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Sample records for uisge beatha glasgow

  1. Silica research in Glasgow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, B W; Cagnoli, G; Casey, M M; Clubley, D; Crooks, D R M; Danzmann, K; Elliffe, E J; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Grote, H; Heptonstall, A; Hough, J; Jennrich, O; Lueck, H; McIntosh, S A; Newton, G P; Palmer, D A; Plissi, M V; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Rowan, S; Skeldon, K D; Sneddon, P; Strain, K A; Torrie, C I; Ward, H; Willems, P A; Willke, B; Winkler, W

    2002-01-01

    The Glasgow group is involved in the construction of the GEO600 interferometer as well as in R and D activity on technology for advanced gravitational wave detectors. GEO600 will be the first GW detector using quasi-monolithic silica suspensions in order to decrease thermal noise significantly with respect to steel wire suspensions. The results concerning GEO600 suspension mounting and performance will be shown in the first section. Section 2 is devoted to the present results from the direct measurement of thermal noise in mirrors mounted in the 10 m interferometer in Glasgow which has a sensitivity limit of 4 x 10 -19 m Hz -1/2 above 1 kHz. Section 3 presents results on the measurements of coating losses. R and D activity has been carried out to understand better how thermal noise in the suspensions affects the detector sensitivity, and in section 4 a discussion on the non-linear thermoelastic effect is presented

  2. Silica research in Glasgow

    CERN Document Server

    Barr, B W; Casey, M M; Clubley, D; Crooks, D R M; Danzmann, K; Elliffe, E J; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Grote, H; Heptonstall, A; Hough, J; Jennrich, O; Lück, H B; McIntosh, S A; Newton, G P; Palmer, D A; Plissi, M V; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Rowan, S; Skeldon, K D; Sneddon, P; Strain, K A; Torrie, C I; Ward, H; Willems, P A; Willke, B; Winkler, W

    2002-01-01

    The Glasgow group is involved in the construction of the GEO600 interferometer as well as in R and D activity on technology for advanced gravitational wave detectors. GEO600 will be the first GW detector using quasi-monolithic silica suspensions in order to decrease thermal noise significantly with respect to steel wire suspensions. The results concerning GEO600 suspension mounting and performance will be shown in the first section. Section 2 is devoted to the present results from the direct measurement of thermal noise in mirrors mounted in the 10 m interferometer in Glasgow which has a sensitivity limit of 4 x 10 sup - sup 1 sup 9 m Hz sup - sup 1 sup / sup 2 above 1 kHz. Section 3 presents results on the measurements of coating losses. R and D activity has been carried out to understand better how thermal noise in the suspensions affects the detector sensitivity, and in section 4 a discussion on the non-linear thermoelastic effect is presented.

  3. Glasgow physics conference (Preliminary report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1994-09-15

    The third and heaviest pair of quarks, 'beauty' (b) and 'top' (t), were the stars of the International Conference on High Energy Physics, held in Glasgow from 20-27 July, the 27th in the series of traditional biennial 'Rochester' meetings which dominate the particle physics calendar. With all major new results in agreement, in recent years these meetings have also become a festival for the 'Standard Model' of particle physics, and Glasgow was no exception.

  4. Glasgow physics conference (Preliminary report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The third and heaviest pair of quarks, 'beauty' (b) and 'top' (t), were the stars of the International Conference on High Energy Physics, held in Glasgow from 20-27 July, the 27th in the series of traditional biennial 'Rochester' meetings which dominate the particle physics calendar. With all major new results in agreement, in recent years these meetings have also become a festival for the 'Standard Model' of particle physics, and Glasgow was no exception

  5. Promoting breast screening in Glasgow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, L; Dobson, H; McGuire, F

    2000-03-01

    To establish whether there is a role for advertising in the promotion of the Breast Screening Programme and what the role of advertising might be. Four hundred and sixty questionnaires were completed by women attending their breast screening appointment. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from the static unit at Calder Street and the mobile unit in Govan. The advertising (budget 30,000 Pounds) campaign ran over an eight week period in the Govan, Paisley Road West and Cardonald areas of Glasgow. Media used included press advertising, The Glasgow Underground, adshells, bus advertising (interiors) and poster distribution via local outlets. Forty-two per cent of the sample were aware of the campaign. Ninety-seven per cent liked the campaign images. Eighty eight per cent felt that breast screening should be advertised more. Screening uptake increased in the areas covered by the advertising campaign. Govan -58%-71% and Ibrox (Paisley Road West and Cardonald) -59%-61%. Women were very supportive of the role of advertising for the Breast Screening Programme. In particular they found the campaign images and messages reassuring, supportive and credible. Their views suggest that the role of advertising should be: To raise awareness of the service To make women more conscious of the benefits of screening To change public perceptions of the screening process However, it is recognised that a fully integrated approach is required for the promotion of the service to account for the improvement in uptake, as advertising cannot be expected to work in isolation.

  6. The ATLAS Glasgow Overview Week

    CERN Multimedia

    Richard Hawkings

    2007-01-01

    The ATLAS Overview Weeks always provide a good opportunity to see the status and progress throughout the experiment, and the July week at Glasgow University was no exception. The setting, amidst the traditional buildings of one of the UK's oldest universities, provided a nice counterpoint to all the cutting-edge research and technology being discussed. And despite predictions to the contrary, the weather at these northern latitudes was actually a great improvement on the previous few weeks in Geneva. The meeting sessions comprehensively covered the whole ATLAS project, from the subdetector and TDAQ systems and their commissioning, through to offline computing, analysis and physics. As a long-time ATLAS member who remembers plenary meetings in 1991 with 30 people drawing detector layouts on a whiteboard, the hardware and installation sessions were particularly impressive - to see how these dreams have been translated into 7000 tons of reality (and with attendant cabling, supports and services, which certainly...

  7. Reflections on the astronomy of Glasgow

    CERN Document Server

    Clarke, David

    2013-01-01

    How Astronomy contributed to the educational enlightenment of Glasgow, to its society and to its commerce. The words 'Astronomy' and 'Glasgow' seem an incongruous juxtaposition, and yet the two are closely linked over 500 years of history. This is a tale of enlightenment and scientific progress at both institutional and public levels. Combined with the ambitions of civic commerce, it is a story populated with noteworthy personalities and intense rivalries.It is remarkable to realise that the first Astronomy teaching in the Glasgow 'Colledge' presented an Earth-centred Universe, prior to the Co

  8. Ideals of ITE students at Glasgow University

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruyter, D.J.; Conroy, J.C.; Lappin, M.; McKinney, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of a questionnaire completed by initial teacher education (ITE) students at the University of Glasgow shows a clear divergence between their personal and professional ideals. The students define their own ideals predominantly in terms of situations, like being married, having children or

  9. Lead in Glasgow street dirt and soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J G [Univ. of Glasgow; Lyon, T D.B.

    1977-07-01

    The levels of lead in city street dirt and in soil from various locations in Glasgow were investigated during spring 1976. Lead concentrations in street dirt ranged from 150 to 2300 ppM, mean 960 ppM, and were significantly elevated with respect to the observed ''natural'' level of 78 ppM. Lead derived from anti-knock compounds in petrol and introduced to the environment via automobile exhausts was clearly implicated as the main source of lead pollution in a series of soil lead measurements at the centre and periphery of eight Glasgow parks. Various chemical leaching techniques were employed and compared. Less than 5 percent of street dirt and soil lead was found to be associated with the organic phase.

  10. Dietary manganese in the Glasgow area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, J.D.; Dale, I.M.; Raie, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    The manganese content of the diet and human tissue (adult and infant) in the Glasgow area is established. The total manganese intake by a breast fed infant (6 μg/day) is very much lower than that of an adult (5 mg/day). This does not appear to cause any upset in the infant's metabolism and the tissue levels of both groups are similar. This indicates that the human system can obtain its required manganese from both levels of intake. Tea is the major source of manganese in the diet: tobacco, which is rich in manganese, does not contribute a significant amount when smoked. (author)

  11. Dietary selenium in the Glasgow area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, J.D.; Raie, R.M.; Smith, H.

    1978-01-01

    A typical diet for people in the Glasgow area is analysed and an estimate is made of the daily intake of selenium for the average person (234 μg). Meat, poultry and bread products contribute 65% of the total selenium consumed. There is a significant loss of selenium on cooking but the concentration in the diet is high compared with the estimated requirement. Selenium levels in prepared infant foods, artificial milk and natural milk are reported. Those infants on artificial milk feeds have a selenium intake equivalent to that of adults (3 μg/kg) while those on natural milk or prepared infant foods have an intake of 6 μg/kg. Adult and infant tissue selenium levels are established and are shown to be in equilibrium with the diet. There is no concentration in man as a result of his position at the top of the food chain. Sudden infant death cannot be related to selenium levels in human tissue or diet. (author)

  12. Perceptions of smoking cessation among Glasgow's Chinese community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Spence

    2017-10-01

    Smoking-cessation services should consider the culture of this ethnic minority population to improve cessation uptake. Further investigation of this community’s needs and expectations is needed to tailor smoking-cessation interventions for Chinese immigrants in Glasgow.

  13. Does the extended Glasgow Outcome Scale add value to the conventional Glasgow Outcome Scale?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, James; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Butcher, Isabella; Lu, Juan; Lingsma, Hester F; McHugh, Gillian S; Roozenbeek, Bob; Maas, Andrew I R; Murray, Gordon D

    2012-01-01

    The Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) is firmly established as the primary outcome measure for use in Phase III trials of interventions in traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, the GOS has been criticized for its lack of sensitivity to detect small but clinically relevant changes in outcome. The Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOSE) potentially addresses this criticism, and in this study we estimate the efficiency gain associated with using the GOSE in place of the GOS in ordinal analysis of 6-month outcome. The study uses both simulation and the reanalysis of existing data from two completed TBI studies, one an observational cohort study and the other a randomized controlled trial. As expected, the results show that using an ordinal technique to analyze the GOS gives a substantial gain in efficiency relative to the conventional analysis, which collapses the GOS onto a binary scale (favorable versus unfavorable outcome). We also found that using the GOSE gave a modest but consistent increase in efficiency relative to the GOS in both studies, corresponding to a reduction in the required sample size of the order of 3-5%. We recommend that the GOSE be used in place of the GOS as the primary outcome measure in trials of TBI, with an appropriate ordinal approach being taken to the statistical analysis.

  14. The comparison of modified early warning score and Glasgow coma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The purpose of this study is to assess and compare the discriminatory ability of the Glasgow coma scale (GCS)‑age‑systolic blood pressure (GAP) score and modified early warning scoring system (mEWS) score for 4‑week mortality, for the patients being in the triage category 1 and 2 who refer to Emergency ...

  15. Assessment of physicians' knowledge of Glasgow Coma Score ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is the most commonly used tool in assessing comatose patients. It is simple, easily communicable, and useful in prognostication and determination of the treatment modality in head injury. Unfortunately, a high percentage of clinicians who are not in the emergency or neurological ...

  16. Spiderman enlisted to help with glasgow child abuse problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-14

    When Spiderman admitted in a comic that he had been abused as a boy, then children realised they could share their own painful experiences, said a speaker at a conference on Incest and Rape, staged by the Royal College of Nursing Greater Glasgow branch.

  17. 78 FR 67024 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Glasgow, MT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... aid, Glasgow, MT. A favorable comment from the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) was.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: History The FAA published a final rule in the Federal Register establishing Class E..., pursuant to the authority delegated to me, the description under the History heading, as published in the...

  18. Environmental engineering at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clarke, J.A.; Hensen, J.L.M.; Johnstone, C.M.; McLean, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the recently revised curriculum for the Environmental Engineering course at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow. This is done in relation to course content and scope, design and research projects, the role of experimentation and the deployment of advanced computing in terms

  19. The medical collections at the University of Glasgow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Maggie; McDonald, Stuart W

    2009-01-01

    The medical and other collections in the University of Glasgow have at their core the generous bequest of Dr William Hunter (1718 - 1783), a local man who rose to become an internationally renowned anatomist and obstetrician. The University does not have a Medical Museum as such but an Anatomy Museum, a Zoology Museum, a Pathology Collection, medical displays in the main halls of the Hunterian Museum in the Gilbert Scott Building and a rich collection of antiquarian medical books and archives as well as contemporary libraries. The Hunterian Collection, since its inauguration at the University of Glasgow in 1807, has engendered a spirit of diversity and scholarship that embraces many disciplines across the campus. The Hunterian Museum was the first public museum in Scotland and service to the local, national and international communities and response to their academic needs is very much at heart of its function today.

  20. Learning from history: The Glasgow Airport terrorist attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, Gillies

    Glasgow Airport was the target of a terrorist attack on 30th June, 2007. Many people within Scotland had come to believe that Scotland was immune from terrorism. This perception was in large part informed by Scotland's experience during the protracted Troubles in Northern Ireland, during which the Provisional Irish Republican Army's mainland bombing campaign focused on targets in England, sparing both Scotland and Wales. While Glasgow Airport did not expect such an attack to take place, meticulous planning, organising and testing of plans had taken place to mitigate the unlikely event of such an attack. The attack stands up as a shining example of robust business continuity management, where the airport reopened for business as usual in less than 24 hours from the time of the attack. Little is known about how the airport handled the situation in conjunction with other responding agencies as people tend to want to focus on high-profile disasters only. Yet countless such incidents are happening worldwide on a daily basis, in which there are excellent learning opportunities, and, taken in the spirit of converting hindsight into foresight, the likelihood of similar incidents could potentially be reduced in the future.

  1. Nueva terminal del aeropuerto de Glasgow (Abbotsinch, Inglaterra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spence, Basil

    1968-12-01

    Full Text Available This airport substitutes the one at Renfrew, which had become inadequate for the modern volume of traffic. The new airport will handle the intense passenger traffic on the Glasgow London route, which by 1970 it is estimated will reach 970 passengers per hour. Arrangements have been made for a possible enlargement to double the present air traffic capacity of the airport, namely, a maximum of 32 aircraft per hour. The airport building houses everything related to the passengers and offices in the top part, and it has highly modern installations of all types, of which the following are outstanding: the electronic information desks, the bar which is fully air conditioned, and the hall. The general structure is of reinforced concrete, with precast flooring frameworks. The baggage hall has metallic loading tables. The building has a highly impressive external appearance, and is faced with slabs of concrete, whose fine texture has been the result of using carefully chosen formwork of specially grained timber. White slabs and dark brick have also been utilised.Se hizo en sustitución del de Renfrew, que había quedado inadecuado, y dirigirá el intenso movimiento de viajeros y transporte de la ruta Glasgow-Londres, que se calcula, para 1970, en 970 pasajeros a la hora. Por ello, se ha previsto una posible ampliación al doble, con capacidad para un máximo de 33 aviones. El edificio alberga todo lo relacionado con los pasajeros y las oficinas en la parte superior, disponiendo de modernísimas instalaciones de todo tipo, entre las que destacan: los tableros electrónicos y puestos de información, bar y restaurante con climatización total, etc. La estructura general es de hormigón armado con forjados prefabricados; en los muelles es metálica. El aspecto exterior, de una gran elegancia, está conseguido a base de placas de hormigón visto —con bella textura lograda con encofrados muy cuidados de madera rayada—, plaquetas prefabricadas blancas y

  2. Relating quality of life to Glasgow outcome scale health states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosty, Jennifer; Macyszyn, Luke; Lai, Kevin; McCroskery, James; Park, Hae-Ran; Stein, Sherman C

    2012-05-01

    There has recently been a call for the adoption of comparative effectiveness research (CER) and related research approaches for studying traumatic brain injury (TBI). These methods allow researchers to compare the effectiveness of different therapies in producing patient-oriented outcomes of interest. Heretofore, the only measures by which to compare such therapies have been mortality and rate of poor outcome. Better comparisons can be made if parametric, preference-based quality-of-life (QOL) values are available for intermediate outcomes, such as those described by the Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE). Our objective was therefore to determine QOL for the health states described by the GOSE. We interviewed community members at least 18 years of age using the standard gamble method to assess QOL for descriptions of GOSE scores of 2-7 derived from the structured interview. Linear regression analysis was also performed to assess the effect of age, gender, and years of education on QOL. One hundred and one participants between the ages of 18 and 83 were interviewed (mean age 40 ± 19 years), including 55 men and 46 women. Functional impairment and QOL showed a strong inverse relationship, as assessed by both linear regression and the Spearman rank order coefficient. No consistent effect or age, gender, or years of education was seen. As expected, QOL decreased with functional outcome as described by the GOSE. The results of this study will provide the groundwork for future groups seeking to apply CER methods to clinical studies of TBI.

  3. Some studies of maternal and infant lead exposure in Glasgow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, M.R.; Goldberg, A.; Pocock, S.J.; Meredith, A.; Stewart, I.M.; MacAnespie, H.; Lees, R.; Low, A.

    1982-04-01

    In two studies in the city of Glasgow, 236 mothers and their newly born infants and 117 mothers and their 6-weeks old children's environmental lead exposure were examined. In both studies blood lead concentrations were found to correlate significantly with the cube root of the domestic water lead concentrations. In the first study, multiple regression analyses of maternal blood lead and cord blood lead concentrations on other variables showed a significant negative correlation with gestational age. It was also noted that there was an annual fluctuation in maternal blood lead concentration with highest values in the autumn. In the second study, similar relationships were found. Although there was no association between blood lead and sex, age, place of birth or feeding method, as in the previous study, a significant association between social class and blood lead was found. This could be explained on the basis of the significant correlation between water lead and social class. In those mothers who breast fed, breast milk lead concentrations were found to correlate significantly with blood lead concentrations where breast milk lead was around one tenth of blood lead concentration. These studies emphasise the importance of water lead in the economy of environmental lead exposure to mothers and their unborn and newly born infants.

  4. Libraries as 'everyday' settings: the Glasgow MCISS project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitelaw, Sandy; Coburn, Jonathan; Lacey, Marion; McKee, Martin J; Hill, Carol

    2017-10-01

    A settings-based approach is now well-established in health promotion, initially undertaken in conventional places like schools and workplaces, but more recently being expressed in a wider range of what Torp et al. call 'everyday' settings. In this context, libraries have emerged as another potential setting whose ubiquity and accessibility suggests that they may be particularly effective in addressing health inequalities. Drawing on a case study-the Glasgow Macmillan Cancer Information and Support Services Library project-this paper reports on the potential for seeing 'libraries as settings' and in the context of a set of associated theoretical resources, specifically scrutinizes the nature of initiative implementation. Data were drawn from multiple sources: semi-structured interviews and focus groups with strategic partners and stakeholders, operational staff, project volunteers, service users and members of the general public. Qualitative data were complemented by quantitative insights from surveys with members of the partnership, libraries staff and volunteers. Despite some concerns associated with potentially hostile cultural and financial contexts that might threaten longer term sustainability, insights suggested that in pragmatic terms, the project was attracting sizable 'footfall' and successfully addressing a range of needs. Additionally, the formal implementation processes associated with project implementation were considered to have been highly successful in embedding the model into the library culture. In summary, there is evidence that libraries have the potential to be considered as supportive settings and could act as a model for an emergent vision of what libraries do. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Assessment of physicians' knowledge of Glasgow coma score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emejulu, Jkc; Nkwerem, Spu; Ekweogwu, O C

    2014-01-01

    Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is the most commonly used tool in assessing comatose patients. It is simple, easily communicable, and useful in prognostication and determination of the treatment modality in head injury. Unfortunately, a high percentage of clinicians who are not in the emergency or neurological services are not conversant with this life-saving tool. The objective of this study was to assess the level of knowledge of GCS among physicians practicing in a tertiary institution in South-East Nigeria, and to evaluate the call for a new and simpler scoring system. This study was carried out using the instrument of a structured-questionnaire in Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi, a federal government tertiary health institution in South-East Zone of Nigeria, which is a 350-bed facility employing about 550 medical doctors of different cadres. A total of 139 questionnaires were distributed to the doctors practicing in the institution who consented to participating in the study. The questionnaires were completed at the point of their administration and completed questionnaires were retrieved on the spot, and data were collated, and analyzed with the Statistical Package for Social Sciences, SPSS version 17.0. Statistical significance was calculated with the chi square, P ≤ 0.5. The modal age group was 20-30 years 66 (48%), and most were resident doctors 99 (66.2%). One week prior to the questionnaire distribution, 56 (42.1%) had been actively involved in emergency care of patients, and 41 (30%) could not recall what GCS stood for. Medical and house officers showed a better knowledge of GCS. There was a poor knowledge of GCS among a good number of physicians practicing in our setting and hence, continuing medical education on GCS is strongly advocated.

  6. The reliability of the Glasgow Coma Scale: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reith, Florence C M; Van den Brande, Ruben; Synnot, Anneliese; Gruen, Russell; Maas, Andrew I R

    2016-01-01

    The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) provides a structured method for assessment of the level of consciousness. Its derived sum score is applied in research and adopted in intensive care unit scoring systems. Controversy exists on the reliability of the GCS. The aim of this systematic review was to summarize evidence on the reliability of the GCS. A literature search was undertaken in MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL. Observational studies that assessed the reliability of the GCS, expressed by a statistical measure, were included. Methodological quality was evaluated with the consensus-based standards for the selection of health measurement instruments checklist and its influence on results considered. Reliability estimates were synthesized narratively. We identified 52 relevant studies that showed significant heterogeneity in the type of reliability estimates used, patients studied, setting and characteristics of observers. Methodological quality was good (n = 7), fair (n = 18) or poor (n = 27). In good quality studies, kappa values were ≥0.6 in 85%, and all intraclass correlation coefficients indicated excellent reliability. Poor quality studies showed lower reliability estimates. Reliability for the GCS components was higher than for the sum score. Factors that may influence reliability include education and training, the level of consciousness and type of stimuli used. Only 13% of studies were of good quality and inconsistency in reported reliability estimates was found. Although the reliability was adequate in good quality studies, further improvement is desirable. From a methodological perspective, the quality of reliability studies needs to be improved. From a clinical perspective, a renewed focus on training/education and standardization of assessment is required.

  7. An Exploration of Smoking Behavior of African Male Immigrants Living in Glasgow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezika, Ejiofor Augustine

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The aim of this research study was to explore the smoking behavior of adult African male immigrant smokers living in Glasgow to inform and contribute to primary health promotion frameworks. METHODS 25 adult African male immigrant smokers living in Glasgow were recruited via consecutive sampling by soliciting for participation through the use of flyers, posters and word of mouth. Data collection occurred via semi-structured face-to-face interviews. The interviews were audio taped, after which verbatim transcription was carried out and the data analyzed thematically. RESULTS The participants’ smoking habits were influenced by cold weather environment as well as societal norms that appear to make the smoking habit more acceptable in Glasgow than Africa. It appears the more educated the participants were, the fewer cigarettes they smoked. However, there was only a slight difference in the number of cigarettes smoked between participants with a degree and those with a postgraduate degree. CONCLUSION The participants’ smoking habits in Glasgow appear to have increased because of environmental variables associated with living in Glasgow, specifically the cold weather environment and high acceptability of smoking habits in Glasgow. PMID:25741179

  8. Validation of the modified Ranson versus Glasgow score for pancreatitis in a Singaporean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yong Hui Alvin; Rafi, Shumaila; Tyebally Fang, Mirriam; Hwang, Stephen; Lim, Ee Wen; Ngu, James; Tan, Su-Ming

    2017-09-01

    The characteristics of patients with acute pancreatitis in multi-ethnic Singapore differ from that of the populations used in formulating the modified Ranson and Glasgow scores. The use of these scoring systems has not previously been validated in the Singaporean setting. This study aims to validate and compare the prognostic use of the modified Ranson and Glasgow scores, and to determine the superiority of one score over the other in predicting the outcome for acute pancreatitis in the Singaporean population. This is a 3-year retrospective study of patients diagnosed with acute pancreatitis at our centre. Patients with chronic pancreatitis, acute on chronic pancreatitis, iatrogenic pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer as well as those with incomplete Ranson or Glasgow scores were excluded from the study. Case notes and computer records were reviewed for local complications of pancreatitis and organ failure. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves of the Ranson and Glasgow scores were plotted for the prediction of severity and mortality. Between January 2010 and December 2012, 230 cases were diagnosed with acute pancreatitis. A majority of the patients had mild pancreatitis (n = 194, 84.3%), and the overall 30-day mortality rate was 3.5% (n = 8). ROC of the Ranson and Glasgow scoring systems for mortality showed an area under curve (AUC) of 0.854 (P = 0.001) and 0.776 (P = 0.008), respectively. For severity, the AUC for the modified Ranson and Glasgow score was calculated to be 0.694 and 0.668, respectively. The ROC curves of Ranson and Glasgow scores for mortality are comparable with that published in earlier studies. In a Singaporean population, the Ranson score is more accurate in the prediction of mortality. However, both scoring systems are poor predictors for severity of acute pancreatitis. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  9. Euthyroid sick syndrome in head injury patients compared with Glasgow Coma and Outcome Scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palugniok, R.; Kochanska-Dziurowicz, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Background: Evaluation of the role of euthyroid sick syndrome and pituitary gland hormonal changes and the prognosis of patient mortality after severe brain injury. METHODS: The research was conducted on 65 patients with isolated severe brain injury. Blood samples were obtained as soon as possible after the injury and on the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 5th and 7th day after the injury. Blood concentrations of T3, rT3, T4, FT4, TSH, and PRL were estimated. The patients' state of health was evaluated in the sixth hour after the injury, using Glasgow Coma Scale, and after 180 days, using the Glasgow Outcome Scale. Multidirectional correlation was sought between the concentrations of the estimated hormones and the score obtained in the Glasgow Coma Scale and Glasgow Outcome Scale. RESULTS: Cluster analysis showed that concentrations of the hormones in the patients who died are grouped in different clusters from those in the patients who survived. This proves that hormonal patterns are different in these groups. Statistically significant lower T3 concentrations were observed on the 3rd day in comparison with the 0 day. Cumulative proportion surviving was lower for the OP group in comparison with the NOP group and amounted to 0.57. CONCLUSIONS: In all patients covered by the research euthyroid sick syndrome was diagnosed. T3 concentration on the 3rd day after the injury together with the evaluation in Glasgow Coma Scale allows for more precise prognosis. (author)

  10. Perspectives on differing health outcomes by city: accounting for Glasgow's excess mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Simon Ds; George, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Several health outcomes (including mortality) and health-related behaviors are known to be worse in Scotland than in comparable areas of Europe and the United Kingdom. Within Scotland, Greater Glasgow (in West Central Scotland) experiences disproportionately poorer outcomes independent of measurable variation in socioeconomic status and other important determinants. Many reasons for this have been proposed, particularly related to deprivation, inequalities, and variation in health behaviors. The use of models (such as the application of Bradford Hill's viewpoints on causality to the different hypotheses) has provided useful insights on potentially causal mechanisms, with health behaviors and inequalities likely to represent the strongest individual candidates. This review describes the evolution of our understanding of Glasgow's excess mortality, summarizes some of the key work in this area, and provides some suggestions for future areas of exploration. In the context of demographic change, the experience in Glasgow is an important example of the complexity that frequently lies behind observed variations in health outcomes within and between populations. A comprehensive explanation of Glasgow's excess mortality may continue to remain elusive, but is likely to lie in a complex and difficult-to-measure interplay of health determinants acting at different levels in society throughout the life course. Lessons learned from the detailed examination of different potentially causative determinants in Scotland may provide useful methodological insights that may be applied in other settings. Ongoing efforts to unravel the causal mechanisms are needed to inform public health efforts to reduce health inequalities and improve outcomes in Scotland.

  11. A case report on near manual strangulation and glasgow coma scale.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is considered as a gold standard in estimating the prognosis of the comatose patient. The management of the patient relies heavily on this scale. The mechanism of injury must also be included in scor- ing of the GCS. Survival from strangulation is uncommon, and if it ...

  12. Is the "Glasgow effect" of cigarette smoking explained by socio-economic status?: A multilevel analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyland Alastair H

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Glasgow area has elevated levels of deprivation and is known for its poor health and associated negative health-related behaviours, which are socially patterned. Of interest is whether high smoking rates are explained by the area's socio-economic profile. Methods Data on age, sex, current/previous smoking status, area deprivation, social class, education, economic activity, postcode sector, and health board region were available from Scottish Health Surveys conducted in 1995, 1998 and 2003. Multilevel logistic regression models were applied by sex, unadjusted and adjusted for age, survey year, and socio-economic factors, accounting for geographical hierarchy and missing data. Results Compared with the rest of Scotland, men living in Greater Glasgow were 30% and women 43% more likely to smoke [odds ratio (OR = 1.30, (95% CI = 1.08–1.56 and (OR = 1.43, CI = 1.22–1.68, respectively] before adjustment. In adjusted results, the association between living in Greater Glasgow and current smoking was attenuated [OR = 0.92, CI = 0.78–1.09 for men, and OR = 1.08, CI = 0.94–1.23 for women; results based on multiply imputed data to account for missing values remained borderline significant for women]. Accounting for individuals who had been told to give up smoking by a medical person/excluding ex-smokers did not alter results. Conclusion High levels of smoking in Greater Glasgow were attributable to its poorer socio-economic position and the strong social patterning of smoking. Tackling Glasgow's, and indeed Scotland's, poor health must involve policies to alleviate problems associated with poverty.

  13. Street connectivity and obesity in Glasgow, Scotland: impact of age, sex and socioeconomic position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Kylie; Lamb, Karen; Travaglini, Noemi; Ellaway, Anne

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated associations of street connectivity with body mass index (BMI), and whether these associations varied by sex, age and socioeconomic position, amongst adults in Glasgow, Scotland. Data on socio-demographic variables, height and weight were collected from 1062 participants in the Greater Glasgow Health and Well-being Study, and linked with neighbourhood-level census and geo-referenced data on area level deprivation and street connectivity. Results of multilevel models showed that, after adjustment for individual level covariates, street connectivity was not significantly associated with either BMI or BMI category; nor were there any significant interactions between age, sex or socioeconomic position and street connectivity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A Method for Reducing Misclassification in the Extended Glasgow Outcome Score

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Juan; Marmarou, Anthony; Lapane, Kate; Turf, Elizabeth; Wilson, Lindsay

    2010-01-01

    The eight-point extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) is commonly used as the primary outcome measure in traumatic brain injury (TBI) clinical trials. The outcome is conventionally collected through a structured interview with the patient alone or together with a caretaker. Despite the fact that using the structured interview questionnaires helps reach agreement in GOSE assessment between raters, significant variation remains among different raters. We introduce an alternate GOSE rating syste...

  15. Understanding the co-production of public services: the case of asylum seekers in Glasgow

    OpenAIRE

    Strokosch, Kirsty

    2013-01-01

    This thesis explores the co-production of public services in the case of asylum seekers in Glasgow. It makes contributions on the theoretical and empirical levels. First, it integrates two theoretical standpoints on co-production from the public administration/management and services management literatures. This integration forms the basis for the development of an original conceptual framework which differentiates three modes of co-production at the level of the individual ser...

  16. Neither Shoreditch nor Manhattan: Post-politics, 'soft austerity urbanism' and real abstraction in Glasgow North

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Neil

    2018-01-01

    Speirs Locks is being re-constructed as a new cultural quarter in Glasgow North, with urban boosters envisioning the unlikely, rundown and de-populated light industrial estate as a key site in the city's ongoing cultural regeneration strategy. Yet this creative place-making initiative, I argue, masks a post-political conjuncture based on urban speculation, displacement and the foreclosure of dissent. Post-politics at Speirs Locks is characterised by what I term ‘soft austerity urbanism’: seem...

  17. Interconnected synchronicities: the production of Bombay and Glasgow as modern global ports c.1850–1880

    OpenAIRE

    Hazareesingh, Sandip

    2009-01-01

    Cain and Hopkins' influential theory of British imperialism opted for a metropolitan-based model of explanation, rooted in the interests of a City-of-London-based class of ‘gentlemanly capitalists’, and discounting in the process events and experiences in the colonies and the significance of industrialization. By focusing on the simultaneous emergence of Bombay and Glasgow as modern, global ports in the second half of the nineteenth century, this article argues, in diametrical opposition, for...

  18. The food retail environment and area deprivation in Glasgow City, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Laura; Ellaway, Anne; Macintyre, Sally

    2009-08-06

    It has previously been suggested that deprived neighbourhoods within modern cities have poor access to general amenities, for example, fewer food retail outlets. Here we examine the distribution of food retailers by deprivation in the City of Glasgow, UK.We obtained a list of 934 food retailers in Glasgow, UK, in 2007, and mapped these at address level. We categorised small areas (data zones) into quintiles of area deprivation using the 2006 Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation Income sub-domain score. We computed mean number of retailers per 1000 residents per data zone, and mean network distance to nearest outlet from data zone centroid, for all retailers combined and for each of seven categories of retailer separately (i.e. bakers, butchers, fruit and vegetable sellers, fishmongers, convenience stores, supermarkets and delicatessens).The most deprived quintile (of areas) had the greatest mean number of total food retailers per 1000 residents while quintile 1 (least deprived) had the least, and this difference was statistically significant (Chi-square p retailer was within quintile 3 while the furthest distance was within quintile 1, and this was also statistically significant (Chi-square p types of food retailers, and access to amenities depended upon the type of food retailer studied and whether proximity or density was measured. Overall the findings suggested that deprived neighbourhoods within the City of Glasgow did not necessarily have fewer food retail outlets.

  19. A case report on near manual strangulation and glasgow coma scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meel Banwari, L

    2015-09-01

    Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is considered as a gold standard in estimating the prognosis of the comatose patient. The management of the patient relies heavily on this scale. The mechanism of injury must also be included in scoring of the GCS. Survival from strangulation is uncommon, and if it occurs, it is often associated with various complications such as neurological consequences. To highlight a poor correlation with low GCS and ultimate outcome in cases of manual strangulation. This is a case report of young female adult who was raped and manually strangulated by a colleague during a training course for traditional healers. She was admitted with very low (3/15) Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and presumed to have a poor prognosis. She was rigorously ventilated in Intensive Care Unit (ICU), and was discharged from hospital after a week without any complications. The neck and genital injuries are described. This report discusses. A low Glasgow Coma Scale is not a predictive of poor prognosis in cases of manual strangulation.

  20. Gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can predict functional recovery in patients with traumatic brain injury☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Sevil; Guclu-Gunduz, Arzu; Oruckaptan, Hakan; Kose, Nezire; Celik, Bülent

    2012-01-01

    Fifty-one patients with mild (n = 14), moderate (n = 10) and severe traumatic brain injury (n = 27) received early rehabilitation. Level of consciousness was evaluated using the Glasgow Coma Score. Functional level was determined using the Glasgow Outcome Score, whilst mobility was evaluated using the Mobility Scale for Acute Stroke. Activities of daily living were assessed using the Barthel Index. Following Bobath neurodevelopmental therapy, the level of consciousness was significantly improved in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury, but was not greatly influenced in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. Mobility and functional level were significantly improved in patients with mild, moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Gait recovery was more obvious in patients with mild traumatic brain injury than in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Activities of daily living showed an improvement but this was insignificant except for patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Nevertheless, complete recovery was not acquired at discharge. Multiple regression analysis showed that gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can be considered predictors of functional outcomes following traumatic brain injury. PMID:25624828

  1. The furniture of the library of the Glasgow School of Art by Charles Rennie Mackintosh (1868-1928) [dissertation

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, John; Bell, Simon

    1991-01-01

    This dissertation, which encompasses the set of furniture and light fittings designed for use in Glasgow School of Art library has been produced in response to the desire for the complete recording and analysis of that space.

  2. The "Spirit of New Orleans": translating a model of intervention with maltreated children and their families for the Glasgow context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnis, Helen; Bryce, Graham; Phin, Louise; Wilson, Phil

    2010-10-01

    Children in care have higher rates of mental health problems than the general population and placement instability contributes to this. Children are both most vulnerable to the effects of poor quality care and most responsive to treatment in the early weeks and months of life yet, in the UK, permanency decisions are generally not in place until around the age of four. We aimed to understand the components of an innovative system for assessing and intervening with maltreated children and their families developed in New Orleans and to consider how it might be implemented in Glasgow, UK. During and after a visit to New Orleans by a team of Glasgow practitioners, eight key interviews and meetings with New Orleans and Glasgow staff were audio-recorded. Qualitative analysis of verbatim transcripts identified key themes. Themes highlighted shared aspects of the context and attitudes of the two teams, identified gaps in the Glasgow service and steps that would be needed to implement a version of the New Orleans model in Glasgow. Our discussions with the New Orleans team have highlighted concrete steps we can take, in Glasgow, to make better decision-making for vulnerable children a reality.

  3. Glasgow conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, Gordon

    1994-10-15

    The biennial 'Rochester' International Conferences on High Energy Physics which tick the rhythm of high energy physics progress reflect the dominance of the 'Standard Model' - the picture of electroweak and quark/gluon interactions in a simple framework of six weaklyinteracting particles (leptons) and six quarks. Despite its limited intellectual appeal, after a decade of intense probing the Standard Model still refuses to budge.

  4. Glasgow conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, Gordon

    1994-01-01

    The biennial 'Rochester' International Conferences on High Energy Physics which tick the rhythm of high energy physics progress reflect the dominance of the 'Standard Model' - the picture of electroweak and quark/gluon interactions in a simple framework of six weaklyinteracting particles (leptons) and six quarks. Despite its limited intellectual appeal, after a decade of intense probing the Standard Model still refuses to budge

  5. Data analysis and review of radiology services at Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethapudi, Sarath; Ritchie, David; Bongale, Santosh; Gordon, Jonny; MacLean, John; Mendl, Liz

    2015-10-01

    Medical services at the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games (CWG) were provided though a purpose-built medical polyclinic, which had a fully equipped radiology department along with other services, set up within the main Games Village. Data analysis of radiology services offered at CWG has not been published before. Imaging services within the polyclinic, Athletes Village, Glasgow 2014 CWG. The aim of the paper is to analyse data on radiological investigations and assess the demand and distribution of workload on imaging services at CWG 2014. Data on radiology investigations at the CWG 2014 was retrieved from the Carestream picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and Pharmasys (CWG official centralised electronic database system) and analysed. Six hundred ninety-seven diagnostic and interventional procedures were performed. Of these 37.9% were magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, 22% were diagnostic ultrasound (US) examinations, 33.1% were radiographs, 4.3% were computed tomography (CT) scans and 2.7% were imaging-guided interventional procedures. 88% of imaging was performed on athletes and the remainder were performed on team officials and workforce. Demand on radiology services gradually picked up through the pre-competition period and peaked half way through the CWG. Radiology played a vital role in the successful provision of medical services at the Glasgow 2014 CWG. High demand on imaging services can be expected at major international sporting events and therefore pre-event planning is vital. Having back-up facilities in case of technical failure should be given due importance when planning radiology services at future CWG events.

  6. Data analysis and review of radiology services at Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethapudi, Sarath; Ritchie, David; Bongale, Santosh; Gordon, Jonny; MacLean, John; Mendl, Liz

    2015-01-01

    Medical services at the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games (CWG) were provided though a purpose-built medical polyclinic, which had a fully equipped radiology department along with other services, set up within the main Games Village. Data analysis of radiology services offered at CWG has not been published before. Imaging services within the polyclinic, Athletes Village, Glasgow 2014 CWG. The aim of the paper is to analyse data on radiological investigations and assess the demand and distribution of workload on imaging services at CWG 2014. Data on radiology investigations at the CWG 2014 was retrieved from the Carestream picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and Pharmasys (CWG official centralised electronic database system) and analysed. Six hundred ninety-seven diagnostic and interventional procedures were performed. Of these 37.9 % were magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, 22 % were diagnostic ultrasound (US) examinations, 33.1 % were radiographs, 4.3 % were computed tomography (CT) scans and 2.7 % were imaging-guided interventional procedures. 88 % of imaging was performed on athletes and the remainder were performed on team officials and workforce. Demand on radiology services gradually picked up through the pre-competition period and peaked half way through the CWG. Radiology played a vital role in the successful provision of medical services at the Glasgow 2014 CWG. High demand on imaging services can be expected at major international sporting events and therefore pre-event planning is vital. Having back-up facilities in case of technical failure should be given due importance when planning radiology services at future CWG events. (orig.)

  7. Data analysis and review of radiology services at Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethapudi, Sarath [County Durham Darlington Foundation NHS Trust, Durham (United Kingdom); Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Ritchie, David [Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Greater Glasgow and Clyde Hospitals NHS Trust, Western Infirmary, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Bongale, Santosh [Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games, Immediate Care Department, Glasgow (United Kingdom); NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Royal Alexandra Hospital, Paisley (United Kingdom); Gordon, Jonny [Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games, Glasgow (United Kingdom); NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); MacLean, John [Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games, Glasgow (United Kingdom); National Stadium Sports Medicine Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Mendl, Liz [Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Medical services at the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games (CWG) were provided though a purpose-built medical polyclinic, which had a fully equipped radiology department along with other services, set up within the main Games Village. Data analysis of radiology services offered at CWG has not been published before. Imaging services within the polyclinic, Athletes Village, Glasgow 2014 CWG. The aim of the paper is to analyse data on radiological investigations and assess the demand and distribution of workload on imaging services at CWG 2014. Data on radiology investigations at the CWG 2014 was retrieved from the Carestream picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and Pharmasys (CWG official centralised electronic database system) and analysed. Six hundred ninety-seven diagnostic and interventional procedures were performed. Of these 37.9 % were magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, 22 % were diagnostic ultrasound (US) examinations, 33.1 % were radiographs, 4.3 % were computed tomography (CT) scans and 2.7 % were imaging-guided interventional procedures. 88 % of imaging was performed on athletes and the remainder were performed on team officials and workforce. Demand on radiology services gradually picked up through the pre-competition period and peaked half way through the CWG. Radiology played a vital role in the successful provision of medical services at the Glasgow 2014 CWG. High demand on imaging services can be expected at major international sporting events and therefore pre-event planning is vital. Having back-up facilities in case of technical failure should be given due importance when planning radiology services at future CWG events. (orig.)

  8. Validity of a Pediatric Version of the Glasgow Outcome Scale–Extended

    OpenAIRE

    Beers, Sue R.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Garcia-Filion, Pamela; Tian, Ye; Hahner, Thomas; Berger, Rachel P.; Bell, Michael J.; Adelson, P. David

    2012-01-01

    The Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) and its most recent revision, the GOS–Extended (GOS-E), provide the gold standard for measuring traumatic brain injury (TBI) outcome. The GOS-E exhibits validity when used with adults and some adolescents, but validity with younger children is not established. Because the GOS-E lacks the developmental specificity necessary to evaluate children, toddlers, and infants, we modified the original version to create the GOS-E Pediatric Revision (GOS-E Peds), a develop...

  9. Performance of New Thresholds of the Glasgow Blatchford Score in Managing Patients With Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig B; Dalton, Harry R; Murray, Iain A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGIH) is a common cause of hospital admission. The Glasgow Blatchford score (GBS) is an accurate determinant of patients' risk for hospital-based intervention or death. Patients with a GBS of 0 are at low risk for poor outcome and could....... METHODS: We performed an observational study of 2305 consecutive patients presenting with UGIH at 4 centers (Scotland, England, Denmark, and New Zealand). The performance of each threshold and modification was evaluated based on sensitivity and specificity analyses, the proportion of low-risk patients...

  10. The state of radiological protection; views of the radiation protection profession: IRPA13, Glasgow, May 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, Edward; Smith, Rachel; Coates, Roger; Andersen, Ralph; Asano, Yoshihiro; Chapple, Claire-Louise; Faulkner, Keith; Hefner, Alfred; Hill, Marion; Jones, Rick; Larsson, Carl-Magnus; Liebenberg, Gert; Visage, Abrie; Liland, Astrid; McKinlay, Alastair; Menzel, Hans-Georg; Perks, Christopher; Rodriguez, Manuel; Schieber, Caroline; Shaw, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The IRPA13 Congress took place from 14–18 May 2012 in Glasgow, Scotland, UK, and was attended by almost 1500 radiological protection professionals. The scientific programme of the Congress was designed to capture a snapshot of the profession’s views of the current state of knowledge, and of the challenges seen for the coming years. This paper provides a summary of these results of the Congress in twelve key scientific areas that served as the structural backbone of IRPA13. (memorandum)

  11. Assessment of daytime outdoor comfort levels in and outside the urban area of Glasgow, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Eduardo; Drach, Patricia; Emmanuel, Rohinton; Corbella, Oscar

    2013-07-01

    To understand thermal preferences and to define a preliminary outdoor comfort range for the local population of Glasgow, UK, an extensive series of measurements and surveys was carried out during 19 monitoring campaigns from winter through summer 2011 at six different monitoring points in pedestrian areas of downtown Glasgow. For data collection, a Davis Vantage Pro2 weather station equipped with temperature and humidity sensors, cup anemometer with wind vane, silicon pyranometer and globe thermometer was employed. Predictions of the outdoor thermal index PET (physiologically equivalent temperature) correlated closely to the actual thermal votes of respondents. Using concurrent measurements from a second Davis Vantage Pro2 weather station placed in a rural setting approximately 15 km from the urban area, comparisons were drawn with regard to daytime thermal comfort levels and urban-rural temperature differences (∆T(u-r)) for the various sites. The urban sites exhibited a consistent lower level of thermal discomfort during daytime. No discernible effect of urban form attributes in terms of the sky-view factor were observed on ∆Tu-r or on the relative difference of the adjusted predicted percentage of dissatisfied (PPD*).

  12. Dr. Auzoux's botanical teaching models and medical education at the universities of Glasgow and Aberdeen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, Margaret Maria

    2011-09-01

    In the 1860s, Dr. Louis Thomas Jérôme Auzoux introduced a set of papier-mâché teaching models intended for use in the botanical classroom. These botanical models quickly made their way into the educational curricula of institutions around the world. Within these institutions, Auzoux's models were principally used to fulfil educational goals, but their incorporation into diverse curricula also suggests they were used to implement agendas beyond botanical instruction. This essay examines the various uses and meanings of Dr. Auzoux's botanical teaching models at the universities of Glasgow and Aberdeen in the nineteenth century. The two main conclusions of this analysis are: (1) investing in prestigious scientific collections was a way for these universities to attract fee-paying students so that better medical accommodation could be provided and (2) models were used to transmit different kinds of botanical knowledge at both universities. The style of botany at the University of Glasgow was offensive and the department there actively embraced and incorporated ideas of the emerging new botany. At Aberdeen, the style of botany was defensive and there was some hesitancy when confronting new botanical ideas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The food retail environment and area deprivation in Glasgow City, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macintyre Sally

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has previously been suggested that deprived neighbourhoods within modern cities have poor access to general amenities, for example, fewer food retail outlets. Here we examine the distribution of food retailers by deprivation in the City of Glasgow, UK. We obtained a list of 934 food retailers in Glasgow, UK, in 2007, and mapped these at address level. We categorised small areas (data zones into quintiles of area deprivation using the 2006 Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation Income sub-domain score. We computed mean number of retailers per 1000 residents per data zone, and mean network distance to nearest outlet from data zone centroid, for all retailers combined and for each of seven categories of retailer separately (i.e. bakers, butchers, fruit and vegetable sellers, fishmongers, convenience stores, supermarkets and delicatessens. The most deprived quintile (of areas had the greatest mean number of total food retailers per 1000 residents while quintile 1 (least deprived had the least, and this difference was statistically significant (Chi-square p

  14. The relationship between pneumonia and Glasgow coma scale assessment on acute stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritarwan, K.; Batubara, C. A.; Dhanu, R.

    2018-03-01

    Pneumonia is one of the most frequent medical complications of a stroke. Despite the well-documented association of a stroke associated infections with increased mortality and worse long-term outcome, on the other hand, the limited data available on independent predictors of pneumonia in acute stroke patients in an emergency unit. To determine the independentrelationship between pneumonia and Glasgow Coma Scale assessment on acute stroke patients. The cohort retrospective study observed 55 acute stroke patients who stayed in intensive care unit Adam Malik General Hospital from January until August 2017. Pneumonia was more frequent in patients with Ischemic stroke (OR 5.40; 95% CI: 1.28 – 6.40, p=0.003), higher National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) (p=0.014) and lower Glasgow Coma Scale (p=0.0001). Analysis multivariate logistic regression identified NIHSS as an independent of predictors of pneumonia (95% CI : 1.047 – 1.326, p=0.001). Pneumonia was associated with severity and type of stroke and length of hospital stay. The severity of the deficits evaluated by the NIHSS was shown to be the only independent risk factor for pneumonia in acute stroke patients.

  15. [French version of structured interviews for the Glasgow Outcome Scale: guidelines and first studies of validation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayol, P; Carrière, H; Habonimana, D; Preux, P-M; Dumond, J-J

    2004-05-01

    The Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) is the most widely used outcome measure after traumatic brain injury. The GOS's reliability is improved by a structured interview. The two aims of this paper were to present a French version of the structured interview for the five-point Glasgow Outcome Scale and the extended eight-point GOS (GOSE) and to study their validity. The French version was developed using back-translation. Concurrent validity was studied by comparison with GOS/GOSE without structured interview. Inter-rater reliability was studied by comparison between assignments made by untrained head injury observers and trained head injury observers. Strength of agreement between ratings was assessed using the Kappa statistic. The French version and the guidelines for their use are given in the Appendix. Ratings were made for 25 brain injured patients and 25 relatives. Concurrent validity was good and inter-rater reliability was excellent. Using the structured interview for the GOS will give a more reliable assessment of the outcome of brain injured patients by French-speaking rehabilitation teams and a more precise assessment with the extended GOS.

  16. Scenario Testing of the Energy and Environmental Performance of “The Glasgow House”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Sharpe

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the results from a 12-month study of two prototype low energy dwellings built for Glasgow Housing Association (GHA. The houses are intended for mainstream and social tenure within Glasgow and contain a range of energy reducing features including one house with a thermally heavy clay block wall and one house using a conventional timber frame and both houses have sunspaces, Mechanical Ventilation with Heat Recovery (MVHR, solar thermal system and low energy lighting. The dwellings have been subject to an innovative monitoring strategy by MEARU, whereby test occupants (students recruited from the School of Architecture have been asked to inhabit the buildings for six two-week periods using occupancy ‘scripts’ that determine their internal behaviour. The scenarios thus simulate varying patterns of occupancy in both houses simultaneously and the performance of the houses can then been compared. Indications are that although the clay block house had a poorer thermal performance, it did have other qualitative advantages, and consumption differences could be eliminated by exploiting the thermal mass. The performance of the active systems, including the MVHR system, was found to be problematic, and specific scenarios were undertaken to explore the implications of this.

  17. Is proximity to a food retail store associated with diet and BMI in Glasgow, Scotland?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ball Kylie

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Access to healthy food is often seen as a potentially important contributor to diet. Policy documents in many countries suggest that variations in access contribute to inequalities in diet and in health. Some studies, mostly in the USA, have found that proximity to food stores is associated with dietary patterns, body weight and socio-economic differences in diet and obesity, whilst others have found no such relationships. We aim to investigate whether proximity to food retail stores is associated with dietary patterns or Body Mass Index in Glasgow, a large city in the UK. Methods We mapped data from a 'Health and Well-Being Survey' (n = 991, and a list of food stores (n = 741 in Glasgow City, using ArcGIS, and undertook network analysis to find the distance from respondents' home addresses to the nearest fruit and vegetable store, small general store, and supermarket. Results We found few statistically significant associations between proximity to food retail outlets and diet or obesity, for unadjusted or adjusted models, or when stratifying by gender, car ownership or employment. Conclusions The findings suggest that in urban settings in the UK the distribution of retail food stores may not be a major influence on diet and weight, possibly because most urban residents have reasonable access to food stores.

  18. Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Prediction of Mortality From Clinical Presentation and Glasgow Aneurysm Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarten, Toby N; Thompson, Lauren T; Licatino, Lauren K; Bailey, Christopher H; Schroeder, Darrell R; Sprung, Juraj

    2016-04-01

    To examine association of presenting clinical acuity and Glasgow Aneurysm Score (GAS) with perioperative and 1-year mortality. Retrospective chart review. Major tertiary care facility. Patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) from 2003 through 2013. Emergency repair of rAAA. The authors reviewed outcomes after stable versus unstable presentation and by GAS. Unstable presentation included hypotension, cardiac arrest, loss of consciousness, and preoperative tracheal intubation. In total, 125 patients (40 stable) underwent repair. Perioperative mortality rates were 41% and 12% in unstable and stable patients, respectively (pClinical presentation and GAS identified patients with rAAA who were likely to have a poor surgical outcome. GAS≥96 was associated with poor long-term survival, but>20% of these patients survived 1 year. Thus, neither clinical presentation nor GAS provided reliable guidance for decisions regarding futility of surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Audit of the Forensic Psychiatry Liaison Service to Glasgow Sheriff Court 1994 to 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, T; Ramsay, L; Morrison, R

    2002-01-01

    This study seeks to describe the demographic, offence, and diagnostic details of subjects referred by the Procurator Fiscal at Glasgow Sheriff Court to the Forensic Psychiatry Liaison between 1994 and 1997. The initial outcome of the assessment and an assessment of medical time involved is presented. This study is a retrospective review of audit forms completed between 1993 and 1994 and once more in 1997. The referral criteria, age structure and offence pattern was broadly similar to that reported in court diversion schemes in England. A primary diagnosis of alcohol and/or drug dependence was seen in one third of referrals during both years of the audit. A marked increase (250%) in referrals between 1994 and 1997 resulted in a marked reduction of those admitted to hospital, and an increase in the percentage who had 'no psychiatric diagnosis'. The need for ongoing liaison between the Procurators Fiscal and the Forensic Psychiatrists involved would appear important in modifying referral criteria.

  20. Out-of-home food outlets and area deprivation: case study in Glasgow, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cummins Steven

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a popular belief that out-of-home eating outlets, which typically serve energy dense food, may be more commonly found in more deprived areas and that this may contribute to higher rates of obesity and related diseases in such areas. Methods We obtained a list of all 1301 out-of-home eating outlets in Glasgow, UK, in 2003 and mapped these at unit postcode level. We categorised them into quintiles of area deprivation using the 2004 Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation and computed mean density of types of outlet (restaurants, fast food restaurants, cafes and takeaways, and all types combined, per 1000 population. We also estimated odds ratios for the presence of any outlets in small areas within the quintiles. Results The density of outlets, and the likelihood of having any outlets, was highest in the second most affluent quintile (Q2 and lowest in the second most deprived quintile (Q4. Mean outlets per 1,000 were 4.02 in Q2, 1.20 in Q4 and 2.03 in Q5. With Q2 as the reference, Odds Ratios for having any outlets were 0.52 (CI 0.32–0.84 in Q1, 0.50 (CI 0.31 – 0.80 in Q4 and 0.61 (CI 0.38 – 0.98 in Q5. Outlets were located in the City Centre, West End, and along arterial roads. Conclusion In Glasgow those living in poorer areas are not more likely to be exposed to out-of-home eating outlets in their neighbourhoods. Health improvement policies need to be based on empirical evidence about the location of fast food outlets in specific national and local contexts, rather than on popular 'factoids'.

  1. Variations of the entrepreneurial city: Goals, roles visions in Rotterdam’s Kop van Zuid and the Glasgow Harbour megaprojects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doucet, B.M.

    2013-01-01

    Both Rotterdam’s Kop van Zuid and the Glasgow Harbour waterfront developments are examples of different forms of European urban entrepreneurial megaprojects. They are both situated on formerly vacant land in older industrial cities. In Rotterdam, the municipality has taken the initiative in

  2. Combination of Glasgow Coma Scale, Age, and Systolic Blood Pressure in Assessing Patients’ Outcomes with Decreased Consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir S Madjid

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS is commonly used to assess outcomes of patients with loss of consciousness, but it is insufficient in predicting the outcome of some cases. This study aimed to assess the combination of GCS, systolic blood pressure and age to predict the outcome of patients with decreased consciousness. This was a retrospective cohort observational study of 76 loss of consciousness patients that comes into the Emergency Department of Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital in June-August 2014. Data was obtained from the medical records . GCS, systolic blood pressure and age were recorded when patients were admitted to the triage. Outcome was assessed two weeks after admission in the emergency department. Bivariate analysis on the GCS and age showed significant different between patients with poor outcome group with good outcome group (p<0.05 and no significant different of the systolic blood pressure between both groups (p>0.05. Multivariate analysis on the GCS and age showed good probability equation based on the calibration test and discrimination. The combination of Glasgow Coma Scale and age was accurate in assessing the outcomes of patients with loss of consciousness. Keywords. Glasgow Coma Scale, systolic, age, outcomes     Gabungan Glasgow Coma Scale, Umur, dan Tekanan Darah Sistolik Sebagai Penilai Luaran Pasien Penurunan Kesadaran   Abstrak Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS telah menjadi salah satu penilaian yang digunakan untuk menilai luaran pasien penurunan kesadaran, tetapi dinilai masih belum mampu memprediksi luaran yang terjadi. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menilai gabungan GCS, tekanan darah sistolik dan umur untuk memprediksi luaran pasien dengan penurunan kesadaran. Penelitian ini merupakan studi observasional kohort retrospektif yang melibatkan 76 pasien dengan penurunan kesadaran yang datang ke IGD RSUPN Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo selama bulan Juni-Agustus 2014. Data diambil dari rekam medik. GCS, tekanan darah sistolik dan

  3. Predictive Utility of the Total Glasgow Coma Scale Versus the Motor Component of the Glasgow Coma Scale for Identification of Patients With Serious Traumatic Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Roger; Totten, Annette M; Carney, Nancy; Dandy, Spencer; Fu, Rongwei; Grusing, Sara; Pappas, Miranda; Wasson, Ngoc; Newgard, Craig D

    2017-08-01

    The motor component of the Glasgow Coma Scale (mGCS) has been proposed as an easier-to-use alternative to the total GCS (tGCS) for field assessment of trauma patients by emergency medical services. We perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the predictive utility of the tGCS versus the mGCS or Simplified Motor Scale in field triage of trauma for identifying patients with adverse outcomes (inhospital mortality or severe brain injury) or who underwent procedures (neurosurgical intervention or emergency intubation) indicating need for high-level trauma care. Ovid MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PsycINFO, Health and Psychosocial Instruments, and the Cochrane databases were searched through June 2016 for English-language cohort studies. We included studies that compared the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) of the tGCS versus the mGCS or Simplified Motor Scale assessed in the field or shortly after arrival in the emergency department for predicting the outcomes described above. Meta-analyses were performed with a random-effects model, and subgroup and sensitivity analyses were conducted. We included 18 head-to-head studies of predictive utility (n=1,703,388). For inhospital mortality, the tGCS was associated with slightly greater discrimination than the mGCS (pooled mean difference in [AUROC] 0.015; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.009 to 0.022; I 2 =85%; 12 studies) or the Simplified Motor Scale (pooled mean difference in AUROC 0.030; 95% CI 0.024 to 0.036; I 2 =0%; 5 studies). The tGCS was also associated with greater discrimination than the mGCS or Simplified Motor Scale for nonmortality outcomes (differences in AUROC from 0.03 to 0.05). Findings were robust in subgroup and sensitivity analyses. The tGCS is associated with slightly greater discrimination than the mGCS or Simplified Motor Scale for identifying severe trauma. The small differences in discrimination are likely to be

  4. Assessment of nurse's knowledge about Glasgow coma scale at a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Wesley Cajaíba; Vancini-Campanharo, Cássia Regina; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag

    2016-01-01

    To assess knowledge of nurses of emergency services and intensive care units about Glasgow Coma Scale. This cross-sectional analytical study included 127 nurses of critical units of an university hospital. We used structured interview with 12 questions to evaluate their knowledge about the scale. Association of Knowledge with professionals' sociodemographic variables were verified by the Fisher-test, χ2 and likelihood ratio. Most of participants were women mean aged 31.1 years, they had graduated more than 5 years previously, and had 1 to 3 years of work experience. In the assessment of best score possible for Glasgow scale (question 3) nurses who had graduate more than 5 years ago presented a lower percentage success rate (p=0.0476). However, in the question 7, which evaluated what interval of the scale indicated moderate severity of brain trauma injury, those with more years of experience had higher percentage of correct answers (p=0.0251). In addition, nurses from emergency service had more correct answers than nurses from intensive care unit (p=0.0143) in the same question. Nurses graduated for more than 5 years ago had a lower percentage of correct answers in question 7 (p=0.0161). Nurses with more work experience had a better score (p=0.0119) to identify how assessment of motor response should be started. Number of year since graduation, experience, and work at critical care units interfered in nurses' knowledge about the scale, which indicates the need of training. Avaliar o conhecimento de enfermeiros de unidades críticas, serviços de emergência e unidades de terapia intensiva em relação à escala de coma de Glasgow. Estudo transversal e analítico com 127 enfermeiros de unidades críticas de um hospital universitário. Utilizou-se entrevista estruturada com 12 questões que avaliaram conhecimento sobre a escala. Associação do conhecimento com variáveis sociodemográficas dos profissionais foi verificada pelo teste de Fisher, teste χ2 e razão de

  5. Cost comparison of orthopaedic fracture pathways using discrete event simulation in a Glasgow hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Paul J; McDonald, David A; Van Der Meer, Robert; Morton, Alec; Nugent, Margaret; Rymaszewski, Lech A

    2017-01-01

    Objective Healthcare faces the continual challenge of improving outcome while aiming to reduce cost. The aim of this study was to determine the micro cost differences of the Glasgow non-operative trauma virtual pathway in comparison to a traditional pathway. Design Discrete event simulation was used to model and analyse cost and resource utilisation with an activity-based costing approach. Data for a full comparison before the process change was unavailable so we used a modelling approach, comparing a virtual fracture clinic (VFC) with a simulated traditional fracture clinic (TFC). Setting The orthopaedic unit VFC pathway pioneered at Glasgow Royal Infirmary has attracted significant attention and interest and is the focus of this cost study. Outcome measures Our study focused exclusively on patients with non-operative trauma attending emergency department or the minor injuries unit and the subsequent step in the patient pathway. Retrospective studies of patient outcomes as a result of the protocol introductions for specific injuries are presented in association with activity costs from the models. Results Patients are satisfied with the new pathway, the information provided and the outcome of their injuries (Evidence Level IV). There was a 65% reduction in the number of first outpatient face-to-face (f2f) attendances in orthopaedics. In the VFC pathway, the resources required per day were significantly lower for all staff groups (p≤0.001). The overall cost per patient of the VFC pathway was £22.84 (95% CI 21.74 to 23.92) per patient compared with £36.81 (95% CI 35.65 to 37.97) for the TFC pathway. Conclusions Our results give a clearer picture of the cost comparison of the virtual pathway over a wholly traditional f2f clinic system. The use of simulation-based stochastic costings in healthcare economic analysis has been limited to date, but this study provides evidence for adoption of this method as a basis for its application in other healthcare settings

  6. Cost comparison of orthopaedic fracture pathways using discrete event simulation in a Glasgow hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gillian H; Jenkins, Paul J; McDonald, David A; Van Der Meer, Robert; Morton, Alec; Nugent, Margaret; Rymaszewski, Lech A

    2017-09-07

    Healthcare faces the continual challenge of improving outcome while aiming to reduce cost. The aim of this study was to determine the micro cost differences of the Glasgow non-operative trauma virtual pathway in comparison to a traditional pathway. Discrete event simulation was used to model and analyse cost and resource utilisation with an activity-based costing approach. Data for a full comparison before the process change was unavailable so we used a modelling approach, comparing a virtual fracture clinic (VFC) with a simulated traditional fracture clinic (TFC). The orthopaedic unit VFC pathway pioneered at Glasgow Royal Infirmary has attracted significant attention and interest and is the focus of this cost study. Our study focused exclusively on patients with non-operative trauma attending emergency department or the minor injuries unit and the subsequent step in the patient pathway. Retrospective studies of patient outcomes as a result of the protocol introductions for specific injuries are presented in association with activity costs from the models. Patients are satisfied with the new pathway, the information provided and the outcome of their injuries (Evidence Level IV). There was a 65% reduction in the number of first outpatient face-to-face (f2f) attendances in orthopaedics. In the VFC pathway, the resources required per day were significantly lower for all staff groups (p≤0.001). The overall cost per patient of the VFC pathway was £22.84 (95% CI 21.74 to 23.92) per patient compared with £36.81 (95% CI 35.65 to 37.97) for the TFC pathway. Our results give a clearer picture of the cost comparison of the virtual pathway over a wholly traditional f2f clinic system. The use of simulation-based stochastic costings in healthcare economic analysis has been limited to date, but this study provides evidence for adoption of this method as a basis for its application in other healthcare settings. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise

  7. Modelling lead bioaccessibility in urban topsoils based on data from Glasgow, London, Northampton and Swansea, UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleton, J.D.; Cave, M.R.; Wragg, J.

    2012-01-01

    Predictive linear regression (LR) modelling between bioaccessible Pb and a range of total elemental compositions and soil properties was executed for the Glasgow, London, Northampton and Swansea urban areas in order to assess the potential for developing a national urban bioaccessible Pb dataset for the UK. LR indicates that total Pb is the only highly significant independent variable for estimating the bioaccessibility of Pb. Bootstrap resampling shows that the relationship between total Pb and bioaccessible Pb is broadly the same in the four urban areas. The median bioaccessible fraction ranges from 38% in Northampton to 68% in London and Swansea. Results of this study can be used as part of a lines of evidence approach to localised risk assessment but should not be used to replace bioaccessibility testing at individual sites where local conditions may vary considerably from the broad overview presented in this study. - Highlights: ► Total Pb is the only significant predictor for bioaccessible Pb in UK urban topsoils. ► Bootstrap resampling confirms relationship similar in four urban areas. ► Median bioaccessible fraction ranges from 38 to 68%. ► Results can be used for initial risk assessment in UK urban areas. - Total Pb is the only significant predictor for bioaccessible Pb in topsoils from four urban areas in the UK.

  8. Item-Level Psychometrics of the Glasgow Outcome Scale: Extended Structured Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ickpyo; Li, Chih-Ying; Velozo, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    The Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOSE) structured interview captures critical components of activities and participation, including home, shopping, work, leisure, and family/friend relationships. Eighty-nine community dwelling adults with mild-moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) were recruited (average = 2.7 year post injury). Nine items of the 19 items were used for the psychometrics analysis purpose. Factor analysis and item-level psychometrics were investigated using the Rasch partial-credit model. Although the principal components analysis of residuals suggests that a single measurement factor dominates the measure, the instrument did not meet the factor analysis criteria. Five items met the rating scale criteria. Eight items fit the Rasch model. The instrument demonstrated low person reliability (0.63), low person strata (2.07), and a slight ceiling effect. The GOSE demonstrated limitations in precisely measuring activities/participation for individuals after TBI. Future studies should examine the impact of the low precision of the GOSE on effect size. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. A study of issues in administering library services to nursing studies students at Glasgow Caledonian University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, John

    2002-06-01

    Glasgow Caledonian University has had a Scottish Office pre-registration nursing and midwifery contract since 1996. Nursing studies students seemed dissatisfied with the library service and there were frequent complaints. A major study was undertaken during 2000 consisting of: an initial lis-link enquiry, separate analysis of returns from nursing studies students of the Library's annual general satisfaction survey (conducted every February), separate analysis of returns from nursing studies students of the Library's opening hours planning survey, and four focus groups held in October 2000. These studies showed the concerns of nursing studies students to be similar to other students but more strongly felt. The four main issues were textbook availability, journal availability, opening hours and staff helpfulness. Working conditions, placement requirements, study requirements and domestic circumstances were all found to be important factors. IT skill levels tended to be low but there is a growing appreciation of the need for training in this area. Concluded that: Library's services to nursing studies students have become enmeshed with the problems of delivery and assessment of education for nurses. Greatly extended opening hours are essential including evening opening during vacations. The problem of access to textbooks is so severe that conventional solutions are not going to work. Programmes of core text digitization and the promotion of e-books are needed. Reciprocal access programmes with local hospital libraries is essential.

  10. Tracheostomy decannulation at the Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Glasgow: Predictors of success and failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, Fiona; Baird, Tracy-Anne; Clement, W Andrew; Kubba, Haytham

    2016-11-01

    Tracheostomy techniques, indications and care are extensively covered in the literature. However, little is written about the process of removing the tracheostomy tube. At the Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Glasgow we use a stepwise ward-based protocol for safe tracheostomy decannulation. Our aim therefore was to review all the paediatric tracheostomy decannulations that we attempted over the last 3 years to evaluate our protocol, to determine our success rate and to see whether any modifications to the protocol are required. We reviewed all patients who had undergone ward decannulation between January 2012 and May 2015. We extracted data from clinical records including patient characteristics, indications for tracheostomy, timing of decannulation and success or failure of the process. The 45 children in the study underwent 57 attempts at decannulation during the study period. 25 were male (56%) and 20 were female (44%), and they were aged between 1 day and 16 years 6 months at the time of the original tracheostomy operation. 33 attempts were successful (58%). 10 children had more than one attempt at decannulation. Children were found to fail at every stage of the protocol, with the commonest point of failure being day 2 when the tracheostomy tube was capped. We have demonstrated that our current protocol for ward decannulation is effective and safe, and that all five days of the protocol are required. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Relationship between nutritional status and the Glasgow Prognostic Score in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurício, Sílvia Fernandes; da Silva, Jacqueline Braga; Bering, Tatiana; Correia, Maria Isabel Toulson Davisson

    2013-04-01

    The association between nutritional status and inflammation was assessed in patients with colorectal cancer and to verify their association with complications during anticancer treatment. The agreement between the Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) and different nutritional assessment methods was also evaluated. A cross-sectional, prospective, and descriptive study was performed. The nutritional status was defined by the SGA and the severity of inflammation was defined by the Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS). The complications were classified using the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3. Anthropometric measurements such as body mass index, triceps skinfold, midarm circumference, midarm muscle area, and adductor pollicis muscle thickness were also performed, as were handgrip strength and phase angle. The chi-square test, Fisher exact test, Spearman correlation coefficient, independent t test, analysis of variance, Gabriel test, and κ index were used for the statistical analysis. P cancer (60.4 ± 14.3 y old) were included. The nutritional status according to the SGA was associated with the GPS (P nutritional assessment methods with the SGA, there were statistically significant differences. Malnutrition is highly prevalent in patients with colorectal cancer. The nutritional status was associated with the GPS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mortality in NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde employees: 2007-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, K; Waclawski, E

    2013-09-01

    Just over a fifth of all deaths in Scotland occur in those under the age of 65. This study examined deaths in service in employees of the National Health Service Greater Glasgow and Clyde (NHS GG&C) Health Board over a 3-year period. To assess crude death rates by occupational group, the main causes of death and evidence of causes that could have been prevented or modified by lifestyle changes. Demographic details, occupational grouping and death certificate data were obtained for all NHS GG&C employees who died in service between 2007 and 2009. A total of 138 employees died in this period. The occupational groups in which most deaths occurred were support services (porters, domestic and catering staff; 35%) and nurses (34%). The commonest causes of death were lung cancer (15%), ischaemic heart disease (9%) and suicide (9%). The overall crude death rate was 1.2/1000 persons/year (females 1.0 and males 1.7) and was highest among support services employees (2.4) and lowest among medical staff (0.5). The relative risk of death in support services was significantly greater than the majority of occupational groups. These findings suggest health inequality within this workforce. The main causes of death identified in the support services group could potentially be modified through workplace risk factor screening and health promotion.

  13. Proceedings of the international photovoltaic solar energy conference held in Glasgow 1-5 May 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2001-02-01

    The European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conferences are dedicated to accelerating the impetus towards sustainable development of global PV markets. The 16th in the series, held in Glasgow UK, brought together more than 1500 delegates from 72 countries, and provided an important and vital forum for information exchange in the field. The Conference Proceedings place on record a new phase of market development and scientific endeavour in the PV industry, representing current and innovative thinking in all aspects of the science, technology, markets and business of photovoltaics. In three volumes, the Proceedings present some 790 papers selected for presentation by the scientific review committee of the 16th European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference. The Comprehensive range of topics covered comprises: Fundamentals, Novel Devices and New Materials. Thin Film Cells and Technologies. Space Cells and Systems. Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells and Technologies. PV Integration in Buildings. PV Modules and Components of PV Systems. Implementation, Strategies, National Programs and Financing Schemes. Market Deployment in Developing Countries. (author)

  14. Prognostic significance of Glasgow prognostic score in patients undergoing esophagectomy for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ji-Feng; Zhao, Qiang; Chen, Qi-Xun

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that Glasgow prognostic score (GPS), an inflammation-based prognostic score, is inversely related to prognosis in a variety of cancers; high levels of GPS is associated with poor prognosis. However, few studies regarding GPS in esophageal cancer (EC) are available. The aim of this study was to determine whether the GPS is useful for predicting cancer-specific survival (CSS) of patients for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). The GPS was calculated on the basis of admission data as follows: Patients with elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) level (>10 mg/L) and hypoalbuminemia (L) were assigned to GPS2. Patients with one or no abnormal value were assigned to GPS1 or GPS0, respectively. Our study showed that GPS was associated with tumor size, depth of invasion, and nodal metastasis (PGPS0, GPS1, and GPS2 were 60.8%, 34.7% and 10.7%, respectively (PGPS was a significant predictor of CSS. GPS1-2 had a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.399 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.805-3.190] for 1-year CSS (PGPS is associated with tumor progression. GPS can be considered as an independent prognostic factor in patients who underwent esophagectomy for ESCC.

  15. The inflammation-based Glasgow Prognostic Score predicts survival in patients with cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polterauer, Stephan; Grimm, Christoph; Seebacher, Veronika; Rahhal, Jasmin; Tempfer, Clemens; Reinthaller, Alexander; Hefler, Lukas

    2010-08-01

    The Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) is known to reflect the degree of tumor-associated cachexia and inflammation and is associated with survival in various malignancies. We investigated the value of the GPS in patients with cervical cancer. We included 244 consecutive patients with cervical cancer in our study. The pretherapeutic GPS was calculated as follows: patients with elevated C-reactive protein serum levels (>10 mg/L) and hypoalbuminemia (L) were allocated a score of 2, and patients with 1 or no abnormal value were allocated a score of 1 or 0, respectively. The association between GPS and survival was evaluated by univariate log-rank tests and multivariate Cox regression models. The GPS was correlated with clinicopathologic parameters as shown by performing chi2 tests. In univariate analyses, GPS (P GPS (P = 0.03, P = 0.04), FIGO stage (P = 0.006, P = 0.006), and lymph node involvement (P = 0.003, P = 0.002), but not patients' age (P = 0.5, P = 0.5), histological grade (P = 0.7, P = 0.6), and histological type (P = 0.4, P = 0.6) were associated with disease-free and overall survival, respectively. The GPS was associated with FIGO stage (P GPS can be used as an inflammation-based predictor for survival in patients with cervical cancer.

  16. The Glasgow-Maastricht foot model, evaluation of a 26 segment kinematic model of the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterwaal, Michiel; Carbes, Sylvain; Telfer, Scott; Woodburn, James; Tørholm, Søren; Al-Munajjed, Amir A; van Rhijn, Lodewijk; Meijer, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Accurately measuring of intrinsic foot kinematics using skin mounted markers is difficult, limited in part by the physical dimensions of the foot. Existing kinematic foot models solve this problem by combining multiple bones into idealized rigid segments. This study presents a novel foot model that allows the motion of the 26 bones to be individually estimated via a combination of partial joint constraints and coupling the motion of separate joints using kinematic rhythms. Segmented CT data from one healthy subject was used to create a template Glasgow-Maastricht foot model (GM-model). Following this, the template was scaled to produce subject-specific models for five additional healthy participants using a surface scan of the foot and ankle. Forty-three skin mounted markers, mainly positioned around the foot and ankle, were used to capture the stance phase of the right foot of the six healthy participants during walking. The GM-model was then applied to calculate the intrinsic foot kinematics. Distinct motion patterns where found for all joints. The variability in outcome depended on the location of the joint, with reasonable results for sagittal plane motions and poor results for transverse plane motions. The results of the GM-model were comparable with existing literature, including bone pin studies, with respect to the range of motion, motion pattern and timing of the motion in the studied joints. This novel model is the most complete kinematic model to date. Further evaluation of the model is warranted.

  17. 11th February 2011 - Member of the Parliament for Glasgow North and Shadow Secretary of State for Scotland A. McKechin MP signing the geust book with Adviser J. Ellis, University of Glasgow Principal A. Muscatelli and Engineering Department Head R. Saban.

    CERN Document Server

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2011-01-01

    11th February 2011 - Member of the Parliament for Glasgow North and Shadow Secretary of State for Scotland A. McKechin MP signing the geust book with Adviser J. Ellis, University of Glasgow Principal A. Muscatelli and Engineering Department Head R. Saban.

  18. The Glasgow Benefit Inventory: a systematic review of the use and value of an otorhinolaryngological generic patient-recorded outcome measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, J.; Chin, A.; Swan, I.R.C.; Akeroyd, M.A.; Browning, G.G.

    2018-01-01

    Background The Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI) is a validated, generic patient-recorded outcome measure widely used in otolaryngology to report change in quality of life post-intervention. Objectives of review To date, no systematic review has made (i) a quality assessment of reporting of Glasgow Benefit Inventory outcomes; (ii) a comparison between Glasgow Benefit Inventory outcomes for different interventions and objectives; (iii) an evaluation of subscales in describing the area of benefit; (iv) commented on its value in clinical practice and research. Type of review Systematic review. Search strategy ‘Glasgow Benefit Inventory’ and ‘GBI’ were used as keywords to search for published, unpublished and ongoing trials in PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL and Google in addition to an ISI citation search for the original validating Glasgow Benefit Inventory paper between 1996 and January 2015. Evaluation method Papers were assessed for study type and quality graded by a predesigned scale, by two authors independently. Papers with sufficient quality Glasgow Benefit Inventory data were identified for statistical comparisons. Papers with 50% and gave sufficient Glasgow Benefit Inventory total and subscales for meta-analysis. For five of the 11 operation categories (vestibular schwannoma, tonsillectomy, cochlear implant, middle ear implant and stapes surgery) that were most likely to have a single clear clinical objective, score data had low-to-moderate heterogeneity. The value in the Glasgow Benefit Inventory having both positive and negative scores was shown by an overall negative score for the management of vestibular schwannoma. The other six operations gave considerable heterogeneity with rhinoplasty and septoplasty giving the greatest percentages (98% and 99%) most likely because of the considerable variations in patient selection. The data from these operations should not be used for comparative purposes. Five papers also reported the number of patients that had no

  19. Validation of the Glasgow-Blatchford Scoring System to predict mortality in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding in a hospital of Lima, Peru (June 2012-December 2013)

    OpenAIRE

    Cassana, Alessandra; Scialom, Silvia; Segura, Eddy R.; Chacaltana, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim: Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a major cause of hospitalization and the most prevalent emergency worldwide, with a mortality rate of up to 14%. In Peru, there have not been any studies on the use of the Glasgow-Blatchford Scoring System to predict mortality in upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The aim of this study is to perform an external validation of the Glasgow-Blatchford Scoring System and to establish the best cutoff for predicting mortality in upper gastrointest...

  20. Systemic inflammation predicts all-cause mortality: a glasgow inflammation outcome study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Proctor

    Full Text Available Markers of the systemic inflammatory response, including C-reactive protein and albumin (combined to form the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score, as well as neutrophil, lymphocyte and platelet counts have been shown to be prognostic of survival in patients with cancer. The aim of the present study was to examine the prognostic relationship between these markers of the systemic inflammatory response and all-cause, cancer, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular mortality in a large incidentally sampled cohort.Patients (n = 160 481 who had an incidental blood sample taken between 2000 and 2008 were studied for the prognostic value of C-reactive protein (>10mg/l, albumin (>35mg/l, neutrophil (>7.5×109/l lymphocyte and platelet counts. Also, patients (n = 52 091 sampled following the introduction of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (>3mg/l measurements were studied. A combination of these markers, to make cumulative inflammation-based scores, were investigated.In all patients (n = 160 481 C-reactive protein (>10mg/l (HR 2.71, p35mg/l (HR 3.68, p3mg/l (n = 52 091. A combination of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (>3mg/l, albumin and neutrophil count predicted all-cause (HR 7.37, p<0.001, AUC 0.723, cancer (HR 9.32, p<0.001, AUC 0.731, cardiovascular (HR 4.03, p<0.001, AUC 0.650 and cerebrovascular (HR 3.10, p<0.001, AUC 0.623 mortality.The results of the present study showed that an inflammation-based prognostic score, combining high sensitivity C-reactive protein, albumin and neutrophil count is prognostic of all-cause mortality.

  1. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Glasgow NTMS quadrangle, Montana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-06-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Glasgow NTMS quadrangle, Montana. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A through C describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, stream-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  2. Prognostic value of the Glasgow Prognostic Score for glioblastoma multiforme patients treated with radiotherapy and temozolomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topkan, Erkan; Selek, Ugur; Ozdemir, Yurday; Yildirim, Berna A; Guler, Ozan C; Ciner, Fuat; Mertsoylu, Huseyin; Tufan, Kadir

    2018-04-25

    To evaluate the prognostic value of the Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), the combination of C-reactive protein (CRP) and albumin, in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) and concurrent plus adjuvant temozolomide (GPS). Data of newly diagnosed GBM patients treated with partial brain RT and concurrent and adjuvant TMZ were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were grouped into three according to the GPS criteria: GPS-0: CRP L and albumin > 35 g/L; GPS-1: CRP L and albumin L or CRP > 10 mg/L and albumin > 35 g/L; and GPS-2: CRP > 10 mg/L and albumin L. Primary end-point was the association between the GPS groups and the overall survival (OS) outcomes. A total of 142 patients were analyzed (median age: 58 years, 66.2% male). There were 64 (45.1%), 40 (28.2%), and 38 (26.7%) patients in GPS-0, GPS-1, and GPS-2 groups, respectively. At median 15.7 months follow-up, the respective median and 5-year OS rates for the whole cohort were 16.2 months (95% CI 12.7-19.7) and 9.5%. In multivariate analyses GPS grouping emerged independently associated with the median OS (P GPS grouping and the RTOG RPA classification were found to be strongly correlated in prognostic stratification of GBM patients (correlation coefficient: 0.42; P GPS appeared to be useful in prognostic stratification of GBM patients into three groups with significantly different survival durations resembling the RTOG RPA classification.

  3. Performance of new thresholds of the Glasgow Blatchford score in managing patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Stig B; Dalton, Harry R; Murray, Iain A; Michell, Nick; Johnston, Matt R; Schultz, Michael; Hansen, Jane M; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B; Blatchford, Oliver; Stanley, Adrian J

    2015-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGIH) is a common cause of hospital admission. The Glasgow Blatchford score (GBS) is an accurate determinant of patients' risk for hospital-based intervention or death. Patients with a GBS of 0 are at low risk for poor outcome and could be managed as outpatients. Some investigators therefore have proposed extending the definition of low-risk patients by using a higher GBS cut-off value, possibly with an age adjustment. We compared 3 thresholds of the GBS and 2 age-adjusted modifications to identify the optimal cut-off value or modification. We performed an observational study of 2305 consecutive patients presenting with UGIH at 4 centers (Scotland, England, Denmark, and New Zealand). The performance of each threshold and modification was evaluated based on sensitivity and specificity analyses, the proportion of low-risk patients identified, and outcomes of patients classified as low risk. There were differences in age (P = .0001), need for intervention (P 97%). The GBS at cut-off values of ≤1 and ≤2, and both modifications, identified low-risk patients with higher levels of specificity (40%-49%) than the GBS with a cut-off value of 0 (22% specificity; P < .001). The GBS at a cut-off value of ≤2 had the highest specificity, but 3% of patients classified as low-risk patients had adverse outcomes. All GBS cut-off values, and score modifications, had low levels of specificity when tested in New Zealand (2.5%-11%). A GBS cut-off value of ≤1 and both GBS modifications identify almost twice as many low-risk patients with UGIH as a GBS at a cut-off value of 0. Implementing a protocol for outpatient management, based on one of these scores, could reduce hospital admissions by 15% to 20%. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Glasgow Prognostic Score Predicts Response to Chemotherapy in Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dexing; Duan, Li; Tu, Zhiquan; Yan, Fei; Zhang, Cuicui; Li, Xu; Cao, Yuzhu; Wen, Hongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death in women worldwide. The Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), a cumulative prognostic score based on C-reactive protein and albumin, indicates the presence of a systemic inflammatory response. The GPS has been adopted as a powerful prognostic tool for patients with various types of malignant tumors, including breast cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the value of the GPS in predicting the response and toxicity in breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. Patients with metastatic breast cancers in a progressive stage for consideration of chemotherapy were eligible. The clinical characteristics and demographics were recorded. The GPS was calculated before the onset of chemotherapy. Data on the response to chemotherapy and progression-free survival (PFS) were also collected. Objective tumor responses were evaluated according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). Toxicities were graded according to National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI-CTC) version 3.0 throughout therapy. In total, 106 breast cancer patients were recruited. The GPS was associated with the response rate (p = 0.05), the clinical benefit rate (p = 0.03), and PFS (p = 0.005). The GPS was the only independent predictor of PFS (p = 0.005). The GPS was significantly associated with neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, anorexia, nausea and vomiting, fatigue, and mucositis (p = 0.05-0.001). Our data demonstrate that GPS assessment is associated with poor clinical outcomes and severe chemotherapy-related toxicities in patients with metastatic breast cancer who have undergone chemotherapy, without any specific indication regarding the type of chemotherapy applied. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Factors Influencing the Reliability of the Glasgow Coma Scale: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reith, Florence Cm; Synnot, Anneliese; van den Brande, Ruben; Gruen, Russell L; Maas, Andrew Ir

    2017-06-01

    The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) characterizes patients with diminished consciousness. In a recent systematic review, we found overall adequate reliability across different clinical settings, but reliability estimates varied considerably between studies, and methodological quality of studies was overall poor. Identifying and understanding factors that can affect its reliability is important, in order to promote high standards for clinical use of the GCS. The aim of this systematic review was to identify factors that influence reliability and to provide an evidence base for promoting consistent and reliable application of the GCS. A comprehensive literature search was undertaken in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL from 1974 to July 2016. Studies assessing the reliability of the GCS in adults or describing any factor that influences reliability were included. Two reviewers independently screened citations, selected full texts, and undertook data extraction and critical appraisal. Methodological quality of studies was evaluated with the consensus-based standards for the selection of health measurement instruments checklist. Data were synthesized narratively and presented in tables. Forty-one studies were included for analysis. Factors identified that may influence reliability are education and training, the level of consciousness, and type of stimuli used. Conflicting results were found for experience of the observer, the pathology causing the reduced consciousness, and intubation/sedation. No clear influence was found for the professional background of observers. Reliability of the GCS is influenced by multiple factors and as such is context dependent. This review points to the potential for improvement from training and education and standardization of assessment methods, for which recommendations are presented. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  6. A lead isotopic study of the human bioaccessibility of lead in urban soils from Glasgow, Scotland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, John G.; Broadway, Andrew; Cave, Mark R.; Wragg, Joanna; Fordyce, Fiona M.; Graham, Margaret C.; Ngwenya, Bryne T.; Bewley, Richard J.F.

    2011-01-01

    The human bioaccessibility of lead (Pb) in Pb-contaminated soils from the Glasgow area was determined by the Unified Bioaccessibility Research Group of Europe (BARGE) Method (UBM), an in vitro physiologically based extraction scheme that mimics the chemical environment of the human gastrointestinal system and contains both stomach and intestine compartments. For 27 soils ranging in total Pb concentration from 126 to 2160 mg kg -1 (median 539 mg kg -1 ), bioaccessibility as determined by the 'stomach' simulation (pH ∼ 1.5) was 46-1580 mg kg -1 , equivalent to 23-77% (mean 52%) of soil total Pb concentration. The corresponding bioaccessibility data for the 'stomach + intestine' simulation (pH ∼ 6.3) were 6-623 mg kg -1 and 2-42% (mean 22%) of soil Pb concentration. The soil 206 Pb/ 207 Pb ratios ranged from 1.057 to 1.175. Three-isotope plots of 208 Pb/ 206 Pb against 206 Pb/ 207 Pb demonstrated that 206 Pb/ 207 Pb ratios were intermediate between values for source end-member extremes of imported Australian Pb ore (1.04) - used in the manufacture of alkyl Pb compounds (1.06-1.10) formerly added to petrol - and indigenous Pb ores/coal (1.17-1.19). The 206 Pb/ 207 Pb ratios of the UBM 'stomach' extracts were similar ( 206 Pb/ 207 Pb ratio was discernible in the UBM. However, the source of Pb appeared to be less important in determining the extent of UBM-bioaccessible Pb than the overall soil total Pb concentration and the soil phases with which the Pb was associated. The significant phases identified in a subset of samples were carbonates, manganese oxides, iron-aluminium oxyhydroxides and clays. - Highlights: → We determined the human bioaccessibility of Pb in urban soils by in vitro extraction. → We determined the isotopic composition of Pb in soils and simulated stomach extracts. → Soil stable Pb isotope ratios (e.g. 206 Pb/ 207 Pb) indicated a range of sources of Pb. → 206 Pb/ 207 Pb ratios in soils and their simulated stomach extracts were very similar

  7. A lead isotopic study of the human bioaccessibility of lead in urban soils from Glasgow, Scotland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, John G., E-mail: J.G.Farmer@ed.ac.uk [School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JN, Scotland (United Kingdom); Broadway, Andrew [School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JN, Scotland (United Kingdom); Cave, Mark R.; Wragg, Joanna [British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG, England (United Kingdom); Fordyce, Fiona M. [British Geological Survey, Edinburgh, EH9 3LA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Graham, Margaret C.; Ngwenya, Bryne T. [School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JN, Scotland (United Kingdom); Bewley, Richard J.F. [URS Corporation Ltd, Manchester, M1 6HS, England (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-01

    The human bioaccessibility of lead (Pb) in Pb-contaminated soils from the Glasgow area was determined by the Unified Bioaccessibility Research Group of Europe (BARGE) Method (UBM), an in vitro physiologically based extraction scheme that mimics the chemical environment of the human gastrointestinal system and contains both stomach and intestine compartments. For 27 soils ranging in total Pb concentration from 126 to 2160 mg kg{sup -1} (median 539 mg kg{sup -1}), bioaccessibility as determined by the 'stomach' simulation (pH {approx} 1.5) was 46-1580 mg kg{sup -1}, equivalent to 23-77% (mean 52%) of soil total Pb concentration. The corresponding bioaccessibility data for the 'stomach + intestine' simulation (pH {approx} 6.3) were 6-623 mg kg{sup -1} and 2-42% (mean 22%) of soil Pb concentration. The soil {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratios ranged from 1.057 to 1.175. Three-isotope plots of {sup 208}Pb/{sup 206}Pb against {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb demonstrated that {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratios were intermediate between values for source end-member extremes of imported Australian Pb ore (1.04) - used in the manufacture of alkyl Pb compounds (1.06-1.10) formerly added to petrol - and indigenous Pb ores/coal (1.17-1.19). The {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratios of the UBM 'stomach' extracts were similar (< 0.01 difference) to those of the soil for 26 of the 27 samples (r = 0.993, p < 0.001) and lower in 24 of them. A slight preference for lower {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratio was discernible in the UBM. However, the source of Pb appeared to be less important in determining the extent of UBM-bioaccessible Pb than the overall soil total Pb concentration and the soil phases with which the Pb was associated. The significant phases identified in a subset of samples were carbonates, manganese oxides, iron-aluminium oxyhydroxides and clays. - Highlights: {yields} We determined the human bioaccessibility of Pb in urban soils by in vitro extraction. {yields} We

  8. A method for reducing misclassification in the extended Glasgow Outcome Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Juan; Marmarou, Anthony; Lapane, Kate; Turf, Elizabeth; Wilson, Lindsay

    2010-05-01

    The eight-point extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) is commonly used as the primary outcome measure in traumatic brain injury (TBI) clinical trials. The outcome is conventionally collected through a structured interview with the patient alone or together with a caretaker. Despite the fact that using the structured interview questionnaires helps reach agreement in GOSE assessment between raters, significant variation remains among different raters. We introduce an alternate GOSE rating system as an aid in determining GOSE scores, with the objective of reducing inter-rater variation in the primary outcome assessment in TBI trials. Forty-five trauma centers were randomly assigned to three groups to assess GOSE scores on sample cases, using the alternative GOSE rating system coupled with central quality control (Group 1), the alternative system alone (Group 2), or conventional structured interviews (Group 3). The inter-rater variation between an expert and untrained raters was assessed for each group and reported through raw agreement and with weighted kappa (kappa) statistics. Groups 2 and 3 without central review yielded inter-rater agreements of 83% (weighted kappa = 0.81; 95% CI 0.69, 0.92) and 83% (weighted kappa = 0.76, 95% CI 0.63, 0.89), respectively, in GOS scores. In GOSE, the groups had an agreement of 76% (weighted kappa = 0.79; 95% CI 0.69, 0.89), and 63% (weighted kappa = 0.70; 95% CI 0.60, 0.81), respectively. The group using the alternative rating system coupled with central monitoring yielded the highest inter-rater agreement among the three groups in rating GOS (97%; weighted kappa = 0.95; 95% CI 0.89, 1.00), and GOSE (97%; weighted kappa = 0.97; 95% CI 0.91, 1.00). The alternate system is an improved GOSE rating method that reduces inter-rater variations and provides for the first time, source documentation and structured narratives that allow a thorough central review of information. The data suggest that a collective effort can be made to

  9. Tailoring the Glasgow University diagnostic aid for the product storage facilities at TRP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, J.; Miller, E

    2001-02-01

    This report concludes the work carried out under Task D2(d)/UK D00912: Development of Anomaly Diagnosis Algorithms for a Plutonium Tank Monitoring System, which was the companion to Task D2(c)/UK D00913: Analysis and Diagnosis of Anomalies at Bulk-Handling Nuclear Materials Facilities: Benchmarking and Optimisation. Between them these tasks produced a computer software package that could diagnose anomalies in plant data pertaining to solutions of nuclear materials stored and transported around reprocessing plants. The final goal of Task UK D00912 was to demonstrate to the Agency that the software could be applied to the product storage area at the Tokai Reprocessing Plant in Japan. The University of Glasgow does not produce software to any recognisable standard, so this was not an acceptance trial, but a demonstration. It was recognised that further software development would be required before the package could be accepted as a safeguards tool. Being the final report, the report focuses on the issues that are still outstanding so those who choose to continue with this work have a clear understanding of the status of the software. It is taken for granted that the reader appreciates that the package should be able to explain relatively small anomalies (> 0.1 SQ) and has numerous features to estimate evaporation rates, pipe hold-up and so on. Here the focus is on the minor gremlins that are still to be resolved. The report first explains how the software package would be tailored so that it could be implemented at TRP. Of key importance is the fact that the plant uses scanivalves, which multiplex pressure lines from various dip-tubes onto the same pressure transducer. Although suitable for the measurement of a number of signals that are always steady, these devices are less suited to situations where tanks are frequently sparged and where the anomalies of interest inherently relate to changes in data and hence to non-steady operation. This affects the way the data

  10. Glasgow Prognostic Score as a Prognostic Clinical Marker in T4 Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Masaichi; Kubo, Naoshi; Masuda, Go; Yamashita, Yoshito; Sakurai, Katsunobu; Toyokawa, Takahiro; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Muguruma, Kazuya; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2015-09-01

    Patients with clinical T4 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) have an unfavorable prognosis, mainly indicated by the response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT), crucial to estimating long-term survival. Other prognostic measures include systemic inflammatory or immunonutritional indices such as the Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) and Prognostic Nutritional Index (PNI) that have not been sufficiently documented. This study retrospectively evaluated 91 patients with T4 ESCC treated at our Hospital between 2000 and 2013. All patients initially received CRT, including 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and cisplatin or nedaplatin with concurrent 2-Gy/fraction radiation (total dose, 40-60 Gy). Curative tumor resection was undertaken in suitable patients on completing CRT. Patients were classified as GPS0, GPS1, or GPS2 based on C-reactive protein (CRP) ≤ 10 mg/l and albumin ≥ 35 g/l, CRP >10 mg/l or albumin l, or CRP >10 mg/l and albumin l, respectively. PNI was calculated as 10-times the serum albumin (g/dl)+0.005 × total lymphocyte count (/mm(3)). The impact of the pre-treatment GPS and PNI on the prognosis of patients with T4 ESCC was investigated in univariate and multivariate analyses. Sixty (67%) patients responded to CRT (9 complete responses and 51 partial responses). Forty-one (45%) patients also underwent surgical resection of the residual tumor. The overall 5-year survival rate and median survival time were 27.0% and 11.8 months, respectively. In the cohort of CRT-plus-surgical resection, the 5-year survival rate was significantly higher than in the groups treated with CRT-alone (51.1% vs. 6.5%; p GPS1/2 (HR=2.151, p=0.015), and surgical resection (HR=0.282, pGPS is a useful, simple survival marker for patients with T4 ESCC undergoing multimodal therapy. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score and the Glasgow Coma Scale in predicting mortality in critically ill patients*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M; Kramer, Andrew A; Rohs, Thomas; Hanna, Susan; Sadaka, Farid; O'Brien, Jacklyn; Bible, Shonna; Dickess, Stacy M; Foss, Michelle

    2015-02-01

    Impaired consciousness has been incorporated in prediction models that are used in the ICU. The Glasgow Coma Scale has value but is incomplete and cannot be assessed in intubated patients accurately. The Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score may be a better predictor of mortality in critically ill patients. Thirteen ICUs at five U.S. hospitals. One thousand six hundred ninety-five consecutive unselected ICU admissions during a six-month period in 2012. Glasgow Coma Scale and Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score were recorded within 1 hour of admission. Baseline characteristics and physiologic components of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation system, as well as mortality were linked to Glasgow Coma Scale/Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score information. None. We recruited 1,695 critically ill patients, of which 1,645 with complete data could be linked to data in the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation system. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of predicting ICU mortality using the Glasgow Coma Scale was 0.715 (95% CI, 0.663-0.768) and using the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score was 0.742 (95% CI, 0.694-0.790), statistically different (p = 0.001). A similar but nonsignificant difference was found for predicting hospital mortality (p = 0.078). The respiratory and brainstem reflex components of the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score showed a much wider range of mortality than the verbal component of Glasgow Coma Scale. In multivariable models, the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score was more useful than the Glasgow Coma Scale for predicting mortality. The Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score might be a better prognostic tool of ICU mortality than the Glasgow Coma Scale in critically ill patients, most likely a result of incorporating brainstem reflexes and respiration into the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score.

  12. The trivial round, the common task: minutes of the Missionary Board of the Glasgow Missionary Society (1838-1843

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Ross

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to bring to attention a hitherto little-known account of missionary life among the Xhosa people in the Cape Colony during the period 1838-1843 as contained in “The minute book of the Missionary Board of the Glasgow Missionary Society, adhering to the principles of the Church of Scotland, in Caffraria, and in the neighbouring Colony” (MBGMS. The Missionary Board was responsible for providing adequate material infrastructure and logistical support to enable the accomplishment of the aspirations of the Society. The author argues that such mundane work is often neglected in modern missiological historiography, which focuses rather on the more “‘spiritual” aspects of mission work. The historiographic approach adopted in this article is that of modern narrative history. By focusing on some of the themes, trends and struc- tures presenting themselves in the record, the MBGMS is permitted to speak for itself with relatively little retrospective interpretation. It is demonstrated that the Board made an important contribution to the achievement of the goals of the Glasgow Missionary Society, as seen in the rise of a Xhosa middle class and the emergence of a significant group of black intellectuals, whose voice and influence are being recovered after years of enforced neglect.

  13. Integrating Appreciative Inquiry (AI into architectural pedagogy: An assessment experiment of three retrofitted buildings in the city of Glasgow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf M. Salama

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently there has been a growing trend to encourage learning outside the classrooms, so-called ‘universities without walls.’ To this end, mechanisms for learning beyond the boundaries of classroom settings can provide enhanced and challenging learning opportunities. This paper introduces Appreciative Inquiry (AI as a mechanism that integrates various forms of inquiry into learning. AI is operationalized as a Walking Tour assessment project which was introduced as part of the class Cultural and Behavioural Factors in Architecture and Urbanism delivered at the Department of Architecture, University of Strathclyde – Glasgow where thirty-two Master of Architecture students were enrolled. The Walking Tour assessment involved the exploration of 6 factors that delineate key design characteristics in three retrofitted buildings in Glasgow: Theatre Royal, Reid Building, and The Lighthouse. Working in groups, students assessed factors that included context, massing, interface, wayfinding, socio-spatial, and comfort. Findings reveal that students were able to focus on critical issues that go beyond those adopted in traditional teaching practices while accentuating the value of introducing AI and utilizing the built environment as an educational medium. Conclusions are drawn to emphasize the need for structured learning experiences that enable making judgments about building qualities while effectively interrogating various characteristics.

  14. The Glasgow Prognostic Score. An useful tool to predict survival in patients with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Maria Aparecida Coelho de Arruda; Lerco, Mauro Masson; de Oliveira, Walmar Kerche; Guerra, Anderson Roberto; Rodrigues, Maria Aparecida Marchesan

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of the Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) in patients with esophageal carcinoma (EC). A total of 50 patients with EC were analyzed for GPS, nutritional and clinicopathologic parameters. Patients with CRP ≤ 1.0mg/L and albumin ≥ 3.5mg/L were considered as GPS = 0. Patients with only CRP increased or albumin decreased were classified as GPS = 1 and patients with CRP > 1.0mg/L and albumin L were considered as GPS = 2. GPS of 0, 1 and 2 were observed in seven, 23 and 20 patients, respectively. A significant inverse relationship was observed between GPS scores and the survival rate. The survival rate was greatest in patients with GPS = 0 and significantly higher than those from patients with GPS = 1 and GPS = 2. Minimum 12-month survival was observed in 71% patients with GPS = 0 and in 30% patients with GPS = 1. None of the patients with GPS = 2 survived for 12 months. A significant relationship between CRP or albumin individually and the survival rate was observed. No significant relationship among nutritional, clinic pathological parameters and survival was found. Glasgow Prognostic Score is an useful tool to predict survival in patients with esophageal carcinoma.

  15. Who's keeping the code? Compliance with the international code for the marketing of breast-milk substitutes in Greater Glasgow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Rhona J; Wright, Charlotte; Haq, Shogufta; McGranachan, Margaret

    2007-07-01

    To evaluate compliance with the World Health Organization's International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes in primary care, after the introduction of strict local infant feeding guidelines. An audit form was sent to all community-based health professionals with an infant feeding remit. Walking tours were conducted in a random sample of community care facilities. Greater Glasgow Primary Care Division. (1) Primary-care staff with an infant feeding remit; (2) community health-care facilities. Contact with manufacturers of breast-milk substitutes (BMS) and BMS company personnel, free samples or incentives, and advertising of BMS. Contact with company personnel was minimal, usually unsolicited and was mainly to provide product information. Free samples of BMS or feeding equipment were rare but childcare or parenting literature was more prevalent. Staff voiced concerns about the lack of relevant information for bottle-feeding mothers and the need to support the mother's feeding choice. One-third of facilities were still displaying materials non-compliant with the Code, with the most common materials being weight conversion charts and posters. Contact between personnel from primary care and BMS companies was minimal and generally unsolicited. The presence of materials from BMS companies in health-care premises was more common. Due to the high level of bottle-feeding in Glasgow, primary-care staff stated a need for information about BMS.

  16. Bicycle and Car Share Schemes as Inclusive Modes of Travel? A Socio-Spatial Analysis in Glasgow, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Clark

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Public bicycle and car sharing schemes have proliferated in recent years and are increasingly part of the urban transport landscape. Shared transport options have the potential to support social inclusion by improving accessibility: these initiatives could remove some of the barriers to car ownership or bicycle usage such as upfront costs, maintenance and storage. However, the existing evidence base indicates that, in reality, users are most likely to be white, male and middle class. This paper argues that there is a need to consider the social inclusivity of sharing schemes and to develop appropriate evaluation frameworks accordingly. We therefore open by considering ways in which shared transport schemes might be inclusive or not, using a framework developed from accessibility planning. In the second part of the paper, we use the case study of Glasgow in Scotland to undertake a spatial equity analysis of such schemes. We examine how well they serve different population groups across the city, using the locations of bicycle stations and car club parking spaces in Glasgow, comparing and contrasting bike and car. An apparent failure to deliver benefits across the demographic spectrum raises important questions about the socially inclusive nature of public investment in similar schemes.

  17. Evaluation of a pilot peer observation of teaching scheme for chair-side tutors at Glasgow University Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, A M; Bissell, V; Bovill, C

    2013-06-01

    To introduce and examine a pilot peer observation of teaching (POT) scheme within the Department of Paediatric Dentistry at Glasgow Dental School and its associated outreach centres. All tutors teaching paediatric dentistry were invited to be involved in evaluation of the POT scheme. Participants were randomly paired with a peer, who then observed their teaching and provided constructive feedback. For those consenting to be involved in the evaluation of the scheme, semi-structured, one-to-one interviews were carried out by the principal investigator. POT was found by all participants to be a beneficial process, reassuring those of their teaching styles and giving them ideas to adapt their teaching. POT is an effective method for engaging chair-side tutors in the reflection and development of their teaching practice via observations and scholarly discussion.

  18. Geology and climatic indicators in the Westphalian A New Glasgow formation, Nova Scotia, Canada: implications for the genesis of coal and of sandstone-hosted lead deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, F.W. [Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1998-03-01

    Disagreement exists on whether the early Pennsylvanian climate of the Euramerican coal province was everwet or seasonal. Abundant paleopedological evidence, including calcrete-bearing vertisols, shows that during formation of Westphalian C to Stephanian coals in Nova Scotia, the climate was tropical and seasonal with a pronounced by dry season; but interpretation of Westphalian A-B coal-bearing sequences lacks this form of evidence. Development of calcrete-bearing vertisols in alluvial fan deposits of the Westphalian A New Glasgow formation indicate that a tropical climate with a pronounced dry season was already in force by early Westphalian time. During the dry season, the coal swamps of the early Westphalian Joggins and Springhill Mines formations were fed by groundwater from coeval alluvial fan deposits of the Polly Brook Formation at the basin margin. Sedimentological evidence indicates that, similarly, groundwater flowed northward from the toe of the New Glasgow alluvial fan, but correlative palustrine sediments have not been found on land in the New Glasgow area. The possibility remains of an early Westphalian coalfield associated with the New Glasgow formation to the north under the Northumberland Strait and Gulf of St. Lawrence. Formation of the Yava sandstone-hosted lead deposit in the fluvial Silver Mine Formation of Cape Breton Island, a stratigraphic equivalent of the Cumberland Basin coal swamps, indicates that such deposits can form in fluvial strata deposited under a tropical seasonal climate with a pronounced dry season.

  19. "And afterwards your body to be given for public dissection": a history of the murderers dissected in Glasgow and the west of Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, S S; McLeod, K J; McDonald, S W

    2001-02-01

    Between 1752 and 1832, the bodies of hanged murderers were dissected or gibbeted. During this period, 38 murderers were executed in the West of Scotland. The bodies of at least 23 were dissected in Glasgow. The stories of these murders are recounted. Insight is also given into the attitudes of the public and the anatomists to dissection of executed murderers.

  20. Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test: applicability and relation with the Glasgow Coma Scale Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test: aplicabilidad y relación con la Escala de Coma de Glasgow Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test: aplicabilidade e relação com a Escala de Coma de Glasgow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Cristina Fürbringer e Silva

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Restrictions in the application of the Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test and questionings about the relationship between conscience and post-traumatic amnesia motivated this study, which aims to identify, through the Glasgow Coma Scale scores, when to initiate the application of this amnesia test, as well to verify the relationship between the results of these two indicators. The longitudinal prospective study was carried at a referral center for trauma care in São Paulo - Brazil. The sample consisted of 73 victims of blunt traumatic brain injury, admitted at this institution between January 03rd and May 03rd 2001. Regarding the applicability, the test could be applied in patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale score > 12; however, the end of post traumatic amnesia was verified in patients who scored > 14 on the scale. A significant relationship (r s = 0.65 was verified between these measures, although different kinds of relationship between the end of the amnesia and changes in consciousness were observed.Restricciones en la aplicación del Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test y los cuestionamientos sobre la relación entre conciencia y amnesia post-traumática motivaron este estudio que visa identificar, a través de la puntuación de la Escala de Coma de Glasgow, el periodo más adecuado para la aplicación de la prueba de amnesia, y observar la relación entre los resultados de esos dos indicadores. El estudio prospectivo y longitudinal fue realizado en un centro de referencia para traumas en São Paulo - Brasil. El número fue de 73 victimas de trauma craneoencefálico contuso, internadas en esta institución en el periodo de 03/01 a 03/05/2001. Con relación a la aplicabilidad, la prueba puede ser aplicada en los pacientes con la Escala de Coma de Glasgow > 12, pero el término de la amnesia post-traumática fue observado en los pacientes con puntuación > 14 en la escala. Correlación significativa (rs = 0,65 fue observada entre esas

  1. [Validation of the Glasgow-Blatchford Scoring System to predict mortality in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding in a hospital of Lima, Peru (June 2012-December 2013)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassana, Alessandra; Scialom, Silvia; Segura, Eddy R; Chacaltana, Alfonso

    2015-07-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a major cause of hospitalization and the most prevalent emergency worldwide, with a mortality rate of up to 14%. In Peru, there have not been any studies on the use of the Glasgow-Blatchford Scoring System to predict mortality in upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The aim of this study is to perform an external validation of the Glasgow-Blatchford Scoring System and to establish the best cutoff for predicting mortality in upper gastrointestinal bleeding in a hospital of Lima, Peru. This was a longitudinal, retrospective, analytical validation study, with data from patients with a clinical and endoscopic diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding treated at the Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Unit of the Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins between June 2012 and December 2013. We calculated the area under the curve for the receiver operating characteristic of the Glasgow-Blatchford Scoring System to predict mortality with a 95% confidence interval. A total of 339 records were analyzed. 57.5% were male and the mean age (standard deviation) was 67.0 (15.7) years. The median of the Glasgow-Blatchford Scoring System obtained in the population was 12. The ROC analysis for death gave an area under the curve of 0.59 (95% CI 0.5-0.7). Stratifying by type of upper gastrointestinal bleeding resulted in an area under the curve of 0.66 (95% CI 0.53-0.78) for non-variceal type. In this population, the Glasgow-Blatchford Scoring System has no diagnostic validity for predicting mortality.

  2. Validation of the Glasgow-Blatchford Scoring System to predict mortality in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding in a hospital of Lima, Peru (June 2012-December 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Cassana

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a major cause of hospitalization and the most prevalent emergency worldwide, with a mortality rate of up to 14%. In Peru, there have not been any studies on the use of the Glasgow-Blatchford Scoring System to predict mortality in upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The aim of this study is to perform an external validation of the Glasgow-Blatchford Scoring System and to establish the best cutoff for predicting mortality in upper gastrointestinal bleeding in a hospital of Lima, Peru. Methods: This was a longitudinal, retrospective, analytical validation study, with data from patients with a clinical and endoscopic diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding treated at the Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Unit of the Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins between June 2012 and December 2013. We calculated the area under the curve for the receiver operating characteristic of the Glasgow-Blatchford Scoring System to predict mortality with a 95% confidence interval. Results: A total of 339 records were analyzed. 57.5% were male and the mean age (standard deviation was 67.0 (15.7 years. The median of the Glasgow-Blatchford Scoring System obtained in the population was 12. The ROC analysis for death gave an area under the curve of 0.59 (95% CI 0.5-0.7. Stratifying by type of upper gastrointestinal bleeding resulted in an area under the curve of 0.66 (95% CI 0.53-0.78 for non-variceal type. Conclusions: In this population, the Glasgow-Blatchford Scoring System has no diagnostic validity for predicting mortality.

  3. Do children with Glasgow 13/14 could be identified as mild traumatic brain injury? Pacientes pediátricos com Glasgow 13 ou 14 podem ser identificados como traumatismo craniano leve?

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    José Roberto Tude Melo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify in mild head injured children the major differences between those with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS 15 and GCS 13/14. METHOD: Cross-sectional study accomplished through information derived from medical records of mild head injured children presented in the emergency room of a Pediatric Trauma Centre level I, between May 2007 and May 2008. RESULTS: 1888 patients were included. The mean age was 7.6±5.4 years; 93.7% had GCS 15; among children with GCS 13/14, 46.2% (pOBJETIVO: Identificar as principais diferenças entre os pacientes com Escala de Coma de Glasgow (GCS 15 e aqueles com escore 13/14. MÉTODO: Estudo realizado por meio da revisão de prontuários médicos de crianças vítimas de traumatismo craniencefálico leve, admitidas em Centro de Urgências Pediátricas nível I, durante um ano. RESULTADOS: Incluídas 1888 vítimas; idade média de 7,6±5,4 anos; 93,7% apresentaram pontuação 15 na GCS. Naqueles com pontuação 13/14, 46,2% (p<0,001 sofreram traumas múltiplos e 52,1% (p<0,001 apresentaram alterações na tomografia de crânio. Tratamento neurocirúrgico foi necessário em 6,7% dos pacientes com GCS 13/14 e 9,2% (p=0,001 apresentaram seqüelas neurológicas no momento da alta hospitalar. CONCLUSÃO: Crianças com escore 13/14 apresentam maior prevalência de traumas múltiplos, alterações na tomografia de crânio, necessidade de tratamento neurocirúrgico e internação em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva. Devemos ser cautelosos ao classificar crianças com pontuação 13/14 na GCS como vítimas de traumatismo craniano leve.

  4. Association between pretreatment Glasgow prognostic score and gastric cancer survival and clinicopathological features: a meta-analysis

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    Zhang CX

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chun-Xiao Zhang,* Shu-Yi Wang,* Shuang-Qian Chen, Shuai-Long Yang, Lu Wan, Bin Xiong Department of Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Glasgow prognostic score (GPS is widely known as a systemic inflammatory-based marker. The relationship between pretreatment GPS and gastric cancer (GC survival and clinicopathological features remains controversial. The aim of the study was to conduct a meta-analysis of published studies to evaluate the association between pretreatment GPS and survival and clinicopathological features in GC patients. Methods: We searched PubMed, Embase, MEDLINE, and BioMed databases for relevant studies. Combined analyses were used to assess the association between pretreatment GPS and overall survival, disease-free survival, and clinicopathological parameters by Stata Version 12.0. Results: A total of 14 studies were included in this meta-analysis, including 5,579 GC patients. The results indicated that pretreatment high GPS (HGPS predicted poor overall survival (hazard ratio =1.51, 95% CI: 1.37–1.66, P<0.01 and disease-free survival (hazard ratio =1.45, 95% CI: 1.26–1.68, P<0.01 in GC patients. Pretreatment HGPS was also significantly associated with advanced tumor–node–metastasis stage (odds ratio [OR] =3.09, 95% CI: 2.11–4.53, P<0.01, lymph node metastasis (OR =4.60, 95% CI: 3.23–6.56, P<0.01, lymphatic invasion (OR =3.04, 95% CI: 2.00–4.62, P<0.01, and venous invasion (OR =3.56, 95% CI: 1.81–6.99, P<0.01. Conclusion: Our meta-analysis indicated that pretreatment HGPS could be a predicative factor of poor survival outcome and clinicopathological features for GC patients. Keywords: Glasgow prognostic score, gastric cancer, survival, clinicopathological feature

  5. Cine Club

    CERN Document Server

    Ciné Club

    2013-01-01

    Thursday 22 August 2013 at 20:00 CERN Council Chamber The Angels’ Share Directed by Ken Loach (UK, 2012) Original version English; french subtitles; 101 minute This bitter sweet comedy follows protagonist Robbie as he sneaks into the maternity hospital to visit his young girlfriend Leonie and hold his newborn son Luke for the first time. Overwhelmed by the moment, he swears that Luke will not have the same tragic life he has had. Escaping a prison sentence by the skin of his teeth, he's given one last chance...While serving a community service order, he meets Rhino, Albert and Mo who, like him, find it impossible to find work because of their criminal records. Little did Robbie imagine how turning to drink might change their lives - not cheap fortified wine, but the best malt whiskies in the world. Will it be 'slopping out' for the next twenty years, or a new future with 'Uisge Beatha' the 'Water of Life?' Only the angels know.... Th...

  6. MyCity: Glasgow – how can a mobile app based game increase physical activity in the context of a mass spectator sporting event?

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    Cindy Gray

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are many mobile applications being developed to promote healthy lifestyles. Some use gamification as well as psychological behaviour change techniques (BCTs to increase engagement and potential impact on health behaviours. Despite growing research in this area, there is little evidence of game-based apps being rigorously evaluated ‘in the wild’ to explore the mechanisms through which they can achieve widespread user-engagement and health behaviour change. MyCity: Glasgow is a mobile app-based game that aims to use BCTs (self-monitoring of physical activity with daily goal setting and feedback, gamification principles (self-expression, achievement (e.g., quizzes, status and competition and GPS-based features (e.g., challenge trails to encourage users to physically visit locations around Glasgow to increase physical activity (PA and engagement with Glasgow during the period of the 2014 Commonwealth Games. Aim: To use an ‘in the wild’ evaluation to explore the potential and mechanisms of action of a mobile app-based game to increase users’ PA and engagement with their local area. Methods: MyCity: Glasgow was released on Google Play and Apple App Stores in early summer 2014, and real-time usage data logged for 3 months. A mixed-methods approach used quantitative android phone-logged data, an online user experience survey (N=56 and qualitative user interviews (n=11 to investigate uptake, use of behaviour change and gamification features, and impact on physical activity. Results: The app was downloaded 1096 times (android N=673; iOS N=423. Most users were aged 12-25 years (43.1% or 26-40 years (32.6%, with uptake declining with age; over half (51.5% described themselves as physically inactive at baseline. Almost a quarter (24.3% of daily activity goals were achieved; 3,907 quiz questions were attempted, over 72% of which were answered correctly. Survey respondents and interview participants endorsed the self-monitoring and

  7. Estratégias de ensino-aprendizagem na enfermagem: análise pela Escala de Coma de Glasgow Estrategias de enseñanza y aprendizaje en enfermería: análisis por la Escala de coma de Glasgow Teaching-learning strategies in nursing: analysis using the Glasgow Coma Scale

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    Ana Beatriz Pinto da Silva Morita

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Usando como tema a Escala de Coma de Glasgow (ECGl, este estudo objetivou analisar e verificar a retenção do conhecimento frente às estratégias de ensino-aprendizagem e autoaprendizado oferecidas, e verificar o grau de conhecimento adquirido neste processo e a possível associação entre ser ou não aluno que trabalha na enfermagem. Estudo descritivo de abordagem quantitativa. Participaram 62 alunos regularmente matriculados no primeiro semestre do 4º ano de enfermagem. As estratégias de ensino-aprendizagem utilizadas foram: aula expositiva com diapositivos e videoteipe e texto-base. Dos participantes, 41,9% eram trabalhadores na enfermagem; 61,3% informaram ter cuidado de pacientes com alteração do nível de consciência, com predomínio no grupo em que trabalha. Houve incremento estatisticamente significante no percentual de acerto após a aula expositiva e o videoteipe, não havendo alteração no resultado após o autoaprendizado. Não houve diferença no grau de conhecimento adquirido entre os grupos.Usando como tema la Escala de Coma de Glasgow (ECGl, este estudio objetivó analizar y verificar la retención del conocimiento frente a las estrategias de enseñanza aprendizaje y auto aprendizaje ofrecidas; y, verificar el grado de conocimiento adquirido en ese proceso y la posible asociación entre ser o no alumno que trabaja en enfermería. Estudio descriptivo de abordaje cuantitativo. Participaron 62 alumnos regularmente matriculados en el primer semestre del 4ºaño de enfermería. Las estrategias de enseñanza aprendizaje utilizadas fueron: clase expositiva con diapositivas y videotape y texto base. De los participantes, 41,9% eran trabajadores de enfermería; 61,3% informaron haber cuidado de pacientes con alteración del nivel de conciencia, con predominio en el grupo que trabaja. Hubo un incremento estadísticamente significativo en el porcentaje de aciertos después de la clase expositiva e videotape, no hubo alteración en

  8. Predictive Value of Glasgow Coma Score and Full Outline of Unresponsiveness Score on the Outcome of Multiple Trauma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratloo, Alireza; Shokravi, Masumeh; Safari, Saeed; Aziz, Awat Kamal

    2016-03-01

    The Full Outline of Unresponsiveness (FOUR) score was developed to compensate for the limitations of Glasgow coma score (GCS) in recent years. This study aimed to assess the predictive value of GCS and FOUR score on the outcome of multiple trauma patients admitted to the emergency department. The present prospective cross-sectional study was conducted on multiple trauma patients admitted to the emergency department. GCS and FOUR scores were evaluated at the time of admission and at the sixth and twelfth hours after admission. Then the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, sensitivity, specificity, as well as positive and negative predictive value of GCS and FOUR score were evaluated to predict patients' outcome. Patients' outcome was divided into discharge with and without a medical injury (motor deficit, coma or death). Finally, 89 patients were studied. Sensitivity and specificity of GCS in predicting adverse outcome (motor deficit, coma or death) were 84.2% and 88.6% at the time of admission, 89.5% and 95.4% at the sixth hour and 89.5% and 91.5% at the twelfth hour, respectively. These values for the FOUR score were 86.9% and 88.4% at the time of admission, 89.5% and 100% at the sixth hour and 89.5% and 94.4% at the twelfth hour, respectively. Findings of this study indicate that the predictive value of FOUR score and GCS on the outcome of multiple trauma patients admitted to the emergency department is similar.

  9. Procalcitonin Improves the Glasgow Prognostic Score for Outcome Prediction in Emergency Patients with Cancer: A Cohort Study

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    Anna Christina Rast

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS is useful for predicting long-term mortality in cancer patients. Our aim was to validate the GPS in ED patients with different cancer-related urgency and investigate whether biomarkers would improve its accuracy. We followed consecutive medical patients presenting with a cancer-related medical urgency to a tertiary care hospital in Switzerland. Upon admission, we measured procalcitonin (PCT, white blood cell count, urea, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, corrected calcium, C-reactive protein, and albumin and calculated the GPS. Of 341 included patients (median age 68 years, 61% males, 81 (23.8% died within 30 days after admission. The GPS showed moderate prognostic accuracy (AUC 0.67 for mortality. Among the different biomarkers, PCT provided the highest prognostic accuracy (odds ratio 1.6 (95% confidence interval 1.3 to 1.9, P<0.001, AUC 0.69 and significantly improved the GPS to a combined AUC of 0.74 (P=0.007. Considering all investigated biomarkers, the AUC increased to 0.76 (P<0.001. The GPS performance was significantly improved by the addition of PCT and other biomarkers for risk stratification in ED cancer patients. The benefit of early risk stratification by the GPS in combination with biomarkers from different pathways should be investigated in further interventional trials.

  10. Determinants of Glasgow outcome scale in patients with severe traumatic brain injury for better quality of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmajaya, R.; Sari, D. K.; Ganie, R. A.

    2018-03-01

    Primary and secondary brain injury may occur with severe traumatic brain injury. Secondary traumatic brain injury results in a more severe effect compared to primary traumatic brain injury. Therefore, prevention of secondary traumatic brain injury is necessary to obtain maximum therapeutic results and accurate determination of prognosis and better quality of life. This study aimed to determine accurate and noninvasive prognostic factors in patients with severe traumatic brain injury. It was a cohort study on 16 subjects. Intracranial pressure was monitored within the first 24 hours after traumatic brain injury. Examination of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and S100B protein were conducted four times. The severity of outcome was evaluated using Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) three months after traumatic brain injury. Intracranial pressure measurement performed 24 hours after traumatic brain injury, low S100B protein (6.16pg/ml) 48 hours after injury indicate good prognosis and were shown to be significant predictors (p<0.05) for determining the quality of GOS. The conclusion is patient with a moderate increase in intracranial pressure Intracranial pressure S100B protein, being inexpensive and non-invasive, can substitute BDNF and intracranial pressure measurements as a tool for determining prognosis 120 hours following traumatic brain injury.

  11. Glasgow Prognostic Score is superior to ECOG PS as a prognostic factor in patients with gastric cancer with peritoneal seeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shu-Qiang; Nie, Run-Cong; Chen, Yong-Ming; Qiu, Hai-Bo; Li, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Jiang; Xu, Li-Pu; Yang, Li-Fang; Sun, Xiao-Wei; Li, Yuan-Fang; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Chen, Shi; Chen, Ying-Bo

    2018-04-01

    The Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) has been shown to be associated with survival rates in patients with advanced cancer. The present study aimed to compare the GPS with the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status (ECOG PS) in patients with gastric cancer with peritoneal seeding. For the investigation, a total of 384 gastric patients with peritoneal metastasis were retrospectively analyzed. Patients with elevated C-reactive protein (CRP; >10 mg/l) and hypoalbuminemia (l) were assigned a score of 2. Patients were assigned a score of 1 if presenting with only one of these abnormalities, and a score of 0 if neither of these abnormalities were present. The clinicopathologic characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with peritoneal seeding were analyzed. The results showed that the median overall survival (OS) of patients in the GPS 0 group was longer, compared with that in the GPS 1 and GPS 2 groups (15.50, vs. 10.07 and 7.97 months, respectively; PGPS 0 group was significantly longer, compared with that in the GPS 1 and GPS 2 groups, for the patients receiving palliative chemotherapy and patients without palliative chemotherapy. Multivariate survival analysis demonstrated that CA19-9, palliative gastrectomy, first-line chemotherapy and GPS were the prognostic factors predicting OS. In conclusion, the GPS was superior to the subjective assessment of ECOG PS as a prognostic factor in predicting the outcome of gastric cancer with peritoneal seeding.

  12. The Glasgow Parallel Reduction Machine: Programming Shared-memory Many-core Systems using Parallel Task Composition

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    Ashkan Tousimojarad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the Glasgow Parallel Reduction Machine (GPRM, a novel, flexible framework for parallel task-composition based many-core programming. We allow the programmer to structure programs into task code, written as C++ classes, and communication code, written in a restricted subset of C++ with functional semantics and parallel evaluation. In this paper we discuss the GPRM, the virtual machine framework that enables the parallel task composition approach. We focus the discussion on GPIR, the functional language used as the intermediate representation of the bytecode running on the GPRM. Using examples in this language we show the flexibility and power of our task composition framework. We demonstrate the potential using an implementation of a merge sort algorithm on a 64-core Tilera processor, as well as on a conventional Intel quad-core processor and an AMD 48-core processor system. We also compare our framework with OpenMP tasks in a parallel pointer chasing algorithm running on the Tilera processor. Our results show that the GPRM programs outperform the corresponding OpenMP codes on all test platforms, and can greatly facilitate writing of parallel programs, in particular non-data parallel algorithms such as reductions.

  13. Modified Glasgow Prognostic Score is Associated With Risk of Recurrence in Bladder Cancer Patients After Radical Cystectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Matteo; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Buonerba, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Capece, Marco; Bruzzese, Dario; Autorino, Riccardo; Bottero, Danilo; Cioffi, Antonio; Matei, Deliu Victor; Caraglia, Michele; Borghesi, Marco; De Berardinis, Ettore; Busetto, Gian Maria; Giovannone, Riccardo; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Ditonno, Pasquale; Perdonà, Sisto; Bove, Pierluigi; Castaldo, Luigi; Hurle, Rodolfo; Musi, Gennaro; Brescia, Antonio; Olivieri, Michele; Cimmino, Amelia; Altieri, Vincenzo; Damiano, Rocco; Cantiello, Francesco; Serretta, Vincenzo; De Placido, Sabino; Mirone, Vincenzo; Sonpavde, Guru; Terracciano, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recently, many studies explored the role of inflammation parameters in the prognosis of urinary cancers, but the results were not consistent. The modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS), a systemic inflammation marker, is a prognostic marker in various types of cancers. The aim of the present study was to investigate the usefulness of the preoperative mGPS as predictor of recurrence-free (RFS), overall (OS), and cancer-specific (CSS) survivals in a large cohort of urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) patients. A total of 1037 patients with UBC were included in this study with a median follow-up of 22 months (range 3–60 months). An mGPS = 0 was observed in 646 patients (62.3%), mGPS = 1 in 297 patients (28.6 %), and mGPS = 2 in 94 patients (9.1%). In our study cohort, subjects with an mGPS equal to 2 had a significantly shorter median RFS compared with subjects with mGPS equal to 1 (16 vs 19 months, hazard ratio [HR] 1.54, 95% CI 1.31–1.81, P < 0.001) or with subjects with mGPS equal to 0 (16 vs 29 months, HR 2.38, 95% CI 1.86–3.05, P < 0.001). The association between mGPS and RFS was confirmed by weighted multivariate Cox model. Although in univariate analysis higher mGPS was associated with lower OS and CSS, this association disappeared in multivariate analysis where only the presence of lymph node-positive bladder cancer and T4 stage were predictors of worse prognosis for OS and CSS. In conclusion, the mGPS is an easily measured and inexpensive prognostic marker that was significantly associated with RFS in UBC patients. PMID:26496339

  14. Modified Glasgow Prognostic Score is Associated With Risk of Recurrence in Bladder Cancer Patients After Radical Cystectomy: A Multicenter Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Matteo; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Buonerba, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Capece, Marco; Bruzzese, Dario; Autorino, Riccardo; Bottero, Danilo; Cioffi, Antonio; Matei, Deliu Victor; Caraglia, Michele; Borghesi, Marco; De Berardinis, Ettore; Busetto, Gian Maria; Giovannone, Riccardo; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Ditonno, Pasquale; Perdonà, Sisto; Bove, Pierluigi; Castaldo, Luigi; Hurle, Rodolfo; Musi, Gennaro; Brescia, Antonio; Olivieri, Michele; Cimmino, Amelia; Altieri, Vincenzo; Damiano, Rocco; Cantiello, Francesco; Serretta, Vincenzo; De Placido, Sabino; Mirone, Vincenzo; Sonpavde, Guru; Terracciano, Daniela

    2015-10-01

    Recently, many studies explored the role of inflammation parameters in the prognosis of urinary cancers, but the results were not consistent. The modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS), a systemic inflammation marker, is a prognostic marker in various types of cancers. The aim of the present study was to investigate the usefulness of the preoperative mGPS as predictor of recurrence-free (RFS), overall (OS), and cancer-specific (CSS) survivals in a large cohort of urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) patients.A total of 1037 patients with UBC were included in this study with a median follow-up of 22 months (range 3-60 months). An mGPS = 0 was observed in 646 patients (62.3%), mGPS = 1 in 297 patients (28.6 %), and mGPS = 2 in 94 patients (9.1%).In our study cohort, subjects with an mGPS equal to 2 had a significantly shorter median RFS compared with subjects with mGPS equal to 1 (16 vs 19 months, hazard ratio [HR] 1.54, 95% CI 1.31-1.81, P < 0.001) or with subjects with mGPS equal to 0 (16 vs 29 months, HR 2.38, 95% CI 1.86-3.05, P < 0.001). The association between mGPS and RFS was confirmed by weighted multivariate Cox model. Although in univariate analysis higher mGPS was associated with lower OS and CSS, this association disappeared in multivariate analysis where only the presence of lymph node-positive bladder cancer and T4 stage were predictors of worse prognosis for OS and CSS.In conclusion, the mGPS is an easily measured and inexpensive prognostic marker that was significantly associated with RFS in UBC patients.

  15. The Glasgow antipsychotic side-effects scale for clozapine in inpatients and outpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignjatović Ristić, Dragana; Cohen, Dan; Obradović, Andrea; Nikić-Đuričić, Katarina; Drašković, Marija; Hinić, Darko

    2018-02-01

    The inconsistency in clinician and patient ratings of clozapine-induced side effects underscore the need to supplement clinician-based estimates of side effects with patient-reported ones. The main aims of the study are validation of the Glasgow antipsychotic side-effects scale for clozapine (GASS-C) in Serbian inpatients/outpatients with schizophrenia or schizo-affective disorder and recommendations for its future use, based on common and rare clozapine-associated side-effects. The GASS-C was administered to 95 outpatients/inpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia, schizoaffective, or chronic psychotic disorder. The scale showed good overall reliability, with an internal consistency coefficient of α = 0.84, an average retest coefficient of rho = 0.76, and a Spearman-Brown coefficient of validity of 0.81. Side effects were absent or mild in 64.2% of the patients, moderate in 31.6%, severe in 4.2%; 14% of the subjects considered their symptoms distressing. The most commonly reported side-effects were drowsiness, thirst, frequent urination, and dry mouth. Women reported more side effects than men, and patients not in a relationship reported significantly fewer side effects than patients in a relationship. Results indicate a weak positive correlation (rho = 0.231; p = .025) between severity of side effects and clozapine dose. The GASS-C showed good psychometric characteristics in clinical population of patients on clozapine. In future studies, clozapine serum concentrations should be measured when using the GASS-C to monitor side effects.

  16. Comparison of Glasgow prognostic score and prognostic index in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ai-Gui; Chen, Hong-Lin; Lu, Hui-Yu

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that Glasgow prognostic score (GPS) and prognostic index (PI) are also powerful prognostic tool for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The aim of this study was to compare the prognostic value between GPS and PI. We enrolled consecutive patients with advanced NSCLC in this prospective cohort. GPS and PI were calculated before the onset of chemotherapy. The prognosis outcomes included 1-, 3-, and 5-year progression-free survival and overall survival (OS). The performance of two scores in predicting prognosis was analyzed regarding discrimination and calibration. 138 patients were included in the study. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for GPS predicting 1-year DFS was 0.62 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.56-0.68, P statistic showed good fit of the predicted 1-year DFS to the actual 1-year DFS by GPS (χ(2) = 4.326, P = 0.462), while no fit was found between the predicted 1-year DFS and the actual 1-year DFS by PI (χ(2) = 15.234, P = 0.091). Similar results of calibration power were found for predicting 3-year DFS, 5-year DFS, 1-year OS, 3-year OS, and 5-year OS by GPS and PI. GPS is more accurate than PI in predicting prognosis for patients with advanced NSCLC. GPS can be used as a useful and simple tool for predicting prognosis in patients with NSCLC. However, GPS only can be used for preliminary assessment because of low predicting accuracy.

  17. Escala de Coma de Glasgow: subestimação em pacientes com respostas verbais impedidas Escala de Coma de Glasgow: subestimación en pacientes con respuestas verbales impedidas Glasgow Coma Scale: underestimation in patients with verbal responses impeded

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sumie Koizumi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Questão freqüente no uso da Escala de Coma de Glasgow (ECGl, na fase aguda, em pacientes internados devido ao trauma crânio-encefálico (TCE é a subestimação decorrente de situações impeditivas como intubação endotraqueal/traqueostomia, sedação e edema palpebral. O objetivo deste estudo foi identificar e determinar a subestimação na pontuação total da ECGl quando se utiliza a pontuação 1 nas situações de impedimento para a sua avaliação. A amostra estudada foi de 76 pacientes internados com TCE no Hospital das Clínicas da FMUSP. Em 42 (55,3% pacientes, não havia impedimentos e foram realizadas 136 avaliações. Em 34 (44,7%, havia impedimentos caracterizados por intubação ou traqueostomia, podendo estar ou não associados com edema palpebral e sedação, e o total de avaliações foi de 310. A pontuação nesses pacientes total variou de 3 a 11, com os escores mais freqüentes de 3 e 6. Pelos valores estimados pela regressão linear, a partir das pontuações obtidas em AO e MRM foram obtidas as seguintes subestimações: média=1,03 ±1,36, mediana=0,54 (intubação ou traqueostomia; média=0,40 ±0,79, mediana=0,00 (intubação ou traqueostomia + sedação; média=0,57 ±0,96, mediana=0,27 (intubação ou traqueostomia + sedação + edema palpebral. Conclui-se que, no TCE grave, a pontuação total da ECGl fixando a MRV em 1, embora subestimada, encontra-se próxima da real.Cuestionamiento frecuente en el uso de la Escala de Coma de Glasgow (ECG, en la fase aguda, en pacientes internados debido al trauma craneoencefalico es la subestimación decorrient de situaciones impeditivas como intubación endotraqueal/traqueostomía, sedación y edema palpebral. El objetivo de ese estudio fue identificar y determinar la subestimación en la puntuación total de la ECG cuando es utilizada la puntuación 1 en las situaciones de impedimiento para su avaliación. La muestra estudiada fue de 76 pacientes internados por TEC en el

  18. Using the braden and glasgow scales to predict pressure ulcer risk in patients hospitalized at intensive care units Uso de la escala de braden y de glasgow para identificar el riesgo de úlceras de presión en pacientes internados en un centro de terapia intensiva Uso da escala de braden e de glasgow para identificação do risco para úlceras de pressão em pacientes internados em centro de terapia intensiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Magnani Fernandes

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Pressure ulcers remain a major health issue for critical patients. The purpose of this descriptive and exploratory study was to analyze the risk factors for the development of pressure ulcers in patients hospitalized at an intensive care unit of a university hospital. Patients were assessed through the Braden scale to determine the risk for the development of pressure ulcers and to identify individual risks, and the Glasgow scale was used to assess their consciousness. It was found that the risks associated with pressure ulcer development were: low scores on the Braden Scale on the first hospitalization day and low scores on the Glasgow scale. The results showed that these tools can help nurses to identify patients at risk, with a view to nursing care planning.Las ulceras de presión todavía representan un gran problema de salud en pacientes críticos. Este estudio, descriptivo y exploratorio, tuvo como objetivo evaluar los factores de riesgo para el desarrollo de la úlcera de presión presentes en pacientes internados en un centro de terapia intensiva de un hospital universitario. Los pacientes fueron evaluados utilizando la escala de Braden para determinar el riesgo de desarrollo de úlceras de presión e identificación de factores de riesgo individuales y con la escala de Glasgow para evaluar el nivel de conciencia. Se encontró que los factores de riesgo asociados al desarrollo de úlcera de presión fueron: las bajas puntuaciones de la Escala de Braden en el primer día de internación y las bajas puntuaciones de la escala de Glasgow. Los resultados confirmaron que estos instrumentos pueden ayudar al enfermero a identificar pacientes en riesgo y a planificar la asistencia.Úlceras de pressão ainda representam grande problema de saúde em pacientes críticos. Este estudo, descritivo e exploratório, objetivou avaliar os fatores de risco para o desenvolvimento de úlcera de pressão presentes em pacientes internados em um centro de

  19. Inclusion of Highest Glasgow Coma Scale Motor Component Score in Mortality Risk Adjustment for Benchmarking of Trauma Center Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, David; Byrne, James P; Alali, Aziz S; Xiong, Wei; Hoeft, Chris; Neal, Melanie; Subacius, Harris; Nathens, Avery B

    2017-12-01

    The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is the most widely used measure of traumatic brain injury (TBI) severity. Currently, the arrival GCS motor component (mGCS) score is used in risk-adjustment models for external benchmarking of mortality. However, there is evidence that the highest mGCS score in the first 24 hours after injury might be a better predictor of death. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of including the highest mGCS score on the performance of risk-adjustment models and subsequent external benchmarking results. Data were derived from the Trauma Quality Improvement Program analytic dataset (January 2014 through March 2015) and were limited to the severe TBI cohort (16 years or older, isolated head injury, GCS ≤8). Risk-adjustment models were created that varied in the mGCS covariates only (initial score, highest score, or both initial and highest mGCS scores). Model performance and fit, as well as external benchmarking results, were compared. There were 6,553 patients with severe TBI across 231 trauma centers included. Initial and highest mGCS scores were different in 47% of patients (n = 3,097). Model performance and fit improved when both initial and highest mGCS scores were included, as evidenced by improved C-statistic, Akaike Information Criterion, and adjusted R-squared values. Three-quarters of centers changed their adjusted odds ratio decile, 2.6% of centers changed outlier status, and 45% of centers exhibited a ≥0.5-SD change in the odds ratio of death after including highest mGCS score in the model. This study supports the concept that additional clinical information has the potential to not only improve the performance of current risk-adjustment models, but can also have a meaningful impact on external benchmarking strategies. Highest mGCS score is a good potential candidate for inclusion in additional models. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The relationship between Glasgow Prognostic Score and serum tumor markers in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ai-Gui; Chen, Hong-Lin; Lu, Hui-Yu

    2015-05-10

    Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) has been reported as a powerful prognostic tool for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between GPS and prognosis related tumor markers in patients with advanced NSCLC. We included 138 advanced NSCLC patients and twenty healthy controls in the study. GPS was calculated by combined serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and albumin. Three serum tumor markers, which included cytokeratin 19 fragment antigen 21-1 (CYFRA21-1), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and tissue polypeptide specific antigen (TPS), were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). GPS and tumor markers were all assessed before chemotherapy. All patients received at least 2 courses of cisplatin-based chemotherapy. After that, 2 to 5 years follow-up was conducted. Median levels of CYFRA21-1 were 1.5 ng/ml (0.1-3.1 ng/ml) in healthy controls, and 4.6 ng/ml (0.7-35.2 ng/ml) in GPS 0 advanced NSCLC, 11.2 ng/ml (0.4-89.2) ng/ml in GPS 1 advanced NSCLC, and 15.7 ng/ml (2.9-134.6 ng/ml) in GPS 2 advanced NSCLC, respectively. Median levels of CYFRA21-1 were higher in NSCLC patients than in healthy controls, and CYFRA21-1 increased gradually according to GPS category in NSCLC patients (PGPS, CEA and GPS, TPS and GPS. The Spearman's rank correlation coefficient were 0.67 (P GPS was an independent prognostic factor for advanced NSCLC. CYFRA21-1(>3.3 ng/ml) and TPS (>80 U/l) were related with the prognosis of advanced NSCLC by univariate analyses, but multivariate analyses showed CYFRA21-1, TPS and CEA were not the independent prognostic factors for advanced NSCLC. Our results showed GPS were positive correlated with CYFRA21-1, CEA and TPS in patients with advanced NSCLC. However, GPS was more efficient in predicting prognosis of advanced NSCLC than these three single prognosis related tumor markers.

  1. The relationship between glasgow prognostic score and serum tumor markers in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Ai-Gui; Chen, Hong-Lin; Lu, Hui-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) has been reported as a powerful prognostic tool for patients with advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between GPS and prognosis related tumor markers in patients with advanced NSCLC. We included 138 advanced NSCLC patients and twenty healthy controls in the study. GPS was calculated by combined serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and albumin. Three serum tumor markers, which included cytokeratin 19 fragment antigen 21-1 (CYFRA21–1), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and tissue polypeptide specific antigen (TPS), were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). GPS and tumor markers were all assessed before chemotherapy. All patients received at least 2 courses of cisplatin-based chemotherapy. After that, 2 to 5 years follow-up was conducted. Median levels of CYFRA21–1 were 1.5 ng/ml (0.1–3.1 ng/ml) in healthy controls, and 4.6 ng/ml (0.7–35.2 ng/ml) in GPS 0 advanced NSCLC, 11.2 ng/ml (0.4–89.2) ng/ml in GPS 1 advanced NSCLC, and 15.7 ng/ml (2.9–134.6 ng/ml) in GPS 2 advanced NSCLC, respectively. Median levels of CYFRA21-1 were higher in NSCLC patients than in healthy controls, and CYFRA21-1 increased gradually according to GPS category in NSCLC patients (P < 0.05). Similar results were found for median levels of CEA and TPS in healthy controls and NSCLC patients (P < 0.05). In NSCLC patients, positive correlations were found between CYFRA21-1 and GPS, CEA and GPS, TPS and GPS. The Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient were 0.67 (P < 0.05), 0.61 (P < 0.05) and 0.55 (P < 0.05), respectively. Survival analyses showed GPS was an independent prognostic factor for advanced NSCLC. CYFRA21-1(>3.3 ng/ml) and TPS (>80 U/l) were related with the prognosis of advanced NSCLC by univariate analyses, but multivariate analyses showed CYFRA21-1, TPS and CEA were not the independent prognostic factors for advanced NSCLC. Our results showed GPS were positive correlated

  2. Comparison between Modified Neuroendoscopy and Craniotomy Evacuation of Spontaneous Intra-Cerebral Hemorrhages: Study of Clinical Outcome and Glasgow Outcome Score

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    Arie Ibrahim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purposes: Stroke is still one of a leading health-care problem in industrial country and in the developing country. Spontaneous Intra-cerebral Hemorrhage accounts for 30–60% of all stroke admissions into a hospital. Presence of intra-cerebral hemorrhage is considered a poor prognostic factor due to the resultant obstruction to the mass effect following the presence of blood resulting in raised intracranial pressure. While the craniotomy procedure failed to show more benefits over functional outcome, a less invasive and quicker surgical decompression might improve the outcome. Neuroendoscopy is one of promising optional  on minimal invasive  treatment  for spontaneous intra-cerebral hemorrhage. Material and Methods: We evaluated Glasgow Outcome Score and clinical outcome of patients with Spontaneous Intra-cerebral Hemorrhage who underwent modified neuroendoscopic surgery and craniotomy. Randomized control trial was performed during 27 months in 43 patients. Twenty-five patients treated with neuroendoscopy surgery and 18 patients with craniotomy. The removal of intra-cerebral hemorrhage was done by a modified neuroendoscopic transparent sheath made of silastic material, derived from pieces of thoracic tube No. 21F as a conduit working channel. Results: We analyzed statistically, clinical outcome assessment and Glasgow Outcome Scale 6 months post operative follow-up period. The mortality rate was significantly higher by Pearson chi-square methods, in craniotomy group n=12 (63.2% compared with neuroendoscopy group, n=7 (36.8% (p<.005. Patients with Glasgow Outcome Scale score 3–5 was higher in neuroendoscopy group, n=18 (75% compared with craniotomy group n=6 (25%. The survival rate analyzed by Kaplan Meier methods, found that patients in the neuroendoscopy group were a significantly longer survival rate compare with the craniotomy group during 6 months post operative follow-up period. Conclusions: Treatment of spontaneous

  3. Lithostratigraphy does not always equal lithology: lessons learned in communicating uncertainty from stochastic modelling glacial and post glacial deposits in Glasgow U.K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearsey, Tim; Williams, John; Finlayson, Andrew; Williamson, Paul; Dobbs, Marcus; Kingdon, Andrew; Campbell, Diarmad

    2014-05-01

    Geological maps and 3D models usually depict lithostragraphic units which can comprise of many different types of sediment (lithologies). The lithostratigraphic units shown on maps and 3D models of glacial and post glacial deposits in Glasgow are substantially defined by the method of the formation and age of the unit rather than its lithological composition. Therefore, a simple assumption that the dominant lithology is the most common constituent of any stratigraphic unit is erroneous and is only 58% predictive of the actual sediment types seen in a borehole. This is problematic for non-geologist such as planners, regulators and engineers attempting to use these models to inform their decisions and can lead to such users viewing maps and models as of limited use in such decision making. We explore the extent to which stochastic modelling can help to make geological models more predictive of lithology in heterolithic units. Stochastic modelling techniques are commonly used to model facies variations in oil field models. The techniques have been applied to an area containing >4000 coded boreholes to investigate the glacial and fluvial deposits in the centre of the city of Glasgow. We test the predictions from this method by deleting percentages of the control data and re-running the simulations to determine how predictability varies with data density. We also explore the best way of displaying such stochastic models to and suggest that displaying the data as probability maps rather than a single definitive answer better illustrates the uncertainties inherent in the input data. Finally we address whether is it possible truly to be able to predict lithology in such geological facies. The innovative Accessing Subsurface Knowledge (ASK) network was recently established in the Glasgow are by the British Geological Survey and Glasgow City Council to deliver and exchange subsurface data and knowledge. This provides an idea opportunity to communicate and test a range of

  4. High-sensitivity modified Glasgow prognostic score (HS-mGPS) Is superior to the mGPS in esophageal cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Peng; Fang, Min; Wan, Qiuyan; Zhang, Xuebang; Song, Tao; Wu, Shixiu

    2017-01-01

    The present study compared the prognostic value of the modified Glasgow prognostic score (mGPS) and high-sensitivity mGPS (HS-mGPS) in unresectable locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcimona (LAESCC) patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). The baseline data of 163 eligible patients were retrospectively collected. Patients with a C-reactive protein (CRP) ≤ 10 mg/l and albumin ≥ 35 g/l were allocated to mGPS-0 group. Patients with only elevated CRP (> 10 mg/l) were a...

  5. Digital curation and online resources: digital scanning of surgical tools at the royal college of physicians and surgeons of Glasgow for an open university learning resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earley, Kirsty; Livingstone, Daniel; Rea, Paul M

    2017-01-01

    Collection preservation is essential for the cultural status of any city. However, presenting a collection publicly risks damage. Recently this drawback has been overcome by digital curation. Described here is a method of digitisation using photogrammetry and virtual reality software. Items were selected from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow archives, and implemented into an online learning module for the Open University. Images were processed via Agisoft Photoscan, Autodesk Memento, and Garden Gnome Object 2VR. Although problems arose due to specularity, 2VR digital models were developed for online viewing. Future research must minimise the difficulty of digitising specular objects.

  6. Value of Glasgow-Blatchford score in predicting early prognosis of cirrhotic patients with esophagogastric variceal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CUI Shu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the value of Glasgow-Blatchford score (GBS, Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP score, and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD score in predicting the 1- and 6-week prognosis of cirrhotic patients with esophagogastric variceal bleeding via a comparative analysis. MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 202 cirrhotic patients with esophagogastric variceal bleeding who were hospitalized in Tianjin Third Central Hospital from January 1 to December 31, 2014. According to the endpoint of death at 6 weeks after admission, the patients were divided into 1-week death group (10 patients, 6-week death group (23 patients, and survival group (179 patients. The Glasgow-Blatchford score, MELD score, CTP score, and CTP score and classification were calculated on admission, and these scores were compared between the three groups. The two-independent-samples t test was used for comparison of normally distributed continuous data between groups, and the non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test was used for comparison of non-normally distributed continuous data between groups. The chi-square test or the Fisher′s exact test was used for comparison of categorical data between groups. The Z test was used for comparison of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC of these three scoring systems. ResultsThere were significant differences between the 1-week death group and the survival group in the incidence rates of liver cancer with vascular invasion or metastasis (χ2=4.559, P=0.033, hepatic encephalopathy (χ2=25.568, P<0.01, melena (χ2=0.842, P=0.04, and heart failure (P=0.003, pulse rate (Z=-2.943, P=0.003, CTP classification (χ2=12.22, P=0.002, CTP score (Z=-2.505, P=0.012, MELD score (t=-2.395, P=0.018, and GBS score (Z=-2545, P=0.011. There were significant differences between the 6-week death group and the survival group in the incidence rates of liver cancer (χ2=9.374, P=0.002, liver

  7. ‘At-risk’ places: inequities in the distribution of environmental stressors and prescription rates of mental health medications in Glasgow, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maantay, Juliana; Maroko, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Using geospatial analytical methods, this study examines the association between one aspect of the built environment, namely, the concentration of vacant and derelict land (VDL), and the prevalence of mental health disorders (using the proxy variable of mental health medication prescription rates) in Glasgow, Scotland. This study builds on our previous research, which demonstrated the spatial correspondence between the locations of VDL in Glasgow and several physical health outcomes. Numerous studies of other locales have found similar correspondence between different elements of the built environment and various health outcomes. This is the first study of its kind to look at the spatial concentration of vacant and derelict land in relation to mental health, socio-economic indicators, environmental justice, and health inequities. The findings of this study demonstrate an inequity with respect to the distribution of vacant and derelict land, as confirmed by Pearson correlations between VDL density and deprivation (r = .521, p depression, or psychosis and the density of vacant and derelict land while adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics. This indicates that areas with higher VDL densities tend to exhibit higher rates of mental health issues. Based on these findings, strategies for constructive re-use of VDL are proposed.

  8. A Comparative Study of Glasgow Coma Scale and Full Outline of Unresponsiveness Scores for Predicting Long-Term Outcome After Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNett, Molly M; Amato, Shelly; Philippbar, Sue Ann

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare predictive ability of hospital Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores and scores obtained using a novel coma scoring tool (the Full Outline of Unresponsiveness [FOUR] scale) on long-term outcomes among patients with traumatic brain injury. Preliminary research of the FOUR scale suggests that it is comparable with GCS for predicting mortality and functional outcome at hospital discharge. No research has investigated relationships between coma scores and outcome 12 months postinjury. This is a prospective cohort study. Data were gathered on adult patients with traumatic brain injury admitted to urban level I trauma center. GCS and FOUR scores were assigned at 24 and 72 hours and at hospital discharge. Glasgow Outcome Scale scores were assigned at 6 and 12 months. The sample size was n = 107. Mean age was 53.5 (SD = ±21, range = 18-91) years. Spearman correlations were comparable and strongest among discharge GCS and FOUR scores and 12-month outcome (r = .73, p coma scores performed best for both tools, with GCS discharge scores predictive in multivariate models.

  9. Correlations of particle number concentrations and metals with nitrogen oxides and other traffic-related air pollutants in Glasgow and London

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Jiménez, Araceli; Heal, Mathew R.; Beverland, Iain J.

    2012-07-01

    Particle number concentration (PNC) and transition metal content are implicated in the health effects of airborne particulate matter (PM) but they are difficult to measure so consequently their temporal and spatial variations are not well characterized. Daily concentrations of PNC and particle-bound water-soluble metals (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, As, Cd and Pb) were measured at background and kerbside sites in Glasgow and London to examine if other metrics of air pollution such as optical darkness (absorbance) of collected filter samples of PM, gravimetric PM, and NO, NO2 and CO gas concentrations, can be used as surrogates for the temporal and spatial variations of the former. NO2 and NOx exhibited a high degree of within-site correlation and with PNC and water-soluble metals (Fe, Cu, As, Cd, Pb) at background sites in both cities. There is therefore potential to use NO2 and NOx as surrogates for PNC and water-soluble metal at background sites. However, correlation was weaker in complex street canyon environments where pollutant concentrations are strongly affected by local sources and the small-scale variations in pollutant dispersion induced by the wind regimes within street canyons. The corollary of the high correlation between NO2 and PNC and water-soluble metals at the background sites is that the latter pollutants may act as confounders for health effects attributed to NO2 from such sites. Concentrations of CO cannot be used as a surrogate for PNC. Increments in daily NOx and NO2 concentrations between trafficked and background sites were shown to be a simple and novel surrogate for daily spatial variation of PNC; for example, increments in NOx explained 78-79% of the variance in PNC at the paired sites in both Glasgow and London, but relationships were city specific. The increments in NOx also explained 70% of the spatial variation in Cu and Ni in Glasgow but not in London. Weekly NO2 measurements derived from passive diffusion tubes were also shown to

  10. Effects of new motorway infrastructure on active travel in the local population: a retrospective repeat cross-sectional study in Glasgow, Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Jonathan R; Mitchell, Richard; Ogilvie, David

    2016-07-07

    Promoting active travel is an important part of increasing population physical activity, which has both physical and mental health benefits. A key benefit described by the then Scottish Government of the five-mile M74 motorway extension, which opened during June 2011 in the south of Glasgow, was that the forecast reduction in motor traffic on local streets would make these streets safer for walking and cycling, thus increasing active travel by the local population. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of new motorway infrastructure on the proportion of journey stages made actively (cycling or on foot) by individuals travelling in and out of the local area. Data for the periods 2009-10 and 2012-13 were extracted from the Scottish Household Survey (SHS) travel diaries, which record each journey stage made during the previous day by a representative sample of the Scottish population aged 16 and over. Each individual journey stage was assigned to one of the following study areas surrounding existing and new transport infrastructure: (1) an area surrounding the new M74 motorway extension (n = 435 (2009-10), 543 (2012-13)), (2) a comparator area surrounding an existing motorway (n = 477 (2009-10), 560 (2012-13)), and (3) a control area containing no comparable motorway infrastructure (n = 541 (2009-10), 593 (2012-13)). Multivariable, multi-level regression analysis was performed to determine any between-area differences in change in active travel over time, which might indicate an intervention effect. Reference populations were defined using two alternative definitions, (1) Glasgow City and (2) Glasgow and surrounding local authorities. The results showed an increase in the proportion of journey stages using active travel in all study areas compared to both reference populations. However, there were no significant between-area differences to suggest an effect attributable the M74 motorway extension. There was no clear evidence that the M74 motorway

  11. A new approach to age-period-cohort analysis using partial least squares regression: the trend in blood pressure in the Glasgow Alumni cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Kang Tu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to a problem of identification, how to estimate the distinct effects of age, time period and cohort has been a controversial issue in the analysis of trends in health outcomes in epidemiology. In this study, we propose a novel approach, partial least squares (PLS analysis, to separate the effects of age, period, and cohort. Our example for illustration is taken from the Glasgow Alumni cohort. A total of 15,322 students (11,755 men and 3,567 women received medical screening at the Glasgow University between 1948 and 1968. The aim is to investigate the secular trends in blood pressure over 1925 and 1950 while taking into account the year of examination and age at examination. We excluded students born before 1925 or aged over 25 years at examination and those with missing values in confounders from the analyses, resulting in 12,546 and 12,516 students for analysis of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. PLS analysis shows that both systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased with students' age, and students born later had on average lower blood pressure (SBP: -0.17 mmHg/per year [95% confidence intervals: -0.19 to -0.15] for men and -0.25 [-0.28 to -0.22] for women; DBP: -0.14 [-0.15 to -0.13] for men; -0.09 [-0.11 to -0.07] for women. PLS also shows a decreasing trend in blood pressure over the examination period. As identification is not a problem for PLS, it provides a flexible modelling strategy for age-period-cohort analysis. More emphasis is then required to clarify the substantive and conceptual issues surrounding the definitions and interpretations of age, period and cohort effects.

  12. Comparison of Glasgow-Blatchford score and full Rockall score systems to predict clinical outcomes in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhtare M

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Marjan Mokhtare, Vida Bozorgi, Shahram Agah, Mehdi Nikkhah, Amirhossein Faghihi, Amirhossein Boghratian, Neda Shalbaf, Abbas Khanlari, Hamidreza Seifmanesh Colorectal Research Center, Rasoul Akram Hospital, Tehran, Iran Background: Various risk scoring systems have been recently developed to predict clinical outcomes in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB. The two commonly used scoring systems include full Rockall score (RS and the Glasgow-Blatchford score (GBS. Bleeding scores were assessed in terms of prediction of clinical outcomes in patients with UGIB. Patients and methods: Two hundred patients (age >18 years with obvious symptoms of UGIB in the emergency department of Rasoul Akram Hospital were enrolled. Full RS and GBS were calculated. We followed the patients for records of rebleeding and 1-month mortality. A receiver operating characteristic curve by using areas under the curve (AUCs was used to statistically identify the best cutoff point. Results: Eighteen patients were excluded from the study due to failure to follow-up. Rebleeding and mortality rate were 9.34% (n=17 and 11.53% (n=21, respectively. Regarding 1-month mortality, full RS was better than GBS (AUC, 0.648 versus 0.582; P=0.021. GBS was more accurate in terms of detecting transfusion need (AUC, 0.757 versus 0.528; P=0.001, rebleeding rate (AUC, 0.722 versus 0.520; P=0.002, intensive care unit admission rate (AUC, 0.648 versus 0.582; P=0.021, and endoscopic intervention rate (AUC, 0.771 versus 0.650; P<0.001. Conclusion: We found the full RS system is better for 1-month mortality prediction while GBS system is better for prediction of other outcomes. Keywords: full Rockall score, Glasgow-Blatchford score, gastrointestinal bleeding, mortality, prognosis

  13. Estudo de conforto em espaços abertos em região de clima temperado: o caso de Glasgow, Reino Unido

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    Eduardo Leite Krüger

    Full Text Available O estudo da sensação de conforto térmico em espaços abertos deve ser entendido como primordial para o planejamento climaticamente adequado de áreas urbanas. Através do aumento da atratividade das àreas abertas e do incentivo às atividades ao ar livre, o planejamento urbano norteado do pelas preferências térmicas da população torna-se um agente facilitador do uso desses espaços. O presente trabalho analisa a sensação térmica de moradores de Glasgow, Reino Unido, localizada em região temperada, comparando respostas obtidas por meio de entrevistas estruturadas a índices utilizados pela meteorologia (Wind Chill e THSW e em estudos de conforto (PET e PMV. Os dados foram coletados em 19 campanhas de monitoramento, no período do inverno ao verão de 2011. Para a coleta de dados, foi utilizada uma estação Davis Vantage Pro2, contendo sensores de temperatura e umidade relativa, anemômetro e piranômetro. Foi confeccionado um termômetro de globo, utilizado para obtenção da temperatura radiante média (TRM, equipado com um data logger (Tinytag-TGP-4500. Os resultados indicam que os índices THSW e PET foram os que mais se aproximaram da resposta térmica dos entrevistados, podendo ser aplicados no entendimento das condições do clima na cidade e entorno de Glasgow.

  14. Mapping area variability in social and behavioural difficulties among Glasgow pre-schoolers: linkage of a survey of pre-school staff with routine monitoring data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, S J E; Marryat, L; Thompson, L; Ellaway, A; White, J; McClung, M; Wilson, P

    2015-11-01

    Social, emotional and behavioural development in early to middle childhood impact upon many outcomes in future life and are influenced by home, neighbourhood and school environments. We used linked data to investigate differences between areas in Glasgow City in level of difficulties in pre-school age children, after consideration of demographics, including area-level deprivation. Pre-school education staff completed Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaires (SDQ) on all children progressing to school from a local authority or partnership (local authority-funded private) pre-school in Glasgow City between 2010 and 2012. These data were linked to individual (age, gender) and area-level (deprivation) demographics from the City Council Education Services Department. Statistical models were fitted to the SDQ scores, adjusting for age, gender, area deprivation, year of school entry, pre-school establishment attended and electoral ward of residence. Correlation between neighbouring wards was incorporated to allow for clustering of scores. Boys and those living in more deprived areas had higher levels of difficulties. Children aged 5.0-5.5 years had fewest difficulties, while the oldest and youngest children had similar levels of difficulties. There were no significant secular trends by year of school entry. There remained differences among areas after adjusting for these variables, with children living in some areas having fewer difficulties than would be expected based on their socio-demographic characteristics. There remained differences in children's levels of difficulties between areas after adjusting for age, gender, area deprivation and year of school entry. Children in some very deprived areas had fewer difficulties than might be expected, while those in relatively affluent areas had more difficulties than expected based on their deprivation level. There may be other, unmeasured, individual- and area-level reasons for children's level of difficulties, and these

  15. Present status of severe head injured patients with an admission glasgow coma scale score of 3 based on the Japan neurotrauma data bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzura, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    Severe head injured patients presenting with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 3 have been hesitated to treat aggressively. We analyzed present status of patients with GCS score of 3 from the Project 2004 in the Japan Neurotrauma Data Bank. Among 1,101 cases registered, 805 cases with GCS score of 8 or less on admission. Of those, 215 cases with GCS score of 3 were classified the survival group (51 cases) and the dead group (164 cases) and compared each group. These results showed that the characteristics associated with favorable outcome including absence of cardiopulmonary arrest, no abnormality of pupil findings, stable condition of respiration and circulation, serum glucose level (less than 184 mg/dl), absence of initial CT findings including skull base fracture, pneumocephalus and subarachnoid hemorrhage, no serious extracranial injures including Injury Severity Scale score of less than 25, critic al care including intracranial pressure monitoring and temperature management. We suggest that it is important to treat brain and systemic problems aggressively in severe head injured patients with GCS score of 3. (author)

  16. The Glasgow Prognostic Score as a significant predictor of diffuse large B cell lymphoma treated with R-CHOP in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Yunxiang; Zhao, Weili; Liu, Zhao; Shen, Yang; Li, Junmin; Shen, Zhixiang

    2015-01-01

    The Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) incorporates C-reactive protein and albumin as clinically useful markers of tumor behavior and shows significant prognostic value in several types of solid tumors. The accuracy of the GPS in predicting outcomes in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) remains unknown. We performed this study to evaluate the prognostic significance of the GPS in DLBCL in China. We retrospectively analyzed 160 patients with newly diagnosed DLBCL at the Shanghai Ruijin Hospital (China). The prognostic value of the GPS was evaluated and compared with that of the International Prognostic Index (IPI) and immunohistochemical subtyping. The GPS was defined as follows: GPS-0, C-reactive protein (CRP) ≤10 mg/L and albumin ≥35 g/L; GPS-1, CRP >10 mg/L or albumin L; and GPS-2, CRP >10 mg/L and albumin L. Patients with lower GPS tended to have better outcomes including progression-free survival (PFS, P GPS and high IPI score were independent adverse predictors of OS. Similar to several other tumors, GPS is a reliable predictor of survival outcomes in DLBCL patients treated with R-CHOP therapy. Inflammatory responses are implicated in the progression and survival of patients with DLBCL.

  17. Glasgow Prognostic Score is a predictor of perioperative and long-term outcome in patients with only surgically treated esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashist, Yogesh K; Loos, Julian; Dedow, Josephine; Tachezy, Michael; Uzunoglu, Guentac; Kutup, Asad; Yekebas, Emre F; Izbicki, Jakob R

    2011-04-01

    Systemic inflammation (SI) plays a pivotal role in cancer. C-reactive protein (CRP) and albumin as parameters of SI form the Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS). The purpose of the study was to evaluate the potential prognostic role of GPS in a homogeneous population of esophageal cancer (EC) patients undergoing only resection. GPS was evaluated on the basis of admission blood sample taken before surgery. Patients with a CRP L and albumin > 35 g/L were allocated to GPS0 group. If only CRP was increased or albumin decreased patients were allocated to the GPS1 and patients in whom CRP was ≥10 mg/L and albumin level ≤35 g/L were classified as GPS2. GPS was correlated to clinicopathological parameters and clinical outcome. Increasing GPS significantly correlated with more aggressive tumor biology in terms of tumor size (P GPS was identified as an independent prognosticator of perioperative morbidity (odds ratio 1.9; P = 0.03). In addition, a gradual decrease in disease-free and overall survival was evident between the three GPS subgroups. Survival differences between the GPS groups remained apparent even after stratification of the study population to underlying tumor type and nodal status. GPS was identified as a strong prognosticator of tumor recurrence (hazard ratio 2.5; P GPS represents a strong prognosticator of perioperative morbidity and long-term outcome in resected EC patients without neoadjuvant or adjuvant treatment.

  18. Combined evaluation of the Glasgow prognostic score and carcinoembryonic antigen concentration prior to hepatectomy predicts postoperative outcomes in patients with liver metastasis from colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takashi; Kawakamil, Masayo; Hara, Yoshiaki; Shioiri, Sadaaki; Yasuno, Masamichi; Teruya, Masanori; Kaminishi, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the ability of the inflammation-based Glasgow prognostic score (GPS). 106 patients who underwent curative resection for colorectal liver metastasis (CRLM) were analyzed. Patients with an elevated Creactive protein concentration (>10 mg/L) and hypoalbuminemia (L) at admission were assigned a GPS 2, those with only 1 of these biochemical abnormalities were assigned a GPS 1, and those without either abnormality were assigned a GPS 0. Multivariate analysis showed that 2 variables, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) concentration > 30 ng/mL and a GPS 1 or 2, were independently prognostic of survival. Patients were classified into 3 groups on the basis of these 2 variables. Patients with GPS 1 or 2 and CEA concentration > 30 ng/mL were assigned a new score of 2, those with either 1 factor were assigned a new score of 1, and those with neither factors were assigned a new score of 0. The 5-year overall survival rates of new scores of 0, 1, 2 were 71.5%, 31.6%, and 0%, respectively (P < 0.0001). This simple staging system may be able to identify a subgroup of patients who are eligible for curative resection but show poor prognosis.

  19. [Can Glasgow-Blatchford Score and Pre-endoscopic Rockall Score Predict the Occurrence of Hypotension in Initially Normotensive Patients with Non-variceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, June Sung; Ko, Byuk Sung; Son, Chang Hwan; Ahn, Shin; Seo, Dong Woo; Lee, Yoon Seon; Lee, Jae Ho; Oh, Bum Jin; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Won Young

    2016-01-25

    The aim of this study was to identify the ability of Glasgow-Blatchford score (GBS) and pre-endoscopic Rockall score (pre-E RS) to predict the occurrence of hypotension in patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding who are initially normotensive at emergency department. Retrospective observational study was conducted at Asan Medical Center emergency department (ED) in patients who presented with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2013. Study population was divided according to the development of hypotension, and demographics, comorbidities, and laboratory findings were compared. GBS and pre-E RS were estimated to predict the occurrence of hypotension. A total of 747 patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding were included during the study period, and 120 (16.1%) patients developed hypotension within 24 hours after ED admission. The median values GBS and pre-E RS were statistically different according to the occurrence of hypotension (8.0 vs. 10.0, 2.0 vs. 3.0, respectively; pupper gastrointestinal bleeding. Development of other scoring systems are needed.

  20. Pretreatment Modified Glasgow Prognostic Score Predicts Clinical Outcomes After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishi, Takahiro; Matsuo, Yukinori, E-mail: ymatsuo@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Ueki, Nami; Iizuka, Yusuke; Nakamura, Akira; Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Data from 165 patients who underwent SBRT for stage I NSCLC with histologic confirmation from January 1999 to September 2010 were collected retrospectively. Factors, including age, performance status, histology, Charlson comorbidity index, mGPS, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class based on sex and T stage, were evaluated with regard to overall survival (OS) using the Cox proportional hazards model. The impact of the mGPS on cause of death and failure patterns was also analyzed. Results: The 3-year OS was 57.9%, with a median follow-up time of 3.5 years. A higher mGPS correlated significantly with poor OS (P<.001). The 3-year OS of lower mGPS patients was 66.4%, whereas that of higher mGPS patients was 44.5%. On multivariate analysis, mGPS and RPA class were significant factors for OS. A higher mGPS correlated significantly with lung cancer death (P=.019) and distant metastasis (P=.013). Conclusions: The mGPS was a significant predictor of clinical outcomes for SBRT in NSCLC patients.

  1. Factors influencing pediatric Injury Severity Score and Glasgow Coma Scale in pediatric automobile crashes: results from the Crash Injury Research Engineering Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Peter F; Brown, J Kristine; Sochor, Mark R; Wang, Stewart C; Eichelberger, Martin E

    2006-11-01

    Motor vehicle crashes account for more than 50% of pediatric injuries. Triage of pediatric patients to appropriate centers can be based on the crash/injury characteristics. Pediatric motor vehicle crash/injury characteristics can be determined from an in vitro laboratory using child crash dummies. However, to date, no detailed data with respect to outcomes and crash mechanism have been presented with a pediatric in vivo model. The Crash Injury Research Engineering Network is comprised of 10 level 1 trauma centers. Crashes were examined with regard to age, crash severity (DeltaV), crash direction, restraint use, and airbag deployment. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed with Injury Severity Score (ISS) and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) as outcomes. Standard age groupings (0-4, 5-9, 10-14, and 15-18) were used. The database is biases toward a survivor population with few fatalities. Four hundred sixty-one motor vehicle crashes with 2500 injuries were analyzed (242 boys, 219 girls). Irrespective of age, DeltaV > 30 mph resulted in increased ISS and decreased GCS (eg, for 0-4 years, DeltaV 30: ISS = 19.5, GCS = 10.6; P 15) injuries than did backseat passengers (odds ratio, 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 0.7-3.4). A trend was noted for children younger than 12 years sitting in the front seat to have increased ISS and decreased GCS with airbag deployment but was limited by case number. A reproducible pattern of increased ISS and lower GCS characterized by high severity, lateral crashes in children was noted. Further analysis of the specific injuries as a function and the crash characteristic can help guide management and prevention strategies.

  2. Comparison of Glasgow-Blatchford score and full Rockall score systems to predict clinical outcomes in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtare, Marjan; Bozorgi, Vida; Agah, Shahram; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Faghihi, Amirhossein; Boghratian, Amirhossein; Shalbaf, Neda; Khanlari, Abbas; Seifmanesh, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Various risk scoring systems have been recently developed to predict clinical outcomes in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). The two commonly used scoring systems include full Rockall score (RS) and the Glasgow-Blatchford score (GBS). Bleeding scores were assessed in terms of prediction of clinical outcomes in patients with UGIB. Two hundred patients (age >18 years) with obvious symptoms of UGIB in the emergency department of Rasoul Akram Hospital were enrolled. Full RS and GBS were calculated. We followed the patients for records of rebleeding and 1-month mortality. A receiver operating characteristic curve by using areas under the curve (AUCs) was used to statistically identify the best cutoff point. Eighteen patients were excluded from the study due to failure to follow-up. Rebleeding and mortality rate were 9.34% (n=17) and 11.53% (n=21), respectively. Regarding 1-month mortality, full RS was better than GBS (AUC, 0.648 versus 0.582; P =0.021). GBS was more accurate in terms of detecting transfusion need (AUC, 0.757 versus 0.528; P =0.001), rebleeding rate (AUC, 0.722 versus 0.520; P =0.002), intensive care unit admission rate (AUC, 0.648 versus 0.582; P =0.021), and endoscopic intervention rate (AUC, 0.771 versus 0.650; P <0.001). We found the full RS system is better for 1-month mortality prediction while GBS system is better for prediction of other outcomes.

  3. Anti-epidermal or anti-vascular endothelial growth factor as first-line metastatic colorectal cancer in modified Glasgow prognostic score 2' patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dréanic, Johann; Dhooge, Marion; Barret, Maximilien; Brezault, Catherine; Mir, Olivier; Chaussade, Stanislas; Coriat, Romain

    2015-01-01

    Background In metastatic colorectal cancer, the modified Glasgow prognostic score (mGPS) has been approved as an independent prognostic indicator of survival. No data existed on poor prognosis patients treated with molecular-targeted agents. Methods From January 2007 to February 2012, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and poor predictive survival score (mGPS = 2), treated with 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy in addition to an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or anti-vascular epidermal growth factor (VEGF) therapy, were included to assess the interest of targeted therapy within mGPS = 2' patients. Results A total of 27 mGPS = 2' patients were included and received a 5-fluorouracil-based systemic chemotherapy in addition to an anti-EGFR treatment (cetuximab; n = 18) or an anti-VEGF treatment (bevacizumab; n = 9). Median follow-up was 12.1 months (interquartile range 4.9–22). Patients were Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) Performance Status 1, 2, and 3 in 66% (n = 18), 26% (n = 7), and 8% (n = 2), respectively. Comparing anti-EGFR and anti-VEGF groups, median progression-free survival was 3.9 and 15.4 months, respectively, and was significantly different (P = 0.046). Conversely, the median overall survival was not significantly different between the two groups (P = 0.15). Conclusion Our study confirmed the poor survival of patients with mGPS = 2 despite the use of targeted therapy and identified the superiority of an anti-VEGF treatment in progression-free survival, without a significant benefit in the overall survival compared with the anti-EGFR therapy. Our results deserved confirmation by a prospective clinical trial. PMID:26401469

  4. Correlation of Lactate Concentration in Peripheral Plasma and Cerebrospinal Fluid with Glasgow Outcome Scale for Patients with Tuberculous Meningitis Complicated by Acute Hydrocephalus Treated with Fluid Diversions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faried, Ahmad; Arief, Gusman; Arifin, Muhammad Z; Nataprawira, Heda M

    2018-03-01

    Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is an endemic infectious disease in developing countries, and it can become a serious illness in children. Treatment of TBM is more difficult and prone to failure than treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis. TBM causes hydrocephalus, cerebral edema, increased intracranial pressure, global ischemia, and neurologic deficits, which disturb cellular metabolism and increase lactate levels. A reliable, widely available clinical indicator of TBM severity is needed. Successful treatment of TBM is assessed using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). This prospective cohort study included 34 patients with TBM and acute hydrocephalus who had undergone fluid diversions and were admitted to Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital in Bandung from 2014 to 2015. A portable machine for blood glucose measurement was used to measure lactate concentrations. Statistical significance was defined as P ≤ 0.05. Average levels of plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate were 1.99 ± 0.70 mmol/L and 3.04 ± 1.05 mmol/L, respectively. A significantly higher level of lactate was observed in CSF compared with plasma. Preoperative plasma lactate was negatively correlated to GOS (r = -0.539; P = 0.013), and CSF lactate was negatively correlated to GOS (r = -0.412; P = 0.027). Average lactate levels in CSF (central) were higher than plasma (peripheral) levels. GOS scale of patients decreased with increased plasma and CSF lactate levels. Examination of plasma and CSF lactate levels should be included in routine examinations to determine extent of cellular damage and GOS score in patients with TBM and acute hydrocephalus who have undergone fluid diversions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Glasgow Prognostic Score at the Time of Palliative Esophageal Stent Insertion is a Predictive Factor of 30-Day Mortality and Overall Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, Robert J; Handforth, Catherine; Radhakrishna, Ganesh; Bennett, Michael I; Ford, Alexander C; Everett, Simon M

    2018-03-01

    Optimizing the timing of esophageal stent insertion is a challenge, partly due to difficulty predicting survival in advanced malignancy. The Glasgow prognostic score (GPS) is a validated tool for predicting survival in a number of cancers. To assess the utility of the GPS in predicting 30-day mortality and overall survival postesophageal stent insertion. Patients at a tertiary referral center who had received an esophageal stent for palliation of dysphagia were included if they had a measurement of albumin and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the week preceding the procedure (n=209). Patients with both an elevated CRP (>10 mg/L) and hypoalbuminemia (L) were given a GPS score of 2 (GPS2). Patients with only one of these abnormalities were assigned as GPS1 and those with normal CRP and albumin were assigned as GPS0. Clinical and pathologic parameters were also collected to assess for potential confounding factors in the survival analysis. Increasing GPS was associated with 30-day mortality; for patients with GPS0, 30-day mortality was 5% (2/43), for GPS1 it was 23% (26/114), and for GPS2 it was 33% (17/52). The adjusted hazard ratio for overall poststent mortality was 1.6 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-2.4; P=0.02) for GPS1 and 2.4 (95% confidence interval, 1.5-3.8; PGPS2 patients compared with GPS0. GPS is an independent prognostic factor of 30-day mortality and overall survival after esophageal stent insertion. It is a potential adjunct to clinical assessment in identifying those patients at high-risk of short-term mortality poststent.

  6. Hematoma shape, hematoma size, Glasgow coma scale score and ICH score: which predicts the 30-day mortality better for intracerebral hematoma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wei Wang

    Full Text Available To investigate the performance of hematoma shape, hematoma size, Glasgow coma scale (GCS score, and intracerebral hematoma (ICH score in predicting the 30-day mortality for ICH patients. To examine the influence of the estimation error of hematoma size on the prediction of 30-day mortality.This retrospective study, approved by a local institutional review board with written informed consent waived, recruited 106 patients diagnosed as ICH by non-enhanced computed tomography study. The hemorrhagic shape, hematoma size measured by computer-assisted volumetric analysis (CAVA and estimated by ABC/2 formula, ICH score and GCS score was examined. The predicting performance of 30-day mortality of the aforementioned variables was evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests, paired t test, nonparametric test, linear regression analysis, and binary logistic regression. The receiver operating characteristics curves were plotted and areas under curve (AUC were calculated for 30-day mortality. A P value less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant.The overall 30-day mortality rate was 15.1% of ICH patients. The hematoma shape, hematoma size, ICH score, and GCS score all significantly predict the 30-day mortality for ICH patients, with an AUC of 0.692 (P = 0.0018, 0.715 (P = 0.0008 (by ABC/2 to 0.738 (P = 0.0002 (by CAVA, 0.877 (P<0.0001 (by ABC/2 to 0.882 (P<0.0001 (by CAVA, and 0.912 (P<0.0001, respectively.Our study shows that hematoma shape, hematoma size, ICH scores and GCS score all significantly predict the 30-day mortality in an increasing order of AUC. The effect of overestimation of hematoma size by ABC/2 formula in predicting the 30-day mortality could be remedied by using ICH score.

  7. Do poorer people have poorer access to local resources and facilities? The distribution of local resources by area deprivation in Glasgow, Scotland☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macintyre, Sally; Macdonald, Laura; Ellaway, Anne

    2008-01-01

    It has commonly been suggested that in modern cities individual or household deprivation (for example, low income or education) is amplified by area level deprivation (for example, lack of jobs or good schools), in ways which damage the health of the poorest and increase health inequalities. The aim of this study was to determine the location of a range of resources and exposures by deprivation in a UK city. We examined the location of 42 resources in Glasgow City, Scotland, in 2005–2006, by quintile of small area deprivation. Measures included number per 1000 population, network distance to nearest resource, and percentage of data zones containing at least one of each type of resource. Twelve resources had higher density in, and/or were closer to or more common in, more deprived neighbourhoods: public nurseries, public primary schools, police stations, pharmacies, credit unions, post offices, bus stops, bingo halls, public swimming pools, public sports centres, outdoor play areas, and vacant and derelict land/buildings. Sixteen had higher density in, and/or were closer to, or more common in, more affluent neighbourhoods: public secondary schools, private schools, banks, building societies, museums/art galleries, railway stations, subway stations, tennis courts, bowling greens, private health clubs, private swimming pools, colleges, A & E hospitals, parks, waste disposal sites, and tourist attractions. Private nurseries, Universities, fire stations, general, dental and ophthalmic practices, pawn brokers, ATMs, supermarkets, fast food chains, cafes, public libraries, golf courses, and cinemas showed no clear pattern by deprivation. Thus it appears that in the early 21st century access to resources does not always disadvantage poorer neighbourhoods in the UK. We conclude that we need to ensure that theories and policies are based on up-to-date and context-specific empirical evidence on the distribution of neighbourhood resources, and to engage in further research

  8. Do poorer people have poorer access to local resources and facilities? The distribution of local resources by area deprivation in Glasgow, Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macintyre, Sally; Macdonald, Laura; Ellaway, Anne

    2008-09-01

    It has commonly been suggested that in modern cities individual or household deprivation (for example, low income or education) is amplified by area level deprivation (for example, lack of jobs or good schools), in ways which damage the health of the poorest and increase health inequalities. The aim of this study was to determine the location of a range of resources and exposures by deprivation in a UK city. We examined the location of 42 resources in Glasgow City, Scotland, in 2005-2006, by quintile of small area deprivation. Measures included number per 1000 population, network distance to nearest resource, and percentage of data zones containing at least one of each type of resource. Twelve resources had higher density in, and/or were closer to or more common in, more deprived neighbourhoods: public nurseries, public primary schools, police stations, pharmacies, credit unions, post offices, bus stops, bingo halls, public swimming pools, public sports centres, outdoor play areas, and vacant and derelict land/buildings. Sixteen had higher density in, and/or were closer to, or more common in, more affluent neighbourhoods: public secondary schools, private schools, banks, building societies, museums/art galleries, railway stations, subway stations, tennis courts, bowling greens, private health clubs, private swimming pools, colleges, A & E hospitals, parks, waste disposal sites, and tourist attractions. Private nurseries, Universities, fire stations, general, dental and ophthalmic practices, pawn brokers, ATMs, supermarkets, fast food chains, cafes, public libraries, golf courses, and cinemas showed no clear pattern by deprivation. Thus it appears that in the early 21st century access to resources does not always disadvantage poorer neighbourhoods in the UK. We conclude that we need to ensure that theories and policies are based on up-to-date and context-specific empirical evidence on the distribution of neighbourhood resources, and to engage in further research on

  9. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of mild head injury - is it appropriate to classify patients with glasgow coma scale score of 13 to 15 as 'mild injury'?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchino, Y.; Saeki, N.; Yamaura, A.; Okimura, Y.; Tanaka, M.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study is to examine the relation between Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score and findings on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of patients with mild head injury presenting GCS Scores between 13 and 15. Methods. Data were collected from all consecutive patients with mild head injury who were referred to our hospital between July 1 and October 31, 1999. All patients were recommended to undergo CT and MR imaging examinations. Patients younger than 14 years of age were excluded. Results. Ninety patients were recruited into this study. CT scans were obtained in 88 patients and MR imaging were obtained in 65 patients. Of those 90 patients, 2 patients scored 13 points, 5 scored 14 points and 83 (92.2 %) 15 points. Patients with GCS score of 13 points demonstrated parenchymal lesions an both CT and MR imaging. Those with 14 points revealed absence of parenchymal abnormality an CT, but presence of parenchymal lesions an MR imaging. Patients in advanced age (chi square test, p < 0.0001), and those with amnesia (p = 0005, not significant), although scoring 15 points, revealed a tendency to abnormal intracranial lesions on CT scans. Conclusion. It is doubtful whether patients with GCS score 13 should be included in the mild head injury category, due to obvious brain damage on CT scans. MR imaging should be performed on patients with GCS score 14, since the parenchymal lesions are not clearly demonstrated an CT scans. Even if patients scored GCS 15, patients which amnesia or of advanced age should undergo CT scans at minimum, and MR imaging when available. (author)

  10. Hematoma Shape, Hematoma Size, Glasgow Coma Scale Score and ICH Score: Which Predicts the 30-Day Mortality Better for Intracerebral Hematoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Wei; Liu, Yi-Jui; Lee, Yi-Hsiung; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Yang, Fu-Chi; Hsueh, Chun-Jen; Kao, Hung-Wen; Juan, Chun-Jung; Hsu, Hsian-He

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the performance of hematoma shape, hematoma size, Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score, and intracerebral hematoma (ICH) score in predicting the 30-day mortality for ICH patients. To examine the influence of the estimation error of hematoma size on the prediction of 30-day mortality. Materials and Methods This retrospective study, approved by a local institutional review board with written informed consent waived, recruited 106 patients diagnosed as ICH by non-enhanced computed tomography study. The hemorrhagic shape, hematoma size measured by computer-assisted volumetric analysis (CAVA) and estimated by ABC/2 formula, ICH score and GCS score was examined. The predicting performance of 30-day mortality of the aforementioned variables was evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests, paired t test, nonparametric test, linear regression analysis, and binary logistic regression. The receiver operating characteristics curves were plotted and areas under curve (AUC) were calculated for 30-day mortality. A P value less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results The overall 30-day mortality rate was 15.1% of ICH patients. The hematoma shape, hematoma size, ICH score, and GCS score all significantly predict the 30-day mortality for ICH patients, with an AUC of 0.692 (P = 0.0018), 0.715 (P = 0.0008) (by ABC/2) to 0.738 (P = 0.0002) (by CAVA), 0.877 (Phematoma shape, hematoma size, ICH scores and GCS score all significantly predict the 30-day mortality in an increasing order of AUC. The effect of overestimation of hematoma size by ABC/2 formula in predicting the 30-day mortality could be remedied by using ICH score. PMID:25029592

  11. Glasgow Coma Scale in acute poisonings before and after use of antidote in patients with history of use of psychotropic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poplas-Susić, Tonka; Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Komericki-Grzinić, Marija; Kersnik, Janko

    2010-01-01

    Data on emergency interventions in poisonings are scarce. Objective To determine the effectiveness of antidote therapy in acute poisoning-related emergency medical services (EMS) interventions. A prospective observational study included all poisoning-related intervention cases over 3 years (1999-2001) in the Celje region, Slovenia, covering 125,000 inhabitants. Data were recorded on an EMS form. Psychoactive agents were present in 56.5% out of 244 poisoning-related EMS interventions. Prescription drugs were a cause of intoxication in 93 (39.2%) cases alone or in combination with alcohol or illegal drugs. More than one fifth of poisonings were due to the use of illegal drugs in 52 (21.9%) cases, 43 (18.1%) out of them heroin related. At the time of EMS arrival, more patients who ingested illegal drugs were in coma or comatose than the rest. 24 (45.3%) vs. 32 (17.3%) of poisoned patients were in coma (p < 0.001). Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) at the first contact was lower in patients who ingested illegal drugs than in the remaining patients (9.0 vs. 11.6, p = 0.001). In 23.2% of the cases, an antidote was administered. In 29 (12.2%) naloxone and in 16 (6.7%) flumazenil was administered. Mean GCS after intervention was higher in all cases but significantly higher in illegal drug cases, 13.4 vs. 12.2 (p = 0.001), with a mean positive change in GCS of 4.5 vs. 0.6 (p < 0.001). In illegal drug users, mean change after antidote administration was 8.2 vs. 0.5 without antidote administration (p < 0.001). High rate of successful antidote use during the intervention indicated the importance of good EMS protocols and the presence of a skilled doctor in the EMS team.

  12. Glasgow coma scale in acute poisonings before and after use of antidote in patients with history of use of psychotropic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poplas-Sušić Tonka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Data on emergency interventions in poisonings are scarce. Objective. To determine the effectiveness of antidote therapy in acute poisoning-related emergency medical services (EMS interventions. Methods. A prospective observational study included all poisoning-related intervention cases over 3 years (1999-2001 in the Celje region, Slovenia, covering 125,000 inhabitants. Data were recorded on an EMS form. Results. Psychoactive agents were present in 56.5% out of 244 poisoning-related EMS interventions. Prescription drugs were a cause of intoxication in 93 (39.2% cases alone or in combination with alcohol or illegal drugs. More than one fifth of poisonings were due to the use of illegal drugs in 52 (21.9% cases, 43 (18.1% out of them heroin related. At the time of EMS arrival, more patients who ingested illegal drugs were in coma or comatose than the rest. 24 (45.3% vs. 32 (17.3% of poisoned patients were in coma (p<0.001. Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS at the first contact was lower in patients who ingested illegal drugs than in the remaining patients (9.0 vs. 11.6, p=0.001. In 23.2% of the cases, an antidote was administered. In 29 (12.2% naloxone and in 16 (6.7% flumazenil was administered. Mean GCS after intervention was higher in all cases but significantly higher in illegal drug cases, 13.4 vs. 12.2 (p=0.001, with a mean positive change in GCS of 4.5 vs. 0.6 (p<0.001. In illegal drug users, mean change after antidote administration was 8.2 vs. 0.5 without antidote administration (p<0.001. Conclusion. High rate of successful antidote use during the intervention indicated the importance of good EMS protocols and the presence of a skilled doctor in the EMS team.

  13. Effect of Memantine on Serum Levels of Neuron-Specific Enolase and on the Glasgow Coma Scale in Patients With Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Majid; Nayeb-Aghaei, Hossein; Kouchek, Mehran; Miri, Mir Mohammad; Goharani, Reza; Amoozandeh, Arash; Akhavan Salamat, Sina; Sistanizad, Mohammad

    2018-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of disability and death globally. Despite significant progress in neuromonitoring and neuroprotection, pharmacological interventions have failed to generate favorable results. We examined the effect of memantine on serum levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE), a marker of neuronal damage, and the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) in patients with moderate TBI. Patients were randomly assigned to the control group (who received standard TBI management) and the treatment group (who, alongside their standard management, received enteral memantine 30 mg twice daily for 7 days). Patients' clinical data, GCS, findings of head computed tomography, and serum NSE levels were collected during the study. Forty-one patients were randomized into the control and treatment groups, 19 and 22 patients respectively. Baseline characteristics and serum NSE levels were not significantly different between the 2 groups. The mean serum NSE levels for the memantine and the control groups on day 3 were 7.95 ± 2.86 and 12.33 ± 7.09 ng/mL, respectively (P = .05), and on day 7 were 5.03 ± 3.25 and 10.04 ± 5.72 ng/mL, respectively (P = .003). The mean GCS on day 3 was 12.3 ± 2.0 and 10.9 ± 1.9 in the memantine and control groups, respectively (P = .03). Serum NSE levels and GCS changes were negatively correlated (r = -0.368, P = .02). Patients with moderate TBI who received memantine had significantly reduced serum NSE levels by day 7 and marked improvement in their GCS scores on day 3 of the study. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  14. The predictive capacity of the Glasgow-Blatchford score for the risk stratification of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in an emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Recio-Ramírez

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the ability of the Glasgow Blatchford Score (GBS system to identify the need for urgent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGIE in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB. Methods: An observational, retrospective study was carried out in all patients attended at the ER for suspected UGIB in one year. Patients were split into two categories -high-risk (>2 and low-risk (≤2- by means of the GBS system. Results: A total of 60 patients were included. Of these, 46 were classified as "high-risk" (> 2 and 14 as "low-risk" (≤ 2 subjects. The characteristics of patients in the low-risk group included: Mean age: 46.6 ± 13.7 (18-88 years. Males/females: 7/7. Urgent endoscopy revealed: normal (50%; n = 7; esophagitis (21.4%; n = 3; gastritis (14.2%; n = 2; Mallory-Weiss syndrome (7.1%; n = 1; non-bleeding varices (7.1%; n = 1. The characteristics of patients in the high-risk group included: Mean age: 68.7 ± 19.8 (31-91 years. Males/females: 30/16. Digestive endoscopy revealed: Gastric/duodenal ulcer (56.52%; n = 26; normal (17.39%; n = 8; esophagitis (8.69%; n = 4; gastritis (8.69%; n = 4; angioectasia (4.34%; n = 2; bleeding varices (4.34%; n = 2. Low-risk patients exhibited no lesions requiring urgent management during endoscopy, and the sensitivity of the GBS scale for high-risk UGIB detection was found to be 100% (95% CI: 86.27%, 99.71%, with a specificity of 48.28% (95% CI: 29.89, 67.1%. Conclusions: The GBS scale seems to accurately identify patients with low-risk UGIB, who may be managed on an outpatient basis and undergo delayed upper GI endoscopy at the outpatient clinic.

  15. Prospective multicenter validation of the Glasgow Blatchford bleeding score in the management of patients with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage presenting at an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquarius, Michel; Smeets, Fabiënne G M; Konijn, Helena W; Stassen, Patricia M; Keulen, Eric T; Van Deursen, Cees T; Masclee, Ad A M; Keulemans, Yolande C

    2015-09-01

    The Glasgow Blatchford Bleeding Score (GBS) has been developed to assess the need for treatment in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGIH) presenting at emergency departments (EDs). We aimed (a) to determine the validity of the GBS and Rockall scoring systems for prediction of need for treatment and (b) to identify the optimal cut-off value of the GBS. We carried out a population-based, prospective multicenter study of 520 consecutive patients presenting with acute UGIH at EDs of three hospitals. The accuracy of GBS and Rockall scores in predicting the need for treatment (i.e. endoscopic, surgical, or radiological intervention and blood transfusion) was analyzed using receiver operating characteristic curves. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the GBS had a good discriminative ability to determine the need for treatment in patients with acute UGIH (area under the curve: 0.88; 95% confidence interval: 0.85-0.91). The GBS was superior to both the clinical Rockall and the full Rockall score in predicting the need for treatment (area under the curve: 0.86 vs. 0.70 vs. 0.77). At a cut-off value of up to 2, the GBS had the optimal combination of sensitivity (99.4%) and specificity (42.4%). The GBS is superior compared with both Rockall scores in predicting the need for treatment in patients with suspected acute UGIH presenting at EDs in the Netherlands. Patients with a GBS of 2 or less form a subgroup of low-risk patients. These low-risk patients are eligible for outpatient management, which might reduce hospital admissions and healthcare costs.

  16. The use of brain CT Scan in craniocerebral trauma with Glasgow coma scale scores of 13 – 15 in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital 1999-2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jofizal Jannis

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available There is still a controversy among the neurologists whether brain CT scan must be performed on the mild head trauma patients. This study was executed to find out the correlation between the brain CT scan image findings and its clinical impairment among the mild head trauma patients with Glasgow coma scale (GCS score of 13 to 15. The study was a retrospective study by analyzing the uniform medical records of the head trauma patients hospitalized at the Neurology ward of Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital within the period of 1999 to 2001. During that period 1,663 patients were hospitalized due to head trauma, and 1,166 of them (70.1 % were suffered from mild head trauma patients with GCS score of 13-15. Among those with brain CT scan examinations (N: 271, the neurological abnormalities were found on 144 (53.1% of patients, consisted of cerebral edema (11,4%, intracerebral hemorrhage (5.5%, epidural hemorrhage (16.2%, subdural hemorrhage (18.1%, subarachnoid hemorrhage (5.5%, and combination (13.8%. The further analysis showed that cranial nerves disturbance, amnesia, loss of conciousness for more than 10 minutes, and vomiting are significantly correlated to the brain CT scan abnormality. Combination of the above four clinical signs and symptoms have sensitivity of 90 % in predicting brain insults. This findings may be used as a simple set of clinical criteria for identifying mild head trauma patients who need undergo CT scan examination. (Med J Indones 2004; 13: 156-60 Keywords: mild head injury, brain CT scan

  17. A comparison of the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness (FOUR) score and Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) in predictive modelling in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprowicz, Magdalena; Burzynska, Malgorzata; Melcer, Tomasz; Kübler, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    To compare the performance of multivariate predictive models incorporating either the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness (FOUR) score or Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) in order to test whether substituting GCS with the FOUR score in predictive models for outcome in patients after TBI is beneficial. A total of 162 TBI patients were prospectively enrolled in the study. Stepwise logistic regression analysis was conducted to compare the prediction of (1) in-ICU mortality and (2) unfavourable outcome at 3 months post-injury using as predictors either the FOUR score or GCS along with other factors that may affect patient outcome. The areas under the ROC curves (AUCs) were used to compare the discriminant ability and predictive power of the models. The internal validation was performed with bootstrap technique and expressed as accuracy rate (AcR). The FOUR score, age, the CT Rotterdam score, systolic ABP and being placed on ventilator within day one (model 1: AUC: 0.906 ± 0.024; AcR: 80.3 ± 4.8%) performed equally well in predicting in-ICU mortality as the combination of GCS with the same set of predictors plus pupil reactivity (model 2: AUC: 0.913 ± 0.022; AcR: 81.1 ± 4.8%). The CT Rotterdam score, age and either the FOUR score (model 3) or GCS (model 4) equally well predicted unfavourable outcome at 3 months post-injury (AUC: 0.852 ± 0.037 vs. 0.866 ± 0.034; AcR: 72.3 ± 6.6% vs. 71.9%±6.6%, respectively). Adding the FOUR score or GCS at discharge from ICU to predictive models for unfavourable outcome increased significantly their performances (AUC: 0.895 ± 0.029, p = 0.05; AcR: 76.1 ± 6.5%; p model 3; and AUC: 0.918 ± 0.025, p model 4), but there was no benefit from substituting GCS with the FOUR score. Results showed that FOUR score and GCS perform equally well in multivariate predictive modelling in TBI.

  18. Does the choice of neighbourhood supermarket access measure influence associations with individual-level fruit and vegetable consumption? A case study from Glasgow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Lukar E; Pearce, Jamie R; Macdonald, Laura; Lamb, Karen E; Ellaway, Anne

    2012-07-27

    Previous studies have provided mixed evidence with regards to associations between food store access and dietary outcomes. This study examines the most commonly applied measures of locational access to assess whether associations between supermarket access and fruit and vegetable consumption are affected by the choice of access measure and scale. Supermarket location data from Glasgow, UK (n = 119), and fruit and vegetable intake data from the 'Health and Well-Being' Survey (n = 1041) were used to compare various measures of locational access. These exposure variables included proximity estimates (with different points-of-origin used to vary levels of aggregation) and density measures using three approaches (Euclidean and road network buffers and Kernel density estimation) at distances ranging from 0.4 km to 5 km. Further analysis was conducted to assess the impact of using smaller buffer sizes for individuals who did not own a car. Associations between these multiple access measures and fruit and vegetable consumption were estimated using linear regression models. Levels of spatial aggregation did not impact on the proximity estimates. Counts of supermarkets within Euclidean buffers were associated with fruit and vegetable consumption at 1 km, 2 km and 3 km, and for our road network buffers at 2 km, 3 km, and 4 km. Kernel density estimates provided the strongest associations and were significant at a distance of 2 km, 3 km, 4 km and 5 km. Presence of a supermarket within 0.4 km of road network distance from where people lived was positively associated with fruit consumption amongst those without a car (coef. 0.657; s.e. 0.247; p0.008). The associations between locational access to supermarkets and individual-level dietary behaviour are sensitive to the method by which the food environment variable is captured. Care needs to be taken to ensure robust and conceptually appropriate measures of access are used and these should be

  19. Effectiveness of Self Instructional Module on Knowledge and Skills Regarding Use of Glasgow Coma Scale in Neurological Assessment of Patients among Nurses Working in Critical Care Units of KLE Dr. Prabhakar Kore Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Belgaum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milka Madhale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The brain is the central unit that controls all the functions of our body. The brain cannot function all by its self without the neurons. The proper functioning of the brain and its relationship with the world is known as consciousness. The level of consciousness is the sensitive and reliable indicator of the patient’s neurological status. The alteration in the consciousness helps to determine if there is any damage in the nervous system that can occur even without visible damage to the head. There are numerous tools used to determine level of consciousness. The most common tool used to determine level of consciousness is the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS. It was used with ease and helped to standardize clinical observations of the patients with impaired consciousness. A proper neurological assessment using the Glasgow Coma Scale is the essential part of nursing care. It is very essential for the nurse to have knowledge and skills about neurological assessment and the Glasgow Coma Scale.Hence the present study to evaluate the effectiveness of Self Instructional Module (SIM on knowledge and skill regarding Glasgow Coma Scale was undertaken. Aim and Objectives: 1]To assess the knowledge and skills regarding the use of Glasgow Coma Scale in neurological assessment of patients among the staff nurses. 2] To determine the effectiveness of the Self Instructional Module on knowledge and skills regarding the GCS in neurological assessment of patients. 3] To find association between the pre test knowledge and skills scores and demographic variables. 4] To find the correlation between the knowledge score sand the skills scores regarding the GCS in neurological assessment of patients. Material and Methods: The study was evaluative in nature. A purposive sampling technique was used for the study. A total of 55 staff nurses working in Critical Care Units of KLES Hospital and MRC,Belgaum were selected for the study. A structured questionnaire and an

  20. Which clinical variable influences health-related quality of life the most after spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage? Hunt and Hess scale, Fisher score, World Federation of Neurosurgeons score, Brussels coma score, and Glasgow coma score compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapapa, Thomas; Tjahjadi, Martin; König, Ralph; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Woischneck, Dieter

    2013-12-01

    To determine the strength of the correlation between the Hunt and Hess scale, Fisher score, Brussels coma score, World Federation of Neurosurgeons score, and Glasgow coma score and health-related quality of life. Evaluable questionnaires from 236 patients (5.6 years [± standard deviation, 2.854 years] on average after hemorrhage) were included in the analysis. Quality of life was documented using the MOS-36 item short form health survey. Because of the ordinal nature of the variables, Kendall tau was used for calculation. Significance was established as P ≤ 0.05. Weak and very weak correlations were found in general (r ≤ 0.28). The strongest correlations were found between the Glasgow coma score and quality of life (r = 0.236, P = 0.0001). In particular, the "best verbal response" achieved the strongest correlations in the comparison, at r = 0.28/P = 0.0001. The Fisher score showed very weak correlations (r = -0.148/P = 0.012). The Brussels coma score (r = -0.216/P = 0.0001), Hunt and Hess scale (r = -0.197/P = 0.0001), and the World Federation of Neurosurgeons score (r = -0.185/P = 0.0001) revealed stronger correlations, especially in terms of the physical aspects of quality of life. The Glasgow coma scale revealed the strongest, and the Fisher score showed the weakest correlations. Thus the Fisher score, as an indicator of the severity of a hemorrhage, has little significance in terms of health-related quality of life. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of Age on Glasgow Coma Scale in Patients with Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: An Approach with Propensity Score-Matched Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Shyuan Rau

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most widely used methods of describing traumatic brain injury (TBI are the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS and the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS. Recent evidence suggests that presenting GCS in older patients may be higher than that in younger patients for an equivalent anatomical severity of TBI. This study aimed to assess these observations with a propensity-score matching approach using the data from Trauma Registry System in a Level I trauma center. Methods: We included all adult patients (aged ≥20 years old with moderate to severe TBI from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2016. Patients were categorized into elderly (aged ≥65 years and young adults (aged 20–64 years. The severity of TBI was defined by an AIS score in the head (AIS 3‒4 and 5 indicate moderate and severe TBI, respectively. We examined the differences in the GCS scores by age at each head AIS score. Unpaired Student’s t- and Mann–Whitney U-tests were used to analyze normally and non-normally distributed continuous data, respectively. Categorical data were compared using either the Pearson chi-square or two-sided Fisher’s exact tests. Matched patient populations were allocated in a 1:1 ratio according to the propensity scores calculated using NCSS software with the following covariates: sex, pre-existing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, systolic blood pressure, hemoglobin, sodium, glucose, and alcohol level. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the effects of age on the GCS score in each head AIS stratum. Results: The study population included 2081 adult patients with moderate to severe TBI. These patients were categorized into elderly (n = 847 and young adults (n = 1234: each was exclusively further divided into three groups of patients with head AIS of 3, 4, or 5. In the 162 well-balanced pairs of TBI patients with head AIS of 3, the elderly demonstrated a significantly higher GCS score than the young adults (14.1 ± 2.2 vs. 13.1 ± 3

  2. Estudio de validación diagnóstica de la escala de Glasgow-Blatchford para la predicción de mortalidad en pacientes con hemorragia digestiva alta en un hospital de Lima, Perú (junio 2012-diciembre 2013)

    OpenAIRE

    Cassana Abad, Carla Alessandra; Scialom, Silvia; Segura, Eddy R.; Chacaltana, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Antecedentes y propósito del estudio: la hemorragia digestiva alta es una causa importante de ingreso hospitalario y constituye la principal emergencia gastroenterológica, con una tasa de mortalidad de hasta el 14%. En el Perú no existen estudios sobre el uso de la escala de Glasgow-Blatchford para predecir mortalidad por hemorragia digestiva alta. El objetivo de este estudio es realizar la validación externa de la escala de Glasgow-Blatchford y establecer su mejor punto de corte para predeci...

  3. AN OBSERVATIONAL CLINICAL STUDY OF ASSESSING THE UTILITY OF PSS (POISON SEVERITY SCORE AND GCS (GLASGOW COMA SCALE SCORING SYSTEMS IN PREDICTING SEVERITY AND CLINICAL OUTCOMES IN OP POISONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Chandrasekhar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Organophosphorus compound poisoning is the most common poisonings in India because of easy availability often requiring ICU care and ventilator support. Clinical research has indicated that respiratory failure is the most important cause of death due to organophosphorus poisoning. It results in respiratory muscle weakness, pulmonary oedema, respiratory depression, increased secretions and bronchospasm. These complications and death can be prevented with timely institution of ventilator support. MATERIALS AND METHODS Hundred consecutive patients admitted with a history of organophosphorus poisoning at Kurnool Medical College, Kurnool, were taken for study after considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Detailed history, confirmation of poisoning, examination and other than routine investigations, serum pseudocholinesterase and arterial blood gas analysis was done. The severity and clinical outcomes in OP poisoning is graded by PSS (poison severity score and GCS (Glasgow coma scale scoring systems. RESULTS This study was conducted in 100 patients with male preponderance. Majority of poisoning occurred in 21-30 age group (n=5. Most common compound consumed in our study was methyl parathion and least common was phosphoran. Slightly more than half of the patients consumed less than 50 mL of poison. 21 patients consumed between 50 to 100 mL. Distribution of poison severity score of patients studied showed 45 cases of grade 1 poisoning. 26 cases of grade 2 poisoning, 23 cases of grade 3 poisoning and 6 cases of grade 4 poisoning (death within first 24 hours. Distribution of GCS score of patients studied GCS scores were <10 in 25 patients at admission and 24 patients after 24 hours. GCS scores were ≥10 in 75 patients at admission and 76 patients after 24 hours. Poison severity score is not prognostic, but merely defines severity of OP poisoning at a given time. CONCLUSION Both Glasgow coma scale and poison severity scoring systems

  4. Zehirlenme Olgularında Hayatı Tehlike Kararı İçin Glasgow Koma Skalasının Kullanımı

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabiş Keskin

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Zehirlenme nedeniyle gönderilen olgularda, hayati tehlike kavramının değerlendirilmesinde; kişinin yoğun bakım tedavisi görüp görmediği, yoğun bakımda kaldığı süre, antidot tedavisi uygulanıp uygulanmadığı ve varsa ölçülmüş olan madde dozu kriter olarak kullanılmaktadır. Glasgow Koma Skalası (GKS, beyin fonksiyonlarını ölçen, genellikle kranyoserebral yaralanmak hastalarda koma derecesini güvenilir bir şekilde değerlendirmeye yarayan bir indekstir. GKS’nın mortalité ile korelasyonu bulunmaktadır. Bu çalışmada GKS bulguları tanımlanan ve bu tanımlar ışığında GKS hesaplanan olgularda skalanın hayati tehlike kararı açısından kullanılabilirliğinin tartışılması amaçlandı. 1999-2000 yılları arasında Adli Tıp Kurumu 5. İhtisas Kurulu’na zehirlenme nedeni ile gönderilen olgular, klasik hayati tehlike kriterleri ve göz hareketleri, konuşma,sözel cevap, motor cevap olmak üzere, GKS kriterleri açısından ret-rospektif olarak değerlendirildi. Çalışmamızda toplam 647 zehirlenme olgusu içerisinden hayati tehlike bulunup bulunmadığı sorulan 359 olgu arasından GKS belirtilmiş olan ve/veya mevcut verilerle GKS’sı saptanabilen 30 olgu irdelenmiştir. Diğer olgularda ise klinik bilgiler ve hasta öyküsü yeterince kaydedilmediğinden skala değerlendirilememiştir. Bu çalışma sonucunda, zehirlenme olguları için oluşturulacak modifiye bir GKS formunun her sağlık biriminde kullanılmasının yakın bir hedef olması gerektiği düşünülmüştür. Anahtar kelimeler: Glasgow koma skalası, hayati tehlike, zehirlenme

  5. Catestatin, vasostatin, cortisol, temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, scores of the short form of the Glasgow composite measure pain scale and visual analog scale for stress and pain behavior in dogs before and after ovariohysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srithunyarat, Thanikul; Höglund, Odd V; Hagman, Ragnvi; Olsson, Ulf; Stridsberg, Mats; Lagerstedt, Anne-Sofie; Pettersson, Ann

    2016-08-02

    The stress reaction induced by surgery and associated pain may be detrimental for patient recovery and should be minimized. The neuropeptide chromogranin A (CGA) has shown promise as a sensitive biomarker for stress in humans. Little is known about CGA and its derived peptides, catestatin (CST) and vasostatin (VS), in dogs undergoing surgery. The objectives of this study were to investigate and compare concentrations of CGA epitopes CST and VS, cortisol, body temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, scores of the short form of the Glasgow composite measure pain scale (CMPS-SF) and visual analog scales (VAS) for stress and pain behavior in dogs before and after ovariohysterectomy. Thirty healthy privately owned female dogs admitted for elective ovariohysterectomy were included. Physical examination, CMPS-SF, pain behavior VAS, and stress behavior VAS were recorded and saliva and blood samples were collected before surgery, 3 h after extubation, and once at recall 7-15 days after surgery. Dogs were premedicated with morphine and received carprofen as analgesia for 7 days during the postoperative period. At 3 h after extubation, CMPS-SF and pain behavior VAS scores had increased (p stress behavior VAS scores, temperature, respiratory rate (p stress and pain changed in dogs subjected to ovariohysterectomy. To further evaluate CST and VS usefulness as pain biomarkers, studies on dogs in acute painful situations are warranted.

  6. Analysis of long-term (median 10.5 years) outcomes in children presenting with traumatic brain injury and an initial Glasgow Coma Scale score of 3 or 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulkerson, Daniel H; White, Ian K; Rees, Jacqueline M; Baumanis, Maraya M; Smith, Jodi L; Ackerman, Laurie L; Boaz, Joel C; Luerssen, Thomas G

    2015-10-01

    Patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) with low presenting Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores have very high morbidity and mortality rates. Neurosurgeons may be faced with difficult decisions in managing the most severely injured (GCS scores of 3 or 4) patients. The situation may be considered hopeless, with little chance of a functional recovery. Long-term data are limited regarding the clinical outcome of children with severe head injury. The authors evaluate predictor variables and the clinical outcomes at discharge, 1 year, and long term (median 10.5 years) in a cohort of children with TBI presenting with postresuscitation GCS scores of 3 and 4. A review of a prospectively collected trauma database was performed. Patients treated at Riley Hospital for Children (Indianapolis, Indiana) from 1988 to 2004 were reviewed. All children with initial GCS (modified for pediatric patients) scores of 3 or 4 were identified. Patients with a GCS score of 3 were compared with those with a GCS score of 4. The outcomes of all patients at the time of death or discharge and at 1-year and long-term follow-up were measured with a modified Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) that included a "normal" outcome. Long-term outcomes were evaluated by contacting surviving patients. Statistical "classification trees" were formed for survival and outcome, based on predictor variables. Sixty-seven patients with a GCS score of 3 or 4 were identified in a database of 1636 patients (4.1%). Three of the presenting factors differed between the GCS 3 patients (n = 44) and the GCS 4 patients (n = 23): presence of hypoxia, single seizure, and open basilar cisterns on CT scan. The clinical outcomes were statistically similar between the 2 groups. In total, 48 (71.6%) of 67 patients died, remained vegetative, or were severely disabled by 1 year. Eight patients (11.9%) were normal at 1 year. Ten of the 22 patients with long-term follow-up were either normal or had a GOS score of 5. Multiple clinical

  7. The Glasgow 'Deep End' Links Worker Study Protocol: a quasi-experimental evaluation of a social prescribing intervention for patients with complex needs in areas of high socioeconomic deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Stewart W; Fitzpatrick, Bridie; Grant, Lesley; Chng, Nai Rui; O'Donnell, Catherine A; Mackenzie, Mhairi; McConnachie, Alex; Bakhshi, Andisheh; Wyke, Sally

    2017-01-01

    'Social prescribing' can be used to link patients with complex needs to local (non-medical) community resources. The 'Deep End' Links Worker Programme is being tested in general practices serving deprived populations in Glasgow, Scotland. To assess the implementation and impact of the intervention at patient and practice levels. Study design : Quasi-experimental outcome evaluation with embedded theory-driven process evaluation in 15 practices randomized to receive the intervention or not. Complex intervention : Comprising a practice development fund, a practice-based community links practitioner (CLP), and management support. It aims to link patients to local community organizations and enhance practices' social prescribing capacity. Study population : For intervention practices, staff and adult patients involved in referral to a CLP, and a sample of community organization staff. For comparison practices, all staff and a random sample of adult patients. Sample size : 286 intervention and 484 comparator patients. Outcomes : Primary patient outcome is health-related quality of life (EQ-5D-5L). Secondary patient outcomes include capacity, depression/anxiety, self-esteem, and healthcare utilization. Practice outcome measures include team climate, job satisfaction, morale, and burnout. Outcomes measured at baseline and 9 months. Processes : Barriers and facilitators to implementation of the programme and possible mechanisms through which outcomes are achieved. Analysis plan : For outcome, intention-to-treat analysis with differences between groups tested using mixed-effects regression models. For process, case-study approach with thematic analysis. This evaluation will provide new evidence about the implementation and impact of social prescribing by general practices serving patients with complex needs living in areas of high deprivation.

  8. Reverse shock index multiplied by Glasgow Coma Scale score (rSIG) is a simple measure with high discriminant ability for mortality risk in trauma patients: an analysis of the Japan Trauma Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Akio; Tanaka, Noriko

    2018-04-11

    The shock index (SI), defined as heart rate (HR) divided by systolic blood pressure (SBP), is reported to be a more sensitive marker of shock than traditional vital signs alone. In previous literature, use of the reverse shock index (rSI), taken as SBP divided by HR, is recommended instead of SI for hospital triage. Among traumatized patients aged > 55 years, SI multiplied by age (SIA) might provide better prediction of early post-injury mortality. Separately, the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score has been shown to be a very strong predictor. When considering these points together, rSI multiplied by GCS score (rSIG) or rSIG divided by age (rSIG/A) could provide even better prediction of in-hospital mortality. This retrospective, multicenter study used data from 168,517 patients registered in the Japan Trauma Data Bank for the period 2006-2015. We calculated areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROCs) to measure the discriminant ability by comparing those of SI (or rSI), SIA, rSIG, and rSIG/A for in-hospital mortality and for 24-h blood transfusion. The highest ROC AUC (AUROC), 0.901(0.894-0.908) for in-hospital mortality in younger patients (aged < 55 years), was seen for rSIG. In older patients (aged ≥ 55 years), the AUROC of rSIG/A, 0.845(0.840-0.850), was highest for in-hospital mortality. However, the difference between rSIG and rSIG/A was slight and did not seem to be clinically important. rSIG also had the highest AUROC of 0.745 (0.741-749) for 24-h blood transfusion. rSIG ((SBP/HR) × GCS score) is easy to calculate without the need for additional information, charts or equipment, and can be a more reliable triage tool for identifying risk levels in trauma patients.

  9. University of Glasgow at WebCLEF 2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macdonald, C.; Plachouras, V.; He, B.

    2006-01-01

    We participated in the WebCLEF 2005 monolingual task. In this task, a search system aims to retrieve relevant documents from a multilingual corpus of Web documents from Web sites of European governments. Both the documents and the queries are written in a wide range of European languages......, namely content, title, and anchor text of incoming hyperlinks. We use a technique called per-field normalisation, which extends the Divergence From Randomness (DFR) framework, to normalise the term frequencies, and to combine them across the three fields. We also employ the length of the URL path of Web...

  10. The comparison of modified early warning score and Glasgow coma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-02-08

    Feb 8, 2016 ... 4‑week mortality, for the patients being in the triage category 1 and 2 who refer to Emergency ... early warning scoring system (EWS) was defined by Morgan et al. on .... method in identifying the risky patients, since there are.

  11. Patron-driven acquisition at Glasgow School of Art Library

    OpenAIRE

    Buri, David

    2014-01-01

    Reports on a five-month pilot of staff-mediated patron-driven acquisition (PDA) of e-books in a small specialist arts institution. Examines the background to the trial; the selection of platforms and vendors; and the import of e-book records into the catalogue. Presents the results of the pilot; a brief analysis of usage; and an outline of future plans for the further development of the service.

  12. Assessment of physicians' knowledge of glasgow coma score

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-20

    May 20, 2014 ... Key words: Head injury, inter-rater reliability, prognostication, trauma. Date of ..... the true picture of its knowledge in other institutions around our zone since our ... training and recall of GCS rather, a higher percentage of the.

  13. Treatment of tracheomalacia with aortopexy in children in Glasgow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Jenny; Sau, Chung; Clement, William; Danton, Mark; Davis, Carl; Haddock, Graham; McLean, Andrew; Kubba, Haytham

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess outcomes of infants and children undergoing aortopexy and to try and establish which children would derive the greatest benefit from this complex intervention. Materials and This is a retrospective case series in a pediatric tertiary referral hospital between 1993 and 2012. A case sheet review was performed to collect demographic data and identify outcomes for each child. The effects of the subtype of tracheomalacia, weight at surgery, symptoms at presentation, surgical approach, and preoperative ventilation were considered. There were 30 children who underwent aortopexy during the study period. Of the 30 children in the study, 21 children (70%) were male. The gestational age at birth ranged between 25 and 41 weeks (9 children [30%] were preterm). Age at surgery was between 2 and 140 weeks (mean; 31.5 weeks, median; 26 weeks). The onset of symptoms was between birth and 18 months (mean; 3.8 months, median; 3.5 months). The presenting symptoms were stridor (n = 9; 30%), failed extubation (n = 4; 13%), death attacks (n = 8; 27%), and cyanosis (n = 9; 30%). The underlying pathology was primary in 10 children (33%) and secondary in 18 children. The diagnosis was made by bronchoscopy in 26 children (93%). Imaging was performed in 25 children (83%). Aortopexy in our institution is performed by general pediatric surgeons (n = 8; 27%) and cardiothoracic surgeons (n = 22; 73%). In the immediately postoperative period, 25 children (83%) were thriving. Of the children that required another procedure; 1 child was reintubated (3%), 2 children had a tracheostomy (6%), 1 child had a stent (3%), and 2 children died (6%). Clinical follow-up of these children was between 1 month and 12 years. Long term, in 22 children (73%) were asymptomatic. There were no clinical predictors of outcome identified, but aortopexy is a safe effective procedure for children with severe tracheomalacia. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Planet Homeless : Governance arrangements in Amsterdam, Copenhagen and Glasgow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesveldt, N.F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/162503199

    2015-01-01

    Homelessness is a complex policy issue that all local governments face. But, at the same time, local authorities often have very little influence on the causes of homelessness, such as de-institutionalization, drug addiction, and release from detention or evictions. Seen in a European context,

  15. Glasgow Coma Scale Scores, Early Opioids, and 4-year Psychological Outcomes among Combat Amputees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    psychological outcomes, loss of consciousness, military and VA health data, morphine , posttraumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury. INTRODUCTION...appropriate for postinjury analgesia [15–17]. Unfortu- nately, little research has compared the psychological benefits of morphine or fentanyl...that morphine reduced PTSD compared with fentanyl because mor- phine produced more long-lasting pain relief and/or was more effective at blocking

  16. A multicentre, clinical evaluation of a hydro-responsive wound dressing: the Glasgow experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, H; Davidson, D; Duncan, A; Guthrie, J; Henderson, E; MacDiarmid, M; McGown, K; Pollard, V; Potter, R; Rodgers, A; Wilson, A; Horner, J; Doran, M; Simm, S; Taylor, R; Rogers, A; Rippon, M G; Colgrave, M

    2017-11-02

    Our aim was to assess the effectiveness of hydro-responsive wound dressing (HRWD) in debridement and wound bed preparation of a variety of acute and chronic wounds that presented with devitalised tissue needing removal so that healing may proceed. This was a non-comparative evaluation of acute and chronic wounds that required debridement as part of their normal treatment regimen. Clinicians recorded wound changes including a subjective assessment level of devitalised tissue and wound bed preparation, presence of pain, wound status (e.g., wound size) and periwound skin condition. Data was also collected from clinicians and patients to provide information on clinical performance of the dressing. We recruited 100 patients with a variety of wound types into the study. Over 90% of the clinicians reported removal of devitalised tissue to enable a healing response in both chronic and acute wounds. Specifically, over the course of the evaluation period, levels of devitalised tissue (necrosis and slough) reduced from 85.5% to 26.3%, and this was accompanied by an increase in wound bed granulation from 12.0% to 33.7%. Correspondingly, there was a 40% reduction in wound area, hence a clinically relevant healing response was seen upon treatment with HRWD. It is also noteworthy that this patient population included a significant proportion of chronic wounds (51.4%) that showed no signs of wound progression within debridement process (£8.05), larval therapy (£306.39) and mechanical pad debridement (£11.46). HRWD was well tolerated and was demonstrated to be an efficient debridement tool providing rapid, effective and pain free debridement in a variety of wound types.

  17. Circadian variability of the initial Glasgow Coma Scale score in traumatic brain injury patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K. Yue

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Nighttime TBI patients present with decreased GCS scores and are admitted to ICU at higher rates, yet have fewer prior comorbidities and similar systemic injuries. The interaction between nighttime hours and decreased GCS score on ICU admissions has important implications for clinical assessment/triage.

  18. Patients with Glasgow Coma Scale scores 3, 4, 5 after gunshot wounds to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, H H; Levy, M L; Stone, J L; Masri, L S; Lichtor, T; Lavine, S D; Fitzgerald, L F; Apuzzo, M L

    1995-10-01

    Even this information is only partial. To study fully the effects of treatment would require optimal care at all points from time of injury, including rapid prehospital resuscitation, rapid transport to an optimally equipped and staffed hospital, immediate evaluation and treatment of the initial injury and all complications, rapid and comprehensive rehabilitation, and supportive and flexible home and work settings for the patient on discharge. Patients would need to be stratified for premorbid characteristics, including intelligence, personal traits, and training. Prolonged follow-up, possibly for several years, would be required to determine true outcome. No current study contains sufficient numbers of patients treated optimally and studied for prolonged periods, but this should be done. One way of looking at such patients is to decide that many should be treated to salvage a few. The other way of looking at them is that so many must receive care, at great emotional and economic cost to themselves and others, that such treatment is inappropriate for any of them. Treating all such patients would be a major undertaking. If most of these patients were treated vigorously, a great proportion of them would still die but probably not for a number of days. During this period, their families would be under extreme stress. Once stabilized and receiving ongoing care, some patients would enter a permanent vegetative state and survive for prolonged periods until their prognosis was clear and care was withdrawn, again causing family stress as well as high cost. Some would likely survive although impaired. The charges and real costs of care for all these patients would be tremendous. The question therefore arises as to how to decide what to do about caring for a large group of patients whose maximal care would be costly in emotional and financial terms, particularly at a time when it is recognized that resources for medical care are going to be limited. When discussing such patients as a group with a view toward developing practice guidelines, many considerations must be brought to bear. One consideration is the certainty of the prognosis in both a quantitative and a qualitative sense in an individual case. It is not clear that one can be certain in patients except when there are overwhelmingly unfavorable features. As has been noted, even patients who have been shot through the geographic center of the brain and are posturing can make excellent recoveries. This would push toward aggressive treatment for many patients. Decision making must therefore be considered in terms of bioethics. The major principle-based systems of bioethics are deontologic, arising from accepted principles, and utilitarian, arising from effect on outcome. A virtue-based ethic for physicians arising from "the caring bond and the public trust" is being revived as a balance to analytical ethics. A similar orientation from the point of view of patients is communitarian ethics, that is asking for only what is reasonable and not so much as might harm others. Some of the issues to be considered include the sanctity of life while taking into account the criteria for life--vegetative function versus some level of mental function. One must also review each decision from the viewpoints of all the parties involved--patients, family and friends, physicians, and society--in the context of a heterogeneous society in which individual rights and tolerance enforced by law are primary features. In the patients' terms, there is a desire and right to medical care to maintain a healthy productive life. Even if impaired to some extent, patients may still have an interest in living. Balancing benefits and burdens of life is a complex problem. There is also the right, based on patients' values, to refuse care if there is the wish not to take a chance of having a significantly compromised existence. Such declaration before injury should be honored...

  19. The modified Glasgow prognostic score in patients undergoing surgery for bone and soft tissue sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morhij, Rossel; Mahendra, Ashish; Jane, Mike; McMillan, Donald C

    2017-05-01

    The prognostic significance of markers of the systemic inflammatory response in patients with soft tissue and bone sarcomas remains unclear. Therefore, the present study aimed to compare the prognostic value of markers of the systemic inflammatory response in patients undergoing surgery for primary soft tissue and bone sarcoma. Patients who underwent resection of primary soft tissue/bone sarcoma between 2008 and 2012 and had pre-operative measurements of the systemic inflammatory response [C-reactive protein, albumin, white cell, neutrophil, lymphocyte and platelet counts, and the combination of C-reactive protein and albumin (mGPS)] were included in the study (n = 111). The majority of the patients were ≤50 years old (84%), were female (63%), had soft tissue sarcoma (62%), and had tumours >10 cm (52%), mostly of high grade (85%). The median follow-up of survivors was 50 months (range 34-78); 24 (21%) developed local recurrence, 35 (31%) developed distant metastases and 30 (30%) died of their cancer. On univariate analysis, tumour size (P sarcoma. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Glasgow Coma Scores, Early Opioids, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Among Combat Amputees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    extracted from in- theater patient encounter forms by Expeditionary Medical En- counter Database trauma nurses . GCS scores of 3 to 12 in- dicate moderate to...that may negatively impact hemodynamics (Fox et al., 1995). Combat-trauma anes- thesiologists are advised to minimize these side effects when managing...the most seriously injured and/or hemodynamically unstable patients. The present findings are consistent with this principle of combat casualty care by

  1. The Glasgow-Maastricht foot model, evaluation of a 26 segment kinematic model of the foot

    OpenAIRE

    Oosterwaal, Michiel; Carbes, Sylvain; Telfer, Scott; Woodburn, James; T?rholm, S?ren; Al-Munajjed, Amir A.; van Rhijn, Lodewijk; Meijer, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Background Accurately measuring of intrinsic foot kinematics using skin mounted markers is difficult, limited in part by the physical dimensions of the foot. Existing kinematic foot models solve this problem by combining multiple bones into idealized rigid segments. This study presents a novel foot model that allows the motion of the 26 bones to be individually estimated via a combination of partial joint constraints and coupling the motion of separate joints using kinematic rhythms. Methods ...

  2. The Glasgow consensus on the delineation between pesticide emission inventory and impact assessment for LCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Anton, Assumpció; Bengoa, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Pesticides are applied to agricultural fields to optimise crop yield and their global use is substantial. Their consideration in life cycle assessment (LCA) is affected by important inconsistencies between the emission inventory and impact assessment phases of LCA. A clear definition...

  3. The glasgow blatchford score is the most accurate assessment of patients with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Hansen, Jane Møller; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B

    2012-01-01

    Risk scoring systems are used increasingly to assess patients with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGIH). There have been comparative studies to identify the best system, but most have been retrospective and included small sample sizes, few patients with severe bleeding and with low mortality...

  4. Glasgow supported self-management trial (GSuST) for patients with moderate to severe COPD: randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucknall, C E; Miller, G; Lloyd, S M; Cleland, J; McCluskey, S; Cotton, M; Stevenson, R D; Cotton, P; McConnachie, A

    2012-03-06

    To determine whether supported self management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can reduce hospital readmissions in the United Kingdom. Randomised controlled trial. Community based intervention in the west of Scotland. Patients admitted to hospital with acute exacerbation of COPD. Participants in the intervention group were trained to detect and treat exacerbations promptly, with ongoing support for 12 months. The primary outcome was hospital readmissions and deaths due to COPD assessed by record linkage of Scottish Morbidity Records; health related quality of life measures were secondary outcomes. 464 patients were randomised, stratified by age, sex, per cent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second, recent pulmonary rehabilitation attendance, smoking status, deprivation category of area of residence, and previous COPD admissions. No difference was found in COPD admissions or death (111/232 (48%) v 108/232 (47%); hazard ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval 0.80 to 1.38). Return of health related quality of life questionnaires was poor (n=265; 57%), so that no useful conclusions could be made from these data. Pre-planned subgroup analysis showed no differential benefit in the primary outcome relating to disease severity or demographic variables. In an exploratory analysis, 42% (75/150) of patients in the intervention group were classified as successful self managers at study exit, from review of appropriateness of use of self management therapy. Predictors of successful self management on stepwise regression were younger age (P=0.012) and living with others (P=0.010). COPD readmissions/deaths were reduced in successful self managers compared with unsuccessful self managers (20/75 (27%) v 51/105 (49%); hazard ratio 0.44, 0.25 to 0.76; P=0.003). Supported self management had no effect on time to first readmission or death with COPD. Exploratory subgroup analysis identified a minority of participants who learnt to self manage; this group had a significantly reduced risk of COPD readmission, were younger, and were more likely to be living with others. Clinical trials NCT 00706303.

  5. Alien Species: The Discursive Othering of Grey Squirrels, Glasgow Gaelic, Shetland Scots and the Gay Guys in the Shag Pad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, John E.

    2013-01-01

    "Nativeness" has been recognised for two decades now as a problematic concept within applied linguistics, yet other areas of language analysis have been slow to question it, with some continuing to treat it as a primordial fact of nature. This paper briefly examines the history of the "native speaker" and the shifts in thinking…

  6. The efficacy of local governance arrangements in relation to homelessness. A Comparison of Copenhagen, Glasgow, and Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Montfort, A.J.G.M.; Boesveldt, N.F.; Boutellier, J.C.J.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, several northern European metropolitan cities have developed new strategies to deal with homelessness. This article focuses on the efficacy of these new local governance arrangements in terms of service delivery and the related societal effects. By comparing and evaluating the

  7. Antithrombotic drugs and non-variceal bleeding outcomes and risk scoring systems: comparison of Glasgow Blatchford, Rockall and Charlson scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Ali S; McCloskey, Caroline; Craigen, Theresa; Angerson, Wilson J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Antithrombotic drugs (ATDs) cause non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB). Risk scoring systems have not been validated in ATD users. We compared Blatchford, Rockall and Charlson scores in predicting outcomes of NVUGIB in ATD users and controls. Methods A total of 2071 patients with NVUGIB were grouped into ATD users (n=851) and controls (n=1220) in a single-centre retrospective analysis. Outcomes included duration of hospital admission, the need for blood transfusion, rebleeding requiring surgery and 30-day mortality. Results Duration of admission correlated with all scores in controls, but correlations were significantly weaker in ATD users. Rank correlation coefficients in control versus ATD: 0.45 vs 0.20 for Blatchford; 0.48 vs 0.32 for Rockall and 0.42 vs 0.26 for Charlson (all p<0.001). The need for transfusion was best predicted by Blatchford (p<0.001 vs Rockall and Charlson in both ATD users and controls), but all scores performed less well in ATD users. Area under the receiver operation characteristic curve (AUC) in control versus ATD: 0.90 vs 0.85 for Blatchford; 0.77 vs 0.61 for Rockall and 0.69 vs 0.56 for Charlson (all p<0.005). In predicting surgery, Rockall performed best; while mortality was best predicted by Charlson with lower AUCs in ATD patients than controls (p<0.05). Stratification showed the scores' performance to be age-dependent. Conclusions Blatchford score was the strongest predictor of transfusion, Rockall's had the strongest correlation with duration of admission and with rebleeding requiring surgery and Charlson was best in predicting 30-day mortality. Modifications of these systems should be explored to improve their efficiency in ATD users. PMID:28839866

  8. An outbreak of hepatitis A virus associated with a multi-national inner-city nursery in Glasgow, Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kathy K; Penrice, Glillian M; Gunson, Rory N

    2015-08-01

    This report describes an outbreak of hepatitis A virus linked to a nursery which affected a total of 10 individuals. Active case finding, using oral fluid testing, helped identify asymptomatic cases. Nucleotide sequencing showed that all cases were caused by the same virus, which was most similar to HAV strains circulating Zimbabwe. Interestingly, an asymptomatic child had recently returned from visiting family in that country. Standard infection control procedures and vaccination of contacts successfully contained the outbreak. Only one patient developed hepatitis A despite having been vaccinated a week before symptoms began. This hepatitis A outbreak scenario may become more common as the numbers of international travellers and immigrants increase in the UK. It highlights the importance of recommending HAV vaccination to foreign nationals and their families who are travelling to countries endemic for hepatitis A. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Highlights from Faraday Discussion FDSERS17: Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering - SERS, Glasgow, UK, 30th August-1st September 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Martino, G; Fleming, H; Kamp, M; Lussier, F

    2017-11-28

    The 2017 Faraday Discussion on Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) attracted more than a hundred delegates from a broad spectrum of backgrounds and experience levels, bringing together leading scientists involved in the long living field of SERS. The meeting gave an overview of the liveliness of the topic, characterised by open questions and fascinating science still to discover. In the following, we discuss the topics covered during this meeting and briefly highlight the content of each presentation.

  10. Lectures on weak interactions: from Fermi-Majorana-Perrin to Glasgow-Weinberg-Salam and some contributions from Latin American physicists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    Historical aspects on the development of the physics of weak interactions which, after about forty years, converged with quantum electrodynamics to give birth ot the first model of unification of interactions, the so-called electroweak standard model, are presented. (L.C.) [pt

  11. Physical aspects of arc welding : Proceedings of seminar in honour of J.F. Lancaster, 1 September 1993, Glasgow (U.K.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Ouden, G.

    1994-01-01

    This volume contains the papers presented at a seminar held in honour of Prof. J.F. Lancaster on 1 September 1993 in order to mark the occasion of his retirement as Chairman of Study Group 212 (Physics of Welding) of the International Institute of Welding. Prof. Lancaster was Chairman of Study Group

  12. Disposal of radioactive waste. Can it be done safely. An account of the debate organized by the British Association for the Advancement of Science, Glasgow, 28 August 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardine, G C

    1986-01-01

    Presentations were made by L.E.J. Roberts (Summary of the five major options for radioactive waste management and disposal), G.A.M. Webb (Radiation and protection: how and why), J-P Olivier (International Aspects of Waste Disposal), T. Lee (Public perception of risk), K. Bovey (Concern of CND). The open forum which followed the talks grouped questions under the headings: Policy, Accidents/Hazards, Public Assurance and Compensation.

  13. What Can Expeditions Do for Students … and for Science? An Investigation into the Impact of University of Glasgow Exploration Society Expeditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Lynsey R.; Downie, J. Roger; Muir, Martin; White, Stewart A.

    2017-01-01

    The benefits of field courses for biological science students are well established, but field courses also have limitations: they are generally too brief to allow significant research and they are staff-designed and led, limiting the development of student autonomy. In contrast, the value of student-organised field expeditions has been little…

  14. Zpráva z výroční konference Britské sociologické asociace: Glasgow 7. - 9. dubna 2010

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Formánková, Lenka

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2010), s. 95-100 ISSN 1213-0028 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA700280804 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70280505 Keywords : BSA * inequalities * social justice Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography http://www.genderonline.cz

  15. Prehospital Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Increase the Positive Predictive Value of the Glasgow Coma Scale for High-Mortality Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-15

    States, J.D., and Mango , N.K. (1999). Abbreviated injury scale unification: the case for a unified injury system for global use . J. Trauma 47, 309...Andrew Reisner,1,2 Xiaoxiao Chen,1 Kamal Kumar,1 and Jaques Reifman1 Abstract We hypothesized that vital signs could be used to improve the...logistic regression models and, using DeLong’s test, compared their area under receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC AUCs) for three outcomes

  16. Environmental Analysis of the Upper Susitna River Basin using Landsat Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    CourseslData Measuring Sites (SCS) 0 Snow Cover Measurement Location 4 C R RE /N OAA) j HŔ River Gauging Station (UISGS, COE) tI’ql with Water...large-scale map that can be used in selection of moved westward across the area (Kachadoorian drilling sites, provide a basis for estimating 1974...A033500 petrology and structure of the Maclaren, Ruby Range McKim, H L, L W Gatto, C I Merry, and R K Haugen (1976b) and Coast Range Belts implications

  17. A Framework for Evaluating Digital Library Services; Interdisciplinarity: The Road Ahead for Education in Digital Libraries; Federated Digital Rights Management: A Proposed DRM Solution for Research and Education; Learning Lessons Holistically in the Glasgow Digital Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Sayeed; Hobbs, Benjamin; Lorie, Mark; Flores, Nicholas; Coleman, Anita; Martin, Mairead; Kuhlman, David L.; McNair, John H.; Rhodes, William A.; Tipton, Ron; Agnew, Grace; Nicholson, Dennis; Macgregor, George

    2002-01-01

    Includes four articles that address issues related to digital libraries. Highlights include a framework for evaluating digital library services, particularly academic research libraries; interdisciplinary approaches to education about digital libraries that includes library and information science and computing; digital rights management; and the…

  18. ISSN 2073-9990 East Cent. Afr. J. surg

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hp 630 Dual Core

    data sheet was used to record age, cause of injury,Glasgow coma score, injury severity ..... participants constituted a bigger percentage compared to the favourable group.16, 17, .... Does the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale Add Value.

  19. Adam Smith and the Moral Economy of the Classroom System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D.

    1980-01-01

    Traces the development of mass schooling to its origins in 19th-century Glasgow. Its importance as an intellectual and economic center enabled Glasgow to invent a solution to the problem of urban schooling, while the association of scholars like Adam Smith with Glasgow University made Scottish educational theories acceptable around the world. (DB)

  20. Unravelling Bessel beams: Presentation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mhlanga, T

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mhlanga1,3, Angela Dudley1, Martin Lavery2, Miles Padgett2 and Andrew Forbes1,3 1CSIR National Laser Centre, PO Box 395, Pretoria, 0001, South Africa 2Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK 3College of Agriculture...,* Thandeka Mhlanga,1Martin Lavery,2 Andre McDonald,1 Filippus S. Roux,1 Miles Padgett,2 and Andrew Forbes1 1CSIR National Laser Centre, PO Box 395, Pretoria 0001, South Africa 2 Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK *adudley...

  1. How much of the difference in life expectancy between Scottish cities does deprivation explain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, R; Mitchell, R; Dundas, R; Leyland, A H; Popham, F

    2015-10-16

    Glasgow's low life expectancy and high levels of deprivation are well documented. Studies comparing Glasgow to similarly deprived cities in England suggest an excess of deaths in Glasgow that cannot be accounted for by deprivation. Within Scotland comparisons are more equivocal suggesting deprivation could explain Glasgow's excess mortality. Few studies have used life expectancy, an intuitive measure that quantifies the between-city difference in years. This study aimed to use the most up-to-date data to compare Glasgow to other Scottish cities and to (i) evaluate whether deprivation could account for lower life expectancy in Glasgow and (ii) explore whether the age distribution of mortality in Glasgow could explain its lower life expectancy. Sex specific life expectancy was calculated for 2007-2011 for the population in Glasgow and the combined population of Aberdeen, Dundee and Edinburgh. Life expectancy was calculated for deciles of income deprivation, based on the national ranking of datazones, using the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation. Life expectancy in Glasgow overall, and by deprivation decile, was compared to that in Aberdeen, Dundee and Edinburgh combined, and the life expectancy difference decomposed by age using Arriaga's discrete method. Life expectancy for the whole Glasgow population was lower than the population of Aberdeen, Dundee and Edinburgh combined. When life expectancy was compared by national income deprivation decile, Glasgow's life expectancy was not systematically lower, and deprivation accounted for over 90 % of the difference. This was reduced to 70 % of the difference when carrying out sensitivity analysis using city-specific income deprivation deciles. In both analyses life expectancy was not systematically lower in Glasgow when stratified by deprivation. Decomposing the differences in life expectancy also showed that the age distribution of mortality was not systematically different in Glasgow after accounting for deprivation

  2. "Operation Exhibition" - fotokunst uues valguses / Laura Lepp

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lepp, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Šotimaal Glasgow's 22.-27. aprillini avatud Ida-Euroopast pärit noorte fotograafide näitusest, mille korraldasid Glasgow' ülikoolis õppivad kunstiajaloo üliõpilased Laura Lepp (Eesti) ja Jevgenia Judova (Läti). Eestit esindavad näitusel Rene Suurkaev ja Marin Sild

  3. 78 FR 38430 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition; Determinations: “Of Heaven and Earth: 500...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 8359] Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition; Determinations: ``Of Heaven and Earth: 500 Years of Italian Painting From Glasgow Museums'' SUMMARY: Notice is... objects to be included in the exhibition ``Of Heaven and Earth: 500 Years of Italian Painting from Glasgow...

  4. NAUCLEFOLININE: A NEW ALKALOID FROM THE ROOTS OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    NAUCLEFOLININE: A NEW ALKALOID FROM THE ROOTS OF. NAUCLEA LATIFOLIA. D. Ngnokam1*, J.F. Ayafor1, J.D. Connolly2 and J.M. Nuzillard3. 1Department of Chemistry, University of Dschang, Box 67 Dschang, Cameroon. 2Department of Organic Chemistry, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland.

  5. (2013) VOL. 1 ISSUE 1 On behalf of our Editorial Board, I am ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OLAWUYI

    journal features research articles, book reviews and commentaries on matters of ... or nothing to show in terms of development, economic prosperity, social stability and ... Glasgow, Hull, Harvard, Oxford, Calgary, Liverpool, British Columbia,.

  6. Predictors of paediatric injury mortality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PTS) and Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) were tested against outcome by binary logistic regression analysis. Results. Five hundred and seventy-six children presented with injury during the study period with 22 deaths, giving an injury mortality ...

  7. Introducing IT-Based environmental simulation courses at Slovak technical universities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensen, J.L.M.; Hraska, J.; Mallory-Hill, S.M.; Rabenseifer, F.; Maldonado, E.; Yannas, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Since the 1995/96 academic year, four Slovak universities (Slovak Technical University Bratislava, Technical University Kosice, Slovak Agricultural University Nitra and Technical University Zvolen) in cooperation with two EU universities (University of Strathclyde Glasgow and Eindhoven University of

  8. CRUSER's Warfare Innovation Workshop Focused on Hybrid War in the Urban Littorals

    OpenAIRE

    Ehrlich, Michael

    2017-01-01

    News Stories Archive The Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) Consortium for Robotics and Unmanned Systems Education and Research, CRUSER, hosted its annual Warfare Innovation Workshop (WIW) in Glasgow Hall, Sept. 18-21.

  9. Rhinogenic subdural empyema in-older children and teenagers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1993-12-13

    Dec 13, 1993 ... Twenty-two had depressed levels of consciousness and 7 had Glasgow .... recorded separately. The lateral hemisphere was the commonest site (20 patients). Sixteen had interhemispheric collections lying in the parafalcine.

  10. 76 FR 55407 - Announcement of Funding Awards; Public and Indian Housing Family Self-Sufficiency Program Under...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ... Bowling Green 247 Double Springs Bowling Green........ KY 42101 47,740 Road. Housing Authority of Glasgow... Norman Street... Saginaw MI 48605 48,675 Housing and Redevelopment 442 Pine Mill Court.. Virginia MN...

  11. Are secrets of the universe just about to be revealed? Scots scientists search for "God's particle"

    CERN Multimedia

    Morgan, James

    2007-01-01

    "The invisible force which explains the nature of life, the universe and everything was first predicted by an Edinburgh scientist. Now, a team of Glasgow University physicists are prepring to discover if he was right. (2,5 pages)

  12. Surgical Management of Pelvic floor Prolapse in women using Mesh

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAH

    polytetrafluoroethylene) . This article reviews our experience with polypropylene mesh in pelvic floor repair at the. Southern General Hospital Glasgow. The objective was to determine the safety and effectiveness of the prolene mesh in the repair ...

  13. Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research - Vol 16, No 1 (2017)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... changes in blood pressure, body mass index and blood glucose in male Wistar albino rats ... Changes in proximate and phytochemical compositions of Persea ... Nurses use of Glasgow coma scale in neurological assessment of patients in ...

  14. SUBDURAL EMPYEMA, A PATIENT CASE REVIEW

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Presented with a Glasgow coma scale of 8/15, left sided hemiplegia ... brain at 4weeks showed localised right parietal and occipital parafalcine .... Normal liver and kidney function tests. Lumbar ... patient developed the condition post frontal.

  15. What are Pregnant Women in a Rural Niger Delta Community's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Buchanan House, Glasgow Caledonian University Email: Caroline. ... exploratory qualitative study was carried out to identify pregnant women in a rural Niger Delta community's perceptions of ..... sometimes you stay for the whole day.

  16. ISSN 2073-9990 East Cent. Afr. J. surg. (Online) 81

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hp 630 Dual Core

    Hospital Acquired Pneumonia Sepsis. 1. 0.5 ... Glasgow Coma Scale to determine the severity of the patient s brain injury. ... productive groups of the society, ... Kassis, N. Rekik and M. Bouaziz, Prognosis of traumatic head injury in South.

  17. Influence of prayer and prayer habits on outcome in patients with severe head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannemreddy, Prasad; Bryan, Kris; Nanda, Anil

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the effect of prayers on the recovery of the unconscious patients admitted after traumatic brain injury. A retrospective study of patients with severe head injury was conducted. The Glasgow Coma Scale and Glasgow Outcome Scale scores were examined along with age, gender, smoking, and alcohol intake. There were 13 patients who received prayer and 13 who did not receive prayer during the hospital stay with almost identical mean Glasgow Coma Scale score. The prayer group stayed in the hospital for more days (P = .03). On multivariate analysis, patients' age (P = .01), admission Glasgow Coma Scale score (P = .009), and prayer habits (P = .007) were significant factors. Patients with prayers habits recovered better following severe head injury. The role of intercessory prayer needs further studies in larger groups.

  18. From Life in a French Town to the Artificial Heart: An Approach to the Teaching of Scientific French.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Margaret E.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the experiences of one instructor in designing and implementing a short course in scientific French for upper level students majoring in applied biology at Glasgow College. Materials used and aspects of scientific language chosen are briefly discussed. (LMO)

  19. Muusikamaailm / Priit Kuusk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kuusk, Priit, 1938-

    1999-01-01

    Lätis jagati kõrgeimaid muusikalisi autasusid, Deliuse ooper esietendus Glasgow's, Helsingi linnaorkester tuuril, Salzburgi Mozarti nädala laureaatidest ja Schönbergi ooperi "Mooses ja Aaron" esiettekandest Metropolitanis

  20. 77 FR 10771 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ..., 158 E. Main St., Henderson, 12000116 Gibson County Gibson County Training School, 1041 S. Harris St... 900-1450) MPS) 8400 Moores Ln., Brentwood, 12000121 VIRGINIA Amherst County Clifford--New Glasgow...

  1. The Proceedings of the International Conference on Numerical Ship Hydrodynamics (4th) Held in Washington, DC on 24-27 September 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    Arlington VA, U.S.A. M.R. Hendenhall and S.C. Perkins, PREDICTION OF THE UNSTEADY HYDRODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF SUBNERSIBLE VEHICLES ...Architecture and Ocean Engineering University of Glasgow Glasgow, Scotland Abstract Research into slamming on marine vehicles has concentrated in the two...difference (open boun- compare the results obtained by the dary) method (17], hibrid method of - method on the assumption of the linear matching with the

  2. Risk of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Seroconversion in U.S. Navy Personnel Following Visits to Foreign Ports

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-25

    500 - 999 visits 47. Inchon, South Korea 78. Frederiksted, Virgin Is. 9. Bahrain 48. Palermo , Italy 79. Valencia, Spain 10. Augusta Bay, Italy 49...Muscat, Oman 80. Tunis, Tunisia 11. Hong Kong 81. Glasgow, Scotland 12. Palma, Spain 75 - 99 visits 82. Cartagena, Colombia 13. Singapore 50. Cannes...Holy Loch, Scotland 264 81. Glasgow, Scotland 57 32. Esquimalt, Canada 245 82. Cartagena, Colombia 55 33. Cartagena, Spain 206 83. Numazu, Japan 55 34

  3. Impact of socioeconomic deprivation on rate and cause of death in severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Julie Langan; McLean, Gary; Park, John; Martin, Daniel J; Connolly, Moira; Mercer, Stewart W; Smith, Daniel J

    2014-09-12

    Socioeconomic status has important associations with disease-specific mortality in the general population. Although individuals with Severe Mental Illnesses (SMI) experience significant premature mortality, the relationship between socioeconomic status and mortality in this group remains under investigated. We aimed to assess the impact of socioeconomic status on rate and cause of death in individuals with SMI (schizophrenia and bipolar disorder) relative to the local (Glasgow) and wider (Scottish) populations. Cause and age of death during 2006-2010 inclusive for individuals with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder registered on the Glasgow Psychosis Clinical Information System (PsyCIS) were obtained by linkage to the Scottish General Register Office (GRO). Rate and cause of death by socioeconomic status, measured by Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD), were compared to the Glasgow and Scottish populations. Death rates were higher in people with SMI across all socioeconomic quintiles compared to the Glasgow and Scottish populations, and persisted when suicide was excluded. Differences were largest in the most deprived quintile (794.6 per 10,000 population vs. 274.7 and 252.4 for Glasgow and Scotland respectively). Cause of death varied by socioeconomic status. For those living in the most deprived quintile, higher drug-related deaths occurred in those with SMI compared to local Glasgow and wider Scottish population rates (12.3% vs. 5.9%, p = socioeconomic quintiles compared to the Glasgow and Scottish populations but was most marked in the most deprived quintiles when suicide was excluded as a cause of death. Further work assessing the impact of socioeconomic status on specific causes of premature mortality in SMI is needed.

  4. Do Scoring Systems Help in Predicting Survival Following Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatt, Marcel; Goldsmith, Paul; Martinez, Marcos; Barandiaran, Jesus; Grover, Kartikae; El-Barghouti, Naif; Perry, Eugene P

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The aim of this study was to assess the value of the Hardman Index and the Glasgow Aneurysm Score in predicting postoperative mortality in patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA), and to assess the correlation between the two. PATIENTS AND METHODS Patients admitted with rAAA were identified from a hospital database. Hospital records were reviewed and a retrospective Hardman Index and Glasgow Aneurysm Score was calculated. Poor postoperative prognosis was considered at a Glasgow Aneurysm Score > 95 or a Hardman Index ≥ 3. RESULTS A total of 96 patients with a median age of 77.5 years (interquartile range, 71–83 years) and a male:female ratio of 2:1 were identified. Of these, 37 patients were not offered surgery and this was associated with 100% mortality. Of the 59 operated patients, 36 (61%) patients died postoperatively. Operated patients had a median Glasgow Aneurysm Score of 91 (interquartile range, 77–101) and a Hardman Index of 2 (interquartile range, 1–2). In this group, a Glasgow Aneurysm Score > 95 or a Hardman Index ≥ 3 was not associated with mortality (P = 0.10 and P = 0.79, respectively). Correlation between the scoring systems was poor (+0.42 τb). CONCLUSIONS The scoring systems assessed did not help predict the outcome of rAAA surgery, and correlated poorly with each other. They do not aid clinical judgement. PMID:19102824

  5. Predictors of Outcome of Convulsive Status Epilepticus Among an Egyptian Pediatric Tertiary Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halawa, Eman F; Draz, Iman; Ahmed, Dalia; Shaheen, Hala A

    2015-11-01

    Convulsive status epilepticus is a common neurologic emergency in pediatrics. We aimed to study the etiology, clinical features, and prognostic factors among pediatric patients with convulsive status epilepticus. Seventy patients were included in this cohort study from pediatric emergency department of the specialized Children Hospital of Cairo University. The outcome was evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Score. Acute symptomatic etiology was the most common cause of convulsive status epilepticus. Refractory convulsive status epilepticus was observed more significantly in cases caused by acute symptomatic etiologies. The outcome was mortality in 26 (37.1%) patients, severe disability in 15 (21.4%), moderate disability in 17 (24.3%), and good recovery in 12 (17.1%) patients. The significant predictor of mortality was lower modified Glasgow Coma Scale score on admission, whereas lower modified Glasgow Coma Scale score on admission and refractory convulsive status epilepticus were the significant predictors for disability and mortality. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Automated electrocardiogram interpretation programs versus cardiologists' triage decision making based on teletransmitted data in patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clark, Elaine N; Ripa, Maria Sejersten; Clemmensen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the effectiveness of 2 automated electrocardiogram interpretation programs in patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome transported to hospital by ambulance in 1 rural region of Denmark with hospital discharge diagnosis used as the gold standard...... infarction with respect to discharge diagnosis were 78%, 91%, and 81% for LIFEPAK 12 and 78%, 94%, and 87% for the Glasgow program. Corresponding data for attending cardiologists were 85%, 90%, and 81%. In conclusion, the Glasgow program had significantly higher specificity than the LIFEPAK 12 program (p = 0...

  7. The importance of cell surface RANKL in rheumatoid arthritis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kryštůfková, O.; Šinkora, J.; Jarošová, K.; Hladíková, M.; Niederlová, J.; Řeháková, Zuzana; Tegzová, D.; Růžičková, Š.; Vencovský, J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2005), s. 54-54 ISSN 1478-6354. [European Workshop for Rheumatology Research /25./. 24.02.2005-27.02.2005, Glasgow] R&D Projects: GA MZd NK7293 Keywords : HUMAN MONOCYTES Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  8. Spatial Resolution of the Medipix-2 as Neutron Pixel Detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakůbek, J.; Holý, T.; Lehmann, E.; Pospíšil, S.; Uher, J.; Vacík, J.; Vavřík, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 546, - (2005), s. 164-169 ISSN 0168-9002. [International Workshop on Radiation Imaging Detectors /6./. Glasgow, Scotland, 25.07.2004-29.07.2004] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : neutron detection * neutronography * X-ray Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 1.224, year: 2005

  9. Management of intracranial hemorrhage in adult patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fletcher-Sandersjöö, Alexander; Thelin, Eric Peter; Bartek, Jiri

    2017-01-01

    : We conducted a retrospective review of adult patients (≥18 years) who developed an ICH during ECMO treatment at the Karolinska University Hospital (Stockholm, Sweden) between September 2005 and May 2017. Outcome was assessed by 30-day mortality and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) after 6 months...

  10. Long-term quality of life assessment in patients with auricular prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kievit, H.; Verhage-Damen, G.W.; Ingels, K.J.A.O.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Hol, M.K.S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the quality of life of people with an auricular prosthesis. METHODS: A retrospective case series study was conducted. Quality of life was evaluated by an open-ended question form and 3 questionnaires: the Glasgow Benefit Inventory, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale, and the

  11. Apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 (APOE-ε4) genotype is associated with decreased 6-month verbal memory performance after mild traumatic brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.K. Yue (John); Robinson, C.K. (Caitlin K.); J.F. Burke (John F.); E.A. Winkler (Ethan A.); Deng, H. (Hansen); M.C. Cnossen (Maryse); H.F. Lingsma (Hester); A.R. Ferguson (Adam); McAllister, T.W. (Thomas W.); J. Rosand (Jonathan); E.G. Burchard (Esteban); M.D. Sorani (Marco); S. Sharma (Sourabh); J.L. Nielson (Jessica L.); G.G. Satris (Gabriela G.); Talbott, J.F. (Jason F.); P.E. Tarapore (Phiroz E.); F.K. Korley (Frederick K.); Wang, K.K.W. (Kevin K.W.); E.L. Yuh (Esther); P. Mukherjee (Pratik); R. Diaz-Arrastia (Ramon); A.B. Valadka (Alex); D. Okonkwo (David); G. Manley (Geoffrey)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: The apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele associates with memory impairment in neurodegenerative diseases. Its association with memory after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is unclear. Methods: mTBI patients (Glasgow Coma Scale score 13–15, no neurosurgical intervention,

  12. NA62 cavern and sub-detectors 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    Graham, Connor

    2017-01-01

    The NA62 cavern, with the completed detector, during breaks in data taking in July 2017. Pictures from 05-07-17 by Dan Protopopescu and pictures from 08-07-17 by Connor Graham (Both Glasgow-affiliated). Includes pictures of the whole experiment, safety systems and sub-detector elements.

  13. ROLE OF CT IN LOCALISING THE INJURY TO THE PARTICULAR INTRACRANIAL COMPARTMENT IN PATIENTS WITH CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonthu Anuradh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND To evaluate and asses the role of CT in localising the injury to the particular intracranial compartment in patients with craniocerebral trauma. To evaluate the value of early CT imaging, which helps in patient prognosis. To correlate CT findings with Glasgow coma scale and clinical findings there by guide the neurosurgeon for the surgical planning. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was conducted at Department of Radiology, Government General Hospital, Kakinada, from September 2012 to September 2014 over a period of two years. The study includes evaluation of 300 cases of craniocerebral trauma. All age groups were included. RESULTS A higher incidence noted in males and age group of 20-29 years and moderate Glasgow coma scale in majority of cases. Most common presenting symptom being loss of consciousness followed by vomiting. The commonest finding on CT being subdural haematoma followed by intraparenchymal haematoma. Skull fractures noted in 74% of cases. All the patients with moderate Glasgow coma scale showed intracranial bleeds. Out of 300 patients, normal CT findings in 159 patients that is 53% and abnormal CT findings in 141 patients that is 47%. CONCLUSION Incidence of road traffic accidents was more in male population with peak age incidence in between 20-30 years. Subdural haematoma was most common form of intracerebral bleed. Glasgow coma scale combined with relevant presenting complaints can be used as an indication for CT scan in order to avoid unnecessary CT scans.

  14. Speech recognition and communication outcomes with cochlear implantation in Usher syndrome type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietola, Laura; Aarnisalo, Antti A; Abdel-Rahman, Akram; Västinsalo, Hanna; Isosomppi, Juha; Löppönen, Heikki; Kentala, Erna; Johansson, Reijo; Valtonen, Hannu; Vasama, Juha-Pekka; Sankila, Eeva-Marja; Jero, Jussi

    2012-01-01

    Usher syndrome Type 3 (USH3) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by variable type and degree of progressive sensorineural hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa. Cochlear implants are widely used among these patients. To evaluate the results and benefits of cochlear implantation in patients with USH3. A nationwide multicenter retrospective review. During the years 1995-2005, in 5 Finnish university hospitals, 19 patients with USH3 received a cochlear implant. Saliva samples were collected to verify the USH3 genotype. Patients answered to 3 questionnaires: Glasgow Benefit Inventory, Glasgow Health Status Inventory, and a self-made questionnaire. Audiological data were collected from patient records. All the patients with USH3 in the study were homozygous for the Finnish major mutation (p.Y176X). Either they had severe sensorineural hearing loss or they were profoundly deaf. The mean preoperative hearing level (pure-tone average, 0.5-4 kHz) was 110 ± 8 dB hearing loss (HL) and the mean aided hearing level was 58 ± 11 dB HL. The postoperative hearing level (34 ± 9 dB HL) and word recognition scores were significantly better than before surgery. According to the Glasgow Benefit Inventory scores and Glasgow Health Status Inventory data related to hearing, the cochlear implantation was beneficial to patients with USH3. Cochlear implantation is beneficial to patients with USH3, and patients learn to use the implant without assistance.

  15. Ward Round – A patient with multi-organ failure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-17

    Mar 17, 2011 ... with a Glasgow Coma Score of 5/15. She had equal pupils, no neck stiffness and no focal abnormality. No seizure activity had been witnessed. Further blood tests showed a raised serum creatinine concentration (see Table 1b). Her urine output was adequate throughout her admission. Urinalysis showed ...

  16. Outcome of severe traumatic brain injury at a critical care unit: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors that were associated with poor outcome on univariate analysis were Glasgow coma scale of less than 5, diffuse axonal injury and intracerebral mass lesions and blood sugar greater than 10mmol / L. CONCLUSION: Severe TBI is a frequent cause of hospital admission to critical care units among young men with a ...

  17. Bruns Syndrome: a deadly sign | Oudrhiri | Pan African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 52 years old man was admitted to the intensive care unit for a sudden onset coma. His Glasgow Coma Scale was 4/15 with fixed dilated pupils. He has been experiencing paroxystic episodes of headaches, vomiting and vertigo for 6 months that went undiagnosed.Diagnoses include acute hydrocephalous, syncopes, and ...

  18. Outcome of Early Post-traumatic Seizure: An Experience in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the frequency, causes, risk factors and outcome following early posttraumatic seizure. Methods: A retrospective analysis of age, sex, mechanism of injury, type and onset of unprovoked seizure occurring within one week of injury, admission coma score, and Glasgow outcome score in patients with ...

  19. Relationship between admission serum C-reactive protein and short ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-17

    Sep 17, 2012 ... were 30 day Glasgow outcome scale score and functional impairment on the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). An age- and gender-matched healthy control group had serum CRP determined at inclusion. Elevated CRP was defined as any level above the cutoff (mean +2 x standard deviation of CRP level of ...

  20. Relationship between admission serum C-reactive protein and short ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Outcome measures were 30 day Glasgow outcome scale score and functional impairment on the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). An age- and gender-matched healthy control group had serum CRP determined at inclusion. Elevated CRP was defined as any level above the cutoff (mean +2 x standard deviation of CRP level ...

  1. Book notice | Nazombe | Journal of Humanities

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Padraig 6Malle, Living Dangerously, Glasgow: Dudu Nsomba Publications, 1999 189pp. (paperback). Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's ...

  2. Various scoring systems for predicting mortality in Intensive Care Unit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Age, gender, body weight, initial diagnosis, clinic of referral, intubation, comorbidities, APACHE II, APACHE IV, Glasgow coma scale, SAPS III scores, length of hospitalization before referral to ICU, length of stay in ICU, mechanical ventilation were recorded. Results: Most of the patients (54.6%) were consulted from ...

  3. Technology Horizons: A Vision for Air Force Science and Technology 2010-30

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Terrell Cover Art and Book Design and Illustrations Daniel Armstrong Composition and Prepress Production Ann Bailey Print Preparation and Distribution Diane Clark ...Air Force History and Mu- seums Program, 2002. Karagozian, Ann , Werner Dahm, Ed Glasgow, Roger Howe, Ilan Kroo, Richard Murray, and Heidi Shyu

  4. Assessment of Cerebral Hemodynamics in Traumatic Brain Injury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Latka, M; Turalska, M; West, B. J; Kolodziej, W; Latka, D

    2006-01-01

    ... (Glasgow Outcome Scale GOS =1) the average gain = 0.45 calculated at f=0.05 Hz significantly exceeds that of 17 patients with GOS=2: wavelet gain = 0.24 with p = 4 10 (exp -5) (Kruskal-Wallis test...

  5. Erythropoietin in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: a double blind randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, J B; Møller, C; Gideon, P

    2007-01-01

    but preliminarily terminated because of a lower than expected inclusion rate. However, 73 patients were randomised to treatment with EPO (500 IU/kg/day for three days) or placebo. The primary endpoint was Glasgow Outcome Score at six months. We further studied surrogate measures of secondary ischaemia, i...

  6. Identification of possible genetic polymorphisms involved in cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CRP is a predictive indicator of survival time of terminally ill cancer patients (Suh and Ahn 2007). ∗†. Glasgow ...... to body composition, sex, insulin levels and the A55V polymor- .... with survival and C-reactive protein levels in elderly men.

  7. Regional Sign Language Varieties in Contact: Investigating Patterns of Accommodation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamp, Rose; Schembri, Adam; Evans, Bronwen G.; Cormier, Kearsy

    2016-01-01

    Short-term linguistic accommodation has been observed in a number of spoken language studies. The first of its kind in sign language research, this study aims to investigate the effects of regional varieties in contact and lexical accommodation in British Sign Language (BSL). Twenty-five participants were recruited from Belfast, Glasgow,…

  8. Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    Screen break: nursing students Jackie Walsh, Laura Robinson and Liz Midgley join 'matron' Sandra McQuat, a ward manager at Beatson Oncology Centre, the Western Infirmary, Glasgow, as they try out nurse training 1950s style for a new BBC series to be televised this autumn. The series, Thoroughly Modern Matron, was filmed at Belvoir Park Hospital, Belfast.

  9. Investigation of the non-photochemical processes in photosynthetic bacteria and higher plants using interference of coherent radiation - a new approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roháček, Karel; Kloz, M.; Bína, David; Batysta, F.; Vácha, František

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 91, 2-3 (2007), s. 301 ISSN 0166-8595. [International Congress of Photosynthesis/14./. 22.07.2007-27.07.2007, Glasgow] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : photosynthetic bacteria Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  10. Investigation of the non-photochemical processes in photosynthetic bacteria and higher plants using interference of coherent radiation - a new approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roháček, Karel; Kloz, M.; Bína, David; Batysta, F.; Vácha, František

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 91, 2-3 (2007), s. 301 ISSN 0166-8595. [International Congress of Photosynthesis/14./. 22.07.2007-27.07.2007, Glasgow] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : Photosynthesis * higher plants Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  11. Rabies Across Borders

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-12-04

    Dr. Roman Biek, with the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, University of Glasgow, discusses rabies outbreaks in Canada from the U.S.  Created: 12/4/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 12/4/2017.

  12. Comparación de índices pronósticos de morbimortalidad en pacientes neurológicos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén D. Camargo

    2003-06-01

    The BCM scale, which is a prognostic mortality rate for a neurological patient, will give a more dynamic and objective appraisal for the manipulation of a patient in an acute phase and also provides a state of consciousness graded through the Glasgow scale.

  13. Successful School Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Christopher; Sammons, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Working with partners including the Department of Education at Oxford University, the Centre for Equity in Education at the University of Manchester, the University of Glasgow, the University of Nottingham and the Hong Kong Institute of Education, "Education Development Trust" has commissioned a series of reviews of international…

  14. The tradeoff between both basic aspects of a perceived space

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šikl, Radovan; Šimeček, M.

    Supplement, č. 31 (2002), s. 30 ISSN 0301-0066. [European Conference on Visual Perception. 25.08.2002-29.08.2002, Glasgow] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z7025918 Keywords : Perception of space * stimulus parameter * length intervals Subject RIV: AN - Psychology

  15. East and Central African Journal of Surgery Volume 10 Number 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    generalized septic peritonitis were analyzed in which the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health. Evaluation (APACHE) II score was over 16. This score computates predicted mortality according to temperature, mean blood pressure, pulse, respiratory rate, pO2 or PH, Na+, K+,. Creatinine, Haematocrit, WBC, Glasgow Coma.

  16. Poisoning with organophosphates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No other agent was associated with a death in this series (Table 1). .... work by reactivating cholinesterase. The loading dose is ... Fluid balance charts. 3. Glasgow Coma ... alert the medical team to life-saving intervention. The mortality can be ...

  17. siRNAs targeting PB2 and NP genes potentially inhibit replication of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-04-20

    Apr 20, 2015 ... 1ICAR-National Institute of High Security Animal Diseases, Bhopal 462 022, India. 2Department of .... tained in Glasgow Minimum Essential Media (GMEM;. Sigma, USA) supplemented with 10% heat-inactivated fetal ... Viral RNA was isolated from infected cell culture superna- tant using ... The thermal.

  18. External validation of the Emergency Trauma Score for early prediction of mortality in trauma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosse, Pieter; de Jong, Willem-Jan J.; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Wendt, Klaus W.; Schep, Niels W.; Goslings, J. Carel

    2014-01-01

    The Emergency Trauma Score has been developed for early estimation of mortality risk in adult trauma patients with an Injury Severity Score of 16 or higher. Emergency Trauma Score combines four early predictors available at the trauma resuscitation room: age, Glasgow Coma Scale, base excess, and

  19. External Validation of the Emergency Trauma Score for Early Prediction of Mortality in Trauma Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosse, Pieter; de Jong, Willem-Jan J.; Wendt, Klaus W.; Schep, Niels W.; Goslings, J. Carel; Reitsma, J.

    Objectives: The Emergency Trauma Score has been developed for early estimation of mortality risk in adult trauma patients with an Injury Severity Score of 16 or higher. Emergency Trauma Score combines four early predictors available at the trauma resuscitation room: age, Glasgow Coma Scale, base

  20. 77 FR 22343 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ..., Parts of Glasgow, Leffingwell, Madison, Magazine, & N. Market Sts., St. Louis (Independent City), 12000255. NEW YORK Oneida County Wright Settlement Cemetery, Cemetery Rd., Wright Settlement, 12000256. Orange County Denniston--Steidle House, 575 Jackson Ave., New Windsor, 12000257. Orleans County Clarendon...

  1. Alexandria Journal of Medicine - Vol 51, No 3 (2015)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of early changes of cartilage biomarkers following arthroscopic meniscectomy in young Egyptian adults · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL ... Acute ischemic stroke prognostication, comparison between Glasgow Coma Score, NIHS Scale and Full Outline of UnResponsiveness Score in intensive care ...

  2. 78 FR 75458 - Addition of Certain Persons to the Entity List; Amendment of Entity List Entries; and Removal of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-12

    ... Surinanda, Ergin Turker, and Glasgow International Trading. Specifically, these persons have engaged in the... 2nd Floor Zone A805 Srinakarin Road, Suanluang Bangkok 10250 Thailand; and 111/11 Village 0.14... alias: --Khalidee Boolay Surinandha. 21 Tower 2nd Floor Zone A805 Srinakarin Road, Suanluang Bangkok...

  3. Improvement after treatment of hydrocephalus in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage : implications for grading and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Laan, M; Mooij, JJA

    Two patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage and hydrocephalus are presented. On admission they scored E1M4V1 and E1M3Vtube on the Glasgow Coma Scale. The first patient recovered to E3M5Vtube after treatment of hydrocpehalus by extraventricular drainage. The second recovered to E2M5Vtube

  4. Creactive protein and interleukin-6 as markers of systemic inflammatory response and as prognostic factors for metastatic colorectal cancer. Data from the randomized phase III NORDIC-VII study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, M.; Kersten, C.; Sorbye, H.

    2015-01-01

    -6 (IL-6). Methods: The study was based on data from the randomized phase III NORDIC-VII study (Nordic FLOX +/cetuximab as first line treatment of mCRC). The effect of different markers of SIR, including modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS), derived Neutrophil Lymphocyte Ratio (dNLR), levels...

  5. Targeted treatment of severe head injury

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    injury is not a homogeneous concept and is poorly classified for the purposes of treatment.1 The separation of patients into 3 categories of severity (mild, moderate and severe) remains a blunt measure used to guide therapy in individual patients. Patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), i.e. a Glasgow Coma Score ...

  6. 78 FR 28546 - Secondary Service Connection for Diagnosable Illnesses Associated With Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    ... Diagnosable Illnesses Associated With Traumatic Brain Injury Correction In proposed rule document 2012-29709...: The factors considered are: Structural imaging of the brain. LOC--Loss of consciousness. AOC--Alteration of consciousness/mental state. PTA--Post-traumatic amnesia. GCS--Glasgow Coma Scale. (For purposes...

  7. Cobalt-55 positron emission tomography in traumatic brain injury : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, HML; vanderNaalt, J; vanZomeren, AH; Paans, AMJ; VeenmavanderDuin, L; Hew, JM; Pruim, J; Minderhoud, JM; Korf, J

    Traumatic brain injury is usually assessed with the Glasgow coma scale (GCS), CT, or MRI. After such injury, the injured brain tissue is characterised by calcium mediated neuronal damage and inflammation. Positron emission tomography with the isotope cobalt-55 (Go-PET) as a calcium tracer enables

  8. Evaluation of Fractioned Nitric Oxide in Chronic Cough Patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... due to its high positive predictive value, its practical nature, the fact that it is a ..... Eosinophilia at complete blood count. 37. 41.1. 8 .... REFERENCES. 1. Massie J. Cough in children: When does it matter? Paediatr. Respir Rev 2006;7:9-14. 2. Chang AB, Landau LI, Van Asperen PP, Glasgow NJ, Robertson.

  9. Predicting outcome from coma : man-in-the-barrel syndrome as potential pitfall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elting, JW; Haaxma, R; De Keyser, J; Sulter, G.

    The Glasgow coma scale motor score is often used in predicting outcome after hypoxic ischemic coma. Judicious care should be exerted when using this variable in predicting outcome in patients with coma following hypotension since borderzone infarction can obscure the clinical picture. We describe a

  10. Skadestuestrukturen i Danmark 1985-1992

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T B; Rebling, H; Larsen, C F

    1994-01-01

    routinely, and 29 (42%) used the Glasgow Coma Scale as a routine. It is concluded that there has only been a minor centralisation in trauma treatment structure in Denmark over the period 1985-1992, and there are still many accident and emergency departments with relatively few annual patient contacts...

  11. Neuropsychological support to relatives of patients with severe traumatic brain injury in the sub-acute phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norup, Anne; Kristensen, Karin Spangsberg; Siert, Lars

    2011-01-01

    as characteristics related to the patient: Glasgow Coma Scale, Injury Severity Score, Early Functional Abilities, Functional Independence Measure, Rancho Los Amigos; and to the relative: symptoms of anxiety and depression (SCL-90-R), quality of life (SF-36) and amount and number of sessions of neuropsychological...

  12. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohamed S. Rajab" and John M. Ndegwa. 'Kenyatta ... the recent report by Kioy et al. on the isolation of a closely related derivative, muzigadiolide. (5) from W. .... An aliquot of this (15 g) was subjected to CC over silica gel eluting with ... Limited by Robert Maclehose and Company Limited at the University Press: Glasgow;.

  13. Validation of the Actigraph GT3X and ActivPAL Accelerometers for the Assessment of Sedentary Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngdeok; Barry, Vaughn W.; Kang, Minsoo

    2015-01-01

    This study examined (a) the validity of two accelerometers (ActiGraph GT3X [ActiGraph LLC, Pensacola, FL, USA] and activPAL [PAL Technologies Ltd., Glasgow, Scotland]) for the assessment of sedentary behavior; and (b) the variations in assessment accuracy by setting minimum sedentary bout durations against a proxy for direct observation using an…

  14. Getting the best value from refurb projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijevic, Branka

    2013-04-01

    Professor Branka Dimitrijevic, director of CIC Start Online, a project funded by the Scottish Government and European Regional Development Fund combining the resources of seven Scottish universities that aims to embed sustainable building design and refurbishment into practice, reports on a conference jointly staged in Glasgow recently by the organisation and Health Facilities Scotland that considered this topical issue in some depth.

  15. An Analysis of Methods for Maximizing the Utilization of Space in USAF Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    Scotland: Thomas W. Mayer, ABACUS Unit, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, 1973. 37. McHarg, Ian . Design With Nature. Garden City NY: Natural...P. Quinn was born on 31 December 1957 in Maitland , New South Wales, Australia. He graduated from High School in Newcastle, New South Wales, in 1974

  16. Indisciplines of Inquiry: The Scottish "Children's Story", Documentary Film and the Construction of the Viewer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeleira, Helena; Martins, Catarina; Lawn, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The starting point for this article is a film about Scottish education, "Children's Story". "Children's Story" was one of a group of seven documentaries made for the 1938 British Empire Exhibition in Glasgow, under the supervision of John Grierson. The film was an official entry into the Exhibition and is a formal display of…

  17. Preserving the Social Cohesiveness and Lifelong Learning Mission of Scotland's Public Libraries: Evaluating the Scottish National Library Strategy through the Capabilities Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badwal, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    The following paper is based on my master's degree thesis written as a graduate student at the University of Glasgow from 2014-2015 titled, "Preserving the Social Cohesiveness and Lifelong Educational Mission of Public Libraries in Times of Austerity: Assessing the Potential of the Scottish National Library Strategy through the Capabilities…

  18. Review of the Contribution of the Scottish Science Centres Network to Formal and Informal Science Education: Report of Follow-Through Visits by HM Inspectorate of Education--June 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    In 2006, the Scottish Executive's Enterprise, Transport and Lifelong Learning Department (SEETLLD) asked HM Inspectorate of Education (HMIE) to carry out a review of the four Scottish science centres--Glasgow Science Centre (GSC), Our Dynamic Earth (ODE) in Edinburgh, Satrosphere Science Centre in Aberdeen, and Sensation Science Centre in Dundee.…

  19. Is computed tomography of the brain necessary in patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. The objective of the study was to determine whether computed tomography (CT) of the brain is necessary in all head trauma patients with clinically suspected depressed skull fractures, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores of 13 and above, and no focal neurological deficits. Design. A retrospective descriptive ...

  20. Comparison of the predictive performance of the BIG, TRISS, and PS09 score in an adult trauma population derived from multiple international trauma registries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brockamp, Thomas; Maegele, Marc; Gaarder, Christine; Goslings, J. Carel; Cohen, Mitchell J.; Lefering, Rolf; Joosse, Pieter; Naess, Paal A.; Skaga, Nils O.; Groat, Tahnee; Eaglestone, Simon; Borgman, Matthew A.; Spinella, Philip C.; Schreiber, Martin A.; Brohi, Karim

    2013-01-01

    The BIG score (Admission base deficit (B), International normalized ratio (I), and Glasgow Coma Scale (G)) has been shown to predict mortality on admission in pediatric trauma patients. The objective of this study was to assess its performance in predicting mortality in an adult trauma population,

  1. 76 FR 44914 - Change in Bank Control Notices; Acquisitions of Shares of a Bank or Bank Holding Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ..., and Logan County Bank, Lincoln, Illinois. C. Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis (Jacqueline G. King, Community Affairs Officer) 90 Hennepin Avenue, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55480-0291: 1. Stephen L. Grobel, Tabb... thereby indirectly acquire voting shares of First Community Bank, Glasgow, Montana. In addition, Stephen L...

  2. Rehabilitation of patients with traumatic brain injuries in South Sudan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    causing loss of consciousness for more than 6 hours and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) after ... They may go on to have difficulties at work or school, or in their marriage. ... quiet dedicated room in order to achieve the following: •. Minimise the ...

  3. Head Injuries in School-Age Children Who Play Golf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter-Rice, Karin; Krebs, Madelyn; Eads, Julia K.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children. We conducted a prospective study, which examined injury characteristics and outcomes of school-age children of 5.0-15.0 years (N = 10) who were admitted to hospital for a TBI. This study evaluated the role of age, gender, the Glasgow Coma Scale, mechanisms and…

  4. Severe traumatic brain injury managed with decompressive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-05-29

    May 29, 2012 ... Patients with severe taumatic brain injury may develop intractable raised ICP resulting in high mortality ... Glasgow coma score was 8/15 (E1V3M4) and he had left ... An emergency right fronto-temporo-parietal decompressive.

  5. Software Technology for Adaptable Reliable Systems (STARS) Workshop Held at the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC on April 9-12 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Barrie Baston , MITRE Mike Glasgow, IBM Geoff Mendal, Lockheed LL :8: i::6:: 856 "_--’... ISSUES 1. Define forms and provide rationale for selection: a...George Mendal, Lockheed Missiles and Space Alan Blair, General Dynamics Steve Huseth, Honeywell Miguel Carrio, Teledyne Brown Engineering Barrie Baston

  6. Community medicine in the medical curriculum: a statistical analysis of a professional examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, M J; Murdoch, R M; Stewart, G T

    1984-01-01

    This paper analyses the examination results of two cohorts of medical students at the University of Glasgow. It discusses the usefulness of Scottish higher grades as predictors of ability to pass examinations in medicine. Further correlations are made between the results from community medicine and other fourth- and fifth-year medical school examinations.

  7. Always looking on the bright side of life? Exploring optimism and health in three UK post-industrial urban settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, David; McCartney, Gerry; McCullough, Sarah; van der Pol, Marjon; Buchanan, Duncan; Jones, Russell

    2015-09-01

    Many theories have been proposed to explain the high levels of 'excess' mortality (i.e. higher mortality over and above that explained by differences in socio-economic circumstances) shown in Scotland-and, especially, in its largest city, Glasgow-compared with elsewhere in the UK. One such proposal relates to differences in optimism, given previously reported evidence of the health benefits of an optimistic outlook. A representative survey of Glasgow, Liverpool and Manchester was undertaken in 2011. Optimism was measured by the Life Orientation Test (Revised) (LOT-R), and compared between the cities by means of multiple linear regression models, adjusting for any differences in sample characteristics. Unadjusted analyses showed LOT-R scores to be similar in Glasgow and Liverpool (mean score (SD): 14.7 (4.0) for both), but lower in Manchester (13.9 (3.8)). This was consistent in analyses by age, gender and social class. Multiple regression confirmed the city results: compared with Glasgow, optimism was either similar (Liverpool: adjusted difference in mean score: -0.16 (95% CI -0.45 to 0.13)) or lower (Manchester: -0.85 (-1.14 to -0.56)). The reasons for high levels of Scottish 'excess' mortality remain unclear. However, differences in psychological outlook such as optimism appear to be an unlikely explanation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. The evolution of DNA databases--recommendations for new European STR loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, Peter; Fereday, Lyn; Morling, Niels

    2005-01-01

    Following a recent meeting by the ENFSI and EDNAP groups on the 4-5 April, 2005, in Glasgow, UK, it was unanimously agreed that the process of standardization within Europe should take account of recent work that unequivocally demonstrated that chance of obtaining a result from a degraded sample...... the number of European standard Interpol loci from 7 to 10....

  9. Book Reviews | Sheppey | African Zoology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Authors: Edited by Richard E. Brown & David W. Macdonald. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1985. 556 pp. Book Review 4. Book Title: Biology of Communication. Book Authors: D. Brian Lewis & D. Michael Gower. Blackie & Son, Glasgow. 239 pp. Book Review 5. Book Title: Animal Osmoregulation. Book Authors: J.

  10. Constraints to leisure travel and visitation to natural areas: An international comparison of four cities.In: Chavez, Deborah J.; Winter, Patricia L.; Absher, James D., eds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick T. Tierney; Deborah J. Chavez; James D. Absher

    2008-01-01

    Leisure travel and visitation to natural areas and constraints to undertaking these activities are important concerns for recreation resource managers and tourism businesses. Surveys were administered to Los Angeles, Barcelona, Glasgow, and Morelia, Mexico, residents to ascertain leisure travel and undeveloped natural area visitation levels and constraints. A...

  11. secondary injury in traumatic brain injury patients - a prospective study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    incidence of hypoxia, hypotension and delayed evacuation of intracranial haematomas in patients with TBI referred to a tertiary care hospital. METHOD. All TBI patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score less than 13 admitted to Groote Schuur Hospital (GSH) from. 1December1999 to 29 February 2000 were entered ...

  12. 'A future of the past'. Disjuncture between urban and cultural policy planners in the city of Skopje

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Mojanchevska (Katerina); M.P. van Dijk (Meine Pieter)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIn 1993, the city of Antwerp was inaugurated a European Capital of Culture, following Athens, Florence, Amsterdam, Berlin, Paris, Glasgow, Dublin and Madrid. Unlike other cities which simply sought on providing a series of cultural events, in Antwerp the intention was to challenge the

  13. Šoti kunstnik Tallinnas / Tiina Tammet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tammet, Tiina, 1971-

    1998-01-01

    9. veebruarist Draakoni galeriis avatud šoti kunstniku Charles Cusick Smithi (1957) tööde näitusest. Glasgow's sündinud kunstnik ja disainer on pühendanud end teatrile. 12. veebr. "Estonias" esietendunud M. Murdmaa "Romeo ja Julia" on Smithi kujundatud. Ka kunstniku vabalooming on inspireeritud teatrist.

  14. Validation of the Simplified Motor Score in patients with traumatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. This study used data from a large prospectively entered database to assess the efficacy of the motor score (M score) component of the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and the Simplified Motor Score (SMS) in predicting overall outcome in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Objective. To safely and reliably ...

  15. [Translation and Validation of the FOUR Scale for Children and its Use as Outcome Predictor: A Pilot Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Sofia Simões; Meireles, Daniel; Pinto, Alexandra; Abecasis, Francisco

    2017-09-29

    The Full Outline of UnResponsiveness - FOUR scale has been previously validated to assess impaired consciousness in the adult population. The aim of this study is the translation into Portuguese and validation of the FOUR scale in the pediatric population. The study also compares the FOUR scale and Glasgow coma scale score ratings and the clinical outcome of patients hospitalized in Pediatric Intensive Care Units. This study prospectively rated patients admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Units with impaired consciousness during one year. Both scales were applied daily to patients by three types of examiners: intensivists, residents and nurses, from the moment of admission until clinical discharge. Neurological sequelae was evaluated using the King's Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury - KOSCHI. Twenty seven patients between one and 17 years of age were included. Both scales are reliable and inter-rater reliability was greater for the FOUR score. Glasgow coma scale showed a minimum score in eight evaluations, whereas the FOUR scale obtained the minimum score in only two of these evaluations. In both scales there was a strong association between the admission score and the patient's outcome (area under curve FOUR = 0.939, versus Glasgow coma scale = 0.925). The FOUR scale provides more neurological information than Glasgow coma scale in patients with impaired consciousness and has prognostic interest. The FOUR scale can be applied in patients admitted with impaired consciousness in Pediatric Intensive Care Units. We think that a multicenter study would be very beneficial for confirming and generalizing these results.

  16. Making the Most of What We Have Got: Enhancing the RADAR Repository to Support Research Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Dawn; Siminson, Nicola Jane

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses how RADAR, the institutional repository (IR) at the Glasgow School of Art (GSA), has been modified to house an Annual Research Planning (ARP) template. A case study on the implementation of this research planning tool will outline the role that a repository and its staff can play in supporting individuals, enhancing…

  17. The role of some socio-economic factors on its outcome in Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... Methods: Two hundred consecutive patients, aged 18-79 years who met the inclusion criteria, the Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score ... ils influencé l'issue du coma non traumatique dans notre environnement. ... as micro-organisms, dietary substances, and the ... head injury or other causes of surgical coma.

  18. A Two-Year Follow-up on Systematic Desensitization with Data Pertaining to the External Validity of Laboratory Fear Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Gerald M.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    A 2-year follow-up questionnaire was sent to subjects originally tested by Rosen, Glasgow, and Barrera. Initial treatment gains for self- and therapist-directed desensitization subjects were maintained. Posttest behavior approach scores were not predictive of real-life behavioral change as reported at follow-up. (Author)

  19. What is the role of the centre for educational scholarship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Phillip

    2009-01-01

    The role of the Centre for Educational Scholarship is to promote scholarship, in terms of teacher education, teacher accreditation, and teacher collaboration. The strategy adopted by the University of Glasgow, Scotland, UK, is outlined, and a way of estimating effectiveness is suggested.

  20. Communication in Medicine: A Study of How Family Doctors Obtain Information on Recent Advances in the Treatment of Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray-Lyon, N.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a questionnaire on how 131 family doctors in Glasgow and the West of Scotland obtain information regarding recent advances are described, indicating that medical journals and formal lectures and symposia are still popular. Tape/slide and television presentations were not considered of much value. (Author/LBH)

  1. Gangs, Marginalised Youth and Social Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuchar, Ross

    2009-01-01

    Adolescents are routinely demonised by politicians and the media.Ross Deuchar's compelling research into the views of some of the toughest--youths who are growing up in socially deprived urban areas of Glasgow in Scotland--reveals the true facts. They talked to him about their lives, gang culture and territorialiity and he passes on their words…

  2. Database in Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Julia

    1986-01-01

    Describes a specialist bibliographic database of literature in the field of artificial intelligence created by the Turing Institute (Glasgow, Scotland) using the BRS/Search information retrieval software. The subscription method for end-users--i.e., annual fee entitles user to unlimited access to database, document provision, and printed awareness…

  3. Comparing Antonovsky's sense of coherence scale across three UK post-industrial cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, David; McCartney, Gerry; McCullough, Sarah; Buchanan, Duncan; Jones, Russell

    2014-11-25

    High levels of 'excess' mortality (ie, that seemingly not explained by deprivation) have been shown for Scotland compared to England and Wales and, especially, for its largest city, Glasgow, compared to the similarly deprived English cities of Liverpool and Manchester. It has been suggested that this excess may be related to differences in 'Sense of Coherence' (SoC) between the populations. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether levels of SoC differed between these cities and whether, therefore, this could be a plausible explanation for the 'excess'. Three post-industrial UK cities: Glasgow, Liverpool and Manchester. A representative sample of more than 3700 adults (over 1200 in each city). SoC was measured using Antonovsky's 13-item scale (SOC-13). Multivariate linear regression was used to compare SoC between the cities while controlling for characteristics (age, gender, SES etc) of the samples. Additional modelling explored whether differences in SoC moderated city differences in levels of self-assessed health (SAH). SoC was higher, not lower, among the Glasgow sample. Fully adjusted mean SoC scores for residents of Liverpool and Manchester were, respectively, 5.1 (-5.1 (95% CI -6.0 to -4.1)) and 8.1 (-8.1 (-9.1 to -7.2)) lower than those in Glasgow. The additional modelling confirmed the relationship between SoC and SAH: a 1 unit increase in SoC predicted approximately 3% lower likelihood of reporting bad/very bad health (OR=0.97 (95% CI 0.96 to 0.98)): given the slightly worse SAH in Glasgow, this resulted in slightly lower odds of reporting bad/very bad health for the Liverpool and Manchester samples compared to Glasgow. The reasons for the high levels of 'excess' mortality seen in Scotland and particularly Glasgow remain unclear. However, on the basis of these analyses, it appears unlikely that a low SoC provides any explanation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go

  4. Comparison of risk scoring systems for patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding: international multicentre prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Adrian J; Laine, Loren; Dalton, Harry R; Ngu, Jing H; Schultz, Michael; Abazi, Roseta; Zakko, Liam; Thornton, Susan; Wilkinson, Kelly; Khor, Cristopher J L; Murray, Iain A; Laursen, Stig B

    2017-01-04

     To compare the predictive accuracy and clinical utility of five risk scoring systems in the assessment of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.  International multicentre prospective study.  Six large hospitals in Europe, North America, Asia, and Oceania.  3012 consecutive patients presenting over 12 months with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.  Comparison of pre-endoscopy scores (admission Rockall, AIMS65, and Glasgow Blatchford) and post-endoscopy scores (full Rockall and PNED) for their ability to predict predefined clinical endpoints: a composite endpoint (transfusion, endoscopic treatment, interventional radiology, surgery, or 30 day mortality), endoscopic treatment, 30 day mortality, rebleeding, and length of hospital stay. Optimum score thresholds to identify low risk and high risk patients were determined.  The Glasgow Blatchford score was best (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) 0.86) at predicting intervention or death compared with the full Rockall score (0.70), PNED score (0.69), admission Rockall score (0.66, and AIMS65 score (0.68) (all P<0.001). A Glasgow Blatchford score of ≤1 was the optimum threshold to predict survival without intervention (sensitivity 98.6%, specificity 34.6%). The Glasgow Blatchford score was better at predicting endoscopic treatment (AUROC 0.75) than the AIMS65 (0.62) and admission Rockall scores (0.61) (both P<0.001). A Glasgow Blatchford score of ≥7 was the optimum threshold to predict endoscopic treatment (sensitivity 80%, specificity 57%). The PNED (AUROC 0.77) and AIMS65 scores (0.77) were best at predicting mortality, with both superior to admission Rockall score (0.72) and Glasgow Blatchford score (0.64; P<0.001). Score thresholds of ≥4 for PNED, ≥2 for AIMS65, ≥4 for admission Rockall, and ≥5 for full Rockall were optimal at predicting death, with sensitivities of 65.8-78.6% and specificities of 65.0-65.3%. No score was helpful at predicting rebleeding or length

  5. Initiating Nutritional Support Before 72 Hours Is Associated With Favorable Outcome After Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Children: A Secondary Analysis of a Randomized, Controlled Trial of Therapeutic Hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinert, Elizabeth; Bell, Michael J; Buttram, Sandra; Kochanek, Patrick M; Balasubramani, Goundappa K; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Adelson, P David

    2018-04-01

    To understand the relationship between the timing of initiation of nutritional support in children with severe traumatic brain injury and outcomes. Secondary analysis of a randomized, controlled trial of therapeutic hypothermia (Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury Consortium: Hypothermia, also known as "the Cool Kids Trial" (NCT 00222742). Fifteen clinical sites in the United States, Australia, and New Zealand. Inclusion criteria included 1) age less than 18 years, 2) postresuscitation Glasgow Coma Scale less than or equal to 8, 3) Glasgow Coma Scale motor score less than 6, and 4) available to be randomized within 6 hours after injury. Exclusion criteria included normal head CT, Glasgow Coma Scale equals to 3, hypotension for greater than 10 minutes ( 30 min), pregnancy, penetrating injury, and unavailability of a parent or guardian to consent at centers without emergency waiver of consent. Therapeutic hypothermia (32-33°C for 48 hr) followed by slow rewarming for the primary study. For this analysis, the only intervention was the extraction of data regarding nutritional support from the existing database. Timing of initiation of nutritional support was determined and patients stratified into four groups (group 1-no nutritional support over first 7 d; group 2-nutritional support initiated group 3-nutritional support initiated 48 to group 4-nutritional support initiated 72-168 hr after injury). Outcomes were also stratified (mortality and Glasgow Outcomes Scale-Extended for Pediatrics; 1-4, 5-7, 8) at 6 and 12 months. Mixed-effects models were performed to define the relationship between nutrition and outcome. Children (n = 90, 77 randomized, 13 run-in) were enrolled (mean Glasgow Coma Scale = 5.8); the mortality rate was 13.3%. 57.8% of subjects received hypothermia Initiation of nutrition before 72 hours was associated with survival (p = 0.01), favorable 6 months Glasgow Outcomes Scale-Extended for Pediatrics (p = 0.03), and favorable 12 months Glasgow

  6. Mobility of Scottish injecting drug users and risk of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, D J; Frischer, M; Taylor, A; Green, S T; McKeganey, N; Bloor, M; Reid, D; Cossar, J

    1994-08-01

    Nine hundred and nineteen injecting drug users (IDUs) were interviewed in Glasgow, Scotland during 1990 and 1991, as part of a wider study of HIV risk behaviour, about their injecting and sexual behaviour outside the city in the previous two years. Forty-five percent of respondents injected outside Glasgow, 6% shared needles and syringes (n/s) and 20% had sexual intercourse. Much activity occurred outside Scotland but mainly within the UK, particularly London. Predictors of n/s sharing outside Glasgow during the previous two years included current injecting with and passing on of used n/s and sexual intercourse with casual partners. Predictors of sexual behaviour outside Glasgow included passing on used n/s, having sexual intercourse with casual partners and, for females, engaging in prostitution. Glasgow IDUs are a highly mobile group and although HIV prevalence remains low within this population, considerable potential for importation/exportation of HIV and other bloodborne and sexually transmitted infections exists. Further work is required to establish why IDUs travel to, and engage in high-risk activities in locations outside their home environment, and detailed data about activities such as frequency of condom usage and n/s cleaning practices need to obtained. While there is a widespread network of services for IDUs in the UK, information provided usually relates to local services and may not fully address the needs of this mobile population. Therefore, we recommend that IDUs be provided with details of facilities such as n/s exchange schemes and drug-treatment establishments in centres to where they most commonly travel.

  7. Comparison of three scoring systems for risk stratification in elderly patients wıth acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Çağdaş; Soykan, Irfan; Karakaya, Fatih; Tüzün, Ali; Gençtürk, Zeynep Bıyıklı

    2017-04-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a potentially life-threatening condition that requires rapid assessment and dynamic management. Several scoring systems are used to predict mortality and rebleeding in such cases. The aim of the present study was to compare three scoring systems for predicting short-term mortality, rebleeding, duration of hospitalization and the need for blood transfusion in elderly patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The present study included 335 elderly patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Pre- and post-endoscopic Rockall, Glasgow-Blatchford and AIMS65 scores were calculated. The ability of these scores to predict rebleeding, mortality, duration of hospitalization and the need for blood transfusion was determined. Pre- (4.5) and post-endoscopic (7.5) Rockall scores were superior to the Glasgow-Blatchford (12.5) score for predicting mortality (P = 0.006 and P = 0.015). Likewise, pre- (4.5) and post-endoscopic Rockall scores were superior to the respective Glasgow-Blatchford scores for predicting rebleeding (P = 0.013 and P = 0.03). There was an association between duration of hospitalization and mortality; as the duration of hospitalization increased the mortality rate increased. In all, 94% of patients hospitalized for a mean of 5 days were alive versus 56.1% of those hospitalized for 20 days, and 20.2% of those hospitalized for 40 days. In elderly patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, the Rockall score is clinically more useful for predicting mortality and rebleeding than the Glasgow-Blatchford and AIMS65 scores; however, for predicting duration of hospitalization and the need for blood transfusion, the Glasgow-Blatchford score is superior to the Rockall and AIMS65 scores. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 575-583. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  8. Prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors and metabolic syndrome in obese Kuwaiti adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boodai SA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Shurooq A Boodai,1 Lynne M Cherry,2 Naveed A Sattar,2 John J Reilly3 1University of Glasgow School of Medicine, Yorkhill Hospitals, Glasgow, Scotland; 2Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, British Heart Foundation Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Centre, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland; 3University of Strathclyde Physical Activity for Health Group, School of Psychological Sciences and Health, Glasgow, Scotland Background: Childhood and adolescent obesity is associated with insulin resistance, abnormal glucose metabolism, hypertension, dyslipidemia, inflammation, liver disease, and compromised vascular function. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factor abnormalities and metabolic syndrome (MetS in a sample of obese Kuwaiti adolescents, as prevalence data might be helpful in improving engagement with obesity treatment in future. Methods: Eighty obese Kuwaiti adolescents (40 males with a mean (standard deviation age of 12.3 years (1.1 years participated in the present study. All participants had a detailed clinical examination and anthropometry, blood pressure taken, and assessment of fasting levels of C-reactive protein, intracellular adhesion molecule, interleukin-6, fasting blood glucose, insulin, liver function tests (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma glutamyltransferase, lipid profile (cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin resistance by homeostasis model assessment, and adiponectin. MetS was assessed using two recognized criteria modified for use in younger individuals. Results: The cardiometabolic risk factors with highest prevalence of abnormal values included aspartate aminotransferase (88.7% of the sample and insulin resistance by homeostasis model assessment (67.5%, intracellular adhesion molecule (66.5%, fasting insulin (43.5%, C-reactive protein (42.5%, low

  9. Gastrointestinal bleeding after intracerebral hemorrhage: a retrospective review of 808 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tie-Cheng; Li, Jian-Guo; Shi, Hong-Mei; Yu, Dong-Ming; Shan, Kai; Li, Li-Xia; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Ren, Tian-Hua

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the incidence and risk factors for gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding after spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). The available medical records of patients with ICH admitted from June 2008 to December 2009 for any episode of GI bleeding, possible precipitating factors and administration of ulcer prophylaxis were reviewed. The prevalence of GI bleeding was 26.7%, including 3 cases of severe GI bleeding (0.35%). Patients with GI bleeding had significantly longer hospital stay and higher in-hospital mortality compared with patients without GI bleeding. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that age, Glasgow Coma Scale scores, sepsis and ICH volume were independent predictors of GI bleeding. About 63.4% of patients with ICH received stress ulcer prophylaxis. GI bleeding occurred frequently after ICH, but severe events were rare. Age, Glasgow Coma Scale score, sepsis and ICH volume were independent predictors of GI bleeding occurring after ICH.

  10. Acute Kidney Injury Classification in Neuro-ICU Patient Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canan Akıncı

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the role of acute kidney injury (AKI classification system for kidney injury outcome in neuro-Intensive care unit (ICU patients. Material and Method: Total 432 patients who admitted to ICU between 2005 and 2009 evaluated in this study. All patients’ AKI stage, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE-II, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Score (SOFA, Glasgow Coma Score (GCS, Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS, mortality rate, length of ICU stay, need for intubation, and mechanical ventilation were recorded. Results: AKI was found in 24 of all 432 patents’ (5.5%. We found that, patients with AKI had higher APHACE-II score, SOFA score and mortality rates; longer ICU stay, duration of mechanical ventilation and intubation and lower GCS and GOS than without AKI group. Conclusion: Length of ICU stay and mortality rate were higher in AKI positive group.

  11. Exploring health, safety and environment in central and Eastern Europe: an introduction to the European Centre for Occupational Health, Safety and the Environment (ECOHSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, M; Robson, M; Watterson, A; Woolfson, C

    2001-01-01

    This article traces the development of the European Centre for Occupational Health, Safety and the Environment (ECOHSE) at the University of Glasgow. ECOHSE recently has been designated a Thematic Network by the European Union which is providing administrative support through 2004. The de facto de-regulation that accompanied emergent capitalism in Eastern Europe created opportunities for exploitation of the work force. Voluntary efforts of a loose network of occupational and environmental health academics led to a series of yearly conferences to discuss these problems and the lack of research about them. Then, in 1999, a more formal organization was established at Glasgow to pursue continuity and funding. The first occupational and environmental health conference under ECOHSE was held last year in Lithuania, and selected presentations of that meeting are offered in this journal. A second ECOHSE conference will be held this fall in Romania.

  12. Severe traumatic brain injury: outcome in patients with diffuse axonal injury managed conservatively in Hospital Sultanah Aminah, Johor Bahru--an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, B S; Johari, S A; Nasser, A W; Abdullah, J

    2009-12-01

    Patients with isolated severe head injury with diffuse axonal injury and without any surgical lesion may be treated safely without cerebral resuscitation and intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring. Seventy two patients were divided into three groups of patients receiving treatment based on ICP-CPP-targeted, or conservative methods either with or without ventilation support. The characteristics of these three groups were compared based on age, gender, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), pupillary reaction to light, computerized tomography scanning according to the Marshall classification, duration of intensive care unit (ICU) stays, Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS) and possible complications. There were higher risk of mortality (p < 0.001), worse GCS improvement upon discharge (p < 0.001) and longer ICU stays (p = 0.016) in ICP group compared to Intubation group. There were no significant statistical differences of GOS at 3rd and 6th months between all three groups.

  13. Third ventricle midline shift on computed tomography as an alternative to septum pellucidum shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, Carlos Francis A.; Oropilla, Jean Quint L; Alvarez, Victor M.

    2000-01-01

    The cerebral midline shift is measured using the displacement from midline of the third ventricle. It is an easily determined criterion from which CT scans of patients with spontaneous intracerebral hematoma may be investigated. Midline shift is a significant criteria in which to gauge the neurological status of patients. In a retrospective study of 32 patients with spontaneous unilateral intracerebral hemorrhage, a midline third ventricle shift correlated well with septum pellucidum shift. A greater than 7 mm midline third ventricle shift was associated with a significantly lower Glasgow Coma scale score compared a shift less than 7mm. For the septum pellucidum, a greater than 10 mm shift was similarly associated with a significantly lower Glasgow Coma scale score. (Author)

  14. Prognosis of the computerized tomography in the severe head injury. Valor pronostico de la tomografia axial computada (TC) en los traumatismos craneoencefalicos severos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Nieto, J.J.; Lorenzo Dominguez, M.T.; Martin Sanchez, M.J.; Sanchez Gonzalez, E.

    1991-01-01

    A prospective study is made with sixty five people affected of severe head injury, that is to say, with eight or less points in the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), when they get to the hospital. They are studied by computerized tomography at admission, and three and seven days after arrival. In this way, we appraise the type of the lesion, its intensity and the possible prognosis, considering in the last case three features: a) ventricular collapse; b) the mean line structure s shift; and c) effects on perimesencephalic cistern. The findings were parametized and we were able to introduce into the computer program relationships between these findings and the end results. These last ones were appraised through the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). We could show that certain findings in computerized tomography scans have an unavoidable prognosis while as others have a more favorable prognosis. (Author)

  15. The effects of improvement of the main shaft on the operating conditions of the Agnew turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yassi, Y. [Iranian Research Organization for Science and Technology (IROST), Tehran (Iran)

    2009-10-15

    Agnew turbine is a 45 axial flow Kaplan type micro hydro. The turbine was designed by an ex-lecturer of the Univ. of Glasgow, to operate without guide vanes. Later due to a joint research program between the Iranian Research Organization for Science and Technology (IROST) and the Univ. of Glasgow it was developed to operate under low head and limited flow potentials in Iran. The original design of the main shaft of the turbine was supported by a bearing housing consisting of three bearings outside the main casing, leaving the rest of the shaft, hub and the runner without any supports inside the turbine.Later a suitable support near the runner and inside the casing was designed and installed. Standard turbine tests showed considerable improvements in operating characteristics of the turbine due to these design modifications. This paper presents details of these improvements and the related outcomes. (author)

  16. The effects of improvement of the main shaft on the operating conditions of the Agnew turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yassi, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Agnew turbine is a 45 deg. axial flow Kaplan type micro hydro. The turbine was designed by an ex-lecturer of the University of Glasgow, to operate without guide vanes. Later due to a joint research program between the Iranian Research Organization for Science and Technology (IROST) and the University of Glasgow it was developed to operate under low head and limited flow potentials in Iran. The original design of the main shaft of the turbine was supported by a bearing housing consisting of three bearings outside the main casing, leaving the rest of the shaft, hub and the runner without any supports inside the turbine .Later a suitable support near the runner and inside the casing was designed and installed. Standard turbine tests showed considerable improvements in operating characteristics of the turbine due to these design modifications. This paper presents details of these improvements and the related outcomes.

  17. GaAs strip detectors: the Australian production program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butcher, K.S.A.; Alexiev, D.

    1995-01-01

    The Australian High Energy Physics consortium (composed of the University of Melbourne, the University of Sydney and ANSTO) has been investigating the possibility of producing a large area wheel of SI GaAs detectors for the ATLAS detector array. To help assess the extent of Australia's role in this venture a few SI GaAs microstrip detectors are to be manufactured under contract by the CSIRO division of Radiophysics GaAs IC Prototyping Facility. The planned production of the devices is discussed. First, the reasons for producing the detectors here in Australia are examined, then some basic characteristics of the material are considered, and finally details are provided of the design used for the manufacture of the devices. Two sets of detectors will be produced using the standard Glasgow production recipe; SIGaAs and GaN. The Glasgow mask set is being used as a benchmark against which to compare the Australian devices

  18. MIDDLE ENGLISH ANTIDOTARIUM NICHOLAI: EVIDENCE FOR LINGUISTIC DISTRIBUTION AND DISSEMINATION IN THE VERNACULAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª José Carrillo Linares

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The medieval treatise known as Antidotarium Nicholai is preserved in Middle English in several versions from at least five different manuscript families. The Latin version of this treatise was a requirement in the medical curriculum at medieval European universities. The purpose of this paper is to establish the provenance or distribution of the language in eight of the extant copies in order to arrive at a conclusion about the diffusion of this work. Analysed are the dialectal furins and features of the copies found in Clainbridge, Corpus Christi College 424, London, British Library Harley 2374, Glasgow, Uinversity Library Ferguson 147, Oxford, Bodleian Library Aslimole 1438, Cainbridge, Magdalene College Pepys 1307. Cainbridge, St. Jolin's College 37 and Glasgow, University Library Hunter 117. With this analysis I intend to determine the filial relationship ainong the different versions, and to locate each copy within a specific dialect aren.

  19. Innovative taught MSc in Medical Visualisation and Human Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clunie, Lauren; Livingstone, Daniel; Rea, Paul M

    2015-06-01

    A relatively new, fully accredited MSc in Medical Visualisation and Human Anatomy, is now offered through a joint collaboration with the Laboratory of Human Anatomy, University of Glasgow and the Digital Design Studio, Glasgow School of Art. This degree combines training in digital technologies and intensive human anatomy training as a result of a long-standing successful partnership between these two esteemed institutes. The student also has to complete a research dissertation which encompasses both the digital perspective and a related medical, dental, surgical, veterinary (comparative anatomy) or life science specialty to enhance development in the digital field for a variety of specialties. This article discusses the background in development of this degree, the course structure and the career prospects and destinations for graduates of this unique degree programme.

  20. Prognosis of the computerized tomography in the severe head injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Nieto, J.J.; Lorenzo Dominguez, M.T.; Martin Sanchez, M.J.; Sanchez Gonzalez, E.

    1991-01-01

    A prospective study is made with sixty five people affected of severe head injury, that is to say, with eight or less points in the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), when they get to the hospital. They are studied by computerized tomography at the income, but also, three and seven days after arriving. In this way, we appraise the type of the lesion the intensity and the possible effect-wass, considering in the last case, three features: a) ventricular collapse; b) the mean line structure s shift; c) perimesencefalic cisterns affectation. The findings of this study, are parametized and we were able to introduce them into a computer, getting. The relations between these findings ands the end-results. These last ones appraised throungh the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). We could confirm, that certain findings in the computerized tomography have and unavoidable prognosis, where as others have a better prognosis. (Author)

  1. HHARP: The Historical Hospital Admission Records Project – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara Hirst

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hospital records have frequently been used in epidemiological research (Kilgore et al. 2017; Rushton 2016, and in some cases palaeopathological research. However, the availability of data is problematic, with written records requiring considerable time to interpret, digitise and analyse. In 2001, the Historical Hospital Records Project (HHARP began digitising over 140,000 hospital admission records from four hospitals in London and Glasgow, providing researchers with an online data base of hospital records (Figure 1. I review the data available in the HHARP database, as well as make a preliminary analysis of the hospital records from London and Glasgow between c.1852-1921 which illustrates the value of the HHARP database in understanding disease and medical care during this period.

  2. Metals in particle-size fractions of the soils of five European cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajmone-Marsan, F.; Biasioli, M.; Kralj, T.; Grcman, H.; Davidson, C.M.; Hursthouse, A.S.; Madrid, L.; Rodrigues, S.

    2008-01-01

    Soils from Aveiro, Glasgow, Ljubljana, Sevilla and Torino have been investigated in view of their potential for translocation of potentially toxic elements (PTE) to the atmosphere. Soils were partitioned into five size fractions and Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn were measured in the fractions and the whole soil. All PTE concentrated in the <10 μm fraction. Cr and Ni concentrated also in the coarse fraction, indicating a lithogenic contribution. An accumulation factor (AF) was calculated for the <2 and <10 μm fraction. The AF values indicate that the accumulation in the finer fractions is higher where the overall contamination is lower. AF for Cr and Ni are particularly low in Glasgow and Torino. An inverse relationship was found between the AF of some metals and the percentage of <10 μm particles that could be of use in risk assessment or remediation practices. - Metals in size fractions of urban soils

  3. Solving the border control problem: evidence of enhanced face matching in individuals with extraordinary face recognition skills.

    OpenAIRE

    Bobak, Anna K.; Dowsett, A.; Bate, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Photographic identity documents (IDs) are commonly used despite clear evidence that unfamiliar face matching is a difficult and error-prone task. The current study set out to examine the performance of seven individuals with extraordinary face recognition memory, so called ?super recognisers? (SRs), on two face matching tasks resembling border control identity checks. In Experiment 1, the SRs as a group outperformed control participants on the ?Glasgow Face Matching Test?, and some case-by-ca...

  4. Effect of Strathclyde police initiative "Operation Blade" on accident and emergency attendances due to assault.

    OpenAIRE

    Bleetman, A; Perry, C H; Crawford, R; Swann, I J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review assault victim attendance at the accident and emergency department of Glasgow Royal Infirmary before and after a police initiative to curb knife carrying and tackle violent assaults ("Operation Blade"). METHODS: Assault victim attendance was reviewed for the month before the implementation of Operation Blade and for one month a year later. The number of victims requiring treatment in the resuscitation room for stab wounds before, during, and after Operation Blade was also...

  5. Baltimaad - kas "uue" Euroopa esmaasukad? / Jeroen Bult ; tõlk. Marek Laane

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Bult, Jeroen

    2005-01-01

    Ajakirjanikud, teadlased ja rahvusvaheliste suhete analüütikud kasutavad "vana" ja "uue" Euroopa metafoori oma arutlustes Atlandi üleste pingete, Euroopa Liidu praeguse halvatuse ning sotsiaalmajanduslike probleemide üle, millega seisavad silmitsi EL-i suuremad liikmesriigid. See jaotus on omamoodi aluseks ka raamatule "The Baltic States And Their Region. New Europe Or Old? ". Raamatu aluseks on 2004. a. Glasgow's peetud samanimeline konverents

  6. Care of Pediatric Neurosurgical Patients in Iraq in 2007: Clinical and Ethical Experience of a Field Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    penetrating spine injury      •      bioethics Abbreviations used in this paper: EMDG = Expeditionary Medical Group; GCS = Glasgow Coma Scale; GOS...select group of high-acuity patients capable of consuming significant medical resources in a deployed environment. This information has the potential to...impact medical planning, logistics, and policy. 25 256 Care of pediatric neurosurgical patients in Iraq in 2007: clinical and ethical experience of

  7. Experience with Traumatic Brain Injury: Is Early Tracheostomy Associated with Better Prognosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Hosseinali; Paydar, Shahram; Safari, Rasool; Arasteh, Peyman; Niakan, Amin; Abolhasani Foroughi, Amin

    2017-07-01

    In this study we compared the effects of early tracheostomy (ET) versus late tracheostomy on traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related outcomes and prognosis. Data on 152 TBI patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of ≤8, admitted to Rajaee Hospital between March 1, 2014 and August 23, 2015, were collected. Rajaee Hospital is the main referral trauma center in southern Iran and is affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Patients who had tracheostomy before or at the sixth day of their admission were considered as ET, and those who had tracheostomy after the sixth day of admission were considered as late tracheostomy. Patients with ET had a significantly lower hospital stay (46.4 vs. 38.6 days; P = 0.048) and intensive care unit stay (34.9 vs. 26.7 days; P = 0.003). Mortality rates were not significantly different between the 2 groups (P > 0.99). Although not statistically significant, favorable outcomes (Glasgow Outcome Scale >4) were higher and ventilator-associated pneumonia rates were lower among the ET group (P = 0.346 and P = 492, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that ET significantly improves 6-month prognosis (Glasgow Outcome Scale >4) (odds ratio = 2.535; 95% confidence interval: 1.030-6.237). Higher age was inversely associated with favorable prognosis (odds ratio = -0.958; confidence interval: 0.936-0.981). Glasgow Coma Scale and Rotterdam score did not show any effect on 6-month prognosis. Despite previous concern regarding increased mortality rates among patients who undergo ET, performing a tracheostomy for patients with severe TBI <6 days after their hospital admission, in addition to decreasing hospital and intensive care unit stays, will improve patient prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Uurida või mitte uurida, selles on küsimus ... / Heli Müristaja

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Müristaja, Heli

    2011-01-01

    MTÜ Eesti Turismihariduse Liidu 25.-26. mail toimunud turismiettevõtjate, -õpetajate ja -õppurite ühisseminarist, kus arutati , millist rolli kannavad uuringud kvaliteetsete ja jätkusuutlike turismitoodete ja -teenuste arendamisel. Välisesinejateks olid Tony Harrison Glasgow Caledonia Ülikooli Moffat Centre for Travel & Tourism Business Development vanemkonsultant Šotimaalt ja Soomest Eva Holmberg ning Kaija Lindroth Haaga-Kelia Porvoo üksusest

  9. Treatment for Supra-tentorial Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    長島, 梧郎; 藤本, 司; 鈴木, 龍太; 浅井, 潤一郎; 松永, 篤子; 張, 智為; 永井, 美穂; Goro, NAGASHIMA; Tsukasa, FUJIMOTO; Ryuta, SUZUKI; Jun-ichiro, ASAI; Atsuko, MATSUNAGA; Tomoo, CHANG; Miho, NAGAI; 昭和大学藤が丘病院脳神経外科

    2002-01-01

    Only vague guidelines exist for the surgical management of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). We investigated the indications for surgical management of intracerebral hemorrhage and compared the outcomes of computed tomography (CT)-guided stereotactic hematoma aspiration with those after hematoma removal under craniotomy. Our indications for CT-guided stereotactic hematoma aspiration were an age < 80 years old, a hematoma volume ≧ 10 ml, and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score ≦ 14. Those for hemat...

  10. Accuracy of the initial diagnosis among patients with an acutely altered mental status

    OpenAIRE

    Sporer, KA; Solares, M; Edward, JD; Wang, W; Alan, HBW; Robert, MR

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this prospective observational study were to: (1) determine the accuracy of physician diagnosis in patients with an acutely altered mental status (AMS) within the first 20 min of emergency department (ED) presentation; and (2) access if physician confidence in early diagnosis correlates with accuracy of diagnosis. Methods: A prospective observational convenience study was conducted of 112 adult patients who presented to an urban county ED with AMS (Glasgow Coma S...

  11. Stackwalker: Interviews: 2008-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newby, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    , occupancy, and mobility) and forms of communal organisation that have developed within these communities. These are set against processes of archiving and documentation in terms of historical and legal practices. The book collates the transcribed interviews and provides an introductory essay setting them...... in context.This artist's book follows the exhibition, Fields, Factories and Workshops at the Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow, 7 August – 18 September 2010.English language text with Gaelic, Polish, Russian, Latvian and Lithuanian sections....

  12. About the origins of the general theory of relativity: Einstein's search for the truth

    OpenAIRE

    Trainer, M.

    2005-01-01

    On the 20th June 1933 Professor Einstein addressed a large and enthusiastic audience in the Victorian Gothic Bute Hall of the University of Glasgow. Einstein spoke 'About the Origins of the General Theory of Relativity'. In 1905 Einstein had changed the face of physics forever with the publication of his radical new ideas on special relativity. His general theory of relativity was introduced to the world in 1915. However in 1933, Einstein faced another challenge—survival in a world of change....

  13. BioNessie - a grid enabled biochemical networks simulation environment

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, X.; Jiang, J.; Ajayi, O.; Gu, X.; Gilbert, D.; Sinnott, R.O.

    2008-01-01

    The simulation of biochemical networks provides insight and understanding about the underlying biochemical processes and pathways used by cells and organisms. BioNessie is a biochemical network simulator which has been developed at the University of Glasgow. This paper describes the simulator and focuses in particular on how it has been extended to benefit from a wide variety of high performance compute resources across the UK through Grid technologies to support larger scale simulations.

  14. 'BioNessie(G) - a grid enabled biochemical networks simulation environment

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, X; Jiang, J; Ajayi, O; Gu, X; Gilbert, D; Sinnott, R

    2008-01-01

    The simulation of biochemical networks provides insight and understanding about the underlying biochemical processes and pathways used by cells and organisms. BioNessie is a biochemical network simulator which has been developed at the University of Glasgow. This paper describes the simulator and focuses in particular on how it has been extended to benefit from a wide variety of high performance compute resources across the UK through Grid technologies to support larger scal...

  15. Designing a culture of resilience: Embedding innovation in health and social care integration in Scotland

    OpenAIRE

    Raman, Sneha; French, Tara

    2017-01-01

    As part of the work within the Digital Health and Care Institute Innovation Centre, which the Glasgow School of Art is a founding partner, our research has involved a number of collaborative sessions engaging with decision-makers, strategy teams and stakeholders in government, NHS, social care and third sector. The focus of this work has explored a participatory design approach to strategy and policy design, in line with the strategic health and social care agenda in Scotland, developing pers...

  16. The snakes and ladders of FM service excellence

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Ilfryn; Mccarroll, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    A report to accompany a workshop and gamification event at EFMC 2015 in Glasgow.\\ud \\ud Snakes and Ladders is an ancient Indian board game regarded today as a worldwide classic. The historic version had its root in morality lessons, where a player's progression up the board represented a life journey complicated by virtues (ladders) and vices (snakes). Our version brings back the morality element by associating each ladder and snake with enablers or barriers to service excellence in FM all id...

  17. BEARER ON DEMAND

    OpenAIRE

    Mulholland, Craig

    2005-01-01

    A commissioned solo exhibition at Transmission Gallery, Glasgow, comprising of a multimedia installation.\\ud \\ud Take a little, leave a little. But they always take more then they leave by the basic nature of the vampire process of inconspicuous but inexorable consumption. The vampire converts quality-live blood, vitality, youth, talent – into quantity – food and time for himself. He Perpetrates the most basic betrayal of the spirit, reducing all human dreams to his shit.\\ud \\ud William Burou...

  18. “Time is brain” the Gifford factor - or: Why do some civilian gunshot wounds to the head do unexpectedly well? A case series with outcomes analysis and a management guide

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, David J.; Lam, Fred C.; Siracuse, Jeffrey J.; Thomas, Ajith; Kasper, Ekkehard M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Review of intracranial gunshot wounds (GSWs) undergoing emergent neurosurgical intervention despite a very low Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score on admission in order to identify predictors of good outcome, with correlates to recent literature. Methods: A retrospective review of select cases of GSWs presenting to our trauma center over the past 5 years with poor GCS requiring emergent neurosurgical intervention and a minimum of 1-year follow-up. Results: Out of a total of 17 patients...

  19. K nízké sňatečnosti v České republice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hašková, Hana; Rabušic, L.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 2 (2008), s. 9-33 ISSN 1214-813X. [European Sociological Association Conference. Glasgow, 03.09.2007-06.09.2007] R&D Projects: GA MPS 1J034/05-DP2 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA403/05/0800 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70280505 Keywords : marriage rate * cohabitation * family planning Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography

  20. Spontaneous Cerebellar Hematoma: Decision Making in Conscious Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkosha, Hazem M; Ali, Nabil Mansour

    2017-06-01

    To detect predictors of the clinical course and outcome of cerebellar hematoma in conscious patients that may help in decision making. This study entails retrospective and prospective review and collection of the demographic, clinical, and radiologic data of 92 patients with cerebellar hematoma presented conscious and initially treated conservatively. Primary outcome was deterioration lower than a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 14 and secondary outcome was Glasgow Outcome Scale score at discharge and 3 months later. Relevant data to primary outcome were used to create a prediction model and derive a risk score. The model was validated using a bootstrap technique and performance measures of the score were presented. Surgical interventions and secondary outcomes were correlated to the score to explore its use in future decision making. Demographic and clinical data showed no relevance to outcome. The relevant initial computed tomography criteria were used to build up the prediction model. A score was derived after the model proved to be valid using internal validation with bootstrapping technique. The score (0-6) had a cutoff value of ≥2, with sensitivity of 93.3% and specificity of 88.0%. It was found to have a significant negative association with the onset of neurologic deterioration, end point Glasgow Coma Scale scores and the Glasgow Outcome Scale scores at discharge. The score was positively correlated to the aggressiveness of surgical interventions and the length of hospital stay. Early definitive management is critical in conscious patients with cerebellar hematomas and can improve outcome. Our proposed score is a simple tool with high discrimination power that may help in timely decision making in those patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The 'Walking for Wellbeing in the West' randomised controlled trial of a pedometer-based walking programme in combination with physical activity consultation with 12 month follow-up: rationale and study design

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzsimons, Claire F; Baker, Graham; Wright, Annemarie; Nimmo, Myra A; Ward Thompson, Catharine; Lowry, Ruth; Millington, Catherine; Shaw, Rebecca; Fenwick, Elisabeth; Ogilvie, David; Inchley, Joanna; Foster, Charlie E; Mutrie, Nanette

    2008-01-01

    This research was undertaken as part of work carried out by the Scottish Physical Activity Research Collaboration (SPARColl). SPARColl is managed by NHS Health Scotland, hosted by the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow and funded by the Scottish Government. Background: Scotland has a policy aimed at increasing physical activity levels in the population, but evidence on how to achieve this is still developing. Studies that focus on encouraging real world participants to start physical activ...

  2. Blast Injury: Translating Research Into Operational Medicine (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-20

    better body armor, automobile safety systems, and less injurious nonlethal weapons. Many of the key findings of the MOMRP blast re- search program have... Proton MRS also has mood disorders.127–133 MRS imaging has cor- related with functional independence measure,134 Glasgow Outcome Scale, and...Pennsylvania in the Battle of the Crater: A Regimen of Coal Miners Who Tunneled Under the Enemy. Jef- ferson, NC: McFarland & Company ; 2006. 2

  3. Predictors and outcomes of shunt-dependent hydrocephalus in patients with aneurysmal sub-arachnoid hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Hydrocephalus following spontaneous aneurysmal sub-arachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is often associated with unfavorable outcome. This study aimed to determine the potential risk factors and outcomes of shunt-dependent hydrocephalus in aneurysmal SAH patients but without hydrocephalus upon arrival at the hospital. Methods One hundred and sixty-eight aneurysmal SAH patients were evaluated. Using functional scores, those without hydrocephalus upon arrival at the hospital were compared to those already with hydrocephalus on admission, those who developed it during hospitalization, and those who did not develop it throughout their hospital stay. The Glasgow Coma Score, modified Fisher SAH grade, and World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies grade were determined at the emergency room. Therapeutic outcomes immediately after discharge and 18 months after were assessed using the Glasgow Outcome Score. Results Hydrocephalus accounted for 61.9% (104/168) of all episodes, including 82 with initial hydrocephalus on admission and 22 with subsequent hydrocephalus. Both the presence of intra-ventricular hemorrhage on admission and post-operative intra-cerebral hemorrhage were independently associated with shunt-dependent hydrocephalus in patients without hydrocephalus on admission. After a minimum 1.5 years of follow-up, the mean Glasgow outcome score was 3.33 ± 1.40 for patients with shunt-dependent hydrocephalus and 4.21 ± 1.19 for those without. Conclusions The presence of intra-ventricular hemorrhage, lower mean Glasgow Coma Scale score, and higher mean scores of the modified Fisher SAH and World Federation of Neurosurgical grading on admission imply risk of shunt-dependent hydrocephalus in patients without initial hydrocephalus. These patients have worse short- and long-term outcomes and longer hospitalization. PMID:22765765

  4. Long-term outcomes after immediate aortic repair for acute type A aortic dissection complicated by coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukube, Takuro; Haraguchi, Tomonori; Okada, Yasushi; Matsukawa, Ritsu; Kozawa, Shuichi; Ogawa, Kyoichi; Okita, Yutaka

    2014-09-01

    The management of acute type A aortic dissection complicated by coma remains controversial. We previously reported an excellent rate of recovery of consciousness provided aortic repair was performed within 5 hours of the onset of symptoms. This study evaluates the early and long-term outcomes using this approach. Between August 2003 and July 2013, of the 241 patients with acute type A aortic dissection brought to the Japanese Red Cross Kobe Hospital and Hyogo Emergency Medical Center, 30 (12.4%) presented with coma; Glasgow Coma Scale was less than 11 on arrival. Surgery was performed in 186 patients, including 27 (14.5%) who were comatose. Twenty-four comatose patients underwent successful aortic repair immediately (immediate group). Their mean age was 71.0 ± 11.1 years, Glasgow Coma Scale was 6.5 ± 2.4, and prevalence of carotid dissection was 79%. For brain protection, deep hypothermia with antegrade cerebral perfusion was used, and postoperative induced hypothermia was performed. Neurologic evaluations were performed using the Glasgow Coma Scale, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and modified Rankin Scale. In the immediate group, the time from the onset of symptoms to arrival in the operating theater was 222 ± 86 minutes. Hospital mortality was 12.5%. Full recovery of consciousness was achieved in 79% of patients in up to 30 days. Postoperative Glasgow Coma Scale and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale improved significantly when compared with the preoperative score (P coma were satisfactory. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Paradoxical upgrading reaction in extra-pulmonary tuberculosis: association with vitamin D therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Barr, D.A.; Coussens, A.K.; Irvine, S.; Ritchie, N.D.; Herbert, K.; Choo-Kang, B.; Raeside, D.; Bell, D.J.; Seaton, R.A.

    2017-01-01

    SETTING: Glasgow, Scotland, UK.\\ud \\ud BACKGROUND: Paradoxical reactions in tuberculosis (TB) are a notable example of our incomplete understanding of host-pathogen interactions during anti-tuberculosis treatment.\\ud \\ud OBJECTIVES: To determine risk factors for a TB paradoxical reaction, and specifically to assess for an independent association with vitamin D use.\\ud \\ud DESIGN: Consecutive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) negative adult patients treated for extra-pulmonary TB were identif...

  6. Developing a guiding protocol for the moderation of summative assessments.

    OpenAIRE

    McGuire, W.; Raaper, R.

    2016-01-01

    According to literature, assessment moderation is a process for assuring ‘valid, fair and reliable’ assessment outcomes but also consistency of applied marking criteria. While being an important area in assessment, moderation is often referred as an ‘under researched area of higher education’. The School of Education in the University of Glasgow, like many other academic units in the UK and internationally, adopts a range of approaches to moderating assessment within any one programme and acr...

  7. A Prototype Scintillating Fibre Tracker for the Cosmic-Ray Muon Tomography of Legacy Nuclear Waste Containers

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, R.; Clarkson, A.; Hamilton, D. J.; Hoek, M.; Ireland, D.G.; Johnstone, J.R.; Keri, T.; Lumsden, S.; Mahon, D. F.; McKinnon, B.; Murray, M.; Nutbeam-Tuffs, S.; Shearer, C.; Staines, C.; Yang, G.

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic-ray muons are highly-penetrative charged particles observed at sea level with a flux of approximately 1 cm−2 min−1. They interact with matter primarily through Coulomb scattering which can be exploited in muon tomography to image objects within industrial nuclear waste containers. This paper presents the prototype scintillating-fibre detector developed for this application at the University of Glasgow. Experimental results taken with test objects are shown in comparison to results from...

  8. The work of Charles Rennie Mackintosh and Robert Lorimer within national and international tendencies in design at the turn of the century [dissertation

    OpenAIRE

    Milne, Jason E.

    1992-01-01

    This dissertation examines the designs of two of Scotland's most important architects, Charles Rennie Mackintosh and Robert Lorimer, based in Glasgow and Edinburgh respectively at the turn of the century. Their work is viewed in relation to international tendencies in progressive architecture and design, namely the Arts and Crafts Movement; also in relation to the existing strand of Romanticism in Scotland and the Scottish Baronial Revival which in some respects reported a particular manifest...

  9. An Index of Trauma Severity Based on Multiattribute Utility: An Illustration of Complex Utility Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    measure for Central Nervus System is the Glasgow Cons Score (GCS), a scale of brain and spinal cord injury (Langfitt [1978]), and is itself an additive...concerns directly relating to the injury itself were identified. These were: 1. Ventilation Severity 2 Circulation Severity 3. Central Nervous System ...interacting system within which these concerns represent interacting parts. Most trauma involves only one of these systems , but more than one may be

  10. The development strategies of “sport and poverty” related organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Okada, Chiaki

    2018-01-01

    The Homeless World Cup (HWC) is an annual international event in which only homeless people can participate. In July 2016 at Glasgow, Scotland, the 15th tournament was held for one week, and over 500 men/women players from 51 countries played matches, and approximately 80,000 enthusiastic spectators braved the sometimes grey Scottish weather to attend the tournament (Official home page of the homeless world cup, 2016). All the players were sent by their National Partners after selection in ea...

  11. Sovremennoje iskusstvo v angliskom parke

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2003-01-01

    Performance-kunsti rühmituse Virus (Alan Holligan, Stewart Bennett ja Ewan Robertson Edinburghist) projekt "Sekkumine - kaasaegne kunst inglise pargis" toimub Väliskunsti muuseumis, Mikkeli muuseumis ja selle ümbruses. Inspiratsiooniks on Kadrioru park ning parginäitused Mikkeli ja Väliskunsti muuseumis. Radical Loyalty projektist, millele pani aluse Chris Evans (Glasgow) 2002. a. ja mille raames plaanitakse skulptuuripargi rajamist Järvakandisse. Evansi projekt presentatsiooni formaadis toimub Mikkeli muuseumis video ja fotode abil

  12. Managing diversity in organisations: practitioner and academic perspectives: report from a gender in management special interest group research event

    OpenAIRE

    Beauregard, T. Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    Purpose - This report aims to provide a brief summary of the presentations made by researchers and practitioners at the Gender in Management Special Interest Group’s research event, Managing Diversity in Organisations: Practitioner and Academic Perspectives.\\ud \\ud Design/methodology/approach - The research seminar was chaired by Dr. Adelina Broadbridge (University of Stirling) and Dr. Gillian Maxwell (Glasgow Caledonian University), and featured five presentations related to diversity in org...

  13. The formation and design of 'The Acute Admission Database'- a database including a prospective, observational cohort of 6279 patients triaged in the Emergency Department in a larger Danish hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Charlotte; Lauritzen, Marlene Mp; Danker, Jakob K

    2012-01-01

    of peripheral oxygen (9.2%), Glasgow Coma Score (6.6%) and respiratory rate (4.8%). A venous acid-base status was obtained in 43% of all patients. The majority (78%) had a pH within the normal range (7.35-7.45), 15% had acidosis (pH alkalosis (pH > 7.45). Median length of stay was 2 days...

  14. Clearly Defining Pediatric Massive Transfusion: Cutting Through the Fog and Friction with Combat Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    classically been defined as the administration of a large volume of whole blood (WB) or packed red blood cells (PRBCs) over a given time period (e.g...the first 24 hours after injury includingWB, PRBCs, fresh frozen plasma (FFP), platelets (Plt) or cryoprecipitate ( Cryo ). The primary end points were...cluded the demographics of age, weight, sex, and injury mech- anism. Measures of injury severity including Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), AIS for each body

  15. A Multidisciplinary Clinical Pathway Decreases Rib Fracture-Associated Infectious Morbidity and Mortality in High-Risk Trauma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    RT respiratory therapy ; PT physical therapy ; OT occupational therapy ; GCS Glasgow Coma Scale. 808 S.R. Todd et al. / The American Journal of...Morbidity form rib fractures increases after age 45. J Am Coll Surg 2003;196:549–55. [14] Pierson DJ, Kacmarek R. Foundations of Respiratory Care. New...Papers presented A multidisciplinary clinical pathway decreases rib fracture –associated infectious morbidity and mortality in high-risk trauma

  16. A new strategy for the synthesis of 3-cinnamoyl-2-styrylchromones and their transformation into new xanthenodiones derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Diana C. G. A.; Seca, Ana M. L.; Leal, Stephanie B.; Silva, Artur M. S.; Cavaleiro, José A. S.

    2011-01-01

    23rd ISHC Congress will be held in Glasgow, Scotland from July 31 August 4, 2011. Chromones are a class of oxygen heterocyclic compounds widely distributed in Nature. 2-Styrylchromones are, however, a small and rare naturally occurring chromones; only three derivatives have been isolated, two from the marine blue green algae Chrysophaeum taylori1 and one from the rhizomes of Imperata cylindrical. Even so, 2-styrylchromone derivatives are associated with noticeable biological activities. O...

  17. Introduction: film-philosophy and a world of cinemas

    OpenAIRE

    Martin-Jones, David

    2016-01-01

    This Special Section arose out of the 2014 Film-Philosophy conference,\\ud held at the University of Glasgow, which took as its theme: A World of\\ud Cinemas. The aim of both the conference theme and this resulting Special\\ud Section is to broaden the debate in film-philosophy, both in terms of a\\ud world of cinemas and a world of philosophies. This introduction considers\\ud the reasons why such an intervention is worthwhile.

  18. Pressure ulcer development in trauma patients with suspected spinal injury; the influence of risk factors present in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, H W Wietske; Schoonhoven, L Lisette; Schuurmans, M Marieke J; Leenen, L Luke P H

    2017-01-01

    To explore the influence of risk factors present at Emergency Department admission on pressure ulcer development in trauma patients with suspected spinal injury, admitted to the hospital for evaluation and treatment of acute traumatic injuries. Prospective cohort study setting level one trauma center in the Netherlands participants adult trauma patients transported to the Emergency Department on a backboard, with extrication collar and headblocks and admitted to the hospital for treatment or evaluation of their injuries. Between January and December 2013, 254 trauma patients were included. The following dependent variables were collected: Age, Skin color and Body Mass Index, and Time in Emergency Department, Injury Severity Score, Mean Arterial Pressure, hemoglobin level, Glasgow Coma Score, and admission ward after Emergency Department. Pressure ulcer development during admission was associated with a higher age (p 0.00, OR 1.05) and a lower Glasgow Coma Scale score (p 0.00, OR 1.21) and higher Injury Severity Scores (p 0.03, OR 1.05). Extra nutrition decreases the probability of PU development during admission (p 0.04, OR 0.20). Pressure ulcer development within the first 48h of admission was positively associated with a higher age (p 0.01, OR 1.03) and a lower Glasgow Coma Scale score (p 0.01, OR 1.16). The proportion of patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit and Medium Care Unit was higher in patients with pressure ulcers. The pressure ulcer risk during admission is high in patients with an increased age, lower Glasgow Coma Scale and higher Injury Severity Score in the Emergency Department. Pressure ulcer risk should be assessed in the Emergency Department to apply preventive interventions in time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Flipped Classroom for pre-clinical dental skills teaching - a reflective commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crothers, A J; Bagg, J; McKerlie, R

    2017-05-12

    A Flipped Classroom method for teaching of adult practical pre-clinical dental skills was introduced to the BDS curriculum in Glasgow during the 2015/2016 academic session. This report provides a commentary of the first year of employing this method - from the identification of the need to optimise teaching resources, through the planning, implementation and development of the method, with an early indication of performance.

  20. [Comparison between Glascow-Blatchford, Rockall and AIMS65 scores in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding in a hospital in Lima, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza-Ríos, Jorge; Aguilar Sánchez, Victor; Bravo Paredes, Eduar Alban; Pinto Valdivia, José; Huerta-Mercado Tenorio, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Identify the best score that predicts each variable outcome (mortality, rebleeding and need for transfusion for more than 2 red blood cells pack) in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding until 30 days of the event. Material y methods: Patients included were those over 18 years, who had upper gastrointestinal bleeding between January 2014 to June 2015 in a general hospital of third level. The data was analyzed by the area under the curve ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic). In total, there were 231 cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, 154 (66.7%) cases were male, the average age was 57.8 ± 20.02 years, the most common cause of bleeding was peptic ulcer: 111 (48.1%) cases, the mortality rate and rebleeding was 7.8% and 3.9% respectively. 5 patients were excluded from the analysis because they do not count with endoscopy study, the analysis was performed in 226 rest. In the evaluation of mortality, it was found an area under the curve ROC for Glasgow-Blatchford: 0.73, Rockall score: 0.86 and AIMS65 score: 0.90 (p<0.05) to predict rebleeding the Glasgow-Blatchford score: 0.73 Rockall score: 0.66 and AIMS65 score: 0.64 (p=0.41) and transfusion requirements of more than 2 globular packages the Glasgow-Blatchford score: 0.72, Rockall score: 0.67 and AIMS65 score: 0.77 (p=0.09). AIMS65 score is a good predictor of mortality and is useful in predicting the need for more than 2 transfusions of red blood cells pack compared to score Glasgow-Blatchford and Rockall score.

  1. Not Untitled.

    OpenAIRE

    McCaughey, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This chapter situates my own practice within an emergent field of urban intervention. It discusses the process, value of and inherent dangers in reframing interventionist practices and generating critical discourse around the 'invisible' and 'unofficial,' in interventionist practice.\\ud From the introduction:\\ud Cultural hijack is a term that cropped up in conversation with the editor, Ben Parry, in a bar in Glasgow some time ago. I was referring to that moment of being taken unawares by an e...

  2. Community v. non-community assault among adults in Khayelitsha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Injury Severity Scores (ISSs) in the CA group were significantly higher than in the non-CA group (p<0.001), with a median (interquartile range) ISS of 3 (2 - 6) in CA cases v. 1 (1 - 2) in non-CA cases. Comparison between the CA v. non-CA groups showed that a Glasgow Coma Scale <15 (20.1% v. 5.4%, respectively) ...

  3. Dynamical "in situ" observation of biological samples using variable pressure scanning electron microscope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neděla, Vilém

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 126, - (2008), 012046:1-4 ISSN 1742-6588. [Electron Microscopy and Analysis Group Conference 2007 (EMAG 2007). Glasgow, 03.09.2007-07.09.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/05/0886; GA AV ČR KJB200650602 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : biological sample * VP-SEM * dynamical experiments Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  4. Zpráva z 8. mezinárodní konference Evropské sociologické asociace

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vohlídalová, Marta

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2007), s. 101-104 ISSN 1213-0028. [ESA Conference Conflict , Citizenship and Civil Society/ 8. Glasgow, 03.09.2007-06.09.2007] R&D Projects: GA MPS 1J034/05-DP2 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70280505 Keywords : citizenship * family Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography www.genderonline.cz

  5. Live your questions now

    OpenAIRE

    Brownrigg, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    'Live Your Questions Now' is a case study for Cubitt Education's publication 'Aging in Public: creative practice in ageing and the public realm from across the UK', edited by Daniel Baker and published by Cubitt Gallery, Studios and Education, London in 2016. The publication was linked to Cubitt's programme 'Public Wisdom' (2011-2015). My case study is about 'Live your questions now', a group exhibition I curated in 2011 for Mackintosh Museum, The Glasgow School of Art. 'Live your questions n...

  6. First CT findings and improvement in GOS and GOSE scores 6 and 12 months after severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Luisa; Herrero, José Ignacio; Monfort, José Luis; Ventura, José Luis; Javierre, Casimiro F; Juncadella, Montserrat; García-Huete, Lucía; Bartolomé, Carlos; Gabarrós, Andreu

    2009-05-01

    To analyse the association between individual initial computerized tomography (CT) scan characteristics and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) and Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) improvement between 6 months and 1 year. Two hundred and twenty-four adult patients with severe traumatic brain injury and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 8 or less who were admitted to an intensive care unit were studied. GOS and GOSE scores were obtained 6 and 12 months after injury in 203 subjects. Patients were predominantly male (84%) and median age was 35 years. Traumatic Coma Data Bank (TCDB) CT classification was associated with GOS/GOSE improvement between 6 months and 1 year, with diffuse injury type I, type II and evacuated mass improving more than diffuse injury type III, type IV and non-evacuated mass; for GOS 43/155 (28%) vs 3/48 (6%) (chi(2) = 9.66, p GOSE 71/155 (46%) vs 7/48 (15%) (chi(2) = 15.1, p GOSE improvement, with the exception of subarachnoid haemorrhage, which showed a negative association with GOSE improvement (chi(2) = 4.08, p GOSE improvement from 6-12 months, but individual CT abnormalities were not associated.

  7. ¬Mesenchymal Stem Cell Fate: Applying Biomaterials for Control of Stem Cell Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary Jane Anderson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal Stem Cell Fate: Applying Biomaterials for Control of Stem Cell BehaviourHilary J Anderson1, Jugal Kishore Sahoo2, Rein V Ulijn2,3, Matthew J Dalby1*1 Centre for Cell Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.2 Technology and Innovation centre, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK. 3 Advanced Science Research Centre (ASRC and Hunter College, City University of New York, NY 10031, NY, USA. Correspondence:*Hilary Andersonh.anderson.1@research.gla.ac.ukKeywords: mesenchymal stem cells, bioengineering, materials synthesis, nanotopography, stimuli responsive material□AbstractThe materials pipeline for biomaterials and tissue engineering applications is under continuous development. Specifically, there is great interest in the use of designed materials in the stem cell arena as materials can be used to manipulate the cells providing control of behaviour. This is important as the ability to ‘engineer’ complexity and subsequent in vitro growth of tissues and organs is a key objective for tissue engineers. This review will describe the nature of the materials strategies, both static and dynamic, and their influence specifically on mesenchymal stem cell fate.

  8. Association Between Nutritional Status, Inflammatory Condition, and Prognostic Indexes with Postoperative Complications and Clinical Outcome of Patients with Gastrointestinal Neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Milena Damasceno de Souza; Vieira de Melo, Camila Yandara Sousa; Amorim, Ana Carolina Ribeiro de; Cipriano Torres, Dilênia de Oliveira; Dos Santos, Ana Célia Oliveira

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is to describe and relate nutritional and inflammatory status and prognostic indexes with postoperative complications and clinical outcome of patients with gastrointestinal malignancies. Twenty-nine patients were evaluated; nutritional assessment was carried out by subjective and objective parameters; albumin, pre-albumin, C-reactive protein (CRP), and alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) were determined. To assess prognosis, the Glasgow scale, the Prognostic Inflammatory Nutritional Index (PINI), and CRP/albumin ratio were used; the clinical outcomes considered were hospital discharge and death. A high Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) score was associated with the occurrence of postoperative complications: 73% of the patients with postoperative complications had the highest SGA score, but only 6% of those without postoperative complications had the highest SGA score (P 1, and Glasgow score 2. There was a positive correlation between weight loss percentage with serum CRP levels (P = 0.002), CRP/albumin (P = 0.002), PINI (P = 0.002), and Glasgow score (P = 0.000). This study provides evidence that the assessment of the nutritional status and the use of prognostic indexes are good tools for predicting postoperative complications and clinical outcome in patients with gastrointestinal neoplasia.

  9. First solar radio spectrometer deployed in Scotland, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monstein, Christian

    2012-10-01

    A new Callisto solar radio spectrometer system has recently been installed and set into operation at Acre Road Observatory, a facility of University of Glasgow, Scotland UK. There has been an Observatory associated with Glasgow University since 1757, and they presently occupy two different sites. The main observatory ('Acre Road') is close to the Garscube Estate on the outskirts of the city of Glasgow. The outstation ('Cochno', housing the big 20 inch Grubb Parsons telescope) is located farther out at a darker site in the Kilpatrick Hills. The Acre Road Observatory comprises teaching and research labs, a workshop, the main dome housing the 16 inch Meade, the solar dome, presently housing the 12 inch Meade, a transit house containing the transit telescope, a 3m HI radio telescope and a 408 MHz pulsar telescope. They also have 10 and 8 inch Meade telescopes and several 5 inch Celestron instruments. There is a small planetarium beneath the solar dome. The new Callisto instrument is mainly foreseen for scientific solar burst observations as well as for student projects and for 'bad-weather' outreach activities.

  10. The University of Goettingen joins ATLAS - first impressions

    CERN Multimedia

    Arnulf Quadt

    This year the ATLAS Overview Week was being held in Glasgow from 9th to 13th July. The event was being organized by the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Glasgow University. For me this was a very special and important week. In October 2006, I took a position at the University of Goettingen (Germany) with the task to start-up a new particle physics institute. Goettingen is an old and distinguished university with a strong history in quantum mechanics (Max Born, Werner Heisenberg, ...) and subatomic physics (James Franck, ...). Such opportunities are rather rare and I was thrilled to take it. First of all, a new institute needs a project to work on. Having worked at HERA, LEP and the Tevatron before, it was now time to get involved in the LHC and so we submitted an expression of interest to ATLAS. This proposal was presented to ATLAS at the previous Overview Week in February and this time the Collaboration was called to decide about our admission. When I arrived in Glasgow I received a warm welcome in t...

  11. Preoperative C-Reactive Protein/Albumin Ratio Predicts Prognosis of Patients after Curative Resection for Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuechao Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An elevated preoperative C-reactive protein/albumin (CRP/Alb ratio has been reported to be associated with a poor prognosis for hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic value of the preoperative CRP/Alb ratio and compare it with other systemic inflammatory response markers in patients with gastric cancer (GC. METHODS: A retrospective study was performed in 455 patients with GC undergoing curative resection. We investigated the correlations between the preoperative CRP/Alb ratio and overall survival (OS. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression models were used to assess independent prognostic factors. The area under the curve was used to compare the prognostic value of different markers. RESULTS: On multivariate analysis, the CRP/Alb ratio were independently associated with OS in patients with GC (hazard ratio: 1.626; 95% confidence interval: 1.191-2.219; P = .002, along with age (P = .003, preoperative body weight loss (P = .001, tumor location (P = .008, metastatic lymph node ratio (P < .001, and seventh tumor-nodes-metastasis stage (American Joint Committee on Cancer (P = .007. However, several other systemic inflammation–based prognostic scores (neutrophil lymphocyte ratio, platelet lymphocyte ratio and systemic immune-inflammation index, Glasgow Prognostic Score, modified Glasgow prognostic score, and high-sensitivity modified Glasgow prognostic score were not. In addition, the CRP/Alb ratio had a higher area under the curve value (0.625 compared with several other systemic inflammation–based prognostic scores (P < .001. CONCLUSION: The preoperative CRP/Alb ratio, a system inflammation-based prognostic score, is a superior predictor of OS in patients undergoing curative resection for GC and may help to identify the high-risk patients for treatment decisions.

  12. Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury: Clinical Characteristics and a Prognostic Model of 12-Month Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarsen, Cathrine Elisabeth; van der Naalt, Joukje; Jacobs, Bram; Follestad, Turid; Moen, Kent Gøran; Vik, Anne; Håberg, Asta Kristine; Skandsen, Toril

    2018-03-31

    Patients with moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) often are studied together with patients with severe TBI, even though the expected outcome of the former is better. Therefore, we aimed to describe patient characteristics and 12-month outcomes, and to develop a prognostic model based on admission data, specifically for patients with moderate TBI. Patients with Glasgow Coma Scale scores of 9-13 and age ≥16 years were prospectively enrolled in 2 level I trauma centers in Europe. Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE) score was assessed at 12 months. A prognostic model predicting moderate disability or worse (GOSE score ≤6), as opposed to a good recovery, was fitted by penalized regression. Model performance was evaluated by area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristics curves. Of the 395 enrolled patients, 81% had intracranial lesions on head computed tomography, and 71% were admitted to an intensive care unit. At 12 months, 44% were moderately disabled or worse (GOSE score ≤6), whereas 8% were severely disabled and 6% died (GOSE score ≤4). Older age, lower Glasgow Coma Scale score, no day-of-injury alcohol intoxication, presence of a subdural hematoma, occurrence of hypoxia and/or hypotension, and preinjury disability were significant predictors of GOSE score ≤6 (area under the curve = 0.80). Patients with moderate TBI exhibit characteristics of significant brain injury. Although few patients died or experienced severe disability, 44% did not experience good recovery, indicating that follow-up is needed. The model is a first step in development of prognostic models for moderate TBI that are valid across centers. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein and Ubiquitin C-Terminal Hydrolase-L1 as Outcome Predictors in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takala, Riikka S K; Posti, Jussi P; Runtti, Hilkka; Newcombe, Virginia F; Outtrim, Joanne; Katila, Ari J; Frantzén, Janek; Ala-Seppälä, Henna; Kyllönen, Anna; Maanpää, Henna-Riikka; Tallus, Jussi; Hossain, Md Iftakher; Coles, Jonathan P; Hutchinson, Peter; van Gils, Mark; Menon, David K; Tenovuo, Olli

    2016-03-01

    Biomarkers ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) may help detect brain injury, assess its severity, and improve outcome prediction. This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of these biomarkers during the first days after brain injury. Serum UCH-L1 and GFAP were measured in 324 patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) enrolled in a prospective study. The outcome was assessed using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) or the extended version, Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOSE). Patients with full recovery had lower UCH-L1 concentrations on the second day and patients with favorable outcome had lower UCH-L1 concentrations during the first 2 days compared with patients with incomplete recovery and unfavorable outcome. Patients with full recovery and favorable outcome had significantly lower GFAP concentrations in the first 2 days than patients with incomplete recovery or unfavorable outcome. There was a strong negative correlation between outcome and UCH-L1 in the first 3 days and GFAP levels in the first 2 days. On arrival, both UCH-L1 and GFAP distinguished patients with GOS score 1-3 from patients with GOS score 4-5, but not patients with GOSE score 8 from patients with GOSE score 1-7. For UCH-L1 and GFAP to predict unfavorable outcome (GOS score ≤ 3), the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.727, and 0.723, respectively. Neither UCHL-1 nor GFAP was independently able to predict the outcome when age, worst Glasgow Coma Scale score, pupil reactivity, Injury Severity Score, and Marshall score were added into the multivariate logistic regression model. GFAP and UCH-L1 are significantly associated with outcome, but they do not add predictive power to commonly used prognostic variables in a population of patients with TBI of varying severities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of new urban motorway infrastructure on road traffic accidents in the local area: a retrospective longitudinal study in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Jonathan R; Mitchell, Richard; Mackay, Daniel F; Humphreys, David K; Ogilvie, David

    2016-11-01

    The M74 motorway extension, Glasgow, opened in June 2011. One justification for construction was an expectation that it would reduce road traffic accidents (RTAs) on local non-motorway roads. This study evaluated the impact of the extension on the number of RTAs, stratifying by accident severity. Data for the period 1997-2014 were extracted from a UK database of reported RTAs involving a personal injury. RTA severity was defined by the level of injury: minor, severe or fatal. RTAs were assigned to (1) the local area surrounding the motorway extension, (2) a comparator area surrounding an existing motorway or (3) a control area elsewhere in the conurbation. Interrupted time-series regression with autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) errors was used to determine longitudinal between-area differences in change in the number of RTAs, which might indicate an intervention effect. Glasgow and surrounding local authorities saw a 50.6% reduction in annual RTAs (n: 5901 to 2914) between 1997 and 2014. In the intervention area, the number of recorded RTAs decreased by 50.7% (n: 758 to 374), and that of fatal/severe RTAs by 57.4% (n: 129 to 55), with similar reductions in the comparator/control areas. The interrupted time-series analysis showed no significant between-area differences in temporal trends. The reduction of pedestrian casualties was attenuated in the intervention area relative to Glasgow and surrounding authorities. Reduction in RTAs was not associated with the motorway extension. Our findings suggest that in planning future investment, it should not be taken for granted that new road infrastructure alone will reduce RTAs in local areas. Urbanisation is proceeding rapidly worldwide, and evidence of infrastructure changes is lacking; this novel study provides important findings for future developments. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Enhancing learning in geosciences and water engineering via lab activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Cheng, Ming

    2016-04-01

    This study focuses on the utilisation of lab based activities to enhance the learning experience of engineering students studying Water Engineering and Geosciences. In particular, the use of modern highly visual and tangible presentation techniques within an appropriate laboratory based space are used to introduce undergraduate students to advanced engineering concepts. A specific lab activity, namely "Flood-City", is presented as a case study to enhance the active engagement rate, improve the learning experience of the students and better achieve the intended learning objectives of the course within a broad context of the engineering and geosciences curriculum. Such activities, have been used over the last few years from the Water Engineering group @ Glasgow, with success for outreach purposes (e.g. Glasgow Science Festival and demos at the Glasgow Science Centre and Kelvingrove museum). The activity involves a specific setup of the demonstration flume in a sand-box configuration, with elements and activities designed so as to gamely the overall learning activity. Social media platforms can also be used effectively to the same goals, particularly in cases were the students already engage in these online media. To assess the effectiveness of this activity a purpose designed questionnaire is offered to the students. Specifically, the questionnaire covers several aspects that may affect student learning, performance and satisfaction, such as students' motivation, factors to effective learning (also assessed by follow-up quizzes), and methods of communication and assessment. The results, analysed to assess the effectiveness of the learning activity as the students perceive it, offer a promising potential for the use of such activities in outreach and learning.

  16. Decompressive craniectomy for acute subdural haematoma: An overview of current prognostic factors and a discussion about some novel prognostic parametres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalayci, M.; Gul, S.; Edebali, N.; Acikgoz, B.; Aktunc, E.; Hanci, V.; Cagavi, F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify specific factors that can be used to predict functional outcome and to assess the value of decompressive craniectomy in patients with acute subdural haematoma. Methods: The retrospective study was done at the Zonguldak Karaelwas University Practice and Research Hospital, Turkey, and included 34 trauma patients who had undergone decompressive craniectomy for acute subdural haematoma from 2001 to 2009. At the 30th day of the operation, the patients were grouped as survivors and non-survivors. Besides, based on their Glasgow Outcome Scale, which was calculated 6 months post-operatively, the patients were divided into two functional groups: favourable outcomes (4-5 on the scale), and unfavourable outcomes (1-3 on the scale). The characteristics of the groups were compared using SPSS 15 for statistical analysis. Results: One-month mortality was 38.2% (n=13) and 6-month total mortality reached 47% (n=16). Patients with higher pre-operative revised trauma score, Glasgow coma scale, partial anterial pressure of carbon dioxide, arterial oxygen pressure, Charlson co-morbidity index score, blood glucose level, blood urea nitrogen, and lower age had a higher rate of survival and consequently a favourable outcome. Higher platelet values were only found to be a determinant of higher survival at the end of the first month without having any significant effect on the favourable outcome. Conclusion: In patients of traumatic acute subdural haematoma whose Glasgow coma scale on arrival was < 8, a massive craniectomy along with the evacuation of the haematoma, may be considered as a treatment option for intra-operative and post-operative brain swelling. But in patients with a score of 3 on arrival and bilaterally fixed and dilated pupils, decompressive craniectomy is unnecessary. (author)

  17. Head Injury in the Elderly: What Are the Outcomes of Neurosurgical Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, Kathrin Joanna; Jeyaretna, Deva Sanjeeva; Enki, Doyo Gragn; Whitfield, Peter C

    2016-10-01

    Epidemiologic studies show that an increasing proportion of those presenting with head trauma are elderly. This study details the outcomes of elderly patients with head trauma admitted to a regional United Kingdom neurosurgical unit. The notes and imaging were reviewed of all patients with head injury aged ≥75 years, admitted from 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2010, including mortality data up to at least 2 years after discharge. Outcomes comprised death as an inpatient, by 30 days and 1 year after discharge; Glasgow Outcome Score; discharge Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score; recurrence; readmission; reoperation; and complication. A total of 263 patients were admitted: 26 with acute subdural hematoma (ASDH); 175 with chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH); and 46 with mixed subdural collections (ACSDH). Sixteen patients had other head injury diagnoses. Patients with ASDH had a significantly lower survival rate than did those with CSDH or ACSDH: the odds of inpatient death for patients with ASDH was 15.38 (vs. those with CSDH). For all subdural hematomas (SDHs), low American Society of Anesthesiologists score was an independent predictor of early death. Death at 1 year was predicted by head injury severity measured by admission GCS score (P = 0.028), long anesthetic (P = 0.002), and the presence of bilateral SDH (P = 0.002). Unfavorable Glasgow Outcome Scale score (1-3) was predicted by age greater than 85 years (P = 0.029); larger depth of subdural (P neurosurgery after head injury have SDHs. Our results are better than many previously reported; however, the rate of death for those with ASDH is still high. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparing early years and childhood experiences and outcomes in Scotland, England and three city-regions: a plausible explanation for Scottish 'excess' mortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taulbut, Martin; Walsh, David; O'Dowd, John

    2014-10-10

    Negative early years and childhood experiences (EYCE), including socio-economic circumstances, parental health and parenting style, are associated with poor health outcomes both in childhood and adulthood. It has also been proposed that EYCE were historically worse in Scottish areas, especially Glasgow and the Clyde Valley, compared to elsewhere in the UK and that this variation can provide a partial explanation for the excess of ill health and mortality observed among those Scottish populations. Multiple logistic regression analysis was applied to two large, representative, British birth cohorts (the NCDS58 and the BCS70), to test the independent association of area of residence at ages 7 and 5 with risk of behavioural problems, respiratory problems and reading/vocabulary problems at the same age. Cohort members resident in Scotland were compared with those who were resident in England, while those resident in Glasgow and the Clyde Valley were compared with those resident in Merseyside and Greater Manchester. After adjustment for a range of relevant variables, the risk of adverse childhood outcomes was found to be either no different, or lower, in the Scottish areas. At a national level, the study reinforces the combined association of socio-economic circumstances, parental health (especially maternal mental health) and parenting with child health outcomes. Based on these samples, the study does not support the hypothesis that EYCE were worse in Scotland and Glasgow and the Clyde Valley. It seems, therefore (based on these data), less likely that the roots of the excess mortality observed in the Scottish areas can be explained by these factors.

  19. Management of subarachnoid hemorrhage classified grade V. Possibility of intravascular treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uzura, Masahiko; Oshima, Kousuke; Morishima, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Kazuyoshi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Homare; Tanaka, Katsuyuki; Sekino, Hiroaki; Akashi, Katsuya [St. Marianna Univ., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-10-01

    Management outcomes in poor-grade patients (World Federation of Neurological Surgeons Committee on a Universal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Grading Scale Grade V) with ruptured cerebral aneurysms have historically been unsatisfactory. In the present study, we examined the possibility of intravascular treatment for ruptured aneurysm detected by 3-Dimensional CT angiography (3D-CTA) in poor-grade SAH patients. From April 1997 to July 2000, 3D-CTA was performed on 54 of 73 patients admitted with Grade V subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Excluding 3 patients who underwent emergency surgery for ruptured aneurysms and intracerebral hematomas, CT findings from the remaining 51 patients were analyzed. The study included 23 men and 28 women, ranging in age from 28 to 91 with an average age of 63.6. The patients' initial scores on the Glasgow Coma Scale upon admission were 3 in 36 patients (including 19 patients who had undergone cardio-pulmonary arrest), 4 in 11 patients, 5 in 2 patients, and 6 in 2 patients. Ruptured aneurysms responsible for SAH were clearly delineated in 41 aneurysms from 39 patients, with 32 aneurysms in the anterior circulation and 9 in the posterior circulation. Patients with Glasgow Coma Scale of 4 or higher whose score did not progressively decrease for 12 hours after symptom onset were considered for intravascular treatment. In our study, 4 of 39 patients (10.3%) met these criteria. Glasgow Outcome Scale results were good recovery in 1 case, moderate disability in 1 case, severe disability in 1 case, and death in the remaining 48 cases. These results suggest that the management course for poor-grade (WFNS Grade V) SAH patients who retain brain stem reflexes contain the following: identification of aneurysms by 3D-CTA, maintenance of adequate sedation and external drainage to treat acute hydrocephalus, continued minimum 12-hour observation, monitoring levels of consciousness where possible, and consideration of aggressive therapy including

  20. Recovery of Patients with Pure Diffuse Axonal Injury Who Remained in a Coma for 6 Hours or More.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida Vieira, Rita de Cássia; Paiva, Wellingson Silva; de Oliveira, Daniel Vieira; de Paula Guirado, Vinícius Monteiro; Caetano Lança, Ellen de Fátima; de Sousa, Regina Márcia Cardoso

    2018-01-01

    Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is a traumatic brain injury and one of the most common causes of unfavorable outcome and death. The aim of this study was to investigate the recovery of patients with pure DAI who remained in a coma for 6 hours or longer after brain injury. This was a follow-up study of 75 patients diagnosed with pure DAI, aged 18-60 years, with a Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤8 at hospital admission. Patient data were collected at hospital admission, hospital discharge, and 3 and 6 months after DAI. Recovery was assessed by score changes in the Katz Index of Independence in Activities of Daily Living and Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale. The percentage of patients in a coma for 6-24 hours, >24 hours without brainstem signs, and >24 hours with brainstem signs was 42.7%, 20%, and 37.3%, respectively. The 6-month mortality rate was 32.0%, and the mean Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale score among survivors decreased from 3.8 at discharge (SD = 1.2) to 2.1 at 3 months (SD = 1.6) and 1.2 at 6 months (SD = 1.6). The mean Katz Index of Independence in Activities of Daily Living scores were 8.5 (SD = 5.5), 3.5 (SD = 5.8), and 1.8 (SD = 4.5) at discharge and 3 and 6 months after trauma, respectively. Statistically significant differences were observed among the 3 evaluation periods. Mortality was high among patients with DAI, but almost all survivors had favorable outcomes at 6 months. Functional improvement was more pronounced in the first 3 months. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Effects of tramadol alone, in combination with meloxicam or dipyrone, on postoperative pain and the analgesic requirement in dogs undergoing unilateral mastectomy with or without ovariohysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Renata Cr; Monteiro, Eduardo R; Campagnol, Daniela; Coelho, Karina; Bressan, Thais F; Monteiro, Betânia S

    2013-11-01

    To compare the effects of tramadol alone, or in combination with dipyrone or meloxicam, on postoperative pain and analgesia requirement after unilateral mastectomy with or without ovariohysterectomy in dogs. Prospective, randomized, clinical study. Twenty seven bitches undergoing unilateral mastectomy with or without ovariohysterectomy. Anesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane and a constant rate infusion of morphine. Before the end of surgery, dogs were randomly assigned to receive intravenous tramadol alone (3 mg kg(-1), group T), combined with dipyrone (30 mg kg(-1), group TD) or meloxicam (0.2 mg kg(-1), group TM). Dogs received additional doses of tramadol (groups T and TM) or tramadol with dipyrone (group TD) at 8 and 16 hours after extubation. Postoperative pain was assessed by a blinded observer before anesthesia (baseline) and at 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16 and 24 hours after extubation using a visual analog scale (VAS) and a modified Glasgow scale. Rescue analgesia (morphine, 0.5 mg kg(-1)) was administered if the Glasgow pain score was >3.5. There were no significant differences among groups in pain scores evaluated by the VAS or the Glasgow scale. In groups T, TD and TM, pain scores were significantly higher than at baseline for 6, 8 and 2 hours, respectively. Rescue analgesia was administered to 3/9, 2/9 and 1/9 dogs in groups T, TD and TM, respectively (p > 0.05) [Correction added on 15 August 2013, after first online publication: 'T, TM and TD' was changed to 'T, TD and TM'.]. Under the conditions of this study, tramadol alone or in combination with dypyrone or meloxicam provided effective analgesia for 24 hours in most dogs after unilateral mastectomy with or without ovariohysterectomy. Further evaluation of combination therapies is needed in larger groups of dogs. © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  2. Traumatic Brain Injury Severity, Neuropathophysiology, and Clinical Outcome: Insights from Multimodal Neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Irimia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe relationship between the acute clinical presentation of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI, long-term changes in brain structure prompted by injury and chronic functional outcome is insufficiently understood. In this preliminary study, we investigate how acute Glasgow coma score (GCS and epileptic seizure occurrence after TBIs are statistically related to functional outcome (as quantified using the Glasgow Outcome Score and to the extent of cortical thinning observed 6 months after the traumatic event.MethodsUsing multivariate linear regression, the extent to which the acute GCS and epileptic seizure occurrence (predictor variables correlate with structural brain changes (relative cortical atrophy was examined in a group of 33 TBI patients. The statistical significance of the correlation between relative cortical atrophy and the Glasgow Outcome Score was also investigated.ResultsA statistically significant correlative relationship between cortical thinning and the predictor variables (acute GCS and seizure occurrence was identified in the study sample. Regions where the statistical model was found to have highest statistical reliability in predicting both gray matter atrophy and neurological outcome include the frontopolar, middle frontal, postcentral, paracentral, middle temporal, angular, and lingual gyri. In addition, relative atrophy and GOS were also found to be significantly correlated over large portions of the cortex.ConclusionThis study contributes to our understanding of the relationship between clinical descriptors of acute TBI, the extent of injury-related chronic brain changes and neurological outcome. This is partly because the brain areas where cortical thinning was found to be correlated with GCS and with seizure occurrence are implicated in executive control, sensory function, motor acuity, memory, and language, all of which may be affected by TBI. Thus, our quantification suggests the existence of a

  3. Dominance of highly divergent feline leukemia virus A progeny variants in a cat with recurrent viremia and fatal lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauer-Pham Kim

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a cat that had ostensibly recovered from feline leukemia virus (FeLV infection, we observed the reappearance of the virus and the development of fatal lymphoma 8.5 years after the initial experimental exposure to FeLV-A/Glasgow-1. The goals of the present study were to investigate this FeLV reoccurrence and molecularly characterize the progeny viruses. Results The FeLV reoccurrence was detected by the presence of FeLV antigen and RNA in the blood and saliva. The cat was feline immunodeficiency virus positive and showed CD4+ T-cell depletion, severe leukopenia, anemia and a multicentric monoclonal B-cell lymphoma. FeLV-A, but not -B or -C, was detectable. Sequencing of the envelope gene revealed three FeLV variants that were highly divergent from the virus that was originally inoculated (89-91% identity to FeLV-A/Glasgow-1. In the long terminal repeat 31 point mutations, some previously described in cats with lymphomas, were detected. The FeLV variant tissue provirus and viral RNA loads were significantly higher than the FeLV-A/Glasgow-1 loads. Moreover, the variant loads were significantly higher in lymphoma positive compared to lymphoma negative tissues. An increase in the variant provirus blood load was observed at the time of FeLV reoccurrence. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that ostensibly recovered FeLV provirus-positive cats may act as a source of infection following FeLV reactivation. The virus variants that had largely replaced the inoculation strain had unusually heavily mutated envelopes. The mutations may have led to increased viral fitness and/or changed the mutagenic characteristics of the virus.

  4. Daily FOUR score assessment provides accurate prognosis of long-term outcome in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, N; Venot, M; Verdonk, F; Chardon, A; Le Guennec, L; Llerena, M C; Raimbourg, Q; Taldir, G; Luque, Y; Fagon, J-Y; Guerot, E; Diehl, J-L

    2015-05-01

    The accurate prediction of outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is of major importance. The recently described Full Outline of UnResponsiveness (FOUR) is well adapted to mechanically ventilated patients and does not depend on verbal response. To evaluate the ability of FOUR assessed by intensivists to accurately predict outcome in OHCA. We prospectively identified patients admitted for OHCA with a Glasgow Coma Scale below 8. Neurological assessment was performed daily. Outcome was evaluated at 6 months using Glasgow-Pittsburgh Cerebral Performance Categories (GP-CPC). Eighty-five patients were included. At 6 months, 19 patients (22%) had a favorable outcome, GP-CPC 1-2, and 66 (78%) had an unfavorable outcome, GP-CPC 3-5. Compared to both brainstem responses at day 3 and evolution of Glasgow Coma Scale, evolution of FOUR score over the three first days was able to predict unfavorable outcome more precisely. Thus, absence of improvement or worsening from day 1 to day 3 of FOUR had 0.88 (0.79-0.97) specificity, 0.71 (0.66-0.76) sensitivity, 0.94 (0.84-1.00) PPV and 0.54 (0.49-0.59) NPV to predict unfavorable outcome. Similarly, the brainstem response of FOUR score at 0 evaluated at day 3 had 0.94 (0.89-0.99) specificity, 0.60 (0.50-0.70) sensitivity, 0.96 (0.92-1.00) PPV and 0.47 (0.37-0.57) NPV to predict unfavorable outcome. The absence of improvement or worsening from day 1 to day 3 of FOUR evaluated by intensivists provides an accurate prognosis of poor neurological outcome in OHCA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. A simplified clinical risk score predicts the need for early endoscopy in non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammaro, Leonardo; Buda, Andrea; Di Paolo, Maria Carla; Zullo, Angelo; Hassan, Cesare; Riccio, Elisabetta; Vassallo, Roberto; Caserta, Luigi; Anderloni, Andrea; Natali, Alessandro

    2014-09-01

    Pre-endoscopic triage of patients who require an early upper endoscopy can improve management of patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. To validate a new simplified clinical score (T-score) to assess the need of an early upper endoscopy in non variceal bleeding patients. Secondary outcomes were re-bleeding rate, 30-day bleeding-related mortality. In this prospective, multicentre study patients with bleeding who underwent upper endoscopy were enrolled. The accuracy for high risk endoscopic stigmata of the T-score was compared with that of the Glasgow Blatchford risk score. Overall, 602 patients underwent early upper endoscopy, and 472 presented with non-variceal bleeding. High risk endoscopic stigmata were detected in 145 (30.7%) cases. T-score sensitivity and specificity for high risk endoscopic stigmata and bleeding-related mortality was 96% and 30%, and 80% and 71%, respectively. No statistically difference in predicting high risk endoscopic stigmata between T-score and Glasgow Blatchford risk score was observed (ROC curve: 0.72 vs. 0.69, p=0.11). The two scores were also similar in predicting re-bleeding (ROC curve: 0.64 vs. 0.63, p=0.4) and 30-day bleeding-related mortality (ROC curve: 0.78 vs. 0.76, p=0.3). The T-score appeared to predict high risk endoscopic stigmata, re-bleeding and mortality with similar accuracy to Glasgow Blatchford risk score. Such a score may be helpful for the prediction of high-risk patients who need a very early therapeutic endoscopy. Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Acute subdural hematoma because of boxing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushi, Hidehiko; Saito, Takeshi; Sakagami, Yuichiro; Ohtsuki, Jyoji; Tanjoh, Katsuhisa

    2009-02-01

    To identify factors determining the clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) arising from boxing injuries by comparing with ASDH due to any nonboxing cause. Two groups were selected for this study: 10 patients with ASDH because of boxing injuries and 26 patients with nonboxer ASDH. All of the patients underwent neurologic examination by neurosurgeons. Primary resuscitation and stabilization as well as operative therapy were performed to all patients according to the European Brain Injury Consortium Guidelines. Two groups were compared in terms of age, the Glasgow Coma Scale at admission, neurologic findings, craniogram and brain computed tomography scan findings, operative findings, and prognosis. As potential prognostic indicators for boxers, the time interval until surgery, the Glasgow Outcome Scale, hematoma thickness, midline shift, and the site of bleeding were analyzed. The characteristics of patients because of boxing injuries are that patients were younger, had lucid interval, and had no cerebral contusion or contralateral brain injury. There was no significant difference in initial Glasgow Coma Scale, hematoma thickness, midline shift, and their prognosis. The most peculiar clinical presentation of boxers' ASDH was that all bleedings were limited from "bridging veins" or "cortical veins." The prognosis of boxers was most closely correlated with the site of bleeding (r2 = 0.81; p = 0.0001) and the midline shift (r2 = 0.67; p = 0.007). Our study shows that ASDH because of boxing is characterized by bleeding from bridging or cortical veins, and that the site of bleeding is a significant determinant of their prognosis.

  7. A Prototype Scintillating-Fibre Tracker for the Cosmic-ray Muon Tomography of Legacy Nuclear Waste Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, R.; Clarkson, A.; Hamilton, D. J.; Hoek, M.; Ireland, D. G.; Johnston, J. R.; Keri, T.; Lumsden, S.; Mahon, D. F.; McKinnon, B.; Murray, M.; Nutbeam-Tuffs, S.; Shearer, C.; Staines, C.; Yang, G.; Zimmerman, C.

    2014-03-01

    Cosmic-ray muons are highly-penetrative charged particles observed at sea level with a flux of approximately 1 cm-2 min-1. They interact with matter primarily through Coulomb scattering which can be exploited in muon tomography to image objects within industrial nuclear waste containers. This paper presents the prototype scintillating-fibre detector developed for this application at the University of Glasgow. Experimental results taken with test objects are shown in comparison to results from GEANT4 simulations. These results verify the simulation and show discrimination between the low, medium and high-Z materials imaged.

  8. The Effects of Vasospasm and Re-Bleeding on the Outcome of Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage from Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipce, Venko; Caparoski, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Vasospasm and re-bleeding after subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysm are devastating complication that can severely affect the outcome of the patients. We are presenting a series of total number of 224 patients treated and operated at our Department due to subarachnoid hemorrhage, out of which certain number developed vasospasm and re-bleeding. We are evaluating the effect of these complications on the outcome of the patients according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale at the day of discharge. In our experience both vasospasm and ReSAH can significantly influence the outcome of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysm.

  9. A facility for long term evaluation and quality assurance of LHCb Vertex Detector modules

    CERN Document Server

    Marinho, F; Dimattia, R; Doherty, F; Dumps, R; Gersabeck, M; Melone, J; Parkes, C; Saavedra, A; Tobin, M

    2007-01-01

    This note describes the facility developed for long term evaluation and quality assurance of the LHCb Vertex Detector modules, known as the 'Glasgow Burn-in System'. This facility was developed to ensure that the modules conform to stringent quality levels. The system was able to uncover any weaknesses that could be introduced during the manufacturing and assembly of the components or during the transport of the modules to CERN. The system consisted of: a high resolution microscope for visual inspections; and a burn-in system to operate cooled modules in vacuum. The main components of the burn-in system were a vacuum system, a cooling system and a DAQ system.

  10. Esplacnología clínica

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Hernández, Fernando; Santos del Rey, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    Materiales de clase: 1.Tema 1.Asistencia 1; 2.Tema 2: Asistencia 2; 3. Tema 3: Reanimación cardiopulmonar; 4. Tema 4: Manejo C. RCP. Cohibir-fluidos-shock. Lesiones con riesgo inminente de muerte; 5. Tema 5: Manejo D. Exploración neurológica. Escala de Glasgow; 6. Tema 6: Ejercicio de Triage; 7. Tema 7: Casos clínicos reales; 8. Tema 8: Material de emergencias en atención primaria. Esta asignatura tiene como objetivo aplicar, mediante casos clínicos enfocados hacia Enfermería, criterios y ...

  11. Development of a Traumatic Brain Injury Assessment Score Using Novel Biomarkers Discovered Through Autoimmune Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    10 mm and a subdural or epidural hematoma of 5 mm. The thirty-day extended Glasgow outcome scale ranged from 2 to 7 with an average of 5 for the...0.6) 0 CT- 16 (10) 0 Subdural Hematoma Acute - - CT-Subarachnoid _Hemorrhage 24 (16) 0 CT-Contusion 11 (7) 0 CT-Intracerebral_ Hemorrhage IO (6) 0... Hematoma 0 (0) 0 MRI- 21 (14) 0 Subdural Hematoma Acute - - MRI- 23 (15) 0 Subarachnoid _Hemorrhage MRI-Contusion 19 (12) 0 MRI-IntracerebraJ

  12. Prediction of time trends in recovery of cognitive function after mild head injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Kay; Ingebrigtsen, Tor; Wilsgaard, Tom

    2009-01-01

    . There was significant improvement of performance after 6 months. APOE-epsilon4 genotype was the only independent factor significantly predicting less improvement. CONCLUSION: The presence of the APOE-epsilon4 allele predicts less recovery of cognitive function after mild head injury....... change. RESULTS: A Glasgow Coma Scale score of less than 15, traumatic brain injury demonstrated with computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and serum S-100B greater than 0.14 microg/L predicted impaired cognitive performance both at baseline and after 6 months; APOE genotype did not...

  13. 7th February 2011 - Scottish Cabinet Secretary for Education and Lifelong Learning M. Russell MSP signing the guest book with Beams Department Head P. Collier and Adviser J. Ellis

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    01-17:Scottish Cabinet Secretary for Education and Lifelong Learning M. Russell MSP signing the guest book with Beams Department Head P. Collier and Adviser J. Ellis 18-22: Teachers and Pupils signing the guest book 23-27: visiting the CERN control centre with P. Collier 28-32: visiting the LHCb underground area 33-74: visitng the ATLAS underground area Other members of the delegation: Chief Scientific Adviser to the Scottish Government and Chair in Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of Aberdeen A. Glover; Assistant Private Secretary M. Gallagher; Associate Director Institute for Gravitational Research, University of Glasgow J.Hough.

  14. Patent Remedies: Online Management of IP Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Gordon

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper was inspired by work currently in progress under a DTI (Department of Trade and Industry funded KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership Project between Kennedy’s Patent and Glasgow Caledonian University. The project offers a unique opportunity to study the interplay between the firm's business exigencies, and the constantly evolving legal and procedural framework within which the firm operates. The particular focus of the paper is the issues raised by the provision of online legal/quasi-legal services in an ‘e-government’ context.

  15. Juliette Pattinson, Behind Enemy Lines: Gender, Passing and the Special Operations Executive in the Second World War

    OpenAIRE

    Capet, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Les crécibistes qui s’intéressent au domaine baptisé War Studies (à ne pas confondre avec Military History, à la fois plus facile à saisir et plus aisé à traduire) savent qu’il est en pleine expansion dans les universités britanniques. Autrefois, le King’s College de Londres en avait le quasi monopole. Aujourd’hui, il existe des centres très actifs à Birmingham, Édimbourg et Glasgow. Indirectement, également, des dépôts d’archive comme Mass Observation à Brighton et des groupes de recherche d...

  16. Detente and Alliance Politics in the Postwar Era: Strategic Dilemmas in United States - West German Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    the German Problem and their lipicatioms for Bet Gr as Rol in ltern Itro" 1967-1972 (FM Theais, Uiversity of Glasgow, 1976), for an excelleit analysis...Andre Deutsch, 1957), pp.246ff. political life and the widespread fear of the effects of war, atomic or otherwise, on German soil.1 7 A much smaller...defense, it can undertake what has been too long delayed - a political offensive... 3 John Poster Dulles, "A Policy of Boldness", Life , 19 May 1952

  17. The potential for biodiesel production in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, K.C.

    1992-01-01

    Scottish Agricultural Colleges have recently completed an investigation into the potential of biodiesel and other uses of oilseed rape (traditional food use and specialist oils), funded by Scottish Enterprise. The study began as a result of the closure of the Glasgow crusher, which led to either the seed being transported to Liverpool at Pound 10-15/t or exported to Hamburg or Rotterdam - 50% of United Kingdom oilseed exports are out of Scotland. The advantages of Rape Methyl Ester (RME) production have already been spelt out, but the disadvantages are that the costs of production are high and the energy balance can be marginal under some circumstances. (Author)

  18. Mixed tenure communities as a policy instrument for educational outcomes in a deprived urban context?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robison, Oonagh; Kearns, Ade; Gray, Linsay; Bond, Lyndal; Henderson, Marion

    2016-05-03

    This article considers mixed community strategies, enacted through planning and regeneration policies, as a policy approach to the improvement of educational outcomes in schools. Analysis is undertaken of educational outcomes across secondary schools in Glasgow. The level of owner occupation in the catchment is positively associated with both examination results at S4 and positive destinations post-school, particularly at the more deprived end of the school spectrum. The results suggest that tenure mix may be both directly and indirectly related to school performance, with neighbourhood context effects not being entirely mediated through the school context.

  19. Maxillary osteosarcoma in a beef suckler cow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prins Diether G J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A ten-year-old beef suckler cow was referred to the Scottish Centre for Production Animal Health & Food Safety of the University of Glasgow, because of facial swelling in the region of the right maxilla. The facial swelling was first noticed three months earlier and was caused by a slow growing oral mass which contained displaced, loosely embedded teeth. The radiographic, laboratory and clinicopathological findings are described. Necropsy, gross pathology and histological findings confirmed the mass as a maxillary osteosarcoma.

  20. Oncolytic herpes viruses, chemotherapeutics, and other cancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braidwood L

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lynne Braidwood,1 Sheila V Graham,2 Alex Graham,1 Joe Conner11Virttu Biologics Ltd, Department of Neurology, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow, UK; 2MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, Jarrett Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UKAbstract: Oncolytic viruses are emerging as a potential new way of treating cancers. They are selectively replication-competent viruses that propagate only in actively dividing tumor cells but not in normal cells and, as a result, destroy the tumor cells by consequence of lytic infection. At least six different oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (oHSVs have undergone clinical trials worldwide to date, and they have demonstrated an excellent safety profile and intimations of efficacy. The first pivotal Phase III trial with an oHSV, talimogene laherparepvec (T-Vec [OncoVexGM-CSF], is almost complete, with extremely positive early results reported. Intuitively, therapeutically beneficial interactions between oHSV and chemotherapeutic and targeted therapeutic drugs would be limited as the virus requires actively dividing cells for maximum replication efficiency and most anticancer agents are cytotoxic or cytostatic. However, combinations of such agents display a range of responses, with antagonistic, additive, or, perhaps most surprisingly, synergistic enhancement of antitumor activity. When synergistic interactions in cancer cell killing are observed, chemotherapy dose reductions that achieve the same overall efficacy may be possible, resulting in a valuable reduction of adverse side effects. Therefore, the combination of an oHSV with “standard-of-care” drugs makes a logical and reasonable approach to improved therapy, and the addition of a targeted oncolytic therapy with “standard-of-care” drugs merits further investigation, both preclinically and in the clinic. Numerous publications report

  1. Traumatisme insolite de la région temporale | Lmekki | Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Un homme âgé de 37ans était victime d'une agression par coup de couteau. Le patient se présente aux urgences le couteau fiché dans la région temporale sans symptomatologie clinique particulière et avec un score de Glasgow à 15. Le bilan lésionnel n'a pas objectivé d'atteinte vasculaire. Le retrait du couteau a été ...

  2. Cryo-gamma radiation inactivation of bovine herpesvirus type-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degiorgi, C. Fernández; Smolko, E. E.; Lombardo, J. H.

    1999-07-01

    The radioresistance of bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1), commonly known as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (IBRV), suspended in free serum Glasgow-MEM medium and frozen at -78°C was studied. The number of surviving virus at a given dose of gamma-radiation was determined by a plaque assay system. D 10 values were calculated before and after removal of cell debris. The D 10 values obtained were 4.72 kGy and 7.31 kGy before and after removal of cell debris, respectively. Our results indicate that the inactivated viral particles could be used for vaccine preparation or diagnostic reagents.

  3. An Imaging System to Monitor Efficacy of Adenovirus-Based Virotherapy Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    Izumo, S. (2000). Transgenic expression of green fluorescence protein can cause dilated cardiomyopathy . Nat Med 6(5), 482-483. 20 Kelkar, S. A...for adenoviral transduction of canine osteosarcoma cells. Gene Ther. 2006 Mar;13(5):389-99. 3. Le LP, Le HN, N elson AM, Yamamoto M, Curiel DT...Infectivity enhancement for adenoviral transduction of canine osteosarcoma cells LP Le1,4, AA Rivera1,4, JN Glasgow1, VV Ternovoi1, H Wu1, M Wang1, BF

  4. Arta process model of maritime clutter and targets

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mc

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info McDonald_2013_ABSTRACT ONLY.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 1370 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name McDonald_2013_ABSTRACT ONLY.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 IET... Radar 2012, International conference on radar systems, Glasgow, United Kingdom, 22-25 October 2012 ARTA PROCESS MODEL OF MARITIME CLUTTER AND TARGETS Andre McDonald and Jacques Cilliers Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) Meiring...

  5. Teaching NeuroImages: Ma2 encephalitis presenting as acute panhypopituitarism in a young man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergner, Caroline G; Lang, Christine; Spreer, Annette; Bähr, Mathias; Mohr, Alexander; Simons, Mikael

    2013-11-05

    A 21-year-old man presented with headache, hypotonia, hypothermia, and somnolence, deteriorating to a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 3 within days. Hormonal testing revealed panhypopituitarism. His cerebral MRI showed a gadolinium-enhancing lesion in the pituitary gland with adjacent changes to the hypothalamus, midbrain, and basal ganglia (figures 1 and 2). Therapy with prednisolone resulted in rapid improvement. Ma2 antibodies were found in the patient's serum and CSF. FDG-PET demonstrated a tumor mass in the superior mediastinum and histology revealed a mediastinal seminoma. Ma2 antibody-mediated paraneoplastic disease has to be considered as a rare differential diagnosis in patients presenting with acute panhypopituitarism.(1.)

  6. Virgin's Knight tackles climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2008-11-01

    "There is no greater or more immediate challenge than that posed by climate change," said Sir Richard Branson, chairman of the Virgin group, via video-link at the 59th International Astronautical Congress (IAC) held in Glasgow in the UK at the end of September. That grand statement may seem like a lot of hot air for the entrepreneur best known for his attempt to circumnavigate the globe by balloon. But Branson went on to reveal that Virgin Galactic, which aims to fly passengers 100 km into space for 200 000 per trip, will also provide room on its craft for a series of scientific experiments to study the Earth's atmosphere.

  7. Centralized rehabilitation after servere traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Aase Worså; Liebach, Annette; Nordenbo, Annette Mosbæk

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To present results from the first 3 years of centralized subacute rehabilitation after very severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), and to compare results of centralized versus decentralized rehabilitation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Prospectively, the most severely injured group of adults from...... post-trauma was 0.29, and at 1 year 0.055 per 100,000 population. By comparison of 39 patients from the centralized unit injured in 2000-2003 with 21 patients injured in 1982, 1987 or 1992 and with similar PTA- and age distributions and male/female ratio, Glasgow Outcome Scale score at discharge...

  8. Pneumomediastinum and bilateral pneumothorax following near drowning in shallow water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhiya Govindaraj

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We report pneumomediastinum, bilateral pneumothorax and acute respiratory distress syndrome in a victim of near drowning who was intoxicated and did not have thoracic or neck trauma. Chest radiograph revealed the above findings, later confirmed by computed tomography. He was in shock and also had gastrointestinal (GI bleeding and renal dysfunction. With adequate resuscitative measures including fluids, blood transfusions, intercostal tube drainage and mechanical ventilation he made a complete recovery. Good prognostic indicators in near drowning patients include higher Glasgow Coma Scale, short submersion time and quick resuscitative measures even in the presence of serious cardiorespiratory or hemodynamic compromise.

  9. Pneumomediastinum and bilateral pneumothorax following near drowning in shallow water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stalin Viswanathan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We report pneumomediastinum, bilateral pneumothorax and acute respiratory distress syndrome in a victim of near drowning who was intoxicated and did not have thoracic or neck trauma. Chest radiograph revealed the above findings, later confirmed by computed tomography. He was in shock and also had gastrointestinal (GI bleeding and renal dysfunction. With adequate resuscitative measures including fluids, blood transfusions, intercostal tube drainage and mechanical ventilation he made a complete recovery. Good prognostic indicators in near drowning patients include higher Glasgow Coma Scale, short submersion time and quick resuscitative measures even in the presence of serious cardiorespiratory or hemodynamic compromise.

  10. Przekształcenia przestrzenne i funkcjonalne obszarów przemysłowych w miastach brytyjskich. Przykład Doków w Londynie

    OpenAIRE

    Kaczmarek, Sylwia

    1999-01-01

    Materiały wykorzystane w tym opracowaniu autorka zebrała w Londynie podczas wizyty studialnej w Wielkiej Brytanii, finansowanej przez British Council, która odbyła się w październiku 1994 r. Recently the main aspect of British spatial and economic planning was what came to be known as inner city problem. It began around mid 1960s when a lot of traditional industries in cities declined (examples of Glasgow, Manchester, London). The case of London Docklands illustrates the cru...

  11. New results from HERA on photoproduction and diffraction, the proton structure function, deep inelastic scattering at low x, heavy flavour production, jets and searches for leptoquarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreiro, F.; Bhadra, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lim, J.N.; Soeldner-Rembold, S.; Straub, B.

    1994-11-01

    This report contains some of the papers presented by the ZEUS Collaboration at the 27th international conference on high energy physics in Glasgow (20-27 July 1994). These concern deep inelastic ep scattering at low x, photoproduction and diffraction in ep scattering, a measurement of the proton structure function and determination of the low-x gluon distribution, D * and J/Ψ production in ep scattering, multi-jet production and determination of α s in ep scattering, and the search for leptoquarks in ep collisions. (HSI)

  12. A Prototype Scintillating-Fibre Tracker for the Cosmic-ray Muon Tomography of Legacy Nuclear Waste Containers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiser R.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cosmic-ray muons are highly-penetrative charged particles observed at sea level with a flux of approximately 1 cm−2 min−1. They interact with matter primarily through Coulomb scattering which can be exploited in muon tomography to image objects within industrial nuclear waste containers. This paper presents the prototype scintillating-fibre detector developed for this application at the University of Glasgow. Experimental results taken with test objects are shown in comparison to results from GEANT4 simulations. These results verify the simulation and show discrimination between the low, medium and high-Z materials imaged.

  13. Shannon's Wayにおける恋と結婚の障害

    OpenAIRE

    中村, 豪; Takeshi, Nakamura; 昭和女子大学英語コミュニケーション学科

    2016-01-01

    The theme of this study is Shannon's Way as love story: the hero and the heroine's love and the obstacles to their marriage. The novel was written by a Scottish writer and physician, A.J.Cronin(in full Archibald Joseph Cronin, 1896-1981)and published in 1948. The setting of the story is chiefly Winton, a fictitious city based on Glasgow. The hero is Robert Shannon, a twenty-four-year-old poor but excellent researcher and doctor whose ambition is to be successful in medical science by a great ...

  14. Finite temperature and chemical potential in lattice QCD and its critical point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fodor, Z.

    2002-01-01

    We propose a method to study lattice QCD at finite temperature (T) and chemical potential (μ). We compare the method with direct results and with the Glasgow method by using n f =4 QCD at Im(μ)≠0. We locate the critical endpoint (E) of QCD on the Re(μ)-T plane. We use n f =2+1 dynamical staggered quarks with semi-realistic masses on L t =4 lattices. Our results are based on O(10 3 - 10 4 ) configurations. (orig.)

  15. Frontal assessment battery (FAB) performance following traumatic brain injury hospitalized in an acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Natalia; Laguë-Beauvais, Maude; Belisle, Arielle; Lamoureux, Julie; AlSideiri, Ghusn; Marcoux, Judith; Maleki, Mohammed; Alturki, Abdulrahman Y; Anchouche, Sonia; Alquraini, Hanan; Feyz, Mitra; Guise, Elaine de

    2018-01-19

    The Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB) has been shown to be useful in several clinical settings. The aim of the present study was to examine the performance of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) on the FAB and to predict their acute outcome. The FAB was administered to 89 patients with mild (27 = uncomplicated and 39 = complicated) and moderate (n = 23) TBI during hospitalization in an acute care setting. The length of stay in days (LOS), Glasgow Outcome Scale-Revised score (GOSE) and Disability Rating Scale (DRS) score were collected. Results showed no significant differences between the three groups on the FAB score, but age and education were significantly associated with the FAB score. Parietal lesions were associated with lower total FAB score, and with the Similarities, Motor series and Conflicting instructions subscales, while frontal lesions were associated with lower performance on the Motor series and Conflicting instructions subscales. Total FAB score was significantly correlated with all outcome measures, and together the FAB total score and the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score explained 30.8% of the variance in the DRS score. The FAB may be useful clinically to acutely assess frontal and parietal lobe functions at bedside in patients with TBI and, in combination with the GCS score to measure TBI severity, can enable clinicians to predict early outcome.

  16. Comparison of Morphine, Morphine-Lidocaine, and Morphine-Lidocaine-Ketamine Infusions in Dogs Using an Incision-Induced Pain Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiavaccini, Ludovica; Claude, Andrew K; Meyer, Robert E

    We aimed to compare antinociceptive effects of IV infusions of morphine (M), morphine-lidocaine (ML), or morphine-lidocaine-ketamine (MLK) combined, in a mild-to-moderate pain model in dogs. Eighteen adult hounds were heavily sedated with IV morphine (0.2 mg/kg) and dexmedetomidine to undergo thoracic skin incisions. After reversal, dogs were randomly assigned to receive loading doses of lidocaine and ketamine (MLK), lidocaine and saline (ML), or equivalent volume of saline (M), followed by 18 hr constant infusions of morphine (0.12 mg/kg/hr), lidocaine (3 mg/kg/hr) and ketamine (0.6 mg/kg/hr); morphine (0.12 mg/kg/hr) and lidocaine (3 mg/kg/hr); or morphine (0.12 mg/kg/hr), respectively. Pain was assessed with Short Form Glasgow Composite Measure Pain Scale and mechanical nociception with von Frey filaments (VFFS). Data were analyzed with linear mixed model on ranks. Independently of treatment, Short Form Glasgow Composite Measure Pain Scale was significantly higher than baseline for 24 hr (p < .0001), while VFFS was significantly lower than baseline for 48 hr post-recovery (p < .0001), with no difference between MLK and M groups. The ML group recorded significantly lower VFFS (p = .02) than the M group for the entire study. In conclusion, there was no significant analgesic difference between MLK and M alone.

  17. Successful management of drug-induced hypercapnic acidosis with naloxone and noninvasive positive pressure ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrafiotis, Michalis; Tryfon, Stavros; Siopi, Demetra; Chassapidou, Georgia; Galanou, Artemis; Tsara, Venetia

    2015-02-01

    A 74-year-old man was referred to our hospital due to deteriorating level of consciousness and desaturation. His Glasgow Coma Scale was 6, and his pupils were constricted but responded to light. Chest radiograph was negative for significant findings. Arterial blood gas evaluation on supplemental oxygen revealed severe acute on chronic respiratory acidosis: pH 7.15; PCO2, 133 mm Hg; PO2,64 mm Hg; and HCO3, 31 mmol/L. He regained full consciousness (Glasgow Coma Scale, 15) after receiving a 0.4 mg dose of naloxone, but because of persistent severe respiratory acidosis (pH 7.21; PCO2, 105 mm Hg), he was immediately commenced on noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIV) displaying a remarkable improvement in arterial blood gas values within the next few hours. However, in the days that followed, he remained dependent on NIV, and he was finally discharged on a home mechanical ventilation prescription. In cases of drug-induced respiratory depression, NIV should be regarded as an acceptable treatment, as it can provide ventilatory support without the increased risks associated with invasive mechanical ventilation.

  18. Branched chain amino acids supplemented with L-acetylcarnitine versus BCAA treatment in hepatic coma: a randomized and controlled double blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaguarnera, Mariano; Risino, Corrado; Cammalleri, Lisa; Malaguarnera, Lucia; Astuto, Marinella; Vecchio, Ignazio; Rampello, Liborio

    2009-07-01

    Our earlier study has demonstrated that the administration of L-acetylcarnitine (LAC) improves neurological symptoms and serum parameters in hepatic coma. The aim of this work has been to evaluate the efficacy of the LAC and branched chain amino acids (BCAA) versus BCAA, administered in intravenous infusion, in patients with cirrhotic hepatic coma. Forty-eight highly selected patients were enrolled in the study and, after randomization, received blindly LAC+BCAA (n=24) versus BCAA (n=24). The two groups were similar in age, sex, pathogenesis of cirrhosis, and severity of liver disease. The comparison between values before and after LAC planned treatment showed statistical significant differences in neurological findings, evaluated by the Glasgow Scale, ammonia serum levels, blood urea nitrogen, and EEG. After 60 min of the study period, the LAC+BCAA treated patients compared with BCCA treated showed a significant decrease of ammonia serum levels: 41.20 versus 10.40 mumol PBCAA treated patients compared with BCCA treated patients showed a significant increase of Glasgow's score: 3.60 versus 1.50 score PBCAA supplemented with LAC might improve neurological symptoms and serum ammonium levels in selected cirrhotic patients with hepatic coma.

  19. Brain pathology after mild traumatic brain injury: an exploratory study by repeated magnetic resonance examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannsjö, Marianne; Raininko, Raili; Bustamante, Mariana; von Seth, Charlotta; Borg, Jörgen

    2013-09-01

    To explore brain pathology after mild traumatic brain injury by repeated magnetic resonance examination. A prospective follow-up study. Nineteen patients with mild traumatic brain injury presenting with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) 14-15. The patients were examined on day 2 or 3 and 3-7 months after the injury. The magnetic resonance protocol comprised conventional T1- and T2-weighted sequences including fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), two susceptibility-weighted sequences to reveal haemorrhages, and diffusion-weighted sequences. Computer-aided volume comparison was performed. Clinical outcome was assessed by the Rivermead Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire (RPQ), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE). At follow-up, 7 patients (37%) reported ≥  3 symptoms in RPQ, 5 reported some anxiety and 1 reported mild depression. Fifteen patients reported upper level of good recovery and 4 patients lower level of good recovery (GOSE 8 and 7, respectively). Magnetic resonance pathology was found in 1 patient at the first examination, but 4 patients (21%) showed volume loss at the second examination, at which 3 of them reported GOSE scores of 8. Loss of brain volume, demonstrated by computer-aided magnetic resonance imaging volumetry, may be a feasible marker of brain pathology after mild traumatic brain injury.

  20. Emergency department blood alcohol level associates with injury factors and six-month outcome after uncomplicated mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, John K; Ngwenya, Laura B; Upadhyayula, Pavan S; Deng, Hansen; Winkler, Ethan A; Burke, John F; Lee, Young M; Robinson, Caitlin K; Ferguson, Adam R; Lingsma, Hester F; Cnossen, Maryse C; Pirracchio, Romain; Korley, Frederick K; Vassar, Mary J; Yuh, Esther L; Mukherjee, Pratik; Gordon, Wayne A; Valadka, Alex B; Okonkwo, David O; Manley, Geoffrey T

    2017-11-01

    The relationship between blood alcohol level (BAL) and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) remains in need of improved characterization. Adult patients suffering mTBI without intracranial pathology on computed tomography (CT) from the prospective Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury Pilot study with emergency department (ED) Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) 13-15 and recorded blood alcohol level (BAL) were extracted. BAL≥80-mg/dl was set as proxy for excessive use. Multivariable regression was performed for patients with six-month Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOSE; functional recovery) and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Processing Speed Index Composite Score (WAIS-PSI; nonverbal processing speed), using BAL≥80-mg/dl and GOSE≤7; 38.1% vs. 11.5%; p=0.025) and lower WAIS-PSI (92.4±12.7, 30th-percentile vs. 105.1±11.7, 63rd-percentile; pGOSE≤7 and an adjusted mean decrease of 8.88-points (95% CI [0.67-17.09]; p=0.035) on WAIS-PSI. Day-of-injury BAL>80-mg/dl after uncomplicated mTBI was associated with decreased GCS score and prolongation of reported LOC. BAL may be a biomarker for impaired return to baseline function and decreased nonverbal processing speed at six-months postinjury. Future confirmatory studies are needed. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Cognitive Impairment after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury, Clinical Course and Impact on Outcome: A Swedish-Icelandic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Maud; Godbolt, Alison K.; Nygren De Boussard, Catharina; Levi, Richard; Stålnacke, Britt-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the clinical course of cognitive and emotional impairments in patients with severe TBI (sTBI) from 3 weeks to 1 year after trauma and to study associations with outcomes at 1 year. Methods. Prospective, multicenter, observational study of sTBI in Sweden and Iceland. Patients aged 18–65 years with acute Glasgow Coma Scale 3–8 were assessed with the Barrow Neurological Institute Screen for Higher Cerebral Functions (BNIS) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Outcome measures were Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE) and Rancho Los Amigos Cognitive Scale-Revised (RLAS-R). Results. Cognition was assessed with the BNIS assessed for 42 patients out of 100 at 3 weeks, 75 patients at 3 months, and 78 patients at 1 year. Cognition improved over time, especially from 3 weeks to 3 months. The BNIS subscales “orientation” and “visuospatial and visual problem solving” were associated with the GOSE and RLAS-R at 1 year. Conclusion. Cognition seemed to improve over time after sTBI and appeared to be rather stable from 3 months to 1 year. Since cognitive function was associated with outcomes, these results indicate that early screening of cognitive function could be of importance for rehabilitation planning in a clinical setting. PMID:26783381

  2. Improvement in GOS and GOSE scores 6 and 12 months after severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Luisa; Ventura, José Luis; Herrero, José Ignacio; Monfort, Jose Luis; Juncadella, Montserrat; Gabarrós, Andreu; Bartolomé, Carlos; Javierre, Casimiro F; García-Huete, Lucía

    2007-11-01

    To assess improvements in Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) and GOS extended (GOSE) scores between 6 months and 1 year following severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). One studied 214 adult patients with severe TBI with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) GOSE at 6 months and 1 year) was better in the high GCS score at admission (6-8) group than in the low score group (3-5). The improvement in GOS scores between 6 months and 1 year was greater in the high GCS score at admission group than in the low score group. At 6 months, 75 patients had died and 120 survived. None died between the 6-12-month assessments; at 12 months, 36% had improved GOS score. GOS scores improved between 6-12 months after severe TBI in 36% of survivors and it is concluded that the expectancy of improvement is incomplete at 6 months. This improvement was greater in patients with better GCS scores (6-8) at admission than in those with worse GCS scores (3-5).

  3. Cognitive Impairment after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury, Clinical Course and Impact on Outcome: A Swedish-Icelandic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maud Stenberg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the clinical course of cognitive and emotional impairments in patients with severe TBI (sTBI from 3 weeks to 1 year after trauma and to study associations with outcomes at 1 year. Methods. Prospective, multicenter, observational study of sTBI in Sweden and Iceland. Patients aged 18–65 years with acute Glasgow Coma Scale 3–8 were assessed with the Barrow Neurological Institute Screen for Higher Cerebral Functions (BNIS and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Outcome measures were Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE and Rancho Los Amigos Cognitive Scale-Revised (RLAS-R. Results. Cognition was assessed with the BNIS assessed for 42 patients out of 100 at 3 weeks, 75 patients at 3 months, and 78 patients at 1 year. Cognition improved over time, especially from 3 weeks to 3 months. The BNIS subscales “orientation” and “visuospatial and visual problem solving” were associated with the GOSE and RLAS-R at 1 year. Conclusion. Cognition seemed to improve over time after sTBI and appeared to be rather stable from 3 months to 1 year. Since cognitive function was associated with outcomes, these results indicate that early screening of cognitive function could be of importance for rehabilitation planning in a clinical setting.

  4. Antithrombotic agents intake prior to injury does not affect outcome after a traumatic brain injury in hospitalized elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Jessica; Alsideiri, Ghusn; Marcoux, Judith; Hasen, Mohammed; Correa, José A; Feyz, Mitra; Maleki, Mohammed; de Guise, Elaine

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of risk factors including International Normalized Ratio (INR) as well as the Partial Thromboplastin Time (PTT) scores on several outcomes, including hospital length of stay (LOS) and The Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) following TBI in the elderly population. Data were retrospectively collected on patients (n=982) aged 65 and above who were admitted post TBI to the McGill University Health Centre-Montreal General Hospital from 2000 to 2011. Age, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Glasgow Coma Scale score (GCS), type of trauma (isolated TBI vs polytrauma including TBI), initial CT scan results according to the Marshall Classification and the INR and PTT scores and prescriptions of antiplatelet or anticoagulant agents (AP/AC) were collected. Results also indicated that age, ISS and GSC score have an effect on the GOSE score. We also found that taking AC/AP has an effect on GOSE outcome, but that this effects depends on PTT, with lower odds of a worse outcome for those taking AC/AP agents as the PTT value goes up. However, this effect only becomes significant as the PTT value reaches 60 and above. Age and injury severity rather than antithrombotic agent intake are associated with adverse acute outcome such as GOSE in hospitalized elderly TBI patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Prognostic value of intraventricular bleeding in spontaneous intraparenchymal cerebral hemorrhage of small volume: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes Lima, Telmo Tiburcio; Prandini, Mirto Nelso; Gallo, Pasquale; Cavalheiro, Sérgio

    2012-04-01

    The literature is controversial on whether intraventricular bleeding has a negative impact on the prognosis of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. Nevertheless, an association between intraventricular bleeding and spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage volumes has been consistently reported. To evaluate the prognostic value of intraventricular bleeding in deep intraparenchymal hypertensive spontaneous hemorrhage with a bleeding volume bleeding was calculated by the LeRoux scale. Clinical data, including neurological complications, were collected daily during hospitalization. Neurological outcome was evaluated 30 days after the event by using the Glasgow outcome scale. Patients were assigned to 1 of 3 groups according to intraventricular bleeding: Control, no intraventricular bleeding; LR 1, intraventricular bleeding with LeRoux scale scores of 1 to 8; or LR 2, intraventricular bleeding with LeRoux scale scores >8. There were no significant differences among groups concerning age, mean blood pressure, and time from onset to brain CT scan. Patients with greater intraventricular bleeding presented lower initial Glasgow coma scale scores, increased ventricular index and width of temporal horns, increased number of clinical and neurological complications, and longer hospitalization. Furthermore, their relative risk for unfavorable clinical outcome was 1.9 (95% confidence interval 1.25-2.49). Intraventricular bleeding with a LeRoux scale score >8 appears to have a negative effect on deep spontaneous intraparenchymal cerebral hemorrhage of small volume.

  6. Computerised cognitive-behavioural therapy for adults with intellectual disability: randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Patricia; Jackman, Catherine; Coyle, David; O'Reilly, Gary

    2017-08-01

    Background Despite the evidence base for computer-assisted cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) in the general population, it has not yet been adapted for use with adults who have an intellectual disability. Aims To evaluate the utility of a CBT computer game for adults who have an intellectual disability. Method A 2 × 3 (group × time) randomised controlled trial design was used. Fifty-two adults with mild to moderate intellectual disability and anxiety or depression were randomly allocated to two groups: computerised CBT (cCBT) or psychiatric treatment as usual (TAU), and assessed at pre-treatment, post-treatment and 3-month follow-up. Forty-nine participants were included in the final analysis. Results A significant group × time interaction was observed on the primary outcome measure of anxiety (Glasgow Anxiety Scale for people with an Intellectual Disability), favouring cCBT over TAU, but not on the primary outcome measure of depression (Glasgow Depression Scale for people with a Learning Disability). A medium effect size for anxiety symptoms was observed at post-treatment and a large effect size was observed after follow-up. Reliability of Change Indices indicated that the intervention produced clinically significant change in the cCBT group in comparison with TAU. Conclusions As the first application of cCBT for adults with intellectual disability, this intervention appears to be a useful treatment option to reduce anxiety symptoms in this population. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.

  7. Patients with severe head trauma who talk and then deteriorate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isayama, Kazuo; Nakazawa, Shozo; Kobayashi, Shiro; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Yukio; Yajima, Kouzo; Yano, Masami; Otsuka, Toshibumi

    1987-08-01

    Patients with severe head trauma who talk and then deteriorate (or die) are analyzed by means of clinical signs, computerized tomography (CT), and outcome. The twelve severely head-injured patients had an initial verbal score on the Glasgow coma scale (GCS) of 3 or more and a GCS score of 9 or more. There were 8 male and 4 female patients. The ages of these patients ranged from 23 to 85 years (average age 60.9 years); nine of the patients were older than 60 years of age. An initial CT revealed subdural hematoma in 7 cases and traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage in 8 cases. Serial CT could be used for 9 cases; delayed intracerebral hematoma was found in 5 patients, and acute cerebral swelling, in 3 patients. The elderly tended to have the hematoma, while the young tended to have acute cerebral swelling. Concerning the Glasgow outcome scale of cases of head trauma who talk and then deteriorate three months after trauma, there was moderate disability in 2 cases and a persistent vegetative state in one, while 9 had died.

  8. Prognosis of head injury. In relation to age, CT findings and the GCS on admission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Kamei, Ichiro; Ooiwa, Yoshitsugu; Hyotani, Genhachi; Yabumoto, Michio; Kuriyama, Tsuyoshi [Japanese Red Cross Society, Wakayama (Japan). Wakayama Medical Center; Kakishita, Koji; Inui, Yoshiro

    1996-02-01

    We have carried out a retrospective study of head injury patients to determine the factors that predict their outcomes. The subjects consisted of 74 head injury patients (Glasgow Coma Scale: 3-12) treated at our hospital from January, 1989 to March, 1994. Age, CT findings and the GCS on admission were investigated as outcome-predicting factors. CT findings were classified according to the TCDB (Traumatic Coma Data Bank) and the outcomes were evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale 3 months after the head injury. In our study, the factors indicated favorable outcomes were as follows; age younger than 50 years old, GCS higher than 6, appearance of the basal cisterns on CT scan, existence of removable acute epidural hematoma. In contrast, the factors that indicated unfavorable outcomes were as follows; disappearance of the basal cisterns on CT scan, existence of apparent acute subdural hematoma and/or intracranial hematoma associated with cerebral contusion. Based on these findings, we can more accurately estimate the prognosis of head injury. (author)

  9. Rapid reduction of acute subdural hematoma and redistribution of hematoma: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Arata; Omata, Tomohiro; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    An 88-year-old woman presented with acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) which showed rapid resolution on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. She was transferred to our hospital after falling out of bed. On admission, she was comatose with Japan Coma Scale score of 200 and Glasgow Coma Scale score of E1V1M2. Brain CT showed a thick left frontotemporal ASDH. Conservative treatment consisted of 200 ml of glycerol administered intravenously twice a day, and maintenance in the approximately 20 degree head-up position to reduce intracranial pressure. Three days later, her consciousness recovered to Japan Coma Scale score of 30 and Glasgow Coma Scale score of E2V4M5. CT showed obvious reduction of the hematoma without brain or scalp swelling. Spinal MR imaging detected no redistribution of hematoma to the spine. The present case illustrates that rapid spontaneous reduction of ASDH may occur by redistribution of hematoma, mainly to the supratentorial subdural space because of brain atrophy.

  10. Pacientes com desordem de consciência: respostas vitais, faciais e musculares frente música ou mensagem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia Giesbrecht Puggina

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: comparar sinais vitais, expressão facial e sinais eletroneurográfi cos basais com medidas durante os estímulos música, mensagem ou “silêncio” em pacientes em coma, estado vegetativo ou sedado e relacionar a pontuação da Escala de Resultado de Glasgow com a intervenção realizada. Método: ensaio Clínico Controlado Transversal Unicego para o pesquisador. A alocação foi aleatória nos três grupos (experimental música, experimental mensagem ou controle. Foram realizadas duas avaliações (sessões com intervalo de 40 minutos no mesmo dia. Resultados: a maioria dos 76 pacientes eram homens, entre 18 e 36 anos e internados por trauma. Encontraram-se alterações estatisticamente signifi cantes nas variáveis temperatura, expressão facial, eletroneurografi a e Escala de Resultado de Glasgow; alterações mais frequentes na sessão 2, nos pacientes em coma e estado vegetativo, no músculo frontal e no grupo experimental. Conclusões: a expressão facial e a eletroneurografi a parecem ser variáveis mais confi áveis do que os sinais vitais para mensurar consciência.

  11. Pacientes com desordem de consciência: respostas vitais, faciais e musculares frente música ou mensagem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia Giesbrecht Puggina

    Full Text Available Objetivos: comparar sinais vitais, expressão facial e sinais eletroneurográfi cos basais com medidas durante os estímulos música, mensagem ou “silêncio” em pacientes em coma, estado vegetativo ou sedado e relacionar a pontuação da Escala de Resultado de Glasgow com a intervenção realizada. Método: ensaio Clínico Controlado Transversal Unicego para o pesquisador. A alocação foi aleatória nos três grupos (experimental música, experimental mensagem ou controle. Foram realizadas duas avaliações (sessões com intervalo de 40 minutos no mesmo dia. Resultados: a maioria dos 76 pacientes eram homens, entre 18 e 36 anos e internados por trauma. Encontraram-se alterações estatisticamente signifi cantes nas variáveis temperatura, expressão facial, eletroneurografi a e Escala de Resultado de Glasgow; alterações mais frequentes na sessão 2, nos pacientes em coma e estado vegetativo, no músculo frontal e no grupo experimental. Conclusões: a expressão facial e a eletroneurografi a parecem ser variáveis mais confi áveis do que os sinais vitais para mensurar consciência.

  12. Traumatic brain injuries from work accidents: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, A M O; Jaumally, B A; Bayanzay, K; Khoury, K; Torkaman, A

    2013-07-01

    The United Arab Emirates is a rapidly developing country with recent expansion in construction and manufacturing. To investigate the occurrence and outcomes following occupational traumatic brain injury (TBI) requiring hospital admission. Records for all TBI cases admitted to an Abu Dhabi hospital between 2005 and 2009 were reviewed. Data on mechanisms of occupational injuries, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) on admission and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) on follow-up, were analysed. Of 581 TBI cases reviewed, 56 (10%) cases were reported as occupational by either the patient or the informant accompanying the patient. All cases were male migrants, and 63% were aged 25-44. Falls accounted for 63% of cases, falling objects 34% and motor vehicle collisions 4%. Median GCS score was 13 for all cases. Median hospital stay was 7.5 days. Intensive care unit admission data were available in 47 cases, of which 34% (16) were admitted with a median stay of 5 days. GOS data were available in 95% (53) of cases, with good recovery in 81% cases, moderate-to-severe disability in 11% of cases and death in 8% (4) cases. Occupational TBI requiring hospitalization is most frequently due to falls and falling objects, with potentially grave consequences. This study further highlights the urgent need to implement preventative measures to improve construction worker safety.

  13. Value of conventional, and diffusion- and perfusion weighted MRI in the management of patients with unclear cerebral pathology, admitted to the intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundgren, P.C.; Reinstrup, P.; Romner, B.; Holtaas, S.; Maly, P.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of our retrospective study was to determine the extent to which diffusion- and perfusion- weighted MRI combined with conventional MRI could be helpful in the evaluation of intensive care unit (ICU) patients who have unknown or unclear cerebral pathology underlying a serious clinical condition. Twenty-one ICU patients with disparity between the findings on brain CT scan and their clinical status were studied. All patients underwent conventional MR and diffusion-weighted imaging and 14 also had MR perfusion studies. Abnormalities were present on diffusion-weighted imaging of 17 of the 21 patients and on perfusion-weighted studies of 7 of 14 patients. The MRI results changed the preliminary/working diagnosis in six patients. In eight other patients, MRI revealed additional pathology that had not been suspected clinically, and/or characterized more closely findings that had already been detected by CT or suspected clinically. MRI showed abnormalities in four of the five patients who had normal CT. MRI findings suggested a negative clinical outcome in all nine patients who subsequently died. MRI findings also suggested positive long-term outcome in five of nine patients who improved significantly as based on Glasgow and extended Glasgow outcome scales. In the three unconscious patients who had normal diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging the clinical outcome was good. This study suggests that MRI in seriously ill ICU patients with unclear cerebral pathology can provide information that changes, characterizes, or supports diagnoses and/or prognoses and therefore facilitates further management. (orig.)

  14. ANALISA OPTIMALISASI TEKNIK ESTIMASI DAN KOMPENSASI GERAK PADA ENKODER VIDEO H.263

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oka Widyantara

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Mode baseline encoder video H.263 menerapkan teknik estimasi dan kompensasi gerak dengan satu vector gerak untuk setiap macroblock. Prosedur area pencarian menggunakan pencarian penuh dengan akurasi setengah pixel pada bidang [16,15.5] membuat prediksi di tepian frame tidak dapat diprediksi dengan baik. Peningkatan unjuk kerja pengkodean prediksi interframe encoder video H.263 dengan optimalisasi teknik estimasi dan kompensasi gerak diimplementasikan dengan penambahan area pencarian [31.5,31.5] (unrestricted motion vector, Annex D dan 4 motion vector (advanced prediction mode, Annex F. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa advanced mode mampu meningkatkan nilai SNR sebesar 0.03 dB untuk sequence video claire, 0.2 dB untuk sequence video foreman, 0.041 dB untuk sequence video Glasgow, dan juga mampu menurunkan bit rate pengkodean sebesar 2.3 % untuk video Claire, 15.63 % untuk video Foreman,  dan 9.8% untuk video Glasgow dibandingkan dengan implementasi 1 motion vector pada pengkodean baseline mode.

  15. Locating the fourth helix: Rethinking the role of civil society in developing smart learning cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowska, Katarzyna; Osborne, Michael

    2018-06-01

    In the Global North and increasingly in the Global South, smart city technologies are enthusiastically seen as a solution to urban problems and as an alternative to austerity. However, to move beyond a narrow technological focus, it is necessary to explore the degree to which smart initiatives are committed to building socially inclusive innovation with learning at its core. Using the particular case of the Future City Demonstrator Initiative in Glasgow, United Kingdom, the most high-profile initiative of its kind funded by government, the authors of this article assess the extent to which this smart city adopts such an inclusive approach. They use the quadruple helix model (government - academia - industry - civil society) as a starting point and develop an analytic framework composed of four strands: (1) supporting participation of citizens in decision-making; (2) implementing technological innovation which positions citizens as active users; (3) implementing technological innovation to benefit the community; and (4) evaluating technological innovation in the light of the experiences and needs of citizens. Unlike most analyses, the principal focus of this article is on the fourth element of the helix, civil society. The authors argue that Glasgow's rhetoric of smart urbanism, while aspiring to problem-solving, devalues certain principles of human agency. They emphasise that urban change, including the city's desire to become technologically innovative, would more fully facilitate active citizenship, social inclusion and learning opportunities for all if it were underpinned by the broader conceptions and frameworks of learning cities.

  16. CT findings of traumatic primary brain-stem injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosaka, Yasuaki; Hatashita, Shizuo; Bandou, Kuniaki; Ueki, Yasuyuki; Abe, Kouzou; Koga, Nobunori; Sugimura, Jun; Sakakibara, Tokiwa; Takagi, Suguru

    1984-01-01

    A series of 27 consecutive patients with traumatic primary brain stem injuries was studied. They were diagnosed by means of clinical signs, neurological examination, and computerized tomography (CT). The CT findings of the brain-stem lesions were classified into 4 types: Type H, spotty, high-density; Type H and L, high- and low-densities; Type L, low-density; Type I, isodensity. The Glasgow coma scale (GCS), neurological findings on admission, CT findings (findings in the brain stem, obliteration of perimesencephalic cistern (PMC), and other findings), and the Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) were examined. In the 9 cases of Type H, there was a correlation between the GCS and the GOS, and the spotty, high-density lesions were localized mainly in the dorsal and/or ventral midbrain parenchyma, but these lesions did not show focal signs and symptoms. Without an obliteration of the PMC, Type-H patients did not always have a bad outcome. In the 4 cases of Type H and L, the 2 cases of Type L, and the 12 cases of Type I, there was an obliteration of the PMC. All of the these cases had a bad outcome (1 case of moderate disability, 3 cases of severe disability, and 14 cases of death). The mechanism producing a spotty, high-density area was discussed. The weaker impact (than the other types) and individual anatomical differences weresupposed to make for a spotty, high-density are in the brain stem. (author)

  17. Oral antioxidant therapy for marginal dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blades, K J; Patel, S; Aidoo, K E

    2001-07-01

    To assess the efficacy of an orally administered antioxidant dietary supplement for managing marginal dry eye. A prospective, randomised, placebo controlled trial with cross-over. Eye Clinic, Department of Vision Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University. Forty marginal dry eye sufferers composed of 30 females and 10 males (median age 53 y; range 38-69 y). Baseline assessments were made of tear volume sufficiency (thread test), tear quality (stability), ocular surface status (conjunctival impression cytology) and dry eye symptoms (questionnaire). Each subject was administered courses of active treatment, placebo and no treatment, in random order for 1 month each and results compared to baseline. Tear stability and ocular surface status were significantly improved following active treatment (Ptreatment (P>0.05). Absolute increase in tear stability correlated with absolute change in goblet cell population density. Tear volume was not improved following any treatment period and dry eye symptom responses were subject to placebo effect. Oral antioxidants improved both tear stability and conjunctival health, although it is not yet understood whether increased ocular surface health mediates increased tear stability or vice versa. This study was supported by a PhD scholarship funded by the Department of Vision Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, Scotland. Antioxidant supplements and placebos were kindly donated by Vitabiotics.

  18. Functional and social results of osseointegrated hearing aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada MORENO-ALARCÓN

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Osseointegrated implants are nowadays a good therapeutic option for patients suffering from transmission or mixed hearing loss. The aims of this study are both to assess audiology benefits for patients with osseointegrated implants and quantify the change in their quality of life. Method: The study included 10 patients who were implanted in our hospital between March 2013 and September 2014. The instrument used to quantify their quality of life was the Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI and a questionnaire including three questions: use of implant, postoperative pain and whether they would recommend the operation to other patients. Audiology assessment was performed through tone audiometry and free field speech audiometric testing. Results: The average total benefit score with the Glasgow Benefit Inventory was +58, and the general, social and physical scores were +75, +18 and +29, respectively. The improvement with the implant regarding free-field tonal audiometry at the frequencies of 500, 1000 and 2000 Hz was found to be statistically significant, as was the difference between verbal audiometry before and after implantation. Discussion: Improvements in surgical technique for osseointegrated implants, at present minimally invasive, foregrounds the assessment of functional and social aspects as a measure of their effectiveness. Conclusions: The use of the osseointegrated implant is related to an important improvement in the audiological level, especially in patients with conductive or mixed hearing loss, together with a great change in the quality of life of implanted patients.

  19. Intraoperative Secondary Insults During Orthopedic Surgery in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algarra, Nelson N; Lele, Abhijit V; Prathep, Sumidtra; Souter, Michael J; Vavilala, Monica S; Qiu, Qian; Sharma, Deepak

    2017-07-01

    Secondary insults worsen outcomes after traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, data on intraoperative secondary insults are sparse. The primary aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of intraoperative secondary insults during orthopedic surgery after moderate-severe TBI. We also examined the impact of intraoperative secondary insults on postoperative head computed tomographic scan, intracranial pressure (ICP), and escalation of care within 24 hours of surgery. We reviewed medical records of TBI patients 18 years and above with Glasgow Coma Scale score Secondary insults examined were: systemic hypotension (systolic blood pressurehypertension (ICP>20 mm Hg), cerebral hypotension (cerebral perfusion pressure40 mm Hg), hypocarbia (end-tidal CO2hypertension), hyperglycemia (glucose>200 mg/dL), hypoglycemia (glucose38°C). A total of 78 patients (41 [18 to 81] y, 68% male) met the inclusion criteria. The most common intraoperative secondary insults were systemic hypotension (60%), intracranial hypertension and cerebral hypotension (50% and 45%, respectively, in patients with ICP monitoring), hypercarbia (32%), and hypocarbia (29%). Intraoperative secondary insults were associated with worsening of head computed tomography, postoperative decrease of Glasgow Coma Scale score by ≥2, and escalation of care. After Bonferroni correction, association between cerebral hypotension and postoperative escalation of care remained significant (Psecondary insults were common during orthopedic surgery in patients with TBI and were associated with postoperative escalation of care. Strategies to minimize intraoperative secondary insults are needed.

  20. Three-Dimensional Assessment of Early Surgical Outcome in Repaired Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate: Part 1. Nasal changes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ayoub, Ashraf

    2010-08-11

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate 3D nasal morphology following primary reconstruction in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate relative to contemporaneous non-cleft data Design: Prospective, cross-sectional, controlled study. Setting: Glasgow Dental Hospital & School, Faculty of Medicine, Glasgow University Patients and Participants: Two groups of 3-year old children (21 with unilateral cleft lip and palate and 96 controls) with facial images taken using a 3D vision based capture technique. Methods: 3D images of the face were reflected so the cleft was on the left side to create a homogenous group for statistical analysis. Three-dimensional co-ordinates of anthropometric landmarks were extracted from facial images by a single operator. A set of linear measurements was utilised to compare cleft and control subjects on right and left sides, adjusting for sex differences Results: the mean nasal base width and the width of the nostril floor on right and left sides differed significantly between control and Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate (UCLP) groups. The measurements were greater in UCLP children. The difference in the mean nasal height and mean nasal projection between the groups were not statistically significant. Mean columellar lengths were different between the left and right sides in UCLP cases. Conclusions: There were significant nasal deformities following the surgical repair of UCLP. Keywords: child, cleft lip and palate, three-dimensional imaging.

  1. Prognostic Impact of Health Care-Associated Meningitis in Adults with Intracranial Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Onaizah B; Srihawan, Chanunya; Salazar, Lucrecia; Hasbun, Rodrigo

    2017-11-01

    Health care-associated meningitis and ventriculitis (HCAMV) occurs in adults with intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) and is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, but the prognostic impact of this infectious complication in a controlled matched study of ICH is unknown. We conducted a case-control study of adult patients with ICH and HCAMV at a large tertiary care hospital in Houston, Texas, from 2003 to 2016. Cases were defined as patients with ICH and HCAMV as documented by a positive cerebrospinal fluid culture. Controls were defined as patients with ICH without evidence of HCAMV. An adverse clinical outcome was defined as a Glasgow Outcome Scale score of ≤4. This study included 120 patients with ICH; 40 patients also had HCAMV, whereas 80 patients had ICH with no evidence of HCAMV. Cases and controls were appropriately matched by age, Glasgow Coma Scale score, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score (P > 0.05). Patients with ICH and meningitis had more comorbidities, higher rates of abnormal neurologic examination, hypoglycorrhachia, and elevated cerebrospinal fluid lactate levels (P < 0.05). Adverse clinical outcomes were greater in patients with HCAMV and ICH than in patients with ICH alone (83% vs. 30%; P < 0.001). On logistic regression analysis, independent risk factors associated with an adverse outcome were HCAMV and mechanical ventilation (P < 0.05). HCAMV has a significant prognostic impact in adults with ICH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure in Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depreitere, Bart; Bruyninckx, Dominike; Güiza, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    The literature on intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring in meningitis is limited to case reports and a handful of descriptive series. The aim of this study is to investigate relationships among ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and outcome in meningitis and to identify whether ICP affected clinical decisions. Between 1999 and 2011, a total of 17 patients with meningitis underwent ICP monitoring at the University Hospitals Leuven. Charts were reviewed for clinical history, ICP/CPP data, imaging findings, and Glasgow Outcome Scale score. Univariate correlations were computed for outcome and ICP/CPP variables, computed tomography characteristics, and Corticosteroid Randomization After Significant Head Injury outcome model variables. Treatment decisions were assessed regarding whether or not they were based on ICP. At drain placement, Glasgow Coma Scale scores showed a median of 8 (range 3-12). Six of 17 patients had either one or two nonreactive pupils. Significant correlations with outcome were found for the highest documented ICP value (r = -0.70), the number of episodes when CPP meningitis high ICP and low CPP represent secondary insults. The poor condition of the patients illustrates that the level of suspicion for increased ICP in meningitis may not be high enough.

  3. Clinical Course Score (CCS): a new clinical score to evaluate efficacy of neurotrauma treatment in traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandner, Sebastian; Kellermann, Isabel; Hore, Nirjhar; Bozhkov, Yavor; Buchfelder, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neurotrauma continues to represent a challenging public health issue requiring continual improvement in therapeutic approaches. As no such current system exists, we present in this study the Clinical Course Score (CCS) as a new clinical score to evaluate the efficacy of neurotrauma treatment. The CCS was calculated in neurotrauma patients to be the difference between the grade of the Glasgow Outcome Scale 6 months after discharge from our department and the grade of a 1 to 5 point reduced Glasgow Coma Scale on admission. We assessed the CCS in a total of 248 patients (196 traumatic brain injury [TBI] patients and 52 subarachnoid hemorrhage [SAH] patients) who were treated in our Department of Neurosurgery between January 2011 and December 2012. We found negative CCS grades both in mild TBI and in mild SAH patients. In patients with severe TBI or SAH, we found positive CCS grades. In SAH patients, we found higher CCS scores in younger patients compared with elderly subjects in both mild and severe cases. The CCS can be useful in evaluating different therapeutic approaches during neurotrauma therapy. This new score might improve assessment of beneficial effects of therapeutic procedures.

  4. Clinical, biochemical and microbiological factors associated with the prognosis of pneumococcal meningitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Iolanda; Calzada, Yolanda; Monfort, Laura; Vila-Pérez, David; Felipe, Aida; Ortiz, Jessica; Cambra, Francisco José; Muñoz-Almagro, Carmen

    2016-02-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis (PM) has a high morbidity and mortality. The aim of the study was to evaluate what factors are related to a poor PM prognosis. Prospective observational study conducted on patients admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit in a tertiary hospital with a diagnosis of PM (January 2000 to December 2013). Clinical, biochemical and microbiological data were recorded. Variable outcome was classified into good or poor (neurological handicap or death). A multivariate logistic regression was performed based on the univariate analysis of significant data. A total of 88 patients were included. Clinical variables statistically significant for a poor outcome were younger age (p=.008), lengthy fever (p=.016), sepsis (p=.010), lower Glasgow Score (pbiochemical variables were higher level of C-reactive protein (pindicators of poor outcome were age less than 2 years (p=.011), high score on SOFA (p=.030), low Glasgow Score (p=.042), and severe hypoglycorrhachia (p=.009). Patients younger than 2 years of age, with depressed consciousness at admission, especially when longer mechanical ventilation is required, are at high risk of a poor outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  5. The clinical significance of isolated loss of lordosis on cervical spine computed tomography in blunt trauma patients: a prospective evaluation of 1,007 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejaddam, Ali Y; Kaafarani, Haytham M A; Ramly, Elie P; Avery, Laura L; Yeh, Dante D; King, David R; de Moya, Marc A; Velmahos, George C

    2015-11-01

    A negative computed tomographic (CT) scan may be used to rule out cervical spine (c-spine) injury after trauma. Loss of lordosis (LOL) is frequently found as the only CT abnormality. We investigated whether LOL should preclude c-spine clearance. All adult trauma patients with isolated LOL at our Level I trauma center (February 1, 2011 to May 31, 2012) were prospectively evaluated. The primary outcome was clinically significant injury on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), flexion-extension views, and/or repeat physical examination. Of 3,333 patients (40 ± 17 years, 60% men) with a c-spine CT, 1,007 (30%) had isolated LOL. Among 841 patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15, no abnormalities were found on MRI, flexion-extension views, and/or repeat examinations, and all collars were removed. Among 166 patients with Glasgow Coma Scale less than 15, 3 (.3%) had minor abnormal MRI findings but no clinically significant injury. Isolated LOL on c-spine CT is not associated with a clinically significant injury and should not preclude c-spine clearance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Nuclear and particle physics 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacGregor, I.J.D.; Doyle, A.T.

    1993-01-01

    This item documents the International Conference on Nuclear and Particle Physics held at the University of Glasgow, UK, from 30th March to 1st April 1993. It was organised by the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Glasgow University on behalf of the Nuclear and Particle Physics Division of the Institute of Physics. The scientific programme covered many areas of current interest in nuclear and particle physics. Particle physics topics included up to the minute reports on the physics currently coming from CERN'S Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR), Hadron-Elektron-Ring Analage (HERA) and Large Electron-Positron Storage Rings (LEP), and reviews of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) lattice gauge theory. Looking to the future the programme covered the search for the Higgs boson and a review of physics experiments planned for the new generation of accelerators at Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Superconducting Supercollider (SSC). The conference coincided with the final closure of the world class Nuclear Structure Facility at Daresbury and marked the transition of United Kingdom (UK) nuclear physics research into a new era of international collaboration. Several talks described new international collaborative research programmes in nuclear physics initiated by UK scientists. The conference also heard of new areas of nuclear physics which will in future be opened up by high energy continuous beam electron accelerators and by radioactive ion beam accelerators. (author)

  7. Unsteady aerodynamic modelling of wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coton, F.N.; Galbraith, R.A. [Univ. og Glasgow, Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    The following current and future work is discussed: Collaborative wind tunnel based PIV project to study wind turbine wake structures in head-on and yawed flow. Prescribed wake model has been embedded in a source panel representation of the wind tunnel walls to allow comparison with experiment; Modelling of tower shadow using high resolution but efficient vortex model in tower shadow domain; Extension of model to yawing flow; Upgrading and tuning of unsteady aerodynamic model for low speed, thick airfoil flows. Glasgow has a considerable collection of low speed dynamic stall data. Currently, the Leishman - Beddoes model is not ideally suited to such flows. For example: Range of stall onset criteria used for dynamic stall prediction including Beddoes. Wide variation of stall onset prediction. Beddoes representation was developed primarily with reference to compressible flows. Analyses of low speed data from Glasgow indicate deficiencies in the current model; Predicted versus measured response during ramp down motion. Modification of the Beddoes representation is required to obtain a fit with the measured data. (EG)

  8. Bilateral cortical atrophy after severe brain trauma and extradural homatoma Atrofia cortical bilateral após traumatismo cranioencefálico grave e hematoma extradural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Louzada

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a severe head injured 43-year old male patient with a large extradural hematoma, Glasgow Coma Scale 3 and dilated fixed pupils. Patient was promptly submitted to surgical evacuation of the lesion, but remained in persistent vegetative state in the post-operative time. Head computed tomography scans performed before surgery, and at early and late post-operative periods comparatively revealed extreme bilateral cortical atrophy. Late consequences of severe head trauma drastically affect the prognosis of patients, being its prevention, and neuroprotection against secondary injury still a therapeutical challenge for neurosurgeons.Relatamos o caso de um paciente de 43 anos, com traumatismo cranioencefálico grave, com grande hematoma extradural, Escala de Coma de Glasgow 3 e pupilas fixas e dilatadas. O paciente foi prontamente submetido à evacuação cirúrgica da lesão mas permaneceu em estado vegetativo persistente no período pós-operatório. As TC de crânio realizadas antes da cirurgia e nos períodos pós-operatórios precoce e tardio revelaram comparativamente extrema atrofia cerebral bilateral. As conseqüências tardias do traumatismo craniano grave afetam drasticamente o prognóstico dos pacientes, sendo sua prevenção, e a neuroproteção contra a injúria secundária ainda um desafio terapêutico para os neurocirurgiões.

  9. Obituary: Gordon Donaldson Obituary: Gordon Donaldson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegrum, Colin; Campbell, Archie; Hampshire, Damian

    2013-07-01

    Gordon Donaldson died in Glasgow on 28 November 2012 at the age of 71. He was born in Edinburgh and brought up and educated in Glasgow, which was his home city for much of his life. He was educated first at Glasgow Academy, and then with a scholarship at Christ's College Cambridge. Here he read Natural Sciences, finishing with first class honors in Physics. He then did a PhD on tunneling in superconductors in the Mond Laboratory, supervised by John Adkins. These were interesting times, since type II superconductors had only recently been identified, and the Mond was a leading player in the physics of vortices and other quantum effects. It was headed by Pippard and Shoenberg, and colleagues around that time were Brian Josephson, John Clarke, Colin Gough and John Waldram. On finishing his PhD in 1966 Gordon went straight to a lectureship at the University of Lancaster. In 1975 during a sabbatical at the University of California, Berkeley, with John Clarke's group, Gordon co-invented thin-film gradiometers with integrated DC SQUIDs. He then moved back to Glasgow, to the Department of Applied Physics at Strathclyde University, where he founded a new research group to make and use superconducting devices, especially SQUIDs and gradiometers. From modest beginnings the group grew steadily, acquiring new facilities and members, until in the 1990s it had over 20 members and a host of collaborators from elsewhere in Glasgow and abroad. With funding from the Wellcome Trust, Gordon and colleagues at Glasgow University and the Southern General Hospital in Glasgow set up a new biomagnetism facility in 1998 on the hospital campus to use SQUID gradiometers made at Strathclyde for measurements on patients and volunteers. Another of his main research interests was the use of SQUIDs for nondestructive evaluation (NDE). This started in the days before high temperature superconductors (HTS) with wire-wound gradiometers and niobium SQUIDs, soon moving on to miniature thin-film niobium

  10. Two Different Percutaneous Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid Abutment Systems: Comparative Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Beldan; İşeri, Mete; Orhan, Kadir Serkan; Yılmazer, Ayça Başkadem; Enver, Necati; Ceylan, Didem; Kara, Ahmet; Güldiken, Yahya; Çomoğlu, Şenol

    2016-04-01

    To compare two different percutaneous bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) abutment systems regarding operation time, scar healing, quality of life, implant stability, audiologic results, and complications. The study involves a prospective multi-center clinical evaluation. Thirty-two consecutive patients who had undergone BAHA surgery from January 2011 to January 2013 in two tertiary centers were included in the study. The Glasgow Inventory Benefit Score was used to assess the patients at least 6 months after surgery. The operation time and complications were recorded. Implant stability quotient (ISQ) values were recorded using resonance frequency analysis. Holger's classification was used to evaluate skin reactions. The mean length of the operation was 39.2±4 min for standard abutment and 18.3±5.7 min for hydroxyapatite-coated abutment. ISQ scores were significantly better for standard abutment in all tests. The mean total Glasgow Inventory Benefit Score was 39.3±19 for the standard abutment and 46.3±24.5 for the hydroxyapatite-coated abutment groups, but there was no statistical significance between the two groups. There was no difference in audiological improvement between the two groups after surgery. Hydroxyapatite-coated abutment provided a shorter operation time that was significantly different from standard abutment. There were no significant differences between standard abutment and hydroxyapatite-coated abutment regarding audiologic improvement, quality of life, loading time, and complications.

  11. Intracranial traumatic lesion risk factors in elderly patients with minor head injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochi, Masato; Hori, Shigeaki

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a retrospective analysis of the risk factors of intracranial traumatic lesions in elderly patients with minor head injury. Sixty-nine elderly patients with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores of 13-15 after head injury who had presented within 24 hours of trauma and admitted to hospital were included in this study. The indications for admission were a GCS score of 13 or 14 on presentation, loss of consciousness, retrograde or posttraumatic amnesia, local neurological deficit, severe headache and vomiting, dangerous mechanism of injury, skull fracture and abnormal CT findings. The relationship between the clinical findings and intracranial traumatic lesions was analized by univariate and multivariate analysis. The relationship between the clinical findings and surgical intervention was also analized by the same methods in those who had intracranial traumatic lesions. The mean and median age of patients were 81.1 and 83 years, respectively. Of 69 patients, 41 had intracranial traumatic lesions present on their CT scan. Of these, 6 needed surgical intervention. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 13 and a loss of consciousness at injury were identified as independent risk factors of intracranial traumatic lesions in elderly patients with minor head injury and a dangerous mechanism of injury was identified as an independent risk factor of surgical intervention in those who had traumatic intracranial lesions. Our results offer useful information for evaluating patients with minor head injury in Japan's aging society. (author)

  12. Increased Transfusion of Fresh Frozen Plasma is Associated with Mortality or Worse Functional Outcomes After Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Min; Li, Rui; Zhao, Xiao-Chun; Zhang, Qian; Luo, Xing-Liao

    2017-08-01

    The fresh frozen plasma (FFP) transfusion threshold and timing for traumatic brain injury (TBI)-associated coagulopathy are controversial. Thus, a multicenter retrospective study was conducted to determine whether or not FFP transfusion is associated with poor outcomes after severe TBI. Data from decompressive craniotomy after blunt force trauma that took place between December 2013 and June 2016 were collected in a multicenter chart. The primary outcomes were mortality and survival, as well as worse outcomes (defined as a Glasgow Outcome Scale [GOS] score ≤3) and better outcomes (GOS score ≥4). Secondary outcomes included 90-day survival rates in all patients with or without FFP transfusion, as well as length of hospital stay in patients with a better prognosis (GOS score ≥4). Univariate analysis, bivariate logistic regression, Spearman rank correlation, and Kaplan-Meier analysis were performed to account for the association between perioperative FFP transfusion and different outcomes. Bivariate logistic analysis showed that mortality and worse outcomes were correlated with FFP transfusion and Glasgow Coma Scale score (P < 0.05). Kaplan-Meier analysis suggested that mortality was statistically higher in the FFP transfusion groups compared with the no FFP transfusion groups, regardless of the severity of TBI (P < 0.05). The overall complications, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and pneumonia rate were significantly higher for patients receiving FFP transfusion (P < 0.05). Increased perioperative FFP infusion was independently associated with mortality or worse outcomes across a spectrum of surgical risk profiles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Homeopathic treatment for prolonged postoperative coma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vithoulkas, G; Văcăraș, V; Kavouras, J; Buzoianu, A D; Mărginean, M; Văcăraș, D; Cozma, S

    2017-01-01

    Coma is the state of unrousable unconsciousness. There are variations in the degree of coma and the findings and signs found on the patient's clinical examination depend on the underlying cause of the disorder. The Glasgow Coma scale evaluates the best motor, verbal and eye answers of the patient. A patient is considered to be in a coma if his Glasgow Coma Scale is below 8 points. The progress that we have made throughout the years has also led to complications that can culminate in a major catastrophe like death, permanent brain damage, coma. A study performed reached the conclusion that prior comorbidity, older age, intraoperative hypotension, and cardiovascular surgery may predispose patients to postoperative coma. The article presents a case of postoperative coma treated successfully with homeopathy. Although a rare complication, postoperative coma is a severe, death-leading condition, causing immense suffering on both the patient and the patient's family. A multidisciplinary and thorough approach is necessary for these patients, but even after a well-conducted therapy, this condition leads to the death of the patient.

  14. Poor outcome prediction by burst suppression ratio in adults with post-anoxic coma without hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qinglin; Su, Yingying; Hussain, Mohammed; Chen, Weibi; Ye, Hong; Gao, Daiquan; Tian, Fei

    2014-05-01

    Burst suppression ratio (BSR) is a quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) parameter. The purpose of our study was to compare the accuracy of BSR when compared to other EEG parameters in predicting poor outcomes in adults who sustained post-anoxic coma while not being subjected to therapeutic hypothermia. EEG was registered and recorded at least once within 7 days of post-anoxic coma onset. Electrodes were placed according to the international 10-20 system, using a 16-channel layout. Each EEG expert scored raw EEG using a grading scale adapted from Young and scored amplitude-integrated electroencephalography tracings, in addition to obtaining qEEG parameters defined as BSR with a defined threshold. Glasgow outcome scales of 1 and 2 at 3 months, determined by two blinded neurologists, were defined as poor outcome. Sixty patients with Glasgow coma scale score of 8 or less after anoxic accident were included. The sensitivity (97.1%), specificity (73.3%), positive predictive value (82.5%), and negative prediction value (95.0%) of BSR in predicting poor outcome were higher than other EEG variables. BSR1 and BSR2 were reliable in predicting death (area under the curve > 0.8, P coma who do not undergo therapeutic hypothermia when compared to other qEEG parameters.

  15. A Feasibility Randomised Controlled Trial of the New Orleans Intervention for Infant Mental Health: A Study Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Pritchett

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Child maltreatment is associated with life-long social, physical, and mental health problems. Intervening early to provide maltreated children with safe, nurturing care can improve outcomes. The need for prompt decisions about permanent placement (i.e., regarding adoption or return home is internationally recognised. However, a recent Glasgow audit showed that many maltreated children “revolve” between birth families and foster carers. This paper describes the protocol of the first exploratory randomised controlled trial of a mental health intervention aimed at improving placement permanency decisions for maltreated children. This trial compares an infant's mental health intervention with the new enhanced service as usual for maltreated children entering care in Glasgow. As both are new services, the trial is being conducted from a position of equipoise. The outcome assessment covers various fields of a child’s neurodevelopment to identify problems in any ESSENCE domain. The feasibility, reliability, and developmental appropriateness of all outcome measures are examined. Additionally, the potential for linkage with routinely collected data on health and social care and, in the future, education is explored. The results will inform a definitive randomised controlled trial that could potentially lead to long lasting benefits for the Scottish population and which may be applicable to other areas of the world. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NC01485510.

  16. Una riconsiderazione sul ripostiglio di S'Adde 'e S'Ulumu-Usini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Merella

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this poster the author presents the results of a study on several pieces of ashlar masonry were recently discovered in a locale called S'Iscia 'e Su Puttu, indicating the likely presence of sacred place belonging to the Nuragic - Bronze and Early Iron Age - phase. It is located very close to the site of S'Adde 'e S'Ulumu, where an important hoard of bronze objects was found, once considered to belong to a single individual for the absence of any clear archaeological context. This hoard acquires a new dimension thanks to the new data presented here: it could have reasonably been part of a set of ritual activities carried out in a sacred area formed of buildings and spaces between them, a common pattern in Sardinian communities during the Early Iron phase. This poster was presented at the Workshop Materiali e contesti dell'Età del Ferro sarda (Materials and contexts in the Sardinian Iron Age, organised by the University of Glasgow and the Comune di San Vero Milis on the 25th of May 2012, and supported for by the Royal Society of Edinburgh, the Comune di San Vero Milis, the University of Glasgow and the Carnegie Trust of the Universities of Scotland.

  17. Comparison of an inflammation-based prognostic score (GPS) with performance status (ECOG-ps) in patients receiving palliative chemotherapy for gastroesophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumley, Andrew B C; Stuart, Robert C; McKernan, Margaret; McDonald, Alexander C; McMillan, Donald C

    2008-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare an inflammation-based prognostic score (Glasgow Prognostic Score, GPS) with performance status (ECOG-ps) in patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy for palliation of gastroesophageal cancer. Sixty-five patients presenting with gastroesophageal carcinoma to the Royal Infirmary, Glasgow between January 1999 and December 2005 and who received palliative chemotherapy or chemo-radiotherapy were studied. ECOG-ps, C-reactive protein, and albumin were recorded at diagnosis. Patients with both an elevated C-reactive protein (>10 mg/L) and hypoalbuminemia (L) were allocated a GPS of 2. Patients in whom only one of these biochemical abnormalities was present were allocated a GPS of 1 and patients with a normal C-reactive protein and albumin were allocated a score of 0. Toxicity was recorded using the Common Toxicity Criteria. The minimum follow up was 14 months. During the follow-up period, 59 (91%) of the patients died. On univariate and multivariate survival analysis, only the GPS (hazard ratios 1.65, 95% CI 1.10-2.47, P GPS of 0, those patients with a GPS of 1 or 2 required more frequent chemotherapy dose reduction (P GPS, appears to be superior to the subjective assessment of performance status (ECOG-ps) in predicting the response to platinum-based chemotherapy in patients with advanced gastroesophageal cancer.

  18. Role of skull radiography in the initial evaluation of minor head injury: a retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murshid, W.R.

    1994-01-01

    The use of skull radiography in the initial evaluation of minor head injured patients is controversial. In an attempt to evaluate its benefits, a retrospective study of 566 cases subjected to skull radiography following close minor head trauma (Glasgow Coma Scale 13-15), is presented. A skull fracture (linear vault, depressed or base of skull) was present in 64 (11%) cases. Only three (5%) who were found to have a skull fracture on skull radiography developed an intracranial injury which required surgery. Intracranial injuries developed in 19 (3%) cases and were followed by surgery in six (32%). All, except for one case, had a decreased level of consciousness and a Glasgow Coma Scale less than 15, few had focal neurological deficits. Management had not been altered by the results of skull radiography in any of the cases. We concluded that skull radiographs are unnecessary for the decision process in closed minor head injury because management decisions are based primarily on a careful neurological examination. When intracranial injuries are a concern, a CT scan should be obtained. (author)

  19. Denmark in Scotland: The energy and housing market 1988. Danmark i Skotland: Energi- og boligmarkedet 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joergensen, K

    1988-02-01

    A Danish architect and planning firm, ''Praxis'' (Aarhus), and the Scottish firm ''Heatwise'' (Glasgow), backed up by the Ministry of Housing, the Scottish Development Agency and the European Communities, have cooperated in order to examine the Scottish market for Danish ''know-how'' concerning energy conservation and efficiency in relation to the heating of residential buildings. Danish experts could also advise on energy policy and planning and renewable energy sources. The buildings on a large peripheral housing estate were examined in detail, especially with regard to heat losses caused by insufficient insulation and inefficient heating systems. it was discovered that the cost of raising the standard of heating in Scottish residences to that of the average Danish ones would be approximately 7 milliard pounds including necessary general repairs and upheep. There are also many barriers to development inspired by Danish know-how and technology - some being the lack of economical resources and as Glasgow is a town with great poverty problems, other needs hold higher priority amongst its inhabitants. However cooperation between the Danish and English firms will continue. (AB).

  20. 16th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories and Future Neutrino Beam Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    These proceedings present the written contributions from participants of the 16th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories and Future Neutrino Beam Facilities (NUFACT 2014) that was held at the University of Glasgow (Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom) from 25-30 August 2014. This edition of the NUFACT annual meetings, which started in 1999, consisted of 24 plenary and 92 parallel talks and various poster sessions, with the participation of 124 delegates. Furthermore, the International Neutrino Summer School 2014 was held from 10-22 August 2014 at St Andrews, Scotland, in the two weeks before NUFACT 2014. It was intended for young scientists with an interest in neutrino physics in such a way that they would be able to participate and contribute to the NUFACT workshop as well. The objectives of the NUFACT workshops are to review progress on different studies for future accelerator-based neutrino oscillation facilities, with the goal to discover the mass hierarchy of neutrinos, CP violation in the leptonic s...

  1. A Prospective Randomized Study of Brain Tissue Oxygen Pressure-Guided Management in Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Min Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of PbtO2-guided therapy with traditional intracranial pressure- (ICP- guided treatment on the management of cerebral variables, therapeutic interventions, survival rates, and neurological outcomes of moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI patients. From 2009 to 2010, TBI patients with a Glasgow coma scale 20 mmHg, and 27 patients were treated with ICP-guided therapy (ICP 60 mmHg in the neurosurgical intensive care unit (NICU; demographic characteristics were similar across groups. The survival rate in the PbtO2-guided group was also significantly increased at 3 and 6 months after injury. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between the PbtO2 signal and Glasgow outcome scale-extended in patients from 1 to 6 months after injury. This finding demonstrates that therapy directed by PbtO2 monitoring is valuable for the treatment of patients with moderate and severe TBI and that increasing PaO2 to 150 mmHg may be efficacious for preventing cerebral hypoxic events after brain trauma.

  2. Surgery for bilateral large intracranial traumatic hematomas: evacuation in a single session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompheak, Heng; Hwang, Sun-Chul; Kim, Dong-Sung; Shin, Dong-Sung; Kim, Bum-Tae

    2014-06-01

    Management guidelines for single intracranial hematomas have been established, but the optimal management of multiple hematomas has little known. We present bilateral traumatic supratentorial hematomas that each has enough volume to be evacuated and discuss how to operate effectively it in a single anesthesia. In total, 203 patients underwent evacuation and/or decompressive craniectomies for acute intracranial hematomas over 5 years. Among them, only eight cases (3.9%) underwent operations for bilateral intracranial hematomas in a single session. Injury mechanism, initial Glasgow Coma Scale score, types of intracranial lesions, surgical methods, and Glasgow outcome scale were evaluated. The most common injury mechanism was a fall (four cases). The types of intracranial lesions were epidural hematoma (EDH)/intracerebral hematoma (ICH) in five, EDH/EDH in one, EDH/subdural hematoma (SDH) in one, and ICH/SDH in one. All cases except one had an EDH. The EDH was addressed first in all cases. Then, the evacuation of the ICH was performed through a small craniotomy or burr hole. All patients except one survived. Bilateral intracranial hematomas that should be removed in a single-session operation are rare. Epidural hematomas almost always occur in these cases and should be removed first to prevent the hematoma from growing during the surgery. Then, the other hematoma, contralateral to the EDH, can be evacuated with a small craniotomy.

  3. Quantifying white matter structural integrity with high-definition fiber tracking in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presson, Nora; Krishnaswamy, Deepa; Wagener, Lauren; Bird, William; Jarbo, Kevin; Pathak, Sudhir; Puccio, Ava M; Borasso, Allison; Benso, Steven; Okonkwo, David O; Schneider, Walter

    2015-03-01

    There is an urgent, unmet demand for definitive biological diagnosis of traumatic brain injury (TBI) to pinpoint the location and extent of damage. We have developed High-Definition Fiber Tracking, a 3 T magnetic resonance imaging-based diffusion spectrum imaging and tractography analysis protocol, to quantify axonal injury in military and civilian TBI patients. A novel analytical methodology quantified white matter integrity in patients with TBI and healthy controls. Forty-one subjects (23 TBI, 18 controls) were scanned with the High-Definition Fiber Tracking diffusion spectrum imaging protocol. After reconstruction, segmentation was used to isolate bilateral hemisphere homologues of eight major tracts. Integrity of segmented tracts was estimated by calculating homologue correlation and tract coverage. Both groups showed high correlations for all tracts. TBI patients showed reduced homologue correlation and tract spread and increased outlier count (correlations>2.32 SD below control mean). On average, 6.5% of tracts in the TBI group were outliers with substantial variability among patients. Number and summed deviation of outlying tracts correlated with initial Glasgow Coma Scale score and 6-month Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended score. The correlation metric used here can detect heterogeneous damage affecting a low proportion of tracts, presenting a potential mechanism for advancing TBI diagnosis. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  4. Quality of life of patients who underwent aesthetic rhinoplasty: 100 cases assessed with the Glascow Benefit Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotzampasakis, Dimitrios; Piniara, Anastasia; Themelis, Sotirios; Kotzampasakis, Stylianos; Gabriel, Eustratios; Maroudias, Nikos; Nikolopoulos, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to assess the long-term effect of classic rhinoplasty on patients' quality of life. Outcomes research. The study included 100 operated patients; there were 34 males and 66 females. The ages ranged between 23 and 57 years old, with a mean of 36.4 years. A minimum of 3 years between the operation and the study was selected to assess the long-term effect of the operation on the patients' quality of life and exclude any short-term impressions. The time elapsed between surgery and the time of the study ranged from 3 to 13 years, with a mean of 6.8 years. Patients were assessed using the Glasgow Benefit Inventory, which has been proven valid and reliable in ear, nose, and throat interventions. From the 100 patients included in the study, 92 reported improvement in their quality of life due to the operation and only eight worsening. In the social support subscale, 97 patients reported better quality of life, and only three patients reported worse quality of life. The patients' overall life markedly improved, reaching a mean of 80% in the Glasgow Benefit Inventory. The present long-term study using a validated and reliable instrument concludes that rhinoplasty improves the quality of life of patients in all sectors. 2c Laryngoscope, 127:2017-2025, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Increases in cerebrospinal fluid caffeine concentration are associated with favorable outcome after severe traumatic brain injury in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachse, Kathleen T; Jackson, Edwin K; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Gillespie, Delbert G; Puccio, Ava M; Clark, Robert SB; Dixon, C Edward; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive drug and a weak adenosine receptor antagonist, can be neuroprotective or neurotoxic depending on the experimental model or neurologic disorder. However, its contribution to pathophysiology and outcome in traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans is undefined. We assessed serial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of caffeine and its metabolites (theobromine, paraxanthine, and theophylline) by high-pressure liquid chromatography/ultraviolet in 97 ventricular CSF samples from an established bank, from 30 adults with severe TBI. We prospectively selected a threshold caffeine level of ≥1 μmol/L (194 ng/mL) as clinically significant. Demographics, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, admission blood alcohol level, and 6-month dichotomized Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were assessed. Mean time from injury to initial CSF sampling was 10.77±3.13 h. On initial sampling, caffeine was detected in 24 of 30 patients, and the threshold was achieved in 9 patients. Favorable GOS was seen more often in patients with CSF caffeine concentration ≥ versus theobromine and paraxanthine were also associated with favorable outcome (P = 0.018 and 0.056, respectively). Caffeine and its metabolites are commonly detected in CSF in patients with severe TBI and in an exploratory assessment are associated with favorable outcome. We speculate that caffeine may be neuroprotective by long-term upregulation of adenosine A1 receptors or acute inhibition of A2a receptors. PMID:17684518

  6. Surgical Outcome in Patients with Spontaneous Supratentorial Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rendevski Vladimir

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper was to evaluate the surgical outcome in patients with spontaneous supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH after surgical intervention, in respect to the initial clinical conditions, age, sex, hemispheric side and anatomic localization of ICH. Thirty-eight surgically treated patients with spontaneous supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage were included in the study. The surgical outcome was evaluated three months after the initial admission, according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS. The surgical treatment was successful in 14 patients (37%, whereas it was unsuccessful in 24 patients (63%. We have detected a significant negative correlation between the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS scores on admission and the GOS scores after three months, suggesting worse neurological outcome in patients with initially lower GCS scores. The surgical outcome in patients with ICH was not affected by the sex, the hemispheric side and the anatomic localization of ICH, but the age of the patients was estimated as a significant factor for their functional outcome, with younger patients being more likely to be treated successfully. The surgical outcome is affected from the initial clinical state of the patients and their age. The treatment of ICH is still an unsolved clinical problem and the development of new surgical techniques with larger efficiency in the evacuation of the hematoma is necessary, thus making a minimal damage to the normal brain tissue, as well as decreasing the possibility of postoperative bleeding.

  7. Hiding the Complexity: Building a Distributed ATLAS Tier-2 with a Single Resource Interface using ARC Middleware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdie, S; Stewart, G; Skipsey, S; Washbrook, A; Bhimji, W; Filipcic, A; Kenyon, M

    2011-01-01

    Since their inception, Grids for high energy physics have found management of data to be the most challenging aspect of operations. This problem has generally been tackled by the experiment's data management framework controlling in fine detail the distribution of data around the grid and the careful brokering of jobs to sites with co-located data. This approach, however, presents experiments with a difficult and complex system to manage as well as introducing a rigidity into the framework which is very far from the original conception of the grid. In this paper we describe how the ScotGrid distributed Tier-2, which has sites in Glasgow, Edinburgh and Durham, was presented to ATLAS as a single, unified resource using the ARC middleware stack. In this model the ScotGrid 'data store' is hosted at Glasgow and presented as a single ATLAS storage resource. As jobs are taken from the ATLAS PanDA framework, they are dispatched to the computing cluster with the fastest response time. An ARC compute element at each site then asynchronously stages the data from the data store into a local cache hosted at each site. The job is then launched in the batch system and accesses data locally. We discuss the merits of this system compared to other operational models and consider, from the point of view of the resource providers (sites), and from the resource consumers (experiments); and consider issues involved in transitions to this model.

  8. Does semiology of status epilepticus have an impact on treatment response and outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysal-Kirac, Leyla; Feddersen, Berend; Einhellig, Marion; Rémi, Jan; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2018-06-01

    This study investigated whether there is an association between semiology of status epilepticus (SE) and response to treatment and outcome. Two hundred ninety-eight consecutive adult patients (160 females, 138 males) with SE at the University of Munich Hospital were prospectively enrolled. Mean age was 63.2±17.5 (18-97) years. Patient demographics, SE semiology and electroencephalography (EEG) findings, etiology, duration of SE, treatment, and outcome measures were investigated. Status epilepticus semiology was classified according to a semiological status classification. Patient's short-term outcome was determined by Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). The most frequent SE type was nonconvulsive SE (NCSE) (39.2%), mostly associated with cerebrovascular etiology (46.6%). A potentially fatal etiology was found in 34.8% of the patients. More than half (60.7%) of the patients had poor short-term outcome (GOS≤3) with an overall mortality of 12.4%. SE was refractory to treatment in 21.5% of the patients. Older age, potentially fatal etiology, systemic infections, NCSE in coma, refractory SE, treatment with anesthetics, long SE duration (>24h), low Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) (≤8) at onset, and high Status Epilepticus Severity Score (STESS-3) (≥3) were associated with poor short-term outcome and death (pStatus epilepticus semiology has no independent association with outcome, but potentially fatal etiology and low GCS were strong predictive factors for poor short-term outcome of SE. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Reconstructive valve surgery within 10 days of stroke in endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Jai; Ballal, Apoorva; Hota, Bala; Mirza, Sara; Lai, David; Bleck, Thomas; Lateef, Omar

    2016-07-01

    The optimal timing of surgical treatment for infective endocarditis complicated by cerebrovascular events is controversial, largely due to the perceived risk of perioperative intracranial bleeding. Current guidelines suggest waiting 2 weeks between the diagnosis of stroke and surgery. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and neurological outcomes of early surgery following a stroke. This was a single-center retrospective analysis of 12 consecutive patients requiring surgery for infective endocarditis between 2011 and 2014 at Rush University Medical Center, with either ischemic (n = 6) and/or hemorrhagic (n = 6) cerebrovascular complications. All underwent computed tomographic angiography prior to early valve reconstructive surgery to identify potentially actionable neurological findings. Early valve surgery was performed for ongoing sepsis or persistent emboli. Neurologic risk and outcome were assessed pre- and postoperatively using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and the Glasgow Outcome Scale, respectively. All 12 patients underwent surgical treatment within 10 days of the diagnosis of stroke. Mortality in the immediate postoperative period was 8%. Eleven of the 12 patients exhibited good neurological recovery in the immediate postoperative period, with a Glasgow Outcome Scale score ≥ 3. There was no correlation between duration of cardiopulmonary bypass and neurological outcomes. Early cardiac surgery in patients with infective endocarditis and stroke maybe lifesaving with a low neurological risk. Comprehensive neurovascular imaging may help in identifying patient-related risk factors. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Evaluation of scoring models for identifying the need for therapeutic intervention of upper gastrointestinal bleeding: A new prediction score model for Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iino, Chikara; Mikami, Tatsuya; Igarashi, Takasato; Aihara, Tomoyuki; Ishii, Kentaro; Sakamoto, Jyuichi; Tono, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Shinsaku

    2016-11-01

    Multiple scoring systems have been developed to predict outcomes in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. We determined how well these and a newly established scoring model predict the need for therapeutic intervention, excluding transfusion, in Japanese patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. We reviewed data from 212 consecutive patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients requiring endoscopic intervention, operation, or interventional radiology were allocated to the therapeutic intervention group. Firstly, we compared areas under the curve for the Glasgow-Blatchford, Clinical Rockall, and AIMS65 scores. Secondly, the scores and factors likely associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding were analyzed with a logistic regression analysis to form a new scoring model. Thirdly, the new model and the existing model were investigated to evaluate their usefulness. Therapeutic intervention was required in 109 patients (51.4%). The Glasgow-Blatchford score was superior to both the Clinical Rockall and AIMS65 scores for predicting therapeutic intervention need (area under the curve, 0.75 [95% confidence interval, 0.69-0.81] vs 0.53 [0.46-0.61] and 0.52 [0.44-0.60], respectively). Multivariate logistic regression analysis retained seven significant predictors in the model: systolic blood pressure upper gastrointestinal bleeding. © 2016 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  11. Measurement of total cross sections for neutrino and antineutrino charged-current interactions in hydrogen and neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderholz, M.; Corrigan, G.; Hoffmann, E.; Jones, G. T.; Jones, R. W. L.; Kennedy, B. W.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Schmid, P.; Schmitz, N.; Shotton, P. N.; Towers, S. J.; Wittek, W.; Barnham, K. W. J.; Baton, J. P.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Bullock, F. W.; Calicchio, M.; Clayton, E. F.; Coghen, T.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Erriquez, O.; Fitch, P. J.; Fogli-Muciaccia, M. T.; Guy, J. G.; Hamisi, F.; Hulth, P. O.; Kasper, P.; Klein, H.; Lagraa, M.; Marage, P.; Middleton, R. P.; O'Neale, S. W.; Parker, M. A.; Sacton, J.; Sansum, R. A.; Simopoulou, E.; Vallée, C.; Varvell, K.; Vayaki, A.; Venus, W.; Wachmuth, H.; Wells, J.

    1986-06-01

    BEBC filled in turn with hydrogen, and with a neon-hydrogen mixture, was exposed to the CERN SPS wide band neutrino and antineutrino beams. The ratios of the charged-current cross sections per nucleon, σ(νH2)/σ(νNe) and σ(νH2)/σ(νNe), between 20 and 300 GeV were found to be 0.656 +/- 0.020 and 1.425 +/- 0.052, respectively. Multiplying these ratios by the revised cross sections in neon, σ(νNe)/E = (0.723 +/- 0.038) × 10-38 cm2/GeV per nucleon and σ(νNe)/E = (0.351 +/- 0.019) × 10-38 cm2/GeV per nucleon, and their ratio, σ(νNe)/σ(νNe) = 0.485 +/- 0.020,, yields values for the total charged-current cross sections on protons, σ(νp)/E and σ(νp)/E, of (0.474 +/- 0.029) × 10-38 cm2/GeV and (0.500 +/- 0.032) × 10-38 cm2/GeV. respectively, and a value for the ratio σ(νp)/σ(νp) of 1.053 +/- 0.066. Present address: University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK.

  12. Acute extradural haematomas in children: A single neurosurgery unit's 12-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enicker, B; Louw, H; Madiba, T

    2016-11-01

    Acute extradural haematomas (AEDHs) occur infrequently in children. This study was undertaken to review our experience with management and outcomes of this condition in children treated in the Neurosurgery Unit at Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital. A retrospective review of medical records of all children (age less than or equal to (≤) 12 years) with a diagnosis of AEDH admitted from January 2003 to December 2014 was performed. Records were analyzed for demographics, mechanisms of injury, clinical presentation, neuroradiology findings, management and outcomes at discharge. A total of 150 children with AEDHs were admitted during this period. The mean age was 6.6 ± 3.8 years with a peak incidence in the 7-9 year age group. There were 84 (56%) males, (M: F= 1.3:1). Sixty AEDHs resulted from road traffic crashes (40%). On admission 104 (69.3%) children were Glasgow coma scale (GCS) 13-15, 26 (17.3%) GCS 9-12 and 20 (13.4%) GCS 3-8. Haemoglobin was less than (children and the mean hospital stay was 6.9 ± 6.1 days. Four children (2.7%) died during in-hospital stay period. One hundred and forty one (94%) children had a favourable Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) at discharge. AEDHs in children carry a good prognosis, but can be potentially fatal. A vigilant approach is required when assessing these children, as early diagnosis and treatment yields gratifying results.

  13. Traditional systolic blood pressure targets underestimate hypotension-induced secondary brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Megan; Stein, Deborah M; Hu, Peter F; Aarabi, Bizhan; Sheth, Kevin; Scalea, Thomas M

    2012-05-01

    Vital signs, particularly blood pressure, are often manipulated to maximize perfusion and optimize recovery from severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI). We investigated the utility of automated continuously recorded vital signs to predict outcomes after sTBI. Sixty patients with head Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≥ 3, age >14 years, "isolated" TBI, and need for intracranial pressure monitoring were prospectively enrolled at a single, large urban tertiary care facility. Outcome was measured by mortality and extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) at 12 months. Continuous, automated, digital data were collected every 6 seconds for 72 hours after admission, and 5-minute means of systolic blood pressure (SBP) were recorded. We calculated SBP as pressure × time dose (PTD) to describe the cumulative amplitude and duration of episodes above and below clinical thresholds. The extent and duration of the insults were calculated as percent time (%time), PTD, and PTD per day (PTD/D) of defined thresholds (SBP: 100 bpm and >120 bpm; and SpO(2): GOSE by receiver operator characteristics. Mean age was 33.9 (range, 16-83) years, mean admission Glasgow Coma Scale score 6.4 ± 3, and mean head Abbreviated Injury Scale score 4.2 ± 0.72. The 30-day mortality rate was 13.3%. Of the 45 patients in whom GOSE at 12 months was available, 28 (62%) had good neurologic outcomes (GOSE score >4). Traditional markers of poor outcome (admission SBP, admission Glasgow Coma Scale, and Marshall score) were not different between groups with good or poor outcome. PTD, PTD/D, and %time SBP GOSE (p = 0.02). PTD/D SBP GOSE (p < 0.05). Within the first 48 hours of intensive care unit admission, hypotension was found to be predictive of mortality and functional outcomes at higher thresholds than traditionally defined. Systemic blood pressure targets closer to 120 mm Hg may be more efficacious in minimizing secondary insults and particularly useful in settings without invasive intracranial monitoring

  14. Outcome after decompressive craniectomy for the treatment of severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Jerry Lee; Cipolle, Mark D; Anderson, Meredith; Sabella, Victoria; Shollenberger, Daniele; Li, P Mark; Pasquale, Michael D

    2008-08-01

    Using decompressive craniectomy as part of the treatment regimen for severe traumatic brain injury (STBI) has become more common at our Level I trauma center. This study was designed to examine this practice with particular attention to long-term functional outcome. A retrospective review of prospectively collected data was performed for patients with STBI admitted from January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2005. Our institution manages patients using the Brain Trauma Foundation Guidelines. Data collected from patients undergoing decompressive craniectomy included: age, Injury Severity Score, admission and follow-up Glasgow Coma Score, timing of, and indication for decompressive craniectomy, and procedure-related complications. The Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) was performed by a experienced trauma clinical research coordinator using a structured phone interview to assess long-term outcome in the survivors. Student's t test and chi2 were used to examine differences between groups. Forty STBI patients were treated with decompressive craniectomy; 24 were performed primarily in conjunction with urgent evacuation of extra-axial hemorrhage and 16 were performed primarily in response to increased intracranial pressure with 4 of these after an initial craniotomy. Decompressive craniectomy was very effective at lowering intracranial pressure in these 16 patients (35.0 mm Hg +/- 13.5 mm Hg to 14.6 mm Hg +/- 8.7 mm Hg, p = 0.005). Twenty-two decompressive craniectomy patients did not survive to hospital discharge, whereas admission Glasgow Coma Score and admission pupil size and reactivity correlated with outcome, age, and Injury Severity Score did not. At a mean of 11 months (range, 3-26 months) after decompressive craniectomy, 6 survivors had a poor functional outcome (GOSE 1-4), whereas 12 survivors had a good outcome (GOSE 5-8). Therefore, 70% of these patients had an unfavorable outcome (death or severe disability), and 30% had a favorable long-term functional outcome

  15. Potencial evocado auditivo de tronco encefálico no prognóstico do coma superficial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libia Camargo Ribeiro Leite

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available O coma é a redução persistente do nível de consciência, arresponsivo a estímulos, devido à baixa atividade cerebral. Para verificar o nível de consciência, um recurso frequentemente utilizado é a Escala de Coma de Glasgow. Outro método que se destaca é o Potencial Evocado Auditivo de Tronco Encefálico, o qual avalia a atividade elétrica das vias auditivas ascendentes, desde o trajeto periférico até o mesencéfalo. O exame é simples, imune a medicamentos depressores e ambientes eletricamente carregados, sendo o mais adequado dos potenciais para a monitoração dos estados de coma. O presente estudo teve por objetivo verificar as características do Potencial Evocado Auditivo de Tronco Encefálico no estado de coma leve (Glasgow 7 - 8 e suas respectivas contribuições. Foi realizado um estudo prospectivo transversal em dois pacientes em coma (Glasgow 7, estado secundário a traumatismo cranioencefálico. Os resultados do exame evidenciaram presença de atividade elétrica em toda extensão da via estudada, em ambos os casos, com indicações de diferentes alterações, quanto à redução na latência entre os intervalos, morfologia e replicação das ondas. Tais diferenças foram contempladas com a evolução de cada caso: caso 1 evoluiu a alta hospitalar e caso 2 evoluiu a óbito. Os resultados confirmaram os achados da literatura, que descreve que a presença do Potencial Evocado Auditivo de Tronco Encefálico normal está associada à boa evolução do caso clínico, enquanto alterações no exame podem sinalizar para um mau prognóstico.

  16. The Prognostic Value of MRI in Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghbayan, Hourmazd; Boutin, Amélie; Laflamme, Mathieu; Lauzier, François; Shemilt, Michèle; Moore, Lynne; Zarychanski, Ryan; Douville, Vincent; Fergusson, Dean; Turgeon, Alexis F

    2017-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of death and disability, yet many predictors of outcome are not precise enough to guide initial clinical decision-making. Although increasingly used in the early phase following traumatic brain injury, the prognostic utility of MRI remains uncertain. We thus undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies evaluating the predictive value of acute MRI lesion patterns for discriminating clinical outcome in traumatic brain injury. MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS, and CENTRAL from inception to November 2015. Studies of adults who had MRI in the acute phase following moderate or severe traumatic brain injury. Our primary outcomes were all-cause mortality and the Glasgow Outcome Scale. Two authors independently performed study selection and data extraction. We calculated pooled effect estimates with a random effects model, evaluated the risk of bias using a modified version of Quality in Prognostic Studies and determined the strength of evidence with the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation. We included 58 eligible studies, of which 27 (n = 1,652) contributed data to meta-analysis. Brainstem lesions were associated with all-cause mortality (risk ratio, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.01-3.15; I = 43%) and unfavorable Glasgow Outcome Scale (risk ratio, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.72-3.58; I = 81%) at greater than or equal to 6 months. Diffuse axonal injury patterns were associated with an increased risk of unfavorable Glasgow Outcome Scale (risk ratio, 2.46; 95% CI, 1.06-5.69; I = 74%). MRI scores based on lesion depth demonstrated increasing risk of unfavorable neurologic outcome as more caudal structures were affected. Most studies were at high risk of methodological bias. MRI following traumatic brain injury yields important prognostic information, with several lesion patterns significantly associated with long-term survival and neurologic outcome. Given the high risk of bias in the current body of literature, large well

  17. The effects of magnesium sulfate therapy after severe diffuse axonal injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao L

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ling Zhao,1 Wei Wang,1 Jiwen Zhong,1 YaYun Li,1 YanZi Cheng,1 Zhenjiao Su,1 Wei Zheng,1 Xiang-Dong Guan2 1Department of Critical Care Medicine, Zhuhai People’s Hospital, Zhuhai, Guangdong, 2Department of Critical Care Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China Purpose: To evaluate the clinical effects of magnesium sulfate in the treatment of diffuse axonal injury (DAI.Patients and methods: This study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted in the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou and Zhuhai People’s Hospital, Zhuhai, two trauma center hospitals. A total of 128 patients suffered from DAI, with initial Glasgow coma scale (GCS scores of 3–8. They were randomly divided into two groups: magnesium sulfate treatment (MST group (n=64 and control group (n=64. The MST group received 250 µmol/kg magnesium sulfate intravenously 20 minutes after admission, followed by 750 µmol/kg magnesium sulfate intravenously daily for 5 days. The control group received standard management without MST. GCS scores and serum neuron-specific enolase values were measured and recorded at admission, and on days 3 and 7 after injury. Outcomes were determined by Glasgow outcome scale scores at discharge and at 3 months’ follow-up, respectively.Results: After the 7-day treatment, patients in the MST group, compared with those in the control group, had a lower serum neuron-specific enolase level (25.40±6.66 vs 29.58±7.32, respectively, P=0.001 and higher GCS score (8.23±2.72 vs 7.05±2.64, respectively, P=0.016. Although the length of stay and mortality did not differ between the groups in the intensive care unit, Glasgow outcome scale score was significantly lower in the MST group at discharge (3.30±1.35 vs 3.90±1.10, P=0.004 and 3 months after discharge (2.95±1.48 vs 3.66±1.44, P=0.009.Conclusion: Early treatment with magnesium sulfate

  18. Bundle of measures for external cerebral ventricular drainage-associated ventriculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzi, Maria; Karvouniaris, Marios; Makris, Demosthenes; Tsimitrea, Eleni; Gatos, Charalampos; Tasiou, Anastasia; Mantzarlis, Kostas; Fountas, Kostas N; Zakynthinos, Epaminondas

    2014-01-01

    To assess the prevalence and outcome of external cerebral ventricular drainage-associated ventriculitis in neurocritical patients before and after the implementation of a bundle of external cerebral ventricular drainage-associated ventriculitis control measures. Clinical prospective case series. University Hospital of Larissa, Greece. Consecutive patients were recruited from the ICU of the hospital. Patient inclusion criteria included presence of external ventricular drainage and ICU stay more than 48 hours. The bundle of external cerebral ventricular drainage-associated ventriculitis control measures included 1) reeducation of ICU personnel on issues of infection control related to external cerebral ventricular drainage, 2) meticulous intraventricular catheter handling, 3) cerebrospinal fluid sampling only when clinically necessary, and 4) routine replacement of the drainage catheter on the seventh drainage day if the catheter was still necessary. The bundle was applied after an initial period (preintervention) where standard policy for external cerebral ventricular drainage-associated ventriculitis was established. External cerebral ventricular drainage-associated ventriculitis prevalence, external cerebral ventricular drainage-associated ventriculitis events per 1,000 drainage days (drain-associated infection rate), length of ICU stay, Glasgow Outcome Scale at 6 months, and risk factors for external cerebral ventricular drainage-associated ventriculitis. Eighty-two patients entered the study in the preintervention period and 57 patients during the intervention period. During the preintervention and intervention period, external cerebral ventricular drainage-associated ventriculitis prevalence was 28% and 10.5% (p = 0.02) and drain-associated infection rate was 18 and 7.1, respectively (p = 0.0001); mean (95% CI) length of ICU stay in patients who presented external cerebral ventricular drainage-associated ventriculitis was 44.4 days (36.4-52.4 d), whereas mean

  19. Patient reported outcome data following influenza A (H1N1p vaccination in the 2009–2010 season: web-based and telephone evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wade AG

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Alan G Wade1, Gordon M Crawford1, Neil Pumford1, Alex McConnachie21Patients Direct, 3 Todd Campus, Glasgow, UK; 2Robertson Centre for Biostatistics, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UKBackground: There has been worldwide interest in the safety of the pandemic influenza A (H1N1p vaccines, although limited data are available from the vaccine recipients’ perspective. This evaluation was designed to collect data from people who had received an influenza vaccination during the 2009–2010 season using a web-based data collection tool supplemented by telephone reporting (PROBE.Methods: People scheduled to receive the influenza A (H1N1p or seasonal influenza vaccines were recruited through media advertising and campaigns throughout the West of Scotland. Vaccine recipients participated in the evaluation by answering demographic and side effect questions using PROBE methodology on the day of the immunization, after 3 days, 8 days, 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 26 weeks.Results: A total of 1103 vaccine recipients including 134 young children (0–4 years participated in the evaluation; 694 (63% received H1N1p vaccine only, 135 (12% seasonal vaccine only, 224 (20% both H1N1p and seasonal vaccines, and 50 (5% received H1N1p or seasonal vaccine with a non-influenza vaccine (eg, travel or pneumococcal. Overall, 42% of recipients reported experiencing a side effect after their baseline vaccination; the most commonly reported were general and arm side effects (>20%. Injection site discomfort/pain and flu-like symptoms were reported by 57% and 24% of recipients, respectively. A significantly higher proportion of the 960 H1N1p vaccine recipients experienced a side effect (44% vs 27%, P < 0.001 or injection site discomfort/pain (61% vs 26%, P < 0.001 than those receiving seasonal influenza vaccines. Female sex and H1N1p vaccination were associated with a significantly higher risk of injection site discomfort/pain, whereas the 70+ age group was associated with a

  20. Solving the Border Control Problem: Evidence of Enhanced Face Matching in Individuals with Extraordinary Face Recognition Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobak, Anna Katarzyna; Dowsett, Andrew James; Bate, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Photographic identity documents (IDs) are commonly used despite clear evidence that unfamiliar face matching is a difficult and error-prone task. The current study set out to examine the performance of seven individuals with extraordinary face recognition memory, so called "super recognisers" (SRs), on two face matching tasks resembling border control identity checks. In Experiment 1, the SRs as a group outperformed control participants on the "Glasgow Face Matching Test", and some case-by-case comparisons also reached significance. In Experiment 2, a perceptually difficult face matching task was used: the "Models Face Matching Test". Once again, SRs outperformed controls both on group and mostly in case-by-case analyses. These findings suggest that SRs are considerably better at face matching than typical perceivers, and would make proficient personnel for border control agencies.

  1. Prediction of chronic critical illness in a general intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio H. Loss

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the incidence, costs, and mortality associated with chronic critical illness (CCI, and to identify clinical predictors of CCI in a general intensive care unit. METHODS: This was a prospective observational cohort study. All patients receiving supportive treatment for over 20 days were considered chronically critically ill and eligible for the study. After applying the exclusion criteria, 453 patients were analyzed. RESULTS: There was an 11% incidence of CCI. Total length of hospital stay, costs, and mortality were significantly higher among patients with CCI. Mechanical ventilation, sepsis, Glasgow score < 15, inadequate calorie intake, and higher body mass index were independent predictors for cci in the multivariate logistic regression model. CONCLUSIONS: CCI affects a distinctive population in intensive care units with higher mortality, costs, and prolonged hospitalization. Factors identifiable at the time of admission or during the first week in the intensive care unit can be used to predict CCI.

  2. Predicting unfavourable outcome in herpetic meningoencephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdem, Hakan; Cag, Yasemin; Karaahmetoglu, Gokhan

    BACKGROUND: Herpetic meningoencephalitis is the most frequent form of sporadic fatal encephalitis in the world and accounts for 10- 20% of all viral encephalitides. There were studies assessing the outcomes particularly by comparing the efficacies of antiviral drugs in the past. To the best of our...... knowledge, no datum exists in the literature on the mortality indicators of HME patients with definite microbiological diagnosis. Thus, our study makes use of the largest case series ever reported in the literature to provide data for the predictors of unfavorable outcome in HME cases. METHODS...... outcome in HME. Thus, it appears that both host and therapeutic parameters contribute to success in these cases. Table. Final model including independent predictors of unfavorable outcome 95% CIs OR [1] Low High p Age (years) 1.04 1.02 1.05 0.000 Glasgow coma scale 0.84 0.77 0.93 0.000 Elapsed time [2] >2...

  3. Detection of irradiated food using photostimulated luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malec-Czechowska, K.; Stachowicz, W.

    2005-01-01

    Detection of irradiated spices, dried mushrooms and flavour blends using photostimulated luminescence (PSL) is presented. PSL measurements were carried out as described in standard PN-EN 13751. A lower threshold (T 1 700 counts/60s) and an upper threshold (T 2 = 5000 counts/60s) were used to classify the sample. PSL intensities below the threshold were classified as from non-irradiated samples and PSL signals above the upper threshold were regarded from irradiated samples. Signal levels between the two thresholds were classified as intermediate, showing that further investigations are necessary. The PSL tests were carried out at Institute Nutritional Physiology, Federal Research Centre for Nutrition in Karlsruhe with a SURRAC PPSL Iradiated food screening system (SURRAC, Glasgow, UK). (author)

  4. Environmental Lead Pollution in an Urban Soft-water Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, A. D.; Moore, M. R.; Devenay, W. T.; Miller, A. R.; Goldberg, A.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation has been reported on the clinical and metabolic effects of lead acquired by soft domestic water from lead plumbing systems in 23 Glasgow households. The lead content of water from cold taps was up to 18 times the upper acceptable limit and was proportional to the amount of lead in the plumbing system. The blood lead of 71 inhabitants of these houses showed a significant positive correlation with water lead content. Delta-aminolaevulic acid dehydrase activity, an extremely sensitive indicator of lead exposure, showed a significant negative correlation with water-lead content. Atmospheric lead was within acceptable limits in all but one house and no significant correlation could be found with biochemical measurements. A small number of clinical abnormalities were found but could not be directly attributed to lead toxicity. The results of the study underline the possible danger to health of lead plumbing systems in soft-water regions. PMID:5031207

  5. Natural course of subarachnoid hemorrhage is worse in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Hendrik Pahl

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aging is a major risk factor for poor outcome in patients with ruptured or unruptured intracranial aneurysms (IA submitted to treatment. It impairs several physiologic patterns related to cerebrovascular hemodynamics and homeostasis. Objective Evaluate clinical, radiological patterns and prognostic factors of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH patients according to age. Method Three hundred and eighty nine patients with aneurismal SAH from a Brazilian tertiary institution (Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual de São Paulo were consecutively evaluated from 2002 to 2012 according to Fisher and Hunt Hess classifications and Glasgow Outcome Scale. Results There was statistically significant association of age with impaired clinical, radiological presentation and outcomes in cases of SAH. Conclusion Natural course of SAH is worse in elderly patients and thus, proper recognition of the profile of such patients and their outcome is necessary to propose standard treatment.

  6. Return to driving after severe traumatic brain injury: increased risk of traffic accidents and personal responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bivona, Umberto; DʼIppolito, Mariagrazia; Giustini, Marco; Vignally, Pascal; Longo, Eloise; Taggi, Franco; Formisano, Rita

    2012-01-01

    To determine the frequency of road traffic accidents among individuals who start or resume driving after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to investigate their responsibility for these accidents. Observational/retrospective study. Sixty adults with severe TBI and their caregivers. Return to Driving Questionnaire and Glasgow Outcome Scale. Thirty of the 60 participants started to drive or resumed driving after TBI. Nineteen (63%) of them were involved in traffic accidents, with personal responsibility in 26 of 36 after return to driving. Participants caused a significantly higher number of accidents after TBI than before. The ability to drive is frequently compromised after severe TBI. Specific rehabilitation of this complex activity should be a main goal of social reintegration programs in this population.

  7. Implementing digital skills training in care homes: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Deidre; Kydd, Angela; Szczepura, Ala

    2016-05-01

    This article is the first of a two-part series that informs and describes digital skills training using a dedicated console computer provided for staff and residents in a care home setting. This was part of a programme of culture change in a large care home with nursing in Glasgow, Scotland. The literature review shows that over the past decade there has been a gradual increase in the use of digital technology by staff and older people in community settings including care homes. Policy from the European Commission presents a persuasive argument for the advancement of technology-enabled care to counter the future impact of an increased number of people of advanced age on finite health and social care resources. The psychosocial and environmental issues that inhibit or enhance the acquisition of digital skills in care homes are considered and include the identification of exemplar schemes and the support involved.

  8. Developing Physiologic Models for Emergency Medical Procedures Under Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Nigel; O'Quinn, Veronica

    2012-01-01

    Several technological enhancements have been made to METI's commercial Emergency Care Simulator (ECS) with regard to how microgravity affects human physiology. The ECS uses both a software-only lung simulation, and an integrated mannequin lung that uses a physical lung bag for creating chest excursions, and a digital simulation of lung mechanics and gas exchange. METI s patient simulators incorporate models of human physiology that simulate lung and chest wall mechanics, as well as pulmonary gas exchange. Microgravity affects how O2 and CO2 are exchanged in the lungs. Procedures were also developed to take into affect the Glasgow Coma Scale for determining levels of consciousness by varying the ECS eye-blinking function to partially indicate the level of consciousness of the patient. In addition, the ECS was modified to provide various levels of pulses from weak and thready to hyper-dynamic to assist in assessing patient conditions from the femoral, carotid, brachial, and pedal pulse locations.

  9. Blunder, Error, Mistake, Pitfall: Trawling the OED with the Help of the Historical Thesaurus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Roberts

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the lexis of error and examines its use across time in relation to the writing and spelling of English, to grammar and pronunciation. Discussion focuses first on the earliest records of notions of correctness in English language usage, from Ælfric forwards to the emergence of standard English, from the sixteenth century’s growing worries about copiousness and purity of diction to eighteenth-century concerns to prescribe and rule the language. The historical overview is complemented by consideration of the data drawn together by the Glasgow Historical Thesaurus project, its evidence taken from the Oxford English Dictionary and the Dictionary of Old English Corpus. For earlier centuries, there are by far fewer relevant citations, often buried within words wide in reference. With the help of the Historical Thesaurus we drill down to view how views of language mistakes and errors have changed over the centuries of the recorded history of English.

  10. A Young Male with Spontaneous Ruptured Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation (Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitorino Modesto Santos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM is considered a congenital condition characterized by arterial-venous connections in the absence of intermediate capillaries with circulatory and functional changes, inclusive on the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF dynamics. Case: A previously healthy young man with abrupt onset of intense headache followed by incoercible vomiting and generalized tonic-clonic seizures. On admission, he was in Glasgow scale IV with respiratory gasping, signs of decerebration and anisocoric mydriasis, and right paresis. Computed tomography showed left intraparenchymal hematoma and intraventricular blood. The abnormal vessels and blood clots were removed by neurosurgery. In early postoperative phase a large cerebrospinal fluid leak developed, and was aspirated and further controlled. The patient had respiratory complications, including pulmonary infection by Pseudomonas. Conclusions: After longstanding hospitalization, he was referred to other medical institution and home care. 

  11. Traumatisme crânien grave et transport héliporté: étude prospective lorraine

    OpenAIRE

    Humbert , Hervé

    2000-01-01

    Non disponible / Not available; Les modalités de prise en charge médicale préhospitalière doivent prendre en compte l'impact essentiel des facteurs d'agression cérébrale secondaire d'origine systémique sur le pronostic des traumatismes crâniens graves. Ainsi tout patient traumatisé crânien avec un score de Glasgow inférieur ou égal à 8 doit bénéficier d'une intubation orotrachéale et d'une ventilation contrôlée, d'un monitorage de la SpO2 er de la PETCO2 et éventuellement d'un remplissage. L'...

  12. Relatives of patients with severe brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norup, Anne; Petersen, Janne; Lykke Mortensen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: To investigate trajectories and predictors of trajectories of anxiety and depression in relatives of patients with a severe brain injury during the first year after injury. RESEARCH DESIGN: A prospective longitudinal study with four repeated measurements. SUBJECTS: Ninety...... relatives of patients with severe brain injury. METHODS: The relatives were assessed on the anxiety and depression scales from the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised and latent variable growth curve models were used to model the trajectories. The effects of patient's age, patient's Glasgow Coma Score, level...... should focus not only on specific deficits in the patient, but also on how the emotional state and well-being of the relatives evolve, while trying to adjust and cope with a new life-situation....

  13. A population-based study of survival and discharge status for survivors after head injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Aase Worså; Teasdale, T W

    2004-01-01

    and cerebral lesion was described quantitatively through Kaplan-Meier survival distributions. Besides, patterns of severity, neurophysical and mental sequelae among survivors 5, 10 and 15 years post-injury were described. It was shown by examples how the study has been useful already for the planning......-Meier survival functions were calculated for these two categories. Hospital records for a random sample of 389 survivors in 1997 after cranial fracture, acute brain lesion or chronical subdural haematoma, which occurred in 1982, 1987 and 1992 in patients aged 15 years or more at injury, were reviewed. Survivors...... the decreasing incidence with time, the point prevalence of survivors in 1997 after brain lesions occurring in 1982, 1987 or 1992 was nearly the same, averaging 8.4 per 100 000 of the population above age 14. Half of them were severe, as defined by initial Glasgow Coma Score

  14. The UK National Quantum Technologies Hub in sensors and metrology (Keynote Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongs, K.; Boyer, V.; Cruise, M. A.; Freise, A.; Holynski, M.; Hughes, J.; Kaushik, A.; Lien, Y.-H.; Niggebaum, A.; Perea-Ortiz, M.; Petrov, P.; Plant, S.; Singh, Y.; Stabrawa, A.; Paul, D. J.; Sorel, M.; Cumming, D. R. S.; Marsh, J. H.; Bowtell, R. W.; Bason, M. G.; Beardsley, R. P.; Campion, R. P.; Brookes, M. J.; Fernholz, T.; Fromhold, T. M.; Hackermuller, L.; Krüger, P.; Li, X.; Maclean, J. O.; Mellor, C. J.; Novikov, S. V.; Orucevic, F.; Rushforth, A. W.; Welch, N.; Benson, T. M.; Wildman, R. D.; Freegarde, T.; Himsworth, M.; Ruostekoski, J.; Smith, P.; Tropper, A.; Griffin, P. F.; Arnold, A. S.; Riis, E.; Hastie, J. E.; Paboeuf, D.; Parrotta, D. C.; Garraway, B. M.; Pasquazi, A.; Peccianti, M.; Hensinger, W.; Potter, E.; Nizamani, A. H.; Bostock, H.; Rodriguez Blanco, A.; Sinuco-Leon, G.; Hill, I. R.; Williams, R. A.; Gill, P.; Hempler, N.; Malcolm, G. P. A.; Cross, T.; Kock, B. O.; Maddox, S.; John, P.

    2016-04-01

    The UK National Quantum Technology Hub in Sensors and Metrology is one of four flagship initiatives in the UK National of Quantum Technology Program. As part of a 20-year vision it translates laboratory demonstrations to deployable practical devices, with game-changing miniaturized components and prototypes that transform the state-of-the-art for quantum sensors and metrology. It brings together experts from the Universities of Birmingham, Glasgow, Nottingham, Southampton, Strathclyde and Sussex, NPL and currently links to over 15 leading international academic institutions and over 70 companies to build the supply chains and routes to market needed to bring 10-1000x improvements in sensing applications. It seeks, and is open to, additional partners for new application development and creates a point of easy open access to the facilities and supply chains that it stimulates or nurtures.

  15. STORYLINE APPROACH AS ENHANCEMENT OF LEARNING FOREIGN LANGUAGE AND CHARACTER BUILDING AT ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frimadhona Syafri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Using stories in teaching foreign language, it forces the teacher to be crative and innovative to encourage the young learners to enjoy reading stories. The teacher has to be smart to select which one approaches or methods which can enhance learning foreign language and character building in the teaching foreign language process.The storyline approach was specifically designed for the use at primary schools. The storyline method (Storyline for teaching children at primary schools was mainly developed in 1967 by a team of teachers from Jordanhill College of Education (now known as University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland. The primary schools in Scotland use a curriculum that involves integration of new topics, such as environmental studies and expressive arts, in their teaching foreign language process. This method could be one of alternative method that be applied in teaching foreign language to Elementary School or English Courses for Children in Indonesia.

  16. Experience with contrast-enhanced CT in delayed traumatic intracerebral hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Shiro; Nakazawa, Shozo; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Isayama, Kazuo; Yajima, Kouzo; Otsuka, Toshibumi [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo

    1984-02-01

    During the four-and-a-half-year period from April, 1976, to September, 1980, out of 257 patients with severe head injuries graded 8 or less by the Glasgow Coma Scale in the Department of Neurosurgery and Critical Care Medicine of the Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan, 33 cases showed the development of delayed traumatic intracerebral hematoma (DTICH) upon the serial computerized tomography (CT). Contrast-enhanced CT was performed in 20 cases of the 33 patients demonstrating DTICH. Among these, 8 cases (40%) indicated the development of DTICH in the lesions of cerebral contusion (a salt-and-pepper appearance in the initial plain CT) which showed a remarkable enhancement, sustaining the extravasation of the contrast medium into the contused brain tissue. The authors discuss the pathogenesis of DTICH and suggest that vasoparalysis in the cerebral contusion might be a factor in the development of DTICH in patients with servere head injuries.

  17. Long-term follow-up of cerebral blood flow in patients with ruptured cerebral aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamakami, Iwao; Tanno, Hirokazu; Isobe, Katsumi [Kimitsu Central Hospital, Kisarazu, Chiba (Japan); Yamaura, Akira

    1992-03-01

    The xenon-133 inhalation technique was used to make three measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) in 34 patients with ruptured cerebral aneurysm: in the acute period (<14 days) after subarachnoid hemorrhage, in the subacute period (15-30 days), and in the chronic period (12-24 months). The hemispheric mean value of initial slope index was used as the mean CBF. The clinical outcomes were classified into good recovery (GR)(24 cases), moderate disability (MD)(5), and severe disability (SD)(5) on the Glasgow Outcome Scale. In all periods, the mean CBF significantly correlated with the outcome. GR patients had the highest mean CBF, MD patients the intermediate mean CBF, and SD patients the lower mean CBF. GR patients had a near-normal mean CBF by the chronic period, while SD patients showed no significant CBF recovery throughout the course. (author).

  18. The Cernettes are back at the Hardronic!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN MusiClub

    2017-01-01

    Five years after their last epic performance, at the Hardronic Festival 2012, “Les Horribles Cernettes” (the rockin’ LHC) will be singing and dancing again on the planks of the CERN Festival on July 15th. The band’s comeback is a real challenge, since the four singers are scattered as far as Washington DC and Mauritius, passing through Glasgow and Montecarlo. The backing musicians too, live in Tenerife, Mauritius, London. So to make their comeback this summer, CERN’s favourite High Energy Band needs to raise funds for travel. The good news is, we’re half way there, and if you click on the donate button on their website, you can help make every fan’s dream come true. Get the Cernettes back at CERN!                      www.cernettes.com #cernettescomeback

  19. Cerebral infarction secondary to temporal lobe herniation in head trauma: a CT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Park, Eui Dong; Kim, Hyung Jin; Han, Jong Woo; Chung, Sung Hoon; Ha, Choong Kun; Kim, Jae Il [College of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-11-15

    Cerebral infarction is a known complication of temporal lobe herniation caused by a traumatic intracranial lesion. To ascertain the frequency, time of recognition, and influence on mortality of posttraumatic cerebral infarction secondary to temporal lobe herniation, we retrospectively reviewed brain CT scans and clinical records of 55 patients who had CT and clinical signs of temporal lobe herniation on admission date. Cerebral infarctions were recognized in seven (12.7%) patients on CT scans taken within two days after admission (mean: 1.3 days). Cerebral infarctions were in the terrtiories of the posterior cerebral artery in all seven patients, two of whom had infarctions of the anterior choroidal artery as well. Mortality (71.4%) for these seven patients was not statistically significant from that (50%) of patients without cerebral infarction admitted with the same range of Glasgow Coma Scale score. The result suggests that such cerebral infarction dose not greatly influence patient's mortality.

  20. Study of the direct electron production in the reaction π-p at 70 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennion, P.

    1980-06-01

    This experiment tries to answer the following questions. What is the dependence with the transverse impulsion psub(T) of the production rate l/π. Are the direct leptons produced alone or by pairs. If they are produced alone, are they issued from a charm particle. Are there lepton pairs whose origin is not understood. This experiment is a collaboration between Bologne, Glasgow, Rutherford, Saclay and Turin laboratories. Data are from the CERN bubble chamber, equipped with a sensitive target. This equipment is described in the chapter one, together with experimental process. In chapter two, results on single electron production are given. Pairs production is studied in chapter three. Pairs issuing from the π zero decay in e + , e - and gamma are also analyzed [fr