WorldWideScience

Sample records for ubiquitous game-based learning

  1. Foundations of Game-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plass, Jan L.; Homer, Bruce D.; Kinzer, Charles K.

    2015-01-01

    In this article we argue that to study or apply games as learning environments, multiple perspectives have to be taken into account. We first define game-based learning and gamification, and then discuss theoretical models that describe learning with games, arguing that playfulness is orthogonal to learning theory. We then review design elements…

  2. Game-Based Life-Long Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelle, Sebastian; Sigurðarson, Steinn; Westera, Wim; Specht, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    Kelle, S., Sigurðarson, S., Westera, W., & Specht, M. (2011). Game-Based Life-Long Learning. In G. D. Magoulas (Ed.), E-Infrastructures and Technologies for Lifelong Learning: Next Generation Environments (pp. 337-349). Hershey, PA: IGI Global.

  3. Design for game based learning platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Birgitte Holm; Meyer, Bente

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the challenges related to the design of game based learning platforms for formal learning contexts that are inspired by the pupil's leisure time related use of web 2.0. The paper is based on the project Serious Games on a Global Market Place (2007-2011) founded by the Danish...... of web 2.0 and integrates theories of learning, didactics, games, play, communication, multimodality and different pedagogical approaches. In relation to the introduced model the teacher role is discussed.......This paper focuses on the challenges related to the design of game based learning platforms for formal learning contexts that are inspired by the pupil's leisure time related use of web 2.0. The paper is based on the project Serious Games on a Global Market Place (2007-2011) founded by the Danish...... Council for Strategic Research, in which an online game-based platform for English as a foreign language in primary school is studied. The paper presents a model for designing for game based learning platforms. This design is based on cultural and ethnographic based research on children's leisure time use...

  4. Game based learning for computer science education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Birgit; Czauderna, André; Klemke, Roland; Specht, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Schmitz, B., Czauderna, A., Klemke, R., & Specht, M. (2011). Game based learning for computer science education. In G. van der Veer, P. B. Sloep, & M. van Eekelen (Eds.), Computer Science Education Research Conference (CSERC '11) (pp. 81-86). Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open Universiteit.

  5. Domesticating Digital Game-based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga Dís Sigurdardottir

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the use of digital game-based learning (DGBL in schools in Norway. It investigates the types of games used in Norwegian schools and how pupils experience that practice. Digital game-based learning is being widely employed throughout Norway as a result of the increased focus on digital skills in Norwegian education. This paper analyses that development by way of focus group interviews with a total of sixty-four pupils at four schools. Drawing upon domestication and actor-network theory, the paper provides a novel approach to the study of DGBL. The broad empirical investigation into DGBL practices furthermore provides a contribution to scholarly literature on the subject. A noteworthy finding of this study is the diversity of games employed in schools—around 30 different titles— indicating that the choice of games lies at the discretion of individual teachers. Findings from this research show that the domestication of digital game-based learning occurs through the construction of complex game-based learning assemblages. This includes the classroom and home as gaming sites, group work and individual assignments as practices, and PCs and iPads as platforms.

  6. Game Based Learning (GBL) adoption model for universities: cesim ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Game Based Learning (GBL) adoption model for universities: cesim simulation. ... The global market has escalated the need of Game Based Learning (GBL) to offer a wide range of courses since there is a ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  7. Game-Based Learning Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Persistent Immersive Synthetic Environments (PISE) are not just connection points, they are meeting places. They are the new public squares, village centers, malt shops, malls and pubs all rolled into one. They come with a sense of 'thereness" that engages the mind like a real place does. Learning starts as a real code. The code defines "objects." The objects exist in computer space, known as the "grid." The objects and space combine to create a "place." A "world" is created, Before long, the grid and code becomes obscure, and the "world maintains focus.

  8. Digital game-based learning in secondary education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizenga, J.C.

    2017-01-01

    This PhD thesis presents research on digital game-based learning in secondary education. The main research question is: How do digital games contribute to learning, engagement and motivation to learn? The thesis contains seven chapters. Chapter one is an introduction to digital game-based learning

  9. Learning with Ubiquitous Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenheck, Louisa

    2008-01-01

    If ubiquitous computing becomes a reality and is widely adopted, it will inevitably have an impact on education. This article reviews the background of ubiquitous computing and current research projects done involving educational "ubicomp." Finally it explores how ubicomp may and may not change education in both formal and informal settings and…

  10. Game Based Language Learning for Bilingual Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hautopp, Heidi; Hanghøj, Thorkild

    2014-01-01

    experiences with the central goals in communicative language teaching (CLT). The paper is based on a study of The Danish Simulator when integrated in a game‐based language course with 15 students at a language center in Copenhagen during spring, 2013. The Danish Simulator consists of language drills......, the analysis presents preliminary findings in relation to students’ different experiences of The Danish Simulator and the teacher’s redesign of the game based teaching. It is concluded that the meaningful use of The Danish Simulator in a game‐based language course for bilingual adults depends on the students......What happens when a single‐player training game enters a classroom context? The use of training activities in game‐based learning (GBL) has often been criticized for letting players perform mechanical operations with no reflection upon the learning experiences involved (e.g. Egenfeldt‐Nielsen, 2005...

  11. Mobile and ubiquitous learning technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Specht, M. (2012, 22 November). Mobile and ubiquitous learning technologies. Presentation given at the Workshop "Blended Learning an Hochschulen" at the Fakultätentag Informatik at the Universität Jena, Jena, Germany.

  12. Developing and Assessing Teachers' Knowledge of Game-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mamta; Foster, Aroutis

    2015-01-01

    Research focusing on the development and assessment of teacher knowledge in game-based learning is in its infancy. A mixed-methods study was undertaken to educate pre-service teachers in game-based learning using the Game Network Analysis (GaNA) framework. Fourteen pre-service teachers completed a methods course, which prepared them in game…

  13. Gender-Inclusive Game-Based Learning in Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admiraal, Wilfried; Huizenga, Jantina; Heemskerk, Irma; Kuiper, Els; Volman, Monique; ten Dam, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Boys show a stronger preference for digital entertainment games than girls. For this reason, it may be that game-based learning is more acceptable to boys than to girls. Yet game-based learning might improve the performance of both boys and girls, depending upon the instructional design. In a quasi-experimental study with a secret-trail game,…

  14. Gender-inclusive game-based learning in secondary education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Admiraal, W.; Huizenga, J.; Heemskerk, I.; Kuiper, E.; Volman, M.; ten Dam, G.

    2014-01-01

    Boys show a stronger preference for digital entertainment games than girls. For this reason, it may be that game-based learning is more acceptable to boys than to girls. Yet game-based learning might improve the performance of both boys and girls, depending upon the instructional design. In a

  15. Adding Social Elements to Game-Based Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Chien-Hung Lai; Yu-Chang Lin; Bin-Shyan Jong; Yen-Teh Hsia

    2014-01-01

    Game-based learning is to present the instruction by games in learning, with the main purpose of triggering learners’ motives instead of instructing the courses. Thus, increasing learning motive by game-based learning becomes a common instructional strategy to enhance learning achievement. However, it is not easy to design interesting games combined with courses. In 2011, Echeverria proposed a design to combine characteristics of games with elements of courses by matching the virtual scenario...

  16. Rethinking Game Based Learning: applying pedagogical standards to educational games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Birgit; Kelle, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Schmitz, B., & Kelle, S. (2010, 1-6 February). Rethinking Game Based Learning: applying pedagogical standards to educational games. Presentation at JTEL Winter School 2010 on Advanced Learning Technologies, Innsbruck, Austria.

  17. Game Based Learning (GBL) Adoption Model for Universities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pc

    2018-03-05

    Mar 5, 2018 ... faced while adopting Game Based Learning (GBL) model, its benefits and ... preferred traditional lectures styles, 7% online class and. 34% preferred .... students in developing problem-solving skills which in return may help ...

  18. Current and Future Trends in Game-Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Vaz de Carvalho

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The first number of the second volume of the EAI Transactions on Serious Games focuses on the results presented on the European Conference on Game-Based Learning. This event, already on the 8th edition, has set standards in terms of presentation of research and practice and in the pointing out of new and future trends in the development of Game-Based Learning. As such, we are quite thrilled to be able to report them here.

  19. ENGAGE: A Game Based Learning and Problem Solving Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    Gamification Summit 2012  Mensa Colloquium 2012.2: Social and Video Games  Seattle Science Festival  TED Salon Vancouver : http...From - To) 6/1/2012 – 6/30/2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ENGAGE: A Game Based Learning and Problem Solving Framework 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER N/A 5b...Popović ENGAGE: A Game Based Learning and Problem Solving Framework (Task 1 Month 4) Progress, Status and Management Report Monthly Progress

  20. A Collaborative Model for Ubiquitous Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Jorge; Barbosa, Debora; Rabello, Solon

    2016-01-01

    Use of mobile devices and widespread adoption of wireless networks have enabled the emergence of Ubiquitous Computing. Application of this technology to improving education strategies gave rise to Ubiquitous e-Learning, also known as Ubiquitous Learning. There are several approaches to organizing ubiquitous learning environments, but most of them…

  1. Adding Social Elements to Game-Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hung Lai

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Game-based learning is to present the instruction by games in learning, with the main purpose of triggering learners’ motives instead of instructing the courses. Thus, increasing learning motive by game-based learning becomes a common instructional strategy to enhance learning achievement. However, it is not easy to design interesting games combined with courses. In 2011, Echeverria proposed a design to combine characteristics of games with elements of courses by matching the virtual scenarios in games with proper courses. However, in the past game-based learning, students were gathered in regular places for several times of game-based learning. Students’ learning was limited by time and space. Therefore, for students’ game-based learning at any time and in any places, based on theories of design elements of online community game Aki Järvinen, this study treats Facebook as the platform of games. The development by online community game is easier, faster and cheaper than traditional video games. In 2006, Facebook allowed API program of the third party. Therefore, by Facebook, this study provides the platform for students to learn in social lives to explore students’ activities in online community games. Questionnaire survey is conducted to find out if the design of non-single user game is attractive for students to participate in game-based learning. In order to make sure that the questionnaires can be the criteria to investigate students’ intention to play games, by statistical program of social science; this study validates reliability and validity of items of questionnaire to effectively control the effect of online community games on students’ learning intention.

  2. Designing and Evaluating Conative Game-Based Learning Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønau-Fog, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    It is an essential prerequisite to design for motivation in game-based learning applications, tools and activities. However, how is it possible to design and evaluate motivational game-based learning scenarios in a systematic process-oriented manner based on conation and player engagement? While...... of ‘continuation desire’ such as interfacing with the scenario, exploration and socialising. This paper aims to combine the concepts of Player Engagement, Conation and Continuation Desire by focusing on the conative aspects which are the essential drivers for the desire to continue any learning activity......-based learning scenarios....

  3. What Is Game-Based Learning? Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Mingfong; Gaydos, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    This article aims at clarifying and conceptualizing game-based learning (GBL) in order to pinpoint directions for practices and research. The authors maintain that GBL should be conceptualized toward the transformation of a textbook-learning culture. The authors emphasize the importance of a paradigm shift in learning and a reorientation in…

  4. Designing Science Learning with Game-Based Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Rosenblum, Jason A.; Horton, Lucas; Kang, Jina

    2014-01-01

    Given the growing popularity of digital games as a form of entertainment, educators are interested in exploring using digital games as a tool to facilitate learning. In this study, we examine game-based learning by describing a learning environment that combines game elements, play, and authenticity in the real world for the purpose of engaging…

  5. Preparing Instructional Designers for Game-Based Learning: Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirumi, Atsusi; Appelman, Bob; Rieber, Lloyd; Van Eck, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Like many rapidly growing industries, advances in video game technology are far outpacing research on its design and effectiveness. Relatively little is understood about how to apply what we know about teaching and learning to optimize game-based learning. For the most part, instructional designers know little about game development and video game…

  6. Understanding Game-Based Learning Cultures: Introduction to Special Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engerman, Jason A.; Carr-Chellman, Alison

    2017-01-01

    This special issue expands our understanding of teaching and learning through video game play, with specific attention to culture. The issue gives insight into the ways educators, researchers, and developers should be discussing and designing for impactful learner-centered game-based learning experiences. The issue features forward-thinking…

  7. Investigating Science Interest in a Game-Based Learning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annetta, Leonard; Vallett, David; Fusarelli, Bonnie; Lamb, Richard; Cheng, Meng-Tzu; Holmes, Shawn; Folta, Elizabeth; Thurmond, Brandi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect Serious Educational Games (SEGs) had on student interest in science in a federally funded game-based learning project. It can be argued that today's students are more likely to engage in video games than they are to interact in live, face-to-face learning environments. With a keen eye on…

  8. 3D Game-Based Learning System for Improving Learning Achievement in Software Engineering Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su,Chung-Ho; Cheng, Ching-Hsue

    2013-01-01

    The advancement of game-based learning has encouraged many related studies, such that students could better learn curriculum by 3-dimension virtual reality. To enhance software engineering learning, this paper develops a 3D game-based learning system to assist teaching and assess the students' motivation, satisfaction and learning achievement. A…

  9. Digital Game-Based Learning in Accounting and Business Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carenys, Jordi; Moya, Soledad

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a review of the accounting and business literature on digital game-based learning (DGBL). The article classifies what is already settled in the literature about the theoretical foundations of DGBL's effectiveness and its practical use into three categories. The first comprises what is known about the evaluation of digital…

  10. Gender differences and game-based learning in secondary education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Admiraal, W.; Huizenga, J.; Reitenbach, M.; Rosenthal, S.; Volman, M.; ten Dam, G.; Vanthournout, G.; Coertjens, L.; Donche, V.; Gijbels, D.; Evans, C.; Cools, E.; Pedrosa de Jesus, H.

    2011-01-01

    In the Netherlands, differences in school motivation and performance between boys and girls are a major issue in political debates. In the first years of secondary education in the Netherlands, boys tend to underachieve and to be disengaged from school. Game-based learning might improve the school

  11. Computer Game-based Learning: Applied Game Development Made Simpler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyamsuren, Enkhbold

    2018-01-01

    The RAGE project (Realising an Applied Gaming Ecosystem, http://rageproject.eu/) is an ongoing initiative that aims to offer an ecosystem to support serious games’ development and use. Its two main objectives are to provide technologies for computer game-based pedagogy and learning and to establish

  12. The Design Consideration for Game-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chaoyun; Lee, Yuan-Zone; Chou, Wen-Shou

    2010-01-01

    The integration of game playing with online education has recently become one of the most discussed issues in the e-learning field for its potentially positive impact on the development of related industries and on the social lives of young people. In this article, the authors propose a set of design considerations to assist game-based learning…

  13. Gameplay Engagement and Learning in Game-Based Learning: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Jabbar, Azita Iliya; Felicia, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we investigated game design features that promote engagement and learning in game-based learning (GBL) settings. The aim was to address the lack of empirical evidence on the impact of game design on learning outcomes, identify how the design of game-based activities may affect learning and engagement, and develop a set of general…

  14. Gamification and Game-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiorgas, Dimitrios N.; Niemann, Shari

    2017-01-01

    In the last 10 years, gaming has evolved to the point that it is now being used as a learning medium to educate students in many different disciplines. The educational community has begun to explore the effectiveness of gaming as a learning tool and as a result two different ways of utilizing games for education have been created: Gamification and…

  15. Game-Based Learning: A Different Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, Karl

    2008-01-01

    Because the goals of games and the object of school-based learning are fundamentally mismatched, efforts to integrate games into the curriculum have largely fallen flat despite the best intentions of teachers and the gaming industry. Arguing that educational game designers should be investigating ways to get education into games rather than…

  16. Dashboard for Analyzing Ubiquitous Learning Log

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lkhagvasuren, Erdenesaikhan; Matsuura, Kenji; Mouri, Kousuke; Ogata, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Mobile and ubiquitous technologies have been applied to a wide range of learning fields such as science, social science, history and language learning. Many researchers have been investigating the development of ubiquitous learning environments; nevertheless, to date, there have not been enough research works related to the reflection, analysis…

  17. A New Design Approach to Game-Based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lasse Juel

    2012-01-01

    to ground the student’s reason to learn. This paper proposes a different approach: using visualisation in immersive 3D worlds as both documentation of learning progress and as a reward system which motivates further learning. The overall design idea is to build a game based learning system from three......This paper puts forward a new design perspective for gamebased learning. The general idea is to abandon the long sought-after dream of designing a closed learning system, where students in both primary and secondary school could learn – without the interference of teachers – whatever subject......-based learning system, but will also confront aspects of modern learning theory, especially the notion of reference between the content of an assignment and the reality with which it should or could be connected (situated learning). The second idea promotes a way of tackling the common experience of the average...

  18. Understanding the Role of Achievements in Game-Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Blair

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the current research was to examine whether one potentially effective gaming strategy—achievements—has a positive impact on learning in a game-based environment. An achievement in a video game is a reward or recognition earned by players for an in-game accomplishment. This paper describes a series of studies to evaluate the effects of achievement types on learning in a game designed to teach about health resources. The Game “Phone Dash” was used as the testbed for the following studies. The following questionnaires were utilized in this study: Video Game Self-Efficacy Scale (VGSES questionnaire, Relevance and Usefulness questionnaire, Game Engagement Questionnaire (GEQ, and the Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (IMI. Four studies were conducted. Results indicated that while in unison, the achievements were not as potent in motivating performance, certainly when combined they produced measurable changes in behavior. The four studies described in this paper provide important information regarding the optimal design of achievements in game-based health education. Developers of future game-based learning can use this information to enhance the potential effectiveness of their products. 

  19. The Design and Analysis of Learning Effects for a Game-based Learning System

    OpenAIRE

    Wernhuar Tarng; Weichian Tsai

    2010-01-01

    The major purpose of this study is to use network and multimedia technologies to build a game-based learning system for junior high school students to apply in learning “World Geography" through the “role-playing" game approaches. This study first investigated the motivation and habits of junior high school students to use the Internet and online games, and then designed a game-based learning system according to situated and game-based learning theories. A teaching experiment was conducted to...

  20. Using Wikis as a Support and Assessment Tool in Collaborative Digital Game-Based Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samur, Yavuz

    2011-01-01

    In computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environments, there are many researches done on collaborative learning activities; however, in game-based learning environments, more research and literature on collaborative learning activities are required. Actually, both game-based learning environments and wikis enable us to use new chances…

  1. An Examination of Game-Based Learning from Theories of Flow Experience and Cognitive Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Hung; Chu, Chih-Ming; Liu, Hsiang-Hsuan; Yang, Shun-Bo; Chen, Wei-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to discuss whether game-based learning with the integration of games and digital learning could enhance not only the flow experience in learning but achieve the same flow experience in pure games. In addition, the authors discovered that whether the game-based learning could make learners to reveal higher cognitive load. The…

  2. Kinespell: Kinesthetic Learning Activity and Assessment in a Digital Game-Based Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cariaga, Ada Angeli; Salvador, Jay Andrae; Solamo, Ma. Rowena; Feria, Rommel

    Various approaches in learning are commonly classified into visual, auditory and kinesthetic (VAK) learning styles. One way of addressing the VAK learning styles is through game-based learning which motivates learners pursue knowledge holistically. The paper presents Kinespell, an unconventional method of learning through digital game-based learning. Kinespell is geared towards enhancing not only the learner’s spelling abilities but also the motor skills through utilizing wireless controllers. It monitors player’s performance through integrated assessment scheme. Results show that Kinespell may accommodate the VAK learning styles and is a promising alternative to established methods in learning and assessing students’ performance in Spelling.

  3. Investigating the Learning-Theory Foundations of Game-Based Learning: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, W-H.; Hsiao, H-C.; Wu, P-L.; Lin, C-H.; Huang, S-H.

    2012-01-01

    Past studies on the issue of learning-theory foundations in game-based learning stressed the importance of establishing learning-theory foundation and provided an exploratory examination of established learning theories. However, we found research seldom addressed the development of the use or failure to use learning-theory foundations and…

  4. Can Learning Motivation Predict Learning Achievement? A Case Study of a Mobile Game-Based English Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Hui; Cheng, Ching-Hsue; Yeh, Duen-Yian; Lin, Shih-Yun

    2017-01-01

    This study applied a quasi-experimental design to investigate the influence and predictive power of learner motivation for achievement, employing a mobile game-based English learning approach. A system called the Happy English Learning System, integrating learning material into a game-based context, was constructed and installed on mobile devices…

  5. Learning potentials of the ubiquitous internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Christian; Pedersen, Nicholai Friis; Aaen, Janus Holst

    The aim of this paper is to identify the key learning potentials of the ubiquitous internet. Rather than focusing on mobile technology or the mobility of the learner, the paper emphasises the ubiquity of internet access as a paramount catalyst for new learning in the digital age. From...... a sociocultural perspective the paper discusses different ways in which the use of mobile devices can extend and augment the context of the learner. The learning potentials of the ubiquitous internet relate to the opportunities to extend the context of the learner on three levels: 1) personalisation...

  6. A Multi-Modal Digital Game-Based Learning Environment for Hospitalized Children with Chronic Illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jui-Chih; Tsuei, Mengping

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the digital game-based learning for children with chronic illnesses in the hospital settings. The design-based research and qualitative methods were applied. Three eight-year-old children with leukemia participated in this study. In the first phase, the multi-user game-based learning system was developed and…

  7. Exploring Elementary-School Students' Engagement Patterns in a Game-Based Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ya-Hui; Lin, Yi-Chun; Hou, Huei-Tse

    2015-01-01

    Unlike most research, which has primarily examined the players' interest in or attitude toward game-based learning through questionnaires, the purpose of this empirical study is to explore students' engagement patterns by qualitative observation and sequential analysis to visualize and better understand their game-based learning process. We…

  8. Evaluating Listening and Speaking Skills in a Mobile Game-Based Learning Environment with Situational Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Shih, Timothy K.; Ma, Zhao-Heng; Shadiev, Rustam; Chen, Shu-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Game-based learning activities that facilitate students' listening and speaking skills were designed in this study. To participate in learning activities, students in the control group used traditional methods, while students in the experimental group used a mobile system. In our study, we looked into the feasibility of mobile game-based learning…

  9. Game based learning for 21st century transferable skills: challenges and opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellotti, Francesco; Bottino, Rosa Maria; Nadolski, Rob; Fernández Manjón, Baltasar

    2012-01-01

    Bellotti, F., Bottino, R. M., Nadolski, R. J., & Fernández Manjón, B. (2012, 4-6 July). Game based learning for 21st century transferable skills: challenges and opportunities. Presentation at the Workshop Game based learning for 21st century transferable skills: challenges and opportunities, 12th

  10. Digital Game-Based Learning: What's Literacy Got to Do With It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spires, Hiller A.

    2015-01-01

    Just as literacy practices are contextualized in social situations and relationships, game players establish shared language and understandings within a game; in essence, they gain fluency in specialized languages. This commentary explores the importance of digital game-based learning for schooling, the relationship between game-based learning,…

  11. USING WIKIS AS A SUPPORT AND ASSESSMENT TOOL IN COLLABORATIVE DIGITAL GAME-BASED LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz SAMUR

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL environments, there are many researches done on collaborative learning activities; however, in game-based learning environments, more research and literature on collaborative learning activities are required. Actually, both game-based learning environments and wikis enable us to use new chances for learning, especially in collaborative learning activities. Therefore, in this paper, related literature on wikis and how game & instructional designers can leverage from wikis in game-based learning settings for enhancing students’ collaborative learning activities are examined. Based on the reviewed literature, two main suggestions are given in this paper with their underlying reasons. First, using wikis as a support tool for enhancing collaboration in digital game-based learning (DGBL environments, and second using wikis as an assessment tool in DGBL are suggested.

  12. Innovative Educational Scenarios in Game Based Teaching and Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Smeureanu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The didactical game can be considered part of an educational scenario in teaching and learning. This article aims to show how fundamental concepts from the economicmathematical modeling area can be visualized, how to organize knowledge in coherent scenarios, presented in an educational game manner, to gain the attention and influence students' spirit of competition. At the same time, benefitting from the 3D visualizations, the graphical interfaces for navigating in multidimensional spaces or projections are defined and thus imagination used for mental models construction is stimulated and human intuition is capitalized in the process of knowledge discovery, assisted by computer with analytic algorithms type. Exploration becomes a game feature and can be pursued both numerically and visually. 3D environments give realism to visualizations that are found in games, facilitating realimaginary relationship throughout the game and enhancing learning motivation. The innovative character of teaching is given by the method in which the teacher creates his own educational scenario by considering specific learning objectives, age particularities of students, time and space-related resources, the technical requirements of the game and the evaluation method. The paper makes several references to such projects, developed by the authors and implemented in working with students. Game based on demonstration (using simulation, modelling or visualization coordinates users to obtain relevant information; the multiple representations of knowledge are so used and compared through a multitude of examples.

  13. Ubiquitous Learning Environments in Higher Education: A Scoping Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Mari Aulikki; Haavisto, Elina; Liikanen, Eeva; Kääriäinen, Maria

    2018-01-01

    Ubiquitous learning and the use of ubiquitous learning environments heralds a new era in higher education. Ubiquitous learning environments enhance context-aware and seamless learning experiences available from any location at any time. They support smooth interaction between authentic and digital learning resources and provide personalized…

  14. Teaching Sport Psychology to the XBox Generation: Further evidence for game-based learning

    OpenAIRE

    Manley, A; Whitaker, L; Patterson, L

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To extend recent research examining the impact of game-based activities on the learning experience of undergraduate psychology students. Design: A counterbalanced repeated measures design was employed to evaluate students’ learning experiences following their involvement in active game-based learning activities. Method: Students on a Level 5 sport psychology module (N=134) were asked to participate in four practical classes demonstrating the impact of psychological factors (e.g. an...

  15. The Construction of an Ontology-Based Ubiquitous Learning Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ching-Jung; Chou, Chien-Chih; Yang, Jin-Tan David

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to incorporate adaptive ontology into ubiquitous learning grid to achieve seamless learning environment. Ubiquitous learning grid uses ubiquitous computing environment to infer and determine the most adaptive learning contents and procedures in anytime, any place and with any device. To achieve the goal, an…

  16. The Effect of Computer Game-Based Learning on FL Vocabulary Transferability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franciosi, Stephan J.

    2017-01-01

    In theory, computer game-based learning can support several vocabulary learning affordances that have been identified in the foreign language learning research. In the observable evidence, learning with computer games has been shown to improve performance on vocabulary recall tests. However, while simple recall can be a sign of learning,…

  17. What Role do Metaphors Play in Game-Based Learning Processes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Thomas Duus

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores the role played by metaphors in learning games and game-based learning processes. The aim is to contribute better understanding of the mechanisms of how such games contribute to learning and learning transfer. On the basis of an analytical strategy that emphasises metaphors...... as storylines, actors, acts and movement, three learning games are analysed in order to understand how learning emerges in association to game-embedded metaphors. As shown in this chapter, metaphors seem to play a profound role in game-based learning, both by providing participants with a suitcase containing...

  18. DIGITAL GAME-BASED LANGUAGE LEARNING IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHER EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    ALYAZ, Yunus; GENC, Zubeyde Sinem

    2016-01-01

    New technologies including digital game-based language learning have increasingly received attention. However, their implementation is far from expected and desired levels due to technical, instructional, financial and sociological barriers. Previous studies suggest that there is a strong need to establish courses in order to support adaptation of game-based learning pedagogy through helping teachers experience digital games themselves before they are expected to use them in teaching. This st...

  19. Designing for Game-Based Learning: The Effective Integration of Technology to Support Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaswad, Zina; Nadolny, Larysa

    2015-01-01

    The use of games and game structures in educational contexts is growing in popularity. An increasing number of technologies have been developed to meet the needs of designing a course as a game. This article discussed the design process in game-based learning and reviewed the research on structuring a course with a focus on feedback, goals, and…

  20. An Exploration of the Attitude and Learning Effectiveness of Business College Students towards Game Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chiung-Sui; Huang, Ya-Ping; Chien, Fei-Ling

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the attitude and learning effectiveness in game based simulations from college students' perspective. The participants included 189 business college students in Taiwan. The main instrument employed in this study was McDonald's video game. Additionally, participant selection, data collection and analysis, and results…

  1. What Role do Metaphors Play in Game-based Learning Processes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Thomas Duus

    2015-01-01

    This chapter explores the role played by metaphors in learning games and game-based learning processes. The aim is to contribute better understanding of the mechanisms of how such games contribute to learning and learning transfer. On the basis of an analytical strategy that emphasises metaphors...... as storylines, actors, acts and movement, three learning games are analysed in order to understand how learningemerges in association to game-embedded metaphors.As shown in this chapter, metaphorsseem to play a profound role in game-based learning, both by providing participantswith a suitcase containing...

  2. Acceptance of Game-Based Learning and Intrinsic Motivation as Predictors for Learning Success and Flow Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ninaus

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available There is accumulating evidence that engagement with digital math games can improve students’ learning. However, in what way individual variables critical to game-based learning influence students' learning success still needs to be explored. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the influence of students’ acceptance of game-based learning (e.g., perceived usefulness of a game as a learning tool, perceived ease of use, as well as their intrinsic motivation for math (e.g., their math interest, self-efficacy and quality of playing experience on learning success in a game-based rational number training. Additionally, we investigated the influence of the former variables on quality of playing experience (operationalized as perceived flow. Results indicated that the game-based training was effective. Moreover, students’ learning success and their quality of playing experience were predicted by measures of acceptance of game-based learning and intrinsic motivation for math. These findings indicated that learning success in game-based learning approaches are driven by students’ acceptance of the game as a learning tool and content-specific intrinsic motivation. Therefore, the present work is of particular interest to researchers, developers, and practitioners working with game-based learning environments.

  3. Agriscience Teachers' Implementation of Digital Game-based Learning in an Introductory Animal Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Angela W.; Bunch, J. C.; Wallace, Maria F. G.

    2015-12-01

    In today's technological age, visions for technology integration in the classroom continue to be explored and examined. Digital game-based learning is one way to purposefully integrate technology while maintaining a focus on learning objectives. This case study sought to understand agriscience teachers' experiences implementing digital game-based learning in an introductory animal science course. From interviews with agriscience teachers on their experiences with the game, three themes emerged: (1) the constraints of inadequate and inappropriate technologies, and time to game implementation; (2) the shift in teacher and student roles necessitated by implementing the game; and (3) the inherent competitive nature of learning through the game. Based on these findings, we recommend that pre-service and in-service professional development opportunities be developed for teachers to learn how to implement digital game-based learning effectively. Additionally, with the potential for simulations that address cross-cutting concepts in the next generation science standards, digital game-based learning should be explored in various science teaching and learning contexts.

  4. Empirical evidence of the game-based learning advantages for online students persistence

    OpenAIRE

    A. Imbellone; G. Marinensi; C.M. Medaglia

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the empirical results obtained from a study conducted on a game-based online course that took place in 2014 with 47 participants. The study evidenced the benefits of the learning games mechanics on learners’ willingness to continue the course. Assuming the interest for the subject of the course as a fundamental condition for student persistence within the course, it is shown how it can be significantly enhanced by the presence of both ludic and narrative game-based elements.

  5. Game-based versus traditional case-based learning: comparing effectiveness in stroke continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telner, Deanna; Bujas-Bobanovic, Maja; Chan, David; Chester, Bob; Marlow, Bernard; Meuser, James; Rothman, Arthur; Harvey, Bart

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate family physicians' enjoyment of and knowledge gained from game-based learning, compared with traditional case-based learning, in a continuing medical education (CME) event on stroke prevention and management. An equivalence trial to determine if game-based learning was as effective as case-based learning in terms of attained knowledge levels. Game questions and small group cases were developed. Participants were randomized to either a game-based or a case-based group and took part in the event. Ontario provincial family medicine conference. Thirty-two family physicians and 3 senior family medicine residents attending the conference. Participation in either a game-based or a case-based CME learning group. Scores on 40-item immediate and 3-month posttests of knowledge and a satisfaction survey. Results from knowledge testing immediately after the event and 3 months later showed no significant difference in scoring between groups. Participants in the game-based group reported higher levels of satisfaction with the learning experience. Games provide a novel way of organizing CME events. They might provide more group interaction and discussion, as well as improve recruitment to CME events. They might also provide a forum for interdisciplinary CME. Using games in future CME events appears to be a promising approach to facilitate participant learning.

  6. Exploring a Narrative Game-based Learning Platform as a Vehicle for Inclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedde, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    for all types of learners irrespective of their capabilities or their challenges. Within the framework of a research project in Denmark, learning designs were developed that incorporated the entire curriculum for grade 9-10 in a narrative, game-based framework and based on this, design models were...... the opportunity to develop and experience new roles in the classroom that allowed for greater activity, joy of learning and learning experiences. This paper will report on aspects and implications of this type of narrarive game-based design for inclusion in the class-room. keywords: narrative learning, game...

  7. A Critical Review of 13 Years of Mobile Game-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakas, Filippos; Kambourakis, Georgios; Papasalouros, Andreas; Gritzalis, Stefanos

    2018-01-01

    With the increasing popularity of smartphones and tablets, game-based learning (GBL) is undergoing a rapid shift to mobile platforms. This transformation is driven by mobility, wireless interfaces, and built-in sensors that these smart devices offer in order to enable blended and context-sensitive mobile learning (m-Learning) activities. Thus,…

  8. A Game Based e-Learning System to Teach Artificial Intelligence in the Computer Sciences Degree

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro-Santos, Amable; Fajardo, Waldo; Molina-Solana, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Our students taking the Artificial Intelligence and Knowledge Engineering courses often encounter a large number of problems to solve which are not directly related to the subject to be learned. To solve this problem, we have developed a game based e-learning system. The elected game, that has been implemented as an e-learning system, allows to…

  9. From the Games Industry: Ten Lessons for Game-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollins, Paul; Whitton, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    This paper draws on lessons learned from the development process of the entertainment games industry and discusses how they can be applied to the field of game-based learning. This paper examines policy makers and those wishing to commission or develop games for learning and highlights potential opportunities as well as pitfalls. The paper focuses…

  10. Improving the Impact and Return of Investment of Game-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Christian Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Today's economic situation demands that learning organizations become more diligent in their business dealings to reduce cost and increase bottom line for survival. While there are many champions and proponents claiming that game-based learning (GBL) is sure to improve learning, researchers have, thus far, been unable to (re)produce concrete,…

  11. Computer Game-Based Learning: Perceptions and Experiences of Senior Chinese Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feihong; Lockee, Barbara B.; Burton, John K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate senior Chinese adults' potential acceptance of computer game-based learning (CGBL) by probing their perceptions of computer game play and their perceived impacts of game play on their learning of computer skills and life satisfaction. A total of 60 senior adults from a local senior adult learning center…

  12. An Examination of Digital Game-Based Situated Learning Applied to Chinese Language Poetry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Ren; Lin, You-Shiuan

    2016-01-01

    By gradually placing more importance on game-based education and changing learning motivation by applying game-playing characteristics, students' learning experiences can be enhanced and a better learning effect can be achieved. When teaching the content of Chinese poetry in Taiwanese junior high schools, most teachers only explain the meaning of…

  13. Digital Game-Based Learning Supports Student Motivation, Cognitive Success, and Performance Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jeng-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Traditional multimedia learning is primarily based on the cognitive load concept of information processing theory. Recent digital game-based learning (DGBL) studies have focused on exploring content support for learning motivation and related game characteristics. Motivation, volition, and performance (MVP) theory indicates that cognitive load and…

  14. The Construction of an Online Competitive Game-Based Learning System for Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuh-Ming; Kuo, Sheng-Huang; Lou, Shi-Jer; Shih, Ru-Chu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study aimed to construct an online competitive game-based learning system by using freeware for junior high school students and to assess its effectiveness. From the learning standpoints, game mechanisms including learning points, competition mechanism, training room mechanism, questioning & answering mechanism, tips, and…

  15. Integrating Collaborative and Decentralized Models to Support Ubiquitous Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Jorge Luis Victória; Barbosa, Débora Nice Ferrari; Rigo, Sandro José; de Oliveira, Jezer Machado; Rabello, Solon Andrade, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    The application of ubiquitous technologies in the improvement of education strategies is called Ubiquitous Learning. This article proposes the integration between two models dedicated to support ubiquitous learning environments, called Global and CoolEdu. CoolEdu is a generic collaboration model for decentralized environments. Global is an…

  16. Using Game-Based Cooperative Learning to Improve Learning Motivation: A Study of Online Game Use in an Operating Systems Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Bin-Shyan; Lai, Chien-Hung; Hsia, Yen-Teh; Lin, Tsong-Wuu; Lu, Cheng-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Many researchers have studied the use of game-based learning. Game-based learning takes many forms, including virtual reality, role playing, and performing tasks. For students to learn specific course content, it is important that the selected game be suited to the course. Thus far, no studies have investigated the use of game-based cooperative…

  17. Undertaking an Ecological Approach to Advance Game-Based Learning: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mamta; Foster, Aroutis

    2014-01-01

    Systematic incorporation of digital games in schools is largely unexplored. This case study explored the ecological conditions necessary for implementing a game-based learning course by examining the interaction between three domains (the innovator, the innovation, and the context). From January-April 2012, one in-service teacher learned and…

  18. PlayIt: Game Based Learning Approach for Teaching Programming Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathrani, Anuradha; Christian, Shelly; Ponder-Sutton, Agate

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates a game-based learning (GBL) approach to engage students in learning and enhance their programming skills. The paper gives a detailed narrative of how an educational game was mapped with the curriculum of a prescribed programming course in a computing diploma study programme. Two separate student cohorts were invited to…

  19. Agriscience Teachers' Implementation of Digital Game-Based Learning in an Introductory Animal Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Angela W.; Bunch, J. C.; Wallace, Maria F.

    2015-01-01

    In today's technological age, visions for technology integration in the classroom continue to be explored and examined. Digital game-based learning is one way to purposefully integrate technology while maintaining a focus on learning objectives. This case study sought to understand agriscience teachers' experiences implementing digital game-based…

  20. Using Game-Based Learning to Foster Critical Thinking in Student Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchino, Marc I.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research indicates the importance of student discourse in the construction of knowledge and the fostering of critical thinking skills, especially in the field of problem-based learning (PBL). Further, a growing body of research on game-based learning (GBL) draws parallels between playing certain types of games and the solving of…

  1. Personality Traits and Performance in Online Game-Based Learning: Collaborative versus Individual Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Miguel Angel

    2013-01-01

    Extant research indicates that, in face-to-face settings, cooperative learning and game-based learning strategies can be effective. However, in online settings (e.g., in distance education), there is a paucity of research in this area. This study was designed to investigate performance and attitudes of university students who played an educational…

  2. Reconceptualizing Pedagogical Usability of and Teachers' Roles in Computer Game-Based Learning in School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzuo, Pei-Wen; Ling, Jennifer Isabelle Ong Pei; Yang, Chien-Hui; Chen, Vivian Hsueh-Hua

    2012-01-01

    At present, methods for the optimal use of two approaches to computer game-based learning in school to enhance students' learning, namely, computer game play and game design, are obscure because past research has been devoted more to designing rather than evaluating the implementation of these approaches in school. In addition, most studies…

  3. Motivation, students' needs and learning outcomes: a hybrid game-based app for enhanced language learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, Anke; Isla-Montes, José-Luis; Palomo-Duarte, Manuel; Dodero, Juan-Manuel

    2016-01-01

    In the context of European Higher Education students face an increasing focus on independent, individual learning-at the expense of face-to-face interaction. Hence learners are, all too often, not provided with enough opportunities to negotiate in the target language. The current case study aims to address this reality by going beyond conventional approaches to provide students with a hybrid game-based app, combining individual and collaborative learning opportunities. The 4-week study was carried out with 104 German language students (A1.2 CEFR) who had previously been enrolled in a first-semester A1.1 level course at a Spanish university. The VocabTrainerA1 app-designed specifically for this study-harnesses the synergy of combining individual learning tasks and a collaborative murder mystery game in a hybrid level-based architecture. By doing so, the app provides learners with opportunities to apply their language skills to real-life-like communication. The purpose of the study was twofold: on one hand we aimed to measure learner motivation, perceived usefulness and added value of hybrid game-based apps; on the other, we sought to determine their impact on language learning. To this end, we conducted focus group interviews and an anonymous Technology Acceptance Model survey (TAM). In addition, students took a pre-test and a post-test. Scores from both tests were compared with the results obtained in first-semester conventional writing tasks, with a view to measure learning outcomes. The study provides qualitative and quantitative data supporting our initial hypotheses. Our findings suggest that hybrid game-based apps like VocabTrainerA1-which seamlessly combine individual and collaborative learning tasks-motivate learners, stimulate perceived usefulness and added value, and better meet the language learning needs of today's digital natives. In terms of acceptance, outcomes and sustainability, the data indicate that hybrid game-based apps significantly improve

  4. Ubiquitous Learning Project Using Life-Logging Technology in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Hiroaki; Hou, Bin; Li, Mengmeng; Uosaki, Noriko; Mouri, Kosuke; Liu, Songran

    2014-01-01

    A Ubiquitous Learning Log (ULL) is defined as a digital record of what a learner has learned in daily life using ubiquitous computing technologies. In this paper, a project which developed a system called SCROLL (System for Capturing and Reusing Of Learning Log) is presented. The aim of developing SCROLL is to help learners record, organize,…

  5. [Applying Game-Based Learning in Nursing Education: Empathy Board Game Learning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chueh-Fen; Wu, Shu-Mei; Shu, Ying-Mei; Yeh, Mei-Yu

    2018-02-01

    Attending lectures and reading are two common approaches to acquiring knowledge, while repetitive practice is a common approach to acquiring skills. Nurturing proper attitudes in students is one of the greatest challenges for educators. Health professionals must incorporate empathy into their practice. Creative teaching strategies may offer a feasible approach to enhancing empathy-related competence. The present article focuses on analyzing current, empathy-related curriculums in nursing education in Taiwan, exploring the concepts of empathy and game-based learning, presenting the development of an empathy board game as a teaching aid, and, finally, evaluating the developed education application. Based on the learner-centered principle, this aid was designed with peer learning, allowing learners to influence the learning process, to simulate the various roles of clients, and to develop diverse interpersonal dialogues. The continuous learning loops were formed using the gamification mechanism and transformation, enabling students to connect and practice the three elements of empathy ability: emotion, cognition and expression. Via the game elements of competition, interaction, storytelling, real-time responses, concretizing feedback, integrated peer learning, and equality between teachers and students, students who play patient roles are able to perceive different levels of comfort, which encourages the development of insight into the meaning of empathy. Thereby, the goals of the empathy lesson is achievable within a creative game-based learning environment.

  6. The Effectiveness of Game-Based Learning as an Instructional Strategy to Engage Students in Higher Education in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tham, Raymond; Tham, Lesley

    2014-01-01

    The Internet Generation today is accustomed to multi-tasking, graphics, fun, and fantasy. Educators are finding it challenging to engage and motivate students with the traditional mode of teaching. They are increasingly seeking to tap the potential of game-based learning to engage and motivate learners. Game-based learning is also catching on in…

  7. Murder on Grimm Isle: The Impact of Game Narrative Design in an Educational Game-Based Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Michele D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the impact of narrative design in a game-based learning environment. Specifically, this investigation focuses the narrative design in an adventure-styled, game-based learning environment for fostering argumentation writing by looking at how the game narrative impacted player/learner (1) intrinsic…

  8. Empirical evidence of the game-based learning advantages for online students persistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Imbellone

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the empirical results obtained from a study conducted on a game-based online course that took place in 2014 with 47 participants. The study evidenced the benefits of the learning games mechanics on learners’ willingness to continue the course. Assuming the interest for the subject of the course as a fundamental condition for student persistence within the course, it is shown how it can be significantly enhanced by the presence of both ludic and narrative game-based elements.

  9. Game-Based Learning in Science Education: A Review of Relevant Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Chaun; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to review empirical research articles regarding game-based science learning (GBSL) published from 2000 to 2011. Thirty-one articles were identified through the Web of Science and SCOPUS databases. A qualitative content analysis technique was adopted to analyze the research purposes and designs, game design and…

  10. The Play Curricular Activity Reflection Discussion Model for Game-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Aroutis; Shah, Mamta

    2015-01-01

    This article elucidates the process of game-based learning in classrooms through the use of the Play Curricular activity Reflection Discussion (PCaRD) model. A mixed-methods study was conducted at a high school to implement three games with the PCaRD model in a year-long elective course. Data sources included interviews and observations for…

  11. The Importance of Future Kindergarten Teachers' Beliefs about the Usefulness of Games Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manessis, Dionysios

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the importance of future kindergarten teachers' beliefs about the usefulness of Games Based Learning in Early Childhood Education. Data were collected by using questionnaires which were given to the participants at the end of an introductory level, Information and Communication Technologies course. The sample of this study was…

  12. Game-Based Learning in Professional Development for Practicing Educators: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Tamara R.

    2016-01-01

    Many game-based learning (GBL) researchers working in K-12 educational settings have supported the incorporation of gaming technologies into classroom practice, but little has been communicated about the effect of incorporating GBL into practicing K-12 educators' professional development. This review is a critical appraisal of the quantity and…

  13. Digital Game-Based Learning for K-12 Mathematics Education: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, JaeHwan; Joung, Eunmi

    2018-01-01

    Digital games (e.g., video games or computer games) have been reported as an effective educational method that can improve students' motivation and performance in mathematics education. This meta-analysis study (a) investigates the current trend of digital game-based learning (DGBL) by reviewing the research studies on the use of DGBL for…

  14. Digital Game-Based Language Learning in Foreign Language Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyaz, Yunus; Genc, Zubeyde Sinem

    2016-01-01

    New technologies including digital game-based language learning have increasingly received attention. However, their implementation is far from expected and desired levels due to technical, instructional, financial and sociological barriers. Previous studies suggest that there is a strong need to establish courses in order to support adaptation of…

  15. Exploring Teacher Use of an Online Forum to Develop Game-Based Learning Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barany, Amanda; Shah, Mamta; Foster, Aroutis

    2017-01-01

    Game-based learning researchers have emphasized the importance of teachers' game literacy and knowledge of pedagogical approaches involved in successfully adopting an instructional approach (Bell and Gresalfi, 2017). In this paper, we describe findings from an online resource that teachers used to generate a repository of games for use both during…

  16. Mathematics Achievement with Digital Game-Based Learning in High School Algebra 1 Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Terri Lynn Kurley

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the impact of digital game-based learning (DGBL) on mathematics achievement in a rural high school setting in North Carolina. A causal comparative research design was used in this study to collect data to determine the effectiveness of DGBL in high school Algebra 1 classes. Data were collected from the North Carolina…

  17. Transforming Classrooms through Game-Based Learning: A Feasibility Study in a Developing Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vate-U-Lan, Poonsri

    2015-01-01

    This article reports an exploratory study which investigated attitudes towards the practice of game-based learning in teaching STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) within a Thai educational context. This self-administered Internet-based survey yielded 169 responses from a snowball sampling technique. Three fifths of respondents…

  18. Game-Based Learning in Teacher Education: A Strategy to Integrate Digital Games into Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, Nathalie; De Fraine, Biecke

    2012-01-01

    As educational technology is rapidly changing, greater emphasis has been placed on preparing the next generation of teachers for effective technology integration into the classrooms. In this article, the authors describe the design, implementation, and evaluation of a course on digital game-based learning (DGBL) developed for the preservice…

  19. Awareness for Contextualized Digital Contents in Ubiquitous Learning Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Börner, D. (2009). Awareness for Contextualized Digital Contents in Ubiquitous Learning Environments. Presented at the Doctoral Consortium of the Fourth European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning (EC-TEL 2009). September, 29-October, 2, 2009, Nice, France.

  20. Games-to-teach or games-to-learn unlocking the power of digital game-based learning through performance

    CERN Document Server

    Chee, Yam San

    2016-01-01

    The book presents a critical evaluation of current approaches related to the use of digital games in education. The author identifies two competing paradigms: that of games-to-teach and games-to-learn. Arguing in favor of the latter, the author advances the case for approaching game-based learning through the theoretical lens of performance, rooted in play and dialog, to unlock the power of digital games for 21st century learning. Drawing upon the author’s research, three concrete exemplars of game-based learning curricula are described and discussed. The challenge of advancing game-based learning in education is addressed in the context of school reform. Finally, future prospects of and educational opportunities for game-based learning are articulated. Readers of the book will find the explication of performance theory applied to game-based learning especially interesting. This work constitutes the author’s original theorization. Readers will derive four main benefits: (1) an explication of the differenc...

  1. An overview of game-based learning in building services engineering education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanne, Kari

    2016-03-01

    To ensure proper competence development and short graduation times for engineering students, it is essential that the study motivation is encouraged by new learning methods. In game-based learning, the learner's engagement is increased and learning is made meaningful by applying game-like features such as competition and rewarding through virtual promotions or achievement badges. In this paper, the state of the art of game-based learning in building services engineering education at university level is reviewed and discussed. A systematic literature review indicates that educational games have been reported in the field of related disciplines, such as mechanical and civil engineering. The development of system-level educational games that realistically simulate work life in building services engineering is still in its infancy. Novel rewarding practices and more comprehensive approaches entailing the state-of-the-art information tools such as building information modelling, geographic information systems, building management systems and augmented reality are needed in the future.

  2. Deep assessment: an exploratory study of game-based, multimodal learning in Epidemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Jenson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available n this study, we examine what and how intermediate age students learned from playing in a health-focused game-based digital learning environment, Epidemic. Epidemic is a playful interactive environment designed to deliver factual knowledge, invite critical understanding, and encourage effective self-care practices in dealing with viral contagious diseases, using a social networking interface to integrate both serious games and game-like multimodal design projects. Epidemic invites a playful approach to its deadly serious core concern – communicable disease – in order to see what happens when students are encouraged to critically approach information from multiple or contradictory perspectives. To identify what participants learned while interacting within Epidemic, we deployed two instructional and assessment models, noting the differences each instructional approach could potentially make, and what approach to assessment might help us evaluate game-based learning. We found that each approach provided importantly different perspectives on what and how students learned, and on the very meaning of student success. Recognizing that traditional assessment tools based in print-cultural literacy may prove increasingly ill-suited for assessing emergent multimodal literacies in game-based learning environments, this study seeks to contribute to a growing body of work on the development of novel assessments for learning.

  3. Gaming the Schools. Didaktische Szenarien des Digital Game Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Mitgutsch

    2009-12-01

    government funded research project studying the use of commercial computer games in schools. This includes the scientific analysis of the experience of teachers as well as students during the pilot projects. The results of this study indicate the need of a new media pedagogical professionalization of teachers with respect to the didactic challenges of computer game based formal education.

  4. Measuring the Differences between Traditional Learning and Game-Based Learning Using Electroencephalography (EEG) Physiologically Based Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Huei

    2017-01-01

    Students' cognitive states can reflect a learning experience that results in engagement in an activity. In this study, we used electroencephalography (EEG) physiologically based methodology to evaluate students' levels of attention and relaxation, as well as their learning performance within a traditional and game-based learning context. While no…

  5. Game-Based Learning: Increasing the Logical-Mathematical, Naturalistic, and Linguistic Learning Levels of Primary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Moral Pérez, M. Esther; Duque, Alba P. Guzmán; García, L. Carlota Fernández

    2018-01-01

    Game-based learning is an innovative methodology that takes advantage of the educational potential offered by videogames in general and serious games in particular to boost training processes, thus making it easier for users to achieve motivated learning. The present paper focuses on the description of the Game to Learn Project, which has as its…

  6. Game-Based Learning in an OpenSim-Supported Virtual Environment on Perceived Motivational Quality of Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heesung; Ke, Fengfeng; Paek, Insu

    2017-01-01

    This experimental study was intended to examine whether game-based learning (GBL) that encompasses four particular game characteristics (challenges, a storyline, immediate rewards and the integration of game-play with learning content) in an OpenSimulator-supported virtual reality learning environment can improve perceived motivational quality of…

  7. Twenty-First Century Learning: Communities, Interaction and Ubiquitous Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leh, Amy S.C.; Kouba, Barbara; Davis, Dirk

    2005-01-01

    Advanced technology makes 21st century learning, communities and interactions unique and leads people to an era of ubiquitous computing. The purpose of this article is to contribute to the discussion of learning in the 21st century. The paper will review literature on learning community, community learning, interaction, 21st century learning and…

  8. Perspectives on a Learning-Model for Innovating Game-Based Movement in Sports and Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elbæk, Lars; Friis, Jørgen Jakob

    2017-01-01

    science and health education. We therefore ask: Which learning approach and educational factors does a learning model need to provide, in order to establish the best foundation for learning innovation and the design of game-based movement solutions within sport and health education? This paper suggests......As fitness trackers promote the quantifiable self and exergaming and interactive playful installations find their way into the public domain, the design for movement comes into focus. New trends like mobile platforms for gamed-based interaction, such as Pokémon GO, are also attempting to promote...... an active lifestyle. Such digitally supported movement promote health and underlines a need for students to understand that movement design incorporates many aspects: technology, gamification, motivation and understanding of health. To support this, a movement innovation program was needed at our sports...

  9. Computer game-based and traditional learning method: a comparison regarding students’ knowledge retention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rondon Silmara

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Educational computer games are examples of computer-assisted learning objects, representing an educational strategy of growing interest. Given the changes in the digital world over the last decades, students of the current generation expect technology to be used in advancing their learning requiring a need to change traditional passive learning methodologies to an active multisensory experimental learning methodology. The objective of this study was to compare a computer game-based learning method with a traditional learning method, regarding learning gains and knowledge retention, as means of teaching head and neck Anatomy and Physiology to Speech-Language and Hearing pathology undergraduate students. Methods Students were randomized to participate to one of the learning methods and the data analyst was blinded to which method of learning the students had received. Students’ prior knowledge (i.e. before undergoing the learning method, short-term knowledge retention and long-term knowledge retention (i.e. six months after undergoing the learning method were assessed with a multiple choice questionnaire. Students’ performance was compared considering the three moments of assessment for both for the mean total score and for separated mean scores for Anatomy questions and for Physiology questions. Results Students that received the game-based method performed better in the pos-test assessment only when considering the Anatomy questions section. Students that received the traditional lecture performed better in both post-test and long-term post-test when considering the Anatomy and Physiology questions. Conclusions The game-based learning method is comparable to the traditional learning method in general and in short-term gains, while the traditional lecture still seems to be more effective to improve students’ short and long-term knowledge retention.

  10. Computer game-based and traditional learning method: a comparison regarding students' knowledge retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondon, Silmara; Sassi, Fernanda Chiarion; Furquim de Andrade, Claudia Regina

    2013-02-25

    Educational computer games are examples of computer-assisted learning objects, representing an educational strategy of growing interest. Given the changes in the digital world over the last decades, students of the current generation expect technology to be used in advancing their learning requiring a need to change traditional passive learning methodologies to an active multisensory experimental learning methodology. The objective of this study was to compare a computer game-based learning method with a traditional learning method, regarding learning gains and knowledge retention, as means of teaching head and neck Anatomy and Physiology to Speech-Language and Hearing pathology undergraduate students. Students were randomized to participate to one of the learning methods and the data analyst was blinded to which method of learning the students had received. Students' prior knowledge (i.e. before undergoing the learning method), short-term knowledge retention and long-term knowledge retention (i.e. six months after undergoing the learning method) were assessed with a multiple choice questionnaire. Students' performance was compared considering the three moments of assessment for both for the mean total score and for separated mean scores for Anatomy questions and for Physiology questions. Students that received the game-based method performed better in the pos-test assessment only when considering the Anatomy questions section. Students that received the traditional lecture performed better in both post-test and long-term post-test when considering the Anatomy and Physiology questions. The game-based learning method is comparable to the traditional learning method in general and in short-term gains, while the traditional lecture still seems to be more effective to improve students' short and long-term knowledge retention.

  11. Exploring Children's Requirements for Game-Based Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marja Kankaanranta

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available End users' expertise in the development of new applications is acknowledged in user-centered and participatory design. Similarly, children's experience of what they find enjoyable and how they learn is a valuable source of inspiration for the design of products intended for them. In this paper, we explore experiences obtained from collaboration with elementary school children in the design of learning environments, based on three projects and three requirements gathering techniques. We also discuss how the children experienced the participation. The children's contribution yielded useful, both expected and unanticipated, outcomes in regard to the user interface and contents of the learning environments under development. Moreover, we present issues related to design collaboration with children, especially in terms of the children's feeling of ownership over the final outcome.

  12. Video Game-Based Learning: An Emerging Paradigm for Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Kurt D.

    2013-01-01

    Interactive digital media, or video games, are a powerful new medium. They offer immersive experiences in which players solve problems. Players learn more than just facts--ways of seeing and understanding problems so that they "become" different kinds of people. "Serious games" coming from business strategy, advergaming, and entertainment gaming…

  13. Game-Based Teaching: What Educators Can Learn from Videogames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Janna

    2009-01-01

    Most teachers only dream of their students spending the amount of motivation, attention, passion, and critical thinking on their classes that some students do playing videogames. This investigation examines the success, pitfalls, and lessons learned from incorporating videogame-like components into an educational technology class. For example,…

  14. Agoras: Towards Collaborative Game-Based Learning Experiences on Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catala, Alejandro; Garcia-Sanjuan, Fernando; Pons, Patricia; Jaen, Javier; Mocholi, Jose A.

    2012-01-01

    Children nowadays consume and manage lots of interactive digital software. This makes it more interesting and powerful to use digital technologies and videogames supporting learning experiences. However, in general, current digital proposals lack of in-situ social interaction supporting natural exchange and discussion of ideas in the course of…

  15. Effects of the Badge Mechanism on Self-Efficacy and Learning Performance in a Game-Based English Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie Chi; Quadir, Benazir; Chen, Nian-Shing

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of studies have been conducted on digital game-based learning (DGBL). However, there has been a lack of attention paid to individuals' self-efficacy and learning performance in the implementation of DGBL. This study therefore investigated how the badge mechanism in DGBL enhanced users' self-efficacy in the subject domain of…

  16. Effects of Locus of Control on Behavioral Intention and Learning Performance of Energy Knowledge in Game-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie Chi; Lin, Yi Lung; Liu, Yi-Chun

    2017-01-01

    Game-based learning has been gradually adopted in energy education as an effective learning tool because digital games have the potential to increase energy literacy and encourage behavior change. However, not every learner can benefit from this support. There is a need to examine how human factors affect learners' reactions to digital games for…

  17. The Comparison of Solitary and Collaborative Modes of Game-Based Learning on Students' Science Learning and Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Huei; Wang, Kuan-Chieh; Lin, Yu-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated and compared solitary and collaborative modes of game-based learning in promoting students' science learning and motivation. A total of fifty seventh grade students participated in this study. The results showed that students who played in a solitary or collaborative mode demonstrated improvement in learning…

  18. Quiz Lounge Game-Based Learning on Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Harriehausen-Mühlbauer

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Quiz Lounge project is a collaboration between Hochschule Darmstadt and Lufthansa AG. The goal of the project was the development of a mobile learning application. With the application, the Lufthansa managers should be able to learn about data privacy topics playfully and interactively. The application is based on a quiz concept and asks the user for answers to a series of ten questions which increase in difficulty level. While playing the game the user can use two "lifeline" helpers, the audience- and the 50-50-helper. Furthermore, the user has the ability to browse a glossary of related terms if he or she has the need of more detailed knowledge. New questions and also new games can be added with a web-based authoring tool. The authoring tool was uniquely developed for the Quiz Lounge application and conforms to the specific needs of its architecture.

  19. Engaging Students with a Mobile Game-Based Learning System in University Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Bartel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution we present a game-based learning concept which is based on mobile devices. It focuses a joyful stabilization of knowledge and the engagement of students using the Gamification approach and its game mechanics. Previous findings how to promote students’ motivation are adapted in the mobile context and discussed. A pre-evaluation of the prototype is described with its findings.

  20. The Sea of Simulation: Improving Naval Shiphandling Training and Readiness through Game-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    playing any video game on a computer in the last 6 months (non-console, Xbox , PS3)? (e.g., hours, days, weeks, months, etc.) Participant...COVE) shiphandling trainer. Students were later evaluated in COVE on their ability to maneuver a Guided Missile Destroyer, a similarly configured but...characteristics of one model and learning a new one through the course of their instruction. Our findings suggest that an individually accessible, game based

  1. Evaluation of Game-Based Learning in Cybersecurity Education for High School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Ge; Tu, Manghui; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Heffron, Justin; White, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    The increasing demand for global cybersecurity workforce made it a critical mission for universities and colleges to attract and train next generation of cybersecurity professionals. To address this issue, Purdue University Northwest (PNW) launched high school summer camps to 181 high school students, with 51.3% underrepresented minority ratio. PNW summer camp activities were delivered in the format of game based learning and hands-on labs. Four cybersecurity education games were developed to...

  2. Calculation laboratory: game based learning in exact discipline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Felipe de Almeida Xavier

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Calculation Laboratory appeared with the need to give meaning to the learning of students entering the courses of Engineering, in the discipline of Differential Calculus, in the semester 1/2016. After obtaining good results, the activity was also extended to the classes of Analytical Geometry and Linear Algebra (GAAL and Integral Calculus, so that these incoming students could continue the process. Historically, students present some difficulty in these contents, and it is necessary to give meaning to their learning. Given the table presented, the Calculation Laboratory aims to give meaning to the contents worked, giving students autonomy, having the teacher as the tutor, as intermediary between the student and the knowledge, creating various practical, playful and innovative activities to assist in this process. Through this article, it is intended to report a little about the activities created to facilitate this process of execution of the Calculation Laboratory, in addition to demonstrating the results obtained and measured after its application. Through these proposed activities, it is noticed that the student is gradually gaining autonomy in the search for knowledge.

  3. Surveying In-Service Teachers' Beliefs about Game-Based Learning and Perceptions of Technological Pedagogical and Content Knowledge of Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chung-Yuan; Tsai, Meng-Jung; Chang, Yu-Hsuan; Liang, Jyh-Chong

    2017-01-01

    Using the Game-based-learning Teaching Belief Scale (GTBS) and the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge--Games questionnaire (TPACK-G), this study investigated 316 Taiwanese in-service teachers' teaching beliefs about game-based learning and their perceptions of game-based pedagogical content knowledge (GPCK). Both t-tests and ANOVA…

  4. Digital Game-Based Language Learning in Foreign Language Teacher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus ALYAZ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available New technologies including digital game-based language learning have increasingly received attention. However, their implementation is far from expected and desired levels due to technical, instructional, financial and sociological barriers. Previous studies suggest that there is a strong need to establish courses in order to support adaptation of game-based learning pedagogy through helping teachers experience digital games themselves before they are expected to use them in teaching. This study was conducted to investigate educational digital games in foreign language teaching, to identify the determining reasons behind the pittfalls in applications and to explore the contribution of a serious game to the development of professional language skills of pre-service teachers. Pre- and post-tests were applied to measure the contribution of the game to the development of their language skills. In addition, a game diary and semi-structured interviews were used to elicit information about the problems pre-service teachers had and their perceptions on the whole process. The analysis of the data illustrated that there was great improvement in pre-service teachers’ professional language skills and attitudes towards using these games while teaching in the future. This is important in foreign language teacher education in terms of enhancing digital game-based language learning pedagogy for teachers.

  5. Collaborative Game-based Learning - Automatized Adaptation Mechanics for Game-based Collaborative Learning using Game Mastering Concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Wendel, Viktor Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Learning and playing represent two core aspects of the information and communication society nowadays. Both issues are subsumed in Digital Education Games, one major field of Serious Games. Serious Games combine concepts of gaming with a broad range of application fields: among others, educational sectors and training or health and sports, but also marketing, advertisement, political education, and other societally relevant areas such as climate, energy, and safety. This work focuses on colla...

  6. Digital game based learning: A new method in teaching and learning mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Sayed Yusoff bin Syed; Hoe, Tan Wee; Idris, Muhammad Zaffwan bin

    2017-05-01

    Digital game-based learning (DGBL) had been regarded as a sound learning strategy in raising pupils' willingness and interest in many disciplines. Normally, video and digital games are used in the teaching and learning mathematics. based on literature, digital games have proven its capability in making pupils motivated and are more likely to contribute to effective learning mathematics. Hence this research aims to construct a DGBL in the teaching of Mathematics for Year 1 pupils. Then, a quasi-experimental study was carried out in a school located in Gua Musang, Kelantan, involving 39 pupils. Specifically, this article tests the effectiveness of the use of DGBL in the teaching of the topic Addition of Less than 100 on pupil's achievement. This research employed a quasi-experiment, Pre and Post Test of Non-equivalent Control Group design. The data were analysed using the Nonparametric test namely the Mann-Whitney U. The research finding shows the use of the DGBL could increase the pupils' achievement in the topic of Addition of Less than 100. In practice, this research indicates that the DBGL can utilized as an alternative reference strategy for Mathematics teacher.

  7. Games are motivating, aren´t they? Disputing the arguments for digital game-based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Westera

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The growing popularity of game-based learning reflects the burning desire for exploiting the involving and motivating characteristics of games for serious purposes. A wide range of arguments for using games for teaching and learning can be encountered in scientific papers, policy reports, game reviews and advertisements. With contagious enthusiasm, the proponents of game-based learning make their claims for using games to improve education. However, standing up for a good cause is easily replaced with the unconcerned promotion and spread of the word, which tends to make gaming an article of faith. This paper critically examines and re-establishes the argumentation used for game-based learning and identifies misconceptions that confuse the discussions. It reviews the following claims about game-based learning: 1 games foster motivation, 2 play is a natural mode of learning, 3 games induce cognitive flow, which is productive for learning, 4 games support learning-by-doing, 5 games allow for performance monitoring, 6 games offer freedom of movement and the associated problem ownership, 7 games support social learning, 8 games allow for safe experimentation, 9 games accommodate new generations of learners, who have grown up immersed in digital media, and 10 there are many successful games for learning. Assessing the validity of argumentation is considered essential for the credibility of game-based learning as a discipline.

  8. Comparing 2D and 3D Game-Based Learning Environments in Terms of Learning Gains and Student Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ak, Oguz; Kutlu, Birgul

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of traditional, 2D and 3D game-based environments assessed by student achievement scores and to reveal student perceptions of the value of these learning environments. A total of 60 university students from the Faculty of Education who were registered in three sections of a required…

  9. Earthquake: Game-based learning for 21st century STEM education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Abigail Christine

    To play is to learn. A lack of empirical research within game-based learning literature, however, has hindered educational stakeholders to make informed decisions about game-based learning for 21st century STEM education. In this study, I modified a research and development (R&D) process to create a collaborative-competitive educational board game illuminating elements of earthquake engineering. I oriented instruction- and game-design principles around 21st century science education to adapt the R&D process to develop the educational game, Earthquake. As part of the R&D, I evaluated Earthquake for empirical evidence to support the claim that game-play results in student gains in critical thinking, scientific argumentation, metacognitive abilities, and earthquake engineering content knowledge. I developed Earthquake with the aid of eight focus groups with varying levels of expertise in science education research, teaching, administration, and game-design. After developing a functional prototype, I pilot-tested Earthquake with teacher-participants (n=14) who engaged in semi-structured interviews after their game-play. I analyzed teacher interviews with constant comparison methodology. I used teachers' comments and feedback from content knowledge experts to integrate game modifications, implementing results to improve Earthquake. I added player roles, simplified phrasing on cards, and produced an introductory video. I then administered the modified Earthquake game to two groups of high school student-participants (n = 6), who played twice. To seek evidence documenting support for my knowledge claim, I analyzed videotapes of students' game-play using a game-based learning checklist. My assessment of learning gains revealed increases in all categories of students' performance: critical thinking, metacognition, scientific argumentation, and earthquake engineering content knowledge acquisition. Players in both student-groups improved mostly in critical thinking, having

  10. The Effectiveness of the Game-Based Learning System for the Improvement of American Sign Language Using Kinect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamnardsiri, Teerawat; Hongsit, Ler-on; Khuwuthyakorn, Pattaraporn; Wongta, Noppon

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigated students' achievement for learning American Sign Language (ASL), using two different methods. There were two groups of samples. The first experimental group (Group A) was the game-based learning for ASL, using Kinect. The second control learning group (Group B) was the traditional face-to-face learning method, generally…

  11. Ubiquitous Learning Ecologies for a Critical Cyber-Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez-Gutiérrez, Enrique; Díaz-Nafría, José-María

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this research is to identify and analyse the ubiquitous learning acquired through blending education settings devoted to the "lifelong training of trainers" and how these contribute to the development of a conscious, critic and engaged citizenship. Through active exploration of the learning process, the study analyses the…

  12. Awareness for Contextualized Digital Contents in Ubiquitous Learning Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Specht, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    Börner, D., & Specht, M. (2009). Awareness for Contextualized Digital Contents in Ubiquitous Learning Environments. Proceedings of the Doctoral Consortium of the Fourth European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning (EC-TEL 2009). September, 29-October, 2, 2009, Nice, France. [unpublished

  13. Internet messenger based smart virtual class learning using ubiquitous computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umam, K.; Mardi, S. N. S.; Hariadi, M.

    2017-06-01

    Internet messenger (IM) has become an important educational technology component in college education, IM makes it possible for students to engage in learning and collaborating at smart virtual class learning (SVCL) using ubiquitous computing. However, the model of IM-based smart virtual class learning using ubiquitous computing and empirical evidence that would favor a broad application to improve engagement and behavior are still limited. In addition, the expectation that IM based SVCL using ubiquitous computing could improve engagement and behavior on smart class cannot be confirmed because the majority of the reviewed studies followed instructions paradigms. This article aims to present the model of IM-based SVCL using ubiquitous computing and showing learners’ experiences in improved engagement and behavior for learner-learner and learner-lecturer interactions. The method applied in this paper includes design process and quantitative analysis techniques, with the purpose of identifying scenarios of ubiquitous computing and realize the impressions of learners and lecturers about engagement and behavior aspect and its contribution to learning

  14. Twelve tips for maximizing the effectiveness of game-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Michael B; Borman-Shoap, Emily C; Eppich, Walter J

    2015-01-01

    Game-based learning (GBL) in medical education is emerging as a valid alternative to traditional teaching methods. Well-designed GBL sessions use non-threatening competition to capitalize on heightened learner arousal, allowing for high-level engagement and dynamic group discussion. While many templates for specific educational games have been published, little has been written on strategies for educators to create their own or how to use them with maximal effectiveness. These 12 tips provide specific recommendations for the successful design and implementation of GBL sessions in medical education based on a review of the literature and insight from experienced designers.

  15. I WHATSAPP AN IGUANA: AN ATTEMPT TO APPLY UBIQUITOUS LEARNING

    OpenAIRE

    Dwi Haryanti

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims at presenting how Whatsapp provides alternative method to enhance writing skills on personal letter for senior high school student. This method Whatsapps inspired by the concept called ubiquitous learning (U-Learning), which means ―learning supported by ICT resources held anytime, anywhere and fits the context of the learner‖ (de Sousa Monteiro et al., 2014). Participants were 40 11-th grade students in one class in Cirebon High School. A short story in the form of personal le...

  16. The impact of specially designed digital games-based learning in undergraduate pathology and medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanthan, Rani; Senger, Jenna-Lynn

    2011-01-01

    The rapid advances of computer technologies have created a new e-learner generation of "Homo-zappien" students that think and learn differently. Digital gaming is an effective, fun, active, and encouraging way of learning, providing immediate feedback and measurable process. Within the context of ongoing reforms in medical education, specially designed digital games, a form of active learning, are effective, complementary e-teaching/learning resources. To examine the effectiveness of the use of specially designed digital games for student satisfaction and for measurable academic improvement. One hundred fourteen students registered in first-year pathology Medicine 102 had 8 of 16 lecture sessions reviewed in specially designed content-relevant digital games. Performance scores to relevant content sessions were analyzed at midterm and final examinations. Seventy-one students who registered in second-year pathology Medicine 202 were exposed to the games only during the final examination, with the midterm examination serving as an internal matched-control group. Outcome measures included performance at midterm and final examinations. Paired 2-tailed t test statistics compared means. A satisfaction survey questionnaire of yes or no responses analyzed student engagement and their perceptions to digital game-based learning. Questions relevant to the game-play sessions had the highest success rate in both examinations among 114 first-year students. In the 71 second-year students, the examination scores at the end of the final examination were significantly higher than the scores on the midterm examination. Positive satisfaction survey noted increased student engagement, enhanced personal learning, and reduced student stress. Specially constructed digital games-based learning in undergraduate pathology courses showed improved academic performance as measured by examination test scores with increased student satisfaction and engagement.

  17. Mobile, ubiquitous, and pervasive learning fundaments, applications, and trends

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book is concerned with the mobile, ubiquitous, and pervasive learning arena. It present a collection of works corresponding to four categories: reviews, studies, conceptual proposals, and approaches. As a result of the submission and revision processes eight manuscripts were accepted and organized into the aforementioned four parts as follows: ·Review: a couple of chapters offer a survey of related works. One concerns with the diversity of mobile, ubiquitous, and pervasive labor, where interested findings are unveiled based on correlations. Other focuses on adaptive and adaptable architectures that are suitable to implement ubiquitous learning sceneries, whose contribution represents a model of a domain specific architecture. ·Studies: two chapters explore issues related to the effect of question styles made through smartphones and tablets, and the disposition of teachers to exploit mobile devices at classroom. ·Conceptual: a pair of chapters offer a given proposal, the first to develop adaptive mobil...

  18. A Development of Game-Based Learning Environment to Activate Interaction among Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, Ryo; Shimokawa, Masayuki; Okamoto, Toshio

    Many studies and systems that incorporate elements such as “pleasure” and “fun” in the game to improve a learner's motivation have been developed in the field of learning environments. However, few are the studies of situations where many learners gather at a single computer and participate in a game-based learning environment (GBLE), and where the GBLE designs the learning process by controlling the interactions between learners such as competition, collaboration, and learning by teaching. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to propose a framework of educational control that induces and activates interaction between learners intentionally to create a learning opportunity that is based on the knowledge understanding model of each learner. In this paper, we explain the design philosophy and the framework of our GBLE called “Who becomes the king in the country of mathematics?” from a game viewpoint and describe the method of learning support control in the learning environment. In addition, we report the results of the learning experiment with our GBLE, which we carried out in a junior high school, and include some comments by a principal and a teacher. From the results of the experiment and some comments, we noticed that a game may play a significant role in weakening the learning relationship among students and creating new relationships in the world of the game. Furthermore, we discovered that learning support control of the GBLE has led to activation of the interaction between learners to some extent.

  19. Learning Behavior and Achievement Analysis of a Digital Game-Based Learning Approach Integrating Mastery Learning Theory and Different Feedback Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai-Hsiang

    2017-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the digital game-based learning approach has the advantage of stimulating students' learning motivation, but simply using digital games in the classroom does not guarantee satisfactory learning achievement, especially in the case of the absence of a teacher. Integrating appropriate learning strategies into a game can…

  20. Medication calculation: the potential role of digital game-based learning in nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, Brynjar; Mordt Ba, Petter; Oftedal, Bjørg F; Løkken, Atle

    2013-12-01

    Medication dose calculation is one of several medication-related activities that are conducted by nurses daily. However, medication calculation skills appear to be an area of global concern, possibly because of low numeracy skills, test anxiety, low self-confidence, and low self-efficacy among student nurses. Various didactic strategies have been developed for student nurses who still lack basic mathematical competence. However, we suggest that the critical nature of these skills demands the investigation of alternative and/or supplementary didactic approaches to improve medication calculation skills and to reduce failure rates. Digital game-based learning is a possible solution because of the following reasons. First, mathematical drills may improve medication calculation skills. Second, games are known to be useful during nursing education. Finally, mathematical drill games appear to improve the attitudes of students toward mathematics. The aim of this article was to discuss common challenges of medication calculation skills in nurse education, and we highlight the potential role of digital game-based learning in this area.

  1. Evaluation of students' perceptions on game based learning program using fuzzy set conjoint analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofian, Siti Siryani; Rambely, Azmin Sham

    2017-04-01

    An effectiveness of a game based learning (GBL) can be determined from an application of fuzzy set conjoint analysis. The analysis was used due to the fuzziness in determining individual perceptions. This study involved a survey collected from 36 students aged 16 years old of SMK Mersing, Johor who participated in a Mathematics Discovery Camp organized by UKM research group called PRISMatik. The aim of this research was to determine the effectiveness of the module delivered to cultivate interest in mathematics subject in the form of game based learning through different values. There were 11 games conducted for the participants and students' perceptions based on the evaluation of six criteria were measured. A seven-point Likert scale method was used to collect students' preferences and perceptions. This scale represented seven linguistic terms to indicate their perceptions on each module of GBLs. Score of perceptions were transformed into degree of similarity using fuzzy set conjoint analysis. It was found that Geometric Analysis Recreation (GEAR) module was able to increase participant preference corresponded to the six attributes generated. The computations were also made for the other 10 games conducted during the camp. Results found that interest, passion and team work were the strongest values obtained from GBL activities in this camp as participants stated very strongly agreed that these attributes fulfilled their preferences in every module. This was an indicator of efficiency for the program. The evaluation using fuzzy conjoint analysis implicated the successfulness of a fuzzy approach to evaluate students' perceptions toward GBL.

  2. Games are motivating, aren´t they? Disputing the arguments for digital game-based learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westera, Wim

    2015-01-01

    The growing popularity of game-based learning reflects the burning desire for exploiting the involving and motivating characteristics of games for serious purposes. A wide range of arguments for using games for teaching and learning can be encountered in scientific papers, policy reports, game

  3. The Effects of Game-Based Learning on Mathematical Confidence and Performance: High Ability vs. Low Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Oskar; Chen, Sherry Y.; Wu, Denise H.; Lao, Andrew C. C.; Chan, Tak-Wai

    2014-01-01

    Many students possess low confidence toward learning mathematics, which, in turn, may lead them to give up pursuing more mathematics knowledge. Recently, game-based learning (GBL) is regarded as a potential means in improving students' confidence. Thus, this study tried to promote students' confidence toward mathematics by using GBL. In addition,…

  4. Impeding Phenomena Emerging from Students' Constructivist Online Game-Based Learning Process: Implications for the Importance of Teacher Facilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Morris Siu-yung; Shang, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    "Virtual Interactive Student-Oriented Learning Environment" ("VISOLE") is a pedagogical approach to integrating constructivist online game-based learning (COGBLe) into formal teaching in school education. This paper reports a qualitative case study on the implementation of VISOLE (in secondary Geography education) in which we…

  5. Ambient Learning Displays - Distributed Mixed Reality Information Mash-ups to support Ubiquitous Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Börner, D. (2010, 19-21 March). Ambient Learning Displays Distributed Mixed Reality Information Mash-ups to support Ubiquitous Learning. Presented at the IADIS International Conference Mobile Learning 2010, Porto, Portugal.

  6. Ubiquitous mobile knowledge construction in collaborative learning environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloian, Nelson; Zurita, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge management is a critical activity for any organization. It has been said to be a differentiating factor and an important source of competitiveness if this knowledge is constructed and shared among its members, thus creating a learning organization. Knowledge construction is critical for any collaborative organizational learning environment. Nowadays workers must perform knowledge creation tasks while in motion, not just in static physical locations; therefore it is also required that knowledge construction activities be performed in ubiquitous scenarios, and supported by mobile and pervasive computational systems. These knowledge creation systems should help people in or outside organizations convert their tacit knowledge into explicit knowledge, thus supporting the knowledge construction process. Therefore in our understanding, we consider highly relevant that undergraduate university students learn about the knowledge construction process supported by mobile and ubiquitous computing. This has been a little explored issue in this field. This paper presents the design, implementation, and an evaluation of a system called MCKC for Mobile Collaborative Knowledge Construction, supporting collaborative face-to-face tacit knowledge construction and sharing in ubiquitous scenarios. The MCKC system can be used by undergraduate students to learn how to construct knowledge, allowing them anytime and anywhere to create, make explicit and share their knowledge with their co-learners, using visual metaphors, gestures and sketches to implement the human-computer interface of mobile devices (PDAs).

  7. An Expert System-based Context-Aware Ubiquitous Learning Approach for Conducting Science Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Po-Han; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Tsai, Wen-Hung

    2013-01-01

    Context-aware ubiquitous learning has been recognized as being a promising approach that enables students to interact with real-world learning targets with supports from the digital world. Several researchers have indicated the importance of providing learning guidance or hints to individual students during the context-aware ubiquitous learning…

  8. Evaluation of Game-Based Learning in Cybersecurity Education for High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Jin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for global cybersecurity workforce made it a critical mission for universities and colleges to attract and train next generation of cybersecurity professionals. To address this issue, Purdue University Northwest (PNW launched high school summer camps to 181 high school students, with 51.3% underrepresented minority ratio. PNW summer camp activities were delivered in the format of game based learning and hands-on labs. Four cybersecurity education games were developed to teach social engineering, cyber-attack and defense methods, secure online behavior, and cybersecurity principles. Survey result of 154 camp participants indicated that the cybersecurity education games were very effective in cybersecurity awareness training. Further analysis of survey data revealed that the gamification of cybersecurity education to raise students’ interests in computer science and cybersecurity was more effective in male high school students than in female students.

  9. Game-Based Learning in Science Education: A Review of Relevant Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Chaun; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to review empirical research articles regarding game-based science learning (GBSL) published from 2000 to 2011. Thirty-one articles were identified through the Web of Science and SCOPUS databases. A qualitative content analysis technique was adopted to analyze the research purposes and designs, game design and implementation, theoretical backgrounds and learning foci of these reviewed studies. The theories and models employed by these studies were classified into four theoretical foundations including cognitivism, constructivism, the socio-cultural perspective, and enactivism. The results indicate that cognitivism and constructivism were the major theoretical foundations employed by the GBSL researchers and that the socio-cultural perspective and enactivism are two emerging theoretical paradigms that have started to draw attention from GBSL researchers in recent years. The analysis of the learning foci showed that most of the digital games were utilized to promote scientific knowledge/concept learning, while less than one-third were implemented to facilitate the students' problem-solving skills. Only a few studies explored the GBSL outcomes from the aspects of scientific processes, affect, engagement, and socio-contextual learning. Suggestions are made to extend the current GBSL research to address the affective and socio-contextual aspects of science learning. The roles of digital games as tutor, tool, and tutee for science education are discussed, while the potentials of digital games to bridge science learning between real and virtual worlds, to promote collaborative problem-solving, to provide affective learning environments, and to facilitate science learning for younger students are also addressed.

  10. Game Based Learning as a Means to Teach Climate Literacy in a High School Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, M. K.; Tedesco, L.; Katz, M. E.

    2013-12-01

    As part of RPI's GK-12 graduate fellowship program (which involves graduate STEM fellows in K-12 education) a climate change board game activity was developed and implemented at inner city Troy High School in Troy, New York. The goal was to engage and teach two classes of the Earth Science General Repeat (GR) tenth grade students about climate change through a game-based leaning module. Students placed in the GR course had previously failed Earth Science, and had never passed a general science class in high school. In the past, these students have responded positively to hands-on activities. Therefore, an interactive board game activity was created to teach students about climate, explore how humans impact our environment, and address the future of climate change. The students are presented with a draft version of the game, created by the graduate fellow, and are asked to redesign the game for their peers in the other GR class. The students' version of the game is required to include certain aspects of the original game, for example, the climate change Trivia and Roadblock cards, but the design, addition of rules and overall layout are left to the students. The game-based learning technique allows the students to learn through a storyline, compete against each other, and challenge themselves to perfect their learning and understanding of climate change. The climate change board game activity also incorporates our cascade learning model, in which the graduate fellow designs the activity, works with a high school teacher, and implements the game with high school students. In addition, the activity emphasizes peer-to-peer learning, allowing each classroom to design the game for a different group of students. This allows the students to take leadership and gives them a sense of accomplishment with the completed board game. The nature of a board game also creates a dynamic competitive atmosphere, in which the students want to learn and understand the material to succeed

  11. Console Game-Based Pedagogy: A Study of Primary and Secondary Classroom Learning through Console Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groff, Jennifer S.; Howells, Cathrin; Cranmer, Sue

    2012-01-01

    The main focus of this research project was to identify the educational benefits of console game-based learning in primary and secondary schools. The project also sought to understand how the benefits of educational gaming could transfer to other settings. For this purpose, research was carried out in classrooms in Scotland to explore learning…

  12. A Comparative Analysis of a Game-Based Mobile Learning Model in Low-Socioeconomic Communities of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul; Buckner, Elizabeth; Kim, Hyunkyung; Makany, Tamas; Taleja, Neha; Parikh, Vallabhi

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the effectiveness of a game-based mobile learning model for children living in underdeveloped regions with significant contextual variations. Data for this study came from a total of 210 children between the ages of 6-14 years old from six marginalized communities in India. The findings reveal that children with little or no…

  13. Serious games for global education digital game-based learning in the english as a foreign language (EFL) classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    The author of this book conducted different studies to investigate the potential of serious games for global education when used in EFL classrooms. The results show a clear contribution of serious games to global education when used with EFL learners, leading to a reference model of digital game-based learning in the EFL classroom.

  14. The Effects of Applying Game-Based Learning to Webcam Motion Sensor Games for Autistic Students' Sensory Integration Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun-Hsien; Lou, Shi-Jer; Tsai, Huei-Yin; Shih, Ru-Chu

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to explore the effects of applying game-based learning to webcam motion sensor games for autistic students' sensory integration training for autistic students. The research participants were three autistic students aged from six to ten. Webcam camera as the research tool wad connected internet games to engage in motion sensor…

  15. Teachers' Experience and Reflections on Game-Based Learning in the Primary Classroom: Views from England and Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allsop, Yasemin; Jessel, John

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to provide a comparative account of teachers' experience and views of their role when using digital games in primary classrooms in England and Italy. Interviews and a survey administered online and in hardcopy were used to find out teachers' perceptions of game-based learning and how these impact upon their role as a teacher. This…

  16. Does Online Game-Based Learning Work in Formal Education at School? A Case Study of VISOLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Morris S. Y.

    2015-01-01

    VISOLE (Virtual Interactive Student-Oriented Environment) is a teacher-facilitated pedagogical approach to integrating constructivist online game-based learning into formal curriculum teaching in school education. This paper reports a case study on the implementation of VISOLE in secondary Geography education. We compared the pedagogical…

  17. Teaching EBP Using Game-Based Learning: Improving the Student Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Sandra J; Candy, Laurie

    2016-08-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is considered a key entry to practice competency for nurses. However, many baccalaureate nursing programs continue to teach "traditional" nursing research courses that fail to address many of the critical knowledge, skills, and attitudes that foster EBP. Traditional classroom teaching strategies do little to promote the development of competencies critical for engaging in EBP in clinical contexts. The purpose of this work was to develop, implement, and evaluate an innovative teaching strategy aimed at improving student learning, engagement and satisfaction in an online EBP course. The goals of this paper are to: (1) describe the process of course development, (2) describe the innovative teaching strategy, and (3) discuss the outcomes of the pilot course offered using game-based learning. A midterm course-specific survey and standard institutional end of course evaluations were used to evaluate student satisfaction. Game platform analytics and thematic analysis of narrative comments in the midterm and end of course surveys were used to evaluate students' level of engagement. Student learning was evaluated using the end of course letter grade. Students indicated a high satisfaction with the course. Student engagement was also maintained throughout the course. The majority of students (87%, 26/30) continued to complete learning quests in the game after achieving the minimum amount of points to earn an A. Seven students completed every learning quest available in the game platform. Of the 30 students enrolled in the course, 17 students earned a final course grade of A+ and 13 earned an A. Provide students with timely, individualized feedback to enable mastery learning. Create student choice and customization of learning. Integrate the use of badges (game mechanics) to increase engagement and motivation. Level learning activities to build on each other and create flow. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  18. Ambient Learning Displays - Distributed Mixed Reality Information Mash-ups to support Ubiquitous Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Börner, D. (2012). Ambient Learning Displays - Distributed Mixed Reality Information Mash-ups to support Ubiquitous Learning. 2012 IEEE Seventh International Conference on Wireless, Mobile and Ubiquitous Technology in Education (pp. 337-338). March, 27-30, 2012, Takamatsu, Japan: IEEE Computer

  19. Ice Flows: A Game-based Learning approach to Science Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Brocq, Anne

    2017-04-01

    Game-based learning allows people to become immersed in an environment, and learn how the system functions and responds to change through playing a game. Science and gaming share a similar characteristic: they both involve learning and understanding the rules of the environment you are in, in order to achieve your objective. I will share experiences of developing and using the educational game "Ice Flows" for science communication. The game tasks the player with getting a penguin to its destination, through controlling the size of the ice sheet via ocean temperature and snowfall. Therefore, the game aims to educate the user about the environmental controls on the behaviour of the ice sheet, whilst they are enjoying playing a game with penguins. The game was funded by a NERC Large Grant entitled "Ice shelves in a warming world: Filchner Ice Shelf system, Antarctica", so uses data from the Weddell Sea sector of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet to generate unique levels. The game will be easily expandable to other regions of Antarctica and beyond, with the ultimate aim of giving a full understanding to the user of different ice flow regimes across the planet.

  20. A Multiplayer Learning Game based on Mixed Reality to Enhance Awareness on Archaeology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Loiseau

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Our research deals with the development of a new type of game-based learning environment: (MMORPG based on mixed reality, applied in the archaeological domain. In this paper, we propose a learning scenario that enhances players’ motivation thanks to individual, collaborative and social activities and that offers a continuous experience between the virtual environment and real places (archaeological sites, museum. After describing the challenge to a rich multidisciplinary approach involving both computer scientists and archaeologists, we present two types of game: multiplayer online role-playing games and mixed reality games. We build on the specificities of these games to make the design choices described in the paper. We also present three modular features we have developed to support independently three activities of the scenario. The proposed approach aims at raising awareness among people on the scientific approach in Archaeology, by providing them information in the virtual environment and encouraging them to go on real sites. We finally discuss the issues raised by this work, such as the tensions between the perceived individual, team and community utilities, as well as the choice of the entering point in the learning scenario (real or virtual for the players’ involvement in the game.

  1. CyberPsychological Computation on Social Community of Ubiquitous Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xuan; Dai, Genghui; Huang, Shuang; Sun, Xuemin; Hu, Feng; Hu, Hongzhi; Ivanović, Mirjana

    2015-01-01

    Under the modern network environment, ubiquitous learning has been a popular way for people to study knowledge, exchange ideas, and share skills in the cyberspace. Existing research findings indicate that the learners' initiative and community cohesion play vital roles in the social communities of ubiquitous learning, and therefore how to stimulate the learners' interest and participation willingness so as to improve their enjoyable experiences in the learning process should be the primary consideration on this issue. This paper aims to explore an effective method to monitor the learners' psychological reactions based on their behavioral features in cyberspace and therefore provide useful references for adjusting the strategies in the learning process. In doing so, this paper firstly analyzes the psychological assessment of the learners' situations as well as their typical behavioral patterns and then discusses the relationship between the learners' psychological reactions and their observable features in cyberspace. Finally, this paper puts forward a CyberPsychological computation method to estimate the learners' psychological states online. Considering the diversity of learners' habitual behaviors in the reactions to their psychological changes, a BP-GA neural network is proposed for the computation based on their personalized behavioral patterns. PMID:26557846

  2. The Effectiveness of Digital Game-Based Vocabulary Learning: A Framework-Based View of Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meng-Hua; Tseng, Wen-Ta; Hsiao, Tsung-Yuan

    2018-01-01

    This study presents the results of a meta-analytic study about the effects of digital game-based learning (DGBL) on vocabulary. The results of the study showed that the effects of DGBL on vocabulary learning may vary with game design features (Q = 5.857, df = 1, p = 0.016), but not with learners' age (Q = 0.906, df = 1, p = 0.341) or linguistic…

  3. Why Use-Centered Game-Based Learning in Higher Education? The Case of Cesim Simbrand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Kikot

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper endeavours to research about simulation/serious games exploration within University of Algarve (Portugal, namely Cesim SimBrand for Marketing Simulation (course unit. A total amount of 30 learners participated in this study through a mixed survey (openended and closed-ended queries. The empirical evidences exhibit interesting outcomes: (i a response rate of 50 percent; (ii these tools increase learning engagement, although it is essential to be more realistic; (iii teamwork seems to be a controversial topic; (iv learners had a positive experience; however, some feel unprepared before their usage (prior knowledge. Hence, this survey provides a good platform for future research and approaches how to promote a better exploration of simulation/serious games. To conclude, this manuscript will be divided into six sections: (i the 5W’s of game-based learning; (ii research (statement of the problem, aims/objectives, philosophical approach and data collection/analysis; (iii diagnosis (game deliver and learners’ pre-perception; (iv findings (learners’ profile, awareness, experiences and preparation; (v limitations and future work (methodological limitations and tools/analysis upgrade; and, (vi conclusions.

  4. Measuring Effectiveness in Digital Game-Based Learning: A Methodological Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anissa All

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a growing number of studies are being conducted into the effectiveness of digital game-based learning (DGBL. Despite this growing interest, there is a lack of sound empirical evidence on the effectiveness of DGBL due to different outcome measures for assessing effectiveness, varying methods of data collection and inconclusive or difficult to interpret results. This has resulted in a need for an overarching methodology for assessing the effectiveness of DGBL. The present study took a first step in this direction by mapping current methods used for assessing the effectiveness of DGBL. Results showed that currently, comparison of results across studies and thus looking at effectiveness of DGBL on a more general level is problematic due to diversity in and suboptimal study designs. Variety in study design relates to three issues, namely different activities that are implemented in the control groups, different measures for assessing the effectiveness of DGBL and the use of different statistical techniques for analyzing learning outcomes. Suboptimal study designs are the result of variables confounding study results. Possible confounds that were brought forward in this review are elements that are added to the game as part of the educational intervention (e.g., required reading, debriefing session, instructor influences and practice effects when using the same test pre- and post-intervention. Lastly, incomplete information on the study design impedes replication of studies and thus falsification of study results.

  5. I WHATSAPP AN IGUANA: AN ATTEMPT TO APPLY UBIQUITOUS LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Haryanti

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at presenting how Whatsapp provides alternative method to enhance writing skills on personal letter for senior high school student. This method Whatsapps inspired by the concept called ubiquitous learning (U-Learning, which means ―learning supported by ICT resources held anytime, anywhere and fits the context of the learner‖ (de Sousa Monteiro et al., 2014. Participants were 40 11-th grade students in one class in Cirebon High School. A short story in the form of personal letter entitled I Wanna Iguana by Karen Kaufman Orloff was used as main learning source and the mobile version of the story was sent to the class Whatsapp group along with the reading comprehension questions and the personal letter template. The study was conducted for three weeks in the middle of the second semester year 2017. Contrary to the basic face-to-face teaching and learning, the using of Whatsapp group demonstrates how mobile technology can be fully integrated in an educational context to support students‘ learning beyond the classroom. Another advantages of using Whatsapp group is the fact that learning become the responsibility of learners and may take place through observation, trial and error, asking for help, conversing with others, reading to stories, reflecting on a one‘s personal event, or stimulated by general interests

  6. The use of a game-based learning platform to engage nursing students: A descriptive, qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Cara; Tesar, Abigail J; Connor, Kelley; Martz, Kim

    2017-11-01

    Baccalaureate nursing programs require students to complete a research course, and faculty find it challenging to engage students. Educational gaming has recently gained attention as a technique to motivate students and enhance learning. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe undergraduate nursing students' reflections of their experiences with 3D Gamelab © , a game-based learning platform. A descriptive qualitative research design was used to elicit students' reflections of their experiences. Educational content such as handouts, videos, activities, and recommended resources for a required junior level nursing research course was organized into quests for use in 3D GameLab © . At the end of the semester, students were invited to give their feedback through a survey with open-ended questions. Thematic analysis resulted in the following components of the game-based learning experience: navigation, motivation, gaming concept, knowledge, technology, and target population. Although the overall response to 3D GameLab © in this course was negative, game-based learning does have the potential to engage students and enhance learning. To better understand how educational gaming could be used in nursing, further research should be conducted to determine the most motivating elements and the types of course content best delivered in this manner. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Role of Game Based Learning in the Health Literacy of African American Adolescent Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Judith; Knight, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Twenty-first century literacy is more than being able to encode for spelling ability, decode for reading comprehension, and calculate for numeric reasoning. It demands the skills to negotiate the world of technology. Health literacy is lower than general literacy, and general literacy is lower among African American males than the overall population. The authors discuss the prospects of incorporating Game Based Learning approaches into strategies for teaching health literacy. Results of a survey administered to youth to determine their level of involvement in video game playing indicate that key elements must be in place to ensure that a game will be played. These include action, strategy, and entertainment. Future investigation will examine the knowledge level of African American adolescent males of the nexus of certain concepts of climate change and health literacy. Climate change has significant implications for human health. This understanding will produce a scientifically based foundation for curricular and instructional decisions that include GBL. Results of this study will be used to design a video game concept and will contribute to the body of knowledge concerning environmental justice and empower individuals to make informed decisions about their own health and those they influence.

  8. Why Do Teachers Use Game-Based Learning Technologies? The Role of Individual and Institutional ICT Readiness

    OpenAIRE

    Hamari, Juho; Nousiainen, Tuula

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates how different individual and institutional factors pertaining to ICT readiness influence teachers’ adoption of game-based learning technologies. The data were gathered from Finnish primary, lower secondary and upper secondary school teachers (N=1668) with an online survey. The results indicate that openness towards ICT, ICT attitude and the ICT compatibility with teaching positively influence the perceived value whereas openness towards ICT, ...

  9. Uro Island I – Game-based E-Learning in der Urologie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dern, Peter

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Game-based Learning verspricht gegenüber traditionellen Lernformen eine höhere Motivation des Lernenden, indem Lerninhalte in einer hoch-interaktiven, Regel-kontrollierten und kompetitiven Form präsentiert werden, und fördert nicht nur die Anwendung kognitiver sondern auch affektiver und psycho-motorischer Fähigkeiten. Mit Uro Island I wird hier ein Spiel-basiertes E-Learning-Programm für die „Beurteilung pathologischer Urinbefunde“ präsentiert, das das Genre der Adventure-Games für die medizinische Lehre nutzbar macht. Dazu wurden didaktische Spiel-Elemente und Sequenzen für Adventure-Games entwickelt, die geeignet sind entsprechend der spezifischen Inhalte und ihrer Kontexte medizinisches Wissen zu vermitteln. In einer Nutzbarkeitsanalyse (n=14 konnte gezeigt werden, dass die Studierenden im Wesentlichen gut mit Uro Island I arbeiten konnten, wobei lediglich die zu umfangreiche Länge der Dialoge negativ bewertet wurde. Die Spiel-Elemente zur Wissensvermittlung wurden entsprechend der Komplexität der medizinischen Inhalte und der Erfahrung der Studierenden mit Computerspielen sehr unterschiedlich aber grundsätzlich positiv bewertet. Der Spielspaß ist trotz der medizinischen Inhalte des Spieles erhalten geblieben, so dass die meisten Studierenden auch weitere Module von Uro Island I spielen würden. Mit Uro Island I wurde ein Adventure-Game für die Urologische Lehre entwickelt, mit dem gezeigt werden kann, dass es möglich ist, den Lerninhalt einer kompletten urologischen Unterrichtseinheit in diesem Format effektiv abzubilden. Es ist gelungen in einzelnen Spiel-Elementen und Sequenzen komplexe medizinische Sachverhalte in diesem Genre abzubilden, wobei der Spielspaß erhalten geblieben ist.

  10. Integrating Game-Based Learning Initiative: Increasing the Usage of Game-Based Learning within K-12 Classrooms through Professional Learning Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denham, André R.; Mayben, Robert; Boman, Terri

    2016-01-01

    In the past 15 to 20 years there has been an increased interest in the use of games for learning. A considerable amount of work has already been done by educational researchers and theorists (Gee, Squire, Malone, Lepper, Shaffer, etc.) to identify and to operationalize the native affordances of games that make them good for learning. Unfortunately…

  11. Continued use of an interactive computer game-based visual perception learning system in children with developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsien-Cheng; Chiu, Yu-Hsien; Chen, Yenming J; Wuang, Yee-Pay; Chen, Chiu-Ping; Wang, Chih-Chung; Huang, Chien-Ling; Wu, Tang-Meng; Ho, Wen-Hsien

    2017-11-01

    This study developed an interactive computer game-based visual perception learning system for special education children with developmental delay. To investigate whether perceived interactivity affects continued use of the system, this study developed a theoretical model of the process in which learners decide whether to continue using an interactive computer game-based visual perception learning system. The technology acceptance model, which considers perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, and perceived playfulness, was extended by integrating perceived interaction (i.e., learner-instructor interaction and learner-system interaction) and then analyzing the effects of these perceptions on satisfaction and continued use. Data were collected from 150 participants (rehabilitation therapists, medical paraprofessionals, and parents of children with developmental delay) recruited from a single medical center in Taiwan. Structural equation modeling and partial-least-squares techniques were used to evaluate relationships within the model. The modeling results indicated that both perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness were positively associated with both learner-instructor interaction and learner-system interaction. However, perceived playfulness only had a positive association with learner-system interaction and not with learner-instructor interaction. Moreover, satisfaction was positively affected by perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, and perceived playfulness. Thus, satisfaction positively affects continued use of the system. The data obtained by this study can be applied by researchers, designers of computer game-based learning systems, special education workers, and medical professionals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Use of Digital Game Based Learning and Gamification in Secondary School Science: The Effect on Student Engagement, Learning and Gender Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Amna; Ahmad, Farzana Hayat; Malik, Muhammad Muddassir

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the impact of a game based learning (GBL) application using computer technologies on student engagement in secondary school science classrooms. The literature reveals that conventional Science teaching techniques (teacher-centered lecture and teaching), which foster rote learning among students, are one of the major…

  13. Game-Based Learning: Increasing the Logical-Mathematical, Naturalistic, and Linguistic Learning Levels of Primary School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Esther Del Moral Pérez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Game-based learning is an innovative methodology that takes advantage of the educational potential offered by videogames in general and serious games in particular to boost training processes, thus making it easier for users to achieve motivated learning. The present paper focuses on the description of the Game to Learn Project, which has as its aim not only to promote the use of serious games and digital mini-games for the development of Multiple Intelligences, but also to analyse whether this methodology results in increased learning. Teachers assessed the level achieved by primary education students (N=119 in each learning category, before and after participating in the project, by means of a qualitative instrument. Finally, after corresponding analysis through descriptive statistical techniques, bivariate correlations, and ANOVA, the results showed significant differences between children’s learning levels in logical-mathematical, naturalistic and linguistic abilities before and after their participation in this innovative project, thus revealing a widespread increase in every indicator.

  14. Understanding and Predicting Student Self-Regulated Learning Strategies in Game-Based Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabourin, Jennifer L.; Shores, Lucy R.; Mott, Bradford W.; Lester, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Self-regulated learning behaviors such as goal setting and monitoring have been found to be crucial to students' success in computer-based learning environments. Consequently, understanding students' self-regulated learning behavior has been the subject of increasing attention. Unfortunately, monitoring these behaviors in real-time has…

  15. Serious Games for Learning: Games-Based Child Sexual Abuse Prevention in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholes, Laura; Jones, Christian; Stieler-Hunt, Colleen; Rolfe, Ben

    2014-01-01

    In spite of research demonstrating conceptual weakness in many child sexual abuse (CSA) prevention programmes and outdated modes of delivery, students continue to participate in a diversity of initiatives. Referring to the development of a games-based approach to CSA prevention in Australia, this paper examines empirically based attributes of…

  16. Multimodal emotion recognition as assessment for learning in a game-based communication skills training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nadolski, Rob; Bahreini, Kiavash; Westera, Wim

    2014-01-01

    This paper presentation describes how our FILTWAM software artifacts for face and voice emotion recognition will be used for assessing learners' progress and providing adequate feedback in an online game-based communication skills training. This constitutes an example of in-game assessment for

  17. Multimodal Emotion Recognition for Assessment of Learning in a Game-Based Communication Skills Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bahreini, Kiavash; Nadolski, Rob; Westera, Wim

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes how our FILTWAM software artifacts for face and voice emotion recognition will be used for assessing learners' progress and providing adequate feedback in an online game-based communication skills training. This constitutes an example of in-game assessment for mainly formative

  18. Cultivating Critical Game Makers in Digital Game-Based Learning: Learning from the Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denham, André R.; Guyotte, Kelly W.

    2018-01-01

    Digital games have the potential of being a transformative tool for applying constructionist principles to learning within formal and informal learning settings. Unfortunately, most recent attention has focused on instructionist games. Connected gaming provides a tantalizing alternative approach by calling for the development of games that are…

  19. Conjoint Analysis for Mobile Devices for Ubiquitous Learning in Higher Education: The Korean Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeongjik

    2013-01-01

    Despite the increasing importance of mobile devices in education, the essential features of these devices for ubiquitous learning have not been empirically addressed. This study empirically investigated the necessary conditions for using mobile devices as an educational tool for ubiquitous learning in higher education by a conjoint method. The…

  20. Location-based technology and game-based learning in secondary education: learning about medieval Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Admiraal, W.; Akkerman, S.; Huizenga, J.; van Zeijts, H.

    2009-01-01

    Mobile games in education are excellent ways to combine situated, active and constructive learning with fun. In the mobile city game Frequency 1550 teams -of four students each- step into the game's world. With help of the Internet, smart phones and GPS technology, Amsterdam changes into a medieval

  1. Creative Writing, Problem-Based Learning, and Game-Based Learning Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trekles, Anastasia M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines how virtual worlds and other advanced social media can be married with problem-based learning to encourage creativity and critical thinking in the English/Language Arts classroom, particularly for middle school, high school, and undergraduate college education. Virtual world experiences such as "Second Life," Jumpstart.com, and…

  2. Mobile Game Based Learning: Can it enhance learning of marginalized peer educators?

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Anupama; Sharples, Mike

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an investigatory project to pilot an SMS based game to enhance the training of peer educators of MSM (Males having Sex with Males) groups in India. The objective of this research was to increase the efficacy of the MSM peer educators by bridging the gap between the training needs and their real life experiences. An SMS based game was designed using participatory approaches as a learning support, upholding their real life experiences in game form. The game was designed on ...

  3. The Interaction Effects of Working Memory Capacity, Gaming Expertise, and Scaffolding Design on Attention and Comprehension in Digital Game Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Hao

    2013-01-01

    Educational digital games are often complex problem-solving experiences that can facilitate systematic comprehension. However, empirical studies of digital game based learning (DGBL) have found mixed results regarding DGBL's effect in improving comprehension. While learners generally enjoyed the DGBL learning experience, they often failed to…

  4. PERKAM: Personalized Knowledge Awareness Map for Computer Supported Ubiquitous Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bishouty, Moushir M.; Ogata, Hiroaki; Yano, Yoneo

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces a ubiquitous computing environment in order to support the learners while doing tasks; this environment is called PERKAM (PERsonalized Knowledge Awareness Map). PERKAM allows the learners to share knowledge, interact, collaborate, and exchange individual experiences. It utilizes the RFID ubiquities technology to detect the…

  5. Learning Mechanics and Game Mechanics Under the Perspective of Self-Determination Theory to Foster Motivation in Digital Game Based Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Proulx, Jean-Nicolas; Romero, Margarida; Arnab, Sylvester

    2018-01-01

    Background: Using digital games for educational purposes has been associated with higher levels of motivation among learners of different educational levels. However, the underlying psychological factors involved in digital game based learning (DGBL) have been rarely analyzed considering self-determination theory (SDT, Ryan \\& Deci, 2000b); the relation of SDT with the flow experience (Csikszentmihalyi, 1990) has neither been evaluated in the context of DGBL.

  6. Three Designs for Using Game-Based Learning in Business Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lainema, Timo; Henriksen, Thomas Duus

    2015-01-01

    This chapter presents three didactic frameworks for integrating learning games with other syllabus activities in business education. These three models illustrate how different didactic framings of particular learning games allow for different learning processes, using Kolb’s learning model...

  7. Ubiquitous Knowledge Construction: Mobile Learning Re-Defined and a Conceptual Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hsinyi; Su, Yi-Ju; Chou, Chien; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2009-01-01

    Emerging from recent mobile technologies, mobile learning, or m-learning, is beginning to offer "stunning new technical capabilities" in education (DiGiano et al., 2003). This new genre of learning is viewed as a revolutionary stage in educational technology. However, ubiquitous computing technologies have given rise to several issues. This…

  8. The Impact of Educational Games-Based iPad Applications on the Development of Social Studies Achievement and Learning Retention among Sixth Grade Students in Jeddah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najmuldeen, Hanan A.

    2017-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the impact of educational games-based iPad applications on the development of social studies achievement and learning retention. Sample consisted of (48) sixth grade primary students in Jeddah. The author adopted Quasi-experimental design of the experimental and control groups. She also provided the teacher a…

  9. The Relative Effectiveness of Digital Game-Based Learning Types in English as a Foreign Language Setting: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yi-hui; Kao, Chian-wen; Reynolds, Barry Lee

    2012-01-01

    During the past 10 years, the number of digital game-based learning (DGBL) studies has significantly increased (Hwang & Wu, 2012). DGBL is generally found to be positive over traditional instruction (Liao, 2010) and it has had great impact on education (Prensky, 2001). The DGBL effectiveness, however, might vary according to subjects taught or…

  10. Game-Based Learning Engagement: A Theory- and Data-Driven Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Fengfeng; Xie, Kui; Xie, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The promise of using games for learning is that play- and learning-engagement would occur cohesively as a whole to compose a highly motivated learning experience. Yet the conceptualization of such an integrative process in the development of play-based learning engagement is lacking. In this analytical paper, we explored and conceptualized the…

  11. Development and Design of Problem Based Learning Game-Based Courseware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chiung-Sui; Chen, Jui-Fa; Chen, Fei-Ling

    2015-01-01

    In an educational environment, instructors would always think of ways to provide students with motivational learning materials and efficient learning strategies. Hence, many researchers have proposed that students' problem-solving ability enhances their learning. Problem-solving ability plays an important role for users in dealing with problems…

  12. Making Sense of Game-Based User Data: Learning Analytics in Applied Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Christina M.; Kickmeier-Rus, Michael D.; Albert, Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    Digital learning games are useful educational tools with high motivational potential. With the application of games for instruction there comes the need of acknowledging learning game experiences also in the context of educational assessment. Learning analytics provides new opportunities for supporting assessment in and of educational games. We…

  13. Digital Game-Based Learning: A Didactic Experience in the Pre-Degree Nursing Career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís de Ovando, A; Rodríguez, A; Hullin, C

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays we are faced with a society immersed in globalization and native technology, causing a great challenge in the university teaching staff. The gamification, as teaching-learning didactic methodology, gathers the characteristics that allow to motivate and achieve an active and significant learning. The objective of this work is to show the experience of the nursing career, which combines the learning based on games and the use of digital applications.

  14. Game-Based Methods to Encourage EFL Learners to Transition to Autonomous Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Berger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a work in progress in which we aim to encourage EFL students to take their learning beyond the classroom in order to experience English in different ways. Inspired by what is being done at the Quest to Learn middle and high school in New York City and ChicagoQuest (Institute of Play, 2014b our idea involves conducting an action research project in order to find out if game-like learning techniques, modified and adapted to the needs of university-aged EFL learners in Ecuador will help to increase motivation and independent learning for our students.

  15. Digital Game-Based Learning to Encourage Secondary Students to Purse STEM Related Careers Using Arecibo Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Correa, Z. M.; Lautenbach, J.; Franco-Diaz, E.; Raizada, S.; Ghosh, T.; Rivera-Valentín, E.; Ortiz, A.

    2017-12-01

    This project was developed to encourage secondary students to pursue STEM related careers through exposure to the interdisciplinary nature of the Arecibo Observatory (AO) in Puerto Rico. The idea for this project was initiated due to the NSF-funded Research Experience for Teachers (RET) Summer Program. The AO RET summer program allows teaching faculty from public schools to collaborate with scientist on their ongoing research or instrument development projects at the AO for five weeks. Subsequently, the research is disseminated among secondary students through several workshops and hands-on activities. Through the workshops and hands-on activities underrepresented secondary students will learn about the research conducted at the AO to study Earth's upper atmosphere, asteroids and other Solar System bodies, as well as stars and galaxies beyond. Afterwards, students will develop virtual worlds simulating the different AO facilities (Lidar Laboratory, Radio Telescope, Planetary Radar System, HF Facility, Visitor Center, among others) and showing their functions using digital game-based learning.

  16. ZooQuest: A mobile game-based learning application for fifth graders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhof, G.; Sandberg, J.A.C.; Maris, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined ZooQuest, a mobile game that supported fifth graders in the process of learning English as a second language. ZooQuest embedded the Mobile English Learning (MEL) application and was compared to MEL as a stand-alone application. Two groups were compared in a quasi-experimental

  17. The Role of Surprise in Game-Based Learning for Mathematics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Pieter; van Oostendorp, Herre; ter Vrugte, Judith; Vandercruysse, Sylke; de Jong, Anthonius J.M.; Elen, Jan; De Gloria, Alessandro; Veltkamp, Remco

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the potential of surprise on learning with prevocational students in the domain of proportional reasoning. Surprise involves an emotional reaction, but it also serves a cognitive goal as it directs attention to explain why the surprising event occurred and to learn for

  18. The Effects of Goal-Oriented Instructions in Digital Game-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhel, Séverine; Jamet, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the effects of the instructions provided in educational computer games on cognitive processing and learning outcomes. In our experiment, we sought to compare the effects on learning outcomes of two different types of goal-oriented instructions: "mastery-goal" instructions, which prompt learners to develop…

  19. Affect and Willingness to Communicate in Digital Game-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinders, Hayo; Wattana, Sorada

    2015-01-01

    The possible benefits of digital games for language learning and teaching have received increasing interest in recent years. Games are said, amongst others, to be motivating, to lower affective barriers in learning, and to encourage foreign or second language (L2) interaction. But how do learners actually experience the use of games? What impact…

  20. Game Immersion Experience: Its Hierarchical Structure and Impact on Game-Based Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, M.-T.; She, H.-C.; Annetta, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have shown the positive impact of serious educational games (SEGs) on learning outcomes. However, there still exists insufficient research that delves into the impact of immersive experience in the process of gaming on SEG-based science learning. The dual purpose of this study was to further explore this impact. One purpose was to…

  1. Ubiquitous testing using tablets: its impact on medical student perceptions of and engagement in learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyong-Jee; Hwang, Jee-Young

    2016-03-01

    Ubiquitous testing has the potential to affect medical education by enhancing the authenticity of the assessment using multimedia items. This study explored medical students' experience with ubiquitous testing and its impact on student learning. A cohort (n=48) of third-year students at a medical school in South Korea participated in this study. The students were divided into two groups and were given different versions of 10 content-matched items: one in text version (the text group) and the other in multimedia version (the multimedia group). Multimedia items were delivered using tablets. Item response analyses were performed to compare item characteristics between the two versions. Additionally, focus group interviews were held to investigate the students' experiences of ubiquitous testing. The mean test score was significantly higher in the text group. Item difficulty and discrimination did not differ between text and multimedia items. The participants generally showed positive responses on ubiquitous testing. Still, they felt that the lectures that they had taken in preclinical years did not prepare them enough for this type of assessment and clinical encounters during clerkships were more helpful. To be better prepared, the participants felt that they needed to engage more actively in learning in clinical clerkships and have more access to multimedia learning resources. Ubiquitous testing can positively affect student learning by reinforcing the importance of being able to understand and apply knowledge in clinical contexts, which drives students to engage more actively in learning in clinical settings.

  2. Digital Learning Resources and Ubiquitous Technologies in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Mark Anthony; Camilleri, Adriana Caterina

    2017-01-01

    This research explores the educators' attitudes and perceptions about their utilisation of digital learning technologies. The methodology integrates measures from "the pace of technological innovativeness" and the "technology acceptance model" to understand the rationale for further ICT investment in compulsory education. A…

  3. Designing Ubiquitous Computing to Enhance Children's Learning in Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, T.; Bannon, L.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, novel paradigms of computing have emerged, which enable computational power to be embedded in artefacts and in environments in novel ways. These developments may create new possibilities for using computing to enhance learning. This paper presents the results of a design process that set out to explore interactive techniques,…

  4. Design of a Virtual Ecological Pond for Motion-Sensing Game-Based Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Wernhuar Tarng; Nien - Yin Lu; Yi - Syuan Shih; Hsin - Hun Liou

    2014-01-01

    The campus ecological pond is an effective tool to a ssist science teaching since it allows students to obtain knowledge of aquatic biology in freshwater environments by practical observation. In this study, a v irtual campus ecological pond was developed for applications in science education in elementary sc hools. The system integrates real ecological situations of aquatic environments into learning activities to enh ance the learning interest and motivation of stude...

  5. How to Evaluate Competencies in Game-Based Learning Systems Automatically?

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas , Pradeepa; Labat , Jean-Marc; Muratet , Mathieu; Yessad , Amel

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Serious games are increasingly used in schools, universities or in vocational training. When they are used in the classroom, teachers often have to deal with the lack of tools for monitoring the students during the game and assessing them after the game. So they often tend to add assessment questionnaires to the fun sequence of " learning by playing " , to ensure that students have learned during the session. Our goal is to enable the teacher to do without this type of...

  6. Game-based e-learning is more effective than a conventional instructional method: a randomized controlled trial with third-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeker, Martin; Andel, Peter; Vach, Werner; Frankenschmidt, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    When compared with more traditional instructional methods, Game-based e-learning (GbEl) promises a higher motivation of learners by presenting contents in an interactive, rule-based and competitive way. Most recent systematic reviews and meta-analysis of studies on Game-based learning and GbEl in the medical professions have shown limited effects of these instructional methods. To compare the effectiveness on the learning outcome of a Game-based e-learning (GbEl) instruction with a conventional script-based instruction in the teaching of phase contrast microscopy urinalysis under routine training conditions of undergraduate medical students. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 145 medical students in their third year of training in the Department of Urology at the University Medical Center Freiburg, Germany. 82 subjects where allocated for training with an educational adventure-game (GbEl group) and 69 subjects for conventional training with a written script-based approach (script group). Learning outcome was measured with a 34 item single choice test. Students' attitudes were collected by a questionnaire regarding fun with the training, motivation to continue the training and self-assessment of acquired knowledge. The students in the GbEl group achieved significantly better results in the cognitive knowledge test than the students in the script group: the mean score was 28.6 for the GbEl group and 26.0 for the script group of a total of 34.0 points with a Cohen's d effect size of 0.71 (ITT analysis). Attitudes towards the recent learning experience were significantly more positive with GbEl. Students reported to have more fun while learning with the game when compared to the script-based approach. Game-based e-learning is more effective than a script-based approach for the training of urinalysis in regard to cognitive learning outcome and has a high positive motivational impact on learning. Game-based e-learning can be used as an effective teaching

  7. Game-based e-learning is more effective than a conventional instructional method: a randomized controlled trial with third-year medical students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Boeker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: When compared with more traditional instructional methods, Game-based e-learning (GbEl promises a higher motivation of learners by presenting contents in an interactive, rule-based and competitive way. Most recent systematic reviews and meta-analysis of studies on Game-based learning and GbEl in the medical professions have shown limited effects of these instructional methods. OBJECTIVES: To compare the effectiveness on the learning outcome of a Game-based e-learning (GbEl instruction with a conventional script-based instruction in the teaching of phase contrast microscopy urinalysis under routine training conditions of undergraduate medical students. METHODS: A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 145 medical students in their third year of training in the Department of Urology at the University Medical Center Freiburg, Germany. 82 subjects where allocated for training with an educational adventure-game (GbEl group and 69 subjects for conventional training with a written script-based approach (script group. Learning outcome was measured with a 34 item single choice test. Students' attitudes were collected by a questionnaire regarding fun with the training, motivation to continue the training and self-assessment of acquired knowledge. RESULTS: The students in the GbEl group achieved significantly better results in the cognitive knowledge test than the students in the script group: the mean score was 28.6 for the GbEl group and 26.0 for the script group of a total of 34.0 points with a Cohen's d effect size of 0.71 (ITT analysis. Attitudes towards the recent learning experience were significantly more positive with GbEl. Students reported to have more fun while learning with the game when compared to the script-based approach. CONCLUSIONS: Game-based e-learning is more effective than a script-based approach for the training of urinalysis in regard to cognitive learning outcome and has a high positive motivational impact on

  8. Flow experience in game based learning – a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arttu Perttula

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The entertaining elements implemented in a serious game are key factors in determining whether a player will be engaged in a play-learn process and able to achieve the desired learning outcomes. Thus, optimization of subjective playing experience is a crucial part of a game design process. Flow theory can be adopted for measuring user experience and analyzing the quality of serious game designs. In addition, flow seems to have a positive influence on performance enhancement, learning and engagement. The focus of this review is especially on examining the meaning of flow in the context of serious games as well as exploring the relationship between flow and learning, factors that influence occurrence of flow and how flow is operationalized. The review revealed that there are mainly conceptual considerations about flow in serious games, but no robust empirical evidence about the meaning of flow. This is in line with other studies. We argue that research on flow should focus on the specific aspects related to the very nature of serious games that combine enjoyment and learning. Furthermore, new methods to measure flow and analyse the data need to be developed and studied.

  9. Effects of Game-Based Learning in an Opensim-Supported Virtual Environment on Mathematical Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heesung; Ke, Fengfeng

    2017-01-01

    This experimental study was intended to examine whether the integration of game characteristics in the OpenSimulator-supported virtual reality (VR) learning environment can improve mathematical achievement for elementary school students. In this pre- and posttest experimental comparison study, data were collected from 132 fourth graders through an…

  10. Game-Based Learning as a Vehicle to Teach First Aid Content: A Randomized Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, Nathalie; De Fraine, Bieke

    2013-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of first aid (FA), which constitutes lifesaving treatments for injuries or illnesses, is important for every individual. In this study, we have set up a group-randomized controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of a board game for learning FA. Methods: Four class groups (120 students) were randomly assigned to 2…

  11. Using Game-Based Learning to Support Struggling Readers at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Significant numbers of children (6% of 11-year-olds) have difficulties learning to read. Meanwhile, children who receive appropriate support from their parents do better in literacy than those who do not. This study uses a case study approach to investigate how digital games designed to support struggling readers in school were used at home, by…

  12. Game-Based Experiential Learning in Online Management Information Systems Classes Using Intel's IT Manager 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliemel, Michael; Ali-Hassan, Hossam

    2014-01-01

    For several years, we used Intel's flash-based game "IT Manager 3: Unseen Forces" as an experiential learning tool, where students had to act as a manager making real-time prioritization decisions about repairing computer problems, training and upgrading systems with better technologies as well as managing increasing numbers of technical…

  13. The Role of Curiosity-Triggering Events in Game-Based Learning for Mathematics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Pieter; van Oostendorp, Herre; ter Vrugte, Judith; Vandercruysse, Sylke; de Jong, Anthonius J.M.; Elen, Jan; Torbeyns, Joke; Lehtinen, Erno; Elen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigate whether cognitive conflicts induced by curiosity-triggering events have a positive impact on learning and motivation. In two experiments, we tested a game about proportional reasoning for secondary prevocational students. Experiment 1 used a curiosity-triggering vs.

  14. Serious Game-Based and Nongame-Based Online Courses: Learning Experiences and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Taryn; Gunter, Glenda

    2013-01-01

    When combining the increasing use of online educational environments, the push to use serious video games and the lack of research on the effectiveness of online learning environments and video games, there is a clear need for further investigation into the use of serious video games in an online format. A mix methods model was used to triangulate…

  15. Students' Perceptions of the Learning Environment and Attitudes in Game-Based Mathematics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afari, Ernest; Aldridge, Jill M.; Fraser, Barry J.; Khine, Myint Swe

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether the introduction of games into college-level mathematics classes in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) was effective in terms of improving students' perceptions of the learning environment and their attitudes towards of mathematics. A pre-post design involved the administration of English and Arabic versions of two surveys (one…

  16. The role of pedagogy and continuous assessment in game-based learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stubbé-Alberts, H.E.; Telford, R.; Hulst, A.H. van der

    2015-01-01

    This research is grounded in the issues of educating children living in remote and conflict areas, with a particular focus on innovative approaches to access via online and distance learning using ICT. Educational technology often focuses on giving resources and support for use by teachers, working

  17. Learning in a Game-Based Virtual Environment: A Comparative Evaluation in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Igor; Warmelink, Harald; Bekebrede, Geertje

    2013-01-01

    The authors define the requirements and a conceptual model for comparative evaluation research of simulation games and serious games (SGs) in a learning context. A first operationalisation of the model was used to comparatively evaluate a suite of 14 SGs on varying topics played between 2004 and 2009 in 13 institutes of higher education in the…

  18. Authentic Game-Based Learning and Teachers' Dilemmas in Reconstructing Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Yam San; Mehrotra, Swati; Ong, Jing Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Teachers who attempt pedagogical innovation with authentic digital games face significant challenges because such games instantiate open systems of learner activity, inviting enquiry learning rather than knowledge acquisition. However, school environments are normatively sanctioned cultural spaces where direct instruction and high-stakes tests are…

  19. Augmented Reality Game-Based Learning: Enriching Students' Experience during Reading Comprehension Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobar-Muñoz, Hendrys; Baldiris, Silvia; Fabregat, Ramon

    2017-01-01

    Program for International Student Assessment results indicate that while reading comprehension needs to be promoted, teachers are struggling to find ways to motivate students to do reading comprehension activities and although technology-enhanced learning approaches are entering the classroom, researchers are still experimenting with them to…

  20. Automatic, Global and Dynamic Student Modeling in a Ubiquitous Learning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Graf

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitous learning allows students to learn at any time and any place. Adaptivity plays an important role in ubiquitous learning, aiming at providing students with adaptive and personalized learning material, activities, and information at the right place and the right time. However, for providing rich adaptivity, the student model needs to be able to gather a variety of information about the students. In this paper, an automatic, global, and dynamic student modeling approach is introduced, which aims at identifying and frequently updating information about students’ progress, learning styles, interests and knowledge level, problem solving abilities, preferences for using the system, social connectivity, and current location. This information is gathered in an automatic way, using students’ behavior and actions in different learning situations provided by different components/services of the ubiquitous learning environment. By providing a comprehensive student model, students can be supported by rich adaptivity in every component/service of the learning environment. Furthermore, the information in the student model can help in giving teachers a better understanding about the students’ learning process.

  1. Game-based learning as a vehicle to teach first aid content: a randomized experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, Nathalie; De Fraine, Bieke

    2013-07-01

    Knowledge of first aid (FA), which constitutes lifesaving treatments for injuries or illnesses, is important for every individual. In this study, we have set up a group-randomized controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of a board game for learning FA. Four class groups (120 students) were randomly assigned to 2 conditions, a board game or a traditional lecture method (control condition). The effect of the learning environment on students' achievement was examined through a paper-and-pencil test of FA knowledge. Two months after the intervention, the participants took a retention test and completed a questionnaire assessing enjoyment, interest, and motivation. An analysis of pre- and post-test knowledge scores showed that both conditions produced significant increases in knowledge. The lecture was significantly more effective in increasing knowledge, as compared to the board game. Participants indicated that they liked the game condition more than their fellow participants in the traditional lecture condition. These results suggest that traditional lectures are more effective in increasing student knowledge, whereas educational games are more effective for student enjoyment. From this case study we recommend alteration or a combination of these teaching methods to make learning both effective and enjoyable. © 2013, American School Health Association.

  2. Editorial: is Game-Based Math Learning Finally Coming of Age?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Juha Mikael Kiili

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Acquisition of mathematical skills is crucial for today’s society.  Individuals who experience difficulties in learning basic mathematics can be at a great disadvantage in their professional lives. Nevertheless, fewer research efforts have been directed toward mathematical development and mathematical difficulties than toward some other areas of development, such as language and literacy. In fact, it has been argued that at an individual level, insufficient mathematical competencies may be even more harmful to career prospects than reading or spelling deficiencies. From a societal perspective, mathematical deficiencies can lead to significant costs. Thus, it is important to develop more engaging and effective methods that can be used to enhance children’s conceptual understanding of mathematics, develop mathematical thinking processes, and improve arithmetical skills. Digital games provide interesting possibilities to support and study mathematical development. Yes, whereas it is easy to find online mathematics training solutions, games, and apps, only a small fraction of existing mathematics learning games are  founded on theoretically sound principles, integrate mathematics directly into the gameplay, rely on good pedagogical practices, and  really utilize the possibilities that game technologies provide for learning.

  3. Mobile Learning as a Method of Ubiquitous Learning: Students' Attitudes, Readiness, and Possible Barriers to Implementation in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassan, Riyadh

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes and level of readiness, and possible barriers to implementing Mobile Learning as a part of ubiquitous learning. In addition, the study attempted to find out to what extent students are interested in mobile learning. It also aimed to answer the question regarding the readiness of college…

  4. Games-Based Learning as an Interdisciplinary Approach to Literacy across Curriculum for Excellence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh O'Donnell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Literacy remains an area of concern in early secondary education in Scotland (ages 12-14, with recent research suggesting a continued decline in attainment levels. As literacy underpins learning, interdisciplinary and collaborative approaches to teaching literacy are now being emphasized through the new Curriculum for Excellence that aims to address this issue. It is not clear, however, what types of learning activity are most appropriate for implementing this new, more cooperative approach. One candidate is the use of educational games and reflective writing. So, to what extent do learners demonstrate transferable literacy skills through engaging with educational games? This paper evaluates the effectiveness of the multi-user simulation game, Mars Colony Challenger (MCC, which portrays a scientifically accurate Mars colonisation mission in a way that aims to facilitate both scientific and literary development. A class of secondary school pupils (n=28 used the game within the context of a science class on ‘The Three States of Matter’. They then produced written narratives that captured the experiential learning undertaken. Comparing these narratives with the remaining pupils in the cohort, who had not used MCC in their science class, revealed a statistically significant difference in literacy ability. Further qualitative analysis of the narratives themselves highlighted a high level of engagement and inspiration evoked through the experience. Consequently, these results highlight the efficacy of MCC as a means of literacy development, and they suggest a means to elicit greater frequency of opportunity for pupil engagement with, and subsequent assessment of, literacy competencies. Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5

  5. The impact of Game-based learning on the achievement of learning goals and motivation for learning mathematics - literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaženka Divjak

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false SH X-NONE X-NONE Information technologies are an integral part of a contemporary society which bases its progress on knowledge being one goal of education. Beside acquiring knowledge, skills and routines, the goal of education is to create a complete individual who can rationally and timely make decisions, purposefully react in new situations and be trained for life-long learning. In order to accomplish all this, it is necessary to make educational process more creative, contemporary and adjusted to new generations of computer literate pupils who demand quicker and more frequent interactions, a lot of information at the same time, generations who quickly acquire rules of computer games. Computer games meeting pedagogical criteria should become an integral part of learning. Teaching with mathematical computer games, which fulfil pedagogical criteria, influences pupils’ motivation, learning, retention and forgetting. This paper provides a review of literature in this field and determines whether the use of mathematical computer games contributes to more efficient realisation of educational goals at all level of education. Furthermore, considering prior research we have attempted to establish whether the use of mathematical games for teaching has an impact on the formation of a positive attitude of pupils of different ages toward the subject of mathematics, their motivation and knowledge acquisition when compared to learning without computer games. Finally, we have analysed different research methods concerning this issue and assessed the impact of pedagogically designed mathematical computer games on the realisation of educational goals and quality improvement of teaching and learning.

  6. Game-based Learning in Technology Management Education: A Novel Business Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Günther

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Management games allow students to obtain valuable first-hand experience that is of particular value in a field such as technology management, which usually involves substantial risk as well as significant time lags between a managerial decision and its effects. In drawing from more than fifteen years of experience with management games in higher education, we have developed a management simulation for teaching technology management, a field that is increasingly regarded an important area of study for engineering students. This paper outlines a blended-learning design for a course on technology management, describes the various didactical elements as well as their effects in class, and addresses the technical implementation of the management game as a service-oriented multi-tier application in Java.

  7. Ubiquitous and Ambient Intelligence Assisted Learning Environment Infrastructures Development--A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagarajan, Sujith; Ramakrishnan, Sivakumar

    2018-01-01

    Ubiquitous Learning Environment (ULE) has been becoming a mobile and sensor based technology equipped environment that suits the modern world education discipline requirements for the past few years. Ambient Intelligence (AmI) makes much smarter the ULE by the support of optimization and intelligent techniques. Various efforts have been so far…

  8. Learning Analytics for Supporting Seamless Language Learning Using E-Book with Ubiquitous Learning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouri, Kousuke; Uosaki, Noriko; Ogata, Hiroaki

    2018-01-01

    Seamless learning has been recognized as an effective learning approach across various dimensions including formal and informal learning contexts, individual and social learning, and physical world and cyberspace. With the emergence of seamless learning, the majority of the current research focuses on realizing a seamless learning environment at…

  9. A Context-Aware Ubiquitous Learning Approach for Providing Instant Learning Support in Personal Computer Assembly Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ching-Kun; Hwang, Gwo-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Personal computer assembly courses have been recognized as being essential in helping students understand computer structure as well as the functionality of each computer component. In this study, a context-aware ubiquitous learning approach is proposed for providing instant assistance to individual students in the learning activity of a…

  10. Researching the Ethical Dimensions of Mobile, Ubiquitous and Immersive Technology Enhanced Learning (MUITEL): A Thematic Review and Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lally, Vic; Sharples, Mike; Tracy, Frances; Bertram, Neil; Masters, Sherriden

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we examine the ethical dimensions of researching the mobile, ubiquitous and immersive technology enhanced learning (MUITEL), with a particular focus on learning in informal settings. We begin with an analysis of the interactions between mobile, ubiquitous and immersive technologies and the wider context of the digital economy. In…

  11. From Learning Object to Learning Cell: A Resource Organization Model for Ubiquitous Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shengquan; Yang, Xianmin; Cheng, Gang; Wang, Minjuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new model for organizing learning resources: Learning Cell. This model is open, evolving, cohesive, social, and context-aware. By introducing a time dimension into the organization of learning resources, Learning Cell supports the dynamic evolution of learning resources while they are being used. In addition, by introducing a…

  12. Game-Based Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanghøj, Thorkild

    2013-01-01

    This chapter outlines theoretical and empirical perspectives on how Game-Based Teaching can be integrated within the context of formal schooling. Initially, this is done by describing game scenarios as models for possible actions that need to be translated into curricular knowledge practices...... approaches to game-based teaching, which may or may not correspond with the pedagogical models of particular games....

  13. Maintaining collaborative, democratic and dialogue-based learning processes in virtual and game-based learning environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyldendahl Jensen, Camilla; Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    2017-01-01

    The incorporation and use of virtual learning platforms, including computer games, in the education sector, challenge these years the complexity of the learning environment regarding maintaining collaborative, democratic and dialogue-based learning processes that support a high degree of reflection....... When virtual learning platforms are used in an educational context, a fundamental paradox appears as the student needs an active and practice-oriented participation identity to learn while at the same time needing to learn to acquire a participation identity. This identity is raised and trained...... by being a continuous part of a community that recalls the scenarios of reality. It is therefore crucial that the learning environment reflects the reality of which the students' professionalism is unfolded. Learning is, therefore, something more and not just the acquisition of knowledge and past actions...

  14. The Impact of Students' Temporal Perspectives on Time-on-Task and Learning Performance in Game Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Margarida; Usart, Mireia

    2013-01-01

    The use of games for educational purposes has been considered as a learning methodology that attracts the students' attention and may allow focusing individuals on the learning activity through the [serious games] SG game dynamic. Based on the hypothesis that students' Temporal Perspective has an impact on learning performance and time-on-task,…

  15. Facilitating Effective Digital Game-Based Learning Behaviors and Learning Performances of Students Based on a Collaborative Knowledge Construction Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Han-Yu; Hwang, Gwo-Jen

    2018-01-01

    Researchers have recognized the potential of educational computer games in improving students' learning engagement and outcomes; however, facilitating effective learning behaviors during the gaming process remains an important and challenging issue. In this paper, a collaborative knowledge construction strategy was incorporated into an educational…

  16. Game-based telerehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, B; Flynn, Sheryl M; Rizzo, A A

    2009-03-01

    This article summarizes the recent accomplishments and current challenges facing game-based virtual reality (VR) telerehabilitation. Specifically this article addresses accomplishments relative to realistic practice scenarios, part to whole practice, objective measurement of performance and progress, motivation, low cost, interaction devices and game design. Furthermore, a description of the current challenges facing game based telerehabilitation including the packaging, internet capabilities and access, data management, technical support, privacy protection, seizures, distance trials, scientific scrutiny and support from insurance companies.

  17. Mobile game-based learning in secondary education: engagement, motivation and learning in a mobile city game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizenga, J.; Admiraal, W.; Akkerman, S.; ten Dam, G.

    2009-01-01

    Using mobile games in education combines situated and active learning with fun in a potentially excellent manner. The effects of a mobile city game called Frequency 1550, which was developed by The Waag Society to help pupils in their first year of secondary education playfully acquire historical

  18. A Decision-Tree-Oriented Guidance Mechanism for Conducting Nature Science Observation Activities in a Context-Aware Ubiquitous Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Chu, Hui-Chun; Shih, Ju-Ling; Huang, Shu-Hsien; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2010-01-01

    A context-aware ubiquitous learning environment is an authentic learning environment with personalized digital supports. While showing the potential of applying such a learning environment, researchers have also indicated the challenges of providing adaptive and dynamic support to individual students. In this paper, a decision-tree-oriented…

  19. Exploring the Effects of Web-Mediated Computational Thinking on Developing Students' Computing Skills in a Ubiquitous Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Wen; Shen, Pei-Di; Tsai, Meng-Chuan; Chen, Wen-Yu

    2017-01-01

    Much application software education in Taiwan can hardly be regarded as practical. The researchers in this study provided a flexible means of ubiquitous learning (u-learning) with a mobile app for students to access the learning material. In addition, the authors also adopted computational thinking (CT) to help students develop practical computing…

  20. Ubiquitous learning model using interactive internet messenger group (IIMG) to improve engagement and behavior for smart campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umam, K.; Mardi, S. N. S.; Hariadi, M.

    2017-01-01

    The recent popularity of internet messenger based smartphone technologies has motivated some university lecturers to use them for educational activities. These technologies have enormous potential to enhance the teaching and ubiquitous learning experience for smart campus development. However, the design ubiquitous learning model using interactive internet messenger group (IIMG) and empirical evidence that would favor a broad application of mobile and ubiquitous learning in smart campus settings to improve engagement and behavior is still limited. In addition, the expectation that mobile learning could improve engagement and behavior on smart campus cannot be confirmed because the majority of the reviewed studies followed instructions paradigms. This article aims to present ubiquitous learning model design and showing learners’ experiences in improved engagement and behavior using IIMG for learner-learner and learner-lecturer interactions. The method applied in this paper includes design process and quantitative analysis techniques, with the purpose of identifying scenarios of ubiquitous learning and realize the impressions of learners and lecturers about engagement and behavior aspect, and its contribution to learning.

  1. Effects of Collaborative Learning Styles on Performance of Students in a Ubiquitous Collaborative Mobile Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakomogbon, Michael Ayodele; Bolaji, Hameed Olalekan

    2017-01-01

    Collaborative learning is an approach employed by instructors to facilitate learning and improve learner's performance. Mobile learning can accommodate a variety of learning approaches. This study, therefore, investigated the effects of collaborative learning styles on performance of students in a mobile learning environment. The specific purposes…

  2. Personalised Context-Aware Ubiquitous Learning System for Supporting Effective English Vocabulary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ming; Li, Yi-Lun

    2010-01-01

    Because learning English is extremely popular in non-native English speaking countries, developing modern assisted-learning schemes that facilitate effective English learning is a critical issue in English-language education. Vocabulary learning is vital within English learning because vocabulary comprises the basic building blocks of English…

  3. Media Presentation Mode, English Listening Comprehension and Cognitive Load in Ubiquitous Learning Environments: Modality Effect or Redundancy Effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Cheng; Lei, Hao; Tseng, Ju-Shih

    2011-01-01

    Although ubiquitous learning enhances students' access to learning materials, it is crucial to find out which media presentation modes produce the best results for English listening comprehension. The present study examined the effect of media presentation mode (sound and text versus sound) on English listening comprehension and cognitive load.…

  4. Learning Potentials of the Ubiquitous Internet: Using Mobile Devices to Support the Individual, Social and Physical Context of the Learner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalsgaard, Christian; Pedersen, Nicholai Friis; Aaen, Janus Holst

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify the key learning potentials of the ubiquitous internet. Rather than focusing on mobile technology or the mobility of the learner, the paper emphasises the ubiquity of internet access as a paramount catalyst for new learning in the digital age. From a sociocultural perspective the paper discusses different ways…

  5. Ubiquitous English Learning System with Dynamic Personalized Guidance of Learning Portfolio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ting-Ting; Sung, Tien-Wen; Huang, Yueh-Min; Yang, Chu-Sing; Yang, Jin-Tan

    2011-01-01

    Situated learning has been recognized as an effective approach in enhancing learning impressions and experiences for students. Can we take advantage of situated learning in helping students who are not English native speakers to read English articles more effective? Can the effectiveness of situated learning be further promoted by individual…

  6. Geography Map Knowledge Acquisition by Solving a Jigsaw Map Compared to Self-Study: Investigating Game Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Srishti; Ved, Arunima; Vemuri, Kavita

    2018-01-01

    Efficacy of games as learning medium is of interest to researchers and the gaming industry. A critical metric for learning is knowledge retention and very few studies have conducted in-depth comparisons of: a) game versus no-game learning, b) collaborative versus individual learning. Towards this, the study reported in this article will present…

  7. Computer-Game-Based Tutoring of Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Fengfeng

    2013-01-01

    This in-situ, descriptive case study examined the potential of implementing computer mathematics games as an anchor for tutoring of mathematics. Data were collected from middle school students at a rural pueblo school and an urban Hispanic-serving school, through in-field observation, content analysis of game-based tutoring-learning interactions,…

  8. GAME ON! An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis of Games-Based Learning in an Undergraduate Liberal Arts Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, David Anthony, Jr.

    2017-01-01

    Current higher education focuses on a teacher centered pedagogy where students benefit but are not the primary consideration for learning. Conversely, experiential learning focuses on students in the learning process. This is done through a socialized and personalized environment that can be implemented through the application of games-based…

  9. Empirical Study on the Effect of Digital Game-Based Instruction on Students' Learning Motivation and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Chun

    2017-01-01

    As pupils are largely increased the opportunities to contact digital games, the effect of digital games has been broadly discussed and studied. Digital games no longer play the function of entertainment, but could assist students in more active learning and deeper and broader learning, when being applied to instruction. It is limited to learn in…

  10. Evaluation of a Digital Game-Based Learning Program for Enhancing Youth Mental Health: A Structural Equation Modeling of the Program Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huen, Jenny My; Lai, Eliza Sy; Shum, Angie Ky; So, Sam Wk; Chan, Melissa Ky; Wong, Paul Wc; Law, Y W; Yip, Paul Sf

    2016-10-07

    Digital game-based learning (DGBL) makes use of the entertaining power of digital games for educational purposes. Effectiveness assessment of DGBL programs has been underexplored and no attempt has been made to simultaneously model both important components of DGBL: learning attainment (ie, educational purposes of DGBL) and engagement of users (ie, entertaining power of DGBL) in evaluating program effectiveness. This study aimed to describe and evaluate an Internet-based DGBL program, Professor Gooley and the Flame of Mind, which promotes mental health to adolescents in a positive youth development approach. In particular, we investigated whether user engagement in the DGBL program could enhance their attainment on each of the learning constructs per DGBL module and subsequently enhance their mental health as measured by psychological well-being. Users were assessed on their attainment on each learning construct, psychological well-being, and engagement in each of the modules. One structural equation model was constructed for each DGBL module to model the effect of users' engagement and attainment on the learning construct on their psychological well-being. Of the 498 secondary school students that registered and participated from the first module of the DGBL program, 192 completed all 8 modules of the program. Results from structural equation modeling suggested that a higher extent of engagement in the program activities facilitated users' attainment on the learning constructs on most of the modules and in turn enhanced their psychological well-being after controlling for users' initial psychological well-being and initial attainment on the constructs. This study provided evidence that Internet intervention for mental health, implemented with the technologies and digital innovations of DGBL, could enhance youth mental health. Structural equation modeling is a promising approach in evaluating the effectiveness of DGBL programs.

  11. Outdoor Natural Science Learning with an RFID-Supported Immersive Ubiquitous Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tsung-Yu; Tan, Tan-Hsu; Chu, Yu-Ling

    2009-01-01

    Despite their successful use in many conscientious studies involving outdoor learning applications, mobile learning systems still have certain limitations. For instance, because students cannot obtain real-time, context-aware content in outdoor locations such as historical sites, endangered animal habitats, and geological landscapes, they are…

  12. Summarize to learn: summarization and visualization of text for ubiquitous learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chongtay, Rocio; Last, Mark; Verbeke, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Visualizations can stand in many relations to texts – and, as research into learning with pictures has shown, they can become particularly valuable when they transform the contents of the text (rather than just duplicate its message or structure it). But what kinds of transformations can...... be particularly helpful in the learning process? In this paper, we argue that interacting with, and creating, summaries of texts is a key transformation technique, and we investigate how textual and graphical summarization approaches, as well as automatic and manual summarization, can complement one another...... to support effective learning....

  13. The Effects of Game Strategy and Preference-Matching on Flow Experience and Programming Performance in Game-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Chun; Chen, Ming-Puu

    2010-01-01

    Learning to program is difficult for novices, even for those undergraduates who have majored in computer science. The study described in this paper has investigated the effects of game strategy and preference-matching on novice learners' flow experience and performance in learning to program using an experiential gaming activity. One hundred and…

  14. From Mario to FIFA: What Qualitative Case Study Research Suggests about Games-Based Learning in a US Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Hannah R.; Abrams, Sandra Schamroth; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Benge, Cindy L.

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the impact of using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) videogames in a high school curriculum when developed through a connected learning frame by examining the influence that COTS videogames have on transforming students' literacy learning in-school. However, it must be noted that transforming literacy in school is about more…

  15. Design and Empirical Validation of Effectiveness of LANGA, an Online Game-Based Platform for Second Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usai, Francesco; O'Neil, Kiera G. R.; Newman, Aaron J.

    2018-01-01

    Computer and smartphone-based applications for second language (L2) learning have become popular tools, being integrated in many classroom-based courses and adopted by the public at large. Yet, despite a significant body of research that suggests that individuals differ in their ability to learn L2, it is still unclear what factors predict…

  16. Teachers' Concerns about Adopting Constructivist Online Game-Based Learning in Formal Curriculum Teaching: The VISOLE Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Morris S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Our work is set against the backdrop of the pervasive discussion of harnessing online games to provide students with new constructivist learning opportunities. Upon the theoretical foundation, we have developed Virtual Interactive Student-Oriented Learning Environment (VISOLE), a teaching framework for implementing constructivist online game-based…

  17. Learning User Preferences in Ubiquitous Systems: A User Study and a Reinforcement Learning Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Zaidenberg , Sofia; Reignier , Patrick; Mandran , Nadine

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Our study concerns a virtual assistant, proposing services to the user based on its current perceived activity and situation (ambient intelligence). Instead of asking the user to define his preferences, we acquire them automatically using a reinforcement learning approach. Experiments showed that our system succeeded the learning of user preferences. In order to validate the relevance and usability of such a system, we have first conducted a user study. 26 non-expert s...

  18. Shifting Contexts: Investigating the Role of Context in the Use of Ubiquitous Computing for Design-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Katharine S.; Corino, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    In design teaching ubiquitous technologies can offer new ways of situating learning within real world experiences. Yet they require new types of knowledge; both an understanding of how to work with the technology and also an understanding of how to use the technologies to respond to changing contexts such as the place and the people. We sought to…

  19. Evaluation of a ubiquitous learning system in a design engineering environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroom, R.W.; Horvath, I.; Rusak, Z.; De Smit, A.; Opiyo, E.Z.

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitous computing is computing power that is integrated in devices and environments in such a way that they offer optimal support to human daily life activities. For industrial design engineering students, applying ubiquitous technologies offer a great opportunity and challenge for innovating

  20. A new model on the use of ubiquitous technology (U-Tech as a learning tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muliati Sedek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Laptops, smartphones and tablets which also known as ubiquitous technology or u-tech have been widely used by students in the university. However, study on the factors influencing it usage as not many comprehensive studies have been done related to it. A review of related literature reveals that factors, namely the Technology Competency (TC, Performance Expectancy (PE, Effort Expectancy (EE, Behavioural Intention (BI, Facilitating Conditions (FC and Social Status (SS influence its usage. Thus, the focus of this study was to confirm whether the determined factors contribute towards u-tech usage among students in the institutions of higher learning, particularly in Malaysia. This study was based on a quantitative research in which the Structural Equation Modelling using AMOS was employed. The results attained from the analysis produced a reliable model towards u-tech usage. Therefore, it can be concluded that, u-tech usage described by the five factors. This study has suggested that the university administration should play an active role in disseminating any news that is related to the usefulness of u-tech.

  1. Virtual Environments for the Transfer of Navigation Skills in the Blind: A Comparison of Directed Instruction Versus Video Game Based Learning Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin C Connors

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available For profoundly blind individuals, navigating in an unfamiliar building can represent a significant challenge. We investigated the use of an audio-based, virtual environment called Audio-based Environment Simulator (AbES that can be explored for the purposes of learning the layout of an unfamiliar, complex indoor environment. Furthermore, we compared two modes of interaction with AbES. In one group, blind participants implicitly learned the layout of a target environment while playing an exploratory, goal-directed video game. By comparison, a second group was explicitly taught the same layout following a standard route and instructions provided by a sighted facilitator. As a control, a third group interacted with AbES while playing an exploratory, goal-directed video game however, the explored environment did not correspond to the target layout. Following interaction with AbES, a series of route navigation tasks were carried out in the virtual and physical building represented in the training environment to assess the transfer of acquired spatial information. We found that participants from both modes of interaction were able to transfer the spatial knowledge gained as indexed by their successful route navigation performance. This transfer was not apparent in the control participants. Most notably, the game-based learning strategy was also associated with enhanced performance when participants were required to find alternate routes and short cuts within the target building suggesting that a ludic-based training approach may provide for a more flexible mental representation of the environment. Furthermore, outcome comparisons between early and late blind individuals suggested that greater prior visual experience did not have a significant effect on overall navigation performance following training. Finally, performance did not appear to be associated with other factors of interest such as age, gender, and verbal memory recall. We conclude that the

  2. A Constructivist Approach to Game-Based Language Learning: Student Perceptions in a Beginner-Level EFL Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, James; deHaan, Jonathan William

    2018-01-01

    This article provides information on an action research project in a low-level EFL setting in Japan. The project aims were to (1) foster spoken communication skills and (2) help students engage with their own learning. The project investigated the applicability of board games as a mediating tool for authentic communication as part of a wider TBLT…

  3. Hybrid Augmented Reality for Participatory Learning: The Hidden Efficacy of Multi-User Game-Based Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seungjae; So, Hyo-Jeong; Gaydos, Matthew

    2018-01-01

    The goal for this research is to articulate and test a new hybrid Augmented Reality (AR) environment for conceptual understanding. From the theoretical lens of embodied interaction, we have designed a multi-user participatory simulation called ARfract where visitors in a science museum can learn about complex scientific concepts on the refraction…

  4. Reflection Paper on a Ubiquitous English Vocabulary Learning System: Evidence of Active/Passive Attitude vs. Usefulness/Ease-of-Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    "A ubiquitous English vocabulary learning system: evidence of active/passive attitudes vs. usefulness/ease-of-use" introduces and develops "Ubiquitous English Vocabulary Learning" (UEFL) system. It introduces to the memorization using the video clips. According to their paper the video clip gives a better chance for students to…

  5. Understanding the Behavioral Intention to Play Austronesian Learning Games: From the Perspectives of Learning Outcome, Service Quality, and Hedonic Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Kuo-Lun; Huang, Tien-Chi; Chen, Mu-Yen; Chiang, Nien-Ting

    2018-01-01

    Although ubiquitous learning is a novel and creative teaching approach, two key issues inhibit its success overall: a lack of appropriate learning strategies regarding learning objectives, and ineffective learning tools for receiving knowledge regarding the chosen subjects. To address these issues, we develops and designs a game-based educational…

  6. Virtual environments for the transfer of navigation skills in the blind: a comparison of directed instruction vs. video game based learning approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Erin C; Chrastil, Elizabeth R; Sánchez, Jaime; Merabet, Lotfi B

    2014-01-01

    For profoundly blind individuals, navigating in an unfamiliar building can represent a significant challenge. We investigated the use of an audio-based, virtual environment called Audio-based Environment Simulator (AbES) that can be explored for the purposes of learning the layout of an unfamiliar, complex indoor environment. Furthermore, we compared two modes of interaction with AbES. In one group, blind participants implicitly learned the layout of a target environment while playing an exploratory, goal-directed video game. By comparison, a second group was explicitly taught the same layout following a standard route and instructions provided by a sighted facilitator. As a control, a third group interacted with AbES while playing an exploratory, goal-directed video game however, the explored environment did not correspond to the target layout. Following interaction with AbES, a series of route navigation tasks were carried out in the virtual and physical building represented in the training environment to assess the transfer of acquired spatial information. We found that participants from both modes of interaction were able to transfer the spatial knowledge gained as indexed by their successful route navigation performance. This transfer was not apparent in the control participants. Most notably, the game-based learning strategy was also associated with enhanced performance when participants were required to find alternate routes and short cuts within the target building suggesting that a ludic-based training approach may provide for a more flexible mental representation of the environment. Furthermore, outcome comparisons between early and late blind individuals suggested that greater prior visual experience did not have a significant effect on overall navigation performance following training. Finally, performance did not appear to be associated with other factors of interest such as age, gender, and verbal memory recall. We conclude that the highly interactive

  7. Is School a Better Environment than Home for Digital Game-Based Learning? The Case of GraphoGame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miia Ronimus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated how the use of an online reading game differs in home and school environments. First and second graders (N = 194 participated in an 8-week training during which they used the reading program GraphoGame either at home or at school under the supervision of parents or teachers. Child participants were recommended by parents and teachers recruited from the list of GraphoGame users, and adults decided whether the training took place at home or at school. We measured the frequency and duration of playing, children’s engagement, development of reading skill and reading interest, and adult supportive involvement. The results revealed that children who played GraphoGame at school showed higher engagement and used it more frequently than players at home. Although teachers were more involved in the children’s playing than were parents, only parental involvement was significantly associated with a child’s engagement during training and the child’s learning outcomes.

  8. Ubiquitous positioning

    CERN Document Server

    Mannings, Robin

    2008-01-01

    This groundbreaking resource offers a practical, in-depth understanding of Ubiquitous Positioning - positioning systems that identify the location and position of people, vehicles and objects in time and space in the digitized networked economy. The future and growth of ubiquitous positioning will be fueled by the convergence of many other areas of technology, from mobile telematics, Internet technology, and location systems, to sensing systems, geographic information systems, and the semantic web. This first-of-its-kind volume explores ubiquitous positioning from a convergence perspective, of

  9. Conditions for Ubiquitous Computing: What Can Be Learned from a Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jing

    2010-01-01

    Based on survey data and interview data collected over four academic years, this longitudinal study examined how a ubiquitous computing project evolved along with the changes in teachers, students, the human infrastructure, and technology infrastructure in the school. This study also investigated what conditions were necessary for successful…

  10. Connected and Ubiquitous: A Discussion of Two Theories That Impact Future Learning Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bair, Richard A.; Stafford, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Mobile media break down traditional barriers that have defined learning in schools because they enable constant, personalized access to media. This information-rich environment could dramatically expand learning opportunities. This article identifies and discusses two instructional design theories for mobile learning including the major…

  11. Development of Highly Interactive Service Platform for Social Learning via Ubiquitous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangman Yi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several emerging issues concerning the development of interactive learning environment were left unsolved although e-learning has been applied for years. With several studies indicate that more interaction between students and systems increases students’ level of interest and allows them to focus on learning support. Due to the way current interactive learning tools are designed, users have to wear or operate actual tools in order to carry out the required learning procedures. The use of tools for long durations of time results in user fatigue. Hence, this study incorporates the Microsoft Kinect as interactive tool for detecting gestures in the e-learning process. This study also uses the interaction method that we had developed on Facebook to interact with the proposed learning system. The experiments in this study are divided into five parts: system performance of the 3D web engine, gesture accuracy, system and gesture usability, system and gesture satisfaction, and learning satisfaction of the learner. Also, the gesture design was accepted by learners when they interacted with the learning system. Our research shows that our concept as well as the features of our system can fully support social learning and enhance interaction between users in learning environments.

  12. Criteria for Evaluating a Game-Based CALL Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ní Chiaráin, Neasa; Ní Chasaide, Ailbhe

    2017-01-01

    Game-based Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) is an area that currently warrants attention, as task-based, interactive, multimodal games increasingly show promise for language learning. This area is inherently multidisciplinary--theories from second language acquisition, games, and psychology must be explored and relevant concepts from…

  13. Understanding Angle and Angle Measure: A Design-Based Research Study Using Context Aware Ubiquitous Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crompton, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Mobile technologies are quickly becoming tools found in the educational environment. The researchers in this study use a form of mobile learning to support students in learning about angle concepts. Design-based research is used in this study to develop an empirically-substantiated local instruction theory about students' develop of angle and…

  14. LSQuiz: A Collaborative Classroom Response System to Support Active Learning through Ubiquitous Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caceffo, Ricardo; Azevedo, Rodolfo

    2014-01-01

    The constructivist theory indicates that knowledge is not something finished and complete. However, the individuals must construct it through the interaction with the physical and social environment. The Active Learning is a methodology designed to support the constructivism through the involvement of students in their learning process, allowing…

  15. The Future of Ubiquitous Elearning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Post-secondary students are increasingly receiving instruction by eLearning. Many or these are part-time students or are working while taking classes. In such circumstances, students may find themselves short of time to study. One mechanism that can be exploited to make the best use of available time is ubiquitous eLearning. Ubiquitous eLearning…

  16. Video Productions as Learning Resources in Students’ Knowledge Building in the Ubiquitous Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie; Andreasen, Lars Birch; Ørngreen, Rikke

    productions developed by the students themselves. This is investigated from a theoretical as well as an empirical perspective, building on the authors’ experiences from researching and teaching dealing with production of video in learning situations, with different learning objectives and didactic designs...... in mind. The paper will present an overview of the state-of-the art of research on using video productions as learning resources, followed by discussions of our own research results and practices. From the overview and the discussions concepts are defined and research questions formed, based...... on a multimodal perspective on teaching and educational design. We conclude by arguing where and why there is a need for more knowledge....

  17. Towards a Game-Based Periscope Simulator for Submarine Officers Tactical Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    ONLY 2. REPORT DATE June 2016 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE TOWARDS A GAME -BASED PERISCOPE SIMULATOR...career to learn and practice these skills. Following an instructional system design process, this thesis developed a 3D, game -based periscope tactical...experience. Results of this thesis support the use of game -based simulation as training tools and that feedback type could be tailored to individuals based

  18. Influences of an Inquiry-based Ubiquitous Gaming Design on Students' Learning Achievements, Motivation, Behavioral Patterns, and Tendency towards Critical Thinking and Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Chen, Chih-Hung

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, an inquiry-based ubiquitous gaming approach was proposed. The objective of the study was to enhance students' performances in in-field learning activities. To show the advantages of the approach, an experiment was carried out to assess the effects of it on students' learning achievement, motivation, critical thinking, and problem…

  19. Understanding game-based literacy practices in a school context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bremholm, Jesper; Brok, Lene Storgaard

    methodology, and the interventions will be carried out at 20 schools in Denmark and will consist of 4 specially designed game-based units in each of the subjects Danish (as L1), mathematics, and science in both 5th and 7th grade. Games include digital as well as analogue games, and we understand game...... in the 21st Century (GBL21), a five years large-scale intervention project launched in December 2017. The overall aim is to explore how and to what degree students develop 21st century skills through a game-based pedagogy in different school subjects. The GBL21 project is based on a mixed methods......-based learning as relating to the process of designing games, exploring game worlds, and reflecting on game activities in an educational context. The purpose of the qualitative strand is to explore how the game-based learning activities influence the literacy practices in the different classrooms. This includes...

  20. UBIQUITOUS, FREE, AND EFFICIENT ONLINE COLLABORATION TOOLS FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jace HARGIS

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an overview of free, online tools that make collaboration effective, efficient, and engaging. Each tool is available world-wide wherever there is access to the internet. These tools help create a more collaborative environment because they allow for voice, video, text, simultaneous editing, and immediate feedback. The tools presented are easy to use, user friendly, and have online support available if needed. Methods for using the tools are suggested, and examples of how they have been used by the authors are discussed. Professional presentations, instructional activities, meetings, and preparing manuscripts or other collaborative documents can all be developed in collaborative online meetings using Skype, Google tools including Talk, Chat, Calendar, Docs, and Notebooks, and Second Life. These may also be used to enhance education in distance learning or on campus classes. The features, functionality, and intuitive ease of use promote collaborative efforts, increasing the effective and efficient use of time while decreasing costs. Hyperlinks are provided for tools so users can determine technology specifications, download necessary files, learn more about their capabilities, and locate help or support information.

  1. Timing Game-Based Practice in a Reading Comprehension Strategy Tutor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacovina, Matthew E.; Jackson, G. Tanner; Snow, Erica L.; McNamara, Danielle S.

    2016-01-01

    Game-based practice within Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITSs) can be optimized by examining how properties of practice activities influence learning outcomes and motivation. In the current study, we manipulated when game-based practice was available to students. All students (n = 149) first completed lesson videos in iSTART-2, an ITS focusing on…

  2. Challenges to Designing Game-Based Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Thomas Duus

    2014-01-01

    The four categories labelled game-design, didactic design, organisational design and business design each constitute a set of challenges, each requiring a particular set of competencies. The key conclusion of the paper is that even though the learning game design constitutes the core of establish......The four categories labelled game-design, didactic design, organisational design and business design each constitute a set of challenges, each requiring a particular set of competencies. The key conclusion of the paper is that even though the learning game design constitutes the core...... of establishing game based business (GBB), the subsequent stages of development call for other kinds of competencies in order to become a viable GBB....

  3. Tennis: Applied Examples of a Game-Based Teaching Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Miguel; Reid, Machar M.; Miley, Dave

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors reveal that tennis has been increasingly taught with a tactical model or game-based approach, which emphasizes learning through practice in match-like drills and actual play, rather than in practicing strokes for exact technical execution. Its goal is to facilitate the player's understanding of the tactical, physical…

  4. Creative Classrooms through Game-Based Role-Play Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedde, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    studies a framework that anchors the curriculum in game-based role-play scenarios and offers affordances for the learners to immerse themselves in the multiple perspectives of the roles. In this way of introducing problem based learning in immersive narrative environments, the learners are provided......-based role-play scenarios as a learning tool that can integrate the curriculum in meaningful context, and how it has impacted on the interaction and creative learning experiences in the class....

  5. Investigation of Learning Behaviors and Achievement of Vocational High School Students Using an Ubiquitous Physics Tablet PC App

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purba, Siska Wati Dewi; Hwang, Wu-Yuin

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we designed and developed an app called Ubiquitous-Physics (U-Physics) for mobile devices like tablet PC or smart phones to help students learn the principles behind a simple pendulum in Physics. The unique characteristic of U-Physics is the use of sensors on mobile devices to collect acceleration and velocity data during pendulum swings. The data collected are transformed to facilitate students' understanding of the pendulum time period. U-Physics helped students understand the effects of pendulum mass, length, and angle in relation to its time period. In addition, U-Physics was equipped with an annotation function such as textual annotation to help students interpret and understand the concepts and phenomena of the simple pendulum. U-Physics also generated graphs automatically to demonstrate the time period during which the pendulum was swinging. Results showed a significant positive correlation between interpreting graphs and applying formula. This finding indicated that the ability to interpret graphs has an important role in scientific learning. Therefore, we strongly recommend that physics teachers use graphs to enrich students' information content and understanding and negative correlation between pair coherence and interpreting graphs. It may be that most of the participants (vocational high school students) have limited skill or confidence in physics problem solving; so, they often seek help from teachers or their high-achieving peers. In addition, the findings also indicated that U-Physics can enhance students' achievement during a 3-week time period. We hope that this app can be globally used to learn physics in the future.

  6. Learning Behavior Analysis of a Ubiquitous Situated Reflective Learning System with Application to Life Science and Technology Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Chen, Hong-Ren; Chen, Nian-Shing; Lin, Li-Kai; Chen, Jin-Wen

    2018-01-01

    Education research has shown that reflective study can efficiently enhance learning, and the acquisition of knowledge and skills from real-life situations has become a focus of interest for scholars. The knowledge-learning model based on verbal instruction, used in traditional classrooms, does not make use of real-life situations that encourage…

  7. Ubiquitous Performance-Support System as Mindtool: A Case Study of Instructional Decision Making and Learning Assistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hsinyi; Chuang, Po-Ya; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Chu, Hui-Chun; Wu, Ting-Ting; Huang, Shu-Xian

    2009-01-01

    Researchers have conducted various studies on applying wireless communication and ubiquitous computing technologies to education, so that the technologies can provide learners and educators with more active and adaptive support. This study proposes a Ubiquitous Performance-support System (UPSS) that can facilitate the seamless use of powerful new…

  8. THE NEED FOR A MORE EFFICIENT USER NOTIFICATION SYSTEM IN USING SOCIAL NETWORKS AS UBIQUITOUS LEARNING PLATFORMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can MIHCI

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available While carrying out formative assessment activities over social network services (SNS, it has been noted that personalized notifications have a high chance of “the important post getting lost” in the notification feed. In order to highlight this problem, this paper compares within a posttest only quasi-experiment, a total of 104 first year undergraduate students, all of which are prospective ICT teachers, in two groups. A formative assessment system in the ubiquitous learning context is delivered over an SNS in both groups. In the first group, the SNS has been used for the entire assessment task. In the second group, the questions have been delivered and responses were received over mobile phone “SMS” messages, while the SNS was used solely for providing feedback. The cases were compared in terms of voluntary participation rates and academic success. Both response rates and academic success have been significantly higher in the SMS group. When asked their reasons for not responding to questions; the SNS-only group frequently reported “not noticing the questions being sent”. This may indicate a flaw in message design for using social networks as LMS's. Sensible use of push-messages is advised.

  9. Fidelity and Game-based Technology in Management Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgard B. Cornacchione Jr.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study explores educational technology and management education by analyzing fidelity in game-basedmanagement education interventions. A sample of 31 MBA students was selected to help answer the researchquestion: To what extent do MBA students tend to recognize specific game-based academic experiences, interms of fidelity, as relevant to their managerial performance? Two distinct game-based interventions (BG1 andBG2 with key differences in fidelity levels were explored: BG1 presented higher physical and functional fidelitylevels and lower psychological fidelity levels. Hypotheses were tested with data from the participants, collectedshortly after their experiences, related to the overall perceived quality of game-based interventions. The findingsreveal a higher overall perception of quality towards BG1: (a better for testing strategies, (b offering betterbusiness and market models, (c based on a pace that better stimulates learning, and (d presenting a fidelity levelthat better supports real world performance. This study fosters the conclusion that MBA students tend torecognize, to a large extent, that specific game-based academic experiences are relevant and meaningful to theirmanagerial development, mostly with heightened fidelity levels of adopted artifacts. Agents must be ready andmotivated to explore the new, to try and err, and to learn collaboratively in order to perform.

  10. The effects of types of reflective scaffolding and language proficiency on the acquisition of physics knowledge in a game-based learning environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tsu-Ting

    With the capability of creating a situated and engaging learning environment, video games have been considered as a powerful tool to enhance students' learning outcomes and interest in learning. Yet, little empirical evidence exists to support the effectiveness of video games in learning. Particularly, little attention has been given to the design of specific game elements. Focusing on middle school students, the goal of this study was to investigate the effects of two types of representations of reflective scaffolds (verbal and visual) on students' learning outcomes, game performance, and level of engagement in a video game for physics learning. In addition, the role of students' level of English proficiency was examined to understand whether the effects of reflective scaffolds were influenced by students' language proficiency. Two studies were conducted. Study 1 playtested the game with target players and led to game modification for its use in Study 2, which focused on the effects of different types of reflective scaffolds and level of English proficiency. The results of Study 2 showed that students who received both verbal and visual reflective scaffolds completed the most levels compared to the other groups in the given time. No significant effect of type of reflective scaffolds were found on learning outcomes despite the fact that the pattern of the learning outcomes across conditions was close to prediction. Participants' engagement in gameplay was high regardless of the type of scaffolds they received, their interest in learning physics, and their prior knowledge of physics. The results of video analysis also showed that the game used in this study was able to engage students not only in gameplay but also in learning physics. Finally, English proficiency functioned as a significant factor moderating the effects of scaffolds, learning outcomes and game performance. Students with limited English proficiency benefited more from visual reflective scaffolds than

  11. The Status of Ubiquitous Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David G.; Petitto, Karen R.

    2003-01-01

    Explains the prevalence and rationale of ubiquitous computing on college campuses--teaching with the assumption or expectation that all faculty and students have access to the Internet--and offers lessons learned by pioneering institutions. Lessons learned involve planning, technology, implementation and management, adoption of computer-enhanced…

  12. The Effect of Gender on Motivation and Student Achievement in Digital Game-Based Learning: A Case Study of a Contented-Based Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Liang-Yi; Chang, Rong-Chi

    2017-01-01

    This study attempts to probe into the impact of learners' gender on learning outcomes and motivation. A digital game focusing on the topic of emergency first aid is designed for the purpose of this present study, according to the curriculum objectives for a content-based instruction (CBI) course as part of the experiment. In the process of playing…

  13. FILTWAM - A Framework for Online Game-based Communication Skills Training - Using Webcams and Microphones for Enhancing Learner Support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bahreini, Kiavash; Nadolski, Rob; Qi, Wen; Westera, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Bahreini, K., Nadolski, R., Qi, W., & Westera, W. (2012). FILTWAM - A Framework for Online Game-based Communication Skills Training - Using Webcams and Microphones for Enhancing Learner Support. In P. Felicia (Ed.), The 6th European Conference on Games Based Learning - ECGBL 2012 (pp. 39-48). Cork,

  14. SIDH: A Game-Based Architecture for a Training Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Backlund

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Game-based simulators, sometimes referred to as “lightweight” simulators, have benefits such as flexible technology and economic feasibility. In this article, we extend the notion of a game-based simulator by introducing multiple screen view and physical interaction. These features are expected to enhance immersion and fidelity. By utilizing these concepts we have constructed a training simulator for breathing apparatus entry. Game hardware and software have been used to produce the application. More important, the application itself is deliberately designed to be a game. Indeed, one important design goal is to create an entertaining and motivating experience combined with learning goals in order to create a serious game. The system has been evaluated in cooperation with the Swedish Rescue Services Agency to see which architectural features contribute to perceived fidelity. The modes of visualization and interaction as well as level design contribute to the usefulness of the system.

  15. Theories and models about learning in connected and ubiquitous environments. Bases for a new theoretical model from a critical vision of “connectivism”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel ZAPATA-ROS

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at setting the bases for the construction of a theoretical model of learning and of elaboration of knowledge, within connected learning environments. The starting point is a critical view of connectivism, and a premise: the study and recognition of existing theories, since their scope is still under development as regards their potentialities and affordances when applied in social, ubiquitous environments. The paper also includes reflections and a hypothesis on the causes that underlie in the origin of connectivism in its actual stage of development in the Information and Knowledge Society, in order to use the obtained conclusions as the bases of a new model, at a later phase.

  16. A Context-Aware Knowledge Map to Support Ubiquitous Learning Activities for a u-Botanical Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Lin; Chen, Chia-Chen; Zhang, Zhe George

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in mobile and wireless communication technologies have played a vital role in building the u-learning environment that now combines both real-world and digital learning resources. However, learners still require assistance to control real objects and manage the abundance of available materials; otherwise, their mental workload…

  17. Embedding Moodle into Ubiquitous Computing Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glahn, Christian; Specht, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    Glahn, C., & Specht, M. (2010). Embedding Moodle into Ubiquitous Computing Environments. In M. Montebello, et al. (Eds.), 9th World Conference on Mobile and Contextual Learning (MLearn2010) (pp. 100-107). October, 19-22, 2010, Valletta, Malta.

  18. CILT2000: Ubiquitous Computing--Spanning the Digital Divide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, Robert; Vahey, Philip

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the role of ubiquitous and handheld computers in education. Summarizes the contributions of the Center for Innovative Learning Technologies (CILT) and describes the ubiquitous computing sessions at the CILT2000 Conference. (Author/YDS)

  19. Making Games Not Work: Paradoxes Embedded in Game-Based Training and Concepts for Overcoming Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Phillip N.; Cuper, Taryn

    2010-01-01

    An interest in game-based training solutions is natural. All one has to do is watch someone fully engaged in a modern game to see the potential of harnessing that attention for training. However, the reality of game-based training has not fully satisfied these expectations. This paper explains two paradoxes that must be overcome for games to support training. These paradoxes are a result of the realities of the basic human condition clashing with the requirements of learning theory. 80th paradoxes arise from the concept of "engagement" that is central to games. The first comes from a more robust definition of engagement, which is the condition of Flow or Optimal Experience. Flow is the state game developers want to see in users. One aspect of Flow is loss of sense of self as the individual becomes immersed in the experience. The paradox arises because this loss of self directly contradicts the learning requirement of self-reflection. The second paradox comes from theories of play, which state in part that play requires a level of individual freedom. The contradiction arises when game-based play must be harnessed to an organizational training program or regimen. The paper will discuss these paradoxes in the context of an effort to design a game-based training modality to train combat medics and will close with a review of compensating strategies identified by the designers. The paper will provide information important to anyone interested in conceptualizing and designing game-based training.

  20. Ubiquitous human computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zittrain, Jonathan

    2008-10-28

    Ubiquitous computing means network connectivity everywhere, linking devices and systems as small as a drawing pin and as large as a worldwide product distribution chain. What could happen when people are so readily networked? This paper explores issues arising from two possible emerging models of ubiquitous human computing: fungible networked brainpower and collective personal vital sign monitoring.

  1. Game-based training environment for nuclear plant control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung Tamin; Sun Tienlung; Yang Chihwei; Yang Lichen; Cheng Tsungchieh; Wang Jyhgang

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear power plant's safety is very important problem. In this very conscientious environment if operator has a little mistake, they may threaten with many people influence their safety. Therefore, operating training of control room is very important. However, the operator training is in limited space and time. Each operator must go to simulative control room do some training. If we can let each trainee having more time to do training and does not go to simulative control room. It may have some advantages for trainee. Moreover, in the traditional training ways, each operator may through the video, teaching manual or through the experienced instructor to learn the knowledge. This training way may let operator feel bored and stressful. So, in this paper aims, we hope utilizing virtual reality technology developing a game-based virtual training environment of control room. Finally, we will use presence questionnaire evaluating realism and feasibility of our virtual training environment. Expecting this initial concept of game-based virtual training environment can attract trainees having more learning motivation to do training in off-hour. (author)

  2. The Effects of Participation, Performance, and Interest in a Game-Based Writing Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Calvin C. Y.; Chang, Wan-Chen; Chan, Tak-Wai

    2018-01-01

    We have observed that many computer-supported writing environments based on pedagogical strategies have only been designed to incorporate the cognitive aspects, but motivational aspects should also be included. Hence, we theorize that integrating game-based learning into the writing environment may be a practical approach that can facilitate…

  3. Computer game-based mathematics education : Embedded faded worked examples facilitate knowledge acquisition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Vrugte, Judith; de Jong, Anthonius J.M.; Vandercruysse, Sylke; Wouters, Pieter; van Oostendorp, Herre; Elen, Jan

    This study addresses the added value of faded worked examples in a computer game-based learning environment. The faded worked examples were introduced to encourage active selection and processing of domain content in the game. The content of the game was proportional reasoning and participants were

  4. How competition and heterogeneous collaboration interact in prevocational game-based mathematics education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Vrugte, Judith; de Jong, Anthonius J.M.; Vandercruysse, Sylke; Wouters, Pieter; van Oostendorp, Herre; Elen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The present study addresses the effectiveness of an educational mathematics game for improving proportional reasoning in students from prevocational education. Though in theory game-based learning is promising, research shows that results are ambiguous and that we should look into ways to support

  5. A Game-Based Approach to an Entire Physical Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daubenfeld, Thorsten; Zenker, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    We designed, implemented, and evaluated a game-based learning approach to increase student motivation and achievement for an undergraduate physical chemistry course. By focusing only on the most important game aspects, the implementation was realized with a production ratio of 1:8 (study load in hours divided by production effort in hours).…

  6. Laying the Foundations for Video-Game Based Language Instruction for the Teaching of EFL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvis, Héctor Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces video-game based language instruction as a teaching approach catering to the different socio-economic and learning needs of English as a Foreign Language students. First, this paper reviews statistical data revealing the low participation of Colombian students in English as a second language programs abroad (U.S. context…

  7. Laying the Foundations for Video-Game Based Language Instruction for the Teaching of EFL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Alejandro Galvis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces video-game based language instruction as a teaching approach catering to the different socio-economic and learning needs of English as a Foreign Language students. First, this paper reviews statistical data revealing the low participation of Colombian students in English as a second language programs abroad (U.S. context especially. This paper also provides solid reasons why the use of video games in education and foreign language education is justified. Additionally, this paper reviews second language acquisition theoretical foundations that provide the rationale for adapting video-game based language instruction in light of important second language acquisition constructs such as culture and identity, among others. Finally, this document provides options for further research to construct and test the efficacy of video-game based language instruction while simultaneously leaving it open for collaborative contributions.

  8. Ubiquitous Annotation Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Frank Allan

    2006-01-01

    Ubiquitous annotation systems allow users to annotate physical places, objects, and persons with digital information. Especially in the field of location based information systems much work has been done to implement adaptive and context-aware systems, but few efforts have focused on the general...... requirements for linking information to objects in both physical and digital space. This paper surveys annotation techniques from open hypermedia systems, Web based annotation systems, and mobile and augmented reality systems to illustrate different approaches to four central challenges ubiquitous annotation...... systems have to deal with: anchoring, structuring, presentation, and authoring. Through a number of examples each challenge is discussed and HyCon, a context-aware hypermedia framework developed at the University of Aarhus, Denmark, is used to illustrate an integrated approach to ubiquitous annotations...

  9. Fidelity and game-based technology in management education

    OpenAIRE

    Cornacchione Jr.,Edgard B.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores educational technology and management education by analyzing fidelity in game-based management education interventions. A sample of 31 MBA students was selected to help answer the research question: To what extent do MBA students tend to recognize specific game-based academic experiences, in terms of fidelity, as relevant to their managerial performance? Two distinct game-based interventions (BG1 and BG2) with key differences in fidelity levels were explored: BG1 presented...

  10. Game-based verification and synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester, Steen

    and the environment behaves. Synthesis of strategies in games can thus be used for automatic generation of correct-by-construction programs from specifications. We consider verification and synthesis problems for several well-known game-based models. This includes both model-checking problems and satisfiability...... can be extended to solve finitely-branching turn-based games more efficiently. Further, the novel concept of winning cores in parity games is introduced. We use this to develop a new polynomial-time under-approximation algorithm for solving parity games. Experimental results show that this algorithm...... corresponds directly to a program for the corresponding entity of the system. A strategy for a player which ensures that the player wins no matter how the other players behave then corresponds to a program ensuring that the specification of the entity is satisfied no matter how the other entities...

  11. A SURVEY ON UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Meshram

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a survey of ubiquitous computing research which is the emerging domain that implements communication technologies into day-to-day life activities. This research paper provides a classification of the research areas on the ubiquitous computing paradigm. In this paper, we present common architecture principles of ubiquitous systems and analyze important aspects in context-aware ubiquitous systems. In addition, this research work presents a novel architecture of ubiquitous computing system and a survey of sensors needed for applications in ubiquitous computing. The goals of this research work are three-fold: i serve as a guideline for researchers who are new to ubiquitous computing and want to contribute to this research area, ii provide a novel system architecture for ubiquitous computing system, and iii provides further research directions required into quality-of-service assurance of ubiquitous computing.

  12. Ubiquitous Computing Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Friday, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    . While such growth is positive, the newest generation of ubicomp practitioners and researchers, isolated to specific tasks, are in danger of losing their sense of history and the broader perspective that has been so essential to the field’s creativity and brilliance. Under the guidance of John Krumm...... applications Privacy protection in systems that connect personal devices and personal information Moving from the graphical to the ubiquitous computing user interface Techniques that are revolutionizing the way we determine a person’s location and understand other sensor measurements While we needn’t become...

  13. Game-based online antenatal breastfeeding education: A pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassley, Jane S; Connor, Kelley C; Bond, Laura

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the Healthy Moms intervention on antenatal breastfeeding self-efficacy and intention and to determine the feasibility of using an online game-based learning platform to deliver antenatal breastfeeding education. The Internet has potential for improving breastfeeding rates through improving women's access to antenatal breastfeeding education. Twelve computer-based breastfeeding education modules were developed using an online learning platform. Changes in participants' breastfeeding self-efficacy and intention pre- and post-intervention were measured using descriptive statistics and a one-way ANOVA. Of the 25 women submitting the pretest, four completed zero quests; seven, orientation only; eight, one to six breastfeeding quests; and six, 10 to 12 breastfeeding quests. No significant differences in breastfeeding self-efficacy and intention were found among the groups. Online antenatal breastfeeding education is feasible; however, further research is warranted to determine if it can affect breastfeeding outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ubiquitous Network Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian USCATU

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Technology is evolving faster than ever in the ITC domain. Computing devices become smaller and more powerful by the day (and cheaper than ever. They have started to move away from the classical “computer” towards portable devices like personal digital assistants (PDAs and mobile phones. Even these devices are no longer what they used to be. A phone is no longer a simple voice communication device, but a minicomputer with lots of functions. The addition of wireless communication protocols, like WiFi and Bluetooth, leads to a web of interconnected devices with the final purpose of enabling us to access desired services anywhere, at any time. Adding less complicated devices, as sensors and detectors, located everywhere (clothes, cars, furniture, home appliances etc. but connected to the same global network, we have a technological world aware of itself and aware of us, ready to serve our needs without hindering our lives. “Ubiquitous computing names the third wave in computing, just now beginning. First were mainframes, each shared by lots of people. Now we are in the personal computing era, person and machine staring uneasily at each other across the desktop. Next comes ubiquitous computing, or the age of calm technology, when technology recedes into the background of our lives.” [Weiser, 1995

  15. Usual and Virtual Reality Video Game-Based Physiotherapy for Children and Youth with Acquired Brain Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levac, Danielle; Miller, Patricia; Missiuna, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about how therapists promote learning of functional motor skills for children with acquired brain injuries. This study explores physiotherapists' description of these interventions in comparison to virtual reality (VR) video game-based therapy. Six physiotherapists employed at a children's rehabilitation center participated in…

  16. Play and Learn: Potentials of Game-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivec, Maja

    2008-01-01

    Learners are encouraged to combine knowledge from different areas to choose a solution or to make a decision at acertain point. Learners can test how the outcome of the game changes based on their decisions and actions. Learners are encouraged to contact other team members and discuss and negotiate subsequent steps, thus improving their social skills.

  17. Programmable ubiquitous telerobotic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Michael; Greene, Matthew; Keaton, David; Och, Christian; Seidl, Matthew L.; Waite, William; Zorn, Benjamin G.

    1997-12-01

    We are investigating a field of research that we call ubiquitous telepresence, which involves the design and implementation of low-cost robotic devices that can be programmed and operated from anywhere on the Internet. These devices, which we call ubots, can be used for academic purposes (e.g., a biologist could remote conduct a population survey), commercial purposes (e.g., a house could be shown remotely by a real-estate agent), and for recreation and education (e.g., someone could tour a museum remotely). We anticipate that such devices will become increasingly common due to recent changes in hardware and software technology. In particular, current hardware technology enables such devices to be constructed very cheaply (less than $500), and current software and network technology allows highly portable code to be written and downloaded across the Internet. In this paper, we present our prototype system architecture, and the ubot implementation we have constructed based on it. The hardware technology we use is the handy board, a 6811-based controller board with digital and analog inputs and outputs. Our software includes a network layer based on TCP/IP and software layers written in Java. Our software enables users across the Internet to program the behavior of the vehicle and to receive image feedback from a camera mounted on it.

  18. Equilibrium: An Investigative Game Based On Biomedical Evidences Of Crimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. L. Santos

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Investigation and laboratory analyses are the major working areas of graduates from Biomedicine. Studying and recognizing medical symptoms, developing and interpreti ng clinical exams are some of the desired routines of these young students to their future professional lives. Recent TV series about hospitals daily work and challenges, criminal investigations and modern techniques of scientists from intelligence agencies bring out fantasies of job (impossibilities. But also, it creates a desire for more study so as to reach the characters brilliance. Based on these interests, we prepared a game based on the classic Scotland Yard®game, which is developed over the resolv ing of crimes. In our version of the game, which was called Equilibrium, the clues hidden on specific sites of the game board are not the common ones, but clinical results or objects that can be related to the medical cause of the death. One can also reach the laboratory on the board and get specific exams to help solving the mystery. The game was developed after a whole semester of Basic Biochemistry classes and was used by the professor as a method of testing students learnings.Developing this showed ho w much the ludic activities can enhance students’ experience with biochemistry and its relation to physiology, pathology and other areas. This game was presented to a Biomedicine class and a board ofbiochemistry teachers of our college. All the spectatorsacknowledged the usefulness of this tool to the teaching -learning process in medical biochemistry.

  19. Game-based programming towards developing algorithmic thinking skills in primary education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hariklia Tsalapatas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents cMinds, a learning intervention that deploys game-based visual programming towards building analytical, computational, and critical thinking skills in primary education. The proposed learning method exploits the structured nature of programming, which is inherently logical and transcends cultural barriers, towards inclusive learning that exposes learners to algorithmic thinking. A visual programming environment, entitled ‘cMinds Learning Suite’, has been developed aimed for classroom use. Feedback from the deployment of the learning methods and tools in classrooms in several European countries demonstrates elevated learner motivation for engaging in logical learning activities, fostering of creativity and an entrepreneurial spirit, and promotion of problem-solving capacity

  20. LifeChanger: A Pilot Study of a Game-Based Curriculum for Sexuality Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliam, Melissa; Jagoda, Patrick; Heathcock, Stephen; Orzalli, Sarah; Saper, Carolyn; Dudley, Jessyca; Wilson, Claire

    2016-04-01

    To assess the feasibility and acceptability of a game-based sexuality education curriculum. Curriculum evaluation used descriptive statistics, observation, and qualitative and quantitative data collection. The study was conducted in eighth grade classrooms in Chicago, Illinois. Students from 3 eighth grade classrooms from a school using a game-based curriculum. The intervention had 11 modules and used an ecological model informed by the extant literature. The intervention was developed by the Game Changer Chicago Design Lab and featured a card game designed with youth participation. The study outcomes of interest included learning, feasibility, and acceptability of the curriculum. Students highly rated frank conversation via "Ask the Doctor" sessions and role-playing. Students raised concerns about the breadth of activities, preferring to explore fewer topics in greater depth. A game-based curriculum was feasible, yet students placed the highest value on frank discussion about sexuality. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Helping Children Actively Design How They Learn about Health and Wellness: The Institute of Play Tests an Online Social Networking Tool within a Game-Based School Curriculum. Program Results Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Youth rarely receive opportunities to craft their own strategies around health and wellness within contexts relevant to them. From 2009 to 2010, the Institute of Play, based in New York, developed Being Me, a social networking site, to enable sixth-graders at the Quest to Learn public school to explore, discover and document a range of ideas…

  2. Digital Game-Based Learning (DGBL) in the L2 Classroom: The Impact of the UN's Off-the-Shelf Videogame, Food Force, on Learner Affect and Vocabulary Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitosugi, Claire Ikumi; Schmidt, Matthew; Hayashi, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    This mixed-method study explored the impact of "Food Force (FF)", a UN-sponsored off-the-shelf videogame, on learner affect and vocabulary learning and retention in a Japanese as a second/foreign language classroom. The videogame was integrated into an existing curriculum and two studies were performed. In Study 1 (n = 9), new vocabulary…

  3. Ubiquitous Computing, Complexity and Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    environments, experience time, and develop identities individually and socially. Interviews with working media artists lend further perspectives on these cultural transformations. Drawing on cultural theory, new media art studies, human-computer interaction theory, and software studies, this cutting-edge book......The ubiquitous nature of mobile and pervasive computing has begun to reshape and complicate our notions of space, time, and identity. In this collection, over thirty internationally recognized contributors reflect on ubiquitous computing’s implications for the ways in which we interact with our...... critically unpacks the complex ubiquity-effects confronting us every day....

  4. Trust Models in Ubiquitous Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens; Krukow, Karl; Sassone, Vladimiro

    2008-01-01

    We recapture some of the arguments for trust-based technologies in ubiquitous computing, followed by a brief survey of some of the models of trust that have been introduced in this respect. Based on this, we argue for the need of more formal and foundational trust models.......We recapture some of the arguments for trust-based technologies in ubiquitous computing, followed by a brief survey of some of the models of trust that have been introduced in this respect. Based on this, we argue for the need of more formal and foundational trust models....

  5. The Effects of Students' Learning Anxiety and Motivation on the Learning Achievement in the Activity Theory Based Gamified Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chung-Ho

    2017-01-01

    The advancement of mobile game-based learning has encouraged many related studies, which has enabled students to learn more and faster. To enhance the clinical path of cardiac catheterization learning, this paper has developed a mobile 3D-CCGBLS (3D Cardiac Catheterization Game-Based Learning System) with a learning assessment for cardiac…

  6. An Application of Games-Based Learning within Software Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Thomas M.; Stansfield, Mark; Hainey, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    For some time now, computer games have played an important role in both children and adults' leisure activities. While there has been much written on the negative aspects of computer games, it has also been recognised that they have potential advantages and benefits. There is no doubt that computer games are highly engaging and incorporate…

  7. Game-based Learning im Bildungskontext einer Hochschule. Ein Praxisbericht

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Pfannstiel

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Das Fach Software-Engineering stellt Lernende und Lehrende gleichermassen vor eine grosse Herausforderung, da eine Vielzahl von abstrakten Methoden und Modellen zu erlernen sind. An der Hochschule Offenburg wurde das Lernspiel «Software Engineering in the Future» als Ergänzung zur Präsenzveranstaltung entwickelt. Die Studierenden sollen über das Lernspiel motiviert werden, sich mit der Thematik zu befassen, um dann in ansprechend gestalteten authentischen Szenarien einzelne Methoden zu erlernen und zu vertiefen. Der Artikel stellt die zentralen Aspekte der Spielentwicklung und Ergebnisse einer ersten Befragung der Studierenden vor.

  8. Gender and Cultural Differences in Game-Based Learning Experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukosch, H.K.; Kurapati, S.; Groen, D; Verbraeck, A.

    2017-01-01

    Games have been successfully used in educational settings for many years. Still, it is not known in detail which factors influence the use and effectiveness of educational games. The game environment, its technology, and other game mechanics are factors directly linked to the game itself. The

  9. Impact of Game-Based Training on Classroom Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Erwin, 2000). Several studies support the notion that GBT increases learners’ motivation. Massively multiple online role-playing games ( MMORPGs ) are...synthetic arenas where players interact, collaborate, and strategize with others. The nature of MMORPGs challenges players to think critically and...online role-playing games ( MMORPGs ) foster intrinsic motivation. Educational Technology Research and Development, 55, 253-273. Dondi, C., & Moretti

  10. Preparing Instructional Designers for Game-Based Learning: Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirumi, Atsusi; Appelman, Bob; Rieber, Lloyd; Van Eck, Richard

    2010-01-01

    As noted in part I of this article (published in "TechTrends 54"(3)), advances in technology continue to outpace research on the design and effectiveness of instructional (digital video) games. In general, instructional designers know little about game development, commercial video game developers know little about training, education and…

  11. Gender and Cultural Differences in Game-Based Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukosch, Heide; Kurapati, Shalini; Groen, Daan; Verbraeck, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Games have been successfully used in educational settings for many years. Still, it is not known in detail which factors influence the use and effectiveness of educational games. The game environment, its technology, and other game mechanics are factors directly linked to the game itself. The player's experience with the subject of the game and/or…

  12. Effectiveness of Game-Based Learning: Influence of Cognitive Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanović, Miloš; Minović, Miroslav; Kovačević, Ivana; Minović, Jelena; Starčević, Dušan

    Today students have grown up using devices like computers, mobile phones, and video consoles for almost any activity; from studies and work to entertainment or communication. Motivating them with traditional teaching methods such as lectures and written materials becomes more difficult daily. That is why digital games are becoming more and more considered to have a promising role in education process. We decided to conduct a study among university students. Purpose of that study was to try to find some empirical evidence to support the claim that educational games can be used as an effective form of teaching. We also invested an effort to measure effects of different teaching approaches with the respect of individual differences in cognitive styles. Initial results provide a good argument for use of educational games in teaching. In addition, we reported some influence of cognitive style on effectiveness of using educational games.

  13. Ubiquitous media for collocated interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Ann; Jacucci, Giulio; Peltonen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Has ubiquitous computing entered our lives as anticipated in the early 90s or at the turn of the millennium? In this last decade, the processing of media combined with sensing and communication capabilities has been slowly entering our lives through powerful smartphones, multimodal game consoles,...

  14. International Symposium on Ubiquitous Networking

    CERN Document Server

    Medromi, Hicham; Sadik, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    This volume publishes new trends and findings in hot topics related to ubiquitous computing/networking. It is the outcome of UNet - ainternational scientific event that took place on September 08-10, 2015, in the fascinating city of Casablanca, Morocco. UNet’15 is technically sponsored by IEEE Morocco Section and IEEE COMSOC Morocco Chapter.

  15. Trust models in ubiquitous computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukow, Karl; Nielsen, Mogens; Sassone, Vladimiro

    2008-10-28

    We recapture some of the arguments for trust-based technologies in ubiquitous computing, followed by a brief survey of some of the models of trust that have been introduced in this respect. Based on this, we argue for the need of more formal and foundational trust models.

  16. Ubiquitous emotion-aware computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon

    Emotions are a crucial element for personal and ubiquitous computing. What to sense and how to sense it, however, remain a challenge. This study explores the rare combination of speech, electrocardiogram, and a revised Self-Assessment Mannequin to assess people’s emotions. 40 people watched 30

  17. Ubiquitous health in practice: the interreality paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaggioli, Andrea; Raspelli, Simona; Grassi, Alessandra; Pallavicini, Federica; Cipresso, Pietro; Wiederhold, Brenda K; Riva, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new ubiquitous computing paradigm for behavioral health care: "Interreality". Interreality integrates assessment and treatment within a hybrid environment, that creates a bridge between the physical and virtual worlds. Our claim is that bridging virtual experiences (fully controlled by the therapist, used to learn coping skills and emotional regulation) with real experiences (allowing both the identification of any critical stressors and the assessment of what has been learned) using advanced technologies (virtual worlds, advanced sensors and PDA/mobile phones) may improve existing psychological treatment. To illustrate the proposed concept, a clinical scenario is also presented and discussed: Daniela, a 40 years old teacher, with a mother affected by Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Testing Game-Based Performance in Team-Handball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Herbert; Orwat, Matthias; Hinz, Matthias; Pfusterschmied, Jürgen; Bacharach, David W; von Duvillard, Serge P; Müller, Erich

    2016-10-01

    Wagner, H, Orwat, M, Hinz, M, Pfusterschmied, J, Bacharach, DW, von Duvillard, SP, and Müller, E. Testing game-based performance in team-handball. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2794-2801, 2016-Team-handball is a fast paced game of defensive and offensive action that includes specific movements of jumping, passing, throwing, checking, and screening. To date and to the best of our knowledge, a game-based performance test (GBPT) for team-handball does not exist. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop and validate such a test. Seventeen experienced team-handball players performed 2 GBPTs separated by 7 days between each test, an incremental treadmill running test, and a team-handball test game (TG) (2 × 20 minutes). Peak oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak), blood lactate concentration (BLC), heart rate (HR), sprinting time, time of offensive and defensive actions as well as running intensities, ball velocity, and jump height were measured in the game-based test. Reliability of the tests was calculated using an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Additionally, we measured V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak in the incremental treadmill running test and BLC, HR, and running intensities in the team-handball TG to determine the validity of the GBPT. For the test-retest reliability, we found an ICC >0.70 for the peak BLC and HR, mean offense and defense time, as well as ball velocity that yielded an ICC >0.90 for the V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak in the GBPT. Percent walking and standing constituted 73% of total time. Moderate (18%) and high (9%) intensity running in the GBPT was similar to the team-handball TG. Our results indicated that the GBPT is a valid and reliable test to analyze team-handball performance (physiological and biomechanical variables) under conditions similar to competition.

  19. Game-based Research Collaboration adapted to Science Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke; Damgaard Hansen, Sidse; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents prospects for adapting scientific discovery games to science education. In the paper a prototype of The Quantum Computing Game is presented as a working example of adapting game-based research collaboration to physics education. The game concept is the initial result of a three......-year, inter-disciplinary project “Pilot Center for Community-driven Research” at Aarhus and Aalborg University in Denmark. The paper discusses how scientific discovery games can contribute to educating students in how to work with unsolved scientific problems and creation of new scientific knowledge. Based...

  20. Ubiquitous Versus One-to-One

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAnear, Anita

    2006-01-01

    When we planned the editorial calendar with the topic ubiquitous computing, we were thinking of ubiquitous computing as the one-to-one ratio of computers to students and teachers and 24/7 access to electronic resources. At the time, we were aware that ubiquitous computing in the computer science field had more to do with wearable computers. Our…

  1. HCI in Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing

    OpenAIRE

    椎尾, 一郎; 安村, 通晃; 福本, 雅明; 伊賀, 聡一郎; 増井, 俊之

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides some perspectives to human computer interaction in mobile and ubiquitous computing. The review covers overview of ubiquitous computing, mobile computing and wearable computing. It also summarizes HCI topics on these field, including real-world oriented interface, multi-modal interface, context awareness and in-visible computers. Finally we discuss killer applications for coming ubiquitous computing era.

  2. Ubiquitous Multicriteria Clinic Recommendation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Toly

    2016-05-01

    Advancements in information, communication, and sensor technologies have led to new opportunities in medical care and education. Patients in general prefer visiting the nearest clinic, attempt to avoid waiting for treatment, and have unequal preferences for different clinics and doctors. Therefore, to enable patients to compare multiple clinics, this study proposes a ubiquitous multicriteria clinic recommendation system. In this system, patients can send requests through their cell phones to the system server to obtain a clinic recommendation. Once the patient sends this information to the system, the system server first estimates the patient's speed according to the detection results of a global positioning system. It then applies a fuzzy integer nonlinear programming-ordered weighted average approach to assess four criteria and finally recommends a clinic with maximal utility to the patient. The proposed methodology was tested in a field experiment, and the experimental results showed that it is advantageous over two existing methods in elevating the utilities of recommendations. In addition, such an advantage was shown to be statistically significant.

  3. Game-Based Rehabilitation for Myoelectric Prosthesis Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahm, Cosima; Vujaklija, Ivan; Kayali, Fares; Purgathofer, Peter; Aszmann, Oskar C

    2017-02-09

    A high number of upper extremity myoelectric prosthesis users abandon their devices due to difficulties in prosthesis control and lack of motivation to train in absence of a physiotherapist. Virtual training systems, in the form of video games, provide patients with an entertaining and intuitive method for improved muscle coordination and improved overall control. Complementary to established rehabilitation protocols, it is highly beneficial for this virtual training process to start even before receiving the final prosthesis, and to be continued at home for as long as needed. The aim of this study is to evaluate (1) the short-term effects of a commercially available electromyographic (EMG) system on controllability after a simple video game-based rehabilitation protocol, and (2) different input methods, control mechanisms, and games. Eleven able-bodied participants with no prior experience in EMG control took part in this study. Participants were asked to perform a surface EMG test evaluating their provisional maximum muscle contraction, fine accuracy and isolation of electrode activation, and endurance control over at least 300 seconds. These assessments were carried out (1) in a Pregaming session before interacting with three EMG-controlled computer games, (2) in a Postgaming session after playing the games, and (3) in a Follow-Up session two days after the gaming protocol to evaluate short-term retention rate. After each game, participants were given a user evaluation survey for the assessment of the games and their input mechanisms. Participants also received a questionnaire regarding their intrinsic motivation (Intrinsic Motivation Inventory) at the end of the last game. Results showed a significant improvement in fine accuracy electrode activation (Pgames when collecting items and facing challenging game play. Most upper limb amputees use a 2-channel myoelectric prosthesis control. This study demonstrates that this control can be effectively trained by

  4. Ubiquitous Computing Technologies in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Wu, Ting-Ting; Chen, Yen-Jung

    2007-01-01

    The prosperous development of wireless communication and sensor technologies has attracted the attention of researchers from both computer and education fields. Various investigations have been made for applying the new technologies to education purposes, such that more active and adaptive learning activities can be conducted in the real world.…

  5. Ubiquitous Technology for Lifelong Learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabuenca, Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, most people change their career throughout their lives, many times independently on what they learned during their formal education period. Therefore, the necessity to continually keep our skills sharp and up-to-date becomes increasingly important in a rapidly changing job market. The

  6. The Synergy of Paper-Based and Digital Material for Ubiquitous Foreign Language Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Leone

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the development of digital information transfer, storage and communication methods has allowed for access to ubiquitous global connections and to a large number of resources available to foreign language students at all age and levels of schooling. Further, the combination of traditional paper-based learning material with digital one in a ubiquitous learning environment may offer great innovation in the delivery of education, to foster a student-centred approach, and to accommodate the needs of ubiquitous learners’ personal lifestyles. In this direction, research has increasingly emphasised the importance of a technology-enhanced rather than technology-driven learning approach. This paper aims to evaluate the effectiveness of the integration of paper-based and digital material through Quick Response (QR code for ubiquitous English language learners in three different scenarios. Results show that, despite some difficulties, flexibility and personalisation of learning have been perceived as an asset.

  7. Game-Based Virtual Worlds as Decentralized Virtual Activity Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scacchi, Walt

    There is widespread interest in the development and use of decentralized systems and virtual world environments as possible new places for engaging in collaborative work activities. Similarly, there is widespread interest in stimulating new technological innovations that enable people to come together through social networking, file/media sharing, and networked multi-player computer game play. A decentralized virtual activity system (DVAS) is a networked computer supported work/play system whose elements and social activities can be both virtual and decentralized (Scacchi et al. 2008b). Massively multi-player online games (MMOGs) such as World of Warcraft and online virtual worlds such as Second Life are each popular examples of a DVAS. Furthermore, these systems are beginning to be used for research, deve-lopment, and education activities in different science, technology, and engineering domains (Bainbridge 2007, Bohannon et al. 2009; Rieber 2005; Scacchi and Adams 2007; Shaffer 2006), which are also of interest here. This chapter explores two case studies of DVASs developed at the University of California at Irvine that employ game-based virtual worlds to support collaborative work/play activities in different settings. The settings include those that model and simulate practical or imaginative physical worlds in different domains of science, technology, or engineering through alternative virtual worlds where players/workers engage in different kinds of quests or quest-like workflows (Jakobsson 2006).

  8. Privacy-related context information for ubiquitous health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppälä, Antto; Nykänen, Pirkko; Ruotsalainen, Pekka

    2014-03-11

    are regulated or in what kind of environment data can be processed. This study added to the vision of ubiquitous health by analyzing information processing from the viewpoint of an individual's privacy. We learned that health and wellness-related activities may happen in several environments and situations with multiple stakeholders, services, and systems. We have provided new knowledge regarding privacy-related context information and corresponding components by analyzing typical activities in ubiquitous health. With the identified components and their properties, individuals can define their personal preferences on information processing based on situational information, and privacy services can capture privacy-related context of the information-processing situation.

  9. Privacy-Related Context Information for Ubiquitous Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykänen, Pirkko; Ruotsalainen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    data can be processed or how components are regulated or in what kind of environment data can be processed. Conclusions This study added to the vision of ubiquitous health by analyzing information processing from the viewpoint of an individual’s privacy. We learned that health and wellness-related activities may happen in several environments and situations with multiple stakeholders, services, and systems. We have provided new knowledge regarding privacy-related context information and corresponding components by analyzing typical activities in ubiquitous health. With the identified components and their properties, individuals can define their personal preferences on information processing based on situational information, and privacy services can capture privacy-related context of the information-processing situation. PMID:25100084

  10. Usual and virtual reality video game-based physiotherapy for children and youth with acquired brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levac, Danielle; Miller, Patricia; Missiuna, Cheryl

    2012-05-01

    Little is known about how therapists promote learning of functional motor skills for children with acquired brain injuries. This study explores physiotherapists' description of these interventions in comparison to virtual reality (VR) video game-based therapy. Six physiotherapists employed at a children's rehabilitation center participated in semi-structured interviews, which were transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis. Physiotherapists describe using interventions that motivate children to challenge performance quality and optimize real-life functioning. Intervention strategies are influenced by characteristics of the child, parent availability to practice skills outside therapy, and therapist experience. VR use motivates children to participate, but can influence therapist use of verbal strategies and complicate interventions. Physiotherapists consider unique characteristics of this population when providing interventions that promote learning of motor skills. The VR technology has advantageous features but its use with this population can be challenging; further research is recommended.

  11. A ubiquitous reflective e-portfolio architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Marcos; de Souza, Wanderley L; da Silva, Roseli F; do Prado, Antonio F; Rodrigues, Jose F

    2013-11-01

    In nurse and in medicine courses, the use of reflective portfolios as a pedagogical tool is becoming a common practice; in the last years, this practice has gradually migrated from paper-based to electronic-based portfolios. Current approaches for reflective e-portfolios, however, do not widely operate at outdoor sites, where data networks are limited or nonexistent. Considering that many of the activities related to nurse and medicine courses relate to professional practices conducted in such conditions, these network shortcomings restrict the adoption of e-portfolios. The present study describes the requirements specification, design, implementation, and evaluation of the Ubiquitous Reflective E-Portfolio Architecture, a solution proposed to support the development of systems based on mobile and wired access for both online and offline operation. We have implemented a prototype named Professional Practice Module to evaluate the Ubiquitous Reflective E-Portfolio Architecture; the module was based on requirements observed during the professional practice, the paper-based portfolio in use, and related learning meetings in the Medicine Course of a Brazilian University. The evaluation of the system was carried out with a learning group of 2nd year students of the medicine course, who answered to extensive evaluation questionnaires. The prototype proved to be operational in the activities of the professional practice of the Medicine Course object of the study, including homework tasks, patient care, data sharing, and learning meetings. It also demonstrated to be versatile with respect to the availability of the computer network that, many times, was not accessible. Moreover, the students considered the module useful and easy to use, but pointed out difficulties about the keyboard and the display sizes of the netbook devices, and about their operational system. Lastly, most of the students declared preference for the electronic Professional Practice Module in internal

  12. Digital Game-Based Textbook vs. Traditional Print-Based Textbook: The Effect of Textbook Format on College Students' Engagement with Textbook Content outside of the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Antonio Lamar

    2017-01-01

    The relatively little amount of time that some college students spend reading their textbooks outside of the classroom presents a significant threat to their academic success. Using Prenksy's (2001) digital game-based learning (DGBL) principles and Astin's student involvement theory as frameworks, the purpose of this true experiment was to…

  13. Multimedia and ubiquitous engineering MUE 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Ng, Joseph; Jeong, Hwa; Waluyo, Borgy

    2013-01-01

    The new multimedia standards (for example, MPEG-21) facilitate the seamless integration of multiple modalities into interoperable multimedia frameworks, transforming the way people work and interact with multimedia data. These key technologies and multimedia solutions interact and collaborate with each other in increasingly effective ways, contributing to the multimedia revolution and having a significant impact across a wide spectrum of consumer, business, healthcare, education, and governmental domains. Multimedia and Ubiquitous Engineering provides an opportunity for academic and industry professionals to discuss recent progress in the area of multimedia and ubiquitous environment including models and systems, new directions, novel applications associated with the utilization and acceptance of ubiquitous computing devices and systems.

  14. The Effect of Game-Based Interventions in Rehabilitation of Diabetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan; Valentiner, Laura Staun; Petersen, Rikke Juelsgaard

    2016-01-01

    on the effect of game-based interventions on HbA1c, diabetes-related knowledge, and physical outcomes in rehabilitation of diabetes patients. METHODS: We conducted a systematic literature search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, PEDro, Scopus, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, and Psych INFO in October...... 2014 based on a priori defined inclusion criteria: patients with diabetes (type 1 or type 2), game-based interventions, and randomized controlled trials. RESULTS: The database search identified 1,101 potential articles for screening, four of which were eligible for the present systematic review. Game......). No difference was found between game-based interventions and usual care or waiting lists in terms of diabetes-related knowledge (one study). DISCUSSION: PA is important for diabetes management. The present review indicates that game-based interventions are not superior to ordinary PA in controlling HbA1c. Due...

  15. FILTWAM - A Framework for Online Game-based Communication Skills Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bahreini, Kiavash; Nadolski, Rob; Qi, Wen; Westera, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Bahreini, K., Nadolski, R., Qi, W., & Westera, W. (2012, October). FILTWAM - A Framework for Online Game-based Communication Skills Training. Poster presented at reaseach day in Pretoria building at the Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  16. Online, game-based education for melanoma recognition: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maganty, Nishita; Ilyas, Muneeb; Zhang, Nan; Sharma, Amit

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a game-based learning (GBL) intervention, Tapamole, in improving recognition of the features of melanoma (MM) compared to a written education intervention. Tapamole, an online education intervention, was developed using GBL. Participants were voluntarily recruited from the Dermatology waiting room and randomized to three groups: game, pamphlet, and no intervention. Participants completed a pre-intervention survey, post-intervention survey, and test on MM recognition. Clustered binary data equations were used to calculate sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for each group and GEE model with log link was used to compare measures between groups. Sixty participants were recruited. The sensitivity for MM recognition in the game group was 100% compared to 95% for the pamphlet group. The specificity (40.8% vs 53.3%) and accuracy (60.6% vs 67.2%) of the game and pamphlet groups were similar. Participants in the game group reported higher enjoyment than those in the pamphlet group. GBL was as effective as the written intervention in identifying features of MM. With increasing use of the Internet for health information, it is critical to have effective online education interventions. GBL education tools are effective, enjoyable, and should be used to improve MM patient education. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Teacher Implementation and the Impact of Game-Based Science Curriculum Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Christopher D.; Reichsman, Frieda; Mutch-Jones, Karen; Gardner, April; Marchi, Lisa; Kowalski, Susan; Lord, Trudi; Dorsey, Chad

    2018-01-01

    Research-based digital games hold great potential to be effective tools in supporting next-generation science learning. However, as with all instructional materials, teachers significantly influence their implementation and contribute to their effectiveness. To more fully understand the contributions and challenges of teacher implementation of digital games, we studied the replacement of existing high school biology genetics lessons over a 3- to 6-week period with Geniverse, an immersive, game-like learning environment designed to be used in classrooms. The Geniverse materials infuse virtual experimentation in genetics with a narrative of a quest to heal a genetic disease; incorporate the topics of meiosis and protein synthesis with inheritance; and include the science practices of explanation and argumentation. The research design involved a quasi-experiment with 48 high school teachers and about 2000 students, student science content knowledge and argumentation outcome measures, and analysis using hierarchical linear modeling. Results indicate that when Geniverse was implemented as the designers intended, student learning of genetics content was significantly greater than in the comparison, business-as-usual group. However, a wide range of levels of Geniverse implementation resulted in no significant difference between the groups as a whole. Students' abilities to engage in scientific explanation and argumentation were greater in the Geniverse group, but these differences were not statistically significant. Observation, survey, and interview data indicate a range of barriers to implementation and teacher instructional decisions that may have influenced student outcomes. Implications for the role of the teacher in the implementation of game-based instructional materials are discussed.

  18. Musical Peddy-Paper: A Collaborative Learning Activity Suported by Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, José Duarte Cardoso; Figueiredo, Mauro Jorge Guerreiro; Amante, Lúcia da Graça Cruz Domingues; Gomes, Cristina Maria Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    Gaming activities are an integral part of the human learning process, in particular for children. Game-based learning focuses on motivation and children's engagement towards learning. Educational game-based activities are becoming effective strategies to enhance the learning process. This paper presents an educational activity focusing to merge…

  19. The Effects of Online Interactive Games on High School Students' Achievement and Motivation in History Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuan-Cheng; Wei, Yu Che; Hung, Jason C.

    2012-01-01

    Many studies demonstrate that Digital Game Based Learning (DGBL) can foster learning effect. The purpose of this study is to survey whether the online game in junior high school students can encourage learning effect in Taiwan's History. So, the research applied Interactive Game-based Learning System (IGLS) to junior high history teaching as an…

  20. Using Learning Games to Meet Learning Objectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Thomas Duus

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the question on how learning games can be used to meet with the different levels in Bloom’s and the SOLO taxonomy, which are commonly used for evaluating the learning outcome of educational activities. The paper discusses the quality of game-based learning outcomes based on a...... on a case study of the learning game 6Styles....

  1. Effects of a Progressive Prompting-Based Educational Game on Second Graders' Mathematics Learning Performance and Behavioral Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai-Hsiang; Chu, Hui-Chun; Chiang, Li-Yu

    2018-01-01

    Game-based learning (GBL) has been proven to be an attractive learning model by many studies; however, scholars have pointed out that the effectiveness of game-based learning could be limited if proper learning strategies are not incorporated. Prompting is a strategy that plays the important role of providing hints and guidance in interactive…

  2. Ubiquitous Information Technologies and Applications CUTE 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Doo-Soon; Jia, Weijia; Yeo, Sang-Soo

    2013-01-01

    This book is for The 7th International Conference on Ubiquitous Information Technologies and Applications (CUTE 2012). Ubiquitous computing will require a new approach to fitting technology to our lives. The advent of new computing devices, and the seamless connectivity between these devices, thanks to diverse wired and wireless networks, are enabling new opportunities for a user to perform his/her operation all the time and everywhere. These seamlessly connected devices are ranging from mobile handset to wearable computers. Also, it is expected that these devices will become so pervasive that they will be embedded in the surrounding physical environment, and transparent and invisible to a user. Such devices, whether carried on by people or embedded into other systems, will constitute a global internetworking infrastructure and likely to provide a new level of openness and dynamics. Ubiquitous computing has as its goal the enhancing computer use by pushing computational services out of conventional desktop in...

  3. Normal Threshold Size of Stimuli in Children Using a Game-Based Visual Field Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanfang; Ali, Zaria; Subramani, Siddharth; Biswas, Susmito; Fenerty, Cecilia; Henson, David B; Aslam, Tariq

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate and explore the ability of novel game-based perimetry to establish normal visual field thresholds in children. One hundred and eighteen children (aged 8.0 ± 2.8 years old) with no history of visual field loss or significant medical history were recruited. Each child had one eye tested using a game-based visual field test 'Caspar's Castle' at four retinal locations 12.7° (N = 118) from fixation. Thresholds were established repeatedly using up/down staircase algorithms with stimuli of varying diameter (luminance 20 cd/m 2 , duration 200 ms, background luminance 10 cd/m 2 ). Relationships between threshold and age were determined along with measures of intra- and intersubject variability. The Game-based visual field test was able to establish threshold estimates in the full range of children tested. Threshold size reduced with increasing age in children. Intrasubject variability and intersubject variability were inversely related to age in children. Normal visual field thresholds were established for specific locations in children using a novel game-based visual field test. These could be used as a foundation for developing a game-based perimetry screening test for children.

  4. Observations on sustainable and ubiquitous healthcare informatics from Florence Nightingale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Helen J; Wright, Graham

    2009-01-01

    As nurses around the world prepare to celebrate the centenary of the death of Florence Nightingale in 2010 this paper reviews her work on using information, especially statistics, to analyze and manage patient care and links that to current developments in informatics. It then examines assistive technologies and how they may impact on nursing practice in the future and links these developments to the writings of Florence Nightingale. The paper concludes by suggesting that in progressing towards sustainable and ubiquitous healthcare informatics we need to study history in order to learn from the lessons of Florence Nightingale and other healthcare pioneers.

  5. Unit and ubiquitous Internet of Things

    CERN Document Server

    Ning, Huansheng

    2013-01-01

    Although the Internet of Things (IoT) will play a key role in the development of next generation information, network, and communication technologies, many are still unclear about what makes IoT different from similar concepts. Answering fundamental questions about IoT architectures and models, Unit and Ubiquitous Internet of Things introduces essential IoT concepts from the perspectives of mapping and interaction between the physical world and the cyber world. It addresses key issues such as strategy and education, particularly around unit and ubiquitous IoT technologies. Supplying a new pers

  6. Attacker Modelling in Ubiquitous Computing Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papini, Davide

    in with our everyday life. This future is visible to everyone nowadays: terms like smartphone, cloud, sensor, network etc. are widely known and used in our everyday life. But what about the security of such systems. Ubiquitous computing devices can be limited in terms of energy, computing power and memory...... attacker remain somehow undened and still under extensive investigation. This Thesis explores the nature of the ubiquitous attacker with a focus on how she interacts with the physical world and it denes a model that captures the abilities of the attacker. Furthermore a quantitative implementation...

  7. Ubiquitous Computing and Changing Pedagogical Possibilities: Representations, Conceptualizations and Uses of Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Karen; Van 'T Hooft, Mark; Kratcoski, Annette; Schenker, Jason

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on preliminary findings from an ongoing study of teaching and learning in a ubiquitous computing classroom. The research employed mixed methods and multiple measures to document changes in teaching and learning that result when teachers and students have access to a variety of digital devices wherever and whenever they need…

  8. Using Formal Game Design Methods to Embed Learning Outcomes into Game Mechanics and Avoid Emergent Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Simon; Grey, David; Gordon, Neil; Purdy, Jon

    2017-01-01

    This paper offers an approach to designing game-based learning experiences inspired by the Mechanics-Dynamics-Aesthetics (MDA) model (Hunicke et al., 2004) and the elemental tetrad model (Schell, 2008) for game design. A case for game based learning as an active and social learning experience is presented including arguments from both teachers and…

  9. Exploring the Role of Relational Practices in Water Governance Using a Game-Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Magnuszewski

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The growing complexity and interdependence of water management processes requires the involvement of multiple stakeholders in water governance. Multi-party collaboration is increasingly vital at both the strategy development and implementation levels. Multi-party collaboration involves a process of joint decision-making among key stakeholders in a problem domain directed towards the future of that domain. However, the common goal is not present from the beginning; rather, the common goal emerges during the process of collaboration. Unfortunately, when the conflicting interests of different actors are at stake, the large majority of environmental multi-party efforts often do not reliably deliver sustainable improvements to policy and/or practice. One of the reasons for this, which has been long established by many case studies, is that social learning with a focus on relational practices is missing. The purpose of this paper is to present the design and initial results of a pilot study that utilized a game-based approach to explore the effects of relational practices on the effectiveness of water governance. This paper verifies the methods used by addressing the following question: are game mechanisms, protocols for facilitation and observation, the recording of decisions and results, and participant surveys adequate to reliably test hypotheses about behavioral decisions related to water governance? We used the “Lords of the Valley” (LOV game, which focuses on the local-level management of a hypothetical river valley involving many stakeholders. We used an observation protocol to collect data on the quality of relational practices and compared this data with the quantitative outcomes achieved by participants in the game. In this pilot study, we ran the game three times with different groups of participants, and here we provide the outcomes within the context of verifying and improving the methods.

  10. Creating ubiquitous intelligent sensing environments (CRUISE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prasad, Neeli R.; Prasad, Ramjee

    2006-01-01

    The recent developments in the research and the technology have brought attention to the wireless sensor networks as one of the key enabling technologies in the next 10 years. Ubiquitous Intelligent Sensing Environments have promising future in supporting the everyday life of the European citizens...

  11. Ubiquitous Computing in Physico-Spatial Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgård, Peter; Eriksson, Eva

    2007-01-01

    Interaction design of pervasive and ubiquitous computing (UC) systems must take into account physico-spatial issues as technology is implemented into our physical surroundings. In this paper we discuss how one conceptual framework for understanding interaction in context, Activity Theory (AT...

  12. Designing for Privacy in Ubiquitous Social Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sapuppo, Antonio; Figueiras, Joao

    2015-01-01

    Improving human communication during face–to–face meetings is nowadays possible by transferring online social networking benefits to the physical world. This is enabled by the ubiquitous social networking services that became available by means of wirelessly interconnected smart devices...

  13. Ubiquitous developments of the digital single market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maciejewski, M.; Porrino, F.; Veenstra, A.F.E. van; Marcus, J.S.; Cave, J.; Huijboom, N.M.; Elixmann, D.; Hillebrand, A.; Schindler, R.; Horvath, V.

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitous solutions providing access from anywhere at any time are a next step for government and commercial services, and are expected to result in lower costs, increased flexibility, and an enhanced user experience. These solutions, based on modern cloud technologies, may facilitate re-use across

  14. Game-based dynamic simulations supporting technical education and training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tore Bjølseth

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Educational games may improve learning by taking advantage of the new knowledge and skills of today’s students obtained from extensive use of interactive games. This paper describes how interactive dynamic simulators of advanced technical systems and phenomena can be shaped and adapted as games and competitions supporting technical education and training. Some selected examples at different educational levels are shown, from vocational training to university level courses. The potential benefit and perceived learning effect of this approach is also described and underpinned from comprehensive user feedback.

  15. Ubiquitous Retailing Innovative Scenario: From the Fixed Point of Sale to the Flexible Ubiquitous Store

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Pantano

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The current advances in information and communications technologies developed new tools for retailers to innovate. In fact, the increasing computing capacity and the advancements in networking systems provided a new ubiquitous scenario that can be adapted for retailing in order to develop innovative shopping environments. The aim of this paper is to deeply understand the emergence of the ubiquitous retailing phenomenon and the possible shift from the physical point of sale to a ubiquitous one, by analysing this radical innovation and the main consequences for frms and market.

  16. Game-based tools to transmit freshwater ecology concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Serra, Hélène; Raimbault, Juste

    2016-01-01

    International audience; There is an increasing expectation on people to be aware and to get involved in the environmental issues that our world is facing. However, expert knowledge is often required to understand most of these issues. One of the challenges in science today lies in explaining complex issues in a simple and understandable way to an unspecialized audience. Games can turn out to be a good medium for scientific vulgarization. Indeed, the first form of learning we all experienced w...

  17. Effects of Using Teams Games Tournaments (TGT) Cooperative Technique for Learning Mathematics in Secondary Schools of Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Abdus; Hossain, Anwar; Rahman, Shahidur

    2015-01-01

    Games-based learning has captured the interest of educationists and industrialists who seek to reveal the characteristics of computer games as perceived by some to be a potentially effective approach for teaching and learning. Despite this interest in using games-based learning, there is a dearth of studies on the context of gaming and education…

  18. Ubiquitous Robotic Technology for Smart Manufacturing System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenshan; Zhu, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Liyu; Qiu, Qiang; Cao, Qixin

    2016-01-01

    As the manufacturing tasks become more individualized and more flexible, the machines in smart factory are required to do variable tasks collaboratively without reprogramming. This paper for the first time discusses the similarity between smart manufacturing systems and the ubiquitous robotic systems and makes an effort on deploying ubiquitous robotic technology to the smart factory. Specifically, a component based framework is proposed in order to enable the communication and cooperation of the heterogeneous robotic devices. Further, compared to the service robotic domain, the smart manufacturing systems are often in larger size. So a hierarchical planning method was implemented to improve the planning efficiency. A test bed of smart factory is developed. It demonstrates that the proposed framework is suitable for industrial domain, and the hierarchical planning method is able to solve large problems intractable with flat methods.

  19. An Instrumental Paradigm for Ubiquitous Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2008-01-01

    will require comprehensive experimental user centred development. Originality/Value -- This research offers a new way of thinking interaction, suited for the dynamism of modern computing. Take away message -- Through a strong foundation in activity theory and ecological psychology a new paradigm for ubiquitous...... shortcomings of some of the restrictive assumptions contemporary graphical user interfaces are built upon. Research approach -- Based on activity theory and ecological psychology a conceptual model for ubiquitous interaction is proposed and iteratively challenged and developed through actual implementation....... Findings/Design -- The project will ultimately shed light on how an understanding of interaction form activity theory and ecological psychology maps to an implementation of a new conceptual model for interaction with technology. Research limitations/Implications -- Implementation of an actual system...

  20. Effects of Video Game-Based Instruction on Writing Achievement and Motivation in Postsecondary Accelerated Degree Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael C.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative experimental posttest-only control group research study was to determine the degree to which differences exist in outcomes between students using a video game-based instruction and students using a traditional non-video game-based instruction in accelerated degree program courses at a 4-year university in Illinois…

  1. Mobile Game Based Learning: Can It Enhance Learning of Marginalized Peer Educators?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anupama; Sharples, Mike

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an investigatory project to pilot an SMS based game to enhance the training of peer educators of MSM (Males having Sex with Males) groups in India. The objective of this research was to increase the efficacy of the MSM peer educators by bridging the gap between the training needs and their real life experiences. An SMS based…

  2. Student Assessment in the Ubiquitously Connected World

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Student cheating on university assessments from entrance exams to finals and from contract cheating on coursework to requesting exam answers using a mobile phone during the exam, has received more and more attention of late. As connection to the Internet becomes ubiquitous and computing and communications technology more embedded in our environment, it is argued that a re-focussing on providing educational opportunities is needed in higher education, rather than chasing the ever-retreating p...

  3. Design of a game-based pre-hospital resuscitation training for first responders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco; Schmitz, Birgit; Biermann, Henning; Klemke, Roland; Ternier, Stefaan; Specht, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Kalz, M., Schmitz, B., Biermann, H., Klemke, R., Ternier, S., & Specht, M. (2013). Design of a game-based pre-hospital resuscitation training for first responders. In A. Holzinger, M. Ziefle, & V. Glavinić (Eds.), SouthCHI 2013, LNCS 7946 (pp. 363-372). Germany: Springer, Heidelberg.

  4. Design and evaluation of a data-driven scenario generation framework for game-based training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, L.; Yin, H.; Cai, W.; Zhong, J.; Lees, M.

    Generating suitable game scenarios that can cater for individual players has become an emerging challenge in procedural content generation. In this paper, we propose a data-driven scenario generation framework for game-based training. An evolutionary scenario generation process is designed with a

  5. Game-Based Assessments: A Promising Way to Create Idiographic Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, A. Adrienne; Engelhard, George, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    "Game-Based Assessments: A Promising Way to Create Idiographic Perspectives" (Adrienne Walker and George Englehard) comments on: "How Task Features Impact Evidence from Assessments Embedded in Simulations and Games" by Russell G. Almond, Yoon Jeon Kim, Gertrudes Velasquez, and Valerie J. Shute. Here, Walker and Englehard write…

  6. Game-Based Evacuation Drill Using Augmented Reality and Head-Mounted Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Junya; Mitsuhara, Hiroyuki; Shishibori, Masami

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Evacuation drills should be more realistic and interactive. Focusing on situational and audio-visual realities and scenario-based interactivity, the authors have developed a game-based evacuation drill (GBED) system that presents augmented reality (AR) materials on tablet computers. The paper's current research purpose is to improve…

  7. A Computer Game-Based Method for Studying Bullying and Cyberbullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancilla-Caceres, Juan F.; Espelage, Dorothy; Amir, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    Even though previous studies have addressed the relation between face-to-face bullying and cyberbullying, none have studied both phenomena simultaneously. In this article, we present a computer game-based method to study both types of peer aggression among youth. Study participants included fifth graders (N = 93) in two U.S. Midwestern middle…

  8. Games for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, James Paul

    2013-01-01

    Today there is a great deal of interest in and a lot of hype about using video games in schools. Video games are a new silver bullet. Games can create good learning because they teach in powerful ways. The theory behind game-based learning is not really new, but a traditional and well-tested approach to deep and effective learning, often…

  9. Selene: A Videogame for Learning about the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C. A.; Reese, D. D.

    2008-06-01

    The Selene game-based, metaphor-enhanced (GaME) learning object prepares players with concrete knowledge of basic lunar geology processes. Selene is embedded within an online research environment studying learning and assessment within videogames.

  10. A Description Grid to Support the Design of Learning Role-Play Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariais, Christelle; Michau, Florence; Pernin, Jean-Philippe

    2012-01-01

    To strengthen the motivation of learners, the professional training sector is focusing more and more on game-based learning. In this context, the authors have become interested in the design of Learning Role-Play Game (LRPG) scenarios. The aim of this article is to improve the designers' confidence in the validity of the game-based learning…

  11. An exploration of computer game-based instruction in the "world history" class in secondary education: a comparative study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhonggen; Yu, Wei Hua; Fan, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    So far, many studies on educational games have been carried out in America and Europe. Very few related empirical studies, however, have been conducted in China. This study, combining both quantitative with qualitative research methods, possibly compensated for this regret. The study compared data collected from two randomly selected classes (out of 13 classes) under computer game-based instruction (CGBI) and non-computer game-based instruction (NCGBI), respectively, in a senior high school located in Nanjing, Capital of Jiangsu Province, in China. The participants were 103 students, composed of 52 boys and 51 girls (aged 17-18 years old). The following conclusion was reached: (1) participants under CGBI obtained significantly greater learning achievement than those under NCGBI; (2) participants were significantly more motivated by CGBI compared with NCGBI; (3) there were no significant differences in learning achievement between boys and girls; although (4) boys were significantly more motivated by CGBI than girls. Both disadvantages and advantages were discussed, together with directions for future research.

  12. An Exploration of Computer Game-Based Instruction in the “World History” Class in Secondary Education: A Comparative Study in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhonggen; Yu, Wei Hua; Fan, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    So far, many studies on educational games have been carried out in America and Europe. Very few related empirical studies, however, have been conducted in China. This study, combining both quantitative with qualitative research methods, possibly compensated for this regret. The study compared data collected from two randomly selected classes (out of 13 classes) under computer game-based instruction (CGBI) and non-computer game-based instruction (NCGBI), respectively, in a senior high school located in Nanjing, Capital of Jiangsu Province, in China. The participants were 103 students, composed of 52 boys and 51 girls (aged 17-18 years old). The following conclusion was reached: (1) participants under CGBI obtained significantly greater learning achievement than those under NCGBI; (2) participants were significantly more motivated by CGBI compared with NCGBI; (3) there were no significant differences in learning achievement between boys and girls; although (4) boys were significantly more motivated by CGBI than girls. Both disadvantages and advantages were discussed, together with directions for future research. PMID:24816635

  13. Game-based peripheral biofeedback for stress assessment in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop-Jordanova, Nada; Gucev, Zoran

    2010-06-01

    Peripheral biofeedback is considered to be an efficient method for assessment and stress mitigation in children. The aim of the present study was to assess the levels of stress and stress mitigation in healthy school children (HSC), in children with cystic fibrosis (CF), general anxiety (GA) and attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Each investigated group (HSC, CF, GA, ADHD) consisted of 30 school-aged children from both sexes. Psychological characteristics were evaluated on Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ). The lie scale was used to determine participant honesty. Four biofeedback games using a pulls detector were applied for assessment of the stress levels as well as to evaluate ability to relax. EPQ found more psychopathological traits (P Magic blocks score was significantly different in relaxation levels between control and CF children (P game Canal was significantly different in relaxation levels between healthy controls and all other groups, but no changes in pulls, as a relaxation measure, were found during the game. The CF group had much more commissions stemming from impulsivity (t= 5.71, P < 0.01), while the GA and ADHD children had more inattention omissions (P < 0.05). Strong negative correlation between age and pulls (r= 0.49, P= 0.003) and strong negative correlation between age and omissions (r=-0.86, P= 0.029) were found among all groups analyzed. The ability to learn stress mediation is correlated with age. All three groups of children had significantly lower relaxation levels when compared to healthy controls. Relaxation was more difficult for children with GA or ADHD, and easier for children with CF.

  14. A proposal of ubiquitous fuzzy computing for ambient Intelligence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acampora, G.; Loia, V.

    2008-01-01

    Ambient Intelligence is considered as the composition of three emergent technologies: Ubiquitous Computing, Ubiquitous Communication and Intelligent User Interfaces. The aim of integration of aforesaid technologies is to make wider the interaction between human beings and information technology

  15. Ubiquitous fuzzy computing in open ambient intelligence environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acampora, G.; Loia, V.

    2006-01-01

    Ambient intelligence (AmI) is considered as the composition of three emergent technologies: ubiquitous computing, ubiquitous communication and intelligent user interfaces. The aim of integration of aforesaid technologies is to make wider the interaction between human beings and information

  16. Bringing Mohamed to the Mountain: Situated Professional Development in a Ubiquitous Computing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Karen; Kratcoski, Annette; Mazzer, Pat; Schenker, Jason

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an ongoing situated professional development program in which teachers bring their intact classes for an extended stay in a ubiquitous computing environment equipped with a variety of state-of-the-art computing devices. The experience is unique in that it not only situates teacher learning about technology integration in…

  17. Empowering Pre-Service Teachers to Produce Ubiquitous Flipped Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya García-Sánchez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on technological and educational outcomes that resulted from the production of foreign language educational videos by 90 pre-service instructors enrolled in an official Master’s Degree in Secondary Education programme. This teaching practice, conducted during two consecutive years, was set in a ubiquitous learning environment with the intention of effectively linking digital technology with pedagogy by means of producing flipped classroom units. The findings reveal that these pre-service teachers successfully combined instructional dynamics with digital skills to produce flipped classes adapted to the young generation’s needs. The classroom becomes, therefore, a more participatory learner-centred scenario with a variety of interactive and collaborative activities performed by foreign language students.

  18. New Trends on Ubiquitous Mobile Multimedia Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Marco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile devices present the opportunity to enhance our fast-growing and globally connected society, improving user-experience through novel approaches for information dissemination through mobile communication. The research community is developing new technologies, services, and applications to enable ubiquitous environments based on mobile technology. This paper tackles several important challenges such as communication cost and device limitations for development of ubiquitous multimedia applications. And we propose a system for news delivery using a set of wireless multimedia applications. For this purpose, we have performed a case study with Apple iPhone's platform, featuring two multimedia application contexts, namely, Web and native applications. The multimedia mobile applications draw on iPhone's assets, enabling context-awareness to distribute news, improving communication efficiency and setting-up viewing optimizations, thus enhancing user-experience. The proposed system is evaluated and validated through a series of real-life experiments on real devices, with online full availability. Moreover, due to the Web application availability, the system is not restrained to Apple's iPhone platform, but can also benefit users with other devices.

  19. Ubiquitous computing in shared-care environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, S

    2006-07-01

    In light of future challenges, such as growing numbers of elderly, increase in chronic diseases, insufficient health care budgets and problems with staff recruitment for the health-care sector, information and communication technology (ICT) becomes a possible means to meet these challenges. Organizational changes such as the decentralization of the health-care system lead to a shift from in-hospital to both advanced and basic home health care. Advanced medical technologies provide solutions for distant home care in form of specialist consultations and home monitoring. Furthermore, the shift towards home health care will increase mobile work and the establishment of shared care teams which require ICT-based solutions that support ubiquitous information access and cooperative work. Clinical documentation and decision support systems are the main ICT-based solutions of interest in the context of ubiquitous computing for shared care environments. This paper therefore describes the prerequisites for clinical documentation and decision support at the point of care, the impact of mobility on the documentation process, and how the introduction of ICT-based solutions will influence organizations and people. Furthermore, the role of dentistry in shared-care environments is discussed and illustrated in the form of a future scenario.

  20. Learning "in" or "with" Games? Quality Criteria for Digital Learning Games from the Perspectives of Learning, Emotion, and Motivation Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hense, Jan; Mandl, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    This conceptual paper aims to clarify the theoretical underpinnings of game based learning (GBL) and learning with digital learning games (DLGs). To do so, it analyses learning of game related skills and contents, which occurs constantly during playing conventional entertainment games, from three perspectives: learning theory, emotion theory, and…

  1. Diseño de Juegos Basados en el Paradigma de Gramáticas Artificiales Para Favorecer el Aprendizaje Implícito en Niños Design of Games Based on the Paradigm of Artificial Grammars to Facilitate Implicit Learning in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Thibaut

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Se desarrollaron dos juegos en formato computacional basados en el paradigma de gramáticas artificiales de Reber, con el objetivo de favorecer la demostración de aprendizaje implícito en niños con distintas características: normales (N, con déficit atencional (DA y con déficit intelectual (DI. Los resultados muestran que los niños N y DA rinden por sobre lo esperado por azar, a diferencia de los DI quienes logran un desempeño similar al azar. Los hallazgos sugieren que niños con problemas de atención aprenden a través de vías implícitas al igual que niños sin problemas de atención, independientemente del juego utilizado.Two computer-based games were developed based on Reber(s Artificial Grammar Paradigm, in order to facilitate implicit learning ocurrence in normal (N, ADHD, and intellectually disabled (ID children. Results show that N and ADHD children perform above chance level, as opposed to ID children whose performance is equivalent to random response. These findings show that ADHD children learn through implicit paths as well as children without attention problems, independently of the game used.

  2. What Do Stroke Patients Look for in Game-Based Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ya-Xuan; Huang, Pei-Chen; Chen, Kuan-Ta; Chu, Woei-Chyn

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stroke is one of the most common causes of physical disability, and early, intensive, and repetitive rehabilitation exercises are crucial to the recovery of stroke survivors. Unfortunately, research shows that only one third of stroke patients actually perform recommended exercises at home, because of the repetitive and mundane nature of conventional rehabilitation exercises. Thus, to motivate stroke survivors to engage in monotonous rehabilitation is a significant issue in the therapy process. Game-based rehabilitation systems have the potential to encourage patients continuing rehabilitation exercises at home. However, these systems are still rarely adopted at patients’ places. Discovering and eliminating the obstacles in promoting game-based rehabilitation at home is therefore essential. For this purpose, we conducted a study to collect and analyze the opinions and expectations of stroke patients and clinical therapists. The study is composed of 2 parts: Rehab-preference survey – interviews to both patients and therapists to understand the current practices, challenges, and expectations on game-based rehabilitation systems; and Rehab-compatibility survey – a gaming experiment with therapists to elaborate what commercial games are compatible with rehabilitation. The study is conducted with 30 outpatients with stroke and 19 occupational therapists from 2 rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. Our surveys show that game-based rehabilitation systems can turn the rehabilitation exercises more appealing and provide personalized motivation for various stroke patients. Patients prefer to perform rehabilitation exercises with more diverse and fun games, and need cost-effective rehabilitation systems, which are often built on commodity hardware. Our study also sheds light on incorporating the existing design-for-fun games into rehabilitation system. We envision the results are helpful in developing a platform which enables rehab-compatible (i.e., existing

  3. Evaluation of Game-Based Visualization Tools for Military Flight Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    accepted that game-based flight simulators cannot approach the complexity and realism of the high fidelity avionics simulations employed in...modern Air Force training systems. However, low cost Commercial Off the Shelf (COTS) gaming technology is rapidly approaching many of the...pitch, and yaw) then converts this position to WGS84 geocentric coordinates to conform to DIS standards prior to broadcast. The position data of

  4. The effect of game-based exercise on infant acute lymphocytic leukaemia patients

    OpenAIRE

    Cortés-Reyes, Édgar; Escobar-Zabala, Paola; González-García, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To establish the effect of a game-based exercise programme on Physical Deconditioning Syndrome (PDS) in 5 to 12 year-old children suffering Acute Lymphocytic Leukaemia (ALL). Materials and methods. This was a quasi-experimental study involving seven children being treated for ALL at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in Bogotá, Colombia. Fitness determinants (aerobic capacity, muscle strength, flexibility, motor skills and proprioception) were initially assessed to establish their...

  5. Physical demands of game-based training drills in women's team handball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luteberget, Live S; Trollerud, Hege P; Spencer, Matt

    2018-03-01

    Game-based training drills are popular in team sports. This study compared two game-based training conditions and official matches in team handball. Thirty-one women players wore inertial measurement units in five training sessions and five official matches. In training, 3vs3 and 6vs6 game-based training conditions were performed with a 5-min duration. PlayerLoad™ and high-intensity events (HIEs; >2.5 m · s -1 ) were extracted from the raw data. Data were analysed using magnitude-based inferences and reported with effect sizes (ESs). PlayerLoad™ · min -1 from all positions combined was 11.37 ± 0.49 (mean ± 90% confidence limits) and 9.71 ± 0.3 for the 3vs3 and 6vs6 conditions, respectively. Backs (ES: 1.63), wings (ES: 1.91), and pivots (ES: 1.58) had greater PlayerLoad™ in 3vs3 than 6vs6. Substantially greater HIE · min -1 in 3vs3 occurred for all positions. There was substantially greater PlayerLoad™ · min -1 in 3vs3 and 6vs6 than match play for backs, wings, and pivots. Wings (ES: 1.95), pivots (ES: 0.70), and goalkeeper (ES: 1.13) had substantially greater HIE · min -1 in 3vs3 than match play. This study shows greater PlayerLoad™ and HIE in 3vs3 than 6vs6. Both game-based training conditions investigated in this study provide an overload in overall PlayerLoad™; however, additional exercises might be needed to overload HIE, especially for backs and pivots.

  6. What Do Stroke Patients Look for in Game-Based Rehabilitation: A Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ya-Xuan; Huang, Pei-Chen; Chen, Kuan-Ta; Chu, Woei-Chyn

    2016-03-01

    Stroke is one of the most common causes of physical disability, and early, intensive, and repetitive rehabilitation exercises are crucial to the recovery of stroke survivors. Unfortunately, research shows that only one third of stroke patients actually perform recommended exercises at home, because of the repetitive and mundane nature of conventional rehabilitation exercises. Thus, to motivate stroke survivors to engage in monotonous rehabilitation is a significant issue in the therapy process. Game-based rehabilitation systems have the potential to encourage patients continuing rehabilitation exercises at home. However, these systems are still rarely adopted at patients' places. Discovering and eliminating the obstacles in promoting game-based rehabilitation at home is therefore essential. For this purpose, we conducted a study to collect and analyze the opinions and expectations of stroke patients and clinical therapists. The study is composed of 2 parts: Rehab-preference survey - interviews to both patients and therapists to understand the current practices, challenges, and expectations on game-based rehabilitation systems; and Rehab-compatibility survey - a gaming experiment with therapists to elaborate what commercial games are compatible with rehabilitation. The study is conducted with 30 outpatients with stroke and 19 occupational therapists from 2 rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. Our surveys show that game-based rehabilitation systems can turn the rehabilitation exercises more appealing and provide personalized motivation for various stroke patients. Patients prefer to perform rehabilitation exercises with more diverse and fun games, and need cost-effective rehabilitation systems, which are often built on commodity hardware. Our study also sheds light on incorporating the existing design-for-fun games into rehabilitation system. We envision the results are helpful in developing a platform which enables rehab-compatible (i.e., existing, appropriately

  7. A Microworld-Based Role-Playing Game Development Approach to Engaging Students in Interactive, Enjoyable, and Effective Mathematics Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Yuan; Chang, Shao-Chen; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Chen, Pei-Ying

    2018-01-01

    In traditional teacher-centered mathematics instruction, students might show low learning motivation owing to the lack of applied contexts. Game-based learning has been recognized as a potential approach to addressing this issue; however, without proper alignment between the gaming and math-applied contexts, the benefits of game-based learning…

  8. Benefits of game-based leisure activities in normal aging and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narme, Pauline

    2016-12-01

    Given the increasing prevalence of dementia and the limited efficacy of pharmacological treatments, it is crucial to improve the knowledge of the factors that might delay the onset of dementia for developing non-pharmacological interventions. Recent studies have provided evidence that game-based interventions, especially the practice of video games, could improve the cognitive functioning (e.g. executive functions) in older adults and in demented patients. The positive effects of these games have also been demonstrated on physical health (e.g. improvement of balance and gait). Video gamed-based interventions may also alleviate mood or behavioral disorders, and increase interactions with friends, family, caregivers or other patients. The positive impact of games on these domains (cognitive and physical decline, social isolation) suggests that game-based interventions might contribute to delay the onset of dementia. Thus, playing games might be considered as a protective factor in dementia and even more as a potential non-pharmacological strategy in dementia rather than leisure activity.

  9. Video game-based neuromuscular electrical stimulation system for calf muscle training: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayenko, D G; Masani, K; Milosevic, M; Robinson, M F; Vette, A H; McConville, K M V; Popovic, M R

    2011-03-01

    A video game-based training system was designed to integrate neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) and visual feedback as a means to improve strength and endurance of the lower leg muscles, and to increase the range of motion (ROM) of the ankle joints. The system allowed the participants to perform isotonic concentric and isometric contractions in both the plantarflexors and dorsiflexors using NMES. In the proposed system, the contractions were performed against exterior resistance, and the angle of the ankle joints was used as the control input to the video game. To test the practicality of the proposed system, an individual with chronic complete spinal cord injury (SCI) participated in the study. The system provided a progressive overload for the trained muscles, which is a prerequisite for successful muscle training. The participant indicated that he enjoyed the video game-based training and that he would like to continue the treatment. The results show that the training resulted in a significant improvement of the strength and endurance of the paralyzed lower leg muscles, and in an increased ROM of the ankle joints. Video game-based training programs might be effective in motivating participants to train more frequently and adhere to otherwise tedious training protocols. It is expected that such training will not only improve the properties of their muscles but also decrease the severity and frequency of secondary complications that result from SCI. Copyright © 2010 IPEM. All rights reserved.

  10. Networked Biomedical System for Ubiquitous Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjan Durresi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a distributed system that enables global and ubiquitous health monitoring of patients. The biomedical data will be collected by wearable health diagnostic devices, which will include various types of sensors and will be transmitted towards the corresponding Health Monitoring Centers. The permanent medical data of patients will be kept in the corresponding Home Data Bases, while the measured biomedical data will be sent to the Visitor Health Monitor Center and Visitor Data Base that serves the area of present location of the patient. By combining the measured biomedical data and the permanent medical data, Health Medical Centers will be able to coordinate the needed actions and help the local medical teams to make quickly the best decisions that could be crucial for the patient health, and that can reduce the cost of health service.

  11. For the Love of the Game: Game- Versus Lecture-Based Learning With Generation Z Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Mary A; Chen, Hengyi; Kackley, Russell; Micheal, Alicia

    2018-02-01

    The current study evaluated adolescent patients' enjoyment of and knowledge gained from game-based learning compared with an interactive lecture format on the topic of mood disorders. It was hypothesized that game-based learning would be statistically more effective than a lecture in knowledge acquisition and satisfaction scores. A pre-post design was implemented in which a convenience sample of 160 adolescent patients were randomized to either a lecture (n = 80) or game-based (n = 80) group. Both groups completed a pretest/posttest and satisfaction survey. Results showed that both groups had significant improvement in knowledge from pretest compared to posttest. Game-based learning was statistically more effective than the interactive lecture in knowledge achievement and satisfaction scores. This finding supports the contention that game-based learning is an active technique that may be used with patient education. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 56(2), 29-36.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. High intensity intermittent games-based activity and adolescents' cognition: moderating effect of physical fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Simon B; Dring, Karah J; Morris, John G; Sunderland, Caroline; Bandelow, Stephan; Nevill, Mary E

    2018-05-08

    An acute bout of exercise elicits a beneficial effect on subsequent cognitive function in adolescents. The effect of games-based activity, an ecologically valid and attractive exercise model for young people, remains unknown; as does the moderating effect of fitness on the acute exercise-cognition relationship. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the effect of games-based activity on subsequent cognition in adolescents, and the moderating effect of fitness on this relationship. Following ethical approval, 39 adolescents (12.3 ± 0.7 year) completed an exercise and resting trial in a counterbalanced, randomised crossover design. During familiarisation, participants completed a multi-stage fitness test to predict VO 2 peak. The exercise trial consisted of 60-min games-based activity (basketball), during which heart rate was 158 ± 11 beats∙min - 1 . A battery of cognitive function tests (Stroop test, Sternberg paradigm, trail making and d2 tests) were completed 30-min before, immediately following and 45-min following the basketball. Response times on the complex level of the Stroop test were enhanced both immediately (p = 0.021) and 45-min (p = 0.035) post-exercise, and response times on the five item level of the Sternberg paradigm were enhanced immediately post-exercise (p = 0.023). There were no effects on the time taken to complete the trail making test or any outcome of the d2 test. In particular, response times were enhanced in the fitter adolescents 45-min post-exercise on both levels of the Stroop test (simple, p = 0.005; complex, p = 0.040) and on the three item level of the Sternberg paradigm immediately (p = 0.017) and 45-min (p = 0.008) post-exercise. Games-based activity enhanced executive function and working memory scanning speed in adolescents, an effect particularly evident in fitter adolescents, whilst the high intensity intermittent nature of games-based activity may be too demanding for

  13. Ubiquitous information for ubiquitous computing: expressing clinical data sets with openEHR archetypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garde, Sebastian; Hovenga, Evelyn; Buck, Jasmin; Knaup, Petra

    2006-01-01

    Ubiquitous computing requires ubiquitous access to information and knowledge. With the release of openEHR Version 1.0 there is a common model available to solve some of the problems related to accessing information and knowledge by improving semantic interoperability between clinical systems. Considerable work has been undertaken by various bodies to standardise Clinical Data Sets. Notwithstanding their value, several problems remain unsolved with Clinical Data Sets without the use of a common model underpinning them. This paper outlines these problems like incompatible basic data types and overlapping and incompatible definitions of clinical content. A solution to this based on openEHR archetypes is motivated and an approach to transform existing Clinical Data Sets into archetypes is presented. To avoid significant overlaps and unnecessary effort during archetype development, archetype development needs to be coordinated nationwide and beyond and also across the various health professions in a formalized process.

  14. Ubiquitous Monitoring of Electrical Household Appliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret, Jaime; Macías, Elsa; Suárez, Alvaro; Lacuesta, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    The number of appliances at home is increasing continuously, mainly because they make our lives easier. Currently, technology is integrated in all objects of our daily life. TCP/IP let us monitor our home in real time and check ubiquitously if something is happening at home. Bearing in mind this idea, we have developed a low-cost system, which can be used in any type of electrical household appliance that takes information from the appliance and posts the information to the Twitter Social network. Several sensors placed in the household appliances gather the sensed data and send them wired or wirelessly, depending on the case, using small and cheap devices to a gateway located in the home. This gateway takes decisions, based on the received data, and sends notifications to Twitter. We have developed a software application that takes the values and decides when to issue an alarm to the registered users (Twitter friends of our smart home). The performance of our system has been measured taking into account the home network (using IEEE 802.3u and IEEE 802.11g) and the data publishing in Twitter. As a result, we have generated an original product and service for any electrical household appliance, regardless of the model and manufacturer, that helps home users improve their quality of life. The paper also shows that there is no system with the same innovative features like the ones presented in this paper. PMID:23202205

  15. Ubiquitous monitoring of electrical household appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret, Jaime; Macías, Elsa; Suárez, Alvaro; Lacuesta, Raquel

    2012-11-07

    The number of appliances at home is increasing continuously, mainly because they make our lives easier. Currently, technology is integrated in all objects of our daily life. TCP/IP let us monitor our home in real time and check ubiquitously if something is happening at home. Bearing in mind this idea, we have developed a low-cost system, which can be used in any type of electrical household appliance that takes information from the appliance and posts the information to the Twitter Social network. Several sensors placed in the household appliances gather the sensed data and send them wired or wirelessly, depending on the case, using small and cheap devices to a gateway located in the home. This gateway takes decisions, based on the received data, and sends notifications to Twitter. We have developed a software application that takes the values and decides when to issue an alarm to the registered users (Twitter friends of our smart home). The performance of our system has been measured taking into account the home network (using IEEE 802.3u and IEEE 802.11g) and the data publishing in Twitter. As a result, we have generated an original product and service for any electrical household appliance, regardless of the model and manufacturer, that helps home users improve their quality of life. The paper also shows that there is no system with the same innovative features like the ones presented in this paper.

  16. Ubiquitous Graphene Electronics on Scotch Tape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yoonyoung; Ho Kim, Hyun; Lee, Sangryun; Lee, Eunho; Won Kim, Seong; Ryu, Seunghwa; Cho, Kilwon

    2015-07-01

    We report a novel concept of graphene transistors on Scotch tape for use in ubiquitous electronic systems. Unlike common plastic substrates such as polyimide and polyethylene terephthalate, the Scotch tape substrate is easily attached onto various objects such as banknotes, curved surfaces, and human skin, which implies potential applications wherein electronics can be placed in any desired position. Furthermore, the soft Scotch tape serves as an attractive substrate for flexible/foldable electronics that can be significantly bent, or even crumpled. We found that the adhesive layer of the tape with a relatively low shear modulus relaxes the strain when subjected to bending. The capacitance of the gate dielectric made of oxidized aluminum oxide was 1.5 μF cm-2, so that a supply voltage of only 2.5 V was sufficient to operate the devices. As-fabricated graphene transistors on Scotch tape exhibited high electron mobility of 1326 (±155) cm2 V-1 s-1 the transistors still showed high mobility of 1254 (±478) cm2 V-1 s-1 even after they were crumpled.

  17. UBIQUITOUS POLLUTION FROM HEALTH AND COSMETIC ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Those chemical pollutants that are regulated under various international, federal, and state programs represent but a small fraction of the universe of chemicals that occur in the environment as a result of both natural processses and human influence. Although this galaxy of targeted chemicals might be miniuscule compared with the universe of both known and yet-to-be identified chemicals, an implicit assumption is that these selective lists of chemicals are responsible for the most significant share of risk with respect to environmental or economic impairment or to human health.Pharmaceuticals and person care products (PPCPs) comprise a particularly large and diverse array of unregulated pollutants that occur in the environment from the combined activities and actions of multitudes of individuals as well as from veterinary and agricultural use. Although the concentration of any individual PPCP are generally less than ppt-ppb), evidence is accumulateing that these trace-level pollutants are ubiquitous, they can have a continuous presence regardless of environment half-lives (especially where sanitary wastewaters enter the environment), and the numbers of distinct and varied chemical entities could be extremely large (given that thousands are in commerical use). The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in the area of Water Quality. Locat

  18. Security policies and trust in ubiquitous computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anupam; Finin, Tim; Kagal, Lalana; Parker, Jim; Patwardhan, Anand

    2008-10-28

    Ubiquitous environments comprise resource-constrained mobile and wearable devices and computational elements embedded in everyday artefacts. These are connected to each other using both infrastructure-based as well as short-range ad hoc networks. Limited Internet connectivity limits the use of conventional security mechanisms such as public key infrastructures and other forms of server-centric authentication. Under these circumstances, peer-to-peer interactions are well suited for not just information interchange, but also managing security and privacy. However, practical solutions for protecting mobile devices, preserving privacy, evaluating trust and determining the reliability and accuracy of peer-provided data in such interactions are still in their infancy. Our research is directed towards providing stronger assurances of the reliability and trustworthiness of information and services, and the use of declarative policy-driven approaches to handle the open and dynamic nature of such systems. This paper provides an overview of some of the challenges and issues, and points out directions for progress.

  19. Intelligent Multi-Agent Middleware for Ubiquitous Home Networking Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Minwoo Son; Seung-Hun Lee; Dongkyoo Shin; Dongil Shin

    2008-01-01

    The next stage of the home networking environment is supposed to be ubiquitous, where each piece of material is equipped with an RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) tag. To fully support the ubiquitous environment, home networking middleware should be able to recommend home services based on a user-s interests and efficiently manage information on service usage profiles for the users. Therefore, USN (Ubiquitous Sensor Network) technology, which recognizes and manages a ...

  20. Ubiquitous and pervasive commerce new frontiers for electronic business

    CERN Document Server

    Roussos, George

    2006-01-01

    The new capabilities of ubiquitous and pervasive computing imply that products, locations, consumers and employees create rich streams of information about themselves, their immediate environment and their use. This book brings together technological and business aspects of conducting commerce using ubiquitous and pervasive computing techniques and also examines its implications for society at large. Individual chapters examine in detail the core technologies that make ubiquitous computing possible, the business standards that must be established to support the envisioned global infrastructure

  1. Mobile game-based virtual reality rehabilitation program for upper limb dysfunction after ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon-Hee; Ku, Jeonghun; Lim, Hyunmi; Kim, Yeo Hyung; Paik, Nam-Jong

    2016-05-02

    Virtual reality (VR) has the potential to provide intensive, repetitive, and task-oriented training, and game-based therapy can enhance patients' motivation and enjoyment. The objective of the present study was to develop a mobile game-based upper extremity VR program for patients who have experienced stroke, and to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of the program. This randomized, double-blind, controlled trial included 24 patients with ischemic stroke. The intervention group (n = 12) received 30 min of conventional occupational therapy (OT) and 30 min of the mobile upper extremity rehabilitation program using a smartphone and a tablet PC (MoU-Rehab). The controls (n = 12) received conventional OT alone for 1 h per day. Rehabilitation consisted of 10 sessions of therapy, 5 days per week, for 2 weeks. The outcome measures (Fugl-Meyer Assessment of the upper extremity [FMA-UE], Brunnström stage [B-stage] for the arm and the hand, manual muscle testing [MMT], modified Barthel index [MBI], EuroQol-5 Dimension [EQ-5D], and Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]) were assessed at the beginning and end of treatment, and at 1 month. User satisfaction was evaluated by a questionnaire. A greater improvement in the FMA-UE, B-stage, and MMT was found after treatment with the MoU-Rehab than with conventional therapy. The extent of improvements in the MBI, EQ-5D, and BDI was not significantly different between the two groups. Patients in the experimental group completed the 2-weeks treatment without adverse effects, and they were generally satisfied with MoU-Rehab. This mobile game-based VR rehabilitation program appears to be feasible and effective for promoting upper limb recovery after ischemic stroke.

  2. Flipping the teacher's role : What to teach when using game-based learning?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stubbé-Alberts, H.E.; McCance, G.; Twissi, Z.; Ibrahim, N.

    2017-01-01

    Access to quality education is essential for children's academic, occupational, social, and emotional outcomes. Yet globally, 121 million school-aged children are out of school. Many of these children live in countries affected by armed conflict, poverty, or instability. Additionally, host countries

  3. Game-Based Learning: How to Delight and Instruct in The 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Joel

    2004-01-01

    Not long after he completed his Ph.D. at the University of Michigan, Mike Van Lent used his interest in videogames and artificial intelligence to land a research professorship at the University of Southern California (USC). There he edits the Journal of Game Development and conducts studies for the Institute for Creative Technologies, a $45…

  4. Digital Game-Based Learning: A Supplement for Medication Calculation Drills in Nurse Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, Brynjar; Lokken, Atle; Leland, Arne; Stordalen, Jorn; Mordt, Petter; Oftedal, Bjorg F.

    2014-01-01

    Student nurses, globally, appear to struggle with medication calculations. In order to improve these skills among student nurses, the authors developed The Medication Game--an online computer game that aims to provide simple mathematical and medical calculation drills, and help students practise standard medical units and expressions. The aim of…

  5. The Design of Scaffolding in Game-Based Learning: A Formative Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weppel, Sheri; Bishop, Mj; Munoz-Avila, Hector

    2012-01-01

    Instructional games fluctuate between "restricted play" and "free play." Highly structured games with lots of corrective feedback can be less engaging, whereas unstructured games with minimal feedback can lead to frustration. This mixed methods, formative evaluation study investigated how designers might find the balance between too much and too…

  6. Cybertext Redux: Using Digital Game-Based Learning to Teach L2 Vocabulary, Reading, and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, David O.; Shelton, Brett E.; McInnis, Brian

    2009-01-01

    The essay reports on a mixed-methods study using an interactive fiction (IF) game to teach German vocabulary, reading, and culture to university students. The study measured knowledge retention and transfer, and evaluated the attitudes of students toward the game. The results tentatively indicate that contextualized, immersive role play may have…

  7. Teacher perceptions of the value of game-based learning in secondary education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizenga, J.C.; ten Dam, G.T.M.; Voogt, J.M.; Admiraal, W.F.

    Teachers' perceptions of the usefulness of digital games might be a reason for the limited application of digital games in education. However, participants in most studies of teaching with digital games are teachers who do not use digital games regularly in their teaching. This study examined the

  8. Not Just Fun, But Serious Strategies: Using Meta-Cognitive Strategies in Game-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bokyeong; Park, Hyungsung; Baek, Youngkyun

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the effects of the meta-cognitive strategies on the academic and gaming achievements. Exploring the effects of those achievements on the social problem solving of students is also of interest. For this purpose, the MMORPG [Massively Multiple Online Role Playing Game] "Gersang" was used. The…

  9. Adaptive Game Based Learning Using Brain Measures for Attention--Some Explorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Pal, Jelke; Roos, Christopher; Sewnath, Ghanshaam; Rosheuvel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The prospective use of low fidelity simulation and gaming in aviation training is high, and may facilitate individual, personal training needs in usually asynchronous training setting. Without direct feedback from, or intervention by, an instructor, adaptivity of the training environment is in high demand to ensure training sessions maintain an…

  10. From Users to Designers: Building a Self-Organizing Game-Based Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Kurt; Giovanetto, Levi; Devane, Ben; Durga, Shree

    2005-01-01

    The simultaneous publication of Steven Johnson's Everything Bad is Good for You and appearance of media reports of X-rated content in the popular game Grand Theft Auto has renewed controversies surrounding the social effects of computer and video games. On the one hand, videogames scholars argue that videogames are complex, cognitively challenging…

  11. Effect of Digital Game Based Learning on Ninth Grade Students' Mathematics Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swearingen, Dixie K.

    2011-01-01

    This experimental study examined the effect of an educational massive multiplayer online game (MMOG) on achievement on a standards-based mathematics exam. It also examined the interaction of student characteristics (gender and socioeconomic status) with digital game play on mathematics achievement. Two hundred eighty ninth grade students from a…

  12. Encouraging Free Play: Extramural Digital Game-Based Language Learning as a Complex Adaptive System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Kyle

    2017-01-01

    Massively multiplayer online role-playing games like World of Warcraft are ideally suited to encourage and facilitate second language development (SLD) in the extramural setting, but to what extent do the language learners' actual trajectories of gameplay contribute to SLD? With the current propensity to focus research in digital game-based…

  13. Guest Editorial: Game Based Learning for 21st Century Transferable Skills: Challenges and Opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellotti, Francesco; Bottino, Rosa Maria; Fernández-Manjón, Baltazar; Nadolski, Rob

    2018-01-01

    This special issue focuses on analysing how digital SGs can contribute to the knowledge society’s higher demand towards acquiring transferable, transversal skills, that can be applied in different contexts, dealing with various scientific disciplines and subjects.

  14. Fear of (Serious) Digital Games and Game-Based Learning?: Causes, Consequences and a Possible Countermeasure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosche, Wolfgang; Kattner, Florian

    2011-01-01

    Digital games and their power as a tool for acquiring knowledge, training skills and changing behavior are--for some laymen--associated with rather negative concepts, and are thought to pose a general health risk. This paper shortly reviews and evaluates the scientific evidence for both positive and negative outcomes. It describes how particularly…

  15. Investigating Elementary School Students' Technology Acceptance by Applying Digital Game-Based Learning to Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuh-Ming; Lou, Shi-Jer; Kuo, Sheng-Huang; Shih, Ru-Chu

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve and promote students' environmental knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour, integrating environmental education into the primary education curriculum has become a key issue for environmental education. For this reason, this study aimed to investigate elementary school students' acceptance of technology applying digital game-based…

  16. Fighting Baddies and Collecting Bananas: Teachers' Perceptions of Games-Based Literacy Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Hannah R.; Price, Debra P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses how practicing teachers conceptualize commercial off the shelf (COTS) videogames within classroom-based English language arts instruction. Understanding how today's teachers perceive virtual worlds and videogames as an instructional tool for schema building within literacy development will help researchers better understand…

  17. Cases on Digital Game-Based Learning: Methods, Models, and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Youngkyun; Whitton, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    In K-12 classrooms, as well as on the college and university level, the incorporation of digital games has played a vital role in the educational system. While introducing teachers to new fields, these digital games have been designed and implemented for the classroom and have shown positive results at a variety of educational levels. Cases on…

  18. Getting Serious About Games -- Using Video Game-Based Learning to Enhance Nuclear Terrorism Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    grant, HH&S provides writers and producers with accurate and timely health content for the scripts that not only enhances the drama , but also educates...the fact that today’s generation came of age in a technology rich environment that changed the way they accept and process information. Consequently...to kill: A call to action against TV, movie and video game violence. New York: Crown Archetype. Hampton, B., Altmire, B., Brunjes, B., Jennings, D. M

  19. Game-based digital interventions for depression therapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhui; Theng, Yin-Leng; Foo, Schubert

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to review the existing literature on game-based digital interventions for depression systematically and examine their effectiveness through a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Database searching was conducted using specific search terms and inclusion criteria. A standard meta-analysis was also conducted of available RCT studies with a random effects model. The standard mean difference (Cohen's d) was used to calculate the effect size of each study. Nineteen studies were included in the review, and 10 RCTs (eight studies) were included in the meta-analysis. Four types of game interventions-psycho-education and training, virtual reality exposure therapy, exercising, and entertainment-were identified, with various types of support delivered and populations targeted. The meta-analysis revealed a moderate effect size of the game interventions for depression therapy at posttreatment (d=-0.47 [95% CI -0.69 to -0.24]). A subgroup analysis showed that interventions based on psycho-education and training had a smaller effect than those based on the other forms, and that self-help interventions yielded better outcomes than supported interventions. A higher effect was achieved when a waiting list was used as the control. The review and meta-analysis support the effectiveness of game-based digital interventions for depression. More large-scale, high-quality RCT studies with sufficient long-term data for treatment evaluation are needed.

  20. Game-based versus storyboard-based evaluations of crew support prototypes for long duration missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smets, N. J. J. M.; Abbing, M. S.; Neerincx, M. A.; Lindenberg, J.; van Oostendorp, H.

    2010-03-01

    The Mission Execution Crew Assistant (MECA) is developing a distributed system of electronic partners (ePartners) to support astronauts performing nominal and off- nominal actions in long duration missions. The ePartners' support should adequately deal with the dynamics of the context, operations, team and personal conditions, which will change over time substantially. Such support—with the concerning context effects—should be thoroughly tested in all stages of the development process. A major question is how to address the context effects of in-space operations for evaluations of crew support prototypes. Via game-technology, the prototype can be tested with astronauts or their representatives, immersed in the envisioned, simulated context. We investigated if a game-based evaluation better addresses the context effects by producing a more elaborate, in-depth and realistic user experience than a "classical" storyboard-based evaluation. In the game-based evaluation, the participants showed higher arousal levels where expected, a more intense feeling of spatial presence, better situation awareness, and faster performance where needed. Such an evaluation can be used as an alternative or complement of field or micro-world tests when context dynamics cannot be simulated in these last tests cost-efficiently.

  1. You Like It, You Learn It: Affectivity and Learning in Competitive Social Role Play Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brom, Cyril; Šisler, Vít; Slussareff, Michaela; Selmbacherová, Tereza; Hlávka, Zdenek

    2016-01-01

    Despite the alleged ability of digital game-based learning (DGBL) to foster positive affect and in turn improve learning, the link between affectivity and learning has not been sufficiently investigated in this field. Regarding learning from team-based games with competitive elements, even less is known about the relationship between…

  2. Iterative Design and Testing for the Development of a Game-Based Chlamydia Awareness Intervention: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rui; McKanna, James; Calabrese, Samantha; Seif El-Nasr, Magy

    2017-08-01

    Herein we describe a methodology for developing a game-based intervention to raise awareness of Chlamydia and other sexually transmitted infections among youth in Boston's underserved communities. We engaged in three design-based experiments. These utilized mixed methods, including playtesting and assessment methods, to examine the overall effectiveness of the game. In this case, effectiveness is defined as (1) engaging the target group, (2) increasing knowledge about Chlamydia, and (3) changing attitudes toward Chlamydia testing. These three experiments were performed using participants from different communities and with slightly different versions of the game, as we iterated through the design/feedback process. Overall, participants who played the game showed a significant increase in participants' knowledge of Chlamydia compared with those in the control group (P = 0.0002). The version of the game, including elements specifically targeting systemic thinking, showed significant improvement in participants' intent to get tested compared with the version of the game without such elements (Stage 2: P > 0.05; Stage 3: P = 0.0045). Furthermore, during both Stage 2 and Stage 3, participants showed high levels of enjoyment, mood, and participation and moderate levels of game engagement and social engagement. During Stage 3, however, participants' game engagement (P = 0.0003), social engagement (P = 0.0003), and participation (P = 0.0003) were significantly higher compared with those of Stage 2. Thus, we believe that motivation improvements from Stage 2 to 3 were also effective. Finally, participants' overall learning effectiveness was correlated with their prepositive affect (r = 0.52) and their postproblem hierarchy (r = -0.54). The game improved considerably from its initial conception through three stages of iterative design and feedback. Our assessment methods for each stage targeted and integrated learning, health, and engagement

  3. Implications of Ubiquitous Computing for the Social Studies Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hover, Stephanie D.; Berson, Michael J.; Bolick, Cheryl Mason; Swan, Kathleen Owings

    2004-01-01

    In March 2002, members of the National Technology Leadership Initiative (NTLI) met in Charlottesville, Virginia to discuss the potential effects of ubiquitous computing on the field of education. Ubiquitous computing, or "on-demand availability of task-necessary computing power," involves providing every student with a handheld computer--a…

  4. Ubiquitous Computing: The Universal Use of Computers on College Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David G., Ed.

    This book is a collection of vignettes from 13 universities where everyone on campus has his or her own computer. These 13 institutions have instituted "ubiquitous computing" in very different ways at very different costs. The chapters are: (1) "Introduction: The Ubiquitous Computing Movement" (David G. Brown); (2) "Dartmouth College" (Malcolm…

  5. Towards context adaptive privacy decisions in ubiquitous computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaub, Florian; Könings, Bastian; Weber, M.; Kargl, Frank

    2012-01-01

    In ubiquitous systems control of privacy settings will be increasingly difficult due to the pervasive nature of sensing and communication capabilities. We identify challenges for privacy decisions in ubiquitous systems and propose a system for in situ privacy decision support. When context changes

  6. Architecture of personal healthcare information system in ubiquitous healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhardwaj, S.; Sain, M.; Lee, H.-J.; Chung, W.Y.; Slezak, D.; et al., xx

    2009-01-01

    Due to recent development in Ubiquitous Healthcare now it’s time to build such application which can work independently and with less interference of Physician. In this paper we are try to build the whole architecture of personal Healthcare information system for ubiquitous healthcare which also

  7. A New Design Approach to game or play based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lasse Juel

    to ground the students sense of meaning. This paper proposes another approach: using visualization in immersive 3D-worlds as documentation of learning progress while at the same time constituting a reward system which motivate further learning. The overall design idea is to build a game based learning......Abstract: The present paper proposes a new design perspective for game based learning. The general idea is to abandon the long and sought after dream of designing a closed learning system, where students from elementary school to high school without teachers’ interference could learn whatever...... game based learning system, but also confront aspects of modern learning theory especially the notion of reference between content of an assignment and the reality with which it should or could be connected (situated learning). The second idea promotes a way to tackle the common experience...

  8. A Game-based Intervention – a technical tool for social workers to combat Adolescent Dating-Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Sorbring

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dating violence prevalence is increasing and effective prevention and intervention methods are needed in order to adress this growing social problem. The use of on-line game-based intervention programmes open ups new possibilities for social worker practice of interventions on a large scale. The purpose of this study was to examine young people´s experiences of a on line game-based intervention programme designed to adress dating-violence among youths. Swedish youths that took part in the intervention programme were interviewed in focus-groups. Results indicate that the use of a game as an intervention method for this socially sensitive topic was perceived as positive by the young people, seeing it as a new, engaging and interesting method. The findings from the study indicate that on-line game-based programme addressing dating violence between young people has the potential to be used as a technical tool in social work practice.

  9. Collective Learning in Games through Social Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosterman, S.; Gierasimczuk, N.; Armentano, M.G.; Monteserin, A.; Tang, J.; Yannibelli, V.

    2015-01-01

    This paper argues that combining social networks communication and games can positively influence the learning behavior of players. We propose a computational model that combines features of social network learning (communication) and game-based learning (strategy reinforcement). The focus is on

  10. Socio-technical Issues for Ubiquitous Information Society in 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funabashi, Motohisa; Homma, Koichi; Sasaki, Toshiro; Sato, Yoshinori; Kido, Kunihiko; Fukumoto, Takashi; Yano, Koujin

    Impact of the ubiquitous information technology on our society is so significant that directing technological development and preparing institutional apparatus are quite important and urgent. The present paper elaborates, with the efforts by both humanity and engineering disciplines, to find out the socio-technical issues of ubiquitous information society in 2010 by inspecting social implications of emerging technology as well as social expectations. In order to deliberate the issues, scenarios are developed that describes possible life in ubiquitous information society. The derived issues cover integrating information technology and human body, producing smart sharable environment, protecting individual rights, fostering new service business, and forming community.

  11. USE OF UBIQUITOUS TECHNOLOGIES IN MILITARY LOGISTIC SYSTEM IN IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jafari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study is about integration and evaluation of RFID and ubiquitous technologies in military logistic system management. Firstly, supply chain management and the necessity of a revolution in logistic systems especially in military area, are explained. Secondly RFID and ubiquitous technologies and the advantages of their use in supply chain management are introduced. Lastly a system based on these technologies for controlling and increasing the speed and accuracy in military logistic system in Iran with its unique properties, is presented. The system is based on full control of military logistics (supplies from the time of deployment to replenishment using sensor network, ubiquitous and RFID technologies.

  12. Use of Ubiquitous Technologies in Military Logistic System in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, P.; Sadeghi-Niaraki, A.

    2013-09-01

    This study is about integration and evaluation of RFID and ubiquitous technologies in military logistic system management. Firstly, supply chain management and the necessity of a revolution in logistic systems especially in military area, are explained. Secondly RFID and ubiquitous technologies and the advantages of their use in supply chain management are introduced. Lastly a system based on these technologies for controlling and increasing the speed and accuracy in military logistic system in Iran with its unique properties, is presented. The system is based on full control of military logistics (supplies) from the time of deployment to replenishment using sensor network, ubiquitous and RFID technologies.

  13. Design and development of the mobile game based on the J2ME technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, JunHua

    2012-01-01

    With the continuous improvement of mobile performance, mobile entertainment applications market trend has been increasingly clear, mobile entertainment applications will be after the PC entertainment applications is another important business growth. Through the full analysis of the current mobile entertainment applications market demand and trends, the author has accumulated a lot of theoretical knowledge and practical experience. Rational, using of some new technology for a mobile entertainment games design, and described the development of key technologies required for mobile game an analysis and design of the game, and to achieve a complete game development. Light of the specific mobile game project - "Battle City", detailed the development of a mobile game based on the J2ME platform, the basic steps and the various key elements, focusing on how to use object-oriented thinking on the role of mobile phones in the abstract and Game Animation package, the source code with specific instructions.

  14. Influence of prior knowledge of exercise duration on pacing strategies during game-based activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbett, Tim J; Walker, Ben; Walker, Shane

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the influence of prior knowledge of exercise duration on the pacing strategies employed during game-based activities. Twelve semiprofessional team-sport athletes (mean ± SD age 22.8 ± 2.1 y) participated in this study. Players performed 3 small-sided games in random order. In one condition (Control), players were informed that they would play the small-sided game for 12 min and then completed the 12-min game. In a 2nd condition (Deception), players were told that they would play the small-sided game for 6 minutes, but after completing the 6-min game, they were asked to complete another 6 min. In a 3rd condition (Unknown), players were not told how long they would be required to play the small-sided game, but the activity was terminated after 12 min. Movement was recorded using a GPS unit sampling at 10 Hz. Post hoc inspection of video footage was undertaken to count the number of possessions and the number and quality of disposals. Higher initial intensities were observed in the Deception (130.6 ± 3.3 m/min) and Unknown (129.3 ± 2.4 m/min) conditions than the Control condition (123.3 ± 3.4 m/min). Greater amounts of high-speed running occurred during the initial phases of the Deception condition, and more low-speed activity occurred during the Unknown condition. A moderately greater number of total skill involvements occurred in the Unknown condition than the Control condition. These findings suggest that during game-based activities, players alter their pacing strategy based on the anticipated endpoint of the exercise bout.

  15. Learning Multidisciplinary Collaboration with Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Thomas Duus

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the design of a game-based learning process for developing communication in public organisations. The game-design presented here emphasises those parts of public organisations that tend to employ multidisciplinary teams for solving wicked problems. As such teams employ...... members from different, professional backgrounds, the game Public Professional sought to develop new understandings among team members and across professions. The purpose of this game was to facilitate an understanding among team members and across professions, a game-based learning process named Public...... from the game’s core mechanics....

  16. New functionalities in abundant element oxides: ubiquitous element strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosono, Hideo; Hayashi, Katsuro; Kamiya, Toshio; Atou, Toshiyuki; Susaki, Tomofumi

    2011-01-01

    While most ceramics are composed of ubiquitous elements (the ten most abundant elements within the Earth's crust), many advanced materials are based on rare elements. A 'rare-element crisis' is approaching owing to the imbalance between the limited supply of rare elements and the increasing demand. Therefore, we propose a 'ubiquitous element strategy' for materials research, which aims to apply abundant elements in a variety of innovative applications. Creation of innovative oxide materials and devices based on conventional ceramics is one specific challenge. This review describes the concept of ubiquitous element strategy and gives some highlights of our recent research on the synthesis of electronic, thermionic and structural materials using ubiquitous elements. (topical review)

  17. Mining the preferences of patients for ubiquitous clinic recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tin-Chih Toly; Chiu, Min-Chi

    2018-03-06

    A challenge facing all ubiquitous clinic recommendation systems is that patients often have difficulty articulating their requirements. To overcome this problem, a ubiquitous clinic recommendation mechanism was designed in this study by mining the clinic preferences of patients. Their preferences were defined using the weights in the ubiquitous clinic recommendation mechanism. An integer nonlinear programming problem was solved to tune the values of the weights on a rolling basis. In addition, since it may take a long time to adjust the values of weights to their asymptotic values, the back propagation network (BPN)-response surface method (RSM) method is applied to estimate the asymptotic values of weights. The proposed methodology was tested in a regional study. Experimental results indicated that the ubiquitous clinic recommendation system outperformed several existing methods in improving the successful recommendation rate.

  18. Disclosure of Personal Data in Ubiquitous Social Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sapuppo, Antonio

    users' privacy. Firstly, it updates the current privacy guidelines of ubiquitous computing by proposing four drawbacks to be avoided when designing for privacy in ubiquitous social networking environments. Secondly, this dissertation identifies and investigates the determinants that might influence......Ubiquitous social networking focuses on developing possible advantageous relationships such as friendships, partnerships and business relations in the physical world, by uncovering hidden connections that people share with others nearby. The foundation of these services is based on disclosure...... of personal information, which can provoke numerous accidental invasions of privacy. This dissertation contributes by addressing two problems, related to support of privacy-aware social networking in ubiquitous computing environments that focus on maximizing potential networking benefits while preserving...

  19. Evolving Pedagogical Perceptions of Teachers Integrating Ubiquitous Computing in Their Classrooms: A Case Study of the South Dakota Laptop Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogany, Wade S.

    2009-01-01

    With technology changing the world at a rapid rate, the impact of ubiquitous computing in the classroom has had an influence on education. As the number of one-to-one laptop initiatives grows, the need for further research on the effects of teaching and learning also increases. This case study sought to examine changes in teaching that resulted…

  20. Wireless Technologies, Ubiquitous Computing and Mobile Health: Application to Drug Abuse Treatment and Compliance with HIV Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Edward W; Smelson, David; Fletcher, Richard; Ziedonis, Douglas; Picard, Rosalind W

    2010-06-01

    Beneficial advances in the treatment of substance abuse and compliance with medical therapies, including HAART, are possible with new mobile technologies related to personal physiological sensing and computational methods. When incorporated into mobile platforms that allow for ubiquitous computing, these technologies have great potential for extending the reach of behavioral interventions from clinical settings where they are learned into natural environments.

  1. USE OF UBIQUITOUS TECHNOLOGIES IN MILITARY LOGISTIC SYSTEM IN IRAN

    OpenAIRE

    P. Jafari; A. Sadeghi-Niaraki

    2013-01-01

    This study is about integration and evaluation of RFID and ubiquitous technologies in military logistic system management. Firstly, supply chain management and the necessity of a revolution in logistic systems especially in military area, are explained. Secondly RFID and ubiquitous technologies and the advantages of their use in supply chain management are introduced. Lastly a system based on these technologies for controlling and increasing the speed and accuracy in military logistic system ...

  2. Cluster-based localization and tracking in ubiquitous computing systems

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez-de Dios, José Ramiro; Torres-González, Arturo; Ollero, Anibal

    2017-01-01

    Localization and tracking are key functionalities in ubiquitous computing systems and techniques. In recent years a very high variety of approaches, sensors and techniques for indoor and GPS-denied environments have been developed. This book briefly summarizes the current state of the art in localization and tracking in ubiquitous computing systems focusing on cluster-based schemes. Additionally, existing techniques for measurement integration, node inclusion/exclusion and cluster head selection are also described in this book.

  3. Game-Based Practice versus Traditional Practice in Computer-Based Writing Strategy Training: Effects on Motivation and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proske, Antje; Roscoe, Rod D.; McNamara, Danielle S.

    2014-01-01

    Achieving sustained student engagement with practice in computer-based writing strategy training can be a challenge. One potential solution is to foster engagement by embedding practice in educational games; yet there is currently little research comparing the effectiveness of game-based practice versus more traditional forms of practice. In this…

  4. Exploring Indigenous Game-Based Physics Activities in Pre-Service Physics Teachers' Conceptual Change and Transformation of Epistemic Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Marie Paz Escaño

    2017-01-01

    "Laro-ng-Lahi" (Indigenous Filipino game) based physics activities invigorated the integration of culture in the pre-service physics education to develop students' epistemic beliefs and the notion of conceptual understanding through conceptual change. The study conveniently involved 28 pre-service undergraduate physics students enrolled…

  5. Novel Research Approaches to Gauge Global Teacher Familiarity with Game-Based Teaching in Physical Education: An Exploratory #Twitter Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pill, Shane; Harvey, Stephen; Hyndman, Brendon

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the use of the microblogging platform Twitter as a tool for research in physical education. The research examined teacher use of game-based approaches (GBAs). A rolling Twitter conversation hosted over the course of 12 hours provided the data for the study. Participants were from 18 countries and they contributed on average…

  6. Translational selection is ubiquitous in prokaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fran Supek

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Codon usage bias in prokaryotic genomes is largely a consequence of background substitution patterns in DNA, but highly expressed genes may show a preference towards codons that enable more efficient and/or accurate translation. We introduce a novel approach based on supervised machine learning that detects effects of translational selection on genes, while controlling for local variation in nucleotide substitution patterns represented as sequence composition of intergenic DNA. A cornerstone of our method is a Random Forest classifier that outperformed previous distance measure-based approaches, such as the codon adaptation index, in the task of discerning the (highly expressed ribosomal protein genes by their codon frequencies. Unlike previous reports, we show evidence that translational selection in prokaryotes is practically universal: in 460 of 461 examined microbial genomes, we find that a subset of genes shows a higher codon usage similarity to the ribosomal proteins than would be expected from the local sequence composition. These genes constitute a substantial part of the genome--between 5% and 33%, depending on genome size--while also exhibiting higher experimentally measured mRNA abundances and tending toward codons that match tRNA anticodons by canonical base pairing. Certain gene functional categories are generally enriched with, or depleted of codon-optimized genes, the trends of enrichment/depletion being conserved between Archaea and Bacteria. Prominent exceptions from these trends might indicate genes with alternative physiological roles; we speculate on specific examples related to detoxication of oxygen radicals and ammonia and to possible misannotations of asparaginyl-tRNA synthetases. Since the presence of codon optimizations on genes is a valid proxy for expression levels in fully sequenced genomes, we provide an example of an "adaptome" by highlighting gene functions with expression levels elevated specifically in

  7. Toward Game-Based Digital Mental Health Interventions: Player Habits and Preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandryk, Regan Lee; Birk, Max Valentin

    2017-04-20

    Designers of digital interventions for mental health often leverage interactions from games because the intrinsic motivation that results from game-based interventions may increase participation and translate into improved treatment efficacy. However, there are outstanding questions about the suitability (eg, are desktop or mobile interventions more appropriate?) and intervention potential (eg, do people with depression activate enough to play?) of games for mental health. In this paper, we aimed to describe the presently unknown relationship between gaming activity and indicators of well-being so that designers make informed choices when designing game-based interventions for mental health. We gathered validated scales of well-being (Beck's Depression Inventory [BDI-II], Patient Health Questionnaire [PHQ-9], trait anxiety [TA], and basic psychological needs satisfaction [BPNS]), play importance (control over game behavior: control; gamer identity: identity), and play behavior (play frequency, platform preferences, and genre preferences) in a Web-based survey (N=491). The majority of our participants played games a few times a week (45.3%, 222/490) or daily (34.3%, 168/490). In terms of depression, play frequency was associated with PHQ-9 (P=.003); PHQ-9 scores were higher for those who played daily than for those who played a few times a week or less. Similarly, for BDI-II (P=.01), scores were higher for those who played daily than for those who played once a week or less. Genre preferences were not associated with PHQ-9 (P=.32) or BDI-II (P=.68); however, platform preference (ie, mobile, desktop, or console) was associated with PHQ-9 (P=.04); desktop-only players had higher PHQ-9 scores than those who used all platforms. Platform preference was not associated with BDI-II (P=.18). In terms of anxiety, TA was not associated with frequency (P=.23), platform preference (P=.07), or genre preference (P=.99). In terms of needs satisfaction, BPNS was not associated with

  8. Trust information-based privacy architecture for ubiquitous health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruotsalainen, Pekka Sakari; Blobel, Bernd; Seppälä, Antto; Nykänen, Pirkko

    2013-10-08

    Ubiquitous health is defined as a dynamic network of interconnected systems that offers health services independent of time and location to a data subject (DS). The network takes place in open and unsecure information space. It is created and managed by the DS who sets rules that regulate the way personal health information is collected and used. Compared to health care, it is impossible in ubiquitous health to assume the existence of a priori trust between the DS and service providers and to produce privacy using static security services. In ubiquitous health features, business goals and regulations systems followed often remain unknown. Furthermore, health care-specific regulations do not rule the ways health data is processed and shared. To be successful, ubiquitous health requires novel privacy architecture. The goal of this study was to develop a privacy management architecture that helps the DS to create and dynamically manage the network and to maintain information privacy. The architecture should enable the DS to dynamically define service and system-specific rules that regulate the way subject data is processed. The architecture should provide to the DS reliable trust information about systems and assist in the formulation of privacy policies. Furthermore, the architecture should give feedback upon how systems follow the policies of DS and offer protection against privacy and trust threats existing in ubiquitous environments. A sequential method that combines methodologies used in system theory, systems engineering, requirement analysis, and system design was used in the study. In the first phase, principles, trust and privacy models, and viewpoints were selected. Thereafter, functional requirements and services were developed on the basis of a careful analysis of existing research published in journals and conference proceedings. Based on principles, models, and requirements, architectural components and their interconnections were developed using system

  9. An improved anonymous authentication scheme for roaming in ubiquitous networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hakjun; Lee, Donghoon; Moon, Jongho; Jung, Jaewook; Kang, Dongwoo; Kim, Hyoungshick; Won, Dongho

    2018-01-01

    With the evolution of communication technology and the exponential increase of mobile devices, the ubiquitous networking allows people to use our data and computing resources anytime and everywhere. However, numerous security concerns and complicated requirements arise as these ubiquitous networks are deployed throughout people's lives. To meet the challenge, the user authentication schemes in ubiquitous networks should ensure the essential security properties for the preservation of the privacy with low computational cost. In 2017, Chaudhry et al. proposed a password-based authentication scheme for the roaming in ubiquitous networks to enhance the security. Unfortunately, we found that their scheme remains insecure in its protection of the user privacy. In this paper, we prove that Chaudhry et al.'s scheme is vulnerable to the stolen-mobile device and user impersonation attacks, and its drawbacks comprise the absence of the incorrect login-input detection, the incorrectness of the password change phase, and the absence of the revocation provision. Moreover, we suggest a possible way to fix the security flaw in Chaudhry et al's scheme by using the biometric-based authentication for which the bio-hash is applied in the implementation of a three-factor authentication. We prove the security of the proposed scheme with the random oracle model and formally verify its security properties using a tool named ProVerif, and analyze it in terms of the computational and communication cost. The analysis result shows that the proposed scheme is suitable for resource-constrained ubiquitous environments.

  10. An improved anonymous authentication scheme for roaming in ubiquitous networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakjun Lee

    Full Text Available With the evolution of communication technology and the exponential increase of mobile devices, the ubiquitous networking allows people to use our data and computing resources anytime and everywhere. However, numerous security concerns and complicated requirements arise as these ubiquitous networks are deployed throughout people's lives. To meet the challenge, the user authentication schemes in ubiquitous networks should ensure the essential security properties for the preservation of the privacy with low computational cost. In 2017, Chaudhry et al. proposed a password-based authentication scheme for the roaming in ubiquitous networks to enhance the security. Unfortunately, we found that their scheme remains insecure in its protection of the user privacy. In this paper, we prove that Chaudhry et al.'s scheme is vulnerable to the stolen-mobile device and user impersonation attacks, and its drawbacks comprise the absence of the incorrect login-input detection, the incorrectness of the password change phase, and the absence of the revocation provision. Moreover, we suggest a possible way to fix the security flaw in Chaudhry et al's scheme by using the biometric-based authentication for which the bio-hash is applied in the implementation of a three-factor authentication. We prove the security of the proposed scheme with the random oracle model and formally verify its security properties using a tool named ProVerif, and analyze it in terms of the computational and communication cost. The analysis result shows that the proposed scheme is suitable for resource-constrained ubiquitous environments.

  11. A model for ubiquitous care of noncommunicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianna, Henrique Damasceno; Barbosa, Jorge Luis Victória

    2014-09-01

    The ubiquitous computing, or ubicomp, is a promising technology to help chronic diseases patients managing activities, offering support to them anytime, anywhere. Hence, ubicomp can aid community and health organizations to continuously communicate with patients and to offer useful resources for their self-management activities. Communication is prioritized in works of ubiquitous health for noncommunicable diseases care, but the management of resources is not commonly employed. We propose the UDuctor, a model for ubiquitous care of noncommunicable diseases. UDuctor focuses the resources offering, without losing self-management and communication supports. We implemented a system and applied it in two practical experiments. First, ten chronic patients tried the system and filled out a questionnaire based on the technology acceptance model. After this initial evaluation, an alpha test was done. The system was used daily for one month and a half by a chronic patient. The results were encouraging and show potential for implementing UDuctor in real-life situations.

  12. Navigation studies based on the ubiquitous positioning technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lei; Mi, Weijie; Wang, Defeng

    2007-11-01

    This paper summarized the nowadays positioning technologies, such as absolute positioning methods and relative positioning methods, indoor positioning and outdoor positioning, active positioning and passive positioning. Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) technologies were introduced as the omnipresent out-door positioning technologies, including GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BD-1/2. After analysis of the shortcomings of GNSS, indoor positioning technologies were discussed and compared, including A-GPS, Cellular network, Infrared, Electromagnetism, Computer Vision Cognition, Embedded Pressure Sensor, Ultrasonic, RFID (Radio Frequency IDentification), Bluetooth, WLAN etc.. Then the concept and characteristics of Ubiquitous Positioning was proposed. After the ubiquitous positioning technologies contrast and selection followed by system engineering methodology, a navigation system model based on Incorporate Indoor-Outdoor Positioning Solution was proposed. And this model was simulated in the Galileo Demonstration for World Expo Shanghai project. In the conclusion, the prospects of ubiquitous positioning based navigation were shown, especially to satisfy the public location information acquiring requirement.

  13. Training for vigilance on the move: a video game-based paradigm for sustained attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalma, J L; Daly, T N; Teo, G W L; Hancock, G M; Hancock, P A

    2018-04-01

    The capacity for superior vigilance can be trained by using knowledge of results (KR). Our present experiments demonstrate the efficacy of such training using a first-person perspective movement videogame-based platform in samples of students and Soldiers. Effectiveness was assessed by manipulating KR during a training phase and withdrawing it in a subsequent transfer phase. Relative to a no KR control condition, KR systematically improved performance for both Soldiers and students. These results build upon our previous findings that demonstrated that a video game-based platform can be used to create a movement-centred sustained attention task with important elements of traditional vigilance. The results indicate that KR effects in sustained attention extend to a first person perspective movement based paradigm, and that these effects occur in professional military as well as a more general population. Such sustained attention training can save lives and the present findings demonstrate one particular avenue to achieve this goal. Practitioner Summary: Sustained attention can be trained by means of knowledge of results using a videogame-based platform with samples of students and Soldiers. Four experiments demonstrate that a dynamic, first-person perspective video game environment can serve to support effective sustained attention training in professional military as well as a more general population.

  14. Recent Developments in Game-Based Virtual Reality Educational Laboratories Using the Microsoft Kinect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingshao Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Virtual Reality (VR is a well-known concept and has been proven to be beneficial in various areas. However, several disadvantages inherent in VR prevent its broad deployment in the educational arena. These limitations include non-realistic representation, lack of customizability and flexibility, financial feasibility, physical and psychological discomforts of the users, simulator sickness, etc. In this paper, an innovative method that uses the Microsoft Kinect as an essential component for developing game-based VR educational laboratories is presented. This technique addresses three different aspects. First, it represents an efficient method for creating the VE using the Kinect as a measuring tool. Second, the Kinect is employed as a substitute DAQ system for acquiring range data and tracking the motion of objects of interest. At last, the Kinect serves as a novel human-computer interface for tracking the users’ entire body motion and recognizing their voices. Using the method described here, three major aspects of educational VR development can be accomplished with an inexpensive and commercially available Kinect.

  15. A Game-Based Virtualized Reality Approach for Simultaneous Rehabilitation of Motor Skill and Confidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alasdair G. Thin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Virtualized reality games offer highly interactive and engaging user experience and therefore game-based approaches (GBVR may have significant potential to enhance clinical rehabilitation practice as traditional therapeutic exercises are often repetitive and boring, reducing patient compliance. The aim of this study was to investigate if a rehabilitation training programme using GBVR could simultaneously improve both motor skill (MS and confidence (CON, as they are both important determinants of daily living and physical and social functioning. The study was performed using a nondominant hand motor deficit model in nonambidextrous healthy young adults, whereby dominant and nondominant arms acted as control and intervention conditions, respectively. GBVR training was performed using a commercially available tennis-based game. CON and MS were assessed by having each subject perform a comparable real-world motor task (RWMT before and after training. Baseline CON and MS for performing the RWMT were significantly lower for the nondominant hand and improved after GBVR training, whereas there were no changes in the dominant (control arm. These results demonstrate that by using a GBVR approach to address a MS deficit in a real-world task, improvements in both MS and CON can be facilitated and such approaches may help increase patient compliance.

  16. Effects of interactive video-game based system exercise on the balance of the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chien-Hung; Peng, Chih-Wei; Chen, Yu-Luen; Huang, Ching-Ping; Hsiao, Yu-Ling; Chen, Shih-Ching

    2013-04-01

    This study evaluated the effects of interactive video-game based (IVGB) training on the balance of older adults. The participants of the study included 30 community-living persons over the age of 65. The participants were divided into 2 groups. Group A underwent IVGB training for 6 weeks and received no intervention in the following 6 weeks. Group B received no intervention during the first 6 weeks and then participated in training in the following 6 weeks. After IVGB intervention, both groups showed improved balance based on the results from the following tests: the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Modified Falls Efficacy Scale (MFES), Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, and the Sway Velocity (SV) test (assessing bipedal stance center pressure with eyes open and closed). Results from the Sway Area (SA) test (assessing bipedal stance center pressure with eyes open and closed) revealed a significant improvement in Group B after IVGB training. Group A retained some training effects after 6 weeks without IVGB intervention. Additionally, a moderate association emerged between the Xavix measured step system stepping tests and BBS, MFES, Unipedal Stance test, and TUG test measurements. In conclusion, IVGB training improves balance after 6 weeks of implementation, and the beneficial effects partially remain after training is complete. Further investigation is required to determine if this training is superior to traditional physical therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Integrated Environment for Ubiquitous Healthcare and Mobile IPv6 Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagalaban, Giovanni; Kim, Seoksoo

    The development of Internet technologies based on the IPv6 protocol will allow real-time monitoring of people with health deficiencies and improve the independence of elderly people. This paper proposed a ubiquitous healthcare system for the personalized healthcare services with the support of mobile IPv6 networks. Specifically, this paper discusses the integration of ubiquitous healthcare and wireless networks and its functional requirements. This allow an integrated environment where heterogeneous devices such a mobile devices and body sensors can continuously monitor patient status and communicate remotely with healthcare servers, physicians, and family members to effectively deliver healthcare services.

  18. A Survey of Service Composition Mechanisms in Ubiquitous Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønsted, Jeppe; Hansen, Klaus Marius; Ingstrup, Mads

    2007-01-01

    Composition of services, i.e., providing new services by combining existing ones, is a pervasive idea in ubiquitous computing. We surveyed the field by looking at what features are actually present in technologies that support service composition in some form. Condensing this into a list...... of features allowed us to discuss the qualitative merits and drawbacks of various approaches to service composition, focusing in particular on usability, adaptability and efficiency. Moreover, we found that further research is needed into quality-of-service assurance of composites and into contingency...... management for composites—one of the concerns differentiating service composition in ubiquitous computing from its counterpart in less dynamic settings....

  19. Effects of the Team Competition-Based Ubiquitous Gaming Approach on Students' Interactive Patterns, Collective Efficacy and Awareness of Collaboration and Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Hung; Hwang, Gwo-Jen

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has illustrated the importance of acquiring knowledge from authentic contexts; however, without full engagement, students' learning performance might not be as good as expected. In this study, a Team Competition-based Ubiquitous Gaming approach was proposed for improving students' learning effectiveness in authentic learning…

  20. Fabrication of Games and Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoenau-Fog, Henrik; Reng, Lars; Kofoed, Lise

    2015-01-01

    The concept of Game based learning has proven to have many possibilities for supporting better learning outcomes, when using educational or commercial games in the classroom. However, there is also a great potential in using game development as a motivator in several other kinds of learning...... scenarios. Using game development as an approach for including game based learning in various educations has become more accessible due to more user friendly game development tools and systems. This study will thus focus on an exploration on how game development motivates students and what they learn when...... creating games. We exemplify the potential of using game fabrication as a learning environment with the investigation of a game production, which involved over 25 students across semesters. In order to investigate students’ experiences during this purposive game production, we set up an experiment where...

  1. Playing styles based on experiential learning theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bontchev, Boyan; Vassileva, Dessislava; Aleksieva-Petrova, Adelina; Petrov, Milen

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, many researchers have reported positive outcomes and effects from applying computer games to the educational process. The main preconditions for an effective game-based learning process include the presence of high learning interest and the desire to study hard. Therefore,

  2. Game Engagement Theory and Adult Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitton, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    One of the benefits of computer game-based learning is the ability of certain types of game to engage and motivate learners. However, theories of learning and engagement, particularly in the sphere of higher education, typically fail to consider gaming engagement theory. In this article, the author examines the principles of engagement from games…

  3. The Feasibility of a Customized, In-Home, Game-Based Stroke Exercise Program Using the Microsoft Kinect Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Proffitt

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of a 6-week, game-based, in-home telerehabilitation exercise program using the Microsoft Kinect® for individuals with chronic stroke. Four participants with chronic stroke completed the intervention based on games designed with the customized Mystic Isle software. The games were tailored to each participant’s specific rehabilitation needs to facilitate the attainment of individualized goals determined through the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Likert scale questionnaires assessed the feasibility and utility of the game-based intervention. Supplementary clinical outcome data were collected. All participants played the games with moderately high enjoyment. Participant feedback helped identify barriers to use (especially, limited free time and possible improvements. An in-home, customized, virtual reality game intervention to provide rehabilitative exercises for persons with chronic stroke is practicable. However, future studies are necessary to determine the intervention’s impact on participant function, activity, and involvement.

  4. Video Game Learning Dynamics: Actionable Measures of Multidimensional Learning Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Debbie Denise; Tabachnick, Barbara G.; Kosko, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Valid, accessible, reusable methods for instructional video game design and embedded assessment can provide actionable information enhancing individual and collective achievement. Cyberlearning through game-based, metaphor-enhanced learning objects (CyGaMEs) design and embedded assessment quantify player behavior to study knowledge discovery and…

  5. Exploratory Analysis in Learning Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, David; de Freitas, Sara

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes the methods, observations, challenges and implications for exploratory analysis drawn from two learning analytics research projects. The cases include an analysis of a games-based virtual performance assessment and an analysis of data from 52,000 students over a 5-year period at a large Australian university. The complex…

  6. The ICCE Framework: Framing Learning Experiences Afforded by Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Aroutis; Shah, Mamta

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for game-based learning frameworks that provide a lens for understanding learning experiences afforded in digital games. These frameworks should aim to facilitate game analyses, identification of learning opportunities, and support for learner experiences. This article uses the inquiry, communication, construction, and expression…

  7. Enhancing Formal E-Learning with Edutainment on Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labus, A.; Despotovic-Zrakic, M.; Radenkovic, B.; Bogdanovic, Z.; Radenkovic, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the investigation of the possibilities of enhancing the formal e-learning process by harnessing the potential of informal game-based learning on social networks. The goal of the research is to improve the outcomes of the formal learning process through the design and implementation of an educational game on a social network…

  8. Multimedia Adaptation in Ubiquitous Environments: Benefits of Structured Multimedia Documents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago); I. Vaishnavi (Ishan); R. Kernchen; S. Meissner; M. Boussard; A. Spedalieri; B. Gao (Bo); D.C.A. Bulterman (Dick)

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractThis paper demonstrates the advantages of using structured multimedia documents for session management and media distribution in ubiquitous environments. We show how document manipulations can be used to perform powerful operations such as content to context adaptation and presentation

  9. Noise and Vibration Risk Prevention Virtual Web for Ubiquitous Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redel-Macías, María Dolores; Cubero-Atienza, Antonio J.; Martínez-Valle, José Miguel; Pedrós-Pérez, Gerardo; del Pilar Martínez-Jiménez, María

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new Web portal offering experimental labs for ubiquitous training of university engineering students in work-related risk prevention. The Web-accessible computer program simulates the noise and machine vibrations met in the work environment, in a series of virtual laboratories that mimic an actual laboratory and provide the…

  10. Dynamic Service Discovery and Composition for Ubiquitous Networks Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonino da Silva Santos, L.O.; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Ferreira Pires, Luis

    2006-01-01

    The realization of ubiquitous networks brings new challenges to application development. In this kind of network, services and, more specifically web services, have been used to provide the functionality required by its users and applications. In such environments features like automatic service

  11. A survey on web modeling approaches for ubiquitous web applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwinger, W.; Retschitzegger, W.; Schauerhuber, A.; Kappel, G.; Wimmer, M.; Pröll, B.; Cachero Castro, C.; Casteleyn, S.; De Troyer, O.; Fraternali, P.; Garrigos, I.; Garzotto, F.; Ginige, A.; Houben, G.J.P.M.; Koch, N.; Moreno, N.; Pastor, O.; Paolini, P.; Pelechano Ferragud, V.; Rossi, G.; Schwabe, D.; Tisi, M.; Vallecillo, A.; Sluijs, van der K.A.M.; Zhang, G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – Ubiquitous web applications (UWA) are a new type of web applications which are accessed in various contexts, i.e. through different devices, by users with various interests, at anytime from anyplace around the globe. For such full-fledged, complex software systems, a methodologically sound

  12. Ubiquitous Computing--Are We Crazy? Point/Counterpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Scott W.; Horn, Patricia S.

    2005-01-01

    The push for ubiquitous computing (UC) relies on an understandable and well-intentioned belief that teaching and schooling need to be transformed. This view appears credible based on large-scale criteria, such as test scores relative to other countries, drop-out rates, and economic changes. And the use of technology to achieve this goal is…

  13. Commentary: Ubiquitous Computing Revisited--A New Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Glen; Garofalo, Joe

    2006-01-01

    In 2002, representatives from the teacher educator associations representing the core content areas (science, mathematics, language arts, and social studies) and educational technology met at the National Technology Leadership Retreat (NTLR) to discuss potential implications of ubiquitous computing for K-12 schools. This paper re-examines some of…

  14. Mobile Computing and Ubiquitous Networking: Concepts, Technologies and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Samuel

    2001-01-01

    Analyzes concepts, technologies and challenges related to mobile computing and networking. Defines basic concepts of cellular systems. Describes the evolution of wireless technologies that constitute the foundations of mobile computing and ubiquitous networking. Presents characterization and issues of mobile computing. Analyzes economical and…

  15. Privacy context model for dynamic privacy adaptation in ubiquitous computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaub, Florian; Koenings, Bastian; Dietzel, Stefan; Weber, M.; Kargl, Frank

    Ubiquitous computing is characterized by the merger of physical and virtual worlds as physical artifacts gain digital sensing, processing, and communication capabilities. Maintaining an appropriate level of privacy in the face of such complex and often highly dynamic systems is challenging. We argue

  16. Effects of the Digital Game-Development Approach on Elementary School Students' Learning Motivation, Problem Solving, and Learning Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hui-Chun; Hung, Chun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the game-based development approach is proposed for improving the learning motivation, problem solving skills, and learning achievement of students. An experiment was conducted on a learning activity of an elementary school science course to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach. A total of 59 sixth graders from two…

  17. An improved anonymous authentication scheme for roaming in ubiquitous networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hakjun; Lee, Donghoon; Moon, Jongho; Jung, Jaewook; Kang, Dongwoo; Kim, Hyoungshick

    2018-01-01

    With the evolution of communication technology and the exponential increase of mobile devices, the ubiquitous networking allows people to use our data and computing resources anytime and everywhere. However, numerous security concerns and complicated requirements arise as these ubiquitous networks are deployed throughout people’s lives. To meet the challenge, the user authentication schemes in ubiquitous networks should ensure the essential security properties for the preservation of the privacy with low computational cost. In 2017, Chaudhry et al. proposed a password-based authentication scheme for the roaming in ubiquitous networks to enhance the security. Unfortunately, we found that their scheme remains insecure in its protection of the user privacy. In this paper, we prove that Chaudhry et al.’s scheme is vulnerable to the stolen-mobile device and user impersonation attacks, and its drawbacks comprise the absence of the incorrect login-input detection, the incorrectness of the password change phase, and the absence of the revocation provision. Moreover, we suggest a possible way to fix the security flaw in Chaudhry et al’s scheme by using the biometric-based authentication for which the bio-hash is applied in the implementation of a three-factor authentication. We prove the security of the proposed scheme with the random oracle model and formally verify its security properties using a tool named ProVerif, and analyze it in terms of the computational and communication cost. The analysis result shows that the proposed scheme is suitable for resource-constrained ubiquitous environments. PMID:29505575

  18. A Narrative Review of Social Media and Game-Based Nutrition Interventions Targeted at Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nour, Monica; Yeung, Sin Hang; Partridge, Stephanie; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret

    2017-05-01

    The increased popularity of social media and mobile gaming among young adults provides an opportunity for innovative nutrition programs. This review evaluated the efficacy of these strategies in interventions targeted at 18- to 35-year-olds. The protocol was guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA). Ten scientific databases, information technology conference proceedings, and gray literature were searched. Two reviewers conducted screening, data extraction, and quality assessments. Interventions were included if they used social media or electronic games. Comparisons were made pre- to post-intervention, or between intervention and control arms. Outcomes of interest included change in nutrition knowledge, attitudes, behavior, or weight and/or body composition. Eleven social media-based (randomized controlled trials [RCT] n=7) and six game-based [RCT n=1]) interventions were included. Overall quality of studies was low. Social media-based strategies included forum/blogs (n=5), Facebook (n=5), Twitter (n=1), YouTube (n=1), and chat rooms (n=1). Eight (RCT n=6) of 11 social media-based studies demonstrated improvements in outcomes. Findings suggested that social media may be more effective when combined with other strategies. Virtual reality games (n=3), web-based games (n=2), and a mobile application (n=1) were used in the gaming interventions. While a significant increase in knowledge was reported by three gaming studies (RCT=1), two used nonvalidated tools and longer-term measures of weight and behavioral outcomes were limited. The use of social media and gaming for nutrition promotion is in its infancy. Preliminary evidence suggests that these strategies have some utility for intervening with young adults. Further research using high-quality study designs is required, with measurement of outcomes over longer time periods. The systematic review protocol is registered with PROSPERO (registration number: CRD42015025427

  19. Reproducibility of heart rate and perceptual demands of game-based training drills in handball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Ravier

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Game-based training are popular in team-sports; however there is a lack of research specific to team handball. The aim of this study was to assess i the test-retest reliability of heart rate (HR, time spent in HR zone intensities and rating of perceived exertion of a novel small-sided game, ii and whether it is comparable to that of generic intermittent shuttle running and match play with team handball players. Fourteen elite male handball players completed each exercise comprising two periods of 10min interspersed with 2min recovery in separate occasions and repeated them one week apart. Exercises consisted of intermittent 30s-30s shuttle running (ISR, intermittent 30s-30s small-sided game (with 3-a-side field players, 3vs3 and match play (with 6-a-side field players, 6vs6. Mean HR demonstrated high level of reproducibility for the three drills (r = 0.86-0.89, TEM = 2.21-2.63 bpm, CV = 1.23-1.55%. For time spent in heart rate zones TEMs reached up 1.12, 1.40 and 2.48 min for ISR, 6vs6 and 3vs3, respectively. Specifically for HR zone higher than 90% of HRmax, CVs showed wide extent of scores with 9.73 (ISR, 27.39 (6vs6 and 108.29% (3vs3. Mean HR results suggest that physiological response was consistent between sessions. Because of the poor reproducibility for time spent in the target zone higher than 90% of HRmax, the efficiency of both 3vs3 and 6vs6 in improving aerobic power should be analysed with caution. The present results suggest that reproducibility of physiological demand of ball-drills should be considered before prescribing them as conditioning training.

  20. The Game Enhanced Learning Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reng, Lars; Schoenau-Fog, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    will describe the levels of the model, which is based on our experience in teaching professional game development at university level. Furthermore, we have been using the model to inspire numerous educators to improve their students’ motivation and skills. The model presents various game-based learning...... activities, and depicts their required planning and expected outcome through eight levels. At its lower levels, the model contains the possibilities of using stand-alone analogue and digital games as teachers, utilizing games as a facilitator of learning activities, exploiting gamification and motivating......In this paper, we will introduce the Game Enhanced learning Model (GEM), which describes a range of gameoriented learning activities. The model is intended to give an overview of the possibilities of game-based learning in general and all the way up to purposive game productions. In the paper, we...