WorldWideScience

Sample records for ubiquitous kinase maps

  1. PERKAM: Personalized Knowledge Awareness Map for Computer Supported Ubiquitous Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bishouty, Moushir M.; Ogata, Hiroaki; Yano, Yoneo

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces a ubiquitous computing environment in order to support the learners while doing tasks; this environment is called PERKAM (PERsonalized Knowledge Awareness Map). PERKAM allows the learners to share knowledge, interact, collaborate, and exchange individual experiences. It utilizes the RFID ubiquities technology to detect the…

  2. A rice kinase-protein interaction map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaodong; Richter, Todd; Chen, Mei; Fujii, Hiroaki; Seo, Young Su; Xie, Mingtang; Zheng, Xianwu; Kanrar, Siddhartha; Stevenson, Rebecca A; Dardick, Christopher; Li, Ying; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Yan; Yu, Fahong; Bartley, Laura E; Chern, Mawsheng; Bart, Rebecca; Chen, Xiuhua; Zhu, Lihuang; Farmerie, William G; Gribskov, Michael; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Fromm, Michael E; Ronald, Pamela C; Song, Wen-Yuan

    2009-03-01

    Plants uniquely contain large numbers of protein kinases, and for the vast majority of the 1,429 kinases predicted in the rice (Oryza sativa) genome, little is known of their functions. Genetic approaches often fail to produce observable phenotypes; thus, new strategies are needed to delineate kinase function. We previously developed a cost-effective high-throughput yeast two-hybrid system. Using this system, we have generated a protein interaction map of 116 representative rice kinases and 254 of their interacting proteins. Overall, the resulting interaction map supports a large number of known or predicted kinase-protein interactions from both plants and animals and reveals many new functional insights. Notably, we found a potential widespread role for E3 ubiquitin ligases in pathogen defense signaling mediated by receptor-like kinases, particularly by the kinases that may have evolved from recently expanded kinase subfamilies in rice. We anticipate that the data provided here will serve as a foundation for targeted functional studies in rice and other plants. The application of yeast two-hybrid and TAPtag analyses for large-scale plant protein interaction studies is also discussed.

  3. Protein Kinase Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 (MAP4K4) Promotes Obesity-induced Hyperinsulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth Flach, Rachel J; Danai, Laura V; DiStefano, Marina T; Kelly, Mark; Menendez, Lorena Garcia; Jurczyk, Agata; Sharma, Rohit B; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Jason K; Bortell, Rita; Alonso, Laura C; Czech, Michael P

    2016-07-29

    Previous studies revealed a paradox whereby mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (Map4k4) acted as a negative regulator of insulin sensitivity in chronically obese mice, yet systemic deletion of Map4k4 did not improve glucose tolerance. Here, we report markedly reduced glucose-responsive plasma insulin and C-peptide levels in whole body Map4k4-depleted mice (M4K4 iKO) as well as an impaired first phase of insulin secretion from islets derived from M4K4 iKO mice ex vivo After long-term high fat diet (HFD), M4K4 iKO mice pancreata also displayed reduced β cell mass, fewer proliferating β cells and reduced islet-specific gene mRNA expression compared with controls, although insulin content was normal. Interestingly, the reduced plasma insulin in M4K4 iKO mice exposed to chronic (16 weeks) HFD was not observed in response to acute HFD challenge or short term treatment with the insulin receptor antagonist S961. Furthermore, the improved insulin sensitivity in obese M4K4 iKO mice was abrogated by high exogenous insulin over the course of a euglycemic clamp study, indicating that hypoinsulinemia promotes insulin sensitivity in chronically obese M4K4 iKO mice. These results demonstrate that protein kinase Map4k4 drives obesity-induced hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in part by promoting insulin secretion from β cells in mice. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase: An Ubiquitous Signaling Pathway With Key Roles in the Cardiovascular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salt, Ian P; Hardie, D Grahame

    2017-05-26

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key regulator of cellular and whole-body energy homeostasis, which acts to restore energy homoeostasis whenever cellular energy charge is depleted. Over the last 2 decades, it has become apparent that AMPK regulates several other cellular functions and has specific roles in cardiovascular tissues, acting to regulate cardiac metabolism and contractile function, as well as promoting anticontractile, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherogenic actions in blood vessels. In this review, we discuss the role of AMPK in the cardiovascular system, including the molecular basis of mutations in AMPK that alter cardiac physiology and the proposed mechanisms by which AMPK regulates vascular function under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Overexpression of ubiquitous 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase in the liver of transgenic mice results in weight gain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, Joan; Navarro-Sabate, Aurea; Pujol, Anna; Perales, Jose C.; Manzano, Anna; Obach, Merce; Gomez, Marta; Bartrons, Ramon

    2008-01-01

    Fructose 2,6-bisphosphate (Fru-2,6-P 2 ) is an important metabolite that controls glycolytic and gluconeogenic pathways in several cell types. Its synthesis and degradation are catalyzed by the bifunctional enzyme 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose 2,6-bisphosphatase (PFK-2). Four genes, designated Pfkfb1-4, codify the different PFK-2 isozymes. The Pfkfb3 gene product, ubiquitous PFK-2 (uPFK-2), has the highest kinase/bisphosphatase activity ratio and is associated with proliferation and tumor metabolism. A transgenic mouse model that overexpresses uPFK-2 under the control of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase promoter was designed to promote sustained and elevated Fru-2,6-P 2 levels in the liver. Our results demonstrate that in diet-induced obesity, high Fru-2,6-P 2 levels in transgenic livers caused changes in hepatic gene expression profiles for key gluconeogenic and lipogenic enzymes, as well as an accumulation of lipids in periportal cells, and weight gain

  6. MAP kinase cascades in Arabidopsis innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Magnus Wohlfahrt; Roux, Milena Edna; Petersen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Plant mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades generally transduce extracellular stimuli into cellular responses. These stimuli include the perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by host transmembrane pattern recognition receptors which trigger MAPK-dependent innate ...

  7. Gene regulation by MAP kinase cascades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Petersen, Klaus; Petersen, Morten

    2009-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are signaling modules that transduce extracellular stimuli to a range of cellular responses. Research in yeast and metazoans has shown that MAPK-mediated phosphorylation directly or indirectly regulates the activity of transcription factors. Plant ...

  8. c-Jun controls the efficiency of MAP kinase signaling by transcriptional repression of MAP kinase phosphatases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprowles, Amy; Robinson, Dan; Wu Yimi; Kung, H.-J.; Wisdom, Ron

    2005-01-01

    The mammalian JNK signaling pathway regulates the transcriptional response of cells to environmental stress, including UV irradiation. This signaling pathway is composed of a classical MAP kinase cascade; activation results in phosphorylation of the transcription factor substrates c-Jun and ATF2, and leads to changes in gene expression. The defining components of this pathway are conserved in the fission yeast S. pombe, where the genetic studies have shown that the ability of the JNK homolog Spc1 to be activated in response to UV irradiation is dependent on the presence of the transcription factor substrate Atf1. We have used genetic analysis to define the role of c-Jun in activation of the mammalian JNK signaling pathway. Our results show that optimal activation of JNK requires the presence of its transcription factor substrate c-Jun. Mutational analysis shows that the ability of c-Jun to support efficient activation of JNK requires the ability of Jun to bind DNA, suggesting a transcriptional mechanism. Consistent with this, we show that c-Jun represses the expression of several MAP kinase phosphatases. In the absence of c-Jun, the increased expression of MAP kinase phosphatases leads to impaired activation of the ERK, JNK, and p38 MAP kinases after pathway activation. The results show that one function of c-Jun is to regulate the efficiency of signaling by the ERK, p38, and JNK MAP kinases, a function that is likely to affect cellular responses to many different stimuli

  9. MAP kinases in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet; Olsen, Jørgen; Seidelin, Jakob Benedict

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian family of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) is activated by diverse extracellular and intracellular stimuli, and thereby they play an essential role in connecting cell-surface receptors to changes in transcriptional programs. The MAPK signaling pathways regulate a wide range...... these signaling pathways have been exploited for the development of therapeutics and discuss the current knowledge of potential MAPK inhibitors and their anti-inflammatory effects in clinical trials related to IBD....

  10. HSP90 inhibitors potentiate PGF2α-induced IL-6 synthesis via p38 MAP kinase in osteoblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiko Fujita

    Full Text Available Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90 that is ubiquitously expressed in various tissues, is recognized to be a major molecular chaperone. We have previously reported that prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α, a potent bone remodeling mediator, stimulates the synthesis of interleukin-6 (IL-6 through p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase and p38 MAP kinase in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells, and that Rho-kinase acts at a point upstream of p38 MAP kinase. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of HSP90 in the PGF2α-stimulated IL-6 synthesis and the underlying mechanism in MC3T3-E1 cells. Geldanamycin, an inhibitor of HSP90, significantly amplified both the PGF2α-stimulated IL-6 release and the mRNA expression levels. In addition, other HSP90 inhibitors, 17-allylamino-17demethoxy-geldanamycin (17-AAG and 17-dimethylamino-ethylamino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin (17-DMAG and onalespib, enhanced the PGF2α-stimulated IL-6 release. Geldanamycin, 17-AAG and onalespib markedly strengthened the PGF2α-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase. Geldanamycin and 17-AAG did not affect the PGF2α-induced phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAP kinase and myosin phosphatase targeting subunit (MYPT-1, a substrate of Rho-kinase, and the protein levels of RhoA and Rho-kinase. In addition, HSP90-siRNA enhanced the PGF2α-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase. Furthermore, SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase, significantly suppressed the amplification by geldanamycin, 17-AAG or 17-DMAG of the PGF2α-stimulated IL-6 release. Our results strongly suggest that HSP90 negatively regulates the PGF2α-stimulated IL-6 synthesis in osteoblasts, and that the effect of HSP90 is exerted through regulating p38 MAP kinase activation.

  11. A conserved p38 MAP kinase pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dennis H; Feinbaum, Rhonda; Alloing, Geneviève; Emerson, Fred E; Garsin, Danielle A; Inoue, Hideki; Tanaka-Hino, Miho; Hisamoto, Naoki; Matsumoto, Kunihiro; Tan, Man-Wah; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2002-07-26

    A genetic screen for Caenorhabditis elegans mutants with enhanced susceptibility to killing by Pseudomonas aeruginosa led to the identification of two genes required for pathogen resistance: sek-1, which encodes a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase, and nsy-1, which encodes a MAP kinase kinase kinase. RNA interference assays and biochemical analysis established that a p38 ortholog, pmk-1, functions as the downstream MAP kinase required for pathogen defense. These data suggest that this MAP kinase signaling cassette represents an ancient feature of innate immune responses in evolutionarily diverse species.

  12. MAP kinase genes and colon and rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Martha L.

    2012-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways regulate many cellular functions including cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. We evaluate genetic variation in the c-Jun-N-terminal kinases, p38, and extracellular regulated kinases 1/2 MAPK-signaling pathways and colon and rectal cancer risk using data from population-based case-control studies (colon: n = 1555 cases, 1956 controls; rectal: n = 754 cases, 959 controls). We assess 19 genes (DUSP1, DUSP2, DUSP4, DUSP6, DUSP7, MAP2K1, MAP3K1, MAP3K2, MAP3K3, MAP3K7, MAP3K9, MAP3K10, MAP3K11, MAPK1, MAPK3, MAPK8, MAPK12, MAPK14 and RAF1). MAP2K1 rs8039880 [odds ratio (OR) = 0.57, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.38, 0.83; GG versus AA genotype] and MAP3K9 rs11625206 (OR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.14, 1.76; recessive model) were associated with colon cancer (P adj value rectal cancer (P adj cancer risk. Genetic variants had unique associations with KRAS, TP53 and CIMP+ tumors. DUSP2 rs1724120 [hazard rate ratio (HRR) = 0.72, 95%CI = 0.54, 0.96; AA versus GG/GA), MAP3K10 rs112956 (HRR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.10, 1.76; CT/TT versus CC) and MAP3K11 (HRR = 1.76, 95% CI 1.18, 2.62 TT versus GG/GT) influenced survival after diagnosis with colon cancer; MAP2K1 rs8039880 (HRR = 2.53, 95% CI 1.34, 4.79 GG versus AG/GG) and Raf1 rs11923427 (HRR = 0.59 95% CI = 0.40, 0.86; AA versus TT/TA) were associated with rectal cancer survival. These data suggest that genetic variation in the MAPK-signaling pathway influences colorectal cancer risk and survival after diagnosis. Associations may be modified by lifestyle factors that influence inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:23027623

  13. Phosphorylation sites of Arabidopsis MAP Kinase Substrate 1 (MKS1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspersen, M.B.; Qiu, J.-L.; Zhang, X.

    2007-01-01

    The Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) substrate MKS1 was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified, full-length, 6x histidine (His)-tagged MKS1 was phosphorylated in vitro by hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged MPK4 immuno-precipitated from plants. MKS1 phosphorylation was initially verified by electrophore......The Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) substrate MKS1 was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified, full-length, 6x histidine (His)-tagged MKS1 was phosphorylated in vitro by hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged MPK4 immuno-precipitated from plants. MKS1 phosphorylation was initially verified...... phosphopeptide detection. As MAP kinases generally phosphorylate serine or threonine followed by proline (Ser/Thr-Pro), theoretical masses of potentially phosphorylated peptides were calculated and mass spectrometric peaks matching these masses were fragmented and searched for a neutral-loss signal...... at approximately 98 Da indicative of phosphorylation. Additionally, mass spectrometric peaks present in the MPK4-treated MKS1, but not in the control peptide map of untreated MKS1, were fragmented. Fragmentation spectra were subjected to a MASCOT database search which identified three of the twelve Ser-Pro serine...

  14. CZK3, a MAP kinase kinase kinase homolog in Cercospora zeae-maydis, regulates cercosporin biosynthesis, fungal development, and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Won-Bo; Dunkle, Larry D

    2003-09-01

    The fungus Cercospora zeae-maydis causes gray leaf spot of maize and produces cercosporin, a photosensitizing perylenequinone with toxic activity against a broad spectrum of organisms. However, little is known about the biosynthetic pathway or factors that regulate cercosporin production. Analysis of a cDNA subtraction library comprised of genes that are up-regulated during cercosporin synthesis revealed a sequence highly similar to mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases in other fungi. Sequencing and conceptual translation of the full-length genomic sequence indicated that the gene, which we designated CZK3, contains a 4,119-bp open reading frame devoid of introns and encodes a 1,373-amino acid sequence that is highly similar to Wis4, a MAP kinase kinase kinase in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Targeted disruption of CZK3 suppressed expression of genes predicted to participate in cercosporin biosynthesis and abolished cercosporin production. The disrupted mutants grew faster on agar media than the wild type but were deficient in conidiation and elicited only small chlorotic spots on inoculated maize leaves compared with rectangular necrotic lesions incited by the wild type. Complementation of disruptants with the CZK3 open reading frame and flanking sequences restored wild-type levels of conidiation, growth rate, and virulence as well as the ability to produce cercosporin. The results suggest that cercosporin is a virulence factor in C. zeae-maydis during maize pathogenesis, but the pleiotropic effects of CZK3 disruption precluded definitive conclusions.

  15. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 negatively regulates systemic acquired resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, M.; Brodersen, P.; Naested, H.

    2000-01-01

    Transposon inactivation of Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 produced the mpk4 mutant exhibiting constitutive systemic acquired resistance (SAR) including elevated salicylic acid (SA) revels, increased resistance to virulent pathogens, and constitutive pathogenesis-related gene expression shown by Northern...... of NPR1. PDF1.2 and THI2.1 gene induction by jasmonate was blocked in mpk4 expressing NahG, suggesting that MPK4 is required for jasmonic acid-responsive gene expression....

  16. Heat Shock Protein 70 Negatively Regulates TGF-β-Stimulated VEGF Synthesis via p38 MAP Kinase in Osteoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go Sakai

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: We previously demonstrated that transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β stimulates the synthesis of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF through the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. Heat shock protein70 (HSP70 is a ubiquitously expressed molecular chaperone. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of HSP70 in the TGF-β-stimulated VEGF synthesis and the underlying mechanism in these cells. Methods: Culture MC3T3-E1 cells were stimulated by TGF-β. Released VEGF was measured using an ELISA assay. VEGF mRNA level was quantified by RT-PCR. Phosphorylation of each protein kinase was analyzed by Western blotting. Results: VER-155008 and YM-08, both of HSP70 inhibitors, significantly amplified the TGF-β-stimulated VEGF release. In addition, the expression level of VEGF mRNA induced by TGF-β was enhanced by VER-155008. These inhibitors markedly strengthened the TGF-β-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase. The TGF-β-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase was amplified in HSP70-knockdown cells. SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase, significantly suppressed the amplification by these inhibitors of the TGF-β-induced VEGF release. Conclusion: These results strongly suggest that HSP70 acts as a negative regulator in the TGF-β-stimulated VEGF synthesis in osteoblasts, and that the inhibitory effect of HSP70 is exerted at a point upstream of p38 MAP kinase.

  17. The NDR kinase scaffold HYM1/MO25 is essential for MAK2 map kinase signaling in Neurospora crassa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Dettmann

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cell communication is essential for eukaryotic development, but our knowledge of molecules and mechanisms required for intercellular communication is fragmentary. In particular, the connection between signal sensing and regulation of cell polarity is poorly understood. In the filamentous ascomycete Neurospora crassa, germinating spores mutually attract each other and subsequently fuse. During these tropic interactions, the two communicating cells rapidly alternate between two different physiological states, probably associated with signal delivery and response. The MAK2 MAP kinase cascade mediates cell-cell signaling. Here, we show that the conserved scaffolding protein HYM1/MO25 controls the cell shape-regulating NDR kinase module as well as the signal-receiving MAP kinase cascade. HYM1 functions as an integral part of the COT1 NDR kinase complex to regulate the interaction with its upstream kinase POD6 and thereby COT1 activity. In addition, HYM1 interacts with NRC1, MEK2, and MAK2, the three kinases of the MAK2 MAP kinase cascade, and co-localizes with MAK2 at the apex of growing cells. During cell fusion, the three kinases of the MAP kinase module as well as HYM1 are recruited to the point of cell-cell contact. hym-1 mutants phenocopy all defects observed for MAK2 pathway mutants by abolishing MAK2 activity. An NRC1-MEK2 fusion protein reconstitutes MAK2 signaling in hym-1, while constitutive activation of NRC1 and MEK2 does not. These data identify HYM1 as a novel regulator of the NRC1-MEK2-MAK2 pathway, which may coordinate NDR and MAP kinase signaling during cell polarity and intercellular communication.

  18. ROS and CDPK-like kinase-mediated activation of MAP kinase in rice roots exposed to lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tsai-Lien; Huang, Hao-Jen

    2008-04-01

    Lead (Pb2+) is a cytotoxic metal ion in plants, the mechanism of which is not yet established. The aim of this study is to investigate the signalling pathways that are activated by elevated concentrations of Pb2+ in rice roots. Root growth was stunted and cell death was accelerated when exposed to different dosages of Pb2+ during extended time periods. Using ROS-sensitive dye and Ca2+ indicator, we demonstrated that Pb2+ induced ROS production and Ca2+ accumulation, respectively. In addition, Pb2+ elicited a remarkable increase in myelin basic protein (MBP) kinase activities. By immunoblot and immunoprecipitation analysis, 40- and 42-kDa MBP kinases that were activated by Pb2+ were identified to be mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Pre-treatment of rice roots with an antioxidant and a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, glutathione (GSH) and diphenylene iodonium (DPI), effectively reduced Pb2+-induced cell death and MAP kinase activation. Moreover, calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) antagonist, W7, attenuated Pb2+-induced cell death and MAP kinase activation. These results suggested that the ROS and CDPK may function in the Pb2+-triggered cell death and MAP kinase signalling pathway in rice roots.

  19. Insulin signaling inhibits the 5-HT2C receptor in choroid plexus via MAP kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Kunliang

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs interact with heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (G proteins to modulate acute changes in intracellular messenger levels and ion channel activity. In contrast, long-term changes in cellular growth, proliferation and differentiation are often mediated by tyrosine kinase receptors and certain GPCRs by activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases. Complex interactions occur between these signaling pathways, but the specific mechanisms of such regulatory events are not well-understood. In particular it is not clear whether GPCRs are modulated by tyrosine kinase receptor-MAP kinase pathways. Results Here we describe tyrosine kinase receptor regulation of a GPCR via MAP kinase. Insulin reduced the activity of the 5-HT2C receptor in choroid plexus cells which was blocked by the MAP kinase kinase (MEK inhibitor, PD 098059. We demonstrate that the inhibitory effect of insulin and insulin-like growth factor type 1 (IGF-1 on the 5-HT2C receptor is dependent on tyrosine kinase, RAS and MAP kinase. The effect may be receptor-specific: insulin had no effect on another GPCR that shares the same G protein signaling pathway as the 5-HT2C receptor. This effect is also direct: activated MAP kinase mimicked the effect of insulin, and removing a putative MAP kinase site from the 5-HT2C receptor abolished the effect of insulin. Conclusion These results show that insulin signaling can inhibit 5-HT2C receptor activity and suggest that MAP kinase may play a direct role in regulating the function of a specific GPCR.

  20. Ubiquitous positioning

    CERN Document Server

    Mannings, Robin

    2008-01-01

    This groundbreaking resource offers a practical, in-depth understanding of Ubiquitous Positioning - positioning systems that identify the location and position of people, vehicles and objects in time and space in the digitized networked economy. The future and growth of ubiquitous positioning will be fueled by the convergence of many other areas of technology, from mobile telematics, Internet technology, and location systems, to sensing systems, geographic information systems, and the semantic web. This first-of-its-kind volume explores ubiquitous positioning from a convergence perspective, of

  1. The cAMP Signaling and MAP Kinase Pathways in Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehrabi, R.; Zhao, X.; Kim, Y.; Xu, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The key components of the well conserved cyclic AMP signaling and MAP kinase pathways have been functionally characterized in the corn smut Ustilago maydis, rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea, and a few other fungal pathogens. In general, the cAMP signaling and the MAP kinase cascade homologous to

  2. Identification of p38α MAP kinase inhibitors by pharmacophore based virtual screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gangwal, Rahul P; Das, Nihar R; Thanki, Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    The p38α mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase plays a vital role in treating many inflammatory diseases. In the present study, a combined ligand and structure based pharmacophore model was developed to identify potential DFG-in selective p38 MAP kinase inhibitors. Conformations of co...

  3. The Drosophila rolled locus encodes a MAP kinase required in the sevenless signal transduction pathway.

    OpenAIRE

    Biggs, W H; Zavitz, K H; Dickson, B; van der Straten, A; Brunner, D; Hafen, E; Zipursky, S L

    1994-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases have been proposed to play a critical role in receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-mediated signal transduction pathways. Although genetic and biochemical studies of RTK pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster and mammals have revealed remarkable similarities, a genetic requirement for MAP kinases in RTK signaling has not been established. During retinal development in Drosophila, the sevenless (Sev) RTK is required for development of the ...

  4. Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II is a Ubiquitous Molecule in Human Long-term Memory Synaptic Plasticity: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataei, Negar; Sabzghabaee, Ali Mohammad; Movahedian, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term memory is based on synaptic plasticity, a series of biochemical mechanisms include changes in structure and proteins of brain's neurons. In this article, we systematically reviewed the studies that indicate calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) is a ubiquitous molecule among different enzymes involved in human long-term memory and the main downstream signaling pathway of long-term memory. Methods: All of the observational, case–control and review studies were considered and evaluated by the search engines PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and ScienceDirect Scopus between 1990 and February 2015. We did not carry out meta-analysis. Results: At the first search, it was fined 1015 articles which included “synaptic plasticity” OR “neuronal plasticity” OR “synaptic density” AND memory AND “molecular mechanism” AND “calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II” OR CaMKII as the keywords. A total of 335 articles were duplicates in the databases and eliminated. A total of 680 title articles were evaluated. Finally, 40 articles were selected as reference. Conclusions: The studies have shown the most important intracellular signal of long-term memory is calcium-dependent signals. Calcium linked calmodulin can activate CaMKII. After receiving information for learning and memory, CaMKII is activated by Glutamate, the most important neurotransmitter for memory-related plasticity. Glutamate activates CaMKII and it plays some important roles in synaptic plasticity modification and long-term memory. PMID:26445635

  5. The comparison of nuclear ubiquitous casein and cyclin-dependent kinases substrate (NUCKS) with Ki67 proliferation marker expression in common skin tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zduniak, Krzysztof; Agrawal, Siddarth; Symonowicz, Krzysztof; Jurczyszyn, Kamil; Ziółkowski, Piotr

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear ubiquitous casein and cyclin-dependent kinases substrate (NUCKS) is a chromosomal protein of unknown function. Its amino acid composition and structure of its DNA binding domain resemble those of high mobility group A (HMGA) proteins which are associated with various malignancies. Since changes in expression of HMGA are considered as a marker of tumor progression, it is possible that similar changes in expression of NUCKS could be a useful tool in diagnosis of malignant skin tumors. To investigate this assumption we used specific antibodies against NUCKS for immunohistochemistry of squamous (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) as well as keratoacanthoma (KA). We found high expression of NUCKS in nuclei of SCC and BCC cells which exceeded expression of the well-known proliferation marker Ki67. Expression of NUCKS in benign KA was much below that of malignant tumors. With the present study and based on our previous experience we would like to suggest the NUCKS protein as a novel proliferation marker for immunohistochemical evaluation of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded skin tumor specimens. We would like to emphasize that NUCKS abundance in malignant skin tumors is higher than that of the well-known proliferation marker Ki67, thus allowing more precise assessment of tumor proliferation potential.

  6. Immunohistochemical and Proteomic Evaluation of Nuclear Ubiquitous Casein and Cyclin-Dependent Kinases Substrate in Invasive Ductal Carcinoma of the Breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Ziółkowski

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear ubiquitous casein and cyclin-dependent kinases substrate (NUCKS is 27 kDa chromosomal protein of unknown function. Its amino acid composition as well as structure of its DNA binding domain resembles that of high-mobility group A, HMGA proteins. HMGA proteins are associated with various malignancies. Since changes in expression of HMGA are considered as marker of tumor progression, it is possible that similar changes in expression of NUCKS could be useful tool in diagnosis and prognosis of breast cancer. For identification and analysis of NUCKS we used proteomic and histochemical methods. Analysis of patient-matched samples of normal and breast cancer by mass spectrometry revealed elevated levels of NUCKS in protein extracts from ductal breast cancers. We elicited specific antibodies against NUCKS and used them for immunohistochemistry in invasive ductal carcinoma of breast. We found high expression of NUCKS in 84.3% of cancer cells. We suggest that such overexpression of NUCKS can play significant role in breast cancer biology.

  7. Effects of Butyltins (BTs) on Mitogen-Activated-Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase (MAP3K) and Ras Activity in Human Natural Killer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celada, Lindsay J.; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2013-01-01

    Butyltins (BTs) contaminate the environment and are found in human blood. BTs, tributyltin (TBT) and dibutyltin (DBT), diminish the cytotoxic function and levels of key proteins of human natural killer (NK) cells. NK cells are an initial immune defense against tumors, virally-infected cells and antibody-coated cells and thus critical to human health. The signaling pathways that regulate NK cell functions include mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Studies have shown that exposure to BTs leads to the activation of specific MAPKs and MAPK kinases (MAP2Ks) in human NK cells. MAP2K kinases (MAP3Ks) are upstream activators of MAP2Ks, which then activate MAPKs. The current study examined if BT-induced activation of MAP3Ks was responsible for MAP2K and thus, MAPK activation. This study examines the effects of TBT and DBT on the total levels of two MAP3Ks, c-Raf and ASK1, as well as activating and inhibitory phosphorylation sites on these MAP3Ks. In addition, the immediate upstream activator of c-Raf, Ras, was examined for BT-induced alterations. Our results show significant activation of the MAP3K, c-Raf, in human NK cells within 10 minutes of TBT exposure and the MAP3K, ASK1, after one hour exposures to TBT. In addition, our results suggest that both TBT and DBT are impacting the regulation of c-Raf. PMID:24038145

  8. 2-Aminopyridine-Based Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 (MAP4K4) Inhibitors: Assessment of Mechanism-Based Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Robert L; Ammirati, Mark; Bagley, Scott W; Bhattacharya, Samit K; Buckbinder, Leonard; Cortes, Christian; El-Kattan, Ayman F; Ford, Kristen; Freeman, Gary B; Guimarães, Cristiano R W; Liu, Shenping; Niosi, Mark; Skoura, Athanasia; Tess, David

    2018-04-12

    Studies have linked the serine-threonine kinase MAP4K4 to the regulation of a number of biological processes and/or diseases, including diabetes, cancer, inflammation, and angiogenesis. With a majority of the members of our lead series (e.g., 1) suffering from time-dependent inhibition (TDI) of CYP3A4, we sought design avenues that would eliminate this risk. One such approach arose from the observation that carboxylic acid-based intermediates employed in our discovery efforts retained high MAP4K4 inhibitory potency and were devoid of the TDI risk. The medicinal chemistry effort that led to the discovery of this central nervous system-impaired inhibitor together with its preclinical safety profile is described.

  9. A double-mutant collection targeting MAP kinase related genes in Arabidopsis for studying genetic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shih-Heng; Krysan, Patrick J

    2016-12-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades are conserved in all eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis thaliana there are approximately 80 genes encoding MAP kinase kinase kinases (MAP3K), 10 genes encoding MAP kinase kinases (MAP2K), and 20 genes encoding MAP kinases (MAPK). Reverse genetic analysis has failed to reveal abnormal phenotypes for a majority of these genes. One strategy for uncovering gene function when single-mutant lines do not produce an informative phenotype is to perform a systematic genetic interaction screen whereby double-mutants are created from a large library of single-mutant lines. Here we describe a new collection of 275 double-mutant lines derived from a library of single-mutants targeting genes related to MAP kinase signaling. To facilitate this study, we developed a high-throughput double-mutant generating pipeline using a system for growing Arabidopsis seedlings in 96-well plates. A quantitative root growth assay was used to screen for evidence of genetic interactions in this double-mutant collection. Our screen revealed four genetic interactions, all of which caused synthetic enhancement of the root growth defects observed in a MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) single-mutant line. Seeds for this double-mutant collection are publicly available through the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center. Scientists interested in diverse biological processes can now screen this double-mutant collection under a wide range of growth conditions in order to search for additional genetic interactions that may provide new insights into MAP kinase signaling. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. A mitotically inheritable unit containing a MAP kinase module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kicka, Sébastien; Bonnet, Crystel; Sobering, Andrew K; Ganesan, Latha P; Silar, Philippe

    2006-09-05

    Prions are novel kinds of hereditary units, relying solely on proteins, that are infectious and inherited in a non-Mendelian fashion. To date, they are either based on autocatalytic modification of a 3D conformation or on autocatalytic cleavage. Here, we provide further evidence that in the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina, a MAP kinase cascade is probably able to self-activate and generate C, a hereditary unit that bears many similarities to prions and triggers cell degeneration. We show that in addition to the MAPKKK gene, both the MAPKK and MAPK genes are necessary for the propagation of C, and that overexpression of MAPK as that of MAPKKK facilitates the appearance of C. We also show that a correlation exists between the presence of C and localization of the MAPK inside nuclei. These data emphasize the resemblance between prions and a self-positively regulated cascade in terms of their transmission. This thus further expands the concept of protein-base inheritance to regulatory networks that have the ability to self-activate.

  11. HOG MAP kinase regulation of alternariol biosynthesis in Alternaria alternata is important for substrate colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Eva; Schmidt-Heydt, Markus; Geisen, Rolf

    2012-07-16

    Strains of the genus Alternaria are ubiquitously present and frequently found on fruits, vegetables and cereals. One of the most commonly found species from this genus is A. alternata which is able to produce the mycotoxin alternariol among others. To date only limited knowledge is available about the regulation of the biosynthesis of alternariol, especially under conditions relevant to food. Tomatoes are a typical substrate of A. alternata and have a high water activity. On the other hand cereals with moderate water activity are also frequently colonized by A. alternata. In the current analysis it was demonstrated that even minor changes in the osmotic status of the substrate affect the alternariol biosynthesis of strains from vegetables resulting in nearly complete inhibition. High osmolarity in the environment is usually transmitted to the transcriptional level of downstream regulated genes by the HOG signal cascade (high osmolarity glycerol cascade) which is a MAP kinase transduction pathway. The phosphorylation status of the A. alternata HOG (AaHOG) was determined. Various concentrations of NaCl induce the phosphorylation of AaHOG in a concentration, time and strain dependent manner. A strain with a genetically inactivated aahog gene was no longer able to produce alternariol indicating that the activity of the aahog gene is required for alternariol biosynthesis. Further experiments revealed that the biosynthesis of alternariol is important for the fungus to colonize tomato tissue. The tight water activity dependent regulation of alternariol biosynthesis ensures alternariol biosynthesis at conditions which indicate an optimal colonization substrate for the fungus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The role of p38 MAP kinase and c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase signaling in the differentiation and apoptosis of immortalized neural stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Se-Ran; Cho, Sung-Dae; Ahn, Nam-Shik; Jung, Ji-Won; Park, Joon-Suk; Jo, Eun-Hye; Hwang, Jae-Woong; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Bong-Hee; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Lee, Yong-Soon

    2005-01-01

    The two distinct members of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and p38 MAP kinase, play an important role in central nervous system (CNS) development and differentiation. However, their role and functions are not completely understood in CNS. To facilitate in vitro study, we have established an immortal stem cell line using SV40 from fetal rat embryonic day 17. In these cells, MAP kinase inhibitors (SP600125, SB202190, and PD98059) were treated for 1, 24, 48, and 72 h to examine the roles of protein kinases. Early inhibition of JNK did not alter phenotypic or morphological changes of immortalized cells, however overexpression of Bax and decrease of phosphorylated AKT was observed. The prolonged inhibition of JNK induced polyploidization of immortalized cells, and resulted in differentiation and inhibition of cell proliferation. Moreover, JNK and p38 MAP kinase but not ERK1/2 was activated, and p21, p53, and Bax were overexpressed by prolonged inhibition of JNK. These results indicate that JNK and p38 MAP kinase could play dual roles on cell survival and apoptosis. Furthermore, this established cell line could facilitate study of the role of JNK and p38 MAP kinase on CNS development or differentiation/apoptosis

  13. MAP kinase-independent signaling in angiotensin II regulation of neuromodulation in SHR neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H; Raizada, M K

    1998-09-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II), via its interaction with the angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor subtype, causes enhanced stimulation of norepinephrine (NE) neuromodulation. This involves increased transcription of NE transporter, tyrosine hydroxylase, and dopamine ss-hydroxylase genes in Wistar-Kyoto rat (WKY) brain neurons. AT1 receptor-mediated regulation of certain signaling events (such as activation of the Ras-Raf-1-mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling pathway, nuclear translocation of transcription factors such as Fos and Jun, and the interactions of these factors with AP-1 binding sites) is involved in this NE neuromodulation (Lu et al. J Cell Biol. 1996;135:1609-1617). The aim of this study was to compare the signal transduction mechanism of Ang II regulation of NE neuromodulation in WKY and spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) brain neurons, in view of the fact that AT1 receptor expression and Ang II stimulation of NE neuromodulation are higher in SHR neurons compared with WKY neurons. Despite this hyperactivity, Ang II stimulation of Ras, Raf-1, and MAP kinase activities was comparable between the neurons from WKY and SHR. Similarly, central injections of Ang II caused a comparable stimulation of MAP kinase in the hypothalamic and brain stem areas of adult WKY and SHR. Inhibition of MAP kinase by either an MAP kinase kinase inhibitor (PD98059) or an MAP kinase antisense oligonucleotide completely attenuated the stimulatory effects of Ang II on [3H]-NE uptake, NE transporter mRNA, and tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA levels in WKY neurons. These treatments resulted in only 43% to 50% inhibition of [3H]-NE uptake and NE transporter and tyrosine hydroxylase mRNAs in SHR neurons. Thus, Ang II stimulation of NE neuromodulation was completely blocked by MAP kinase inhibition in WKY neurons and only partially blocked in the SHR neurons. These observations suggest the presence of an additional signal transduction pathway involved in NE neuromodulation in SHR neurons

  14. The Amoebal MAP Kinase Response to Legionella pneumophila Is Regulated by DupA

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhiru; Dugan, Aisling S.; Bloomfield, Gareth; Skelton, Jason; Ivens, Alasdair; Losick, Vicki; Isberg, Ralph R.

    2009-01-01

    The amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum can support replication of Legionella pneumophila. Here we identify the dupA gene, encoding a putative tyrosine kinase/dual-specificity phosphatase, in a screen for D. discoideum mutants altered in allowing L. pneumophila intracellular replication. Inactivation of dupA resulted in depressed L. pneumophila growth and sustained hyperphosphorylation of the amoebal MAP kinase ERK1, consistent with loss of a phosphatase activity. Bacterial challenge of wild-type...

  15. Tunable signal processing in synthetic MAP kinase cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shaughnessy, Ellen C; Palani, Santhosh; Collins, James J; Sarkar, Casim A

    2011-01-07

    The flexibility of MAPK cascade responses enables regulation of a vast array of cell fate decisions, but elucidating the mechanisms underlying this plasticity is difficult in endogenous signaling networks. We constructed insulated mammalian MAPK cascades in yeast to explore how intrinsic and extrinsic perturbations affect the flexibility of these synthetic signaling modules. Contrary to biphasic dependence on scaffold concentration, we observe monotonic decreases in signal strength as scaffold concentration increases. We find that augmenting the concentration of sequential kinases can enhance ultrasensitivity and lower the activation threshold. Further, integrating negative regulation and concentration variation can decouple ultrasensitivity and threshold from the strength of the response. Computational analyses show that cascading can generate ultrasensitivity and that natural cascades with different kinase concentrations are innately biased toward their distinct activation profiles. This work demonstrates that tunable signal processing is inherent to minimal MAPK modules and elucidates principles for rational design of synthetic signaling systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Structural Bioinformatics-Based Prediction of Exceptional Selectivity of p38 MAP Kinase Inhibitor PH-797804

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Li; Shieh, Huey S.; Selness, Shaun R.; Devraj, Rajesh V.; Walker, John K.; Devadas, Balekudru; Hope, Heidi R.; Compton, Robert P.; Schindler, John F.; Hirsch, Jeffrey L.; Benson, Alan G.; Kurumbail, Ravi G.; Stegeman, Roderick A.; Williams, Jennifer M.; Broadus, Richard M.; Walden, Zara; Monahan, Joseph B.; Pfizer

    2009-07-24

    PH-797804 is a diarylpyridinone inhibitor of p38{alpha} mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase derived from a racemic mixture as the more potent atropisomer (aS), first proposed by molecular modeling and subsequently confirmed by experiments. On the basis of structural comparison with a different biaryl pyrazole template and supported by dozens of high-resolution crystal structures of p38{alpha} inhibitor complexes, PH-797804 is predicted to possess a high level of specificity across the broad human kinase genome. We used a structural bioinformatics approach to identify two selectivity elements encoded by the TXXXG sequence motif on the p38{alpha} kinase hinge: (i) Thr106 that serves as the gatekeeper to the buried hydrophobic pocket occupied by 2,4-difluorophenyl of PH-797804 and (ii) the bidentate hydrogen bonds formed by the pyridinone moiety with the kinase hinge requiring an induced 180{sup o} rotation of the Met109-Gly110 peptide bond. The peptide flip occurs in p38{alpha} kinase due to the critical glycine residue marked by its conformational flexibility. Kinome-wide sequence mining revealed rare presentation of the selectivity motif. Corroboratively, PH-797804 exhibited exceptionally high specificity against MAP kinases and the related kinases. No cross-reactivity was observed in large panels of kinase screens (selectivity ratio of >500-fold). In cellular assays, PH-797804 demonstrated superior potency and selectivity consistent with the biochemical measurements. PH-797804 has met safety criteria in human phase I studies and is under clinical development for several inflammatory conditions. Understanding the rationale for selectivity at the molecular level helps elucidate the biological function and design of specific p38{alpha} kinase inhibitors.

  17. MAP kinase pathways in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustin, M. C.; Albertyn, J.; Alexander, M.; Davenport, K.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    A cascade of three protein kinases known as a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is commonly found as part of the signaling pathways in eukaryotic cells. Almost two decades of genetic and biochemical experimentation plus the recently completed DNA sequence of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome have revealed just five functionally distinct MAPK cascades in this yeast. Sexual conjugation, cell growth, and adaptation to stress, for example, all require MAPK-mediated cellular responses. A primary function of these cascades appears to be the regulation of gene expression in response to extracellular signals or as part of specific developmental processes. In addition, the MAPK cascades often appear to regulate the cell cycle and vice versa. Despite the success of the gene hunter era in revealing these pathways, there are still many significant gaps in our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms for activation of these cascades and how the cascades regulate cell function. For example, comparison of different yeast signaling pathways reveals a surprising variety of different types of upstream signaling proteins that function to activate a MAPK cascade, yet how the upstream proteins actually activate the cascade remains unclear. We also know that the yeast MAPK pathways regulate each other and interact with other signaling pathways to produce a coordinated pattern of gene expression, but the molecular mechanisms of this cross talk are poorly understood. This review is therefore an attempt to present the current knowledge of MAPK pathways in yeast and some directions for future research in this area.

  18. Discovery and Characterization of Non-ATP Site Inhibitors of the Mitogen Activated Protein (MAP) Kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comess, Kenneth M.; Sun, Chaohong; Abad-Zapatero, Cele; Goedken, Eric R.; Gum, Rebecca J.; Borhani, David W.; Argiriadi, Maria; Groebe, Duncan R.; Jia, Yong; Clampit, Jill E.; Haasch, Deanna L.; Smith, Harriet T.; Wang, Sanyi; Song, Danying; Coen, Michael L.; Cloutier, Timothy E.; Tang, Hua; Cheng, Xueheng; Quinn, Christopher; Liu, Bo; Xin, Zhili; Liu, Gang; Fry, Elizabeth H.; Stoll, Vincent; Ng, Teresa I.; Banach, David; Marcotte, Doug; Burns, David J.; Calderwood, David J.; Hajduk, Philip J. (Abbott)

    2012-03-02

    Inhibition of protein kinases has validated therapeutic utility for cancer, with at least seven kinase inhibitor drugs on the market. Protein kinase inhibition also has significant potential for a variety of other diseases, including diabetes, pain, cognition, and chronic inflammatory and immunologic diseases. However, as the vast majority of current approaches to kinase inhibition target the highly conserved ATP-binding site, the use of kinase inhibitors in treating nononcology diseases may require great selectivity for the target kinase. As protein kinases are signal transducers that are involved in binding to a variety of other proteins, targeting alternative, less conserved sites on the protein may provide an avenue for greater selectivity. Here we report an affinity-based, high-throughput screening technique that allows nonbiased interrogation of small molecule libraries for binding to all exposed sites on a protein surface. This approach was used to screen both the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase Jnk-1 (involved in insulin signaling) and p38{alpha} (involved in the formation of TNF{alpha} and other cytokines). In addition to canonical ATP-site ligands, compounds were identified that bind to novel allosteric sites. The nature, biological relevance, and mode of binding of these ligands were extensively characterized using two-dimensional {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, protein X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and direct enzymatic activity and activation cascade assays. Jnk-1 and p38{alpha} both belong to the MAP kinase family, and the allosteric ligands for both targets bind similarly on a ledge of the protein surface exposed by the MAP insertion present in the CMGC family of protein kinases and distant from the active site. Medicinal chemistry studies resulted in an improved Jnk-1 ligand able to increase adiponectin secretion in human adipocytes and increase insulin-induced protein kinase PKB phosphorylation in human hepatocytes, in

  19. The MAP kinase substrate MKS1 is a regulator of plant defense responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasson, E.; Jenkins, T.; Brodersen, P.

    2005-01-01

    Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) functions as a regulator of pathogen defense responses, because it is required for both repression of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent resistance and for activation of jasmonate (JA)-dependent defense gene expression. To understand MPK4 signaling mechanisms, we used...

  20. The MAP kinase Pmk1 and protein kinase A are required for rotenone resistance in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yiwei; Gulis, Galina; Buckner, Scott; Johnson, P. Connor; Sullivan, Daniel [Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Busenlehner, Laura [Department of Chemistry, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Marcus, Stevan, E-mail: smarcus@bama.ua.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Rotenone induces generation of ROS and mitochondrial fragmentation in fission yeast. {yields} The MAPK Pmk1 and PKA are required for rotenone resistance in fission yeast. {yields} Pmk1 and PKA are required for ROS clearance in rotenone treated fission yeast cells. {yields} PKA plays a role in ROS clearance under normal growth conditions in fission yeast. -- Abstract: Rotenone is a widely used pesticide that induces Parkinson's disease-like symptoms in rats and death of dopaminergic neurons in culture. Although rotenone is a potent inhibitor of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, it can induce death of dopaminergic neurons independently of complex I inhibition. Here we describe effects of rotenone in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which lacks complex I and carries out rotenone-insensitive cellular respiration. We show that rotenone induces generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as fragmentation of mitochondrial networks in treated S. pombe cells. While rotenone is only modestly inhibitory to growth of wild type S. pombe cells, it is strongly inhibitory to growth of mutants lacking the ERK-type MAP kinase, Pmk1, or protein kinase A (PKA). In contrast, cells lacking the p38 MAP kinase, Spc1, exhibit modest resistance to rotenone. Consistent with these findings, we provide evidence that Pmk1 and PKA, but not Spc1, are required for clearance of ROS in rotenone treated S. pombe cells. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of S. pombe for elucidating complex I-independent molecular targets of rotenone as well as mechanisms conferring resistance to the toxin.

  1. The MAP kinase Pmk1 and protein kinase A are required for rotenone resistance in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yiwei; Gulis, Galina; Buckner, Scott; Johnson, P. Connor; Sullivan, Daniel; Busenlehner, Laura; Marcus, Stevan

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Rotenone induces generation of ROS and mitochondrial fragmentation in fission yeast. → The MAPK Pmk1 and PKA are required for rotenone resistance in fission yeast. → Pmk1 and PKA are required for ROS clearance in rotenone treated fission yeast cells. → PKA plays a role in ROS clearance under normal growth conditions in fission yeast. -- Abstract: Rotenone is a widely used pesticide that induces Parkinson's disease-like symptoms in rats and death of dopaminergic neurons in culture. Although rotenone is a potent inhibitor of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, it can induce death of dopaminergic neurons independently of complex I inhibition. Here we describe effects of rotenone in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which lacks complex I and carries out rotenone-insensitive cellular respiration. We show that rotenone induces generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as fragmentation of mitochondrial networks in treated S. pombe cells. While rotenone is only modestly inhibitory to growth of wild type S. pombe cells, it is strongly inhibitory to growth of mutants lacking the ERK-type MAP kinase, Pmk1, or protein kinase A (PKA). In contrast, cells lacking the p38 MAP kinase, Spc1, exhibit modest resistance to rotenone. Consistent with these findings, we provide evidence that Pmk1 and PKA, but not Spc1, are required for clearance of ROS in rotenone treated S. pombe cells. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of S. pombe for elucidating complex I-independent molecular targets of rotenone as well as mechanisms conferring resistance to the toxin.

  2. Loss of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 (MAP3K4) Reveals a Requirement for MAPK Signalling in Mouse Sex Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, Debora; Siggers, Pam; Brixey, Rachel; Warr, Nick; Beddow, Sarah; Edwards, Jessica; Williams, Debbie; Wilhelm, Dagmar; Koopman, Peter; Flavell, Richard A.; Chi, Hongbo; Ostrer, Harry; Wells, Sara; Cheeseman, Michael; Greenfield, Andy

    2009-01-01

    Sex determination in mammals is controlled by the presence or absence of the Y-linked gene SRY. In the developing male (XY) gonad, sex-determining region of the Y (SRY) protein acts to up-regulate expression of the related gene, SOX9, a transcriptional regulator that in turn initiates a downstream pathway of testis development, whilst also suppressing ovary development. Despite the requirement for a number of transcription factors and secreted signalling molecules in sex determination, intracellular signalling components functioning in this process have not been defined. Here we report a role for the phylogenetically ancient mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway in mouse sex determination. Using a forward genetic screen, we identified the recessive boygirl (byg) mutation. On the C57BL/6J background, embryos homozygous for byg exhibit consistent XY gonadal sex reversal. The byg mutation is an A to T transversion causing a premature stop codon in the gene encoding MAP3K4 (also known as MEKK4), a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase. Analysis of XY byg/byg gonads at 11.5 d post coitum reveals a growth deficit and a failure to support mesonephric cell migration, both early cellular processes normally associated with testis development. Expression analysis of mutant XY gonads at the same stage also reveals a dramatic reduction in Sox9 and, crucially, Sry at the transcript and protein levels. Moreover, we describe experiments showing the presence of activated MKK4, a direct target of MAP3K4, and activated p38 in the coelomic region of the XY gonad at 11.5 d post coitum, establishing a link between MAPK signalling in proliferating gonadal somatic cells and regulation of Sry expression. Finally, we provide evidence that haploinsufficiency for Map3k4 accounts for T-associated sex reversal (Tas). These data demonstrate that MAP3K4-dependent signalling events are required for normal expression of Sry during testis development, and create a novel

  3. Loss of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 4 (MAP3K4 reveals a requirement for MAPK signalling in mouse sex determination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Bogani

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Sex determination in mammals is controlled by the presence or absence of the Y-linked gene SRY. In the developing male (XY gonad, sex-determining region of the Y (SRY protein acts to up-regulate expression of the related gene, SOX9, a transcriptional regulator that in turn initiates a downstream pathway of testis development, whilst also suppressing ovary development. Despite the requirement for a number of transcription factors and secreted signalling molecules in sex determination, intracellular signalling components functioning in this process have not been defined. Here we report a role for the phylogenetically ancient mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signalling pathway in mouse sex determination. Using a forward genetic screen, we identified the recessive boygirl (byg mutation. On the C57BL/6J background, embryos homozygous for byg exhibit consistent XY gonadal sex reversal. The byg mutation is an A to T transversion causing a premature stop codon in the gene encoding MAP3K4 (also known as MEKK4, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase. Analysis of XY byg/byg gonads at 11.5 d post coitum reveals a growth deficit and a failure to support mesonephric cell migration, both early cellular processes normally associated with testis development. Expression analysis of mutant XY gonads at the same stage also reveals a dramatic reduction in Sox9 and, crucially, Sry at the transcript and protein levels. Moreover, we describe experiments showing the presence of activated MKK4, a direct target of MAP3K4, and activated p38 in the coelomic region of the XY gonad at 11.5 d post coitum, establishing a link between MAPK signalling in proliferating gonadal somatic cells and regulation of Sry expression. Finally, we provide evidence that haploinsufficiency for Map3k4 accounts for T-associated sex reversal (Tas. These data demonstrate that MAP3K4-dependent signalling events are required for normal expression of Sry during testis development, and

  4. The amoebal MAP kinase response to Legionella pneumophila is regulated by DupA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiru; Dugan, Aisling S; Bloomfield, Gareth; Skelton, Jason; Ivens, Alasdair; Losick, Vicki; Isberg, Ralph R

    2009-09-17

    The amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum can support replication of Legionella pneumophila. Here we identify the dupA gene, encoding a putative tyrosine kinase/dual-specificity phosphatase, in a screen for D. discoideum mutants altered in allowing L. pneumophila intracellular replication. Inactivation of dupA resulted in depressed L. pneumophila growth and sustained hyperphosphorylation of the amoebal MAP kinase ERK1, consistent with loss of a phosphatase activity. Bacterial challenge of wild-type amoebae induced dupA expression and resulted in transiently increased ERK1 phosphorylation, suggesting that dupA and ERK1 are part of a response to bacteria. Indeed, over 500 of the genes misregulated in the dupA(-) mutant were regulated in response to L. pneumophila infection, including some thought to have immune-like functions. MAP kinase phosphatases are known to be highly upregulated in macrophages challenged with L. pneumophila. Thus, DupA may regulate a MAP kinase response to bacteria that is conserved from amoebae to mammals.

  5. A role for Pyk2 and Src in linking G-protein-coupled receptors with MAP kinase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikic, I; Tokiwa, G; Lev, S; Courtneidge, S A; Schlessinger, J

    1996-10-10

    The mechanisms by which mitogenic G-protein-coupled receptors activate the MAP kinase signalling pathway are poorly understood. Candidate protein tyrosine kinases that link G-protein-coupled receptors with MAP kinase include Src family kinases, the epidermal growth factor receptor, Lyn and Syk. Here we show that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and bradykinin induce tyrosine phosphorylation of Pyk2 and complex formation between Pyk2 and activated Src. Moreover, tyrosine phosphorylation of Pyk2 leads to binding of the SH2 domain of Src to tyrosine 402 of Pyk2 and activation of Src. Transient overexpression of a dominant interfering mutant of Pyk2 or the protein tyrosine kinase Csk reduces LPA- or bradykinin-induced activation of MAP kinase. LPA- or bradykinin-induced MAP kinase activation was also inhibited by overexpression of dominant interfering mutants of Grb2 and Sos. We propose that Pyk2 acts with Src to link Gi- and Gq-coupled receptors with Grb2 and Sos to activate the MAP kinase signalling pathway in PC12 cells.

  6. HAM-5 functions as a MAP kinase scaffold during cell fusion in Neurospora crassa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfried Jonkers

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell fusion in genetically identical Neurospora crassa germlings and in hyphae is a highly regulated process involving the activation of a conserved MAP kinase cascade that includes NRC-1, MEK-2 and MAK-2. During chemotrophic growth in germlings, the MAP kinase cascade members localize to conidial anastomosis tube (CAT tips every ∼8 minutes, perfectly out of phase with another protein that is recruited to the tip: SOFT, a recently identified scaffold for the MAK-1 MAP kinase pathway in Sordaria macrospora. How the MAK-2 oscillation process is initiated, maintained and what proteins regulate the MAP kinase cascade is currently unclear. A global phosphoproteomics approach using an allele of mak-2 (mak-2Q100G that can be specifically inhibited by the ATP analog 1NM-PP1 was utilized to identify MAK-2 kinase targets in germlings that were potentially involved in this process. One such putative target was HAM-5, a protein of unknown biochemical function. Previously, Δham-5 mutants were shown to be deficient for hyphal fusion. Here we show that HAM-5-GFP co-localized with NRC-1, MEK-2 and MAK-2 and oscillated with identical dynamics from the cytoplasm to CAT tips during chemotropic interactions. In the Δmak-2 strain, HAM-5-GFP localized to punctate complexes that did not oscillate, but still localized to the germling tip, suggesting that MAK-2 activity influences HAM-5 function/localization. However, MAK-2-GFP showed cytoplasmic and nuclear localization in a Δham-5 strain and did not localize to puncta. Via co-immunoprecipitation experiments, HAM-5 was shown to physically interact with NRC-1, MEK-2 and MAK-2, suggesting that it functions as a scaffold/transport hub for the MAP kinase cascade members for oscillation and chemotropic interactions during germling and hyphal fusion in N. crassa. The identification of HAM-5 as a scaffold-like protein will help to link the activation of MAK-2 cascade to upstream factors and proteins involved in this

  7. Interdomain allosteric regulation of Polo kinase by Aurora B and Map205 is required for cytokinesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachaner, David; Pinson, Xavier; El Kadhi, Khaled Ben; Normandin, Karine; Talje, Lama; Lavoie, Hugo; Lépine, Guillaume; Carréno, Sébastien; Kwok, Benjamin H.; Hickson, Gilles R.

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster Polo and its human orthologue Polo-like kinase 1 fulfill essential roles during cell division. Members of the Polo-like kinase (Plk) family contain an N-terminal kinase domain (KD) and a C-terminal Polo-Box domain (PBD), which mediates protein interactions. How Plks are regulated in cytokinesis is poorly understood. Here we show that phosphorylation of Polo by Aurora B is required for cytokinesis. This phosphorylation in the activation loop of the KD promotes the dissociation of Polo from the PBD-bound microtubule-associated protein Map205, which acts as an allosteric inhibitor of Polo kinase activity. This mechanism allows the release of active Polo from microtubules of the central spindle and its recruitment to the site of cytokinesis. Failure in Polo phosphorylation results in both early and late cytokinesis defects. Importantly, the antagonistic regulation of Polo by Aurora B and Map205 in cytokinesis reveals that interdomain allosteric mechanisms can play important roles in controlling the cellular functions of Plks. PMID:25332165

  8. The role of p38 MAP kinase in cancer cell apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenassi, M.; Plemenitas, A.

    2006-01-01

    Background. Cellular behaviour in response to many extracellular stimuli is mediated through MAP kinase signalling pathways. p38 MAP kinase that is represented in mammals by four isoforms (p38α, p38β, p38γ and p38δ) is one of the four main subgroups of MAP kinases. Recent studies show that p38 activation is necessary for cancer cell death initiated by variety of anti-cancer agents. This finding connected cancer therapies previously considered to be mechanistically unrelated and raised the possibility of developing anti-cancer agents that lack the side effects caused by events upstream of p38 MAPK. Many of the details of p38 induced apoptosis still need to be elucidated. Since most of the past studies rely only on the cell culture models, all the results have to be verified using in vivo models. Also very little is known about the role of p38 mediated apoptosis on non-neoplastic cells in response to anti-cancer agents. Conclusion. Although p38 activation of cancer cell apoptosis is a very complex process, recent studies indicate a good starting point for new strategies that would increase the efficiency and decrease the toxicity of proven therapies. (author)

  9. Acute lymphoid and gastrointestinal toxicity induced by selective p38alpha map kinase and map kinase-activated protein kinase-2 (MK2) inhibitors in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Dale L; O'Neil, Shawn P; Devraj, Rajesh V; Portanova, Joseph P; Gilles, Richard W; Gross, Cindy J; Curtiss, Sandra W; Komocsar, Wendy J; Garner, Debra S; Happa, Fernando A; Kraus, Lori J; Nikula, Kristen J; Monahan, Joseph B; Selness, Shaun R; Galluppi, Gerald R; Shevlin, Kimberly M; Kramer, Jeffrey A; Walker, John K; Messing, Dean M; Anderson, David R; Mourey, Robert J; Whiteley, Laurence O; Daniels, John S; Yang, Jerry Z; Rowlands, Philip C; Alden, Carl L; Davis, John W; Sagartz, John E

    2010-06-01

    Exposure to moderately selective p38alpha mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors in the Beagle dog results in an acute toxicity consisting of mild clinical signs (decreased activity, diarrhea, and fever), lymphoid necrosis and depletion in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen, and linear colonic and cecal mucosal hemorrhages. Lymphocyte apoptosis and necrosis in the GALT is the earliest and most prominent histopathologic change observed, followed temporally by neutrophilic infiltration and acute inflammation of the lymph nodes and spleen and multifocal mucosal epithelial necrosis and linear hemorrhages in the colon and cecum. These effects are not observed in the mouse, rat, or cynomolgus monkey. To further characterize the acute toxicity in the dog, a series of in vivo, in vitro, and immunohistochemical studies were conducted to determine the relationship between the lymphoid and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity and p38 MAPK inhibition. Results of these studies demonstrate a direct correlation between p38alpha MAPK inhibition and the acute lymphoid and gastrointestinal toxicity in the dog. Similar effects were observed following exposure to inhibitors of MAPK-activated protein kinase-2 (MK2), further implicating the role of p38alpha MAPK signaling pathway inhibition in these effects. Based on these findings, the authors conclude that p38alpha MAPK inhibition results in acute lymphoid and GI toxicity in the dog and is unique among the species evaluated in these studies.

  10. A ubiquitous method for street scale spatial data collection and analysis in challenging urban environments: mapping health risks using spatial video in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Andrew; Blackburn, Jason K; Widmer, Jocelyn M; Morris, J Glenn

    2013-04-15

    Fine-scale and longitudinal geospatial analysis of health risks in challenging urban areas is often limited by the lack of other spatial layers even if case data are available. Underlying population counts, residential context, and associated causative factors such as standing water or trash locations are often missing unless collected through logistically difficult, and often expensive, surveys. The lack of spatial context also hinders the interpretation of results and designing intervention strategies structured around analytical insights. This paper offers a ubiquitous spatial data collection approach using a spatial video that can be used to improve analysis and involve participatory collaborations. A case study will be used to illustrate this approach with three health risks mapped at the street scale for a coastal community in Haiti. Spatial video was used to collect street and building scale information, including standing water, trash accumulation, presence of dogs, cohort specific population characteristics, and other cultural phenomena. These data were digitized into Google Earth and then coded and analyzed in a GIS using kernel density and spatial filtering approaches. The concentrations of these risks around area schools which are sometimes sources of diarrheal disease infection because of the high concentration of children and variable sanitary practices will show the utility of the method. In addition schools offer potential locations for cholera education interventions. Previously unavailable fine scale health risk data vary in concentration across the town, with some schools being proximate to greater concentrations of the mapped risks. The spatial video is also used to validate coded data and location specific risks within these "hotspots". Spatial video is a tool that can be used in any environment to improve local area health analysis and intervention. The process is rapid and can be repeated in study sites through time to track spatio

  11. Regulation of peripheral inflammation by spinal p38 MAP kinase in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Boyle

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Somatic afferent input to the spinal cord from a peripheral inflammatory site can modulate the peripheral response. However, the intracellular signaling mechanisms in the spinal cord that regulate this linkage have not been defined. Previous studies suggest spinal cord p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase and cytokines participate in nociceptive behavior. We therefore determined whether these pathways also regulate peripheral inflammation in rat adjuvant arthritis, which is a model of rheumatoid arthritis.Selective blockade of spinal cord p38 MAP kinase by administering the p38 inhibitor SB203580 via intrathecal (IT catheters in rats with adjuvant arthritis markedly suppressed paw swelling, inhibited synovial inflammation, and decreased radiographic evidence of joint destruction. The same dose of SB203580 delivered systemically had no effect, indicating that the effect was mediated by local concentrations in the neural compartment. Evaluation of articular gene expression by quantitative real-time PCR showed that spinal p38 inhibition markedly decreased synovial interleukin-1 and -6 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP3 gene expression. Activation of p38 required tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha in the nervous system because IT etanercept (a TNF inhibitor given during adjuvant arthritis blocked spinal p38 phosphorylation and reduced clinical signs of adjuvant arthritis.These data suggest that peripheral inflammation is sensed by the central nervous system (CNS, which subsequently activates stress-induced kinases in the spinal cord via a TNFalpha-dependent mechanism. Intracellular p38 MAP kinase signaling processes this information and profoundly modulates somatic inflammatory responses. Characterization of this mechanism could have clinical and basic research implications by supporting development of new treatments for arthritis and clarifying how the CNS regulates peripheral immune responses.

  12. Pancreatic cancer stimulates pancreatic stellate cell proliferation and TIMP-1 production through the MAP kinase pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Seiya; Yokota, Tokuyasu; Ujiki, Michael; Ding Xianzhong; Pelham, Carolyn; Adrian, Thomas E.; Talamonti, Mark S.; Bell, Richard H.; Denham, Woody

    2004-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is characterized by an intense desmoplastic reaction that surrounds the tumor. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are thought to be responsible for production of this extracellular matrix. When activated, PSCs have a myofibroblast phenotype and produce not only components of the extracellular matrix including collagen, fibronectin, and laminin, but also matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Since PSCs are found in the stroma surrounding human pancreatic adenocarcinoma, we postulate that pancreatic cancer could impact PSC proliferation and TIMP-1 production. Rat PSCs were isolated and cultured. Isolated PSCs were exposed to PANC-1 conditioned medium (CM) and proliferation, activation of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway, and TIMP-1 gene induction were determined. Exposure to PANC-1 CM increased PSC DNA synthesis, cell number, and TIMP-1 mRNA (real-time PCR) as well as activating the extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. Inhibition of ERK 1/2 phosphorylation (U0126) prevented the increases in growth and TIMP-1 expression. PANC-1 CM stimulates PSC proliferation and TIMP-1 through the MAP kinase (ERK 1/2) pathway

  13. Negative regulation of MAP kinase signaling in Drosophila by Ptp61F/PTP1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchankouo-Nguetcheu, Stéphane; Udinotti, Mario; Durand, Marjorie; Meng, Tzu-Ching; Taouis, Mohammed; Rabinow, Leonard

    2014-10-01

    PTP1B is an important negative regulator of insulin and other signaling pathways in mammals. However, the role of PTP1B in the regulation of RAS-MAPK signaling remains open to deliberation, due to conflicting evidence from different experimental systems. The Drosophila orthologue of mammalian PTP1B, PTP61F, has until recently remained largely uncharacterized. To establish the potential role of PTP61F in the regulation of signaling pathways in Drosophila and particularly to help resolve its fundamental function in RAS-MAPK signaling, we generated a new allele of Ptp61F as well as employed both RNA interference and overexpression alleles. Our results validate recent data showing that the activity of insulin and Abl kinase signaling is increased in Ptp61F mutants and RNA interference lines. Importantly, we establish negative regulation of the RAS/MAPK pathway by Ptp61F activity in whole animals. Of particular interest, our results document the modulation of hyperactive MAP kinase activity by Ptp61F alleles, showing that the phosphatase intervenes to directly or indirectly regulate MAP kinase itself.

  14. Arabidopsis MAP Kinase 4 regulates gene expression via transcription factor release in the nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Jin-Long; Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Petersen, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    kinase 4 (MPK4) exists in nuclear complexes with the WRKY33 transcription factor. This complex depends on the MPK4 substrate MKS1. Challenge with Pseudomonas syringae or flagellin leads to the activation of MPK4 and phosphorylation of MKS1. Subsequently, complexes with MKS1 and WRKY33 are released from...... MPK4, and WRKY33 targets the promoter of PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT3 (PAD3) encoding an enzyme required for the synthesis of antimicrobial camalexin. Hence, wrky33 mutants are impaired in the accumulation of PAD3 mRNA and camalexin production upon infection. That WRKY33 is an effector of MPK4 is further...... supported by the suppression of PAD3 expression in mpk4-wrky33 double mutant backgrounds. Our data establish direct links between MPK4 and innate immunity and provide an example of how a plant MAP kinase can regulate gene expression by releasing transcription factors in the nucleus upon activation....

  15. PSM/SH2-B distributes selected mitogenic receptor signals to distinct components in the PI3-kinase and MAP kinase signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Youping; Xu, Hu; Riedel, Heimo

    2007-02-15

    The Pro-rich, PH, and SH2 domain containing mitogenic signaling adapter PSM/SH2-B has been implicated as a cellular partner of various mitogenic receptor tyrosine kinases and related signaling mechanisms. Here, we report in a direct comparison of three peptide hormones, that PSM participates in the assembly of distinct mitogenic signaling complexes in response to insulin or IGF-I when compared to PDGF in cultured normal fibroblasts. The complex formed in response to insulin or IGF-I involves the respective peptide hormone receptor and presumably the established components leading to MAP kinase activation. However, our data suggest an alternative link from the PDGF receptor via PSM directly to MEK1/2 and consequently also to p44/42 activation, possibly through a scaffold protein. At least two PSM domains participate, the SH2 domain anticipated to link PSM to the respective receptor and the Pro-rich region in an association with an unidentified downstream component resulting in direct MEK1/2 and p44/42 regulation. The PDGF receptor signaling complex formed in response to PDGF involves PI 3-kinase in addition to the same components and interactions as described for insulin or IGF-I. PSM associates with PI 3-kinase via p85 and in addition the PSM PH domain participates in the regulation of PI 3-kinase activity, presumably through membrane interaction. In contrast, the PSM Pro-rich region appears to participate only in the MAP kinase signal. Both pathways contribute to the mitogenic response as shown by cell proliferation, survival, and focus formation. PSM regulates p38 MAP kinase activity in a pathway unrelated to the mitogenic response.

  16. Regulation of the MAP kinase cascade in PC12 cells: B-Raf activates MEK-1 (MAP kinase or ERK kinase) and is inhibited by cAMP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peraldi, P; Frödin, M; Barnier, J V

    1995-01-01

    AMP inhibits B-Raf autokinase activity as well as its ability to phosphorylate and activate MEK-1. This inhibition is likely to be due to a direct effect since we found that PKA phosphorylates B-Raf in vitro. Further, we show that B-Raf binds to p21ras, but more important, this binding to p21ras is virtually...... abolished with B-Raf from PC12 cells treated with CPT-cAMP. Hence, these data indicate that the PKA-mediated phosphorylation of B-Raf hampers its interaction with p21ras, which is responsible for the PKA-mediated decrease in B-Raf activity. Finally, our work suggests that in PC12 cells, cAMP stimulates MAP...

  17. Normal p21Ras/MAP kinase pathway expression and function in PBMC from patients with polycystic ovary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchs, A; Chagag, P; Weiss, M; Kish, E; Levinson, R; Aharoni, D; Rapoport, M J

    2004-04-01

    Polycystic ovary disease (PCOD) is associated with insulin resistance and increased prevalence of type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The p21Ras/MAP kinase is a major intracellular signaling pathway mediating insulin signaling in insulin responsive tissues. The expression, regulation and function of the p21Ras/MAP kinase pathway in PCOD patients were examined. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from ten patients with PCOD and ten controls. The expression of p21Ras and its regulatory proteins; hSOS1 and p120GAP were studied. The basal and phytohemaglutinin (PHA) or insulin stimulated phosphorylation of MAP kinase was determined. Expression of p21Ras, and its regulatory proteins hSOS1 and p120GAP were similar in PCOD patients and controls. Basal, PHA and insulin stimulated phosphorylation of MAP kinase, were also comparable in the two groups as well as their PBMC proliferative response. These data indicate that the expression and overall function of the p21Ras/MAP kinase pathway remain intact in non-diabetic patients with PCOD.

  18. Identification and characterization of an ABA-activated MAP kinase cascade in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Danquah, Agyemang

    2015-04-01

    Summary Abscisic acid (ABA) is a major phytohormone involved in important stress-related and developmental plant processes. Recent phosphoproteomic analyses revealed a large set of ABA-triggered phosphoproteins as putative mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) targets, although the evidence for MAPKs involved in ABA signalling is still scarce. Here, we identified and reconstituted in vivo a complete ABA-activated MAPK cascade, composed of the MAP3Ks MAP3K17/18, the MAP2K MKK3 and the four C group MAPKs MPK1/2/7/14. In planta, we show that ABA activation of MPK7 is blocked in mkk3-1 and map3k17mapk3k18 plants. Coherently, both mutants exhibit hypersensitivity to ABA and altered expression of a set of ABA-dependent genes. A genetic analysis further reveals that this MAPK cascade is activated by the PYR/PYL/RCAR-SnRK2-PP2C ABA core signalling module through protein synthesis of the MAP3Ks, unveiling an atypical mechanism for MAPK activation in eukaryotes. Our work provides evidence for a role of an ABA-induced MAPK pathway in plant stress signalling. Significance Statement We report in this article the identification of a complete MAPK module, composed of MAP3K17/18, MKK3 and MPK1/2/7/14, which is activated by ABA through the ABA core signalling complex. We showed that the activation of this module requires the MAP3K protein synthesis which occurs after hours of stress treatment, suggesting that the pathway is involved in a delayed wave of cellular responses to ABA and drought. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Identification and characterization of an ABA-activated MAP kinase cascade in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Danquah, Agyemang; Zé licourt, Axel de; Boudsocq, Marie; Neubauer, Jorinde; Frei Dit Frey, Nicolas; Leonhardt, Nathalie; Pateyron, Sté phanie; Gwinner, Frederik; Tamby, Jean Philippe; Ortiz-Masià , Dolores; Marcote, Marí a Jesú s; Hirt, Heribert; Colcombet, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Summary Abscisic acid (ABA) is a major phytohormone involved in important stress-related and developmental plant processes. Recent phosphoproteomic analyses revealed a large set of ABA-triggered phosphoproteins as putative mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) targets, although the evidence for MAPKs involved in ABA signalling is still scarce. Here, we identified and reconstituted in vivo a complete ABA-activated MAPK cascade, composed of the MAP3Ks MAP3K17/18, the MAP2K MKK3 and the four C group MAPKs MPK1/2/7/14. In planta, we show that ABA activation of MPK7 is blocked in mkk3-1 and map3k17mapk3k18 plants. Coherently, both mutants exhibit hypersensitivity to ABA and altered expression of a set of ABA-dependent genes. A genetic analysis further reveals that this MAPK cascade is activated by the PYR/PYL/RCAR-SnRK2-PP2C ABA core signalling module through protein synthesis of the MAP3Ks, unveiling an atypical mechanism for MAPK activation in eukaryotes. Our work provides evidence for a role of an ABA-induced MAPK pathway in plant stress signalling. Significance Statement We report in this article the identification of a complete MAPK module, composed of MAP3K17/18, MKK3 and MPK1/2/7/14, which is activated by ABA through the ABA core signalling complex. We showed that the activation of this module requires the MAP3K protein synthesis which occurs after hours of stress treatment, suggesting that the pathway is involved in a delayed wave of cellular responses to ABA and drought. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Computational-experimental approach to drug-target interaction mapping: A case study on kinase inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Cichonska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to relatively high costs and labor required for experimental profiling of the full target space of chemical compounds, various machine learning models have been proposed as cost-effective means to advance this process in terms of predicting the most potent compound-target interactions for subsequent verification. However, most of the model predictions lack direct experimental validation in the laboratory, making their practical benefits for drug discovery or repurposing applications largely unknown. Here, we therefore introduce and carefully test a systematic computational-experimental framework for the prediction and pre-clinical verification of drug-target interactions using a well-established kernel-based regression algorithm as the prediction model. To evaluate its performance, we first predicted unmeasured binding affinities in a large-scale kinase inhibitor profiling study, and then experimentally tested 100 compound-kinase pairs. The relatively high correlation of 0.77 (p < 0.0001 between the predicted and measured bioactivities supports the potential of the model for filling the experimental gaps in existing compound-target interaction maps. Further, we subjected the model to a more challenging task of predicting target interactions for such a new candidate drug compound that lacks prior binding profile information. As a specific case study, we used tivozanib, an investigational VEGF receptor inhibitor with currently unknown off-target profile. Among 7 kinases with high predicted affinity, we experimentally validated 4 new off-targets of tivozanib, namely the Src-family kinases FRK and FYN A, the non-receptor tyrosine kinase ABL1, and the serine/threonine kinase SLK. Our sub-sequent experimental validation protocol effectively avoids any possible information leakage between the training and validation data, and therefore enables rigorous model validation for practical applications. These results demonstrate that the kernel

  1. Hsp90 inhibition differentially destabilises MAP kinase and TGF-beta signalling components in cancer cells revealed by kinase-targeted chemoproteomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haupt, Armin; Dahl, Andreas; Lappe, Michael; Lehrach, Hans; Gonzalez, Cayetano; Drewes, Gerard; Lange, Bodo MH; Joberty, Gerard; Bantscheff, Marcus; Fröhlich, Holger; Stehr, Henning; Schweiger, Michal R; Fischer, Axel; Kerick, Martin; Boerno, Stefan T

    2012-01-01

    The heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is required for the stability of many signalling kinases. As a target for cancer therapy it allows the simultaneous inhibition of several signalling pathways. However, its inhibition in healthy cells could also lead to severe side effects. This is the first comprehensive analysis of the response to Hsp90 inhibition at the kinome level. We quantitatively profiled the effects of Hsp90 inhibition by geldanamycin on the kinome of one primary (Hs68) and three tumour cell lines (SW480, U2OS, A549) by affinity proteomics based on immobilized broad spectrum kinase inhibitors ('kinobeads'). To identify affected pathways we used the KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathway classification. We combined Hsp90 and proteasome inhibition to identify Hsp90 substrates in Hs68 and SW480 cells. The mutational status of kinases from the used cell lines was determined using next-generation sequencing. A mutation of Hsp90 candidate client RIPK2 was mapped onto its structure. We measured relative abundances of > 140 protein kinases from the four cell lines in response to geldanamycin treatment and identified many new potential Hsp90 substrates. These kinases represent diverse families and cellular functions, with a strong representation of pathways involved in tumour progression like the BMP, MAPK and TGF-beta signalling cascades. Co-treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 enabled us to classify 64 kinases as true Hsp90 clients. Finally, mutations in 7 kinases correlate with an altered response to Hsp90 inhibition. Structural modelling of the candidate client RIPK2 suggests an impact of the mutation on a proposed Hsp90 binding domain. We propose a high confidence list of Hsp90 kinase clients, which provides new opportunities for targeted and combinatorial cancer treatment and diagnostic applications

  2. Virtual screening filters for the design of type II p38 MAP kinase inhibitors: a fragment based library generation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayan, Preethi; Sastry, G Narahari

    2012-04-01

    In this work, we introduce the development and application of a three-step scoring and filtering procedure for the design of type II p38 MAP kinase leads using allosteric fragments extracted from virtual screening hits. The design of the virtual screening filters is based on a thorough evaluation of docking methods, DFG-loop conformation, binding interactions and chemotype specificity of the 138 p38 MAP kinase inhibitors from Protein Data Bank bound to DFG-in and DFG-out conformations using Glide, GOLD and CDOCKER. A 40 ns molecular dynamics simulation with the apo, type I with DFG-in and type II with DFG-out forms was carried out to delineate the effects of structural variations on inhibitor binding. The designed docking-score and sub-structure filters were first tested on a dataset of 249 potent p38 MAP kinase inhibitors from seven diverse series and 18,842 kinase inhibitors from PDB, to gauge their capacity to discriminate between kinase and non-kinase inhibitors and likewise to selectively filter-in target-specific inhibitors. The designed filters were then applied in the virtual screening of a database of ten million (10⁷) compounds resulting in the identification of 100 hits. Based on their binding modes, 98 allosteric fragments were extracted from the hits and a fragment library was generated. New type II p38 MAP kinase leads were designed by tailoring the existing type I ATP site binders with allosteric fragments using a common urea linker. Target specific virtual screening filters can thus be easily developed for other kinases based on this strategy to retrieve target selective compounds. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ubiquitous human computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zittrain, Jonathan

    2008-10-28

    Ubiquitous computing means network connectivity everywhere, linking devices and systems as small as a drawing pin and as large as a worldwide product distribution chain. What could happen when people are so readily networked? This paper explores issues arising from two possible emerging models of ubiquitous human computing: fungible networked brainpower and collective personal vital sign monitoring.

  4. Learning with Ubiquitous Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenheck, Louisa

    2008-01-01

    If ubiquitous computing becomes a reality and is widely adopted, it will inevitably have an impact on education. This article reviews the background of ubiquitous computing and current research projects done involving educational "ubicomp." Finally it explores how ubicomp may and may not change education in both formal and informal settings and…

  5. Functional Redundancy of ERK1 and ERK2 MAP Kinases during Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Frémin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ERK1 and ERK2 are the effector kinases of the ERK1/2 MAP-kinase signaling pathway, which plays a central role in transducing signals controlling cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Deregulated activity of the ERK1/2 pathway is linked to a group of developmental syndromes and contributes to the pathogenesis of various human diseases. One fundamental question that remains unaddressed is whether ERK1 and ERK2 have evolved unique physiological functions or whether they are used redundantly to reach a threshold of global ERK activity. Here, we show that the extent of development of the mouse placenta and embryo bearing different combinations of Erk1 and Erk2 alleles is strictly correlated with total ERK1/2 activity. We further demonstrate that transgenic expression of ERK1 fully rescues the embryonic and placental developmental defects associated with the loss of ERK2. We conclude that ERK1 and ERK2 exert redundant functions in mouse development.

  6. Purification of reversibly oxidized proteins (PROP reveals a redox switch controlling p38 MAP kinase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J Templeton

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation of cysteine residues of proteins is emerging as an important means of regulation of signal transduction, particularly of protein kinase function. Tools to detect and quantify cysteine oxidation of proteins have been a limiting factor in understanding the role of cysteine oxidation in signal transduction. As an example, the p38 MAP kinase is activated by several stress-related stimuli that are often accompanied by in vitro generation of hydrogen peroxide. We noted that hydrogen peroxide inhibited p38 activity despite paradoxically increasing the activating phosphorylation of p38. To address the possibility that cysteine oxidation may provide a negative regulatory effect on p38 activity, we developed a biochemical assay to detect reversible cysteine oxidation in intact cells. This procedure, PROP, demonstrated in vivo oxidation of p38 in response to hydrogen peroxide and also to the natural inflammatory lipid prostaglandin J2. Mutagenesis of the potential target cysteines showed that oxidation occurred preferentially on residues near the surface of the p38 molecule. Cysteine oxidation thus controls a functional redox switch regulating the intensity or duration of p38 activity that would not be revealed by immunodetection of phosphoprotein commonly interpreted as reflective of p38 activity.

  7. MgSlt2, a cellular integrity MAP kinase of the fungal wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola, is dispensable for penetration but essential for invasive growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehrabi, R.; Lee, van der T.A.J.; Waalwijk, C.; Kema, G.H.J.

    2006-01-01

    Among expressed sequence tag libraries of Mycosphaerella graminicola isolate IPO323, we identified a full-length cDNA clone with high homology to the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase Slt2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This MAP kinase consists of a 1,242-bp open reading frame, and encodes a

  8. Scattering of MCF7 cells by heregulin ß-1 depends on the MEK and p38 MAP kinase pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rintaro Okoshi

    Full Text Available Heregulin (HRG β1 signaling promotes scattering of MCF7 cells by inducing breakdown of adherens and tight junctions. Here, we show that stimulation with HRG-β1 causes the F-actin backbone of junctions to destabilize prior to the loss of adherent proteins and scattering of the cells. The adherent proteins dissociate and translocate from cell-cell junctions to the cytosol. Moreover, using inhibitors we show that the MEK1 pathway is required for the disappearance of F-actin from junctions and p38 MAP kinase activity is essential for scattering of the cells. Upon treatment with a p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, adherens junction complexes immediately reassemble, most likely in the cytoplasm, and move to the plasma membrane in cells dissociated by HRG-β1 stimulation. Subsequently, tight junction complexes form, most likely in the cytoplasm, and move to the plasma membrane. Thus, the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor causes a re-aggregation of scattered cells, even in the presence of HRG-β1. These results suggest that p38 MAP kinase signaling to adherens junction proteins regulates cell aggregation, providing a novel understanding of the regulation of cell-cell adhesion.

  9. Protein kinase D stabilizes aldosterone-induced ERK1/2 MAP kinase activation in M1 renal cortical collecting duct cells to promote cell proliferation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McEneaney, Victoria

    2010-01-01

    Aldosterone elicits transcriptional responses in target tissues and also rapidly stimulates the activation of protein kinase signalling cascades independently of de novo protein synthesis. Here we investigated aldosterone-induced cell proliferation and extra-cellular regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1\\/2) mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling in the M1 cortical collecting duct cell line (M1-CCD). Aldosterone promoted the proliferative growth of M1-CCD cells, an effect that was protein kinase D1 (PKD1), PKCdelta and ERK1\\/2-dependent. Aldosterone induced the rapid activation of ERK1\\/2 with peaks of activation at 2 and 10 to 30 min after hormone treatment followed by sustained activation lasting beyond 120 min. M1-CCD cells suppressed in PKD1 expression exhibited only the early, transient peaks in ERK1\\/2 activation without the sustained phase. Aldosterone stimulated the physical association of PKD1 with ERK1\\/2 within 2 min of treatment. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist RU28318 inhibited the early and late phases of aldosterone-induced ERK1\\/2 activation, and also aldosterone-induced proliferative cell growth. Aldosterone induced the sub-cellular redistribution of ERK1\\/2 to the nuclei at 2 min and to cytoplasmic sites, proximal to the nuclei after 30 min. This sub-cellular distribution of ERK1\\/2 was inhibited in cells suppressed in the expression of PKD1.

  10. The MAP kinase-activated protein kinase Rck2p regulates cellular responses to cell wall stresses, filamentation and virulence in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xichuan; Du, Wei; Zhao, Jingwen; Zhang, Lilin; Zhu, Zhiyan; Jiang, Linghuo

    2010-06-01

    Rck2p is the Hog1p-MAP kinase-activated protein kinase required for the attenuation of protein synthesis in response to an osmotic challenge in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Rck2p also regulates rapamycin sensitivity in both S. cerevisiae and Candida albicans. In this study, we demonstrate that the deletion of CaRCK2 renders C. albicans cells sensitive to, and CaRck2p translocates from the cytosol to the nucleus in response to, cell wall stresses caused by Congo red, Calcoflor White, elevated heat and zymolyase. However, the kinase activity of CaRck2p is not required for the cellular response to these cell wall stresses. Furthermore, transcripts of cell wall protein-encoding genes CaBGL2, CaHWP1 and CaXOG1 are reduced in C. albicans cells lacking CaRCK2. The deletion of CaRCK2 also reduces the in vitro filamentation of C. albicans and its virulence in a mouse model of systemic candidasis. The kinase activity of CaRck2p is required for the virulence, but not for the in vitro filamentation, in C. albicans. Therefore, Rck2p regulates cellular responses to cell wall stresses, filamentation and virulence in the human fungal pathogen C. albicans.

  11. RhMKK9, a rose MAP KINASE KINASE gene, is involved in rehydration-triggered ethylene production in rose gynoecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiwei; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Qigang; Feng, Ming; Li, Yang; Meng, Yonglu; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Guoqin; Ma, Zhimin; Wu, Hongzhi; Gao, Junping; Ma, Nan

    2017-02-23

    Flower opening is an important process in the life cycle of flowering plants and is influenced by various endogenous and environmental factors. Our previous work demonstrated that rose (Rosa hybrida) flowers are highly sensitive to dehydration during flower opening and the water recovery process after dehydration induced ethylene production rapidly in flower gynoecia. In addition, this temporal- and spatial-specific ethylene production is attributed to a transient but robust activation of the rose MAP KINASE6-ACC SYNTHASE1 (RhMPK6-RhACS1) cascade in gynoecia. However, the upstream component of RhMPK6-RhACS1 is unknown, although RhMKK9 (MAP KINASE KINASE9), a rose homologue of Arabidopsis MKK9, could activate RhMPK6 in vitro. In this study, we monitored RhMKK2/4/5/9 expression, the potential upstream kinase to RhMPK6, in rose gynoecia during dehydration and rehydration. We found only RhMKK9 was rapidly and strongly induced by rehydration. Silencing of RhMKK9 significantly decreased rehydration-triggered ethylene production. Consistently, the expression of several ethylene-responsive genes was down regulated in the petals of RhMKK9-silenced flowers. Moreover, we detected the DNA methylation level in the promoter and gene body of RhMKK9 by Chop-PCR. The results showed that rehydration specifically elevated the DNA methylation level on the RhMKK9 gene body, whereas it resulted in hypomethylation in its promoter. Our results showed that RhMKK9 possibly acts as the upstream component of the RhMKK9-RhMPK6-RhACS1 cascade and is responsible for water recovery-triggered ethylene production in rose gynoecia, and epigenetic DNA methylation is involved in the regulation of RhMKK9 expression by rehydration.

  12. Torilin Inhibits Inflammation by Limiting TAK1-Mediated MAP Kinase and NF-κB Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehari Endale

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Torilin, a sesquiterpene isolated from the fruits of Torilis japonica, has shown antimicrobial, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory properties. However, data on the mechanism of torilin action against inflammation is limited. This study aimed at determining the anti-inflammatory property of torilin in LPS-induced inflammation using in vitro model of inflammation. We examined torilin’s effect on expression levels of inflammatory mediators and cytokines in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. The involvement of NF-kB and AP-1, MAP kinases, and adaptor proteins were assessed. Torilin strongly inhibited LPS-induced NO release, iNOS, PGE2, COX-2, NF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and GM-CSF gene and protein expressions. In addition, MAPKs were also suppressed by torilin pretreatment. Involvement of ERK1/2, P38MAPK, and JNK1/2 was further confirmed by PD98059, SB203580, and SP600125 mediated suppression of iNOS and COX-2 proteins. Furthermore, torilin attenuated NF-kB and AP-1 translocation, DNA binding, and reporter gene transcription. Interestingly, torilin inhibited TAK1 kinase activation with the subsequent suppression of MAPK-mediated JNK, p38, ERK1/2, and AP-1 (ATF-2 and c-jun activation and IKK-mediated I-κBα degradation, p65/p50 activation, and translocation. Together, the results revealed the suppression of NF-κB and AP-1 regulated inflammatory mediator and cytokine expressions, suggesting the test compound’s potential as a candidate anti-inflammatory agent.

  13. Analysis of the Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MAP2K4) tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, Sally J; Choong, David YH; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Ryland, Georgina L; Campbell, Ian G; Gorringe, Kylie L

    2011-01-01

    MAP2K4 is a putative tumor and metastasis suppressor gene frequently found to be deleted in various cancer types. We aimed to conduct a comprehensive analysis of this gene to assess its involvement in ovarian cancer. We screened for mutations in MAP2K4 using High Resolution Melt analysis of 149 primary ovarian tumors and methylation at the promoter using Methylation-Specific Single-Stranded Conformation Polymorphism analysis of 39 tumors. We also considered the clinical impact of changes in MAP2K4 using publicly available expression and copy number array data. Finally, we used siRNA to measure the effect of reducing MAP2K4 expression in cell lines. In addition to 4 previously detected homozygous deletions, we identified a homozygous 16 bp truncating deletion and a heterozygous 4 bp deletion, each in one ovarian tumor. No promoter methylation was detected. The frequency of MAP2K4 homozygous inactivation was 5.6% overall, and 9.8% in high-grade serous cases. Hemizygous deletion of MAP2K4 was observed in 38% of samples. There were significant correlations of copy number and expression in three microarray data sets. There was a significant correlation between MAP2K4 expression and overall survival in one expression array data set, but this was not confirmed in an independent set. Treatment of JAM and HOSE6.3 cell lines with MAP2K4 siRNA showed some reduction in proliferation. MAP2K4 is targeted by genetic inactivation in ovarian cancer and restricted to high grade serous and endometrioid carcinomas in our cohort

  14. Ubiquitous Annotation Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Frank Allan

    2006-01-01

    Ubiquitous annotation systems allow users to annotate physical places, objects, and persons with digital information. Especially in the field of location based information systems much work has been done to implement adaptive and context-aware systems, but few efforts have focused on the general...... requirements for linking information to objects in both physical and digital space. This paper surveys annotation techniques from open hypermedia systems, Web based annotation systems, and mobile and augmented reality systems to illustrate different approaches to four central challenges ubiquitous annotation...... systems have to deal with: anchoring, structuring, presentation, and authoring. Through a number of examples each challenge is discussed and HyCon, a context-aware hypermedia framework developed at the University of Aarhus, Denmark, is used to illustrate an integrated approach to ubiquitous annotations...

  15. The MADD-3 LAMMER Kinase Interacts with a p38 MAP Kinase Pathway to Regulate the Display of the EVA-1 Guidance Receptor in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena A D'Souza

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The proper display of transmembrane receptors on the leading edge of migrating cells and cell extensions is essential for their response to guidance cues. We previously discovered that MADD-4, which is an ADAMTSL secreted by motor neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, interacts with an UNC-40/EVA-1 co-receptor complex on muscles to attract plasma membrane extensions called muscle arms. In nematodes, the muscle arm termini harbor the post-synaptic elements of the neuromuscular junction. Through a forward genetic screen for mutants with disrupted muscle arm extension, we discovered that a LAMMER kinase, which we call MADD-3, is required for the proper display of the EVA-1 receptor on the muscle's plasma membrane. Without MADD-3, EVA-1 levels decrease concomitantly with a reduction of the late-endosomal marker RAB-7. Through a genetic suppressor screen, we found that the levels of EVA-1 and RAB-7 can be restored in madd-3 mutants by eliminating the function of a p38 MAP kinase pathway. We also found that EVA-1 and RAB-7 will accumulate in madd-3 mutants upon disrupting CUP-5, which is a mucolipin ortholog required for proper lysosome function. Together, our data suggests that the MADD-3 LAMMER kinase antagonizes the p38-mediated endosomal trafficking of EVA-1 to the lysosome. In this way, MADD-3 ensures that sufficient levels of EVA-1 are present to guide muscle arm extension towards the source of the MADD-4 guidance cue.

  16. The MpkB MAP kinase plays a role in autolysis and conidiation of Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ji Young; Chun, Jeesun; Jun, Sang-Cheol; Han, Dong-Min; Chae, Keon-Sang; Jahng, Kwang Yeop

    2013-12-01

    The mpkB gene of Aspergillus nidulans encodes a MAP kinase homologous to Fus3p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae which is involved in conjugation process. MpkB is required for completing the sexual development at the anastomosis and post-karyogamy stages. The mpkB deletion strain could produce conidia under the repression condition of conidiation such as sealing and even in the submerged culture concomitant with persistent brlA expression, implying that MpkB might have a role in timely regulation of brlA expression. The submerged culture of the deletion strain showed typical autolytic phenotypes including decrease in dry cell mass (DCM), disorganization of mycelial balls, and fragmentation of hyphae. The chiB, engA and pepJ genes which are encoding cell wall hydrolytic enzymes were transcribed highly in the submerged culture. Also, we observed that the enzyme activity of chitinase and glucanase in the submerged culture of mpkB deletion strain was much higher than that of wild type. The deletion of mpkB also caused a precocious germination of conidia and reduction of spore viability. The expression of the vosA gene, a member of velvet gene family, was not observed in the mpkB deletion strain. These results suggest that MpkB should have multiple roles in germination and viability of conidia, conidiation and autolysis through regulating the expression of vosA and brlA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Unbinding Kinetics of a p38 MAP Kinase Type II Inhibitor from Metadynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasnovas, Rodrigo; Limongelli, Vittorio; Tiwary, Pratyush; Carloni, Paolo; Parrinello, Michele

    2017-04-05

    Understanding the structural and energetic requisites of ligand binding toward its molecular target is of paramount relevance in drug design. In recent years, atomistic free energy calculations have proven to be a valid tool to complement experiments in characterizing the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of protein/ligand interaction. Here, we investigate, through a recently developed metadynamics-based protocol, the unbinding mechanism of an inhibitor of the pharmacologically relevant target p38 MAP kinase. We provide a thorough description of the ligand unbinding pathway identifying the most stable binding mode and other thermodynamically relevant poses. From our simulations, we estimated the unbinding rate as k off = 0.020 ± 0.011 s -1 . This is in good agreement with the experimental value (k off = 0.14 s -1 ). Next, we developed a Markov state model that allowed identifying the rate-limiting step of the ligand unbinding process. Our calculations further show that the solvation of the ligand and that of the active site play crucial roles in the unbinding process. This study paves the way to investigations on the unbinding dynamics of more complex p38 inhibitors and other pharmacologically relevant inhibitors in general, demonstrating that metadynamics can be a powerful tool in designing new drugs with engineered binding/unbinding kinetics.

  18. The Ser/Thr Protein Kinase Protein-Protein Interaction Map of M. tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fan-Lin; Liu, Yin; Jiang, He-Wei; Luan, Yi-Zhao; Zhang, Hai-Nan; He, Xiang; Xu, Zhao-Wei; Hou, Jing-Li; Ji, Li-Yun; Xie, Zhi; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Yan, Wei; Deng, Jiao-Yu; Bi, Li-Jun; Zhang, Xian-En; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2017-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is the causative agent of tuberculosis, the leading cause of death among all infectious diseases. There are 11 eukaryotic-like serine/threonine protein kinases (STPKs) in Mtb, which are thought to play pivotal roles in cell growth, signal transduction and pathogenesis. However, their underlying mechanisms of action remain largely uncharacterized. In this study, using a Mtb proteome microarray, we have globally identified the binding proteins in Mtb for all of the STPKs, and constructed the first STPK protein interaction (KPI) map that includes 492 binding proteins and 1,027 interactions. Bioinformatics analysis showed that the interacting proteins reflect diverse functions, including roles in two-component system, transcription, protein degradation, and cell wall integrity. Functional investigations confirmed that PknG regulates cell wall integrity through key components of peptidoglycan (PG) biosynthesis, e.g. MurC. The global STPK-KPIs network constructed here is expected to serve as a rich resource for understanding the key signaling pathways in Mtb, thus facilitating drug development and effective control of Mtb. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Mycosporine-Like Amino Acids Promote Wound Healing through Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAP Kinases Signaling Pathway in Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Hee Choi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs are secondary metabolites found in diverse marine, freshwater, and terrestrial organisms. Evidence suggests that MAAs have several beneficial effects on skin homeostasis such as protection against UV radiation and reactive oxygen species (ROS. In addition, MAAs are also involved in the modulation of skin fibroblasts proliferation. However, the regulatory function of MAAs on wound repair in human skin is not yet clearly elucidated. To investigate the roles of MAAs on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes, three MAAs, Shinorine (SH, Mycosporine-glycine (M-Gly, and Porphyra (P334 were purified from Chlamydomonas hedlyei and Porphyra yezoensis. We found that SH, M-Gly, and P334 have significant effects on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes and these effects were mediated by activation of focal adhesion kinases (FAK, extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK, and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK. These results suggest that MAAs accelerate wound repair by activating the FAK-MAPK signaling pathways. This study also indicates that MAAs can act as a new wound healing agent and further suggests that MAAs might be a novel biomaterial for wound healing therapies.

  20. Mycosporine-Like Amino Acids Promote Wound Healing through Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAP Kinases) Signaling Pathway in Keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun-Hee; Yang, Dong Joo; Kulkarni, Atul; Moh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Ki Woo

    2015-01-01

    Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are secondary metabolites found in diverse marine, freshwater, and terrestrial organisms. Evidence suggests that MAAs have several beneficial effects on skin homeostasis such as protection against UV radiation and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, MAAs are also involved in the modulation of skin fibroblasts proliferation. However, the regulatory function of MAAs on wound repair in human skin is not yet clearly elucidated. To investigate the roles of MAAs on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes, three MAAs, Shinorine (SH), Mycosporine-glycine (M-Gly), and Porphyra (P334) were purified from Chlamydomonas hedlyei and Porphyra yezoensis. We found that SH, M-Gly, and P334 have significant effects on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes and these effects were mediated by activation of focal adhesion kinases (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK). These results suggest that MAAs accelerate wound repair by activating the FAK-MAPK signaling pathways. This study also indicates that MAAs can act as a new wound healing agent and further suggests that MAAs might be a novel biomaterial for wound healing therapies. PMID:26703626

  1. The Ste20 Family Kinases MAP4K4, MINK1, and TNIK Converge to Regulate Stress-Induced JNK Signaling in Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larhammar, Martin; Huntwork-Rodriguez, Sarah; Rudhard, York; Sengupta-Ghosh, Arundhati; Lewcock, Joseph W

    2017-11-15

    The c-Jun- N -terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway regulates nervous system development, axon regeneration, and neuronal degeneration after acute injury or in chronic neurodegenerative disease. Dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) is required for stress-induced JNK signaling in neurons, yet the factors that initiate DLK/JNK pathway activity remain poorly defined. In the present study, we identify the Ste20 kinases MAP4K4, misshapen-like kinase 1 (MINK1 or MAP4K6) and TNIK Traf2- and Nck-interacting kinase (TNIK or MAP4K7), as upstream regulators of DLK/JNK signaling in neurons. Using a trophic factor withdrawal-based model of neurodegeneration in both male and female embryonic mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons, we show that MAP4K4, MINK1, and TNIK act redundantly to regulate DLK activation and downstream JNK-dependent phosphorylation of c-Jun in response to stress. Targeting MAP4K4, MINK1, and TNIK, but not any of these kinases individually, is sufficient to protect neurons potently from degeneration. Pharmacological inhibition of MAP4Ks blocks stabilization and phosphorylation of DLK within axons and subsequent retrograde translocation of the JNK signaling complex to the nucleus. These results position MAP4Ks as important regulators of the DLK/JNK signaling pathway. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neuronal degeneration occurs in disparate circumstances: during development to refine neuronal connections, after injury to clear damaged neurons, or pathologically during disease. The dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK)/c-Jun- N -terminal kinase (JNK) pathway represents a conserved regulator of neuronal injury signaling that drives both neurodegeneration and axon regeneration, yet little is known about the factors that initiate DLK activity. Here, we uncover a novel role for a subfamily of MAP4 kinases consisting of MAP4K4, Traf2- and Nck-interacting kinase (TNIK or MAP4K7), and misshapen-like kinase 1 (MINK1 or MAP4K6) in regulating DLK/JNK signaling in neurons. Inhibition of

  2. A chimeric cyclic interferon-α2b peptide induces apoptosis by sequential activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, protein kinase Cδ and p38 MAP kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, V C; Bertucci, L; Furmento, V A; Peña, C; Marino, V J; Roguin, L P

    2013-06-10

    We have previously demonstrated that tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT1/3 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) activation are involved in the apoptotic response triggered by a chimeric cyclic peptide of the interferon-α2b (IFN-α2b) in WISH cells. Since the peptide also induced serine phosphorylation of STAT proteins, in the present study we examined the kinase involved in serine STAT1 phosphorylation and the signaling effectors acting upstream such activation. We first found that p38 MAPK is involved in serine STAT1 phosphorylation, since a reduction of phophoserine-STAT1 levels was evident after incubating WISH cells with cyclic peptide in the presence of a p38 pharmacological inhibitor or a dominant-negative p38 mutant. Next, we demonstrated that the peptide induced activation of protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ). Based on this finding, the role of this kinase was then evaluated. After incubating WISH cells with a PKCδ inhibitor or after decreasing PKCδ expression levels by RNA interference, both peptide-induced serine STAT1 and p38 phosphorylation levels were significantly decreased, indicating that PKCδ functions as an upstream regulator of p38. We also showed that PKCδ and p38 activation stimulated by the peptide was inhibited by a specific pharmacological inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) or by a dominant-negative p85 PI3K-regulatory subunit, suggesting that PI3K is upstream in the signaling cascade. In addition, the role of PI3K and PKCδ in cyclic peptide-induced apoptosis was examined. Both signaling effectors were found to regulate the antiproliferative activity and the apoptotic response triggered by the cyclic peptide in WISH cells. In conclusion, we herein demonstrated that STAT1 serine phosphorylation is mediated by the sequential activation of PI3K, PKCδ and p38 MAPK. This signaling cascade contributes to the antitumor effect induced by the chimeric IFN-α2b cyclic peptide in WISH cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc

  3. Context Specificity of Stress-activated Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Signaling: The Story as Told by Caenorhabditis elegans*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrusiak, Matthew G.; Jin, Yishi

    2016-01-01

    Stress-associated p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling cascades trigger specific cellular responses and are involved in multiple disease states. At the root of MAP kinase signaling complexity is the differential use of common components on a context-specific basis. The roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans was developed as a system to study genes required for development and nervous system function. The powerful genetics of C. elegans in combination with molecular and cellular dissections has led to a greater understanding of how p38 and JNK signaling affects many biological processes under normal and stress conditions. This review focuses on the studies revealing context specificity of different stress-activated MAPK components in C. elegans. PMID:26907690

  4. Context Specificity of Stress-activated Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Signaling: The Story as Told by Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrusiak, Matthew G; Jin, Yishi

    2016-04-08

    Stress-associated p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling cascades trigger specific cellular responses and are involved in multiple disease states. At the root of MAP kinase signaling complexity is the differential use of common components on a context-specific basis. The roundwormCaenorhabditis eleganswas developed as a system to study genes required for development and nervous system function. The powerful genetics ofC. elegansin combination with molecular and cellular dissections has led to a greater understanding of how p38 and JNK signaling affects many biological processes under normal and stress conditions. This review focuses on the studies revealing context specificity of different stress-activated MAPK components inC. elegans. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins H, H', and F are members of a ubiquitously expressed subfamily of related but distinct proteins encoded by genes mapping to different chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Rasmussen, H H; Vorum, H

    1995-01-01

    Molecular cDNA cloning, two-dimensional gel immunoblotting, and amino acid microsequencing identified three sequence-unique and distinct proteins that constitute a subfamily of ubiquitously expressed heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins corresponding to hnRNPs H, H', and F. These proteins share...... epitopes and sequence identity with two other proteins, isoelectric focusing sample spot numbers 2222 (37.6 kDa; pI 6.5) and 2326 (39.5 kDa; pI 6.6), indicating that the subfamily may contain additional members. The identity between hnRNPs H and H' is 96%, between H and F 78%, and between H' and F 75......%, respectively. The three proteins contain three repeats, which we denote quasi-RRMs (qRRMs) since they have a remote similarity to the RNA recognition motif (RRM). The three qRRMs of hnRNP H, with a few additional NH2-terminal amino acids, were constructed by polymerase chain reaction amplification and used...

  6. Activation of the Cph1-dependent MAP kinase signaling pathway induces white-opaque switching in Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Ramírez-Zavala

    Full Text Available Depending on the environmental conditions, the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans can undergo different developmental programs, which are controlled by dedicated transcription factors and upstream signaling pathways. C. albicans strains that are homozygous at the mating type locus can switch from the normal yeast form (white to an elongated cell type (opaque, which is the mating-competent form of this fungus. Both white and opaque cells use the Ste11-Hst7-Cek1/Cek2 MAP kinase signaling pathway to react to the presence of mating pheromone. However, while opaque cells employ the transcription factor Cph1 to induce the mating response, white cells recruit a different downstream transcription factor, Tec1, to promote the formation of a biofilm that facilitates mating of opaque cells in the population. The switch from the white to the opaque cell form is itself induced by environmental signals that result in the upregulation of the transcription factor Wor1, the master regulator of white-opaque switching. To get insight into the upstream signaling pathways controlling the switch, we expressed all C. albicans protein kinases from a tetracycline-inducible promoter in a switching-competent strain. Screening of this library of strains showed that a hyperactive form of Ste11 lacking its N-terminal domain (Ste11(ΔN467 efficiently stimulated white cells to switch to the opaque phase, a behavior that did not occur in response to pheromone. Ste11(ΔN467-induced switching specifically required the downstream MAP kinase Cek1 and its target transcription factor Cph1, but not Cek2 and Tec1, and forced expression of Cph1 also promoted white-opaque switching in a Wor1-dependent manner. Therefore, depending on the activation mechanism, components of the pheromone-responsive MAP kinase pathway can be reconnected to stimulate an alternative developmental program, switching of white cells to the mating-competent opaque phase.

  7. A SURVEY ON UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Meshram

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a survey of ubiquitous computing research which is the emerging domain that implements communication technologies into day-to-day life activities. This research paper provides a classification of the research areas on the ubiquitous computing paradigm. In this paper, we present common architecture principles of ubiquitous systems and analyze important aspects in context-aware ubiquitous systems. In addition, this research work presents a novel architecture of ubiquitous computing system and a survey of sensors needed for applications in ubiquitous computing. The goals of this research work are three-fold: i serve as a guideline for researchers who are new to ubiquitous computing and want to contribute to this research area, ii provide a novel system architecture for ubiquitous computing system, and iii provides further research directions required into quality-of-service assurance of ubiquitous computing.

  8. Expression and purification of functional JNK2beta2: perspectives on high-level production of recombinant MAP kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savopoulos, John W; Dowd, Stephen; Armour, Carolyn; Carter, Paul S; Greenwood, Catherine J; Mills, David; Powell, David; Pettman, Gary R; Jenkins, Owen; Walsh, Frank S; Philpott, Karen L

    2002-02-01

    The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are a group of serine/threonine kinases that mediate intracellular signal transduction in response to environmental stimuli including stress, growth factors, and various cytokines. Of this family, the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are members which, depending on cell type, have been shown to activate the transcription of genes involved in the inflammatory response, apoptosis, and hypertrophy. Here we report the use Baculovirus/Sf9 cells to produce milligram quantities of recombinant JNK2beta2 substrate which could be purified to >90% as judged by SDS-PAGE. In addition, we report a novel method for the site-specific biotinylation for this enzyme and demonstrate that the biotinylated product is an authentic substrate of the upstream kinases MKK4 and 7 and can phosphorylate a downstream target, ATF-2. We also show that the phosphorylated product can be captured efficiently on streptavidin-coated beads for use in scintillation proximity assays. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  9. Tiam1-Rac1 Axis Promotes Activation of p38 MAP Kinase in the Development of Diabetic Retinopathy: Evidence for a Requisite Role for Protein Palmitoylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajakrishnan Veluthakal

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Evidence in multiple tissues, including retina, suggests generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and the ensuing oxidative stress as triggers for mitochondrial defects and cell apoptosis. We recently reported novel roles for Tiam1-Rac1-Nox2 axis in retinal mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death leading to the development of diabetic retinopathy. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that activation of p38 MAP kinase, a stress kinase, represents the downstream signaling event to Rac1-Nox2 activation in diabetes-induced metabolic stress leading to capillary cell apoptosis. Methods: Activation of p38 MAP kinase was quantified by Western blotting in retinal endothelial cells incubated with high glucose (20 mM for up to 96 hours, a duration where mitochondrial dysfunction and capillary cell apoptosis can be observed. NSC23766 and 2-bromopalmitate (2-BP were used to assess the roles of Tiam1-Rac1 and palmitoylation pathways, respectively. Results: Activation of p38 MAP kinase was observed as early as 3 hours after high glucose exposure, and continued until 96 hours. Consistent with this, p38 MAP kinase activation was significantly higher in the retina from diabetic mice compared to age-matched normal mice. NSC23766 markedly attenuated hyperglycemia-induced activation of p38 MAP kinase. Lastly, 2-BP inhibited glucose-induced Rac1, Nox2 and p38 MAP kinase activation in endothelial cells. Conclusions: Tiam1-Rac1-mediated activation of Nox2 and p38 MAP kinase constitutes early signaling events leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and the development of diabetic retinopathy. Our findings also provide the first evidence to implicate novel roles for protein palmitoylation in this signaling cascade.

  10. Unit and ubiquitous Internet of Things

    CERN Document Server

    Ning, Huansheng

    2013-01-01

    Although the Internet of Things (IoT) will play a key role in the development of next generation information, network, and communication technologies, many are still unclear about what makes IoT different from similar concepts. Answering fundamental questions about IoT architectures and models, Unit and Ubiquitous Internet of Things introduces essential IoT concepts from the perspectives of mapping and interaction between the physical world and the cyber world. It addresses key issues such as strategy and education, particularly around unit and ubiquitous IoT technologies. Supplying a new pers

  11. Ubiquitous Computing Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Friday, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    . While such growth is positive, the newest generation of ubicomp practitioners and researchers, isolated to specific tasks, are in danger of losing their sense of history and the broader perspective that has been so essential to the field’s creativity and brilliance. Under the guidance of John Krumm...... applications Privacy protection in systems that connect personal devices and personal information Moving from the graphical to the ubiquitous computing user interface Techniques that are revolutionizing the way we determine a person’s location and understand other sensor measurements While we needn’t become...

  12. STATE OF JNK AND P38 MAP-KINASE SYSTEM IN BLOOD monon uclea r le ucocytes DUR ING INFLAMMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Y. Chasovskih

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Pogrammed cell death of peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes from patients with acute inflammatory diseases (non-nosocomial pneumonia, acute appendicitis was investigated under ex vivo conditions, upon cultivation of the cells with selective inhibitors of JNK (SP600125 and р38 МАРК (ML3403. In vitro addition of SP600125 and ML3403 under oxidative stress conditions prevents increase of annexinpositive mononuclear cells numbers, thus suggesting JNK and р38 МАР-kinases to be involved into oxidative mechanisms of apoptosis deregulation. A role of JNK in IL-8 production by mononuclear leucocytes was revealed in cases of acute inflammation. Regulatory effect of JNK and p38 MAP-kinases can be mediated through activation of redox-sensitive apoptogenic signal transduction systems, as well as due to changes in cellular cytokine-producing function.

  13. Investigating small molecules to inhibit germinal center kinase-like kinase (GLK/MAP4K3) upstream of PKCθ phosphorylation: Potential therapy to modulate T cell dependent immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May-Dracka, Tricia L; Arduini, Robert; Bertolotti-Ciarlet, Andrea; Bhisetti, Govinda; Brickelmaier, Margot; Cahir-McFarland, Ellen; Enyedy, Istvan; Fontenot, Jason D; Hesson, Thomas; Little, Kevin; Lyssikatos, Joe; Marcotte, Douglas; McKee, Timothy; Murugan, Paramasivam; Patterson, Thomas; Peng, Hairuo; Rushe, Mia; Silvian, Laura; Spilker, Kerri; Wu, Ping; Xin, Zhili; Burkly, Linda C

    2018-06-01

    Germinal center kinase-like kinase (GLK, also known as MAP4K3) has been hypothesized to have an effect on key cellular activities, including inflammatory responses. GLK is required for activation of protein kinase C-θ (PKCθ) in T cells. Controlling the activity of T helper cell responses could be valuable for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. This approach circumvents previous unsuccessful approaches to target PKCθ directly. The use of structure based drug design, aided by the first crystal structure of GLK, led to the discovery of several inhibitors that demonstrate potent inhibition of GLK biochemically and in relevant cell lines. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ubiquitous Network Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian USCATU

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Technology is evolving faster than ever in the ITC domain. Computing devices become smaller and more powerful by the day (and cheaper than ever. They have started to move away from the classical “computer” towards portable devices like personal digital assistants (PDAs and mobile phones. Even these devices are no longer what they used to be. A phone is no longer a simple voice communication device, but a minicomputer with lots of functions. The addition of wireless communication protocols, like WiFi and Bluetooth, leads to a web of interconnected devices with the final purpose of enabling us to access desired services anywhere, at any time. Adding less complicated devices, as sensors and detectors, located everywhere (clothes, cars, furniture, home appliances etc. but connected to the same global network, we have a technological world aware of itself and aware of us, ready to serve our needs without hindering our lives. “Ubiquitous computing names the third wave in computing, just now beginning. First were mainframes, each shared by lots of people. Now we are in the personal computing era, person and machine staring uneasily at each other across the desktop. Next comes ubiquitous computing, or the age of calm technology, when technology recedes into the background of our lives.” [Weiser, 1995

  15. MAP kinase pathways and calcitonin influence CD44 alternate isoform expression in prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, Eric W; Travanty, Emily A; Yang, Kui; Iczkowski, Kenneth A

    2008-01-01

    Dysregulated expression and splicing of cell adhesion marker CD44 is found in many types of cancer. In prostate cancer (PC) specifically, the standard isoform (CD44s) has been found to be downregulated compared with benign tissue whereas predominant variant isoform CD44v7-10 is upregulated. Mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and paracrine calcitonin are two common factors linked to dysregulated expression and splicing of CD44 in cancer. Calcitonin has been found to increase proliferation and invasion in PC acting through the protein kinase A pathway. In androgen-independent PC with known high CD44v7-10 expression, CD44 total and CD44v7-10 RNA or protein were assessed in response to exogenous and endogenous calcitonin and to inhibitors of protein kinase A, MEK, JNK, or p38 kinase. Benign cells and calcitonin receptor-negative PC cells were also tested. MEK or p38 but not JNK reduced CD44 total RNA by 40%–65% in cancer and benign cells. Inhibition of protein kinase A reduced CD44 total and v7-10 protein expression. In calcitonin receptor-positive cells only, calcitonin increased CD44 variant RNA and protein by 3 h and persisting to 48 h, apparently dependent on an uninhibited p38 pathway. Cells with constitutive CT expression showed an increase in CD44v7-10 mRNA but a decrease in CD44 total RNA. The MEK pathway increases CD44 RNA, while calcitonin, acting through the protein kinase A and p38 pathway, facilitates variant splicing. These findings could be used in the formulation of therapeutic methods for PC targeting CD44 alternate splicing

  16. Inhibition of stress-activated MAP kinases induces clinical improvement in moderate to severe Crohn's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommes, Daan; van den Blink, Bernt; Plasse, Terry; Bartelsman, Joep; Xu, Cuiping; Macpherson, Bret; Tytgat, Guido; Peppelenbosch, Mailkel; van Deventer, Sander

    2002-01-01

    Background & Aims: We investigated if inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) was beneficial in Crohn's disease. Methods: Inhibition of JNK and p38 MAPK activation with CNI-1493, a guanylhydrazone, was tested in vitro. Twelve patients with severe Crohn's disease (mean baseline, CDAI

  17. Novel mechanisms of sildenafil in pulmonary hypertension involving cytokines/chemokines, MAP kinases and Akt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamas Kiss

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PH is associated with high mortality due to right ventricular failure and hypoxia, therefore to understand the mechanism by which pulmonary vascular remodeling initiates these processes is very important. We used a well-characterized monocrotaline (MCT-induced rat PH model, and analyzed lung morphology, expression of cytokines, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK phosphorylation, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt (PI-3k-Akt pathway and nuclear factor (NF-κB activation in order to elucidate the mechanisms by which sildenafil's protective effect in PH is exerted. Besides its protective effect on lung morphology, sildenafil suppressed multiple cytokines involved in neutrophil and mononuclear cells recruitment including cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC-1, CINC-2α/β, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1, interleukin (IL-1α, lipopolysaccharide induced CXC chemokine (LIX, monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-1α, and MIP-3α. NF-κB activation and phosphorylation were also attenuated by sildenafil. Furthermore, sildenafil reduced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK activation while enhanced activation of the cytoprotective Akt pathway in PH. These data suggest a beneficial effect of sildenafil on inflammatory and kinase signaling mechanisms that substantially contribute to its protective effects, and may have potential implications in designing future therapeutic strategies in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

  18. A genome-wide RNAi screen reveals MAP kinase phosphatases as key ERK pathway regulators during embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen-Hsi Yang

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells represent potentially important therapeutic agents in regenerative medicine. Complex interlinked transcriptional and signaling networks control the fate of these cells towards maintenance of pluripotency or differentiation. In this study we have focused on how mouse embryonic stem cells begin to differentiate and lose pluripotency and, in particular, the role that the ERK MAP kinase and GSK3 signaling pathways play in this process. Through a genome-wide siRNA screen we have identified more than 400 genes involved in loss of pluripotency and promoting the onset of differentiation. These genes were functionally associated with the ERK and/or GSK3 pathways, providing an important resource for studying the roles of these pathways in controlling escape from the pluripotent ground state. More detailed analysis identified MAP kinase phosphatases as a focal point of regulation and demonstrated an important role for these enzymes in controlling ERK activation kinetics and subsequently determining early embryonic stem cell fate decisions.

  19. Inducible Activation of ERK5 MAP Kinase Enhances Adult Neurogenesis in the Olfactory Bulb and Improves Olfactory Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenbin; Lu, Song; Li, Tan; Pan, Yung-Wei; Zou, Junhui; Abel, Glen M.; Xu, Lihong; Storm, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent discoveries have suggested that adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and olfactory bulb (OB) may be required for at least some forms of olfactory behavior in mice. However, it is unclear whether conditional and selective enhancement of adult neurogenesis by genetic approaches is sufficient to improve olfactory function under physiological conditions or after injury. Furthermore, specific signaling mechanisms regulating adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB are not fully defined. We previously reported that ERK5, a MAP kinase selectively expressed in the neurogenic regions of the adult brain, plays a critical role in adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB. Using a site-specific knock-in mouse model, we report here that inducible and targeted activation of the endogenous ERK5 in adult neural stem/progenitor cells enhances adult neurogenesis in the OB by increasing cell survival and neuronal differentiation. This conditional ERK5 activation also improves short-term olfactory memory and odor-cued associative olfactory learning under normal physiological conditions. Furthermore, these mice show enhanced recovery of olfactory function and have more adult-born neurons after a zinc sulfate-induced lesion of the main olfactory epithelium. We conclude that ERK5 MAP kinase is an important endogenous signaling pathway regulating adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB, and that conditional activation of endogenous ERK5 is sufficient to enhance adult neurogenesis in the OB thereby improving olfactory function both under normal conditions and after injury. PMID:25995470

  20. A Myb transcription factor of Phytophthora sojae, regulated by MAP kinase PsSAK1, is required for zoospore development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Zhang

    Full Text Available PsSAK1, a mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase from Phytophthora sojae, plays an important role in host infection and zoospore viability. However, the downstream mechanism of PsSAK1 remains unclear. In this study, the 3'-tag digital gene expression (DGE profiling method was applied to sequence the global transcriptional sequence of PsSAK1-silenced mutants during the cysts stage and 1.5 h after inoculation onto susceptible soybean leaf tissues. Compared with the gene expression levels of the recipient P. sojae strain, several candidates of Myb family were differentially expressed (up or down in response to the loss of PsSAK1, including of a R2R3-type Myb transcription factor, PsMYB1. qRT-PCR indicated that the transcriptional level of PsMYB1 decreased due to PsSAK1 silencing. The transcriptional level of PsMYB1 increased during sporulating hyphae, in germinated cysts, and early infection. Silencing of PsMYB1 results in three phenotypes: a no cleavage of the cytoplasm into uninucleate zoospores or release of normal zoospores, b direct germination of sporangia, and c afunction in zoospore-mediated plant infection. Our data indicate that the PsMYB1 transcription factor functions downstream of MAP kinase PsSAK1 and is required for zoospore development of P. sojae.

  1. Mitogen activated protein kinase kinase kinase 3 (MAP3K3/MEKK3) overexpression is an early event in esophageal tumorigenesis and is a predictor of poor disease prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, Raghibul; Sharma, Rinu; Saraya, Anoop; Chattopadhyay, Tushar K; DattaGupta, Siddartha; Walfish, Paul G; Chauhan, Shyam S; Ralhan, Ranju

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase3 (MAP3K3/MEKK3) was identified to be differentially expressed in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) using cDNA microarrays by our laboratory. Here in we determined the clinical significance of MEKK3 in ESCC. Immunohistochemical analysis of MEKK3 expression was carried out in archived tissue sections from 93 ESCCs, 47 histologically normal and 61 dysplastic esophageal tissues and correlated with clinicopathological parameters and disease prognosis over up to 7.5 years for ESCC patients. MEKK3 expression was significantly increased in esophageal dysplasia and ESCC in comparison with normal mucosa (p trend < 0.001). Kaplan Meier survival analysis showed significantly reduced median disease free survival median DFS = 10 months in patients with MEKK3 positive ESCCs compared to patients with no immunopositivity (median DFS = 19 months, p = 0.04). ESCC patients with MEKK3 positive and lymph node positive tumors had median DFS = 9 months, as compared to median DFS = 21 months in patients who did not show the alterations (p = 0.01). In multivariate Cox regression analysis, combination of MEKK3 overexpression and node positivity [p = 0.015, hazard ratio (HR) = 2.082, 95% CI = 1.154 - 3.756] emerged as important predictor of reduced disease free survival and poor prognosticator for ESCC patients. Alterations in MEKK3 expression occur in early stages of development of ESCC and are sustained during disease progression; MEKK3 in combination with lymph node positivity has the potential to serve as adverse prognosticator in ESCC

  2. Programmable ubiquitous telerobotic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Michael; Greene, Matthew; Keaton, David; Och, Christian; Seidl, Matthew L.; Waite, William; Zorn, Benjamin G.

    1997-12-01

    We are investigating a field of research that we call ubiquitous telepresence, which involves the design and implementation of low-cost robotic devices that can be programmed and operated from anywhere on the Internet. These devices, which we call ubots, can be used for academic purposes (e.g., a biologist could remote conduct a population survey), commercial purposes (e.g., a house could be shown remotely by a real-estate agent), and for recreation and education (e.g., someone could tour a museum remotely). We anticipate that such devices will become increasingly common due to recent changes in hardware and software technology. In particular, current hardware technology enables such devices to be constructed very cheaply (less than $500), and current software and network technology allows highly portable code to be written and downloaded across the Internet. In this paper, we present our prototype system architecture, and the ubot implementation we have constructed based on it. The hardware technology we use is the handy board, a 6811-based controller board with digital and analog inputs and outputs. Our software includes a network layer based on TCP/IP and software layers written in Java. Our software enables users across the Internet to program the behavior of the vehicle and to receive image feedback from a camera mounted on it.

  3. Structural Requirements for Yersinia YopJ Inhibition of MAP Kinase Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdette, Dara; Mukherjee, Sohini; Keitany, Gladys; Goldsmith, Elizabeth; Orth, Kim

    2008-01-01

    MAPK signaling cascades are evolutionally conserved. The bacterial effector, YopJ, uses the unique activity of Ser/Thr acetylation to inhibit the activation of the MAPK kinase (MKK) and prevent activation by phosphorylation. YopJ is also able to block yeast MAPK signaling pathways using this mechanism. Based on these observations, we performed a genetic screen to isolate mutants in the yeast MKK, Pbs2, that suppress YopJ inhibition. One suppressor contains a mutation in a conserved tyrosine residue and bypasses YopJ inhibition by increasing the basal activity of Pbs2. Mutations on the hydrophobic face of the conserved G α-helix in the kinase domain prevent both binding and acetylation by YopJ. Corresponding mutants in human MKKs showed that they are conserved not only structurally, but also functionally. These studies reveal a conserved binding site found on the superfamily of MAPK kinases while providing insight into the molecular interactions required for YopJ inhibition. PMID:18167536

  4. Structural requirements for Yersinia YopJ inhibition of MAP kinase pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Heng Hao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available MAPK signaling cascades are evolutionally conserved. The bacterial effector, YopJ, uses the unique activity of Ser/Thr acetylation to inhibit the activation of the MAPK kinase (MKK and prevent activation by phosphorylation. YopJ is also able to block yeast MAPK signaling pathways using this mechanism. Based on these observations, we performed a genetic screen to isolate mutants in the yeast MKK, Pbs2, that suppress YopJ inhibition. One suppressor contains a mutation in a conserved tyrosine residue and bypasses YopJ inhibition by increasing the basal activity of Pbs2. Mutations on the hydrophobic face of the conserved G alpha-helix in the kinase domain prevent both binding and acetylation by YopJ. Corresponding mutants in human MKKs showed that they are conserved not only structurally, but also functionally. These studies reveal a conserved binding site found on the superfamily of MAPK kinases while providing insight into the molecular interactions required for YopJ inhibition.

  5. Inhibition of the MEK-1/p42 MAP kinase reduces aryl hydrocarbon receptor-DNA interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, Sujin; Oh, Myoungsuk; Choi, Su Mi; Park, Hyunsung

    2004-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces expression of the cytochrome P450 1A1 gene, cyp1a1, by binding to its receptor, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). TCDD-bound AhR translocates to the nucleus and forms a heterodimer with its partner protein, AhR nuclear translocator (Arnt). The AhR/Arnt heterodimer then binds to the dioxin-response elements (DREs) in the cyp1a1 enhancer and stimulates transcription of cyp1a1. We tested whether kinase pathways are involved in this process by treating Hepa1c1c7 cells with kinase inhibitors. The MEK-1 inhibitor PD98059 reduced TCDD-induced transcription of cyp1a1. TCDD treatment results in phosphorylation of p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), a substrate of MEK-1. Overexpression of dominant negative form of p42 MAPK suppressed TCDD-dependent transcription of a reporter gene controlled by dioxin-response elements (DREs), and pretreatment with PD98059 also blocked this transcription. PD98059 pretreatment also inhibited TCDD-induced DRE binding of the AhR/Arnt heterodimer. Together these results indicate that TCDD activates the MEK-1/p44/p42 MAPK pathway, which in turn activates AhR and so facilitates binding of AhR to the cyp1a1 DRE

  6. Systems Analysis of Adaptive Responses to MAP Kinase Pathway Blockade in BRAF Mutant Melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J Capaldo

    Full Text Available Fifty percent of cutaneous melanomas are driven by activated BRAFV600E, but tumors treated with RAF inhibitors, even when they respond dramatically, rapidly adapt and develop resistance. Thus, there is a pressing need to identify the major mechanisms of intrinsic and adaptive resistance and develop drug combinations that target these resistance mechanisms. In a combinatorial drug screen on a panel of 12 treatment-naïve BRAFV600E mutant melanoma cell lines of varying levels of resistance to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway inhibition, we identified the combination of PLX4720, a targeted inhibitor of mutated BRaf, and lapatinib, an inhibitor of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases, as synergistically cytotoxic in the subset of cell lines that displayed the most resistance to PLX4720. To identify potential mechanisms of resistance to PLX4720 treatment and synergy with lapatinib treatment, we performed a multi-platform functional genomics analysis to profile the genome as well as the transcriptional and proteomic responses of these cell lines to treatment with PLX4720. We found modest levels of resistance correlated with the zygosity of the BRAF V600E allele and receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK mutational status. Layered over base-line resistance was substantial upregulation of many ErbB pathway genes in response to BRaf inhibition, thus generating the vulnerability to combination with lapatinib. The transcriptional responses of ErbB pathway genes are associated with a number of transcription factors, including ETS2 and its associated cofactors that represent a convergent regulatory mechanism conferring synergistic drug susceptibility in the context of diverse mutational landscapes.

  7. The Future of Ubiquitous Elearning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Post-secondary students are increasingly receiving instruction by eLearning. Many or these are part-time students or are working while taking classes. In such circumstances, students may find themselves short of time to study. One mechanism that can be exploited to make the best use of available time is ubiquitous eLearning. Ubiquitous eLearning…

  8. MAP Kinase Cascades Regulate the Cold Response by Modulating ICE1 Protein Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunzhao; Wang, Pengcheng; Si, Tong; Hsu, Chuan-Chih; Wang, Lu; Zayed, Omar; Yu, Zheping; Zhu, Yingfang; Dong, Juan; Tao, W Andy; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2017-12-04

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades are important signaling modules that convert environmental stimuli into cellular responses. We show that MPK3, MPK4, and MPK6 are rapidly activated after cold treatment. The mpk3 and mpk6 mutants display increased expression of CBF genes and enhanced freezing tolerance, whereas constitutive activation of the MKK4/5-MPK3/6 cascade in plants causes reduced expression of CBF genes and hypersensitivity to freezing, suggesting that the MKK4/5-MPK3/6 cascade negatively regulates the cold response. MPK3 and MPK6 can phosphorylate ICE1, a basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factor that regulates the expression of CBF genes, and the phosphorylation promotes the degradation of ICE1. Interestingly, the MEKK1-MKK2-MPK4 pathway constitutively suppresses MPK3 and MPK6 activities and has a positive role in the cold response. Furthermore, the MAPKKK YDA and two calcium/calmodulin-regulated receptor-like kinases, CRLK1 and CRLK2, negatively modulate the cold activation of MPK3/6. Our results uncover important roles of MAPK cascades in the regulation of plant cold response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Inducible activation of ERK5 MAP kinase enhances adult neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb and improves olfactory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenbin; Lu, Song; Li, Tan; Pan, Yung-Wei; Zou, Junhui; Abel, Glen M; Xu, Lihong; Storm, Daniel R; Xia, Zhengui

    2015-05-20

    Recent discoveries have suggested that adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and olfactory bulb (OB) may be required for at least some forms of olfactory behavior in mice. However, it is unclear whether conditional and selective enhancement of adult neurogenesis by genetic approaches is sufficient to improve olfactory function under physiological conditions or after injury. Furthermore, specific signaling mechanisms regulating adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB are not fully defined. We previously reported that ERK5, a MAP kinase selectively expressed in the neurogenic regions of the adult brain, plays a critical role in adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB. Using a site-specific knock-in mouse model, we report here that inducible and targeted activation of the endogenous ERK5 in adult neural stem/progenitor cells enhances adult neurogenesis in the OB by increasing cell survival and neuronal differentiation. This conditional ERK5 activation also improves short-term olfactory memory and odor-cued associative olfactory learning under normal physiological conditions. Furthermore, these mice show enhanced recovery of olfactory function and have more adult-born neurons after a zinc sulfate-induced lesion of the main olfactory epithelium. We conclude that ERK5 MAP kinase is an important endogenous signaling pathway regulating adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB, and that conditional activation of endogenous ERK5 is sufficient to enhance adult neurogenesis in the OB thereby improving olfactory function both under normal conditions and after injury. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/357833-17$15.00/0.

  10. Transgenic Analysis of the Leishmania MAP Kinase MPK10 Reveals an Auto-inhibitory Mechanism Crucial for Stage-Regulated Activity and Parasite Viability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayla, M.; Rachidi, N.; Leclercq, O.

    2014-01-01

    Protozoan pathogens of the genus Leishmania have evolved unique signaling mechanisms that can sense changes in the host environment and trigger adaptive stage differentiation essential for host cell infection. The signaling mechanisms underlying parasite development remain largely elusive even...... though Leishmania mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have been linked previously to environmentally induced differentiation and virulence. Here, we unravel highly unusual regulatory mechanisms for Leishmania MAP kinase 10 (MPK10). Using a transgenic approach, we demonstrate that MPK10 is stage...... at position 395 that could be implicated in kinase regulation. Finally, we uncovered a feedback loop that limits MPK10 activity through dephosphorylation of the tyrosine residue of the TxY motif. Together our data reveal novel aspects of protein kinase regulation in Leishmania, and propose MPK10...

  11. An Instrumental Paradigm for Ubiquitous Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2008-01-01

    will require comprehensive experimental user centred development. Originality/Value -- This research offers a new way of thinking interaction, suited for the dynamism of modern computing. Take away message -- Through a strong foundation in activity theory and ecological psychology a new paradigm for ubiquitous...... shortcomings of some of the restrictive assumptions contemporary graphical user interfaces are built upon. Research approach -- Based on activity theory and ecological psychology a conceptual model for ubiquitous interaction is proposed and iteratively challenged and developed through actual implementation....... Findings/Design -- The project will ultimately shed light on how an understanding of interaction form activity theory and ecological psychology maps to an implementation of a new conceptual model for interaction with technology. Research limitations/Implications -- Implementation of an actual system...

  12. Effect of lipopolysaccharide and chlorpromazine on glucocorticoid receptor-mediated gene transcription and immunoreactivity: a possible involvement of p38-MAP kinase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Basta-Kaim, A.; Budziszewska, B.; Jaworska-Feil, L.; Tetich, M.; Kubera, M.; Zajícová, Alena; Holáň, Vladimír; Lasoń, W.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 6 (2004), s. 521-528 ISSN 0924-977X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : p38-MAP kinase, cytokines, gene transcription Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.545, year: 2004

  13. Assay Methods for ACS Activity and ACS Phosphorylation by MAP Kinases In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaomin; Li, Guojing; Zhang, Shuqun

    2017-01-01

    Ethylene, a gaseous phytohormone, has profound effects on plant growth, development, and adaptation to the environment. Ethylene-regulated processes begin with the induction of ethylene biosynthesis. There are two key steps in ethylene biosynthesis. The first is the biosynthesis of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) from S-Adenosyl-Methionine (SAM), a common precursor in many metabolic pathways, which is catalyzed by ACC synthase (ACS). The second is the oxidative cleavage of ACC to form ethylene under the action of ACC oxidase (ACO). ACC biosynthesis is the committing and generally the rate-limiting step in ethylene biosynthesis. As a result, characterizing the cellular ACS activity and understanding its regulation are important. In this chapter, we detail the methods used to measure, (1) the enzymatic activity of both recombinant and native ACS proteins, and (2) the phosphorylation of ACS protein by mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in vivo and in vitro.

  14. Elucidating the roles of MAP kinases in the moss Physcomitrella patens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanimirovic, Sabrina

    changes of plant immunity required for the conquest of land by plants. I describe the role of MPKs (MPK3, MPK5, RAK1 & double knockout RAK1/RAK2) upon abiotic stress by characterizing the phenotypes and morphological changes there may be during stress treatments. I characterized the mutant phenotypes...... during treatment with phytohormones and osmotic and light stress. This thesis contains of a general introduction to plant immunity and the role of MPKs in signaling processes related to immunity, abiotic stress, and plant development in both vascular and non-vascular plants. The focus in this thesis......-Acetyltransferase-Kinase). This thesis and work on these MPK mutants gives the laboratory a great start on several future publications, since many of the mutant lines have interesting phenotypes with and without exposure to abiotic stresses...

  15. DupA: a key regulator of the amoebal MAP kinase response to Legionella pneumophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiru; Dugan, Aisling S.; Bloomfield, Gareth; Skelton, Jason; Ivens, Alasdair; Losick, Vicki; Isberg, Ralph R.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The dupA gene, encoding a putative tyrosine kinase/dual specificity phosphatase (Dusp), was identified in a screen for Dictyostelium discoideum mutants altered in supporting Legionella pneumophila intracellular replication. The absence of dupA resulted in hyperphosphorylation of ERK1, consistent with the loss of a phosphatase activity, as well as degradation of ERK2. ERK1 hyperphosphorylation mimicked the response of this protein after bacterial challenge of wild type amoebae. Similar to Dusps in higher eukaryotic cells, the amoebal dupA gene was induced after bacterial contact, indicating a response of Dusps that is conserved from amoebae to mammals. A large set of genes was misregulated in the dupA− mutant that largely overlaps with genes responding to L. pneumophila infection. Some of the amoebal genes appear to be involved in a response similar to innate immunity in higher eukaryotes, indicating there was misregulation of a conserved response to bacteria. PMID:19748467

  16. Mobile and ubiquitous learning technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Specht, M. (2012, 22 November). Mobile and ubiquitous learning technologies. Presentation given at the Workshop "Blended Learning an Hochschulen" at the Fakultätentag Informatik at the Universität Jena, Jena, Germany.

  17. Role played by Disabled-2 in albumin induced MAP Kinase signalling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diwakar, Ramaswamy; Pearson, Alexander L.; Colville-Nash, Paul; Baines, Deborah L.; Dockrell, Mark E.C.

    2008-01-01

    Albumin has been shown to activate the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in proximal tubular cells (PTECs) of the kidney. Megalin, the putative receptor for albumin has potential signalling properties. However, the mechanisms by which megalin signals are unclear. The adaptor phosphoprotein Disabled-2 (Dab2) is known to interact with the cytoplasmic tail of megalin and may be involved in albumin-mediated MAPK signalling. In this study, we investigated the role of Dab2 in albumin-mediated MAPK signalling and further studied the role of Dab2 in albumin-induced TGFβ-1 secretion, a MAPK dependent event. We used RNA interference to knockdown Dab2 protein abundance in HKC-8 cells a model of human PTECs. Albumin activated ERK1,2 and Elk-1 in a MEK-1 dependent manner and resulted in secretion of TGFβ-1. In the absence of albumin, knockdown of Dab2 resulted in a trend towards increase in pERK1,2 consistent with its putative role as an inhibitor of cell proliferation. However albumin-induced ERK1,2 activation was completely abolished by Dab2 knockdown. Dab2 knockdown did not however result in inhibition of albumin-induced TGFβ-1 secretion. These results suggest that Dab2 is a ligand dependent bi-directional regulator of ERK1,2 activity by demonstrating that in addition to its more traditional role as an inhibitor of ERK1,2 it may also activate ERK1,2

  18. Effects of butyltin exposures on MAP kinase dependent transcription regulators in human natural killer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Person, Rachel J.; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2010-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are a major immune defense mechanism against cancer development and viral infection. The butyltins (BTs), tributyltin (TBT) and dibutyltin (DBT) have been widely used in industrial and other applications and significantly contaminate the environment. Both TBT and DBT have been detected in human blood. These compounds inhibit the lytic and binding function of human NK cells and thus could increase the incidence of cancer and viral infections. Butyltin (BT)-induced loss of NK function is accompanied by activation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and decreases in expression of cell-surface and cytolytic proteins. MAPKs activate components of the transcription regulator AP-1 and activate the transcription regulator Elk-1. Based on the fact that BTs activate MAPKs and alter protein expression, the current study examined the effect of BT exposures on the levels and phosphorylation states of the components of AP-1 and the phosphorylation state of Elk-1. Exposure to 300 nM TBT for 10 min increased the phosphorylation of c-Jun in NK cells. 1 h exposures to 300 nM and 200 nM TBT increased the phosphorylation and overall level of c-Jun. During a 300 nM treatment with TBT for 1 h the binding activity of AP-1 was significantly decreased. There were no significant alterations of AP-1 components or of Elk-1 with DBT exposures. Thus, it appears that TBT-induced alterations on phosphorylation, total levels and binding activity of c-Jun might contribute to, but are not fully responsible for, TBT-induced alterations of NK protein expression. PMID:20370538

  19. Deciphering the Arginine-binding preferences at the substrate-binding groove of Ser/Thr kinases by computational surface mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avraham Ben-Shimon

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinases are key signaling enzymes that catalyze the transfer of γ-phosphate from an ATP molecule to a phospho-accepting residue in the substrate. Unraveling the molecular features that govern the preference of kinases for particular residues flanking the phosphoacceptor is important for understanding kinase specificities toward their substrates and for designing substrate-like peptidic inhibitors. We applied ANCHORSmap, a new fragment-based computational approach for mapping amino acid side chains on protein surfaces, to predict and characterize the preference of kinases toward Arginine binding. We focus on positions P-2 and P-5, commonly occupied by Arginine (Arg in substrates of basophilic Ser/Thr kinases. The method accurately identified all the P-2/P-5 Arg binding sites previously determined by X-ray crystallography and produced Arg preferences that corresponded to those experimentally found by peptide arrays. The predicted Arg-binding positions and their associated pockets were analyzed in terms of shape, physicochemical properties, amino acid composition, and in-silico mutagenesis, providing structural rationalization for previously unexplained trends in kinase preferences toward Arg moieties. This methodology sheds light on several kinases that were described in the literature as having non-trivial preferences for Arg, and provides some surprising departures from the prevailing views regarding residues that determine kinase specificity toward Arg. In particular, we found that the preference for a P-5 Arg is not necessarily governed by the 170/230 acidic pair, as was previously assumed, but by several different pairs of acidic residues, selected from positions 133, 169, and 230 (PKA numbering. The acidic residue at position 230 serves as a pivotal element in recognizing Arg from both the P-2 and P-5 positions.

  20. Conditional deletion of ERK5 MAP kinase in the nervous system impairs pheromone information processing and pheromone-evoked behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhui Zou

    Full Text Available ERK5 MAP kinase is highly expressed in the developing nervous system but absent in most regions of the adult brain. It has been implicated in regulating the development of the main olfactory bulb and in odor discrimination. However, whether it plays an essential role in pheromone-based behavior has not been established. Here we report that conditional deletion of the Mapk7 gene which encodes ERK5 in mice in neural stem cells impairs several pheromone-mediated behaviors including aggression and mating in male mice. These deficits were not caused by a reduction in the level of testosterone, by physical immobility, by heightened fear or anxiety, or by depression. Using mouse urine as a natural pheromone-containing solution, we provide evidence that the behavior impairment was associated with defects in the detection of closely related pheromones as well as with changes in their innate preference for pheromones related to sexual and reproductive activities. We conclude that expression of ERK5 during development is critical for pheromone response and associated animal behavior in adult mice.

  1. Biphasic Estradiol-induced AKT Phosphorylation Is Modulated by PTEN via MAP Kinase in HepG2 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Maria; Acconcia, Filippo; Trentalance, Anna

    2003-01-01

    We reported previously in HepG2 cells that estradiol induces cell cycle progression throughout the G1–S transition by the parallel stimulation of both PKC-α and ERK signaling molecules. The analysis of the cyclin D1 gene expression showed that only the MAP kinase pathway was involved. Here, the presence of rapid/nongenomic, estradiol-regulated, PI3K/AKT signal transduction pathway, its modulation by the levels of the tumor suppressor PTEN, its cross-talk with the ERK pathway, and its involvement in DNA synthesis and cyclin D1 gene promoter activity have all been studied in HepG2 cells. 17β-Estradiol induced the rapid and biphasic phosphorylation of AKT. These phosphorylations were independent of each other, being the first wave of activation independent of the estrogen receptor (ER), whereas the second was dependent on ER. Both activations were dependent on PI3K activity; furthermore, the ERK pathway modulated AKT phosphorylation by acting on the PTEN levels. The results showed that the PI3K pathway, as well as ER, were strongly involved in both G1–S progression and cyclin D1 promoter activity by acting on its proximal region (-254 base pairs). These data indicate that in HepG2 cells, different rapid/nongenomic estradiol-induced signal transduction pathways modulate the multiple steps of G1–S phase transition. PMID:12808053

  2. A New MAP Kinase Protein Involved in Estradiol-Stimulated Reproduction of the Helminth Parasite Taenia crassiceps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo, Galileo; Soldevila, Gloria; Ortega-Pierres, Guadalupe; Chávez-Ríos, Jesús Ramsés; Nava, Karen; Fonseca-Liñán, Rocío; López-Griego, Lorena; Hallal-Calleros, Claudia; Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    MAP kinases (MAPK) are involved in the regulation of cellular processes such as reproduction and growth. In parasites, the role of MAPK has been scarcely studied. Here, we describe the participation of an ERK-like protein in estrogen-dependent reproduction of the helminth parasite Taenia crassiceps. Our results show that 17β-estradiol induces a concentration-dependent increase in the bud number of in vitro cultured cysticerci. If parasites are also incubated in presence of an ERK-inhibitor, the stimulatory effect of estrogen is blocked. The expression of ERK-like mRNA and its corresponding protein was detected in the parasite. The ERK-like protein was over-expressed by all treatments. Nevertheless, a strong induction of phosphorylation of this protein was observed only in response to 17β-estradiol. Cross-contamination by host cells was discarded by flow cytometry analysis. Parasite cells expressing the ERK-like protein were exclusively located at the subtegument tissue by confocal microscopy. Finally, the ERK-like protein was separated by bidimensional electrophoresis and then sequenced, showing the conserved TEY activation motif, typical of all known ERK 1/2 proteins. Our results show that an ERK-like protein is involved in the molecular signalling during the interaction between the host and T. crassiceps, and may be considered as target for anti-helminth drugs design. PMID:20145710

  3. The ERK MAP kinase-PEA3/ETV4-MMP-1 axis is operative in oesophageal adenocarcinoma

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keld, Richard

    2010-12-09

    Abstract Background Many members of the ETS-domain transcription factor family are important drivers of tumourigenesis. In this context, their activation by Ras-ERK pathway signaling is particularly relevant to the tumourigenic properties of many ETS-domain transcription factors. The PEA3 subfamily of ETS-domain transcription factors have been implicated in tumour metastasis in several different cancers. Results Here, we have studied the expression of the PEA3 subfamily members PEA3\\/ETV4 and ER81\\/ETV1 in oesophageal adenocarcinomas and determined their role in oesophageal adenocarcinoma cell function. PEA3 plays an important role in controlling both the proliferation and invasive properties of OE33 oesophageal adenocarcinoma cells. A key target gene is MMP-1. The ERK MAP kinase pathway activates PEA3 subfamily members and also plays a role in these PEA3 controlled events, establishing the ERK-PEA3-MMP-1 axis as important in OE33 cells. PEA3 subfamily members are upregulated in human adenocarcinomas and expression correlates with MMP-1 expression and late stage metastatic disease. Enhanced ERK signaling is also more prevalent in late stage oesophageal adenocarcinomas. Conclusions This study shows that the ERK-PEA3-MMP-1 axis is upregulated in oesophageal adenocarcinoma cells and is a potentially important driver of the metastatic progression of oesophageal adenocarcinomas.

  4. Disassembly of microtubules and inhibition of neurite outgrowth, neuroblastoma cell proliferation, and MAP kinase tyrosine dephosphorylation by dibenzyl trisulphide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösner, H; Williams, L A; Jung, A; Kraus, W

    2001-08-22

    Dibenzyl trisulphide (DTS), a main lipophilic compound in Petiveria alliacea L. (Phytolaccaceae), was identified as one of the active immunomodulatory compounds in extracts of the plant. To learn more about its biological activities and molecular mechanisms, we conducted one-dimensional NMR interaction studies with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and tested DTS and related compounds in two well-established neuronal cell-and-tissue culture systems. We found that DTS preferentially binds to an aromatic region of BSA which is rich in tyrosyl residues. In SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, DTS attenuates the dephosphorylation of tyrosyl residues of MAP kinase (erk1/erk2). In the same neuroblastoma cell line and in Wistar 38 human lung fibroblasts, DTS causes a reversible disassembly of microtubules, but it did not affect actin dynamics. Probably due to the disruption of the microtubule dynamics, DTS also inhibits neuroblastoma cell proliferation and neurite outgrowth from spinal cord explants. Related dibenzyl compounds with none, one, or two sulphur atoms were found to be significantly less effective. These data confirmed that the natural compound DTS has a diverse spectrum of biological properties, including cytostatic and neurotoxic actions in addition to immunomodulatory activities.

  5. Ubiquitous Computing, Complexity and Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    environments, experience time, and develop identities individually and socially. Interviews with working media artists lend further perspectives on these cultural transformations. Drawing on cultural theory, new media art studies, human-computer interaction theory, and software studies, this cutting-edge book......The ubiquitous nature of mobile and pervasive computing has begun to reshape and complicate our notions of space, time, and identity. In this collection, over thirty internationally recognized contributors reflect on ubiquitous computing’s implications for the ways in which we interact with our...... critically unpacks the complex ubiquity-effects confronting us every day....

  6. Trust Models in Ubiquitous Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens; Krukow, Karl; Sassone, Vladimiro

    2008-01-01

    We recapture some of the arguments for trust-based technologies in ubiquitous computing, followed by a brief survey of some of the models of trust that have been introduced in this respect. Based on this, we argue for the need of more formal and foundational trust models.......We recapture some of the arguments for trust-based technologies in ubiquitous computing, followed by a brief survey of some of the models of trust that have been introduced in this respect. Based on this, we argue for the need of more formal and foundational trust models....

  7. Induction of MAP Kinase Homologues during Growth and Morphogenetic Development of Karnal Bunt (Tilletia indica) under the Influence of Host Factor(s) from Wheat Spikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Atul K.; Seneviratne, J. M.; Joshi, G. K.; Kumar, Anil

    2012-01-01

    Signaling pathways that activate different mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in response to certain environmental conditions, play important role in mating type switching (Fus3) and pathogenicity (Pmk1) in many fungi. In order to determine the roles of such regulatory genes in Tilletia indica, the causal pathogen of Karnal bunt (KB) of wheat, semi-quantitative and quantitative RT-PCR was carried out to isolate and determine the expression of MAP kinase homologues during fungal growth and development under in vitro culture. Maximum expression of TiFus3 and TiPmk1 genes were observed at 14th and 21st days of culture and decreased thereafter. To investigate whether the fungus alters the expression levels of same kinases upon interaction with plants, cultures were treated with 1% of host factors (extracted from S-2 stage of wheat spikes). Such treatment induced the expression of MAPks in time dependent manner compared to the absence of host factors. These results suggest that host factor(s) provide certain signal(s) which activate TiFus3 and TiPmk1 during morphogenetic development of T. indica. The results also provides a clue about the role of host factors in enhancing the disease potential due to induction of MAP kinases involved in fungal development and pathogenecity. PMID:22547988

  8. PRO40 is a scaffold protein of the cell wall integrity pathway, linking the MAP kinase module to the upstream activator protein kinase C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Teichert

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways are crucial signaling instruments in eukaryotes. Most ascomycetes possess three MAPK modules that are involved in key developmental processes like sexual propagation or pathogenesis. However, the regulation of these modules by adapters or scaffolds is largely unknown. Here, we studied the function of the cell wall integrity (CWI MAPK module in the model fungus Sordaria macrospora. Using a forward genetic approach, we found that sterile mutant pro30 has a mutated mik1 gene that encodes the MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK of the proposed CWI pathway. We generated single deletion mutants lacking MAPKKK MIK1, MAPK kinase (MAPKK MEK1, or MAPK MAK1 and found them all to be sterile, cell fusion-deficient and highly impaired in vegetative growth and cell wall stress response. By searching for MEK1 interaction partners via tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identified previously characterized developmental protein PRO40 as a MEK1 interaction partner. Although fungal PRO40 homologs have been implicated in diverse developmental processes, their molecular function is currently unknown. Extensive affinity purification, mass spectrometry, and yeast two-hybrid experiments showed that PRO40 is able to bind MIK1, MEK1, and the upstream activator protein kinase C (PKC1. We further found that the PRO40 N-terminal disordered region and the central region encompassing a WW interaction domain are sufficient to govern interaction with MEK1. Most importantly, time- and stress-dependent phosphorylation studies showed that PRO40 is required for MAK1 activity. The sum of our results implies that PRO40 is a scaffold protein for the CWI pathway, linking the MAPK module to the upstream activator PKC1. Our data provide important insights into the mechanistic role of a protein that has been implicated in sexual and asexual development, cell fusion, symbiosis, and pathogenicity in different fungal systems.

  9. Recognition of ERK MAP kinase by PEA-15 reveals a common docking site within the death domain and death effector domain

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Justine M.; Vaidyanathan, Hema; Ramos, Joe W.; Ginsberg, Mark H.; Werner, Milton H.

    2002-01-01

    PEA-15 is a multifunctional protein that modulates signaling pathways which control cell proliferation and cell death. In particular, PEA-15 regulates the actions of the ERK MAP kinase cascade by binding to ERK and altering its subcellular localization. The three-dimensional structure of PEA-15 has been determined using NMR spectroscopy and its interaction with ERK defined by characterization of mutants that modulate ERK function. PEA-15 is composed of an N-terminal death effector domain (DED...

  10. Ubiquitous media for collocated interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Ann; Jacucci, Giulio; Peltonen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Has ubiquitous computing entered our lives as anticipated in the early 90s or at the turn of the millennium? In this last decade, the processing of media combined with sensing and communication capabilities has been slowly entering our lives through powerful smartphones, multimodal game consoles,...

  11. International Symposium on Ubiquitous Networking

    CERN Document Server

    Medromi, Hicham; Sadik, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    This volume publishes new trends and findings in hot topics related to ubiquitous computing/networking. It is the outcome of UNet - ainternational scientific event that took place on September 08-10, 2015, in the fascinating city of Casablanca, Morocco. UNet’15 is technically sponsored by IEEE Morocco Section and IEEE COMSOC Morocco Chapter.

  12. Trust models in ubiquitous computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukow, Karl; Nielsen, Mogens; Sassone, Vladimiro

    2008-10-28

    We recapture some of the arguments for trust-based technologies in ubiquitous computing, followed by a brief survey of some of the models of trust that have been introduced in this respect. Based on this, we argue for the need of more formal and foundational trust models.

  13. The Status of Ubiquitous Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David G.; Petitto, Karen R.

    2003-01-01

    Explains the prevalence and rationale of ubiquitous computing on college campuses--teaching with the assumption or expectation that all faculty and students have access to the Internet--and offers lessons learned by pioneering institutions. Lessons learned involve planning, technology, implementation and management, adoption of computer-enhanced…

  14. Ubiquitous emotion-aware computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon

    Emotions are a crucial element for personal and ubiquitous computing. What to sense and how to sense it, however, remain a challenge. This study explores the rare combination of speech, electrocardiogram, and a revised Self-Assessment Mannequin to assess people’s emotions. 40 people watched 30

  15. A Collaborative Model for Ubiquitous Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Jorge; Barbosa, Debora; Rabello, Solon

    2016-01-01

    Use of mobile devices and widespread adoption of wireless networks have enabled the emergence of Ubiquitous Computing. Application of this technology to improving education strategies gave rise to Ubiquitous e-Learning, also known as Ubiquitous Learning. There are several approaches to organizing ubiquitous learning environments, but most of them…

  16. Protein kinase CK2 in human diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Barbara; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2008-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 (formerly referred to as casein kinase II) is an evolutionary conserved, ubiquitous protein kinase. There are two paralog catalytic subunits, i.e. alpha (A1) and alpha' (A2). The alpha and alpha' subunits are linked to two beta subunits to produce a heterotetrameric structure...

  17. The Aspergillus fumigatus SchASCH9 kinase modulates SakAHOG1 MAP kinase activity and it is essential for virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves de Castro, Patrícia; Dos Reis, Thaila Fernanda; Dolan, Stephen K; Oliveira Manfiolli, Adriana; Brown, Neil Andrew; Jones, Gary W; Doyle, Sean; Riaño-Pachón, Diego M; Squina, Fábio Márcio; Caldana, Camila; Singh, Ashutosh; Del Poeta, Maurizio; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Goldman, Gustavo H

    2016-11-01

    The serine-threonine kinase TOR, the Target of Rapamycin, is an important regulator of nutrient, energy and stress signaling in eukaryotes. Sch9, a Ser/Thr kinase of AGC family (the cAMP-dependent PKA, cGMP- dependent protein kinase G and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase C family), is a substrate of TOR. Here, we characterized the fungal opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus Sch9 homologue (SchA). The schA null mutant was sensitive to rapamycin, high concentrations of calcium, hyperosmotic stress and SchA was involved in iron metabolism. The ΔschA null mutant showed increased phosphorylation of SakA, the A. fumigatus Hog1 homologue. The schA null mutant has increased and decreased trehalose and glycerol accumulation, respectively, suggesting SchA performs different roles for glycerol and trehalose accumulation during osmotic stress. The schA was transcriptionally regulated by osmotic stress and this response was dependent on SakA and MpkC. The double ΔschA ΔsakA and ΔschA ΔmpkC mutants were more sensitive to osmotic stress than the corresponding parental strains. Transcriptomics and proteomics identified direct and indirect targets of SchA post-exposure to hyperosmotic stress. Finally, ΔschA was avirulent in a low dose murine infection model. Our results suggest there is a complex network of interactions amongst the A. fumigatus TOR, SakA and SchA pathways. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A superoxide anion-scavenger, 1,3-selenazolidin-4-one suppresses serum deprivation-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells by activating MAP kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishina, Atsuyoshi; Kimura, Hirokazu; Kozawa, Kunihisa; Sommen, Geoffroy; Nakamura, Takao; Heimgartner, Heinz; Koketsu, Mamoru; Furukawa, Shoei

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic organic selenium compounds, such as ebselen, may show glutathione peroxidase-like antioxidant activity and have a neurotrophic effect. We synthesized 1,3-selenazolidin-4-ones, new types of synthetic organic selenium compounds (five-member ring compounds), to study their possible applications as antioxidants or neurotrophic-like molecules. Their superoxide radical scavenging effects were assessed using the quantitative, highly sensitive method of real-time kinetic chemiluminescence. At 166 μM, the O 2 − scavenging activity of 1,3-selenazolidin-4-ones ranged from 0 to 66.2%. 2-[3-(4-Methoxyphenyl)-4-oxo-1,3-selenazolidin-2-ylidene]malononitrile (compound b) showed the strongest superoxide anion-scavenging activity among the 6 kinds of 2-methylene-1,3-selenazolidin-4-ones examined. Compound b had a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) at 92.4 μM and acted as an effective and potentially useful O 2 − scavenger in vitro. The effect of compound b on rat pheochromocytome cell line PC12 cells was compared with that of ebselen or nerve growth factor (NGF) by use of the MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide] assay. When ebselen was added at 100 μM or more, toxicity toward PC12 cells was evident. On the contrary, compound b suppressed serum deprivation-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells more effectively at a concentration of 100 μM. The activity of compound b to phosphorylate mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) 1/2 (MAP kinase) in PC12 cells was higher than that of ebselen, and the former at 100 μM induced the phosphorylation of MAP kinase to a degree similar to that induced by NGF. From these results, we conclude that this superoxide anion-scavenger, compound b, suppressed serum deprivation-induced apoptosis by promoting the phosphorylation of MAP kinase. -- Highlights: ► We newly synthesized 1,3-selenazolidin-4-ones to study their possible applications. ► Among new

  19. A superoxide anion-scavenger, 1,3-selenazolidin-4-one suppresses serum deprivation-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells by activating MAP kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishina, Atsuyoshi, E-mail: nishina@yone.ac.jp [Yonezawa Women' s Junior College, 6-15-1 Tohrimachi, Yonezawa, Yamagata 992-0025 (Japan); Kimura, Hirokazu; Kozawa, Kunihisa [Gunma Prefectural Institute of Public Health and Environmental Sciences, 378 Kamioki, Maebashi, Gunma 371-0052 (Japan); Sommen, Geoffroy [Lonza Braine SA, Chaussee de Tubize 297, B-1420 Braine l' Alleud (Belgium); Nakamura, Takao [Department of Biomedical Information Engineering, Graduate School of Medical Science, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Heimgartner, Heinz [University of Zuerich, Institut of Organic Chemistry, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Koketsu, Mamoru [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Gifu University, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Furukawa, Shoei [Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, 5-6-1 Mitahora-higashi, Gifu 502-8585 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    Synthetic organic selenium compounds, such as ebselen, may show glutathione peroxidase-like antioxidant activity and have a neurotrophic effect. We synthesized 1,3-selenazolidin-4-ones, new types of synthetic organic selenium compounds (five-member ring compounds), to study their possible applications as antioxidants or neurotrophic-like molecules. Their superoxide radical scavenging effects were assessed using the quantitative, highly sensitive method of real-time kinetic chemiluminescence. At 166 {mu}M, the O{sub 2}{sup -} scavenging activity of 1,3-selenazolidin-4-ones ranged from 0 to 66.2%. 2-[3-(4-Methoxyphenyl)-4-oxo-1,3-selenazolidin-2-ylidene]malononitrile (compound b) showed the strongest superoxide anion-scavenging activity among the 6 kinds of 2-methylene-1,3-selenazolidin-4-ones examined. Compound b had a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC{sub 50}) at 92.4 {mu}M and acted as an effective and potentially useful O{sub 2}{sup -} scavenger in vitro. The effect of compound b on rat pheochromocytome cell line PC12 cells was compared with that of ebselen or nerve growth factor (NGF) by use of the MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide] assay. When ebselen was added at 100 {mu}M or more, toxicity toward PC12 cells was evident. On the contrary, compound b suppressed serum deprivation-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells more effectively at a concentration of 100 {mu}M. The activity of compound b to phosphorylate mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) 1/2 (MAP kinase) in PC12 cells was higher than that of ebselen, and the former at 100 {mu}M induced the phosphorylation of MAP kinase to a degree similar to that induced by NGF. From these results, we conclude that this superoxide anion-scavenger, compound b, suppressed serum deprivation-induced apoptosis by promoting the phosphorylation of MAP kinase. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We newly synthesized 1,3-selenazolidin-4-ones to

  20. MAP kinase-signaling controls nuclear translocation of tripeptidyl-peptidase II in response to DNA damage and oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preta, Giulio; Klark, Rainier de; Chakraborti, Shankhamala [Center for Molecular Medicine (CMM), Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Glas, Rickard, E-mail: rickard.glas@ki.se [Center for Molecular Medicine (CMM), Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Nuclear translocation of TPPII occurs in response to different DNA damage inducers. {yields} Nuclear accumulation of TPPII is linked to ROS and anti-oxidant enzyme levels. {yields} MAPKs control nuclear accumulation of TPPII. {yields} Inhibited nuclear accumulation of TPPII decreases DNA damage-induced {gamma}-H2AX expression. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a continuous hazard in eukaroytic cells by their ability to cause damage to biomolecules, in particular to DNA. Previous data indicated that the cytosolic serine peptidase tripeptidyl-peptidase II (TPPII) translocates into the nucleus of most tumor cell lines in response to {gamma}-irradiation and ROS production; an event that promoted p53 expression as well as caspase-activation. We here observed that nuclear translocation of TPPII was dependent on signaling by MAP kinases, including p38MAPK. Further, this was caused by several types of DNA-damaging drugs, a DNA cross-linker (cisplatinum), an inhibitor of topoisomerase II (etoposide), and to some extent also by nucleoside-analogues (5-fluorouracil, hydroxyurea). In the minority of tumor cell lines where TPPII was not translocated into the nucleus in response to DNA damage we observed reduced intracellular ROS levels, and the expression levels of redox defense systems were increased. Further, treatment with the ROS-inducer {gamma}-hexa-chloro-cyclohexane ({gamma}-HCH, lindane), an inhibitor of GAP junctions, restored nuclear translocation of TPPII in these cell lines upon {gamma}-irradiation. Moreover, blocking nuclear translocation of TPPII in etoposide-treated cells, by using a peptide-derived inhibitor (Z-Gly-Leu-Ala-OH), attenuated expression of {gamma}-H2AX in {gamma}-irradiated melanoma cells. Our results indicated a role for TPPII in MAPK-dependent DNA damage signaling.

  1. MAP kinase signaling protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Seger, Rony

    2004-01-01

    ..., or recommendatoins are those of the author(s), and do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher. Methods in Molecular Biology TM is a trademark of The Humana Press, Inc. This publication is printed on acid-free paper. ANSI Z39.48-1984 (American Standards Institute) Permanence of Paper for Printed Library Materials. Production Editor...

  2. Mitogen activated protein kinase 6 and MAP kinase phosphatase 1 are involved in the response of Arabidopsis roots to L-glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Bucio, Jesús Salvador; Raya-González, Javier; Ravelo-Ortega, Gustavo; Ruiz-Herrera, León Francisco; Ramos-Vega, Maricela; León, Patricia; López-Bucio, José; Guevara-García, Ángel Arturo

    2018-03-01

    The function and components of L-glutamate signaling pathways in plants have just begun to be elucidated. Here, using a combination of genetic and biochemical strategies, we demonstrated that a MAPK module is involved in the control of root developmental responses to this amino acid. Root system architecture plays an essential role in plant adaptation to biotic and abiotic factors via adjusting signal transduction and gene expression. L-Glutamate (L-Glu), an amino acid with neurotransmitter functions in animals, inhibits root growth, but the underlying genetic mechanisms are poorly understood. Through a combination of genetic analysis, in-gel kinase assays, detailed cell elongation and division measurements and confocal analysis of expression of auxin, quiescent center and stem cell niche related genes, the critical roles of L-Glu in primary root growth acting through the mitogen-activated protein kinase 6 (MPK6) and the dual specificity serine-threonine-tyrosine phosphatase MKP1 could be revealed. In-gel phosphorylation assays revealed a rapid and dose-dependent induction of MPK6 and MPK3 activities in wild-type Arabidopsis seedlings in response to L-Glu. Mutations in MPK6 or MKP1 reduced or increased root cell division and elongation in response to L-Glu, possibly modulating auxin transport and/or response, but in a PLETHORA1 and 2 independent manner. Our data highlight MPK6 and MKP1 as components of an L-Glu pathway linking the auxin response, and cell division for primary root growth.

  3. The transcription factor Ste12 mediates the regulatory role of the Tmk1 MAP kinase in mycoparasitism and vegetative hyphal fusion in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma atroviride.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Gruber

    Full Text Available Mycoparasitic species of the fungal genus Trichoderma are potent antagonists able to combat plant pathogenic fungi by direct parasitism. An essential step in this mycoparasitic fungus-fungus interaction is the detection of the fungal host followed by activation of molecular weapons in the mycoparasite by host-derived signals. The Trichoderma atroviride MAP kinase Tmk1, a homolog of yeast Fus3/Kss1, plays an essential role in regulating the mycoparasitic host attack, aerial hyphae formation and conidiation. However, the transcription factors acting downstream of Tmk1 are hitherto unknown. Here we analyzed the functions of the T. atroviride Ste12 transcription factor whose orthologue in yeast is targeted by the Fus3 and Kss1 MAP kinases. Deletion of the ste12 gene in T. atroviride not only resulted in reduced mycoparasitic overgrowth and lysis of host fungi but also led to loss of hyphal avoidance in the colony periphery and a severe reduction in conidial anastomosis tube formation and vegetative hyphal fusion events. The transcription of several orthologues of Neurospora crassa hyphal fusion genes was reduced upon ste12 deletion; however, the Δste12 mutant showed enhanced expression of mycoparasitism-relevant chitinolytic and proteolytic enzymes and of the cell wall integrity MAP kinase Tmk2. Based on the comparative analyses of Δste12 and Δtmk1 mutants, an essential role of the Ste12 transcriptional regulator in mediating outcomes of the Tmk1 MAPK pathway such as regulation of the mycoparasitic activity, hyphal fusion and carbon source-dependent vegetative growth is suggested. Aerial hyphae formation and conidiation, in contrast, were found to be independent of Ste12.

  4. Ubiquitous Versus One-to-One

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAnear, Anita

    2006-01-01

    When we planned the editorial calendar with the topic ubiquitous computing, we were thinking of ubiquitous computing as the one-to-one ratio of computers to students and teachers and 24/7 access to electronic resources. At the time, we were aware that ubiquitous computing in the computer science field had more to do with wearable computers. Our…

  5. HCI in Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing

    OpenAIRE

    椎尾, 一郎; 安村, 通晃; 福本, 雅明; 伊賀, 聡一郎; 増井, 俊之

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides some perspectives to human computer interaction in mobile and ubiquitous computing. The review covers overview of ubiquitous computing, mobile computing and wearable computing. It also summarizes HCI topics on these field, including real-world oriented interface, multi-modal interface, context awareness and in-visible computers. Finally we discuss killer applications for coming ubiquitous computing era.

  6. Amide-based inhibitors of p38alpha MAP kinase. Part 2: design, synthesis and SAR of potent N-pyrimidyl amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tester, Richland; Tan, Xuefei; Luedtke, Gregory R; Nashashibi, Imad; Schinzel, Kurt; Liang, Weiling; Jung, Joon; Dugar, Sundeep; Liclican, Albert; Tabora, Jocelyn; Levy, Daniel E; Do, Steven

    2010-04-15

    Optimization of a tri-substituted N-pyridyl amide led to the discovery of a new class of potent N-pyrimidyl amide based p38alpha MAP kinase inhibitors. Initial SAR studies led to the identification of 5-dihydrofuran as an optimal hydrophobic group. Additional side chain modifications resulted in the introduction of hydrogen bond interactions. Through extensive SAR studies, analogs bearing free amino groups and alternatives to the parent (S)-alpha-methyl benzyl moiety were identified. These compounds exhibited improved cellular activities and maintained balance between p38alpha and CYP3A4 inhibition. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. TGFβ1-mediated PI3K/Akt and p38 MAP kinase dependent alternative splicing of fibronectin extra domain A in human podocyte culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madne, Tarunkumar Hemraj; Dockrell, Mark Edward Carl

    2018-04-30

    Alternative splicing is an important gene regulation process to distribute proteins in health and diseases. Extra Domain A+ Fibronectin (EDA+Fn) is an alternatively spliced form of fibronectin (Fn) protein, present in the extra cellular matrix (ECM) and a recognised marker of various pathologies. TGFβ1 has been shown to induce alternative splicing of EDA+Fn in many cell types. Podocytes are spectacular cell type and play a key role in filtration and synthesise ECM proteins in renal physiology and pathology. In our previous study we have demonstrated expression and alternative splicing of EDA+Fn in basal condition in human podocytes culture. TGFβ1 further induced the basal expression and alternative splicing of EDA+Fn through Alk5 receptor and SR proteins. In this study, we have investigated TGFβ1 mediated signalling involved in alternative splicing of EDA+Fn in human podocytes. We have performed western blotting to characterise the expression of the EDA+Fn protein and other signalling proteins and RT-PCR to look for signalling pathways involved in regulation of alternative splicing of EDA+Fn in conditionally immortalised human podocytes culture.We have used TGFβ1 as a stimulator and SB431542, SB202190 and LY294002 for inhibitory studies. In this work, we have demonstrated in human podocytes culture TGFβ1 2.5ng/ml induced phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8, Smad2 and Smad3 via the ALK5 receptor. TGFβ1 significantly induced the PI3K/Akt pathway and the PI3K/Akt pathway inhibitor LY294002 significantly downregulated basal as well as TGFβ1 induced alternative splicing of EDA+Fn in human podocytes. In addition to this, TGFβ1 significantly induced the p38 MAP kinase signalling pathway and p38 MAP kinase signalling pathway inhibitor SB202190 downregulated the TGFβ1-mediated alternative splicing of EDA+Fn in human podocytes. The results with PI3K and p38 MAP kinase signalling pathway suggest that inhibiting PI3K signalling pathway downregulated the basal alternative

  8. [INHIBITORS OF MAP-KINASE PATHWAY U0126 AND PD98059 DIFFERENTLY AFFECT ORGANIZATION OF TUBULIN CYTOSKELETON AFTER STIMULATION OF EGF RECEPTOR ENDOCYTOSIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlobina, M V; Steblyanko, Yu Yu; Shklyaeva, M A; Kharchenko, V V; Salova, A V; Kornilova, E S

    2015-01-01

    To confirm the hypothesis about the involvement of EGF-stimulated MAP-kinase ERK1/2 in the regulation of microtubule (MT) system, the influence of two widely used ERK1/2 inhibitors, U0126 and PD98059, on the organization of tubulin cytoskeleton in interphase HeLa cells during EGF receptor endocytosis has been investigated. We have found that addition of U0126 or PD98059 to not-stimulated with EGF ells for 30 min has no effect on radially organized MT system. However, in the case of U0126 addition before EGF endocytosis stimulation, the number of MT per cell decreased within 15 min after such stimulation and was followed by complete MT depolymerization by 60-90 min. Stimulation of EGF endocytosis in the presence of PD98059 resulted only in insignificant depolymerization of MT and it could be detected mainly from their minus-ends. At the same time, MT regions close to plasma membrane became stabilized, which was proved by increase in tubulin acetylation level. This situation was characteristic for all period of the experiment. It has been also found that the inhibitors affect endocytosis dynamics of EGF-receptor complexes. Quantitative analysis demonstrated that the stimulation of endocytosis in the presence of U0126 generated a greater number of endosomes compared to control cells, and their number did not change significantly during the experiment. All these endosomes were localized peripherally. Effect of PD98059 resulted in the formation of lower number of endosomes that in control, but they demonstrated very slow clusterization despite the presence of some intact MT. Both inhibitors decreased EGFR colocolization with early endosomal marker EEA1, which indicated a delay in endosome fusions and maturation. The inhibitors were also shown to affect differently phospho-ERK 1 and 2 forms: U0126 completely inhibited phospho-ERK1 and 2, white, in the presence of PD98059, the two ERK forms demonstrated sharp transient activation in 15 min after stimulation, but only

  9. Inhibiting Src family tyrosine kinase activity blocks glutamate signalling to ERK1/2 and Akt/PKB but not JNK in cultured striatal neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossthwaite, Andrew J; Valli, Haseeb; Williams, Robert J

    2004-03-01

    Glutamate receptor activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling cascades has been implicated in diverse neuronal functions such as synaptic plasticity, development and excitotoxicity. We have previously shown that Ca2+-influx through NMDA receptors in cultured striatal neurones mediates the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) through a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase)-dependent pathway. Exposing neurones to the Src family tyrosine kinase inhibitor PP2, but not the inactive analogue PP3, inhibited NMDA receptor-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt/PKB in a concentration-dependent manner, and reduced cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation. To establish a link between Src family tyrosine kinase-mediated phosphorylation and PI 3-kinase signalling, affinity precipitation experiments were performed with the SH2 domains of the PI 3-kinase regulatory subunit p85. This revealed a Src-dependent phosphorylation of a focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-p85 complex on glutamate stimulation. Demonstrating that PI3-kinase is not ubiquitously involved in NMDA receptor signal transduction, the PI 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002 did not prevent NMDA receptor Ca2+-dependent phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2). Further, inhibiting Src family kinases increased NMDA receptor-dependent JNK1/2 phosphorylation, suggesting that Src family kinase-dependent cascades may physiologically limit signalling to JNK. These results demonstrate that Src family tyrosine kinases and PI3-kinase are pivotal regulators of NMDA receptor signalling to ERK/Akt and JNK in striatal neurones.

  10. FvBck1, a Component of Cell Wall Integrity MAP Kinase Pathway, is Required for Virulence and Oxidative Stress Response in Sugarcane Pokkah Boeng Pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengkang eZhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium verticillioides (formerly F. moniliforme is suggested as one of the causal agents of Pokkah Boeng, a serious disease of sugarcane worldwide. Currently, detailed molecular and physiological mechanism of pathogenesis is unknown. In this study, we focused on cell wall integrity MAPK pathway as one of the potential signaling mechanisms associated with Pokkah Boeng pathogenesis. We identified FvBCK1 gene that encodes a MAP kinase kinase kinase homolog and determined that it is not only required for growth, micro- and macro-conidia production, and cell wall integrity but also for response to osmotic and oxidative stresses. The deletion of FvBCK1 caused a significant reduction in virulence and FB1 production, a carcinogenic mycotoxin produced by the fungus. Moreover, we found the expression levels of three genes, which are known to be involved in superoxide scavenging, were down regulated in the mutant. We hypothesized that the loss of superoxide scavenging capacity was one of the reasons for reduced virulence, but overexpression of catalase or peroxidase gene failed to restore the virulence defect in the deletion mutant. When we introduced Magnaporthe oryzae MCK1 into the FvBck1 deletion mutant, while certain phenotypes were restored, the complemented strain failed to gain full virulence. In summary, FvBck1 plays a diverse role in F. verticillioides, and detailed investigation of downstream signaling pathways will lead to a better understanding of how this MAPK pathway regulates Pokkah Boeng on sugarcane.

  11. The role of MAP kinases in the induction of iNOS expression in neutrophils exposed to NDMA: the involvement transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak-Wrona, W; Jablonska, E; Garley, M; Jablonski, J; Radziwon, P; Iwaniuk, A

    2013-01-01

    The role of MAP kinases in the activation of AP-1 (c-Jun, c-Fos) and NF-κB p65 engaged in the regulation of iNOS expression in human neutrophils (PMNs) exposed to N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) was analyzed in the study. The study included a group of 20 healthy individuals. Isolated human PMN were incubated in the presence of NDMA. Selective MAP kinases inhibitors were used. The expression of proteins in the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions was assessed using Western blot method. The results show that NDMA intensifies iNOS, c-Jun, NF-κB p65 and IκB-α expression in the analyzed PMNs. The blocking of the p38 pathway led to lower iNOS expression, and higher expression of c-Jun and c-Fos in the cytoplasmic fraction, and also lower c-Jun expression in the nuclear fraction of PMNs exposed to NDMA. A decrease in iNOS expression in the cytoplasmic fraction, and also c-Jun in both fractions of the examined cells, was observed as a result of JNK pathway inhibition. The blocking of the ERK5 pathway led to higher iNOS, c-Jun and c-Fos expression in the cytoplasmic fraction, and higher c-Jun expression in the nuclear fraction of PMNs exposed to NDMA. The study also demonstrated that blocking of the p38 and JNK pathways resulted in higher expression of NF-κB p65 and IκB-α in the cytoplasmic fraction and their lower expression in the nuclear fraction of these cells. Our data indicate the role of MAP kinases p38 and JNK in the activation of c-Jun and NF-κB p65 transcription factors engaged in the regulation of iNOS expression in human neutrophils exposed to NDMA. However ERK5 kinase is not involved in the regulation of iNOS and NO production by those cells.

  12. Accurate calculation of mutational effects on the thermodynamics of inhibitor binding to p38α MAP kinase: a combined computational and experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shun; Travis, Sue M; Elcock, Adrian H

    2013-07-09

    A major current challenge for drug design efforts focused on protein kinases is the development of drug resistance caused by spontaneous mutations in the kinase catalytic domain. The ubiquity of this problem means that it would be advantageous to develop fast, effective computational methods that could be used to determine the effects of potential resistance-causing mutations before they arise in a clinical setting. With this long-term goal in mind, we have conducted a combined experimental and computational study of the thermodynamic effects of active-site mutations on a well-characterized and high-affinity interaction between a protein kinase and a small-molecule inhibitor. Specifically, we developed a fluorescence-based assay to measure the binding free energy of the small-molecule inhibitor, SB203580, to the p38α MAP kinase and used it measure the inhibitor's affinity for five different kinase mutants involving two residues (Val38 and Ala51) that contact the inhibitor in the crystal structure of the inhibitor-kinase complex. We then conducted long, explicit-solvent thermodynamic integration (TI) simulations in an attempt to reproduce the experimental relative binding affinities of the inhibitor for the five mutants; in total, a combined simulation time of 18.5 μs was obtained. Two widely used force fields - OPLS-AA/L and Amber ff99SB-ILDN - were tested in the TI simulations. Both force fields produced excellent agreement with experiment for three of the five mutants; simulations performed with the OPLS-AA/L force field, however, produced qualitatively incorrect results for the constructs that contained an A51V mutation. Interestingly, the discrepancies with the OPLS-AA/L force field could be rectified by the imposition of position restraints on the atoms of the protein backbone and the inhibitor without destroying the agreement for other mutations; the ability to reproduce experiment depended, however, upon the strength of the restraints' force constant

  13. Fungal communication requires the MAK-2 pathway elements STE-20 and RAS-2, the NRC-1 adapter STE-50 and the MAP kinase scaffold HAM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmann, Anne; Heilig, Yvonne; Valerius, Oliver; Ludwig, Sarah; Seiler, Stephan

    2014-11-01

    Intercellular communication is critical for the survival of unicellular organisms as well as for the development and function of multicellular tissues. Cell-to-cell signaling is also required to develop the interconnected mycelial network characteristic of filamentous fungi and is a prerequisite for symbiotic and pathogenic host colonization achieved by molds. Somatic cell-cell communication and subsequent cell fusion is governed by the MAK-2 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade in the filamentous ascomycete model Neurospora crassa, yet the composition and mode of regulation of the MAK-2 pathway are currently unclear. In order to identify additional components involved in MAK-2 signaling we performed affinity purification experiments coupled to mass spectrometry with strains expressing functional GFP-fusion proteins of the MAPK cascade. This approach identified STE-50 as a regulatory subunit of the Ste11p homolog NRC-1 and HAM-5 as cell-communication-specific scaffold protein of the MAPK cascade. Moreover, we defined a network of proteins consisting of two Ste20-related kinases, the small GTPase RAS-2 and the adenylate cyclase capping protein CAP-1 that function upstream of the MAK-2 pathway and whose signals converge on the NRC-1/STE-50 MAP3K complex and the HAM-5 scaffold. Finally, our data suggest an involvement of the striatin interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex, the casein kinase 2 heterodimer, the phospholipid flippase modulators YPK-1 and NRC-2 and motor protein-dependent vesicle trafficking in the regulation of MAK-2 pathway activity and function. Taken together, these data will have significant implications for our mechanistic understanding of MAPK signaling and for homotypic cell-cell communication in fungi and higher eukaryotes.

  14. Tamm-Horsfall Glycoprotein Enhances PMN Phagocytosis by Binding to Cell Surface-Expressed Lactoferrin and Cathepsin G That Activates MAP Kinase Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Li Yu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The molecular basis of polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN phagocytosis-enhancing activity (PEA by human purified urinary Tamm-Horsfall glyco- protein (THP has not been elucidated. In this study, we found human THP bound to lactoferrin (LF and cathepsin G (CG expressed on the surface of PMN, identified by a proteomic study with MALDI-TOF- LC/LC/mass spectrometric analysis. Pre-incubation of 10% SDS-PAGE electrophoresed PMN lysates with monoclonal anti-LF or anti-CG antibody reduced the binding with THP. To elucidate the signaling pathway of THP on PMN activation, we found THP enhanced ERK1/2 phosphorylation, reduced p38 MAP kinase phosphorylation, but had no effect on DNA binding of the five NF-kB family members in PMN. To further clarify whether the carbohydrate-side chains or protein-core structure in THP molecule is responsible for THP-PEA, THP was cleaved by different degrading enzymes with carbohydrate specificity (neuraminidase and β-galactosidase, protein specificity (V8 protease and proteinase K or glycoconjugate specificity (carboxylpeptidase Y and O-sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase. We clearly demonstrated that the intact protein-core structure in THP molecule was more important for THP-PEA than carbohydrate-side chains. Putting these results together, we conclude that THP adheres to surface-expressed LF and CG on PMN and transduces signaling via the MAP kinase pathway to enhance PMN phagocytosis.

  15. The C-type lectin OCILRP2 costimulates EL4 T cell activation via the DAP12-Raf-MAP kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Qiang; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Guangchao; Ma, Yuanfang

    2014-01-01

    OCILRP2 is a typical Type-II transmembrane protein that is selectively expressed in activated T lymphocytes, dendritic cells, and B cells and functions as a novel co-stimulator of T cell activation. However, the signaling pathways underlying OCILRP2 in T cell activation are still not completely understood. In this study, we found that the knockdown of OCILRP2 expression with shRNA or the blockage of its activity by an anti-OCILRP2 antagonist antibody reduced CD3/CD28-costimulated EL4 T cell viability and IL-2 production, inhibit Raf1, MAPK3, and MAPK8 activation, and impair NFAT and NF-κB transcriptional activities. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation results indicated that OCILRP2 could interact with the DAP12 protein, an adaptor containing an intracellular ITAM motif that can transduce signals to induce MAP kinase activation for T cell activation. Our data reveal that after binding with DAP12, OCILRP2 activates the Raf-MAP kinase pathways, resulting in T cell activation.

  16. The C-type lectin OCILRP2 costimulates EL4 T cell activation via the DAP12-Raf-MAP kinase pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Lou

    Full Text Available OCILRP2 is a typical Type-II transmembrane protein that is selectively expressed in activated T lymphocytes, dendritic cells, and B cells and functions as a novel co-stimulator of T cell activation. However, the signaling pathways underlying OCILRP2 in T cell activation are still not completely understood. In this study, we found that the knockdown of OCILRP2 expression with shRNA or the blockage of its activity by an anti-OCILRP2 antagonist antibody reduced CD3/CD28-costimulated EL4 T cell viability and IL-2 production, inhibit Raf1, MAPK3, and MAPK8 activation, and impair NFAT and NF-κB transcriptional activities. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation results indicated that OCILRP2 could interact with the DAP12 protein, an adaptor containing an intracellular ITAM motif that can transduce signals to induce MAP kinase activation for T cell activation. Our data reveal that after binding with DAP12, OCILRP2 activates the Raf-MAP kinase pathways, resulting in T cell activation.

  17. Ubiquitous Multicriteria Clinic Recommendation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Toly

    2016-05-01

    Advancements in information, communication, and sensor technologies have led to new opportunities in medical care and education. Patients in general prefer visiting the nearest clinic, attempt to avoid waiting for treatment, and have unequal preferences for different clinics and doctors. Therefore, to enable patients to compare multiple clinics, this study proposes a ubiquitous multicriteria clinic recommendation system. In this system, patients can send requests through their cell phones to the system server to obtain a clinic recommendation. Once the patient sends this information to the system, the system server first estimates the patient's speed according to the detection results of a global positioning system. It then applies a fuzzy integer nonlinear programming-ordered weighted average approach to assess four criteria and finally recommends a clinic with maximal utility to the patient. The proposed methodology was tested in a field experiment, and the experimental results showed that it is advantageous over two existing methods in elevating the utilities of recommendations. In addition, such an advantage was shown to be statistically significant.

  18. Membrane Transfer from Mononuclear Cells to Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils Transduces Cell Survival and Activation Signals in the Recipient Cells via Anti-Extrinsic Apoptotic and MAP Kinase Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ko-Jen; Wu, Cheng-Han; Shen, Chieh-Yu; Kuo, Yu-Min; Yu, Chia-Li; Hsieh, Song-Chou

    2016-01-01

    The biological significance of membrane transfer (trogocytosis) between polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and mononuclear cells (MNCs) remains unclear. We investigated the biological/immunological effects and molecular basis of trogocytosis among various immune cells in healthy individuals and patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). By flow cytometry, we determined that molecules in the immunological synapse, including HLA class-I and-II, CD11b and LFA-1, along with CXCR1, are exchanged among autologous PMNs, CD4+ T cells, and U937 cells (monocytes) after cell-cell contact. Small interfering RNA knockdown of the integrin adhesion molecule CD11a in U937 unexpectedly enhanced the level of total membrane transfer from U937 to PMN cells. Functionally, phagocytosis and IL-8 production by PMNs were enhanced after co-culture with T cells. Total membrane transfer from CD4+ T to PMNs delayed PMN apoptosis by suppressing the extrinsic apoptotic molecules, BAX, MYC and caspase 8. This enhancement of activities of PMNs by T cells was found to be mediated via p38- and P44/42-Akt-MAP kinase pathways and inhibited by the actin-polymerization inhibitor, latrunculin B, the clathrin inhibitor, Pitstop-2, and human immunoglobulin G, but not by the caveolin inhibitor, methyl-β-cyclodextrin. In addition, membrane transfer from PMNs enhanced IL-2 production by recipient anti-CD3/anti-CD28 activated MNCs, and this was suppressed by inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (PD98059) and protein kinase C (Rottlerin). Of clinical significance, decreased total membrane transfer from PMNs to MNCs in patients with active SLE suppressed mononuclear IL-2 production. In conclusion, membrane transfer from MNCs to PMNs, mainly at the immunological synapse, transduces survival and activation signals to enhance PMN functions and is dependent on actin polymerization, clathrin activation, and Fcγ receptors, while membrane transfer from PMNs to MNCs depends on MAP kinase and

  19. Membrane Transfer from Mononuclear Cells to Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils Transduces Cell Survival and Activation Signals in the Recipient Cells via Anti-Extrinsic Apoptotic and MAP Kinase Signaling Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko-Jen Li

    Full Text Available The biological significance of membrane transfer (trogocytosis between polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs and mononuclear cells (MNCs remains unclear. We investigated the biological/immunological effects and molecular basis of trogocytosis among various immune cells in healthy individuals and patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. By flow cytometry, we determined that molecules in the immunological synapse, including HLA class-I and-II, CD11b and LFA-1, along with CXCR1, are exchanged among autologous PMNs, CD4+ T cells, and U937 cells (monocytes after cell-cell contact. Small interfering RNA knockdown of the integrin adhesion molecule CD11a in U937 unexpectedly enhanced the level of total membrane transfer from U937 to PMN cells. Functionally, phagocytosis and IL-8 production by PMNs were enhanced after co-culture with T cells. Total membrane transfer from CD4+ T to PMNs delayed PMN apoptosis by suppressing the extrinsic apoptotic molecules, BAX, MYC and caspase 8. This enhancement of activities of PMNs by T cells was found to be mediated via p38- and P44/42-Akt-MAP kinase pathways and inhibited by the actin-polymerization inhibitor, latrunculin B, the clathrin inhibitor, Pitstop-2, and human immunoglobulin G, but not by the caveolin inhibitor, methyl-β-cyclodextrin. In addition, membrane transfer from PMNs enhanced IL-2 production by recipient anti-CD3/anti-CD28 activated MNCs, and this was suppressed by inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (PD98059 and protein kinase C (Rottlerin. Of clinical significance, decreased total membrane transfer from PMNs to MNCs in patients with active SLE suppressed mononuclear IL-2 production. In conclusion, membrane transfer from MNCs to PMNs, mainly at the immunological synapse, transduces survival and activation signals to enhance PMN functions and is dependent on actin polymerization, clathrin activation, and Fcγ receptors, while membrane transfer from PMNs to MNCs depends on

  20. Cyanidin-3-glucoside inhibits UVB-induced oxidative damage and inflammation by regulating MAP kinase and NF-κB signaling pathways in SKH-1 hairless mice skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Son, Young-Ok; Wang, Xin; Divya, Sasidharan Padmaja; Joseph, Binoy; Hitron, John Andrew; Wang, Lei; Kim, Donghern; Yin, Yuanqin; Roy, Ram Vinod; Lu, Jian; Zhang, Zhuo; Wang, Yitao

    2014-01-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in the United States. Exposure to ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation induces inflammation and photocarcinogenesis in mammalian skin. Cyanidin-3-glucoside (C3G), a member of the anthocyanin family, is present in various vegetables and fruits especially in edible berries, and displays potent antioxidant and anticarcinogenic properties. In this study, we have assessed the in vivo effects of C3G on UVB irradiation induced chronic inflammatory responses in SKH-1 hairless mice, a well-established model for UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis. Here, we show that C3G inhibited UVB-induced skin damage and inflammation in SKH-1 hairless mice. Our results indicate that C3G inhibited glutathione depletion, lipid peroxidation and myeloperoxidation in mouse skin by chronic UVB exposure. C3G significantly decreased the production of UVB-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and TNF-α, associated with cutaneous inflammation. Likewise, UVB-induced inflammatory responses were diminished by C3G as observed by a remarkable reduction in the levels of phosphorylated MAP kinases, Erk1/2, p38, JNK1/2 and MKK4. Furthermore, C3G also decreased UVB-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), PGE 2 and iNOS levels, which are well-known key mediators of inflammation and cancer. Treatment with C3G inhibited UVB-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB and degradation of IκBα in mice skin. Immunofluorescence assay revealed that topical application of C3G inhibited the expression of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and cyclin D1 in chronic UVB exposed mouse skin. Collectively, these data indicates that C3G can provide substantial protection against the adverse effects of UVB radiation by modulating UVB-induced MAP kinase and NF-κB signaling pathways. - Highlights: • C3G inhibited UVB-induced oxidative damage and inflammation. • C3G inhibited UVB-induced COX-2, iNOS and PGE 2 production. • C3G inhibited

  1. Cyanidin-3-glucoside inhibits UVB-induced oxidative damage and inflammation by regulating MAP kinase and NF-κB signaling pathways in SKH-1 hairless mice skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Son, Young-Ok; Wang, Xin; Divya, Sasidharan Padmaja [Center for Research on Environmental Disease, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Joseph, Binoy [Spinal Cord and Brain Injury Research Center and Department of Physiology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0509 (United States); Hitron, John Andrew; Wang, Lei [Center for Research on Environmental Disease, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Kim, Donghern [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Yin, Yuanqin [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Cancer Institute, The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Roy, Ram Vinod [Center for Research on Environmental Disease, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Lu, Jian [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Institute of Life Sciences, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Zhang, Zhuo [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Wang, Yitao [State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine, Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences, University of Macau, Macau (China); and others

    2014-10-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in the United States. Exposure to ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation induces inflammation and photocarcinogenesis in mammalian skin. Cyanidin-3-glucoside (C3G), a member of the anthocyanin family, is present in various vegetables and fruits especially in edible berries, and displays potent antioxidant and anticarcinogenic properties. In this study, we have assessed the in vivo effects of C3G on UVB irradiation induced chronic inflammatory responses in SKH-1 hairless mice, a well-established model for UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis. Here, we show that C3G inhibited UVB-induced skin damage and inflammation in SKH-1 hairless mice. Our results indicate that C3G inhibited glutathione depletion, lipid peroxidation and myeloperoxidation in mouse skin by chronic UVB exposure. C3G significantly decreased the production of UVB-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and TNF-α, associated with cutaneous inflammation. Likewise, UVB-induced inflammatory responses were diminished by C3G as observed by a remarkable reduction in the levels of phosphorylated MAP kinases, Erk1/2, p38, JNK1/2 and MKK4. Furthermore, C3G also decreased UVB-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), PGE{sub 2} and iNOS levels, which are well-known key mediators of inflammation and cancer. Treatment with C3G inhibited UVB-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB and degradation of IκBα in mice skin. Immunofluorescence assay revealed that topical application of C3G inhibited the expression of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and cyclin D1 in chronic UVB exposed mouse skin. Collectively, these data indicates that C3G can provide substantial protection against the adverse effects of UVB radiation by modulating UVB-induced MAP kinase and NF-κB signaling pathways. - Highlights: • C3G inhibited UVB-induced oxidative damage and inflammation. • C3G inhibited UVB-induced COX-2, iNOS and PGE{sub 2} production. • C3G

  2. Novel p38α MAP kinase inhibitors identified from yoctoReactor DNA-encoded small molecule library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, L. K.; Blakskjær, P.; Chaikuad, A.

    2016-01-01

    A highly specific and potent (7 nM cellular IC50) inhibitor of p38α kinase was identified directly from a 12.6 million membered DNA-encoded small molecule library. This was achieved using the high fidelity yoctoReactor technology (yR) for preparing the DNA-encoded library, and a homogeneous...... interactions. Moreover, the crystal structure showed, that although buried in the p38α active site, the original DNA attachment point of the compound was accessible through a channel created by the distorted P-loop conformation. This study demonstrates the usability of DNA-encoded library technologies...

  3. Dashboard for Analyzing Ubiquitous Learning Log

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lkhagvasuren, Erdenesaikhan; Matsuura, Kenji; Mouri, Kousuke; Ogata, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Mobile and ubiquitous technologies have been applied to a wide range of learning fields such as science, social science, history and language learning. Many researchers have been investigating the development of ubiquitous learning environments; nevertheless, to date, there have not been enough research works related to the reflection, analysis…

  4. Acrolein induces cyclooxygenase-2 and prostaglandin production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells: roles of p38 MAP kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong Seek; Kim, Jayoung; Misonou, Yoshiko; Takamiya, Rina; Takahashi, Motoko; Freeman, Michael R; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2007-06-01

    Acrolein, a known toxin in tobacco smoke, might be involved in atherogenesis. This study examined the effect of acrolein on expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin (PG) production in endothelial cells. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 induction by acrolein and signal pathways were measured using Western blots, Northern blots, immunofluorescence, ELISA, gene silencing, and promoter assay. Colocalization of COX2 and acrolein-adduct was determined by immunohistochemistry. Here we report that the levels of COX-2 mRNA and protein are increased in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) after acrolein exposure. COX-2 was found to colocalize with acrolein-lysine adducts in human atherosclerotic lesions. Inhibition of p38 MAPK activity abolished the induction of COX-2 protein and PGE2 accumulation by acrolein, while suppression of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and JNK activity had no effect on the induction of COX-2 expression in experiments using inhibitors and siRNA. Furthermore, rottlerin, an inhibitor of protein kinase Cdelta (PKCdelta), abrogated the upregulation of COX-2 at both protein and mRNA levels. These results provide that acrolein may play a role in progression of atherosclerosis and new information on the signaling pathways involved in COX-2 upregulation in response to acrolein and provide evidence that PKCdelta and p38 MAPK are required for transcriptional activation of COX-2.

  5. The transcriptional response to the inactivation of the PaMpk1 and PaMpk2 MAP kinase pathways in Podospora anserina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidard, Frédérique; Coppin, Evelyne; Silar, Philippe

    2012-08-01

    Transcription pattern during mycelium growth of Podospora anserina was assayed by microarray analysis in wild type and in mutants affected in the MAP kinase genes PaMpk1 and PaMpk2 and in the NADPH oxidase gene PaNox1. 15% of the genes have their expression modified by a factor two or more as growth proceeds in wild type. The genes whose expression is modified during growth in P. anserina are either not conserved or differently regulated in Neurospora crassa and Aspergillus niger, two fungi for which transcriptome data during growth are available. The P. anserina mutants display a similar alteration of their transcriptome profile, with nearly 1000 genes affected similarly in the three mutants, accounting for their similar growth phenotypes. Yet, each mutant has its specific set of modified transcripts, in line with particular phenotypes exhibited by each mutant. Again, there is limited conservation during evolution of the genes regulated at the transcription level by MAP kinases, as indicated by the comparison the P. anserina data, with those of Aspergillus fumigatus and N. crassa, two fungi for which gene expression data are available for mutants of the MAPK pathways. Among the genes regulated in wild type and affected in the mutants, those involved in carbohydrate and secondary metabolisms appear prominent. The vast majority of the genes differentially expressed are of unknown function. Availability of their transcription profile at various stages of development should help to decipher their role in fungal physiology and development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Interplay between calcineurin and the Slt2 MAP-kinase in mediating cell wall integrity, conidiation and virulence in the insect fungal pathogen Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuaishuai; He, Zhangjiang; Zhang, Shiwei; Keyhani, Nemat O; Song, Yulin; Yang, Zhi; Jiang, Yahui; Zhang, Wenli; Pei, Yan; Zhang, Yongjun

    2015-10-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus, Beauveria bassiana, is of environmental and economic importance as an insect pathogen, currently used for the biological control of a number of pests. Cell wall integrity and conidiation are critical parameters for the ability of the fungus to infect insects and for production of the infectious propagules. The contribution of calcineurin and the Slt2 MAP kinase to cell wall integrity and development in B. bassiana was investigated. Gene knockouts of either the calcineurin CNA1 subunit or the Slt2 MAP kinase resulted in decreased tolerance to calcofluor white and high temperature. In contrast, the Δcna1 strain was more tolerant to Congo red but more sensitive to osmotic stress (NaCl, sorbitol) than the wild type, whereas the Δslt2 strain had the opposite phenotype. Changes in cell wall structure and composition were seen in the Δslt2 and Δcna1 strains during growth under cell wall stress as compared to the wild type. Both Δslt2 and Δcna1 strains showed significant alterations in growth, conidiation, and viability. Elevation of intracellular ROS levels, and decreased conidial hydrophobicity and adhesion to hydrophobic surfaces, were also seen for both mutants, as well as decreased virulence. Under cell wall stress conditions, inactivation of Slt2 significantly repressed CN-mediated phosphatase activity suggesting some level of cross talk between the two pathways. Comparative transcriptome profiling of the Δslt2 and Δcna1 strains revealed alterations in the expression of distinct gene sets, with overlap in transcripts involved in cell wall integrity, stress response, conidiation and virulence. These data illustrate convergent and divergent phenotypes and targets of the calcineurin and Slt2 pathways in B. bassiana. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Constitutive Activity of the Arabidopsis MAP Kinase 3 Confers Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae and Drives Robust Immune Responses

    KAUST Repository

    Lang, Julien

    2017-08-02

    Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) are known to be important mediators of plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. In a recent report, we enlarged the understanding of the Arabidopsis thaliana MPK3 functions showing that the expression of a constitutively active (CA) form of the protein led to auto-immune phenotypes. CA-MPK3 plants are dwarf and display defense responses that are characterized by the accumulation of salicylic acid and phytoalexins as well as by the upregulation of several defense genes. Consistently with these data, we present here results demonstrating that, compared to wild type controls, CA-MPK3 plants are more resistant to the hemibiotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae DC3000. Based on our previous work, we also discuss the mechanisms of robust plant immunity controlled by sustained MPK3 activity, focusing especially on the roles of disease resistance proteins.

  8. Multimedia and ubiquitous engineering MUE 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Ng, Joseph; Jeong, Hwa; Waluyo, Borgy

    2013-01-01

    The new multimedia standards (for example, MPEG-21) facilitate the seamless integration of multiple modalities into interoperable multimedia frameworks, transforming the way people work and interact with multimedia data. These key technologies and multimedia solutions interact and collaborate with each other in increasingly effective ways, contributing to the multimedia revolution and having a significant impact across a wide spectrum of consumer, business, healthcare, education, and governmental domains. Multimedia and Ubiquitous Engineering provides an opportunity for academic and industry professionals to discuss recent progress in the area of multimedia and ubiquitous environment including models and systems, new directions, novel applications associated with the utilization and acceptance of ubiquitous computing devices and systems.

  9. Efficacy and gastrointestinal tolerability of ML3403, a selective inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase and CBS-3595, a dual inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase and phosphodiesterase 4 in CFA-induced arthritis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Diana A; Silva, Rodrigo B M; de Souza, Alessandra H; Leite, Carlos E; Nicoletti, Natália F; Campos, Maria M; Laufer, Stefan; Morrone, Fernanda B

    2014-03-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 inhibitors have entered the clinical phase, although many of them have failed due to high toxicity and lack of efficacy. In the present study we compared the effects of the selective p38 inhibitor ML3403 and the dual p38-PDE4 inhibitor CBS-3595, on inflammatory and nociceptive parameters in a model of polyarthritis in rats. Male Wistar rats (180-200 g) were used for the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis model and they were evaluated at 14-21 days. We also analysed the effects of these pharmacological tools on liver and gastrointestinal toxicity and on cytokine levels. Repeated CBS-3595 (3 mg/kg) or ML3403 (10 mg/kg) administration produced significant anti-inflammatory actions in the chronic arthritis model induced by CFA. CBS-3595 and ML3403 treatment also markedly reduced the production of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 in the paw tissue, whereas it widely increased the levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Moreover, CBS-3595 produced partial anti-allodynic effects in the CFA model at 4 and 8 days after treatment. Notably, ML3403 and CBS-3595 did not show marked signs of hepatoxicity, as supported by unaltered histological observations in the liver sections. Finally, both compounds were safe in the gastrointestinal tract, according to evaluation of intestinal biopsies. CBS-3595 displayed a superior profile regarding its anti-inflammatory effects. Thus p38 MAPK/PDE4 blocking might well constitute a relevant strategy for the treatment of RA.

  10. Embedding Moodle into Ubiquitous Computing Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glahn, Christian; Specht, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    Glahn, C., & Specht, M. (2010). Embedding Moodle into Ubiquitous Computing Environments. In M. Montebello, et al. (Eds.), 9th World Conference on Mobile and Contextual Learning (MLearn2010) (pp. 100-107). October, 19-22, 2010, Valletta, Malta.

  11. Constitutively active Arabidopsis MAP Kinase 3 triggers defense responses involving salicylic acid and SUMM2 resistance protein

    KAUST Repository

    Genot, Baptiste

    2017-04-12

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are important regulators of plant immunity. Most of the knowledge about the function of these pathways is derived from loss-of-function approaches. Using a gain-of-function approach, we investigated the responses controlled by a constitutively active (CA) MPK3 in Arabidopsis thaliana. CA-MPK3 plants are dwarfed and display a massive de-repression of defense genes associated with spontaneous cell death as well as accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), phytoalexins and the stress-related hormones ethylene and salicylic acid (SA). Remarkably CA-MPK3/sid2 and CA-MPK3/ein2-50 lines which are impaired in SA synthesis and ethylene signaling, respectively, retain most of the CA-MPK3-associated phenotypes, indicating that constitutive activity of MPK3 can bypass SA and ethylene signaling to activate defense responses. A comparative analysis of the molecular phenotypes of CA-MPK3 and mpk4 autoimmunity suggested convergence between the MPK3 and MPK4-guarding modules. In support of this model, CA-MPK3 crosses with summ1 and summ2, two known suppressors of mpk4, resulted in a partial reversion of the CA-MPK3 phenotypes. Overall, our data unravel a novel mechanism by which the MAPK signaling network contributes to a robust defense response system.

  12. Increased expression of interleukin-1β in triglyceride-induced macrophage cell death is mediated by p38 MAP kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Ho Joong; Son, Sin Jee; Yang, Seung-ju; Rhee, Ki-Jong; Kim, Yoon Suk

    2012-07-01

    Triglycerides (TG) are implicated in the development of atherosclerosis through formation of foam cells and induction of macrophage cell death. In this study, we report that addition of exogenous TG induced cell death in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-differentiated THP-1 human macrophages. TG treatment induced a dramatic decrease in interleukin-1β (IL-1β) mRNA expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The expression of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule remained unchanged. To identify signaling pathways involved in TG-induced downregulation of IL-1β, we added p38 MAPK, protein kinase C (PKC) or c-Raf1 specific inhibitors. We found that inhibition of p38 MAPK alleviated the TG-induced downregulation of IL-1β, whereas inhibition of PKC and c-Raf1 had no effect. This is the first report showing decreased IL-1β expression during TG-induced cell death in a human macrophage line. Our results suggest that downregulation of IL-1β expression by TG-treated macrophages may play a role during atherogenesis.

  13. Phosphorylation of the Yeast Choline Kinase by Protein Kinase C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mal-Gi; Kurnov, Vladlen; Kersting, Michael C.; Sreenivas, Avula; Carman, George M.

    2005-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae CKI1-encoded choline kinase catalyzes the committed step in phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the Kennedy pathway. The enzyme is phosphorylated on multiple serine residues, and some of this phosphorylation is mediated by protein kinase A. In this work, we examined the hypothesis that choline kinase is also phosphorylated by protein kinase C. Using choline kinase as a substrate, protein kinase C activity was dose- and time-dependent, and dependent on the concentrations of choline kinase (Km = 27 μg/ml) and ATP (Km = 15 μM). This phosphorylation, which occurred on a serine residue, was accompanied by a 1.6-fold stimulation of choline kinase activity. The synthetic peptide SRSSS25QRRHS (Vmax/Km = 17.5 mM-1 μmol min-1 mg-1) that contains the protein kinase C motif for Ser25 was a substrate for protein kinase C. A Ser25 to Ala (S25A) mutation in choline kinase resulted in a 60% decrease in protein kinase C phosphorylation of the enzyme. Phosphopeptide mapping analysis of the S25A mutant enzyme confirmed that Ser25 was a protein kinase C target site. In vivo, the S25A mutation correlated with a decrease (55%) in phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the Kennedy pathway whereas an S25D phosphorylation site mimic correlated with an increase (44%) in phosphatidylcholine synthesis. Whereas the S25A (protein kinase C site) mutation did not affect the phosphorylation of choline kinase by protein kinase A, the S30A (protein kinase A site) mutation caused a 46% reduction in enzyme phosphorylation by protein kinase C. A choline kinase synthetic peptide (SQRRHS30LTRQ) containing Ser30 was a substrate (Vmax/Km = 3.0 mM−1 μmol min−1 mg−1) for protein kinase C. Comparison of phosphopeptide maps of the wild type and S30A mutant choline kinase enzymes phosphorylated by protein kinase C confirmed that Ser30 was also a target site for protein kinase C. PMID:15919656

  14. A Major Facilitator Superfamily Transporter-Mediated Resistance to Oxidative Stress and Fungicides Requires Yap1, Skn7, and MAP Kinases in the Citrus Fungal Pathogen Alternaria alternata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Hung Chen

    Full Text Available Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS transporters play an important role in multidrug resistance in fungi. We report an AaMFS19 gene encoding a MFS transporter required for cellular resistance to oxidative stress and fungicides in the phytopathogenic fungus Alternaria alternata. AaMFS19, containing 12 transmembrane domains, displays activity toward a broad range of substrates. Fungal mutants lacking AaMFS19 display profound hypersensitivities to cumyl hydroperoxide, potassium superoxide, many singlet oxygen-generating compounds (eosin Y, rose Bengal, hematoporphyrin, methylene blue, and cercosporin, and the cell wall biosynthesis inhibitor, Congo red. AaMFS19 mutants also increase sensitivity to copper ions, clotrimazole, fludioxonil, and kocide fungicides, 2-chloro-5-hydroxypyridine (CHP, and 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA. AaMFS19 mutants induce smaller necrotic lesions on leaves of a susceptible citrus cultivar. All observed phenotypes in the mutant are restored by introducing and expressing a wild-type copy of AaMFS19. The wild-type strain of A. alternata treated with either CHP or TIBA reduces radial growth and formation and germination of conidia, increases hyphal branching, and results in decreased expression of the AaMFS19 gene. The expression of AaMFS19 is regulated by the Yap1 transcription activator, the Hog1 and Fus3 mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases, the 'two component' histidine kinase, and the Skn7 response regulator. Our results demonstrate that A. alternata confers resistance to different chemicals via a membrane-bound MFS transporter.

  15. The involvement of calcium and MAP kinase signaling pathways in the production of radiation-induced bystander effects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lyng, F M

    2006-04-01

    Much evidence now exists regarding radiation-induced bystander effects, but the mechanisms involved in the transduction of the signal are still unclear. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways have been linked to growth factor-mediated regulation of cellular events such as proliferation, senescence, differentiation and apoptosis. Activation of multiple MAPK pathways such as the ERK, JNK and p38 pathways have been shown to occur after exposure of cells to radiation and a variety of other toxic stresses. Previous studies have shown oxidative stress and calcium signaling to be important in radiation-induced bystander effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate MAPK signaling pathways in bystander cells exposed to irradiated cell conditioned medium (ICCM) and the role of oxidative metabolism and calcium signaling in the induction of bystander responses. Human keratinocytes (HPV-G cell line) were irradiated (0.005-5 Gy) using a cobalt-60 teletherapy unit. The medium was harvested 1 h postirradiation and transferred to recipient HPV-G cells. Phosphorylated forms of p38, JNK and ERK were studied by immunofluorescence 30 min-24 h after exposure to ICCM. Inhibitors of the ERK pathway (PD98059 and U0126), the JNK pathway (SP600125), and the p38 pathway (SB203580) were used to investigate whether bystander-induced cell death could be blocked. Cells were also incubated with ICCM in the presence of superoxide dismutase, catalase, EGTA, verapamil, nifedipine and thapsigargin to investigate whether bystander effects could be inhibited because of the known effects on calcium homeostasis. Activated forms of JNK and ERK proteins were observed after exposure to ICCM. Inhibition of the ERK pathway appeared to increase bystander-induced apoptosis, while inhibition of the JNK pathway appeared to decrease apoptosis. In addition, reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, and calcium signaling were found to be important modulators of

  16. Blackberry extract inhibits UVB-induced oxidative damage and inflammation through MAP kinases and NF-κB signaling pathways in SKH-1 mice skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divya, Sasidharan Padmaja; Wang, Xin; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Son, Young-Ok; Roy, Ram Vinod; Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin; Hitron, John Andrew; Wang, Lei; Asha, Padmaja; Shi, Xianglin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    Extensive exposure of solar ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation to skin induces oxidative stress and inflammation that play a crucial role in the induction of skin cancer. Photochemoprevention with natural products represents a simple but very effective strategy for the management of cutaneous neoplasia. In this study, we investigated whether blackberry extract (BBE) reduces chronic inflammatory responses induced by UVB irradiation in SKH-1 hairless mice skin. Mice were exposed to UVB radiation (100 mJ/cm 2 ) on alternate days for 10 weeks, and BBE (10% and 20%) was applied topically a day before UVB exposure. Our results show that BBE suppressed UVB-induced hyperplasia and reduced infiltration of inflammatory cells in the SKH-1 hairless mice skin. BBE treatment reduced glutathione (GSH) depletion, lipid peroxidation (LPO), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) in mouse skin by chronic UVB exposure. BBE significantly decreased the level of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α in UVB-exposed skin. Likewise, UVB-induced inflammatory responses were diminished by BBE as observed by a remarkable reduction in the levels of phosphorylated MAP Kinases, Erk1/2, p38, JNK1/2 and MKK4. Furthermore, BBE also reduced inflammatory mediators such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) levels in UVB-exposed skin. Treatment with BBE inhibited UVB-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB and degradation of IκBα in mouse skin. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that topical application of BBE inhibited the expression of 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and cyclin D1 in UVB-exposed skin. Collectively, these data indicate that BBE protects from UVB-induced oxidative damage and inflammation by modulating MAP kinase and NF-κB signaling pathways. - Highlights: • Blackberry extract inhibits UVB-induced glutathione depletion. • Blackberry

  17. Blackberry extract inhibits UVB-induced oxidative damage and inflammation through MAP kinases and NF-κB signaling pathways in SKH-1 mice skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Divya, Sasidharan Padmaja; Wang, Xin; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Son, Young-Ok; Roy, Ram Vinod [Center for Research on Environmental Disease, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Department of Toxicology and Cancer Biology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin [Department of Toxicology and Cancer Biology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Hitron, John Andrew; Wang, Lei [Center for Research on Environmental Disease, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Department of Toxicology and Cancer Biology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Asha, Padmaja [National Centre for Aquatic Animal Health, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin (India); Shi, Xianglin [Center for Research on Environmental Disease, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Department of Toxicology and Cancer Biology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Zhang, Zhuo, E-mail: zhuo.zhang@uky.edu [Department of Toxicology and Cancer Biology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Extensive exposure of solar ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation to skin induces oxidative stress and inflammation that play a crucial role in the induction of skin cancer. Photochemoprevention with natural products represents a simple but very effective strategy for the management of cutaneous neoplasia. In this study, we investigated whether blackberry extract (BBE) reduces chronic inflammatory responses induced by UVB irradiation in SKH-1 hairless mice skin. Mice were exposed to UVB radiation (100 mJ/cm{sup 2}) on alternate days for 10 weeks, and BBE (10% and 20%) was applied topically a day before UVB exposure. Our results show that BBE suppressed UVB-induced hyperplasia and reduced infiltration of inflammatory cells in the SKH-1 hairless mice skin. BBE treatment reduced glutathione (GSH) depletion, lipid peroxidation (LPO), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) in mouse skin by chronic UVB exposure. BBE significantly decreased the level of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α in UVB-exposed skin. Likewise, UVB-induced inflammatory responses were diminished by BBE as observed by a remarkable reduction in the levels of phosphorylated MAP Kinases, Erk1/2, p38, JNK1/2 and MKK4. Furthermore, BBE also reduced inflammatory mediators such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) levels in UVB-exposed skin. Treatment with BBE inhibited UVB-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB and degradation of IκBα in mouse skin. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that topical application of BBE inhibited the expression of 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and cyclin D1 in UVB-exposed skin. Collectively, these data indicate that BBE protects from UVB-induced oxidative damage and inflammation by modulating MAP kinase and NF-κB signaling pathways. - Highlights: • Blackberry extract inhibits UVB-induced glutathione depletion.

  18. IDC1, a pezizomycotina-specific gene that belongs to the PaMpk1 MAP kinase transduction cascade of the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamet-Vierny, Corinne; Debuchy, Robert; Prigent, Magali; Silar, Philippe

    2007-12-01

    Components involved in the activation of the MAPK cascades in filamentous fungi are not well known. Here, we provide evidence that IDC1, a pezizomycotina-specific gene is involved along with the PaNox1 NADPH oxidase in the nuclear localization of the PaMpk1 MAP kinase, a prerequisite for MAPK activity. Mutants of IDC1 display the same phenotypes as mutants in PaNox1 and PaMpk1, i.e., lack of pigment and of aerial hyphae, female sterility, impairment in hyphal interference and inability to develop Crippled Growth cell degeneration. As observed for the PaNox1 mutant, IDC1 mutants are hypostatic to PaMpk1 mutants. IDC1 seems to play a key role in sexual reproduction. Indeed, fertility is diminished in strains with lower level of IDC1. In strains over-expressing IDC1, protoperithecia reach a later stage of development towards perithecia without fertilization; however, upon fertilization maturation of fertile perithecia is diminished and delayed. In addition, heterokaryon construction shows that IDC1 is necessary together with PaNox1 in the perithecial envelope but not in the dikaryon resulting from fertilization.

  19. The Phytochemical Bergenin Enhances T Helper 1 Responses and Anti-Mycobacterial Immunity by Activating the MAP Kinase Pathway in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debprasad Chattopadhyay

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains one of the greatest health concerns worldwide, which has hindered socioeconomic development in certain parts of the world for many centuries. Although current TB therapy, “Directly Observed Treatment Short-course,” is effective, it is associated with unwanted side effects and the risk for the generation of drug-resistant organisms. The majority of infected individuals successfully confine the mycobacterial organisms and remain asymptotic unless immune responses are perturbed. Thus, host immunity can protect against TB and immunomodulation is therefore an attractive therapeutic option. Previous studies have shown that TNF-α and Nitric Oxide (NO in conjunction with IFN-γ-producing T helper 1 (Th1 cells play critical roles in host protection against TB. Here, we show that bergenin, a phytochemical isolated from tender leaves of Shorea robusta, activates the MAP kinase and ERK pathways and induces TNF-α, NO and IL-12 production in infected macrophages. We further show that bergenin induces Th1 immune responses and potently inhibits bacillary growth in a murine model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. These findings identify bergenin as a potential adjunct to TB therapy.

  20. RNAi-mediated silencing of MAP kinase signalling genes (Fmk1, Hog1, and Pbs2) in Fusarium oxysporum reduces pathogenesis on tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareek, Manish; Rajam, Manchikatla Venkat

    2017-09-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is a soil-borne plant fungal pathogen, and causes colossal losses in several crop plants including tomato. Effective control measures include the use of harmful fungicides and resistant cultivars, but these methods have shown limited success. Conventional methods to validate fungal pathogenic genes are labour intensive. Therefore, an alternative strategy is required to efficiently characterize unknown pathogenic genes. RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a potential tool to functionally characterize novel fungal pathogenic genes and also to control fungal diseases. Here, we report an efficient method to produce stable RNAi transformants of F. oxysporum using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (AMT). We have transformed F. oxysporum spores using RNAi constructs of Fmk1, Hog1, and Pbs2 MAP kinase signalling genes. Fmk1 RNAi fungal transformants showed loss of surface hydrophobicity, reduced invasive growth on tomato fruits and hypo-virulence on tomato seedlings. Hog1 and Pbs2 RNAi transformants showed altered conidial size, and reduced invasive growth and pathogenesis. These results showed that AMT using RNAi constructs is an effective approach for dissecting the role of genes involved in pathogenesis in F. oxysporum and this could be extended for other fungal systems. The obtained knowledge can be easily translated for developing fungal resistant crops by RNAi. Copyright © 2017 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ubiquitous Information Technologies and Applications CUTE 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Doo-Soon; Jia, Weijia; Yeo, Sang-Soo

    2013-01-01

    This book is for The 7th International Conference on Ubiquitous Information Technologies and Applications (CUTE 2012). Ubiquitous computing will require a new approach to fitting technology to our lives. The advent of new computing devices, and the seamless connectivity between these devices, thanks to diverse wired and wireless networks, are enabling new opportunities for a user to perform his/her operation all the time and everywhere. These seamlessly connected devices are ranging from mobile handset to wearable computers. Also, it is expected that these devices will become so pervasive that they will be embedded in the surrounding physical environment, and transparent and invisible to a user. Such devices, whether carried on by people or embedded into other systems, will constitute a global internetworking infrastructure and likely to provide a new level of openness and dynamics. Ubiquitous computing has as its goal the enhancing computer use by pushing computational services out of conventional desktop in...

  2. Attacker Modelling in Ubiquitous Computing Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papini, Davide

    in with our everyday life. This future is visible to everyone nowadays: terms like smartphone, cloud, sensor, network etc. are widely known and used in our everyday life. But what about the security of such systems. Ubiquitous computing devices can be limited in terms of energy, computing power and memory...... attacker remain somehow undened and still under extensive investigation. This Thesis explores the nature of the ubiquitous attacker with a focus on how she interacts with the physical world and it denes a model that captures the abilities of the attacker. Furthermore a quantitative implementation...

  3. Learning potentials of the ubiquitous internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Christian; Pedersen, Nicholai Friis; Aaen, Janus Holst

    The aim of this paper is to identify the key learning potentials of the ubiquitous internet. Rather than focusing on mobile technology or the mobility of the learner, the paper emphasises the ubiquity of internet access as a paramount catalyst for new learning in the digital age. From...... a sociocultural perspective the paper discusses different ways in which the use of mobile devices can extend and augment the context of the learner. The learning potentials of the ubiquitous internet relate to the opportunities to extend the context of the learner on three levels: 1) personalisation...

  4. Thymidine kinase diversity in bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandrini, Michael; Clausen, A.R.; Munch-Petersen, B.

    2006-01-01

    Thymidine kinases (TKs) appear to be almost ubiquitous and are found in nearly all prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and several viruses. They are the key enzymes in thymidine salvage and activation of several anti-cancer and antiviral drugs. We show that bacterial TKs can be subdivided into 2 groups. The....... The TKs from Gram-positive bacteria are more closely related to the eukaryotic TK1 enzymes than are TKs from Gram-negative bacteria....

  5. Creating ubiquitous intelligent sensing environments (CRUISE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prasad, Neeli R.; Prasad, Ramjee

    2006-01-01

    The recent developments in the research and the technology have brought attention to the wireless sensor networks as one of the key enabling technologies in the next 10 years. Ubiquitous Intelligent Sensing Environments have promising future in supporting the everyday life of the European citizens...

  6. Ubiquitous Computing in Physico-Spatial Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgård, Peter; Eriksson, Eva

    2007-01-01

    Interaction design of pervasive and ubiquitous computing (UC) systems must take into account physico-spatial issues as technology is implemented into our physical surroundings. In this paper we discuss how one conceptual framework for understanding interaction in context, Activity Theory (AT...

  7. Designing for Privacy in Ubiquitous Social Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sapuppo, Antonio; Figueiras, Joao

    2015-01-01

    Improving human communication during face–to–face meetings is nowadays possible by transferring online social networking benefits to the physical world. This is enabled by the ubiquitous social networking services that became available by means of wirelessly interconnected smart devices...

  8. Ubiquitous developments of the digital single market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maciejewski, M.; Porrino, F.; Veenstra, A.F.E. van; Marcus, J.S.; Cave, J.; Huijboom, N.M.; Elixmann, D.; Hillebrand, A.; Schindler, R.; Horvath, V.

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitous solutions providing access from anywhere at any time are a next step for government and commercial services, and are expected to result in lower costs, increased flexibility, and an enhanced user experience. These solutions, based on modern cloud technologies, may facilitate re-use across

  9. Ubiquitous Retailing Innovative Scenario: From the Fixed Point of Sale to the Flexible Ubiquitous Store

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Pantano

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The current advances in information and communications technologies developed new tools for retailers to innovate. In fact, the increasing computing capacity and the advancements in networking systems provided a new ubiquitous scenario that can be adapted for retailing in order to develop innovative shopping environments. The aim of this paper is to deeply understand the emergence of the ubiquitous retailing phenomenon and the possible shift from the physical point of sale to a ubiquitous one, by analysing this radical innovation and the main consequences for frms and market.

  10. Effects of interleukins 2 and 12 on TBT-induced alterations of MAP kinases p38 and p44/42 in human natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluoch, Aloice O; Whalen, Margaret M

    2006-01-01

    NK cells are lymphocytes in the non-adaptive immune system that protect the body against intracellular pathogens and eliminate tumor cells. Tributyltin (TBT) is a toxic chemical that has been detected in human foods as well as in human blood. The role of TBT in immunosuppression has been described, including inhibition of the human NK-cell cytotoxic function. Previous studies indicated that exposure of NK cells to TBT for 1 h induced progressive and irreversible inhibition of cytotoxic function. However, it was found that if NK cells were incubated in TBT-free media with either IL-2 or IL-12, loss of cytotoxic function was prevented/reversed within 24 h. Molecular studies established that loss of cytotoxic function is accompanied by alteration of MAP kinases (MAPKs) p38 and p44/42 phosphorylation. This study examined whether interleukin-mediated recovery of cytotoxicity involved reversal of tributyltin-altered p38 and p44/42 phosphorylation. The results indicated that there was no substantial IL-2 prevention/reversal of the TBT-induced alteration of phosphorylation of either p38 or p44/42 after either a 24 or 48 h recovery period. Additionally, IL-12 caused no substantial prevention/reversal of the TBT-induced alteration of phosphorylation of the MAPKs seen after either 24 or 48 h. These data suggest that IL-2 and/or IL-12-mediated recovery of NK cytotoxic function is not a result of prevention/reversal of TBT-induced phosphorylation of p38 and p44/42 MAPKs at the 24 or 48 h time points. Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. p-Benzoquinone initiates non-invasive urothelial cancer through aberrant tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR, MAP kinase activation and cell cycle deregulation: Prevention by vitamin C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinjini Ganguly

    Full Text Available According to WHO classification system, non-invasive urothelial carcinoma represents urothelial carcinoma in situ (CIS and dysplasia. Dysplastic urothelium often progresses to CIS that further advances to urothelial carcinoma (UC. The strongest risk factor for UC is cigarette smoking. However, the pathogenesis of cigarette smoke (CS-induced UC is poorly understood. Earlier we had shown that p-benzoquinone (p-BQ, a major toxic quinone derived from p-benzosemiquinone of CS in vivo, is a causative factor for various CS-induced diseases. Here, using a guinea pig model we showed that prolonged treatment with p-BQ led to non-invasive UC, specifically carcinoma in situ (CIS of the renal pelvis and dysplasia in the ureter and bladder. The mechanisms of carcinogenesis were p-BQ-induced oxidative damage and apoptosis that were later suppressed and followed by activation of epidermal growth factor receptor, aberrant phosphorylation of intracellular tyrosine residues, activation of MAP kinase pathway and persistent growth signaling. This was accompanied by deregulation of cell cycle as shown by marked decrease in the expression of p21waf1/cip1 and cyclin D1 proteins as well as hyperphosphorylation of pRb. UC has been characterised by histopathology and immunohistochemistry showing aberrant CK20, increased Ki-67, and marked p53 nuclear immunopositivity with uniformly negative labelling of CD44. Oral supplementation of vitamin C (30 mg/kg body weight/day prevented CIS of the renal pelvis and dysplasia in the ureter and bladder. Since majority of non-invasive UC progresses to invasive cancer with increased risk of mortality, our preclinical study might help to devise effective strategies for early intervention of the disease. Abbreviations: Bax, Bcl-2, CS, DNPH, GAPDH, IARC, p-BQ, p-BSQ, PAHs, PBS, ROS, SDS PAGE, TUNEL, WHO, UC, CIS, EGFR, MAPK, Keywords: p-Benzoquinone, Carcinoma in situ, Dysplasia, Aberrant EGFR activation, Cell cycle deregulation

  12. Sodium methyldithiocarbamate inhibits MAP kinase activation through toll-like receptor 4, alters cytokine production by mouse peritoneal macrophages, and suppresses innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, Stephen B; Zheng, Qiang; Schwab, Carlton; Fan, Ruping

    2005-09-01

    Sodium methyldithiocarbamate (SMD; trade name, Metam Sodium) is an abundantly used soil fumigant that can cause adverse health effects in humans, including some immunological manifestations. The mechanisms by which SMD acts, and its targets within the immune system are not fully understood. Initial experiments demonstrated that SMD administered by oral gavage substantially decreased IL-12 production and increased IL-10 production induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice. The present study was conducted to further characterize these effects and to evaluate our working hypothesis that the mechanism for these effects involves alteration in signaling through toll-like receptor 4 and that this would suppress innate immunity to infection. SMD decreased the activation of MAP kinases and AP-1 but not NF-kappaB in peritoneal macrophages. The expression of mRNA for IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-18, IFN-gamma, IL-12 p35, IL-12 p40, and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was inhibited by SMD, whereas mRNA for IL-10 was increased. SMD increased the IL-10 concentration in the peritoneal cavity and serum and decreased the concentration of IL-12 p40 in the serum, peritoneal cavity, and intracellularly in peritoneal cells (which are >80% macrophages). Similar effects on LPS-induced cytokine production were observed following dermal administration of SMD. The major breakdown product of SMD, methylisothiocyanate (MITC), caused similar effects on cytokine production at dosages as low as 17 mg/kg, a dosage relevant to human exposure levels associated with agricultural use of SMD. Treatment of mice with SMD decreased survival following challenge with non-pathogenic Escherichia coli within 24-48 h, demonstrating suppression of innate immunity.

  13. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Drosophila Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopko, Richelle; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a significant role in a wide range of cellular processes. The Drosophila genome encodes more than 20 receptor tyrosine kinases and extensive studies in the past 20 years have illustrated their diverse roles and complex signaling mechanisms. Although some receptor tyrosine kinases have highly specific functions, others strikingly are used in rather ubiquitous manners. Receptor tyrosine kinases regulate a broad expanse of processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to differentiation and patterning. Remarkably, different receptor tyrosine kinases share many of the same effectors and their hierarchical organization is retained in disparate biological contexts. In this comprehensive review, we summarize what is known regarding each receptor tyrosine kinase during Drosophila development. Astonishingly, very little is known for approximately half of all Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:23732470

  14. Ubiquitous Robotic Technology for Smart Manufacturing System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenshan; Zhu, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Liyu; Qiu, Qiang; Cao, Qixin

    2016-01-01

    As the manufacturing tasks become more individualized and more flexible, the machines in smart factory are required to do variable tasks collaboratively without reprogramming. This paper for the first time discusses the similarity between smart manufacturing systems and the ubiquitous robotic systems and makes an effort on deploying ubiquitous robotic technology to the smart factory. Specifically, a component based framework is proposed in order to enable the communication and cooperation of the heterogeneous robotic devices. Further, compared to the service robotic domain, the smart manufacturing systems are often in larger size. So a hierarchical planning method was implemented to improve the planning efficiency. A test bed of smart factory is developed. It demonstrates that the proposed framework is suitable for industrial domain, and the hierarchical planning method is able to solve large problems intractable with flat methods.

  15. Chitin and stress induced protein kinase activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenchappa, Chandra Shekar; Azevedo da Silva, Raquel; Bressendorff, Simon

    2017-01-01

    The assays described here are pertinent to protein kinase studies in any plant. They include an immunoblot phosphorylation/activation assay and an in-gel activity assay for MAP kinases (MPKs) using the general protein kinase substrate myelin basic protein. They also include a novel in-gel peptide...... substrate assay for Snf1-related kinase family 2 members (SnRK2s). This kinase family-specific assay overcomes some limitations of in-gel assays and permits the identification of different types of kinase activities in total protein extracts....

  16. Student Assessment in the Ubiquitously Connected World

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Student cheating on university assessments from entrance exams to finals and from contract cheating on coursework to requesting exam answers using a mobile phone during the exam, has received more and more attention of late. As connection to the Internet becomes ubiquitous and computing and communications technology more embedded in our environment, it is argued that a re-focussing on providing educational opportunities is needed in higher education, rather than chasing the ever-retreating p...

  17. DNA Protecting Activities of Nymphaea nouchali (Burm. f Flower Extract Attenuate t-BHP-Induced Oxidative Stress Cell Death through Nrf2-Mediated Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression by Activating MAP-Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Badrul Alam

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to investigate the antioxidant activities of Nymphaea nouchali flower (NNF extract and the underlying mechanism using RAW 264.7 cells. The presence of gallic acid, catechin, epicatechin, epigallocatechin, epicatechin gallate, caffeic acid, quercetin, and apigenin in the NNF was confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The extract had a very potent capacity to scavenge numerous free radicals. NNF extract was also able to prevent DNA damage and quench cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS generation induced by tert-Butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP with no signs of toxicity. The NNF extract was able to augment the expression of both primary and phase II detoxifying enzyme, resulting in combat the oxidative stress. This is accomplished by phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase (p38 kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK followed by enhancing the nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2. This attenuates cellular ROS generation and confers protection from cell death. Altogether, the results of current study revealed that Nymphaea nouchali flower could be a source of natural phytochemicals that could lead to the development of new therapeutic agents for preventing oxidative stress associated diseases and attenuating disease progression.

  18. Thioredoxin-1 promotes survival in cells exposed to S-nitrosoglutathione: Correlation with reduction of intracellular levels of nitrosothiols and up-regulation of the ERK1/2 MAP Kinases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Roberto J.; Ogata, Fernando T.; Batista, Wagner L.; Masutani, Hiroshi; Yodoi, Junji; Debbas, Victor; Augusto, Ohara; Stern, Arnold; Monteiro, Hugo P.

    2008-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that post-translational protein modifications by nitric oxide and its derived species are critical effectors of redox signaling in cells. These protein modifications are most likely controlled by intracellular reductants. Among them, the importance of the 12 kDa dithiol protein thioredoxin-1 (TRX-1) has been increasingly recognized. However, the effects of TRX-1 in cells exposed to exogenous nitrosothiols remain little understood. We investigated the levels of intracellular nitrosothiols and survival signaling in HeLa cells over-expressing TRX-1 and exposed to S-nitrosoglutahione (GSNO). A role for TRX-1 expression on GSNO catabolism and cell viability was demonstrated by the concentration-dependent effects of GSNO on decreasing TRX-1 expression, activation of caspase-3, and increasing cell death. The over-expression of TRX-1 in HeLa cells partially attenuated caspase-3 activation and enhanced cell viability upon GSNO treatment. This was correlated with reduction of intracellular levels of nitrosothiols and increasing levels of nitrite and nitrotyrosine. The involvement of ERK, p38 and JNK pathways were investigated in parental cells treated with GSNO. Activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinases was shown to be critical for survival signaling. In cells over-expressing TRX-1, basal phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 MAP kinases were higher and further increased after GSNO treatment. These results indicate that the enhanced cell viability promoted by TRX-1 correlates with its capacity to regulate the levels of intracellular nitrosothiols and to up-regulate the survival signaling pathway mediated by the ERK1/2 MAP kinases

  19. Molecular Basis of Meiotic Maturation and Apoptosis of Oocytes, Sperm-Oocyte Interactions and Early Cleavage of Embryos in Mice, Role of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase, Mos, Fas-Fas Ligand, Integrinα6 and MAP Kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Yumi Hoshino; Ken-ichi Yamanaka; Ikuo Tomioka; Noritaka Fukunaga; Mehdi Abbasi; Eimei Sato

    2005-01-01

    The interaction between molecular biology and embryology made an extensive progress in the research on gametogenesis, fertilization and early embryogenesis in mice. In this article, molecules involving in meiotic maturation and apoptosis of oocytes, sperm-oocyte interactions and early cleavage of fertilized embryos in mice are described including our recent following experiments. 1) Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and Akt participate in the follicle stimulating hormone-induced meiotic maturatio...

  20. A proposal of ubiquitous fuzzy computing for ambient Intelligence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acampora, G.; Loia, V.

    2008-01-01

    Ambient Intelligence is considered as the composition of three emergent technologies: Ubiquitous Computing, Ubiquitous Communication and Intelligent User Interfaces. The aim of integration of aforesaid technologies is to make wider the interaction between human beings and information technology

  1. Ubiquitous fuzzy computing in open ambient intelligence environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acampora, G.; Loia, V.

    2006-01-01

    Ambient intelligence (AmI) is considered as the composition of three emergent technologies: ubiquitous computing, ubiquitous communication and intelligent user interfaces. The aim of integration of aforesaid technologies is to make wider the interaction between human beings and information

  2. CILT2000: Ubiquitous Computing--Spanning the Digital Divide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, Robert; Vahey, Philip

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the role of ubiquitous and handheld computers in education. Summarizes the contributions of the Center for Innovative Learning Technologies (CILT) and describes the ubiquitous computing sessions at the CILT2000 Conference. (Author/YDS)

  3. New Trends on Ubiquitous Mobile Multimedia Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Marco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile devices present the opportunity to enhance our fast-growing and globally connected society, improving user-experience through novel approaches for information dissemination through mobile communication. The research community is developing new technologies, services, and applications to enable ubiquitous environments based on mobile technology. This paper tackles several important challenges such as communication cost and device limitations for development of ubiquitous multimedia applications. And we propose a system for news delivery using a set of wireless multimedia applications. For this purpose, we have performed a case study with Apple iPhone's platform, featuring two multimedia application contexts, namely, Web and native applications. The multimedia mobile applications draw on iPhone's assets, enabling context-awareness to distribute news, improving communication efficiency and setting-up viewing optimizations, thus enhancing user-experience. The proposed system is evaluated and validated through a series of real-life experiments on real devices, with online full availability. Moreover, due to the Web application availability, the system is not restrained to Apple's iPhone platform, but can also benefit users with other devices.

  4. Ubiquitous computing in shared-care environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, S

    2006-07-01

    In light of future challenges, such as growing numbers of elderly, increase in chronic diseases, insufficient health care budgets and problems with staff recruitment for the health-care sector, information and communication technology (ICT) becomes a possible means to meet these challenges. Organizational changes such as the decentralization of the health-care system lead to a shift from in-hospital to both advanced and basic home health care. Advanced medical technologies provide solutions for distant home care in form of specialist consultations and home monitoring. Furthermore, the shift towards home health care will increase mobile work and the establishment of shared care teams which require ICT-based solutions that support ubiquitous information access and cooperative work. Clinical documentation and decision support systems are the main ICT-based solutions of interest in the context of ubiquitous computing for shared care environments. This paper therefore describes the prerequisites for clinical documentation and decision support at the point of care, the impact of mobility on the documentation process, and how the introduction of ICT-based solutions will influence organizations and people. Furthermore, the role of dentistry in shared-care environments is discussed and illustrated in the form of a future scenario.

  5. Ubiquitous Learning Environments in Higher Education: A Scoping Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Mari Aulikki; Haavisto, Elina; Liikanen, Eeva; Kääriäinen, Maria

    2018-01-01

    Ubiquitous learning and the use of ubiquitous learning environments heralds a new era in higher education. Ubiquitous learning environments enhance context-aware and seamless learning experiences available from any location at any time. They support smooth interaction between authentic and digital learning resources and provide personalized…

  6. Integrating Collaborative and Decentralized Models to Support Ubiquitous Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Jorge Luis Victória; Barbosa, Débora Nice Ferrari; Rigo, Sandro José; de Oliveira, Jezer Machado; Rabello, Solon Andrade, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    The application of ubiquitous technologies in the improvement of education strategies is called Ubiquitous Learning. This article proposes the integration between two models dedicated to support ubiquitous learning environments, called Global and CoolEdu. CoolEdu is a generic collaboration model for decentralized environments. Global is an…

  7. The Construction of an Ontology-Based Ubiquitous Learning Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ching-Jung; Chou, Chien-Chih; Yang, Jin-Tan David

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to incorporate adaptive ontology into ubiquitous learning grid to achieve seamless learning environment. Ubiquitous learning grid uses ubiquitous computing environment to infer and determine the most adaptive learning contents and procedures in anytime, any place and with any device. To achieve the goal, an…

  8. Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-MAP kinase. Durable type II inhibitors that do not require binding into the canonical ATP hinge region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yu Mi; Clare, Michael; Ensinger, Carol L; Hood, Molly M; Lord, John W; Lu, Wei-Ping; Miller, David F; Patt, William C; Smith, Bryan D; Vogeti, Lakshminarayana; Kaufman, Michael D; Petillo, Peter A; Wise, Scott C; Abendroth, Jan; Chun, Lawrence; Clark, Robin; Feese, Michael; Kim, Hidong; Stewart, Lance; Flynn, Daniel L

    2010-10-01

    Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-alpha kinase are described. Durable type II inhibitors were designed which bind to arginines (Arg67 or Arg70) that function as key residues for mediating phospho-threonine 180 dependant conformational fluxing of p38-alpha from an inactive type II state to an active type I state. Binding to Arg70 in particular led to potent inhibitors, exemplified by DP-802, which also exhibited high kinase selectivity. Binding to Arg70 obviated the requirement for binding into the ATP Hinge region. X-ray crystallography revealed that DP-802 and analogs induce an enhanced type II conformation upon binding to either the unphosphorylated or the doubly phosphorylated form of p38-alpha kinase. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Networked Biomedical System for Ubiquitous Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjan Durresi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a distributed system that enables global and ubiquitous health monitoring of patients. The biomedical data will be collected by wearable health diagnostic devices, which will include various types of sensors and will be transmitted towards the corresponding Health Monitoring Centers. The permanent medical data of patients will be kept in the corresponding Home Data Bases, while the measured biomedical data will be sent to the Visitor Health Monitor Center and Visitor Data Base that serves the area of present location of the patient. By combining the measured biomedical data and the permanent medical data, Health Medical Centers will be able to coordinate the needed actions and help the local medical teams to make quickly the best decisions that could be crucial for the patient health, and that can reduce the cost of health service.

  10. Ubiquitous health in practice: the interreality paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaggioli, Andrea; Raspelli, Simona; Grassi, Alessandra; Pallavicini, Federica; Cipresso, Pietro; Wiederhold, Brenda K; Riva, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new ubiquitous computing paradigm for behavioral health care: "Interreality". Interreality integrates assessment and treatment within a hybrid environment, that creates a bridge between the physical and virtual worlds. Our claim is that bridging virtual experiences (fully controlled by the therapist, used to learn coping skills and emotional regulation) with real experiences (allowing both the identification of any critical stressors and the assessment of what has been learned) using advanced technologies (virtual worlds, advanced sensors and PDA/mobile phones) may improve existing psychological treatment. To illustrate the proposed concept, a clinical scenario is also presented and discussed: Daniela, a 40 years old teacher, with a mother affected by Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Opposite effects of the p52shc/p46shc and p66shc splicing isoforms on the EGF receptor-MAP kinase-fos signalling pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Migliaccio, E; Mele, S; Salcini, A E

    1997-01-01

    Shc proteins are targets of activated tyrosine kinases and are implicated in the transmission of activation signals to Ras. The p46shc and p52shc isoforms share a C-terminal SH2 domain, a proline- and glycine-rich region (collagen homologous region 1; CH1) and a N-terminal PTB domain. We have...

  12. Phosphorylation of varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein gpI by mammalian casein kinase II and casein kinase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grose, C.; Jackson, W.; Traugh, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) glycoprotein gpI is the predominant viral glycoprotein within the plasma membranes of infected cells. This viral glycoprotein is phosphorylated on its polypeptide backbone during biosynthesis. In this report, the authors investigated the protein kinases which participate in the phosphorylation events. Under in vivo conditions, VZV gpI was phosphorylated on its serine and threonine residues by protein kinases present within lysates of either VZV-infected or uninfected cells. Because this activity was diminished by heparin, a known inhibitor of casein kinase II, isolated gpI was incubated with purified casein kinase II and shown to be phosphorylated in an in vitro assay containing [γ- 32 P]ATP. The same glycoprotein was phosphorylated when [ 32 P]GTP was substituted for [ 32 P]ATP in the protein kinase assay. They also tested whether VZV gpI was phosphorylated by two other ubiquitous mammalian protein kinases--casein kinase I and cyclic AMP-dependent kinase--and found that only casein kinase I modified gpI. When the predicted 623-amino-acid sequence of gpI was examined, two phosphorylation sites known to be optimal for casein kinase II were observed. In summary, this study showed that VZV gpI was phosphorylated by each of two mammalian protein kinases (casein kinase I and casein kinase II) and that potential serine-threonine phosphorylation sites for each of these two kinases were present in the viral glycoprotein

  13. SMALL GRAIN 1, which encodes a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4, influences grain size in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Penggen; Rao, Yuchun; Zeng, Dali; Yang, Yaolong; Xu, Ran; Zhang, Baolan; Dong, Guojun; Qian, Qian; Li, Yunhai

    2014-02-01

    Although grain size is one of the most important components of grain yield, little information is known about the mechanisms that determine final grain size in crops. Here we characterize rice small grain1 (smg1) mutants, which exhibit small and light grains, dense and erect panicles and comparatively slightly shorter plants. The short grain and panicle phenotypes of smg1 mutants are caused by a defect in cell proliferation. The smg1 mutations were identified, using a map-based cloning approach, in mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (OsMKK4). Relatively higher expression of OsMKK4/SMG1 was detected in younger organs than in older ones, consistent with its role in cell proliferation. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-OsMKK4/SMG1 fusion proteins appear to be distributed ubiquitously in plant cells. Further results revealed that OsMKK4 influenced brassinosteroid (BR) responses and the expression of BR-related genes. Thus, our findings have identified OsMKK4 as a factor for grain size, and suggest a possible link between the MAPK pathways and BRs in grain growth. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Ubiquitous information for ubiquitous computing: expressing clinical data sets with openEHR archetypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garde, Sebastian; Hovenga, Evelyn; Buck, Jasmin; Knaup, Petra

    2006-01-01

    Ubiquitous computing requires ubiquitous access to information and knowledge. With the release of openEHR Version 1.0 there is a common model available to solve some of the problems related to accessing information and knowledge by improving semantic interoperability between clinical systems. Considerable work has been undertaken by various bodies to standardise Clinical Data Sets. Notwithstanding their value, several problems remain unsolved with Clinical Data Sets without the use of a common model underpinning them. This paper outlines these problems like incompatible basic data types and overlapping and incompatible definitions of clinical content. A solution to this based on openEHR archetypes is motivated and an approach to transform existing Clinical Data Sets into archetypes is presented. To avoid significant overlaps and unnecessary effort during archetype development, archetype development needs to be coordinated nationwide and beyond and also across the various health professions in a formalized process.

  15. Paroxetine-induced apoptosis in human osteosarcoma cells: Activation of p38 MAP kinase and caspase-3 pathways without involvement of [Ca2+]i elevation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, C.-T.; He Shiping; Jan, C.-R.

    2007-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a group of antidepressants, are generally used for treatment of various mood and anxiety disorders. There has been much research showing the anti-tumor and cytotoxic activities of some antidepressants; but the detailed mechanisms were unclear. In cultured human osteosarcoma cells (MG63), paroxetine reduced cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Paroxetine caused apoptosis as assessed by propidium iodide-stained cells and increased caspase-3 activation. Although immunoblotting data revealed that paroxetine could activate the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun NH 2 -terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), only SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor) partially prevented cells from apoptosis. Paroxetine also induced [Ca 2+ ] i increases which involved the mobilization of intracellular Ca 2+ stored in the endoplasmic reticulum and Ca 2+ influx from extracellular medium. However, pretreatment with BAPTA/AM, a Ca 2+ chelator, to prevent paroxetine-induced [Ca 2+ ] i increases did not protect cells from death. The results suggest that in MG63 cells, paroxetine caused Ca 2+ -independent apoptosis via inducing p38 MAPK-associated caspase-3 activation

  16. Combined 15N-Labeling and TandemMOAC Quantifies Phosphorylation of MAP Kinase Substrates Downstream of MKK7 in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola V. Huck

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Reversible protein phosphorylation is a widespread posttranslational modification that plays a key role in eukaryotic signal transduction. Due to the dynamics of protein abundance, low stoichiometry and transient nature of protein phosphorylation, the detection and accurate quantification of substrate phosphorylation by protein kinases remains a challenge in phosphoproteome research. Here, we combine tandem metal-oxide affinity chromatography (tandemMOAC with stable isotope 15N metabolic labeling for the measurement and accurate quantification of low abundant, transiently phosphorylated peptides by mass spectrometry. Since tandemMOAC is not biased toward the enrichment of acidophilic, basophilic, or proline-directed kinase substrates, the method is applicable to identify targets of all these three types of protein kinases. The MKK7-MPK3/6 module, for example, is involved in the regulation of plant development and plant basal and systemic immune responses, but little is known about downstream cascade components. Using our here described phosphoproteomics approach we identified several MPK substrates downstream of the MKK7-MPK3/6 phosphorylation cascade in Arabidopsis. The identification and validation of dynamin-related protein 2 as a novel phosphorylation substrate of the MKK7-MPK3/6 module establishes a novel link between MPK signaling and clathrin-mediated vesicle trafficking.

  17. Ubiquitous Monitoring of Electrical Household Appliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret, Jaime; Macías, Elsa; Suárez, Alvaro; Lacuesta, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    The number of appliances at home is increasing continuously, mainly because they make our lives easier. Currently, technology is integrated in all objects of our daily life. TCP/IP let us monitor our home in real time and check ubiquitously if something is happening at home. Bearing in mind this idea, we have developed a low-cost system, which can be used in any type of electrical household appliance that takes information from the appliance and posts the information to the Twitter Social network. Several sensors placed in the household appliances gather the sensed data and send them wired or wirelessly, depending on the case, using small and cheap devices to a gateway located in the home. This gateway takes decisions, based on the received data, and sends notifications to Twitter. We have developed a software application that takes the values and decides when to issue an alarm to the registered users (Twitter friends of our smart home). The performance of our system has been measured taking into account the home network (using IEEE 802.3u and IEEE 802.11g) and the data publishing in Twitter. As a result, we have generated an original product and service for any electrical household appliance, regardless of the model and manufacturer, that helps home users improve their quality of life. The paper also shows that there is no system with the same innovative features like the ones presented in this paper. PMID:23202205

  18. Ubiquitous monitoring of electrical household appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret, Jaime; Macías, Elsa; Suárez, Alvaro; Lacuesta, Raquel

    2012-11-07

    The number of appliances at home is increasing continuously, mainly because they make our lives easier. Currently, technology is integrated in all objects of our daily life. TCP/IP let us monitor our home in real time and check ubiquitously if something is happening at home. Bearing in mind this idea, we have developed a low-cost system, which can be used in any type of electrical household appliance that takes information from the appliance and posts the information to the Twitter Social network. Several sensors placed in the household appliances gather the sensed data and send them wired or wirelessly, depending on the case, using small and cheap devices to a gateway located in the home. This gateway takes decisions, based on the received data, and sends notifications to Twitter. We have developed a software application that takes the values and decides when to issue an alarm to the registered users (Twitter friends of our smart home). The performance of our system has been measured taking into account the home network (using IEEE 802.3u and IEEE 802.11g) and the data publishing in Twitter. As a result, we have generated an original product and service for any electrical household appliance, regardless of the model and manufacturer, that helps home users improve their quality of life. The paper also shows that there is no system with the same innovative features like the ones presented in this paper.

  19. Ubiquitous Graphene Electronics on Scotch Tape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yoonyoung; Ho Kim, Hyun; Lee, Sangryun; Lee, Eunho; Won Kim, Seong; Ryu, Seunghwa; Cho, Kilwon

    2015-07-01

    We report a novel concept of graphene transistors on Scotch tape for use in ubiquitous electronic systems. Unlike common plastic substrates such as polyimide and polyethylene terephthalate, the Scotch tape substrate is easily attached onto various objects such as banknotes, curved surfaces, and human skin, which implies potential applications wherein electronics can be placed in any desired position. Furthermore, the soft Scotch tape serves as an attractive substrate for flexible/foldable electronics that can be significantly bent, or even crumpled. We found that the adhesive layer of the tape with a relatively low shear modulus relaxes the strain when subjected to bending. The capacitance of the gate dielectric made of oxidized aluminum oxide was 1.5 μF cm-2, so that a supply voltage of only 2.5 V was sufficient to operate the devices. As-fabricated graphene transistors on Scotch tape exhibited high electron mobility of 1326 (±155) cm2 V-1 s-1 the transistors still showed high mobility of 1254 (±478) cm2 V-1 s-1 even after they were crumpled.

  20. UBIQUITOUS POLLUTION FROM HEALTH AND COSMETIC ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Those chemical pollutants that are regulated under various international, federal, and state programs represent but a small fraction of the universe of chemicals that occur in the environment as a result of both natural processses and human influence. Although this galaxy of targeted chemicals might be miniuscule compared with the universe of both known and yet-to-be identified chemicals, an implicit assumption is that these selective lists of chemicals are responsible for the most significant share of risk with respect to environmental or economic impairment or to human health.Pharmaceuticals and person care products (PPCPs) comprise a particularly large and diverse array of unregulated pollutants that occur in the environment from the combined activities and actions of multitudes of individuals as well as from veterinary and agricultural use. Although the concentration of any individual PPCP are generally less than ppt-ppb), evidence is accumulateing that these trace-level pollutants are ubiquitous, they can have a continuous presence regardless of environment half-lives (especially where sanitary wastewaters enter the environment), and the numbers of distinct and varied chemical entities could be extremely large (given that thousands are in commerical use). The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in the area of Water Quality. Locat

  1. Security policies and trust in ubiquitous computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anupam; Finin, Tim; Kagal, Lalana; Parker, Jim; Patwardhan, Anand

    2008-10-28

    Ubiquitous environments comprise resource-constrained mobile and wearable devices and computational elements embedded in everyday artefacts. These are connected to each other using both infrastructure-based as well as short-range ad hoc networks. Limited Internet connectivity limits the use of conventional security mechanisms such as public key infrastructures and other forms of server-centric authentication. Under these circumstances, peer-to-peer interactions are well suited for not just information interchange, but also managing security and privacy. However, practical solutions for protecting mobile devices, preserving privacy, evaluating trust and determining the reliability and accuracy of peer-provided data in such interactions are still in their infancy. Our research is directed towards providing stronger assurances of the reliability and trustworthiness of information and services, and the use of declarative policy-driven approaches to handle the open and dynamic nature of such systems. This paper provides an overview of some of the challenges and issues, and points out directions for progress.

  2. Intelligent Multi-Agent Middleware for Ubiquitous Home Networking Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Minwoo Son; Seung-Hun Lee; Dongkyoo Shin; Dongil Shin

    2008-01-01

    The next stage of the home networking environment is supposed to be ubiquitous, where each piece of material is equipped with an RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) tag. To fully support the ubiquitous environment, home networking middleware should be able to recommend home services based on a user-s interests and efficiently manage information on service usage profiles for the users. Therefore, USN (Ubiquitous Sensor Network) technology, which recognizes and manages a ...

  3. Ubiquitous and pervasive commerce new frontiers for electronic business

    CERN Document Server

    Roussos, George

    2006-01-01

    The new capabilities of ubiquitous and pervasive computing imply that products, locations, consumers and employees create rich streams of information about themselves, their immediate environment and their use. This book brings together technological and business aspects of conducting commerce using ubiquitous and pervasive computing techniques and also examines its implications for society at large. Individual chapters examine in detail the core technologies that make ubiquitous computing possible, the business standards that must be established to support the envisioned global infrastructure

  4. Casein kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issinger, O G

    1993-01-01

    The present review on casein kinases focuses mainly on the possible metabolic role of CK-2, with special emphasis on its behavior in pathological tissues. From these data at least three ways to regulate CK-2 activity emerge: (i) CK-2 activity changes during embryogenesis, being high at certain...

  5. A ubiquitous reflective e-portfolio architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Marcos; de Souza, Wanderley L; da Silva, Roseli F; do Prado, Antonio F; Rodrigues, Jose F

    2013-11-01

    In nurse and in medicine courses, the use of reflective portfolios as a pedagogical tool is becoming a common practice; in the last years, this practice has gradually migrated from paper-based to electronic-based portfolios. Current approaches for reflective e-portfolios, however, do not widely operate at outdoor sites, where data networks are limited or nonexistent. Considering that many of the activities related to nurse and medicine courses relate to professional practices conducted in such conditions, these network shortcomings restrict the adoption of e-portfolios. The present study describes the requirements specification, design, implementation, and evaluation of the Ubiquitous Reflective E-Portfolio Architecture, a solution proposed to support the development of systems based on mobile and wired access for both online and offline operation. We have implemented a prototype named Professional Practice Module to evaluate the Ubiquitous Reflective E-Portfolio Architecture; the module was based on requirements observed during the professional practice, the paper-based portfolio in use, and related learning meetings in the Medicine Course of a Brazilian University. The evaluation of the system was carried out with a learning group of 2nd year students of the medicine course, who answered to extensive evaluation questionnaires. The prototype proved to be operational in the activities of the professional practice of the Medicine Course object of the study, including homework tasks, patient care, data sharing, and learning meetings. It also demonstrated to be versatile with respect to the availability of the computer network that, many times, was not accessible. Moreover, the students considered the module useful and easy to use, but pointed out difficulties about the keyboard and the display sizes of the netbook devices, and about their operational system. Lastly, most of the students declared preference for the electronic Professional Practice Module in internal

  6. Kinases and Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jonas Cicenas; Egle Zalyte; Amos Bairoch; Pascale Gaudet

    2018-01-01

    Protein kinases are a large family of enzymes catalyzing protein phosphorylation. The human genome contains 518 protein kinase genes, 478 of which belong to the classical protein kinase family and 40 are atypical protein kinases [...

  7. The wavy Mutation Maps to the Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate 3-Kinase 2 (IP3K2) Gene of Drosophila and Interacts with IP3R to Affect Wing Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Derek M; Maroja, Luana S; Cottrill, Sarah; Bomkamp, Brent E; Westervelt, Kathleen A; Deitcher, David L

    2015-11-27

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) regulates a host of biological processes from egg activation to cell death. When IP3-specific receptors (IP3Rs) bind to IP3, they release calcium from the ER into the cytoplasm, triggering a variety of cell type- and developmental stage-specific responses. Alternatively, inositol polyphosphate kinases can phosphorylate IP3; this limits IP3R activation by reducing IP3 levels, and also generates new signaling molecules altogether. These divergent pathways draw from the same IP3 pool yet cause very different cellular responses. Therefore, controlling the relative rates of IP3R activation vs. phosphorylation of IP3 is essential for proper cell functioning. Establishing a model system that sensitively reports the net output of IP3 signaling is crucial for identifying the controlling genes. Here we report that mutant alleles of wavy (wy), a classic locus of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, map to IP3 3-kinase 2 (IP3K2), a member of the inositol polyphosphate kinase gene family. Mutations in wy disrupt wing structure in a highly specific pattern. RNAi experiments using GAL4 and GAL80(ts) indicated that IP3K2 function is required in the wing discs of early pupae for normal wing development. Gradations in the severity of the wy phenotype provide high-resolution readouts of IP3K2 function and of overall IP3 signaling, giving this system strong potential as a model for further study of the IP3 signaling network. In proof of concept, a dominant modifier screen revealed that mutations in IP3R strongly suppress the wy phenotype, suggesting that the wy phenotype results from reduced IP4 levels, and/or excessive IP3R signaling. Copyright © 2016 Dean et al.

  8. The wavy Mutation Maps to the Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate 3-Kinase 2 (IP3K2 Gene of Drosophila and Interacts with IP3R to Affect Wing Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek M. Dean

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3 regulates a host of biological processes from egg activation to cell death. When IP3-specific receptors (IP3Rs bind to IP3, they release calcium from the ER into the cytoplasm, triggering a variety of cell type- and developmental stage-specific responses. Alternatively, inositol polyphosphate kinases can phosphorylate IP3; this limits IP3R activation by reducing IP3 levels, and also generates new signaling molecules altogether. These divergent pathways draw from the same IP3 pool yet cause very different cellular responses. Therefore, controlling the relative rates of IP3R activation vs. phosphorylation of IP3 is essential for proper cell functioning. Establishing a model system that sensitively reports the net output of IP3 signaling is crucial for identifying the controlling genes. Here we report that mutant alleles of wavy (wy, a classic locus of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, map to IP3 3-kinase 2 (IP3K2, a member of the inositol polyphosphate kinase gene family. Mutations in wy disrupt wing structure in a highly specific pattern. RNAi experiments using GAL4 and GAL80ts indicated that IP3K2 function is required in the wing discs of early pupae for normal wing development. Gradations in the severity of the wy phenotype provide high-resolution readouts of IP3K2 function and of overall IP3 signaling, giving this system strong potential as a model for further study of the IP3 signaling network. In proof of concept, a dominant modifier screen revealed that mutations in IP3R strongly suppress the wy phenotype, suggesting that the wy phenotype results from reduced IP4 levels, and/or excessive IP3R signaling.

  9. Furosin, an ellagitannin, suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and function through inhibition of MAP kinase activation and actin ring formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Eui Kyun; Kim, Myung Sunny; Lee, Seung Ho; Kim, Kyung Hee; Park, Ju-Young; Kim, Tae-Ho; Lee, In-Seon; Woo, Je-Tae; Jung, Jae-Chang; Shin, Hong-In; Choi, Je-Yong; Kim, Shin-Yoon

    2004-01-01

    Phenolic compounds including tannins and flavonoids have been implicated in suppression of osteoclast differentiation/function and prevention of bone diseases. However, the effects of hydrolysable tannins on bone metabolism remain to be elucidated. In this study, we found that furosin, a hydrolysable tannin, markedly decreased the differentiation of both murine bone marrow mononuclear cells and Raw264.7 cells into osteoclasts, as revealed by the reduced number of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells and decreased TRAP activity. Furosin appears to target at the early stage of osteoclastic differentiation while having no cytotoxic effect on osteoclast precursors. Analysis of the inhibitory mechanisms of furosin revealed that it inhibited the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/activating protein-1 (AP-1). Furthermore, furosin reduced resorption pit formation in osteoclasts, which was accompanied by disruption of the actin rings. Taken together, these results demonstrate that naturally occurring furosin has an inhibitory activity on both osteoclast differentiation and function through mechanisms involving inhibition of the RANKL-induced p38MAPK and JNK/AP-1 activation as well as actin ring formation

  10. The MAP kinase ERK and its scaffold protein MP1 interact with the chromatin regulator Corto during Drosophila wing tissue development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades (p38, JNK, ERK pathways) are involved in cell fate acquisition during development. These kinase modules are associated with scaffold proteins that control their activity. In Drosophila, dMP1, that encodes an ERK scaffold protein, regulates ERK signaling during wing development and contributes to intervein and vein cell differentiation. Functional relationships during wing development between a chromatin regulator, the Enhancer of Trithorax and Polycomb Corto, ERK and its scaffold protein dMP1, are examined here. Results Genetic interactions show that corto and dMP1 act together to antagonize rolled (which encodes ERK) in the future intervein cells, thus promoting intervein fate. Although Corto, ERK and dMP1 are present in both cytoplasmic and nucleus compartments, they interact exclusively in nucleus extracts. Furthermore, Corto, ERK and dMP1 co-localize on several sites on polytene chromosomes, suggesting that they regulate gene expression directly on chromatin. Finally, Corto is phosphorylated. Interestingly, its phosphorylation pattern differs between cytoplasm and nucleus and changes upon ERK activation. Conclusions Our data therefore suggest that the Enhancer of Trithorax and Polycomb Corto could participate in regulating vein and intervein genes during wing tissue development in response to ERK signaling. PMID:21401930

  11. Using 3D Culture of Primary Mammary Epithelial Cells to Define Molecular Entities Required for Acinus Formation: Analyzing MAP Kinase Phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewska, Malgorzata; McNally, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures on reconstituted basement membrane (rBM) enable the study of complex interactions between extracellular matrix (ECM) components and epithelial cells, which are crucial for the establishment of cell polarity and functional development of epithelia. 3D cultures of mammary epithelial cells (MECs) on Matrigel (a laminin-rich ECM derived from the Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm (EHS) murine tumor) promote interactions of MECs with the matrix via integrins, leading to formation of spherical monolayers of polarized cells surrounding a hollow lumen (acini). Acini closely resemble mammary alveoli found in the mammary gland. Thus, it is possible to study ECM-cell interactions and signalling pathways that regulate formation and maintenance of tissue-specific shape and functional differentiation of MECs in 3D under in vitro conditions. Here we present experimental protocols used to investigate the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatases (MKPs) during development of the alveoli-like structures by primary mouse mammary epithelial cells (PMMEC) cultured on Matrigel. We present detailed protocols for PMMEC isolation, and establishment of 3D cultures using an "on top" method, use of specific kinase and phosphatases inhibitors (PD98059 and pervanadate, respectively) administered at different stages of acinus development, and give examples of analyses carried out post-culture (Western blot, immunofluorescence staining, and confocal imaging).

  12. The MAP kinase ERK and its scaffold protein MP1 interact with the chromatin regulator Corto during Drosophila wing tissue development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchel-Vielh, Emmanuèle; Rougeot, Julien; Decoville, Martine; Peronnet, Frédérique

    2011-03-14

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades (p38, JNK, ERK pathways) are involved in cell fate acquisition during development. These kinase modules are associated with scaffold proteins that control their activity. In Drosophila, dMP1, that encodes an ERK scaffold protein, regulates ERK signaling during wing development and contributes to intervein and vein cell differentiation. Functional relationships during wing development between a chromatin regulator, the Enhancer of Trithorax and Polycomb Corto, ERK and its scaffold protein dMP1, are examined here. Genetic interactions show that corto and dMP1 act together to antagonize rolled (which encodes ERK) in the future intervein cells, thus promoting intervein fate. Although Corto, ERK and dMP1 are present in both cytoplasmic and nucleus compartments, they interact exclusively in nucleus extracts. Furthermore, Corto, ERK and dMP1 co-localize on several sites on polytene chromosomes, suggesting that they regulate gene expression directly on chromatin. Finally, Corto is phosphorylated. Interestingly, its phosphorylation pattern differs between cytoplasm and nucleus and changes upon ERK activation. Our data therefore suggest that the Enhancer of Trithorax and Polycomb Corto could participate in regulating vein and intervein genes during wing tissue development in response to ERK signaling.

  13. The MAP kinase ERK and its scaffold protein MP1 interact with the chromatin regulator Corto during Drosophila wing tissue development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peronnet Frédérique

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades (p38, JNK, ERK pathways are involved in cell fate acquisition during development. These kinase modules are associated with scaffold proteins that control their activity. In Drosophila, dMP1, that encodes an ERK scaffold protein, regulates ERK signaling during wing development and contributes to intervein and vein cell differentiation. Functional relationships during wing development between a chromatin regulator, the Enhancer of Trithorax and Polycomb Corto, ERK and its scaffold protein dMP1, are examined here. Results Genetic interactions show that corto and dMP1 act together to antagonize rolled (which encodes ERK in the future intervein cells, thus promoting intervein fate. Although Corto, ERK and dMP1 are present in both cytoplasmic and nucleus compartments, they interact exclusively in nucleus extracts. Furthermore, Corto, ERK and dMP1 co-localize on several sites on polytene chromosomes, suggesting that they regulate gene expression directly on chromatin. Finally, Corto is phosphorylated. Interestingly, its phosphorylation pattern differs between cytoplasm and nucleus and changes upon ERK activation. Conclusions Our data therefore suggest that the Enhancer of Trithorax and Polycomb Corto could participate in regulating vein and intervein genes during wing tissue development in response to ERK signaling.

  14. Ubiquitous Learning Project Using Life-Logging Technology in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Hiroaki; Hou, Bin; Li, Mengmeng; Uosaki, Noriko; Mouri, Kosuke; Liu, Songran

    2014-01-01

    A Ubiquitous Learning Log (ULL) is defined as a digital record of what a learner has learned in daily life using ubiquitous computing technologies. In this paper, a project which developed a system called SCROLL (System for Capturing and Reusing Of Learning Log) is presented. The aim of developing SCROLL is to help learners record, organize,…

  15. Implications of Ubiquitous Computing for the Social Studies Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hover, Stephanie D.; Berson, Michael J.; Bolick, Cheryl Mason; Swan, Kathleen Owings

    2004-01-01

    In March 2002, members of the National Technology Leadership Initiative (NTLI) met in Charlottesville, Virginia to discuss the potential effects of ubiquitous computing on the field of education. Ubiquitous computing, or "on-demand availability of task-necessary computing power," involves providing every student with a handheld computer--a…

  16. Ubiquitous Computing: The Universal Use of Computers on College Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David G., Ed.

    This book is a collection of vignettes from 13 universities where everyone on campus has his or her own computer. These 13 institutions have instituted "ubiquitous computing" in very different ways at very different costs. The chapters are: (1) "Introduction: The Ubiquitous Computing Movement" (David G. Brown); (2) "Dartmouth College" (Malcolm…

  17. Towards context adaptive privacy decisions in ubiquitous computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaub, Florian; Könings, Bastian; Weber, M.; Kargl, Frank

    2012-01-01

    In ubiquitous systems control of privacy settings will be increasingly difficult due to the pervasive nature of sensing and communication capabilities. We identify challenges for privacy decisions in ubiquitous systems and propose a system for in situ privacy decision support. When context changes

  18. Architecture of personal healthcare information system in ubiquitous healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhardwaj, S.; Sain, M.; Lee, H.-J.; Chung, W.Y.; Slezak, D.; et al., xx

    2009-01-01

    Due to recent development in Ubiquitous Healthcare now it’s time to build such application which can work independently and with less interference of Physician. In this paper we are try to build the whole architecture of personal Healthcare information system for ubiquitous healthcare which also

  19. Ubiquitous Creation of Bas-Relief Surfaces with Depth-of-Field Effects Using Smartphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong-Soo Sohn

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a new method to automatically generate digital bas-reliefs with depth-of-field effects from general scenes. Most previous methods for bas-relief generation take input in the form of 3D models. However, obtaining 3D models of real scenes or objects is often difficult, inaccurate, and time-consuming. From this motivation, we developed a method that takes as input a set of photographs that can be quickly and ubiquitously captured by ordinary smartphone cameras. A depth map is computed from the input photographs. The value range of the depth map is compressed and used as a base map representing the overall shape of the bas-relief. However, the resulting base map contains little information on details of the scene. Thus, we construct a detail map using pixel values of the input image to express the details. The base and detail maps are blended to generate a new depth map that reflects both overall depth and scene detail information. This map is selectively blurred to simulate the depth-of-field effects. The final depth map is converted to a bas-relief surface mesh. Experimental results show that our method generates a realistic bas-relief surface of general scenes with no expensive manual processing.

  20. Fluoride-induced IL-8 release in human epithelial lung cells: Relationship to EGF-receptor-, SRC- and MAP-kinase activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refsnes, Magne; Skuland, Tonje; Schwarze, Per E.; Ovrevik, Johan; Lag, Marit

    2008-01-01

    Exposure of human epithelial lung cells to fluorides is known to induce a marked increase in the release of interleukin (IL)-8, a chemokine involved in neutrophil recruitment. In the present study, the involvement of mitogen-activating protein kinases (MAPKs), the role of upstream activation of Src family kinases (SFKs), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation and the interrelationships between these pathways in fluoride-induced IL-8 were examined in a human epithelial lung cell line (A549). Sodium fluoride strongly activated MAPK, in particular JNK1/2 and p38. The ERK1/2-inhibitor PD98059, the p38-inhibitor SB202190 and the JNK1/2-inhibitor SP600125 partially inhibited the fluoride-induced IL-8 response. Combinations of these inhibitors reduced the responses nearly to basal levels. Treatment with siRNA against JNK2 also reduced the IL-8 response to fluoride. Furthermore, fluoride activated SFKs, which was abolished by the SFK-inhibitor PP2. PP2 substantially inhibited the increased levels of IL-8, and partially reduced the fluoride-induced activation of ERK1/2, p38 and JNK1/2. Fluoride exposure also led to a phosphorylation of the EGFR, that was partially inhibited by PP2. AG1478, an EGFR-inhibitor, partially reduced the fluoride-induced IL-8 response and the phosphorylation of JNK1/2 and ERK1/2, but less the phosphorylation of p38. The effects of AG1478 were less than that of PP2. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the fluoride-induced IL-8 release involves the combined activation of ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and p38, and that the phosphorylation of these kinases, and in particular JNK1/2 and ERK1/2, partly, is mediated via a SFK-dependent EGFR-linked pathway. SFK-dependent, but EGFR-independent mechanisms seem important, and especially for phosphorylation of p38

  1. Superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetics but not MAP kinase inhibitors are neuroprotective against oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced neuronal death in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Miou; Dominguez, Reymundo; Baudry, Michel

    2007-12-01

    Although oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) has been widely used as a model of ischemic brain damage, the mechanisms underlying acute neuronal death in this model are not yet well understood. We used OGD in acute hippocampal slices to investigate the roles of reactive oxygen species and of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in neuronal death. In particular, we tested the neuroprotective effects of two synthetic superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetics, EUK-189 and EUK-207. Acute hippocampal slices prepared from 2-month-old or postnatal day 10 rats were exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation for 2 h followed by 2.5 h reoxygenation. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release in the medium and propidium iodide (PI) uptake were used to evaluate cell viability. EUK-189 or EUK-207 applied during the OGD and reoxygenation periods decreased LDH release and PI uptake in slices from 2-month-old rats. EUK-189 or EUK-207 also partly blocked OGD-induced ATP depletion and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) dephosphorylation, and completely eliminated reactive oxygen species generation. The MEK inhibitor U0126 applied together with EUK-189 or EUK-207 completely blocked ERK1/2 activation, but had no effect on their protective effects against OGD-induced LDH release. U0126 alone had no effect on OGD-induced LDH release. EUK-207 had no effect on OGD-induced p38 or c-Jun N-terminal kinase dephosphorylation, and when the p38 inhibitor SB203580 was applied together with EUK-207, it had no effect on the protective effects of EUK-207. SB203580 alone had no effect on OGD-induced LDH release either. In slices from p10 rats, OGD also induced high-LDH release that was partly reversed by EUK-207; however, neither OGD nor EUK-207 produced significant changes in ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation. OGD-induced spectrin degradation was not modified by EUK-189 or EUK-207 in slices from p10 or 2-month-old rats, suggesting that their protective effects was not mediated through

  2. Modulation of fatty acid synthase degradation by concerted action of p38 MAP kinase, E3 ligase COP1, and SH2-tyrosine phosphatase Shp2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jianxiu; Deng, Rong; Zhu, Helen H; Zhang, Sharon S; Zhu, Changhong; Montminy, Marc; Davis, Roger; Feng, Gen-Sheng

    2013-02-08

    The Src-homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 has been known to regulate various signaling pathways triggered by receptor and cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases. Here we describe a novel function of Shp2 in control of lipid metabolism by mediating degradation of fatty acid synthase (FASN). p38-phosphorylated COP1 accumulates in the cytoplasm and subsequently binds FASN through Shp2 here as an adapter, leading to FASN-Shp2-COP1 complex formation and FASN degradation mediated by ubiquitination pathway. By fasting p38 is activated and stimulates FASN protein degradation in mice. Consistently, the FASN protein levels are dramatically elevated in mouse liver and pancreas in which Shp2/Ptpn11 is selectively deleted. Thus, this study identifies a new activity for Shp2 in lipid metabolism.

  3. Pattern of MAP kinases p44/42 and JNK activation by non-lethal doses of tributyltin in human natural killer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aluoch, Aloice O. [Tennessee State University, Department of Biological Sciences, Nashville, TN (United States); Odman-Ghazi, Sabah O.; Whalen, Margaret M. [Tennessee State University, Department of Chemistry, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2007-04-15

    Tributyltin (TBT) has been shown to disrupt the ability of natural killer (NK) cells to destroy tumor targets in vitro even at exposures of 25 nM for 24 h, but cell viability was not significantly impacted. Thus, evaluation of intracellular molecular events that regulate cell viability in TBT exposed NK cells are of interest. It has been suggested that activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), may promote apoptosis while activation of the MAPK p44/42 may be crucial in mediating anti-apoptotic stimuli. However, it is well established that increases in pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family members, such as Bax, results in cell death. We have set out to study the effects of a range of TBT concentrations on the MAPKs, JNK and p44/42. Additionally, we examined the effects of TBT on the levels of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and p53 as well as anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. The results show that 300-25 nM TBT activated JNK within 10 min. MAPK p44/42 was also activated by 300-50 nM TBT within 10 min. These data show that while 300-200 nM TBT activates p44/42 significantly more than JNK, the pattern of 100-25 nM TBT activation of these MAPKs may be similar. TBT exposure alters neither pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and p53 nor anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 levels at any exposure studied. The results suggest that exposure to TBT activated the anti-apoptotic regulatory p44/42 pathway to a greater extent than the pro-apoptotic JNK pathway, which may explain to some extent how NK cell viability is maintained. (orig.)

  4. Expression of the MAP kinase phosphatase DUSP4 is associated with microsatellite instability in colorectal cancer (CRC) and causes increased cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröschl, Benedikt; Bettstetter, Marcus; Giedl, Christian; Woenckhaus, Matthias; Edmonston, Tina; Hofstädter, Ferdinand; Dietmaier, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    DUSP4 (MKP-2), a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase (MKP) family and potential tumor suppressor, negatively regulates the MAPKs (mitogen-activated protein kinases) ERK, p38 and JNK. MAPKs play a crucial role in cancer development and progression. Previously, using microarray analyses we found a conspicuously frequent overexpression of DUSP4 in colorectal cancer (CRC) with high frequent microsatellite instability (MSI-H) compared to microsatellite stable (MSS) CRC. Here we studied DUSP4 expression on mRNA level in 38 CRC (19 MSI-H and 19 MSS) compared to matched normal tissue as well as in CRC cell lines by RT-qPCR. DUSP4 was overexpressed in all 19 MSI-H tumors and in 14 MSS tumors. Median expression levels in MSI-H tumors were significantly higher than in MSS-tumors (p CRC cell lines showed 6.8-fold higher DUSP4 mRNA levels than MSS cell lines. DUSP4 expression was not regulated by promoter methylation since no methylation was found by quantitative methylation analysis of DUSP4 promoter in CRC cell lines neither in tumor samples. Furthermore, no DUSP4 mutation was found on genomic DNA level in four CRC cell lines. DUSP4 overexpression in CRC cell lines through DUSP4 transfection caused upregulated expression of MAPK targets CDC25A, CCND1, EGR1, FOS, MYC and CDKN1A in HCT116 as well as downregulation of mismatch repair gene MSH2 in SW480. Furthermore, DUSP4 overexpression led to increased proliferation in CRC cell lines. Our findings suggest that DUSP4 acts as an important regulator of cell growth within the MAPK pathway and causes enhanced cell growth in MSI-H CRC. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  5. Mapping the brain pathways of traumatic memory: inactivation of protein kinase M zeta in different brain regions disrupts traumatic memory processes and attenuates traumatic stress responses in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Hagit; Kozlovsky, Nitsan; Matar, Michael A; Kaplan, Zeev; Zohar, Joseph

    2010-04-01

    Protein kinase M zeta (PKMzeta), a constitutively active isoform of protein kinase C, has been implicated in protein synthesis-dependent maintenance of long-term potentiation and memory storage in the brain. Recent studies reported that local application of ZIP, a membrane-permeant PKMzeta inhibitor, into the insular cortex (IC) of behaving rats abolished long-term memory of taste associations. This study assessed the long-term effects of local applications of ZIP microinjected immediately (1 h) or 10 days after predator scent stress exposure, in a controlled prospectively designed animal model for PTSD. Four brain structures known to be involved in memory processes and in anxiety were investigated: lateral ventricle (LV), dorsal hippocampus (DH), basolateral amygdala and IC. The outcome measures included behavior in an elevated plus maze and acoustic startle response 7 days after microinjection, and freezing behavior upon exposure to trauma-related cue 8 days after microinjection. Previously acquired/encoded memories associated with the IC were also assessed. Inactivation of PKMzeta in the LV or DH within 1h of exposure effectively reduced PTSD-like behavioral disruption and trauma cue response 8 days later. Inactivation of PKMzeta 10 days after exposure had equivalent effects only when administered in the IC. The effect was demonstrated to be specific for trauma memories, whereas previously acquired data were unaffected by the procedure. Predator scent related memories are located in different brain areas at different times beginning with an initial hippocampus-dependent consolidation process, and are eventually stored in the IC. These bring the IC to the forefront as a potential region of significance in processes related to traumatic stress-induced disorders. 2010 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  6. Differential regulation of iron chelator-induced IL-8 synthesis via MAP kinase and NF-κB in immortalized and malignant oral keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hwa-Jeong; Lee, Jun; Lee, Sun-Kyung; Lee, Suk-Keun; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2007-01-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a cytokine that plays an important role in tumor progression in a variety of cancer types; however, its regulation is not well understood in oral cancer cells. In the present study, we examined the expression and mechanism of IL-8 in which it is involved by treating immortalized (IHOK) and malignant human oral keratinocytes (HN12) cells with deferoxamine (DFO). IL-8 production was measured by an enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays was used to determine NF-κB binding activity. Phosphorylation and degradation of the I-κB were analyized by Western blot. IHOK cells incubated with DFO showed increased expression of IL-8 mRNA, as well as higher release of the IL-8 protein. The up-regulation of DFO-induced IL-8 expression was higher in IHOK cells than in HN12 cells and was concentration-dependent. DFO acted additively with IL-1β to strongly up-regulate IL-8 in IHOK cells but not in HN12 cells. Accordingly, selective p38 and ERK1/2 inhibitors for both kinases abolished DFO-induced IL-8 expression in both IHOK and HN12 cells. Furthermore, DFO induced the degradation and phosphorylation of IκB, and activation of NF-κB. The IL-8 inducing effects of DFO were mediated by a nitric oxide donor (S-nitrosoglutathione), and by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, an inhibitor of NF-κB, as well as by wortmannin, which inhibits the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent activation of NAD(P)H oxidase. This results demonstrate that DFO-induced IL-8 acts via multiple signaling pathways in immortalized and malignant oral keratinocytes, and that the control of IL-8 may be an important target for immunotheraphy against human oral premalignant lesions

  7. 2,2',4,4'-Tetrachlorobiphenyl upregulates cyclooxygenase-2 in HL-60 cells via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and NF-κB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezdecny, Steven A.; Karmaus, Peer; Roth, Robert A.; Ganey, Patricia E.

    2007-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitous, persistent environmental contaminants that affect a number of cellular systems, including neutrophils. Among the effects caused by the noncoplanar PCB 2,2',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (2244-TCB) in granulocytic HL-60 cells are increases in superoxide anion production, activation of phospholipase A 2 with subsequent release of arachidonic acid (AA) and upregulation of the inflammatory gene cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The objective of this study was to determine the signal transduction pathways involved in the upregulation of COX-2 by 2244-TCB. Treatment of HL-60 cells with 2244-TCB led to increased expression of COX-2 mRNA. This increase was prevented by the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D in cells pretreated with 2244-TCB for 10 min. The increase in COX-2 mRNA was associated with release of 3 H-AA, phosphorylation of p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, increased levels of nuclear NF-κB and increased superoxide anion production. Bromoenol lactone, an inhibitor of the calcium-independent phospholipase A 2 , reduced 3 H-AA release but had no effect on COX-2 mRNA, protein or activity. Pretreatment with SB-202190 or SB-203580, inhibitors of the p38 MAP kinase pathway, prevented the 2244-TCB-mediated induction of COX-2 and phosphorylation of p38 and ERK MAP kinases. These inhibitors did not alter 3 H-AA release. Treatment with PD 98059 or U 0126, inhibitors of the MAP/ERK (MEK) pathway, prevented the 2244-TCB-mediated activation of ERK but had no effect on COX-2 induction or p38 phosphorylation. 2244-TCB treatment did not affect c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation. 2244-TCB exposure increased the amount of nuclear NF-κB. This increase was prevented by pretreatment with p38 MAP kinase inhibitors, but not by pretreatment with MEK inhibitors. Pretreatment with inhibitors of NF-κB prevented the 2244-TCB-mediated induction of COX-2 mRNA. 2244-TCB

  8. Chromosomal mapping and mutational analysis of the coding region of the glycogen synthase kinase-3alpha and beta isoforms in patients with NIDDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L; Arden, K C; Rasmussen, S B

    1997-01-01

    isoforms of GSK-3alpha and GSK-3beta in 72 NIDDM patients and 12 control subjects. No structural changes were detected apart from a few silent mutations. Mapping of the GSK-3alpha to chromosome 19q13.1-13.2 and the GSK-3beta to chromosome 3q13.3-q21 outside known genetic loci linked to NIDDM further makes...

  9. Socio-technical Issues for Ubiquitous Information Society in 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funabashi, Motohisa; Homma, Koichi; Sasaki, Toshiro; Sato, Yoshinori; Kido, Kunihiko; Fukumoto, Takashi; Yano, Koujin

    Impact of the ubiquitous information technology on our society is so significant that directing technological development and preparing institutional apparatus are quite important and urgent. The present paper elaborates, with the efforts by both humanity and engineering disciplines, to find out the socio-technical issues of ubiquitous information society in 2010 by inspecting social implications of emerging technology as well as social expectations. In order to deliberate the issues, scenarios are developed that describes possible life in ubiquitous information society. The derived issues cover integrating information technology and human body, producing smart sharable environment, protecting individual rights, fostering new service business, and forming community.

  10. USE OF UBIQUITOUS TECHNOLOGIES IN MILITARY LOGISTIC SYSTEM IN IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jafari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study is about integration and evaluation of RFID and ubiquitous technologies in military logistic system management. Firstly, supply chain management and the necessity of a revolution in logistic systems especially in military area, are explained. Secondly RFID and ubiquitous technologies and the advantages of their use in supply chain management are introduced. Lastly a system based on these technologies for controlling and increasing the speed and accuracy in military logistic system in Iran with its unique properties, is presented. The system is based on full control of military logistics (supplies from the time of deployment to replenishment using sensor network, ubiquitous and RFID technologies.

  11. Use of Ubiquitous Technologies in Military Logistic System in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, P.; Sadeghi-Niaraki, A.

    2013-09-01

    This study is about integration and evaluation of RFID and ubiquitous technologies in military logistic system management. Firstly, supply chain management and the necessity of a revolution in logistic systems especially in military area, are explained. Secondly RFID and ubiquitous technologies and the advantages of their use in supply chain management are introduced. Lastly a system based on these technologies for controlling and increasing the speed and accuracy in military logistic system in Iran with its unique properties, is presented. The system is based on full control of military logistics (supplies) from the time of deployment to replenishment using sensor network, ubiquitous and RFID technologies.

  12. Inhibition of MAP kinase promotes the recruitment of corepressor SMRT by tamoxifen-bound estrogen receptor alpha and potentiates tamoxifen action in MCF-7 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Wei; Chen, Linfeng; Li, Juan; Yao, Zhi

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), a ligand controlled transcription factor, plays an important role in breast cancer growth and endocrine therapy. Tamoxifen (TAM) antagonizes ERα activity and has been applied in breast cancer treatment. TAM-bound ERα associates with nuclear receptor-corepressors. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) has been elucidated to result in cross-talk between growth factor and ERα mediated signaling. We show that activated MAPK represses interaction of TAM-bound ERα with silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT) and inhibits the recruitment of SMRT by ERα to certain estrogen target genes. Blockade of MAPK signaling cascade with MEK inhibitor U0126 promotes the interaction and subsequently inhibits ERα activity via enhanced recruitment of SMRT, leading to reduced expression of ERα target genes. The growth rate of MCF-7 cells was decelerated when treated with both TAM and U0126. Moreover, the growth of MCF-7 cells stably expressing SMRT showed a robust repression in the presence of TAM and U0126. These results suggest that activated MAPK signaling cascade attenuates antagonist-induced recruitment of SMRT to ERα, suggesting corepressor mediates inhibition of ERα transactivation and breast cancer cell growth by antagonist. Taken together, our finding indicates combination of antagonist and MAPK inhibitor could be a helpful approach for breast cancer therapy.

  13. Deoxycholic acid and selenium metabolite methylselenol exert common and distinct effects on cell cycle, apoptosis, and MAP kinase pathway in HCT116 human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Botnen, James H; Briske-Anderson, Mary

    2010-01-01

    The cell growth inhibition induced by bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) may cause compensatory hyperproliferation of colonic epithelial cells and consequently increase colon cancer risk. On the other hand, there is increasing evidence for the efficacy of certain forms of selenium (Se) as anticancer nutrients. Methylselenol has been hypothesized to be a critical Se metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated that both DCA (75-300 micromol/l) and submicromolar methylselenol inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation by up to 64% and 63%, respectively. In addition, DCA and methylselenol each increased colon cancer cell apoptosis rate by up to twofold. Cell cycle analyses revealed that DCA induced an increase in only the G1 fraction with a concomitant drop in G2 and S-phase; in contrast, methylselenol led to an increase in the G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop only in the S-phase. Although both DCA and methylselenol significantly promoted apoptosis and inhibited cell growth, examination of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation showed that DCA, but not methylselenol, induced SAPK/JNK1/2, p38 MAPK, ERK1/2 activation. Thus, our data provide, for the first time, the molecular basis for opposite effects of methylselenol and DCA on colon tumorigenesis.

  14. Insulin increase in MAP kinase phosphorylation is shifted to early time-points by overexpressing APS, while Akt phosphorylation is not influenced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onnockx, Sheela; Xie, Jingwei; Degraef, Chantal; Erneux, Christophe; Pirson, Isabelle

    2009-09-10

    Upon insulin stimulation, the adaptor protein APS is recruited to the insulin receptor and tyrosine phosphorylated. APS initiates the insulin-induced TC10 cascade which participates to GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism that governs APS and its SH2 and PH domains action on the insulin transduction cascade is not yet fully understood. Here, we show that APS co-immunoprecipitates with the class I PI 3-kinase regulatory subunit p85, through its SH2 domain but that APS does not modulate neither PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 levels nor Akt phosphorylation provoked by insulin. We have confirmed a previously described positive effect of APS overexpression on insulin-induced MAPK phosphorylation upregulation. Consequently, we analyzed the role of SH2 and PH domains of APS in the APS increased MAPK phosphorylation observed upon insulin stimulation and correlated this with the membrane localization of the protein. The effect observed on MAPK phosphorylation requires the intact PH binding domain of APS as well as its SH2 domain.

  15. New functionalities in abundant element oxides: ubiquitous element strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosono, Hideo; Hayashi, Katsuro; Kamiya, Toshio; Atou, Toshiyuki; Susaki, Tomofumi

    2011-01-01

    While most ceramics are composed of ubiquitous elements (the ten most abundant elements within the Earth's crust), many advanced materials are based on rare elements. A 'rare-element crisis' is approaching owing to the imbalance between the limited supply of rare elements and the increasing demand. Therefore, we propose a 'ubiquitous element strategy' for materials research, which aims to apply abundant elements in a variety of innovative applications. Creation of innovative oxide materials and devices based on conventional ceramics is one specific challenge. This review describes the concept of ubiquitous element strategy and gives some highlights of our recent research on the synthesis of electronic, thermionic and structural materials using ubiquitous elements. (topical review)

  16. Awareness for Contextualized Digital Contents in Ubiquitous Learning Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Börner, D. (2009). Awareness for Contextualized Digital Contents in Ubiquitous Learning Environments. Presented at the Doctoral Consortium of the Fourth European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning (EC-TEL 2009). September, 29-October, 2, 2009, Nice, France.

  17. Mining the preferences of patients for ubiquitous clinic recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tin-Chih Toly; Chiu, Min-Chi

    2018-03-06

    A challenge facing all ubiquitous clinic recommendation systems is that patients often have difficulty articulating their requirements. To overcome this problem, a ubiquitous clinic recommendation mechanism was designed in this study by mining the clinic preferences of patients. Their preferences were defined using the weights in the ubiquitous clinic recommendation mechanism. An integer nonlinear programming problem was solved to tune the values of the weights on a rolling basis. In addition, since it may take a long time to adjust the values of weights to their asymptotic values, the back propagation network (BPN)-response surface method (RSM) method is applied to estimate the asymptotic values of weights. The proposed methodology was tested in a regional study. Experimental results indicated that the ubiquitous clinic recommendation system outperformed several existing methods in improving the successful recommendation rate.

  18. Disclosure of Personal Data in Ubiquitous Social Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sapuppo, Antonio

    users' privacy. Firstly, it updates the current privacy guidelines of ubiquitous computing by proposing four drawbacks to be avoided when designing for privacy in ubiquitous social networking environments. Secondly, this dissertation identifies and investigates the determinants that might influence......Ubiquitous social networking focuses on developing possible advantageous relationships such as friendships, partnerships and business relations in the physical world, by uncovering hidden connections that people share with others nearby. The foundation of these services is based on disclosure...... of personal information, which can provoke numerous accidental invasions of privacy. This dissertation contributes by addressing two problems, related to support of privacy-aware social networking in ubiquitous computing environments that focus on maximizing potential networking benefits while preserving...

  19. USE OF UBIQUITOUS TECHNOLOGIES IN MILITARY LOGISTIC SYSTEM IN IRAN

    OpenAIRE

    P. Jafari; A. Sadeghi-Niaraki

    2013-01-01

    This study is about integration and evaluation of RFID and ubiquitous technologies in military logistic system management. Firstly, supply chain management and the necessity of a revolution in logistic systems especially in military area, are explained. Secondly RFID and ubiquitous technologies and the advantages of their use in supply chain management are introduced. Lastly a system based on these technologies for controlling and increasing the speed and accuracy in military logistic system ...

  20. Cluster-based localization and tracking in ubiquitous computing systems

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez-de Dios, José Ramiro; Torres-González, Arturo; Ollero, Anibal

    2017-01-01

    Localization and tracking are key functionalities in ubiquitous computing systems and techniques. In recent years a very high variety of approaches, sensors and techniques for indoor and GPS-denied environments have been developed. This book briefly summarizes the current state of the art in localization and tracking in ubiquitous computing systems focusing on cluster-based schemes. Additionally, existing techniques for measurement integration, node inclusion/exclusion and cluster head selection are also described in this book.

  1. Human p38δ MAP kinase mediates UV irradiation induced up-regulation of the gene expression of chemokine BRAK/CXCL14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Shigeyuki; Ito, Shin; Kato, Yasumasa; Kubota, Eiro; Hata, Ryu-Ichiro

    2010-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family comprises ERK, JNK, p38 and ERK5 (big-MAPK, BMK1). UV irradiation of squamous cell carcinoma cells induced up-regulation of gene expression of chemokine BRAK/CXCL14, stimulated p38 phosphorylation, and down-regulated the phosphorylation of ERK. Human p38 MAPKs exist in 4 isoforms: p38α, β, γ and δ. The UV stimulation of p38 phosphorylation was not inhibited by the presence of SB203580 or PD169316, inhibitors of p38α and β, suggesting p38 phosphorylation was not dependent on these 2 isoforms and that p38γ and/or δ was responsible for the phosphorylation. In fact, inhibition of each of these 4 p38 isoforms by the introduction of short hairpin (sh) RNAs for respective isoforms revealed that only shRNA for p38δ attenuated the UV-induced up-regulation of BRAK/CXCL14 gene expression. In addition, over-expression of p38 isoforms in the cells showed the association of p38δ with ERK1 and 2, concomitant with down-regulation of ERK phosphorylation. The usage of p38δ isoform by UV irradiation is not merely due to the abundance of this p38 isoform in the cells. Because serum deprivation of the cells also induced an increase in BRAK/CXCL14 gene expression, and in this case p38α and/or β isoform is responsible for up-regulation of BRAK/CXCL14 gene expression. Taken together, the data indicate that the respective stress-dependent action of p38 isoforms is responsible for the up-regulation of the gene expression of the chemokine BRAK/CXCL14.

  2. Dietary turmeric modulates DMBA-induced p21ras, MAP kinases and AP-1/NF-κB pathway to alter cellular responses during hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, Rachana; Ingle, Arvind; Maru, Girish

    2008-01-01

    The chemopreventive efficacy of turmeric has been established in experimental systems. However, its mechanism(s) of action are not fully elucidated in vivo. The present study investigates the mechanism of turmeric-mediated chemoprevention in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis at 2, 4, 6, 10 and 12 weeks. Dietary turmeric (1%) led to decrease in DMBA-induced tumor burden and multiplicity, and enhanced the latency period in parallel, to its modulatory effects on oncogene products and various cellular responses during HBP tumorigenesis. DMBA-induced expression of ras oncogene product, p21 and downstream target, the mitogen-activated protein kinases were significantly decreased by turmeric during HBP carcinogenesis. Turmeric also diminished the DMBA-induced mRNA expression of proto-oncogenes (c-jun, c-fos) and NF-κB, leading to decreased protein levels and in further attenuation of DMBA-induced AP-1/NF-κB DNA-binding in the buccal pouch nuclear extracts. Besides, buccal pouch of hamsters receiving turmeric diet showed significant alterations in DMBA-induced effects: (a) decrease in cell proliferation (diminished PCNA and Bcl2 expression), (b) enhanced apoptosis (increased expression of Bax, caspase-3 and apoptotic index), (c) decrease in inflammation (levels of Cox-2, the downstream target of AP-1/NF-κB, and PGE2) and (d) aberrant expression of differentiation markers, the cytokeratins (1, 5, 8, and 18). Together, the protective effects of dietary turmeric converge on augmenting apoptosis of the initiated cells and decreasing cell proliferation in DMBA-treated animals, which in turn, is reflected in decreased tumor burden, multiplicity and enhanced latency period. Some of these biomarkers are likely to be helpful in monitoring clinical trials and evaluating drug effect measurements

  3. Fine mapping of a dominantly inherited powdery mildew resistance major-effect QTL, Pm1.1, in cucumber identifies a 41.1 kb region containing two tandemly arrayed cysteine-rich receptor-like protein kinase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuewen; Yu, Ting; Xu, Ruixue; Shi, Yang; Lin, Xiaojian; Xu, Qiang; Qi, Xiaohua; Weng, Yiqun; Chen, Xuehao

    2016-03-01

    A dominantly inherited major-effect QTL for powdery mildew resistance in cucumber was fine mapped. Two tandemly arrayed cysteine-rich receptor-like protein kinase genes were identified as the most possible candidates. Powdery mildew (PM) is one of the most severe fungal diseases of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) and other cucurbit crops, but the molecular genetic mechanisms of powdery mildew resistance in cucurbits are still poorly understood. In this study, through marker-assisted backcrossing with an elite cucumber inbred line, D8 (PM susceptible), we developed a single-segment substitution line, SSSL0.7, carrying 95 kb fragment from PM resistance donor, Jin5-508, that was defined by two microsatellite markers, SSR16472 and SSR16881. A segregating population with 3600 F2 plants was developed from the SSSL0.7 × D8 mating; segregation analysis confirmed a dominantly inherited major-effect QTL, Pm1.1 in cucumber chromosome 1 underlying PM resistance in SSSL0.7. New molecular markers were developed through exploring the next generation resequenced genomes of Jin5-508 and D8. Linkage analysis and QTL mapping in a subset of the F2 plants delimited the Pm1.1 locus into a 41.1 kb region, in which eight genes were predicted. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed that two concatenated genes, Csa1M064780 and Csa1M064790 encoding the same function of a cysteine-rich receptor-like protein kinase, were the most likely candidate genes. GFP fusion protein-aided subcellular localization indicated that both candidate genes were located in the plasma membrane, but Csa1M064780 was also found in the nucleus. This is the first report of dominantly inherited PM resistance in cucumber. Results of this study will provide new insights into understanding the phenotypic and genetic mechanisms of PM resistance in cucumber. This work should also facilitate marker-assisted selection in cucumber breeding for PM resistance.

  4. The Cek1‑mediated MAP kinase pathway regulates exposure of α‑1,2 and β‑1,2‑mannosides in the cell wall of Candida albicans modulating immune recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román, E; Correia, I; Salazin, A; Fradin, C; Jouault, T; Poulain, D; Liu, F-T; Pla, J

    2016-07-03

    The Cek1 MAP kinase (MAPK) mediates vegetative growth and cell wall biogenesis in the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Alterations in the fungal cell wall caused by a defective Cek1‑mediated signaling pathway leads to increased β‑1,3‑glucan exposure influencing dectin‑1 fungal recognition by immune cells. We show here that cek1 cells also display an increased exposure of α‑1,2 and β‑1,2‑mannosides (α‑M and β‑M), a phenotype shared by strains defective in the activating MAPKK Hst7, suggesting a general defect in cell wall assembly. cek1 cells display walls with loosely bound material as revealed by transmission electron microscopy and are sensitive to tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N‑glycosylation. Transcriptomal analysis of tunicamycin treated cells revealed a differential pattern between cek1 and wild type cells which involved mainly cell wall and stress related genes. Mapping α‑M and β‑M epitopes in the mannoproteins of different cell wall fractions (CWMP) revealed an important shift in the molecular weight of the mannan derived from mutants defective in this MAPK pathway. We have also assessed the role of galectin‑3, a member of a β‑galactoside‑binding protein family shown to bind to and kill C. albicans through β‑M recognition, in the infection caused by cek1 mutants. Increased binding of cek1 to murine macrophages was shown to be partially blocked by lactose. Galectin-3(-/-) mice showed increased resistance to fungal infection, although galectin-3 did not account for the reduced virulence of cek1 mutants in a mouse model of systemic infection. All these data support a role for the Cek1‑mediated pathway in fungal cell wall maintenance, virulence and antifungal discovery.

  5. Trust information-based privacy architecture for ubiquitous health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruotsalainen, Pekka Sakari; Blobel, Bernd; Seppälä, Antto; Nykänen, Pirkko

    2013-10-08

    Ubiquitous health is defined as a dynamic network of interconnected systems that offers health services independent of time and location to a data subject (DS). The network takes place in open and unsecure information space. It is created and managed by the DS who sets rules that regulate the way personal health information is collected and used. Compared to health care, it is impossible in ubiquitous health to assume the existence of a priori trust between the DS and service providers and to produce privacy using static security services. In ubiquitous health features, business goals and regulations systems followed often remain unknown. Furthermore, health care-specific regulations do not rule the ways health data is processed and shared. To be successful, ubiquitous health requires novel privacy architecture. The goal of this study was to develop a privacy management architecture that helps the DS to create and dynamically manage the network and to maintain information privacy. The architecture should enable the DS to dynamically define service and system-specific rules that regulate the way subject data is processed. The architecture should provide to the DS reliable trust information about systems and assist in the formulation of privacy policies. Furthermore, the architecture should give feedback upon how systems follow the policies of DS and offer protection against privacy and trust threats existing in ubiquitous environments. A sequential method that combines methodologies used in system theory, systems engineering, requirement analysis, and system design was used in the study. In the first phase, principles, trust and privacy models, and viewpoints were selected. Thereafter, functional requirements and services were developed on the basis of a careful analysis of existing research published in journals and conference proceedings. Based on principles, models, and requirements, architectural components and their interconnections were developed using system

  6. Geraniol attenuates 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in mouse skin: possible role of p38 MAP Kinase and NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Khan, Rehan; Qamar, Wajhul; Lateef, Abdul; Rehman, Muneeb U; Tahir, Mir; Ali, Farrah; Hamiza, Oday O; Hasan, Syed Kazim; Sultana, Sarwat

    2013-06-01

    Abnormal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and proinflammatory cytokines often act as trigger for development of most of the chronic human diseases including cancer via up-regulation of transcription factors and activation of MAP kinases. We investigated the protective effects of geraniol (GOH) against 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) induced oxidative and inflammatory responses, expression of p38MAPK, NF-κB and COX-2 in mouse skin. Animals were divided into four groups I-IV (n=6). Group II and III received topical application of TPA at the dose of 10 nmol/0.2 ml of acetone/animal/day, for two days. Group III was pre-treated with GOH (250 μg) topically 30 min prior to each TPA administration. While group I and IV were given acetone (0.2 ml) and GOH respectively. Our results show that GOH significantly inhibited TPA induced lipid peroxidation (LPO), inflammatory responses, proinflammatory cytokine release, up regulates reduced glutathione (GSH) content and the activity of different antioxidant enzymes. Interestingly, GOH also inhibited TPA induced altered activity of p38MAPK. Further, TPA induced altered expression of NF-κB (p65) and COX-2 was also attenuated by GOH. Thus, our results suggest that GOH attenuates early tumor promotional changes, and it may serve as one of the various ways to prevent carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Long-term potentiation in the CA1 hippocampus induced by NR2A subunit-containing NMDA glutamate receptors is mediated by Ras-GRF2/Erk map kinase signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-xue Jin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs are major contributors to long-term potentiation (LTP, a form of synaptic plasticity implicated in the process of learning and memory. These receptors consist of calcium-permeating NR1 and multiple regulatory NR2 subunits. A majority of studies show that both NR2A and NR2B-containing NMDARs can contribute to LTP, but their unique contributions to this form of synaptic plasticity remain poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we show that NR2A and NR2B-containing receptors promote LTP differently in the CA1 hippocampus of 1-month old mice, with the NR2A receptors functioning through Ras-GRF2 and its downstream effector, Erk Map kinase, and NR2B receptors functioning independently of these signaling molecules. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates that NR2A-, but not NR2B, containing NMDA receptors induce LTP in pyramidal neurons of the CA1 hippocampus from 1 month old mice through Ras-GRF2 and Erk. This difference add new significance to the observation that the relative levels of these NMDAR subtypes is regulated in neurons, such that NR2A-containing receptors become more prominent late in postnatal development, after sensory experience and synaptic activity.

  8. An improved anonymous authentication scheme for roaming in ubiquitous networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hakjun; Lee, Donghoon; Moon, Jongho; Jung, Jaewook; Kang, Dongwoo; Kim, Hyoungshick; Won, Dongho

    2018-01-01

    With the evolution of communication technology and the exponential increase of mobile devices, the ubiquitous networking allows people to use our data and computing resources anytime and everywhere. However, numerous security concerns and complicated requirements arise as these ubiquitous networks are deployed throughout people's lives. To meet the challenge, the user authentication schemes in ubiquitous networks should ensure the essential security properties for the preservation of the privacy with low computational cost. In 2017, Chaudhry et al. proposed a password-based authentication scheme for the roaming in ubiquitous networks to enhance the security. Unfortunately, we found that their scheme remains insecure in its protection of the user privacy. In this paper, we prove that Chaudhry et al.'s scheme is vulnerable to the stolen-mobile device and user impersonation attacks, and its drawbacks comprise the absence of the incorrect login-input detection, the incorrectness of the password change phase, and the absence of the revocation provision. Moreover, we suggest a possible way to fix the security flaw in Chaudhry et al's scheme by using the biometric-based authentication for which the bio-hash is applied in the implementation of a three-factor authentication. We prove the security of the proposed scheme with the random oracle model and formally verify its security properties using a tool named ProVerif, and analyze it in terms of the computational and communication cost. The analysis result shows that the proposed scheme is suitable for resource-constrained ubiquitous environments.

  9. Internet messenger based smart virtual class learning using ubiquitous computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umam, K.; Mardi, S. N. S.; Hariadi, M.

    2017-06-01

    Internet messenger (IM) has become an important educational technology component in college education, IM makes it possible for students to engage in learning and collaborating at smart virtual class learning (SVCL) using ubiquitous computing. However, the model of IM-based smart virtual class learning using ubiquitous computing and empirical evidence that would favor a broad application to improve engagement and behavior are still limited. In addition, the expectation that IM based SVCL using ubiquitous computing could improve engagement and behavior on smart class cannot be confirmed because the majority of the reviewed studies followed instructions paradigms. This article aims to present the model of IM-based SVCL using ubiquitous computing and showing learners’ experiences in improved engagement and behavior for learner-learner and learner-lecturer interactions. The method applied in this paper includes design process and quantitative analysis techniques, with the purpose of identifying scenarios of ubiquitous computing and realize the impressions of learners and lecturers about engagement and behavior aspect and its contribution to learning

  10. An improved anonymous authentication scheme for roaming in ubiquitous networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakjun Lee

    Full Text Available With the evolution of communication technology and the exponential increase of mobile devices, the ubiquitous networking allows people to use our data and computing resources anytime and everywhere. However, numerous security concerns and complicated requirements arise as these ubiquitous networks are deployed throughout people's lives. To meet the challenge, the user authentication schemes in ubiquitous networks should ensure the essential security properties for the preservation of the privacy with low computational cost. In 2017, Chaudhry et al. proposed a password-based authentication scheme for the roaming in ubiquitous networks to enhance the security. Unfortunately, we found that their scheme remains insecure in its protection of the user privacy. In this paper, we prove that Chaudhry et al.'s scheme is vulnerable to the stolen-mobile device and user impersonation attacks, and its drawbacks comprise the absence of the incorrect login-input detection, the incorrectness of the password change phase, and the absence of the revocation provision. Moreover, we suggest a possible way to fix the security flaw in Chaudhry et al's scheme by using the biometric-based authentication for which the bio-hash is applied in the implementation of a three-factor authentication. We prove the security of the proposed scheme with the random oracle model and formally verify its security properties using a tool named ProVerif, and analyze it in terms of the computational and communication cost. The analysis result shows that the proposed scheme is suitable for resource-constrained ubiquitous environments.

  11. Constitutive Activity in an Ancestral Form of Abl Tyrosine Kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadat U Aleem

    Full Text Available The c-abl proto-oncogene encodes a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that is found in all metazoans, and is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian tissues. The Abl tyrosine kinase plays important roles in the regulation of mammalian cell physiology. Abl-like kinases have been identified in the genomes of unicellular choanoflagellates, the closest relatives to the Metazoa, and in related unicellular organisms. Here, we have carried out the first characterization of a premetazoan Abl kinase, MbAbl2, from the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis. The enzyme possesses SH3, SH2, and kinase domains in a similar arrangement to its mammalian counterparts, and is an active tyrosine kinase. MbAbl2 lacks the N-terminal myristoylation and cap sequences that are critical regulators of mammalian Abl kinase activity, and we show that MbAbl2 is constitutively active. When expressed in mammalian cells, MbAbl2 strongly phosphorylates cellular proteins on tyrosine, and transforms cells much more potently than mammalian Abl kinase. Thus, MbAbl2 appears to lack the autoinhibitory mechanism that tightly constrains the activity of mammalian Abl kinases, suggesting that this regulatory apparatus arose more recently in metazoan evolution.

  12. Mobile, ubiquitous, and pervasive learning fundaments, applications, and trends

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book is concerned with the mobile, ubiquitous, and pervasive learning arena. It present a collection of works corresponding to four categories: reviews, studies, conceptual proposals, and approaches. As a result of the submission and revision processes eight manuscripts were accepted and organized into the aforementioned four parts as follows: ·Review: a couple of chapters offer a survey of related works. One concerns with the diversity of mobile, ubiquitous, and pervasive labor, where interested findings are unveiled based on correlations. Other focuses on adaptive and adaptable architectures that are suitable to implement ubiquitous learning sceneries, whose contribution represents a model of a domain specific architecture. ·Studies: two chapters explore issues related to the effect of question styles made through smartphones and tablets, and the disposition of teachers to exploit mobile devices at classroom. ·Conceptual: a pair of chapters offer a given proposal, the first to develop adaptive mobil...

  13. A model for ubiquitous care of noncommunicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianna, Henrique Damasceno; Barbosa, Jorge Luis Victória

    2014-09-01

    The ubiquitous computing, or ubicomp, is a promising technology to help chronic diseases patients managing activities, offering support to them anytime, anywhere. Hence, ubicomp can aid community and health organizations to continuously communicate with patients and to offer useful resources for their self-management activities. Communication is prioritized in works of ubiquitous health for noncommunicable diseases care, but the management of resources is not commonly employed. We propose the UDuctor, a model for ubiquitous care of noncommunicable diseases. UDuctor focuses the resources offering, without losing self-management and communication supports. We implemented a system and applied it in two practical experiments. First, ten chronic patients tried the system and filled out a questionnaire based on the technology acceptance model. After this initial evaluation, an alpha test was done. The system was used daily for one month and a half by a chronic patient. The results were encouraging and show potential for implementing UDuctor in real-life situations.

  14. Navigation studies based on the ubiquitous positioning technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lei; Mi, Weijie; Wang, Defeng

    2007-11-01

    This paper summarized the nowadays positioning technologies, such as absolute positioning methods and relative positioning methods, indoor positioning and outdoor positioning, active positioning and passive positioning. Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) technologies were introduced as the omnipresent out-door positioning technologies, including GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BD-1/2. After analysis of the shortcomings of GNSS, indoor positioning technologies were discussed and compared, including A-GPS, Cellular network, Infrared, Electromagnetism, Computer Vision Cognition, Embedded Pressure Sensor, Ultrasonic, RFID (Radio Frequency IDentification), Bluetooth, WLAN etc.. Then the concept and characteristics of Ubiquitous Positioning was proposed. After the ubiquitous positioning technologies contrast and selection followed by system engineering methodology, a navigation system model based on Incorporate Indoor-Outdoor Positioning Solution was proposed. And this model was simulated in the Galileo Demonstration for World Expo Shanghai project. In the conclusion, the prospects of ubiquitous positioning based navigation were shown, especially to satisfy the public location information acquiring requirement.

  15. Integrated Environment for Ubiquitous Healthcare and Mobile IPv6 Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagalaban, Giovanni; Kim, Seoksoo

    The development of Internet technologies based on the IPv6 protocol will allow real-time monitoring of people with health deficiencies and improve the independence of elderly people. This paper proposed a ubiquitous healthcare system for the personalized healthcare services with the support of mobile IPv6 networks. Specifically, this paper discusses the integration of ubiquitous healthcare and wireless networks and its functional requirements. This allow an integrated environment where heterogeneous devices such a mobile devices and body sensors can continuously monitor patient status and communicate remotely with healthcare servers, physicians, and family members to effectively deliver healthcare services.

  16. Privacy-related context information for ubiquitous health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppälä, Antto; Nykänen, Pirkko; Ruotsalainen, Pekka

    2014-03-11

    Ubiquitous health has been defined as a dynamic network of interconnected systems. A system is composed of one or more information systems, their stakeholders, and the environment. These systems offer health services to individuals and thus implement ubiquitous computing. Privacy is the key challenge for ubiquitous health because of autonomous processing, rich contextual metadata, lack of predefined trust among participants, and the business objectives. Additionally, regulations and policies of stakeholders may be unknown to the individual. Context-sensitive privacy policies are needed to regulate information processing. Our goal was to analyze privacy-related context information and to define the corresponding components and their properties that support privacy management in ubiquitous health. These properties should describe the privacy issues of information processing. With components and their properties, individuals can define context-aware privacy policies and set their privacy preferences that can change in different information-processing situations. Scenarios and user stories are used to analyze typical activities in ubiquitous health to identify main actors, goals, tasks, and stakeholders. Context arises from an activity and, therefore, we can determine different situations, services, and systems to identify properties for privacy-related context information in information-processing situations. Privacy-related context information components are situation, environment, individual, information technology system, service, and stakeholder. Combining our analyses and previously identified characteristics of ubiquitous health, more detailed properties for the components are defined. Properties define explicitly what context information for different components is needed to create context-aware privacy policies that can control, limit, and constrain information processing. With properties, we can define, for example, how data can be processed or how components

  17. A Survey of Service Composition Mechanisms in Ubiquitous Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønsted, Jeppe; Hansen, Klaus Marius; Ingstrup, Mads

    2007-01-01

    Composition of services, i.e., providing new services by combining existing ones, is a pervasive idea in ubiquitous computing. We surveyed the field by looking at what features are actually present in technologies that support service composition in some form. Condensing this into a list...... of features allowed us to discuss the qualitative merits and drawbacks of various approaches to service composition, focusing in particular on usability, adaptability and efficiency. Moreover, we found that further research is needed into quality-of-service assurance of composites and into contingency...... management for composites—one of the concerns differentiating service composition in ubiquitous computing from its counterpart in less dynamic settings....

  18. Privacy-Related Context Information for Ubiquitous Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykänen, Pirkko; Ruotsalainen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    Background Ubiquitous health has been defined as a dynamic network of interconnected systems. A system is composed of one or more information systems, their stakeholders, and the environment. These systems offer health services to individuals and thus implement ubiquitous computing. Privacy is the key challenge for ubiquitous health because of autonomous processing, rich contextual metadata, lack of predefined trust among participants, and the business objectives. Additionally, regulations and policies of stakeholders may be unknown to the individual. Context-sensitive privacy policies are needed to regulate information processing. Objective Our goal was to analyze privacy-related context information and to define the corresponding components and their properties that support privacy management in ubiquitous health. These properties should describe the privacy issues of information processing. With components and their properties, individuals can define context-aware privacy policies and set their privacy preferences that can change in different information-processing situations. Methods Scenarios and user stories are used to analyze typical activities in ubiquitous health to identify main actors, goals, tasks, and stakeholders. Context arises from an activity and, therefore, we can determine different situations, services, and systems to identify properties for privacy-related context information in information-processing situations. Results Privacy-related context information components are situation, environment, individual, information technology system, service, and stakeholder. Combining our analyses and previously identified characteristics of ubiquitous health, more detailed properties for the components are defined. Properties define explicitly what context information for different components is needed to create context-aware privacy policies that can control, limit, and constrain information processing. With properties, we can define, for example, how

  19. Ubiquitous Learning Ecologies for a Critical Cyber-Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez-Gutiérrez, Enrique; Díaz-Nafría, José-María

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this research is to identify and analyse the ubiquitous learning acquired through blending education settings devoted to the "lifelong training of trainers" and how these contribute to the development of a conscious, critic and engaged citizenship. Through active exploration of the learning process, the study analyses the…

  20. Multimedia Adaptation in Ubiquitous Environments: Benefits of Structured Multimedia Documents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago); I. Vaishnavi (Ishan); R. Kernchen; S. Meissner; M. Boussard; A. Spedalieri; B. Gao (Bo); D.C.A. Bulterman (Dick)

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractThis paper demonstrates the advantages of using structured multimedia documents for session management and media distribution in ubiquitous environments. We show how document manipulations can be used to perform powerful operations such as content to context adaptation and presentation

  1. Noise and Vibration Risk Prevention Virtual Web for Ubiquitous Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redel-Macías, María Dolores; Cubero-Atienza, Antonio J.; Martínez-Valle, José Miguel; Pedrós-Pérez, Gerardo; del Pilar Martínez-Jiménez, María

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new Web portal offering experimental labs for ubiquitous training of university engineering students in work-related risk prevention. The Web-accessible computer program simulates the noise and machine vibrations met in the work environment, in a series of virtual laboratories that mimic an actual laboratory and provide the…

  2. Dynamic Service Discovery and Composition for Ubiquitous Networks Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonino da Silva Santos, L.O.; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Ferreira Pires, Luis

    2006-01-01

    The realization of ubiquitous networks brings new challenges to application development. In this kind of network, services and, more specifically web services, have been used to provide the functionality required by its users and applications. In such environments features like automatic service

  3. A survey on web modeling approaches for ubiquitous web applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwinger, W.; Retschitzegger, W.; Schauerhuber, A.; Kappel, G.; Wimmer, M.; Pröll, B.; Cachero Castro, C.; Casteleyn, S.; De Troyer, O.; Fraternali, P.; Garrigos, I.; Garzotto, F.; Ginige, A.; Houben, G.J.P.M.; Koch, N.; Moreno, N.; Pastor, O.; Paolini, P.; Pelechano Ferragud, V.; Rossi, G.; Schwabe, D.; Tisi, M.; Vallecillo, A.; Sluijs, van der K.A.M.; Zhang, G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – Ubiquitous web applications (UWA) are a new type of web applications which are accessed in various contexts, i.e. through different devices, by users with various interests, at anytime from anyplace around the globe. For such full-fledged, complex software systems, a methodologically sound

  4. Twenty-First Century Learning: Communities, Interaction and Ubiquitous Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leh, Amy S.C.; Kouba, Barbara; Davis, Dirk

    2005-01-01

    Advanced technology makes 21st century learning, communities and interactions unique and leads people to an era of ubiquitous computing. The purpose of this article is to contribute to the discussion of learning in the 21st century. The paper will review literature on learning community, community learning, interaction, 21st century learning and…

  5. Ubiquitous Computing--Are We Crazy? Point/Counterpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Scott W.; Horn, Patricia S.

    2005-01-01

    The push for ubiquitous computing (UC) relies on an understandable and well-intentioned belief that teaching and schooling need to be transformed. This view appears credible based on large-scale criteria, such as test scores relative to other countries, drop-out rates, and economic changes. And the use of technology to achieve this goal is…

  6. Commentary: Ubiquitous Computing Revisited--A New Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Glen; Garofalo, Joe

    2006-01-01

    In 2002, representatives from the teacher educator associations representing the core content areas (science, mathematics, language arts, and social studies) and educational technology met at the National Technology Leadership Retreat (NTLR) to discuss potential implications of ubiquitous computing for K-12 schools. This paper re-examines some of…

  7. Mobile Computing and Ubiquitous Networking: Concepts, Technologies and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Samuel

    2001-01-01

    Analyzes concepts, technologies and challenges related to mobile computing and networking. Defines basic concepts of cellular systems. Describes the evolution of wireless technologies that constitute the foundations of mobile computing and ubiquitous networking. Presents characterization and issues of mobile computing. Analyzes economical and…

  8. Awareness for Contextualized Digital Contents in Ubiquitous Learning Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Specht, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    Börner, D., & Specht, M. (2009). Awareness for Contextualized Digital Contents in Ubiquitous Learning Environments. Proceedings of the Doctoral Consortium of the Fourth European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning (EC-TEL 2009). September, 29-October, 2, 2009, Nice, France. [unpublished

  9. Privacy context model for dynamic privacy adaptation in ubiquitous computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaub, Florian; Koenings, Bastian; Dietzel, Stefan; Weber, M.; Kargl, Frank

    Ubiquitous computing is characterized by the merger of physical and virtual worlds as physical artifacts gain digital sensing, processing, and communication capabilities. Maintaining an appropriate level of privacy in the face of such complex and often highly dynamic systems is challenging. We argue

  10. An improved anonymous authentication scheme for roaming in ubiquitous networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hakjun; Lee, Donghoon; Moon, Jongho; Jung, Jaewook; Kang, Dongwoo; Kim, Hyoungshick

    2018-01-01

    With the evolution of communication technology and the exponential increase of mobile devices, the ubiquitous networking allows people to use our data and computing resources anytime and everywhere. However, numerous security concerns and complicated requirements arise as these ubiquitous networks are deployed throughout people’s lives. To meet the challenge, the user authentication schemes in ubiquitous networks should ensure the essential security properties for the preservation of the privacy with low computational cost. In 2017, Chaudhry et al. proposed a password-based authentication scheme for the roaming in ubiquitous networks to enhance the security. Unfortunately, we found that their scheme remains insecure in its protection of the user privacy. In this paper, we prove that Chaudhry et al.’s scheme is vulnerable to the stolen-mobile device and user impersonation attacks, and its drawbacks comprise the absence of the incorrect login-input detection, the incorrectness of the password change phase, and the absence of the revocation provision. Moreover, we suggest a possible way to fix the security flaw in Chaudhry et al’s scheme by using the biometric-based authentication for which the bio-hash is applied in the implementation of a three-factor authentication. We prove the security of the proposed scheme with the random oracle model and formally verify its security properties using a tool named ProVerif, and analyze it in terms of the computational and communication cost. The analysis result shows that the proposed scheme is suitable for resource-constrained ubiquitous environments. PMID:29505575

  11. Type IV pilins regulate their own expression via direct intramembrane interactions with the sensor kinase PilS

    OpenAIRE

    Kilmury, Sara L. N.; Burrows, Lori L.

    2016-01-01

    Although two-component systems are a ubiquitous means of rapid bacterial adaptation to changing environments, identification of the specific signals detected by sensor kinases can be challenging. Also, little is known about the diverse, poorly characterized family of sensor kinases that detect intramembrane signals. We show that the major type IV pilin, PilA, is an inhibitory intramembrane ligand for the PilS sensor kinase that controls pilA expression and we characterize the mechanism of sig...

  12. Distributed Monocular SLAM for Indoor Map Building

    OpenAIRE

    Ruwan Egodagamage; Mihran Tuceryan

    2017-01-01

    Utilization and generation of indoor maps are critical elements in accurate indoor tracking. Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) is one of the main techniques for such map generation. In SLAM an agent generates a map of an unknown environment while estimating its location in it. Ubiquitous cameras lead to monocular visual SLAM, where a camera is the only sensing device for the SLAM process. In modern applications, multiple mobile agents may be involved in the generation of such maps,...

  13. An abundance of ubiquitously expressed genes revealed by tissue transcriptome sequence data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ramsköld

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The parts of the genome transcribed by a cell or tissue reflect the biological processes and functions it carries out. We characterized the features of mammalian tissue transcriptomes at the gene level through analysis of RNA deep sequencing (RNA-Seq data across human and mouse tissues and cell lines. We observed that roughly 8,000 protein-coding genes were ubiquitously expressed, contributing to around 75% of all mRNAs by message copy number in most tissues. These mRNAs encoded proteins that were often intracellular, and tended to be involved in metabolism, transcription, RNA processing or translation. In contrast, genes for secreted or plasma membrane proteins were generally expressed in only a subset of tissues. The distribution of expression levels was broad but fairly continuous: no support was found for the concept of distinct expression classes of genes. Expression estimates that included reads mapping to coding exons only correlated better with qRT-PCR data than estimates which also included 3' untranslated regions (UTRs. Muscle and liver had the least complex transcriptomes, in that they expressed predominantly ubiquitous genes and a large fraction of the transcripts came from a few highly expressed genes, whereas brain, kidney and testis expressed more complex transcriptomes with the vast majority of genes expressed and relatively small contributions from the most expressed genes. mRNAs expressed in brain had unusually long 3'UTRs, and mean 3'UTR length was higher for genes involved in development, morphogenesis and signal transduction, suggesting added complexity of UTR-based regulation for these genes. Our results support a model in which variable exterior components feed into a large, densely connected core composed of ubiquitously expressed intracellular proteins.

  14. Towards ubiquitous access of computer-assisted surgery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Lufei, Hanping; Shi, Weishong; Chaudhary, Vipin

    2006-01-01

    Traditional stand-alone computer-assisted surgery (CAS) systems impede the ubiquitous and simultaneous access by multiple users. With advances in computing and networking technologies, ubiquitous access to CAS systems becomes possible and promising. Based on our preliminary work, CASMIL, a stand-alone CAS server developed at Wayne State University, we propose a novel mobile CAS system, UbiCAS, which allows surgeons to retrieve, review and interpret multimodal medical images, and to perform some critical neurosurgical procedures on heterogeneous devices from anywhere at anytime. Furthermore, various optimization techniques, including caching, prefetching, pseudo-streaming-model, and compression, are used to guarantee the QoS of the UbiCAS system. UbiCAS enables doctors at remote locations to actively participate remote surgeries, share patient information in real time before, during, and after the surgery.

  15. Design requirements for ubiquitous computing environments for healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bång, Magnus; Larsson, Anders; Eriksson, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    Ubiquitous computing environments can support clinical administrative routines in new ways. The aim of such computing approaches is to enhance routine physical work, thus it is important to identify specific design requirements. We studied healthcare professionals in an emergency room and developed the computer-augmented environment NOSTOS to support teamwork in that setting. NOSTOS uses digital pens and paper-based media as the primary input interface for data capture and as a means of controlling the system. NOSTOS also includes a digital desk, walk-up displays, and sensor technology that allow the system to track documents and activities in the workplace. We propose a set of requirements and discuss the value of tangible user interfaces for healthcare personnel. Our results suggest that the key requirements are flexibility in terms of system usage and seamless integration between digital and physical components. We also discuss how ubiquitous computing approaches like NOSTOS can be beneficial in the medical workplace.

  16. Network architecture test-beds as platforms for ubiquitous computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscoe, Timothy

    2008-10-28

    Distributed systems research, and in particular ubiquitous computing, has traditionally assumed the Internet as a basic underlying communications substrate. Recently, however, the networking research community has come to question the fundamental design or 'architecture' of the Internet. This has been led by two observations: first, that the Internet as it stands is now almost impossible to evolve to support new functionality; and second, that modern applications of all kinds now use the Internet rather differently, and frequently implement their own 'overlay' networks above it to work around its perceived deficiencies. In this paper, I discuss recent academic projects to allow disruptive change to the Internet architecture, and also outline a radically different view of networking for ubiquitous computing that such proposals might facilitate.

  17. A Client-Server System for Ubiquitous Video Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronit Nossenson

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we introduce a simple client-server system architecture and algorithms for ubiquitous live video and VOD service support. The main features of the system are: efficient usage of network resources, emphasis on user personalization, and ease of implementation. The system supports many continuous service requirements such as QoS provision, user mobility between networks and between different communication devices, and simultaneous usage of a device by a number of users.

  18. I WHATSAPP AN IGUANA: AN ATTEMPT TO APPLY UBIQUITOUS LEARNING

    OpenAIRE

    Dwi Haryanti

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims at presenting how Whatsapp provides alternative method to enhance writing skills on personal letter for senior high school student. This method Whatsapps inspired by the concept called ubiquitous learning (U-Learning), which means ―learning supported by ICT resources held anytime, anywhere and fits the context of the learner‖ (de Sousa Monteiro et al., 2014). Participants were 40 11-th grade students in one class in Cirebon High School. A short story in the form of personal le...

  19. Application of ubiquitous computing in personal health monitoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, C; Grossmann, U; Stork, W; Müller-Glaser, K D

    2002-01-01

    A possibility to significantly reduce the costs of public health systems is to increasingly use information technology. The Laboratory for Information Processing Technology (ITIV) at the University of Karlsruhe is developing a personal health monitoring system, which should improve health care and at the same time reduce costs by combining micro-technological smart sensors with personalized, mobile computing systems. In this paper we present how ubiquitous computing theory can be applied in the health-care domain.

  20. Development of Wearable Systems for Ubiquitous Healthcare Service Provisioning

    OpenAIRE

    Ogunduyile, O.O.; Olugbara, O.O.; Lall, M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a wearable system using wireless biomedical sensors for ubiquitous healthcare service provisioning. The prototype system is developed to address current healthcare challenges such as increasing cost of services, inability to access diverse services, low quality services and increasing population of elderly as experienced globally. The biomedical sensors proactively collect physiological data of remote patients to recommend diagnostic services. The prot...

  1. Thymidine kinases in archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, A.R.; Matakos, A.; Sandrini, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-six fully sequenced archaeal genomes were searched for genes coding for putative deoxyribonucleoside kinases (dNKs). We identified only 5 human-like thymidine kinase 1 genes (TK1s) and none for non-TK1 kinases. Four TK1s were identified in the Euryarchaea and one was found in the Crenarcha...

  2. Modeling mechanisms of susceptibility in vitro: Differential activation of the MAP kinase ERK, but not p38, mediates variability and adaptation in the pro-inflammatory response to ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozone is a ubiquitous ambient air pollutant that causes pulmonary inflammation upon exposure. The ozone-induced inflammatory response varies by orders of magnitude and the range of variation in “healthy” individuals extends beyond that of “susceptible” po...

  3. Alexithymia in anorexia and bulimia: Ubiquitous and primary trait?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Amianto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alexithymia is associated to Eating Disorders (ED and relevant for their prognosis but it is uncertain if it is ubiquitous, primary and necessary for ED outburst. Methods: 124 ED outpatients and 80 healthy controls were compared with the Toronto Alexithymia Scale, personality and psychopathology measures. Alexithymia and the other features are compared between anorexia nervosa (AN, bulimia nervosa (BN and control groups. Alexithymia-based clusters were explored and compared with controls. Alexithymia traits are correlated with the other features. Results: Difficulty in identifying feelings was ubiquitous in ED subjects. A Non-Alexithymic Cluster (NAC and an Alexithymic Cluster (ALC were found with no difference in AN/BN distribution. ALC displays disordered personality and high psychopathology. Self-directiveness and interoceptive awareness were independently related to alexithymia and to depressive feelings. These two features along with depressive features completely accounted for alexithymia variance. Conclusion: even though the difficulty in identifying feelings is ubiquitous in ED subjects, Alexithymia may not represent a primary trait but a complex dysfunction consequent to co-occurring character immaturity, altered interoceptive awareness, and depressive traits.

  4. Ubiquitous mobile knowledge construction in collaborative learning environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloian, Nelson; Zurita, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge management is a critical activity for any organization. It has been said to be a differentiating factor and an important source of competitiveness if this knowledge is constructed and shared among its members, thus creating a learning organization. Knowledge construction is critical for any collaborative organizational learning environment. Nowadays workers must perform knowledge creation tasks while in motion, not just in static physical locations; therefore it is also required that knowledge construction activities be performed in ubiquitous scenarios, and supported by mobile and pervasive computational systems. These knowledge creation systems should help people in or outside organizations convert their tacit knowledge into explicit knowledge, thus supporting the knowledge construction process. Therefore in our understanding, we consider highly relevant that undergraduate university students learn about the knowledge construction process supported by mobile and ubiquitous computing. This has been a little explored issue in this field. This paper presents the design, implementation, and an evaluation of a system called MCKC for Mobile Collaborative Knowledge Construction, supporting collaborative face-to-face tacit knowledge construction and sharing in ubiquitous scenarios. The MCKC system can be used by undergraduate students to learn how to construct knowledge, allowing them anytime and anywhere to create, make explicit and share their knowledge with their co-learners, using visual metaphors, gestures and sketches to implement the human-computer interface of mobile devices (PDAs).

  5. DMP: Detouring Using Multiple Paths against Jamming Attack for Ubiquitous Networking System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihui Kim

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available To successfully realize the ubiquitous network environment including home automation or industrial control systems, it is important to be able to resist a jamming attack. This has recently been considered as an extremely threatening attack because it can collapse the entire network, despite the existence of basic security protocols such as encryption and authentication. In this paper, we present a method of jamming attack tolerant routing using multiple paths based on zones. The proposed scheme divides the network into zones, and manages the candidate forward nodes of neighbor zones. After detecting an attack, detour nodes decide zones for rerouting, and detour packets destined for victim nodes through forward nodes in the decided zones. Simulation results show that our scheme increases the PDR (Packet Delivery Ratio and decreases the delay significantly in comparison with rerouting by a general routing protocol on sensor networks, AODV (Ad hoc On Demand Distance Vector, and a conventional JAM (Jammed Area Mapping service with one reroute.

  6. DMP: detouring using multiple paths against jamming attack for ubiquitous networking system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mihui; Chae, Kijoon

    2010-01-01

    To successfully realize the ubiquitous network environment including home automation or industrial control systems, it is important to be able to resist a jamming attack. This has recently been considered as an extremely threatening attack because it can collapse the entire network, despite the existence of basic security protocols such as encryption and authentication. In this paper, we present a method of jamming attack tolerant routing using multiple paths based on zones. The proposed scheme divides the network into zones, and manages the candidate forward nodes of neighbor zones. After detecting an attack, detour nodes decide zones for rerouting, and detour packets destined for victim nodes through forward nodes in the decided zones. Simulation results show that our scheme increases the PDR (Packet Delivery Ratio) and decreases the delay significantly in comparison with rerouting by a general routing protocol on sensor networks, AODV (Ad hoc On Demand Distance Vector), and a conventional JAM (Jammed Area Mapping) service with one reroute.

  7. The Impact of Ubiquitous Technologies on the Art Museum as Urban [Political] Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Mogens; Søndergaard, Morten

    art practice. Our hypothesis is that these new domains have a more general existence and ’profile’ in the paradigm of media art – even though the following is based on the process of creating the ‘MAP – Media Art Platform’ at the Museum of Contemporary Art (MFSK) in Roskilde, Denmark, between 2005...... and 2008, a process in which we both were involved as media artist and media art curator, respectively. Our focus in this article is to investigate further the status of these new competencies and roles, and to ask: what are these new domains that emerge with regard to the artist, the software developer......The Museum is part of a ubiquitous framing of cultural production and a common, urban (political) space. In later years, technology has enhanced the ubiquity, as well as challenged the foundation of, the Museum. From this enhancement and challenge, which is transforming the museum itself, new...

  8. Damage-induced DNA replication stalling relies on MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köpper, Frederik; Bierwirth, Cathrin; Schön, Margarete

    2013-01-01

    knockdown of the MAP kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2), a kinase currently implicated in p38 stress signaling and G2 arrest. Depletion or inhibition of MK2 also protected cells from DNA damage-induced cell death, and mice deficient for MK2 displayed decreased apoptosis in the skin upon UV irradiation...

  9. Staphylococcal PknB as the First Prokaryotic Representative of the Proline-Directed Kinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, Malgorzata; Donat, Stefanie; Rakette, Sonja; Stehle, Thilo; Kouwen, Thijs R. H. M.; Diks, Sander H.; Dreisbach, Annette; Reilman, Ewoud; Gronau, Katrin; Becher, Doerte; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Ohlsen, Knut

    2010-01-01

    In eukaryotic cell types, virtually all cellular processes are under control of proline-directed kinases and especially MAP kinases. Serine/threonine kinases in general were originally considered as a eukaryote-specific enzyme family. However, recent studies have revealed that orthologues of

  10. Suppression of inflammatory and infection responses in lung macrophages by eucalyptus oil and its constituent 1,8-cineole: Role of pattern recognition receptors TREM-1 and NLRP3, the MAP kinase regulator MKP-1, and NFκB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niket Yadav

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus oil (EO used in traditional medicine continues to prove useful for aroma therapy in respiratory ailments; however, there is a paucity of information on its mechanism of action and active components. In this direction, we investigated EO and its dominant constituent 1,8-cineole (eucalyptol using the murine lung alveolar macrophage (AM cell line MH-S. In an LPS-induced AM inflammation model, pre-treatment with EO significantly reduced (P ≤0.01or 0.05 the pro-inflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-1 (α and β, and NO, albeit at a variable rate and extent; 1,8-cineole diminished IL-1 and IL-6. In a mycobacterial-infection AM model, EO pre-treatment or post-treatment significantly enhanced (P ≤0.01 the phagocytic activity and pathogen clearance. 1,8-cineole also significantly enhanced the pathogen clearance though the phagocytic activity was not significantly altered. EO or 1,8-cineole pre-treatment attenuated LPS-induced inflammatory signaling pathways at various levels accompanied by diminished inflammatory response. Among the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs involved in LPS signaling, the TREM pathway surface receptor (TREM-1 was significantly downregulated. Importantly, the pre-treatments significantly downregulated (P ≤0.01 the intracellular PRR receptor NLRP3 of the inflammasome, which is consistent with the decrease in IL-1β secretion. Of the shared downstream signaling cascade for these PRR pathways, there was significant attenuation of phosphorylation of the transcription factor NF-κB and p38 (but increased phosphorylation of the other two MAP kinases, ERK1/2 and JNK1/2. 1,8-cineole showed a similar general trend except for an opposite effect on NF-κB and JNK1/2. In this context, either pre-treatment caused a significant downregulation of MKP-1 phosphatase, a negative regulator of MAPKs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory activity of EO and 1,8-cineole is modulated via selective downregulation

  11. Stress-induced activation of protein kinase CK2 by direct interaction with p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sayed, M; Kim, S O; Salh, B S

    2000-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 has been implicated in the regulation of a wide range of proteins that are important in cell proliferation and differentiation. Here we demonstrate that the stress signaling agents anisomycin, arsenite, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulate the specific enzyme activity of CK2...... in the human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells by up to 8-fold, and this could be blocked by the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580. We show that p38alpha MAP kinase, in a phosphorylation-dependent manner, can directly interact with the alpha and beta subunits of CK2 to activate the holoenzyme through what appears...

  12. Some guidelines for the ethical development of ubiquitous computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Adam

    2008-10-28

    At a time when both the landscape of everyday life and the choices available to us there are increasingly conditioned by ubiquitous information processing systems, it seems wise to articulate some general principles guiding their ethical design and deployment. I here enunciate five broad guidelines for the designers of such systems, including recommendations that they be devised in such a way as to default to harmlessness, be conservative of time, be conservative of face, be self-disclosing and be deniable. I conclude with some observations about the likelihood of any such principles winning usefully widespread voluntary adherence.

  13. Observations on sustainable and ubiquitous healthcare informatics from Florence Nightingale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Helen J; Wright, Graham

    2009-01-01

    As nurses around the world prepare to celebrate the centenary of the death of Florence Nightingale in 2010 this paper reviews her work on using information, especially statistics, to analyze and manage patient care and links that to current developments in informatics. It then examines assistive technologies and how they may impact on nursing practice in the future and links these developments to the writings of Florence Nightingale. The paper concludes by suggesting that in progressing towards sustainable and ubiquitous healthcare informatics we need to study history in order to learn from the lessons of Florence Nightingale and other healthcare pioneers.

  14. A proposal of an open ubiquitous fuzzy computing system for Ambient Intelligence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acampora, G.; Loia, V.; Lee, R.S.T.; Lioa, V.

    2007-01-01

    Ambient Intelligence (AmI) is considered as the composition of three emergent technologies: Ubiquitous Computing, Ubiquitous Communication and Intelligent User Interfaces. The aim of integration of aforesaid technologies is to make wider the interaction between human beings and information

  15. Datenschutz- und Medizinprodukterecht bei Ubiquitous Computing-Anwendungen im Gesundheitssektor / Data protection and medical product law with respect to medical ubiquitous computing applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skistims, Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With respect to ubiquitous computing there is a great potential of application, particularly in medicine and health care. This work deals with the legal problems which ubiquitous computing is facing in these areas. At the beginning, issues with respect to data protection and professional secrecy are treated. Afterwards the problem of applicability of medical product law for medical ubiquitous computing applications as well as the resulting requirements for manufactures, operators and users will be discussed.

  16. CyberPsychological Computation on Social Community of Ubiquitous Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xuan; Dai, Genghui; Huang, Shuang; Sun, Xuemin; Hu, Feng; Hu, Hongzhi; Ivanović, Mirjana

    2015-01-01

    Under the modern network environment, ubiquitous learning has been a popular way for people to study knowledge, exchange ideas, and share skills in the cyberspace. Existing research findings indicate that the learners' initiative and community cohesion play vital roles in the social communities of ubiquitous learning, and therefore how to stimulate the learners' interest and participation willingness so as to improve their enjoyable experiences in the learning process should be the primary consideration on this issue. This paper aims to explore an effective method to monitor the learners' psychological reactions based on their behavioral features in cyberspace and therefore provide useful references for adjusting the strategies in the learning process. In doing so, this paper firstly analyzes the psychological assessment of the learners' situations as well as their typical behavioral patterns and then discusses the relationship between the learners' psychological reactions and their observable features in cyberspace. Finally, this paper puts forward a CyberPsychological computation method to estimate the learners' psychological states online. Considering the diversity of learners' habitual behaviors in the reactions to their psychological changes, a BP-GA neural network is proposed for the computation based on their personalized behavioral patterns. PMID:26557846

  17. Distributed user interfaces for clinical ubiquitous computing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bång, Magnus; Larsson, Anders; Berglund, Erik; Eriksson, Henrik

    2005-08-01

    Ubiquitous computing with multiple interaction devices requires new interface models that support user-specific modifications to applications and facilitate the fast development of active workspaces. We have developed NOSTOS, a computer-augmented work environment for clinical personnel to explore new user interface paradigms for ubiquitous computing. NOSTOS uses several devices such as digital pens, an active desk, and walk-up displays that allow the system to track documents and activities in the workplace. We present the distributed user interface (DUI) model that allows standalone applications to distribute their user interface components to several devices dynamically at run-time. This mechanism permit clinicians to develop their own user interfaces and forms to clinical information systems to match their specific needs. We discuss the underlying technical concepts of DUIs and show how service discovery, component distribution, events and layout management are dealt with in the NOSTOS system. Our results suggest that DUIs--and similar network-based user interfaces--will be a prerequisite of future mobile user interfaces and essential to develop clinical multi-device environments.

  18. Non-Orthogonal Multiple Access for Ubiquitous Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Asim; Seet, Boon-Chong; Ding, Zhiguo

    2018-02-08

    Ubiquitous wireless sensor networks (UWSNs) have become a critical technology for enabling smart cities and other ubiquitous monitoring applications. Their deployment, however, can be seriously hampered by the spectrum available to the sheer number of sensors for communication. To support the communication needs of UWSNs without requiring more spectrum resources, the power-domain non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) technique originally proposed for 5th Generation (5G) cellular networks is investigated for UWSNs for the first time in this paper. However, unlike 5G networks that operate in the licensed spectrum, UWSNs mostly operate in unlicensed spectrum where sensors also experience cross-technology interferences from other devices sharing the same spectrum. In this paper, we model the interferences from various sources at the sensors using stochastic geometry framework. To evaluate the performance, we derive a theorem and present new closed form expression for the outage probability of the sensors in a downlink scenario under interference limited environment. In addition, diversity analysis for the ordered NOMA users is performed. Based on the derived outage probability, we evaluate the average link throughput and energy consumption efficiency of NOMA against conventional orthogonal multiple access (OMA) technique in UWSNs. Further, the required computational complexity for the NOMA users is presented.

  19. Toward ubiquitous healthcare services with a novel efficient cloud platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chenguang; Fan, Xiaomao; Li, Ye

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitous healthcare services are becoming more and more popular, especially under the urgent demand of the global aging issue. Cloud computing owns the pervasive and on-demand service-oriented natures, which can fit the characteristics of healthcare services very well. However, the abilities in dealing with multimodal, heterogeneous, and nonstationary physiological signals to provide persistent personalized services, meanwhile keeping high concurrent online analysis for public, are challenges to the general cloud. In this paper, we proposed a private cloud platform architecture which includes six layers according to the specific requirements. This platform utilizes message queue as a cloud engine, and each layer thereby achieves relative independence by this loosely coupled means of communications with publish/subscribe mechanism. Furthermore, a plug-in algorithm framework is also presented, and massive semistructure or unstructured medical data are accessed adaptively by this cloud architecture. As the testing results showing, this proposed cloud platform, with robust, stable, and efficient features, can satisfy high concurrent requests from ubiquitous healthcare services.

  20. Ubiquitous Supervisory System Based on Social Contexts Using Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Izumi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available As described in this paper, we propose a supervisory system that considers actual situations and social aspects of users in a ubiquitous computing environment. To realize gentle and safe supervision while providing efficient supervisory services, the system must recognize the situations of a watched person, such as the person's physical condition. To achieve this, we have proposed a ubiquitous supervisory system "uEyes", which introduces Social Context Awareness: a distinguishing feature for supervision. Using this feature, the system can combine environmental information acquired from sensors in the real world and common-sense knowledge related to human activities in daily life. As described in this paper, we specifically examine design of Social Context Awareness using ontology technologies. Based on this advanced feature, a live video streaming system is configured autonomously depending on the users' circumstances in runtime. We implemented a uEyes prototype for supervising elderly people and performed some experiments based on several scenarios. Based on those experimental results, we confirmed that the social contexts are handled effectively to support the supervision.

  1. After Installation: Ubiquitous Computing and High School Science in Three Experienced, High-Technology Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drayton, Brian; Falk, Joni K.; Stroud, Rena; Hobbs, Kathryn; Hammerman, James

    2010-01-01

    There are few studies of the impact of ubiquitous computing on high school science, and the majority of studies of ubiquitous computing report only on the early stages of implementation. The present study presents data on 3 high schools with carefully elaborated ubiquitous computing systems that have gone through at least one "obsolescence cycle"…

  2. Role and regulation of 90 kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) in signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frödin, M; Gammeltoft, S

    1999-01-01

    ), which were among the first substrates of ERK to be discovered and which has proven to be a ubiquitous and versatile mediator of ERK signal transduction. RSK is composed of two functional kinase domains that are activated in a sequential manner by a series of phosphorylations. Recently, a family of RSK......-related kinases that are activated by ERK as well as p38 MAPK were discovered and named mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinases (MSK). A number of cellular functions of RSK have been proposed. (1) Regulation of gene expression via association and phosphorylation of transcriptional regulators including c...

  3. Role of the mixed-lineage protein kinase pathway in the metabolic stress response to obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Kant, Shashi; Barrett, Tamera; Vertii, Anastassiia; Noh, Yun Hee; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jason K.; Davis, Roger J.

    2013-01-01

    Saturated free fatty acid (FFA) is implicated in the metabolic response to obesity. In vitro studies indicate that FFA signaling may be mediated by the mixed-lineage protein kinase (MLK) pathway that activates cJun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK). Here, we examined the role of the MLK pathway in vivo using a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. The ubiquitously expressed MLK2 and MLK3 protein kinases have partially redundant functions. We therefore compared wild-type and compound mutant mice that l...

  4. Angiotensin II regulation of neuromodulation: downstream signaling mechanism from activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, D; Yang, H; Raizada, M K

    1996-12-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) stimulates expression of tyrosine hydroxylase and norepinephrine transporter genes in brain neurons; however, the signal-transduction mechanism is not clearly defined. This study was conducted to determine the involvement of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling pathway in Ang II stimulation of these genes. MAP kinase was localized in the perinuclear region of the neuronal soma. Ang II caused activation of MAP kinase and its subsequent translocation from the cytoplasmic to nuclear compartment, both effects being mediated by AT1 receptor subtype. Ang II also stimulated SRE- and AP1-binding activities and fos gene expression and its translocation in a MAP kinase-dependent process. These observations are the first demonstration of a downstream signaling pathway involving MAP kinase in Ang II-mediated neuromodulation in noradrenergic neurons.

  5. Ubiquitous Emergency Medical Service System Based on Wireless Biosensors, Traffic Information, and Wireless Communication Technologies: Development and Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan-Hsu Tan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a new ubiquitous emergency medical service system (UEMS that consists of a ubiquitous tele-diagnosis interface and a traffic guiding subsystem. The UEMS addresses unresolved issues of emergency medical services by managing the sensor wires for eliminating inconvenience for both patients and paramedics in an ambulance, providing ubiquitous accessibility of patients’ biosignals in remote areas where the ambulance cannot arrive directly, and offering availability of real-time traffic information which can make the ambulance reach the destination within the shortest time. In the proposed system, patient’s biosignals and real-time video, acquired by wireless biosensors and a webcam, can be simultaneously transmitted to an emergency room for pre-hospital treatment via WiMax/3.5 G networks. Performances of WiMax and 3.5 G, in terms of initialization time, data rate, and average end-to-end delay are evaluated and compared. A driver can choose the route of the shortest time among the suggested routes by Google Maps after inspecting the current traffic conditions based on real-time CCTV camera streams and traffic information. The destination address can be inputted vocally for easiness and safety in driving. A series of field test results validates the feasibility of the proposed system for application in real-life scenarios.

  6. Mapping strengths into virtues: The relation of the 24 VIA-strengths to six ubiquitous virtues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willibald eRuch

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Values-in-Action (VIA-classification distinguishes six core virtues and 24 strengths. As the assignment of the strengths to the virtues was done on theoretical grounds it still needs empirical verification. As an alternative to factor analytic investigations the present study utilizes expert judgments. In a pilot study the conceptual overlap among five sources of knowledge (strength’s name including synonyms, short definitions, brief descriptions, longer theoretical elaborations, and item content about a particular strength was examined. The results show that the five sources converged quite well, with the short definitions and the items being slightly different from the other. All strengths exceeded a cut-off value but the convergence was much better for some strengths (e.g., zest than for others (e.g., perspective. In the main study 70 experts (from psychology, philosophy, theology, etc. and 41 laypersons rated how prototypical the strengths are for each of the six virtues. The results showed that 10 were very good markers for their virtues, 9 were good markers, four were acceptable markers, and only one strength failed to reach the cut-off score for its assigned virtue. However, strengths were often markers for two or even three virtues, and occasionally they marked the other virtue more strongly than the one they were assigned to. The virtue prototypicality ratings were slightly positively correlated with higher coefficients being found for justice and humanity. A factor analysis of the 24 strengths across the ratings yielded the six factors with an only slightly different composition of strengths and double loadings. It is proposed to adjust either the classification (by reassigning strengths and by allowing strengths to be subsumed under more than one virtue or to change the definition of certain strengths so that they only exemplify one virtue. The results are discussed in the context of factor analytic attempts to verify the structural model.

  7. Muscle phosphorylase kinase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C; Echaniz-Laguna, A

    2012-01-01

    To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD).......To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD)....

  8. Decentralized Sensor Fusion for Ubiquitous Networking Robotics in Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfeliu, Alberto; Andrade-Cetto, Juan; Barbosa, Marco; Bowden, Richard; Capitán, Jesús; Corominas, Andreu; Gilbert, Andrew; Illingworth, John; Merino, Luis; Mirats, Josep M.; Moreno, Plínio; Ollero, Aníbal; Sequeira, João; Spaan, Matthijs T.J.

    2010-01-01

    In this article we explain the architecture for the environment and sensors that has been built for the European project URUS (Ubiquitous Networking Robotics in Urban Sites), a project whose objective is to develop an adaptable network robot architecture for cooperation between network robots and human beings and/or the environment in urban areas. The project goal is to deploy a team of robots in an urban area to give a set of services to a user community. This paper addresses the sensor architecture devised for URUS and the type of robots and sensors used, including environment sensors and sensors onboard the robots. Furthermore, we also explain how sensor fusion takes place to achieve urban outdoor execution of robotic services. Finally some results of the project related to the sensor network are highlighted. PMID:22294927

  9. Empowering Pre-Service Teachers to Produce Ubiquitous Flipped Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya García-Sánchez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on technological and educational outcomes that resulted from the production of foreign language educational videos by 90 pre-service instructors enrolled in an official Master’s Degree in Secondary Education programme. This teaching practice, conducted during two consecutive years, was set in a ubiquitous learning environment with the intention of effectively linking digital technology with pedagogy by means of producing flipped classroom units. The findings reveal that these pre-service teachers successfully combined instructional dynamics with digital skills to produce flipped classes adapted to the young generation’s needs. The classroom becomes, therefore, a more participatory learner-centred scenario with a variety of interactive and collaborative activities performed by foreign language students.

  10. Unfolding and Refolding Embodiment into the Landscape of Ubiquitous Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schick, Lea; Malmborg, Lone

    2009-01-01

    This paper advocates the future of the body as a distributed and shared embodiment; an unfolded body that doesn’t end at one's skin, but emerges as intercorporeality between bodies and the technological environment. Looking at new tendencies within interaction design and ubiquitous computing to see...... how these are to an increasing extent focusing on sociality, context-awareness, relations, affects, connectedness, and collectivity we will examine how these new technological movements can change our perception of embodiment towards a distributed and shared one. By examining interactive textiles...... as part of a future rising landscape of multi-sensory networks we will exemplify how the new technologies can shutter dichotomies and challenge traditional notions of embodiment and the subject. Finally, we show how this ‘new embodiment’ manifests Deleuze’s philosophy of the body as something unstable...

  11. Quasistatic Cavity Resonance for Ubiquitous Wireless Power Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabalko, Matthew J; Shahmohammadi, Mohsen; Sample, Alanson P

    2017-01-01

    Wireless power delivery has the potential to seamlessly power our electrical devices as easily as data is transmitted through the air. However, existing solutions are limited to near contact distances and do not provide the geometric freedom to enable automatic and un-aided charging. We introduce quasistatic cavity resonance (QSCR), which can enable purpose-built structures, such as cabinets, rooms, and warehouses, to generate quasistatic magnetic fields that safely deliver kilowatts of power to mobile receivers contained nearly anywhere within. A theoretical model of a quasistatic cavity resonator is derived, and field distributions along with power transfer efficiency are validated against measured results. An experimental demonstration shows that a 54 m3 QSCR room can deliver power to small coil receivers in nearly any position with 40% to 95% efficiency. Finally, a detailed safety analysis shows that up to 1900 watts can be transmitted to a coil receiver enabling safe and ubiquitous wireless power.

  12. Quasistatic Cavity Resonance for Ubiquitous Wireless Power Transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Chabalko

    Full Text Available Wireless power delivery has the potential to seamlessly power our electrical devices as easily as data is transmitted through the air. However, existing solutions are limited to near contact distances and do not provide the geometric freedom to enable automatic and un-aided charging. We introduce quasistatic cavity resonance (QSCR, which can enable purpose-built structures, such as cabinets, rooms, and warehouses, to generate quasistatic magnetic fields that safely deliver kilowatts of power to mobile receivers contained nearly anywhere within. A theoretical model of a quasistatic cavity resonator is derived, and field distributions along with power transfer efficiency are validated against measured results. An experimental demonstration shows that a 54 m3 QSCR room can deliver power to small coil receivers in nearly any position with 40% to 95% efficiency. Finally, a detailed safety analysis shows that up to 1900 watts can be transmitted to a coil receiver enabling safe and ubiquitous wireless power.

  13. Quasistatic Cavity Resonance for Ubiquitous Wireless Power Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmohammadi, Mohsen; Sample, Alanson P.

    2017-01-01

    Wireless power delivery has the potential to seamlessly power our electrical devices as easily as data is transmitted through the air. However, existing solutions are limited to near contact distances and do not provide the geometric freedom to enable automatic and un-aided charging. We introduce quasistatic cavity resonance (QSCR), which can enable purpose-built structures, such as cabinets, rooms, and warehouses, to generate quasistatic magnetic fields that safely deliver kilowatts of power to mobile receivers contained nearly anywhere within. A theoretical model of a quasistatic cavity resonator is derived, and field distributions along with power transfer efficiency are validated against measured results. An experimental demonstration shows that a 54 m3 QSCR room can deliver power to small coil receivers in nearly any position with 40% to 95% efficiency. Finally, a detailed safety analysis shows that up to 1900 watts can be transmitted to a coil receiver enabling safe and ubiquitous wireless power. PMID:28199321

  14. Decentralized Sensor Fusion for Ubiquitous Networking Robotics in Urban Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aníbal Ollero

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article we explain the architecture for the environment and sensors that has been built for the European project URUS (Ubiquitous Networking Robotics in Urban Sites, a project whose objective is to develop an adaptable network robot architecture for cooperation between network robots and human beings and/or the environment in urban areas. The project goal is to deploy a team of robots in an urban area to give a set of services to a user community. This paper addresses the sensor architecture devised for URUS and the type of robots and sensors used, including environment sensors and sensors onboard the robots. Furthermore, we also explain how sensor fusion takes place to achieve urban outdoor execution of robotic services. Finally some results of the project related to the sensor network are highlighted.

  15. A Survey of Software Infrastructures and Frameworks for Ubiquitous Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Endres

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this survey, we discuss 29 software infrastructures and frameworks which support the construction of distributed interactive systems. They range from small projects with one implemented prototype to large scale research efforts, and they come from the fields of Augmented Reality (AR, Intelligent Environments, and Distributed Mobile Systems. In their own way, they can all be used to implement various aspects of the ubiquitous computing vision as described by Mark Weiser [60]. This survey is meant as a starting point for new projects, in order to choose an existing infrastructure for reuse, or to get an overview before designing a new one. It tries to provide a systematic, relatively broad (and necessarily not very deep overview, while pointing to relevant literature for in-depth study of the systems discussed.

  16. Mobile-PKI Service Model for Ubiquitous Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeun, Inkyung; Chun, Kilsoo

    One of the most important things in PKI(Public Key Infrastructure) is the private key management issue. The private key must be deal with safely for secure PKI service. Even though PKI service is usually used for identification and authentication of user in e-commerce, PKI service has many inconvenient factors. Especially, the fact that storage media of private key for PKI service is limited to PC hard disk drive or smart card users must always carry, gives an inconvenience to user and is not suitable in ubiquitous network. This paper suggests the digital signature service using a mobile phone(m-PKI service) which is suitable in future network. A mobile phone is the most widely used for personal communication means and has a characteristic of high movability. We can use the PKI service anytime and anywhere using m-PKI.

  17. Transparency of intentions decreases privacy concerns in ubiquitous surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulasvirta, Antti; Suomalainen, Tiia; Hamari, Juho; Lampinen, Airi; Karvonen, Kristiina

    2014-10-01

    An online experiment (n=1,897) was carried out to understand how data disclosure practices in ubiquitous surveillance affect users' privacy concerns. Information about the identity and intentions of a data collector was manipulated in hypothetical surveillance scenarios. Privacy concerns were found to differ across the scenarios and moderated by knowledge about the collector's identity and intentions. Knowledge about intentions exhibited a stronger effect. When no information about intentions was disclosed, the respondents postulated negative intentions. A positive effect was found for disclosing neutral intentions of an organization or unknown data collector, but not for a private data collector. The findings underline the importance of disclosing intentions of data use to users in an easily understandable manner.

  18. A Comprehensive Ubiquitous Healthcare Solution on an Android™ Mobile Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Cheng Hii

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Provision of ubiquitous healthcare solutions which provide healthcare services at anytime anywhere has become more favorable nowadays due to the emphasis on healthcare awareness and also the growth of mobile wireless technologies. Following this approach, an Android™ smart phone device is proposed as a mobile monitoring terminal to observe and analyze ECG (electrocardiography waveforms from wearable ECG devices in real time under the coverage of a wireless sensor network (WSN. The exploitation of WSN in healthcare is able to substitute the complicated wired technology, moving healthcare away from a fixed location setting. As an extension to the monitoring scheme, medicine care is taken into consideration by utilizing the mobile phone as a barcode decoder, to verify and assist out-patients in the medication administration process, providing a better and more comprehensive healthcare service.

  19. Successful enrichment of the ubiquitous freshwater acI Actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Sarahi L; McMahon, Katherine D; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Warnecke, Falk

    2014-02-01

    Actinobacteria of the acI lineage are often the numerically dominant bacterial phylum in surface freshwaters, where they can account for > 50% of total bacteria. Despite their abundance, there are no described isolates. In an effort to obtain enrichment of these ubiquitous freshwater Actinobacteria, diluted freshwater samples from Lake Grosse Fuchskuhle, Germany, were incubated in 96-well culture plates. With this method, a successful enrichment containing high abundances of a member of the lineage acI was established. Phylogenetic classification showed that the acI Actinobacteria of the enrichment belonged to the acI-B2 tribe, which seems to prefer acidic lakes. This enrichment grows to low cell densities and thus the oligotrophic nature of acI-B2 was confirmed. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Growth- and Stress-Induced PASTA Kinase Phosphorylation in Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbe, Benjamin D; Kristich, Christopher J

    2017-11-01

    Transmembrane Ser/Thr kinases containing extracellular PASTA domains are ubiquitous among Actinobacteria and Firmicutes Such PASTA kinases regulate critical processes, including antibiotic resistance, cell division, toxin production, and virulence, and are essential for viability in certain organisms. Based on in vitro studies with purified extracellular and intracellular fragments of PASTA kinases, a model for signaling has been proposed, in which the extracellular PASTA domains bind currently undefined ligands (typically thought to be peptidoglycan, or fragments thereof) to drive kinase dimerization, which leads to enhanced kinase autophosphorylation and enhanced phosphorylation of substrates. However, this model has not been rigorously tested in vivo Enterococcus faecalis is a Gram-positive intestinal commensal and major antibiotic-resistant opportunistic pathogen. In E. faecalis , the PASTA kinase IreK drives intrinsic resistance to cell wall-active antimicrobials, suggesting that such antimicrobials may trigger IreK signaling. Here we show that IreK responds to cell wall stress in vivo by enhancing its phosphorylation and that of a downstream substrate. This response requires both the extracellular PASTA domains and specific phosphorylatable residues in the kinase domain. Thus, our results provide in vivo evidence, with an intact full-length PASTA kinase in its native physiological environment, that supports the prevailing model of PASTA kinase signaling. In addition, we show that IreK responds to a signal associated with growth and/or cell division, in the absence of cell wall-active antimicrobials. Surprisingly, the ability of IreK to respond to growth and/or division does not require the extracellular PASTA domains, suggesting that IreK monitors multiple parameters for sensory input in vivo IMPORTANCE Transmembrane Ser/Thr kinases containing extracellular PASTA domains are ubiquitous among Actinobacteria and Firmicutes and regulate critical processes. The

  1. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 8 (MAP3K8) Mediates the Signaling Pathway of Estradiol Stimulating Progesterone Production Through G Protein-Coupled Receptor 30 (GPR30) in Mouse Corpus Luteum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Li, Yueqin; Zhang, Di; Liu, Jiali; Gou, Kemian; Cui, Sheng

    2015-05-01

    The corpus luteum (CL) is a transient endocrine gland developed from the ovulated follicles, and the most important function is to synthesize and secrete progesterone (P(4)), a key hormone to maintain normal pregnancy and estrous cycle in most mammals. It is known that estrogen has a vital role in stimulating P(4) synthesis in CL, but it still remains unclear about the mechanism of estradiol (E(2)) regulating P(4) production in CL. Our results here first show that all of the CL cells express MAPK 8 (MAP3K8), and the MAP3K8 level is much higher at the midstage than at the early and late stages during CL development. The further functional studies show that the forced inhibition of endogenous MAP3K8 by using MAP3K8 small interfering RNA and MAP3K8 signaling inhibitor (MAP3K8i) in the luteal cells significantly block the P(4) synthesis and neutralize the enhancing effect of E(2) on P(4) production in the CL. In addition, our results here demonstrate that the stimulating effect of E(2) on P(4) synthesis relies on the estrogen no-classical protein-coupled receptor 30, and MAP3K8 is involved in mediating the protein-coupled receptor 30signaling of E(2) affecting P(4) synthesis via stimulating ERK phosphorylation. These novel findings are critical for our understanding the ovary physiology and pathological mechanism.

  2. A seamless ubiquitous emergency medical service for crisis situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bor-Shing

    2016-04-01

    In crisis situations, a seamless ubiquitous communication is necessary to provide emergency medical service to save people's lives. An excellent prehospital emergency medicine provides immediate medical care to increase the survival rate of patients. On their way to the hospital, ambulance personnel must transmit real-time and uninterrupted patient information to the hospital to apprise the physician of the situation and provide options to the ambulance personnel. In emergency and crisis situations, many communication channels can be unserviceable because of damage to equipment or loss of power. Thus, data transmission over wireless communication to achieve uninterrupted network services is a major obstacle. This study proposes a mobile middleware for cognitive radio (CR) for improving the wireless communication link. CRs can sense their operating environment and optimize the spectrum usage so that the mobile middleware can integrate the existing wireless communication systems with a seamless communication service in heterogeneous network environments. Eventually, the proposed seamless mobile communication middleware was ported into an embedded system, which is compatible with the actual network environment without the need for changing the original system architecture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Distributing Workflows over a Ubiquitous P2P Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddie Al-Shakarchi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses issues in the distribution of bundled workflows across ubiquitous peer-to-peer networks for the application of music information retrieval. The underlying motivation for this work is provided by the DART project, which aims to develop a novel music recommendation system by gathering statistical data using collaborative filtering techniques and the analysis of the audio itsel, in order to create a reliable and comprehensive database of the music that people own and which they listen to. To achieve this, the DART scientists creating the algorithms need the ability to distribute the Triana workflows they create, representing the analysis to be performed, across the network on a regular basis (perhaps even daily in order to update the network as a whole with new workflows to be executed for the analysis. DART uses a similar approach to BOINC but differs in that the workers receive input data in the form of a bundled Triana workflow, which is executed in order to process any MP3 files that they own on their machine. Once analysed, the results are returned to DART's distributed database that collects and aggregates the resulting information. DART employs the use of package repositories to decentralise the distribution of such workflow bundles and this approach is validated in this paper through simulations that show that suitable scalability is maintained through the system as the number of participants increases. The results clearly illustrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  4. FCJ-135 Feral Computing: From Ubiquitous Calculation to Wild Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Fuller

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In ‘The Coming Age of Calm Technology’, Mark Weiser and John Seely Brown are clear in their assertions, what really ‘matters’ about technology is not technology in itself, rather, its capacity to continuously recreate our relationship with the world at large (Brown and Weiser 1996. Even though they promote such an idea under the banner of ‘calm technology’, what is central to their thesis is the mutational capacities brought into the world by the spillage of computation out from its customary boxes. What their work tends to occlude is that in setting the sinking of technology almost imperceptibly, but deeply into the ‘everyday’ as a target for ubiquitous computing, other possibilities are masked, for instance, those of greater hackability or interrogability of such technologies. Our contention is that making ubicomp seamless (MacColl et al, 2002 tends to obfuscate the potential of computation in reworking computational subjects, including societies, modes of life, and inter-relations with the dynamics of thought and the composition of experience and understanding.

  5. Ubiquitous Monitoring of Electrical Household Appliances 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Lacuesta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The number of appliances at home is increasing continuously, mainly because they make our lives easier. Currently, technology is integrated in all objects of our daily life. TCP/IP let us monitor our home in real time and check ubiquitously if something is happening at home. Bearing in mind this idea, we have developed a low-cost system, which can be used in any type of electrical household appliance that takes information from the appliance and posts the information to the Twitter Social network. Several sensors placed in the household appliances gather the sensed data and send them wired or wirelessly, depending on the case, using small and cheap devices to a gateway located in the home. This gateway takes decisions, based on the received data, and sends notifications to Twitter. We have developed a software application that takes the values and decides when to issue an alarm to the registered users (Twitter friends of our smart home. The performance of our system has been measured taking into account the home network (using IEEE 802.3u and IEEE 802.11g and the data publishing in Twitter. As a result, we have generated an original product and service for any electrical household appliance, regardless of the model and manufacturer, that helps home users improve their quality of life. The paper also shows that there is no system with the same innovative features like the ones presented in this paper.

  6. I WHATSAPP AN IGUANA: AN ATTEMPT TO APPLY UBIQUITOUS LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Haryanti

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at presenting how Whatsapp provides alternative method to enhance writing skills on personal letter for senior high school student. This method Whatsapps inspired by the concept called ubiquitous learning (U-Learning, which means ―learning supported by ICT resources held anytime, anywhere and fits the context of the learner‖ (de Sousa Monteiro et al., 2014. Participants were 40 11-th grade students in one class in Cirebon High School. A short story in the form of personal letter entitled I Wanna Iguana by Karen Kaufman Orloff was used as main learning source and the mobile version of the story was sent to the class Whatsapp group along with the reading comprehension questions and the personal letter template. The study was conducted for three weeks in the middle of the second semester year 2017. Contrary to the basic face-to-face teaching and learning, the using of Whatsapp group demonstrates how mobile technology can be fully integrated in an educational context to support students‘ learning beyond the classroom. Another advantages of using Whatsapp group is the fact that learning become the responsibility of learners and may take place through observation, trial and error, asking for help, conversing with others, reading to stories, reflecting on a one‘s personal event, or stimulated by general interests

  7. From computers to ubiquitous computing by 2010: health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Omer; Lo, Benny; Pansiot, Julien; Atallah, Louis; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara

    2008-10-28

    Over the past decade, miniaturization and cost reduction in semiconductors have led to computers smaller in size than a pinhead with powerful processing abilities that are affordable enough to be disposable. Similar advances in wireless communication, sensor design and energy storage have meant that the concept of a truly pervasive 'wireless sensor network', used to monitor environments and objects within them, has become a reality. The need for a wireless sensor network designed specifically for human body monitoring has led to the development of wireless 'body sensor network' (BSN) platforms composed of tiny integrated microsensors with on-board processing and wireless data transfer capability. The ubiquitous computing abilities of BSNs offer the prospect of continuous monitoring of human health in any environment, be it home, hospital, outdoors or the workplace. This pervasive technology comes at a time when Western world health care costs have sharply risen, reflected by increasing expenditure on health care as a proportion of gross domestic product over the last 20 years. Drivers of this rise include an ageing post 'baby boom' population, higher incidence of chronic disease and the need for earlier diagnosis. This paper outlines the role of pervasive health care technologies in providing more efficient health care.

  8. Ubiquitous computing in sports: A review and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baca, Arnold; Dabnichki, Peter; Heller, Mario; Kornfeind, Philipp

    2009-10-01

    Ubiquitous (pervasive) computing is a term for a synergetic use of sensing, communication and computing. Pervasive use of computing has seen a rapid increase in the current decade. This development has propagated in applied sport science and everyday life. The work presents a survey of recent developments in sport and leisure with emphasis on technology and computational techniques. A detailed analysis on new technological developments is performed. Sensors for position and motion detection, and such for equipment and physiological monitoring are discussed. Aspects of novel trends in communication technologies and data processing are outlined. Computational advancements have started a new trend - development of smart and intelligent systems for a wide range of applications - from model-based posture recognition to context awareness algorithms for nutrition monitoring. Examples particular to coaching and training are discussed. Selected tools for monitoring rules' compliance and automatic decision-making are outlined. Finally, applications in leisure and entertainment are presented, from systems supporting physical activity to systems providing motivation. It is concluded that the emphasis in future will shift from technologies to intelligent systems that allow for enhanced social interaction as efforts need to be made to improve user-friendliness and standardisation of measurement and transmission protocols.

  9. Structure of the vault, a ubiquitous celular component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, L B; Siva, A C; Rome, L H; Stewart, P L

    1999-04-15

    The vault is a ubiquitous and highly conserved ribonucleoprotein particle of approximately 13 MDa. This particle has been shown to be upregulated in certain multidrug-resistant cancer cell lines and to share a protein component with the telomerase complex. Determination of the structure of the vault was undertaken to provide a first step towards understanding the role of this cellular component in normal metabolism and perhaps to shed some light on its role in mediating drug resistance. Over 1300 particle images were combined to calculate an approximately 31 A resolution structure of the vault. Rotational power spectra did not yield a clear symmetry peak, either because of the thin, smooth walls or inherent flexibility of the vault. Although cyclic eightfold (C8) symmetry was imposed, the resulting reconstruction may be partially cylindrically averaged about the eightfold axis. Our results reveal the vault to be a hollow, barrel-like structure with two protruding caps and an invaginated waist. Although the normal cellular function of the vault is as yet undetermined, the structure of the vault is consistent with either a role in subcellular transport, as previously suggested, or in sequestering macromolecular assemblies.

  10. A concept for ubiquitous robotics in industrial environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallinen, Mikko; Heilala, Juhani; Kivikunnas, Sauli

    2007-09-01

    In this paper a concept for industrial ubiquitous robotics is presented. The concept combines two different approaches to manage agile, adaptable production: firstly the human operator is strongly in the production loop and secondly, the robot workcell will be more autonomous and smarter to manage production. This kind of autonomous robot cell can be called production island. Communication to the human operator working in this kind of smart industrial environment can be divided into two levels: body area communication and operator-infrastructure communication including devices, machines and infra. Body area communication can be supportive in two directions: data is recorded by means of measuring physical actions, such as hand movements, body gestures or supportive when it will provide information to user such as guides or manuals for operation. Body area communication can be carried out using short range communication technologies such as NFC (Near Field communication) which is RFID type of communication. In the operator-infrastructure communication, WLAN or Bluetooth -communication can be used. Beyond the current Human Machine interaction HMI systems, the presented system concept is designed to fulfill the requirements for hybrid, knowledge intensive manufacturing in the future, where humans and robots operate in close co-operation.

  11. Ubiquitous Health in Korea: Progress, Barriers, and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yountae

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Korea has one of the most advanced information technology (IT) infrastructures in the world, and the application of IT in health systems is rapidly progressing from computerization to information systems, ubiquitous systems, and smart systems. This study aims to analyze Korean environments in regards to the development of their u-Health industry and propose directions for u-Healthcare services based on this analysis. Methods This paper reviews the background, progress history, and current status of u-Health in Korea, and suggests strategies for the u-Health industry based on an analysis of its barriers and obstacles. Results When u-Health was introduced to Koreans, their policies and approaches focused mainly on environmental factors, yet these efforts have not progressed further to impact the u-Healthcare service industry itself. To develop the u-Healthcare industry, four points need to be considered: the development and support of the practical service model, institutional support, support of core technology and industry, and the institutionalization of health management service. Conclusions Korea is at a strategic point to start building u-Healthcare service delivery models. u-Healthcare is a healthcare service that provides added value through u-Health environments. By identifying critical success factors in u-Healthcare, we can strengthen the u-Health industry and implement policies to coordinate our efforts in the process of value chains to which we belong. PMID:23346474

  12. Pyruvate kinase blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003357.htm Pyruvate kinase blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... energy when oxygen levels are low. How the Test is Performed A blood sample is needed. In the laboratory, white blood ...

  13. AUP1 (Ancient Ubiquitous Protein 1) Is a Key Determinant of Hepatic Very-Low-Density Lipoprotein Assembly and Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Zamani, Mostafa; Thiele, Christoph; Taher, Jennifer; Amir Alipour, Mohsen; Yao, Zemin; Adeli, Khosrow

    2017-04-01

    AUP1 (ancient ubiquitous protein 1) is an endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein that also localizes to the surface of lipid droplets (LDs), with dual role in protein quality control and LD regulation. Here, we investigated the role of AUP1 in hepatic lipid mobilization and demonstrate critical roles in intracellular biogenesis of apoB100 (apolipoprotein B-100), LD mobilization, and very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) assembly and secretion. APPROACH AND RESULTS: siRNA (short/small interfering RNA) knockdown of AUP1 significantly increased secretion of VLDL-sized apoB100-containing particles from HepG2 cells, correcting a key metabolic defect in these cells that normally do not secrete much VLDL. Secreted particles contained higher levels of metabolically labeled triglyceride, and AUP1-deficient cells displayed a larger average size of LDs, suggesting a role for AUP1 in lipid mobilization. Importantly, AUP1 was also found to directly interact with apoB100, and this interaction was enhanced with proteasomal inhibition. Knockdown of AUP1 reduced apoB100 ubiquitination, decreased intracellular degradation of newly synthesized apoB100, and enhanced extracellular apoB100 secretion. Interestingly, the stimulatory effect of AUP1 knockdown on VLDL assembly was reminiscent of the effect previously observed after MEK-ERK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-extracellular signal-regulated kinase) inhibition; however, further studies indicated that the AUP1 effect was independent of MEK-ERK signaling. In summary, our findings reveal an important role for AUP1 as a regulator of apoB100 stability, hepatic LD metabolism, and intracellular lipidation of VLDL particles. AUP1 may be a crucial factor in apoB100 quality control, determining the rate at which apoB100 is degraded or lipidated to enable VLDL particle assembly and secretion. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. A system for ubiquitous health monitoring in the bedroom via a Bluetooth network and wireless LAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J M; Choi, B H; Seo, J W; Sohn, R H; Ryu, M S; Yi, W; Park, K S

    2004-01-01

    Advances in information technology have enabled ubiquitous health monitoring at home, which is particularly useful for patients, who have to live alone. We have focused on the automatic and unobtrusive measurement of biomedical signals and activities of patients. We have constructed wireless communication networks in order to transfer data. The networks consist of Bluetooth and Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN). In this paper, we present the concept of a ubiquitous-Bedroom (u-Bedroom) which is a part of a ubiquitous-House (u-House) and we present our systems for ubiquitous health monitoring.

  15. Comparative proteomic analysis reveals a dynamic pollen plasma membrane protein map and the membrane landscape of receptor-like kinases and transporters important for pollen tube growth and interaction with pistils in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ning; Wang, Tai

    2017-01-05

    The coordination of pollen tube (PT) growth, guidance and timely growth arrest and rupture mediated by PT-pistil interaction is crucial for the PT to transport sperm cells into ovules for double fertilization. The plasma membrane (PM) represents an important interface for cell-cell interaction, and PM proteins of PTs are pioneers for mediating PT integrity and interaction with pistils. Thus, understanding the mechanisms underlying these events is important for proteomics. Using the efficient aqueous polymer two-phase system and alkali buffer treatment, we prepared high-purity PM from mature and germinated pollen of rice. We used iTRAQ quantitative proteomic methods and identified 1,121 PM-related proteins (PMrPs) (matched to 899 loci); 192 showed differential expression in the two pollen cell types, 119 increased and 73 decreased in abundance during germination. The PMrP and differentially expressed PMrP sets all showed a functional skew toward signal transduction, transporters, wall remodeling/metabolism and membrane trafficking. Their genomic loci had strong chromosome bias. We found 37 receptor-like kinases (RLKs) from 8 kinase subfamilies and 209 transporters involved in flux of diversified ions and metabolites. In combination with the rice pollen transcriptome data, we revealed that in general, the protein expression of these PMrPs disagreed with their mRNA expression, with inconsistent mRNA expression for 74% of differentially expressed PMrPs. This study identified genome-wide pollen PMrPs, and provided insights into the membrane profile of receptor-like kinases and transporters important for pollen tube growth and interaction with pistils. These pollen PMrPs and their mRNAs showed discordant expression. This work provides resource and knowledge to further dissect mechanisms by which pollen or the PT controls PMrP abundance and monitors interactions and ion and metabolite exchanges with female cells in rice.

  16. Mapping of the receptor protein-tyrosine kinase 10 to human chromosome 1q21-q23 and mouse chromosome 1H1-5 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelhoff, S.; Disteche, C.M. [Univ. of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States); Lai, C. [Scripps Research Inst., LaJolla, CA (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Receptor protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs) play a critical role in the transduction of signals important to cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Mutations affecting the expression of receptor PTK genes have been associated with a number of vertebrate and invertebrate developmental abnormalities, and the aberrant regulation of tyrosine phosphorylation is implicated in a variety of neoplasias. One estimate suggests that approximately 100 receptor PTK genes exist in the mammalian genome, about half of which have been identified. The tyro-10 receptor protein-tyrosine kinase, first identified in a PCR-based survey for novel tyrosine kinases in the rat nervous system, defines a new subfamily of PTKs. It exhibits a catalytic domain most closely related to those found in the trk PTK receptor subfamily, which transduces signals for nerve growth factor and the related molecules brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3, and neurotrophin-4 (NT-3 and NT-4). Trk and the related PTK receptors trkB and trkC play a critical role in the neurotrophin-dependent survival of subsets of sensory and motor neurons. The predicted tyro-10 extracellular region is, however, distinct from that of the trk subfamily and is unique except for a domain shared with the blood coagulation factors V and VIII, thought to be involved in phospholipid binding. Although tyro-10 RNA is most abundant in heart and skeletal muscle in the adult rat, it is expressed in a wide variety of tissues, including the developing and mature brain. Tyro-10 appears identical to the murine TKT sequence reported by Karn et al. and exhibits a high degree of similarity with the CaK, DDR, and Nep PTKs. A ligand for tyro-10 has not yet been identified. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Mapping out Map Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferjan Ormeling

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Discussing the requirements for map data quality, map users and their library/archives environment, the paper focuses on the metadata the user would need for a correct and efficient interpretation of the map data. For such a correct interpretation, knowledge of the rules and guidelines according to which the topographers/cartographers work (such as the kind of data categories to be collected, and the degree to which these rules and guidelines were indeed followed are essential. This is not only valid for the old maps stored in our libraries and archives, but perhaps even more so for the new digital files as the format in which we now have to access our geospatial data. As this would be too much to ask from map librarians/curators, some sort of web 2.0 environment is sought where comments about data quality, completeness and up-to-dateness from knowledgeable map users regarding the specific maps or map series studied can be collected and tagged to scanned versions of these maps on the web. In order not to be subject to the same disadvantages as Wikipedia, where the ‘communis opinio’ rather than scholarship, seems to be decisive, some checking by map curators of this tagged map use information would still be needed. Cooperation between map curators and the International Cartographic Association ( ICA map and spatial data use commission to this end is suggested.

  18. New Wistar Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rat transgenic models with ubiquitous expression of green fluorescent protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel Garcia Diaz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Wistar Kyoto (WKY rat and the spontaneously hypertensive (SHR rat inbred strains are well-established models for human crescentic glomerulonephritis (CRGN and metabolic syndrome, respectively. Novel transgenic (Tg strains add research opportunities and increase scientific value to well-established rat models. We have created two novel Tg strains using Sleeping Beauty transposon germline transgenesis, ubiquitously expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP under the rat elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1a promoter on the WKY and SHR genetic backgrounds. The Sleeping Beauty system functioned with high transgenesis efficiency; 75% of new rats born after embryo microinjections were transgene positive. By ligation-mediated PCR, we located the genome integration sites, confirming no exonic disruption and defining a single or low copy number of the transgenes in the new WKY-GFP and SHR-GFP Tg lines. We report GFP-bright expression in embryos, tissues and organs in both lines and show preliminary in vitro and in vivo imaging data that demonstrate the utility of the new GFP-expressing lines for adoptive transfer, transplantation and fate mapping studies of CRGN, metabolic syndrome and other traits for which these strains have been extensively studied over the past four decades.

  19. Ubiquitous Geo-Sensing for Context-Aware Analysis: Exploring Relationships between Environmental and Human Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euro Beinat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitous geo-sensing enables context-aware analyses of physical and social phenomena, i.e., analyzing one phenomenon in the context of another. Although such context-aware analysis can potentially enable a more holistic understanding of spatio-temporal processes, it is rarely documented in the scientific literature yet. In this paper we analyzed the collective human behavior in the context of the weather. We therefore explored the complex relationships between these two spatio-temporal phenomena to provide novel insights into the dynamics of urban systems. Aggregated mobile phone data, which served as a proxy for collective human behavior, was linked with the weather data from climate stations in the case study area, the city of Udine, Northern Italy. To identify and characterize potential patterns within the weather-human relationships, we developed a hybrid approach which integrates several spatio-temporal statistical analysis methods. Thereby we show that explanatory factor analysis, when applied to a number of meteorological variables, can be used to differentiate between normal and adverse weather conditions. Further, we measured the strength of the relationship between the ‘global’ adverse weather conditions and the spatially explicit effective variations in user-generated mobile network traffic for three distinct periods using the Maximal Information Coefficient (MIC. The analyses result in three spatially referenced maps of MICs which reveal interesting insights into collective human dynamics in the context of weather, but also initiate several new scientific challenges.

  20. Comparative Genomics of the Ubiquitous, Hydrocarbon-degrading Genus Marinobacter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, E.; Webb, E.; Edwards, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    The genus Marinobacter is amongst the most ubiquitous in the global oceans and strains have been isolated from a wide variety of marine environments, including offshore oil-well heads, coastal thermal springs, Antarctic sea water, saline soils and associations with diatoms and dinoflagellates. Many strains have been recognized to be important hydrocarbon degraders in various marine habitats presenting sometimes extreme pH or salinity conditions. Analysis of the genome of M. aquaeolei revealed enormous adaptation versatility with an assortment of strategies for carbon and energy acquisition, sensation, and defense. In an effort to elucidate the ecological and biogeochemical significance of the Marinobacters, seven Marinobacter strains from diverse environments were included in a comparative genomics study. Genomes were screened for metabolic and adaptation potential to elucidate the strategies responsible for the omnipresence of the Marinobacter genus and their remedial action potential in hydrocarbon-polluted waters. The core genome predominantly encodes for key genes involved in hydrocarbon degradation, biofilm-relevant processes, including utilization of external DNA, halotolerance, as well as defense mechanisms against heavy metals, antibiotics, and toxins. All Marinobacter strains were observed to degrade a wide spectrum of hydrocarbon species, including aliphatic, polycyclic aromatic as well as acyclic isoprenoid compounds. Various genes predicted to facilitate hydrocarbon degradation, e.g. alkane 1-monooxygenase, appear to have originated from lateral gene transfer as they are located on gene clusters of 10-20% lower GC-content compared to genome averages and are flanked by transposases. Top ortholog hits are found in other hydrocarbon degrading organisms, e.g. Alcanivorax borkumensis. Strategies for hydrocarbon uptake encoded by various Marinobacter strains include cell surface hydrophobicity adaptation via capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis and attachment

  1. Twelve previously unknown phage genera are ubiquitous in global oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmfeldt, Karin; Solonenko, Natalie; Shah, Manesh; Corrier, Kristen; Riemann, Lasse; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2013-07-30

    Viruses are fundamental to ecosystems ranging from oceans to humans, yet our ability to study them is bottlenecked by the lack of ecologically relevant isolates, resulting in "unknowns" dominating culture-independent surveys. Here we present genomes from 31 phages infecting multiple strains of the aquatic bacterium Cellulophaga baltica (Bacteroidetes) to provide data for an underrepresented and environmentally abundant bacterial lineage. Comparative genomics delineated 12 phage groups that (i) each represent a new genus, and (ii) represent one novel and four well-known viral families. This diversity contrasts the few well-studied marine phage systems, but parallels the diversity of phages infecting human-associated bacteria. Although all 12 Cellulophaga phages represent new genera, the podoviruses and icosahedral, nontailed ssDNA phages were exceptional, with genomes up to twice as large as those previously observed for each phage type. Structural novelty was also substantial, requiring experimental phage proteomics to identify 83% of the structural proteins. The presence of uncommon nucleotide metabolism genes in four genera likely underscores the importance of scavenging nutrient-rich molecules as previously seen for phages in marine environments. Metagenomic recruitment analyses suggest that these particular Cellulophaga phages are rare and may represent a first glimpse into the phage side of the rare biosphere. However, these analyses also revealed that these phage genera are widespread, occurring in 94% of 137 investigated metagenomes. Together, this diverse and novel collection of phages identifies a small but ubiquitous fraction of unknown marine viral diversity and provides numerous environmentally relevant phage-host systems for experimental hypothesis testing.

  2. mORCA: ubiquitous access to life science web services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Del-Pino, Sergio; Trelles, Oswaldo; Falgueras, Juan

    2018-01-16

    Technical advances in mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets have produced an extraordinary increase in their use around the world and have become part of our daily lives. The possibility of carrying these devices in a pocket, particularly mobile phones, has enabled ubiquitous access to Internet resources. Furthermore, in the life sciences world there has been a vast proliferation of data types and services that finish as Web Services. This suggests the need for research into mobile clients to deal with life sciences applications for effective usage and exploitation. Analysing the current features in existing bioinformatics applications managing Web Services, we have devised, implemented, and deployed an easy-to-use web-based lightweight mobile client. This client is able to browse, select, compose parameters, invoke, and monitor the execution of Web Services stored in catalogues or central repositories. The client is also able to deal with huge amounts of data between external storage mounts. In addition, we also present a validation use case, which illustrates the usage of the application while executing, monitoring, and exploring the results of a registered workflow. The software its available in the Apple Store and Android Market and the source code is publicly available in Github. Mobile devices are becoming increasingly important in the scientific world due to their strong potential impact on scientific applications. Bioinformatics should not fall behind this trend. We present an original software client that deals with the intrinsic limitations of such devices and propose different guidelines to provide location-independent access to computational resources in bioinformatics and biomedicine. Its modular design makes it easily expandable with the inclusion of new repositories, tools, types of visualization, etc.

  3. Lipid droplets as ubiquitous fat storage organelles in C. elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Fengli

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipid droplets are a class of eukaryotic cell organelles for storage of neutral fat such as triacylglycerol (TAG and cholesterol ester (CE. We and others have recently reported that lysosome-related organelles (LROs are not fat storage structures in the nematode C. elegans. We also reported the formation of enlarged lipid droplets in a class of peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation mutants. In the present study, we seek to provide further evidence on the organelle nature and biophysical properties of fat storage structures in wild-type and mutant C. elegans. Results In this study, we provide biochemical, histological and ultrastructural evidence of lipid droplets in wild-type and mutant C. elegans that lack lysosome related organelles (LROs. The formation of lipid droplets and the targeting of BODIPY fatty acid analogs to lipid droplets in live animals are not dependent on lysosomal trafficking or peroxisome dysfunction. However, the targeting of Nile Red to lipid droplets in live animals occurs only in mutants with defective peroxisomes. Nile Red labelled-lipid droplets are characterized by a fluorescence emission spectrum distinct from that of Nile Red labelled-LROs. Moreover, we show that the recently developed post-fix Nile Red staining method labels lipid droplets exclusively. Conclusions Our results demonstrate lipid droplets as ubiquitous fat storage organelles and provide a unified explanation for previous studies on fat labelling methods in C. elegans. These results have important applications to the studies of fat storage and lipid droplet regulation in the powerful genetic system, C. elegans.

  4. Protein Kinase C δ: a Gatekeeper of Immune Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Elisabeth; Santos-Valente, Elisangela; Keller, Bärbel; Warnatz, Klaus; Boztug, Kaan

    2016-10-01

    Human autoimmune disorders present in various forms and are associated with a life-long burden of high morbidity and mortality. Many different circumstances lead to the loss of immune tolerance and often the origin is suspected to be multifactorial. Recently, patients with autosomal recessive mutations in PRKCD encoding protein kinase c delta (PKCδ) have been identified, representing a monogenic prototype for one of the most prominent forms of humoral systemic autoimmune diseases, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). PKCδ is a signaling kinase with multiple downstream target proteins and with functions in various signaling pathways. Interestingly, mouse models have indicated a special role of the ubiquitously expressed protein in the control of B-cell tolerance revealed by the severe autoimmunity in Prkcd (-/-) knockout mice as the major phenotype. As such, the study of PKCδ deficiency in humans has tremendous potential in enhancing our knowledge on the mechanisms of B-cell tolerance.

  5. An Expert System-based Context-Aware Ubiquitous Learning Approach for Conducting Science Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Po-Han; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Tsai, Wen-Hung

    2013-01-01

    Context-aware ubiquitous learning has been recognized as being a promising approach that enables students to interact with real-world learning targets with supports from the digital world. Several researchers have indicated the importance of providing learning guidance or hints to individual students during the context-aware ubiquitous learning…

  6. Evaluation of a ubiquitous learning system in a design engineering environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroom, R.W.; Horvath, I.; Rusak, Z.; De Smit, A.; Opiyo, E.Z.

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitous computing is computing power that is integrated in devices and environments in such a way that they offer optimal support to human daily life activities. For industrial design engineering students, applying ubiquitous technologies offer a great opportunity and challenge for innovating

  7. Conjoint Analysis for Mobile Devices for Ubiquitous Learning in Higher Education: The Korean Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeongjik

    2013-01-01

    Despite the increasing importance of mobile devices in education, the essential features of these devices for ubiquitous learning have not been empirically addressed. This study empirically investigated the necessary conditions for using mobile devices as an educational tool for ubiquitous learning in higher education by a conjoint method. The…

  8. The Influential Factors for the Variation of Data Sensitivity in Ubiquitous Social Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sapuppo, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitous social networking services offer new opportunities for developing advantageous relationships by uncovering hidden connections that people share with others nearby. As sharing of personal information is an intrinsic part of ubiquitous social networking, these services are subject......, mood, location familiarity, number of previous encounters and mutual friends, were also discovered to influence participants' data disclosure, but as factors of secondary importance....

  9. Ambient Learning Displays - Distributed Mixed Reality Information Mash-ups to support Ubiquitous Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Börner, D. (2012). Ambient Learning Displays - Distributed Mixed Reality Information Mash-ups to support Ubiquitous Learning. 2012 IEEE Seventh International Conference on Wireless, Mobile and Ubiquitous Technology in Education (pp. 337-338). March, 27-30, 2012, Takamatsu, Japan: IEEE Computer

  10. Linkage mapping of putative regulator genes of barley grain development characterized by expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wobus Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. seed development is a highly regulated process with fine-tuned interaction of various tissues controlling distinct physiological events during prestorage, storage and dessication phase. As potential regulators involved within this process we studied 172 transcription factors and 204 kinases for their expression behaviour and anchored a subset of them to the barley linkage map to promote marker-assisted studies on barley grains. Results By a hierachical clustering of the expression profiles of 376 potential regulatory genes expressed in 37 different tissues, we found 50 regulators preferentially expressed in one of the three grain tissue fractions pericarp, endosperm and embryo during seed development. In addition, 27 regulators found to be expressed during both seed development and germination and 32 additional regulators are characteristically expressed in multiple tissues undergoing cell differentiation events during barley plant ontogeny. Another 96 regulators were, beside in the developing seed, ubiquitously expressed among all tissues of germinating seedlings as well as in reproductive tissues. SNP-marker development for those regulators resulted in anchoring 61 markers on the genetic linkage map of barley and the chromosomal assignment of another 12 loci by using wheat-barley addition lines. The SNP frequency ranged from 0.5 to 1.0 SNP/kb in the parents of the various mapping populations and was 2.3 SNP/kb over all eight lines tested. Exploration of macrosynteny to rice revealed that the chromosomal orders of the mapped putative regulatory factors were predominantly conserved during evolution. Conclusion We identified expression patterns of major transcription factors and signaling related genes expressed during barley ontogeny and further assigned possible functions based on likely orthologs functionally well characterized in model plant species. The combined linkage map and reference

  11. Enterococcus faecalis phosphomevalonate kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doun, Stephanie S.; Burgner, John W.; Briggs, Scott D.; Rodwell, Victor W.

    2005-01-01

    The six enzymes of the mevalonate pathway of isopentenyl diphosphate biosynthesis represent potential for addressing a pressing human health concern, the development of antibiotics against resistant strains of the Gram-positive streptococci. We previously characterized the first four of the mevalonate pathway enzymes of Enterococcus faecalis, and here characterize the fifth, phosphomevalonate kinase (E.C. 2.7.4.2). E. faecalis genomic DNA and the polymerase chain reaction were used to clone DNA thought to encode phosphomevalonate kinase into pET28b(+). Double-stranded DNA sequencing verified the sequence of the recombinant gene. The encoded N-terminal hexahistidine-tagged protein was expressed in Escherichia coli with induction by isopropylthiogalactoside and purified by Ni++ affinity chromatography, yield 20 mg protein per liter. Analysis of the purified protein by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry established it as E. faecalis phosphomevalonate kinase. Analytical ultracentrifugation revealed that the kinase exists in solution primarily as a dimer. Assay for phosphomevalonate kinase activity used pyruvate kinase and lactate dehydrogenase to couple the formation of ADP to the oxidation of NADH. Optimal activity occurred at pH 8.0 and at 37°C. The activation energy was ~5.6 kcal/mol. Activity with Mn++, the preferred cation, was optimal at about 4 mM. Relative rates using different phosphoryl donors were 100 (ATP), 3.6 (GTP), 1.6 (TTP), and 0.4 (CTP). Km values were 0.17 mM for ATP and 0.19 mM for (R,S)-5-phosphomevalonate. The specific activity of the purified enzyme was 3.9 μmol substrate converted per minute per milligram protein. Applications to an immobilized enzyme bioreactor and to drug screening and design are discussed. PMID:15802646

  12. Pervanadate induces Mammalian Ste20 Kinase 3 (MST3) tyrosine phosphorylation but not activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Wei-Chih; Lu, Te-Ling; Ling, Pin; Lee, Te-Hsiu; Cho, Chien-Yu; Huang, Chi-Ying F; Jeng, Wen-Yih; Weng, Yui-Ping; Chiang, Chun-Yen; Wu, Jin Bin; Lu, Te-Jung

    2016-07-01

    The yeast Ste20 (sterile) protein kinase, which is a serine/threonine kinase, responds to the stimulation of the G proteincoupled receptor (GPCR) pheromone receptor. Ste20 protein kinase serves as the critical component that links signaling from the GPCR/G proteins to the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade in yeast. The yeast Ste20p functions as a MAP kinase kinase kinase kinase (MAP4K) in the pheromone response. Ste20-like kinases are structurally conserved from yeast to mammals. The mechanism by which MAP4K links GPCR to the MAPK pathway is less clearly defined in vertebrates. In addition to MAP4K, the tyrosine kinase cascade bridges G proteins and the MAPK pathway in vertebrate cells. Mammalian Ste20 Kinase 3 (MST3) has been categorized into the Ste20 family and has been reported to function in the regulation of cell polarity and migration. However, whether MST3 tyrosine phosphorylation regulates diverse signaling pathways is unknown. In this study, the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor pervanadate was found to induce MST3 tyrosine phosphorylation in intact cells, and the activity of tyrosine-phosphorylated MST3 was measured. This tyrosine-directed phosphorylation was independent of MST3 activity. Parameters including protein conformation, Triton concentration and ionic concentration influenced the sensitivity of MST3 activity. Taken together, our data suggests that the serine/threonine kinase MST3 undergoes tyrosinedirected phosphorylation. The tyrosine-phosphorylated MST3 may create a docking site for the structurally conserved SH2/SH3 (Src Homology 2 and 3) domains within the Src oncoprotein. The unusual tyrosinephosphorylated MST3 may recruit MST3 to various signaling components. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. From Phosphosites to Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Stephanie; Refsgaard, Jan C; Olsen, Jesper V

    2016-01-01

    Kinases play a pivotal role in propagating the phosphorylation-mediated signaling networks in living cells. With the overwhelming quantities of phosphoproteomics data being generated, the number of identified phosphorylation sites (phosphosites) is ever increasing. Often, proteomics investigations...... sequence motifs, mostly based on large scale in vivo and in vitro experiments. The context of the kinase and the phosphorylated proteins in a biological system is equally important for predicting association between the enzymes and substrates, an aspect that is also being tackled with available...

  14. Human adenylate kinases – classification, structure, physiological and pathological importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Wujak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenylate kinase (AK, EC 2.7.4.3 is a ubiquitous phosphotransferase which catalyzes the reversible transfer of high-energy β – and γ-phosphate groups between nucleotides. All classified AKs show a similar structure: they contain a large central CORE region, nucleoside monophosphate and triphosphate binding domains (NMPbd and NTPbd and the LID domain. Analysis of amino acid sequence similarity revealed the presence of as many as nine human AK isoenzymes, which demonstrate different organ-tissue and intercellular localization. Among these kinases, only two, AK1 and AK2, fulfill the structural and functional criterion by the highest affinity for adenine nucleotides and the utilization of only AMP or dAMP as phosphate acceptors. Human AK isoenzymes are involved in nucleotide homeostasis and monitor disturbances of cell energy charge. Participating in large regulatory protein complexes, AK supplies high energy substrates for controlling the functions of channels and transporters as well as ligands for extracellular P2 nucleotide receptors. In pathological conditions AK can take over the function of other kinases, such as creatine kinase in oxygen-depleted myocardium. Directed mutagenesis and genetic studies of diseases (such as aleukocytosis, hemolytic anemia, primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD link the presence and activity of AK with etiology of these disturbances. Moreover, AK participates in regulation of differentiation and maturation of cells as well as in apoptosis and oncogenesis. Involvement of AK in a wide range of processes and the correlation between AK and etiology of diseases support the medical potential for the use of adenylate kinases in the diagnosis and treatment of certain diseases. This paper summarizes the current knowledge on the structure, properties and functions of human adenylate kinase.

  15. Ubi-RKE: A Rhythm Key Based Encryption Scheme for Ubiquitous Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Dong Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As intelligent ubiquitous devices become more popular, security threats targeting them are increasing; security is seen as one of the major challenges of the ubiquitous computing. Now a days, applying ubiquitous computing in number of fields for human safety and convenience was immensely increased in recent years. The popularity of the technology is rising day by day, and hence the security is becoming the main focused point with the advent and rising popularity of the applications. In particular, the number of wireless networks based on ubiquitous devices has increased rapidly; these devices support transmission for many types of data traffic. The convenient portability of ubiquitous devices makes them vulnerable to security threats, such as loss, theft, data modification, and wiretapping. Developers and users should seriously consider employing data encryption to protect data from such vulnerabilities. In this paper, we propose a Rhythm Key based Encryption scheme for ubiquitous devices (Ubi-RKE. The concept of Rhythm Key based Encryption has been applied to numerous real world applications in different domains. It provides key memorability and secure encryption through user touching rhythm on ubiquitous devices. Our proposed scheme is more efficient for users than existing schemes, by providing a strong cipher.

  16. p38 MAP kinase is required for Wnt3a-mediated osterix expression independently of Wnt-LRP5/6-GSK3β signaling axis in dental follicle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakisaka, Yukihiko; Kanaya, Sousuke; Nakamura, Takashi; Tamura, Masato; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi; Nemoto, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Wnt3a is a secreted glycoprotein that activates the glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β)/β-catenin signaling pathway through low-density-lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP)5/6 co-receptors. Wnt3a has been implicated in periodontal development and homeostasis, as well as in cementum formation. Recently, we have reported that Wnt3a increases alkaline phosphatase expression through the induction of osterix (Osx) expression in dental follicle cells, a precursor of cementoblasts. However, the molecular mechanism by which Wnt3a induces Osx expression is still unknown. In this study, we show that Wnt3a-induced Osx expression was inhibited in the presence of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors (SB203580 and SB202190) at gene and protein levels, as assessed by real-time PCR and immunocytohistochemistry, respectively. Pretreatment of cells with Dickkopf-1, a potent canonical Wnt antagonist binding to LRP5/6 co-receptors, did not influence Wnt3a-mediated p38 MAPK phosphorylation, suggesting that Wnt3a activates p38 MAPK through LRP5/6-independent signaling. On the other hand, pretreatment with p38 MAPK inhibitors had no effects on the phosphorylated status of GSK3β and β-catenin as well as β-catenin nuclear translocation, but inhibited Wnt3a-mediated β-catenin transcriptional activity. These findings suggest that p38 MAPK modulates canonical Wnt signaling at the β-catenin transcriptional level without any crosstalk with the Wnt3a-mediated LRP5/6-GSK3β signaling axis and subsequent β-catenin nuclear translocation. These findings expand our knowledge of the mechanisms controlling periodontal development and regeneration. - Highlights: • Wnt3a induces Osx expression via p38 MAPK signaling in dental follicle cells. • p38 MAPK has no crosstalk with Wnt3a-mediated LRP5/6 and GSK3β signaling. • p38 MAPK is required for Wnt signaling at the β-catenin transcriptional level.

  17. An Intelligent and Fast Chaotic Encryption Using Digital Logic Circuits for Ad-Hoc and Ubiquitous Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Khare

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Delays added by the encryption process represent an overhead for smart computing devices in ad-hoc and ubiquitous computing intelligent systems. Digital Logic Circuits are faster than other computing techniques, so these can be used for fast encryption to minimize processing delays. Chaotic Encryption is more attack-resilient than other encryption techniques. One of the most attractive properties of cryptography is known as an avalanche effect, in which two different keys produce distinct cipher text for the same information. Important properties of chaotic systems are sensitivity to initial conditions and nonlinearity, which makes two similar keys that generate different cipher text a source of confusion. In this paper a novel fast and secure Chaotic Map-based encryption technique using 2’s Compliment (CET-2C has been proposed, which uses a logistic map which implies that a negligible difference in parameters of the map generates different cipher text. Cryptanalysis of the proposed algorithm shows the strength and security of algorithm and keys. Performance of the proposed algorithm has been analyzed in terms of running time, throughput and power consumption. It is to be shown in comparison graphs that the proposed algorithm gave better results compare to different algorithms like AES and some others.

  18. Multimodal and ubiquitous computing systems: supporting independent-living older users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Mark; Dowdall, Alan; Lines, Lorna; Hone, Kate

    2004-09-01

    We document the rationale and design of a multimodal interface to a pervasive/ubiquitous computing system that supports independent living by older people in their own homes. The Millennium Home system involves fitting a resident's home with sensors--these sensors can be used to trigger sequences of interaction with the resident to warn them about dangerous events, or to check if they need external help. We draw lessons from the design process and conclude the paper with implications for the design of multimodal interfaces to ubiquitous systems developed for the elderly and in healthcare, as well as for more general ubiquitous computing applications.

  19. FTRA 4th International Conference on Mobile, Ubiquitous, and Intelligent Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Adeli, Hojjat; Park, Namje; Woungang, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    MUSIC 2013 will be the most comprehensive text focused on the various aspects of Mobile, Ubiquitous and Intelligent computing. MUSIC 2013 provides an opportunity for academic and industry professionals to discuss the latest issues and progress in the area of intelligent technologies in mobile and ubiquitous computing environment. MUSIC 2013 is the next edition of the 3rd International Conference on Mobile, Ubiquitous, and Intelligent Computing (MUSIC-12, Vancouver, Canada, 2012) which was the next event in a series of highly successful International Workshop on Multimedia, Communication and Convergence technologies MCC-11 (Crete, Greece, June 2011), MCC-10 (Cebu, Philippines, August 2010).

  20. Tyrosine kinases in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Akiko

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an inflammatory, polyarticular joint disease. A number of cellular responses are involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, including activation of inflammatory cells and cytokine expression. The cellular responses involved in each of these processes depends on the specific signaling pathways that are activated; many of which include protein tyrosine kinases. These pathways include the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, Janus kinases/signal transducers and activators transcription pathway, spleen tyrosine kinase signaling, and the nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells pathway. Many drugs are in development to target tyrosine kinases for the treatment of RA. Based on the number of recently published studies, this manuscript reviews the role of tyrosine kinases in the pathogenesis of RA and the potential role of kinase inhibitors as new therapeutic strategies of RA.

  1. Influence of Ubiquitous Electron Acceptors on In Situ Anaerobic Biotransformation of RDX in Groundwater

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wani, Altaf

    2003-01-01

    A series of column studies, with aquifer material from the former Nebraska Ordnance Plant, were performed to explore the phenomenon of electron competition from ubiquitous inorganic electron acceptors (nitrate and sulfate...

  2. Ambient Learning Displays - Distributed Mixed Reality Information Mash-ups to support Ubiquitous Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Börner, D. (2010, 19-21 March). Ambient Learning Displays Distributed Mixed Reality Information Mash-ups to support Ubiquitous Learning. Presented at the IADIS International Conference Mobile Learning 2010, Porto, Portugal.

  3. The Synergy of Paper-Based and Digital Material for Ubiquitous Foreign Language Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Leone

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the development of digital information transfer, storage and communication methods has allowed for access to ubiquitous global connections and to a large number of resources available to foreign language students at all age and levels of schooling. Further, the combination of traditional paper-based learning material with digital one in a ubiquitous learning environment may offer great innovation in the delivery of education, to foster a student-centred approach, and to accommodate the needs of ubiquitous learners’ personal lifestyles. In this direction, research has increasingly emphasised the importance of a technology-enhanced rather than technology-driven learning approach. This paper aims to evaluate the effectiveness of the integration of paper-based and digital material through Quick Response (QR code for ubiquitous English language learners in three different scenarios. Results show that, despite some difficulties, flexibility and personalisation of learning have been perceived as an asset.

  4. System architecture for ubiquitous live video streaming in university network environment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dludla, AG

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available an architecture which supports ubiquitous live streaming for university or campus networks using a modified bluetooth inquiry mechanism with extended ID, integrated end-user device usage and adaptation to heterogeneous networks. Riding on that architecture...

  5. Budesonide Inhibits Intracellular Infection with Non-Typeable Haemophilus influenzae Despite Its Anti-Inflammatory Effects in Respiratory Cells and Human Lung Tissue: A Role for p38 MAP Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Christopher; Goldmann, Torsten; Rohmann, Kristina; Rupp, Jan; Marwitz, Sebastian; Rotta Detto Loria, Johannes; Limmer, Stefan; Zabel, Peter; Dalhoff, Klaus; Drömann, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are widely used in the treatment of obstructive lung diseases. Recent data suggest a higher pneumonia risk in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients treated with ICS. Since non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is the most common pathogen associated with acute exacerbations of COPD, we investigated the effects of budesonide (BUD) on NTHi-induced inflammation and invasive infection. The alveolar epithelial cell line A549 and specimens of human lung tissue (HLT) were used in our experiments. Intracellular infection was determined by a lysis/culture assay of infected cells. Activated p38 mitogen-associated protein kinase (MAPK) was assessed using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, expression of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) was determined by PCR, and CXCL-8 levels were measured using ELISA. Immunohistochemistry was used for detection of CXCL-8, platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R) and NTHi. BUD significantly reduced CXCL-8 secretion in A549 cells and lung tissue infected with NTHi. Furthermore, BUD decreased the expression of PAF-R in HLT and A549 cells. In A549 cells and HLT, BUD inhibited intracellular infection and - synergistically with NTHi - increased the expression of TLR2 (in A549 cells). TLR2 stimulation did not influence the intracellular infection of A549 cells, but p38 MAPK inhibition resulted in a significant reduction of infection. The present study adds new insights into the effects of glucocorticoids on pulmonary host defence after NTHi infection. Although the inflammatory response to infection is suppressed by BUD, interestingly, the intracellular infection is also inhibited. This effect seems to depend on the inhibition of p38 MAPK - a key enzyme in many pro-inflammatory pathways - as well as of PAF-R expression. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Limb Remote Ischemic Postconditioning Reduces Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Inhibiting NADPH Oxidase Activation and MyD88-TRAF6-P38MAP-Kinase Pathway of Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangling Chen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Limb remote ischemic postconditioning (LRIP has been confirmed to reduce the ischemia-reperfusion injury but its mechanisms are still not clear. This study clarified the mechanism of LRIP based on the nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase and Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88-Tumor necrosis factor (TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6-P38 pathway of neutrophils. Rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO model was used in this study. Ischemia-reperfusion injury was carried out by MCAO 1.5 h followed by 24 h reperfusion. LRIP operation was performed to the left femoral artery at 0, 1 or 3 h after reperfusion. Behavioral testing, including postural reflex test, vibrissae-elicited forelimb placing test and tail hang test, showed that LRIP operated at 0 h of reperfusion could significantly ameliorate these behavioral scores. Pathological examinations, infarct size, Myeloperoxidase (MPO activity showed that LRIP operated at 0 h of reperfusion could significantly ameliorate the pathological scores, reduce the infarct size and MPO activity in the brain and increase the MPO activity in the left leg. By using Neutrophil counting, immunofluorescence and real-time PCR techniques, we found that LRIP operated at 0 h of reperfusion could reduce neutrophil counts in the peripheral blood and downregulate the activation of neutrophil in the peripheral blood and rat brain. Western blots revealed that MyD88, TRAF6, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK in neutrophils and the phosphorylation of p47phox (Ser 304 and Ser 345 in neutrophil could be downregulated by LRIP. Our study suggests that LRIP inhibits the number and activation of neutrophils in the rat brain and peripheral blood linked to down-regulating the activation of NADPH oxidase in neutrophils by MyD88/TRAF6/p38-MAPK pathway.

  7. Smart Geographic object: Toward a new understanding of GIS Technology in Ubiquitous Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Zakaria, Sakyoud; Rey, Gaëtan; Mohamed, Eladnani; Lavirotte, Stéphane; Abdelaziz, El Fazziki; Tigli, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    International audience; One of the fundamental aspects of ubiquitous computing is the instrumentation of the real world by smart devices. This instrumentation constitutes an opportunity to rethink the interactions between human beings and their environment on the one hand, and between the components of this environment on the other. In this paper we discuss what this understanding of ubiquitous computing can bring to geographic science and particularly to GIS technology. Our main idea is the ...

  8. Interactive Spaces: Towards Collaborative structuring and Ubiquitous Presentation in Domestic Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2004-01-01

    collaborative structuring and ubiquitous presentation of materials in private homes. With DoHM we propose establishing new relationship between digital and physical hyperspaces, folding hyperspaces into the physical space of the household. Thus we strive to combine the qualities of physical domestic materials...... and spaces with the flexibility and dynamics of digital hyperspaces. We propose a variety of new ubiquitous home appliances called MediaWall, MediaTable, MediaTray and MediaPort, which address these issues....

  9. Interactive Spaces: Towards Collaborative Structuring and Ubiquitous Presentation in Domestic Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2004-01-01

    collaborative structuring and ubiquitous presentation of materials in private homes. With DoHM we propose establishing new relationship between digital and physical hyperspaces, folding hyperspaces into the physical space of the household. Thus we strive to combine the qualities of physical domestic materials...... and spaces with the flexibility and dynamics of digital hyperspaces. We propose a variety of new ubiquitous home appliances called MediaWall, MediaTable, MediaTray and MediaPort, which address these issues....

  10. From Many-to-One to One-to-Many: The Evolution of Ubiquitous Computing in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenli; Lim, Carolyn; Tan, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    Personal, Internet-connected technologies are becoming ubiquitous in the lives of students, and ubiquitous computing initiatives are already expanding in educational contexts. Historically in the field of education, the terms one-to-one (1:1) computing and ubiquitous computing have been interpreted in a number of ways and have at times been used…

  11. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridharan, Savitha; Jain, Kirti; Basu, Alakananda

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated protein kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK) and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets

  12. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Savitha; Jain, Kirti; Basu, Alakananda, E-mail: alakananda.basu@unthsc.edu [Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology, Institute for Cancer Research, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States)

    2011-06-09

    Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated protein kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK) and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets.

  13. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Savitha; Jain, Kirti; Basu, Alakananda

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated protein kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK) and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets. PMID:24212825

  14. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savitha Sridharan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets.

  15. Differential extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 activation by the angiotensin type 1 receptor supports distinct phenotypes of cardiac myocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aplin, Mark; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Schneider, Mikael

    2007-01-01

    that phosphorylates p90 Ribosomal S6 Kinase, a ubiquitous and versatile mediator of ERK1/2 signal transduction. Moreover, the beta-arrestin2-dependent ERK1/2 signal supports intact proliferation of cardiac myocytes. In contrast to G(q)-activated ERK1/2, and in keeping with its failure to translocate to the nucleus...

  16. Bacterial Protein-Tyrosine Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Lei; Kobir, Ahasanul; Jers, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    in exopolysaccharide production, virulence, DNA metabolism, stress response and other key functions of the bacterial cell. BY-kinases act through autophosphorylation (mainly in exopolysaccharide production) and phosphorylation of other proteins, which have in most cases been shown to be activated by tyrosine......Bacteria and Eukarya share essentially the same family of protein-serine/threonine kinases, also known as the Hanks-type kinases. However, when it comes to protein-tyrosine phosphorylation, bacteria seem to have gone their own way. Bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases) are bacterial...... and highlighted their importance in bacterial physiology. Having no orthologues in Eukarya, BY-kinases are receiving a growing attention from the biomedical field, since they represent a particularly promising target for anti-bacterial drug design....

  17. Stimulation of casein kinase II by epidermal growth factor: Relationship between the physiological activity of the kinase and the phosphorylation state of its beta subunit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, P.; Osheroff, N.; Glover, C.V.C.

    1990-01-01

    To determine relationships between the hormonal activation of casein kinase II and its phosphorylation state, epidermal growth factor (EGF)-treated and EGF-naive human A-431 carcinoma cells were cultured in the presence of [ 32 P]orthophosphate. Immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that casein kinase II in the cytosol of EGF-treated cells contained approximately 3-fold more incorporated [ 32 P]phosphate than did its counterpart in untreated cells. Levels of kinase phosphorylation paralleled levels of kinase activity over a wide range of EGF concentrations as well as over a time course of hormone action. Approximately 97% of the incorporated [ 32 P]phosphate was found in the β subunit of casein kinase II. Both activated and hormone-naive kinase contained radioactive phosphoserine and phosphothreonine but no phosphotyronsine. On the basis of proteolytic mapping experiments, EGF treatment of A-431 cells led to an increase in the average [ 32 P]phosphate content (i.e., hyperphosphorylation) of casein kinase II β subunit peptides which were modified prior to hormone treatment. Finally, the effect of alkaline phosphatase on the reaction kinetics of activated casein kinase II indicated that hormonal stimulation of the kinase resulted from the increase in its phosphorylation state

  18. LmxMPK4, an essential mitogen-activated protein kinase of Leishmania mexicana is phosphorylated and activated by the STE7-like protein kinase LmxMKK5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    John von Freyend, Simona; Rosenqvist, Heidi; Fink, Annette

    2010-01-01

    The essential mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase), LmxMPK4, of Leishmania mexicana is minimally active when purified following recombinant expression in Escherichia coli and was therefore unsuitable for drug screening until now. Using an E. coli protein co-expression system we identified...... LmxMKK5, a STE7-like protein kinase from L. mexicana, which phosphorylates and activates recombinant LmxMPK4 in vitro. LmxMKK5 is comprised of 525 amino acids and has a calculated molecular mass of 55.9kDa. The co-expressed, purified LmxMPK4 showed strong phosphotransferase activity in radiometric...... kinase assays and was confirmed by immunoblot and tandem mass spectrometry analyses to be phosphorylated on threonine 190 and tyrosine 192 of the typical TXY MAP kinase activation motif. The universal protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine reduced the phosphotransferase activity of co...

  19. Neural cell adhesion molecule-stimulated neurite outgrowth depends on activation of protein kinase C and the Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolkova, K; Novitskaya, V; Pedersen, N

    2000-01-01

    , inhibitors of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase p59(fyn), PLC, PKC and MEK and an activator of PKC, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). MEK2 transfection rescued cells treated with all inhibitors. The same was found for PMA treatment, except when cells concomitantly were treated with the MEK inhibitor....... Arachidonic acid rescued cells treated with antibodies to the FGF receptor or the PLC inhibitor, but not cells in which the activity of PKC, p59(fyn), FAK, Ras, or MEK was inhibited. Interaction of NCAM with a synthetic NCAM peptide ligand, known to induce neurite outgrowth, was shown to stimulate...... phosphorylation of the MAP kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1 and ERK2. The MAP kinase activation was sustained, because ERK1 and ERK2 were phosphorylated in PC12-E2 cells and primary hippocampal neurons even after 24 hr of cultivation on NCAM-expressing fibroblasts. Based on these results, we...

  20. Role of the Mixed-Lineage Protein Kinase Pathway in the Metabolic Stress Response to Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Kant

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Saturated free fatty acid (FFA is implicated in the metabolic response to obesity. In vitro studies indicate that FFA signaling may be mediated by the mixed-lineage protein kinase (MLK pathway that activates cJun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK. Here, we examined the role of the MLK pathway in vivo using a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. The ubiquitously expressed MLK2 and MLK3 protein kinases have partially redundant functions. We therefore compared wild-type and compound mutant mice that lack expression of MLK2 and MLK3. MLK deficiency protected mice against high-fat-diet-induced insulin resistance and obesity. Reduced JNK activation and increased energy expenditure contribute to the metabolic effects of MLK deficiency. These data confirm that the MLK pathway plays a critical role in the metabolic response to obesity.

  1. Ubiquitous testing using tablets: its impact on medical student perceptions of and engagement in learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyong-Jee; Hwang, Jee-Young

    2016-03-01

    Ubiquitous testing has the potential to affect medical education by enhancing the authenticity of the assessment using multimedia items. This study explored medical students' experience with ubiquitous testing and its impact on student learning. A cohort (n=48) of third-year students at a medical school in South Korea participated in this study. The students were divided into two groups and were given different versions of 10 content-matched items: one in text version (the text group) and the other in multimedia version (the multimedia group). Multimedia items were delivered using tablets. Item response analyses were performed to compare item characteristics between the two versions. Additionally, focus group interviews were held to investigate the students' experiences of ubiquitous testing. The mean test score was significantly higher in the text group. Item difficulty and discrimination did not differ between text and multimedia items. The participants generally showed positive responses on ubiquitous testing. Still, they felt that the lectures that they had taken in preclinical years did not prepare them enough for this type of assessment and clinical encounters during clerkships were more helpful. To be better prepared, the participants felt that they needed to engage more actively in learning in clinical clerkships and have more access to multimedia learning resources. Ubiquitous testing can positively affect student learning by reinforcing the importance of being able to understand and apply knowledge in clinical contexts, which drives students to engage more actively in learning in clinical settings.

  2. A single gene (Eu4) encodes the tissue-ubiquitous urease of soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torisky, R S; Griffin, J D; Yenofsky, R L; Polacco, J C

    1994-02-01

    We sought to determine the genetic basis of expression of the ubiquitous (metabolic) urease of soybean. This isozyme is termed the metabolic urease because its loss, in eu4/eu4 mutants, leads to accumulation of urea, whereas loss of the embryo-specific urease isozyme does not. The eu4 lesion eliminated the expression of the ubiquitous urease in vegetative and embryonic tissues. RFLP analysis placed urease clone LC4 near, or within, the Eu4 locus. Sequence comparison of urease proteins (ubiquitous and embryo-specific) and clones (LC4 and LS1) indicated that LC4 and LS1 encode ubiquitous and embryo-specific ureases, respectively. That LC4 is transcribed into poly(A)+ RNA in all tissues was indicated by the amplification of its transcript by an LC4-specific PCR primer. (The LS1-specific primer, on the other hand, amplified poly(A)+ RNA only from developing embryos expressing the embryo-specific urease.) These observations are consistent with Eu4 being the ubiquitous urease structural gene contained in the LC4 clone. In agreement with this notion, the mutant phenotype of eu4/eu4 callus was partially corrected by the LC4 urease gene introduced by particle bombardment.

  3. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase efficiently phosphorylates serine 15 of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josephson, Matthew P.; Sikkink, Laura A.; Penheiter, Alan R.; Burghardt, Thomas P.; Ajtai, Katalin

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) is phosphorylated at S15. ► Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase. ► It is a widely believed that MYL2 is a poor substrate for smMLCK. ► In fact, smMLCK efficiently and rapidly phosphorylates S15 in MYL2. ► Phosphorylation kinetics measured by novel fluorescence method without radioactivity. -- Abstract: Specific phosphorylation of the human ventricular cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) modifies the protein at S15. This modification affects MYL2 secondary structure and modulates the Ca 2+ sensitivity of contraction in cardiac tissue. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase prevalent in uterus and present in other contracting tissues including cardiac muscle. The recombinant 130 kDa (short) smMLCK phosphorylated S15 in MYL2 in vitro. Specific modification of S15 was verified using the direct detection of the phospho group on S15 with mass spectrometry. SmMLCK also specifically phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain S15 in porcine ventricular myosin and chicken gizzard smooth muscle myosin (S20 in smooth muscle) but failed to phosphorylate the myosin regulatory light chain in rabbit skeletal myosin. Phosphorylation kinetics, measured using a novel fluorescence method eliminating the use of radioactive isotopes, indicates similar Michaelis–Menten V max and K M for regulatory light chain S15 phosphorylation rates in MYL2, porcine ventricular myosin, and chicken gizzard myosin. These data demonstrate that smMLCK is a specific and efficient kinase for the in vitro phosphorylation of MYL2, cardiac, and smooth muscle myosin. Whether smMLCK plays a role in cardiac muscle regulation or response to a disease causing stimulus is unclear but it should be considered a potentially significant kinase in cardiac tissue on the basis of its specificity, kinetics, and tissue expression.

  4. Protein Kinase G Induces an Immune Response in Cows Exposed to Mycobacterium avium Subsp. paratuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horacio Bach

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To establish infection, pathogens secrete virulence factors, such as protein kinases and phosphatases, to modulate the signal transduction pathways used by host cells to initiate immune response. The protein MAP3893c is annotated in the genome sequence of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP, the causative agent of Johne’s disease, as the serine/threonine protein kinase G (PknG. In this work, we report that PknG is a functional kinase that is secreted within macrophages at early stages of infection. The antigen is able to induce an immune response from cattle exposed to MAP in the form of interferon gamma production after stimulation of whole blood with PknG. These findings suggest that PknG may contribute to the pathogenesis of MAP by phosphorylating macrophage signalling and/or adaptor molecules as observed with other pathogenic mycobacterial species.

  5. Ubiquitous Computing Services Discovery and Execution Using a Novel Intelligent Web Services Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Okkyung; Han, SangYong

    2007-01-01

    Ubiquitous Computing makes it possible to determine in real time the location and situations of service requesters in a web service environment as it enables access to computers at any time and in any place. Though research on various aspects of ubiquitous commerce is progressing at enterprises and research centers, both domestically and overseas, analysis of a customer's personal preferences based on semantic web and rule based services using semantics is not currently being conducted. This paper proposes a Ubiquitous Computing Services System that enables a rule based search as well as semantics based search to support the fact that the electronic space and the physical space can be combined into one and the real time search for web services and the construction of efficient web services thus become possible.

  6. Aurora A kinase RNAi and small molecule inhibition of Aurora kinases with VE-465 induce apoptotic death in multiple myeloma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Robert; Naber, Claudia; Steffler, Tara; Checkland, Tamara; Keats, Jonathan; Maxwell, Christopher; Perry, Troy; Chau, Heidi; Belch, Andrew; Pilarski, Linda; Reiman, Tony

    2008-03-01

    The expression of RHAMM and other centrosome-associated genes are known to correlate with the extent of centrosome amplification in multiple myeloma, and with poor prognosis. RHAMM has a significant interaction with TPX2, a protein which regulates the localization and action of Aurora A kinase (AURKA) at the spindle poles. AURKA is known to be a central determinant of centrosome and spindle function and is a target for cancer therapy. Given these observations, we investigated the role of Aurora kinases as therapeutic targets in myeloma. Here we report that AURKA is expressed ubiquitously in myeloma, to varying degrees, in both cell lines and patients' bone marrow plasma cells. siRNA targeting AURKA induces apoptotic cell death in myeloma cell lines. The Aurora kinase inhibitor VE-465 also induces apoptosis and death in myeloma cell lines and primary myeloma plasma cells. The combination of VE-465 and dexamethasone improves cell killing compared with the use of either agent alone, even in cells resistant to the single agents. The phenotype of myeloma cells treated with VE-465 is consistent with published reports on the effects of Aurora kinase inhibition. Aurora kinase inhibitors should be pursued as potential treatments for myeloma.

  7. RECON: Capturing Mobile and Ubiquitous Interaction in Real Contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kasper Løvborg

    2009-01-01

    for studying the user experience of such applications in the field tend to be cumbersome and expensive with regard to time and manpower, and they generally do not scale well with number of users and duration of studies. RECON addresses these challenges and provides an addition to the methodological...... to conduct large scale remote studies of mobile and ubiquitous applications in real contexts.......Evaluating the user experience of mobile and ubiquitous applications is a challenging task. They are becoming increasingly complex and tightly interwoven into the fabric of everyday life and thus cannot easily be taken out of context and evaluated in controlled experimental environments. Methods...

  8. [Facing the challenges of ubiquitous computing in the health care sector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieff, Peter; Friedewald, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The steady progress of microelectronics, communications and information technology will enable the realisation of the vision for "ubiquitous computing" where the Internet extends into the real world embracing everyday objects. The necessary technical basis is already in place. Due to their diminishing size, constantly falling price and declining energy consumption, processors, communications modules and sensors are being increasingly integrated into everyday objects today. This development is opening up huge opportunities for both the economy and individuals. In the present paper we discuss possible applications, but also technical, social and economic barriers to a wide-spread use of ubiquitous computing in the health care sector. .

  9. Hypothalamic glycogen synthase kinase 3β has a central role in the regulation of food intake and glucose metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Benzler, Jonas; Ganjam, Goutham K.; Krüger, Manon; Pinkenburg, Olaf; Kutschke, Maria; Stöhr, Sigrid; Steger, Juliane; Koch, Christiane E.; Ölkrug, Rebecca; Schwartz, Michael W.; Shepherd, Peter R.; Grattan, David R.; Tups, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    GSK3β (glycogen synthase kinase 3β) is a ubiquitous kinase that plays a key role in multiple intracellular signalling pathways, and increased GSK3β activity is implicated in disorders ranging from cancer to Alzheimer’s disease. In the present study, we provide the first evidence of increased hypothalamic signalling via GSK3β in leptin-deficient Lepob/ob mice and show that intracerebroventricular injection of a GSK3β inhibitor acutely improves glucose tolerance in these mice. The beneficial ef...

  10. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β promotes liver innate immune activation by restraining AMP-activated protein kinase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Haoming; Wang, Han; Ni, Ming; Yue, Shi; Xia, Yongxiang; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W; Lu, Ling; Wang, Xuehao; Zhai, Yuan

    2018-02-13

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (Gsk3β [Gsk3b]) is a ubiquitously expressed kinase with distinctive functions in different types of cells. Although its roles in regulating innate immune activation and ischaemia and reperfusion injuries (IRIs) have been well documented, the underlying mechanisms remain ambiguous, in part because of the lack of cell-specific tools in vivo. We created a myeloid-specific Gsk3b knockout (KO) strain to study the function of Gsk3β in macrophages in a murine liver partial warm ischaemia model. Compared with controls, myeloid Gsk3b KO mice were protected from IRI, with diminished proinflammatory but enhanced anti-inflammatory immune responses in livers. In bone marrow-derived macrophages, Gsk3β deficiency resulted in an early reduction of Tnf gene transcription but sustained increase of Il10 gene transcription on Toll-like receptor 4 stimulation in vitro. These effects were associated with enhanced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, which led to an accelerated and higher level of induction of the novel innate immune negative regulator small heterodimer partner (SHP [Nr0b2]). The regulatory function of Gsk3β on AMPK activation and SHP induction was confirmed in wild-type bone marrow-derived macrophages with a Gsk3 inhibitor. Furthermore, we found that this immune regulatory mechanism was independent of Gsk3β Ser9 phosphorylation and the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt signalling pathway. In vivo, myeloid Gsk3β deficiency facilitated SHP upregulation by ischaemia-reperfusion in liver macrophages. Treatment of Gsk3b KO mice with either AMPK inhibitor or SHP small interfering RNA before the onset of liver ischaemia restored liver proinflammatory immune activation and IRI in these otherwise protected hosts. Additionally, pharmacological activation of AMPK protected wild-type mice from liver IRI, with reduced proinflammatory immune activation. Inhibition of the AMPK-SHP pathway by liver ischaemia was demonstrated in tumour resection

  11. Mechanisms of Altered Control of Proliferation by Cyclic Amp/Protein Kinase A During Mammary Tumor Progression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Imagawa, Walter

    1999-01-01

    We hypothesize that alterations in the regulation of growth by growth factors and cAMP during mammary tumor progression are related to MAP kinase signaling pathways known to be affected by cAMP and pertussis toxin (PT...

  12. Receptor-interacting protein (RIP) kinase family

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Duanwu; Lin, Juan; Han, Jiahuai

    2010-01-01

    Receptor-interacting protein (RIP) kinases are a group of threonine/serine protein kinases with a relatively conserved kinase domain but distinct non-kinase regions. A number of different domain structures, such as death and caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARD) domains, were found in different RIP family members, and these domains should be keys in determining the specific function of each RIP kinase. It is known that RIP kinases participate in different biological processes, incl...

  13. Ubiquitous atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spruch, G.M.; Spruch, L.

    1974-01-01

    The fundamentals of modern physics, including the basic physics and chemistry of the atom, elementary particles, cosmology, periodicity, and recent advances, are surveyed. The biology and chemistry of the life process is discussed to provide a background for considering the effects of atomic particles on living things. The uses of atomic power in space travel, merchant shipping, food preservation, desalination, and nuclear clocks are explored. (Pollut. Abstr.)

  14. Eotaxin induces degranulation and chemotaxis of eosinophils through the activation of ERK2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampen, G T; Stafford, S; Adachi, T

    2000-01-01

    Eotaxin and other CC chemokines acting via CC chemokine receptor-3 (CCR3) are believed to play an integral role in the development of eosinophilic inflammation in asthma and allergic inflammatory diseases. However, little is known about the intracellular events following agonist binding to CCR3...... and the relationship of these events to the functional response of the cell. The objectives of this study were to investigate CCR3-mediated activation of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase-2 (ERK2), p38, and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in eosinophils and to assess...... the requirement for MAP kinases in eotaxin-induced eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) release and chemotaxis. MAP kinase activation was studied in eotaxin-stimulated eosinophils (more than 97% purity) by Western blotting and immune-complex kinase assays. ECP release was measured by radioimmunoassay. Chemotaxis...

  15. Hierarchical modeling of activation mechanisms in the ABL and EGFR kinase domains: thermodynamic and mechanistic catalysts of kinase activation by cancer mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshuman Dixit

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Structural and functional studies of the ABL and EGFR kinase domains have recently suggested a common mechanism of activation by cancer-causing mutations. However, dynamics and mechanistic aspects of kinase activation by cancer mutations that stimulate conformational transitions and thermodynamic stabilization of the constitutively active kinase form remain elusive. We present a large-scale computational investigation of activation mechanisms in the ABL and EGFR kinase domains by a panel of clinically important cancer mutants ABL-T315I, ABL-L387M, EGFR-T790M, and EGFR-L858R. We have also simulated the activating effect of the gatekeeper mutation on conformational dynamics and allosteric interactions in functional states of the ABL-SH2-SH3 regulatory complexes. A comprehensive analysis was conducted using a hierarchy of computational approaches that included homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, protein stability analysis, targeted molecular dynamics, and molecular docking. Collectively, the results of this study have revealed thermodynamic and mechanistic catalysts of kinase activation by major cancer-causing mutations in the ABL and EGFR kinase domains. By using multiple crystallographic states of ABL and EGFR, computer simulations have allowed one to map dynamics of conformational fluctuations and transitions in the normal (wild-type and oncogenic kinase forms. A proposed multi-stage mechanistic model of activation involves a series of cooperative transitions between different conformational states, including assembly of the hydrophobic spine, the formation of the Src-like intermediate structure, and a cooperative breakage and formation of characteristic salt bridges, which signify transition to the active kinase form. We suggest that molecular mechanisms of activation by cancer mutations could mimic the activation process of the normal kinase, yet exploiting conserved structural catalysts to accelerate a conformational transition

  16. Thymidine kinase 2 (H126N) knockin mice show the essential role of balanced deoxynucleotide pools for mitochondrial DNA maintenance

    OpenAIRE

    Akman, Hasan O.; Dorado, Beatriz; López, Luis C.; García-Cazorla, Ángeles; Vilà, Maya R.; Tanabe, Lauren M.; Dauer, William T.; Bonilla, Eduardo; Tanji, Kurenai; Hirano, Michio

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome (MDS), an autosomal recessive condition, is characterized by variable organ involvement with decreased mtDNA copy number and activities of respiratory chain enzymes in affected tissues. MtDNA depletion has been associated with mutations in nine autosomal genes, including thymidine kinase (TK2), which encodes a ubiquitous mitochondrial protein. To study the pathogenesis of TK2-deficiency, we generated mice harboring an H126N Tk2 mutation. Homozygous...

  17. Mitogen-activated protein kinases interacting kinases are autoinhibited by a reprogrammed activation segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Ralf; Cho, Min-Kyu; Jäkel, Stefan; Netter, Catharina; Schreiter, Kay; Aicher, Babette; Zweckstetter, Markus; Jäckle, Herbert; Wahl, Markus C

    2006-09-06

    Autoinhibition is a recurring mode of protein kinase regulation and can be based on diverse molecular mechanisms. Here, we show by crystal structure analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based nucleotide affinity studies and rational mutagenesis that nonphosphorylated mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases interacting kinase (Mnk) 1 is autoinhibited by conversion of the activation segment into an autoinhibitory module. In a Mnk1 crystal structure, the activation segment is repositioned via a Mnk-specific sequence insertion at the N-terminal lobe with the following consequences: (i) the peptide substrate binding site is deconstructed, (ii) the interlobal cleft is narrowed, (iii) an essential Lys-Glu pair is disrupted and (iv) the magnesium-binding loop is locked into an ATP-competitive conformation. Consistently, deletion of the Mnk-specific insertion or removal of a conserved phenylalanine side chain, which induces a blockade of the ATP pocket, increase the ATP affinity of Mnk1. Structural rearrangements required for the activation of Mnks are apparent from the cocrystal structure of a Mnk2 D228G -staurosporine complex and can be modeled on the basis of crystal packing interactions. Our data suggest a novel regulatory mechanism specific for the Mnk subfamily.

  18. Study on the Context-Aware Middleware for Ubiquitous Greenhouses Using Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeonghwang Hwang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Network (WSN technology is one of the important technologies to implement the ubiquitous society, and it could increase productivity of agricultural and livestock products, and secure transparency of distribution channels if such a WSN technology were successfully applied to the agricultural sector. Middleware, which can connect WSN hardware, applications, and enterprise systems, is required to construct ubiquitous agriculture environment combining WSN technology with agricultural sector applications, but there have been insufficient studies in the field of WSN middleware in the agricultural environment, compared to other industries. This paper proposes a context-aware middleware to efficiently process data collected from ubiquitous greenhouses by applying WSN technology and used to implement combined services through organic connectivity of data. The proposed middleware abstracts heterogeneous sensor nodes to integrate different forms of data, and provides intelligent context-aware, event service, and filtering functions to maximize operability and scalability of the middleware. To evaluate the performance of the middleware, an integrated management system for ubiquitous greenhouses was implemented by applying the proposed middleware to an existing greenhouse, and it was tested by measuring the level of load through CPU usage and the response time for users’ requests when the system is working.

  19. Undergraduate Students' Opinions with Regard to Ubiquitous MOOC for Enhancing Cross-Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plangsorn, Boonrat; Na-Songkhla, Jaitip; Luetkehans, Lara M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to study undergraduate students' opinions with regard to the ubiquitous massive open online course (MOOC) for enhancing cross-cultural competence. This descriptive research applied a survey method. The survey data were collected by using survey questionnaires and online questionnaires from 410 undergraduate students…

  20. Pervasion of what? : techno–human ecologies and their ubiquitous spirits.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coeckelbergh, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Are the robots coming? Is the singularity near? Will we be dominated by technology? The usual response to ethical issues raised by pervasive and ubiquitous technologies assumes a philosophical anthropology centered on existential autonomy and agency, a dualistic ontology separating humans from

  1. A Socio-technical study of an Ubiquitous CPOE-system in Local Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wentzer, Helle; Böttger, Ulrich; Boye, Niels

    2006-01-01

    , transformation in competencies, and less time spent at the bedside for nurses and doctors, as a system - constructed for ubiquitous drug-order entries and handling - was implemented for local use. This study throws light on problems of patient continuity, patient-related and IT-system-related error...

  2. 2nd FTRA International Conference on Ubiquitous Computing Application and Wireless Sensor Network

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Yi; Chao, Han-Chieh; Yi, Gangman

    2015-01-01

    IT changes everyday’s life, especially in education and medicine. The goal of ITME 2014 is to further explore the theoretical and practical issues of Ubiquitous Computing Application and Wireless Sensor Network. It also aims to foster new ideas and collaboration between researchers and practitioners. The organizing committee is soliciting unpublished papers for the main conference and its special tracks.

  3. Ubiquitous Accessibility for People with Visual Impairments: Are We There Yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billah, Syed Masum; Ashok, Vikas; Porter, Donald E; Ramakrishnan, I V

    2017-05-01

    Ubiquitous access is an increasingly common vision of computing, wherein users can interact with any computing device or service from anywhere, at any time. In the era of personal computing, users with visual impairments required special-purpose, assistive technologies, such as screen readers, to interact with computers. This paper investigates whether technologies like screen readers have kept pace with, or have created a barrier to, the trend toward ubiquitous access, with a specific focus on desktop computing as this is still the primary way computers are used in education and employment. Towards that, the paper presents a user study with 21 visually-impaired participants, specifically involving the switching of screen readers within and across different computing platforms, and the use of screen readers in remote access scenarios. Among the findings, the study shows that, even for remote desktop access-an early forerunner of true ubiquitous access-screen readers are too limited, if not unusable. The study also identifies several accessibility needs, such as uniformity of navigational experience across devices, and recommends potential solutions. In summary, assistive technologies have not made the jump into the era of ubiquitous access, and multiple, inconsistent screen readers create new practical problems for users with visual impairments.

  4. Radar sensor technology developments as CSIR DPSS in support of persistent, ubiquitous surveillance systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anderson, F

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available of an S&T capability based on international technology trends in persistent, ubiquitous surveillance. The ultimate aim of this programme is to develop and produce a series of South African innovations that can be used by departments and agencies...

  5. Bringing Mohamed to the Mountain: Situated Professional Development in a Ubiquitous Computing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Karen; Kratcoski, Annette; Mazzer, Pat; Schenker, Jason

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an ongoing situated professional development program in which teachers bring their intact classes for an extended stay in a ubiquitous computing environment equipped with a variety of state-of-the-art computing devices. The experience is unique in that it not only situates teacher learning about technology integration in…

  6. Ubiquitous Computing and Changing Pedagogical Possibilities: Representations, Conceptualizations and Uses of Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Karen; Van 'T Hooft, Mark; Kratcoski, Annette; Schenker, Jason

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on preliminary findings from an ongoing study of teaching and learning in a ubiquitous computing classroom. The research employed mixed methods and multiple measures to document changes in teaching and learning that result when teachers and students have access to a variety of digital devices wherever and whenever they need…

  7. Conditions for Ubiquitous Computing: What Can Be Learned from a Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jing

    2010-01-01

    Based on survey data and interview data collected over four academic years, this longitudinal study examined how a ubiquitous computing project evolved along with the changes in teachers, students, the human infrastructure, and technology infrastructure in the school. This study also investigated what conditions were necessary for successful…

  8. Evaluating Ubiquitous Media Usability Challenges: Content Transfer and Channel Switching Delays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleury, Alexandre; Pedersen, Jakob Schou; Larsen, Lars Bo

    2011-01-01

    As ubiquitous media is developing rapidly, new HCI challenges emerge. In this paper, we address usability issues related to the transfer of content between fixed and mobile devices, as well as channel switching delays on mobile devices. We first provide an extensive review of the field. We...

  9. Introducing Laptops to Children: An Examination of Ubiquitous Computing in Grade 3 Reading, Language, and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Robert M.; Bethel, Edward Clement; Abrami, Philip C.; Wade, C. Anne

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the achievement outcomes accompanying the implementation of a Grade 3 laptop or so-­called "ubiquitous computing" program in a Quebec school district. CAT­3 reading, language, and mathematics batteries were administered at the end of Grade 2 and again at the end of Grade 3, after the first year of computer…

  10. Ubiquitous Knowledge Construction: Mobile Learning Re-Defined and a Conceptual Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hsinyi; Su, Yi-Ju; Chou, Chien; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2009-01-01

    Emerging from recent mobile technologies, mobile learning, or m-learning, is beginning to offer "stunning new technical capabilities" in education (DiGiano et al., 2003). This new genre of learning is viewed as a revolutionary stage in educational technology. However, ubiquitous computing technologies have given rise to several issues. This…

  11. Four Stages of Research on the Educational Use of Ubiquitous Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laru, Jari; Naykki, Piia; Järvelä, Sanna

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the Gartner Group's hype cycle is used as the basis for categorizing and analyzing research on the educational use of ubiquitous computing. There are five phases of the hype cycle: the technology trigger, the peak of inflated expectations, the trough of disillusionment, the slope of enlightenment, and the plateau of productivity.…

  12. Ubiquitous and Ambient Intelligence Assisted Learning Environment Infrastructures Development--A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagarajan, Sujith; Ramakrishnan, Sivakumar

    2018-01-01

    Ubiquitous Learning Environment (ULE) has been becoming a mobile and sensor based technology equipped environment that suits the modern world education discipline requirements for the past few years. Ambient Intelligence (AmI) makes much smarter the ULE by the support of optimization and intelligent techniques. Various efforts have been so far…

  13. Refining the ethics of computer-made decisions : A classification of moral mediation by ubiquitous machines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Voort, M.; Pieters, W.; Consoli, L.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decades, computers have become more and more involved in society by the rise of ubiquitous systems, increasing the number of interactions between humans and IT systems. At the same time, the technology itself is getting more complex, enabling devices to act in a way that previously only

  14. Using TinyOS Components for the Design of an Adaptive Ubiquitous System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaya, O.S.; Durmaz, O.; Dulman, S.O.; Gemesi, R.; Jansen, P.G.; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2005-01-01

    This work is an initiative attempt toward component-based software engineering in ubiquitous computing systems. Software components cooperate in a distributed manner to meet a demand, and adapt their software bindings during run-time depending on the context information. There are two main research

  15. Using TinyOS Components for the Design of an Adaptive Ubiquitous System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaya, O.S.; Durmaz, O.; Dulman, S.O.; Gemesi, R.; Jansen, P.G.; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    This work is an initiative attempt toward component-based software engineering in ubiquitous computing systems. Software components cooperate in a distributed manner to meet a demand, and adapt their software bindings during run-time depending on the context information. There are two main research

  16. Glucose, other secretagogues, and nerve growth factor stimulate mitogen-activated protein kinase in the insulin-secreting beta-cell line, INS-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frödin, M; Sekine, N; Roche, E

    1995-01-01

    The signaling pathways whereby glucose and hormonal secretagogues regulate insulin-secretory function, gene transcription, and proliferation of pancreatic beta-cells are not well defined. We show that in the glucose-responsive beta-cell line INS-1, major secretagogue-stimulated signaling pathways...... converge to activate 44-kDa mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. Thus, glucose-induced insulin secretion was found to be associated with a small stimulatory effect on 44-kDa MAP kinase, which was synergistically enhanced by increased levels of intracellular cAMP and by the hormonal secretagogues......-1. Phorbol ester, an activator of protein kinase C, stimulated 44-kDa MAP kinase by both Ca(2+)-dependent and -independent pathways. Nerve growth factor, independently of changes in cytosolic Ca2+, efficiently stimulated 44-kDa MAP kinase without causing insulin release, indicating that activation...

  17. Ubiquitous Total Station Development using Smartphone, RSSI and Laser Sensor providing service to Ubi-GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Shoushtari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The growing trend in technological advances and Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS has targeted for intelligent human lives. Accordingly, Ubiquitous Computing Approach was proposed by Mark Weiser. This paper proposes an ubiquitous surveying solution in Geometrics and surveying field. Ubiquitous Surveying provides cost-effective, smart and available surveying techniques while traditional surveying equipment are so expensive and have small availability specially in indoor and daily surveying jobs. In order to have a smart surveying instrument, different information technology methods and tools like Triangle method, Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI method and laser sensor are used. These new ways in combine with surveying equations introduces a modern surveying equipment called Ubi-Total Station that also employed different sensors embedded in smartphone and mobile stand. RSSI-based localization and Triangle method technique are easy and well known methods to predict the position of an unknown node in indoor environments whereas additional measures are required for a sufficient accuracy. In this paper the main goal is to introduce the Ubiquitous Total Station as a development in smart and ubiquitous GIS. In order to public use of the surveying equipment, design and implementation of this instrument has been done. Conceptual model of Smartphone-based system is designed for this study and based on this model, an Android application as a first sample is developed. Finally the evaluations shows that absolute errors in X and Y calculation are 0.028 and 0.057 meter respectively. Also RMSE of 0.26 was calculated in RSSI method for distance measurement. The high price of traditional equipment and their requirement for professional surveyors has given way to intelligent surveying. In the suggested system, smartphones can be used as tools for positioning and coordinating geometric information of objects.

  18. Ubiquitous computing to support co-located clinical teams: using the semiotics of physical objects in system design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Magnus; Timpka, Toomas

    2007-06-01

    Co-located teams often use material objects to communicate messages in collaboration. Modern desktop computing systems with abstract graphical user interface (GUIs) fail to support this material dimension of inter-personal communication. The aim of this study is to investigate how tangible user interfaces can be used in computer systems to better support collaborative routines among co-located clinical teams. The semiotics of physical objects used in team collaboration was analyzed from data collected during 1 month of observations at an emergency room. The resulting set of communication patterns was used as a framework when designing an experimental system. Following the principles of augmented reality, physical objects were mapped into a physical user interface with the goal of maintaining the symbolic value of those objects. NOSTOS is an experimental ubiquitous computing environment that takes advantage of interaction devices integrated into the traditional clinical environment, including digital pens, walk-up displays, and a digital desk. The design uses familiar workplace tools to function as user interfaces to the computer in order to exploit established cognitive and collaborative routines. Paper-based tangible user interfaces and digital desks are promising technologies for co-located clinical teams. A key issue that needs to be solved before employing such solutions in practice is associated with limited feedback from the passive paper interfaces.

  19. A Context-Aware Knowledge Map to Support Ubiquitous Learning Activities for a u-Botanical Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Lin; Chen, Chia-Chen; Zhang, Zhe George

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in mobile and wireless communication technologies have played a vital role in building the u-learning environment that now combines both real-world and digital learning resources. However, learners still require assistance to control real objects and manage the abundance of available materials; otherwise, their mental workload…

  20. Activation of c-Raf-1 kinase signal transduction pathway in alpha(7) integrin-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saher, G; Hildt, E

    1999-09-24

    Integrin alpha(7)-deficient mice develop a novel form of muscular dystrophy. Here we report that deficiency of alpha(7) integrin causes an activation of the c-Raf-1/mitogen-activated protein (MAP) 2 kinase signal transduction pathway in muscle cells. The observed activation of c-Raf-1/MAP2 kinases is a specific effect, because the alpha(7) integrin deficiency does not cause unspecific stress as determined by measurement of the Hsp72/73 level and activity of the JNK2 kinase. Because an increased level of activated FAK was found in muscle of alpha(7) integrin-deficient mice, the activation of c-Raf-1 kinase is triggered most likely by an integrin-dependent pathway. In accordance with this, in the integrin alpha(7)-deficient mice, part of the integrin beta(1D) variant in muscle is replaced by the beta(1A) variant, which permits the FAK activation. A recent report describes that integrin activity can be down-modulated by the c-Raf-1/MAP2 kinase pathway. Specific activation of the c-Raf-1/MAP2 kinases by cell-permeable peptides in skeletal muscle of rabbits causes degeneration of muscle fibers. Therefore, we conclude that in alpha(7) integrin-deficient mice, the continuous activation of c-Raf-1 kinase causes a permanent reduction of integrin activity diminishing integrin-dependent cell-matrix interactions and thereby contributing to the development of the dystrophic phenotype.

  1. Ubiquitous geospatial concept in evolution of the macro and micro spatial planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabri, S; Ludin, A N M; Majid, M R

    2014-01-01

    There are many examples of GIS application in planning such as urban land-use planning, cultural heritage conservation, coastal zone management, and the design of structure plans for sustainable economic development. All these applications are dealing with systems in which natural and human factors are interconnected. But an issue that should be addressed is to what extent the current information technology is able to connect all these parts together? Contemporary improvement in information technology made the computer so imbedded in our everyday practices that we use it without having to think about it. Thus, computing is becoming truly ubiquitous and is available anywhere anytime. Advances in the internet facilities and devices, such as high speed wireless networks, mobile middleware, and smart technologies, has pushed the concept of ubiquitous computing to the forefront of GIS research and development. There are developments in this regards, these are such as GeoWeb 2.0, voluntarily geographic Information (VGI), and Mashups, whereby the application of cloud computing was possible in visualizing urban air pollution and emergency responses to ensure the safety and security. These advancements therefore, have changed the conventional facet of macro and micro spatial planning. Every possible information system such as residential, medical, business, environmental, governmental, and the like can be linked through ubiquitous computing technologies and acts as a virtually one system which works for society. However, the journey to achieve a true ubiquitous GIS is not without challenges. Despite the current potentials there are many issues and obstacles need to be addressed before GIS can to be truly ubiquitous in planning context. Perhaps four criteria as explained by Goodchild et al (1997) can be applied to ubiquitous GIS in planning very well: the system must be distributed (data storage, processing and user interaction can occur at locations that are potentially

  2. Ubiquitous geospatial concept in evolution of the macro and micro spatial planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, S.; Ludin, A. N. M.; Majid, M. R.

    2014-02-01

    There are many examples of GIS application in planning such as urban land-use planning, cultural heritage conservation, coastal zone management, and the design of structure plans for sustainable economic development. All these applications are dealing with systems in which natural and human factors are interconnected. But an issue that should be addressed is to what extent the current information technology is able to connect all these parts together? Contemporary improvement in information technology made the computer so imbedded in our everyday practices that we use it without having to think about it. Thus, computing is becoming truly ubiquitous and is available anywhere anytime. Advances in the internet facilities and devices, such as high speed wireless networks, mobile middleware, and smart technologies, has pushed the concept of ubiquitous computing to the forefront of GIS research and development. There are developments in this regards, these are such as GeoWeb 2.0, voluntarily geographic Information (VGI), and Mashups, whereby the application of cloud computing was possible in visualizing urban air pollution and emergency responses to ensure the safety and security. These advancements therefore, have changed the conventional facet of macro and micro spatial planning. Every possible information system such as residential, medical, business, environmental, governmental, and the like can be linked through ubiquitous computing technologies and acts as a virtually one system which works for society. However, the journey to achieve a true ubiquitous GIS is not without challenges. Despite the current potentials there are many issues and obstacles need to be addressed before GIS can to be truly ubiquitous in planning context. Perhaps four criteria as explained by Goodchild et al (1997) can be applied to ubiquitous GIS in planning very well: the system must be distributed (data storage, processing and user interaction can occur at locations that are potentially

  3. MAP Kinase 4 Substrates and Plant Innate Immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Magnus Wohlfahrt

    . For example, Arabidopsis MPK4 regulates the expression of a subset of defense genes via at least one WRKY transcription factor. We report here that MPK4 is found in complexes in vivo with (i) PAT1, component of the mRNA decapping machinery, (ii) AOC3, a component in the biosynthesis pathway of JA and (iii) e...

  4. Oxide Synthase Expression by p38 MAP Kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuija Turpeinen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of dual specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1 in inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression in A549 human pulmonary epithelial cells, J774 mouse macrophages and primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs was investigated. iNOS expression was induced by a cytokine mixture (TNF, IFNγ and IL-1β in A549 cells and by LPS in J774 cells, and it was inhibited by p38 MAPK inhibitors SB202190 and BIRB 796. Stimulation with cytokine mixture or LPS enhanced also DUSP1 expression. Down-regulation of DUSP1 by siRNA increased p38 MAPK phosphorylation and iNOS expression in A549 and J774 cells. In addition, LPS-induced iNOS expression was enhanced in BMMs from DUSP1(−/− mice as compared to that in BMMs from wild-type mice. The results indicate that DUSP1 suppresses iNOS expression by limiting p38 MAPK activity in human and mouse cells. Compounds that enhance DUSP1 expression or modulate its function may be beneficial in diseases complicated with increased iNOS-mediated NO production.

  5. The molecular architecture of human N-acetylgalactosamine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoden, James B; Holden, Hazel M

    2005-09-23

    Galactokinase plays a key role in normal galactose metabolism by catalyzing the conversion of alpha-d-galactose to galactose 1-phosphate. Within recent years, the three-dimensional structures of human galactokinase and two bacterial forms of the enzyme have been determined. Originally, the gene encoding galactokinase in humans was mapped to chromosome 17. An additional gene, encoding a protein with sequence similarity to galactokinase, was subsequently mapped to chromosome 15. Recent reports have shown that this second gene (GALK2) encodes an enzyme with greater activity against GalNAc than galactose. This enzyme, GalNAc kinase, has been implicated in a salvage pathway for the reutilization of free GalNAc derived from the degradation of complex carbohydrates. Here we report the first structural analysis of a GalNAc kinase. The structure of the human enzyme was solved in the presence of MnAMPPNP and GalNAc or MgATP and GalNAc (which resulted in bound products in the active site). The enzyme displays a distinctly bilobal appearance with its active site wedged between the two domains. The N-terminal region is dominated by a seven-stranded mixed beta-sheet, whereas the C-terminal motif contains two layers of anti-parallel beta-sheet. The overall topology displayed by GalNAc kinase places it into the GHMP superfamily of enzymes, which generally function as small molecule kinases. From this investigation, the geometry of the GalNAc kinase active site before and after catalysis has been revealed, and the determinants of substrate specificity have been defined on a molecular level.

  6. Ubiquitous Performance-Support System as Mindtool: A Case Study of Instructional Decision Making and Learning Assistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hsinyi; Chuang, Po-Ya; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Chu, Hui-Chun; Wu, Ting-Ting; Huang, Shu-Xian

    2009-01-01

    Researchers have conducted various studies on applying wireless communication and ubiquitous computing technologies to education, so that the technologies can provide learners and educators with more active and adaptive support. This study proposes a Ubiquitous Performance-support System (UPSS) that can facilitate the seamless use of powerful new…

  7. Researching the Ethical Dimensions of Mobile, Ubiquitous and Immersive Technology Enhanced Learning (MUITEL): A Thematic Review and Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lally, Vic; Sharples, Mike; Tracy, Frances; Bertram, Neil; Masters, Sherriden

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we examine the ethical dimensions of researching the mobile, ubiquitous and immersive technology enhanced learning (MUITEL), with a particular focus on learning in informal settings. We begin with an analysis of the interactions between mobile, ubiquitous and immersive technologies and the wider context of the digital economy. In…

  8. 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, metabolism and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenbach, William G; Sakamoto, Kei; Goodyear, Laurie J

    2004-01-01

    The 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a member of a metabolite-sensing protein kinase family that functions as a metabolic 'fuel gauge' in skeletal muscle. AMPK is a ubiquitous heterotrimeric protein, consisting of an alpha catalytic, and beta and gamma regulatory subunits that exist in multiple isoforms and are all required for full enzymatic activity. During exercise, AMPK becomes activated in skeletal muscle in response to changes in cellular energy status (e.g. increased adenosine monophosphate [AMP]/adenosine triphosphate [ATP] and creatine/phosphocreatine ratios) in an intensity-dependent manner, and serves to inhibit ATP-consuming pathways, and activate pathways involved in carbohydrate and fatty-acid metabolism to restore ATP levels. Recent evidence shows that although AMPK plays this key metabolic role during acute bouts of exercise, it is also an important component of the adaptive response of skeletal muscles to endurance exercise training because of its ability to alter muscle fuel reserves and expression of several exercise-responsive genes. This review discusses the putative roles of AMPK in acute and chronic exercise responses, and suggests avenues for future AMPK research in exercise physiology and biochemistry.

  9. The National Map: from geography to mapping and back again

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelmelis, John A.; DeMulder, Mark L.; Ogrosky, Charles E.; Van Driel, J. Nicholas; Ryan, Barbara J.

    2003-01-01

    When the means of production for national base mapping were capital intensive, required large production facilities, and had ill-defined markets, Federal Government mapping agencies were the primary providers of the spatial data needed for economic development, environmental management, and national defense. With desktop geographic information systems now ubiquitous, source data available as a commodity from private industry, and the realization that many complex problems faced by society need far more and different kinds of spatial data for their solutions, national mapping organizations must realign their business strategies to meet growing demand and anticipate the needs of a rapidly changing geographic information environment. The National Map of the United States builds on a sound historic foundation of describing and monitoring the land surface and adds a focused effort to produce improved understanding, modeling, and prediction of land-surface change. These added dimensions bring to bear a broader spectrum of geographic science to address extant and emerging issues. Within the overarching construct of The National Map, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is making a transition from data collector to guarantor of national data completeness; from producing paper maps to supporting an online, seamless, integrated database; and from simply describing the Nation’s landscape to linking these descriptions with increased scientific understanding. Implementing the full spectrum of geographic science addresses a myriad of public policy issues, including land and natural resource management, recreation, urban growth, human health, and emergency planning, response, and recovery. Neither these issues nor the science and technologies needed to deal with them are static. A robust research agenda is needed to understand these changes and realize The National Map vision. Initial successes have been achieved. These accomplishments demonstrate the utility of

  10. Human Pacman: A Mobile Augmented Reality Entertainment System Based on Physical, Social, and Ubiquitous Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheok, Adrian David

    This chapter details the Human Pacman system to illuminate entertainment computing which ventures to embed the natural physical world seamlessly with a fantasy virtual playground by capitalizing on infrastructure provided by mobile computing, wireless LAN, and ubiquitous computing. With Human Pacman, we have a physical role-playing computer fantasy together with real human-social and mobile-gaming that emphasizes on collaboration and competition between players in a wide outdoor physical area that allows natural wide-area human-physical movements. Pacmen and Ghosts are now real human players in the real world experiencing mixed computer graphics fantasy-reality provided by using the wearable computers on them. Virtual cookies and actual tangible physical objects are incorporated into the game play to provide novel experiences of seamless transitions between the real and virtual worlds. This is an example of a new form of gaming that anchors on physicality, mobility, social interaction, and ubiquitous computing.

  11. NOVEL APPLICATIONS FOR EMERGING MARKETS USING TELEVISION AS A UBIQUITOUS DEVICE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pal, Arpan

    2013-01-01

    – personal computer (including laptop and tablet), television and mobile (including smart phone). For emerging market countries like India, personal computers are not yet affordable to masses and most of the people are not savvy or skilled enough to operate a personal computer. Mobile phones, though being...... connected to the internet-world in a low-cost manner, it has the potential of becoming the ―Ubiquitous Computing Screen‖ for the home. The emerging markets are characterized by some unique issues like low bandwidth / low Quality-of-Service (QoS) of the available wireless networks, extreme cost...... solutions for seamlessly blending Internet with broadcasting content. To this end, in this thesis a novel application development framework is proposed first on top of a low-cost over-the-top box that uses television as a ubiquitous device with a focus on emerging markets. Then an end-to-end solution...

  12. Ubiquitous health monitoring and real-time cardiac arrhythmias detection: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Zhou, Haiying; Zuo, Decheng; Hou, Kun-Mean; De Vaulx, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    As the symptoms and signs of heart diseases that cause sudden cardiac death, cardiac arrhythmia has attracted great attention. Due to limitations in time and space, traditional approaches to cardiac arrhythmias detection fail to provide a real-time continuous monitoring and testing service applicable in different environmental conditions. Integrated with the latest technologies in ECG (electrocardiograph) analysis and medical care, the pervasive computing technology makes possible the ubiquitous cardiac care services, and thus brings about new technical challenges, especially in the formation of cardiac care architecture and realization of the real-time automatic ECG detection algorithm dedicated to care devices. In this paper, a ubiquitous cardiac care prototype system is presented with its architecture framework well elaborated. This prototype system has been tested and evaluated in all the clinical-/home-/outdoor-care modes with a satisfactory performance in providing real-time continuous cardiac arrhythmias monitoring service unlimitedly adaptable in time and space.

  13. Real-time long term measurement using integrated framework for ubiquitous smart monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Gwanghee; Lee, Giu; Lee, Woosang; Jeon, Joonryong; Kim, Pil-Joong

    2007-04-01

    Ubiquitous monitoring combining internet technologies and wireless communication is one of the most promising technologies of infrastructure health monitoring against the natural of man-made hazards. In this paper, an integrated framework of the ubiquitous monitoring is developed for real-time long term measurement in internet environment. This framework develops a wireless sensor system based on Bluetooth technology and sends measured acceleration data to the host computer through TCP/IP protocol. And it is also designed to respond to the request of web user on real time basis. In order to verify this system, real time monitoring tests are carried out on a prototype self-anchored suspension bridge. Also, wireless measurement system is analyzed to estimate its sensing capacity and evaluate its performance for monitoring purpose. Based on the evaluation, this paper proposes the effective strategies for integrated framework in order to detect structural deficiencies and to design an early warning system.

  14. Ubiquitous Wireless Sensor Networks and future “Internet of Things""

    OpenAIRE

    Vermesan, Ovidiu

    2009-01-01

    Overview of heterogeneous networks of embedded devices that can range from RFID, to smart identifiable systems with sensing and actuating capabilitie. Presentation of wireless sensor networks protocols and Internet of Things future technology. Bridging the real, virtual and digital worlds by using wireless connectivity. Application examples in automotive, aeronautics, healthcare, building, oil and gas industries. Ubiquitous Wireless Sensor Networks and future “Internet ...

  15. Expressing clinical data sets with openEHR archetypes: a solid basis for ubiquitous computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garde, Sebastian; Hovenga, Evelyn; Buck, Jasmin; Knaup, Petra

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse the feasibility and usefulness of expressing clinical data sets (CDSs) as openEHR archetypes. For this, we present an approach to transform CDS into archetypes, and outline typical problems with CDS and analyse whether some of these problems can be overcome by the use of archetypes. Literature review and analysis of a selection of existing Australian, German, other European and international CDSs; transfer of a CDS for Paediatric Oncology into openEHR archetypes; implementation of CDSs in application systems. To explore the feasibility of expressing CDS as archetypes an approach to transform existing CDSs into archetypes is presented in this paper. In case of the Paediatric Oncology CDS (which consists of 260 data items) this lead to the definition of 48 openEHR archetypes. To analyse the usefulness of expressing CDS as archetypes, we identified nine problems with CDS that currently remain unsolved without a common model underpinning the CDS. Typical problems include incompatible basic data types and overlapping and incompatible definitions of clinical content. A solution to most of these problems based on openEHR archetypes is motivated. With regard to integrity constraints, further research is required. While openEHR cannot overcome all barriers to Ubiquitous Computing, it can provide the common basis for ubiquitous presence of meaningful and computer-processable knowledge and information, which we believe is a basic requirement for Ubiquitous Computing. Expressing CDSs as openEHR archetypes is feasible and advantageous as it fosters semantic interoperability, supports ubiquitous computing, and helps to develop archetypes that are arguably of better quality than the original CDS.

  16. SiC: An Agent Based Architecture for Preventing and Detecting Attacks to Ubiquitous Databases

    OpenAIRE

    Pinzón, Cristian; de Paz Santana, Yanira; Bajo Pérez, Javier; Abraham, Ajith P.; Corchado Rodríguez, Juan M.

    2009-01-01

    One of the main attacks to ubiquitous databases is the structure query language (SQL) injection attack, which causes severe damages both in the commercial aspect and in the user’s confidence. This chapter proposes the SiC architecture as a solution to the SQL injection attack problem. This is a hierarchical distributed multiagent architecture, which involves an entirely new approach with respect to existing architectures for the prevention and detection of SQL injections. SiC incorporates a k...

  17. The new transparency: police violence in the context of ubiquitous surveillance

    OpenAIRE

    Brucato, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Media and surveillance scholars often comment on the purported empowering quality of transparency, which they expect participatory media to promote. From its Enlightenment origins, transparency is related to accountability and legitimacy: its increase is believed to promote these. It has earned a position as an unassailed, prime normative value in contemporary liberal and social democracies. Though still valued, transparency is undergoing change in an era of ubiquitous surveillance. Publics s...

  18. Design and Implementation of Ubiquitous Health System U-Health Using Smart-Watches Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi Termeh, V.; Sadeghi Niaraki, A.

    2015-12-01

    Today as diseases grow rapidly, the responsibilities of the health clinics in giving services to patients increase and patients have to be more monitored and controlled. Remote systems of monitoring patients result in reducing cost, ease of movement, and also persistent control of patients by their doctors, so that patient can be monitored without need to go to the clinic. Recent advances in the field of ubiquitous sciences as well as using smartphones have resulted in increasingly use of this devices in remote monitoring of patients. The aim of this paper is to design and implement a ubiquitous health system using smartphones and sensors of smart-watches. This is accomplished through the information sent to the smartphone from the sensors of the watch, e.g. heart beat measurement sensor and ultraviolet ray. Then, this information is analyzed in the smartphone and some information based on the position of the patient and the path of him/her using GIS analyses as well as the information about the health level of the patient is sent to the doctor via SMS or phone call. Unnatural heart beats can be resulted in diseases such as Heart Failure and Arterial Fibrillation. With the approach adopted in this study, the patient or the doctor could be aware of these diseases at any time. The proposed approach is a low cost, without need to complex and resilient equipment, system in ubiquitous health that does not limit the movement of the patient.

  19. Developing Ubiquitous Sensor Network Platform Using Internet of Things: Application in Precision Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Ferrández-Pastor

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The application of Information Technologies into Precision Agriculture methods has clear benefits. Precision Agriculture optimises production efficiency, increases quality, minimises environmental impact and reduces the use of resources (energy, water; however, there are different barriers that have delayed its wide development. Some of these main barriers are expensive equipment, the difficulty to operate and maintain and the standard for sensor networks are still under development. Nowadays, new technological development in embedded devices (hardware and communication protocols, the evolution of Internet technologies (Internet of Things and ubiquitous computing (Ubiquitous Sensor Networks allow developing less expensive systems, easier to control, install and maintain, using standard protocols with low-power consumption. This work develops and test a low-cost sensor/actuator network platform, based in Internet of Things, integrating machine-to-machine and human-machine-interface protocols. Edge computing uses this multi-protocol approach to develop control processes on Precision Agriculture scenarios. A greenhouse with hydroponic crop production was developed and tested using Ubiquitous Sensor Network monitoring and edge control on Internet of Things paradigm. The experimental results showed that the Internet technologies and Smart Object Communication Patterns can be combined to encourage development of Precision Agriculture. They demonstrated added benefits (cost, energy, smart developing, acceptance by agricultural specialists when a project is launched.

  20. Automatic, Global and Dynamic Student Modeling in a Ubiquitous Learning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Graf

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitous learning allows students to learn at any time and any place. Adaptivity plays an important role in ubiquitous learning, aiming at providing students with adaptive and personalized learning material, activities, and information at the right place and the right time. However, for providing rich adaptivity, the student model needs to be able to gather a variety of information about the students. In this paper, an automatic, global, and dynamic student modeling approach is introduced, which aims at identifying and frequently updating information about students’ progress, learning styles, interests and knowledge level, problem solving abilities, preferences for using the system, social connectivity, and current location. This information is gathered in an automatic way, using students’ behavior and actions in different learning situations provided by different components/services of the ubiquitous learning environment. By providing a comprehensive student model, students can be supported by rich adaptivity in every component/service of the learning environment. Furthermore, the information in the student model can help in giving teachers a better understanding about the students’ learning process.

  1. Developing Ubiquitous Sensor Network Platform Using Internet of Things: Application in Precision Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrández-Pastor, Francisco Javier; García-Chamizo, Juan Manuel; Nieto-Hidalgo, Mario; Mora-Pascual, Jerónimo; Mora-Martínez, José

    2016-07-22

    The application of Information Technologies into Precision Agriculture methods has clear benefits. Precision Agriculture optimises production efficiency, increases quality, minimises environmental impact and reduces the use of resources (energy, water); however, there are different barriers that have delayed its wide development. Some of these main barriers are expensive equipment, the difficulty to operate and maintain and the standard for sensor networks are still under development. Nowadays, new technological development in embedded devices (hardware and communication protocols), the evolution of Internet technologies (Internet of Things) and ubiquitous computing (Ubiquitous Sensor Networks) allow developing less expensive systems, easier to control, install and maintain, using standard protocols with low-power consumption. This work develops and test a low-cost sensor/actuator network platform, based in Internet of Things, integrating machine-to-machine and human-machine-interface protocols. Edge computing uses this multi-protocol approach to develop control processes on Precision Agriculture scenarios. A greenhouse with hydroponic crop production was developed and tested using Ubiquitous Sensor Network monitoring and edge control on Internet of Things paradigm. The experimental results showed that the Internet technologies and Smart Object Communication Patterns can be combined to encourage development of Precision Agriculture. They demonstrated added benefits (cost, energy, smart developing, acceptance by agricultural specialists) when a project is launched.

  2. Topographic mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) produced its first topographic map in 1879, the same year it was established. Today, more than 100 years and millions of map copies later, topographic mapping is still a central activity for the USGS. The topographic map remains an indispensable tool for government, science, industry, and leisure. Much has changed since early topographers traveled the unsettled West and carefully plotted the first USGS maps by hand. Advances in survey techniques, instrumentation, and design and printing technologies, as well as the use of aerial photography and satellite data, have dramatically improved mapping coverage, accuracy, and efficiency. Yet cartography, the art and science of mapping, may never before have undergone change more profound than today.

  3. Phosphorylation of Dgk1 Diacylglycerol Kinase by Casein Kinase II Regulates Phosphatidic Acid Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yixuan; Hassaninasab, Azam; Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M

    2016-12-16

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Dgk1 diacylglycerol (DAG) kinase catalyzes the CTP-dependent phosphorylation of DAG to form phosphatidic acid (PA). The enzyme in conjunction with Pah1 PA phosphatase controls the levels of PA and DAG for the synthesis of triacylglycerol and membrane phospholipids, the growth of the nuclear/endoplasmic reticulum membrane, and the formation of lipid droplets. Little is known about how DAG kinase activity is regulated by posttranslational modification. In this work, we examined the phosphorylation of Dgk1 DAG kinase by casein kinase II (CKII). When phosphate groups were globally reduced using nonspecific alkaline phosphatase, Triton X-100-solubilized membranes from DGK1-overexpressing cells showed a 7.7-fold reduction in DAG kinase activity; the reduced enzyme activity could be increased 5.5-fold by treatment with CKII. Dgk1(1-77) expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli was phosphorylated by CKII on a serine residue, and its phosphorylation was dependent on time as well as on the concentrations of CKII, ATP, and Dgk1(1-77). We used site-specific mutagenesis, coupled with phosphorylation analysis and phosphopeptide mapping, to identify Ser-45 and Ser-46 of Dgk1 as the CKII target sites, with Ser-46 being the major phosphorylation site. In vivo, the S46A and S45A/S46A mutations of Dgk1 abolished the stationary phase-dependent stimulation of DAG kinase activity. In addition, the phosphorylation-deficient mutations decreased Dgk1 function in PA production and in eliciting pah1Δ phenotypes, such as the expansion of the nuclear/endoplasmic reticulum membrane, reduced lipid droplet formation, and temperature sensitivity. This work demonstrates that the CKII-mediated phosphorylation of Dgk1 regulates its function in the production of PA. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Phosphorylation of Dgk1 Diacylglycerol Kinase by Casein Kinase II Regulates Phosphatidic Acid Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yixuan; Hassaninasab, Azam; Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M.

    2016-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Dgk1 diacylglycerol (DAG) kinase catalyzes the CTP-dependent phosphorylation of DAG to form phosphatidic acid (PA). The enzyme in conjunction with Pah1 PA phosphatase controls the levels of PA and DAG for the synthesis of triacylglycerol and membrane phospholipids, the growth of the nuclear/endoplasmic reticulum membrane, and the formation of lipid droplets. Little is known about how DAG kinase activity is regulated by posttranslational modification. In this work, we examined the phosphorylation of Dgk1 DAG kinase by casein kinase II (CKII). When phosphate groups were globally reduced using nonspecific alkaline phosphatase, Triton X-100-solubilized membranes from DGK1-overexpressing cells showed a 7.7-fold reduction in DAG kinase activity; the reduced enzyme activity could be increased 5.5-fold by treatment with CKII. Dgk1(1–77) expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli was phosphorylated by CKII on a serine residue, and its phosphorylation was dependent on time as well as on the concentrations of CKII, ATP, and Dgk1(1–77). We used site-specific mutagenesis, coupled with phosphorylation analysis and phosphopeptide mapping, to identify Ser-45 and Ser-46 of Dgk1 as the CKII target sites, with Ser-46 being the major phosphorylation site. In vivo, the S46A and S45A/S46A mutations of Dgk1 abolished the stationary phase-dependent stimulation of DAG kinase activity. In addition, the phosphorylation-deficient mutations decreased Dgk1 function in PA production and in eliciting pah1Δ phenotypes, such as the expansion of the nuclear/endoplasmic reticulum membrane, reduced lipid droplet formation, and temperature sensitivity. This work demonstrates that the CKII-mediated phosphorylation of Dgk1 regulates its function in the production of PA. PMID:27834677

  5. Requirement for tyrosine phosphatase during serotonergic neuromodulation by protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catarsi, S; Drapeau, P

    1997-08-01

    Tyrosine kinases and phosphatases are abundant in the nervous system, where they signal cellular differentiation, mediate the responses to growth factors, and direct neurite outgrowth during development. Tyrosine phosphorylation can also alter ion channel activity, but its physiological significance remains unclear. In an identified leech mechanosensory neuron, the ubiquitous neuromodulator serotonin increases the activity of a cation channel by activating protein kinase C (PKC), resulting in membrane depolarization and modulation of the receptive field properties. We observed that the effects on isolated neurons and channels were blocked by inhibiting tyrosine phosphatases. Serotonergic stimulation of PKC thus activates a tyrosine phosphatase activity associated with the channels, which reverses their constitutive inhibition by tyrosine phosphorylation, representing a novel form of neuromodulation.

  6. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 Inhibitors in the Next Horizon for Alzheimer's Disease Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Martinez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3, a proline/serine protein kinase ubiquitously expressed and involved in many cellular signaling pathways, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD being probably the link between β-amyloid and tau pathology. A great effort has recently been done in the discovery and development of different new molecules, of synthetic and natural origin, able to inhibit this enzyme, and several kinetics mechanisms of binding have been described. The small molecule called tideglusib belonging to the thiadiazolidindione family is currently on phase IIb clinical trials for AD. The potential risks and benefits of this new kind of disease modifying drugs for the future therapy of AD are discussed in this paper.

  7. Distributed Monocular SLAM for Indoor Map Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruwan Egodagamage

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilization and generation of indoor maps are critical elements in accurate indoor tracking. Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM is one of the main techniques for such map generation. In SLAM an agent generates a map of an unknown environment while estimating its location in it. Ubiquitous cameras lead to monocular visual SLAM, where a camera is the only sensing device for the SLAM process. In modern applications, multiple mobile agents may be involved in the generation of such maps, thus requiring a distributed computational framework. Each agent can generate its own local map, which can then be combined into a map covering a larger area. By doing so, they can cover a given environment faster than a single agent. Furthermore, they can interact with each other in the same environment, making this framework more practical, especially for collaborative applications such as augmented reality. One of the main challenges of distributed SLAM is identifying overlapping maps, especially when relative starting positions of agents are unknown. In this paper, we are proposing a system having multiple monocular agents, with unknown relative starting positions, which generates a semidense global map of the environment.

  8. Protein kinase C and extracellular signal-regulated kinase regulate movement, attachment, pairing and egg release in Schistosoma mansoni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Ressurreição

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinases C (PKCs and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs are evolutionary conserved cell signalling enzymes that coordinate cell function. Here we have employed biochemical approaches using 'smart' antibodies and functional screening to unravel the importance of these enzymes to Schistosoma mansoni physiology. Various PKC and ERK isotypes were detected, and were differentially phosphorylated (activated throughout the various S. mansoni life stages, suggesting isotype-specific roles and differences in signalling complexity during parasite development. Functional kinase mapping in adult worms revealed that activated PKC and ERK were particularly associated with the adult male tegument, musculature and oesophagus and occasionally with the oesophageal gland; other structures possessing detectable activated PKC and/or ERK included the Mehlis' gland, ootype, lumen of the vitellaria, seminal receptacle and excretory ducts. Pharmacological modulation of PKC and ERK activity in adult worms using GF109203X, U0126, or PMA, resulted in significant physiological disturbance commensurate with these proteins occupying a central position in signalling pathways associated with schistosome muscular activity, neuromuscular coordination, reproductive function, attachment and pairing. Increased activation of ERK and PKC was also detected in worms following praziquantel treatment, with increased signalling associated with the tegument and excretory system and activated ERK localizing to previously unseen structures, including the cephalic ganglia. These findings support roles for PKC and ERK in S. mansoni homeostasis, and identify these kinase groups as potential targets for chemotherapeutic treatments against human schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease of enormous public health significance.

  9. Participatory Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    2016-01-01

    practice. In particular, mapping environmental damage, endangered species, and human-made disasters has become one focal point for environmental knowledge production. This type of digital map has been highlighted as a processual turn in critical cartography, whereas in related computational journalism...... of a geo-visualization within information mapping that enhances embodiment in the experience of the information. InfoAmazonia is defined as a digitally created map-space within which journalistic practice can be seen as dynamic, performative interactions between journalists, ecosystems, space, and species...

  10. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase 3 Regulates Seed Dormancy in Barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shingo; Pourkheirandish, Mohammad; Morishige, Hiromi; Kubo, Yuta; Nakamura, Masako; Ichimura, Kazuya; Seo, Shigemi; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Wu, Jianzhong; Ando, Tsuyu; Hensel, Goetz; Sameri, Mohammad; Stein, Nils; Sato, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Takashi; Yano, Masahiro; Komatsuda, Takao

    2016-03-21

    Seed dormancy has fundamental importance in plant survival and crop production; however, the mechanisms regulating dormancy remain unclear [1-3]. Seed dormancy levels generally decrease during domestication to ensure that crops successfully germinate in the field. However, reduction of seed dormancy can cause devastating losses in cereals like wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) due to pre-harvest sprouting, the germination of mature seed (grain) on the mother plant when rain occurs before harvest. Understanding the mechanisms of dormancy can facilitate breeding of crop varieties with the appropriate levels of seed dormancy [4-8]. Barley is a model crop [9, 10] and has two major seed dormancy quantitative trait loci (QTLs), SD1 and SD2, on chromosome 5H [11-19]. We detected a QTL designated Qsd2-AK at SD2 as the single major determinant explaining the difference in seed dormancy between the dormant cultivar "Azumamugi" (Az) and the non-dormant cultivar "Kanto Nakate Gold" (KNG). Using map-based cloning, we identified the causal gene for Qsd2-AK as Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase 3 (MKK3). The dormant Az allele of MKK3 is recessive; the N260T substitution in this allele decreases MKK3 kinase activity and appears to be causal for Qsd2-AK. The N260T substitution occurred in the immediate ancestor allele of the dormant allele, and the established dormant allele became prevalent in barley cultivars grown in East Asia, where the rainy season and harvest season often overlap. Our findings show fine-tuning of seed dormancy during domestication and provide key information for improving pre-harvest sprouting tolerance in barley and wheat. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein protects cells against locostatin-mediated inhibition of migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne N Shemon

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein (RKIP, also PEBP1, a member of the Phosphatidylethanolamine Binding Protein family, negatively regulates growth factor signaling by the Raf/MAP kinase pathway. Since an organic compound, locostatin, was reported to bind RKIP and inhibit cell migration by a Raf-dependent mechanism, we addressed the role of RKIP in locostatin function.We analyzed locostatin interaction with RKIP and examined the biological consequences of locostatin binding on RKIP function. NMR studies show that a locostatin precursor binds to the conserved phosphatidylethanolamine binding pocket of RKIP. However, drug binding to the pocket does not prevent RKIP association with its inhibitory target, Raf-1, nor affect RKIP phosphorylation by Protein Kinase C at a regulatory site. Similarly, exposure of wild type, RKIP-depleted HeLa cells or RKIP-deficient (RKIP(-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs to locostatin has no effect on MAP kinase activation. Locostatin treatment of wild type MEFs causes inhibition of cell migration following wounding. RKIP deficiency impairs migration further, indicating that RKIP protects cells against locostatin-mediated inhibition of migration. Locostatin treatment of depleted or RKIP(-/- MEFs reveals cytoskeletal disruption and microtubule abnormalities in the spindle.These results suggest that locostatin's effects on cytoskeletal structure and migration are caused through mechanisms independent of its binding to RKIP and Raf/MAP kinase signaling. The protective effect of RKIP against drug inhibition of migration suggests a new role for RKIP in potentially sequestering toxic compounds that may have deleterious effects on cells.

  12. Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein protects cells against locostatin-mediated inhibition of migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemon, Anne N; Eves, Eva M; Clark, Matthew C; Heil, Gary; Granovsky, Alexey; Zeng, Lingchun; Imamoto, Akira; Koide, Shohei; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2009-06-24

    Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein (RKIP, also PEBP1), a member of the Phosphatidylethanolamine Binding Protein family, negatively regulates growth factor signaling by the Raf/MAP kinase pathway. Since an organic compound, locostatin, was reported to bind RKIP and inhibit cell migration by a Raf-dependent mechanism, we addressed the role of RKIP in locostatin function. We analyzed locostatin interaction with RKIP and examined the biological consequences of locostatin binding on RKIP function. NMR studies show that a locostatin precursor binds to the conserved phosphatidylethanolamine binding pocket of RKIP. However, drug binding to the pocket does not prevent RKIP association with its inhibitory target, Raf-1, nor affect RKIP phosphorylation by Protein Kinase C at a regulatory site. Similarly, exposure of wild type, RKIP-depleted HeLa cells or RKIP-deficient (RKIP(-/-)) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to locostatin has no effect on MAP kinase activation. Locostatin treatment of wild type MEFs causes inhibition of cell migration following wounding. RKIP deficiency impairs migration further, indicating that RKIP protects cells against locostatin-mediated inhibition of migration. Locostatin treatment of depleted or RKIP(-/-) MEFs reveals cytoskeletal disruption and microtubule abnormalities in the spindle. These results suggest that locostatin's effects on cytoskeletal structure and migration are caused through mechanisms independent of its binding to RKIP and Raf/MAP kinase signaling. The protective effect of RKIP against drug inhibition of migration suggests a new role for RKIP in potentially sequestering toxic compounds that may have deleterious effects on cells.

  13. Cell-type-specific activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in PAN-induced progressive renal disease in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang-Joon; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2004-01-01

    We examined the time-course activation and the cell-type specific role of MAP kinases in puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN)-induced renal disease. The maximal activation of c-Jun-NH 2 -terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK), and p38 MAP kinase was detected on Days 52, 38, and 38 after PAN-treatment, respectively. p-JNK was localized in mesangial and proximal tubular cells at the early renal injury. It was expressed, therefore, in the inflammatory cells of tubulointerstitial lesions. While, p-ERK was markedly increased in the glomerular regions and macrophages p-p38 was observed in glomerular endothelial cells, tubular cells, and some inflammatory cells. The results show that the activation of MAP kinases in the early renal injury by PAN-treatment involves cellular changes such as cell proliferation or apoptosis in renal native cells. The activation of MAP kinases in infiltrated inflammatory cells and fibrotic cells plays an important role in destructive events such as glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis

  14. The frequencies and clinical implications of mutations in 33 kinase-related genes in locally advanced rectal cancer: a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abdul-Jalil, Khairun I

    2014-08-01

    Locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC: T3\\/4 and\\/or node-positive) is treated with preoperative\\/neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT), but responses are not uniform. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), MAP kinase (MAPK), and related pathways are implicated in rectal cancer tumorigenesis. Here, we investigated the association between genetic mutations in these pathways and LARC clinical outcomes.

  15. Non-Viral Deoxyribonucleoside Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Louise Slot; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte; Knecht, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleoside kinases (dNKs) phosphorylate deoxyribonucleosides to their corresponding monophosphate compounds. dNks also phosphorylate deoxyribonucleoside analogues that are used in the treatment of cancer or viral infections. The study of the mammalian dNKs has therefore always been of gr...

  16. Revisiting Frequency Reuse towards Supporting Ultra-Reliable Ubiquitous-Rate Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Jihong; Kim, Dong Min; Popovski, Petar

    2017-01-01

    One of the goals of 5G wireless systems stated by the NGMN alliance is to provide moderate rates (50+ Mbps) everywhere and with very high reliability. We term this service Ultra-Reliable Ubiquitous-Rate Communication (UR2C). This paper investigates the role of frequency reuse in supporting UR2C...... in the downlink. To this end, two frequency reuse schemes are considered: user-specific frequency reuse (FRu) and BS-specific frequency reuse (FRb). For a given unit frequency channel, FRu reduces the number of serving user equipments (UEs), whereas FRb directly decreases the number of interfering base stations...

  17. Processing models for conflicting user requests in ubiquitous corporate smart spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levonevskiy Dmitriy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers processing of conflicting user requests in ubiquitous corporate smart spaces. The formulated problem consists in the contradiction between the limitation of available smart space resources to perform the conflicting user requests and necessity to provide the proper quality of service in corporate smart spaces. The principles of constructing the simulation model are described. The experiments were carried out basing on a model of the SPIIRAS digital signage service. Several task management strategies are discussed, an assessment of their effectiveness is given. The research is aimed at improving the quality of service and user experience in human-computer interaction within the corporate smart spaces.

  18. Handling membership dynamicity in service composition for ubiquitous computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønsted, Jeppe

    2007-01-01

    In ubiquitous computing, as more and more devices are introduced into the environment, new applications are made possible that exploit device capabilities in new ways. Currently, however, there is a mismatch between the effort involved in implementing these applications and the benefit they provide...... to specify which nodes partake in the composite and how they interact. In this paper we introduce mechanisms for handling membership dynamicity in service composition specifications. We demonstrate how an application scenario developed in cooperation with users can be implemented using the mechanisms...

  19. A cloud-based X73 ubiquitous mobile healthcare system: design and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhanlin; Ganchev, Ivan; O'Droma, Máirtín; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Xueji

    2014-01-01

    Based on the user-centric paradigm for next generation networks, this paper describes a ubiquitous mobile healthcare (uHealth) system based on the ISO/IEEE 11073 personal health data (PHD) standards (X73) and cloud computing techniques. A number of design issues associated with the system implementation are outlined. The system includes a middleware on the user side, providing a plug-and-play environment for heterogeneous wireless sensors and mobile terminals utilizing different communication protocols and a distributed "big data" processing subsystem in the cloud. The design and implementation of this system are envisaged as an efficient solution for the next generation of uHealth systems.

  20. Reference model of future ubiquitous convergent network and context-aware telecommunication service platform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Xiu-quan; LI Xiao-feng; LIANG Shou-qing

    2006-01-01

    A reference model for future ubiquitous convergent network is analyzed. To provide user-centric, intelligent,personalized service, this article presents a context-aware telecommunication service platform (CaTSP) to adapt to dynamically changing context. This article focuses on the new design method of context-aware telecommunication service platform and its architecture. Through the use of model-driven architecture (MDA) and semantic web technologies, CaTSP can enable context reasoning and service personalization adaption.This article explores a new approach for service intelligence,personalization, and adaptability in the semantic web service computing era.

  1. Ubiquitous computing in the workplace what ethical issues? : an interdisciplinary perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Nihan, Céline

    2015-01-01

    This book provides an interdisciplinary collection of views on the ethical challenges and opportunities of workplaces in the Internet of things. Current developments within Ubiquitous computing (ubicomp) systems designed for the workplace are introduced and philosophical, organizational and socio-ethical considerations of ubicomp in workplaces are provided. Suggestions regarding the rules that should be respected in order to favor an adequate implementation of ubicomp in the workplace are offered, considering both intra-organizational but also wider societal concerns. The interdisciplinary collection of contributions invites the reader to engage in the discussion of ubicomp in everyday working environments.      

  2. Concept Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology & Learning, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Concept maps are graphical ways of working with ideas and presenting information. They reveal patterns and relationships and help students to clarify their thinking, and to process, organize and prioritize. Displaying information visually--in concept maps, word webs, or diagrams--stimulates creativity. Being able to think logically teaches…

  3. An Arabidopsis kinase cascade influences auxin-responsive cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, Tara A; Frick, Elizabeth M; Strader, Lucia C

    2017-10-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MPK) cascades are conserved mechanisms of signal transduction across eukaryotes. Despite the importance of MPK proteins in signaling events, specific roles for many Arabidopsis MPK proteins remain unknown. Multiple studies have suggested roles for MPK signaling in a variety of auxin-related processes. To identify MPK proteins with roles in auxin response, we screened mpk insertional alleles and identified mpk1-1 as a mutant that displays hypersensitivity in auxin-responsive cell expansion assays. Further, mutants defective in the upstream MAP kinase kinase MKK3 also display hypersensitivity in auxin-responsive cell expansion assays, suggesting that this MPK cascade affects auxin-influenced cell expansion. We found that MPK1 interacts with and phosphorylates ROP BINDING PROTEIN KINASE 1 (RBK1), a protein kinase that interacts with members of the Rho-like GTPases from Plants (ROP) small GTPase family. Similar to mpk1-1 and mkk3-1 mutants, rbk1 insertional mutants display auxin hypersensitivity, consistent with a possible role for RBK1 downstream of MPK1 in influencing auxin-responsive cell expansion. We found that RBK1 directly phosphorylates ROP4 and ROP6, supporting the possibility that RBK1 effects on auxin-responsive cell expansion are mediated through phosphorylation-dependent modulation of ROP activity. Our data suggest a MKK3 • MPK1 • RBK1 phosphorylation cascade that may provide a dynamic module for altering cell expansion. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Cyclin dependent kinase 5 regulates endocytosis in nerve terminals via dynamin I phosphorylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, T.C.; Hansra, G.; Calova, V.; Cousin, M.; Robinson, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Synaptic vesicle endocytosis (SVE) in nerve terminals is essential for normal synaptic transmission and for memory retrieval. Dynamin I is a 96kDa nerve terminal phosphoprotein necessary for synaptic vesicle endocytosis in the nerve terminal. Dynamin I is dephosphorylated and rephosphorylated in a cyclical fashion with nerve terminal depolarisation and repolarisation. A number of kinases phosphorylate dynamin I in vitro including PKC, MAP kinase and cdc2. PKC phosphorylates dynamin in the proline rich domain on Ser 795 and is also thought to be the in vivo kinase for dynamin I. Another candidate is the neuron specific kinase cdk5, crucial for CNS development. The aim of this study is to identify the kinase which phosphorylates dynamin I in intact nerve terminals. Here we show that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (cdk5) phosphorylates dynamin I in the proline-rich tail on Ser-774 or Ser-778. The phosphorylation of these sites but not Ser-795 also occurred in intact nerve terminals suggesting that cdk5 is the physiologically relevant enzyme for dynamin I. Synaptosomes prepared from rat brains (after cervical dislocations) and labelled with 32 Pi, were incubated with 100 M roscovitine (a selective inhibitor of cdks), 10 M Ro 31-8220 (a selective PKC inhibitor) and 100 M PD 98059 (a MEK kinase inhibitor). Dynamin rephosphorylation during repolarisation was reduced in synaptosomes treated with roscovitine and Ro 38-8220 but not in synaptosomes treated with PD 98059. Fluorimetric experiments on intact synaptosomes utilising FM-210 (a fluorescent dye) indicate that endocytosis was reduced in synaptosomes treated with 100 M roscovitine. Our results suggest that dynamin phosphorylation in intact nerve terminals may not be regulated by PKC or MAP kinase and that dynamin phosphorylation by cdk5 may regulate endocytosis. Copyright (2002) Australian Neuroscience Society

  5. Autoregulation of kinase dephosphorylation by ATP binding in AGC protein kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tung O; Pascal, John M; Armen, Roger S; Rodeck, Ulrich

    2012-02-01

    AGC kinases, including the three Akt (protein kinase B) isoforms, protein kinase A (PKA) and all protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms, require activation loop phosphorylation (threonine 308 in Akt1) as well as phosphorylation of a C-terminal residue (serine 473 in Akt1) for catalytic activity and phosphorylation of downstream targets. Conversely, phosphatases reverse these phosphorylations. Virtually all cellular processes are affected by AGC kinases, a circumstance that has led to intense scrutiny of the molecular mechanisms that regulate phosphorylation of these kinases. Here, we review a new layer of control of phosphorylation in Akt, PKA and PKC pointing to ATP binding pocket occupancy as a means to decelerate dephosphorylation of these and, potentially, other kinases. This additional level of kinase regulation opens the door to search for new functional motifs for the rational design of non- ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors that discriminate within and between protein kinase families.

  6. Autoregulation of kinase dephosphorylation by ATP binding to AGC protein kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, John M; Armen, Roger S

    2012-01-01

    AGC kinases, including the three Akt (protein kinase B) isoforms, protein kinase A (PKA) and all protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms, require activation loop phosphorylation (threonine 308 in Akt1) as well as phosphorylation of a C-terminal residue (serine 473 in Akt1) for catalytic activity and phosphorylation of downstream targets. Conversely, phosphatases reverse these phosphorylations. Virtually all cellular processes are affected by AGC kinases, a circumstance that has led to intense scrutiny of the molecular mechanisms that regulate phosphorylation of these kinases. Here, we review a new layer of control of phosphorylation in Akt, PKA and PKC pointing to ATP binding pocket occupancy as a means to decelerate dephosphorylation of these and, potentially, other kinases. This additional level of kinase regulation opens the door to search for new functional motifs for the rational design of non-ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors that discriminate within and between protein kinase families. PMID:22262182

  7. A Wireless Sensor Network-Based Ubiquitous Paprika Growth Management System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeonghwan Hwang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Network (WSN technology can facilitate advances in productivity, safety and human quality of life through its applications in various industries. In particular, the application of WSN technology to the agricultural area, which is labor-intensive compared to other industries, and in addition is typically lacking in IT technology applications, adds value and can increase the agricultural productivity. This study attempts to establish a ubiquitous agricultural environment and improve the productivity of farms that grow paprika by suggesting a ‘Ubiquitous Paprika Greenhouse Management System’ using WSN technology. The proposed system can collect and monitor information related to the growth environment of crops outside and inside paprika greenhouses by installing WSN sensors and monitoring images captured by CCTV cameras. In addition, the system provides a paprika greenhouse environment control facility for manual and automatic control from a distance, improves the convenience and productivity of users, and facilitates an optimized environment to grow paprika based on the growth environment data acquired by operating the system.

  8. A Wireless Sensor Network-Based Ubiquitous Paprika Growth Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jeonghwan; Shin, Changsun; Yoe, Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) technology can facilitate advances in productivity, safety and human quality of life through its applications in various industries. In particular, the application of WSN technology to the agricultural area, which is labor-intensive compared to other industries, and in addition is typically lacking in IT technology applications, adds value and can increase the agricultural productivity. This study attempts to establish a ubiquitous agricultural environment and improve the productivity of farms that grow paprika by suggesting a ‘Ubiquitous Paprika Greenhouse Management System’ using WSN technology. The proposed system can collect and monitor information related to the growth environment of crops outside and inside paprika greenhouses by installing WSN sensors and monitoring images captured by CCTV cameras. In addition, the system provides a paprika greenhouse environment control facility for manual and automatic control from a distance, improves the convenience and productivity of users, and facilitates an optimized environment to grow paprika based on the growth environment data acquired by operating the system. PMID:22163543

  9. Automated Construction of Node Software Using Attributes in a Ubiquitous Sensor Network Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woojin; Kim, Juil; Kang, JangMook

    2010-01-01

    In sensor networks, nodes must often operate in a demanding environment facing restrictions such as restricted computing resources, unreliable wireless communication and power shortages. Such factors make the development of ubiquitous sensor network (USN) applications challenging. To help developers construct a large amount of node software for sensor network applications easily and rapidly, this paper proposes an approach to the automated construction of node software for USN applications using attributes. In the proposed technique, application construction proceeds by first developing a model for the sensor network and then designing node software by setting the values of the predefined attributes. After that, the sensor network model and the design of node software are verified. The final source codes of the node software are automatically generated from the sensor network model. We illustrate the efficiency of the proposed technique by using a gas/light monitoring application through a case study of a Gas and Light Monitoring System based on the Nano-Qplus operating system. We evaluate the technique using a quantitative metric—the memory size of execution code for node software. Using the proposed approach, developers are able to easily construct sensor network applications and rapidly generate a large number of node softwares at a time in a ubiquitous sensor network environment. PMID:22163678

  10. Analysis of energy efficient routing protocols for implementation of a ubiquitous health system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jongwon; Park, Yongman; Koo, Sangjun; Ayurzana, Odgeral; Kim, Hiesik

    2007-12-01

    The innovative Ubiquitous-Health was born through convergence of medical service, with development of up to date information technologies and ubiquitous IT. The U-Health can be applied to a variety of special situations for managing functions of each medical center efficiently. This paper focuses on estimation of various routing protocols for implementation of U-health monitoring system. In order to facilitate wireless communication over the network, a routing protocol on the network layer is used to establish precise and efficient route between sensor nodes so that information acquired from sensors may be delivered in a timely manner. A route establishment should be considered to minimize overhead, data loss and power consumption because wireless networks for U-health are organized by a large number of sensor nodes which are small in size and have limited processing power, memory and battery life. In this paper a overview of wireless sensor network technologies commonly known is described as well as evaluation of three multi hop routing protocols which are flooding, gossiping and modified low energy adaptive clustering hierarchy(LEACH) for use with these networks using TOSSIM simulator. As a result of evaluation the integrated wireless sensor board was developed in particular. The board is embedded device based on AVR128 porting TinyOS. Also it employs bio sensor measures blood pressure, pulse frequency and ZigBee module for wireless communication. This paper accelerates the digital convergence age through continual research and development of technologies related the U-Health.

  11. The Characteristics of Ubiquitous and Unique Leptospira Strains from the Collection of Russian Centre for Leptospirosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronina, Olga L.; Kunda, Marina S.; Aksenova, Ekaterina I.; Ryzhova, Natalia N.; Semenov, Andrey N.; Petrov, Evgeny M.; Didenko, Lubov V.; Lunin, Vladimir G.; Ananyina, Yuliya V.; Gintsburg, Alexandr L.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim. Leptospira, the causal agent of leptospirosis, has been isolated from the environment, patients, and wide spectrum of animals in Russia. However, the genetic diversity of Leptospira in natural and anthropurgic foci was not clearly defined. Methods. The recent MLST scheme was used for the analysis of seven pathogenic species. 454 pyrosequencing technology was the base of the whole genome sequencing (WGS). Results. The most wide spread and prevalent Leptospira species in Russia were L. interrogans, L. kirschneri, and L. borgpetersenii. Five STs, common for Russian strains: 37, 17, 199, 110, and 146, were identified as having a longtime and ubiquitous distribution in various geographic areas. Unexpected properties were revealed for the environmental Leptospira strain Bairam-Ali. WGS of this strain genome suggested that it combined the features of the pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains and may be a reservoir of the natural resistance genes. Results of the comparative analysis of rrs and rpoB genes and MLST loci for different Leptospira species strains and phenotypic and serological properties of the strain Bairam-Ali suggested that it represented separate Leptospira species. Conclusions. Thus, the natural and anthropurgic foci supported ubiquitous Leptospira species and the pool of genes important for bacterial adaptivity to various conditions. PMID:25276806

  12. Ubiquitous Monitoring Solution for Wireless Sensor Networks with Push Notifications and End-to-End Connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. L. Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs belongs to a new trend in technology in which tiny and resource constrained devices are wirelessly interconnected and are able to interact with the surrounding environment by collecting data such as temperature and humidity. Recently, due to the huge growth in the use of mobile devices with Internet connection, smartphones are becoming the center of future ubiquitous wireless networks. Interconnecting WSNs with smartphones and the Internet is a big challenge and new architectures are required due to the heterogeneity of these devices. Taking into account that people are using smartphones with Internet connection, there is a good opportunity to propose a new architecture for wireless sensors monitoring using push notifications and smartphones. Then, this paper proposes a ubiquitous approach for WSN monitoring based on a REST Web Service, a relational database, and an Android mobile application. Real-time data sensed by WSNs are sent directly to a smartphone or stored in a database and requested by the mobile application using a well-defined RESTful interface. A push notification system was created in order to alert mobile users when a sensor parameter overcomes a given threshold. The proposed architecture and mobile application were evaluated and validated using a laboratory WSN testbed and are ready for use.

  13. Ubiquitous and Seamless Localization: Fusing GNSS Pseudoranges and WLAN Signal Strengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Richter

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitous global positioning is not feasible by GNSS alone, as it lacks accurate position fixes in dense urban centres and indoors. Hybrid positioning methods have been developed to aid GNSS in those environments. Fingerprinting localization in wireless local area networks (WLANs is a promising aiding system because of its availability, accuracy, and error mechanisms opposed to that of GNSS. This article presents a low-cost approach to ubiquitous, seamless positioning based on a particle filter integrating GNSS pseudoranges and WLAN received signal strength indicators (RSSIs. To achieve accurate location estimates indoors/outdoors and in the transition zones, appropriate likelihood functions are essential as they determine the influence of each sensor information on the position estimate. We model the spatial RSSI distributions with Gaussian processes and use these models to predict RSSIs at the particle’s positions to obtain point estimates of the RSSI likelihood function. The particle filter’s performance is assessed with real data of two test trajectories in an environment challenging for GNSS and WLAN fingerprinting localization. Outcomes of an extended Kalman filter using pseudoranges and a WLAN position as observation is included as benchmark. The proposed algorithm achieves accurate and robust seamless localization with a median accuracy of five meters.

  14. A Framework for Real-Time Collection, Analysis, and Classification of Ubiquitous Infrasound Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christe, A.; Garces, M. A.; Magana-Zook, S. A.; Schnurr, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Traditional infrasound arrays are generally expensive to install and maintain. There are ~10^3 infrasound channels on Earth today. The amount of data currently provided by legacy architectures can be processed on a modest server. However, the growing availability of low-cost, ubiquitous, and dense infrasonic sensor networks presents a substantial increase in the volume, velocity, and variety of data flow. Initial data from a prototype ubiquitous global infrasound network is already pushing the boundaries of traditional research server and communication systems, in particular when serving data products over heterogeneous, international network topologies. We present a scalable, cloud-based approach for capturing and analyzing large amounts of dense infrasonic data (>10^6 channels). We utilize Akka actors with WebSockets to maintain data connections with infrasound sensors. Apache Spark provides streaming, batch, machine learning, and graph processing libraries which will permit signature classification, cross-correlation, and other analytics in near real time. This new framework and approach provide significant advantages in scalability and cost.

  15. The ubiquitous presence of exopolygalacturonase in maize suggests a fundamental cellular function for this enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubald, M; Barakate, A; Mandaron, P; Mache, R

    1993-11-01

    Exopolygalacturonase (exoPG) is a pectin-degrading enzyme abundant in maize pollen. Using immunochemistry and in situ hybridization it is shown that in addition to its presence in pollen, exoPG is also present in sporophytic tissues, such as the tapetum and mesophyll cells. The enzyme is located in the cytoplasm of pollen and of some mesophyll cells. In other mesophyll cells, the tapetum and the pollen tube, exoPG is located in the cell wall. The measurement of enzyme activity shows that exoPG is ubiquitous in the vegetative organs. These results suggest a general function for exoPG in cell wall edification or degradation. ExoPG is encoded by a closely related multigene family. The regulation of the expression of one of the exoPG genes was analyzed in transgenic tobacco. Reporter GUS activity was detected in anthers, seeds and stems but not in leaves or roots of transgenic plants. This strongly suggests that the ubiquitous presence of exoPG in maize is the result of the expression of different exoPG genes.

  16. Automated Construction of Node Software Using Attributes in a Ubiquitous Sensor Network Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JangMook Kang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In sensor networks, nodes must often operate in a demanding environment facing restrictions such as restricted computing resources, unreliable wireless communication and power shortages. Such factors make the development of ubiquitous sensor network (USN applications challenging. To help developers construct a large amount of node software for sensor network applications easily and rapidly, this paper proposes an approach to the automated construction of node software for USN applications using attributes. In the proposed technique, application construction proceeds by first developing a model for the sensor network and then designing node software by setting the values of the predefined attributes. After that, the sensor network model and the design of node software are verified. The final source codes of the node software are automatically generated from the sensor network model. We illustrate the efficiency of the proposed technique by using a gas/light monitoring application through a case study of a Gas and Light Monitoring System based on the Nano-Qplus operating system. We evaluate the technique using a quantitative metric—the memory size of execution code for node software. Using the proposed approach, developers are able to easily construct sensor network applications and rapidly generate a large number of node softwares at a time in a ubiquitous sensor network environment.

  17. Clinical decision support systems in hospital care using ubiquitous devices: Current issues and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Mirza Mansoor; GholamHosseini, Hamid; Moqeem, Aasia A; Mirza, Farhaan; Lindén, Maria

    2017-11-01

    Supporting clinicians in decision making using advanced technologies has been an active research area in biomedical engineering during the past years. Among a wide range of ubiquitous systems, smartphone applications have been increasingly developed in healthcare settings to help clinicians as well as patients. Today, many smartphone applications, from basic data analysis to advanced patient monitoring, are available to clinicians and patients. Such applications are now increasingly integrating into healthcare for clinical decision support, and therefore, concerns around accuracy, stability, and dependency of these applications are rising. In addition, lack of attention to the clinicians' acceptability, as well as the low impact on the medical professionals' decision making, are posing more serious issues on the acceptability of smartphone applications. This article reviews smartphone-based decision support applications, focusing on hospital care settings and their overall impact of these applications on the wider clinical workflow. Additionally, key challenges and barriers of the current ubiquitous device-based healthcare applications are identified. Finally, this article addresses current challenges, future directions, and the adoption of mobile healthcare applications.

  18. HSDPA (3.5G)-based ubiquitous integrated biotelemetry system for emergency care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jaemin; Shin, Il Hyung; Koo, Yoonseo; Jung, Min Yang; Suh, Gil Joon; Kim, Hee Chan

    2007-01-01

    We have developed the second prototype system of Ubiquitous Integrated Biotelemetry System for Emergency Care(UIBSEC) using a HSDPA(High Speed Downlink Packet Access) modem to be used by emergency rescuers to get directions from medical doctors in providing emergency medical services for patients in ambulance. Five vital bio-signal instrumentation modules have been implemented, which include noninvasive arterial blood pressure (NIBP), arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), 6-channel electro-cardiogram(ECG), blood glucose level, and body temperature and real-time motion picture of the patient and GPS information are also taken. Measured patient data, captured motion picture and GPS information are then transferred to a doctor's PC through the HSDPA and TCP/IP networks using stand-alone HSDPA modem. Most prominent feature of the developed system is that it is based on the HSDPA backbone networks available in Korea now, through which we will be able to establish a ubiquitous emergency healthcare service system.

  19. Automated construction of node software using attributes in a ubiquitous sensor network environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woojin; Kim, Juil; Kang, JangMook

    2010-01-01

    In sensor networks, nodes must often operate in a demanding environment facing restrictions such as restricted computing resources, unreliable wireless communication and power shortages. Such factors make the development of ubiquitous sensor network (USN) applications challenging. To help developers construct a large amount of node software for sensor network applications easily and rapidly, this paper proposes an approach to the automated construction of node software for USN applications using attributes. In the proposed technique, application construction proceeds by first developing a model for the sensor network and then designing node software by setting the values of the predefined attributes. After that, the sensor network model and the design of node software are verified. The final source codes of the node software are automatically generated from the sensor network model. We illustrate the efficiency of the proposed technique by using a gas/light monitoring application through a case study of a Gas and Light Monitoring System based on the Nano-Qplus operating system. We evaluate the technique using a quantitative metric-the memory size of execution code for node software. Using the proposed approach, developers are able to easily construct sensor network applications and rapidly generate a large number of node softwares at a time in a ubiquitous sensor network environment.

  20. A pervasive health monitoring service system based on ubiquitous network technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chung-Chih; Lee, Ren-Guey; Hsiao, Chun-Chieh

    2008-07-01

    The phenomenon of aging society has derived problems such as shortage of medical resources and reduction of quality in healthcare services. This paper presents a system infrastructure for pervasive and long-term healthcare applications, i.e. a ubiquitous network composed of wireless local area network (WLAN) and cable television (CATV) network serving as a platform for monitoring physiological signals. Users can record vital signs including heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature anytime either at home or at frequently visited public places in order to create a personal health file. The whole system was formally implemented in December 2004. Analysis of 2000 questionnaires indicates that 85% of users were satisfied with the provided community-wide healthcare services. Among the services provided by our system, health consultation services offered by family doctors was rated the most important service by 17.9% of respondents, and was followed by control of one's own health condition (16.4% of respondents). Convenience of data access was rated most important by roughly 14.3% of respondents. We proposed and implemented a long-term healthcare system integrating WLAN and CATV networks in the form of a ubiquitous network providing a service platform for physiological monitoring. This system can classify the health levels of the resident according to the variation tendency of his or her physiological signal for important reference of health management.