see the woods for the trees: exploring the range and connection of tobacco industry argumentation in the 2012 UK standardised packaging consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, Jessamina Lih Yan; Fooks, Gary; de Vries, Nanne K; Heijndijk, Suzanne M; Willemsen, Marc C

    2017-07-25

    Transnational tobacco company (TTC) submissions to the 2012 UK standardised packaging consultation are studied to examine TTC argumentation in the context of Better Regulation practices. A content analysis was conducted of Philip Morris International and British American Tobacco submissions to the 2012 UK consultation. Industry arguments concerning expected costs and (contested) benefits of the policy were categorised into themes and frames. The inter-relationship between frames through linked arguments was mapped to analyse central arguments using an argumentation network. 173 arguments were identified. Arguments fell into one of five frames: ineffectiveness, negative economic consequences, harm to public health, increased crime or legal ramifications. Arguments highlighted high costs to a wide range of groups, including government, general public and other businesses. Arguments also questioned the public health benefits of standardised packaging and highlighted the potential benefits to undeserving groups. An increase in illicit trade was the most central argument and linked to the greatest variety of arguments. In policy-making systems characterised by mandatory impact assessments and public consultations, the wide range of cost (and contested benefits) based arguments highlights the risk of TTCs overloading policy actors and causing delays in policy adoption. Illicit trade related arguments are central to providing a rationale for these arguments, which include the claim that standardised packaging will increase health risks. The strategic importance of illicit trade arguments to industry argumentation in public consultations underlines the risks of relying on industry data relating to the scale of the illicit trade. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Of things to come: Tourism and hospitality education in a post-industrial age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dredge Dianne

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Across the globe, tourism higher education is undergoing massive and sustained change driven by three interlocking sets of concerns. First, there are massive changes taking place in the global higher education environment that have important implications for how tourism education is positioned at national, sub-national and institutional levels, second, as most developed countries move into a post-industrial epoch, traditional industrial tourism structures and practices are increasingly subject to pres­sures that are likely to bring about significant structural change. Third, massive changes in higher education combined with the changes taking place in tourism itself, suggest that there are significant implications for the future of tourism and hospitality higher education. Yet to date, discussion and exploration of this latter concern the future of tourism education has taken place in isolation from the earlier two areas of concern, almost as if they were discourses painted on different canvasses, colored with different values and issues, and crafted using different language. This paper explores future challenges for tourism and hospitality education within this changing tourism world, and it discusses key issues for the future development of tourism curriculum and for professional development.

  6. Renewable Energy Sources in the Function of Sustainable Business in Tourism and Hospitality Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljerka Cerović

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Trends on the international tourist market are recording numerous changes almost on a daily basis, regarding the development of ecological tourist offer. Modern tourists are becoming more and more aware of the necessity of applying the principles of sustainable development in everyday life, so the same preferences are being expressed during their stay in their chosen tourist destination. The management of ecologically oriented tourist destination must pay special attention to the use of renewable energy sources, and in its micro-environment encourage an approach to business according to modern ecological standards. The implementation of renewable energy sources in tourism and hospitality industry aims at ensuring the improvement of business, profiling of an ecologically responsible tourist destination, repositioning of the current tourist offer on the international tourist market and achieving competitive advantages and conquest of a specific tourist segment of ecologically-oriented consumers. The aim of the research is to point out the advantages which sustainable development and application of renewable energy sources has on business development in tourism and hospitality industry, with a goal of improving competitive advantages and positive effect on the environment

  7. Hospital competition, GP fundholders and waiting times in the UK internal market: the case of elective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Ana

    2003-03-01

    In this paper I model the demand for and supply of elective surgery using a modified Hotelling framework in which time, money, and distance are determinants of the demand for hospital care. Hospitals compete with each other in terms of the waiting time and consequently treat a certain number of patients. The basic model of hospital competition is then extended to incorporate the general practitioner (GP) fundholding scheme whereby the GPs are allocated a budget with which to buy care for their patients. Waiting time increases when production of care becomes more expensive, when the benefit obtained from treatment increases, when the unit cost of distance decreases, and when the importance given to time as a performance indicator decreases. The higher the money price the lower the waiting time. Finally, the money price paid by the GP fundholders is greater than that paid by the Health Authorities and greater than the hospitals marginal cost of production. As a consequence, fundholding patients pay a zero time price while non-fundholding patients experiment a positive waiting time.

  8. PERCEPTION OF MANAGERS ON PERFORMANCE - EMPIRICAL STUDY CONDUCTED IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY ENTITIES IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scorte Carmen Mihaela

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We seek performance. We want to become performers, but undoubtedly most often we forget to get down to the essence of things, wondering "What is performance?". But what is meant by performance in the hospitality and tourism industry, an industry that is booming at world level, but which, at the same time, in the local area, faces an environment increasingly difficult? What is the perception of managers about this concept? This was one of the questions addressed to managers in the hospitality industry Bihor within a broader empirical research that targeted the importance of accounting information for the management of entities in this sector. The basis of the empirical research is a survey conducted between November 2012 and January 2013, the working tool used being a questionnaire that consists of 38 questions administered on the ground and online. The total population consists of 146 economic entities in the sector in Bihor; the sample consists of 91 tourist entities and the response rate is 62.33 % as a result of research in the field. 83.5% of the managers surveyed said that the most important factor influencing the performance in this sector is the occupancy rate of the capacities available, in second place as a factor of influence being the demand for services and travel packages offered, in the view of 75.8 % of respondents. It is surprising that less than 50% of the managers surveyed identified as a factor influencing the performance the accounting result of the business. Based on these results we also wanted to identify what measures are taken by managers in the sector to increase occupancy rate. The research conducted adds value to the indigenous research on issues regarding management accounting in hospitality and tourism industry, but also in the perception of performance, paving the way for future research. As limitations of our research we can identify the restricted area of application of the questionnaires (Bihor county, but also

  9. Managing family businesses in the tourism and hospitality industry: the transitional economy of Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallas Brozik

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This study’s objective is to examine the nature of tourism and hospitality family businesses that operate in the transitional Polish economy and to analyze the environment for development and growth of these entrepreneurial firms in the reformingeconomy. In order to evaluate and compare firms’ development relative to selected external environmental factors affecting entrepreneurial operations, on-site surveys and personal interviews were conducted with Polish entrepreneurs who own and operate family businesses within tourism and hospitality industry. Theenvironmental conditions are grouped into four external nvironmental factors: political and legal environment, financial environment, non-financial environment, and socio-economic environment, and analyzed based on Kazanjian’s (1988 and Gnyawali and Fogel’s models (1994. The paper also analyzes the competencies ofthe owners of the entrepreneurial firms that are important for the firm’s success throughout the firm’s life cycle. Based on this study results, policy implications are made for assisting the tourism and hospitality firms’ growth and development in transitional economy

  10. Adverse incidents resulting in exposure to body fluids at a UK dental teaching hospital over a 6-year period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A Hughes,1 L Davies,1 R Hale,1 JE Gallagher21Kings College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, 2King's College London Dental Institute, London, United KingdomBackground: The safety and protection of patients and health care workers is of paramount importance in dentistry, and this includes students in training who provide clinical care. Given the nature of dental care, adverse incidents can and do occur, exposing health care workers to body fluids and putting them at risk of infection, including contracting a blood-borne virus. The aim of this research was to analyze trends in the volume, rate, nature, management, and outcome of adverse incidents reported at one dental teaching hospital from 2005 to 2010.Methods: Descriptive analysis of trends in the volume, rate, nature, management, and outcome of adverse incidents reported at one dental teaching hospital over a six-year period was undertaken in relation to the level of outpatient and day surgery activity.Results: In total, 287 incidents were reported over a six-year period, which amounted to 0.039% of outpatient or day surgery appointments. Nearly three quarters of all the incidents (n = 208, 72% took place during treatment or whilst clearing away after the appointment. The most frequent incidents were associated with administration of local anesthetic (n = 63, 22%, followed by burs used in dental hand pieces (n = 51, 18%.Conclusion: This research confirms that adverse incidents are a feature of dental hospitals and reports the common sources. The importance of accurate and consistent reporting of data to ensure that these issues are monitored to inform action and reduce risks to staff, students, and patients are highlighted.Keywords: risk management, blood-borne virus, dental hospital, body fluids exposure, adverse event reporting

  11. Industry-University Collaborations in Canada, Japan, the UK and USA – With Emphasis on Publication Freedom and Managing the Intellectual Property Lock-Up Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneller, Robert; Mongeon, Marcel; Cope, Jeff; Garner, Cathy; Ternouth, Philip

    2014-01-01

    As industry-university collaborations are promoted to commercialize university research and foster economic growth, it is important to understand how companies benefit from these collaborations, and to ensure that resulting academic discoveries are developed for the benefit of all stakeholders: companies, universities and public. Lock up of inventions, and censoring of academic publications, should be avoided if feasible. This case-study analysis of interviews with 90 companies in Canada, Japan, the UK and USA assesses the scope of this challenge and suggests possible resolutions. The participating companies were asked to describe an important interaction with universities, and most described collaborative research. The most frequently cited tensions concerned intellectual property management and publication freedom. IP disagreements were most frequent in the context of narrowly-focused collaborations with American universities. However, in the case of exploratory research, companies accepted the IP management practices of US universities. It might make sense to let companies have an automatic exclusive license to IP from narrowly defined collaborations, but to encourage universities to manage inventions from exploratory collaborations to ensure development incentives. Although Canada, the UK and US have strong publication freedom guarantees, tensions over this issue arose frequently in focused collaborations, though were rare in exploratory collaborations. The UK Lambert Agreements give sponsors the option to control publications in return for paying the full economic cost of a project. This may offer a model for the other three countries. Uniquely among the four countries, Japan enables companies to control exclusively most collaborative inventions and to censor academic publications. Despite this high degree of control, the interviews suggest many companies do not develop university discoveries to their full potential. The steps suggested above may rebalance the

  12. Industry-university collaborations in Canada, Japan, the UK and USA--with emphasis on publication freedom and managing the intellectual property lock-up problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneller, Robert; Mongeon, Marcel; Cope, Jeff; Garner, Cathy; Ternouth, Philip

    2014-01-01

    As industry-university collaborations are promoted to commercialize university research and foster economic growth, it is important to understand how companies benefit from these collaborations, and to ensure that resulting academic discoveries are developed for the benefit of all stakeholders: companies, universities and public. Lock up of inventions, and censoring of academic publications, should be avoided if feasible. This case-study analysis of interviews with 90 companies in Canada, Japan, the UK and USA assesses the scope of this challenge and suggests possible resolutions. The participating companies were asked to describe an important interaction with universities, and most described collaborative research. The most frequently cited tensions concerned intellectual property management and publication freedom. IP disagreements were most frequent in the context of narrowly-focused collaborations with American universities. However, in the case of exploratory research, companies accepted the IP management practices of US universities. It might make sense to let companies have an automatic exclusive license to IP from narrowly defined collaborations, but to encourage universities to manage inventions from exploratory collaborations to ensure development incentives. Although Canada, the UK and US have strong publication freedom guarantees, tensions over this issue arose frequently in focused collaborations, though were rare in exploratory collaborations. The UK Lambert Agreements give sponsors the option to control publications in return for paying the full economic cost of a project. This may offer a model for the other three countries. Uniquely among the four countries, Japan enables companies to control exclusively most collaborative inventions and to censor academic publications. Despite this high degree of control, the interviews suggest many companies do not develop university discoveries to their full potential. The steps suggested above may rebalance the

  13. Industry-university collaborations in Canada, Japan, the UK and USA--with emphasis on publication freedom and managing the intellectual property lock-up problem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Kneller

    Full Text Available As industry-university collaborations are promoted to commercialize university research and foster economic growth, it is important to understand how companies benefit from these collaborations, and to ensure that resulting academic discoveries are developed for the benefit of all stakeholders: companies, universities and public. Lock up of inventions, and censoring of academic publications, should be avoided if feasible. This case-study analysis of interviews with 90 companies in Canada, Japan, the UK and USA assesses the scope of this challenge and suggests possible resolutions. The participating companies were asked to describe an important interaction with universities, and most described collaborative research. The most frequently cited tensions concerned intellectual property management and publication freedom. IP disagreements were most frequent in the context of narrowly-focused collaborations with American universities. However, in the case of exploratory research, companies accepted the IP management practices of US universities. It might make sense to let companies have an automatic exclusive license to IP from narrowly defined collaborations, but to encourage universities to manage inventions from exploratory collaborations to ensure development incentives. Although Canada, the UK and US have strong publication freedom guarantees, tensions over this issue arose frequently in focused collaborations, though were rare in exploratory collaborations. The UK Lambert Agreements give sponsors the option to control publications in return for paying the full economic cost of a project. This may offer a model for the other three countries. Uniquely among the four countries, Japan enables companies to control exclusively most collaborative inventions and to censor academic publications. Despite this high degree of control, the interviews suggest many companies do not develop university discoveries to their full potential. The steps suggested

  14. Customer service as an act of(f balance: lessons for the tourism and hospitality industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Henning

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on corporate customers' perceptions of a telecommunications organisation in South Africa and the lessons learned for the tourism industry. The purpose of the research was to explore reasons for the decline in customers' perceptions of overall quality of service at Telematics SA from a systems theory perspective. The Three State Triangle model (Henning, 2009 was presented as the three dynamic states of all living systems, including businesses and industries. The states were identified as Stable equilibrium (Se, Explosive instability (Ei and Bounded instability (Bi. The model was applied to interpret the findings and offered a way to interpret customer experiences at Telematics SA. Qualitative research was the chosen method of inquiry. A card game was the conversational instrument used to conduct 10 in-depth interviews with Virtual Private Network customers. Purposeful sampling fitted the rationale of the study. Content analysis was done to identify coding categories, while touch-point validity confirmed that the findings were aligned with the systems theoretical concepts. The research methodology can be applied as a qualitative diagnostic tool in different business contexts, while the Three State Triangle model reveals the underlying dynamic processes in organisations. The research results are applied as lessons to be learned for the continuous improvement of products and services of businesses in the hospitality and tourism industry. Businesses should not get stuck in old strategies and policies but adopt a state of Bounded instability where innovation and renewal is possible.

  15. THE INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY – IMPACT ON THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela FIROIU

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the context of an increasingly dynamic society, globalization has become one of the key issues, causing important changes in the evolution of all economic sectors and especially in the development of the tourism industry, an industry that depends heavily on the free movement of people and unhindered access to information. Although the implications of the globalization phenomenon on tourism are extremely diverse and profound, sometimes difficult to commensurate, the evolution of the information and communication technology is currently outlining the main directions of the global economy through the accelerated pace of innovation. The hospitality industry requires a high level of adaptability to the demands of the tourist market, and the information and communication technology represents an efficient tool for increasing the degree of correlation between tourist supply and clients' demands, thus turning into a real progress bond. Improving the efficiency of this sector's activity becomes one of the primary issues on an increasingly dynamic global market, the changes regarding the distribution channel, the marketing services and the customer relationship management representing the key elements in this respect. In this context, the hotel market in Romania acquires new dimensions, its performance depending on the strong influence that the implementation of the newest informational technologies has on it, determining important changes at both the management and the operational level.

  16. Evaluation of industrial engineering students’ competencies for process improvement in hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Maciej Mazur

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The failures to properly educate students about process improvement can be seen as major factor leading to increased risks of patient safety and increased wastes in hospital settings. The purpose of this research was two-fold: 1 to identify characteristics that explain the efficacy of Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA based-tools while used by Industrial Engineering (IE students on multidisciplinary teams in hospital; 2 to identify competencies needed by IEs for effective process improvement in hospital using PDSA based-tools. Exploratory mixed method design approach with survey study, unstructured interviews, and focus group discussions was used to collect the data. A regression analysis was used to identify PDSA based-tool characteristics perceived by IE students as instrumental for process improvement. Next, the abductive inference was applied to analyze qualitative data in order to investigate competencies needed for effective process improvement using PDSA based-tools.Using regression analysis, we found the brainstorming via visualization, recognizing root-cause(s of the problem and selecting improvement measures via linking the process flow with task(s characteristics to be the significant characteristics. From qualitative data analysis, we learned that IE students strived in technical analysis but lacked competencies in analyzing qualitative data needed for change implementation efforts. There is increasing evidence that success in achieving process improvement goals is at least partially attributable to implementation processes and contexts and not just to the nature of the technical solution. Therefore, IE students interested in working in hospitals must develop new competencies related to qualitative data analysis to manage change initiatives.

  17. A survey of doctors at a UK teaching hospital to assess understanding of recent changes to consent law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.W. O'Brien, BSc MRCS

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: The majority were not familiar with the concept of material risk and recent legal changes. A majority were not confident that their practice meets current requirements, suggesting that recent changes in consent law may not be widely understood at this hospital. We suggest more guidance and education may be necessary than is currently available. Increased understanding of recent changes to consent law will reduce the risk taken by NHS trusts and offer patients a service compliant with Supreme Court guidance.

  18. Experiencing different generations in the hospitality workplace : An exploratory study into generational differences in the content of the psychological contract for workers in the hospitality industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lub, X.D.; Blomme, R.J.; Muijen, van J.J.

    2009-01-01

    High levels of turnover remain a challenge for the hospitality industry. Earlier research links turnover problems to psychological contract breach, and popular literature on generations suggests a new generation of workers is likely to further aggravate problems with turnover. This study explores

  19. Patient and public understanding and knowledge of antimicrobial resistance and stewardship in a UK hospital: should public campaigns change focus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micallef, Christianne; Kildonaviciute, Kornelija; Castro-Sánchez, Enrique; Scibor-Stepien, Aleksandra; Santos, Reem; Aliyu, Sani H; Cooke, Fiona J; Pacey, Sarah; Holmes, Alison H; Enoch, David A

    2017-01-01

    The rising global tide of antimicrobial resistance is a well-described phenomenon. Employing effective and innovative antimicrobial stewardship strategies is an essential approach to combat this public health threat. Education of the public and patients is paramount to enable the success of such strategies. A panel of hospital multidisciplinary healthcare professionals was set up and a short quiz containing true/false statements around antimicrobial stewardship and resistance was designed and piloted. An educational leaflet with the correct replies and supporting information was also produced and disseminated. Participants were recruited on a single day (18 November 2015) from the hospital outpatient clinics and the hospital outpatient pharmacy waiting room. One hundred and forty-five completed quizzes were returned, providing a total of 1450 answers. Overall, 934 of 1450 (64%) statements were scored correctly whilst 481 (33%) were scored incorrectly; 35 (3%) statements were left unscored. We speculate that these results may demonstrate that respondents understood the statements, as only a small proportion of statements were left unanswered. The question dealing with the definition of antimicrobial resistance and the question dealing with the definition of antimicrobial stewardship obtained the most incorrect replies (85% and 72%, respectively). However, a specific factual recall question regarding only one microorganism (MRSA) received the most correct responses (99%). We describe a simple, innovative method of engagement with patients and the general public to help educate and disseminate important public health messages around antimicrobial resistance and stewardship. We also identified the need for public health campaigns to address the knowledge gaps found around this topic. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. The importance of brand in the industrial purchase decision : a case study of the UK tractor market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walley, K.; Custance, P.; Taylor, S.; Lindgreen, A.; Hingley, M.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: Purpose – With brands being an important source of competitive advantage, knowledge of branding is needed to inform their management. After reviewing the literature, the article aims to report the findings of a case study that investigated the role of branding in the industrial purchase of

  1. The organization enacts the environment and the environment feeds back : mortality rates in the UK motorcycle industry, 1895-1993

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wezel, Filippo Carlo

    2002-01-01

    This paper uses the information on 648 manufacturers during the period included between 1895 and 1993 to explore the interaction of different levels of analysis in developing of the United Kingdom motorcycle industry. It provides three general results. First, it demonstrates how long term changes of

  2. From "Embrace and Change" to "Engage and Change": Trade Union Renewal and New Management Strategies in the UK Automotive Industry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Paul; Wass, Victoria

    1998-01-01

    Interviews with 32 British union representatives and a survey of 200 auto workers found that union strength was renewed because of new management techniques in industry, which have increased local autonomy. Unions are directly engaged in the issues involved in teamwork, quality control, and flexible manufacturing. (SK)

  3. Examining the Feasibilities of Industry 4.0 for the Hospitality Sector with the Lens of Management Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Shamim, S.; Cang, Shuang; Yu, H.N.A.; Liu, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Industry 4.0 and its impact in the manufacturing sector are well documented. However, the service sector is understudied, and it is also facing the challenges of mass customization, digital enhancement, smart work environment, and efficient supply chain. The aim of this study is to fill this research gap by exploring the issues of Industry 4.0 in the service sector, with cases in the hospitality industry. All the challenges of Industry 4.0 require continuous innovation and learning, which is ...

  4. Human resource in tourism and hospitality industry: Relation between level of education and job satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Bojana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper offers a concise summary of current problems including the impact of education on (dissatisfaction of human resources in tourism and hospitality industry. In recent years, many researches have been focused on the phenomena of the relation between level of education and job satisfaction of the employees in tourism organizations as it is well known that employee satisfaction enhance competitiveness and efficiency in business. A current issue was set as the fundamental goal in designing this paper, and the basic parameter of the research is employee satisfaction with business operations and working conditions, or to be more precise, examining the extent of (dissatisfaction with the given segments depending on the employees' educational level. This paper represents a synthesis of the electronic research, the analysis of available references, as well as the use of descriptive, analytical and synthetic methods, and it will result in a critical analysis and confirmation (denial of certain hypotheses.

  5. Always looking on the bright side of life? Exploring optimism and health in three UK post-industrial urban settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, David; McCartney, Gerry; McCullough, Sarah; van der Pol, Marjon; Buchanan, Duncan; Jones, Russell

    2015-09-01

    Many theories have been proposed to explain the high levels of 'excess' mortality (i.e. higher mortality over and above that explained by differences in socio-economic circumstances) shown in Scotland-and, especially, in its largest city, Glasgow-compared with elsewhere in the UK. One such proposal relates to differences in optimism, given previously reported evidence of the health benefits of an optimistic outlook. A representative survey of Glasgow, Liverpool and Manchester was undertaken in 2011. Optimism was measured by the Life Orientation Test (Revised) (LOT-R), and compared between the cities by means of multiple linear regression models, adjusting for any differences in sample characteristics. Unadjusted analyses showed LOT-R scores to be similar in Glasgow and Liverpool (mean score (SD): 14.7 (4.0) for both), but lower in Manchester (13.9 (3.8)). This was consistent in analyses by age, gender and social class. Multiple regression confirmed the city results: compared with Glasgow, optimism was either similar (Liverpool: adjusted difference in mean score: -0.16 (95% CI -0.45 to 0.13)) or lower (Manchester: -0.85 (-1.14 to -0.56)). The reasons for high levels of Scottish 'excess' mortality remain unclear. However, differences in psychological outlook such as optimism appear to be an unlikely explanation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Assessing climate risks across different business sectors and industries: an investigation of methodological challenges at national scale for the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surminski, Swenja; Di Mauro, Manuela; Baglee, J. Alastair R.; Connell, Richenda K.; Hankinson, Joel; Haworth, Anna R.; Ingirige, Bingunath; Proverbs, David

    2018-06-01

    Climate change poses severe risks for businesses, which companies as well as governments need to understand in order to take appropriate steps to manage those. This, however, represents a significant challenge as climate change risk assessment is itself a complex, dynamic and geographically diverse process. A wide range of factors including the nature of production processes and value chains, the location of business sites as well as relationships and interdependencies with customers and suppliers play a role in determining if and how companies are impacted by climate risks. This research explores the methodological challenges for a national-scale assessment of climate risks through the lens of the UK Climate Change Risk Assessment (UKCCRA) process and compares the approaches adopted in the first and second UKCCRA (2011, 2016), while also reflecting on international experiences elsewhere. A review of these issues is presented, drawing on a wide body of contemporary evidence from a range of sources including the research disciplines, grey literature and government policy. The study reveals the methodological challenges and highlights six broad themes, namely scale, evidence base, adaptation responses, scope, interdependencies and public policy. The paper concludes by identifying suitable lessons for future national climate risk assessments, which should guide the next phase of research in preparation for UKCCRA3 and those of national-level risk assessments elsewhere. This article is part of the theme issue `Advances in risk assessment for climate change adaptation policy'.

  7. A cross-sectional survey of cardiovascular health and lifestyle habits of hospital staff in the UK: Do we look after ourselves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Tarun K; Cleghorn, Christine L; Cade, Janet E; Barr, Suzanne; Grove, Tim; Bassett, Paul; Wood, David A; Kotseva, Kornelia

    2018-03-01

    Background A high prevalence of stress-related disorders is well known among healthcare professionals. We set out to assess the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and compliance with national dietary and physical activity recommendations in NHS staff in the UK with comparison between clinical and non-clinical staff, and national surveys. Design A multi-centre cross-sectional study. Methods A web-based questionnaire was developed to include anonymised data on demographics, job role, cardiovascular risk factors and diseases, dietary habits, physical activity and barriers towards healthy lifestyle. This was distributed to staff in four NHS hospitals via emails. Results A total of 1158 staff completed the survey (response rate 13%) with equal distribution between the clinical and non-clinical groups. Most staff were aged 26-60 years and 79% were women. Half of the staff were either overweight or obese (51%) with no difference between the groups ( P = 0.176), but there was a lower prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors compared to the general population. The survey revealed a low compliance (17%) with the recommended intake of five-a-day portions of fruit and vegetables, and that of moderate or vigorous physical activity (56%), with no difference between the clinical and non-clinical staff ( P = 0.6). However, more clinical staff were exceeding the alcohol recommendations ( P = 0.02). Lack of fitness facilities and managerial support, coupled with long working hours, were the main reported barriers to a healthy lifestyle. Conclusions In this survey of UK NHS staff, half were found to be overweight or obese with a lower prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors compared to the general population. There was a low compliance with the five-a-day fruit and vegetables recommendation and physical activity guidelines, with no difference between the clinical and non-clinical staff.

  8. Network analysis of patient flow in two UK acute care hospitals identifies key sub-networks for A&E performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Daniel M; Stringer, Clive; Beeknoo, Neeraj; Teo, James; Dobson, Richard J B

    2017-01-01

    The topology of the patient flow network in a hospital is complex, comprising hundreds of overlapping patient journeys, and is a determinant of operational efficiency. To understand the network architecture of patient flow, we performed a data-driven network analysis of patient flow through two acute hospital sites of King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. Administration databases were queried for all intra-hospital patient transfers in an 18-month period and modelled as a dynamic weighted directed graph. A 'core' subnetwork containing only 13-17% of all edges channelled 83-90% of the patient flow, while an 'ephemeral' network constituted the remainder. Unsupervised cluster analysis and differential network analysis identified sub-networks where traffic is most associated with A&E performance. Increased flow to clinical decision units was associated with the best A&E performance in both sites. The component analysis also detected a weekend effect on patient transfers which was not associated with performance. We have performed the first data-driven hypothesis-free analysis of patient flow which can enhance understanding of whole healthcare systems. Such analysis can drive transformation in healthcare as it has in industries such as manufacturing.

  9. Quantity and quality of interaction between staff and older patients in UK hospital wards: A descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Hannah Ruth; Griffiths, Peter; Mesa-Eguiagaray, Ines; Pickering, Ruth; Gould, Lisa; Bridges, Jackie

    2016-10-01

    The quality of staff-patient interactions underpins the overall quality of patient experience and can affect other important outcomes. However no studies have been identified that comprehensively explore both the quality and quantity of interactions in general hospital settings. To quantify and characterise the quality of staff-patient interactions and to identify factors associated with negative interaction ratings. Data were gathered at two acute English NHS hospitals between March and April 2015. Six wards for adult patients participated including medicine for older people (n=4), urology (n=1) and orthopaedics (n=1). Eligible patients on participating wards were randomly selected for observation. Staff-patient interactions were observed using the Quality of Interactions Schedule. 120h of care were observed with each 2h observation session determined from a balanced random schedule (Monday-Friday, 08:00-22:00h). Multilevel logistic regression models were used to determine factors associated with negative interactions. 1554 interactions involving 133 patients were observed. The median length of interaction was 36s with a mean of 6 interactions per patient per hour. Seventy three percent of interactions were categorized as positive, 17% neutral and 10% negative. Forty percent of patients had at least one negative interaction (95% confidence interval 32% to 49%). Interactions initiated by the patient (adjusted Odds Ratio [OR] 5.30), one way communication (adjusted OR 10.70), involving two or more staff (adjusted OR 5.86 for 2 staff, 6.46 for 3+ staff), having a higher total number of interactions (adjusted OR 1.09 per unit increase), and specific types of interaction content were associated with increased odds of negative interaction (pinteraction was associated with increased odds of negative interaction in a reduced model. There was no significant association with gender, age or cognitive impairment. There was substantially more variation at ward level (variance

  10. A survey of users and non-users of a UK teaching hospital library and information service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtle, Kathleen M

    2005-12-01

    The Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust was formed in 2002 with the merger of two existing trusts. The library services unified to create a new expanded service with 11 staff. The librarians wanted to test out users' opinions of the service, as a basis for a developmental strategy. They also wanted to find out to what extent they were offering a multi-disciplinary service, available to all staff. Therefore it was decided to include both users and non-users in the survey. A twenty-question questionnaire was sent out to a 10% sample of registered users in all staff categories. The same questionnaire was sent out to a 10% sample of non-users, with the help of the Human Resources Department. The library staff and facilities were generally well regarded. The stock needed expansion in various areas, especially allied health and biomedical science. Non-users were in fact often occasional or remote users. Other non-users needed informing that they were entitled to use the service. Further research is required, especially concerning the information needs of allied health and scientific staff. There is a need for stock expansion. A marketing strategy is required to capture the interest of potential users.

  11. Clozapine: an effective treatment for seriously violent and psychopathic men with antisocial personality disorder in a UK high-security hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Darcy; Larkin, Fintan; Sengupta, Samrat; Romero-Ureclay, Jose L; Ross, Callum C; Gupta, Nitin; Vinestock, Morris; Das, Mrigendra

    2014-10-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated the anti-aggressive properties of clozapine in schizophrenia and its positive effect in borderline personality disorder. There is no published literature on the treatment of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) with clozapine. We present a case series of 7 patients with primary ASPD and high psychopathic traits treated with clozapine, having a significant history of serious violence and currently detained in a UK based high-security hospital. A retrospective review of case notes was carried out to formulate Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scores and record incidents of violence and aggression. Effect on specific symptom domains (cognitive-perceptual, impulsive-behavioural dyscontrol, affective dysregulation) was also noted. Metabolic parameters and serum clozapine levels were also sampled. All 7 patients showed significant improvement on clozapine. It was shown to benefit all symptom domains, especially impulsive behavioral dyscontrol and anger. The number of violent incidents committed by 6 of the 7 patients reduced significantly, and all patients' risk of violence reduced. Clozapine serum levels for 6 of the 7 patients were in the range 150-350 ng/mL. Clozapine is of benefit in reducing the clinical severity of ASPD. It improved all symptom domains, especially impulsive-behavioral dyscontrol and anger, and reduced levels of aggression and violence, especially at lower doses (serum levels <350 ng/m). To our knowledge, this is the first account of clozapine treatment in patients with ASPD and high psychopathy.

  12. The evolution and outcome of surveillance of Barrett's oesophagus over four decades in a UK District General Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royston, Christine; Caygill, Christine; Charlett, Andre; Bardhan, Karna Dev

    2016-12-01

    We present the long-term outcome of Barrett's oesophagus (BO) at a District General Hospital set against the increasing numbers of patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). Data were collected prospectively over 37 years. Comparison of GORD without Barrett's (NoBO) versus BO was performed from 1/1/1977 to 31/12/2001 when the NoBO database closed and outcomes of all cases of BO diagnosed until 31/12/2011 and followed up until 31/12/2013 have been reported. During the period 1977-2001 the number of GORD NoBO cases was 11 610, and that of BO cases was 764 (6.2% of all GORD); total number of BO cases in 1977-2011 was 1468. NoBO patients were younger than BO patients: 52.2 versus 61.6 years. There was a male predominance in both groups: NoBO 55% and BO 62% (P<0.0001). The prevalence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC) was 87/1468 (5.9%) BO cases. Its incidence was 54/1381 (3.9%); the mean interval between the diagnosis of BO and incident OAC was 9 years (range 13 months-25.4 years); there was one OAC per 192 patient-years of follow-up (0.52% per year). Mortality was significantly lower in 37 patients under endoscopic surveillance at the time OAC was diagnosed (51 vs. 88% P=0.0141) partly because of older age and comorbidity of the other 17, in whom serial endoscopy was contraindicated. A proportional hazards model to allow for age estimated that the hazard rate ratio was lower in the surveillance group; however, this difference did not reach statistical significance (0.64, 95% confidence interval 0.30-1.48, P=0.08). Excluding prevalent cancers from both groups, mortality in BO was double that in NoBO (47 vs. 24%). These 37 years of observation suggest, but do not confirm, that endoscopic surveillance may reduce the risk of death from OAC. Modern technology is likely to yield better results, but larger prospective studies are needed to confirm the benefits.

  13. The influence of organizational culture on negative work-home interference among highly educated employees in the hospitality industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blomme, R.J.; Sok, J.; Tromp, D.M.

    2013-01-01

    An issue which has recently come to the fore in studies conducted among hospitality industry employees is the effect of negative work-home interference on the turnover of highly educated employees. This article examines the role of organizational culture with regard to negative work-home

  14. The Implications of the National Minimum Wage for Training Practices and Skill Utilisation in the United Kingdom Hospitality Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Gill; Williams, Steve; Adam-Smith, Derek

    2003-01-01

    Two key issues thrown up by the 1999 introduction of the National Minimum Wage (NMW) in the United Kingdom are its likely impact on employers' training practices in low paying sectors of the economy and the implications for skills. Based on a study of the hospitality industry, this article assesses the limited significance of the differential,…

  15. Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of Hospitals for 50 states and Washington D.C. , Puerto Rico and US territories. The dataset only includes hospital facilities and...

  16. UK Mission to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    At the end of June, nine experts from UK industry visited CERN to study techniques for developing distributed computing systems and to look at some specific applications. In a packed three-day programme, almost 40 CERN experts presented a comprehensive survey of achievements.

  17. HOSPITAL-BASED HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT FOR THE ADOPTION OF INNOVATIVE MEDICAL DEVICES WITHIN FRENCH HOSPITALS: OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES FOR INDUSTRY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutot, Camille; Mercier, Grégoire; Borget, Isabelle; de Sauvebeuf, Côme; Martelli, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Within French university hospitals, some internal committees are in charge of conducting hospital-based health technology assessment (Hb-HTA) to support managerial decisions regarding the adoption of innovations. For manufacturers, hospitals are usually the entry point for new and innovative medical devices, which cannot be accessed without the Hb-HTA committees' approval. Thus, the main objective of this pilot survey was to explore manufacturers' insights into Hb-HTA processes. A two-step pilot survey was conducted in 2014. First, semi-structured phone interviews were carried out to capture manufacturers' feedback on the Hb-HTA procedure. Second, a prospective and iterative questionnaire designed to explore manufacturers' market access strategies was administered. Eight manufacturers from the medical device industry completed the retrospective phone interviews, and five of them participated in the prospective survey. According to the overall feedback, the Hb-HTA process timeline and transparency are major issues, and the expectations of internal committees, especially in terms of clinical evidence, remain difficult to understand. However, despite this and due to the complexity of reimbursement processes at the national level, manufacturers are increasingly considering hospital adoption through Hb-HTA submission as a viable market access and coverage opportunity. Our study reaffirms the primary role of hospitals in the diffusion of innovative medical devices. However, to ensure efficient and broad access to innovation, cooperation between local and national HTA bodies is critical and should be promoted.

  18. Attitudes and relationship between physicians and the pharmaceutical industry in a public general hospital in Lima, Peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo De Ferrari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The interaction between physicians and the pharmaceutical industry influences physicians' attitudes and prescribing behavior. Although largely studied in the US, this topic has not been well studied in resource-poor settings, where a close relationship between physicians and industry still exists. OBJECTIVE: To describe physician interactions with and attitudes towards the pharmaceutical industry in a public general hospital in Lima, Peru. DESIGN: Descriptive, cross-sectional study through an anonymous, self-filled questionnaire distributed among faculty and trainee physicians of five different clinical departments working in a Peruvian public general hospital. A transcultural validation of an existing Spanish questionnaire was performed. Exposure to marketing activities, motivations to contact pharmaceutical representatives and attitudes towards industry were studied. Collected data was analyzed by degree of training, clinical department, gender and teaching status. Attitudes were measured on a four-point LIKERT scale. RESULTS: 155 physicians completed the survey, of which 148 were included in the study sample. 94.5% of attending physicians reported ongoing encounters with pharmaceutical representatives. The most common industry-related activities were receiving medical samples (91.2%, promotional material (87.8% and attending meetings in restaurants (81.8%. Respondents considered medical samples and continuing medical education the most ethically acceptable benefits. We found significant differences between attendings and residents, and teaching and non-teaching attendings. An association between the amount of encounters with pharmaceutical representatives, and attitudes towards industry and acceptance of medical samples was found. CONCLUSIONS: A close physician-industry relationship exists in the population under study. The contact is established mainly through pharmaceutical representatives. Medical samples are the most received

  19. Prevalence of supporting limb laminitis in a UK equine practice and referral hospital setting between 2005 and 2013: implications for future epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, C E; Newton, J R; Bathe, A P; Payne, R J

    2015-01-17

    The electronic patient records of all equine patients of Rossdales Equine Practice between January 1, 2005 and November 1, 2013 were reviewed to determine the number of cases of supporting limb laminitis (SLL) in a large equine practice and referral hospital setting in the UK and to discuss the implications for future epidemiological studies. The clinical notes were searched electronically for a combination of 'laminitis AND (contralateral OR supporting OR overload OR weight bearing)'. The prevalence of SLL within each identified denominator population and the corresponding 95% CI were calculated. SLL developed in nine horses, one donkey and one pony. Thoroughbreds were the most commonly affected breed (72.7 per cent, CI 46.4 to 99.1 per cent), aged 2-14 years (median six years), and only mares (n=9) and stallions (n=2) were represented. SLL was not restricted to horses that were non-weightbearing lame, it developed within 4-100 days after injury (median 14.5 days) and occurred most commonly in a forelimb (54.6 per cent, CI 25.1 to 84.0 per cent). During the same time frame, a total of 65,327 horses were registered with Rossdales Equine Practice, resulting in an overall practice prevalence of SLL of 0.02 per cent (CI 0.01 to 0.03 per cent). Future epidemiological studies to investigate risk factors for SLL prevention will, therefore, be a logistical challenge. British Veterinary Association.

  20. Incidence, treatment and recurrence of endometriosis in a UK-based population analysis using data from The Health Improvement Network and the Hospital Episode Statistics database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cea Soriano, Lucia; López-Garcia, Esther; Schulze-Rath, Renate; Garcia Rodríguez, Luis A

    2017-10-01

    This retrospective study used medical records from The Health Improvement Network (THIN) and Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) database to evaluate endometriosis (incidence, treatment and need for recurrent invasive procedures) in the general UK population. Women aged 12-54 years between January 2000 and December 2010, with a Read code for endometriosis, were identified in THIN. Cases were validated by manual review of free-text comments in medical records and responses to physician questionnaires. False-negative cases were identified among women with Read codes for hysterectomy or dysmenorrhea. Prescriptions of medical therapies for endometriosis were identified in THIN. Cases of single and recurrent invasive procedures were identified in women with medical records in both THIN and HES. Overall, 5087 women had a Read code for endometriosis, corresponding to an incidence of 1.02 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.99-1.05) per 1000 person-years. After case validation, the estimate was 1.46 (95% CI: 1.43-1.50) per 1000 person-years. Medical therapy was prescribed to 55.5% of women with endometriosis in the first year after diagnosis. In total, 48.3% of women received invasive treatment during the study period; approximately one-fifth of these women required further invasive treatment, mainly in the 3 years after the index procedure. Using Read codes as the only method to identify women with endometriosis underestimates incidence. Over half of women with recorded endometriosis are prescribed medical therapy in the first year after diagnosis. Women with diagnosed endometriosis are at risk of requiring recurrent invasive procedures.

  1. Development and validation of a casemix classification to predict costs of specialist palliative care provision across inpatient hospice, hospital and community settings in the UK: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ping; Dzingina, Mendwas; Firth, Alice M; Davies, Joanna M; Douiri, Abdel; O'Brien, Suzanne M; Pinto, Cathryn; Pask, Sophie; Higginson, Irene J; Eagar, Kathy; Murtagh, Fliss E M

    2018-03-17

    Provision of palliative care is inequitable with wide variations across conditions and settings in the UK. Lack of a standard way to classify by case complexity is one of the principle obstacles to addressing this. We aim to develop and validate a casemix classification to support the prediction of costs of specialist palliative care provision. Phase I: A cohort study to determine the variables and potential classes to be included in a casemix classification. Data are collected from clinicians in palliative care services across inpatient hospice, hospital and community settings on: patient demographics, potential complexity/casemix criteria and patient-level resource use. Cost predictors are derived using multivariate regression and then incorporated into a classification using classification and regression trees. Internal validation will be conducted by bootstrapping to quantify any optimism in the predictive performance (calibration and discrimination) of the developed classification. Phase II: A mixed-methods cohort study across settings for external validation of the classification developed in phase I. Patient and family caregiver data will be collected longitudinally on demographics, potential complexity/casemix criteria and patient-level resource use. This will be triangulated with data collected from clinicians on potential complexity/casemix criteria and patient-level resource use, and with qualitative interviews with patients and caregivers about care provision across difference settings. The classification will be refined on the basis of its performance in the validation data set. The study has been approved by the National Health Service Health Research Authority Research Ethics Committee. The results are expected to be disseminated in 2018 through papers for publication in major palliative care journals; policy briefs for clinicians, commissioning leads and policy makers; and lay summaries for patients and public. ISRCTN90752212. © Article author

  2. Exposure of UK industrial plumbers to asbestos, Part II: Awareness and responses of plumbers to working with asbestos during a survey in parallel with personal sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bard, Delphine; Burdett, Garry

    2007-03-01

    Throughout the European Union, millions tonnes of asbestos were used in the manufacture of products for building and for industrial installations. Today, in the UK, it is estimated that over half a million non-domestic premises alone have asbestos-containing materials in them and it is recognized that those working in building maintenance trades continue to be at significant risk. In part II, the awareness of UK plumbers to when they are working with asbestos was investigated and compared with the monitored levels reported in part I. The plumbers were issued by post with passive samplers, activity logs to monitor a working week and a questionnaire. The activity logs were used to assess whether maintenance workers were knowingly or unknowingly exposed to airborne asbestos fibres during a course of a working week. The questionnaire was designed to gather information on their: age, employment status, current and past perception of the frequency which they work with asbestos and knowledge of the precautions that should be taken to limit exposure and risk. Approximately 20% of workers reported on the sample log that they had worked with asbestos. There was a high correlation (93%) between the sampling log replies that they were knowingly working with asbestos and measured asbestos on the passive sampler. However, some 60% of the samples had >5 microm long asbestos structures found by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis suggesting that the plumbers were aware of about only one-third of their contacts with asbestos materials throughout the week. This increased to just over one half of the plumbers being aware of their contact based on the results for phase contrast microscopy (PCM) countable asbestos fibres. The results from the questionnaire found that over half of the plumbers replying thought that they disturb asbestos only once a year and 90% of them thought they would work with asbestos for<10 h year-1. Their expectations and awareness of work with

  3. Identification of the benefits, enablers and barriers to integrating junior pharmacists into the ward team within one UK-based hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung MY

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Man Yui Hung,1 David John Wright,2 Jeanette Blacklock,2 Richard John Needle1,2 1Pharmacy Department, Colchester Hospital University NHS Foundation Trust, Colchester, 2School of Pharmacy, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK Introduction: A high nurse-vacancy rate combined with high numbers of applications for junior pharmacist roles resulted in Colchester Hospital University National Health System Foundation Trust trial employing junior pharmacists into traditional nursing posts with the aim of integrating pharmacists into the ward team and enhancing local medicines optimization. The aim of the evaluation was to describe the implementation process and practice of the integrated care pharmacists (ICPs in order to inform future innovations of a similar nature.Methods: Four band 6 ward-based ICPs were employed on two wards funded within current ward staffing expenditure. With ethical committee approval, interviews were undertaken with the ICPs and focus groups with ward nurses, senior ward nurses and members of the medical team. Data were analyzed thematically to identify service benefits, barriers and enablers. Routine ward performance data were obtained from the two ICP wards and two wards selected as comparators. Appropriate statistical tests were performed to identify differences in performance.Results: Four ICPs were interviewed, and focus groups were undertaken with three junior nurses, four senior nurses and three medical practitioners. Service enablers were continuous ward time, undertaking drug administration, positive feedback and use of effective communication methods. Barriers were planning, funding model, career development, and interprofessional working and social isolation. ICPs were believed to save nurse time and improve medicines safety. The proportion of patients receiving medicine reconciliation within 24 hours increased significantly in the ICP wards. All ICPs had resigned from their role within 12 months.Discussion: It was

  4. Lung cancer risk and pollution in an industrial region of Northern Spain: a hospital-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cima, María Felicitas; García-Pérez, Javier; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Aragonés, Nuria; López-Abente, Gonzalo; Tardón, Adonina; Pollán, Marina

    2011-01-25

    Asturias, an Autonomous Region in Northern Spain with a large industrial area, registers high lung cancer incidence and mortality. While this excess risk of lung cancer might be partially attributable to smoking habit and occupational exposure, the role of industrial and urban pollution also needs to be assessed. The objective was to ascertain the possible effect of air pollution, both urban and industrial, on lung cancer risk in Asturias. This was a hospital-based case-control study covering 626 lung cancer patients and 626 controls recruited in Asturias and matched by ethnicity, hospital, age, and sex. Distances from the respective participants' residential locations to industrial facilities and city centers were computed. Using logistic regression, odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) for categories of distance to urban and industrial pollution sources were calculated, with adjustment for sex, age, hospital area, tobacco consumption, family history of cancer, and occupation. Whereas individuals living near industries displayed an excess risk of lung cancer (OR = 1.49; 95%CI = 0.93-2.39), which attained statistical significance for small cell carcinomas (OR = 2.23; 95%CI = 1.01-4.92), residents in urban areas showed a statistically significant increased risk for adenocarcinoma (OR = 1.92; 95%CI = 1.09-3.38). In the Gijon health area, residents in the urban area registered a statistically significant increased risk of lung cancer (OR = 2.17; 95%CI = 1.25-3.76), whereas in the Aviles health area, no differences in risk were found by area of exposure. This study provides further evidence that air pollution is a moderate risk factor for lung cancer.

  5. Aspects of the implementation of quality management systems in the hospitality industry in the context of sustainable development

    OpenAIRE

    Anca Cristina STANCIU; Elena CONDREA; Cristina RACOCEANU

    2013-01-01

    The numerous challenges at international level, such as globalization, increased competition, and the existing financial crisis led organizations to realize that keeping them on the market depends on the quality of their products or services. Thus, under the impact of these factors, organizations in the hospitality industry must turn their attention to the customer. The present paper aims to highlight the role of service quality in the success of the organizations acting in this area and of t...

  6. Representation and misrepresentation of scientific evidence in contemporary tobacco regulation: a review of tobacco industry submissions to the UK Government consultation on standardised packaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selda Ulucanlar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Standardised packaging (SP of tobacco products is an innovative tobacco control measure opposed by transnational tobacco companies (TTCs whose responses to the UK government's public consultation on SP argued that evidence was inadequate to support implementing the measure. The government's initial decision, announced 11 months after the consultation closed, was to wait for 'more evidence', but four months later a second 'independent review' was launched. In view of the centrality of evidence to debates over SP and TTCs' history of denying harms and manufacturing uncertainty about scientific evidence, we analysed their submissions to examine how they used evidence to oppose SP.We purposively selected and analysed two TTC submissions using a verification-oriented cross-documentary method to ascertain how published studies were used and interpretive analysis with a constructivist grounded theory approach to examine the conceptual significance of TTC critiques. The companies' overall argument was that the SP evidence base was seriously flawed and did not warrant the introduction of SP. However, this argument was underpinned by three complementary techniques that misrepresented the evidence base. First, published studies were repeatedly misquoted, distorting the main messages. Second, 'mimicked scientific critique' was used to undermine evidence; this form of critique insisted on methodological perfection, rejected methodological pluralism, adopted a litigation (not scientific model, and was not rigorous. Third, TTCs engaged in 'evidential landscaping', promoting a parallel evidence base to deflect attention from SP and excluding company-held evidence relevant to SP. The study's sample was limited to sub-sections of two out of four submissions, but leaked industry documents suggest at least one other company used a similar approach.The TTCs' claim that SP will not lead to public health benefits is largely without foundation. The tools of Better

  7. Representation and misrepresentation of scientific evidence in contemporary tobacco regulation: a review of tobacco industry submissions to the UK Government consultation on standardised packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulucanlar, Selda; Fooks, Gary J; Hatchard, Jenny L; Gilmore, Anna B

    2014-03-01

    Standardised packaging (SP) of tobacco products is an innovative tobacco control measure opposed by transnational tobacco companies (TTCs) whose responses to the UK government's public consultation on SP argued that evidence was inadequate to support implementing the measure. The government's initial decision, announced 11 months after the consultation closed, was to wait for 'more evidence', but four months later a second 'independent review' was launched. In view of the centrality of evidence to debates over SP and TTCs' history of denying harms and manufacturing uncertainty about scientific evidence, we analysed their submissions to examine how they used evidence to oppose SP. We purposively selected and analysed two TTC submissions using a verification-oriented cross-documentary method to ascertain how published studies were used and interpretive analysis with a constructivist grounded theory approach to examine the conceptual significance of TTC critiques. The companies' overall argument was that the SP evidence base was seriously flawed and did not warrant the introduction of SP. However, this argument was underpinned by three complementary techniques that misrepresented the evidence base. First, published studies were repeatedly misquoted, distorting the main messages. Second, 'mimicked scientific critique' was used to undermine evidence; this form of critique insisted on methodological perfection, rejected methodological pluralism, adopted a litigation (not scientific) model, and was not rigorous. Third, TTCs engaged in 'evidential landscaping', promoting a parallel evidence base to deflect attention from SP and excluding company-held evidence relevant to SP. The study's sample was limited to sub-sections of two out of four submissions, but leaked industry documents suggest at least one other company used a similar approach. The TTCs' claim that SP will not lead to public health benefits is largely without foundation. The tools of Better Regulation

  8. UK Transfusion Laboratory Collaborative: minimum standards for staff qualifications, training, competency and the use of information technology in hospital transfusion laboratories 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffe, B; Glencross, H; Jones, J; Staves, J; Capps-Jenner, A; Mistry, H; Bolton-Maggs, P; McQuade, M; Asher, D

    2014-12-01

    The SHOT Adverse Incident Reporting Scheme has consistently reported an unacceptably high level of errors originating in the laboratory setting. In 2006 an initiative was launched in conjunction with the IBMS, SHOT, RCPath, BBTS, UK NEQAS, the NHSE NBTC and the equivalents in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland that led to the formation of the UK TLC. The UK TLC in considering the nature and spread of the errors documented by SHOT concluded that a significant proportion of these errors were most likely to be related to either the use of information technology or staff education, staffing levels, skill mix, training and competency issues. In the absence of any formal guidance on these matters, the UK TLC developed a series of recommendations using the results of two laboratory surveys conducted in 2007 and 2008.

  9. HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY'S COMPETITION IN TERMS OF ATTRACTING AND RETAINING VALUABLE HR IN EASTERN EUROPE – THE CASE OF ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra CIULU

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The particularity of hospitality industries in Eastern Europe is that, although most the officials consider tourism & hospitality a strategic priority, a vast majority of researchers and industrialists agree that not enough steps have been taken. Our research focused on the case of Romania, a country facing the challenge of limited qualified personnel in the field, and was built upon qualitative and quantitative tools, examining three groups of potential, part-time & full-time employees, as well as employers, as a fourth group. Results largely support literature in terms of employees being underpaid, undertrained and insufficiently motivated. Still, they can be considered rather suprising in terms of decreasing interest of graduates for the hospitality sector over time and migration to other sectors.

  10. Web Based Projects Enhancing English Language and Generic Skills Development for Asian Hospitality Industry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei-jung

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated hospitality students' responses toward their learning experiences from undertaking group projects based upon a College web platform, the "Ubiquitous Hospitality English Learning Platform" (U-HELP). Twenty-six students in the Department of Applied Foreign Languages participated in this study. Their attitudes toward…

  11. Temporal patterns of hypoglycaemia and burden of sulfonylurea-related hypoglycaemia in UK hospitals: a retrospective multicentre audit of hospitalised patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Rajesh; Kerry, Christopher; Rayman, Gerry

    2014-07-09

    To determine whether temporal patterns of hypoglycaemia exist in inpatients with diabetes 'at risk' of hypoglycaemia (those on insulin and/or sulfonylureas), and if so whether patterns differ between hospitals and between these treatments. Retrospective multicentre audit of inpatients with diabetes involving 11 acute UK National Health Service (NHS) trusts. Capillary blood glucose readings of 3.9 mmol/L or less (hypoglycaemia) for all adult (≥18 years) inpatients with diabetes 'at risk' of hypoglycaemia were extracted from the Abbott PrecisionWeb Point-of-Care Data Management System over a 4-week period. Overall, 2521 readings of 3.9 mmol/L or less (hypoglycaemia) occurring in 866 participants between 1 June 2013 and 29 June 2013 were analysed. The majority (65%) occurred between 21:00 and 08:59, a pattern common to all Trusts. This was more frequent in sulfonylurea-treated than insulin-treated participants (75.3% vs 59.3%, p=0.0001). Furthermore, hypoglycaemic readings were more frequent between 5:00 and 7:59 in sulfonylurea-treated than insulin-treated participants (46.7% vs 22.7% of readings for respective treatments, p=0.0001). Sulfonylureas accounted for 31.8% of all hypoglycaemic readings. As a group, sulfonylurea-treated participants were older (median age 78 vs 73 years, p=0.0001) and had lower glycated haemoglobin (median 56 (7.3%) vs 69 mmol/mol (8.5%), p=0.0001). Hypoglycaemic readings per participant were as frequent for sulfonylurea-treated participants as for insulin-treated participants (median=2 for both) as were the proportions in each group with ≥5 hypoglycaemic readings (17.3% vs 17.7%). In all Trusts, hypoglycaemic readings were more frequent between 21:00 and 08:59 in 'at risk' inpatients with diabetes, with a greater frequency in the early morning period (5:00-7:59) in sulfonylurea-treated inpatients. This may have implications for the continuing use of sulfonylureas in the inpatient setting. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group

  12. Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullins, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The challenge could be briefly seen in these terms: hospitals as places for treatment where there’s a technology focus and hospitals for healing where there’s a human focus. In the 60s - 70s wave of new hospital building, an emphasis on technology can be seen. It’s time to move from the technology...... focus. It is not enough to consider only the factors of function within architecture, hygiene, economy and logistics. We also need to look at aspects of aesthetics, bringing nature into the building, art, color, acoustics, volume and space as we perceive them. Contemporary methods and advances...... placed, accessible, provided with plenty of greenery, and maximize sensory impressions, providing sounds, smells, sight and the possibility to be touched. This is a very well documented area I can say. Hygiene, in terms of architecture can give attention to hand wash facilities and their positioning...

  13. Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, I.; Wiesenberger, H.

    2001-01-01

    This chapter of the environmental control report deals with the environmental impact of the industry in Austria. It gives a review of the structure and types of the industry, the legal framework and environmental policy of industrial relevance. The environmental situation of the industry in Austria is analyzed in detail, concerning air pollution (SO 2 , NO x , CO 2 , CO, CH 4 , N 2 O, NH 3 , Pb, Cd, Hg, dioxin, furans), waste water, waste management and deposit, energy and water consumption. The state of the art in respect of the IPPC-directives (European Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control Bureau) concerning the best available techniques of the different industry sectors is outlined. The application of European laws and regulations in the Austrian industry is described. (a.n.)

  14. A new marketing mix model to rescue the hospitality industry: Evidence from Egypt after the Arab Spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doaa Salman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available After January 25th 2011 Egypt witnessed political, economic and social instability leading to drastic consequences in the hospitality and tourism industry. Thus unstable situation reflected on the deteriorated occupancy percentages that led to declined profit margins, higher employee layoffs and degraded quality of product and services. The objectives of this research is to examine how the Egyptian hospitality properties manage this dilemma through their marketing practices, and to propose a new marketing mix model that adds new layers of depth to the traditional marketing mix model. A methodological framework was designed to help in the assessment process of management practices pertaining to marketing initiatives during times of crisis. Results indicated the presence of tactical elements that assembled the traditional marketing mix model in the investigated hotels. However, these elements are not effectively used and the interaction between them not appears very clear. Results also indicated that the new proposed model would help in providing a framework for the Egyptian hospitality industry to maintain their competitive position during crisis time and avoiding undesired situations for labour force and decline of companies׳ revenues.

  15. Representation and Misrepresentation of Scientific Evidence in Contemporary Tobacco Regulation: A Review of Tobacco Industry Submissions to the UK Government Consultation on Standardised Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulucanlar, Selda; Fooks, Gary J.; Hatchard, Jenny L.; Gilmore, Anna B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Standardised packaging (SP) of tobacco products is an innovative tobacco control measure opposed by transnational tobacco companies (TTCs) whose responses to the UK government's public consultation on SP argued that evidence was inadequate to support implementing the measure. The government's initial decision, announced 11 months after the consultation closed, was to wait for ‘more evidence’, but four months later a second ‘independent review’ was launched. In view of the centrality of evidence to debates over SP and TTCs' history of denying harms and manufacturing uncertainty about scientific evidence, we analysed their submissions to examine how they used evidence to oppose SP. Methods and Findings We purposively selected and analysed two TTC submissions using a verification-oriented cross-documentary method to ascertain how published studies were used and interpretive analysis with a constructivist grounded theory approach to examine the conceptual significance of TTC critiques. The companies' overall argument was that the SP evidence base was seriously flawed and did not warrant the introduction of SP. However, this argument was underpinned by three complementary techniques that misrepresented the evidence base. First, published studies were repeatedly misquoted, distorting the main messages. Second, ‘mimicked scientific critique’ was used to undermine evidence; this form of critique insisted on methodological perfection, rejected methodological pluralism, adopted a litigation (not scientific) model, and was not rigorous. Third, TTCs engaged in ‘evidential landscaping’, promoting a parallel evidence base to deflect attention from SP and excluding company-held evidence relevant to SP. The study's sample was limited to sub-sections of two out of four submissions, but leaked industry documents suggest at least one other company used a similar approach. Conclusions The TTCs' claim that SP will not lead to public health benefits is largely

  16. Organizational rationality, performance, and social responsibility: results from the hospital industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Edmund R; Potter, Sharyn J

    2002-01-01

    Drawing on stakeholder theory and Weber's distinction between formal and substantive rationality, we posit that: (1) for-profit organizations manage stakeholders in ways that result in the organization being more efficient and less socially responsible than organizations that are not as profit oriented, and (2) organizations with major corporate relationships that are not local manage stakeholders in a manner that results in the organization being more efficient and less socially responsible than organizations without such arrangements. We test these hypotheses with 1994 data on 4,705 of the nation's short-term general hospitals using two measures of hospital efficiency and four measures of social responsibility. Results confirm that for-profit hospitals and hospitals lacking local ties are managing stakeholder relationships in ways that increases the efficiency of these hospitals but decreases their social responsiveness. We conclude by speculating that organizational efficiency and social responsibility may be inversely related and then summarize some of the academic, managerial, and policy implications, with emphasis on the implications for stakeholder theory.

  17. THE INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY – IMPACT ON THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY IN ROMANIA

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela FIROIU; Adina Gabriela CROITORU

    2015-01-01

    In the context of an increasingly dynamic society, globalization has become one of the key issues, causing important changes in the evolution of all economic sectors and especially in the development of the tourism industry, an industry that depends heavily on the free movement of people and unhindered access to information. Although the implications of the globalization phenomenon on tourism are extremely diverse and profound, sometimes difficult to commensurate, the evolution of the informa...

  18. The population impact of smoke-free workplace and hospitality industry legislation on smoking behaviour. Findings from a national population survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelhout, Gera E; Willemsen, Marc C; de Vries, Hein

    2011-04-01

    To study the impact of implementing smoke-free workplace and hospitality industry legislation on smoking behaviour. A cross-sectional population survey from 2001 to 2008 (n ≈ 18,000 per year) was used to assess trends and seasonal patterns in smoking and quitting, and to examine whether changes could be observed after the workplace smoking ban in the Netherlands in 2004 and the hospitality industry ban in 2008. Outcome measures were smoking prevalence, quit attempts and successful quit attempts. Interactions with educational level (socio-economic status) and bar visiting (exposure to the hospitality industry ban) were tested. The workplace ban was followed by a decrease in smoking prevalence (OR = 0.91, P hospitality industry ban was not (OR = 0.96, P = 0.127). Both bans, especially the workplace ban, were followed by an increase in quit attempts and successful quit attempts: workplace ban, OR = 1.31, P hospitality industry ban, OR = 1.13, P = 0.013; OR = 1.44, P hospitality industry ban had a larger effect on quit attempts among frequent bar visitors (OR = 1.48, P = 0.003) than on non-bar visitors (OR = 0.71, P = 0.014). A workplace smoking ban in the Netherlands was followed by more changes in smoking and quitting than a hospitality industry ban. The hospitality industry ban only appeared to have an impact on quit attempts, and not on smoking prevalence. © 2010 The Authors, Addiction © 2010 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  19. Assessing the Benefits of Yield Management in the Hospitality Industry in the Kumasi Metropolis of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owusu Boahen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ghana's hotel industry has a great deal of potential for future development. However, revenue loss due to lost opportunity arising from unused rooms or no shows is a challenge facing the industry. Maximizing revenue is important in the industry because of high costs of operation. Yield Management (YM offers one of the potential revenue maximization strategies in the hotel business operations. This study aims at evaluating the effect of yield management practices on business operations in the hotel industry in the Kumasi Metropolis of Ghana. The study adopted a combination of qualitative and quantitative approach. The study relied on primary data which was collected through field survey using semi-structured interview and questionnaires instruments. Descriptive statistics was used to analyse qualitative data whilst the qualitative data was analysed through deduction and inferences. The study revealed that that the implementation of yield management has positive impact in hotel business operations in the Kumasi Metropolis in terms of profitability competitive advantage operational efficiency productivity and cost saving. it is recommended that the hotel industry, particularly in the Kumasi Metropolis,  should invest in  information technology education as well as staff training to improve their skill capacity since effective practices YM depends on effective information system.

  20. Hospitality Industry Technology Training (HITT). Final Performance Report, April 1, 1989-December 31, 1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount Hood Community Coll., Gresham, OR.

    This final performance report includes a third-party evaluation and a replication guide. The first section describes a project to develop and implement an articulated curriculum for grades 8-14 to prepare young people for entry into hospitality/tourism-related occupations. It discusses the refinement of existing models, pilot test, curriculum…

  1. Identification of Industry Needs with Hospitality Management Curriculum Development: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayburry, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify a well-defined, comprehensive portrait of knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) expected of students graduating from baccalaureate institutions conferring four-year degrees in hospitality management and further, to utilize those KSAs as foundations for curriculum development. This study provided a…

  2. The Importance of Understanding Cultural Awareness for Managers in the Hospitality Industry (in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hera Oktadiana

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Cultural awareness is a basic knowledge that each individuality must has. In hotel industry, there are positive advantages that could be reached if a manager could appreciate a cultural, value, attitude differences of each person. This paper adjusts how important the understanding of cultural diversity and pragmatic implementation from several cross cultural communication theory, especially for managers in hotel industry. This paper also describes examples of cultural attitude and habits from some countries that could be refferences in workforce diversity. 

  3. Industrialization

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lucy

    . African states as ... regarded as the most important ingredients that went to add value to land and labour in order for countries ... B. Sutcliffe Industry and Underdevelopment (Massachusetts Addison – Wesley Publishing Company. 1971), pp.

  4. Industrialization

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lucy

    scholar, Walt W. Rostow presented and supported this line of thought in his analysis of ... A Brief Historical Background of Industrialization in Africa ... indicative) The western model allowed for the political economy to be shaped by market.

  5. Psychosocial work environment and hospital admissions due to mental disorders: a 15-year prospective study of industrial employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joensuu, Matti; Väänänen, Ari; Koskinen, Aki; Kivimäki, Mika; Virtanen, Marianna; Vahtera, Jussi

    2010-07-01

    Low levels of job control and social support may increase the risk of mental disorders, particularly depression, but the evidence is mostly based on self-reports. We examined whether components of job control and work-related social support predict medically-certified mental disorders. 13868 forest company employees with no previous hospital admissions for mental disorders responded to questionnaires on decision authority, skill discretion, co-worker and supervisor support. They were followed-up for hospital admissions due to mental disorders (ICD-9 codes 290 to 319), using national hospital discharge records (577 hospitalized, mean follow-up 15.1 years). In analyses adjusted for confounders, high skill discretion was associated with a reduced risk of hospital admission for mental disorders (HR 0.74, 95% CI 0.58-0.95). High decision authority was associated with an elevated risk (HR 1.48, 95% CI 1.17-1.87). Diagnosis-specific analyses showed high skill discretion to associate with a reduced risk of both depressive and non-depressive non-alcohol-related mental disorders. High decision authority was a risk factor for alcohol-related and depressive disorders. Good co-worker support was associated with a reduced risk of non-depressive non-alcohol-related mental disorders. Supervisor support was not associated with any mental disorders. We used a single time point estimate in an industrial sample comprising largely of men. Contrary to previous research on job control, high decision authority increased the risk of depressive and alcohol-related disorders, which suggest a need to reconsider the strategies for prevention and clinical practise in regard to psychosocial work environment and mental health.

  6. The Hospital Management of Fatal Self-Poisoning in Industrialized Countries: An Opportunity for Suicide Prevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Navneet; Turnbull, Pauline; Hawton, Keith; Simkin, Sue; Mackway-Jones, Kevin; Gunnell, David

    2006-01-01

    Suicide by self-poisoning is a prevalent cause of death worldwide. A substantial proportion of individuals who poison themselves come into contact with medical services before they die. Our focus in the current study was the medical management of drug self-poisoning in industrialized countries and its possible contribution to suicide prevention.…

  7. Effciency of HIV-infected patients detection in neurological hospitals of large industrial center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shmelev V.V.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Aim of the study: to evaluate the effciency of detection for HIV-infection in patients of neurological departments of Saratov. Materials and methods. We retrospectively analyzed 25 250 medical histories of patients hospitalized into neurological departments of Saratov hospitals between January 2007 and April 2012. Results. Blood samples of 2010 patients (7,96 % were tested for the presence of HIV-antibodies. 37 patients were HIV-positive (1,84 % of examined patients and 0,15 % of the total number of patients. Conclusion. Increasing popularity and variety of clinical manifestations of HIV-infection requires the expansion of neurological patients whom serum test for antibodies against HIV is needed.

  8. EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES OF THE HEARING IMPAIRED IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY: GENDER ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Yusoff, Norhayati Mat; Zahari, Mohd Salehuddin Mohd; Ahmad, Zamri; Isa, Nina Farisha; Ghani, Fatimah Abd

    2013-01-01

    The increasing participating rates of disable youth in hospitality higher career educationcan clearly be seen in many countries including Malaysia. This group has been identified as a key equity group for several years on the basis of their overall participating level, progression rates and the employments outcomes they achieve after completion their special education. This study empirically compares the barriers and constraints of employment among the young male and female hearing impaired g...

  9. AN EVALUATION OF ELECTRONIC WORD OF MOUTH IN HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY FOR CONSUMERS AND HOTELS

    OpenAIRE

    Kutlu, Didem; Ayyıldız, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    In recent years with the development of information communication technologies and social media sites, word of mouth(WOM) takes place not just face to face but in the internet, social networking sites, blogs…etc. Due to the intangibility of the tourism product and difficulty in try it out before purchasing, consumers rely on word from an experienced source to reduce the uncertainty and perceived risks. Therefore electronic word of mouth (eWOM) has become more important in terms of hospitality...

  10. What do hotels and hospitals have in common? How we can learn from the hotel industry to take better care of patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygourakis, Corinna C.; Rolston, John D.; Treadway, James; Chang, Susan; Kliot, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Despite widely divergent public perceptions and goals, hotels and hospitals share many core characteristics. Both serve demanding and increasingly well-informed clienteles, both employ a large hierarchy of workers with varying levels of responsibility, and both have payments that are increasingly tied to customer/patient evaluations. In the hotel industry, decades of management experience and market research have led to widespread improvements and innovations that improve customer satisfaction. But there has been incredibly little cross-fertilization between the hotel and hospital industries. In this paper, we first consider the changes in the healthcare system that are forcing hospitals to become more concerned with patient satisfaction. We discuss the similarities and differences between the hotel and hospital industries, and then outline several of the unique challenges that neurosurgeons face in taking care of patients and increasing their comfort. We cite specific lessons from the hotel industry that can be applied to patients’ preadmission, check-in, hospital stay, discharge planning, and poststay experiences. We believe that hospitals can and should leverage the successful advances within the hotel industry to improve patient satisfaction, without having to repeat identical research or market experimentation. We hope this will lead to rapid improvements in patient experiences and overall wellbeing. PMID:24818061

  11. What do hotels and hospitals have in common? How we can learn from the hotel industry to take better care of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygourakis, Corinna C; Rolston, John D; Treadway, James; Chang, Susan; Kliot, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Despite widely divergent public perceptions and goals, hotels and hospitals share many core characteristics. Both serve demanding and increasingly well-informed clienteles, both employ a large hierarchy of workers with varying levels of responsibility, and both have payments that are increasingly tied to customer/patient evaluations. In the hotel industry, decades of management experience and market research have led to widespread improvements and innovations that improve customer satisfaction. But there has been incredibly little cross-fertilization between the hotel and hospital industries. In this paper, we first consider the changes in the healthcare system that are forcing hospitals to become more concerned with patient satisfaction. We discuss the similarities and differences between the hotel and hospital industries, and then outline several of the unique challenges that neurosurgeons face in taking care of patients and increasing their comfort. We cite specific lessons from the hotel industry that can be applied to patients' preadmission, check-in, hospital stay, discharge planning, and poststay experiences. We believe that hospitals can and should leverage the successful advances within the hotel industry to improve patient satisfaction, without having to repeat identical research or market experimentation. We hope this will lead to rapid improvements in patient experiences and overall wellbeing.

  12. The Perception of Job-related Motivators When Choosing a Career in the Tourism and Hospitality Industry – A Comparative Study Between Polish and Spanish Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grobelna Aleksandra

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent rapid growth of the tourism and hospitality industries raises a question about the quantity and quality of the workforce needed in these sectors. In the tourism/hospitality industry, where most services are delivered directly by employees, competitive advantage is primarily attained through people (employees, who are perceived as an integral component of tourism experience. This creates challenges for an industry suffering from high rates of staff turnover, especially of young employees who leave their jobs after graduation, choosing other career paths.

  13. Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of

  14. Review of the quality of studies on the economic effects of smoke-free policies on the hospitality industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollo, M; Lal, A; Hyland, A; Glantz, S

    2003-03-01

    To compare the quality and funding source of studies concluding a negative economic impact of smoke-free policies in the hospitality industry to studies concluding no such negative impact. Researchers sought all studies produced before 31 August 2002. Articles published in scientific journals were located with Medline, Science Citation Index, Social Sciences Citation Index, Current Contents, PsychInfo, Econlit, and Healthstar. Unpublished studies were located from tobacco company websites and through internet searches. 97 studies that made statements about economic impact were included. 93% of the studies located met the selection criteria as determined by consensus between multiple reviewers. Findings and characteristics of studies (apart from funding source) were classified independently by two researchers. A third assessor blind to both the objective of the present study and to funding source also classified each study. In studies concluding a negative impact, the odds of using a subjective outcome measure was 4.0 times (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4 to 9.6; p = 0.007) and the odds of not being peer reviewed was 20 times (95% CI 2.6 to 166.7; p = 0.004) that of studies concluding no such negative impact. All of the studies concluding a negative impact were supported by the tobacco industry. 94% of the tobacco industry supported studies concluded a negative economic impact compared to none of the non-industry supported studies. All of the best designed studies report no impact or a positive impact of smoke-free restaurant and bar laws on sales or employment. Policymakers can act to protect workers and patrons from the toxins in secondhand smoke confident in rejecting industry claims that there will be an adverse economic impact.

  15. Effective Recruitment Challenges Faced by the Hospitality Industry in Bangladesh: A Study on Selected Star Rated Residential Hotels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazi HUDA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In Human Resource Management (HRM, Recruitment is the first and foremost issue to be considered with full of sincerity, because its role is to create a positive impression about the employer in the job market by ensuring effective stimuli for the job seekers. At the beginning, the study sets a picture that focuses on the importance of effective recruitment in the hospitality sector of Bangladesh and then the study details obligatory determinants of attracting efficient human resource for the development of this sector. The main objective of the paper is to study the status and the scopes of recruitment function in hospitality industry with focus towards star rated residential hotels. This study is based on primary data collection through a formal questionnaire. The questionnaire was of mixed mode with most questions in likert-type scale and few were dichotomous in nature. The key finding of the study is that recruitment is a highly challenging task in hospitality and it is quite evident that attractive compensation package is the key factor to attract potential employees. The need and scope to modernize the recruitment practices along with the line of company and employer branding ideas are also recommended in details. There is a long way to go on the way of conceptualizing and actualizing recruitment functions and practices. A paper like this can help to discuss and debate on the necessity of developing better recruitment cultural and conceptual change in these sectors.

  16. New Dimensions for Manufacturing: A UK Strategy for Nanotechnology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Taylor, John M

    2002-01-01

    ... R&D for nanotechnology. This report, of the UK Advisory Group on Nanotechnology Applications, examines the growth of nanotechnology, its potential implications for industry in the UK, and proposes the elements of a strategy...

  17. Customer service as an act of(f) balance: lessons for the tourism and hospitality industry

    OpenAIRE

    S Henning

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on corporate customers' perceptions of a telecommunications organisation in South Africa and the lessons learned for the tourism industry. The purpose of the research was to explore reasons for the decline in customers' perceptions of overall quality of service at Telematics SA from a systems theory perspective. The Three State Triangle model (Henning, 2009) was presented as the three dynamic states of all living systems, including businesses and i...

  18. [Evaluation of the cost of treating pressure ulcers in hospitalized patients using industrialized dressings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Angela Cristina Beck; Guerra, Diana Mendonça

    2011-01-01

    This work evaluated wound dresses used in the Neurosurgery Department of Restauração Hospital: polyurethane, hydrogel and activated carbon wound dresses and hydrogel with alginate used for pressure ulcer care. This work aimed to identify a critical factor that increases demand and cost of wound dresses. The evaluation conducted at the Neurosurgery Department identified individuals at risk of pressure ulcer development. Sixty-two patients were evaluated and the prevalence of pressure ulcer was 22.6% according to the Braden scale. Comparative evaluation between patients that didn't receive preventive measures and others that received, showed that the average daily cost of hospitalization for the first group was 45% higher than the mean for the second group. The Wilcoxon-Mann-Withiney test compared the population at risk to develop pressure ulcer and population at low risk showing that the evaluation of Braden Scale scores between the groups presents statistically significant differences and confidence limits of 95%. Pressure ulcer is a key quality indicator in health services.It is possible to reduce costs and offer higher quality public health services by implementing a training program of nursing staff using a preventive measure protocol based on a test to evaluate risk as Braden Scale.

  19. Introducing wood pellet fuel to the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotton, R A; Giffard, A

    2001-07-01

    Technical and non-technical issues affecting the introduction of wood pellet-fired heating to the UK were investigated with the aim of helping to establish a wood pellet industry in the UK. The project examined the growth and status of the industry in continental Europe and North America, reviewed relevant UK standards and legislation, identified markets for pellet heating in the UK, organised workshops and seminars to demonstrate pellet burning appliances, carried out a trial pelletisation of a range of biomass fuels, helped to set up demonstration installations of pellet-fired appliances, undertook a promotional campaign for wood pellet fuel and compiled resource directories for pellet fuel and pellet burning appliances in the UK. The work was completed in three phases - review, identification and commercialisation. Project outputs include UK voluntary standards for wood pellet fuel and combustion appliances, and a database of individuals with an interest in wood pellet fuel.

  20. Customer Satisfaction at the Hospitality Industry: Holiday Inn Helsinki-Vantaa Airport

    OpenAIRE

    Eld, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The intention of this Bachelor’s Degree thesis was to examine and observe the customer service and especially customer satisfaction in a hotel industry, and Holiday Inn Helsinki-Vantaa Airport was selected to be an example for this survey. This survey and thesis is carried out by the author in collaboration with Holiday Inn Helsinki-Vantaa Airport, which was the commissioner of this Bachelor’s Degree thesis. This hotel was chosen since the author of this thesis did her second internship there...

  1. Business Environmental Responsibility in the Hospitality Industry = Okoljska odgovornost podjetij v turistični industriji

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azilah Kasim

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the literature is reviewed and analyzed to establish the connection between tourism and the physical environments. The review shows an inevitable link between tourism activities with both environments. This and the strong tourism growth in the past, implies that tourism has far-reaching negative impacts that must be mitigated, not only for the good of the physical environments, but also for the sustainability of the industry itself. The review also indicates a slow integration of responsible environmental considerations into tourism planning and development due to lack of consensus about the importance of sustainable tourism as the industry’s new direction, lack of a single comprehensive meaning of sustainable tourism to ease operationalizing the concept, and the flawed acceptance of alternative tourism as the answer for all tourism ills. The paper ends by confirming the need for a new way of thinking that takes into consideration the fragmented nature of the industry and a collective and conscious effort of all tourism businesses, governmental policymakers and planners as well as the key stakeholders (the society, the NGOS, the CBOS and the tourists to prioritize environmental issues in their daily undertakings. It also highlights the environmental impacts of a hotel operation and stresses the need for hotels, as one of the key tourism businesses to deal with its environmental obligations.

  2. ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGES AND JOB SATISFACTION IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY IN SERBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nedeljkovic

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It is very important to investigate what factors influence a high level of the service customer orientation of hotels employees under the conditions of the transition and a high rate of the unemployment. One of the conclusions of the research is that management of the hotels in Serbia don’t fully recognize the potentials of the knowledge of employees as a possible competitive advantage during organizational changes in a high competitive global environment. Since job satisfaction is one the most important factor which influences readiness for organizational changes of employees we investigate in the study the relationships between job satisfaction, perceptions of organizational customer climate, cultural dimensions and employees customer orientation among front-line employees in the hotel industry in a non-Western country in the transition. Data for the current study were collected through the use of a survey instruments completed by front-line employees in several hotels in the north province of Serbia –Vojvodina. This part of Serbia is one of the most developed part of Serbia and tourism industry is one of the important factors of the economic development of the region.

  3. An integrated dataset on organisational culture, job satisfaction and performance in the hospitality industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirisu, Joy; Worlu, Rowland; Osibanjo, Adewale; Salau, Odunayo; Borishade, Taiye; Meninwa, Sandra; Atolagbe, Tolulope

    2018-08-01

    The relevance of organisational culture on job satisfaction and performance particularly within the hospitality sector cannot be over-emphasized. The culture of an organization goes a long way in distinguishing it from other organizations because it shows its ability to either be successful or to fail. To however achieve excellence and high-level performance, it is important to note that for effective and efficient operation, an organization would need a formal approach of communication as well as for making decisions and completing the tasks to match the needs of the organization. The managerial implications drawn from the study is that organizations should take advantage of their culture and inculcate values that will enhance performance.

  4. Comparing the odds of postpartum haemorrhage in planned home birth against planned hospital birth: results of an observational study of over 500,000 maternities in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Nove, Andrea; Berrington, Ann; Matthews, Zo?

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study is to compare the odds of postpartum haemorrhage among women who opt for home birth against the odds of postpartum haemorrhage for those who plan a hospital birth. It is an observational study involving secondary analysis of maternity records, using binary logistic regression modelling. The data relate to pregnancies that received maternity care from one of fifteen hospitals in the former North West Thames Regional Health Authority Area in England, an...

  5. Dataset on brand culture and perceived value of offerings to customers in the hospitality industry in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirisu, Joy; Worlu, Rowland; Osibanjo, Adewale; Borisade, Taiye; Olokundun, Maxwell; Atolagbe, Tolu; Obi, James

    2018-08-01

    This study critically examines the role of brand culture in influencing the perceived value of offerings to customers within the hospitality industry in Nigeria. In today's competitive market, the extent at which organizations disregard the importance of developing a strong brand culture before communicating their value to the outside world has become worrisome. Hence, this study filled in the gaps and a total of 434 customers drawn from six different hotels in Lagos state, Nigeria, were sampled. The data were analysed using Structural Equation Modelling (SEM). Management of these hotels were able to define their expectations in order to deliver a consistent brand experience to their customers. The result showed that brand culture has positive significant influence on the perceived value of offerings to customers. Important recommendations have also been made.

  6. Comparing the odds of postpartum haemorrhage in planned home birth against planned hospital birth: results of an observational study of over 500,000 maternities in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nove Andrea

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study is to compare the odds of postpartum haemorrhage among women who opt for home birth against the odds of postpartum haemorrhage for those who plan a hospital birth. It is an observational study involving secondary analysis of maternity records, using binary logistic regression modelling. The data relate to pregnancies that received maternity care from one of fifteen hospitals in the former North West Thames Regional Health Authority Area in England, and which resulted in a live or stillbirth in the years 1988–2000 inclusive, excluding ‘high-risk’ pregnancies, unplanned home births, pre-term births, elective Caesareans and medical inductions. Results Even after adjustment for known confounders such as parity, the odds of postpartum haemorrhage (≥1000ml of blood lost are significantly higher if a hospital birth is intended than if a home birth is intended (odds ratio 2.5, 95% confidence interval 1.7 to 3.8. The ‘home birth’ group included women who were transferred to hospital during labour or shortly after birth. Conclusions Women and their partners should be advised that the risk of PPH is higher among births planned to take place in hospital compared to births planned to take place at home, but that further research is needed to understand (a whether the same pattern applies to the more life-threatening categories of PPH, and (b why hospital birth is associated with increased odds of PPH. If it is due to the way in which labour is managed in hospital, changes should be made to practices which compromise the safety of labouring women.

  7. Comparing the odds of postpartum haemorrhage in planned home birth against planned hospital birth: results of an observational study of over 500,000 maternities in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nove, Andrea; Berrington, Ann; Matthews, Zoë

    2012-11-19

    The aim of this study is to compare the odds of postpartum haemorrhage among women who opt for home birth against the odds of postpartum haemorrhage for those who plan a hospital birth. It is an observational study involving secondary analysis of maternity records, using binary logistic regression modelling. The data relate to pregnancies that received maternity care from one of fifteen hospitals in the former North West Thames Regional Health Authority Area in England, and which resulted in a live or stillbirth in the years 1988-2000 inclusive, excluding 'high-risk' pregnancies, unplanned home births, pre-term births, elective Caesareans and medical inductions. Even after adjustment for known confounders such as parity, the odds of postpartum haemorrhage (≥1000ml of blood lost) are significantly higher if a hospital birth is intended than if a home birth is intended (odds ratio 2.5, 95% confidence interval 1.7 to 3.8). The 'home birth' group included women who were transferred to hospital during labour or shortly after birth. Women and their partners should be advised that the risk of PPH is higher among births planned to take place in hospital compared to births planned to take place at home, but that further research is needed to understand (a) whether the same pattern applies to the more life-threatening categories of PPH, and (b) why hospital birth is associated with increased odds of PPH. If it is due to the way in which labour is managed in hospital, changes should be made to practices which compromise the safety of labouring women.

  8. The co-digestion of animal manure and food industry residues in the UK. The role of the NFFO as a catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukehurste, C T

    1997-08-01

    The adoption of AD (anaerobig digestion) in the UK has been sporadic and limited to small installations or farms. In 1993 the North Tamar LEADER Project embarked on the first large scale community initiative to use AD as an instrument for environmental management and integrated rural development. At the same time a new turn-key construction company began to use the NFFO process to stimulate AD adoption and sales. This paper examines the two approaches and their contribution of the NFFO process. (au)

  9. Maturing safety in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debenham, A.; Kovan, D.

    1994-01-01

    AEA Technology provides UK nuclear industry with technical services and R+D support, concentrating on plant performance, safety and environmental issues. Today, safety has a new set of priorities, reflected by a more demanding regulatory regime which takes account of concerns such as human factors, severe accidents, risks during plant outages, the need for improving safety culture, etc

  10. Country report for the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abram, T.

    2000-01-01

    In the frame of the status of the UK nuclear industry, activities concerning fast reactor are reviewed. There is no government funded program except for decommissioning work at Dounrey. Major activities are concerned with knowledge preservation, fuel cycle modelling and scenario studies, and gas-cooled fast reactor feasibility studies. European, international and BNFL collaboration are also reviewed

  11. THE IMPORTANCE OF THE QUALITATIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF ACCOUNTING INFORMATION FOR DECISION MAKING . EMPIRICAL STUDY CONDUCTED IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Hospitality industry is a sector of the national and world economy facing one of the most dynamic developments of the third millennium as if against the fact that it does not only face challenges of the economic crisis, but also the changes in the market, the perception and consumer behavior and of technological trends . The contribution of accounting to the accomplishment of strategic objectives of the business managers in hospitality and tourism industry, is manifested in the form of ensuring the information necessary for monitoring, determining the degree of liability and the effect, at various jobs, which allows the detection of internal reserves, of uneconomic and unnecessary expenses and of losses. Convinced of the vital importance of accounting information for all sectors of activity, and hence the hospitality and tourism industry, but also motivated by the unexplored potential in this sector we wanted to find "live" the perception of Romanian hospitality industry managers on the usefulness of accounting information, especially of that provided by management accounting, and how to exploit it in decision making process. Therefore, we pondered it was time to get into the "natural environment" of managers in the hospitality industry and find "at home in the field", for we can say that work is a second home, which is the importance given to the accounting information, which management accounting practices apply to survive in a market that offers many opportunities, yet many challenges, too. The entry into the natural environment was made by empirical research and is based on a survey conducted between November 2012 and January 2013, using a questionnaire as a tool consisting of 38 questions, administered online and on location to managers in the Bihor hospitality industry. The total population consisted of 146 entities in this sector, the sample being made up of 91 tourism entities, with a response rate of 62.33%, due to movements in the

  12. Interval between onset of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis comparing the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink with a hospital-based cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillett, William; Charlton, Rachel; Nightingale, Alison; Snowball, Julia; Green, Amelia; Smith, Catherine; Shaddick, Gavin; McHugh, Neil

    2017-12-01

    To describe the time interval between the onset of psoriasis and PsA in the UK primary care setting and compare with a large, well-classified secondary care cohort. Patients with PsA and/or psoriasis were identified in the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). The secondary care cohort comprised patients from the Bath PsA longitudinal observational cohort study. For incident PsA patients in the CPRD who also had a record of psoriasis, the time interval between PsA diagnosis and first psoriasis record was calculated. Comparisons were made with the time interval between diagnoses in the Bath cohort. There were 5272 eligible PsA patients in the CPRD and 815 in the Bath cohort. In both cohorts, the majority of patients (82.3 and 61.3%, respectively) had psoriasis before their PsA diagnosis or within the same calendar year (10.5 and 23.8%), with only a minority receiving their PsA diagnosis first (7.1 and 14.8%). Excluding those who presented with arthritis before psoriasis, the median time between diagnoses was 8 years [interquartile range (IQR) 2-15] in the CPRD and 7 years (IQR 0-20) in the Bath cohort. In the CPRD, 60.1 and 75.1% received their PsA diagnosis within 10 and 15 years of their psoriasis diagnosis, respectively; this was comparable with 57.2 and 67.7% in the Bath cohort. A similar distribution for the time interval between psoriasis and arthritis was observed in the CPRD and secondary care cohort. These data can inform screening strategies and support the validity of data from each cohort. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  13. UK Chemical Nuclear Data Committee progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.

    1990-01-01

    Basic nuclear data requirements for industrial application are monitored by the UK Chemical Nuclear Data Committee (UKCNDC), covering half-lives, decay data, fission yields and the content of computerised data files. While the UKCNDC Request list was reviewed at the end of 1989 to reveal new and continued requirements, funding problems have increased during the year. Difficulties in the UK nuclear power industry are reflected in the decline in experimental studies, although evaluation efforts have been maintained. (author)

  14. Critical Success Factors for Public Private Partnerships in the UAE Construction Industry- A Comparative Analysis between the UAE and the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Almarri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Procurement instruments by Public Private Partnerships (PPP have shown their amazing capacity in procuring public works from around the globe. Their success rate has been immense as they are known to bring efficiency, quality, innovation, experience, funds, and most importantly, the art of risk sharing to developed projects. This research aims to pinpoint the critical success factors (CSFs that are needed to implement PPPs in transitional economies. We have taken UAE as a case study and will be comparing its results with that of the UK’s; a developed country. Relevant data was collected through a questionnaire to establish the PPP critical success factors for the each of the two countries. In this questionnaire, data was collected from 30 participants residing in the UAE and 62 participants residing in the UK. A comparative analysis between the results of the UK and UAE showed a great deal of similarity between the two in PPP practice trends in the critical success factors. Both countries ranked the same nine factors as the most significant ones out of the eighteen critical success factors for implementing PPPs. These factors were commitment of public and private parties, appropriate risk allocation, committed and competent public agency, transparent procurement process, strong private consortium, competitive procurement process, political support, detailed cost/benefits assessment, and good governance. Whereas, the major differences were related to local financial market, macro-economic conditions, and favourable legal framework. The findings were validated through a small sample of practitioners using the Partnering Performance Index, and were found to be comprehensive, objective, reliable, practical, replicable, and adaptable.

  15. UK surplus source disposal programme - 16097

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, Gordon H.; Reeves, Nigel; Nisbet, Amy C.; Garnett, Andrew; Williams, Clive R.

    2009-01-01

    The UK Surplus Source Disposal Programme (SSDP), managed by the Environment Agency, was designed to remove redundant radioactive sources from the public domain. The UK Government Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) was concerned that disused sources were being retained by hospitals, universities and businesses, posing a risk to public health and the environment. AMEC provided a range of technical and administrative services to support the SSDP. A questionnaire was issued to registered source holders and the submitted returns compiled to assess the scale of the project. A member of AMEC staff was seconded to the Environment Agency to provide technical support and liaise directly with source holders during funding applications, which would cover disposal costs. Funding for disposal of different sources was partially based on a sliding scale of risk as determined by the IAEA hazard categorisation system. This funding was also sector dependent. The SSDP was subsequently expanded to include the disposal of luminised aircraft instruments from aviation museums across the UK. These museums often hold significant radiological inventories, with many items being unused and in a poor state of repair. These instruments were fully characterised on site by assessing surface dose rate, dimensions, source integrity and potential contamination issues. Calculations using the Microshield computer code allowed gamma radiation measurements to be converted into total activity estimates for each source. More than 11,000 sources were disposed of under the programme from across the medical, industrial, museum and academic sectors. The total activity disposed of was more than 8.5 E+14 Bq, and the project was delivered under budget. (authors)

  16. Prospects for UK fuel cells component suppliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, C.; Tunnicliffe, M.

    2002-07-01

    This report examines the capabilities of the UK fuel cell industry in meeting the expected increase in demand, and aims to identify all UK suppliers of fuel cell components, evaluate their products and match them to fuel cell markets, and identify components where the UK is in a competitive position. Component areas are addressed along with the need to reduce costs and ensure efficient production. The well established supplier base in the UK is noted, and the car engine manufacturing base and fuel supply companies are considered. The different strengths of UK suppliers of the various types of fuel cells are listed. The future industry structure, the opportunities and dangers for business posed by fuel cells, the investment in cleaner technologies by the large fuel companies, opportunities for catalyst suppliers, and the residential combined heat and power and portable electronics battery markets are discussed.

  17. Food hygiene training in the UK: time for a radical re-think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAuslan, E

    2001-12-01

    Training food handlers in the hospitality industry has been recommended by various organisations as a means of improving food handling practices and thus the safety of food for consumers. It is nearly 20 years since the first examinations for basic level food hygiene certificates were made available to food handlers in the UK. Since then little has changed in the syllabuses and in the way the questions are worded. However, the range of languages spoken by food handlers working in the UK has increased substantially since more employers are recruiting those who speak English as a second language. Training can be an unwelcome expense for managers where there is a high turnover of employees, especially amongst those for whom English is not a first language. To improve practical implementation of food hygiene theory it is time to develop a radical strategy concerning the way training is targeted and delivered in the UK, and perhaps Europe.

  18. The importance of relationships in mental health care: A qualitative study of service users' experiences of psychiatric hospital admission in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slade Mike

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While a number of studies have looked at life on service users' experiences of life on psychiatric wards, no research exists that have approached these experiences from the user perspective since the introduction of community care. Methods This user-led study uses a participatory approach to develop an understanding of the processes and themes which define the user experience of hospitalisation. Nineteen service users who had all had inpatient stays in psychiatric hospitals in London were interviewed in the community. Results Relationships formed the core of service users' experiences. Three further codes, treatment, freedom and environment defined the role of hospital and its physical aspects. Themes of communication, safety, trust, coercion, and cultural competency contributed to the concept of relationships. Conclusion Relationships with an individual which comprised effective communication, cultural sensitivity, and the absence of coercion resulted in that person being attributed with a sense of trust. This resulted in the patient experiencing the hospital as a place of safety in terms of risk from other patients and staff. Barriers to positive relationships included ineffective and negative communication, a lack of trust, a lack of safety in terms of staff as ineffective in preventing violence, and as perpetrators themselves, and the use of coercion by staff. This unique perspective both acts as a source of triangulation with previous studies and highlights the importance of the therapeutic relationship in providing a safe and therapeutic milieu for the treatment of people with acute mental health problems.

  19. The Challenges and Opportunities of Social Media in the Hospitality Industry. A Study of the North East Region of Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Maha

    2015-05-01

    and YouTube are apparently not that popular. Social Media accounts are not used at their full capacity and from the total number identified on each segment, not all have a direct reference from their own site, for in case of Facebook 31 out of 48, Twitter 7 out of 10 and YouTube 7 out of 10. The most important limitation is considered to be the consistency of the sample we used. We only investigated the hotels (rated 3 to 5 stars from the North-East region of Romania. A sample including all the hotels from Romania would have given a more realistic view of the use of Social Media in the hospitality industry. Another possible study limitation can be that the Social Media accounts may have been missed as it did not feature in the first three pages search results. The worst part is that the same mistake would be made by the potential customers searching for that hotel that is why we considered this error an acceptable one. As we made only a qualitative research, the results must be validated in a future research. The results of this research can be used by hotel managers and also by those who manage Internet websites. Business people who intend to enter on hospitality market might also be interested in this information. For the North-East region of Romania, during our documentation stage for this article, there was no study identified, similar to the one we realized. Also Romania, as a country where tourism industry it is in early stages of development, needs to benefit from this kind of research, for creating new strategies and implement best practices in the field.

  20. Management of industrial municipal and hospital wastes: the Asturias consortium. Gestion de residuos industriales, municipales y hospitalarios: el consorcio de Asturias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    A case of integrated management of wastes in Asturias (Spain) is presented. The consortium COGERSA manages this service for an area with 1.100.000 inhabitants. The article provides information on biogas energy production (2600 MW), leachates treatment in landfills, inventory of industrial wastes and hospital wastes.

  1. The Main Strategic Directions of the Education System Development (on the Example of Higher Education Institutions on Personnel Education for the Hospitality Industry)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitseva, Natalia A.; Ilina, Elena L.; Nikolskaya, Elena Y.; Romanova, Marianna M.; Larionova, Anna A.

    2016-01-01

    The importance and relevance of research of questions is determined by the intensive development of the tourism and hospitality industry, the consequence of which is the increase of business needs for skilled personnel. The purpose of this paper is to examine and assess the main strategic trends in educational technologies and methods used for…

  2. "We're Not Slaves--We Are Actually the Future!" A Follow-up Study of Apprentices' Experiences in the Norwegian Hospitality Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkevig Dagsland, Åse Helene; Mykletun, Reidar Johan; Einarsen, Ståle

    2015-01-01

    This study addresses the socialisation processes taking place during the apprenticeship period within the hospitality industry, searching for explanations of drop-out and early staff turnover in the personal, social and educational experiences of the apprentices during their organisational socialisation process and vocational training. Data were…

  3. A Sectoral Approach to Training in the Printing Industry and the Hospital Sector. Synthesis Report of a Study in Five European Countries. CEDEFOP Panorama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmerdam, John

    The development of sectoral training systems in two economic sectors--the printing industry and the sector of health care in hospitals--was examined in a study that entailed parallel research projects in five European countries: Belgium, Latvia, The Netherlands, Norway, and the United Kingdom. The study was based on the assumption that the…

  4. The Role of Experiential Learning in Nurturing Management Competencies in Hospitality and Tourism Management Students: Perceptions from Students, Faculty, and Industry Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Kristen

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has revealed that industry professionals and educators in the field of Hospitality and Tourism Management (HTM) agree that classroom theory and experience in the field are essential components of undergraduate HTM education. Yet there is some disagreement on internship hour requirements, and limited data on actual outcomes. This…

  5. Geothermal heat pumps - gaining ground in the UK and worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, Robin

    2001-01-01

    This 2001 edition of the guide to UK renewable energy companies examines the geothermal heat pump sector, and discusses the technology involved, installations of geothermal heat pumps, the activity in the UK market with increased interest in UK geothermal heat pump products from abroad, and developments in the building sector. The UK government's increased support for the industry including its sponsorship of the Affordable Warmth programme, and the future potential of ground source systems are discussed

  6. A hospital-based cost minimization study of the potential financial impact on the UK health care system of introduction of iron isomaltoside 1000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Bhandari

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Sunil BhandariDepartment of Renal Medicine, Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals National Health Service Trust and Hull York Medical School, Kingston upon Hull, UKBackground: The clinical need to be able to administer high doses of intravenous iron conveniently in a single rapid infusion has been addressed by the recent introduction of ferric carboxymaltose and subsequently iron isomaltoside 1000. Neither requires a test dose. Ferric carboxymaltose can be administered at 15 mg/kg body weight to a maximum dose of 1000 mg, whereas iron isomaltoside 1000 can be administered at 20 mg/kg body weight. The ability to give high doses of iron is important in the context of managing iron deficiency anemia in a number of clinical conditions where demands for iron are high (including chronic blood loss associated with inflammatory bowel disease, menorrhagia, and chronic kidney disease. It is also an important component in the strategy as an alternative to a blood transfusion. Affordability is a key issue for health services.Methods: This study was a comparative analysis of the costs of administering the newly available intravenous iron formulations against standard practice (blood transfusion, intravenous iron sucrose by considering the cost of this treatment option plus nursing costs associated with administration, equipment for administration, and patient transportation in the secondary care (hospital setting across three dosage levels (600 mg, 1000 mg, and 1600 mg.Results and conclusion: The analysis indicates that the use of iron isomaltoside 1000 results in a net saving when compared with iron sucrose, blood, and ferric carboxymaltose. At 600 mg and 1000 mg doses, it is cheaper than low-molecular-weight iron dextran but more expensive at a dose of 1600 mg. However, it takes six hours to administer low-molecular-weight iron dextran at this dose level, which is inconvenient and reduces patient throughput (productivity.Keywords: iron isomaltoside 1000, iron

  7. The Patient Feedback Response Framework - Understanding why UK hospital staff find it difficult to make improvements based on patient feedback: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheard, Laura; Marsh, Claire; O'Hara, Jane; Armitage, Gerry; Wright, John; Lawton, Rebecca

    2017-04-01

    Patients are increasingly being asked for feedback about their healthcare experiences. However, healthcare staff often find it difficult to act on this feedback in order to make improvements to services. This paper draws upon notions of legitimacy and readiness to develop a conceptual framework (Patient Feedback Response Framework - PFRF) which outlines why staff may find it problematic to respond to patient feedback. A large qualitative study was conducted with 17 ward based teams between 2013 and 2014, across three hospital Trusts in the North of England. This was a process evaluation of a wider study where ward staff were encouraged to make action plans based on patient feedback. We focus on three methods here: i) examination of taped discussion between ward staff during action planning meetings ii) facilitators notes of these meetings iii) telephone interviews with staff focusing on whether action plans had been achieved six months later. Analysis employed an abductive approach. Through the development of the PFRF, we found that making changes based on patient feedback is a complex multi-tiered process and not something that ward staff can simply 'do'. First, staff must exhibit normative legitimacy - the belief that listening to patients is a worthwhile exercise. Second, structural legitimacy has to be in place - ward teams need adequate autonomy, ownership and resource to enact change. Some ward teams are able to make improvements within their immediate control and environment. Third, for those staff who require interdepartmental co-operation or high level assistance to achieve change, organisational readiness must exist at the level of the hospital otherwise improvement will rarely be enacted. Case studies drawn from our empirical data demonstrate the above. It is only when appropriate levels of individual and organisational capacity to change exist, that patient feedback is likely to be acted upon to improve services. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published

  8. Nuclear prospects in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawley, Robert

    1993-01-01

    During the late 1980s and early 1990s the UK government decided to privatise the UK electricity supply industry. In order to introduce competition into the generation side of the business it was decided that the large generating boards - the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) and in Scotland, the South of Scotland Electricity Board and North of Scotland Hydro Board, - should be split up into smaller companies. In England and Wales two companies were proposed. The larger company National Power would include the nuclear generating business in England and Wales, the smaller company, Power Gen would use fossil generation only. Scotland was also to have two companies, Scottish Power - including Scotland's nuclear stations - and Scottish Hydro. But these were troubled times for the UK nuclear industry. A lot of misinformation was being issued by its opponents, in particular about decommissioning and fuel reprocessing costs. Looking back I can see there were reasons for that. Both National Power and Scottish Power wanted to be absolutely certain that they got the best possible deal and that every imaginable, and unimaginable, cost that may ever arise would be taken care of. This attitude resulted in the estimate of huge liabilities and 'unprecedented guarantees' that the then Secretary of State for Energy in the UK, could not accept

  9. Ecological Study on Hospitalizations for Cancer, Cardiovascular, and Respiratory Diseases in the Industrial Area of Etang-de-Berre in the South of France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Etang-de-Berre area is a large industrialized area in the South of France, exposing 300,000 inhabitants to the plumes of its industries. The possible associated health risks are of the highest concern to the population, who asked for studies investigating their health status. A geographical ecological study based on standardized hospitalizations ratios for cancer, cardiovascular, and respiratory diseases was carried out over the 2004–2007 period. Exposure to air pollution was assessed using dispersion models coupled with a geographic information system to estimate an annual mean concentration of sulfur dioxide (SO2 for each district. Results showed an excess risk of hospitalization for myocardial infarction in women living in districts with medium or high SO2 exposure, respectively, 38% [CI 95% 4 : 83] and 54% [14 : 110] greater than women living in districts at the reference level exposure. A 26% [2 : 57] excess risk of hospitalization for myocardial infarction was also observed in men living in districts with high SO2 levels. No excess risk of hospitalization for respiratory diseases or for cancer was observed, except for acute leukemia in men only. Results illustrate the impact of industrial air pollution on the cardiovascular system and call for an improvement of the air quality in the area.

  10. Augmentation of clozapine with amisulpride: an effective therapeutic strategy for violent treatment-resistant schizophrenia patients in a UK high-security hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotham, James E; Simpson, Patrick J D; Brooman-White, Rosalie S; Basu, Amlan; Ross, Callum C; Humphreys, Sharon A; Larkin, Fintan; Gupta, Nitin; Das, Mrigendra

    2014-10-01

    Clozapine is used in the management of treatment-resistant schizophrenia and is effective in reducing aggression; however a subgroup of patients is poorly responsive. For violent patients in this group, there is limited literature on the use of strategies to augment clozapine with other agents. Here we present a case series of 6 schizophrenia patients, within a high-security hospital, who have a history of serious violence and who were treated with clozapine augmented with amisulpride. We reviewed case notes and health records for evidence of violence/aggression and positive factors such as engagement in activities, and Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scores were formulated. We also examined metabolic parameters before and after augmentation. All 6 of the patients showed clinical improvement in symptoms and a reduction in their risk of violence to others. Five patients had a reduction in number of violent/aggressive incidents, and all patients showed improvement in engagement in occupational, vocational, and/or psychological work. Metabolic parameters were largely unchanged except for 1 patient whose Body Mass Index (BMI) increased. Five patients reported side effects as unchanged or improved. These schizophrenia patients with a history of violence showed clinical improvement and reduced aggression and violence with amisulpride augmentation of clozapine. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an antiaggressive benefit of this combination in forensic psychiatric patients. Further studies are warranted to establish the efficacy and anti-aggressive effects of amisulpride augmentation of clozapine.

  11. Comparison of CATs, CURB-65 and PMEWS as triage tools in pandemic influenza admissions to UK hospitals: case control analysis using retrospective data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myles, Puja R; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan S; Lim, Wei Shen; Nicholson, Karl G; Brett, Stephen J; Enstone, Joanne E; McMenamin, James; Openshaw, Peter J M; Read, Robert C; Taylor, Bruce L; Bannister, Barbara; Semple, Malcolm G

    2012-01-01

    Triage tools have an important role in pandemics to identify those most likely to benefit from higher levels of care. We compared Community Assessment Tools (CATs), the CURB-65 score, and the Pandemic Medical Early Warning Score (PMEWS); to predict higher levels of care (high dependency--Level 2 or intensive care--Level 3) and/or death in patients at or shortly after admission to hospital with A/H1N1 2009 pandemic influenza. This was a case-control analysis using retrospectively collected data from the FLU-CIN cohort (1040 adults, 480 children) with PCR-confirmed A/H1N1 2009 influenza. Area under receiver operator curves (AUROC), sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values and negative predictive values were calculated. CATs best predicted Level 2/3 admissions in both adults [AUROC (95% CI): CATs 0.77 (0.73, 0.80); CURB-65 0.68 (0.64, 0.72); PMEWS 0.68 (0.64, 0.73), ptools for predicting need for higher levels of care and/or mortality in patients of all ages.

  12. Remote interest in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, C.

    1993-01-01

    The United Kingdom nuclear industry has moved on from its low-technology solutions to remote handling problems which were popular in the 1950s and 1960s. A change in attitude has occurred which means that users are looking for high-technology solutions to today's remote handling problems. This review focuses on the ways in which their needs are being met and on the demands for future development which they are generating. (UK)

  13. A hospital-based cost minimization study of the potential financial impact on the UK health care system of introduction of iron isomaltoside 1000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    The clinical need to be able to administer high doses of intravenous iron conveniently in a single rapid infusion has been addressed by the recent introduction of ferric carboxymaltose and subsequently iron isomaltoside 1000. Neither requires a test dose. Ferric carboxymaltose can be administered at 15 mg/kg body weight to a maximum dose of 1000 mg, whereas iron isomaltoside 1000 can be administered at 20 mg/kg body weight. The ability to give high doses of iron is important in the context of managing iron deficiency anemia in a number of clinical conditions where demands for iron are high (including chronic blood loss associated with inflammatory bowel disease, menorrhagia, and chronic kidney disease). It is also an important component in the strategy as an alternative to a blood transfusion. Affordability is a key issue for health services. This study was a comparative analysis of the costs of administering the newly available intravenous iron formulations against standard practice (blood transfusion, intravenous iron sucrose) by considering the cost of this treatment option plus nursing costs associated with administration, equipment for administration, and patient transportation in the secondary care (hospital) setting across three dosage levels (600 mg, 1000 mg, and 1600 mg). The analysis indicates that the use of iron isomaltoside 1000 results in a net saving when compared with iron sucrose, blood, and ferric carboxymaltose. At 600 mg and 1000 mg doses, it is cheaper than low-molecular-weight iron dextran but more expensive at a dose of 1600 mg. However, it takes six hours to administer low-molecular-weight iron dextran at this dose level, which is inconvenient and reduces patient throughput (productivity).

  14. Identification of the benefits, enablers and barriers to integrating junior pharmacists into the ward team within one UK-based hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Man Yui; Wright, David John; Blacklock, Jeanette; Needle, Richard John

    2017-01-01

    A high nurse-vacancy rate combined with high numbers of applications for junior pharmacist roles resulted in Colchester Hospital University National Health System Foundation Trust trial employing junior pharmacists into traditional nursing posts with the aim of integrating pharmacists into the ward team and enhancing local medicines optimization. The aim of the evaluation was to describe the implementation process and practice of the integrated care pharmacists (ICPs) in order to inform future innovations of a similar nature. Four band 6 ward-based ICPs were employed on two wards funded within current ward staffing expenditure. With ethical committee approval, interviews were undertaken with the ICPs and focus groups with ward nurses, senior ward nurses and members of the medical team. Data were analyzed thematically to identify service benefits, barriers and enablers. Routine ward performance data were obtained from the two ICP wards and two wards selected as comparators. Appropriate statistical tests were performed to identify differences in performance. Four ICPs were interviewed, and focus groups were undertaken with three junior nurses, four senior nurses and three medical practitioners. Service enablers were continuous ward time, undertaking drug administration, positive feedback and use of effective communication methods. Barriers were planning, funding model, career development, and interprofessional working and social isolation. ICPs were believed to save nurse time and improve medicines safety. The proportion of patients receiving medicine reconciliation within 24 hours increased significantly in the ICP wards. All ICPs had resigned from their role within 12 months. It was believed that by locating pharmacists on the ward full time and allowing them to undertake medicines administration and medicines reconciliation, the nursing time would be saved and medicines safety improved. There was however significant learning to be derived from the implementation

  15. Comparison of CATs, CURB-65 and PMEWS as triage tools in pandemic influenza admissions to UK hospitals: case control analysis using retrospective data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puja R Myles

    Full Text Available Triage tools have an important role in pandemics to identify those most likely to benefit from higher levels of care. We compared Community Assessment Tools (CATs, the CURB-65 score, and the Pandemic Medical Early Warning Score (PMEWS; to predict higher levels of care (high dependency--Level 2 or intensive care--Level 3 and/or death in patients at or shortly after admission to hospital with A/H1N1 2009 pandemic influenza. This was a case-control analysis using retrospectively collected data from the FLU-CIN cohort (1040 adults, 480 children with PCR-confirmed A/H1N1 2009 influenza. Area under receiver operator curves (AUROC, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values and negative predictive values were calculated. CATs best predicted Level 2/3 admissions in both adults [AUROC (95% CI: CATs 0.77 (0.73, 0.80; CURB-65 0.68 (0.64, 0.72; PMEWS 0.68 (0.64, 0.73, p<0.001] and children [AUROC: CATs 0.74 (0.68, 0.80; CURB-65 0.52 (0.46, 0.59; PMEWS 0.69 (0.62, 0.75, p<0.001]. CURB-65 and CATs were similar in predicting death in adults with both performing better than PMEWS; and CATs best predicted death in children. CATs were the best predictor of Level 2/3 care and/or death for both adults and children. CATs are potentially useful triage tools for predicting need for higher levels of care and/or mortality in patients of all ages.

  16. Nuclear skills and education training in the UK through the Dalton nuclear institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard Clegg

    2006-01-01

    The UK demand for nuclear skills and research requirements is showing signs of a significant upturn. More capacity is being needed to support the UK's national programmes on clean-up and decommissioning, keeping the nuclear option open, and longer term advanced reactors technology. In response to this, The University of Manchester has launched the Dalton Nuclear Institute. The Institute is working with government and industry to strengthen and develop the UK's strategic nuclear skills base in the university sector. The Institute's scope covers the broad entirety of the UK's nuclear requirements spanning reactors, fuel cycles, decommissioning, disposal, social policy and regulation, and with connections into nuclear medicine and fusion. The rational behind the setting up of the Dalton Nuclear Institute including its research and education strategies are explained below, together with a description of the areas of current strength and the areas where major university investment is being targeted to uplift UK capacity and infrastructure. A big driver is also to forge links with other world leading centres internationally that will complement Manchester's in house capability. In the UK, the Dalton Nuclear Institute is working in partnership with Nexia Solutions and the NDA (Nuclear Decommissioning Authority) to match the Institute's plans with end-user industry and sector requirements. A key driver is to maximize the utilisation of the UK's specialist research facilities, notably the new Sellafield Technology Centre in West Cumbria. Discussions are underway with Nexia Solutions and the NDA to grant academic access for the Dalton Nuclear Institute and its collaborators to the Sellafield Technology Centre, to utilize it along the lines akin to a 'teaching hospital' model. The paper also explains the steps Dalton has taken by setting up and leading a consortium with ten other higher education providers in the UK, to launch a national programme for postgraduate

  17. Analysis of preterm deliveries below 35 weeks' gestation in a tertiary referral hospital in the UK. A case-control survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sellers Susan M

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preterm birth remains a major public health problem and its incidence worldwide is increasing. Epidemiological risk factors have been investigated in the past, but there is a need for a better understanding of the causes of preterm birth in well defined obstetric populations in tertiary referral centres; it is important to repeat surveillance and identify possible changes in clinical and socioeconomic factors associated with preterm delivery. The aim of this study was to identify current risk factors associated with preterm delivery and highlight areas for further research. Findings We studied women with singleton deliveries at St Michael's Hospital, Bristol during 2002 and 2003. 274 deliveries between 23-35 weeks' gestation (preterm group, were compared to 559 randomly selected control deliveries at term (37-42 weeks using standard statistical procedures. Both groups were >80% Caucasian. Previous preterm deliveries, high maternal age (> 39 years, socioeconomic problems, smoking during pregnancy, hypertension, psychiatric disorders and uterine abnormalities were significantly associated with preterm deliveries. Both lean and obese mothers were more common in the preterm group. Women with depression/psychiatric disease were significantly more likely to have social problems, to have smoked during pregnancy and to have had previous preterm deliveries; when adjustments for these three factors were made the relationship between psychiatric disease and pregnancy outcome was no longer significant. 53% of preterm deliveries were spontaneous, and were strongly associated with episodes of threatened preterm labour. Medically indicated preterm deliveries were associated with hypertension and fetal growth restriction. Preterm premature rupture of the membranes, vaginal bleeding, anaemia and oligohydramnios were significantly increased in both spontaneous and indicated preterm deliveries compared to term controls. Conclusions More than 50

  18. Industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This Health and Safety Executive Information Sheet on industrial radiography aims to inform directors and managers of industrial radiography companies on the safety precautions necessary to ensure that their personnel do not exceed dose guidelines for exposure to ionizing radiation. The Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985 (IRR85) require that exposure doses for radiographers are kept as low reasonably practicable. Equipment maintenance, and the employment of proper emergency procedures will help to ensure personnel safety. (UK)

  19. Products, practices and processes: exploring the innovation potential for low-carbon housing refurbishment among small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the UK construction industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killip, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Scenario-based studies agree that the technical potential for CO 2 emissions reduction from the housing stock is large. This paper explores how a market might be developed for the refurbishment activities assumed in these scenarios, taking the existing market for repair, maintenance and improvement (RMI) as its starting point. Interviews with 16 small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the construction industry reveal the interdependence of products, practices and processes in housing renovation activities. Conservative practice as well as innovation can be understood as the outcome of multi-lateral influences on firms from other firms, clients, the material buildings and products in their working lives, and from regulations and regulators. Contractors' openness to innovation is contingent on an informal approach to risk assessment, taking account of cost, time efficiency, client demands, and installer confidence in the reliability of the resulting work. The implications of the research are discussed in relation to the need for new practices and processes on refurbishment projects, raising questions for future research on key questions of quality assurance, performance over time, the application of standards, and vocational training. -- Highlights: •Repair, maintenance and improvement works are triggers for low-carbon refurbishment. •Millions of property owners and small firms make for fragmented decision-making. •Actor-Network Theory is used to frame decision-making processes for refurbishment. •Small builders can be innovative if clients allow time and money for experimentation. •Energy policy for existing homes needs to engage with the construction sector

  20. Guide to UK renewable energy companies 2001. 6. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This 2001 edition of the guide to UK renewable companies and equipment and service providers presents summaries of the different industry sectors covering wind power, photovoltaics, solar water heating, geothermal heat pump, hydroelectric power, marine current and wave technology, bioenergy, power generation from landfill gas, energy from waste, and cogeneration. A UK company classification listing and index is provided along with listing of UK organisations and companies and an index of advertisers

  1. APPLICATION OF PROMOTION TOOLS IN HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM INDUSTRY AND ITS ROLE IN DEVELOPING THE JAMMU AND KASHMIR AS A TOURIST DESTINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán BUJDOSÓ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The proposed study will mainly attempt to study the promotional tools undertaken by different hotels and tour operators, and evaluate how they have been able to develop tourism and hospitality industry in the state. A survey questionnaire was used to collect primary data. Our study revealed that the main reason of not succeeding and overcoming the problem of rebuilding the state as a tourists destination after the period of militancy and others problems mainly lies within the negligence of tourism authorities not following appropriate marketing activities ; inappropriate measures and wrong allocation of promotional funds also contribute to the problem.

  2. Characterisation: Challenges and Opportunities - A UK Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emptage, Matthew; Loudon, David; Mcleod, Richard; Milburn, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Characterisation plays a very important role in the nuclear industry supporting: the development and implementation of decommissioning strategies/plans (and the optimisation of associated costs through reduction in technical risks); regulatory compliance demonstration; waste prevention/minimisation; evaluation and optimisation of worker radiation doses; and maintaining public confidence. Recognising these important drivers, the UK regulators are working with the UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) to undertake a review of characterisation practice in the UK nuclear (decommissioning) industry. The objective of the characterisation review is to understand the current characterisation challenges and to determine strategic and tactical opportunities (including sharing of standards and guidance, capabilities, learning from experience, good practice, research and development, training, quality assurance) to optimise characterisation practice. The work is being undertaken through review of nuclear operator's characterisation practice, with input from the NDA, the UK regulators, nuclear operators and representatives from the supply chain, and through consideration of good practice case studies. To support this, a catalogue of relevant national/international guidance documents is also be compiled. Finally a workshop with representatives from all parties has taken place to consider the findings and establish a common understanding of challenges and opportunities and to start to consider how they can be addressed. The review is establishing a collective (UK regulator's, NDA; nuclear operator's and supply chain) understanding of opportunities to improve characterisation practice in the UK. The characterisation review process is described and early results are presented and discussed. Subsequent work in 2016 will be required to prioritise the opportunities and to build a consensus to facilitate development and implementation of an improvement plan. The aim

  3. Leader-member exchange and organizational citizenship behavior in hospitality industry: a study on effect of gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Estiri, Mehrdad; Seyyed Amiri, Nader; Khajeheian, Datis

    2018-01-01

    The relationship between leaders and followers regarding their gender is an important research issue in recent decades. Also the importance of effective leadership in hospitality organizations has been stressed widely in literature. This issue has drawn the attention of researchers towards...

  4. 75 FR 73107 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia and Ventilator-Associated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... sponsors and investigators in the development of antimicrobial drugs for the treatment of hospital... of antimicrobial drugs for the treatment of HABP and VABP. This guidance revises and replaces the... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-D-0589...

  5. UK nuclear power: gone but not forgotten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The nuclear power industry in Britain will not now be privatised. The future of nuclear power in the UK is discussed. In Scotland the South of Scotland Electricity Board will be expecting to sell some of its electricity to Britain. The structure of the new electricity supply industry in Scotland will also be unusual with most of the country's electricity being produced by a state-run company, while two private companies produce the rest and sell it on to customers. The situation in England is uncertain mainly because of the policy and potential costs involved in decommissioning of the Magnox stations as they are shutdown at the end of their service life. The privatisation of the electricity industry has highlighted the problems of decommissioning. It has also shown that the nuclear industry assumed itself to be immortal and has also assumed that money is not important, an attitude which has alarmed the City financiers. (UK)

  6. Students and Sex Work in the UK: Providers and Purchasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Ron; Jones, Amy; Sanders, Teela

    2013-01-01

    Available evidence suggests that changes in the funding of UK higher education in recent years have been accompanied by an increased student presence in the sex industry, ostensibly for financial reasons and to make ends meet. The current study comprises a sample of students ("N" = 200) drawn from several universities in the UK. Data…

  7. Worldwide open access: UK leadership?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevan Harnad

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The web is destined to become humankind's cognitive commons, where digital knowledge is jointly created and freely shared. The UK has been a leader in the global movement toward open access (OA to research but recently its leadership has been derailed by the joint influence of the publishing industry lobby from without and well-intentioned but premature and unhelpful over-reaching from within the OA movement itself. The result has been the extremely counterproductive ‘Finch Report’ followed by a new draft of the Research Councils UK (RCUK OA mandate, downgrading the role of cost-free OA self-archiving of research publications (‘green OA’ in favor of paying subscription publishers over and above subscriptions, out of scarce research funds, in exchange for making single articles OA (‘hybrid gold OA’. The motivation of the new policy is to reform publication and to gain certain re-use rights (CC-BY, but the likely effect would be researcher resistance, very little OA and a waste of research funds. There is still time to fix the RCUK mandate and restore the UK's leadership by taking a few very specific steps to clarify and strengthen the green component by adding a mechanism for monitoring and verifying compliance, with consequences for non-compliance, along lines also being adopted in the EC and the US.

  8. The Operational Performance of UK Airlines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assaf, A. Georg; Josiassen, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to measure the efficiency of UK airlines in light of all the recent industry challenges. Design/methodology/approach – The study measured the technical efficiency of airlines through the innovative data envelopment analysis (DEA) bootstrap methodology. Findi...

  9. UK Chemical Nuclear Data Committee: progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.

    1992-02-01

    Studies of the basic nuclear data for commercial and industrial application are monitored by the UK Chemical Nuclear Data Committee (UKCNDC). Such data are defined on the basis of chemical methods of analysis, and include half-lives, decay parameters and fission yields. Work undertaken within this area is described in this document for information. (author)

  10. The Effects of Year-Round Schools on the Hospitality Industry's Seasonal Labor Force in the State of Tennessee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickeral, Lyn M.; Hubbard, Susan

    2002-01-01

    Data collected from 66 managers in Tennessee tourist attractions indicate that 53 percent of seasonal workers in Tennessee come from the school system. The proposal to implement year-round schools would drastically increase the tourism industry's labor shortage. An alternative labor force needs to be identified and the issue of year-round schools…

  11. Flying with doctors: Experiences with the application of 6 techniques from aviation industry in the Rotterdam Eye Hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.F. de Korne (Dirk); U.F. Hiddema (Frans); F.G. Bleeker (Fred); N.S. Klazinga (Niek)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIntoduction. Aviation industry is often put forward as an example in creating safer health care. Comparing aviation and health care, there are similarities in using technology, working with highly specialized professional teams and the need for dealing with risk and uncertainties (Sexton

  12. Assessment of the Impact of Globalization on the Introduction of Innovative Technology Companies in the Hospitality Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitseva, Natalia A.; Larionova, Anna A.; Yumatov, Konstantin V.; Korsunova, Natalia M.; Dmitrieva, Nina V.

    2016-01-01

    The importance and relevance of the study of the globalization effects on the introduction of innovative technologies in the hotel industry is difficult to overestimate, as only those hotels that are able to change with demographic, technological and economic changes, and to adapt to occurring changes, will be able to succeed. The aim of this work…

  13. Porter's generic strategies, discontinuous environments, and performance: a longitudinal study of changing strategies in the hospital industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, B T; Marlin, D; Hoffman, J J

    1993-12-01

    Changes in generic strategies in response to discontinuous environments have been relatively ignored in the management literature. This study reports an examination of the relationships between Porter's (1980) generic strategies, discontinuous environments, and performance. Archival data for 1984 and 1988 were collected for 172 acute care hospitals in Florida in order to test these relationships. To examine fully the performance impact of changes in strategy in a discontinuous environment, a longitudinal research design that identified a firm's strategy at two points in time, 1984 and 1988, was used. Results indicate that firms with a proper strategy environment fit performed the highest, firms that did not change their strategy had no change in performance, and firms that changed their strategy toward a proper strategy environment showed an increase in performance. Findings support the notion that hospitals with appropriate strategy-environment combinations will exhibit higher performance.

  14. DEVELOPING HUMAN RESOURCES’ SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE IN TOURISM AND HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY THROUGH THE DETERMINATION OF QUALITY OF TRAINING PROGRAMS

    OpenAIRE

    Valachis, Ioannis; Christou, Evaggelos; Sigala, Marianna; Maroudas, Leonidas

    2009-01-01

    Research into tourism and hospitality training field has been focused on the subjects of training need assessments, training evaluation models, training within organizational frameworks and useful training techniques. Despite the significance of the above aspects, less afford has been made in the field of training quality and particularly in defining those factors that the quality of a training program consists of. Taking into account that training is a service which the organization, the ...

  15. Industrial coal survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-25

    UK industrial coal sales were down 400,000t to 7.1mt in 1991. This was largely due to fall in cement purchases as the construction industry was badly hit in the recession. Increased competition from petroleum coke also had an effect. A brief roundup is presented of sales to the UK's major coal buyers: Alcan, ICI, Blue Circle, Castle Cement, Rugby Cement, British Steel, UK Paper, Courtaulds, Unilever, AHS Emstar, Tate Lyle, and British Sugar. 1 tab.

  16. THE ALGORITHM IMPLEMENTATION OF THE DIVERSIFICATION STRATEGY IN SMALL AND MEDIUM-SIZED ENTERPRISES (FOR EXAMPLE, THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталья Николаевна Масюк

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Diversification in small businesses in the general sense is an extension of business activities to new areas of business (expanding the range of products, types of services provided, etc.. Application of the strategy of diversification in the small and medium business is justified in cases where the industry does not give us opportunities for further growth or when growth opportunities outside the industry more attractive. To determine whether diversification overdue and justified, the entrepreneur must clearly define the algorithm for their actions.Purpose: To determine the algorithm implementation of the strategy of diversification.Methodology: Desk research.Results: The developed algorithm.Practical implications: Management.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-9-19

  17. UK ignores treaty obligations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, P.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed critique is offered of United Kingdom (UK) political policy with respect to the Non-Proliferation Treaty, an interim agreement valid while nuclear disarmament was supposed to occur, by a representative of Greenpeace, the anti-nuclear campaigning group. The author argues that the civil and military nuclear programmes are still firmly linked, and emphasises his opinions by quoting examples of how UK politicians have broken treaty obligations in order to pursue their own political, and in some cases financial, goals. It is argued that the treaty has failed to force nuclear countries to disarm because of its promoted civil nuclear power programmes. (U.K.)

  18. Co-creation in hospitality industry: a case study on the drivers of traveler-generated content

    OpenAIRE

    Ferraz, Camila dos Anjos

    2015-01-01

    User-generated content in travel industry is the phenomenon studied in this research, which aims to fill the literature gap on the drivers to write reviews on TripAdvisor. The object of study is relevant from a managerial standpoint since the motivators that drive users to co-create can shape strategies and be turned into external leverages that generate value for brands through content production. From an academic perspective, the goal is to enhance literature on the field, and fill a gap on...

  19. Update on Radioactive Waste Management in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, John; McCall, Ann

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides a brief background to the current position in the United Kingdom (UK) and provides an update on the various developments and initiatives within the field of radioactive waste management that have been taking place during 2002/03. These include: The UK Government's Department of Trade and Industry (DTi) review of UK energy policy; The UK Government's (Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) and Devolved Administrations*) consultation program; The UK Government's DTi White Paper, 'Managing the Nuclear Legacy: A Strategy for Action'; Proposals for improved regulation of Intermediate Level Waste (ILW) conditioning and packaging. These various initiatives relate, in Nirex's opinion, to the three sectors of the industry and this paper will provide a comment on these initiatives in light of the lessons that Nirex has learnt from past events and suggest some conclusions for the future

  20. UK nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronow, W.S.

    Regulations and conditions for the commissioning of nuclear power plants in the UK, their siting, licence conditions, design safety assessment, inspection during construction and conditions for safety in operation are listed. (J.P.)

  1. UK victims of trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Burgoyne

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of court cases shows how hard it is forvictims of trafficking to win the right to remain in the UK. Case law is inconsistent and more research and data collection are urgently needed.

  2. Challenges facing use of energy in the tourism and hospitality industry in Zimbabwe and policies that can promote the sustainable use of renewable energy and tourism development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marunda, E.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the various challenges facing use of energy for sustainable tourism development in Zimbabwe on the backdrop of Zimbabwe’s reliance mainly on non-renewable energy sources such as fossil fuels and wood whilst very little use is being made of the abundant renewable sources of energy for instance the sun and wind technologies. It is based on the research carried out with the objective of establishing policies that can promote the sustainable use of renewable energy sources in the country. The findings reveal that stakeholders in the tourism and hospitality industry are largely in favour of formulating and expanding policies that encourage use of solar and wind technologies, at the same time mitigating environmental degradation. The article summarises the findings and duly recommends policies than can be used in Zimbabwe to promote the sustainable use of renewable energy employing solar and wind among others for tourism development.

  3. Comments on the article "Changing attitudes towards the care of children in hospital: a new assessment of the influence of the work of Bowlby and Robertson in the UK, 1940-1970" by Frank C.P. van der Horst and Rene van der Veer (Attachment and Human Development Vol 11, No 2, March 2009, 119-142).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Mary

    2009-11-01

    The authors give an impressive list of references, but these do not reflect the situation in the UK; most of those looking after children in hospital did not write about what they did or read about what others did. Children in hospital saw little or nothing of their parents, and once they had 'settled' the doctors and nurses were unaware of their distress. John Bowlby's interest in maternal deprivation led him to appoint James Robertson as his research assistant, to observe responses of young children to loss of maternal care on admission to hospital. They formulated the theoretical framework of the three stages through which the children went; protest, despair, and detachment constituting a developmental interference. Robertson was so concerned when nobody would listen that in 1952 he made the film 'A Two Year Old Goes to Hospital', which upset children's doctors and nurses. It also probably contributed to the government setting up in 1957 a Committee chaired by Sir Harry Platt to consider the Welfare of Children in Hospital. 'Going to Hospital with Mother' was made by Robertson in 1958. With Dermod MacCarthy he showed the films to the Committee, who accepted the suggestions in Robertson's Memorandum which included unrestricted visiting and mothers being admitted with their young children. The Report, known as the Platt Report, was published in 1959. Robertson could then show his films publicly, campaign in the media and encourage the pressure group NAWCH (the National Association for the Welfare of Children in Hospital) who were successful in getting many of the Committee's recommendations implemented, to the benefit of all children in hospital.

  4. Funding Decommissioning - UK Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKerron, Gordon

    2006-01-01

    'Funding' started with CEGB and SSEB (state-owned electric utilities) in 1976 using the internal un-segregated fund route (i.e unfunded). This continued until privatisation of electricity industry (excluding nuclear) in 1990. Assets bought with the internal un-segregated fund were mostly transferred into non-nuclear private utilities. New state-owned Nuclear Electric (England and Wales) was given a 'Fossil Fuel Levy', a consumer charge of 10% on retail bills, amounting to c. BP 1 bn. annually. This allowed Nuclear Electric to trade legally (A reserve of BP 2.5 bn. was available from Government if company ran out of money). By 1996 the newer nuclear stations (AGRS plus PWR) were privatised as British Energy. British Energy started an external segregated fund, the Nuclear Decommissioning Fund, with a starting endowment of c. BP 225 m. - and BE made annual contributions of British Pound 16 m. into the Fund. Assumptions were that BE had 70 to accumulate cash and could get a 3.5% average annual real return. Older stations (Magnox) were left in private sector and went to BNFL in 1997. Magnox inherited the surplus cash in BE - mostly unspent Fossil Fuel Levy receipts - of c. BP 2.6 bn. Government gave an 'Undertaking' to pay BP 3.8 bn. (escalating at 4.5% real annually) for Magnox liabilities, should Magnox Electric run out of cash. BNFL inherited the BP 2.6 bn. and by 2000 had a 'Nuclear Liabilities Investment Portfolio' of c. BP 4 bn. This was a quasi-segregated internal fund for liabilities in general. [Note: overall UK nuclear liabilities in civilian sector were running at c. BP 48 bn. by now]. BE started profitable and paid BP 100 m. annually in dividends to private investors for several years. BE ran into severe financial problems after 2001 and Government organised restructuring aid, now approved by European Commission. Terms include: - BE now to contribute BP 20 m. a year into an expanded Nuclear Liabilities Fund; - A bond issue of BP 275 m. to go to Fund; - 65

  5. Nuclear industry chart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    As part of a survey on Switzerland a pull-out organisation chart is presented of the nuclear industry showing Swiss government bodies and industrial concerns. Their interests, connections with each other and their associations with international and other national organizations and firms are indicated. (U.K.)

  6. Sustainable Industrial Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this case is to create awareness about a somewhat unfamiliar industry that accounts for over €3 billion in Scandinavia and £5,6 billion in the UK, the Metals recycling industry. The case features a Scandinavian Company and includes several perspectives from managerial disciplines...

  7. Environmental tobacco smoke in designated smoking areas in the hospitality industry: exposure measurements, exposure modelling and policy assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNabola, A; Eyre, G J; Gill, L W

    2012-09-01

    Tobacco control policy has been enacted in many jurisdictions worldwide banning smoking in the workplace. In the hospitality sector many businesses such as bars, hotels and restaurants have installed designated smoking areas on their premises and allowance for such smoking areas has been made in the tobacco control legislation of many countries. An investigation was carried out into the level of exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) present in 8 pubs in Ireland which included designated smoking areas complying with two different definitions of a smoking area set out in Irish legislation. In addition, ETS exposure in a pub with a designated smoking area not in compliance with the legislation was also investigated. The results of this investigation showed that the two differing definitions of a smoking area present in pubs produced similar concentrations of benzene within smoking areas (5.1-5.4 μg/m(3)) but differing concentrations within the 'smoke-free' areas (1.42-3.01 μg/m(3)). Smoking areas in breach of legislative definitions were found to produce the highest levels of benzene in the smoking area (49.5 μg/m(3)) and 'smoke-free' area (7.68 μg/m(3)). 3D exposure modelling of hypothetical smoking areas showed that a wide range of ETS exposure concentrations were possible in smoking areas with the same floor area and same smoking rate but differing height to width and length to width ratios. The results of this investigation demonstrate that significant scope for improvement of ETS exposure concentrations in pubs and in smoking areas may exist by refining and improving the legislative definitions of smoking areas in law. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Estimating solid waste generation by hospitality industry during major festivals: A quantification model based on multiple regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulredha, Muhammad; Al Khaddar, Rafid; Jordan, David; Kot, Patryk; Abdulridha, Ali; Hashim, Khalid

    2018-04-26

    Major-religious festivals hosted in the city of Kerbala, Iraq, annually generate large quantities of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) which negatively impacts the environment and human health when poorly managed. The hospitality sector, specifically hotels, is one of the major sources of MSW generated during these festivals. Because it is essential to establish a proper waste management system for such festivals, accurate information regarding MSW generation is required. This study therefore investigated the rate of production of MSW from hotels in Kerbala during major festivals. A field questionnaire survey was conducted with 150 hotels during the Arba'een festival, one of the largest festivals in the world, attended by about 18 million participants, to identify how much MSW is produced and what features of hotels impact on this. Hotel managers responded to questions regarding features of the hotel such as size (Hs), expenditure (Hex), area (Ha) and number of staff (Hst). An on-site audit was also carried out with all participating hotels to estimate the mass of MSW generated from these hotels. The results indicate that MSW produced by hotels varies widely. In general, it was found that each hotel guest produces an estimated 0.89 kg of MSW per day. However, this figure varies according to the hotels' rating. Average rates of MSW production from one and four star hotels were 0.83 and 1.22 kg per guest per day, respectively. Statistically, it was found that the relationship between MSW production and hotel features can be modelled with an R 2 of 0.799, where the influence of hotel feature on MSW production followed the order Hs > Hex > Hst. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. UK nuclear terrorism insurance arrangements: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetley, M. G.

    2004-01-01

    The risk of terrorism in the UK is not new, but since the New York World Trade Centre attacks in 2001, the potential scale of any terrorist attack has required a considerable reassessment. With UK foreign policy closely aligned to that of the USA, the UK security services now consider it is simply a matter of when and no longer if the UK is attacked. For insurers of any type this fact would cause concern; for insurers involved in high profile and potentially catastrophic loss targets such as nuclear power plants, any attack could have a severe impact on solvency and shareholder's funds. This paper's objective is to describe the terrorism insurance arrangements put in place in the U.K. both before and after the September 2001 attacks. These arrangements have been designed both to safeguard insurers' solvency and to ensure that the nuclear industry and general public can continue to be reassured by the availability of insurance should an attack ever occur.(author)

  10. Use of a national hospitalization register to identify industrial sectors carrying high risk of severe injuries: a three-year cohort study of more than 900,000 Danish men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baarts, C; Mikkelsen, K L; Hannerz, H; Tüchsen, F

    2000-12-01

    Data indicates that Denmark has relatively high risks of occupational injuries. We evaluated all injuries resulting in hospitalization by occupation. All gainfully employed men younger than 60 in 1990 were divided into 47 industrial groups and followed using the National Inpatient Registry, for hospitalized injuries 1991-1993. Following ICD-8, injuries were grouped into six categories: head, upper extremities, back, trunk, lower extremities and ruptures, sprains and strains. Standardized industrial hospitalization ratios (SHRs) were calculated and Pearson's independence test was performed for each category. Industrial differences were ascertained for each injury category. The highest associated injury category was upper extremity injuries ranging from SHR = 43 (fire services and salvage corps) to SHR = 209 (slaughterhouse industry). Carpentry, joinery, bricklaying and construction work had significantly high SHRs for all injury categories, whereas administrative work was significantly low throughout. Occupational surveillance systems based on hospitalized injuries can be used to identify high-risk industries, and thereby suggest where to direct prevention efforts. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. The Continental Market Seen from the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romieu, Michel

    1998-01-01

    In this presentation, the Chairman of a French gas company (Elf) comments on the evolution of the Continental gas market from a British point of view. He first discusses the differences between the US, British and Continental gas markets, recalls the provisions of the European Gas Directive and states why a fully competitive system is a long-term prospect in Continental Europe. Seen from the UK, the provisions of the EU directive may appear modest. Due to the long transportation, British gas companies may find it hard to compete on the gas market of Continental Europe. When Inter connector, the gas pipeline connecting the gas markets in UK and the Continent, begins operation, there will be a flow of gas from the UK to the Continent according to already signed contracts. But there may be contractual flows both ways. Gas prices will level off between the UK and Northern Europe, at least for the industry. The continental markets will change gradually, the Gas Directive and the Inter connector will help the move towards a more competitive gas industry, but the fundamentals will not change: low gas prices for the next few years, competition between the big three exporters to Continental Europe, and long-term contracts that will extend beyond 2005

  12. Nuclear physics in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    Nuclear physics is the study of the heavy but tiny nucleus that lies at the centre of all atoms and makes up 99.9 per cent by weight of everything we see. There are many applications of nuclear physics including direct contributions to medicine and industry, such as the use of radioactive isotopes as diagnostic tracers, or of beams of nuclei for tailoring the properties of semiconductors. More indirectly, ideas and concepts of nuclear physics have influence in many corners of modern science and technology. Physicists in the UK have a long tradition in nuclear physics, and have developed a world-wide reputation for the excellence of their work. This booklet explains more about this rich field of study, its applications, its role in training, and its future directions. (author)

  13. Energy UK 1986. An economic, social and policy audit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, A; Gretton, J [eds.

    1986-01-01

    In a yearbook on energy in the UK with emphasis on economic, social and policy issues, eleven articles are presented of which nine were selected and indexed separately. The topics covered include energy forecasting, energy conservation, its balance with respect to supply investment, government relationships with fuel industries, fuel poverty, acid rain and efficiency studies of the electricity supply industry.

  14. UK national consensus conference on radwaste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craven-Howe, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    UK CEED organised a consensus conference to debate radwaste disposal. It lasted from 21-24 May 1999. Among the witnesses called to give evidence were UKAEA, BNFL, Nuclear Industries' Inspectorate, Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions, Friends of the Earth and Greenpeace. The end result was a report produced by the panel of members of the public, recording their views and recommendations. Conclusions are presented. (author)

  15. Studies project development off U.K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that capital spending on U.K. Continental Shelf (UKCS) oil and gas development in 1992-94 will reach about $36 billion, Arthur Andersen Petroleum Services (AAPS) predicts. Expenditures during the 3 year period would be about 55% more than capital spending for UKCS development in 1989-91 AAPS noted. Another industry forecast, by Grampian Regional Council, Aberdeen, estimates more than 90 new fields could be developed on the UKCS during the next 20 years

  16. EC tells Bonn let in UK coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-23

    The European Commission has told the German federal government to open the door for coal imports from other EC member countries. As an initial step, the Commission is suggesting that some of the power station coal which was to be sourced from German stockpiles under the November 1991 agreement between Rurhkohle AG, the state mining company and the generators, be supplied by other member states such as the UK. The implications of this move for the German coal industry are discussed. 2 tabs.

  17. Depleted uranium. A study of its uses within the UK and disposal issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.H.

    2001-01-01

    A number of events during recent years have triggered a need for the Environment Agency to confirm its understanding of the various uses to which depleted uranium (DU) has been and is being put, where it may be found in the UK, and the disposal consequences. A scoping study has been performed of DU usage in the UK; it is not an exhaustive study and it does not examine any health issues. By far the largest quantities of DU are to be found in the nuclear fuel cycle but the main focus of this report is to examine the uses of DU outside this area. An indication is provided of the most likely premises where DU is to be found and these are principally in the aircraft, ammunitions production, non-destructive testing, radioactive source supply industries, in hospitals and, to a lesser extent, in research and teaching establishments. The study reveals that accounting for DU varies in the UK depending on the application, user organisation and location. Areas to improve control are recommended, particularly in the application of the Radioactive Substances Act 1993 and in the formalised and more systematic exchange of information between the Environment Agency and the Department of Trade and Industry about holders, inventories and locations of DU. In regard to the civil aircraft industry, it is suggested that there should be improved provision of information passing with an aircraft either for resale or, more particularly, for scrapping in view of the fact that more older aircraft containing DU may be coming to the end of their lifespan. A way forward may be for the regulating bodies to jointly discuss with the industry the issues and perhaps the provision of guidance. Because of the international character of this issue, resolution may prove difficult. It is also suggested that the awareness of the amount of DU in linacs and teletherapy machines in hospitals could be improved, an aspect which may be of growing importance in view of the apparent gradual reduction of the use of

  18. The use of the psychological contract to explain turnover intentions in the hospitality industry : A research study on the impact of age categories and gender on turnover intentions of highly educated employees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blomme, R.J.; Tromp, D.M.; Rheede, van A.

    2010-01-01

    The subject of this study is the psychological contract approach to the employment relationship within the hospitality industry with special reference to highly educated employees. The purpose was to research the differences in the psychological contract and its relation to the intention to leave

  19. ELEMENTAL FORMS OF HOSPITALITY

    OpenAIRE

    Maximiliano Emanuel Korstanje

    2010-01-01

    Modern studies emphasized on the needs of researching the hospitality as relevant aspects of tourism and hospitality fields. Anyway, these approaches are inextricably intertwined to the industry of tourism and do not take seriously the anthropological and sociological roots of hospitality. In fact, the hotel seems to be a partial sphere of hospitality at all. Under this context, the present paper explores the issue of hospitality enrooted in the political and economic indo-European principle ...

  20. Nuclear industry almanac v.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhalgh, G.; Jeffs, E.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear Industry Almanac. National energy profiles of 17 Western European countries are given, concentrating on electricity supply and the role nuclear power plays in meeting the demand for electric power. The nuclear industries of Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom are described and addresses of establishments and industries are listed. (U.K.)

  1. 14 April 2014 - UK University College London Hospitals and National Health Service Foundation Trust Chairman R. Murley in the ATLAS cavern with CERN Head of Medical Applications S. Myers and Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton.

    CERN Multimedia

    Gadmer, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Mr Richard Murley Chairman Sir Robert Naylor Chief Executive University College London Hospitals (UCLH) – National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

  2. Potential for biogas on farms in the UK (1990 update)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosey, F.E.

    1991-01-01

    In a previous report, the potential for generating renewable energy as biogas on farms in the UK using a new generation of 'package plant' anaerobic digestion units was investigated. It was concluded that the digestion technology was rugged and reliable but rather expensive for general farm use. An update report is presented to determine whether anaerobic digester design concepts, increasing environmental constraints on farm waste disposal and the Electricity Industry's Non-Fossil Fuel Obligation has modified these conclusions. (UK)

  3. Gas industry directory 1998. 101. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    In the Gas Industry Directory 1988, the following information is available: key information contacts, a buyer's guide, brand and trade names, company data, country index to overseas suppliers, who's who in the gas industry, UK gas suppliers, associations and organisations. (UK)

  4. The decision-making process and the use of causation and effectuation in the transition from small to medium firms: cases of hospitality industry in Curitiba-PR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Leucz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to analize how the changes caused by the growth of the company affect the decision-making process, focusing on the transition from small to medium businesses. We attempted to fill the existing gap over this period of transition between small and medium firms, especially in the aspects addressed by the logical Causation and Effectuation, described by Sarasvathy (2001. The research was qualitative and exploratory in nature and makes use of the method of case studies through interviews with entrepreneurs, their successors and managers in the hospitality industry, which is a service sector that has had great visibility and growth in recent years. At the end of the survey, it was concluded that the transition from small to medium business affects decisions to i increase the formalization of processes, ii there is a small delegation of powers, iii there is a greater distancing of the employees and senior management, iv there is a greater concern with training of staff, v a support team for decision making is established, vi there is concern about the long term, vii rational aspects are considered for decision, viii the responsibilities become clearer and ix more autonomy is delegated to employees.

  5. UK Royal Navy WWII Logbooks

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006, the UK and NOAA's Climate Database Modernization Program (CDMP) funded the imaging of approximately 8,000 Royal Navy logbooks in the UK National Archives...

  6. UK Nuclear Science Forum. Progress report: Data studies during 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.

    2001-06-01

    The UK Nuclear Science Forum (UKNSF) now meets once per year to discuss issues of direct relevance to forum members, and to review nuclear data for application in the UK nuclear industry. Links are also maintained through the year, mainly through e-mail and the normal postal system. Work of immediate interest includes the measurement and evaluation of decay data (e.g., half-lives and gamma-ray emission probabilities), fission yields and thermal neutron cross sections; all known UK studies in 2000 are summarised in this document. Specific applications and international links of relevance in the field of nuclear data are also described

  7. UK resource base assessment of organisations and capabilities in the biomass sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    British Biogen is the trade association for the UK's emerging biomass industry. It has been recognised that the biomass industry has considerable export potential due to its immense scale potential overseas, and there is an accompanying need for an export development strategy for the industry. The report contains a detailed analysis of a selection of UK companies and organisations, with regard to their export capabilities, thus providing an essential pre-requisite to developing the export strategy. The fundamental aim of the study is to assess the nature, scale and current capabilities of the UK biomass industry resource base and, in turn, to determine its potential to service export markets. (author)

  8. Why nuclear power failed the market test in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesshire, J.

    1992-01-01

    The Conservative Party's manifesto for the general election of May 1987 contained two pledges of relevance to the UK electricity supply industry (ESI). These were to privatize the industry; and to continue to support the development of civil nuclear power in the private sector. As anticipated by some independent commentators, in the event these objectives proved incompatible. The costs of nuclear power have long been a vexed issue and UK nuclear costs have been higher than those in many other countries. While most of the UK ESI has now been privatized, nuclear generation remains in the public sector. This article seeks to explore the reasons for this fundamental and politically embarrassing policy reversal, a rarity under three successive Conservative administrations since 1979. It would be incorrect to argue that private ownership and nuclear power are inherently incompatible. Rather the specific - competitive - form of privatization proposed for the UK failed to provide sufficient guarantees for the London capital market. Thus, at least in this specific case, nuclear power failed the market test. The implications of this for the UK nuclear industry have been profound. As a result, the UK case has wider international lessons as the pressures for privatization, liberalization and greater cost transparency bear down upon electric utilities in other countries. (author)

  9. Influence on UK Nuclear Regulation from the Fukushima Daiichi Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the UKs response to the Fukushima Daiichi Accident and highlights the influence that this has had on UK nuclear regulation since March 2011. ONR’s Incident Suite was staffed from the first day of the accident and remained active on a 24 hours basis for over two weeks. The purpose was to provide advice to the UK government specifically prompt assurance of why this accident couldn’t take place in the UK and practical advice in relation to the 17,000 UK nationals in Japan at that time. In the early phase of the accident ONR took part in international cooperation with the US, Canadian and French regulators in order to determine the actual technical status of the Fukushima Daiichi power plant units. The UK Secretary of State requested that the ONR Chief Inspector identify any lessons to be learnt by the UK nuclear industry and in doing so cooperate and coordinate with international colleagues. The Interim report was produced (May 2011) this focused on civil NPP’s, provided background to radiation, technology and regulations. This report compared the Japan situation with the UK and identified 11 conclusions and 26 recommendations.

  10. Operational radiation protection in UK mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Riordan, M.C.

    1977-01-01

    The radiological conditions of the mining industry (coal-national, coal-private, non-coal) in the UK are described. From the point of view of radiological protection, non-coal miners have the highest occupational exposure of any group in the UK in relation to a recommended limit. From the point of view of general health and safety in non-coal mining, however, the situation does not look no serious. This is illustrated as follows. The US epidemiological study of uranium miners yields, on extrapolation, a risk estimate of some 0.3 deaths annually from lung cancer per 1000 miners exposed to 100 WLM. On the other hand, accident statistics for non-coal mines in the UK yield an estimate of two deaths annually per 1000 miners. Further perspective is given to the problem by the incidence of lung cancer among adult males within the UK, that is, 1.5 cases annually per 1000 persons. Narrow concern for the radiological safety of miners must therefore be tempered with broader concern for the other hazards they face

  11. Sizewell: UK power demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    The Sizewell Inquiry was about whether the next power stations to be built in the UK should be nuclear or coal and, if nuclear, PWRs or AGRs. During the period of the Inquiry forecasts of demand for electricity were low. Now, however, it seems that the forecast demand is much increased. This uncertainty in demand and the wide regional variations are examined in some detail. Facts and figures on electricity sales (area by area) are presented. Also the minutes of supply lost per consumer per year. These show that security of supply is also a problem. It is also shown that the way electricity is used has changed. Whilst electricity generation has been changing to large-scale, centralised power stations the demand patterns may make smaller scale, quickly-constructed units more sensible. The questions considered at the Sizewell Inquiry may, indeed, no longer be the right ones. (UK)

  12. UK Tax Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deakin, John F.

    1998-07-01

    The presentation deals with the North Sea fiscal regime, a modern system for corporation tax payments, transfer pricing, general anti-avoidance rule for direct taxes, treaty refunds, deductibility of interest for corporation tax, UK/US double taxation convention, and plain and simple tax legislation. Part of the background for the presentation was the fact that in England a new Labour Government had replaced the Conservatives and the new Chancellor had announced a review of the North Sea fiscal regime.

  13. Nuclear merchant ship propulsion. The present status in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsey, R.P.

    1976-01-01

    The latest report of the Nuclear Ship Stearing Group which deals with three important aspects; economic assessments, international safety and operating procedures for nuclear ships, and the industrial capability of the UK shipbuilding and nuclear industries, is discussed. The integral design concept for a pressurised water reactor for use as a marine reactor is considered. The operational safety aspects of such reactors and of the attendant refuelling facilities are discussed. U.K. capability in the whole nuclear merchant ship propulsion project is considered; reference being made to the design and construction of small PWR reactors, the development, design and supply of the nuclear propulsion unit, financial aspects, and the requirement for cooperation between industrial interests and governmental research units. (U.K.)

  14. The risk of hydraulic fracturing on public health in the UK and the UK's fracking legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reap, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing to extract natural gas from shale rock is a new, rapidly expanding industry in the United States (US). However, there is concern that these operations could be having large negative impacts such as groundwater contamination, increased air pollution and seismic events. The United Kingdom (UK) is looking at the potential for emulating the success of 'shale gas' in the US. Differences in population density and geological conditions mean that the public health impacts recorded in the US cannot be directly extrapolated to the UK. There is limited academic literature available but findings suggest that the UK government is not fully recognising the inherent risks of hydraulic fracturing exposed by this literature. Government reports suggest a reliance on engineering solutions and better practice to overcome problems found in the US when evidence suggests that there are inherent risks and impacts that cannot be eliminated. This study applies US results to approximate the impact of one exposure pathway, inhalation of hydrocarbons by the public from operational air emissions over the 30 year lifetime of a well and finds that 7.2 extra cancer cases from exposure to air contamination would be expected in the UK if all test sites, approved test sites and test sites awaiting approval as of January 2015 went on to extract gas. In conclusion, limited assessment of the public health implications of hydraulic fracturing operations is available but the UK government appears to not be applying the precautionary principle to potentially significant legislation.

  15. Admission factors associated with hospital mortality in patients with haematological malignancy admitted to UK adult, general critical care units: a secondary analysis of the ICNARC Case Mix Programme Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampshire, Peter A; Welch, Catherine A; McCrossan, Lawrence A; Francis, Katharine; Harrison, David A

    2009-01-01

    Patients with haematological malignancy admitted to intensive care have a high mortality. Adverse prognostic factors include the number of organ failures, invasive mechanical ventilation and previous bone marrow transplantation. Severity-of-illness scores may underestimate the mortality of critically ill patients with haematological malignancy. This study investigates the relationship between admission characteristics and outcome in patients with haematological malignancies admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and assesses the performance of three severity-of-illness scores in this population. A secondary analysis of the Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre (ICNARC) Case Mix Programme Database was conducted on admissions to 178 adult, general ICUs in England, Wales and Northern Ireland between 1995 and 2007. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with hospital mortality. The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II and ICNARC score were evaluated for discrimination (the ability to distinguish survivors from nonsurvivors); and the APACHE II, SAPS II and ICNARC mortality probabilities were evaluated for calibration (the accuracy of the estimated probability of survival). There were 7,689 eligible admissions. ICU mortality was 43.1% (3,312 deaths) and acute hospital mortality was 59.2% (4,239 deaths). ICU and hospital mortality increased with the number of organ failures on admission. Admission factors associated with an increased risk of death were bone marrow transplant, Hodgkin's lymphoma, severe sepsis, age, length of hospital stay prior to intensive care admission, tachycardia, low systolic blood pressure, tachypnoea, low Glasgow Coma Score, sedation, PaO2:FiO2, acidaemia, alkalaemia, oliguria, hyponatraemia, hypernatraemia, low haematocrit, and uraemia. The ICNARC model had the best discrimination

  16. Admission factors associated with hospital mortality in patients with haematological malignancy admitted to UK adult, general critical care units: a secondary analysis of the ICNARC Case Mix Programme Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Patients with haematological malignancy admitted to intensive care have a high mortality. Adverse prognostic factors include the number of organ failures, invasive mechanical ventilation and previous bone marrow transplantation. Severity-of-illness scores may underestimate the mortality of critically ill patients with haematological malignancy. This study investigates the relationship between admission characteristics and outcome in patients with haematological malignancies admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and assesses the performance of three severity-of-illness scores in this population. Methods A secondary analysis of the Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre (ICNARC) Case Mix Programme Database was conducted on admissions to 178 adult, general ICUs in England, Wales and Northern Ireland between 1995 and 2007. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with hospital mortality. The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II and ICNARC score were evaluated for discrimination (the ability to distinguish survivors from nonsurvivors); and the APACHE II, SAPS II and ICNARC mortality probabilities were evaluated for calibration (the accuracy of the estimated probability of survival). Results There were 7,689 eligible admissions. ICU mortality was 43.1% (3,312 deaths) and acute hospital mortality was 59.2% (4,239 deaths). ICU and hospital mortality increased with the number of organ failures on admission. Admission factors associated with an increased risk of death were bone marrow transplant, Hodgkin's lymphoma, severe sepsis, age, length of hospital stay prior to intensive care admission, tachycardia, low systolic blood pressure, tachypnoea, low Glasgow Coma Score, sedation, PaO2:FiO2, acidaemia, alkalaemia, oliguria, hyponatraemia, hypernatraemia, low haematocrit, and uraemia. The ICNARC

  17. How do food bloggers and PR practitioners in the hospitality sector view their relationships? A UK perspective / ¿Cómo ven su relación los bloggers de alimentos y los profesionales de relaciones públicas en el sector de la hostelería? Desde Reino Unido

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz Yeomans

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bloggers are increasingly viewed by public relations practitioners as important influencers within the online media environment, yet research that explores relationships between bloggers and PR practitioners, particularly in the UK, is relatively limited. This paper reports on findings from a small-scale, in depth qualitative study of food blogger-practitioner relationships within the hospitality sector in the UK. The study explored why bloggers write about their restaurant experiences and how they view their relationships with PR professionals; while PR practitioners were questioned about their relationships with bloggers and the influence bloggers are having on PR clients’ reputations. In keeping with previous research, this study found that the practitioner-blogger relationship is complex. The PR practitioners interviewed within the hospitality sector viewed restaurant review bloggers as highly influential to their clients’ reputations and view the relationship as one that is built on mutual interests and trust. However, bloggers do not perceive the relationship in this light and are sceptical of PR practitioners’ motives. While bloggers had different motivations for blogging, they shared a common passion for blogging and a drive to provide reliable information and objective advice to their readers. Concerns within the blogging community were highlighted in regard to accepting incentives (free meals from PR practitioners, and how this can be damaging to bloggers’ reputations. While some bloggers claim to resist PR practitioners’ attempts to influence their blog content, other bloggers take an active role in building relationships with PR practitioners. It is argued that both parties are engaged in ‘identity work’ in order to protect their respective identities and practices and that emotion management plays a part in the practitioner-blogger relationship.

  18. Coal industry - memoranda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    This paper contains 41 memoranda submitted to the UK House of Commons Energy Committee containing views on the UK coal industry and responses to questions from the Select Committee. The following organizations are represented: Department of Energy; National Coal Board; APEX; BACM; NACODS; NUM; UDM; TUC; CEGB; Electricity Council; Northern Ireland Electricity Service; SSEB; British Gas Corporation; BP; Conoco (UK) Ltd.; Costain Mining Ltd.; Shell UK Ltd.; BSC; ICI; Boots; CBI; PSA; Solid Fuel Advisory Service; Domestic Coal Consumers Council; Associated Heat Services; Association of Shell Boilermakers; Babcock Power Ltd.; GEC; Foster Wheeler Power Products; ABMEC; British Longwall Mining Association; Federation of Civil Engineering Contractors; Federation of Small Mines of Great Britain; Chamber of Coal Traders; Coalfield Communities Campaign; Nottinghamshire County Council; Federation of Self-Employed and Small Businesses; the Colombian, Belgian and Netherlands Embassies; and Plaid Cymru.

  19. Nuclear fuel reprocessing in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allardice, R.; Harris, D.; Mills, A.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear fuel reprocessing has been carried out on an industrial scale in the United Kingdom since 1952. Two large reprocessing plants have been constructed and operated at Windscale, Cumbria and two smaller specialized plants have been constructed and operated at Dounreay, Northern Scotland. At the present time, the second of the two Windscale plants is operating, and Government permission has been given for a third reprocessing plant to be built on that site. At Dounreay, one of the plants is operating in its original form, whilst the second is now operating in a modified form, reprocessing fuel from the prototype fast reactor. This chapter describes the development of nuclear fuel reprocessing in the UK, commencing with the research carried out in Canada immediately after the Second World War. A general explanation of the techniques of nuclear fuel reprocessing and of the equipment used is given. This is followed by a detailed description of the plants and processes installed and operated in the UK

  20. Developing wind energy for the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rand, Marcus [Open Univ., Milton Keynes (GB). Faculty of Technology

    1990-01-01

    There is now emerging a consensus that the sensitive development of renewable sources of energy, and in particular wind energy, is going to be of major environmental significance for the UK. Primarily, renewable sources of energy can act as a means of combating the Greenhouse Effect and of reducing the other environmental impacts of conventional energy technology, including the build-up of radioactive waste and the damaging emissions from fossil fuelled power stations. The UK has a large natural potential for harnessing energy from the wind (between 20% and 200% of our current electrical requirements). This potential is beginning to be tapped. Wind energy is now in a position where it can take advantage of the profound changes taking place in the form of the privatisation of the Electricity Supply Industry. In other countries wind energy has developed successfully. (author).

  1. MNCs in Denmark and the UK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navrbjerg, Steen Erik; Marginson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Multinational companies (MNCs) have more opportunities than ever to forum shop and choose between different market systems - including different industrial relations (IR) systems. When an MNC choose to engage in a certain country, it also becomes an actor in the country's labor market system. MNCs...... are often quite large companies, and hence they can become significant players, potentially affecting the existing balances between the social partners. The question is whether MNCs adapt to the host country's labor market system (host country effect) - or if they seek in various ways to change the host...... to determine the employment relations. Quite the opposite to the UK, where trade unions are weak and where collective bargaining is far less widespread. Further analyses show that MNCs originating from liberal market economies (especially the US) acts differently in the two countries; in the UK they tend...

  2. Hospitality Services. Student Activity Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This student activity book contains pencil-and-paper activities for use in a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The activities are organized into 29 chapters on the following topics: hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization/management structures in…

  3. Radiation safety in the nuclear medicine department: impact of the UK Ionising Radiations Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, L.K.

    1987-01-01

    The new 1985 regulations and guidance on radiation protection in the U.K. are discussed in relation to the needs for controlled areas in the nuclear medicine department and patient wards, admittance to hospital to comply with legislation, classification of workers, patient waiting rooms, handling flood sources, pregnancy and breast feeding. (U.K.)

  4. GUIDELINES FOR HOSPITALITY EDUCATION IN JUNIOR COLLEGES, A MANUAL FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF PROGRAMS FOR CAREERS IN THE HOTEL-MOTEL, RESTAURANT, AND INSTITUTIONAL INDUSTRIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALMARODE, RICHARD L.

    THIS REPORT DISCUSSES JUNIOR COLLEGE PROGRAMS TO MEET THE NEEDS OF STUDENTS AND INDUSTRY. THE STUDENTS RECEIVE BOTH EDUCATION AND TRAINING, WHILE INDUSTRY RECEIVES COMPETENT EMPLOYEES. BEFORE DEVELOPING THIS OCCUPATIONAL PROGRAM, THE COLLEGE SHOULD SURVEY LOCAL INDUSTRY NEEDS, OPPORTUNITIES FOR ON-THE-JOB TRAINING, POSSIBILITIES OF PART-TIME WORK…

  5. The oil and petroleum industry. 20. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This financial survey is a compilation of financial and marketing data on oil and petroleum industry companies in the United Kingdom. It includes quoted companies in the production and distribution industry, unquoted companies in the exploration and production industry, unquoted companies in the refining and distribution industry, a geographical index and an alphabetical index. (UK)

  6. Managing UK nuclear liabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadnicki, Mike; MacKerron, Gordon.

    1997-01-01

    This paper sets out a framework for a fundamental reappraisal of the management of nuclear liabilities in the United Kingdom, built around two policy objectives, sustainable development and cost-effectiveness. The practical implications of the policy objectives are explored in relation to nuclear liability strategies, such as the adequacy or otherwise of current funding arrangements, the completeness of liability estimates and the distribution of financial responsibility between the public and private sector. A fundamental review of the management of nuclear liabilities is urged in the light of inadequacies identified in this paper. (UK)

  7. The UK shielding Forum. Best Practice through consensus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobson, J.; Gunston, K.; Gunston, K.

    2000-01-01

    The UK national shielding Forum has been established to represent all key industry groups in the UK (including the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII), the national regulatory authority). The Forum's aim is to increase awareness and confidence in the range of professional practice within the UK shielding community, with a view to having a coherent and dynamic role within the international shielding community. In the past, no comprehensive representative body covering the whole UK nuclear industry has existed, and the different industry shielding groups have developed local ways of working to address their particular requirements. Inevitably, there are common issues arising from these requirements which benefit from a wider consensus. As a result of the formation of the Forum (initiated by the NII and subsequently chaired by BNFL as an industry key player), expertise, experience and best working practice are now being actively shared between shielding professionals, and there has been a strong and successful drive to achieving consensus on key issues, which is also reflected in the increasing quality of industry-regulator relationships. (author)

  8. Moving up in industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covell, Charlotte

    2016-01-23

    Charlotte Covell is commercial business manager at Virbac UK, a role that gives her responsibility for the company's sales to corporate practices, some buying groups and internet pharmacies. She began her career as a veterinary nurse, but moved into industry and now has a role in senior business management. British Veterinary Association.

  9. Energy prospects for industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, P P; Roberts, G F.I.; Thomas, V E; Davies, D; Crow, L M

    1983-01-01

    Contents: Electricity today and tomorrow; Gas--supply prospects for the future; Petroleum based energy--the UK perspective; Future markets for coal; Flexibility--the key to Dunlop's energy strategy; Energy conservation in Alcan; Present and future energy patterns in Courtaulds PLC; New energy technology for the quarrying industry.

  10. How much should I eat? A comparison of suggested portion sizes in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Hannah B; Ahern, Amy L; Jebb, Susan A

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify and compare suggested food portion sizes in UK schemes. Design The study collated and compared suggested portion sizes from selected UK schemes intended both for general advice and weight-loss advice. Setting Portion size schemes were included if they were relevant to the UK, provided actual portion size information, were intended for adults and were obtainable from the public domain in November 2010. Included schemes were from the food industry, non-governmental organis...

  11. A Point of View on the UK Energy Policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lescoeur, Bruno

    2017-02-01

    The United Kingdom chose to leave the European Union at a crucial moment for the Energy Union, and in a period when the necessity of leading a coherent energy transition is strongly shared by EU countries. In the light of this conjunction of events, this study analyses the determining factors of the UK energy policy. The industrial revolution started in England, a country endowed with abundant coal supplies but also with robust policies and the right technical, economic and social conditions for making the most out of these natural resources. Likewise, the UK developed effective domestic and foreign policies in the first half of the 20. century and successfully managed the second industrial revolution, which was based on the use of oil and electricity. The UK energy system has gone through significant changes over the past forty years, with the gradual phase out of coal, the development of oil and gas production in the North Sea, the transformation of the electricity system, the re-building of a credible nuclear strategy and the rise of a low-carbon economy. These changes have been implemented at a reasonable cost, at least compared to the cost incurred by the other EU energy systems. The consistency and stability of the UK energy policies are striking, and one must admit that they are driven by a great sense of pragmatism. They are developed through trial and error and their results are openly debated and confronted to the three objectives of having secure, affordable and sustainable energy supplies. There is no doubt about who is the main beneficiary from these policies: it should always be the UK national community. Its interests are well-defended, government after government, and this national focus is probably the main reason why the UK energy policy appears to be very consistent. The EU has often tried to replicate the UK initiatives in the field of energy, but probably without taking proper account of the specificities of the UK context

  12. UK retail marketing survey 94

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    This document draws together data on the United Kingdom (UK) petroleum market up to the end of 1993. Lists include suppliers of petrol to the UK market listed by brand name, a regional breakdown of petrol and derv outlets, UK outlets which retail derv. Average retail prices for motor spirit and derv per litre are given as are sites fitted with Vapour Recovery equipment. Other tables shown indicate various companies' share of the market in terms of the percentage of petrol sites, including supermarkets. The volumes of motor spirit and derv delivered to retail and commercial customers between 1984 and 1993 is also given. (UK)

  13. Results of a pilot randomised controlled trial to measure the clinical and cost effectiveness of peer support in increasing hope and quality of life in mental health patients discharged from hospital in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Alan; Flood, Chris; Rowe, Julie; Quigley, Jody; Henry, Susan; Hall, Cerdic; Evans, Richard; Sherman, Paul; Bowers, Len

    2014-02-05

    Mental health patients can feel anxious about losing the support of staff and patients when discharged from hospital and often discontinue treatment, experience relapse and readmission to hospital, and sometimes attempt suicide. The benefits of peer support in mental health services have been identified in a number of studies with some suggesting clinical and economic gains in patients being discharged. This pilot randomised controlled trial with economic evaluation aimed to explore whether peer support in addition to usual aftercare for patients during the transition from hospital to home would increase hope, reduce loneliness, improve quality of life and show cost effectiveness compared with patients receiving usual aftercare only, with follow-up at one and three-months post-discharge. A total of 46 service users were recruited to the study; 23 receiving peer support and 23 in the care-as-usual arm. While this pilot trial found no statistically significant benefits for peer support on the primary or secondary outcome measures, there is an indication that hope may be further increased in those in receipt of peer support. The total cost per case for the peer support arm of the study was £2154 compared to £1922 for the control arm. The mean difference between costs was minimal and not statistically significant. However, further analyses demonstrated that peer support has a reasonably high probability of being more cost effective for a modest positive change in the measure of hopelessness. Challenges faced in recruitment and follow-up are explored alongside limitations in the delivery of peer support. The findings suggest there is merit in conducting further research on peer support in the transition from hospital to home consideration should be applied to the nature of the patient population to whom support is offered; the length and frequency of support provided; and the contact between peer supporters and mental health staff. There is no conclusive evidence to

  14. Essentials for profitable coalbed methane production in the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creel, J.C.; Rollins, J.B. [Cawley, Gillespie & Associates, Inc. (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    The UK coalbed methane industry is now poised for a continuation of its growth. For this potential growth to be realized, coalbed methane production must be profitable for producers. Commercial viability of coalbed methane production in the UK depends on th fulfilment of essential technical, regulatory, and economic conditions. Technically, coalbed methane reservoirs must have an adequate thickness of permeable gas saturated coal. The regulatory environment must offer favorable treatment regarding taxation, royalties, and policies on well spacing, wellsite locations, and market accessibility. Economically, gas prices and initial capital costs must be sufficiently favorable to yield an acceptable rate of return. If these essential conditions can be fulfilled, UK coalbed methane production can be expected to be a commercially viable industry. 6 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Prediction of Ownership and Control Concentration in German and UK Initial Public Offerings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goergen, M.; Renneboog, L.D.R.

    1999-01-01

    The paper investigates why the corporate landscapes of Germany and UK are so different in terms of control by analyzing ownership and control evolution in recent IPOs. We report the control evolution of a sample of size- and industry-matched German and UK companies six years subsequent to the

  16. An Exploration of the Relationship between Training Grants and Profitability of UK Construction Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Wahab, Mohamed; Dainty, Andrew R. J.; Ison, Stephen G.; Hazlehurst, Guy

    2008-01-01

    A levy/grant system exists in the UK construction industry to provide financial support for companies undertaking training activities. With the current UK government skills policy, there is an emphasis on ensuring that training support provided to employers is aimed at enhancing companies' profitability. This paper explores the profitability of…

  17. Wind energy - current status in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindley, D.

    1995-01-01

    Twenty two windfarms are operational or are under construction in the U.K. They have a total installed capacity of approximately 140 MW and will generate about 360 GWh in a full year and provide the electricity needs of about 250 000 individuals and save the emission of about 400 000 tonnes of CO 2 each year. Developments so far have required an investment of about Pound 140 million provided mostly by banks and large corporate investors. Financing these projects has broken new ground for renewable technologies and established a framework for the financing of windfarms built using future NFFO contracts. Obtaining planning consents for these windfarms has involved thirteen public inquiries, eight of which have been successful. Four of these remain unused and the result of another is awaited. Statutory and other bodies have responded to the rapid deployment of windfarms by issuing guidelines and these together with Public Inquiry documentation now provide invaluable guidance for the industry. The U.K. market is arguably the most 'open' in Europe and Danish Wind Turbine manufacturers have gained over 50 per cent of the total market. A Japanese manufacturer has gained 25 per cent whilst the major U.K. turbine supplier has gained 17 per cent market share. There are still over thirty manufacturers worldwide and signs that a combination of innovation and market pressures are continuing to reduce the costs of wind energy. (author)

  18. The Role of the Sellafield Ltd Centres of Expertise in Engaging with the Science, Environment and Technology Supply Chain and University Sector to Support Site Operations and Decommissioning in the UK Nuclear Industry - 13018

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butcher, Ed [Uranium and Reactive Metals Centre of Expertise Lead, Technical Directorate, Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Connor, Donna [Technical Capability Manager, Technical Directorate, Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Keighley, Debbie [Head of Profession, Technical Directorate, Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    The development and maintenance of the broad range of the highly technical skills required for safe and successful management of nuclear sites is of vital importance during routine operations, decommissioning and waste treatment activities.. In order to maintain a core team of technical experts, across all of the disciplines required for these tasks, the approach which has been taken by the Sellafield Ltd has been the formation of twenty five Centres of Expertise (CoE), each covering key aspects of the technical skills required for nuclear site operations. Links with the Specialist University Departments: The CoE leads are also responsible for establishing formal links with university departments with specialist skills and facilities relevant to their CoE areas. The objective of these links is to allow these very specialist capabilities within the university sector to be more effectively utilized by the nuclear industry, which benefits both sectors. In addition to the utilization of specialist skills, the university links are providing an important introduction to the nuclear industry for students and researchers. This is designed to develop the pipeline of potential staff, who will be required in the future by both the academic and industrial sectors. (authors)

  19. The Role of the Sellafield Ltd Centres of Expertise in Engaging with the Science, Environment and Technology Supply Chain and University Sector to Support Site Operations and Decommissioning in the UK Nuclear Industry - 13018

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butcher, Ed; Connor, Donna; Keighley, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    The development and maintenance of the broad range of the highly technical skills required for safe and successful management of nuclear sites is of vital importance during routine operations, decommissioning and waste treatment activities.. In order to maintain a core team of technical experts, across all of the disciplines required for these tasks, the approach which has been taken by the Sellafield Ltd has been the formation of twenty five Centres of Expertise (CoE), each covering key aspects of the technical skills required for nuclear site operations. Links with the Specialist University Departments: The CoE leads are also responsible for establishing formal links with university departments with specialist skills and facilities relevant to their CoE areas. The objective of these links is to allow these very specialist capabilities within the university sector to be more effectively utilized by the nuclear industry, which benefits both sectors. In addition to the utilization of specialist skills, the university links are providing an important introduction to the nuclear industry for students and researchers. This is designed to develop the pipeline of potential staff, who will be required in the future by both the academic and industrial sectors. (authors)

  20. UK Nuclear Workforce Demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, John

    2017-01-01

    UK Nuclear Sites: DECOMMISSIONING - 26 Magnox Reactors, 2 Fast Reactors; OPERATIONAL - 14 AGRs, 1 PWR; 9.6 GWe Total Capacity. Nuclear Workforce Demand • Total workforce demand is expected to grow from ~88,000 in 2017 to ~101,000 in 2021 • Average “inflow” is ~7,000 FTEs per annum • 22% of the workforce is female (28% in civil, 12% in defence) • 81% generic skills, 18% nuclear skills, 1% subject matter experts • 3300 trainees total in SLCs and Defence Enterprise (16% graduate trainees) • At peak demand on Civils Construction, over 4,000 workers will be required on each nuclear new build site • Manufacturing workforce is expected to rise from around 4,000 in 2014 to 8,500 at the peak of onsite activity in 2025

  1. Engineering Careers in the UK: Still Not What Women Want?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkinson, Liz; Hamill, Les

    2006-01-01

    Of all professions, engineering is ranked near the bottom in the UK in terms of the proportion of female applicants for university places, so the engineering industry is missing out on some of the best young talent available. Despite initiatives to increase the number of women entering engineering, there has been little change over the last…

  2. The Big Bang: UK Young Scientists' and Engineers' Fair 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The Big Bang: UK Young Scientists' and Engineers' Fair is an annual three-day event designed to promote science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) careers to young people aged 7-19 through experiential learning. It is supported by stakeholders from business and industry, government and the community, and brings together people from various…

  3. Determinants of Small Business Presence in Japanese and UK Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    土井, 教之; Cowling, Mark

    1995-01-01

    The present paper has attempted to examine determinants of small business(SMEs) presence in Japanese and UK manufacturing industries, using a cross-industry model. The results suggest that market structure elements have a definite influence on SMEs' share. This conclusion is consistent with the findings observed in the US and other European countries. The main results here are the following; (1) Concentration is negatively related to SMEs' share. (2) Capital intensity and requirements have a ...

  4. The UK market for dust and particulate removal equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-08-01

    The report has a market overview of dust and particulate removal equipment, 1995-1999 and has specific market reports, by value, of fabric, ceramic and sintered filters, electrostatic precipitators, wet scrubbers (venturi, plate and others) and cyclones. It gives environmental expenditure by UK industry and discusses factors affecting supply, demand and success in the market. An overview is given of the industry structure and profiles are presented of 15 companies. Lists of contracts, trade associations and relevant journals are included. 33 tabs.

  5. UK manufacturers construction joint venture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    This report examines the legal and commercial framework for UK manufacturers to collaborate in a construction venture for a small combustion/steam cycle power plant fueled with biomass. The integration of technology and project plan, the working capital and capitalisation, financial aspects, the market plan, turnkey packages, joint venture entities, and collaboration are discussed. (UK)

  6. Contracts and supply assurance in the UK health care market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenn, P; Rickman, N; McGuire, A

    1994-07-01

    We present a formal model of the relationship between a health care purchaser and a provider drawing on the recent experience of explicit contracting in the UK health sector. Specifically we model the contractual relationships emerging between District Health Authorities, who are presently the dominant health care purchasers, and the providers of hospital care. The comparative static analysis implies that the transaction cost of using non-local hospitals, the expected patient demand, the extent of excess capacity in local hospitals, and the proportion of that excess capacity expected to be lost to competitive purchasers, are all important determinants of the choice of contract.

  7. Solar energy: a UK assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    A panel convened by UK-ISES to analyze all aspects of solar energy systems and to assess the potential for solar energy utilization and research and development needs in the UK and for export is reported. Topics covered include: solar energy in relation to other energy sources; international solar energy research and development program; the physical nature of solar energy and its availability in the UK and other countries; thermal collection, storage, and low-temperature applications; solar energy and architecture; solar thermal power systems; solar cells; agricultural and biological systems; photochemical systems; social, legal, and political considerations with particular reference to the UK; and future policy on solar research and development for the UK. (WDM)

  8. Improved performance of the industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffrey, R.

    1994-01-01

    The remarkable improvements in the performance of AGR stations is illustrated. The underlying reasons for this improvement are discussed, emphasizing both the operational performance factors which have led to higher sustained output and the managerial and cultural changes which have focused attention at all levels on the need to be competitive. It is concluded that the UK nuclear industry has become world class with more improvements to come, an asset to the UK. (Author)

  9. What factors influence UK medical students’ choice of foundation school?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miah S

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Saiful Miah,1,2 Karl H Pang,3 Wayne Rebello,4 Zoe Rubakumar,4 Victoria Fung,5 Suresh Venugopal,6 Hena Begum4 1Division of Surgery and Interventional science, University College London, London, UK; 2Department of Urology, Charing Cross Hospital Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK; 3Academic Urology Unit, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK; 4Medical School, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK; 5Department of Plastic Surgery, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK; 6Department of Urology, Chesterfield Royal Infirmary, Chesterfield, UK Background: We aimed to identify the factors influencing UK medical student applicants’ choice of foundation school. We also explored the factors that doctors currently approaching the end of their 2-year program believe should be considered. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted during the 2013–2014 academic year. An online questionnaire was distributed to 2092 final-year medical students from nine UK medical schools and 84 foundation year-2 (FY2 doctors from eight foundation schools. Participants were asked to rank their top 3 from a list of 12 factors that could potentially influence choice of foundation school on a 5-point Likert scale. Collated categorical data from the two groups were compared using a chi-square test with Yates correction. Results: Geographic location was overwhelmingly the most important factor for medical students and FY2 doctors with 97.2% and 98.8% in agreement, respectively. Social relationships played a pivotal role for medical student applicants. Clinical specialties within the rotations were of less importance to medical students, in comparison to location and social relationships. In contrast, FY2 doctors placed a significantly greater importance on the specialties undertaken in their 2-year training program, when compared to medical students (chi-square; p=0.0001. Conclusion: UK medical schools should make their foundation program applicants aware

  10. Industry Study, Environment Industry, Spring 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    practices. For example, the cruising sector of the tourism industry has widely- acknowledged negative environmental impacts (carbon emissions and ocean...Services: An Industry Analysis ,” (2009): 4. http://www.berr.gov.uk/files/file50253.pdf 18 Ibid., 5. 19 EBI, 21 20 Department for Business...Ibid., 26. 50 DataMonitor Country Analysis Report, “Korea: In-Depth PESTLE Insights,” (June 2008): 4. 51 EBI, “3000,” 1-22. 52 Ibid., 5-130, 5

  11. LLW disposal wasteform preparation in the UK: the role of high force compaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L. F.; Fearnley, I. G. [British Nuclear Fuels Ltd., Sellafield (United Kingdom)

    1991-07-01

    British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) owns and operates the principal UK solid low level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal site. The site is located at Drigg in West Cumbria some 6 km to the south east of BNFL's Sellafield reprocessing complex. Sellafield is the major UK generator of LLW, accounting for about 85% of estimated future arisings of raw (untreated, unpackaged) waste. Non-Sellafield consignors to the Drigg site include other BNFL production establishments, nuclear power stations, sites of UKAEA, Ministry of Defence facilities, hospitals, universities, radioisotope production sites and various other industrial organisations. In September 1987, BNFL announced a major upgrade of operations at the Drigg site aimed at improving management practices, the efficiency of space utilisation and enhancing the visual impact of disposal operations. During 1989 a review of plans for compaction and containerisation of Sellafield waste identified that residual voidage in ISO freight containers could be significant even after the introduction of compaction. Subsequent studies which examined a range of compaction and packaging options concluded that the preferred scheme centred on the use of high force compaction (HFC) of compactable waste, and grouting to take up readily accessible voidage in the wasteform. The paper describes the emergence of high force compaction as the preferred scheme for wasteform preparation and subsequent benefits against the background of the overall development of Low Level Waste disposal operations at Drigg.

  12. LLW disposal wasteform preparation in the UK: the role of high force compaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, L. F.; Fearnley, I. G.

    1991-01-01

    British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) owns and operates the principal UK solid low level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal site. The site is located at Drigg in West Cumbria some 6 km to the south east of BNFL's Sellafield reprocessing complex. Sellafield is the major UK generator of LLW, accounting for about 85% of estimated future arisings of raw (untreated, unpackaged) waste. Non-Sellafield consignors to the Drigg site include other BNFL production establishments, nuclear power stations, sites of UKAEA, Ministry of Defence facilities, hospitals, universities, radioisotope production sites and various other industrial organisations. In September 1987, BNFL announced a major upgrade of operations at the Drigg site aimed at improving management practices, the efficiency of space utilisation and enhancing the visual impact of disposal operations. During 1989 a review of plans for compaction and containerisation of Sellafield waste identified that residual voidage in ISO freight containers could be significant even after the introduction of compaction. Subsequent studies which examined a range of compaction and packaging options concluded that the preferred scheme centred on the use of high force compaction (HFC) of compactable waste, and grouting to take up readily accessible voidage in the wasteform. The paper describes the emergence of high force compaction as the preferred scheme for wasteform preparation and subsequent benefits against the background of the overall development of Low Level Waste disposal operations at Drigg

  13. UK chemical nuclear data committee progress report: data studies during 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.

    1990-01-01

    Basic nuclear data requirements for industrial application are monitored by the UK Chemical Nuclear Data Committee (UKCNDC), covering half-lives, decay data, fission yields and the content of computerised data files. While the UKCNDC Request List was reviewed at the end of 1989 to reveal new and continued requirements, funding problems have increased during the year. Difficulties in the UK nuclear power industry are reflected in the decline in experimental studies, although evaluation efforts have been maintained. (author)

  14. Hospitality Services Reference Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This reference book provides information needed by employees in hospitality services occupations. It includes 29 chapters that cover the following topics: the hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization and management structures; safety practices and emergency procedures; technology; property maintenance and repair; purchasing…

  15. Hospitality Services. Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This guide, which was developed as part of Texas' home economics education program, is intended to assist teachers of a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The first 40% of the approximately 600-page guide consists of strategies for teaching each of 29 essential…

  16. Hospitality Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Homemaking Education.

    This curriculum guide on the hospitality occupations was developed to help secondary and postsecondary home economics teachers prepare individuals for entry-level jobs in the hospitality industry. The content is in seven sections. The first section presents organizational charts of a medium-size hotel, food and beverage division, housekeeping and…

  17. Radwaste management in the UK - present status and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyre, B.

    1991-01-01

    In 1976, the Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution, chaired by Lord Flowers, undertook a thorough review of the status of radioactive waste management in the United Kingdom (UK). Its report became the stimulus which launched a new programme of strategic and technical work to establish a total system plan for the processing, storage, transport and disposal of all radioactive wastes in the UK. This article, which describes the evolution of the programme, is the basis of the presentation to the Korean nuclear industry earlier this year by the Deputy Chairman and Chief Executive of AEA Technology. (author)

  18. Industry information service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yigit, Ipek

    1993-01-01

    BNF is the UK nuclear industry's representative organisation and its membership is inclusive of the entire civil nuclear industry in the Britain. BNF members include Britain's two nuclear electricity generating companies, Nuclear Electric and Scottish Nuclear, who between them manage the seventeen nuclear power stations which provide approximately 20% of the country's generating capacity. An important role of the Forum is to act as the information centre for the industry as a whole and during 1992, the Forum has strengthened its information service with the setting up of an extensive, computer-based network. The network has been established to provide an effective way of managing UK domestic nuclear-related issues and for maximising the news value of our industry's achievements. Equally important is the service's role as an international source of information - particularly when nuclear incidents occur outside the UK. The Forum also acts as an international exchange centre, disseminating technical information, for example, and by promptly providing accurate and comprehensive information to minimise the potential damage to public confidence in nuclear power generation which may be caused by any reported nuclear incidents. Recent examples of the successful operation of the BNF information service and its communications network have been the Leningradskya incident in March 1992 and the hurricane Andrew situation which developed at the end of August 1992

  19. The French natural uranium industry in 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, Marcel

    1987-01-01

    France has relatively large uranium deposits. This led to the creation of an internationally significant uranium mining industry. The structure of this industry is explained. In 1985 world supply of uranium was greater than world demand leading to an increase in uranium stocks. However, as demand is expected to increase, the industry is undertaking extensive uranium exploration, mainly abroad. (UK)

  20. The future of UK/Irish surgery: A European solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varzgalis, M; Kerin, M J; Sweeney, K J

    2015-11-01

    The United Kingdom (UK) and Republic of Ireland (ROI) hospital systems are dependent on junior doctors for their functionality however it is increasingly difficult to recruit UK/ROI trained doctors to fill these posts. Directive 2005/36/EC, which came into force in 2007, is the principal European legislation on the recognition of equivalence of professional qualifications across Europe. European trained doctors are therefore attractive candidates for junior doctor posts. However, although their training is recognised as equivalent by the Irish Medical Council (IMC) and General Medical Council (GMC) they are not being appointed to equivalent posts by the Health Service Executive (HSE) or National Health Service (NHS). With the influence of European Union (EU) centralisation, modification of UK/ROI consultant grade is imminent, possibly to pyramidal structure of the Continental European model with clearer lines of corporate responsibility. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.