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Sample records for tyrone-2 reactor

  1. Using Tellus data to enhance targeting of volcanogenic massive sulphide mineralisation in the Tyrone Igneous Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Hollis, Steven; Cooper, Mark; Earls, Garth; Roberts, Stephen; Herrington, Richard; Piercey, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The Tyrone Igneous Complex of Northern Ireland has been a target for base and precious metal exploration since the 1970s. Historic exploration was hampered by poor exposure and consequently a limited understanding of the local geology. Extensive new field mapping, utilising the high-resolution Tellus geophysical survey, coupled with U-Pb zircon geochronology and whole-rock geochemistry, has greatly improved our understanding of the complex and its potential to host volcanogenic massive sulphi...

  2. Arc-continent collision and the formation of continental crust: A new geochemical and isotopic record from the Ordovician Tyrone Igneous Complex, Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.; Amato, Jeffrey M.; Blusztajn, Jerzy; Schouten, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Collisions between oceanic island-arc terranes and passive continental margins are thought to have been important in the formation of continental crust throughout much of Earth's history. Magmatic evolution during this stage of the plate-tectonic cycle is evident in several areas of the Ordovician Grampian-Taconic orogen, as we demonstrate in the first detailed geochemical study of the Tyrone Igneous Complex, Ireland. New U-Pb zircon dating yields ages of 493 2 Ma from a primitive mafic intrusion, indicating intra-oceanic subduction in Tremadoc time, and 475 10 Ma from a light rare earth element (LREE)-enriched tonalite intrusion that incorporated Laurentian continental material by early Arenig time (Early Ordovician, Stage 2) during arc-continent collision. Notably, LREE enrichment in volcanism and silicic intrusions of the Tyrone Igneous Complex exceeds that of average Dalradian (Laurentian) continental material that would have been thrust under the colliding forearc and potentially recycled into arc magmatism. This implies that crystal fractionation, in addition to magmatic mixing and assimilation, was important to the formation of new crust in the Grampian-Taconic orogeny. Because similar super-enrichment of orogenic melts occurred elsewhere in the Caledonides in the British Isles and Newfoundland, the addition of new, highly enriched melt to this accreted arc terrane was apparently widespread spatially and temporally. Such super-enrichment of magmatism, especially if accompanied by loss of corresponding lower crustal residues, supports the theory that arc-continent collision plays an important role in altering bulk crustal composition toward typical values for ancient continental crust. ?? 2009 Geological Society of London.

  3. Reactor BR2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubel, P

    2000-07-01

    The BR2 reactor is still SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facility. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. Various aspects concerning the operation of the BR2 Reactor, the utilisation of the CALLISTO loop and the irradiation programme, the BR2 R and D programme and the production of isotopes and of NTD-silicon are discussed. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported.

  4. Reactor BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubel, P.

    2000-01-01

    The BR2 reactor is still SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facility. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. Various aspects concerning the operation of the BR2 Reactor, the utilisation of the CALLISTO loop and the irradiation programme, the BR2 R and D programme and the production of isotopes and of NTD-silicon are discussed. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported

  5. PARR-2: reactor description and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyne, M.F.; Meghji, J.H.

    1990-12-01

    PARR-2 is a miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR) research reactor has been designed at the rate of 27 kW. Reactor assembly comprises of peaking characteristics with a self limiting flux. In this report reactor description with its assembly and instrumentation control system has been explained. The reactor engineering and physics experiments which can be performed on this reactor are explained in this report. PARR-2 is fueled with HEU fuel pins which are about 90% enriched in U-235. Specific requirements for the safety of the reactor, its building and the personnel, normal instrumentation as required in an industrial environment is sufficient. (A.B.)

  6. Reactor BR2: Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubel, P.

    2000-01-01

    The BR2 reactor is still SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facility. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. A safety audit was conduced by the IAEA, the conclusions of which demonstrated the excellent performance of the plant in terms of operational safety. In 1999, the CALLISTO facility was extensively used for various programmes involving LWR pressure vessel materials, IASCC of LWR structural materials, fusion reactor materials and martensic steels for use in ADS systems. In 1999, BR2's commercial programmes were further developed

  7. Material test reactor fuel research at the BR2 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, Steven Van; Koonen, Edgar; Berghe, Sven van den [Institute for Nuclear Materials Science, SCK-CEN, Boeretang, Mol (Belgium)

    2012-03-15

    The construction of new, high performance material test reactor or the conversion of such reactors' core from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) based fuel requires several fuel qualification steps. For the conversion of high performance reactors, high density dispersion or monolithic fuel types are being developed. The Uranium-Molybdenum fuel system has been selected as reference system for the qualification of LEU fuels. For reactors with lower performance characteristics, or as medium enriched fuel for high performance reactors, uranium silicide dispersion fuel is applied. However, on the longer term, the U-Mo based fuel types may offer a more efficient fuel alternative and-or an easier back-end solution with respect to the silicide based fuels. At the BR2 reactor of the Belgian nuclear research center, SCK-CEN in Mol, several types of fuel testing opportunities are present to contribute to such qualification process. A generic validation test for a selected fuel system is the irradiation of flat plates with representative dimensions for a fuel element. By flexible positioning and core loading, bounding irradiation conditions for fuel elements can be performed in a standard device in the BR2. For fuel element designs with curved plates, the element fabrication method compatibility of the fuel type can be addressed by incorporating a set of prototype fuel plates in a mixed driver fuel element of the BR2 reactor. These generic types of tests are performed directly in the primary coolant flow conditions of the BR2 reactor. The experiment control and interpretation is supported by detailed neutronic and thermal-hydraulic modeling of the experiments. Finally, the BR2 reactor offers the flexibility for irradiation of full size prototype fuel elements, as 200mm diameter irradiation channels are available. These channels allow the accommodation of various types of prototype fuel elements, eventually using a dedicated cooling loop to provide the

  8. EBR-2 [Experimental Breeder Reactor-2], IFR [Integral Fast Reactor] prototype testing programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehto, W.K.; Sackett, J.I.; Lindsay, R.W.; Planchon, H.P.; Lambert, J.D.B.

    1990-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 (EBR-2) is a sodium cooled power reactor supplying about 20 MWe to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) grid and, in addition, is the key component in the development of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). EBR-2's testing capability is extensive and has seen four major phases: (1) demonstration of LMFBR power plant feasibility, (2) irradiation testing for fuel and material development. (3) testing the off-normal performance of fuel and plant systems and (4) operation as the IFR prototype, developing and demonstrating the IFR technology associated with fuel and plant design. Specific programs being carried out in support of the IFR include advanced fuels and materials development and component testing. This paper discusses EBR-2 as the IFR prototype and the associated testing programs. 29 refs

  9. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubel, P.

    2001-01-01

    The BR2 is a materials testing reactor and is still one of SCK-CEN's important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. During the last three years, the availability of the installation was maintained at an average level of 97.6 percent. In the year 2000, the reactor was operated for a total of 104 days at a mean power of 56 MW. In 2000, most irradiation experiments were performed in the CALLISTO PWR loop. The report describes irradiations achieved or under preparation in 2000, including the development of advanced facilities and concept studies for new programmes. An overview of the scientific irradiation programmes as well as of the R and D programme of the BR2 reactor in 2000 is given

  10. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubel, P

    2001-04-01

    The BR2 is a materials testing reactor and is still one of SCK-CEN's important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. During the last three years, the availability of the installation was maintained at an average level of 97.6 percent. In the year 2000, the reactor was operated for a total of 104 days at a mean power of 56 MW. In 2000, most irradiation experiments were performed in the CALLISTO PWR loop. The report describes irradiations achieved or under preparation in 2000, including the development of advanced facilities and concept studies for new programmes. An overview of the scientific irradiation programmes as well as of the R and D programme of the BR2 reactor in 2000 is given.

  11. Safety features of TR-2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuerker, T.

    2001-01-01

    TR-2 is a swimming pool type research reactor with 5 MW thermal power and uses standard MTR plate type fuel elements. Each standard fuel element consist of 23 fuel plates with a meat + cladding thickness of 0.127 cm, coolant channel clearance is 0.21 cm. Originally TR-2 is designed for %93 enriched U-Al. Alloy fuel meat.This work is based on the preparation of the Final Safety Analyses Report (FSAR) of the TR-2 reactor. The main aspect is to investigate the behaviour of TR-2 reactor under the accident and abnormal operating conditions, which cowers the accident spectrum unique for the TR-2 reactor. This presentation covers some selected transient analyses which are important for the safety aspects of the TR-2 reactor like reactivity induced startup accidents, pump coast down (Loss of Flow Accident, LOFA) and other accidents which are charecteristic to the TR-2

  12. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubel, P.

    2002-01-01

    The BR2 materials testing reactor is one of SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. In 2001, the reactor was operated for a total of 123 days at a mean power of 59 MW in order to satisfy the irradiation conditions of the internal and external programmes using mainly the CALLISTO PWR loop. The mean consumption of fresh fuel elements was 5.26 per 1000 MWd. Main achievements in 2001 included the development of a three-dimensional full-scale model of the BR2 reactor for simulation and prediction of irradiation conditions for various experiments; the construction of the FUTURE-MT device designed for the irradiation of fuel plates under representative conditions of geometry, neutron spectrum, heat flux and thermal-hydraulic conditions and the development of in-pile instrumentation and a data acquisition system

  13. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubel, P

    2002-04-01

    The BR2 materials testing reactor is one of SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. In 2001, the reactor was operated for a total of 123 days at a mean power of 59 MW in order to satisfy the irradiation conditions of the internal and external programmes using mainly the CALLISTO PWR loop. The mean consumption of fresh fuel elements was 5.26 per 1000 MWd. Main achievements in 2001 included the development of a three-dimensional full-scale model of the BR2 reactor for simulation and prediction of irradiation conditions for various experiments; the construction of the FUTURE-MT device designed for the irradiation of fuel plates under representative conditions of geometry, neutron spectrum, heat flux and thermal-hydraulic conditions and the development of in-pile instrumentation and a data acquisition system.

  14. BR2 Reactor: Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moons, F.

    2007-01-01

    The irradiations in the BR2 reactor are in collaboration with or at the request of third parties such as the European Commission, the IAEA, research centres and utilities, reactor vendors or fuel manufacturers. The reactor also contributes significantly to the production of radioisotopes for medical and industrial applications, to neutron silicon doping for the semiconductor industry and to scientific irradiations for universities. Along the ongoing programmes on fuel and materials development, several new irradiation devices are in use or in design. Amongst others a loop providing enhanced cooling for novel materials testing reactor fuel, a device for high temperature gas cooled fuel as well as a rig for the irradiation of metallurgical samples in a Pb-Bi environment. A full scale 3-D heterogeneous model of BR2 is available. The model describes the real hyperbolic arrangement of the reactor and includes the detailed 3-D space dependent distribution of the isotopic fuel depletion in the fuel elements. The model is validated on the reactivity measurements of several tens of BR2 operation cycles. The accurate calculations of the axial and radial distributions of the poisoning of the beryllium matrix by 3 He, 6 Li and 3T are verified on the measured reactivity losses used to predict the reactivity behavior for the coming decades. The model calculates the main functionals in reactor physics like: conventional thermal and equivalent fission neutron fluxes, number of displacements per atom, fission rate, thermal power characteristics as heat flux and linear power density, neutron/gamma heating, determination of the fission energy deposited in fuel plates/rods, neutron multiplication factor and fuel burn-up. For each reactor irradiation project, a detailed geometry model of the experimental device and of its neighborhood is developed. Neutron fluxes are predicted within approximately 10 percent in comparison with the dosimetry measurements. Fission rate, heat flux and

  15. 77 FR 516 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Natural Resource Damages Consent Decree Under the Comprehensive...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-05

    ...-McMoRan Tyrone Inc., Freeport-McMoRan Tyrone Mining LLC, and Freeport-McMoRan Cobre Mining Company... Damage Assessment and Restoration Fund, which can be used to restore, rehabilitate, replace, or acquire...

  16. Application of MCNPX 2.7.D for reactor core management at the research reactor BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalcheva, Silva; Koonen, Edgar

    2011-01-01

    The paper discusses application of the Monte Carlo burn up code MCNPX 2.7.D for whole core criticality and depletion analysis of the Material Testing Research Reactor BR2 at SCK-CEN in Mol, Belgium. Two different approaches in the use of MCNPX 2.7.D are presented. The first methodology couples the evolution of fuel depletion, evaluated by MCNPX 2.7.D in an infinite lattice with a steady-state 3-D power distribution in the full core model. The second method represents fully automatic whole core depletion and criticality calculations in the detailed 3-D heterogeneous geometry model of the BR2 reactor. The accuracy of the method and computational time as function of the number of used unique burn up materials in the model are being studied. The depletion capabilities of MCNPX 2.7.D are compared vs. the developed at the BR2 reactor department MCNPX & ORIGEN-S combined method. Testing of MCNPX 2.7.D on the criticality measurements at the BR2 reactor is presented. (author)

  17. Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactors for replacing SLOWPOKE-2 research reactors and the production of radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, H.W.; Hilborn, J.W.; Carlin, G.E.; Gagnon, R.; Busatta, P.

    2014-01-01

    Inspired from the inherently safe SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor, the Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor was conceived with a double goal: replacing the heterogeneous SLOWPOKE-2 reactors when they reach end-of-core life to continue their missions of neutron activation analysis and neutron radiography at universities, and to produce radioisotopes such as 99 Mo for medical applications. A homogeneous reactor core allows a much simpler extraction of radioisotopes (such as 99 Mo) for applications in industry and nuclear medicine. The 20 kW Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor was modelled using both the deterministic WIMS-AECL and the probabilistic MCNP 5 reactor simulation codes. The homogeneous fuel mixture was a dilute aqueous solution of Uranyl Sulfate (UO 2 SO 4 ) with 994.2 g of 235 U (enrichment at 20%) providing an excess reactivity at operating temperature (40 o C) of 3.8 mk for a molality determined as 1.46 mol kg -1 for a Zircaloy-2 reactor vessel. Because this reactor is intended to replace the core of SLOWPOKE-2 reactors, the Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor core had a height about twice its diameter. The reactor could be controlled by mechanical absorber rods in the beryllium reflector, chemical control in the core, or a combination of both. The safety of the Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor was analysed for both normal operation and transient conditions. Thermal-hydraulics calculations used COMSOL Multiphysics and the results showed that natural convection was sufficient to ensure adequate reactor cooling in all situations. The most severe transient simulated resulted from a 5.87 mk step positive reactivity insertion to the reactor in operation at critical and at steady state at 20 o C. Peak temperature and power were determined as 83 o C and 546 kW, respectively, reached 5.1 s after the reactivity insertion. However, the power fell rapidly to values below 20 kW some 35 s after the peak and remained below that value thereafter. Both the temperature and void coefficients are

  18. Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactors for replacing SLOWPOKE-2 research reactors and the production of radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonin, H.W., E-mail: bonin-h@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Hilborn, J.W. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Carlin, G.E. [Ontario Power Generation, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Gagnon, R.; Busatta, P. [Canadian Forces (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Inspired from the inherently safe SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor, the Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor was conceived with a double goal: replacing the heterogeneous SLOWPOKE-2 reactors when they reach end-of-core life to continue their missions of neutron activation analysis and neutron radiography at universities, and to produce radioisotopes such as {sup 99}Mo for medical applications. A homogeneous reactor core allows a much simpler extraction of radioisotopes (such as {sup 99}Mo) for applications in industry and nuclear medicine. The 20 kW Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor was modelled using both the deterministic WIMS-AECL and the probabilistic MCNP 5 reactor simulation codes. The homogeneous fuel mixture was a dilute aqueous solution of Uranyl Sulfate (UO{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) with 994.2 g of {sup 235}U (enrichment at 20%) providing an excess reactivity at operating temperature (40 {sup o}C) of 3.8 mk for a molality determined as 1.46 mol kg{sup -1} for a Zircaloy-2 reactor vessel. Because this reactor is intended to replace the core of SLOWPOKE-2 reactors, the Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor core had a height about twice its diameter. The reactor could be controlled by mechanical absorber rods in the beryllium reflector, chemical control in the core, or a combination of both. The safety of the Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor was analysed for both normal operation and transient conditions. Thermal-hydraulics calculations used COMSOL Multiphysics and the results showed that natural convection was sufficient to ensure adequate reactor cooling in all situations. The most severe transient simulated resulted from a 5.87 mk step positive reactivity insertion to the reactor in operation at critical and at steady state at 20 {sup o}C. Peak temperature and power were determined as 83 {sup o}C and 546 kW, respectively, reached 5.1 s after the reactivity insertion. However, the power fell rapidly to values below 20 kW some 35 s after the peak and remained below that value thereafter. Both the

  19. Core monitoring at the WNP-2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skeen, D.R.; Torres, R.H.; Burke, W.J.; Jenkins, I.; Jones, S.W.

    1992-01-01

    The WNP-2 reactor is a 3,323-MW(thermal) boiling water reactor (BWR) that is operated by the Washington Public Power Supply System. The WNP-2 reactor began commercial operation in 1984 and is currently in its eighth cycle. The core monitoring system used for the first cycle of operation was supplied by the reactor vendor. Cycles 2 through 6 were monitored with the POWERPLEX Core Monitoring Software System (CMSS) using the XTGBWR simulation code. In 1991, the supply system upgraded the core monitoring system by installing the POWERPLEX 2 CMSS prior to the seventh cycle of operation for WNP-2. The POWERPLEX 2 CMSS was developed by Siemens Power Corporation (SPC) and is based on SPC's advanced state-of-the-art reactor simulator code MICROBURN-B. The improvements in the POWERPLEX 2 system are possible as a result of advances in minicomputer hardware

  20. TA-2 Water Boiler Reactor Decommissioning Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durbin, M.E.; Montoya, G.M.

    1991-06-01

    This final report addresses the Phase 2 decommissioning of the Water Boiler Reactor, biological shield, other components within the biological shield, and piping pits in the floor of the reactor building. External structures and underground piping associated with the gaseous effluent (stack) line from Technical Area 2 (TA-2) Water Boiler Reactor were removed in 1985--1986 as Phase 1 of reactor decommissioning. The cost of Phase 2 was approximately $623K. The decommissioning operation produced 173 m 3 of low-level solid radioactive waste and 35 m 3 of mixed waste. 15 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs

  1. EBR-2 [Experimental Breeder Reactor-2] test programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.; Lehto, W.K.; Lindsay, R.W.; Planchon, H.P.; Lambert, J.D.B.; Hill, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 (EBR-2) is a sodium cooled power reactor supplying about 20 MWe to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) grid and, in addition, is the key component in the development of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). EBR-2's testing capability is extensive and has seen four major phases: (1) demonstration of LMFBR power plant feasibility, (2) irradiation testing for fuel and material development, (3) testing the off-normal performance of fuel and plant systems and (4) operation as the IFR prototype, developing and demonstrating the IFR technology associated with fuel and plant design. Specific programs being carried out in support of the IFR include advanced fuels and materials development, advanced control system development, plant diagnostics development and component testing. This paper discusses EBR-2 as the IFR prototype and the associated testing programs. 29 refs

  2. BR2 Reactor: Irradiation of fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verwimp, A.

    2005-01-01

    Safe, reliable and economical operation of reactor fuels, both UO 2 and MOX types, requires in-pile testing and qualification up to high target burn-up levels. In-pile testing of advanced fuels for improved performance is also mandatory. The objectives of research performed at SCK-CEN are to perform Neutron irradiation of LWR (Light Water Reactor) fuels in the BR2 reactor under relevant operating and monitoring conditions, as specified by the experimenter's requirements and to improve the on-line measurements on the fuel rods themselves

  3. Ageing management of the BR2 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verpoortem, J. R.; Van Dyck, S.

    2014-01-01

    At the Belgian nuclear research centre (SCK.CEN) several test reactors are operated. Among these, Belgian Reactor 2 (BR2) is the largest Material Test Reactor (MTR). This water-cooled, beryllium moderated reactor with a maximum thermal power of 100 MW became operational in 1962. Except for two major refurbishment campaigns of one year each, this reactor has been operated continuously over the past 50 years, with a frequency of 5-12 cycles per year. At present, BR2 is used for different research activities, the production of medical isotopes, the production of n-doped silicon and various training and education activities. (Author)

  4. Reactor theory and power reactors. 1. Calculational methods for reactors. 2. Reactor kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    Various methods for calculation of neutron flux in power reactors are discussed. Some mathematical models used to describe transients in nuclear reactors and techniques for the reactor kinetics' relevant equations solution are also presented

  5. BR2 reactor neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neve de Mevergnies, M.

    1977-01-01

    The use of reactor neutron beams is becoming increasingly more widespread for the study of some properties of condensed matter. It is mainly due to the unique properties of the ''thermal'' neutrons as regards wavelength, energy, magnetic moment and overall favorable ratio of scattering to absorption cross-sections. Besides these fundamental reasons, the impetus for using neutrons is also due to the existence of powerful research reactors (such as BR2) built mainly for nuclear engineering programs, but where a number of intense neutron beams are available at marginal cost. A brief introduction to the production of suitable neutron beams from a reactor is given. (author)

  6. Fission product release from SLOWPOKE-2 reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harnden-Gillis, A M.C. [Queen` s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics

    1994-12-31

    Increasing radiation fields at several SLOWPOKE-2 reactors fuelled with highly enriched uranium aluminum alloy fuel have begun to interfere with the daily operation of these reactors. To investigate this phenomenon, samples of reactor container water and gas from the headspace were obtained at four SLOWPOKE-2 reactor facilities and examined by gamma ray spectroscopy methods. These radiation fields are due to the circulation of fission products within the reactor container vessel. The most likely source of the fission product release is an area of uranium-bearing material exposed to the coolant at the end weld line which originated at the time of fuel fabrication. The results of this study are compared with observations from an underwater visual examination of one core and the metallographic examination of archived fuel elements. 19 refs., 4 tabs., 8 figs.

  7. Pressurized water reactor simulator. Workshop material. 2. ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established an activity in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the development and distribution of simulation programs and educational material and sponsors courses and workshops. The workshops are in two parts: techniques and tools for reactor simulator development. And the use of reactor simulators in education. Workshop material for the first part is covered in the IAEA Training Course Series No. 12, 'Reactor Simulator Development' (2001). Course material for workshops using a WWER- 1000 reactor department simulator from the Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, the Russian Federation is presented in the IAEA Training Course Series No. 21, 2nd edition, 'WWER-1000 Reactor Simulator' (2005). Course material for workshops using a boiling water reactor simulator developed for the IAEA by Cassiopeia Technologies Incorporated of Canada (CTI) is presented in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No.23, 2nd edition, 'Boiling Water Reactor Simulator' (2005). This report consists of course material for workshops using a pressurized water reactor simulator

  8. Advances in Reactor Physics, Mathematics and Computation. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    These proceedings of the international topical meeting on advances in reactor physics, mathematics and computation, Volume 2, are divided into 7 sessions bearing on: - session 7: Deterministic transport methods 1 (7 conferences), - session 8: Interpretation and analysis of reactor instrumentation (6 conferences), - session 9: High speed computing applied to reactor operations (5 conferences), - session 10: Diffusion theory and kinetics (7 conferences), - session 11: Fast reactor design, validation and operating experience (8 conferences), - session 12: Deterministic transport methods 2 (7 conferences), - session 13: Application of expert systems to physical aspects of reactor design and operation.

  9. Neutron transport. Physics and calculation of nuclear reactors with applications to pressurized water reactors and fast neutron reactors. 2 ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussac, J.; Reuss, P.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the main physical bases of neutron theory and nuclear reactor calculation. 1) Interactions of neutrons with matter and basic principles of neutron transport; 2) Neutron transport in homogeneous medium and the neutron field: kinetic behaviour, slowing-down, resonance absorption, diffusion equation, processing methods; 3) Theory of a reactor constituted with homogeneous zones: critical condition, kinetics, separation of variables, calculation and neutron balance of the fundamental mode, one-group and multigroup theories; 4) Study of heterogeneous cell lattices: fast fission factor, resonance absorption, thermal output factor, diffusion coefficient, computer codes; 5) Operation and control of reactors: perturbation theory, reactivity, fuel properties evolution, poisoning by fission products, calculation of a reactor and fuel management; 6) Study of some types of reactors: PWR and fast breeder reactors, the main reactor types of the present French program [fr

  10. TPDWR2: thermal power determination for Westinghouse reactors, Version 2. User's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaczynski, G.M.; Woodruff, R.W.

    1985-12-01

    TPDWR2 is a computer program which was developed to determine the amount of thermal power generated by any Westinghouse nuclear power plant. From system conditions, TPDWR2 calculates enthalpies of water and steam and the power transferred to or from various components in the reactor coolant system and to or from the chemical and volume control system. From these results and assuming that the reactor core is operating at constant power and is at thermal equilibrium, TPDWR2 calculates the thermal power generated by the reactor core. TPDWR2 runs on the IBM PC and XT computers when IBM Personal Computer DOS, Version 2.00 or 2.10, and IBM Personal Computer Basic, Version D2.00 or D2.10, are stored on the same diskette with TPDWR2

  11. Once-through CANDU reactor models for the ORIGEN2 computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croff, A.G.; Bjerke, M.A.

    1980-11-01

    Reactor physics calculations have led to the development of two CANDU reactor models for the ORIGEN2 computer code. The model CANDUs are based on (1) the existing once-through fuel cycle with feed comprised of natural uranium and (2) a projected slightly enriched (1.2 wt % 235 U) fuel cycle. The reactor models are based on cross sections taken directly from the reactor physics codes. Descriptions of the reactor models, as well as values for the ORIGEN2 flux parameters THERM, RES, and FAST, are given

  12. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1988, Part -2, RA reactor annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, M.; Ajdacic, N.; Zaric, M.; Vukovic, Z.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation protection tasks which enable safe operation of the RA reactor, and are defined according the the legal regulations and IAEA safety recommendations are sorted into four categories in this report: (1) Control of the working environment, dosimetry at the RA reactor and radiation protection; (2) Radioactivity control in the vicinity of the reactor and meteorology measurements; (3) Decontamination and relevant actions, collecting and treatment of fluid effluents; and and solid radioactive wastes [sr

  13. Irradiation effects on Zr-2.5Nb in power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, C., E-mail: Carol.Song@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Zirconium alloys are widely used as structural materials in nuclear applications because of their attractive properties such as a low absorption cross-section for thermal neutrons, excellent corrosion resistance in water, and good mechanical properties at reactor operating temperatures. Zr-2.5Nb is one of the most commonly used zirconium alloys and has been used for pressure tube materials in CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) and RBMK (Reaktor Bolshoy Moshchnosti Kanalnyy, 'High Power Channel-type Reactor') reactors for over 40 years. In a recent report from the Electric Power Research Institute, Zr-2.5Nb was identified as one of the candidate materials for use in normal structural applications in light-water reactors owing to its increased resistance to irradiation-induced degradation as compared with currently used materials. Historically, the largest program of in-reactor tests on zirconium alloys was performed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Over many years of in-reactor testing and CANDU operating experience with Zr- 2.5Nb, extensive research has been conducted on the irradiation effects on its microstructures, mechanical properties, deformation behaviours, fracture toughness, delayed hydride cracking, and corrosion. Most of the results on Zr-2.5Nb obtained from CANDU experience could be used to predict the material performance under light water reactors. This paper reviews the irradiation effects on Zr-2.5Nb in power reactors (including heavy-water and light-water reactors) and summarizes the current state of knowledge. (author)

  14. IGORR 2: Proceedings of the 2. meeting of the International Group On Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-07-01

    The International group on Research Reactors was formed to facilitate the sharing of knowledge and experience among those institutions and individuals who are actively working to design, build, and promote new research reactors or to make significant upgrades to existing facilities. Sessions during this second meeting were devoted to research reactor reports (GRENOBLE reactor, FRM-II, HIFAR, PIK, reactors at JAERI, MAPLE, ANS, NIST, MURR, TRIGA, BR-2, SIRIUS 2); other neutron sources; and two workshops were dealing with research and development results and needs and reports on progress in needed of R and D areas identified at IGORR 1.

  15. IGORR 2: Proceedings of the 2. meeting of the International Group On Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The International group on Research Reactors was formed to facilitate the sharing of knowledge and experience among those institutions and individuals who are actively working to design, build, and promote new research reactors or to make significant upgrades to existing facilities. Sessions during this second meeting were devoted to research reactor reports (GRENOBLE reactor, FRM-II, HIFAR, PIK, reactors at JAERI, MAPLE, ANS, NIST, MURR, TRIGA, BR-2, SIRIUS 2); other neutron sources; and two workshops were dealing with research and development results and needs and reports on progress in needed of R and D areas identified at IGORR 1

  16. Characterization of the Three Mile Island Unit-2 reactor building atmosphere prior to the reactor building purge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartwell, J.K.; Mandler, J.W.; Duce, S.W.; Motes, B.G.

    1981-05-01

    The Three Mile Island Unit-2 reactor building atmosphere was sampled prior to the reactor building purge. Samples of the containment atmosphere were obtained using specialized sampling equipment installed through penetration R-626 at the 358-foot (109-meter) level of the TMI-2 reactor building. The samples were subsequently analyzed for radionuclide concentration and for gaseous molecular components (O 2 , N 2 , etc.) by two independent laboratories at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The sampling procedures, analysis methods, and results are summarized

  17. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1998, RA reactor annual report, Part -2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, M.; Pavlovic, R.; Mandic, M.; Pavlovic, S.; Grsic, Z.

    1998-01-01

    Radiation protection tasks which enable safe operation of the RA reactor, and are defined according the the legal regulations and IAEA safety recommendations are sorted into four categories in this report: (1) Control of the working environment, dosimetry at the RA reactor; (2) Radioactivity control in the vicinity of the reactor and meteorology measurements; (3) Collecting and treatment of fluid effluents; and (4) radioactive wastes, decontamination and actions. Each of the category is described as a separate annex of this report [sr

  18. Active species in a large volume N2-O2 post-discharge reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutasi, K; Pintassilgo, C D; Loureiro, J; Coelho, P J

    2007-01-01

    A large volume post-discharge reactor placed downstream from a flowing N 2 -O 2 microwave discharge is modelled using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. The density distributions of the most populated active species present in the reactor-O( 3 P), O 2 (a 1 Δ g ), O 2 (b 1 Σ g + ), NO(X 2 Π), NO(A 2 Σ + ), NO(B 2 Π), NO 2 (X), O 3 , O 2 (X 3 Σ g - ) and N( 4 S)-are calculated and the main source and loss processes for each species are identified for two discharge conditions: (i) p = 2 Torr, f = 2450 MHz, and (ii) p = 8 Torr, f = 915 MHz; in the case of a N 2 -2%O 2 mixture composition and gas flow rate of 2 x 10 3 sccm. The modification of the species relative densities by changing the oxygen percentage in the initial gas mixture composition, in the 0.2%-5% range, are presented. The possible tuning of the species concentrations in the reactor by changing the size of the connecting afterglow tube between the active discharge and the large post-discharge reactor is investigated as well

  19. G 2 reactor project; Projet de pile a double fin: G 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ailleret, [Electricite de France (EDF), Dir. General des Etudes de Recherches, 75 - Paris (France); Taranger, P; Yvon, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    The CEA actually constructs the G-2 reactor core working with natural uranium, which will use graphite as moderator, and gas under pressure as cooling fluid. This report presents the specificity of the new reactor: - the different elements of the reactor core, - the control and the security of the reactor, - the renewal of the fuel, - the biologic surrounding wall, - and the cooling circuit. (M.B.) [French] le Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique construit actuellement la pile G-2 a Uranium naturel, qui utilisera le graphite comme moderateur, et le gaz sous pression comme fluide de refroidissement. Ce rapport presente les specificite du nouveau reacteur: - les differents elements de la pile, - le controle et la securite du reacteur, - le renouvellement du combustible, - l'enceinte biologique, - et le circuit de refroidissement. (M.B.)

  20. Reactor handbook. 2. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederer, B.J.; Wildberg, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    On the basis of the guidelines on expert knowledge, the book discusses the subjects of atomic physics, heat transfer, nuclear power plants, reactor materials, radiation protection, reactor safety, reactor instrumentation, and reactor operation, with special regard to nuclear power plants with LWR-type reactors. The book is intended for shift personnel, especially gang bosses, reactor operators, and control station operators: for this reason a practical and rather popular style has been chosen. However, the book will also be a manual for other operating personnel, personnel of producer companies, expert organisations, authorities, and students. It can be used as a textbook for staff training, a manual for the practice, and as accompanying book for teaching at nuclear engineering schools. (orig.) With 173 figs [de

  1. Annual report on JEN-1 and JEN-2 Reactors; Informe periodico de Reactores JEN-1 y JEN-2 correpondiente al ano 1972

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes Ponce de Leon, J.

    1974-07-01

    In the annual report on the JEN-1 and JEN-2 reactors the main fractures of the reactor operations and maintenance are described. The reactor has been in operation for 2188 hours, what means 74% of the total working time. Maintenance and periodical tests have occupied the rest of the time. Maintenance operations are shown according to three main subjects, the main failures so as the reactor scrams are also described. Different date relating with radiation level and health Physics are also included. (Author)

  2. Optimized Control Rods of the BR2 Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalcheva, Silva; Koonen, E.

    2007-09-15

    At the present time the BR-2 reactor uses control elements with cadmium as neutron absorbing part. The lower section of the control element is a beryllium assembly cooled by light water. Due to the burn up of the lower end of the cadmium section during the reactor operation, the presently used rods for reactivity control of the BR-2 reactor have to be replaced by new ones. Considered are various types Control Rods with full active part of the following materials: cadmium (Cd), hafnium (Hf), europium oxide (Eu2O3) and gadolinium (Gd2O3). Options to decrease the burn up of the control rod material in the hot spot, such as use of stainless steel in the lower active part of the Control Rod are discussed. Comparison with the characteristics of the presently used Control Rods types is performed. The changing of the characteristics of different types Control Rods and the perturbation effects on the reactor neutronics during the BR-2 fuel cycle are investigated. The burn up of the Control Rod absorbing material, total and differential control rods worth, macroscopic and effective microscopic absorption cross sections, fuel and reactivity evolution are evaluated during approximately 30 operating cycles.

  3. Optimized Control Rods of the BR2 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalcheva, Silva; Koonen, E.

    2007-01-01

    At the present time the BR-2 reactor uses control elements with cadmium as neutron absorbing part. The lower section of the control element is a beryllium assembly cooled by light water. Due to the burn up of the lower end of the cadmium section during the reactor operation, the presently used rods for reactivity control of the BR-2 reactor have to be replaced by new ones. Considered are various types Control Rods with full active part of the following materials: cadmium (Cd), hafnium (Hf), europium oxide (Eu2O3) and gadolinium (Gd2O3). Options to decrease the burn up of the control rod material in the hot spot, such as use of stainless steel in the lower active part of the Control Rod are discussed. Comparison with the characteristics of the presently used Control Rods types is performed. The changing of the characteristics of different types Control Rods and the perturbation effects on the reactor neutronics during the BR-2 fuel cycle are investigated. The burn up of the Control Rod absorbing material, total and differential control rods worth, macroscopic and effective microscopic absorption cross sections, fuel and reactivity evolution are evaluated during approximately 30 operating cycles.

  4. Upgrading of the research reactors FRG-1 and FRG-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krull, W.

    1981-01-01

    In 1972 for the research reactor FRG-2 we applied for a license to increase the power from 15 MW to 21 MW. During this procedure a public laying out of the safety report and an upgrading procedure for both research reactors - FRG-1 (5 MW) and FRG-2 - were required by the licensing authorities. After discussing the legal background for licensing procedures in the Federal Republic of Germany the upgrading for both research reactors is described. The present status and future licensing aspects for changes of our research reactors are discussed, too. (orig.) [de

  5. Annual report on JEN-1 and JEN-2 Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes Ponce de Leon, J.

    1974-01-01

    In the annual report on the JEN-1 and JEN-2 reactors the main fractures of the reactor operations and maintenance are described. The reactor has been in operation for 2188 hours, what means 74% of the total working time. Maintenance and periodical tests have occupied the rest of the time. Maintenance operations are shown according to three main subjects, the main failures so as the reactor scrams are also described. Different date relating with radiation level and health Physics are also included. (Author)

  6. System Design of a Supercritical CO_2 cooled Micro Modular Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Gu; Cho, Seongkuk; Yu, Hwanyeal; Kim, Yonghee; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Lee, Jeong Ik

    2014-01-01

    Small modular reactor (SMR) systems that have advantages of little initial capital cost and small restriction on construction site are being developed by many research organizations around the world. Existing SMR concepts have the same objective: to achieve compact size and a long life core. Most of small modular reactors have much smaller size than the large nuclear power plant. However, existing SMR concepts are not fully modularized. This paper suggests a complete modular reactor with an innovative concept for reactor cooling by using a supercritical carbon dioxide. The authors propose the supercritical CO_2 Brayton cycle (S-CO_2 cycle) as a power conversion system to achieve small volume of power conversion unit (PCU) and to contain the reactor core and PCU in one vessel. A conceptual design of the proposed small modular reactor was developed, which is named as KAIST Micro Modular Reactor (MMR). The supercritical CO_2 Brayton cycle for the S-CO_2 cooled reactor core was optimized and the size of turbomachinery and heat exchanger were estimated preliminary. The nuclear fuel composed with UN was proposed and the core lifetime was obtained from a burnup versus reactivity calculation. Furthermore, a system layout with fully passive safety systems for both normal operation and emergency operation was proposed. (author)

  7. The SLOWPOKE-2 reactor with low enrichment uranium oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townes, B.M.; Hilborn, J.W.

    1985-06-01

    A SLOWPOKE-2 reactor core contains less than 1 kg of highly enriched uranium (HEU) and the proliferation risk is very low. However, to overcome proliferation concerns a new low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuelled reactor core has been designed. This core contains approximately 180 fuel elements based on the Zircaloy-4 clad UOsub(2) CANDU fuel element, but with a smaller outside diameter. The physics characteristics of this new reactor core ensure the inherent safety of the reactor under all conceivable conditions and thus the basic SLOWPOKE safety philosophy which permits unattended operation is not affected

  8. Operation of the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor in Jamaica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, C.N.; Lalor, G.C.; Vuchkov, M.K. [University of the West Indies, Kingston (Jamaica)

    2001-07-01

    Over the past sixteen years lCENS has operated a SLOWPOKE 2 nuclear reactor almost exclusively for the purpose of neutron activation analysis. During this period we have adopted a strategy of minimum irradiation times while optimizing our output in an effort to increase the lifetime of the reactor core and to maintaining fuel integrity. An inter-comparison study with results obtained with a much larger reactor at IPEN has validated this approach. The parameters routinely monitored at ICENS are also discussed and the method used to predict the next shim adjustment. (author)

  9. Irradiation techniques at BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebel, W.

    1978-01-01

    Since 1963 the material testing reactor BR2 at Mol is operated for the realisation of numerous research programs and experiments on the behavior of materials under nuclear radiation and in particular under intensive neutron exposure. During this period special irradiation techniques and experimental devices were developed according to the desiderata of the different experiments and to the irradiation possibilities offered at BR2. The design and the operating characteristics of quite a number of those irradiation rigs of proven reliability may be used or can be made available for new irradiation experiments. A brief description is given of some typical irradiation devices designed and constructed by CEN/SCK, Technology and Energy Dpt. They are compiled according to their main use for the different research and development programs realized at BR2. Their eventual application however for different objectives could be possible. A final chapter summarizes the principal irradiation conditions offered by BR2 reactor. (author)

  10. TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

    1985-09-01

    This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training, the head was safely removed and stored; and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities

  11. TMI-2 reactor vessel plenum final lift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    Removal of the plenum assembly from the TMI-2 reactor vessel was necessary to gain access to the core region for defueling. The plenum was lifted from the reactor vessel by the polar crane using three specially designed pendant assemblies. It was then transferred in air to the flooded deep end of the refueling canal and lowered onto a storage stand where it will remain throughout the defueling effort. The lift and transfer were successfully accomplished on May 15, 1985 in just under three hours by a lift team located in a shielded area within the reactor building. The success of the program is attributed to extensive mockup and training activities plus thorough preparations to address potential problems. 54 refs

  12. Refurbishment programme for the BR2-reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koonen, E [Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire, Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie, BR2 Department, Boeretang, Mol (Belgium)

    1992-07-01

    BR2 is a high flux engineering test reactor, which differs from comparable material testing reactors by its specific core array (fig. 1). It is a heterogeneous, thermal, tank-in-pool type reactor, moderated by beryllium and light water, which serves also as coolant. The fuel elements consist of cylindrical assemblies loaded in channels materialized by hexagonal beryllium prisms. The central 200 mm channel is vertical, while all others are inclined and form a hyperbolical arrangement around the central one. This feature combines a very compact core with the requirement of sufficient space for individual access to all channels through penetrations in the top cover of the aluminium pressure vessel. Each channel may hold a fuel element, a control rod, an experiment, an irradiation device or a beryllium plug. The refurbishment Program According to the present programme of C.E.N./S.C.K., BR2 will be in operation until 1996. At that time, the beryllium matrix will reach its foreseen end-of-life. In order to continue operation beyond this point, a thorough refurbishment of the reactor is foreseen, in addition to the unavoidable replacement of the matrix, to ensure quality of the installation and compliance with modern standards. Some fundamental options have been taken as a starting point: BR2 will continue to be used as a classical MTR, i.e. fuel and material irradiations and safety experiments with some additional service-activities. The present configuration is optimized for that use and there is no specific experimental requirement to change the basic concepts and performance characteristics. From the customers viewpoint, it is desirable to go ahead with the well-known features of BR2, to maintain a high degree of availability and reliability and to minimize the duration of the long shutdown. It is also important to limit the amount of nuclear liabilities. So the objective of the refurbishment programme is the life extension of BR2 for about 15 years, corresponding to

  13. Refurbishment programme for the BR2-reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koonen, E.

    1992-01-01

    BR2 is a high flux engineering test reactor, which differs from comparable material testing reactors by its specific core array (fig. 1). It is a heterogeneous, thermal, tank-in-pool type reactor, moderated by beryllium and light water, which serves also as coolant. The fuel elements consist of cylindrical assemblies loaded in channels materialized by hexagonal beryllium prisms. The central 200 mm channel is vertical, while all others are inclined and form a hyperbolical arrangement around the central one. This feature combines a very compact core with the requirement of sufficient space for individual access to all channels through penetrations in the top cover of the aluminium pressure vessel. Each channel may hold a fuel element, a control rod, an experiment, an irradiation device or a beryllium plug. The refurbishment Program According to the present programme of C.E.N./S.C.K., BR2 will be in operation until 1996. At that time, the beryllium matrix will reach its foreseen end-of-life. In order to continue operation beyond this point, a thorough refurbishment of the reactor is foreseen, in addition to the unavoidable replacement of the matrix, to ensure quality of the installation and compliance with modern standards. Some fundamental options have been taken as a starting point: BR2 will continue to be used as a classical MTR, i.e. fuel and material irradiations and safety experiments with some additional service-activities. The present configuration is optimized for that use and there is no specific experimental requirement to change the basic concepts and performance characteristics. From the customers viewpoint, it is desirable to go ahead with the well-known features of BR2, to maintain a high degree of availability and reliability and to minimize the duration of the long shutdown. It is also important to limit the amount of nuclear liabilities. So the objective of the refurbishment programme is the life extension of BR2 for about 15 years, corresponding to

  14. Refurbishing the BR2 materials testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baugnet, J.M.; Dekeyser, J.; Gubel, P.

    1995-01-01

    SCK/CEN is refurbishing its BR2 reactor to allow its further operation during the next 15 years; in doing so, it chooses to keep BR2 available for future scientific and technological irradiation programs within an international context. (author) 2 figs

  15. Feature selection for anomaly–based network intrusion detection using cluster validity indices

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, T

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available for Anomaly–Based Network Intrusion Detection Using Cluster Validity Indices Tyrone Naidoo_, Jules–Raymond Tapamoy, Andre McDonald_ Modelling and Digital Science, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, South Africa 1tnaidoo2@csir.co.za 3...

  16. Proceedings of 2. Yugoslav symposium on reactor physics, Part 2, Herceg Novi (Yugoslavia), 27-29 Sep 1966

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    This Volume 2 of the Proceedings of 2. Yugoslav symposium on reactor physics includes eight papers dealing with the following topics: method for measuring high anti reactivities of a reactor system; integration method for thermal reaction rate calculation; Determination of initial core configuration for BHWR-200 MWe; safety shutdowns and failures of the RA reactor equipment; determining the reactivity of absorption rods; measurements of thermal and fast neutron fluxes at the TRIGA reactor and other measurements during operation of the TRIGA reactor; mathematical modelling of the reactor safety; review of problems and methods for radiation risk assessment in the environment of a nuclear power plant

  17. SIRIUS 2: A versatile medium power research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousselle, P.

    1992-01-01

    Most of the Research Reactors in the world have been critical in the Sixties and operated for twenty to thirty years. Some of them have been completely shut down, modified, or simply refurbished; the total number of RR in operation has decreased but there is still an important need for medium power research reactors in order: - to sustain a power program with fuel and material testing for NPP or fusion reactors; - to produce radioisotopes for industrial or medical purposes, doped silicon, NAA or neutron radiography; - to investigate further the condensed matter, with cold neutrons routed through neutron guides to improved equipment; - to develop new technologies and applications such as medical alphatherapy. Hence, taking advantage of nearly hundred reactor x years operation and backed up by the CEA experience, TECHNICATOME assisted by FRAMATOME has designed a new versatile multipurpose Research Reactor (20-30 Mw) SIRIUS 2 taking into account: - more stringent safety rules; - the lifetime; - the flexibility enabling a wide range of experiments and, - the future dismantling of the facility according to the ALARA criteria

  18. OTUS - Reactor inventory management system based on ORIGEN2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poellaenen, R; Toivonen, H; Lahtinen, J; Ilander, T

    1995-10-01

    ORIGEN2 is a computer code that calculates nuclide composition and other characteristics of nuclear fuel. The use of ORIGEN2 requires good knowledge in reactor physics. However, once the input has been defined for a particular reactor type, the calculations can be easily repeated for any burnup and decay time. This procedure produces large output files that are difficult to handle manually. A new computer code, known as OTUS, was designed to facilitate the postprocessing of the data. OTUS makes use of the inventory files precalculated with ORIGEN2 in a way that enables their versatile treatment for different safety analysis purposes. A data base is created containing a comprehensive set of ORIGEN2 calculations as a function of fuel burnup and decay time. OTUS is a reactor inventory management system for a microcomputer with Windows interface. Four major data operations are available: (1) Build data modifies ORIGEN2 output data into a suitable format, (2) View data enables flexible presentation of the data as such, (3) Different calculations, such as nuclide ratios and hot particle characteristics, can be performed for severe accident analyses, consequence analyses and research purposes, (4) Summary files contain both burnup dependent and decay time dependent inventory information related to the nuclide and the reactor specified. These files can be used for safeguards, radiation monitoring and safety assessment. (orig.) (22 refs., 29 figs.).

  19. The 2nd reactor core of the NS Otto Hahn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manthey, H.J.; Kracht, H.

    1979-01-01

    Details of the design of the 2nd reactor core are given, followed by a brief report summarising the operating experience gained with this 2nd core, as well as by an evaluation of measured data and statements concerning the usefulness of the knowledge gained for the development of future reactor cores. Quite a number of these data have been used to improve the concept and thus the specifications for the fuel elements of the 3rd core of the reactor of the NS Otto Hahn. (orig./HP) [de

  20. EL-2 reactor: Thermal neutron flux distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau, A.; Genthon, J.P.

    1958-01-01

    The flux distribution of thermal neutrons in EL-2 reactor is studied. The reactor core and lattices are described as well as the experimental reactor facilities, in particular, the experimental channels and special facilities. The measurement shows that the thermal neutron flux increases in the central channel when enriched uranium is used in place of natural uranium. However the thermal neutron flux is not perturbed in the other reactor channels by the fuel modification. The macroscopic flux distribution is measured according the radial positioning of fuel rods. The longitudinal neutron flux distribution in a fuel rod is also measured and shows no difference between enriched and natural uranium fuel rods. In addition, measurements of the flux distribution have been effectuated for rods containing other material as steel or aluminium. The neutron flux distribution is also studied in all the experimental channels as well as in the thermal column. The determination of the distribution of the thermal neutron flux in all experimental facilities, the thermal column and the fuel channels has been made with a heavy water level of 1825 mm and is given for an operating power of 1000 kW. (M.P.)

  1. Physics design of advanced steady-state tokamak reactor A-SSTR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Satoshi; Ushigusa, Kenkichi

    2000-10-01

    Based on design studies on the fusion power reactor such as the DEMO reactor SSTR, the compact power reactor A-SSTR and the DREAM reactor with a high environmental safety and high availability, a new concept of compact and economic fusion power reactor (A-SSTR2) with high safety and high availability is proposed. Employing high temperature superconductor, the toroidal filed coils supplies the maximum field of 23T on conductor which corresponds to 11T at the magnetic axis. A-SSTR2 (R p =6.2m, a p =1.5m, I p =12MA) has a fusion power of 4GW with β N =4. For an easy maintenance and for an enough support against a strong electromagnetic force on coils, a poloidal coils system has no center solenoid coils and consists of 6 coils located on top and bottom of the machine. Physics studies on the plasma equilibrium, controllability of the configuration, the plasma initiation and non-inductive current ramp-up, fusion power controllability and the diverter have shown the validity of the A-SSTR2 concept. (author)

  2. FORE-2, Thermohydraulics and Space-Independent Reactor Kinetics for Transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, J.N.; Lawler, B.E.; Butz, H.R.; Heames, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: FORE2 is a coupled thermal hydraulics-point kinetics digital computer code designed to calculate significant reactor parameters under steady-state conditions, or as functions of time during transients. The transients may result from a programmed reactivity insertion or a power change. Variable inlet coolant flow rate and temperature are considered. The code calculates the reactor power, the individual reactivity feedbacks, and the temperature of coolant, cladding, fuel, structure, and additional material for up to seven axial positions in three channel types which represent radial zones of the reactor. The heat of fusion, accompanying fuel melting, the liquid metal voiding reactivity, and the spatial and the time variation of the fuel cladding gap coefficient due to changes in gap size are considered. 2 - Method of solution: FORE2 input consists of property data, geometry, power and flow distribution factors, external time varying functions, experimental coefficients, and termination data. The differential equations for fluid flow, heat transfer, and point neutronics are solved by explicit finite-difference procedures. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Reactor excursions which can be calculated are restricted to those transients in which the reactor is not substantially destroyed. As a general rule, changes in reactor geometry and composition during an excursion are limited to those cases in which the reactivity effects of the changes may be considered as small perturbations of the initial system. Thus, accidents involving large-scale disassembly and bulk meltdown of a core are not covered by FORE2. FORE2 is valid only while the core retains its initial geometry

  3. Keeping research reactors relevant: A pro-active approach for SLOWPOKE-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosby, L.R.; Bennett, L.G.I.; Nielsen, K.; Weir, R.

    2010-01-01

    The SLOWPOKE is a small, inherently safe, pool-type research reactor that was engineered and marketed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) in the 1970s and 80s. The original reactor, SLOWPOKE-1, was moved from Chalk River to the University of Toronto in 1970 and was operated until upgraded to the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor in 1973. In all, eight reactors in the two versions were produced and five are still in operation today, three having been decommissioned. All of the remaining reactors are designated as SLOWPOKE-2 reactors. These research reactors are prone to two major issues: aging components and lack of relevance to a younger audience. In order to combat these problems, one SLOWPOKE -2 facility has embraced a strategy that involves modernizing their reactor in order to keep the reactor up to date and relevant. In 2001, this facility replaced its aging analogue reactor control system with a digital control system. The system was successfully commissioned and has provided a renewed platform for student learning and research. The digital control system provides a better interface and allows flexibility in data storage and retrieval that was never possible with the analogue control system. This facility has started work on another upgrade to the digital control and instrumentation system that will be installed in 2010. The upgrade includes new computer hardware, updated software and a web-based simulation and training system that will allow licensed operators, students and researchers to use an online simulation tool for training, education and research. The tool consists of: 1) A dynamic simulation for reactor kinetics (e.g., core flux, power, core temperatures, etc). This tool is useful for operator training and student education; 2) Dynamic mapping of the reactor and pool container gamma and neutron fluxes as well as the vertical neutron beam tube flux. This research planning tool is used for various researchers who wish to do irradiations (e.g., neutron

  4. Calculations of reactor-accident consequences, Version 2. CRAC2: computer code user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, L.T.; Johnson, J.D.; Blond, R.M.

    1983-02-01

    The CRAC2 computer code is a revision of the Calculation of Reactor Accident Consequences computer code, CRAC, developed for the Reactor Safety Study. The CRAC2 computer code incorporates significant modeling improvements in the areas of weather sequence sampling and emergency response, and refinements to the plume rise, atmospheric dispersion, and wet deposition models. New output capabilities have also been added. This guide is to facilitate the informed and intelligent use of CRAC2. It includes descriptions of the input data, the output results, the file structures, control information, and five sample problems

  5. Thermal reactor benchmark tests on JENDL-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Hideki; Tsuchihashi, Keichiro; Yamane, Tsuyoshi; Akino, Fujiyoshi; Ishiguro, Yukio; Ido, Masaru.

    1983-11-01

    A group constant library for the thermal reactor standard nuclear design code system SRAC was produced by using the evaluated nuclear data JENDL-2. Furthermore, the group constants for 235 U were calculated also from ENDF/B-V. Thermal reactor benchmark calculations were performed using the produced group constant library. The selected benchmark cores are two water-moderated lattices (TRX-1 and 2), two heavy water-moderated cores (DCA and ETA-1), two graphite-moderated cores (SHE-8 and 13) and eight critical experiments for critical safety. The effective multiplication factors and lattice cell parameters were calculated and compared with the experimental values. The results are summarized as follows. (1) Effective multiplication factors: The results by JENDL-2 are considerably improved in comparison with ones by ENDF/B-IV. The best agreement is obtained by using JENDL-2 and ENDF/B-V (only 235 U) data. (2) Lattice cell parameters: For the rho 28 (the ratio of epithermal to thermal 238 U captures) and C* (the ratio of 238 U captures to 235 U fissions), the values calculated by JENDL-2 are in good agreement with the experimental values. The rho 28 (the ratio of 238 U to 235 U fissions) are overestimated as found also for the fast reactor benchmarks. The rho 02 (the ratio of epithermal to thermal 232 Th captures) calculated by JENDL-2 or ENDF/B-IV are considerably underestimated. The functions of the SRAC system have been continued to be extended according to the needs of its users. A brief description will be given, in Appendix B, to the extended parts of the SRAC system together with the input specification. (author)

  6. WWER-1000 reactor simulator. Material for training courses and workshops. 2. ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established an activity in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the development and distribution of simulation programs and educational material and sponsors courses and workshops. The workshops are in two parts: techniques and tools for reactor simulator development; and the use of reactor simulators in education. Workshop material for the first part is covered in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No.12, Reactor Simulator Development (2001). Course material for workshops using a pressurized water reactor (PWR) simulator developed for the IAEA by Cassiopeia Technologies Inc. of Canada is presented in the IAEA publication, Training Course Series No. 22, 2nd edition, Pressurized Water Reactor Simulator (2005) and Training Course Series No.23, 2nd edition, Boiling Water Reactor Simulator (2005). This report consists of course material for workshops using the WWER-1000 Reactor Department Simulator from the Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Russian Federation

  7. ASAMPSA2 best-practices guidelines for L2 PSA development and applications. Volume 3 - Extension to Gen IV reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassi, C.; Bonneville, H.; Brinkman, H.; Burgazzi, L.; Polidoro, F.; Vincon, L.; Jouve, S.

    2010-01-01

    The main objective assigned to the Work Package 4 (WP4) of the 'ASAMPSA2' project (EC 7. FPRD) consist in the verification of the potential compliance of L2PSA guidelines based on PWR/BWR reactors (which are specific tasks of WP2 and WP3) with Generation IV representative concepts. Therefore, in order to exhibit potential discrepancies between LWRs and new reactor types, the following work was based on the up-to-date designs of: - The European Fast Reactor (EFR) which will be considered as prototypical of a pool-type Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR); - The ELSY design for the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) technology; - The ANTARES project which could be representative of a Very-High Temperature Reactor (VHTR); - The CEA 2400 MWth Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR). (authors)

  8. Current status of restoration work for obstacle and upper core structure in reactor vessel of experimental fast reactor 'Joyo'. 2-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, Eiji; Ito, Hiromichi; Yoshihara, Shizuya

    2014-01-01

    An accident occurred in experimental fast reactor 'Joyo' in 2007 which is obstruction of fuel change equipment caused by contacting rotating plug and MARICO-2. In addition, we confirmed two happenings in the reactor vessel that (1) Deformation of MARICO-2 subassembly on the in vessel storage rack together with a transfer pot, (2) Deformation of the Upper core structure of 'Joyo' caused by contacting MARICO-2 subassembly and the UCS. We do the restoration work for restoring it. This time, we describe current status of Replacement work of the UCS. (author)

  9. Sterilization of E. coli bacterium in a flowing N2-O2 post-discharge reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villeger, S; Cousty, S; Ricard, A; Sixou, M

    2003-01-01

    Effective destruction of Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria has been obtained in a flowing N 2 -O 2 microwave post-discharge reactor. The sterilizing agents are the O atoms and the UV emissions of NOβ which are produced by N and O atoms recombination in the reactor. In the following plasma conditions: pressure 5 Torr, flow rate 1 L n min -1 , microwave power of 100 W in a quartz tube of 5 mm, an O atom density of 2.5x10 15 cm -3 is measured by NO titration in the post-discharge reactor with UV emission in a N 2 -(5%)O 2 gas mixture. Full destruction of 10 13 cfu ml -1 E. coli is observed after a treatment time of 25 min. (rapid communication)

  10. Safe dismantling of the SVAFO research reactors R2 and R2-0 in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ARNOLD, Hans-Uwe; BROY, Yvonne; Dirk Schneider

    2017-01-01

    The R2 and R2-0 reactors were part of the Swedish government's research program on nuclear power from the early 1960's. Both reactors were shut down in 2005 following a decision by former operator Studsvik Nuclear AB. The decommissioning of the R2 and R2-0 reactors is divided into three phases. The first phase - awarded to AREVA - involved dismantling of the reactors and associated systems in the reactor pool, treatment of the disassembled components as well as draining, cleaning and emptying the pool. In the second phase, the pool structure itself will be dismantled, while removal of remaining reactor systems, treatment and disposal of materials and clean-up will be carried out in the third stage. The entire work is planned to be completed before the end of this decade. The paper describes the several steps of phase 1 - starting with the team building, followed by the dismantling operations and covers challenges encountered and lessons learned as well. The reactors consist of 5.400 kg aluminum, 6.000 kg stainless steel restraint structures as well as, connection elements of the mostly flanged components (1.000 kg). The most demanding - from a radiological point of view - was the R2-0 reactor that was limited to ∼ 1 m"3 construction volumes but with an extremely heterogeneous activation profile. Based on the calculated radiological entrance data and later sampling, nuclide vectors for both reactors depending on the real placement of the single component and on the material (aluminum and stainless steel) were created. Finally, for the highest activated component from R2 reactor, 85 Sv/h were measured. The dismantling principles - adopted on a safety point of view - were the following: The always protected base area of the ponds served as a flexible buffer area for waste components and packaging. Specific protections were also installed on the walls to protect them from mechanical stress which may occur during dismantling work. A specific work platform was

  11. Benchmark calculations for VENUS-2 MOX -fueled reactor dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Kung; Kim, Hong Chul; Shin, Chang Ho; Han, Chi Young; Na, Byung Chan

    2004-01-01

    As a part of a Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Project, it was pursued the benchmark for dosimetry calculation of the VENUS-2 MOX-fueled reactor. In this benchmark, the goal is to test the current state-of-the-art computational methods of calculating neutron flux to reactor components against the measured data of the VENUS-2 MOX-fuelled critical experiments. The measured data to be used for this benchmark are the equivalent fission fluxes which are the reaction rates divided by the U 235 fission spectrum averaged cross-section of the corresponding dosimeter. The present benchmark is, therefore, defined to calculate reaction rates and corresponding equivalent fission fluxes measured on the core-mid plane at specific positions outside the core of the VENUS-2 MOX-fuelled reactor. This is a follow-up exercise to the previously completed UO 2 -fuelled VENUS-1 two-dimensional and VENUS-3 three-dimensional exercises. The use of MOX fuel in LWRs presents different neutron characteristics and this is the main interest of the current benchmark compared to the previous ones

  12. PCU arrangement of a supercritical CO{sub 2} cooled micro modular reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Gu; Baik, Seungjoon; Cho, Seong Kuk; Oh, Bong Seong; Lee, Jeong Ik [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    As part of the SMR(Small Modular Reactor)s development effort, the authors propose a concept of supercritical CO{sub 2} (S-CO{sub 2}) cooled fast reactor combined with the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle. The reactor concept is named as KAIST Micro Modular Reactor (MMR). The S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle has many strong points when it is used for SMR's power conversion unit. It occupies small footprints due to the compact cycle components and simple layout. Thus, a concept of one module containing the S-CO{sub 2} cooled fast reactor and power conversion system is possible. This module can be shipped via ground transportation (by trailer) or marine transportation. In this study, the authors propose a new conceptual layout for the S-CO{sub 2} cooled direct cycle while considering various issues for arranging cycle components. The new design has an improved cycle efficiency (from 31% to 34%) than the earlier version of MMR by reducing pressure drops in the heat exchangers. As a more efficient option, a recompression recuperated cycle was also designed. It improves 5% of thermal efficiency while 18tons of mass can be added in comparison to the simple recuperated cycle. Even if we adopt recompression cycle as a PCU, the weight of module (152tons) is less than the ground transportable limit (260tons)

  13. TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

    1984-12-01

    This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training the head was safely removed and stored and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities

  14. Neutronic study using oxide and nitride fuels for the Super Phenix 2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, J.L.; Renke, C.A.C.

    1991-11-01

    This report presents a neutronic analysis and a description of the Super Phenix 2 reactor, taken as reference. We present the methodology and results for cell and global reactor calculations for oxide (U O 2 - Pu O 2 ) and nitride (U N - Pu N) fuels. To conclude we compare the performance of oxide and nitride fuels for the reference reactor. (author)

  15. Shadow corrosion evaluation in the Studsvik R2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, Ch.; Lysell, G.

    2000-01-01

    Post-irradiation examination has shown that increased corrosion occurs when zirconium alloys are in contact with or in proximity to other metallic objects. The observations indicate an influence of irradiation from the adjacent component as the enhanced corrosion occurs as a 'shadow' of the metallic object on the zirconium surface. This phenomenon could ultimately limit the lifetime of certain zirconium alloy components in the reactor. The Studsvik R2 materials test reactor has an In-Core Autoclave (INCA) test facility especially designed for water chemistry and materials research. The INCA facility has been evaluated and found suitable for shadow corrosion studies. The R2 reactor core containing the INCA facility was modeled with the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code in order to evaluate the electron deposition in various materials and to develop a hypothesis of the shadow corrosion mechanism. (authors)

  16. Benchmark tests of JENDL-3.2 for thermal and fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Hideki

    1995-01-01

    Benchmark calculations for a variety of thermal and fast reactors have been performed by using the newly evaluated JENDL-3 Version-2 (JENDL-3.2) file. In the thermal reactor calculations for the uranium and plutonium fueled cores of TRX and TCA, the k eff and lattice parameters were well predicted. The fast reactor calculations for ZPPR-9 and FCA assemblies showed that the k eff , reactivity worth of Doppler, sodium void and control rod, and reaction rate distribution were in a very good agreement with the experiments. (author)

  17. Radionuclide distribution in TMI-2 reactor building basement liquids and solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horan, J.T.; McIsaac, C.V.; Keefer, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    As a result of the TMI-2 accident, approximately 2.46 x 10 6 L of contaminated water were released to the Reactor Building basement. The principal fission product release pathway from the damaged core was through the reactor coolant system (RCS) to the pressurizer, through the pressure-operated relief valve (PORV) on the pressurizer to the Reactor Coolant Drain Tank (RCDT), and then through the RCDT rupture disk to the Reactor Building basement. Since August 1979, a number of efforts have been made to determine the location, quantity, and composition of fission products released to the Reactor Building basement. These efforts have included sampling of the basement water and solids, the basement sump pump recirculation line, the RCDT, and visual surveys using a closed circuit television (CCTV) system. The analysis of basement samples has provided data on the physical and radioisotopic characteristics of the liquids and solids. This paper describes the sample collection techniques and discusses radiochemical analyses results

  18. An experimental investigation of fission product release in SLOWPOKE-2 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harnden, A.M.C.

    1995-09-01

    Increasing radiation fields due to a release of fission products in the reactor container of several SLOWPOKE-2 reactors fuelled with a highly-enriched uranium (HEU) alloy core have been observed. It is believed that these increases are associated with the fuel fabrication where a small amount of uranium-bearing material is exposed to the coolant at the end-welds of the fuel element. To investigate this phenomenon samples of reactor water and gas from the headspace above the water have been obtained and examined by gamma spectrometry methods for reactors of various burnups at the University of Toronto, Ecole Polytechnique and Kanata Isotope Production Facility. An underwater visual examination of the fuel core at Ecole Polytechnique has also provided information on the condition of the core. This report (Volume 1) summarizes the equipment, analysis techniques and results of tests conducted at the various reactor sites. The data report is published as Volume 2. (author). 30 refs., 9 tabs., 20 figs

  19. The Oak Ridge Research Reactor: safety analysis: Volume 2, supplement 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurt, S.S.

    1986-11-01

    The Oak Ridge Research Reactor Safety Analysis was last updated via ORNL-4169, Vol. 2, Supplement 1, in May of 1978. Since that date, several changes have been effected through the change-memo system described below. While these changes have involved the cooling system, the electrical system, and the reactor instrumentation and controls, they have not, for the most part, presented new or unreviewed safety questions. However, some of the changes have been based on questions or recommendations stemming from safety reviews or from reactor events at other sites. This paper discusses those changes which were judged to be safety related and which include revisions to the syphon-break system and changes related to seismic considerations which were very recently completed. The maximum hypothetical accident postulated in the original safety analysis requires dynamic containment and filtered flow for compliance with 10CFR100 limits at the site boundary

  20. Loss of coolant analysis for the tower shielding reactor 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radcliff, T.D.; Williams, P.T.

    1990-06-01

    The operational limits of the Tower Shielding Reactor-2 (TSR-2) have been revised to account for placing the reactor in a beam shield, which reduces convection cooling during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A detailed heat transfer analysis was performed to set operating time limits which preclude fuel damage during a LOCA. Since a LOCA is survivable, the pressure boundary need not be safety related, minimizing seismic and inspection requirements. Measurements of reactor component emittance for this analysis revealed that aluminum oxidized in water may have emittance much higher than accepted values, allowing higher operating limits than were originally expected. These limits could be increased further with analytical or hardware improvements. 5 refs., 7 figs

  1. Dalhousie SLOWPOKE-2 reactor: A nuclear analytical chemistry facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatt, A.; Holzbecher, J.

    1990-01-01

    SLOWPOKE is an acronym for Safe Low POwer Kritical Experiment. The SOWPOKE-2 is a compact, inherently safe, swimming-pool-type reactor designed by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for neutron activation analysis (NAA) and isotope production. The Dalhousie University SLOWPOKE-2 reactor (DUSR) has been operating since 1976; a large beryllium reflector was added in 1986 to extend its lifetime by another 8 to 10 yr. The DUSR is generally operated at half-power with a maximum thermal flux of 1.1 x 10 12 n/cm 2 ·s in the inner pneumatic sites and that of 5.4 x 10 11 n/cm 2 ·s in the outer sites. Despite this comparatively low flux, SLOWPOKE-2 reactors have many beneficial features that are continuously being exploited at the DUSR facility for developing nuclear analytical methods for fundamental as well as applied studies. Although NAA is a well-established analytical technique, much of the activation analysis being performed in most facilities has been limited to methods using fairly long-lived nuclides. The approach at the DUSR facility has been to utilize the highly homogeneous, stable, and reproducible neutron flux to develop NAA methods based on short-lived nuclides. SLOWPOKE reactors have a fairly high epithermal neutron flux, which is being advantageously used for determining several trace elements in complex matrices. Radiochemical NAA (RNAA) methods using coprecipitation, distillation, and ion-exchange separations have been used for the determination of very low levels of several elements in biological materials

  2. FMDP Reactor Alternative Summary Report: Volume 2 - CANDU heavy water reactor alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, S.R.; Spellman, D.J.; Bevard, B.B.

    1996-09-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE/MD) initiated a detailed analysis activity to evaluate each of ten plutonium disposition alternatives that survived an initial screening process. This document, Volume 2 of a four volume report, summarizes the results of these analyses for the CANDU reactor based plutonium disposition alternative

  3. FMDP Reactor Alternative Summary Report: Volume 2 - CANDU heavy water reactor alternative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, S.R.; Spellman, D.J.; Bevard, B.B. [and others

    1996-09-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE/MD) initiated a detailed analysis activity to evaluate each of ten plutonium disposition alternatives that survived an initial screening process. This document, Volume 2 of a four volume report, summarizes the results of these analyses for the CANDU reactor based plutonium disposition alternative.

  4. Dynamic simulation of the 2 MWt slowpoke heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, C.M.; Lepp, R.M.

    1982-04-01

    A 2 MWt SLOWPOKE reactor, intended for commercial space heating, is being developed at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories. A small-signal dynamic simulation of this reactor, without closed-loop control, was developed. Basic equations were used to describe the physical phenomena in each kf the eight reactor subsystems. These equations were then linearized about the normal operation conditions and rearranged in a dimensionless form for implementation. The overall simulation is non-linear. Slow transient responses (minutes to days) of the simulation to both reactivity and temperature perturbations were measured at full power. In all cases the system reached a new steady state in times varying from 12 h to 250 h. These results illustrate the benefits of the inherent negative reactivity feedback of this reactor concept. The addition of closed-loop control using core outlet temperature as the controlled variable to move a beryllium reflector is also examined

  5. Distribution of energy of impulses of the modernized IBR-2 REACTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayibov, L.A; Mehtiyeva, R.N.; )

    2011-01-01

    Full text: For the modernized IBR-2 reactor there are two main reasons causing fluctuations of energy of impulses [1,3] on low power of stochastic fluctuations, on the nominal - giving rise to fluctuations of external reactance. The fluctuations of pulse energy is quite significant (20%). They affect the dynamics of the reactor, the process of regulation, starting, as well as the work of the experimental apparatus, etc. It is clear that research of fluctuation of energy of impulses has special value for the IBR-2 type reactor. Sufficient information about the statistical properties of the reactor noise gives the density distribution of the energy pulse power. We used the usual procedure of statistical analysis of time series. Calculated pulse energy of density and the parameters of this distribution.

  6. Equipment for thermal neutron flux measurements in reactor R2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, E; Nilsson, T; Claeson, S

    1960-04-15

    For most of the thermal neutron flux measurements in reactor R2 cobalt wires will be used. The loading and removal of these wires from the reactor core will be performed by means of a long aluminium tube and electromagnets. After irradiation the wires will be scanned in a semi-automatic device.

  7. A conceptual design of LIB fusion reactor: UTLIF(2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madarame, Haruki; Kondo, Shunsuke; Iwata, Shuichi; Oka, Yoshiaki; Miya, Kenzo.

    1984-01-01

    UTLIF(2) is a conceptual design study on a light ion beam driven fusion reactor based on a concept of rod-bundle blanket. Survivability and maintainability of the first wall and the blanket are regarded as of major importance in the design. The blanket rod is composed of a thick tube which has enough stiffness, a thin wrapping wall which receives high heat flux, and liquid lithium which breeds tritium and removes generated heat. The rod can be pulled out from the outside of the reactor vessel, hence the replacement is very easy. Nuclear and thermal analysis have been made and the performance of the reactor has been shown to be satisfactory. (author)

  8. The BR2 materials testing reactor. Past, ongoing and under-study upgradings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baugnet, J M; Roedt, Ch de; Gubel, P; Koonen, E [Centre d' Etude de I' Energie Nucleaire, Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie, C.E.N./S.C.K., Mol (Belgium)

    1990-05-01

    The BR2 reactor (Mol, Belgium) is a high-flux materials testing reactor. The fuel is 93% {sup 235}U enriched uranium. The nominal power ranges from 60 to 100 MW. The main features of the design are the following: 1) maximum neutron flux, thermal: 1.2 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} s; fast (E > 0.1 MeV) : 8.4 x 10{sup 14} n /cm{sup 2} s; 2) great flexibility of utilization: the core configuration and operation mode can be adapted to the experimental loading; 3) neutron spectrum tailoring; 4) availability of five 200 mm diameter channels besides the standard channels (84 mm diameter); 5) access to the top and bottom covers of the reactor authorizing the irradiation of loops. The reactor is used to study the behaviour of fuel elements and structural materials intended for future nuclear power stations of several types (fission and fusion). Irradiations are carried out in connection with performance tests up to very high burn-up or neutron fluence as well as for safety experiments, power cycling experiments, and generally speaking, tests under off-normal conditions. Irradiations for nuclear transmutation (production of high specific activity radio-isotopes and transplutonium elements), neutron-radiography, use of beam tubes for physics studies, and gamma irradiations are also carried out. The BR2 is used in support of Belgian programs, at the request of utilities, industry and universities and in the framework of international agreements. The paper reviews the past and ongoing upgrading and enhancement of reactor capabilities as well as those under study or consideration, namely with regard to: reactor equipment, fuel elements, irradiation facilities, reactor operation conditions and long-term strategy. (author)

  9. TiO2 Solar Photocatalytic Reactor Systems: Selection of Reactor Design for Scale-up and Commercialization—Analytical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmine Abdel-Maksoud

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available For the last four decades, viability of photocatalytic degradation of organic compounds in water streams has been demonstrated. Different configurations for solar TiO2 photocatalytic reactors have been used, however pilot and demonstration plants are still countable. Degradation efficiency reported as a function of treatment time does not answer the question: which of these reactor configurations is the most suitable for photocatalytic process and optimum for scale-up and commercialization? Degradation efficiency expressed as a function of the reactor throughput and ease of catalyst removal from treated effluent are used for comparing performance of different reactor configurations to select the optimum for scale-up. Comparison included parabolic trough, flat plate, double skin sheet, shallow ponds, shallow tanks, thin-film fixed-bed, thin film cascade, step, compound parabolic concentrators, fountain, slurry bubble column, pebble bed and packed bed reactors. Degradation efficiency as a function of system throughput is a powerful indicator for comparing the performance of photocatalytic reactors of different types and geometries, at different development scales. Shallow ponds, shallow tanks and fountain reactors have the potential of meeting all the process requirements and a relatively high throughput are suitable for developing into continuous industrial-scale treatment units given that an efficient immobilized or supported photocatalyst is used.

  10. Planned Scientific programs around the Triga Mark 2 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majah, M Ibn.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear techniques have been introduced to Morocco since the sixties. After the energy crisis of 1973, Morocco decides to create the National Center for Energy Sciences and Nuclear Techniques (CNESTEN) under the supervision of the Ministry of high Education and Research, with a research commercial and support vocation. CNESTEN is in charge of promoting nuclear application, to act as technical support for the authorities and to prepare the technological basis for nuclear power option. In 1998, CNESTEN started the construction of Nuclear Research Centre. The on going activities cover many sectors : earth and environmental sciences, high energy physics, safety and security, waste management. In 2001, CNESTEN started the construction of a 2MW TRiga Mark 2 Reactor, with the possibility to increase the power to 3 MW. The construction was achieved in January 2007. The operation of the reactor is expected for April 2007. The program of the utilization of the reactor was established with th contribution of the university and with the assistance of IAEA. Some of the experimental set-up installed around the reactor have been designed. CNESTEN has developed cooperation with Nuclear research centres from other countries and is receiving visitors and trainees mainly through the IAEA [fr

  11. Power noise spectrum classification in the problem of the IBR-2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bargel, M.; Kitowski, J.; Pepelyshev, Yu.N.

    1988-01-01

    The classification spectrum results of random fluctuations in the IBR-2 energy pulse are presented. The work is performed for the application of the obtained results to the reactor diagnostics and the study of its noise uncontrolled states. For classification of the spectra the method of pattern recognition based upon the ISODATA heuristic algorithm is used. It is shown that a set of noise uncontrolled reactor states, registered during the reactor operation period at power of 0.4-2 MVt with the first variant of moving reflector (1983-1986) is formed into 4(5) most typical states. Each of the states corresponds to the general conditions of the reactor core cooling and provides the normal work of the moving reflector. However, these states differ in coolant flow, power level and peculiarities of the moving reflector rotation regime. One type of anomal power noise, connected with some disorder in the moving reflctor work, is isolated. This work also presents the possibility of control over the state of moving reflectors according to the change in the amplitude of power oscillations at some frequences. The reactor noise classification results can be used as the data bank for the IBR-2 reactor diagnostic system

  12. Research reactor FR2 - 20 years chemical and radiochemical measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feuerstein, H.; Graebner, H.; Oschinski, J.; Hoffmann, W.; Beyer, J.

    1986-09-01

    The FR2 has been a D 2 O cooled and moderated research reactor with a thermal output of 44 MW. It was in operation from 1961 to 1981. Because of the operating conditions of the reactor, only a small number of routine measurements were performed. For these however special techniques had to be developed. During the 20 years of operation a number of special events occured or have been observed, sometimes with very amazing results, e.g. the 'aceton effect'. This report describes the chemical and radiochemical conditions of the reactor systems, as well as the results of the surveilance work. Not described are measurements for the many experiments. The last chapter gives in a short form a description of the most unusual events and observations. (orig.) [de

  13. Venting krypton-85 from the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, H.M.

    1981-01-01

    To permit the less restricted access to the reactor building necessary to maintain instrumentation and equipment, and to proceed towad the total decontamination of the facility, General Public Utilities, operators of the facility referred to hereafter as GPU, asked the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, or NRC, for permission to remove the 85 Kr from the reactor building by venting it to the environment. GPU supported their request with the Safety Analysis and Environmental Assessment Report on the proposed reactor building venting plan. On June 12, 1980, after seven months of licensing deliberations and numerous public hearings, the NRC granted GPU's request. The actual venting took place between June 28 and July 11, 1980. This report presents an overview of the detailed effort involved in the TMI-2 reactor building venting program. The findings reported here are condensed from a published report entitled TMI-2 Reactor Building Purge--Kr-85 Venting

  14. Research on economics and CO2 emission of magnetic and inertial fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Kenjiro; Yamazaki, Kozo; Oishi, Tetsutarou; Arimoto, Hideki; Shoji, Tatsuo

    2011-01-01

    An economical and environment-friendly fusion reactor system is needed for the realization of attractive power plants. Comparative system studies have been done for magnetic fusion energy (MFE) reactors, and been extended to include inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactors by Physics Engineering Cost (PEC) system code. In this study, we have evaluated both tokamak reactor (TR) and IFE reactor (IR). We clarify new scaling formulas for cost of electricity (COE) and CO 2 emission rate with respect to key design parameters. By the scaling formulas, it is clarified that the plant availability and operation year dependences are especially dominant for COE. On the other hand, the parameter dependences of CO 2 emission rate is rather weak than that of COE. This is because CO 2 emission percentage from manufacturing the fusion island is lower than COE percentage from that. Furthermore, the parameters dependences for IR are rather weak than those for TR. Because the CO 2 emission rate from manufacturing the laser system to be exchanged is very large in comparison with CO 2 emission rate from TR blanket exchanges. (author)

  15. Development of a TiO2-coated optical fiber reactor for water decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danion, A.

    2004-09-01

    The objective of this study was to built and to study a photo-reactor composed by TiO 2 -coated optical fibers for water decontamination. The physico-chemical characteristics and the optical properties of the TiO 2 coating were first studied. Then, the influences of different parameters as the coating thickness, the coating length and the coating volume were investigated both on the light transmission in the TiO 2 - coated fiber and on the photo-catalytic activity of the fiber for a model compound (malic acid). The photo-catalytic degradation of malic acid was optimized using the experimental design methodology allowing to build a multi-fiber reactor comprising 57 optical fibers. The photo-degradation of malic acid was conducted in the multi-fiber reactor and it was demonstrated that the multi-fiber reactor was more efficient than the single-fiber reactor at the same fibers density. Finally, the multi-fiber reactor was applied to the photo-degradation of a fungicide, called fenamidone, and a degradation pathway was proposed. (author)

  16. TMI-2 reactor-vessel head removal and damaged-core-removal planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, J.A.; Hultman, C.W.; Lewis, T.J.

    1982-01-01

    A major milestone in the cleanup and recovery effort at TMI-2 will be the removal of the reactor vessel closure head, planum, and damaged core fuel material. The data collected during these operations will provide the nuclear power industry with valuable information on the effects of high-temperature-dissociated coolant on fuel cladding, fuel materials, fuel support structural materials, neutron absorber material, and other materials used in reactor structural support components and drive mechanisms. In addition, examination of these materials will also be used to determine accident time-temperature histories in various regions of the core. Procedures for removing the reactor vessel head and reactor core are presented

  17. Proceedings of the 1992 topical meeting on advances in reactor physics. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This document, Volume 2, presents proceedings of the 1992 Topical Meeting on Advances in Reactor Physics on March 8--11, 1992 at Charleston, SC. Session topics were as follows: Transport Theory; Fast Reactors; Plant Analyzers; Integral Experiments/Measurements & Analysis; Core Computational Systems; Reactor Physics; Monte Carlo; Safety Aspects of Heavy Water Reactors; and Space-Time Core Kinetics. The individual reports have been cataloged separately. (FI)

  18. Fissile fuel production and usage of thermal reactor waste fueled with UO2 by means of hybrid reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ipek, O.

    1997-01-01

    The use of Fast Breeder Reactors to produce fissile fuel from nuclear waste and the operation of these reactors with a new neutron source are becoming today' topic. In the thermonuclear reactors, it is possible to use 2.45-14.1 MeV - neutrons which can be obtained by D-T, D-D Semicatalyzed (D-D) and other fusion reactions. To be able to do these, Hybrid Reactor System, which still has experimental and theoretical studies, have to be taken into consideration.In this study, neutronic analysis of hybrid blanket with grafit reflector, is performed. D-T driven fusion reaction is surrounded by UO 2 fuel layer and the production of ''2''3''9Pu fissile fuel from waste ''2''3''8U is analyzed. It is also compared to the other possible fusion reactions. The results show that 815.8 kg/year ''2''3''8Pu with D-T reaction and 1431.6 kg/year ''2''3''8Pu with semicatalyzed (D-D) reaction can be produced for 1000 MW fusion power. This means production of 2.8/ year and 4.94/ year LWR respectively. In addition, 1000 MW fusion flower is is multiplicated to 3415 MW and 4274 MW for D-T and semicatalyzed (D-D) reactions respectively. The system works subcritical and these values are 0.4115 and 0.312 in order. The calculations, ANISN-ORNL code, S 16 -P 3 approach and DLC36 data library are used

  19. A theoretical analysis of methanol synthesis from CO2 and H2 in a ceramic membrane reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallucci, F.; Basile, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this theoretical work the CO2 conversion into methanol in both a traditional reactor (TR) and a membrane reactor (MR) is considered. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of increasing CO2 conversion into methanol with respect to a TR. A zeolite MR, able to combine

  20. Cronos 2: a neutronic simulation software for reactor core calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lautard, J.J.; Magnaud, C.; Moreau, F.; Baudron, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    The CRONOS2 software is that part of the SAPHYR code system dedicated to neutronic core calculations. CRONOS2 is a powerful tool for reactor design, fuel management and safety studies. Its modular structure and great flexibility make CRONOS2 an unique simulation tool for research and development for a wide variety of reactor systems. CRONOS2 is a versatile tool that covers a large range of applications from very fast calculations used in training simulators to time and memory consuming reference calculations needed to understand complex physical phenomena. CRONOS2 has a procedure library named CPROC that allows the user to create its own application environment fitted to a specific industrial use. (authors)

  1. Set of rules SOR 2 reactor site criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    The purpose of this set of rules is to describe criteria which guide the Director in his evaluation of the suitability of proposed sites for stationary power and testing reactors subject to SOR 2. (B.G.)

  2. Homogeneous fast reactor benchmark testing of CENDL-2 and ENDF/B-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guisheng

    1995-01-01

    How to choose correct weighting spectrum has been studied to produce multigroup constants for fast reactor benchmark calculations. A correct weighting option makes us obtain satisfying results of K eff and central reaction rate ratios for nine fast reactor benchmark testings of CENDL-2 and ENDF/B-6. (4 tabs., 2 figs.)

  3. Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the Reactor Technology Complex Operable Unit 2-13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard P. Wells

    2007-01-01

    This Groundwater Monitoring Plan describes the objectives, activities, and assessments that will be performed to support the on-going groundwater monitoring requirements at the Reactor Technology Complex, formerly the Test Reactor Area (TRA). The requirements for groundwater monitoring were stipulated in the Final Record of Decision for Test Reactor Area, Operable Unit 2-13, signed in December 1997. The monitoring requirements were modified by the First Five-Year Review Report for the Test Reactor Area, Operable Unit 2-13, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to focus on those contaminants of concern that warrant continued surveillance, including chromium, tritium, strontium-90, and cobalt-60. Based upon recommendations provided in the Annual Groundwater Monitoring Status Report for 2006, the groundwater monitoring frequency was reduced to annually from twice a year

  4. Homogeneous fast reactor benchmark testing of CENDL-2 and ENDF/B-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guisheng

    1995-11-01

    How to choose correct weighting spectrum has been studied to produce multigroup constants for fast reactor benchmark calculations. A correct weighting option makes us obtain satisfying results of K eff and central reaction rate ratios for nine fast reactor benchmark testing of CENDL-2 and ENDF/B-6. (author). 8 refs, 2 figs, 4 tabs

  5. An experimental investigation of fission product release in SLOWPOKE-2 reactors - Data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harnden, A.M.C.

    1995-09-01

    The results of an investigation into the release of fission products from SLOWPOKE-2 reactors fuelled with a highly-enriched uranium alloy core are detailed in Volume 1. This data report (Volume 2) contains plots of the activity concentrations of the fission products observed in the reactor container at the University of Toronto, Ecole Polytechnique and the Kanata Isotope Production Facility. Release rates from the reactor container water to the gas headspace are also included. (author)

  6. Safety assessments relating to the use of new fuels in research reactors: application to the case of FRM 2 reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou Yehia, H.; Bars, G.; Tran Dai

    2001-01-01

    After giving a brief reminder of the procedure applied in France for the licensing of the use of a new fuel type or design in a research reactor, we outline the main safety aspects associated with such a modification. Finally, by way of an example, we focus on the safety assessment relating to the IRIS irradiation device used in SILOE reactor, in particular for the qualification of the fuel dedicated to FRM II reactor of the Technical University of Munich. This qualification was carried out on a U 3 Si 2 fuel plate enriched to about 90 % in weight of 235 U and containing 1.5 g of uranium per cm 3 . The evaluation performed by the IPSN for GRS did not call into question the choice of U 3 Si 2 fuel plates for the FRM-II reactor. (authors)

  7. Thermal neutron flux distribution in ET-RR-2 reactor thermal column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Mahmoud M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal column in the ET-RR-2 reactor is intended to promote a thermal neutron field of high intensity and purity to be used for following tasks: (a to provide a thermal neutron flux in the neutron transmutation silicon doping, (b to provide a thermal flux in the neutron activation analysis position, and (c to provide a thermal neutron flux of high intensity to the head of one of the beam tubes leading to the room specified for boron thermal neutron capture therapy. It was, therefore, necessary to determine the thermal neutron flux at above mentioned positions. In the present work, the neutron flux in the ET-RR-2 reactor system was calculated by applying the three dimensional diffusion depletion code TRITON. According to these calculations, the reactor system is composed of the core, surrounding external irradiation grid, beryllium block, thermal column and the water reflector in the reactor tank next to the tank wall. As a result of these calculations, the thermal neutron fluxes within the thermal column and at irradiation positions within the thermal column were obtained. Apart from this, the burn up results for the start up core calculated according to the TRITION code were compared with those given by the reactor designer.

  8. Apollo-L2, an advanced fuel tokamak reactor utilizing direct conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Blanchard, J.P.; El-Guebaly, L.A.; Khater, H.Y.; Santarius, J.F.; Sawan, M.E.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Wittenberg, L.J.; Witt, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    A scoping study of a tokamak reactor fueled by a D- 3 He plasma is presented. The Apollo D- 3 He tokamak capitalizes on recent advances in high field magnets (20 T) and utilizes rectennas to convert the synchrotron radiation directly to electricity. The low neutron wall loading (0.1 MW/m 2 ) permits a first wall lasting the life of the plant and enables the reactor to be classified as inherently safe. The cost of electricity is less than that from a similar power level DT reactor. 10 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  9. Reactor containment and reactor safety in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouts, H.

    1986-01-01

    The reactor safety systems of two reactors are studied aiming at the reactor containment integrity. The first is a BWR type reactor and is called Peachbottom 2, and the second is a PWR type reactor, and is called surry. (E.G.) [pt

  10. Rapid data acquisition from the safety system of the FRJ-2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inhoven, H.

    1980-06-01

    The central department for research reactors (ZFR) of the Juelich Nuclear Research Centre (KFA) is operating the reactors FRJ-1 (MERLIN) and FRJ-2 (DIDO) since 1962. In 1976, a Siemens 330 computer has been put into operation especially for the processing of data from the DIDO reactor, followed by another computer of the same type for the purpose of processing data from the ZFR department in general. The present report is a result of the work investigating 'Data acquisition and data processing in the FRJ-2' and primarily discusses the complex of 'fast analog and binary signals'. The activities in this field of work have been and still are mainly concerned with general problems encountered in adapting a currently 14-year-old reactor system to a digital computer, namely problems such as data decoupling in the safety system of the reactor, data acquisition using the CAMAC system, data transfer via an 'extended branch', data acquisition software as core-resident programs, temporary storage as common data, interpreting software as peripheral - storage - resident programs. (orig./WB) [de

  11. Reactor Physics Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Raedt, C

    2000-07-01

    The Reactor Physics and Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis on reactor fuel. This expertise is applied within the Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Research Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments. Progress and achievements in 1999 in the following areas are reported on: (1) investigations on the use of military plutonium in commercial power reactors; (2) neutron and gamma calculations performed for BR-2 and for other reactors; (3) the updating of neutron and gamma cross-section libraries; (4) the implementation of reactor codes; (6) the management of the UNIX workstations; and (6) fuel cycle studies.

  12. Reactor Physics Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Raedt, C.

    2000-01-01

    The Reactor Physics and Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis on reactor fuel. This expertise is applied within the Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Research Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments. Progress and achievements in 1999 in the following areas are reported on: (1) investigations on the use of military plutonium in commercial power reactors; (2) neutron and gamma calculations performed for BR-2 and for other reactors; (3) the updating of neutron and gamma cross-section libraries; (4) the implementation of reactor codes; (6) the management of the UNIX workstations; and (6) fuel cycle studies

  13. Estimation of power feedback parameters of pulse reactor IBR-2M on transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepyolyshev, Yu.N.; Popov, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    Parameters of the IBR-2M reactor power feedback (PFB) on a model of the reactor dynamics by mathematical treatment of two registered transients are estimated. Frequency characteristics and the pulse transient characteristics corresponding to these PFB parameters are calculated. PFB parameters received thus can be considered as their express tentative estimation as real measurements in this case occupy no more than 30 minutes. Total PFB is negative at 1 and 2 MW. At the received estimations of PFB parameters in a self-regulation mode it is possible to consider the stability margins of the IBR-2M reactor satisfactory

  14. Independent CO2 loop for cooling the samples irradiated in the RA reactor vertical experimental channels, Task 2.50.05

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojic, M.; Pavicevic, M.

    1964-01-01

    This report contains the following volumes V and VI of the Project 'Independent CO 2 loop for cooling the samples irradiated in RA reactor vertical experimental channels': Design project of the dosimetry control system in the independent CO 2 loop for cooling the samples irradiated in the RA reactor vertical experimental channels, and Safety report for the Independent CO 2 loop for cooling the samples irradiated in the RA reactor vertical experimental channels [sr

  15. PSA Level 2 activities for RBMK reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubler, R.

    1998-01-01

    Probabilistic safety analyses (PSAs) of the boiling water graphite moderated pressure tube reactors (RBMKs) have been developed only recently and they are limited to Level 1. Activities at the IAEA were first motivated because of the difficulties to characterize core damage for RBMK reactors. Core damage probability is used in documents of the IAEA as a convenient single valued measure, for example for probabilistic safety criteria. The limited number of PSAs that have been completed for the RBMK reactors have shown that several special features of these channel type reactors necessitate revisiting of the characterization of core damage for these reactors. Furthermore, it has become increasingly evident that detailed deterministic analysis of DBAs and beyond design basis accidents reveal considerable insights into RBMK response to various accident conditions. These analyses can also help in better characterizing the outstanding phenomenological uncertainties, improved EOPs and AM strategies, including potential risk-beneficial accident negative backfits. The deterministic efforts should be focused first on elucidating accident progression processes and phenomena, and second on finding, qualifying and implementing procedures to minimize the risk of severe accident states The IAEA PSA procedures were mainly developed in New of vessel type LWRs, and would therefore require extensions to make them directly applicable. to channel type reactors. (author) (author)

  16. Studsvik's R2 reactor - Review of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grounes, Mikael; Tomani, Hans; Graeslund, Christian; Rundquist, Hans; Skoeld, Kurt [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1993-07-01

    A general description of the R2 reactor, its associated facilities and its history is given. The facilities and range of work are described for the following types of activities: fuel testing, materials testing, neutron transmutation doping of silicon, activation analysis, radioisotope production and basic research including thermal neutron scattering, nuclear chemistry and neutron capture radiography. (author)

  17. Decommissioning of reactor facilities (2). Required technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagihara, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Decommissioning of reactor facilities was planned to perform progressive dismantling, decontamination and radioactive waste disposal with combination of required technology in a safe and economic way. This article outlined required technology for decommissioning as follows: (1) evaluation of kinds and amounts of residual radioactivity of reactor facilities with calculation and measurement, (2) decontamination technology of metal components and concrete structures so as to reduce worker's exposure and production of radioactive wastes during dismantling, (3) dismantling technology of metal components and concrete structures such as plasma arc cutting, band saw cutting and controlled demolition with mostly remote control operation, (3) radioactive waste disposal for volume reduction and reuse, and (4) project management of decommissioning for safe and rational work to secure reduction of worker's exposure and prevent the spreading of contamination. (T. Tanaka)

  18. Reproduction of the PSBR reactor with Exterminator-2; Reproduccion del reactor PSBR con exterminador-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar H, F. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    1983-08-15

    To reproduce the reactor PSBR reported in (1), with the available version of the Exterminator-II in the ININ, they took the dimensions, composition specifications, effective sections of the different compositions (excepting those of the central thimble and of the moderator), the K{sub eff} and the factors of power (FP) for the different burners. Based on the comparison of the K{sub eff} and of the FP obtained with those reported the precision it is determined before in the reproduction of the reactor mentioned. (Author)

  19. Production of Sn-117m in the BR2 high-flux reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsard, B; Srivastava, S C; Mausner, L F; Russ Knapp, F F; Garland, M A; Mirzadeh, S

    2009-01-01

    The BR2 reactor is a 100MW(th) high-flux 'materials testing reactor', which produces a wide range of radioisotopes for various applications in nuclear medicine and industry. Tin-117m ((117m)Sn), a promising radionuclide for therapeutic applications, and its production have been validated in the BR2 reactor. In contrast to therapeutic beta emitters, (117m)Sn decays via isomeric transition with the emission of monoenergetic conversion electrons which are effective for metastatic bone pain palliation and radiosynovectomy with lesser damage to the bone marrow and the healthy tissues. Furthermore, the emitted gamma photons are ideal for imaging and dosimetry.

  20. Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greneche, D.

    2014-01-01

    This article compares the 2 types of light water reactors that are used to produce electricity: the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Historically the BWR concept was developed after the PWR concept. Today 80% of light water reactors operating in the world are of PWR-type. This comparison is comprehensive and detailed. First the main technical features are reviewed and compared: reactor architecture, core and fuel design, reactivity control, reactor vessel, cooling systems and reactor containment. Secondly, various aspects concerning reactor operations like reactor control, fuel management, maintenance, inspections, radiation protection, waste generation and reactor reliability are presented and compared for both reactors. As for the issue of safety, it is highlighted that the accidental situations are too different for the 2 reactors to be compared. The main features of reactor safety are explained for both reactors

  1. Proceedings of 2. Yugoslav symposium on reactor physics, Part 1, Herceg Novi (Yugoslavia), 27-29 Sep 1966

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    This Volume 1 of the Proceedings of 2. Yugoslav symposium on reactor physics includes nine papers dealing with the following topics: reactor kinetics, reactor noise, neutron detection, methods for calculating neutron flux spatial and time dependence in the reactor cores of both heavy and light water moderated experimental reactors, calculation of reactor lattice parameters, reactor instrumentation, reactor monitoring systems; measuring methods of reactor parameters; reactor experimental facilities

  2. Comparative study between fluidized bed and fixed bed reactors in methane reforming with CO2 and O2 to produce syngas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Qiangshan; Lou Hui; Mo Liuye; Zheng Xiaoming

    2006-01-01

    Reforming of methane with carbon dioxide and oxygen was investigated over Ni/MgO-SiO 2 catalysts using fixed bed and fluidized bed reactors. The conversions of CH 4 and CO 2 in a fluidized bed reactor were close to thermodynamic equilibrium. The activity and stability of the catalyst in the fixed bed reactor were lower than that in the fluidized bed reactor due to carbon deposition and nickel sintering. TGA and TEM techniques were used to characterize the spent catalysts. The results showed that a lot of whisker carbon was found on the catalyst in the rear of the fixed bed reactor, and no deposited carbon was observed on the catalysts in the fluidized bed reactor after reaction. It is suggested that this phenomenon is related to a permanent circulation of catalyst particles between the oxygen rich and oxygen free zones. That is, fluidization of the catalysts in the fluidized bed reactor favors inhibiting deposited carbon and thermal uniformity in the reactor

  3. Benchmark testing of Canadol-2.1 for heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ping

    1999-01-01

    The new version evaluated nuclear data library of ENDF-B 6.5 has been released recently. In order to compare the quality of evaluated nuclear data CENDL-2.1 with ENDF-B 6.5, it is necessary to do benchmarks testing for them. In this work, CENDL-2.1 and ENDF-B 6.5 were used to generated the WIMS-69 group library respectively, and benchmarks testing was done for the heavy water reactor, using WIMS5A code. It is obvious that data files of CENDL-2.1 is better than that of old WIMS library for the heavy water reactors calculations, and is in good agreement with those of ENDF-B 6.5

  4. Oxygen suppression in boiling water reactors. Phase 2. Annual report 1981, December 2, 1980-December 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burley, E.L.

    1982-07-01

    A hydrogen addition test will be performed in the Dresden-2 reactor of Commonwealth Edison Company during 1982. Up to 2 ppM hydrogen will be added to and dissolved in the reactor feedwater to reverse the radiolysis reaction in the reactor core and suppress oxgen concentration in the primary coolant. At low oxygen levels the propensity of stressed and sensitized 304 stainless steel toward intergranular stress corrosion cracking is greatly reduced. The test will answer outstanding questions and uncertainties in the areas of water chemistry, equipment design and materials performance. Nine special sample facilities will be prepared in the primary coolant, main stream, feedwater/condensate, and offgas systems. Instrumentation will be available to measure hydrogen, oxygen, conductivity, pH, soluble and insoluble corrosion products, and electrochemical potentials. In addition, an autoclave in which confirming constant extension rate tests can be conducted in reactor water will be provided

  5. Characterization of fuel distributions in the Three-Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor system by neutron and gamma-ray dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Ruddy, F.H.; Preston, C.C.; McNeece, J.P.; Kaiser, B.J.; McElroy, W.N.

    1984-04-01

    The resolution of technical issues generated by the accident at Three-Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) will inevitably be of long range benefit. Determination of the fuel debris dispersal in the TMI-2 reactor system represents a major technical issue. In reactor recovery operations, such as for the safe handling and final disposal of TMI-2 waste, quantitative fuel assessments are being conducted throughout the reactor core and primary coolant system

  6. Joint Assessment of ETRR-2 Research Reactor Operations Program, Capabilities, and Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bissani, M; O'Kelly, D S

    2006-01-01

    A joint assessment meeting was conducted at the Egyptian Atomic Energy Agency (EAEA) followed by a tour of Egyptian Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2) on March 22 and 23, 2006. The purpose of the visit was to evaluate the capabilities of the new research reactor and its operations under Action Sheet 4 between the U.S. DOE and the EAEA, ''Research Reactor Operation'', and Action Sheet 6, ''Technical assistance in The Production of Radioisotopes''. Preliminary Recommendations of the joint assessment are as follows: (1) ETRR-2 utilization should be increased by encouraging frequent and sustained operations. This can be accomplished in part by (a) Improving the supply-chain management for fresh reactor fuel and alleviating the perception that the existing fuel inventory should be conserved due to unreliable fuel supply; and (b) Promulgating a policy for sample irradiation priority that encourages the use of the reactor and does not leave the decision of when to operate entirely at the discretion of reactor operations staff. (2) Each experimental facility in operation or built for a single purpose should be reevaluated to focus on those that most meet the goals of the EAEA strategic business plan. Temporary or long-term elimination of some experimental programs might be necessary to provide more focused utilization. There may be instances of emerging reactor applications for which no experimental facility is yet designed or envisioned. In some cases, an experimental facility may have a more beneficial use than the purpose for which it was originally designed. For example, (a) An effective Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) program requires nearby high quality medical facilities. These facilities are not available and are unlikely to be constructed near the Inshas site. Further, the BNCT facility is not correctly designed for advanced research and therapy programs using epithermal neutrons. (b) The ETRR-2 is frequently operated to provide color-enhanced gemstones but is

  7. Joint Assessment of ETRR-2 Research Reactor Operations Program, Capabilities, and Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissani, M; O' Kelly, D S

    2006-05-08

    A joint assessment meeting was conducted at the Egyptian Atomic Energy Agency (EAEA) followed by a tour of Egyptian Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2) on March 22 and 23, 2006. The purpose of the visit was to evaluate the capabilities of the new research reactor and its operations under Action Sheet 4 between the U.S. DOE and the EAEA, ''Research Reactor Operation'', and Action Sheet 6, ''Technical assistance in The Production of Radioisotopes''. Preliminary Recommendations of the joint assessment are as follows: (1) ETRR-2 utilization should be increased by encouraging frequent and sustained operations. This can be accomplished in part by (a) Improving the supply-chain management for fresh reactor fuel and alleviating the perception that the existing fuel inventory should be conserved due to unreliable fuel supply; and (b) Promulgating a policy for sample irradiation priority that encourages the use of the reactor and does not leave the decision of when to operate entirely at the discretion of reactor operations staff. (2) Each experimental facility in operation or built for a single purpose should be reevaluated to focus on those that most meet the goals of the EAEA strategic business plan. Temporary or long-term elimination of some experimental programs might be necessary to provide more focused utilization. There may be instances of emerging reactor applications for which no experimental facility is yet designed or envisioned. In some cases, an experimental facility may have a more beneficial use than the purpose for which it was originally designed. For example, (a) An effective Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) program requires nearby high quality medical facilities. These facilities are not available and are unlikely to be constructed near the Inshas site. Further, the BNCT facility is not correctly designed for advanced research and therapy programs using epithermal neutrons. (b) The ETRR-2 is frequently operated to

  8. analysis and implementation of reactor protection system circuits - case study Egypt's 2 nd research reactor-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elnokity, O.E.M.

    2006-01-01

    this work presents a way to design and implement the trip unit of a reactor protection system (RPS) using a field programmable gate arrays (FPGA). instead of the traditional embedded microprocessor based interface design method, a proposed tailor made FPGA based circuit is built to substitute the trip unit (TU), which is used in Egypt's 2 nd research reactor ETRR-2. the existing embedded system is built around the STD32 field computer bus which is used in industrial and process control applications. it is modular, rugged, reliable, and easy-to-use and is able to support a large mix of I/O cards and to easily change its configuration in the future. therefore, the same bus is still used in the proposed design. the state machine of this bus is designed based around its timing diagrams and implemented in VHDL to interface the designed TU circuit

  9. General outline of the operation and utilization of the BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baugnet, J.M.; Leonard, F.; Gandolfo, J.M.; Lenders, H.

    1978-01-01

    The BR2 reactor is a high-flux material testing reactor of the thermal heterogeneous type. The fuel is 93% 235 U enriched uranium in the form of plates clad in aluminium. The moderator consists of beryllium and light water, the water being pressurized (12.5kg/cm 2 )and acting also as coolant. The pressure vessel is of aluminium, and is placed in a pool of demineralized water. One should stress the following main features of the design: the experimental channels are skew, the tube bundle presenting the form of a hyperboloid of revolution (see figure 1)-this gives easy access at the top and bottom reactor covers allowing complex instrumented devices, while maintaining a very high neutron flux at the core; great flexibilty of utilization, due to the fact that it is possible to adapt the core configuration to the experimental loading as the fissile charge can be centred on different experimental channels; although BR2 is a thermal reactor, it is possible to achieve neutron spectra very similar to those obtained in a fast reactor, either by the use of absorbing screens or by the use of fissile material within the experimental device; five 200mm diameter channels are available for loading large experimental irradiation devices, as in-pile sodium, gas or water loops. (author)

  10. Benchmark testing of CENDL-2 for U-fuel thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Baocheng; Liu Guisheng; Liu Ping

    1995-01-01

    Based on CENDL-2, NJOY-WIMS code system was used to generate 69-group constants, and do benchmark testing for TRX-1,2; BAPL-UO-2-1,2,3; ZEEP-1,2,3. All the results proved that CENDL-2 is reliable for thermal reactor calculations. (3 tabs.)

  11. Shadow corrosion testing in the INCA facility in the Studsvik R2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nystrand, A.C.; Lassing, A.

    1999-01-01

    Shadow corrosion is a phenomenon which occurs when zirconium alloys are in contact with or in proximity to other metallic objects in a boiling water reactor environment (BWR, RBMK, SGHWR etc.). An enhanced corrosion occurs on the zirconium alloy with the appearance of a 'shadow' of the metallic object. The magnitude of the shadow corrosion can be significant, and is potentially limiting for the lifetime of certain zirconium alloy components in BWRs and other reactors with a similar water chemistry. In order to evaluate the suitability of the In-Core Autoclave (INCA) in the Studsvik R2 materials testing reactor as an experimental facility for studying shadow corrosion, a demonstration test has been performed. A number of test specimens consisting of Zircaloy-2 tubing in contact with Inconel were exposed in an oxidising water chemistry. Some of the specimens were placed within the reactor core and some above the core. The conclusion of this experiment after post irradiation examination is that it is possible to use the INCA facility in the Studsvik R2 reactor to develop a significant level of shadow corrosion after only 800 hours of irradiation. (author)

  12. The 5th surveillance testing for Kori unit 2 reactor vessel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai; Choi, Kwon Jae; Gong, Un Sik; Chang, Jong Hwa; Joo, Yong Sun; Ahn, Sang Bok; Hong, Joon Hwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-03-01

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 5th surveillance testing was performed completely by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute at Taejeon after the capsule was transported from Kori site including its removal from reactor. Fast neutron fluences for capsules were calculated and various testing including mechanical and chemistry analysis were performed in order to evaluate the integrity of Kori unit 2 reactor vessel during the operation until life time. The evaluation results are as follows; Fast neutron fluences for capsules V, R, P, T and N are 2.837E+18, 1.105E+19, 2.110E+19, 3.705E+19 and 4.831E+19n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The bias factor, the ratio of measurement/calculation, was 0.918 for the 1st through 5th testing and the calculational uncertainty, 11.6% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide DG-1053, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 1.898E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 15th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 32, 40, 48 and 56EFPY would reach 4.203E+19, 5.232E+19, 6.262E+19 and 7.291E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. The result through this analysis for Kori unit 2 showed that there would be no problem for the pressurized thermal shock(PTS) during the operation until design life. 49 refs., 35 figs., 48 tabs. (Author)

  13. Digital, remote control system for a 2-MW research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battle, R.E.; Corbett, G.K.

    1988-01-01

    A fault-tolerant programmable logic controller (PLC) and operator workstations have been programmed to replace the hard-wired relay control system in the 2-MW Bulk Shielding Reactor (BSR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In addition to the PLC and remote and local operator workstations, auxiliary systems for remote operation include a video system, an intercom system, and a fiber optic communication system. The remote control station, located at the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2.5 km from the BSR, has the capability of rector startup and power control. The system was designed with reliability and fail-safe features as important considerations. 4 refs., 3 figs

  14. A nodal Grean's function method of reactor core fuel management code, NGCFM2D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dongsheng; Yao Dong.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the mathematical model and program structure of the nodal Green's function method of reactor core fuel management code, NGCFM2D. Computing results of some reactor cores by NGCFM2D are analysed and compared with other codes

  15. RHTF 2, a 1200 MWe high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisbois, Jacques

    1978-01-01

    After having adapted to French conditions the 1160 MWe G.A.C. reactor, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique and French Industry have decided to design an High Temperature Reactor 1200 MWe based on the G.A.C. technology and taking into account the point of view of Electricite de France and the experience of C.E.A. and industry on the gas cooled reactor technology. The main objective of this work is to produce a reactor design having a low technical risk, good operability, with an emphasis on the safety aspects easing the licensing problems

  16. Turkey's regulatory plans for high enriched to low enriched conversion of TR-2 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guelol Oezdere, Oya

    2003-01-01

    Turkey is a developing country and has three nuclear facilities two of which are research reactors and one pilot fuel production plant. One of the two research reactors is TR-2 which is located in Cekmece site in Istanbul. TR-2 Reactor's core is composed of both high enriched and low enriched fuel and from high enriched to low enriched core conversion project will take place in year 2005. This paper presents the plans for drafting regulations on the safety analysis report updates for high enriched to low enriched core conversion of TR-2 reactor, the present regulatory structure of Turkey and licensing activities of nuclear facilities. (author)

  17. Techno-economic assessment of membrane assisted fluidized bed reactors for pure H_2 production with CO_2 capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spallina, V.; Pandolfo, D.; Battistella, A.; Romano, M.C.; Van Sint Annaland, M.; Gallucci, F.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Membrane reactors improve the overall efficiency of H_2 production up to 20%. • Respect to conventional reforming, the H_2 yield increases from 12% to 20%. • The COH is reduced of at least 220% using membrane reactors. • FBMR capture 72% of CO_2 with a specific cost of 8 eur/tonn_C_O_2_. • MA-CLR can reach 90% of CO_2 avoided with same cost of FTR. - Abstract: This paper addresses the techno-economic assessment of two membrane-based technologies for H_2 production from natural gas, fully integrated with CO_2 capture. In the first configuration, a fluidized bed membrane reactor (FBMR) is integrated in the H_2 plant: the natural gas reacts with steam in the catalytic bed and H_2 is simultaneously separated using Pd-based membranes, and the heat of reaction is provided to the system by feeding air as reactive sweep gas in part of the membranes and by burning part of the permeated H_2 (in order to avoid CO_2 emissions for heat supply). In the second system, named membrane assisted chemical looping reforming (MA-CLR), natural gas is converted in the fuel rector by reaction with steam and an oxygen carrier (chemical looping reforming), and the produced H_2 permeates through the membranes. The oxygen carrier is re-oxidized in a separate air reactor with air, which also provides the heat required for the endothermic reactions in the fuel reactor. The plants are optimized by varying the operating conditions of the reactors such as temperature, pressures (both at feed and permeate side), steam-to-carbon ratio and the heat recovery configuration. The plant design is carried out using Aspen Simulation, while the novel reactor concepts have been designed and their performance have been studied with a dedicated phenomenological model in Matlab. Both configurations have been designed and compared with reference technologies for H_2 production based on conventional fired tubular reforming (FTR) with and without CO_2 capture. The results of the analysis show

  18. Reactor building integrity testing: A novel approach at Gentilly 2 - principles and methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, N.; Lafreniere, P.

    1991-01-01

    In 1987, Hydro-Quebec embarked on an ambitious development program to provide the Gentilly 2 nuclear power station with an effective, yet practical reactor building Integrity Test. The Gentilly 2 Integrity Test employs an innovative approach based on the reference volume concept. It is identified as the Temperature Compensation Method (TCM) System. This configuration has been demonstrated at both high and low test pressure and has achieved extraordinary precision in the leak rate measurement. The Gentilly 2 design allows the Integrity Test to be performed at a nominal 3 kPa(g) test pressure during an (11) hour period with the reactor at full power. The reactor building Pressure Test by comparison, is typically performed at high pressure 124 kPa(g)) in a 7 day window during an annual outage. The Integrity Test was developed with the goal of demonstrating containment availability. Specifically it was purported to detect a leak or hole in the 'bottled-up' reactor building greater in magnitude than an equivalent pipe of 25 mm diameter. However it is considered feasible that the high precision of the Gentilly 2 TCM System Integrity Test and a stable reactor building leak characteristic will constitute sufficient grounds for the reduction of the Pressure Test frequency. It is noted that only the TCM System has, to this date, allowed a relevant determination of the reactor building leak rate at a nominal test pressure of 3 kPa(g). Classical method tests at low pressure have lead to inconclusive results due to the high lack of precision

  19. Maximum credible accident analysis for TR-2 reactor conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manopulo, E.

    1981-01-01

    A new reactor, TR-2, of 5 MW, designed in cooperation with CEN/GRENOBLE is under construction in the open pool of TR-1 reactor of 1 MW set up by AMF atomics at the Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center. In this report the fission product inventory and doses released after the maximum credible accident have been studied. The diffusion of the gaseous fission products to the environment and the potential radiation risks to the population have been evaluated

  20. UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} utilization in high temperature engineering test reactor with helium coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waris, Abdul, E-mail: awaris@fi.itb.ac.id; Novitrian,; Pramuditya, Syeilendra; Su’ud, Zaki [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Aji, Indarta K. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    High temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) is one of high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) types which has been developed by Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The HTTR is a graphite moderator, helium gas coolant, 30 MW thermal output and 950 °C outlet coolant temperature for high temperature test operation. Original HTTR uses UO{sub 2} fuel. In this study, we have evaluated the use of UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} in form of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in HTTR. The reactor cell calculation was performed by using SRAC 2002 code, with nuclear data library was derived from JENDL3.2. The result shows that HTTR can obtain its criticality condition if the enrichment of {sup 235}U in loaded fuel is 18.0% or above.

  1. The Chernobyl reactor accident. Pt. 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-06-01

    The report first summarizes the available information on the various incidents of the whole accident scenario, and combines the information to present a first general outline and a basis for appraisal. The most significant incidents reported, namely power excursion, core meltdown, and fire, are discussed with a view to the reactor design and safety of reactors installed in the FRG. The main differences and advantages of German reactor designs are shown, as e.g.: Power excursions are mastered by inherent physical conditions; far better redundancy of engineered safety systems; enclosure of the complete reactor cooling system in a pressure-retaining steel containment; reactor buildings being made of reinforced concrete. The second part of the report deals with the radiological effects to be expected for our country. Data are given on the varying radiological exposure of the different regions. The fate and uptake of radioactivity in the human body are discussed. The conclusion drawn from the data presented is that the individual exposure due to the reactor accident will remain within the variations and limits of natural radioactivity and effects. (orig./HP) [de

  2. Synthesis of the IRSN report related to severe accidents and to the probabilistic level-2 safety study for the Flamanville EPR reactor. Referral of the Permanent Group of Experts for nuclear reactors (GPR), examination of probabilistic level-2 safety studies (EPS 2) and severe accidents (AG) of the Flamanville reactor nr 3. Opinion related to severe accidents and to the probabilistic level-2 safety study for the Flamanville EPR reactor (FA3). Electronuclear reactors - EDF - Flamanville 3 EPR reactor. Severe accidents and probabilistic level 2 studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This document gathers several documents. The first one recalls the main arrangements implemented on the FA3 EPR reactor regarding accidents with core fusion, reports the analysis made by the IRSN about the sizing of these arrangements to reach a controlled status of the installation after a severe accident, regarding the probabilistic level-2 safety assessment, regarding the radiological impact of a severe accident on the population and on the environment, regarding those aimed at facing a total and long duration loss of electric power sources and cold sources, and about the situation of the reactor with respect to WENRA positions on severe accidents for new reactors. The second document is a letter sent by the ASN to the Permanent Group of Experts for nuclear reactors (GPR) to address probabilistic level-2 safety studies (EPS2) and severe accidents for the Flamanville 3 reactor. The third one reports the opinion of the GPR on these both issues and proposes a set of recommendations. The next document is a letter sent by the ASN to the Flamanville 3 project manager at EDF which recalls the related objectives, the ASN opinion on the implemented arrangements for severe accidents (de-pressurization of the primary circuit, management of hydrogen-related risks, corium recovery and cooling outside the vessel, limitation of vapour explosion risks outside the vessel, heat evacuation system, containment enclosure, management of the risk of a return to criticality), to face a total and long duration loss of electricity sources and cold sources, and other aspects addressed in the IRSN analysis. Requests and remarks formulated by the ASN are provided in an appendix to this last document

  3. Irradiated graphite studies prior to decommissioning of G1, G2 and G3 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonal, J.P.; Vistoli, J.Ph.; Combes, C.

    2005-01-01

    G1 (46 MW th ), G2 (250 MW th ) and G3 (250 MW th ) are the first French plutonium production reactors owned by CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique). They started to be operated in 1956 (G1), 1959 (G2) and 1960 (G3); their final shutdown occurred in 1968, 1980 and 1984 respectively. Each reactor used about 1200 tons of graphite as moderator, moreover in G2 and G3, a 95 tons graphite wall is used to shield the rear side concrete from neutron irradiation. G1 is an air cooled reactor operated at a graphite temperature ranging from 30 C to 230 C; G2 and G3 are CO 2 cooled reactors and during operation the graphite temperature is higher (140 C to 400 C). These reactors are now partly decommissioned, but the graphite stacks are still inside the reactors. The graphite core radioactivity has decreased enough so that a full decommissioning stage may be considered. Conceming this decommissioning, the studies reported here are: (i) stored energy in graphite, (ii) graphite radioactivity measurements, (iii) leaching of radionuclide ( 14 C, 36 Cl, 63 Ni, 60 Co, 3 H) from graphite, (iv) chlorine diffusion through graphite. (authors)

  4. Reactor core for LMFBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumi, Ryoji; Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi; Bando, Masaru; Watari, Yoshio.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the power distribution fluctuations and obtain flat and stable power distribution throughout the operation period in an LMFBR type reactor. Constitution: In the inner reactor core region and the outer reactor core region surrounding the same, the thickness of the inner region is made smaller than the axial height of the reactor core region and the radial width thereof is made smaller than that of the reactor core region and the volume thereof is made to 30 - 50 % for the reactor core region. Further, the amount of the fuel material per unit volume in the inner region is made to 70 - 90 % of that in the outer region. The difference in the neutron infinite multiplication factor between the inner region and the outer region is substantially constant irrespective of the burnup degree and the power distribution fluctuation can be reduced to about 2/3, by which the effect of thermal striping to the reactor core upper mechanisms can be moderated. Further, the maximum linear power during operation can be reduced by 3 %, by which the thermal margin in the reactor core is increased and the reactor core fuels can be saved by 3 %. (Kamimura, M.)

  5. A Conceptual Study on a Supercritical CO_2-cooled Micro Modular Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Hwanyeal; Hartanto, Donny; Kim, Yonghee

    2014-01-01

    A Micro Modular Reactor (MMR) using Supercritical-CO_2 (S-CO_2) as coolant has been investigated from the neutronics perspective. The MMR is designed to be transportable so it can reach the remote areas. The thermal power of the reactor is 36.2 M Wth. The size of the active core is limited to 1.2 m length and 93.16 cm width. The size of whole core is 2.8 m length and 166.9 cm width. The reactor lifetime design target is 20 years. To maximize the fuel volume fraction in the core, high density uranium nitride UN"1"5 was used. The PbO/MgO reflector was also utilized to improve the neutron economy. The S-CO_2 is chosen as the coolant because it offers a higher thermal efficiency. In this study, neutronics calculations and depletion using McCARD Monte Carlo code has been done to determine the lifetime and behavior of the core. Several important safety parameters such as Control Rod worth, Doppler reactivity coefficients and coolant void reactivity coefficient have also been analyzed. (author)

  6. Comparison of the N Reactor and Ignalina Unit No. 2 Level 1 Probabilistic Safety Assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coles, G.A.; McKay, S.L.

    1995-06-01

    A multilateral team recently completed a full-scope Level 1 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) on the Ignalina Unit No. 2 reactor plant in Lithuania. This allows comparison of results to those of the PSA for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) N Reactor. The N Reactor, although unique as a Western design, has similarities to Eastern European and Soviet graphite block reactors

  7. CHAP-2 heat-transfer analysis of the Fort St. Vrain reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotas, J.F.; Stroh, K.R.

    1983-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing the Composite High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Analysis Program (CHAP) to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in gas-cooled reactor plants. The CHAP-2 reactor-core model uses the finite-element method to initialize a two-dimensional temperature map of the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) core and its top and bottom reflectors. The code generates a finite-element mesh, initializes noding and boundary conditions, and solves the nonlinear Laplace heat equation using temperature-dependent thermal conductivities, variable coolant-channel-convection heat-transfer coefficients, and specified internal fuel and moderator heat-generation rates. This paper discusses this method and analyzes an FSV reactor-core accident that simulates a control-rod withdrawal at full power

  8. Development of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes for Advanced CANDU Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickel, G.A.; Griffiths, M.; Douchant, A.; Douglas, S.; Woo, O.T.; Buyers, A.

    2010-01-01

    In an Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR), pressure tubes of cold-worked Zr-2.5Nb materials will be used in the reactor core to contain the fuel bundles and the light water coolant. They will be subjected to higher temperature, pressure and flux than that in a CANDU reactor. In order to ensure that these tubes will perform acceptably over their 30-year design life in such an environment, a manufacturing process has been developed to produce 6.5 mm thick ACR pressure tubes with optimized chemical composition, improved mechanical properties and in-reactor behaviour. The test and examination results show that, when compared with current in-service pressure tubes, the mechanical properties of ACR pressure tubes are significantly improved. Based on previous experience with CANDU reactor pressure tubes an assessment of the grain structure and texture indicates that the in-reactor creep deformation will be improved also. Analysis of the distribution of texture parameters from a trial batch of 26 tubes shows that the variability is reduced relative to tubes fabricated in the past. This reduction in variability together with a shift to a coarser grain structure will result in a reduction in diametral creep design limits and thus a longer economic life for the fuel channels of the advanced CANDU reactor. (author)

  9. Preliminary Design of S-CO2 Brayton Cycle for KAIST Micro Modular Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Gu; Kim, Min Gil; Bae, Seong Jun; Lee, Jeong Ik

    2013-01-01

    This paper suggests a complete modular reactor with an innovative concept of reactor cooling by using a supercritical carbon dioxide directly. Authors propose the supercritical CO 2 Brayton cycle (S-CO 2 cycle) as a power conversion system to achieve small volume of power conversion unit (PCU) and to contain the core and PCU in one vessel for the full modularization. This study suggests a conceptual design of small modular reactor including PCU which is named as KAIST Micro Modular Reactor (MMR). As a part of ongoing research of conceptual design of KAIST MMR, preliminary design of power generation cycle was performed in this study. Since the targets of MMR are full modularization of a reactor system with S-CO 2 coolant, authors selected a simple recuperated S-CO 2 Brayton cycle as a power conversion system for KAIST MMR. The size of components of the S-CO 2 cycle is much smaller than existing helium Brayton cycle and steam Rankine cycle, and whole power conversion system can be contained with core and safety system in one containment vessel. From the investigation of the power conversion cycle, recompressing recuperated cycle showed higher efficiency than the simple recuperated cycle. However the volume of heat exchanger for recompressing cycle is too large so more space will be occupied by heat exchanger in the recompressing cycle than the simple recuperated cycle. Thus, authors consider that the simple recuperated cycle is more suitable for MMR. More research for the KAIST MMR will be followed in the future and detailed information of reactor core and safety system will be developed down the road. More refined cycle layout and design of turbomachinery and heat exchanger will be performed in the future study

  10. Severe accident analysis for level 2 PSA of SMART reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Yong; Lee, Jeong Hun; Kim, Jong Uk; Yoo, Tae Geun; Chung, Soon Il; Kim, Min Gi [FNC Technology Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The objectives of this study are to produce data for level 2 PSA and evaluation results of severe accident by analyzing severe accident sequence of transient events, producing fault tree of containment systems and evaluating direct containment heating of the SMART. In this project, severe accident analysis results were produced for general transient, loss of feedwater, station blackout, and steam line break events, and based on the results, design safety of SMART was verified. Also, direct containment heating phenomenon of the SMART was evaluated using TCE methodology. For level 2 PSA, fault tree of the containment isolation system, reactor cavity flooding system, plant chilled water system, and reactor containment building HVAC system was produced and analyzed

  11. Recent advances in the utilization and the irradiation technology of the refurbished BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekeyser, J.; Benoit, P.; Decloedt, C.; Pouleur, Y.; Verwimp, A.; Weber, M.; Vankeerberghen, M.; Ponsard, B.

    1999-01-01

    Operation and utilization of the materials testing reactor BR2 at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK·CEN) has since its start in 1963 always followed closely the needs and developments of nuclear technology. In particular, a multitude of irradiation experiments have been carried out for most types of nuclear power reactors, existing or under design. Since the early 1990s and increased focus was directed towards more specific irradiation testing needs for light water reactor fuels and materials, although other areas of utilization continued as well (e.g. fusion reactor materials, safety research, ...), including also the growing activities of radioisotope production and silicon doping. An important milestone was the decision in 1994 to implement a comprehensive refurbishment programme for the BR2 reactor and plant installations. The scope of this programme comprised very substantial studies and hardware interventions, which have been completed in early 1997 within planning and budget. Directly connected to this strategic decision for reactor refurbishment was the reinforcement of our efforts to requalify and upgrade the existing irradiation facilities and to develop advanced devices in BR2 to support emerging programs in the following fields: - LWR pressure vessel steel, - LWR irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), - reliability and safety of high-burnup LWR fuel, - fusion reactor materials and blanket components, - fast neutron reactor fuels and actinide burning, - extension and diversification of radioisotope production. The paper highlights these advances in the areas of BR2 utilisation and the ongoing development activities for the required new generation of irradiations devices. (author)

  12. An improved thermal-hydraulic modeling of the Jules Horowitz Reactor using the CATHARE2 system code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegonen, R., E-mail: pegonen@kth.se [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullsbacken 21, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Bourdon, S.; Gonnier, C. [CEA, DEN, DER, SRJH, CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Anglart, H. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullsbacken 21, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • An improved thermal-hydraulic modeling of the JHR reactor is described. • Thermal-hydraulics of the JHR is analyzed during loss of flow accident. • The heat exchanger approach gives more realistic and less conservative results. - Abstract: The newest European high performance material testing reactor, the Jules Horowitz Reactor, will support current and future nuclear reactor designs. The reactor is under construction at the CEA Cadarache research center in southern France and is expected to achieve first criticality at the end of this decade. This paper presents an improved thermal-hydraulic modeling of the reactor using solely CATHARE2 system code. Up to now, the CATHARE2 code was simulating the full reactor with a simplified approach for the core and the boundary conditions were transferred into the three-dimensional FLICA4 core simulation. A new more realistic methodology is utilized to analyze the thermal-hydraulic simulation of the reactor during a loss of flow accident.

  13. Hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    The rationale for hybrid fusion-fission reactors is the production of fissile fuel for fission reactors. A new class of reactor, the fission-suppressed hybrid promises unusually good safety features as well as the ability to support 25 light-water reactors of the same nuclear power rating, or even more high-conversion-ratio reactors such as the heavy-water type. One 4000-MW nuclear hybrid can produce 7200 kg of 233 U per year. To obtain good economics, injector efficiency times plasma gain (eta/sub i/Q) should be greater than 2, the wall load should be greater than 1 MW.m -2 , and the hybrid should cost less than 6 times the cost of a light-water reactor. Introduction rates for the fission-suppressed hybrid are usually rapid

  14. Proceedings of 2. Yugoslav symposium on reactor physics, Part 2, Herceg Novi (Yugoslavia), 27-29 Sep 1966; 2. Jugoslovenski simpozijum iz reaktorske fizike, Deo 2, Herceg Novi (Yugoslavia), 27-29 Sep 1966

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1966-07-01

    This Volume 2 of the Proceedings of 2. Yugoslav symposium on reactor physics includes eight papers dealing with the following topics: method for measuring high anti reactivities of a reactor system; integration method for thermal reaction rate calculation; Determination of initial core configuration for BHWR-200 MWe; safety shutdowns and failures of the RA reactor equipment; determining the reactivity of absorption rods; measurements of thermal and fast neutron fluxes at the TRIGA reactor and other measurements during operation of the TRIGA reactor; mathematical modelling of the reactor safety; review of problems and methods for radiation risk assessment in the environment of a nuclear power plant.

  15. Problems of nuclear reactor safety. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, L.A.

    1995-01-01

    Theses of proceedings of the 9 Topical Meeting on problems of nuclear power plant safety are presented. Reports include results of neutron-physical experiments carried out for reactor safety justification. Concepts of advanced reactors with improved safety are considered. Results of researches on fuel cycles are given too

  16. The Effect Of Beryllium Interaction With Fast Neutrons On the Reactivity Of ETRR-2 Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, M.; El Messiry, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of beryllium interactions with fast neutrons is studied for Etrr 2 research reactors. Isotope build up inside beryllium blocks is calculated under different irradiation times. a new model for the Etrr 2 research reactor is designed using MCNP code to calculate the reactivity and flux change of the reactor due to beryllium poison

  17. Economics and utilization of thorium in nuclear reactors. Technical annexes 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    An assessment of the impact of utilizing the 233 U/thorium fuel cycle in the U.S. nuclear economy is strongly dependent upon several decisions involving nuclear energy policy. These decisions include: (1) to recycle or not recycle fissile material; (2) if fissile material is recycled, to recycle plutonium, 233 U, or both; and (3) to deploy or not to deploy advanced reactor designs such as Fast Breeder Reactors (FBR's), High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR's), and Canadian Deuterium Uranium Reactors (CANDU's). This report examines the role of thorium in the context of the above policy decisions while focusing special attention on economics and resource utilization

  18. Development of UO2/PuO2 dispersed in uranium matrix CERMET fuel system for fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, V.P.; Hegde, P.V.; Prasad, G.J.; Pal, S.; Mishra, G.P.

    2012-01-01

    CERMET fuel with either PuO 2 or enriched UO 2 dispersed in uranium metal matrix has a strong potential of becoming a fuel for the liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors (LMR’s). In fact it may act as a bridge between the advantages and disadvantages associated with the two extremes of fuel systems (i.e. ceramic fuel and metallic fuel) for fast reactors. At Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), R and D efforts are on to develop this CERMET fuel by powder metallurgy route. This paper describes the development of flow sheet for preparation of UO 2 dispersed in uranium metal matrix pellets for three different compositions i.e. U–20 wt%UO 2 , U–25 wt%UO 2 and U–30 wt%UO 2 . It was found that the sintered pellets were having excellent integrity and their linear mass was higher than that of carbide fuel pellets used in Fast Breeder Test Reactor programme (FBTR) in India. The pellets were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique for phase analysis and lattice parameter determination. The optical microstructures were developed and reported for all the three different U–UO 2 compositions.

  19. Development of UO2/PuO2 dispersed in uranium matrix CERMET fuel system for fast reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, V. P.; Hegde, P. V.; Prasad, G. J.; Pal, S.; Mishra, G. P.

    2012-08-01

    CERMET fuel with either PuO2 or enriched UO2 dispersed in uranium metal matrix has a strong potential of becoming a fuel for the liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors (LMR's). In fact it may act as a bridge between the advantages and disadvantages associated with the two extremes of fuel systems (i.e. ceramic fuel and metallic fuel) for fast reactors. At Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), R & D efforts are on to develop this CERMET fuel by powder metallurgy route. This paper describes the development of flow sheet for preparation of UO2 dispersed in uranium metal matrix pellets for three different compositions i.e. U-20 wt%UO2, U-25 wt%UO2 and U-30 wt%UO2. It was found that the sintered pellets were having excellent integrity and their linear mass was higher than that of carbide fuel pellets used in Fast Breeder Test Reactor programme (FBTR) in India. The pellets were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique for phase analysis and lattice parameter determination. The optical microstructures were developed and reported for all the three different U-UO2 compositions.

  20. Utilization of the SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalor, G.C.

    2001-01-01

    SLOWPOKEs are typically low power research reactors that have a limited number of applications. However, a significant range of NAA can be performed with such reactors. This paper describes a SLOWPOKE-based NAA program that is performing a valuable series of studies in Jamaica, including geological mapping and pollution assessment. (author)

  1. Alteration in reactor installations (Unit 1 and 2 reactor facilities) in the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station of The Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc. (report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    A report by the Nuclear Safety Commission to the Ministry of International Trade and Industry concerning the alteration in Unit 1 and 2 reactor facilities in the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station, Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., was presented. The technical capabilities for the alteration of reactor facilities in Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., were confirmed to be adequate. The safety of the reactor facilities after the alteration was confirmed to be adequate. The items of examination made for the confirmation of the safety are as follows: reactor core design (nuclear design, mechanical design, mixed reactor core), the analysis of abnormal transients in operation, the analysis of various accidents, the analysis of credible accidents for site evaluation. (Mori, K.)

  2. Measurements at the RA Reactor related to the VISA-2 project - Part 1, Start-up of the RA reactor and measurement of new RA reactor core parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovic, H.

    1962-07-01

    The objective of the measurements was determining the neutron flux in the RA reactor core. Since the number of fuel channels is increased from 56 to 68 within the VISA-2 project, it was necessary to attain criticality of the RA reactor and measure the neutron flux properties. The 'program of RA reactor start-up' has been prepared separately and it is included in this report. Measurements were divided in two phases. First phase was measuring of the neutron flux after the criticality was achieved but at zero power. During phase two measurements were repeated at several power levels, at equilibrium xenon poisoning. This report includes experimental data of flux distributions and absolute values of the thermal and fast neutron flux in the RA reactor experimental channels and values of cadmium ratio for determining the neutron epithermal flux. Data related to calibration of regulatory rods for cold un poisoned core are included [sr

  3. Reactor limitation system improves the safety and availability of the Angra 2 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Mendes, J.E. de

    1987-01-01

    Beyond the classic Reactor Protection System and Reactor Control System, nuclear plant Angra 2 has a third system called Reactor Limitation System which combines the intelligence features of the control systems with the high reliability of the protection systems. In determined events, which are not controlled by the control system (e.g.: load rejection, failure of one main reactor coolant pump), the Reactor Limitation System actuates automatically in order to lead the plant to a safe operating condition and so it avoids the actuation of the Reactor Protection System and consequently the reactor trip. This increases safety and availability of the plant and reduces component stresses. After the safe operating condition is reached, the process guidance automatically returns to the control systems. (Author) [pt

  4. CO_2 capture with solid sorbent: CFD model of an innovative reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barelli, L.; Bidini, G.; Gallorini, F.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new reactor solution based on rotating fixed beds was presented. • The preliminary design of the reactor was approached. • A CFD model of the reactor, including CO_2 capture kinetic, was developed. • The CFD model is validated with experimental results. • Sorbent exploitation increasing is possible thanks to the new reactor. - Abstract: In future decarbonization scenarios, CCS with particular reference to post-combustion technologies will be an important option also for energy intensive industries. Nevertheless, today CCS systems are rarely installed due to high energy and cost penalties of current technology based on chemical scrubbing with amine solvent. Therefore, innovative solutions based on new/optimized solvents, sorbents, membranes and new process designs, are R&D priorities. Regarding the CO_2 capture through solid sorbents, a new reactor solution based on rotating fixed beds is presented in this paper. In order to design the innovative system, a suitable CFD model was developed considering also the kinetic capture process. The model was validated with experimental results obtained by the authors in previous research activities, showing a potential reduction of energy penalties respect to current technologies. In the future, the model will be used to identify the control logic of the innovative reactor in order to verify improvements in terms of sorbent exploitation and reduction of system energy consumption.

  5. MULTI-LOOP CONTROL DESIGN IN MULTIVARIABLE (2X2 CONTINUOUS STIRRED TANK REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Wahid

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available With this study, the design and tuning of multi-loop for multivariable (2x2 CSTR will be made in order to achieve optimum CSTR control performance. This study used Bequette model reactor and MATLAB software and is expected to be able to cope with disturbances in the reactor so that the reactor system is able to stabilize quickly despite the distractions. In this study, the design will be made using multi-loop approach, along with PI controller as the next step. Then, BLT and auto-tune tuning method will be used in PI controller and given disturbances to both of tuning method. The controller performances are then compared. Results of the study are then analyzed for discussions and conclusions. Results from this study have shown that in terms of disturbance rejection, BLT is better than auto-tune based on comparison between both of controller performances. For IAE for the case of temperature, BLT is 30% better than auto-tune, but it is almost the same for the case of concentration. For settling time for the case of concentration, BLT is 30% better than auto-tune, and for the case of temperature, BLT is 18% better than auto-tune. For rise time for the case of concentration and temperature, BLT is 30% better than auto-tune.

  6. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Volume 5, No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-04-01

    The Operating Reactors Licensing Actions Summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Resource Management. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the Operating Reactors Licensing Actions Program

  7. Tests of Neutron Spectrum Calculations with the Help of Foil Measurements in a D{sub 2}O and in an H{sub 2}O-Moderated Reactor and in Reactor Shields of Concrete an Iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, R; Aalto, E

    1964-09-15

    Foil measurements covering the fast, epithermal and thermal neutron energy regions have been made in the centre of the Swedish D{sub 2}O-moderated reactor R1, in the pool reactor R2-0, and in different positions in reactor shields of iron, magnetite concrete and ordinary concrete. Neutron spectra have also been calculated for most of these positions, often with the help of a numerical integration of the Boltzmann equation. The measurements and the calculated spectra are presented.

  8. Microflow photochemistry: UVC-induced [2 + 2]-photoadditions to furanone in a microcapillary reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvestre Bachollet

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available [2 + 2]-Cycloadditions of cyclopentene and 2,3-dimethylbut-2-ene to furanone were investigated under continuous-flow conditions. Irradiations were conducted in a FEP-microcapillary module which was placed in a Rayonet chamber photoreactor equipped with low wattage UVC-lamps. Conversion rates and isolated yields were compared to analogue batch reactions in a quartz test tube. In all cases examined, the microcapillary reactor furnished faster conversions and improved product qualities.

  9. A simulation Model of the Reactor Hall Ventilation and air Conditioning Systems of ETRR-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Rahman, M.F.

    2004-01-01

    Although the conceptual design for any system differs from one designer to another. each of them aims to achieve the function of the system required. the ventilation and air conditioning system of reactors hall is one of those systems that really differs but always dose its function for which it is designed. thus, ventilation and air conditioning in some reactor hall constitute only one system whereas in some other ones, they are separate systems. the Egypt Research Reactor-2 (ETRR-2)represents the second type. most studies conducted on ventilation and air conditioning simulation models either in traditional building or for research rectors show that those models were not designed similarly to the model of the hall of ETRR-2 in which ventilation and air conditioning constitute two separate systems.besides, those studies experimented on ventilation and air conditioning simulation models of reactor building predict the temperature and humidity inside these buildings at certain outside condition and it is difficult to predict when the outside conditions are changed . also those studies do not discuss the influences of reactor power changes. therefore, the present work deals with a computational study backed by infield experimental measurements of the performance of the ventilation and air conditioning systems of reactor hall during normal operation at different outside conditions as well as at different levels of reactor power

  10. Thermal design of heat-exchangeable reactors using a dry-sorbent CO2 capture multi-step process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Hokyu; Yoo, Hoanju; Seo, Hwimin; Park, Yong-Ki; Cho, Hyung Hee

    2015-01-01

    The present study proposes a multi-stage CO 2 capture process that incorporates heat-exchangeable fluidized-bed reactors. For continuous multi-stage heat exchange, three dry regenerable sorbents: K 2 CO 3 , MgO, and CaO, were used to create a three-stage temperature-dependent reaction chain for CO 2 capture, corresponding to low (50–150 °C), middle (350–650 °C), and high (750–900 °C) temperature stages, respectively. Heat from carbonation in the high and middle temperature stages was used for regeneration for the middle and low temperature stages. The feasibility of this process is depending on the heat-transfer performance of the heat-exchangeable fluidized bed reactors as the focus of this study. The three-stage CO 2 capture process for a 60 Nm 3 /h CO 2 flow rate required a reactor area of 0.129 and 0.130 m 2 for heat exchange between the mid-temperature carbonation and low-temperature regeneration stages and between the high-temperature carbonation and mid-temperature regeneration stages, respectively. The reactor diameter was selected to provide dense fluidization conditions for each bed with respect to the desired flow rate. The flow characteristics and energy balance of the reactors were confirmed using computational fluid dynamics and thermodynamic analysis, respectively. - Highlights: • CO 2 capture process is proposed using a multi-stage process. • Reactor design is conducted considering heat exchangeable scheme. • Reactor surface is designed by heat transfer characteristics of fluidized bed

  11. Increased SRP reactor power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacAfee, I.M.

    1983-01-01

    Major changes in the current reactor hydraulic systems could be made to achieve a total of about 1500 MW increase of reactor power for P, K, and C reactors. The changes would be to install new, larger heat exchangers in the reactor buildings to increase heat transfer area about 24%, to increase H 2 O flow about 30% per reactor, to increase D 2 O flow 15 to 18% per reactor, and increase reactor blanket gas pressure from 5 psig to 10 psig. The increased reactor power is possible because of reduced inlet temperature of reactor coolant, increased heat removal capacity, and increased operating pressure (larger margin from boiling). The 23% reactor power increase, after adjustment for increased off-line time for reactor reloading, will provide a 15% increase of production from P, K, and C reactors. Restart of L Reactor would increase SRP production 33%

  12. Core design calculations of IRIS reactor using modified CORD-2 code package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pevec, D.; Grgic, D.; Jecmenica, R.; Petrovic, B.

    2002-01-01

    Core design calculations, with thermal-hydraulic feedback, for the first cycle of the IRIS reactor were performed using the modified CORD-2 code package. WIMSD-5B code is applied for cell and cluster calculations with two different 69-group data libraries (ENDF/BVI rev. 5 and JEF-2.2), while the nodal code GNOMER is used for diffusion calculations. The objective of the calculation was to address basic core design problems for innovative reactors with long fuel cycle. The results were compared to our results obtained with CORD-2 before the modification and to preliminary results obtained with CASMO code for a similar problem without thermal-hydraulic feedback.(author)

  13. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, A.

    2002-01-01

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised

  14. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  15. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised

  16. BR2 reactor: medical and industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponsard, B.

    2005-01-01

    The radioisotopes are produced for various applications in the nuclear medicine (diagnostic, therapy, palliation of metastatic bone pain), industry (radiography of welds, ...), agriculture (radiotracers, ...) and basic research. Due to the availability of high neutron fluxes (thermal neutron flux up to 10 15 n/cm 2 .s), the BR2 reactor is considered as a major facility through its contribution for a continuous supply of products such 99 Mo ( 99 mTc), 131 I, 133 Xe, 192 Ir, 186 Re, 153 Sm, 90 Y, 32 P, 188 W ( 188 Re), 203 Hg, 82 Br, 41 Ar, 125 I, 177 Lu, 89 Sr, 60 Co, 169 Yb, 147 Nd, and others. Neutron Transmutation Doped (NTD) silicon is produced for the semiconductor industry in the SIDONIE (Silicon Doping by Neutron Irradiation Experiment) facility, which is designed to continuously rotate and traverse the silicon through the neutron flux. These combined movements produce exceptional dopant homogeneity in batches of silicon measuring 4 and 5-inches in diameter by up to 750 mm in length. The main objectives of work performed were to provide a reliable and qualitative supply of radioisotopes and NTD-silicon to the customers in accordance with a quality system that has been certified to the requirements of the EN ISO 9001: 2000. This new Quality System Certificate has been obtained in November 2003 for the Production of radioisotopes for medical and industrial applications and the Production of Neutron Transmutation Doped (NTD) Silicon in the BR2 reactor

  17. Possible future roles for fast breeder reactors Part 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-06-01

    Part 1. The Fast Breeder Reactor (in particular in its sodium cooled version) has been steadily developed in the Community. This report attempts to quantify the advantages of this system in terms of fossil energy and uranium savings in the medium/long term as well as to examine some long term economic implications. The methodology of comparing scenarios, not individual reactor systems is followed. These scenarios have been chosen taking into account a range of assumptions concerning Community energy demand growth, fossil energy and uranium availability and technological capabilities. Part 2. The fast breeder reactor (FBR), particularly its sodium-cooled form (LMFBR) has been under development in the Community for many years. Industrial enterprises dedicated to its commercialisation have been formed and long range plans for its industrial utilisation are being formulated. The value of breeder reactors from the point of view of minimising Community fuel requirements has been discussed in Part I of this report (1). In Part II the consequences of delaying their introduction, and the demands placed upon the recycle industry by the introduction of fast reactors of different characteristics, using the Community electricity demand scenarios developed for Part I, are discussed. In addition comments are provided upon the effect of FBR introduction on the size of plutonium stocks

  18. A regression approach for Zircaloy-2 in-reactor creep constitutive equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yung Liu, Y.; Bement, A.L.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper the methodology of multiple regressions as applied to Zircaloy-2 in-reactor creep data analysis and construction of constitutive equation are illustrated. While the resulting constitutive equation can be used in creep analysis of in-reactor Zircaloy structural components, the methodology itself is entirely general and can be applied to any creep data analysis. The promising aspects of multiple regression creep data analysis are briefly outlined as follows: (1) When there are more than one variable involved, there is no need to make the assumption that each variable affects the response independently. No separate normalizations are required either and the estimation of parameters is obtained by solving many simultaneous equations. The number of simultaneous equations is equal to the number of data sets. (2) Regression statistics such as R 2 - and F-statistics provide measures of the significance of regression creep equation in correlating the overall data. The relative weights of each variable on the response can also be obtained. (3) Special regression techniques such as step-wise, ridge, and robust regressions and residual plots, etc., provide diagnostic tools for model selections. Multiple regression analysis performed on a set of carefully selected Zircaloy-2 in-reactor creep data leads to a model which provides excellent correlations for the data. (Auth.)

  19. Coolant radiolysis studies in the high temperature, fuelled U-2 loop in the NRU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliot, A.J.; Stuart, C.R.

    2008-06-01

    An understanding of the radiolysis-induced chemistry in the coolant water of nuclear reactors is an important key to the understanding of materials integrity issues in reactor coolant systems. Significant materials and chemistry issues have emerged in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) and CANDU reactors that have required a detailed understanding of the radiation chemistry of the coolant. For each reactor type, specific computer radiolysis models have been developed to gain insight into radiolysis processes and to make chemistry control adjustments to address the particular issue. In this respect, modelling the radiolysis chemistry has been successful enough to allow progress to be made. This report contains a description of the water radiolysis tests performed in the U-2 loop, NRU reactor in 1995, which measured the CHC under different physical conditions of the loop such as temperature, reactor power and steam quality. (author)

  20. Design and computational analysis of passive siphon breaker for 49-2 swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Zhiting; Song Yunpeng; Liu Xingmin; Zou Yao; Wu Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    Based on safety considerations, a passive siphon breaker will be added to the primary cooling system of 49-2 Swimming Pool Reactor (SPR). With the breaker location determined, the capability of siphon breakers with diameters of 1.5 cm and 2.0 cm was calculated and analyzed respectively by RELAP5/MOD3.3 code. The results show that in the condition of large break loss of coolant accident these two sizes of siphon breakers are able to break the siphon phenomena, and maintain the pool water level above the reactor core when the reactor and the pump are shutdown. In the end, to be conservative, the siphon breaker with diameter of 2.0 cm is adopted. (authors)

  1. Efficient H2O2/CH3COOH oxidative desulfurization/denitrification of liquid fuels in sonochemical flow-reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcio Gaudino, Emanuela; Carnaroglio, Diego; Boffa, Luisa; Cravotto, Giancarlo; Moreira, Elizabeth M; Nunes, Matheus A G; Dressler, Valderi L; Flores, Erico M M

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative desulfurization/denitrification of liquid fuels has been widely investigated as an alternative or complement to common catalytic hydrorefining. In this process, all oxidation reactions occur in the heterogeneous phase (the oil and the polar phase containing the oxidant) and therefore the optimization of mass and heat transfer is of crucial importance to enhancing the oxidation rate. This goal can be achieved by performing the reaction in suitable ultrasound (US) reactors. In fact, flow and loop US reactors stand out above classic batch US reactors thanks to their greater efficiency and flexibility as well as lower energy consumption. This paper describes an efficient sonochemical oxidation with H2O2/CH3COOH at flow rates ranging from 60 to 800 ml/min of both a model compound, dibenzotiophene (DBT), and of a mild hydro-treated diesel feedstock. Four different commercially available US loop reactors (single and multi-probe) were tested, two of which were developed in the authors' laboratory. Full DBT oxidation and efficient diesel feedstock desulfurization/denitrification were observed after the separation of the polar oxidized S/N-containing compounds (S≤5 ppmw, N≤1 ppmw). Our studies confirm that high-throughput US applications benefit greatly from flow-reactors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Direct In Situ Quantification of HO2 from a Flow Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumfield, Brian; Sun, Wenting; Ju, Yiguang; Wysocki, Gerard

    2013-03-21

    The first direct in situ measurements of hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) at atmospheric pressure from the exit of a laminar flow reactor have been carried out using mid-infrared Faraday rotation spectroscopy. HO2 was generated by oxidation of dimethyl ether, a potential renewable biofuel with a simple molecular structure but rich low-temperature oxidation chemistry. On the basis of the results of nonlinear fitting of the experimental data to a theoretical spectroscopic model, the technique offers an estimated sensitivity of reactor exit temperature range of 398-673 K. Accurate in situ measurement of this species will aid in quantitative modeling of low-temperature and high-pressure combustion kinetics.

  3. Reactor science and technology: operation and control of reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Junlong

    1994-01-01

    This article is a collection of short reports on reactor operation and research in China in 1991. The operation of and research activities linked with the Heavy Water Research Reactor, Swimming Pool Reactor and Miniature Neutron Source Reactor are briefly surveyed. A number of papers then follow on the developing strategies in Chinese fast breeder reactor technology including the conceptual design of an experimental fast reactor (FFR), theoretical studies of FFR thermo-hydraulics and a design for an immersed sodium flowmeter. Reactor physics studies cover a range of topics including several related to work on zero power reactors. The section on reactor safety analysis is concerned largely with the assessment of established, and the presentation of new, computer codes for use in PWR safety calculations. Experimental and theoretical studies of fuels and reactor materials for FBRs, PWRs, BWRs and fusion reactors are described. A final miscellaneous section covers Mo-Tc isotope production in the swimming pool reactor, convective heat transfer in tubes and diffusion of tritium through plastic/aluminium composite films and Li 2 SiO 3 . (UK)

  4. Status and perspective of development of cold moderators at the IBR-2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulikov, S; Shabalin, E

    2012-01-01

    The modernized IBR-2M reactor will start its operation with three water grooved moderators in 2011. Afterwards, they will be exchanged by a new complex of moderators. The complex consists of three so-called kombi-moderators, each of them containing a pre-moderator, a cold moderator, grooved ambient water moderators and post-moderators. They are mounted onto three moveable trolleys that serve to deliver and install moderators near the reactor core. The project is divided in three stages. In 2012 the first stage of development of complex of moderators will be finished. The water grooved moderator will be replaced with the new kombi-moderator for beams nos. 7, 8, 10, 11. Main parameters of moderators for this direction will be studied then. The next stages will be done for beams nos. 2-3 and for beams nos. 1, 9, 4-6, consequently. Cold moderator chambers at the modernized IBR-2 reactor are filled with thousands of beads (∼3.5 - 4 mm in diameter) of moderating material. The cold helium gas flow delivers beads from the charging device to the moderator during the fulfillment process and cools down them during the reactor cycle. The mixture of aromatic hydrocarbons (mesithylen and m-xylen) has been chosen as moderating material. The explanation of the choice of material for novel cold neutron moderators, configuration of moderator complex for the modernized IBR-2 reactor and the main results of optimization of moderator complex for the third stage of moderator development are discussed in the article.

  5. Status and perspective of development of cold moderators at the IBR-2 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikov, S.; Shabalin, E.

    2012-03-01

    The modernized IBR-2M reactor will start its operation with three water grooved moderators in 2011. Afterwards, they will be exchanged by a new complex of moderators. The complex consists of three so-called kombi-moderators, each of them containing a pre-moderator, a cold moderator, grooved ambient water moderators and post-moderators. They are mounted onto three moveable trolleys that serve to deliver and install moderators near the reactor core. The project is divided in three stages. In 2012 the first stage of development of complex of moderators will be finished. The water grooved moderator will be replaced with the new kombi-moderator for beams #7, 8, 10, 11. Main parameters of moderators for this direction will be studied then. The next stages will be done for beams #2-3 and for beams #1, 9, 4-6, consequently. Cold moderator chambers at the modernized IBR-2 reactor are filled with thousands of beads (~3.5 - 4 mm in diameter) of moderating material. The cold helium gas flow delivers beads from the charging device to the moderator during the fulfillment process and cools down them during the reactor cycle. The mixture of aromatic hydrocarbons (mesithylen and m-xylen) has been chosen as moderating material. The explanation of the choice of material for novel cold neutron moderators, configuration of moderator complex for the modernized IBR-2 reactor and the main results of optimization of moderator complex for the third stage of moderator development are discussed in the article.

  6. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2002-04-01

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised.

  7. Loss-of-Flow and Loss-of-Pressure Simulations of the BR2 Research Reactor with HEU and LEU Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sikik, E. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Van den Branden, G. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Koonen, E. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium)

    2016-01-01

    Belgian Reactor 2 (BR2) is a research and test reactor located in Mol, Belgium and is primarily used for radioisotope production and materials testing. The Materials Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Program of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is supporting the conversion of the BR2 reactor from Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The reactor core of BR2 is located inside a pressure vessel that contains 79 channels in a hyperboloid configuration. The core configuration is highly variable as each channel can contain a fuel assembly, a control or regulating rod, an experimental device, or a beryllium or aluminum plug. Because of this variability, a representative core configuration, based on current reactor use, has been defined for the fuel conversion analyses. The code RELAP5/Mod 3.3 was used to perform the transient thermal-hydraulic safety analyses of the BR2 reactor to support reactor conversion. The input model has been modernized relative to that historically used at BR2 taking into account the best modeling practices developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and BR2 engineers.

  8. Research reactors - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Gas-cooled reactor thermal-hydraulics using CAST3M and CRONOS2 codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studer, E.; Coulon, N.; Stietel, A.; Damian, F.; Golfier, H.; Raepsaet, X.

    2003-01-01

    The CEA R and D program on advanced Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR) relies on different concepts: modular High Temperature Reactor (HTR), its evolution dedicated to hydrogen production (Very High Temperature Reactor) and Gas Cooled Fast Reactors (GCFR). Some key safety questions are related to decay heat removal during potential accident. This is strongly connected to passive natural convection (including gas injection of Helium, CO 2 , Nitrogen or Argon) or forced convection using active safety systems (gas blowers, heat exchangers). To support this effort, thermal-hydraulics computer codes will be necessary tools to design, enhance the performance and ensure a high safety level of the different reactors. Accurate and efficient modeling of heat transfer by conduction, convection or thermal radiation as well as energy storage are necessary requirements to obtain a high level of confidence in the thermal-hydraulic simulations. To achieve that goal a thorough validation process has to ve conducted. CEA's CAST3M code dedicated to GCR thermal-hydraulics has been validated against different test cases: academic interaction between natural convection and thermal radiation, small scale in-house THERCE experiments and large scale High Temperature Test Reactor benchmarks such as HTTR-VC benchmark. Coupling with neutronics is also an important modeling aspect for the determination of neutronic parameters such as neutronic coefficient (Doppler, moderator,...), critical position of control rods...CEA's CAST3M and CRONOS2 computer codes allow this coupling and a first example of coupled thermal-hydraulics/neutronics calculations has been performed. Comparison with experimental data will be the next step with High Temperature Test Reactor experimental results at nominal power

  10. Further study on parameterization of reactor NAA: Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Weizhi; Zhang Shuxin

    1989-01-01

    In the last paper, Ik 0 method was proposed for fission interference corrections. Another important kind of interferences in reator NAA is due to threshold reaction induced by reactor fast neutrons. In view of the increasing importance of this kind of interferences, and difficulties encountered in using the relative comparison method, a parameterized method has been introduced. Typical channels in heavy water reflector and No.2 horizontal channel of Heavy Water Research Reactor in the Insitute of Atomic Energy have been shown to have fast neutron energy distributions (E>4 MeV) close to primary fission neutron spectrum, by using multi-threshold detectors. On this basis, Ti foil is used as an 'instant fast neutron flux monitor' in parameterized corrections for threshold reaction interferences in the long irradiations. Constant values of φ f /φ s = 0.70 ± 0.02% have been obtained for No.2 rabbit channel. This value can be directly used for threshold reaction inference correction in the short irradiations

  11. EL-2 reactor: Thermal neutron flux distribution; EL-2: Repartition du flux de neutrons thermiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, A; Genthon, J P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    The flux distribution of thermal neutrons in EL-2 reactor is studied. The reactor core and lattices are described as well as the experimental reactor facilities, in particular, the experimental channels and special facilities. The measurement shows that the thermal neutron flux increases in the central channel when enriched uranium is used in place of natural uranium. However the thermal neutron flux is not perturbed in the other reactor channels by the fuel modification. The macroscopic flux distribution is measured according the radial positioning of fuel rods. The longitudinal neutron flux distribution in a fuel rod is also measured and shows no difference between enriched and natural uranium fuel rods. In addition, measurements of the flux distribution have been effectuated for rods containing other material as steel or aluminium. The neutron flux distribution is also studied in all the experimental channels as well as in the thermal column. The determination of the distribution of the thermal neutron flux in all experimental facilities, the thermal column and the fuel channels has been made with a heavy water level of 1825 mm and is given for an operating power of 1000 kW. (M.P.)

  12. HOTEL INFORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Holiday Inn Central Plaza Beijing Tyrone Tang is the newly appointed general manager of Holiday Inn Central Plaza, Beijing.Tang joined IHGin2002.He was transferred from the position of operations manager.

  13. The analysis for inventory of experimental reactor high temperature gas reactor type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sri Kuntjoro; Pande Made Udiyani

    2016-01-01

    Relating to the plan of the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) to operate an experimental reactor of High Temperature Gas Reactors type (RGTT), it is necessary to reactor safety analysis, especially with regard to environmental issues. Analysis of the distribution of radionuclides from the reactor into the environment in normal or abnormal operating conditions starting with the estimated reactor inventory based on the type, power, and operation of the reactor. The purpose of research is to analyze inventory terrace for Experimental Power Reactor design (RDE) high temperature gas reactor type power 10 MWt, 20 MWt and 30 MWt. Analyses were performed using ORIGEN2 computer code with high temperatures cross-section library. Calculation begins with making modifications to some parameter of cross-section library based on the core average temperature of 570 °C and continued with calculations of reactor inventory due to RDE 10 MWt reactor power. The main parameters of the reactor 10 MWt RDE used in the calculation of the main parameters of the reactor similar to the HTR-10 reactor. After the reactor inventory 10 MWt RDE obtained, a comparison with the results of previous researchers. Based upon the suitability of the results, it make the design for the reactor RDE 20MWEt and 30 MWt to obtain the main parameters of the reactor in the form of the amount of fuel in the pebble bed reactor core, height and diameter of the terrace. Based on the main parameter or reactor obtained perform of calculation to get reactor inventory for RDE 20 MWT and 30 MWT with the same methods as the method of the RDE 10 MWt calculation. The results obtained are the largest inventory of reactor RDE 10 MWt, 20 MWt and 30 MWt sequentially are to Kr group are about 1,00E+15 Bq, 1,20E+16 Bq, 1,70E+16 Bq, for group I are 6,50E+16 Bq, 1,20E+17 Bq, 1,60E+17 Bq and for groups Cs are 2,20E+16 Bq, 2,40E+16 Bq, 2,60E+16 Bq. Reactor inventory will then be used to calculate the reactor source term and it

  14. Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, Bojan; Memmott, Matthew; Boy, Guy; Charit, Indrajit; Manera, Annalisa; Downar, Thomas; Lee, John; Muldrow, Lycurgus; Upadhyaya, Belle; Hines, Wesley; Haghighat, Alierza

    2017-01-01

    This final report summarizes results of the multi-year effort performed during the period 2/2013- 12/2016 under the DOE NEUP IRP Project ''Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactors (I 2 S-LWR)''. The goal of the project was to develop a concept of a 1 GWe PWR with integral configuration and inherent safety features, at the same time accounting for lessons learned from the Fukushima accident, and keeping in mind the economic viability of the new concept. Essentially (see Figure 1-1) the project aimed to implement attractive safety features, typically found only in SMRs, to a larger power (1 GWe) reactor, to address the preference of some utilities in the US power market for unit power level on the order of 1 GWe.

  15. Continuous backfitting measures for the FRG-1 and FRG-2 research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blom, K.H.; Falck, K.; Krull, W.

    1990-01-01

    The GKSS-Research Centre Geesthacht GmbH has been operating the research reactors FRG-1 and FRG-2 with power levels of 5 MW and 15 MW for 31 and 26 years respectively. Safe operation at full power levels over so many years with an average utilization between 180 d to 250 d per year is possible only with great efforts in modernization and upgrading of the research reactors. Emphasis has been placed on backfitting since around 1975. At that time within the Federal Republic of Germany many new guidelines, rules, ordinances, and standards in the field of (power) reactor safety were published. Much work has been done on the modernization of the FRG-1 and FRG-2 research reactors therefore within the last ten years. Work done within the last two years and presently underway includes: measures against water leakage through the concrete and along the beam tubes; repair of both cooling towers; modernization of the ventilation system; measures for fire protection; activities in water chemistry and water quality; installation of a double tubing for parts of the primary piping of the FRG-1; replacement of instrumentation, process control systems (operation and monitoring system) and alarm system; renewal of the emergency power supply; installation of internal lightning protection; installation of a cold neutron source; enrichment reduction for FRG-1. These efforts will continue to allow safe operation of our research reactors over their whole operational life

  16. TiO2-photocatalyzed As(III) oxidation in a fixed-bed, flow-through reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Megan A; Hering, Janet G

    2006-07-01

    Compliance with the U.S. drinking water standard for arsenic (As) of 10 microg L(-1) is required in January 2006. This will necessitate implementation of treatment technologies for As removal by thousands of water suppliers. Although a variety of such technologies is available, most require preoxidation of As(III) to As(V) for efficient performance. Previous batch studies with illuminated TiO2 slurries have demonstrated that TiO2-photocatalyzed AS(III) oxidation occurs rapidly. This study examined reaction efficiency in a flow-through, fixed-bed reactor that provides a better model for treatment in practice. Glass beads were coated with mixed P25/sol gel TiO2 and employed in an upflow reactor irradiated from above. The reactor residence time, influent As(III) concentration, number of TiO2 coatings on the beads, solution matrix, and light source were varied to characterize this reaction and determine its feasibility for water treatment. Repeated usage of the same beads in multiple experiments or extended use was found to affect effluent As(V) concentrations but not the steady-state effluent As(III) concentration, which suggests that As(III) oxidation at the TiO2 surface undergoes dynamic sorption equilibration. Catalyst poisoning was not observed either from As(V) or from competitively adsorbing anions, although the higher steady-state effluent As(III) concentrations in synthetic groundwater compared to 5 mM NaNO3 indicated that competitive sorbates in the matrix partially hinder the reaction. A reactive transport model with rate constants proportional to incident light at each bead layer fit the experimental data well despite simplifying assumptions. TiO2-photocatalyzed oxidation of As(III) was also effective under natural sunlight. Limitations to the efficiency of As(III) oxidation in the fixed-bed reactor were attributable to constraints of the reactor geometry, which could be overcome by improved design. The fixed-bed TiO2 reactor offers an environmentally

  17. Exxon nuclear neutronics design methods for pressurized water reactors. Supplement 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skogen, F.B.; Stout, R.B.

    1977-01-01

    Modifications to the Exxon Nuclear PWR neutronic design calculational methods are presented as well as the results obtained when these improved methods are compared to reactor measurements. The basic PWR design tools remain unchanged; i.e., the XPOSE code is used for generating the basic nuclear parameters, the PDQ-7 code is used for calculating reactivity and x-y power distributions, and the XTG code is used for three-dimensional analysis. The recent start-up experiences at D. C. Cook Unit 1 and H. B. Robinson Unit 2 have provided a significant increase in the data base supporting the current ENC PWR neutronic methods. The verification comparisons contained in the supplement include reactor measurements from D. C. Cook Unit 1, Cycle 2; H. B. Robinson Unit 2, Cycles 4 and 5; Palisades Cycle 2, and R. E. Ginna, Cycle 7

  18. Characterization of fuel distribution in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor system by neutron and gamma-ray dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Ruddy, F.H.; Preston, C.C.; McNeece, J.P.; Kaiser, B.J.; McElroy, W.N.

    1984-01-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray dosimetry are being used for nondestructive assessment of the fuel distribution throughout the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor core region and primary cooling system. The fuel content of TMI-2 makeup and purification Demineralizer A has been quantified with Si(Li) continuous gamma-ray spectrometry and solid-state track recorder (SSTR) neutron dosimetry. For fuel distribution characterization in the core region, results from SSTR neutron dosimetry exposures in the TMI-2 reactor cavity are presented. These SSTR results are consistent with the presence of a significant amount of fuel debris, equivalent to several fuel assemblies or more, lying at the bottom of the reactor vessel. (Auth.)

  19. Estimation of power feedback parameters of the IBR-2M reactor by square wave reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepelyshev, Yu.N.; Popov, A.K.; Sumkhuu, D.

    2016-01-01

    Parameters of the IBR-2M reactor power feedback (PFB) are estimated based on the analysis of power transients caused by deliberate square wave reactivity when the pulsed reactor operates in the self-regulation mode. The PFB of the IBR-2M is described by three linear first-order differential equations. Two components of the PFB are responsible for the negative feedback and one, for the positive. The overall feedback is negative, i.e., it has a stabilizing effect for the operation of the reactor. The slowest negative component of the PFB is probably caused by heating of the fuel. Periodically repeated in the process of exploitation, estimation of the PFB parameters is one of the methods to ensure safety operation of the reactor. [ru

  20. Proceedings of 2. Yugoslav symposium on reactor physics, Part 3, Herceg Novi (Yugoslavia), 27-29 Sep 1966

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    This Volume 3 of the Proceedings of 2. Yugoslav symposium on reactor physics includes three papers describing the following: model for spatial synthesis of automated control system of the GCR type reactor; model for analysis of hydrodynamic processes at the BHWR type reactors; mathematical model for safety analysis of heavy water power reactor

  1. TOKMINA, Toroidal Magnetic Field Minimization for Tokamak Fusion Reactor. TOKMINA-2, Total Power for Tokamak Fusion Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatch, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: TOKMINA finds the minimum magnetic field, Bm, required at the toroidal coil of a Tokamak type fusion reactor when the input is beta(ratio of plasma pressure to magnetic pressure), q(Kruskal-Shafranov plasma stability factor), and y(ratio of plasma radius to vacuum wall radius: rp/rw) and arrays of PT (total thermal power from both d-t and tritium breeding reactions), Pw (wall loading or power flux) and TB (thickness of blanket), following the method of Golovin, et al. TOKMINA2 finds the total power, PT, of such a fusion reactor, given a specified magnetic field, Bm, at the toroidal coil. 2 - Method of solution: TOKMINA: the aspect ratio(a) is minimized, giving a minimum value for Bm. TOKMINA2: a search is made for PT; the value of PT which minimizes Bm to the required value within 50 Gauss is chosen. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Input arrays presently are dimensioned at 20. This restriction can be overcome by changing a dimension card

  2. System Definition Document: Reactor Data Necessary for Modeling Plutonium Disposition in Catawba Nuclear Station Units 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (USDOE) has contracted with Duke Engineering and Services, Cogema, Inc., and Stone and Webster (DCS) to provide mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication and reactor irradiation services in support of USDOE's mission to dispose of surplus weapons-grade plutonium. The nuclear station units currently identified as mission reactors for this project are Catawba Units 1 and 2 and McGuire Units 1 and 2. This report is specific to Catawba Nuclear Station Units 1 and 2, but the details and materials for the McGuire reactors are very similar. The purpose of this document is to present a complete set of data about the reactor materials and components to be used in modeling the Catawba reactors to predict reactor physics parameters for the Catawba site. Except where noted, Duke Power Company or DCS documents are the sources of these data. These data are being used with the ORNL computer code models of the DCS Catawba (and McGuire) pressurized-water reactors

  3. Report on the operation in 1973 of the FR 2 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, I.; Steiger, W.

    1975-04-01

    Also in 1973, the heavy-water moderated research and testing reactor FR 2 was operated to schedule at 44 MW nominal power. Again, the availability of the plant was slightly improved. Experimental utilization through instrumented irradiation capsules strongly increased as compared to the previous year. Up to 16 capsule test rigs at a time were inserted in the reactor. As to the beam tube experiments, up to 13 experiments covering a total of 18 test rigs were conducted simultaneously at the 12 reasonably usable beam holes. At the beginning of the year all of the positions available were occupied by 5 loop experiments. Isotope production reached its highest value with a total of 2,372 irradiated capsules (1.3% more than the year before). Some remarkable figures characterized the year 1973: On August 16, 1973 ten years of full power operation at a nominal power of 12 and 44 MW, respectively, had been reached. On July 24, 1973 the 50,000th isotope irradiation was performed in the reactor and on December 26, 1973 a total energy release of 100,000 MWd was recorded. Moreover, the 125,000th visitor of the reactor was welcomed on December 6, 1973. (orig./UA) [de

  4. Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects. Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building decontamination. Summary status report. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerge, D.H.; Miller, R.L.; Scotti, K.S.

    1986-05-01

    This document summarizes information relating to decontamination of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor building. The report covers activities for the period of June 1, 1979 through March 29, 1985. The data collected from activity reports, reactor containment entry records, and other sources were entered into a computerized data system which permits extraction/manipulation of specific information which can be used in planning for recovery from an accident similar to that experienced at TMI-2 on March 28, 1979. This report contains summaries of man-hours, manpower, and radiation exposures incurred during decontamination of the reactor building. Support activities conducted outside of radiation areas are excluded from the scope of this report. Computerized reports included in this document are: a chronological summary listing work performed relating to reactor building decontamination for the period specified; and summary reports for each major task during the period. Each task summary is listed in chronological order for zone entry and subtotaled for the number of personnel entries, exposures, and man-hours. Manually-assembled table summaries are included for: labor and exposures by department and labor and exposures by major activity

  5. Evaluation of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building decontamination process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougherty, D.; Adams, J. W.

    1983-08-01

    Decontamination activities from the cleanup of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building are generating a variety of waste streams. Solid wastes being disposed of in commercial shallow land burial include trash and rubbish, ion-exchange resins (Epicor-II) and strippable coatings. The radwaste streams arising from cleanup activities currently under way are characterized and classified under the waste classification scheme of 10 CFR Part 61. It appears that much of the Epicor-II ion-exchange resin being disposed of in commerical land burial will be Class B and require stabilization if current radionuclide loading practices continue to be followed. Some of the trash and rubbish from the cleanup of the reactor building so far would be Class B. Strippable coatings being used at TMI-2 were tested for leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents, thermal stability, radiation stability, stability under immersion and biodegradability. Actual coating samples from reactor building decontamination testing were evaluated for radionuclide leaching and biodegradation.

  6. Evaluation of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building decontamination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, D.; Adams, J.W.

    1983-08-01

    Decontamination activities from the cleanup of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building are generating a variety of waste streams. Solid wastes being disposed of in commercial shallow land burial include trash and rubbish, ion-exchange resins (Epicor-II) and strippable coatings. The radwaste streams arising from cleanup activities currently under way are characterized and classified under the waste classification scheme of 10 CFR Part 61. It appears that much of the Epicor-II ion-exchange resin being disposed of in commerical land burial will be Class B and require stabilization if current radionuclide loading practices continue to be followed. Some of the trash and rubbish from the cleanup of the reactor building so far would be Class B. Strippable coatings being used at TMI-2 were tested for leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents, thermal stability, radiation stability, stability under immersion and biodegradability. Actual coating samples from reactor building decontamination testing were evaluated for radionuclide leaching and biodegradation

  7. HERESY, 2-D Few-Group Static Eigenvalues Calculation for Thermal Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, D.R.

    1965-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: HERESY3 solves the two- dimensional, few-group, static reactor eigenvalue problem using the heterogeneous (source-sink or Feinburg-Galanin) formalism. The solution yields the reactor k-effective and absorption reaction rates for each rod normalized to the most absorptive rod in the thermal level. Epithermal fissions are allowed at each resonance level, and lattice-averaged values of thermal utilization, resonance escape probability, thermal and resonance eta values, and the fast fission factor are calculated. Kernels in the calculation are based on age-diffusion theory. Both finite reactor lattices and infinitely repeating reactor super-cells may be calculated. Rod parameters may be calculated by several internal options, and a direct interface is provided to a HAMMER system (NESC Abstract 277) lattice library tape to obtain cell parameters. Criticality searches are provided on thermal utilization, thermal eta, and axial leakage buckling. 2 - Method of solution: Direct power iteration on matrix form of the heterogeneous critical equation is used. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Maxima of - 50 flux/geometry symmetry positions; 20 physically different assemblies; 9 resonance levels; 5000 rod coordinate positions

  8. G2 and G3 reactors design; Description des reacteurs G2 et G3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herreng,; Ertaud,; Pasquet, [Societe Alsacienne de Constructions Mecaniques (France)

    1958-07-01

    'FRANCE ATOME' Manufacturers Party has been entrusted with the G2 and G3 reactors engineering by the french A.E.C., for the first-five-year french project. Although these reactors are essentially plutonium generators, everyone has been linked with a power station which is supposed to supply with 40 MW, 'Electricite de France' has taken the liability upon itself. The reactor core includes most of G1 reactor parts (central gap excluded): horizontal channels, graphite parallelepipedic bricks stacking, steel thermal shield. The cooling is provided with CO{sub 2} under a 15 atmospheres pressure. This pressure is kept steady in a press-stressed concrete packing-case which is a cylinder horizontally shaped. Steel strips tightened encircle the concrete cylinder; itself protected by sole-plates. The cylinder bottom has brought about unusual problems which have been solved by the choice of an hemispheric shape. Packing-case tightness is provided by a 30 mm iron-plate connected with the inner wall of concrete. One of the reactor's special characteristics is the possibility of loading and unloading while operating. On loading side, barrel locks, each weighting 50 tons, allow new cans, at a pressure of 15 atmospheres, to pass. The cans process almost in a steady way through the channel, and finally drop down through bent spouts, then through spiral toboggans into a new lock. The cooling CO{sub 2} flow is provided with 3 turbo-bellows, these are actuated by average pressure-steam, obtained from exchangers. Every reactor supplies 4 exchangers which have been very difficult to build and to set up. The secondary cycle is standard and contains 3 stages (pressure 10,3: 2 and 0,5 kg/cm{sup 2}). Steam can be condensed in the event of a group turbo-generator stopping, with no modifion for the normal operating conditions of the reactor. Auxiliary circuits have to assure the continuous purifying of cooling CO{sub 2}, its storage and drain. 49 boron carbide rods are used to control the

  9. Investigation of hydrogen-burn damage in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvares, N.J.; Beason, D.G.; Eidem, G.R.

    1982-06-01

    About 10 hours after the March 28, 1979 Loss-of-Coolant Accident began at Three Mile Island Unit 2, a hydrogen deflagration of undetermined extent occurred inside the reactor building. Examinations of photographic evidence, available from the first fifteen entries into the reactor building, yielded preliminary data on the possible extent and range of hydrogen burn damage. These data, although sparse, contributed to development of a possible damage path and to an estimate of the extent of damage to susceptible reactor building items. Further information gathered from analysis of additional photographs and samples can provide the means for estimating hydrogen source and production rate data crucial to developing a complete understanding of the TMI-2 hydrogen deflagration. 34 figures

  10. A review of the probabilistic safety assessment application to the TR-2 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goektepe, G.; Adalioglu, U.; Anac, H.; Sevdik, B.; Menteseoglu, S.

    2001-01-01

    A review of the Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) to the TR-2 Research Reactor is presented. The level 1 PSA application involved: selection of accident initiators, mitigating functions and system definitions, event tree constructions and quantification, fault tree constructions and quantification, human reliability, component failure data base development, dependent failure analysis. Each of the steps of the analysis given above is reviewed briefly with highlights from the selected results. PSA application is found to be a practical tool for research reactor safety due to intense involvement of human interactions in an experimental facility. Insights gained from the application of PSA methodology to the TR-2 research reactor led to a significant safety review of the system

  11. Solid-state track recorder neutron dosimetry in the Three-Mile Island Unit-2 reactor cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Ruddy, F.H.; Preston, C.C.; McElroy, W.N.

    1985-04-01

    Solid-state track recorder (SSTR) neutron dosimetry has been conducted in the Three-Mile Island Unit (TMI-2) reactor cavity (i.e., the annular gap between the pressure vessel and the biological shield) for nondestructive assessment of the fuel distribution. Two axial stringers were deployed in the annular gap with 17 SSTR dosimeters located on each stringer. SSTR experimental results reveal that neutron streaming, upward from the bottom of the reactor cavity region, dominates the observed neutron intensity. These absolute thermal neutron flux observations are consistent with the presence of a significant amount of fuel debris lying at the bottom of the reactor vessel. A conservative lower bound estimated from these SSTR data implies that there are at least 2 tonnes of fuel, which is roughly 4 fuel assemblies, at the bottom of the vessel. The existence of significant neutron streaming also explains the high count rate observed with the source range monitors (SRMs) that are located in the TMI-2 reactor cavity

  12. Neutron dosimetry in the Three-Mile Island Unit 2 reactor cavity with solid-state track recorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Ruddy, F.H.; Preston, C.C.; McElroy, W.N.; Rao, S.V.; Greenborg, J.; Fricke, V.R.

    1986-01-01

    Solid-state track recorder (SSTR) neutron dosimetry has been conducted in the Three-Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor cavity, for nondestructive assessment of the fuel distribution. Two axial stringers were deployed in the annular gap with 17 SSTR dosimeters located on each stringer. SSTR experimental results reveal that neutron streaming, upward from the bottom of the reactor cavity region, dominates the observed neutron intensity. These absolute thermal neutron flux observations are consistent with the presence of a significant amount of fuel debris lying at the bottom of the reactor vessel. A conservative lower bound estimated from these SSTR data implies that at least 2 tonnes of fuel, which is roughly 4 fuel assemblies, is lying at the bottom of the vessel. This existence of significant neutron streaming also explains the high count rate observed with the source range monitors that are located in the TMI-2 reactor cavity. (author)

  13. Degradation of gas-phase trichloroethylene over thin-film TiO2 photocatalyst in multi-modules reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Bum; Lee, Jun Yub; Kim, Gyung Soo; Hong, Sung Chang

    2009-01-01

    The present paper examined the photocatalytic degradation (PCD) of gas-phase trichloroethylene (TCE) over thin-film TiO 2 . A large-scale treatment of TCE was carried out using scale-up continuous flow photo-reactor in which nine reactors were arranged in parallel and series. The parallel or serial arrangement is a significant factor to determine the special arrangement of whole reactor module as well as to compact the multi-modules in a continuous flow reactor. The conversion of TCE according to the space time was nearly same for parallel and serial connection of the reactors.

  14. A next-generation reactor concept: The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.I.

    1992-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as reactor technology for the 21st century. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system, in particular passive safety and waste management. The IFR concept consists of four technical features: (1) liquid sodium cooling, (2) pool-type reactor configuration, (3) metallic fuel, and (4) fuel cycle closure based on pyroprocessing.

  15. A next-generation reactor concept: The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.I.

    1992-07-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as reactor technology for the 21st century. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system, in particular passive safety and waste management. The IFR concept consists of four technical features: (1) liquid sodium cooling, (2) pool-type reactor configuration, (3) metallic fuel, and (4) fuel cycle closure based on pyroprocessing.

  16. A next-generation reactor concept: The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.

    1992-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as reactor technology for the 21st century. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system, in particular passive safety and waste management. The IFR concept consists of four technical features: (1) liquid sodium cooling, (2) pool-type reactor configuration, (3) metallic fuel, and (4) fuel cycle closure based on pyroprocessing

  17. A gas-phase reactor powered by solar energy and ethanol for H2 production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ampelli, Claudio; Genovese, Chiara; Passalacqua, Rosalba; Perathoner, Siglinda; Centi, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    In the view of H 2 as the future energy vector, we presented here the development of a homemade photo-reactor working in gas phase and easily interfacing with fuel cell devices, for H 2 production by ethanol dehydrogenation. The process generates acetaldehyde as the main co-product, which is more economically advantageous with respect to the low valuable CO 2 produced in the alternative pathway of ethanol photoreforming. The materials adopted as photocatalysts are based on TiO 2 substrates but properly modified with noble (Au) and not-noble (Cu) metals to enhance light harvesting in the visible region. The samples were characterized by BET surface area analysis, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and UV–visible Diffusive Reflectance Spectroscopy, and finally tested in our homemade photo-reactor by simulated solar irradiation. We discussed about the benefits of operating in gas phase with respect to a conventional slurry photo-reactor (minimization of scattering phenomena, no metal leaching, easy product recovery, etc.). Results showed that high H 2 productivity can be obtained in gas phase conditions, also irradiating titania photocatalysts doped with not-noble metals. - Highlights: • A gas-phase photoreactor for H 2 production by ethanol dehydrogenation was developed. • The photocatalytic behaviours of Au and Cu metal-doped TiO 2 thin layers are compared. • Benefits of operating in gas phase with respect to a slurry reactor are presented. • Gas phase conditions and use of not-noble metals are the best economic solution

  18. Performance improvement of the Annular Core Pulse Reactor for reactor safety experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuscher, J.A.; Pickard, P.S.

    1976-01-01

    The Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR) is a TRIGA type reactor which has been in operation at Sandia Laboratories since 1967. The reactor is utilized in a wide variety of experimental programs which include radiation effects, neutron radiography, activation analysis, and fast reactor safety. During the past several years, the ACPR has become an important experimental facility for the United States Fast Reactor Safety Research Program and questions of interest to the safety of the LMFBR are being addressed. In order to enhance the capabilities of the ACPR for reactor safety experiments, a project to improve the performance of the reactor was initiated. It is anticipated that the pulse fluence can be increased by a factor of 2.0 to 2.5 utilizing a two-region core concept with high heat capacity fuel elements around the central irradiation cavity. In addition, the steady-state power of the reactor will be increased by about a factor of two. The new features of the improvements are described

  19. Neutron dosimetry in the Three-Mile Island Unit 2 reactor cavity with solid-state track recorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Ruddy, F.H.; Preston, C.C.; McElroy, W.N.; Rao, S.V.; Greenborg, J.; Fricke, V.R.

    1985-01-01

    Solid-state track recorder (SSTR) neutron dosimetry has been conducted in the Three-Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor cavity (i.e., the annular gap between the pressure vessel and the biological shield) for nondestructive assessment of the fuel distribution. Two axial stringers were deployed in the annular gap with 17 SSTR dosimeters located on each stringer. SSTR experimental results reveal that neutron streaming, upward from the bottom of the reactor cavity region, dominates the observed neutron intensity. These absolute thermal neutron flux observations are consistent with the presence of a significant amount of fuel debris lying at the bottom of the reactor vessel. A conservative lower bound estimated from these SSTR data implies that at least 2 tonnes of fuel, which is roughly 4 fuel assemblies, is lying at the bottom of the vessel. The existence of significant neutron streaming also explains the high count rate observed with the source range monitors (SRMs) that are located in the TMI-2 reactor cavity

  20. A Conceptual Study of a Supercritical CO2-Cooled Micro Modular Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwanyeal Yu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A neutronics conceptual study of a supercritical CO2-cooled micro modular reactor (MMR has been performed in this work. The suggested MMR is an extremely compact and truck-transportable nuclear reactor. The thermal power of the MMR is 36.2 MWth and it is designed to have a 20-year lifetime without refueling. A salient feature of the MMR is that all the components including the generator are integrated in a small reactor vessel. For a minimal volume and long lifetime of the MMR core, a fast neutron spectrum is utilized in this work. To enhance neutron economy and maximize the fuel volume fraction in the core, a high-density uranium mono-nitride U15N fuel is used in the fast-spectrum MMR. Unlike the conventional supercritical CO2-cooled fast reactors, a replaceable fixed absorber (RFA is introduced in a unique way to minimize the excess reactivity and the power peaking factor of the core. For a compact core design, the drum-type control absorber is adopted as the primary reactivity control mechanism. In this study, the neutronics analyses and depletions have been performed by using the continuous energy Monte Carlo Serpent code with the evaluated nuclear data file ENDF/B-VII.1 Library. The MMR core is characterized in view of several important safety parameters such as control system worth, fuel temperature coefficient (FTC and coolant void reactivity (CVR, etc. In addition, a preliminary thermal-hydraulic analysis has also been performed for the hottest channel of the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST MMR.

  1. Analysis of key hardware factors and countermeasure for restricting 49-2 swimming pool reactor lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yadong; Guo Yue; Yang Xiao; Wang Yiwei; Wang Zhanwen

    2013-01-01

    Safe operation is the most important factor to determine the lifetime of aged 49-2 swimming pool reactor. In this paper, the hardware factors of lifetime were analyzed, such as the pool concrete aging, corrosion of aluminum container and primary coolant system, and graphite swelling etc., and then the corresponding measures such as surveillance, prevention and maintenance were purposed. The results show that 49-2 swimming pool reactor can continue to operate safely due to that container is safe under 8 degree earthquake, the reactor is safe on flood level of once per millennium, adding dam break, and the ageing condition of primary coolant system and container is acceptable. (authors)

  2. Comparison between TRU burning reactors and commercial fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Koji; Sanda, Toshio; Ogawa, Takashi

    2001-03-01

    additional consideration should be required in nuclear design and fuel treating facilities due to reactivity coefficient being shifted to the plus side, larger neutron yield and increased heat source caused by MA loading. (2) Confirmation of TRU burning reactor core concepts. The core specification of sodium cooled-nitride fueled TRU burning large reactor was designed based on commercial type fast reactor (sodium cooled nitride fueled large fast reactor, 38000 MWt) which was designed in the feasibility studies on commercialized fast reactor cycle system. The composition of MAs from LWR's spent fuel was supposed. MA content in the core fuel is settled to 60 wt% based on the JAERI's design in order to maximize the MA transmutation amount. We need to exchange 25% of core fuel with zirconium hydride (ZrH 1.6 ) to attain Doppler coefficient being equivalent to that of the conventional type commercial fast reactor loaded 5 wt% MA. Furthermore, this reactor could transmute MAs produced in forty-eight sodium cooled nitride fueled large fast reactors generating the same output. In order to investigate the dependency of MA transmutation characteristics on the reactor output, 1200 MWt TRU burning middle or small reactor core concept was designed. This core was settled by reducing the number of core fuel assemblies from that of TRU burning large reactor designed above. MA transmutation rate in this core is smaller than that in the TRU burning large reactor core because the neutron flux of this core becomes smaller than that of the TRU burning large reactor core due to the higher Pu enrichment. (3) Comparison between TRU burning reactor and conventional type commercial fast reactor. MA transmutation and nuclear characteristics of the sodium cooled nitride fuel commercial type fast reactor loaded 5 wt%MA were evaluated and compared with those of TRU burning large reactor designed in (2). The commercial type fast reactor could only transmute MAs produced in seven sodium cooled nitride

  3. Properties of an irradiated heat-treated Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube removed from the NPD reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, C.K. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada); Coleman, C.E. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Koike, M.H. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., O-Arai Engineering Centre, O-Arai (Japan); Causey, A.R.; Ells, C.E.; Hosbons, R.R.; Sagat, S.; Urbanic, V.F.; Rodgers, D.K

    1997-07-01

    Some pressure tubes in reactors moderated by heavy water have been made from heat-treated (HT) Zr-2.5Nb. One such tube was removed from the NPD nuclear reactor after 20 years of operation. An extensive program was carried out jointly by AECL and PNC to evaluate the condition and properties of this pressure tube. The investigations include irradiation creep, tensile, corrosion, delayed hydride cracking (DHC), fatigue, and fracture properties. Results show that: (I) the in-reactor elongation rate is much lower and the transverse strain rates are slightly larger than in cold-worked (CW) Zr-2.5Nb tubes; (2) the tensile properties, hydrogen pickup, threshold stress intensity factor for DHC initiation, DHC velocity, and fatigue crack growth rates were similar to those of the CW Zr-2.5Nb material; (3) the fracture toughness of this tube, as measured by curved compact toughness specimens and burst tests, is slightly higher than the CW tubes. The results were also compared with other heat-treated Zr-2.5Nb materials irradiated in the Fugen reactor. The tube was in excellent condition when removed from the reactor and would have been satisfactory for further service. (author)

  4. On-line reactor building integrity testing at Gentilly-2 (summary of results 1987-1994)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, N.; Lafreniere, P.

    1994-01-01

    In 1987, Hydro-0uebec embarked on an ambitious development program to provide the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Power Station with an effective and practical Reactor Building Containment integrity Test (CIT). In October 1992, the inaugural low pressure (3 kPa(g) nominal) CIT at 100% F.P was performed. The test was conclusive and the CIT was declared In-Service for containment integrity verification on-line. Five subsequent CITs performed in 1993 and 1994 have demonstrated the expected leak rate results and good reliability. The outstanding feature of the CITs is the demonstrated accurary of better than 5% of the measured leak rate. The CIT was developed with the primary goal of demonstrating 'overall' containment availability. Specifically it was designed to detect a 25 mm. diameter leak or hole in the Reactor Building. However, the remarkable CIT accuracy allows reliable detection of a 2 mm. hole. The Gentilly-2 CIT is an innovative approach based on the Temperature Compensation Method (TCM) which uses a reference volume composed of an extensive tubular network of several different diameters. This eliminates the need to track numerous temperature points. A second independent tubular network includes numerous humidity sampling points, thereby enabling the mearurernent of minute pressure variations inside the Reactor Building, independant of the spatial and temporal humidity behaviour. This Gentilly-2 TOM System has been demonstrated to work at both high and low test pressures. The GentiIly-2 design allows the CIT to be performed at a nominal 3 kPa(g) test pressure during a 12-hour period (28 hours total with alignment time) with the reactor at full power. The traditional Reactor Building Pressure Test (RBPT) is typically performed at high pressure (124 kPa(g) in a 5-day critical path window (7 days total with alignment time) during an annual shutdown

  5. Performance Estimation of Supercritical Co2 Micro Modular Reactor (MMR) for Varying Cooling Air Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Yoonhan; Kim, Seong Gu; Cho, Seong Kuk; Lee, Jeong Ik

    2015-01-01

    A Small Modular Reactor (SMR) receives interests for the various application such as electricity co-generation, small-scale power generation, seawater desalination, district heating and propulsion. As a part of SMR development, supercritical CO2 Micro Modular Reactor (MMR) of 36.2MWth in power is under development by the KAIST research team. To enhance the mobility, the entire system including the power conversion system is designed for the full modularization. Based on the preliminary design, the thermal efficiency is 31.5% when CO2 is sufficiently cooled to the design temperature. A supercritical CO2 MMR is designed to supply electricity to the remote regions. The ambient temperature of the area can influence the compressor inlet temperature as the reactor is cooled with the atmospheric air. To estimate the S-CO2 cycle performance for various environmental conditions, A quasi-static analysis code is developed. For the off design performance of S-CO2 turbomachineries, the experimental result of Sandia National Lab (SNL) is utilized

  6. VENUS-2, Reactor Kinetics with Feedback, 2-D LMFBR Disassembly Excursions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.F.; Nicholson, R.B.; Weber, D.P.

    1980-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: VENUS-2 is an improved edition of the VENUS fast-reactor disassembly program. It is a two- dimensional (r-z) coupled neutronics-hydrodynamics code that calculates the dynamic behavior of an LMFBR during a prompt-critical disassembly excursion. It calculates the power history and fission energy release as well as the space-time histories of the fuel temperatures, core material pressures, and core material motions. Reactivity feedback effects due to Doppler broadening and reactor material motion are taken into account. 2 - Method of solution: The power and energy release are calculated using a point-kinetics formulation with up to six delayed neutron groups. The reactivity is a combination of an input driving function and feedback effects due to Doppler broadening and material motion. An adiabatic model is used to calculate the temperature increase throughout the reactor based on an initial temperature distribution and power profile provided as input data. These temperatures are, in turn, converted to fuel pressures through one of several equation of state options provided. The material motion that results from the pressure buildup is calculated by a direct finite difference solution of a set of two-dimensional (r-z) hydrodynamics equations. This is done in Lagrangian coordinates. The reactivity change associated with this motion is calculated by first-order perturbation theory. The displacements are also used to adjust the fuel densities as required for the density dependent equation-of- state option. An automatic time-step-size selection scheme is provided. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: VENUS-2 is written so that the dimensions of the storage arrays can be readily changed to accommodate a broad range of problem sizes. In the base version, the total number of mesh intervals is restricted such that (NR+3)*(NZ+3) is less than 700, where NR and NZ are the total number of mesh intervals in the r and z

  7. Energy Multiplier Module (EM{sup 2}) - advanced small modular reactor for electricity generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertch, T.; Schleicher, R.; Choi, H.; Rawls, J., E-mail: timothy.bertch@ga.com [General Atomics, San Diego, California (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In order to provide cost effective nuclear energy in other than large reactor, large grid applications, fission technology needs to make further advances. 'Convert and burn' fast reactors offer long life cores, improved fuel utilization, reduced waste and other benefits while achieving cost effective energy production in a smaller reactor. General Atomics' Energy Multiplier Module (EM{sup 2}), a helium-cooled compact fast reactor that augments its fissile fuel load with either depleted uranium (DU) or used nuclear fuel (UNF). The convert and burn in-situ provides 250 MWe with a 30 year core life. High temperature provides a simple, high efficiency direct cycle gas turbine which along with modular construction, fewer systems, road shipment and minimum on site construction support cost effectiveness. Additional advantages in fuel cycle, non-proliferation and siting flexibility and its ability to meet all safety requirements make for an attractive power source, especially in remote and small grid regions. (author)

  8. Steady-State Thermal-Hydraulics Analyses for the Conversion of the BR2 Reactor to LEU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, J. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Van den Branden, G. [SCK CEN (Belgium); Kalcheva, S. [SCK CEN (Belgium); Sikik, E. [SCK CEN (Belgium); Koonen, E. [SCK CEN (Belgium)

    2015-12-01

    BR2 is a research reactor used for radioisotope production and materials testing. It’s a tank-in-pool type reactor cooled by light water and moderated by beryllium and light water (Figure 1). The reactor core consists of a beryllium moderator forming a matrix of 79 hexagonal prisms in a hyperboloid configuration; each having a central bore that can contain a variety of different components such as a fuel assembly, a control or regulating rod, an experimental device, or a beryllium or aluminum plug. Based on a series of tests, the BR2 operation is currently limited to a maximum allowable heat flux of 470 W/cm2 to ensure fuel plate integrity during steady-state operation and after a loss-of-flow/loss-of-pressure accident.

  9. Proceedings of the international topical meeting on advanced reactors safety: Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    In this volume, 89 papers are grouped under the following headings: advances in research/test reactor safety; advanced reactor accident management and emergency actions; advanced reactors instrumentation/controls/human factors; probabilistic risk/safety and reliability assessments; steam explosion research and issues; advanced reactor severe accident issues and research (analysis and assessments); advanced reactor thermal hydraulics; accelerator-driven source safety; liquid-metal reactor safety; structural assessments and issues; late papers

  10. Reactor noise analysis of experimental fast reactor 'JOYO'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtani, Hideji; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    1980-01-01

    As a part of dynamics tests in experimental fast reactor ''JOYO'', reactor noise tests were carried out. The reactor noise analysis techniques are effective for study of plant characteristics by determining fluctuations of process signals (neutron signal, reactor inlet temperature signals, etc.), which are able to be measured without disturbances for reactor operations. The aims of reactor noise tests were to confirm that no unstable phenomenon exists in ''JOYO'' and to gain initial data of the plant for reference of the future data. Data for the reactor noise tests treated in this paper were obtained at 50 MW power level. Fluctuations of process signals were amplified and recorded on analogue tapes. The analysis was performed using noise code (NOISA) of digital computer, with which statistical values of ASPD (auto power spectral density), CPSD (cross power spectral density), and CF (coherence function) were calculated. The primary points of the results are as follows. 1. RMS value of neutron signal at 50 MW power level is about 0.03 MW. This neutron fluctuation is not disturbing reactor operations. 2. The fluctuations of A loop reactor inlet temperatures (T sub(AI)) are larger than the fluctuations of B loop reactor inlet temperature (T sub(BI)). For this reason, the major driving force of neutron fluctuations seems to be the fluctuations of T sub(AI). 3. Core and blanket subassemblies can be divided into two halves (A and B region), with respect to the spacial motion of temperature in the reactor core. A or B region means the region in which sodium temperature fluctuations in subassembly are significantly affected by T sub(AI) or T sub(BI), respectively. This phenomenon seems to be due to the lack of mixing of A and B loop sodium in lower plenum of reactor vessel. (author)

  11. Application of 2DOF controller for reactor power control. Verification by numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Katsuo

    1996-09-01

    In this report the usefulness of the two degree of freedom (2DOF) control is discussed to improve the reference response characteristics and robustness for reactor power control system. The 2DOF controller consists of feedforward and feedback elements. The feedforward element was designed by model matching method and the feedback element by solving the mixed sensitivity problem of H ∞ control. The 2DOF control gives good performance in both reference response and robustness to disturbance and plant perturbation. The simulation of reactor power control was performed by digitizing the 2DOF controller with the digital control periods of 10[msec]. It is found that the control period of 10[msec] is enough not to make degradation of the control performance by digitizing. (author)

  12. Validation of SCALE4.4a for Calculation of Xe-Sm Transients After a Scram of the BR2 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalcheva, S.; Ponsard, B.; Koonen, E.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this report is to validate the computational modules system SCALE4.4a for evaluation of reactivity changes, macroscopic absorption cross sections and calculations of the positions of the Control Rods during their motion in Xe-Sm transient after a scram of the BR-2 reactor. The rapid shutting down of the reactor by inserting of negative reactivity by the Control Rods is known as a reactor scram. Following reactor scram, a large xenon and samarium buildup occur in the reactor, which may appreciably affect the multiplication factor of the core due to enormous neutron absorption. The validation of the calculations of Xe-Sm transients by SCALE4.4a has been performed on the measurements of the positions of the Control Rods during their motion in Xe-Sm transients of the BR-2 reactor and on comparison with the calculations by the standard procedure XESM, developed at the BR-2 reactor. A final conclusion is made that the SCALE4.4a modules system can be used for evaluation of Xe-Sm transients of the BR-2 reactor. The utilization of the code is simple, the computational time takes from few seconds.

  13. Nuclear powerplant standardization: light water reactors. Volume 2. Appendixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-06-01

    This volume contains working papers written for OTA to assist in preparation of the report, NUCLEAR POWERPLANT STANDARDIZATION: LIGHT WATER REACTORS. Included in the appendixes are the following: the current state of standardization, an application of the principles of the Naval Reactors Program to commercial reactors; the NRC and standardization, impacts of nuclear powerplant standardization on public health and safety, descriptions of current control room designs and Duke Power's letter, Admiral Rickover's testimony, a history of standardization in the NRC, and details on the impact of standardization on public health and safety

  14. Degradation of gas-phase trichloroethylene over thin-film TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst in multi-modules reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Bum [New and Renewable Energy Team, Environment and Energy Division, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun Yub, E-mail: ljy02191@hanafos.com [Power Engineering Research Institute, Korea Power Engineering Company, Inc. (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gyung Soo [New and Renewable Energy Team, Environment and Energy Division, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sung Chang [Department of Environmental Engineering, Kyonggi University (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-30

    The present paper examined the photocatalytic degradation (PCD) of gas-phase trichloroethylene (TCE) over thin-film TiO{sub 2}. A large-scale treatment of TCE was carried out using scale-up continuous flow photo-reactor in which nine reactors were arranged in parallel and series. The parallel or serial arrangement is a significant factor to determine the special arrangement of whole reactor module as well as to compact the multi-modules in a continuous flow reactor. The conversion of TCE according to the space time was nearly same for parallel and serial connection of the reactors.

  15. Nuclear reactor (1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillard, M.L.

    1960-01-01

    The first French plutonium-making reactors G1, G2 and G3 built at Marcoule research center are linked to a power plant. The G1 electrical output does not offset the energy needed for operating this reactor. On the contrary, reactors G2 and G3 will each generate a net power of 25 to 30 MW, which will go into the EDF grid. This power is relatively small, but the information obtained from operation is great and will be helpful for starting up the power reactor EDF1, EDF2 and EDF3. The paper describes how, previous to any starting-up operation, the tests performed, especially those concerned with the power plant and the pressure vessel, have helped to bring the commissioning date closer. (author) [fr

  16. Low-enrichment and long-life Scalable LIquid Metal cooled small Modular (SLIMM-1.2) reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S., E-mail: mgenk@unm.edu [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nuclear Engineering Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mechanical Engineering Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Chemical and Biological Engineering Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Palomino, Luis M.; Schriener, Timothy M. [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nuclear Engineering Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Developed low enrichment and natural circulation cooled SLIMM-1.2 SMR for generating 10–100 MW{sub th}. • Neutronics analyses estimate operation life and temperature reactivity feedback. • At 100 MW{sub th}, SLIMM-1.2 operates for 6.3 FPY without refueling. • SLIMM-1.2 has relatively low power peaking and maximum UN fuel temperature < 1400 K. - Abstract: The Scalable LIquid Metal cooled small Modular (SLIMM-1.0) reactor with uranium nitride fuel enrichment of 17.65% had been developed for generating 10–100 MW{sub th} continuously, without refueling for ∼66 and 5.9 full power years, respectively. Natural circulation of in-vessel liquid sodium (Na) cools the core of this fast energy spectrum reactor during nominal operation and after shutdown, with the aid of a tall chimney and an annular Na/Na heat exchanger (HEX) of concentric helically coiled tubes. The HEX at the top of the downcomer maximizes the static pressure head for natural circulation. In addition to the independent emergency shutdown (RSS) and reactor control (RC), the core negative temperature reactivity feedback safely decreases the reactor thermal power, following modest increases in the temperatures of UN fuel and in-vessel liquid sodium. The decay heat is removed from the core by natural circulation of in-vessel liquid sodium, with aid of the liquid metal heat pipes laid along the reactor vessel wall, and the passive backup cooling system (BCS) using natural circulation of ambient air along the outer surface of the guard vessel wall. This paper investigates modifying the SLIMM-1.0 reactor design to lower the UN fuel enrichment. To arrive at a final reactor design (SLIMM-1.2), the performed neutronics and reactivity depletion analyses examined the effects of various design and material choices on both the cold-clean and the hot-clean excess reactivity, the reactivity shutdown margin, the full power operation life at 100 MW{sub th}, the fissile production and depletion, the

  17. Safeguarding research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, J.A.

    1983-03-01

    The report is organized in four sections, including the introduction. The second section contains a discussion of the characteristics and attributes of research reactors important to safeguards. In this section, research reactors are described according to their power level, if greater than 25 thermal megawatts, or according to each fuel type. This descriptive discussion includes both reactor and reactor fuel information of a generic nature, according to the following categories. 1. Research reactors with more than 25 megawatts thermal power, 2. Plate fuelled reactors, 3. Assembly fuelled reactors. 4. Research reactors fuelled with individual rods. 5. Disk fuelled reactors, and 6. Research reactors fuelled with aqueous homogeneous fuel. The third section consists of a brief discussion of general IAEA safeguards as they apply to research reactors. This section is based on IAEA safeguards implementation documents and technical reports that are used to establish Agency-State agreements and facility attachments. The fourth and last section describes inspection activities at research reactors necessary to meet Agency objectives. The scope of the activities extends to both pre and post inspection as well as the on-site inspection and includes the examination of records and reports relative to reactor operation and to receipts, shipments and certain internal transfers, periodic verification of fresh fuel, spent fuel and core fuel, activities related to containment and surveillance, and other selected activities, depending on the reactor

  18. Development of the fast reactor group constant set JFS-3-J3.2R based on the JENDL-3.2

    CERN Document Server

    Chiba, G

    2002-01-01

    It is reported that the fast reactor group constant set JFS-3-J3.2 based on the newest evaluated nuclear data library JENDL3.2 has a serious error in the process of applying the weighting function. As the error affects greatly nuclear characteristics, and a corrected version of the reactor constant set, JFS-3-J3.2R, was developed, as well as lumped FP cross sections. The use of JFS-3-J3.2R improves the results of analyses especially on sample Doppler reactivity and reaction rate in the blanket region in comparison with those obtained using the JFS-3-J3.2.

  19. Reactor Physics Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeten, P.

    2007-01-01

    University courses in nuclear reactor physics at the universities consist of a theoretical description of the physics and technology of nuclear reactors. In order to demonstrate the basic concepts in reactor physics, training exercises in nuclear reactor installations are also desirable. Since the number of reactor facilities is however strongly decreasing in Europe, it becomes difficult to offer to students a means for demonstrating the basic concepts in reactor physics by performing training exercises in nuclear installations. Universities do not generally possess the capabilities for performing training exercises. Therefore, SCK-CEN offers universities the possibility to perform (on a commercial basis) training exercises at its infrastructure consisting of two research reactors (BR1 and VENUS). Besides the organisation of training exercises in the framework of university courses, SCK-CEN also organizes theoretical courses in reactor physics for the education and training of nuclear reactor operators. It is indeed a very important subject to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. In this framework, an understanding of the fundamental principles of nuclear reactor physics is also necessary for reactor operators. Therefore, the organisation of a basic Nuclear reactor physics course at the level of reactor operators in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The objectives this activity are: (1) to provide training and education activities in reactor physics for university students and (2) to organise courses in nuclear reactor physics for reactor operators

  20. Consideration of LH2 and LD2 cold neutron sources in heavy water reactor reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potapov, I.A.; Serebrov, A.P.

    2001-01-01

    The reactor power, the required CNS dimensions and power of the cryogenic equipment define the CNS type with maximized cold neutron production. Cold neutron fluxes from liquid hydrogen (LH 2 ) and liquid deuterium (LD 2 ) cold neutron sources (CNS) are analyzed. Different CNS volumes, presents and absence of reentrant holes inside the CNS, different adjustment of beam tube and containment are considered. (orig.)

  1. Fusion reactor materials program plan. Section 2. Damage analysis and fundamental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    The scope of this program includes: (1) Development of procedures for characterizing neutron environments of test facilities and fusion reactors, (2) Theoretical and experimental investigations of the influence of irradiation environment on damage production, damage microstructure evolution, and mechanical and physical property changes, (3) Identification and, where appropriate, development of essential nuclear and materials data, and (4) Development of a methodology, based on damage mechanisms, for correlating the mechanical behavior of materials exposed to diverse test environments and projecting this behavior to magnetic fusion reactor (MFR) environments. Some major problem areas are addressed

  2. Titanium Mass-balance Analysis of Paso Robles Soils: Elemental Gains and Losses as Affected by Acid Alteration Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Brad; Ming, Douglas W.

    2010-01-01

    The Columbia Hills soils have been exposed to aqueous alteration in alkaline [1] as well as acid conditions [2,3]. The Paso Robles class soils are bright soils that possess the highest S concentration of any soil measured on Mars [2]. Ferric-sulfate detection by Moessbauer analysis indicated that acid solutions were involved in forming these soils [4]. These soils are proposed to have formed by alteration of nearby rock by volcanic hydrothermal or fumarolic activity. The Paso Robles soils consist of the original Paso Robles-disturbed-Pasadena (PR-dist), Paso Robles- PasoLight (PR-PL), Arad-Samra, Arad-Hula, Tyrone- Berker Island1 and Tyrone-MountDarwin [2 ,3. ]Chemical characteristics indicate that the PR-dist and PR-PL soils could be derived from acid weathering of local Wishstone rocks while the Samra and Hula soils are likely derived from local Algonquin-Iroquet rock [3]. The Paso Robles soils were exposed to acidic sulfur bearing fluids; however, little else is known about the chemistry of the alteration fluid and its effects on the alteration of the proposed parent materials. The objectives of this work are to conduct titanium normalized mass-balance analysis to1) assess elemental gains and losses from the parent materials in the formation of the Paso Robles soils and 2) utilize this information to indicate the chemical nature of the alteration fluids.

  3. Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE 5480.6, Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors, establishes reactor safety requirements to assure that reactors are sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that adequately protects health and safety and is in accordance with uniform standards, guides, and codes which are consistent with those applied to comparable licensed reactors. This document identifies nuclear safety criteria applied to NRC [Nuclear Regulatory Commission] licensed reactors. The titles of the chapters and sections of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.70, Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Rev. 3, are used as the format for compiling the NRC criteria applied to the various areas of nuclear safety addressed in a safety analysis report for a nuclear reactor. In each section the criteria are compiled in four groups: (1) Code of Federal Regulations, (2) US NRC Regulatory Guides, SRP Branch Technical Positions and Appendices, (3) Codes and Standards, and (4) Supplemental Information. The degree of application of these criteria to a DOE-owned reactor, consistent with their application to comparable licensed reactors, must be determined by the DOE and DOE contractor

  4. Design and manufacture of a D-shape coil-based toroid-type HTS DC reactor using 2nd generation HTS wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwangmin, E-mail: kwangmin81@gmail.com [Changwon National University, 55306 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Go, Byeong-Soo; Sung, Hae-Jin; Park, Hea-chul; Kim, Seokho [Changwon National University, 55306 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sangjin [Uiduk University, Gyeongju 780-713 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Yoon-Su; Oh, Yunsang [Vector Fields Korea Inc., Pohang 790-834 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Minwon [Changwon National University, 55306 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, In-Keun, E-mail: yuik@changwon.ac.kr [Changwon National University, 55306 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • The authors designed and fabricated a D-shape coil based toroid-type HTS DC reactor using 2G GdBCO HTS wires. • The toroid-type magnet consisted of 30 D-shape double pancake coil (DDC)s. The total length of the wire was 2.32 km. • The conduction cooling method was adopted for reactor magnet cooling. • The maximum cooling temperature of reactor magnet is 5.5 K. • The inductance was 408 mH in the steady-state condition (300 A operating). - Abstract: This paper describes the design specifications and performance of a real toroid-type high temperature superconducting (HTS) DC reactor. The HTS DC reactor was designed using 2G HTS wires. The HTS coils of the toroid-type DC reactor magnet were made in the form of a D-shape. The target inductance of the HTS DC reactor was 400 mH. The expected operating temperature was under 20 K. The electromagnetic performance of the toroid-type HTS DC reactor magnet was analyzed using the finite element method program. A conduction cooling method was adopted for reactor magnet cooling. Performances of the toroid-type HTS DC reactor were analyzed through experiments conducted under the steady-state and charge conditions. The fundamental design specifications and the data obtained from this research will be applied to the design of a commercial-type HTS DC reactor.

  5. IAEA safety standards for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou Yehia, H.

    2007-01-01

    The general structure of the IAEA Safety Standards and the process for their development and revision are briefly presented and discussed together with the progress achieved in the development of Safety Standards for research reactor. These documents provide the safety requirements and the key technical recommendations to achieve enhanced safety. They are intended for use by all organizations involved in safety of research reactors and developed in a way that allows them to be incorporated into national laws and regulations. The author reviews the safety standards for research reactors and details their specificities. There are 4 published safety standards: 1) Safety assessment of research reactors and preparation of the safety analysis report (35-G1), 2) Safety in the utilization and modification of research reactors (35-G2), 3) Commissioning of research reactors (NS-G-4.1), and 4) Maintenance, periodic testing and inspection of research reactors (NS-G-4.2). There 5 draft safety standards: 1) Operational limits and conditions and operating procedures for research reactors (DS261), 2) The operating organization and the recruitment, training and qualification of personnel for research reactors (DS325), 3) Radiation protection and radioactive waste management in the design and operation of research reactors (DS340), 4) Core management and fuel handling at research reactors (DS350), and 5) Grading the application of safety requirements for research reactors (DS351). There are 2 planned safety standards, one concerning the ageing management for research reactor and the second deals with the control and instrumentation of research reactors

  6. Containment Loads Analysis for CANDU6 Reactor using CONTAIN 2.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae H.; Yang, Chae Y.

    2013-01-01

    The containment plays an important role to limit the release of radioactive materials to the environment during design basis accidents (DBAs). Therefore, the containment has to maintain its integrity under DBA conditions. Generally, a containment functional DBA evaluation includes calculations of the key containment loads, i. e., pressure and temperature effects associated with a postulated large rupture of the primary or secondary coolant system piping. In this paper, the behavior of containment pressure and temperature was evaluated for loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs) of the Wolsong unit 1 in order to assess the applicability of CONTAIN 2.0 code for the containment loads analysis of the CANDU6 reactor. The containment pressure and temperature of the Wolsong unit 1 were evaluated using the CONTAIN 2.0 code and the results were compared with the CONTEMPT4 code. The peak pressure and temperature calculated by CONTAIN 2.0 agreed well with those of CONTEMPT4 calculation. The overall result of this analysis shows that the CONTAIN 2.0 code can apply to the containment loads analysis for the CANDU6 reactor

  7. Mass transfer of ammonia escape and CO2 absorption in CO2 capture using ammonia solution in bubbling reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Shuangchen; Chen, Gongda; Zhu, Sijie; Han, Tingting; Yu, Weijing

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Mass transfer coefficient models of ammonia escape were built. • Influences of temperature, inlet CO 2 and ammonia concentration were studied. • Mass transfer coefficients of ammonia escape and CO 2 absorption were obtained. • Studies can provide the basic data as a reference guideline for process application. - Abstract: The mass transfer of CO 2 capture using ammonia solution in the bubbling reactor was studied; according to double film theory, the mass transfer coefficient models and interface area model were built. Through our experiments, the overall volumetric mass transfer coefficients were obtained, while the interface areas in unit volume were estimated. The volumetric mass transfer coefficients of ammonia escaping during the experiment were 1.39 × 10 −5 –4.34 × 10 −5 mol/(m 3 s Pa), and the volumetric mass transfer coefficients of CO 2 absorption were 2.86 × 10 −5 –17.9 × 10 −5 mol/(m 3 s Pa). The estimated interface area of unit volume in the bubbling reactor ranged from 75.19 to 256.41 m 2 /m 3 , making the bubbling reactor a viable choice to obtain higher mass transfer performance than the packed tower or spraying tower.

  8. SoLid: Search for Oscillations with Lithium-6 Detector at the SCK-CEN BR2 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, G.; Beaumont, W.; Buhour, J. M.; Coupé, B.; Cucoanes, A. S.; D'Hondt, J.; Durand, D.; Fallot, M.; Fresneau, S.; Giot, L.; Guillon, B.; Guilloux, G.; Janssen, X.; Kalcheva, S.; Koonen, E.; Labare, M.; Moortgat, C.; Pronost, G.; Raes, L.; Ryckbosch, D.; Ryder, N.; Shitov, Y.; Vacheret, A.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Weber, A.; Yermia, F.

    2016-04-01

    Sterile neutrinos have been considered as a possible explanation for the recent reactor and Gallium anomalies arising from reanalysis of reactor flux and calibration data of previous neutrino experiments. A way to test this hypothesis is to look for distortions of the anti-neutrino energy caused by oscillation from active to sterile neutrino at close stand-off (˜ 6- 8m) of a compact reactor core. Due to the low rate of anti-neutrino interactions the main challenge in such measurement is to control the high level of gamma rays and neutron background. The SoLid experiment is a proposal to search for active-to-sterile anti-neutrino oscillation at very short baseline of the SCK•CEN BR2 research reactor. This experiment uses a novel approach to detect anti-neutrino with a highly segmented detector based on Lithium-6. With the combination of high granularity, high neutron-gamma discrimination using 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) and precise localization of the Inverse Beta Decay products, a better experimental sensitivity can be achieved compared to other state-of-the-art technology. This compact system requires minimum passive shielding allowing for very close stand off to the reactor. The experimental set up of the SoLid experiment and the BR2 reactor will be presented. The new principle of neutrino detection and the detector design with expected performance will be described. The expected sensitivity to new oscillations of the SoLid detector as well as the first measurements made with the 8 kg prototype detector deployed at the BR2 reactor in 2013-2014 will be reported.

  9. A novel condensation reactor for efficient CO2 to methanol conversion for storage of renewable electric energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Martin Johan; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik

    2015-01-01

    A novel reactor design for the conversion of CO2 and H2 to methanol is developed. The conversion limitations because of thermodynamic equilibrium are bypassed via in situ condensation of a water/methanol mixture. Two temperatures zones inside the reactor ensure optimal catalyst activity (high

  10. Quality assurance in the project of RECH-2 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goycolea Donoso, C.; Nino de Zepeda Schele, A.

    1989-01-01

    The implantation of a Quality Assurance Program for the design, supply, construction, installation, and testing of the RECH-2 research reactor, is described in this paper. The obtained results, demonstrate that a Quality Assurance Program constitutes a suitable mean to assure that the installation complies with the safety and reliability requirements. (author)

  11. Set of rules SOR 2 licensing of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-05-01

    This is the set of rules promulgated by the Israel Atomic Energy Commission pursuant to the Supervision of Supplies and Services Law 5718-1957, Order regarding Supervision of Nuclear Reactors (1974) Chapter 3: Permits, to provide for the Licensing of Nuclear Reactors. (B.G.)

  12. Measurement of thermal conductivity of sintered UO{sub 2} in the reactor; Merenje toplotne provodljivosti sinterovanog UO{sub 2} u reaktoru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katanic, J; Stevanovic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1965-10-15

    Thermal conductivity is considered one of the fundamental properties of sintered UO{sub 2} fuel. Samples should be tested under real core conditions. This paper covers the methods and instruments for thermal conductivity measurement of UO{sub 2} samples in the reactor core, measurements outside the core under conditions similar to those in the core and outside the core after irradiation. Fuel samples are placed in capsules for irradiation in the reactor in-core loops.

  13. Geomechanical Analysis of Underground Coal Gasification Reactor Cool Down for Subsequent CO2 Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarhosis, Vasilis; Yang, Dongmin; Kempka, Thomas; Sheng, Yong

    2013-04-01

    Underground coal gasification (UCG) is an efficient method for the conversion of conventionally unmineable coal resources into energy and feedstock. If the UCG process is combined with the subsequent storage of process CO2 in the former UCG reactors, a near-zero carbon emission energy source can be realised. This study aims to present the development of a computational model to simulate the cooling process of UCG reactors in abandonment to decrease the initial high temperature of more than 400 °C to a level where extensive CO2 volume expansion due to temperature changes can be significantly reduced during the time of CO2 injection. Furthermore, we predict the cool down temperature conditions with and without water flushing. A state of the art coupled thermal-mechanical model was developed using the finite element software ABAQUS to predict the cavity growth and the resulting surface subsidence. In addition, the multi-physics computational software COMSOL was employed to simulate the cavity cool down process which is of uttermost relevance for CO2 storage in the former UCG reactors. For that purpose, we simulated fluid flow, thermal conduction as well as thermal convection processes between fluid (water and CO2) and solid represented by coal and surrounding rocks. Material properties for rocks and coal were obtained from extant literature sources and geomechanical testings which were carried out on samples derived from a prospective demonstration site in Bulgaria. The analysis of results showed that the numerical models developed allowed for the determination of the UCG reactor growth, roof spalling, surface subsidence and heat propagation during the UCG process and the subsequent CO2 storage. It is anticipated that the results of this study can support optimisation of the preparation procedure for CO2 storage in former UCG reactors. The proposed scheme was discussed so far, but not validated by a coupled numerical analysis and if proved to be applicable it could

  14. Analysis of SBO accident and natural circulation of 49-2 swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yuanyuan; Liu Tiancai; Sun Wei

    2012-01-01

    The transient thermal hydraulic characteristics of 49-2 Swimming Pool Reactor (SPR) were analyzed by RELAP5/MOD3.3 code to verify the capability of natural circulation and minus reactivity feedback for accident mitigation under the condition of station blackout (SBO). Then, the effects on accident consequence and sequence for core channels and primary pumps were briefly discussed. The calculation results show that the reactor can be shutdown by the effect of minus reactivity feedback, and the residual heat can be removed through the stable natural circulation. Therefore, it demonstrates that the 49-2 SPR is safe during the accident of SBO. (authors)

  15. Status of IVO-FR2-Vg7 experiment for irradiation of fast reactor fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbel, H.; Kummerer, K.; Bojarsky, K.; Lopez Jimenez, J.; Otero de la Gandara, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Report on the Seminar celebrated in Madrid between KfK (Karlsruhe) and JEN (Madrid) concerning a Joint Irradiation Program of Fast Reactor Fuel Rods. The design of fuel rods in general is defined, and, in particular of those with a density 94% DT and diameter 7.6 mm up to a burn-up of 7% FIMA, to be irradiated in the FR2 Reactor (Karlsruhe). Together with the design of NaK and single-wall capsules used in this irradiation, other possibilities of irradiation in the reactor will also be described. (auth.)

  16. CANDU reactors with reactor grade plutonium/thorium carbide fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahin, Suemer [Atilim Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Faculty of Engineering; Khan, Mohammed Javed; Ahmed, Rizwan [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan); Gazi Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Faculty of Technology

    2011-08-15

    Reactor grade (RG) plutonium, accumulated as nuclear waste of commercial reactors can be re-utilized in CANDU reactors. TRISO type fuel can withstand very high fuel burn ups. On the other hand, carbide fuel would have higher neutronic and thermal performance than oxide fuel. In the present work, RG-PuC/ThC TRISO fuels particles are imbedded body-centered cubic (BCC) in a graphite matrix with a volume fraction of 60%. The fuel compacts conform to the dimensions of sintered CANDU fuel compacts are inserted in 37 zircolay rods to build the fuel zone of a bundle. Investigations have been conducted on a conventional CANDU reactor based on GENTILLYII design with 380 fuel bundles in the core. Three mixed fuel composition have been selected for numerical calculation; (1) 10% RG-PuC + 90% ThC; (2) 30% RG-PuC + 70% ThC; (3) 50% RG-PuC + 50% ThC. Initial reactor criticality values for the modes (1), (2) and (3) are calculated as k{sub {infinity}}{sub ,0} = 1.4848, 1.5756 and 1.627, respectively. Corresponding operation lifetimes are {proportional_to} 2.7, 8.4, and 15 years and with burn ups of {proportional_to} 72 000, 222 000 and 366 000 MW.d/tonne, respectively. Higher initial plutonium charge leads to higher burn ups and longer operation periods. In the course of reactor operation, most of the plutonium will be incinerated. At the end of life, remnants of plutonium isotopes would survive; and few amounts of uranium, americium and curium isotopes would be produced. (orig.)

  17. Revision of fast reactor group constant set JFS-3-J2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Hideki; Kaneko, Kunio.

    1989-10-01

    To improve the fast reactor group constant set JFS-3-J2 to be applicable for high burnup reactor calculations, group constants for 155 fission product nuclides and the lumped group cross sections for four mother fission isotopes of U-235, U-238, Pu-239 and Pu-241 have been generated. Furthermore, the group constants for higher actinides such as Am and Cm have been produced on the basis of the JENDL-2 nuclear data, so as to be able to use for TRU-transmutation calculations. Benchmark test of this revised set has been performed by analysing the 21 fast critical experimental assemblies. Benchmark calculation system based on one-dimensional Sn-method has been developed to investigate the accuracy of one-dimensional diffusion calculations. Significant difference between the results obtained with the diffusion and transport calculations was observed for small cores and the assemblies with iron or nickel reflector. (author)

  18. UCLA program in reactor studies: The ARIES tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The ARIES research program is a multi-institutional effort to develop several visions of tokamak reactors with enhanced economic, safety, and environmental features. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Four ARIES visions are currently planned for the ARIES program. The ARIES-1 design is a DT-burning reactor based on ''modest'' extrapolations from the present tokamak physics database and relies on either existing technology or technology for which trends are already in place, often in programs outside fusion. ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 are DT-burning reactors which will employ potential advances in physics. The ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs employ the same plasma core but have two distinct fusion power core designs; ARIES-2 utilize the lithium as the coolant and breeder and vanadium alloys as the structural material while ARIES-4 utilizes helium is the coolant, solid tritium breeders, and SiC composite as the structural material. Lastly, the ARIES-3 is a conceptual D- 3 He reactor. During the period Dec. 1, 1990 to Nov. 31, 1991, most of the ARIES activity has been directed toward completing the technical work for the ARIES-3 design and documenting the results and findings. We have also completed the documentation for the ARIES-1 design and presented the results in various meetings and conferences. During the last quarter, we have initiated the scoping phase for ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs

  19. N2O Catalytic Decomposition – from Laboratory Experiment to Industry Reactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Obalová, L.; Jirátová, Květa; Karásková, K.; Chromčáková, Ž.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 191, č. 1 (2012), s. 116-120 ISSN 0920-5861 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01020336 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : N2O * catalytic decomposition * fixed bed reactor Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.980, year: 2012

  20. Nuclear Reactor RA Safety Report, Vol. 4, Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    RA research reactor is thermal heavy water moderated and cooled reactor. Metal uranium 2% enriched fuel elements were used at the beginning of its operation. Since 1976, 80% enriched uranium oxide dispersed in aluminium fuel elements were gradually introduced into the core and are the only ones presently used. Reactor core is cylindrical, having diameter 40 cm and 123 cm high. Reaktor core is made up of 82 fuel elements in aluminium channels, lattice is square, lattice pitch 13 cm. Reactor vessel is cylindrical made of 8 mm thick aluminium, inside diameter 140 cm and 5.5 m high surrounded with neutron reflector and biological shield. There is no containment, the reactor building is playing the shielding role. Three pumps enable circulation of heavy water in the primary cooling circuit. Degradation of heavy water is prevented by helium cover gas. Control rods with cadmium regulate the reactor operation. There are eleven absorption rods, seven are used for long term reactivity compensation, two for automatic power regulation and two for safety shutdown. Total anti reactivity of the rods amounts to 24%. RA reactor is equipped with a number of experimental channels, 45 vertical (9 in the core), 34 in the graphite reflector and two in the water biological shield; and six horizontal channels regularly distributed in the core. This volume include detailed description of systems and components of the RA reactor, reactor core parameters, thermal hydraulics of the core, fuel elements, fuel elements handling equipment, fuel management, and experimental devices [sr

  1. Alteration of installation of reactors (alteration of No.1 and No.2 reactor facilities) in Oi Power Station, Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Commission reported to the Minister of International Trade and Industry on October 27, 1983, that the technical capability was recognized to be adequate, and the safety after the alteration of the installation of reactors was judged to be ensured. At the time of deliberation, the guidelines for examining the safety design and safety evaluation of LWR facilities for power generation were used. Regarding the change of the degree of enrichment of replacement fuel from 3.2 to 3.4 wt.%, the limiting conditions are satisfied in the replacement core, and the nuclear design is appropriate. Eight test fuel assemblies using UO 2 pellets containing gadolinia are charged in the core of No.2 reactor, and the irradiation of two cycles is carried out. As the result of the safety examination regarding this test, the propriety of the nuclear design and mechanical design of the test fuel assemblies was confirmed. This alteration does not exert influence on the result of safety analysis made so far. This report was decided by the Committee on Examination of Reactor Safety based on the conclusion of No.26 subcommittee. (Kako, I.)

  2. Reactor physics tests of TRIGA Mark-II Reactor in Ljubljana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravnik, M.; Mele, I.; Trkov, A.; Rant, J.; Glumac, B.; Dimic, V.

    2008-01-01

    TRIGA Mark-II Reactor in Ljubljana was recently reconstructed. The reconstruction consisted mainly of replacing the grid plates, the control rod mechanisms and the control unit. The standard type control rods were replaced by the fuelled follower type, the central grid location (A ring) was adapted for fuel element insertion, the triangular cutouts were introduced in the upper plate design. However, the main novelty in reactor physics and operational features of the reactor was the installation of a pulse rod. Having no previous operational experience in pulsing, a detailed and systematic sequence of tests was defined in order to check the predicted design parameters of the reactor with measurements. The following experiments are treated in this paper: initial criticality, excess reactivity measurements, control rod worth measurement, fuel temperature distribution, fuel temperature reactivity coefficient, pulse parameters measurement (peak power, prompt energy, peak temperature). Flux distributions in steady state and pulse mode were measured as well, however, they are treated only briefly due to the volume of the results. The experiments were performed with completely fresh fuel of 12 w% enriched Standard Stainless Steel type. The core configuration was uniform (one fuel element type, including fuelled followers) and compact (no irradiation channels or gaps), as such being particularly convenient for testing the computer codes for TRIGA reactor calculations. Comparison of analytical predictions, obtained with WIMS, SLXTUS, TRIGAP and PULSTRI codes to measured values showed agreement within the error of the measurement and calculation. The paper has the following contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Steady State Experiments; 2.1. Core loading and critical experiment; 2.2. Flux range determination for tests at zero power; 2.3. Digital reactivity meter checkout; 2.4. Control rod worth measurements; 2.5. Excess reactivity measurement; 2.6. Thermal power calibration; 2

  3. Plasma-catalyst hybrid reactor with CeO2/γ-Al2O3 for benzene decomposition with synergetic effect and nano particle by-product reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Lingai; Chen, Zhizong; Wu, Xinyue; Tang, Xiujuan; Yao, Shuiliang; Zhang, Xuming; Jiang, Boqiong; Han, Jingyi; Wu, Zuliang; Lu, Hao; Nozaki, Tomohiro

    2018-04-05

    A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) catalyst hybrid reactor with CeO 2 /γ-Al 2 O 3 catalyst balls was investigated for benzene decomposition at atmospheric pressure and 30 °C. At an energy density of 37-40 J/L, benzene decomposition was as high as 92.5% when using the hybrid reactor with 5.0wt%CeO 2 /γ-Al 2 O 3 ; while it was 10%-20% when using a normal DBD reactor without a catalyst. Benzene decomposition using the hybrid reactor was almost the same as that using an O 3 catalyst reactor with the same CeO 2 /γ-Al 2 O 3 catalyst, indicating that O 3 plays a key role in the benzene decomposition. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis showed that O 3 adsorption on CeO 2 /γ-Al 2 O 3 promotes the production of adsorbed O 2 - and O 2 2‒ , which contribute benzene decomposition over heterogeneous catalysts. Nano particles as by-products (phenol and 1,4-benzoquinone) from benzene decomposition can be significantly reduced using the CeO 2 /γ-Al 2 O 3 catalyst. H 2 O inhibits benzene decomposition; however, it improves CO 2 selectivity. The deactivated CeO 2 /γ-Al 2 O 3 catalyst can be regenerated by performing discharges at 100 °C and 192-204 J/L. The decomposition mechanism of benzene over CeO 2 /γ-Al 2 O 3 catalyst was proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. COOLOD-N2: a computer code, for the analyses of steady-state thermal-hydraulics in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminaga, Masanori

    1994-03-01

    The COOLOD-N2 code provides a capability for the analyses of the steady-state thermal-hydraulics of research reactors. This code is revised version of the COOLOD-N code, and is applicable not only for research reactors in which plate-type fuel is adopted, but also for research reactors in which rod-type fuel is adopted. In the code, subroutines to calculate temperature distribution in rod-type fuel have been newly added to the COOLOD-N code. The COOLOD-N2 code can calculate fuel temperatures under both forced convection cooling mode and natural convection cooling mode as well as COOLOD-N code. In the COOLOD-N2 code, a 'Heat Transfer package' is used for calculating heat transfer coefficient, DNB heat flux etc. The 'Heat Transfer package' is subroutine program and is especially developed for research reactors in which plate-type fuel is adopted. In case of rod-type fuel, DNB heat flux is calculated by both the 'Heat Transfer package' and Lund DNB heat flux correlation which is popular for TRIGA reactor. The COOLOD-N2 code also has a capability of calculating ONB temperature, the heat flux at onset of flow instability as well as DNB heat flux. (author)

  5. Ethanol production by immobilized yeast and its CO2 gas effects on a packed bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, G M; Choi, C Y; Choi, Y D; Han, M H

    1982-10-01

    Immobilised yeast trapped in an alginate matrix demonstrated maximum activity at 30 degrees C and showed no pH effect between 3 and 7. Substrate inhibition was observed at glucose concentrations above 8% but the immobilised cells retained 70% of their maximum activity at 20% glucose concentration. The operation stability of immobilised cells was lower in simple glucose solution than in the activation medium in which only 20% of the activity was lost after 10 days operation. Inactivated immobilised yeast beads were reactivated by incubation in activation medium without a significant increase in cell numbers in a bead. During the operation of the immobilised yeast in a packed bed reactor, CO/sub 2/ gas accumulation adversely affected the reactor performance. An ideal plus flow reactor, not taking into account the formation of CO/sub 2/ gas bubbles and the presence of mass trasnfer resistance, was simulated using a kinetic model for the production of ethanol and the simulation results were compared with the actual reactor performance to determine the CO/sub 2/ gas effect, quantitatively. Up to 45% of the substrate conversion was lost due to the accumulation of CO/sub 2/ gas bubbles in all cases. (Refs. 21).

  6. Power Quality Problems Mitigation using Dynamic Voltage Restorer in Egypt Thermal Research Reactor (ETRR-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandil, T.; Ayad, N.M.; Abdel Haleam, A.; Mahmoud, M.

    2013-01-01

    Egypt thermal research reactor (ETRR-2) was subjected to several Power Quality Problems such as voltage sags/swells, harmonics distortion, and short interruption. ETRR-2 encompasses a wide range of loads which are very sensitive to voltage variations and this leads to several unplanned shutdowns of the reactor due to trigger of the Reactor Protection System (RPS). The Dynamic Voltage Restorer (DVR) has recently been introduced to protect sensitive loads from voltage sags and other voltage disturbances. It is considered as one of the most efficient and effective solution. Its appeal includes smaller size and fast dynamic response to the disturbance. This paper describes a proposal of a DVR to improve power quality in ETRR-2 electrical distribution systems . The control of the compensation voltage is based on d-q-o algorithm. Simulation is carried out by Matlab/Simulink to verify the performance of the proposed method

  7. Modernization of turbine control system and reactor control system in Almaraz 1 and 2; MOdernizacion de los sistemas de control de turbina y del reactor en Almaraz 1 y 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulido, C.; Diez, J.; Carrasco, J. A.; Lopez, L.

    2005-07-01

    The replacement of the Turbine Control System and Reactor Control System are part of the Almaraz modernization program for the Instrumentation and Control. For these upgrades Almaraz has selected the Ovation Platform that provides open architecture and easy expansion to other systems, these platforms is highly used in many nuclear and thermal plants around the world. One of the main objective for this project were to minimize the impact on the installation and operation of the plant, for that reason the project is implemented in two phases, Turbine Control upgrade and Reactor Control upgrade. Another important objective was to increase the reliability of the control system making them fully fault tolerant to single failures. The turbine Control System has been installed in Units 1 and 2 while the Reactor Control System will be installed in 2006 and 2007 outages. (Author)

  8. TRIGA reactor main systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Villa, M.

    2007-01-01

    This module describes the main systems of low power (<2 MW) and higher power (≥2 MW) TRIGA reactors. The most significant difference between the two is that forced reactor cooling and an emergency core cooling system are generally required for the higher power TRIGA reactors. However, those TRIGA reactors that are designed to be operated above 3 MW also use a TRIGA fuel that is specifically designed for those higher power outputs (3 to 14 MW). Typical values are given for the respective systems although each TRIGA facility will have unique characteristics that may only be determined by the experienced facility operators. Due to the inherent wide scope of these research reactor facilities construction and missions, this training module covers those systems found at most operating TRIGA reactor facilities but may also discuss non-standard equipment that was found to be operationally useful although not necessarily required. (author)

  9. Study of the obtainment of Mo_2C by gas-solid reaction in a fixed and rotary bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, C.P.B. de; Souza, C.P. de; Souto, M.V.M.; Barbosa, C.M.; Frota, A.V.V.M.

    2016-01-01

    Carbides' synthesis via gas-solid reaction overcomes many of the difficulties found in other processes, requiring lower temperatures and reaction times than traditional metallurgic routes, for example. In carbides' synthesis in fixed bed reactors (FB) the solid precursor is permeated by the reducing/carburizing gas stream forming a packed bed without mobility. The use of a rotary kiln reactor (RK) adds a mixing character to this process, changing its fluid-particle dynamics. In this work ammonium molybdate was subjected to carbo-reduction reaction (CH4 / H2) in both reactors under the same gas flow (15L / h) and temperature (660 ° C) for 180 minutes. Complete conversion was observed Mo2C (dp = 18.9nm modal particles sizes' distribution) in the fixed bed reactor. In the RK reactor this conversion was only partial (∼ 40%) and Mo2C and MoO3 (34nm dp = bimodal) could be observed on the produced XRD pattern. Partial conversion was attributed to the need to use higher solids loading in the reactor CR (50% higher) to avoid solids to centrifuge. (author)

  10. 2-DB, 2-D Multigroup Diffusion, X-Y, R-Theta, Hexagonal Geometry Fast Reactor, Criticality Search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, W.W. Jr.; Hardie, R.W.; Hirons, T.J.; O'Dell, R.D.

    1969-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: 2DB is a flexible, two- dimensional (x-y, r-z, r-theta, hex geometry) diffusion code for use in fast reactor analyses. The code can be used to: (a) Compute fuel burnup using a flexible material shuffling scheme. (b) Perform criticality searches on time absorption (alpha), material concentrations, and region dimensions using a regular or adjoint model. Criticality searches can be performed during burnup to compensate for fuel depletion. (c) Compute flux distributions for an arbitrary extraneous source. 2 - Method of solution: Standard source-iteration techniques are used. Group re-balancing and successive over-relaxation with line inversion are used to accelerate convergence. Material burnup is by reactor zone. The burnup rate is determined by the zone and energy (group) averaged cross sections which are recomputed after each time-step. The isotopic chains, which can contain any number of isotopes, are formed by the user. The code does not contain built-in or internal chains. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Since variable dimensioning is employed, no simple bounds can be stated. The current 1108 version, however, is nominally restricted to 50 energy groups in a 65 K memory. In the 6600 version the power fraction, average burnup rate, and breeding ratio calculations are limited to reactors with a maximum of 50 zones

  11. Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, Bojan [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Memmott, Matthew [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States); Boy, Guy [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States); Charit, Indrajit [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Manera, Annalisa [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Downar, Thomas [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lee, John [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Muldrow, Lycurgus [Morehouse College, Atlanta, GA (United States); Upadhyaya, Belle [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hines, Wesley [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Haghighat, Alierza [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2017-10-02

    This final report summarizes results of the multi-year effort performed during the period 2/2013- 12/2016 under the DOE NEUP IRP Project “Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactors (I2S-LWR)”. The goal of the project was to develop a concept of a 1 GWe PWR with integral configuration and inherent safety features, at the same time accounting for lessons learned from the Fukushima accident, and keeping in mind the economic viability of the new concept. Essentially (see Figure 1-1) the project aimed to implement attractive safety features, typically found only in SMRs, to a larger power (1 GWe) reactor, to address the preference of some utilities in the US power market for unit power level on the order of 1 GWe.

  12. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Vol. 4, No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-04-01

    This summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Resource Management

  13. Experimental estimations of the kinetics parameters of the IBR-2M reactor by stochastic noises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepelyshev, Yu.N.; Tajybov, L.A.; Garibov, A.A.; Mekhtieva, R.N.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental investigations of stochastic fluctuations of pulse energy of the IBR-2M reactor have been carried out which allowed us to obtain some of the parameters of the reactor kinetics. At different levels of average power a sequence of values of pulse energy was recorded with the calculation of the distribution parameters. An ionization chamber with boron installed near the active zone was used as a neutron detector. The research results allowed us to estimate the average lifetime of prompt neutrons τ = (6.53±0.2)·10 -8 s, absolute power of the reactor and intensity of the source of spontaneous neutrons S sp ≤(6.72±0.12)·10 6 s -1 . It was shown that the experimental results are close to the calculated ones

  14. Enhancements to the SLOWPOKE-2 nuclear research reactor at the Royal Military College of Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hungler, P.C.; Andrews, M.T.; Weir, R.D.; Nielson, K.S.; Chan, P.K.; Bennett, L.G.I., E-mail: paul.hungler@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    In 1985 a Safe Low Power C(K)ritical Experiment (SLOWPOKE) nuclear research reactor was installed at the Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC). The reactor at nominally 20 kW thermal was named SLOWPOKE-2 and the core was designed to have a total of 198 fuel pins with Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel (19.89% U-235). Installation of the reactor was intended to provide an education tool for members of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) and an affordable neutron source for the application of neutron activation analysis (NAA) and radioisotope production. Today, the SLOWPOKE-2 at RMCC continues to be a key education tool for undergraduate and post-graduate students and successfully conducts NAA and isotope production as per its original design intent. RMCC has significantly upgraded the facility and instruments to develop capabilities such as delayed neutron and gamma counting (DNGC) and neutron imaging, including 2D thermal neutron radiography and 3D thermal neutron tomography. These unique nuclear capabilities have been applied to relevant issues in the CAF. The analog control system originally installed in 1985 has been removed and replaced in 2001 by the SLOWPOKE Integrated Reactor Control and Instrumentation System (SIRCIS) which is a digital controller. This control system continues to evolve with SIRCIS V2 currently in operation. The continual enhancement of the facility, instruments and systems at the SLOWPOKE-2 at RMCC will be discussed, including an update on RMCC's refueling plan. (author)

  15. Enhancements to the SLOWPOKE-2 nuclear research reactor at the Royal Military College of Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hungler, P.C.; Andrews, M.T.; Weir, R.D.; Nielson, K.S.; Chan, P.K.; Bennett, L.G.I.

    2014-01-01

    In 1985 a Safe Low Power C(K)ritical Experiment (SLOWPOKE) nuclear research reactor was installed at the Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC). The reactor at nominally 20 kW thermal was named SLOWPOKE-2 and the core was designed to have a total of 198 fuel pins with Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel (19.89% U-235). Installation of the reactor was intended to provide an education tool for members of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) and an affordable neutron source for the application of neutron activation analysis (NAA) and radioisotope production. Today, the SLOWPOKE-2 at RMCC continues to be a key education tool for undergraduate and post-graduate students and successfully conducts NAA and isotope production as per its original design intent. RMCC has significantly upgraded the facility and instruments to develop capabilities such as delayed neutron and gamma counting (DNGC) and neutron imaging, including 2D thermal neutron radiography and 3D thermal neutron tomography. These unique nuclear capabilities have been applied to relevant issues in the CAF. The analog control system originally installed in 1985 has been removed and replaced in 2001 by the SLOWPOKE Integrated Reactor Control and Instrumentation System (SIRCIS) which is a digital controller. This control system continues to evolve with SIRCIS V2 currently in operation. The continual enhancement of the facility, instruments and systems at the SLOWPOKE-2 at RMCC will be discussed, including an update on RMCC's refueling plan. (author)

  16. Collective occupational dose for nuclear reactors of the 2., 3. and 4. generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidez, J.; Saturnin, A.

    2016-01-01

    In France during reactor operation the individual occupational doses are collected and recorded according to the law. When you sum up all the individual doses you get the yearly collective dose expressed in Man.Sv/year. This piece of information can be used to make comparisons between various types of reactors and between reactors of the same type. The results show a steady decrease of the collective dose for all types of reactors over the time except for CANDU reactors for which a slight increase of the dose has appeared since the years 1996-1998. The decrease is due to the continuous improvement of reactor operating and to changes in the reactor design. There is also a constant gap over time between the collective dose for a BWR reactor (1.12 Man.Sv/y) and a PWR reactor 0.60 Man.Sv/y), this gap is certainly due to N 16 nuclide that is created in the primary circuit and transported to turbines in the case of a BWR reactor. For sodium-cooled fast reactors (RNR-Na) the collective dose is below 0.40 Man.Sv/y except for the BN-600 reactor. (A.C.)

  17. Research reactor DHRUVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veeraraghaven, N.

    1990-01-01

    DHRUVA, a 100 MWt research reactor located at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, attained first criticality during August, 1985. The reactor is fuelled with natural uranium and is cooled, moderated and reflected by heavy water. Maximum thermal neutron flux obtained in the reactor is 1.8 X 10 14 n/cm 2 /sec. Some of the salient design features of the reactor are discussed in this paper. Some important features of the reactor coolant system, regulation and protection systems and experimental facilities are presented. A short account of the engineered safety features is provided. Some of the problems that were faced during commissioning and the initial phase of power operation are also dealt upon

  18. Generation III+ Reactor Portfolio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-03-01

    While the power generation needs of utilities are unique and diverse, they are all faced with the double challenge of meeting growing electricity needs while curbing CO 2 emissions. To answer these diverse needs and help tackle this challenge, AREVA has developed several reactor models which are briefly described in this document: The EPR TM Reactor: designed on the basis of the Konvoi (Germany) and N4 (France) reactors, the EPRTM reactor is an evolutionary model designed to achieve best-in-class safety and operational performance levels. The ATMEA1 TM reactor: jointly designed by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and AREVA through ATMEA, their common company. This reactor design benefits from the competencies and expertise of the two mother companies, which have commissioned close to 130 reactor units. The KERENA TM reactor: Designed on the basis of the most recent German BWR reactors (Gundremmingen) the KERENA TM reactor relies on proven technology while also including innovative, yet thoroughly tested, features. The optimal combination of active and passive safety systems for a boiling water reactor achieves a very low probability of severe accident

  19. Safety of nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacPherson, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    Safety is the major public issue to be resolved or accommodated if nuclear power is to have a future. Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA) of accidental releases of low-level radiation, the spread and activity of radiation in populated areas, and the impacts on public health from exposure evolved from the earlier Rasmussen Reactor Safety Study. Applications of the PRA technique have identified design peculiarities in specific reactors, thus increasing reactor safety and establishing a quide for evaluating reactor regulations. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission and reactor vendors must share with utilities the responsibility for reactor safety in the US and for providing reasonable assurance to the public. This entails persuasive public education and information that with safety a top priority, changes now being made in light water reactor hardware and operations will be adequate. 17 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  20. Proceedings of 2. Yugoslav symposium on reactor physics, Part 1, Herceg Novi (Yugoslavia), 27-29 Sep 1966; 2. Jugoslovenski simpozijum iz reaktorske fizike, Deo 1, Herceg Novi (Yugoslavia), 27-29 Sep 1966

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1966-07-01

    This Volume 1 of the Proceedings of 2. Yugoslav symposium on reactor physics includes nine papers dealing with the following topics: reactor kinetics, reactor noise, neutron detection, methods for calculating neutron flux spatial and time dependence in the reactor cores of both heavy and light water moderated experimental reactors, calculation of reactor lattice parameters, reactor instrumentation, reactor monitoring systems; measuring methods of reactor parameters; reactor experimental facilities.

  1. Calibration of RB reactor power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotic, O.; Markovic, H.; Ninkovic, M.; Strugar, P.; Dimitrijevic, Z.; Takac, S.; Stefanovic, D.; Kocic, A.; Vranic, S.

    1976-09-01

    The first and only calibration of RB reactor power was done in 1962, and the obtained calibration ratio was used irrespective of the lattice pitch and core configuration. Since the RB reactor is being prepared for operation at higher power levels it was indispensable to reexamine the calibration ratio, estimate its dependence on the lattice pitch, critical level of heavy water and thickness of the side reflector. It was necessary to verify the reliability of control and dosimetry instruments, and establish neutron and gamma dose dependence on reactor power. Two series of experiments were done in June 1976. First series was devoted to tests of control and dosimetry instrumentation and measurements of radiation in the RB reactor building dependent on reactor power. Second series covered measurement of thermal and epithermal neuron fluxes in the reactor core and calculation of reactor power. Four different reactor cores were chosen for these experiments. Reactor pitches were 8, 8√2, and 16 cm with 40, 52 and 82 fuel channels containing 2% enriched fuel. Obtained results and analysis of these results are presented in this document with conclusions related to reactor safe operation

  2. Status of French reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballagny, A.

    1997-01-01

    The status of French reactors is reviewed. The ORPHEE and RHF reactors can not be operated with a LEU fuel which would be limited to 4.8 g U/cm 3 . The OSIRIS reactor has already been converted to LEU. It will use U 3 Si 2 as soon as its present stock of UO 2 fuel is used up, at the end of 1994. The decision to close down the SILOE reactor in the near future is not propitious for the start of a conversion process. The REX 2000 reactor, which is expected to be commissioned in 2005, will use LEU (except if the fast neutrons core option is selected). Concerning the end of the HEU fuel cycle, the best option is reprocessing followed by conversion of the reprocessed uranium to LEU

  3. Physical measurements at the RA reactor related to VISA-2, e. Measurements of flux and reactivity during RA reactor operation and exploitation; Fizicka merenja na reaktoru RA u vezi projekta VISA-2, e. Pracenje fluksa i reaktivnosti u toku eksploatacije reaktora RA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markovic, H [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-05-15

    This report includes the following: characteristics of neutron flux in vertical experimental channels of the RA reactor; characteristics of neutron flux in VISA-2 channels; reactivity changes in the reactor during VISA-2 irradiation including calibration of control rods.

  4. Passive Decay Heat Removal System Options for S-CO2 Cooled Micro Modular Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Jangsik; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Lee, Jeong Ik

    2014-01-01

    To achieve modularization of whole reactor system, Micro Modular Reactor (MMR) which has been being developed in KAIST took S-CO 2 Brayton power cycle. The S-CO 2 power cycle is suitable for SMR due to high cycle efficiency, simple layout, small turbine and small heat exchanger. These characteristics of S-CO 2 power cycle enable modular reactor system and make reduced system size. The reduced size and modular system motived MMR to have mobility by large trailer. Due to minimized on-site construction by modular system, MMR can be deployed in any electricity demand, even in isolated area. To achieve the objective, fully passive safety systems of MMR were designed to have high reliability when any offsite power is unavailable. In this research, the basic concept about MMR and Passive Decay Heat Removal (PDHR) system options for MMR are presented. LOCA, LOFA, LOHS and SBO are considered as DBAs of MMR. To cope with the DBAs, passive decay heat removal system is designed. Water cooled PDHR system shows simple layout, but has CCF with reactor systems and cannot cover all DBAs. On the other hand, air cooled PDHR system with two-phase closed thermosyphon shows high reliability due to minimized CCF and is able to cope with all DBAs. Therefore, the PDHR system of MMR will follows the air-cooled PDHR system and the air cooled system will be explored

  5. A study of UO2 wafer fuel for very high-power research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, T.C.; Jankus, V.Z.; Rest, J.; Billone, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    The Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor Program is aimed at reducing fuel enrichment to 2 caramel fuel is one of the most promising new types of reduced-enrichment fuel for use in research reactors with very high power density. Parametric studies have been carried out to determine the maximum specific power attainable without significant fission-gas release for UO 2 wafers ranging from 0.75 to 1.50 mm in thickness. The results indicate that (1) all the fuel designs considered in this study are predicted not to fail under full power operation up to a burnup, of 1.9x10 21 fis/cm 3 ; (2) for all fuel designs, failure is predicted at approximately the same fuel centerline temperature for a given burnup; (3) the thinner the wafer, the wider the margin for fuel specific power between normal operation and increased-power operation leading to fuel failure; (4) increasing the coolant pressure in the reactor core could improve fuel performance by maintaining the fuel at a higher power level without failure for a given burnup; and (5) for a given power level, fuel failure will occur earlier at a higher cladding surface temperature and/or under power-cycling conditions. (author)

  6. Microstructure in Zircaloy Creep Tested in the R2 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, Kjell

    2004-12-01

    Tubular specimens of Zircaloy-4 have been creep tested in bending in the R2 reactor in Studsvik. The creep deformation in the reactor core is accelerated in comparison with creep deformation outside the reactor core. The possible mechanisms behind this behaviour are described briefly. In order to determine which the actual mechanism is, the microstructure of the material creep tested in the R2 reactor has been examined by transmission electron microscopy. Due to the bending, material subjected to both tensile and compressive stress during creep was available. Since some of the proposed mechanisms might give microstructures which are different when the material is subjected to compressive or tensile stress it was assumed that examination of both types of material would give valuable information with regard to the operating mechanism. The result of the examination was that in the as-irradiated condition there were no obvious differences detected between materials which had been deformed in tension or compression. After a heat treatment to coarsen the irradiation induced microstructure there were still no significant differences between the two types of material. However it was now observed that in addition to dislocation loops the microstructure also contained network dislocations which presumably had been invisible in the electron microscope before heat treatment due to the high density of small dislocation loops in this state. It is therefore concluded that the most probable mechanism for irradiation creep in this case is climb and glide of the network dislocations. The role of irradiation is two-fold: It accelerates climb due to the production of point defects of which more interstitials than vacancies arrive to the network dislocations stopped at an obstacles. This leads to a net climb after which a dislocation is released from the obstacle and an amount of glide takes place. The second effect is the production of loops which serve as an increasing density of

  7. In-situ stripping of H{sub 2}S in gasoil hydrodesulphurization - reactor design considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nava, J.A.O.; Krishna, R. [Amsterdam Univ., Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2004-02-01

    In order to meet future diesel specifications the sulphur content of diesel would need to be reduced to below 50 ppm. This requirement would require improved reactor configurations. In this study we examine the benefits of counter-current contacting of gas oil with H{sub 2}, over conventional co-current contacting in a trickle bed hydrodesulphurization (HDS) reactor. In counter-current contacting, we achieve in-situ stripping of H{sub 2}S from the liquid phase; this is beneficial to the HDS kinetics. A comparison simulation study shows that counter-current contacting would require about 20% lower catalyst load than co-current contacting. However, counter-current contacting of gas and liquid phases in conventionally used HDS catalysts, of 1.5 mm sizes, is not possible due to flooding limitations. The catalysts need to be housed in special wire gauze envelopes as in the catalytic bales or KATAPAK-S configurations. A preliminary hardware design of a counter-current HDS reactor using catalytic bales was carried out in order to determine the technical feasibility. Using a realistic sulphur containing feedstock, the target of 50 ppm S content of desulphurized oil could be met in a reactor of reasonable dimensions. The study also underlines the need for accurate modelling of thermal effects during desulphurization. Our study also shows that interphase mass transfer is unlikely to be a limiting factor and there is a need to develop improved reactor configurations allowing for increased catalyst loading, at the expense of gas-liquid interfacial area. (Author)

  8. Accidents of loss of flow for the ETTR-2 reactor; deterministic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Messiry, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    The main objective for reactor safety is to keep the fuel in a thermally safe condition with adequate safety margins during all operational modes (normal-abnormal and accidental states). To achieve this purpose an accident analysis of different design base accident (DBA) as loss of flow accident (LOFA), is required assessing reactor safety. The present work concerns this transients applied to Egypt Test and Research Reactor ETRR-3 (new reactor). An accident analysis code FLOWTR is developed to investigate the thermal behaviour of the core during such flow transients. The active core is simulated by two channels: 1 - hot channel (HC), and 2 - average channel (AC) representing the remainder of the core. Each channel is divided into four axial sections. The external loop, core plenums, and core chimney are simulated by different dynamic loops. The code includes modules for pump cast down, flow regimes, decay heat, temperature distributions, and feedback coefficients. FLOWTR is verified against results from RETRAN code, THERMIC code and commissioning tests for null transient case. The comparison shows a good agreement. The study indicates that for LOFA transients, provided the scram system is available, the core is shutdown safely by low flow signal (496.6 kg/s) at 1.4 s were the HC temperature reaches the maximum value, 45.64 o C after shutdown. On the other hand, if the scram system is unavailable, and at t = 47.33 s, the core flow decreases to 67.41 kg/s, the HC temperature increases to 164.02 o C, and the HC clad surface heat flux exceeds its critical value of 400.00 W/cm 2 resulting of fuel burnout. (author)

  9. Project requirements for reconstruction of the RA reactor ventilation system, Task 2.8. Measurement of radioactive iodine and other isotopes contents in the gas system of the RA reactor, Annex of the task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vujisic, Lj. et al

    1981-01-01

    This report is a supplement to the task 2.8. When planning and constructing the ventilation system, it was found that it is necessary to perform additional experiments during RA reactor operation at 2 MW power level for a longer period. In addition to the helium system, the potential source of radioactive pollutants is the space below the upper water shielding of the reactor. All the experimental and fuel channels are ending in this space. During repair and fuel exchange radioactivity can be released in this space. For that reason this space is important when planing and designing the filtration system for incidental conditions or planned dehermetisation of the reactor. The third point where radioactive isotope identification was done, was the entrance into the chimney during steady state operation and planned dehermetisation of the reactor. The following samples were measured: gas system during reactor operation at 2 MW power; entrance into the chimney during last 48 hours of reactor operation at 2 MW power; sample on the platform under the upper water shield with the opened fuel channel after the reactor shutdown; and simultaneously with the latter, measurement at the entrance to the chimney. This annex contains the list of identified radioactive isotopes, volatile and gaseous as well as concentration of volatile 131 I on the adsorbents [sr

  10. Reactor water level control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utagawa, Kazuyuki.

    1993-01-01

    A device of the present invention can effectively control fluctuation of a reactor water level upon power change by reactor core flow rate control operation. That is, (1) a feedback control section calculates a feedwater flow rate control amount based on a deviation between a set value of a reactor water level and a reactor water level signal. (2) a feed forward control section forecasts steam flow rate change based on a reactor core flow rate signal or a signal determining the reactor core flow rate, to calculate a feedwater flow rate control amount which off sets the steam flow rate change. Then, the sum of the output signal from the process (1) and the output signal from the process (2) is determined as a final feedwater flow rate control signal. With such procedures, it is possible to forecast the steam flow rate change accompanying the reactor core flow rate control operation, thereby enabling to conduct preceding feedwater flow rate control operation which off sets the reactor water level fluctuation based on the steam flow rate change. Further, a reactor water level deviated from the forecast can be controlled by feedback control. Accordingly, reactor water level fluctuation upon power exchange due to the reactor core flow rate control operation can rapidly be suppressed. (I.S.)

  11. Decontamination and decommissioning project of the TRIGA Mark-2 and 3 research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, K J; Baik, S T; Chung, U S; Jung, K H; Park, S K; Lee, B J; Kim, J K; Yang, S H

    2000-01-01

    During the review on the decommissioning plan and environmental impact assessment report by the KINS, the number of the inquired items were two hundred and fifty one, and the answers were made and sent until September 10, 1999, as the screened review results were reported to Ministry of Science and Technology(MOST) in December 14, 1999, all the reviews on the licence were over. Radioactive liquid wastes of 400 tons generated during the operation of the research reactors including reactor vessels are stored in the facility of the research reactor 1 and 2. Those liquid wastes have the low-level-radioactivity which can be discharged to the surroundings, but was wholly treated to be vaporized naturally by means of the increased numbers of the natural vaporization disposal facilities with the annual capacity of 200 tons for the purpose of the minimized environmental contamination.

  12. Study on effects of development of reactor constant in fast reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Gou

    2002-12-01

    Evaluation was carried out about an effect of development of the new generation reactor constant system that substitutes for the JFS library in fast reactor analysis. Analyzed cores were ZPPR in JUPITER critical experiment and several power reactor cores that were designed in the feasibility study. In the JUPITER analysis, large effects, over 10%, were observed in sodium void reactivity and sample Doppler reactivity. The former resulted from several factors, while the latter was due to an accurate of a resonance interaction effect between Doppler sample and core fuel. In the previous study, the effect had been evaluated in power reactor cores. The effect included an effect of corrosion of weighting spectrum because JFS-3-J3.2, which had been made with the incorrect weighting spectrum, was used in the evaluation. In the present study, JFS-3-J3.2R, which had been made with the correct weighting spectrum, was used. It was confirmed that the effect of development of reactor constant in power reactor was not as large as that in critical assembly. (author)

  13. Thermal and stress analyses of the reactor pressure vessel lower head of the Three Mile Island Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, K.; Onizawa, K.; Kurihara, R.; Kawasaki, S.; Soda, K.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal and stress analyses were performed using the finite element analysis code ABAQUS to clarify the factors which caused tears in the stainless steel liner of the reactor pressure vessel lower head of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor pressure vessel during the accident on 28 March 1979. The present analyses covered the events which occurred after approximately 20 tons of molten core material were relocated to the lower head of the reactor pressure vessel. They showed that the tensile stress was highest in the case where the relocated core material consisting of homogeneous UO 2 debris was assumed to attack the lower head and the debris was then quenched. The peak tensile stress was in the vicinity of the welded zone of the penetration nozzle. This result agrees with the findings from the examination of the TMI-2 reactor pressure vessel that major tears in the stainless steel liner were observed around two penetration nozzles of the lower head. (author)

  14. The FR 2 reactor at Karlsruhe, F.R. Germany and associated hot cell facilities. Information sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardt, P. von der; Roettger, H.

    1981-01-01

    Technical information is given on the FR 2 reactor and associated hot cell facilities, specialized irradiation devices (loops and capsules) and possibilities for post-irradiation examinations of samples. The information is presented in the form of eight information sheets under the headings: main characteristics of the reactor; utilization and specialization of the reactor; experimental facilities; neutron spectra; main characteristics of specialized irradiation devices; main characteristics of hot cell facilities; equipment and techniques available for post-irradiation examinations; utilization and specialization of the hot cell facilities

  15. Reactor physics measurements with 19-element ThOsub(2)-sup(235)UOsub(2) cluster fuel in heavy water moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, P.M.

    1985-02-01

    Low power lattice physics measurements have been performed with a single rod of 19-element thorium oxide fuel enriched with 1.45 wt. percent sub(235)UOsub(2) (93 percent enriched) in a simulated heavy water moderated and cooled power reactor core. The experiments were designed to provide data relevant to a power reactor irradiation and to obtain some basic information on the physics of uranium-thorium fuel material. Some theoretical flux calculations are summarized and show reasonable agreement with experiment

  16. The performance of ENDF/B-V.2 nuclear data for fast reactor calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, C.A.; Collins, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Calculations with ENDF/B-V.2 data have been made for twenty-five fast-spectrum integral assemblies covering a wide range of sizes and compositions. Analysis was done by transport codes with refined cross section processing methods and detailed reactor modelling. The predictions of fission rate distributions and control rod worths were emphasized for the more prototypic benchmark cores. The results show considerable improvements in agreement with experiment compared with analysis using ENDF/B-IV data, but it is apparent that significant errors remain for fast reactor design calculations

  17. TMI-2 reactor vessel and balance of plant status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    In the fall of 1988 a corporate decision was made which concentrated effort on support of reactor vessel defueling and minimized activity in balance-of-plant areas. The auxiliary and fuel handling building are in a safe/stable state but final preparations for monitored storage won't be pursued until defueling and fuel shipping are complete. In addition to dispositioning fuel, the project is actively preparing for disposal of the Accident Generated Water (2.3 million gallons) by evaporation

  18. Abatement of fluorinated compounds using a 2.45 GHz microwave plasma torch with a reverse vortex plasma reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.H.; Cho, C.H.; Shin, D.H. [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, 814-2 Oxikdo-dong, Gunsan-city, Jeollabuk-do (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Y.C., E-mail: ychong@nfri.re.kr [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, 814-2 Oxikdo-dong, Gunsan-city, Jeollabuk-do (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Y.W. [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, 814-2 Oxikdo-dong, Gunsan-city, Jeollabuk-do (Korea, Republic of); School of Advanced Green Energy and Environments, Handong Global University, Heunghae-eup, Buk-gu, Pohang-city, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • We developed a microwave plasma torch with reverse vortex reactor (RVR). • We calculated a volume fraction and temperature distribution of discharge gas and waste. • The performance of reverse vortex reactor increased from 29% to 43% than conventional vortex reactor. - Abstract: Abatement of fluorinated compounds (FCs) used in semiconductor and display industries has received an attention due to the increasingly stricter regulation on their emission. We have developed a 2.45 GHz microwave plasma torch with reverse vortex reactor (RVR). In order to design a reverse vortex plasma reactor, we calculated a volume fraction and temperature distribution of discharge gas and waste gas in RVR by ANSYS CFX of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation code. Abatement experiments have been performed with respect to SF{sub 6}, NF{sub 3} by varying plasma power and N{sub 2} flow rates, and FCs concentration. Detailed experiments were conducted on the abatement of NF{sub 3} and SF{sub 6} in terms of destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). The DRE of 99.9% for NF{sub 3} was achieved without an additive gas at the N{sub 2} flow rate of 150 liter per minute (L/min) by applying a microwave power of 6 kW with RVR. Also, a DRE of SF{sub 6} was 99.99% at the N{sub 2} flow rate of 60 L/min using an applied microwave power of 6 kW. The performance of reverse vortex reactor increased about 43% of NF{sub 3} and 29% of SF{sub 6} abatements results definition by decomposition energy per liter more than conventional vortex reactor.

  19. Advances in reactor physics education: Visualization of reactor parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snoj, L.; Kromar, M.; Zerovnik, G.

    2012-01-01

    Modern computer codes allow detailed neutron transport calculations. In combination with advanced 3D visualization software capable of treating large amounts of data in real time they form a powerful tool that can be used as a convenient modern educational tool for reactor operators, nuclear engineers, students and specialists involved in reactor operation and design. Visualization is applicable not only in education and training, but also as a tool for fuel management, core analysis and irradiation planning. The paper treats the visualization of neutron transport in different moderators, neutron flux and power distributions in two nuclear reactors (TRIGA type research reactor and a typical PWR). The distributions are calculated with MCNP and CORD-2 computer codes and presented using Amira software. (authors)

  20. Slit-burst testing of cold-worked Zr-2.5 wt.% Nb pressure tubing for CANDU-PHW reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, B.J.S.; Barrie, J.N.; Zink, R.J.

    1978-12-01

    This report documents the available data on critical crack length of cold-worked Zr-2.5 wt.% Nb pressure tubing in CANDU reactors. In particular, it includes data for tubing removed from the Pickering 3 and 4 reactors. (author)

  1. Cronos 2: a neutronic simulation software for reactor core calculations; Cronos 2: un logiciel de simulation neutronique des coeurs de reacteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lautard, J J; Magnaud, C; Moreau, F; Baudron, A M [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Mecanique et de Technologie (DMT/SERMA), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1999-07-01

    The CRONOS2 software is that part of the SAPHYR code system dedicated to neutronic core calculations. CRONOS2 is a powerful tool for reactor design, fuel management and safety studies. Its modular structure and great flexibility make CRONOS2 an unique simulation tool for research and development for a wide variety of reactor systems. CRONOS2 is a versatile tool that covers a large range of applications from very fast calculations used in training simulators to time and memory consuming reference calculations needed to understand complex physical phenomena. CRONOS2 has a procedure library named CPROC that allows the user to create its own application environment fitted to a specific industrial use. (authors)

  2. TARMS, an on-line boiling water reactor operation management system. [3 D core simulator LOGOS 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, T.; Sakurai, S.; Uematsu, H.; Tsuiki, M.; Makino, K.

    1984-12-01

    The TARMS (Toshiba Advanced Reactor Management System) software package was developed as an effective on-line, on-site tool for boiling water reactor core operation management. It was designed to support a complete function set to meet the requirement to the current on-line process computers. The functions can be divided into two categories. One is monitoring of the present core power distribution as well as related limiting parameters. The other is aiding site engineers or reactor operators in making the future reactor operating plan. TARMS performs these functions with a three-dimensional BWR core physics simulator LOGOS 2, which is based on modified one-group, coarse-mesh nodal diffusion theory. A method was developed to obtain highly accurate nodal powers by coupling LOGOS 2 calculations with the readings of an in-core neutron flux monitor. A sort of automated machine-learning method also was developed to minimize the errors caused by insufficiency of the physics model adopted in LOGOS 2. In addition to these fundamental calculational methods, a number of core operation planning aid packages were developed and installed in TARMS, which were designed to make the operator's inputs simple and easy.

  3. Reactor Core Internals Replacement of Ikata Units 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Miyoshi, T.; Takagi, T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the reactor core internals replacement project carried out at the Ikata Nuclear Power Station in Japan, which was the first of its kind among PWRs in the world. Failure of baffle former bolts was first reported in 1989 at Bugey 2 in France. Since then, similar incidents have been reported in Belgium and in the U.S., but not in Japan. However, the possibility of these bolts failing in Japanese plants cannot be denied in the future as operating hours increase. Ageing degradation mechanisms for the reactor core internals include irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of baffle former bolts and mechanical wear of control rod guide cards. Two different approaches can be taken to address these ageing issues: to inspect and repair whenever a problem is found; and to replace the entire core internals with those of a new design having advanced features to prevent ageing degradation problems. The choice of our company was the latter. This paper explains the reasons for the choice and summarizes the replacement project activities at Ikata Units 1 and 2 as well as the improvements incorporated in the new design. (author)

  4. Investigation of the basic reactor physics characteristics of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huy, Ngo Quang [Centre for Nuclear Technique Application, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Thong, Ha Van; Khang, Ngo Phu [Nuclear Research Inst., Da Lat (Viet Nam)

    1994-10-01

    The Dalat nuclear research reactor was reconstructed from TRIGA MARK II reactor, built in 1963 with nominal power of 250 KW, and reached its planned nominal power of 500 kW for the first time in Feb. 1984. The Dalat reactor has some characteristics distinct from the former TRIGA reactor. Investigation of its characteristics is carried out by the determination of the reactor physics parameters. This paper represents the experimental results obtained for the effective fraction of the delayed photoneutrons, the extraneous neutron source left after the reactor is shut down, the lowest power levels of reactor critical states, the relative axial and radial distributions of thermal neutrons, the safe positive reactivity inserted into the reactor at deep subcritical state, the reactivity temperature coefficient of water, the temperature on the surface of the fuel elements, etc. (author). 10 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasile, A.

    2001-01-01

    Fast reactors have capacities to spare uranium natural resources by their breeding property and to propose solutions to the management of radioactive wastes by limiting the inventory of heavy nuclei. This article highlights the role that fast reactors could play for reducing the radiotoxicity of wastes. The conversion of 238 U into 239 Pu by neutron capture is more efficient in fast reactors than in light water reactors. In fast reactors multi-recycling of U + Pu leads to fissioning up to 95% of the initial fuel ( 238 U + 235 U). 2 strategies have been studied to burn actinides: - the multi-recycling of heavy nuclei is made inside the fuel element (homogeneous option); - the unique recycling is made in special irradiation targets placed inside the core or at its surroundings (heterogeneous option). Simulations have shown that, for the same amount of energy produced (400 TWhe), the mass of transuranium elements (Pu + Np + Am + Cm) sent to waste disposal is 60,9 Kg in the homogeneous option and 204.4 Kg in the heterogeneous option. Experimental programs are carried out in Phenix and BOR60 reactors in order to study the feasibility of such strategies. (A.C.)

  6. Request for Naval Reactors Comment on Proposed PROMETHEUS Space Flight Nuclear Reactor High Tier Reactor Safety Requirements and for Naval Reactors Approval to Transmit These Requirements to Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Kokkinos

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this letter is to request Naval Reactors comments on the nuclear reactor high tier requirements for the PROMETHEUS space flight reactor design, pre-launch operations, launch, ascent, operation, and disposal, and to request Naval Reactors approval to transmit these requirements to Jet Propulsion Laboratory to ensure consistency between the reactor safety requirements and the spacecraft safety requirements. The proposed PROMETHEUS nuclear reactor high tier safety requirements are consistent with the long standing safety culture of the Naval Reactors Program and its commitment to protecting the health and safety of the public and the environment. In addition, the philosophy on which these requirements are based is consistent with the Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group recommendations on space nuclear propulsion safety (Reference 1), DOE Nuclear Safety Criteria and Specifications for Space Nuclear Reactors (Reference 2), the Nuclear Space Power Safety and Facility Guidelines Study of the Applied Physics Laboratory

  7. Steady-State Thermal-Hydraulics Analyses for the Conversion of the BR2 Reactor to LEU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, J. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Van den Branden, G. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Kalcheva, S [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Sikik, E [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Koonen, E [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium)

    2016-09-01

    BR2 is a research reactor used for radioisotope production and materials testing. It’s a tank-in-pool type reactor cooled by light water and moderated by beryllium and light water. The reactor core consists of a beryllium moderator forming a matrix of 79 hexagonal prisms in a hyperboloid configuration; each having a central bore that can contain a variety of different components such as a fuel assembly, a control or regulating rod, an experimental device, or a beryllium or aluminum plug. Based on a series of tests, the BR2 operation is currently limited to a maximum allowable heat flux of 470 W/cm2 to ensure fuel plate integrity during steady-state operation and after a loss-of-flow/loss-of-pressure accident. A feasibility study for the conversion of the BR2 reactor from highly-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel was previously performed to verify it can operate safely at the same maximum nominal steady-state heat flux. An assessment was also performed to quantify the heat fluxes at which the onset of flow instability and critical heat flux occur for each fuel type. This document updates and expands these results for the current representative core configuration (assuming a fresh beryllium matrix) by evaluating the onset of nucleate boiling (ONB), onset of fully developed nucleate boiling (FDNB), onset of flow instability (OFI) and critical heat flux (CHF).

  8. Status of French reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballagny, A. [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Saclay (France)

    1997-08-01

    The status of French reactors is reviewed. The ORPHEE and RHF reactors can not be operated with a LEU fuel which would be limited to 4.8 g U/cm{sup 3}. The OSIRIS reactor has already been converted to LEU. It will use U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} as soon as its present stock of UO{sub 2} fuel is used up, at the end of 1994. The decision to close down the SILOE reactor in the near future is not propitious for the start of a conversion process. The REX 2000 reactor, which is expected to be commissioned in 2005, will use LEU (except if the fast neutrons core option is selected). Concerning the end of the HEU fuel cycle, the best option is reprocessing followed by conversion of the reprocessed uranium to LEU.

  9. Applications: fission, nuclear reactors. Fission: the various ways for reactors and cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, P.

    1997-01-01

    A historical review is presented concerning the various nuclear reactor systems developed in France by the CEA: the UNGG (graphite-gas) system with higher CO 2 pressures, bigger fuel assemblies and powers higher than 500 MW e, allowed by studies on reactor physics, cladding material developments and reactor optimization; the fast neutron reactor system, following the graphite-gas development, led to the Superphenix reactor and important progress in simulation based on experiment and return of experience; and the PWR system, based on the american license, which has been successfully accommodated to the french industry and generates up to 75% of the electric power in France

  10. A method of reactor power decrease by 2DOF control system during BWR power oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Katsuo

    1998-09-01

    Occurrence of power oscillation events caused by void feedback effects in BWRs operated at low-flow and high-power condition has been reported. After thoroughly examining these events, BWRs have been equipped with the SRI (Selected Rod Insertion) system to avoid the power oscillation by decreasing the power under such reactor condition. This report presents a power control method for decreasing the reactor power stably by a two degree of freedom (2DOF) control. Performing a numerical simulation by utilizing a simple reactor dynamics model, it is found that the control system designed attains a satisfactory control performance of power decrease from a viewpoint of setting time and oscillation. (author)

  11. Reactor core in FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumi, Ryoji; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1989-01-01

    In a reactor core in FBR type reactors, a portion of homogenous fuels constituting the homogenous reactor core is replaced with multi-region fuels in which the enrichment degree of fissile materials is lower nearer to the axial center. This enables to condition the composition such that a reactor core having neutron flux distribution either of a homogenous reactor core or a heterogenous reactor core has substantially identical reactivity. Accordingly, in the transfer from the homogenous reactor core to the axially heterogenous reactor core, the average reactivity in the reactor core is substantially equal in each of the cycles. Further, by replacing a portion of the homogenous fuels with a multi-region fuels, thereby increasing the heat generation near the axial center, it is possiable to reduce the linear power output in the regions above and below thereof and, in addition, to improve the thermal margin in the reactor core. (T.M.)

  12. Calculation of low-energy reactor neutrino spectra reactor for reactor neutrino experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riyana, Eka Sapta; Suda, Shoya; Ishibashi, Kenji; Matsuura, Hideaki [Dept. of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Kyushu (Japan); Katakura, Junichi [Dept. of Nuclear System Safety Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Nagaoka (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Nuclear reactors produce a great number of antielectron neutrinos mainly from beta-decay chains of fission products. Such neutrinos have energies mostly in MeV range. We are interested in neutrinos in a region of keV, since they may take part in special weak interactions. We calculate reactor antineutrino spectra especially in the low energy region. In this work we present neutrino spectrum from a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor core. To calculate neutrino spectra, we need information about all generated nuclides that emit neutrinos. They are mainly fission fragments, reaction products and trans-uranium nuclides that undergo negative beta decay. Information in relation to trans-uranium nuclide compositions and its evolution in time (burn-up process) were provided by a reactor code MVP-BURN. We used typical PWR parameter input for MVP-BURN code and assumed the reactor to be operated continuously for 1 year (12 months) in a steady thermal power (3.4 GWth). The PWR has three fuel compositions of 2.0, 3.5 and 4.1 wt% {sup 235}U contents. For preliminary calculation we adopted a standard burn-up chain model provided by MVP-BURN. The chain model treated 21 heavy nuclides and 50 fission products. The MVB-BURN code utilized JENDL 3.3 as nuclear data library. We confirm that the antielectron neutrino flux in the low energy region increases with burn-up of nuclear fuel. The antielectron-neutrino spectrum in low energy region is influenced by beta emitter nuclides with low Q value in beta decay (e.g. {sup 241}Pu) which is influenced by burp-up level: Low energy antielectron-neutrino spectra or emission rates increase when beta emitters with low Q value in beta decay accumulate. Our result shows the flux of low energy reactor neutrinos increases with burn-up of nuclear fuel.

  13. Catalytic combustion of the retentate gas from a CO2/H2 separation membrane reactor for further CO2 enrichment and energy recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Kyung-Ran; Park, Jin-Woo; Lee, Sung-Wook; Hong, Sungkook; Lee, Chun-Boo; Oh, Duck-Kyu; Jin, Min-Ho; Lee, Dong-Wook; Park, Jong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    The CCR (catalytic combustion reaction) of the retentate gas, consisting of 90% CO 2 and 10% H 2 obtained from a CO 2 /H 2 separation membrane reactor, was investigated using a porous Ni metal catalyst in order to recover energy and further enrich CO 2 . A disc-shaped porous Ni metal catalyst, namely Al[0.1]/Ni, was prepared by a simple method and a compact MCR (micro-channel reactor) equipped with a catalyst plate was designed for the CCR. CO 2 and H 2 concentrations of 98.68% and 0.46%, respectively, were achieved at an operating temperature of 400 °C, GHSV (gas-hourly space velocity) of 50,000 h −1 and a H 2 /O 2 ratio (R/O) of 2 in the unit module. In the case of the MCR, a sheet of the Ni metal catalyst was easily installed along with the other metal plates and the concentration of CO 2 in the retentate gas increased up to 96.7%. The differences in temperatures measured before and after the CCR were 31 °C at the product outlet and 19 °C at the N 2 outlet in the MCR. The disc-shaped porous metal catalyst and MCR configuration used in this study exhibit potential advantages, such as high thermal transfer resulting in improved energy recovery rate, simple catalyst preparation, and easy installation of the catalyst in the MCR. - Highlights: • The catalytic combustion of a retentate gas obtained from the H 2 /CO 2 separation membrane. • A disc-shaped porous nickel metal catalyst and a micro-channel reactor for catalytic hydrogen combustion. • CO 2 enrichment up to 98.68% at 400 °C, 50,000 h −1 and H 2 /O 2 ratio of 2.

  14. Reactor feedwater system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagaya, Hiroyuki; Tominaga, Kenji.

    1993-01-01

    In a simplified water type reactor using a gravitationally dropping emergency core cooling system (ECCS), the present invention effectively prevents remaining high temperature water in feedwater pipelines from flowing into the reactor upon occurrence of abnormal events. That is, (1) upon LOCA, if a feedwater pipeline injection valve is closed, boiling under reduced pressure of the remaining high temperature water occurs in the feedwater pipelines, generated steams prevent the remaining high temperature water from flowing into the reactor. Accordingly, the reactor is depressurized rapidly. (2) The feedwater pipeline injection valve is closed and a bypassing valve is opened. Steams generated by boiling under reduced pressure of the remaining high temperature water in the feedwater pipelines are released to a condensator or a suppression pool passing through bypass pipelines. As a result, the remaining high temperature water is prevented from flowing into the reactor. Accordingly, the reactor is rapidly depressurized and cooled. It is possible to accelerate the depressurization of the reactor by the method described above. Further, load on the depressurization valve disposed to a main steam pipe can be reduced. (I.S.)

  15. Assessment of United States industry structural codes and standards for application to advanced nuclear power reactors: Appendices. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, T.M.; Stevenson, J.D.

    1995-10-01

    Throughout its history, the USNRC has remained committed to the use of industry consensus standards for the design, construction, and licensing of commercial nuclear power facilities. The existing industry standards are based on the current class of light water reactors and as such may not adequately address design and construction features of the next generation of Advanced Light Water Reactors and other types of Advanced Reactors. As part of their on-going commitment to industry standards, the USNRC commissioned this study to evaluate US industry structural standards for application to Advanced Light Water Reactors and Advanced Reactors. The initial review effort included (1) the review and study of the relevant reactor design basis documentation for eight Advanced Light Water Reactors and Advanced Reactor Designs, (2) the review of the USNRCs design requirements for advanced reactors, (3) the review of the latest revisions of the relevant industry consensus structural standards, and (4) the identification of the need for changes to these standards. The results of these studies were used to develop recommended changes to industry consensus structural standards which will be used in the construction of Advanced Light Water Reactors and Advanced Reactors. Over seventy sets of proposed standard changes were recommended and the need for the development of four new structural standards was identified. In addition to the recommended standard changes, several other sets of information and data were extracted for use by USNRC in other on-going programs. This information included (1) detailed observations on the response of structures and distribution system supports to the recent Northridge, California (1994) and Kobe, Japan (1995) earthquakes, (2) comparison of versions of certain standards cited in the standard review plan to the most current versions, and (3) comparison of the seismic and wind design basis for all the subject reactor designs

  16. Generalities about nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaouen, C.; Beroux, P.

    2012-01-01

    From Zoe, the first nuclear reactor, till the current EPR, the French nuclear industry has always advanced by profiting from the feedback from dozens of years of experience and operations, in particular by drawing lessons from the most significant events in its history, such as the Fukushima accident. The new generations of reactors must improve safety and economic performance so that the industry maintain its legitimacy and its share in the production of electricity. This article draws the history of nuclear power in France, gives a brief description of the pressurized water reactor design, lists the technical features of the different versions of PWR that operate in France and compares them with other types of reactors. The feedback experience concerning safety, learnt from the major nuclear accidents Three Miles Island (1979), Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011) is also detailed. Today there are 26 third generation reactors being built in the world: 4 EPR (1 in Finland, 1 in France and 2 in China); 2 VVER-1200 in Russia, 8 AP-1000 (4 in China and 4 in the Usa), 8 APR-1400 (4 in Korea and 4 in UAE), and 4 ABWR (2 in Japan and 2 in Taiwan)

  17. Model study of an automatic controller of the IBR-2 pulsed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepelyshev, Yu.N.; Popov, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    For calculation of power transients in the IBR-2 reactor a special mathematical model of dynamics taking into account the discontinuous jump of reactivity by an automatic controller with the step motor is created. In the model the nonlinear dependence of the energy of power pulse on the reactivity and the influence of warming up of the reactor on the reactivity by means of introduction of a nonlinear feedback 'power-pulse energy - reactivity' are taken into account. With the help of the model the transients of relative deviation of power-pulse energy are calculated at various (random, mixed and regular) reactivity disturbances at the reactor mean power 1.475 MW. It is shown that to improve the quality of processes the choice of such regular values of parameters of the automatic controller is expedient, at which the least effect of smoothing of a signal acting on an automatic controller and the least speed of an automatic controller are provided, and the reduction of efficiency of one step of the automatic controller and introduction of a five-percent dead space are also expedient

  18. Backfitting of the FRG reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krull, W [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH, Geesthacht (Germany)

    1990-05-01

    The FRG-research reactors The GKSS-research centre is operating two research reactors of the pool type fueled with MTR-type type fuel elements. The research reactors FRG-1 and FRG-2 having power levels of 5 MW and 15 MW are in operation for 31 year and 27 years respectively. They are comparably old like other research reactors. The reactors are operating at present at approximately 180 days (FRG-1) and between 210 and 250 days (FRG-2) per year. Both reactors are located in the same reactor hall in a connecting pool system. Backfitting measures are needed for our and other research reactors to ensure a high level of safety and availability. The main backfitting activities during last ten years were concerned with: comparison of the existing design with today demands (criteria, guidelines, standards etc.); and probability approach for events from outside like aeroplane crashes and earthquakes; the main accidents were rediscussed like startup from low and full power, loss of coolant flow, loss of heat sink, loss of coolant and fuel plate melting; a new reactor protection system had to be installed, following today's demands; a new crane has been installed in the reactor hall. A cold neutron source has been installed to increase the flux of cold neutrons by a factor of 14. The FRG-l is being converted from 93% enriched U with Alx fuel to 20% enriched U with U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel. Both cooling towers were repaired. Replacement of instrumentation is planned.

  19. Backfitting of the FRG reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krull, W.

    1990-01-01

    The FRG-research reactors The GKSS-research centre is operating two research reactors of the pool type fueled with MTR-type type fuel elements. The research reactors FRG-1 and FRG-2 having power levels of 5 MW and 15 MW are in operation for 31 year and 27 years respectively. They are comparably old like other research reactors. The reactors are operating at present at approximately 180 days (FRG-1) and between 210 and 250 days (FRG-2) per year. Both reactors are located in the same reactor hall in a connecting pool system. Backfitting measures are needed for our and other research reactors to ensure a high level of safety and availability. The main backfitting activities during last ten years were concerned with: comparison of the existing design with today demands (criteria, guidelines, standards etc.); and probability approach for events from outside like aeroplane crashes and earthquakes; the main accidents were rediscussed like startup from low and full power, loss of coolant flow, loss of heat sink, loss of coolant and fuel plate melting; a new reactor protection system had to be installed, following today's demands; a new crane has been installed in the reactor hall. A cold neutron source has been installed to increase the flux of cold neutrons by a factor of 14. The FRG-l is being converted from 93% enriched U with Alx fuel to 20% enriched U with U 3 Si 2 fuel. Both cooling towers were repaired. Replacement of instrumentation is planned

  20. Compact stellarators as reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, J.F.; Valanju, P.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Hirshman, S.; Spong, D.A.; Strickler, D.; Williamson, D.E.; Ware, A.

    2001-01-01

    Two types of compact stellarators are examined as reactors: two- and three-field-period (M=2 and 3) quasi-axisymmetric devices with volume-average =4-5% and M=2 and 3 quasi-poloidal devices with =10-15%. These low-aspect-ratio stellarator-tokamak hybrids differ from conventional stellarators in their use of the plasma-generated bootstrap current to supplement the poloidal field from external coils. Using the ARIES-AT model with B max =12T on the coils gives Compact Stellarator reactors with R=7.3-8.2m, a factor of 2-3 smaller R than other stellarator reactors for the same assumptions, and neutron wall loadings up to 3.7MWm -2 . (author)

  1. Design options for a bunsen reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Robert Charles

    2013-10-01

    This work is being performed for Matt Channon Consulting as part of the Sandia National Laboratories New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program (NMSBA). Matt Channon Consulting has requested Sandia's assistance in the design of a chemical Bunsen reactor for the reaction of SO2, I2 and H2O to produce H2SO4 and HI with a SO2 feed rate to the reactor of 50 kg/hour. Based on this value, an assumed reactor efficiency of 33%, and kinetic data from the literature, a plug flow reactor approximately 1%E2%80%9D diameter and and 12 inches long would be needed to meet the specification of the project. Because the Bunsen reaction is exothermic, heat in the amount of approximately 128,000 kJ/hr would need to be removed using a cooling jacket placed around the tubular reactor. The available literature information on Bunsen reactor design and operation, certain support equipment needed for process operation and a design that meet the specification of Matt Channon Consulting are presented.

  2. Relative neutronic performance of proposed high-density dispersion fuels in water-moderated and D2O-reflected research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretscher, M.M.; Matos, J.E.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the neutronic performance of an idealized research reactor using several high density LEU fuels that are being developed by the RERTR program. High-density LEU dispersion fuels are needed for new and existing high-performance research reactors and to extend the lifetime of fuel elements in other research reactors. This paper discusses the anticipated neutronic behavior of proposed advanced fuels containing dispersions of U 3 Si 2 , UN, U 2 Mo and several uranium alloys with Mo, or Zr and Nb. These advanced fuels are ranked based on the results of equilibrium depletion calculations for a simplified reactor model having a small H 2 O-cooled core and a D 2 O reflector. Plans have been developed to fabricate and irradiate several uranium alloy dispersion fuels in order to test their stability and compatibility with the matrix material and to establish practical loading limits

  3. Relative neutronic performance of proposed high-density dispersion fuels in water-moderated and D2O-reflected research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretscher, M.M.; Matos, J.E.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the neutronic performance of an idealized research reactor using several high density Leu fuels that are being developed by the Rarita program. High-density Leu dispersion fuels are needed for new and existing high-performance research reactors and to extend the lifetime of fuel elements in other research reactors. This paper discusses the anticipated neutronic behavior of proposed advanced fuels containing dispersions of U 3 Si 2 , UN, U 2 Mo and several uranium alloys with Mo, or Zr and Nb. These advanced fuels are ranked based on the results of equilibrium depletion calculations for a simplified reactor model having a small H 2 O-cooled core and a D 2 O reflector. Plans have been developed to fabricate and irradiate several uranium alloy dispersion fuels in order to test their stability and compatibility with the matrix material and to establish practical loading limits. (author)

  4. Performance analysis of photocatalytic CO2 reduction in optical fiber monolith reactor with multiple inverse lights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Kai; Yang, Lijun; Du, Xiaoze; Yang, Yongping

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new optical fiber monolith reactor model for CO 2 reduction was developed. • Methanol concentration versus fiber location and operation parameters was obtained. • Reaction efficiency increases by 31.1% due to the four fibers and inverse layout. • With increasing space of fiber and channel center, methanol concentration increases. • Methanol concentration increases as the vapor ratio and light intensity increase. - Abstract: Photocatalytic CO 2 reduction seems potential to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and produce renewable energy. A new model of photocatalytic CO 2 reduction in optical fiber monolith reactor with multiple inverse lights was developed in this study to improve the conversion of CO 2 to CH 3 OH. The new light distribution equation was derived, by which the light distribution was modeled and analyzed. The variations of CH 3 OH concentration with the fiber location and operation parameters were obtained by means of numerical simulation. The results show that the outlet CH 3 OH concentration is 31.1% higher than the previous model, which is attributed to the four fibers and inverse layout. With the increase of the distance between the fiber and the monolith center, the average CH 3 OH concentration increases. The average CH 3 OH concentration also rises as the light input and water vapor percentage increase, but declines with increasing the inlet velocity. The maximum conversion rate and quantum efficiency in the model are 0.235 μmol g −1 h −1 and 0.0177% respectively, both higher than previous internally illuminated monolith reactor (0.16 μmol g −1 h −1 and 0.012%). The optical fiber monolith reactor layout with multiple inverse lights is recommended in the design of photocatalytic reactor of CO 2 reduction

  5. MASTER-2.0: Multi-purpose analyzer for static and transient effects of reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Byung Oh; Song, Jae Seung; Joo, Han Gyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-01-01

    MASTER-2.0 (Multi-purpose Analyzer for Static and Transient Effects of Reactors) is a nuclear design code based on the two group diffusion theory to calculate the steady-state and transient pressurized water reactor core in a 3-dimensional Cartesian or hexagonal geometry. Its neutronics model solves the space-time dependent neutron diffusion equations with NIM(Nodal Integration Method), NEM (Nodal Expansion Method), AFEN (Analytic Function Expansion Nodal Method)/NEM Hybrid Method, NNEM (Non-linear Nodal Expansion Method) or NANM (Non-linear Analytic Nodal Method) for a Cartesian geometry and with AFEN/NEM Hybrid Method or NLFM (Non-linear Local Fine-Mesh Method) for a hexagonal one. Coarse mesh rebalancing, Krylov Subspace method and asymptotic extrapolation method are implemented to accelerate the convergence of iteration process. Master-2.0 performs microscopic depletion calculations using microscopic cross sections provided by CASMO-3 or HELIOS and also has the reconstruction capability of pin information by use of MSS-IAS (Method of Successive Smoothing with Improved Analytic Solution). For the thermal-hydraulic calculation, fuel temperature table or COBRA3-C/P model can be used selectively. In addition, MASTER-2.0 is designed to cover various PWRs including SMART as well as WH-and CE-type reactors, providing all data required in their design procedures. (author). 39 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Fast reactors worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, R.S.; Vignon, D.

    1985-01-01

    The paper concerns the evolution of fast reactors over the past 30 years, and their present status. Fast reactor development in different countries is described, and the present position, with emphasis on cost reduction and collaboration, is examined. The French development of the fast breeder type reactor is reviewed, and includes: the acquisition of technical skills, the search for competitive costs and the spx2 project, and more advanced designs. Future prospects are also discussed. (U.K.)

  7. Application of stable adaptive schemes to nuclear reactor systems, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukuda, Toshio

    1979-01-01

    The parameter identification and adaptive control schemes applied in a previous study to a nonlinear point reactor are extended to the case of a loosely-coupled-core reactor with internal feedbacks, constituting a nonlinear overall system. Both schemes are shown to be stable, with the system newly represented on the pattern of the Model Reference Adaptive System (MRAS) with use made of the Lyapunov's method. For either parameter identification or adaptive control of a loosely-coupled-core reactor, there exists no canonical form of multiple input-multiple output system which can be directly applied for deriving the MRAS with the matrix version of the Kalman-Yakubovich lemma as it was in the case of the point reactor. This difficulty is circumvented by the practical assumption that the neutron density can be directly measured on each core as reactivity change is applied as input into the coupled core as a whole. For parameter identification, the model parameters are adaptively adjusted to those of each core, while for the adaptive control, plant parameters of each core can be adaptively compensated, again through control inputs, to asymptotically reduce the output error between the model and the plant. The point reactor is shown to correspond to a special case. (author)

  8. Upgradation of Apsara reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mammen, S.; Mukherjee, P.; Bhatnagar, A.; Sasidharan, K.; Raina, V.K.

    2009-01-01

    Apsara is a 1 MW swimming pool type research reactor using high enriched uranium as fuel with light water as coolant and moderator. The reactor is in operation for more than five decades and has been extensively used for basic research, radioisotope production, neutron radiography, detector testing, shielding experiments etc. In view of its long service period, it is planned to carry out refurbishment of the reactor to extend its useful life. During refurbishment, it is also planned to upgrade the reactor to a 2 MW reactor to improve its utilization and to upgrade the structure, system and components in line with the current safety standards. This paper gives a brief account of the design features and safety aspects of the upgraded Apsara reactor. (author)

  9. Mixed core management: Use of 93% and 72% enriched uranium in the BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponsard, B.

    2000-01-01

    The BR2 reactor, put into operation in 1963 and refurbished from July 1995 till April 1997, is a 100 MW high-flux Materials Testing Reactor, using 93% 235 U enriched uranium as standard fuel, light water as coolant and beryllium as moderator. The present operating regime consists of five irradiation cycles per year at an operating power between 50 and 70 MW; each cycle is characterized by 21 days operation. In the framework of a 'qualification programme', six 72% 235 U fuel elements fabricated with uranium recovered from the reprocessing of BR2 spent fuel at UKAEA-Dounreay have been successfully irradiated in the period 1994-1995 reaching a maximum mean burnup of 48% without the release of fission products. Since 1998, this type of fuel element is irradiated routinely together with standard 93% 235 U fuel elements in order to optimize the utilization of the available HEU inventory. The purpose of this paper is to present the strategy developed in order to optimize the mixed core management of the BR2 reactor. (author)

  10. Effect of fuel assembly when changing from AFA 2G to AFA 3G on seismic loads of reactor internal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wenjin; Zeng Zhongxiu; Ye Xianhui; Wu Wanjun

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear seismic model for reactor with fuel assemblies of AFA 2G and AFA 3G is established. Using ANSYS software, seismic nonlinear time -history analysis is completed and the effects on seismic loads of reactor system are obtained. The result shows that when the fuel assembly changing from AFA 2G to AFA 3G, it is necessary to reevaluate the fuel assembly itself, but not the reactor internal. (authors)

  11. Thermal limits validation of gamma thermometer power adaption in CFE Laguna Verde 2 reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuevas V, G.; Banfield, J. [GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Americas LLC, Global Nuclear Fuel, Americas LLC, 3901 Castle Hayne Road, Wilmingtonm, North Carolina (United States); Avila N, A., E-mail: Gabriel.Cuevas-Vivas@ge.com [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km 42.5, Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    This paper presents the status of GEH work on Gamma Thermometer (GT) validation using the signals of the instruments installed in the Laguna Verde Unit 2 reactor core. The long-standing technical collaboration between Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE), Global Nuclear Fuel - Americas LLC (GNF) and GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Americas LLC (GEH) is moving forward with solid steps to a final implementation of GTs in a nuclear reactor core. Each GT is integrated into a slightly modified Local Power Range Monitor (LPRM) assembly. Six instrumentation strings are equipped with two gamma field detectors for a total of twenty-four bundles whose calculated powers are adapted to the instrumentation readings in addition to their use as calibration instruments for LPRMs. Since November 2007, the six GT instrumentation strings have been operable with almost no degradation by the strong neutron and gamma fluxes in the Laguna Verde Unit 2 reactor core. In this paper, the thermal limits, Critical Power Ratio (CPR) and maximum Linear Heat Generation Rate (LHGR), of bundles directly monitored by either Traverse In-core Probes (TIPs) or GTs are used to establish validation results that confirm the viability of TIP system replacement with automatic fixed in-core probes (AFIPs, GTs, in a Boiling Water Reactor. The new GNF steady-state reactor core simulator AETNA02 is used to obtain power and exposure distribution. Using this code with an updated methodology for GT power adaption, a reduced value of the GT interpolation uncertainty is obtained that is fed into the LHGR calculation. This new method achieves margin recovery for the adapted thermal limits for use in the Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) or any other BWR in the future that employs a GT based AFIP system for local power measurements. (Author)

  12. Thermal limits validation of gamma thermometer power adaption in CFE Laguna Verde 2 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuevas V, G.; Banfield, J.; Avila N, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the status of GEH work on Gamma Thermometer (GT) validation using the signals of the instruments installed in the Laguna Verde Unit 2 reactor core. The long-standing technical collaboration between Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE), Global Nuclear Fuel - Americas LLC (GNF) and GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Americas LLC (GEH) is moving forward with solid steps to a final implementation of GTs in a nuclear reactor core. Each GT is integrated into a slightly modified Local Power Range Monitor (LPRM) assembly. Six instrumentation strings are equipped with two gamma field detectors for a total of twenty-four bundles whose calculated powers are adapted to the instrumentation readings in addition to their use as calibration instruments for LPRMs. Since November 2007, the six GT instrumentation strings have been operable with almost no degradation by the strong neutron and gamma fluxes in the Laguna Verde Unit 2 reactor core. In this paper, the thermal limits, Critical Power Ratio (CPR) and maximum Linear Heat Generation Rate (LHGR), of bundles directly monitored by either Traverse In-core Probes (TIPs) or GTs are used to establish validation results that confirm the viability of TIP system replacement with automatic fixed in-core probes (AFIPs, GTs, in a Boiling Water Reactor. The new GNF steady-state reactor core simulator AETNA02 is used to obtain power and exposure distribution. Using this code with an updated methodology for GT power adaption, a reduced value of the GT interpolation uncertainty is obtained that is fed into the LHGR calculation. This new method achieves margin recovery for the adapted thermal limits for use in the Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) or any other BWR in the future that employs a GT based AFIP system for local power measurements. (Author)

  13. Modelling and thermal hydraulic analysis of the Angra-2 nuclear reactor using RELAP5-3D code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González Mantecón, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) performance during steady-state and accident conditions has been one of the main research subjects in the nuclear field. In order to simulate the behavior of water-cooled reactors, several complex thermal-hydraulic codes systems have been developed. Particularly, the RELAP5 code, developed by the Idaho National Laboratory, is a best-estimate thermal-hydraulic analysis tool and one of the most used in nuclear industry. The RELAP5-3D 3.0.0 code was used to develop a detailed model of Angra 2 nuclear reactor using reference data from the Final Safety Analysis Report. Angra 2 is the second Brazilian NPP, which began commercial operation in 2001. The plant is equipped with a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) type with 3771.0 MWt. Simulations of the reactor behavior during normal operation conditions and postulated accident conditions were performed. Results achieved in the reactor steady-state simulation were compared with nominal parameters of the NPP. These results proved to be in good agreement, with relative errors less than 1%. In the transient simulation, the obtained results were coherent and satisfactory. This study demonstrates that the RELAP5-3D model is capable to reproduce the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the Angra-2 PWR during diverse operation conditions and it can contribute for the process of the plant safety analysis. (author)

  14. CO2 Energy Reactor - Integrated Mineral Carbonation: Perspectives on Lab-Scale Investigation and Products Valorization

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael M Santos; Pol CM Knops; Keesjan L Rijnsburger; Yi Wai eChiang

    2016-01-01

    To overcome the challenges of mineral CO2 sequestration, Innovation Concepts B.V. is developing a unique proprietary gravity pressure vessel (GPV) reactor technology and has focussed on generating reaction products of high economic value. The GPV provides intense process conditions through hydrostatic pressurization and heat exchange integration that harvests exothermic reaction energy, thereby reducing energy demand of conventional reactor designs, in addition to offering other benefits. In ...

  15. What occurred in the reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Described is what occurred in the reactors of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant at the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami (Mar. 11, 2011) from the aspect of engineering science. The tsunami attacked the Plant 1 hr after the quake. The Plant had reactors in buildings no.1-4 at 10 m height from the normal sea level which was flooded by 1.5-5.5 m high wave. All reactors in no.1-6 in the Plant were the boiling water type, and their core nuclear reactions were stopped within 3 sec due to the first quake by control rods inserted automatically. Reactors in no.1-5 lost their external AC power sources by the breakdown and subsequent submergence (no.1-4) of various equipments and in no.1, 2 and 4, the secondary DC power was then lost by the battery death. Although the isolation condenser started to cool the reactor in no.1 after DC cut, its valve was then kept closed to heat up the reactor, leading to the reaction of heated Zr in the fuel tube and water to yield H 2 which was accumulated in the building: the cause of hydrogen explosion on 12th. The reactor in no.2 had the reactor core isolation cooling system (RCIC) which operated normally for few hrs, then probably stopped to heat up the reactor, resulting in meltdown of the core but no explosion occurred because of the opened door of the blowout panel on the wall by the blast of no.1 explosion. The reactor in no.3 had RCIC and high pressure coolant injection system, but their works stopped to result in the core damage and H 2 accumulation leading to the explosion on 14th. The reactor in no.4 had not been operated because of its periodical annual examination, but was explored on 15th, of which cause was thought to be due to backward flow of H 2 from no.3. Finally, the author discusses about this accident from the industrial aspect of the design of safety level (defense in depth) on international views, and problems and tasks given. (T.T.)

  16. Reactor core and initially loaded reactor core of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Jun-ichi; Aoyama, Motoo.

    1989-01-01

    In BWR type reactors, improvement for the reactor shutdown margin is an important characteristic condition togehter with power distribution flattening . However, in the reactor core at high burnup degree, the reactor shutdown margin is different depending on the radial position of the reactor core. That is , the reactor shutdown margin is smaller in the outer peripheral region than in the central region of the reactor core. In view of the above, the reactor core is divided radially into a central region and as outer region. The amount of fissionable material of first fuel assemblies newly loaded in the outer region is made less than the amount of the fissionable material of second fuel assemblies newly loaded in the central region, to thereby improve the reactor shutdown margin in the outer region. Further, the ratio between the amount of the fissionable material in the upper region and that of the fissionable material in the lower portion of the first fuel assemblies is made smaller than the ratio between the amount of the fissionable material in the upper region and that of the fissionable material in the lower region of the second fuel assemblies, to thereby obtain a sufficient thermal margin in the central region. (K.M.)

  17. Catalytic wet oxidation of phenol in a trickle bed reactor over a Pt/TiO2 catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugans, Clayton B; Akgerman, Aydin

    2003-01-01

    Catalytic wet oxidation of phenol was studied in a batch and a trickle bed reactor using 4.45% Pt/TiO2 catalyst in the temperature range 150-205 degrees C. Kinetic data were obtained from batch reactor studies and used to model the reaction kinetics for phenol disappearance and for total organic carbon disappearance. Trickle bed experiments were then performed to generate data from a heterogeneous flow reactor. Catalyst deactivation was observed in the trickle bed reactor, although the exact cause was not determined. Deactivation was observed to linearly increase with the cumulative amount of phenol that had passed over the catalyst bed. Trickle bed reactor modeling was performed using a three-phase heterogeneous model. Model parameters were determined from literature correlations, batch derived kinetic data, and trickle bed derived catalyst deactivation data. The model equations were solved using orthogonal collocations on finite elements. Trickle bed performance was successfully predicted using the batch derived kinetic model and the three-phase reactor model. Thus, using the kinetics determined from limited data in the batch mode, it is possible to predict continuous flow multiphase reactor performance.

  18. Investigation of sensors and instrument components in boiling water reactors. Results from Oskarshamn 2, Barsebaeck 2 in Sweden and Kernkraftwerk Muehleberg in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergdahl, B.G.

    1998-05-01

    The reactor monitoring instruments are important for the operation and safety of the plants. Static properties of the instruments are controlled annually, but the dynamic properties are rarely, if ever, examined. This study is the result of a project initiated by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate. The examinations are based on signal analysis and simultaneous measurement of multiple signals. Results from Oskarshamn 2 (O2), Barsebaeck 2 (B2) and Kernkraftwerk Muehleberg (KKM) are discussed in this report. The presentation is focused on reactor pressure and reactor level signals. the analysis of O2 revealed that the dynamics for 3 out of 14 sensors was 'filtered', meaning that a rapid level displacement is registered with delay. Inspection showed that a 1 sec filter was installed instead of 1.2 sec. The study also showed that old pressure-sensors in use both at O2 and B2 could not cope with high frequencies, and that some level-sensors were disturbed by mechanical oscillations at Bw. At KKM, a 2 Hz resonance was observed with 12 pressure and level sensors. The oscillation was created by an old pressure sensor and influenced the other sensors through the common impulse network

  19. A new MTR fuel for a new MTR reactor: UMo for the Jules Horowitz reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guigon, B.; Vacelet, H.; Dornbusch, D.

    2000-01-01

    Within some years, the Jules Horowitz Reactor will be the only working experimental reactor (material and fuel testing reactor) in France. It will have to provide facilities for a wide range of needs from activation analysis to power reactor fuel qualification. In this paper the main characteristics of the Jules Horowitz Reactor are presented. Safety criteria are explained. Finally, merits and disadvantages of UMo compared to the standard U 3 Si 2 fuel are discussed. (author)

  20. TMI-2 [Three Mile Island Unit 2] reactor building dose reduction task force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    In late October 1982, the director of Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) created the dose reduction task force with the objective of identifying the principal radiological sources in the reactor building and recommending actions to minimize the dose to workers on labor-intensive projects. Members of the task force were drawn form various groups at TMI. Findings and recommendations were presented to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in a briefing on November 18, 1982. The task force developed a three-step approach toward dose reduction. Step 1 identified the radiological sources. Step 2 modeled the source and estimated its contribution to the general area dose rates. Step 3 recommended actions to achieve dose reductions consistent with general exposure rate goals

  1. A novel auto-thermal reforming membrane reactor for high purity H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tony Boyd; Grace, J.R.; Lim, C.J.; Adris, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    A novel hydrogen reactor based on steam reforming of natural gas has been developed and tested. The reactor produces high purity hydrogen using in-situ perm-selective membranes installed in a fluidized catalyst bed, thus shifting the thermodynamic equilibrium of the SMR reaction and eliminating the need for downstream hydrogen purification. The reactor is particularly suited to auto-thermal reforming, where air is added to the reformer to provide the endothermic reaction heat, thus eliminating the need to indirectly heat the reactor. The gas flow pattern within the fluidized bed induces an internal circulation of catalyst particles between the central SMR reaction (permeation) zone and an outer annulus. The circulating hot catalyst particles from the oxidation zone carry the required endothermic heat of reaction for the reforming, while ensuring that the palladium membranes are not exposed to excessive temperatures or to oxygen. Another beneficial characteristic of the reactor is that very little of the nitrogen present in the oxidation air reaches the reaction zone, thus maintaining the hydrogen driving force for the perm-selective membranes. Pilot plant results carried out in a semi-industrial scale reactor will be presented. The reactor was operated up to 650 C and 14 bar. Pure hydrogen (99.999+%) was initially obtained from the reactor and an equilibrium shift was demonstrated. (authors)

  2. Operating US power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, E.G.

    1988-01-01

    This update, which appears regularly in each issue of Nuclear Safety, surveys the operations of those power reactors in the US which have been issued operating licenses. Table 1 shows the number of such reactors and their net capacities as of September 30, 1987, the end of the three-month period covered in this report. Table 2 lists the unit capacity and forced outage rate for each licensed reactor for each of the three months (July, August, and September 1987) covered in this report and the cumulative values of these parameters since the beginning of commercial operation. In addition to the tabular data, this article discusses other significant occurrences and developments that affected licensed US power reactors during this reporting period. Status changes at Braidwood Unit 1, Nine Mile Point 2, and Beaver Valley 2 are discussed. Other occurrences discussed are: retraining of control-room operators at Peach Bottom; a request for 25% power for Shoreham, problems at Fermi 2 which delayed the request to go to 75% power; the results of a safety study of the N Reactor at Hanford; a proposed merger of Pacific Gas and Electric with Sacramento Municipal Utility District which would result in the decommissioning of Rancho Seco; the ordered shutdown of Oyster Creek; a minor radioactivity release caused by a steam generator tube rupture at North Anna 1; and 13 fines levied by the NRC on reactor licensees

  3. Necessity of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Currently, only three educational research reactors at two universities exist in Japan: KUR, KUCA of Kyoto University and UTR-KINKI of Kinki University. UTR-KINKI is a light-water moderated, graphite reflected, heterogeneous enriched uranium thermal reactor, which began operation as a private university No. 1 reactor in 1961. It is a low power nuclear reactor for education and research with a maximum heat output of 1 W. Using this nuclear reactor, researches, practical training, experiments for training nuclear human resources, and nuclear knowledge dissemination activities are carried out. As of October 2016, research and practical training accompanied by operation are not carried out because it is stopped. The following five items can be cited as challenges faced by research reactors: (1) response to new regulatory standards and stagnation of research and education, (2) strengthening of nuclear material protection and nuclear fuel concentration reduction, (3) countermeasures against aging and next research reactor, (4) outflow and shortage of nuclear human resources, and (5) expansion of research reactor maintenance cost. This paper would like to make the following recommendations so that we can make contribution to the world in the field of nuclear power. (1) Communication between regulatory authorities and business operators regarding new regulatory standards compliance. (2) Response to various problems including spent fuel measures for long-term stable utilization of research reactors. (3) Personal exchanges among nuclear experts. (4) Expansion of nuclear related departments at universities to train nuclear human resources. (5) Training of world-class nuclear human resources, and succession and development of research and technologies. (A.O.)

  4. Conceptual design of reactor assembly of prototype fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvaraj, A.; Balasubramaniyan, V.; Raghupathy, S.; Elango, D.; Sodhi, B.S.; Chetal, S.C.; Bhoje, S.B.

    1996-01-01

    The conceptual design of Reactor Assembly of 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (as selected in 1985) was reviewed with the aim of 'simplification of design', 'Compactness of the reactor assembly' and 'ease in construction'. The reduction in size has been possible by incorporating concentric core arrangement, adoption of elastomer seals for Rotatable plugs, fuel handling with one transfer arm type mechanism, incorporation of mechanical sealing arrangement for IHX at the penetration in Inner vessel redan and reduction in number of components. The erection of the components has been made easier by adopting 'hanging' support for roof slab with associated changes in the safety vessel design. This paper presents the conceptual design of the reactor assembly components. (author). 8 figs, 2 tabs

  5. Environmental assessment for decontamination of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building atmosphere. Addendum 2. Draft NRC staff report for public comment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1980-04-01

    The reactor building purge system is an existing system originally installed for purging the reactor building atmosphere during normal operation or maintenance conditions. Use of the reactor building purge system in conjunction with the hydrogen control subsystem evaluated in Section 6.1 represents a variation in the purging alternative for decontaminating the Unit 2 reactor building atmosphere. This variation in the purging alternative would function only under meteorological conditions favorable to atmospheric dispersion. The reactor building purge system is capable of purging the building at flow rates of 5,000-50,000 cfm. Actual purge rates authorized during any time interval would be dependent on meteorological conditions and reactor building concentrations. Like the hydrogen control subsystem, this system would remove reactor building atmosphere through a filter system and discharge it through the 160-ft plant vent stack to the environment. The advantage of using the reactor building purge system in conjunction with the hydrogen control system is that it could decontaminate the reactor building atmosphere in a total elapsed purge time as short as approximately 5 days, as compared with the 60 days that would be required if the hydrogen purge subsystem were used alone. Use of this variation in the purge alternative would result in the release of radioactive materials to the environment. However, calculations based on actual meteorological and release-rate data would be used to monitor radioactive releases so that they do not exceed the requirements of 10 CFR Part 20, the design objectives of 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix 1 and the applicable requirements of 40 CFR 190.10.

  6. Re criticality assessment following reactor core damage in Fukushima unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hae Sun; Song, Jin Ho; Park, Chang Je; Ha, Kwang Soon; Song, Yong Mann; Ryu, Eun Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Following the severe core damage accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plants (NPPs), many researchers have studied a possible Re criticality caused by core melting or corium. However, no one can accurately examine the internal conditions of the reactor vessel, and thus there have been different opinions from some organizations depending on their assumption and analysis methods. If there is a potential Re criticality in the reactor vessel, some counter plans for the accident management should be established to prevent and mitigate re criticality, and to return the plant to a safe and stable state. In this study, the criticality level following a severe core damage accident was first analyzed using the MCNPX 2.6.0 code. Based on this result, practical strategies in terms of accident management were obtained by charging soluble boron (H 3B O 3) into re flooded water

  7. RB reactor as the U-D2O benchmark criticality system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.

    1998-01-01

    From a rich and valuable database fro 580 different reactor cores formed up to now in the RB nuclear reactor, a selected and well recorded set is carefully chosen and preliminarily proposed as a new uranium-heavy water benchmark criticality system for validation od reactor design computer codes and data libraries. The first results of validation of the MCNP code and adjoining neutron cross section libraries are resented in this paper. (author)

  8. VIPRE-01: a thermal-hydraulic analysis code for reactor cores. Volume 2. User's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuta, J.M.; Koontz, A.S.; Stewart, C.W.; Montgomery, S.D.

    1983-04-01

    VIPRE (Versatile Internals and Component Program for Reactors; EPRI) has been developed for nuclear power utility thermal-hydraulic analysis applications. It is designed to help evaluate nuclear energy reactor core safety limits including minimum departure from nucleate boiling ratio (MDNBR), critical power ratio (CPR), fuel and clad temperatures, and coolant state in normal operation and assumed accident conditions. This volume (Volume 2: User's Manual) describes the input requirements of VIPRE and its auxiliary programs, SPECSET, ASP and DECCON, and lists the input instructions for each code

  9. Cadmium-emitter self-powered thermal neutron detector performance characterization & reactor power tracking capability experiments performed in ZED-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFontaine, M.W., E-mail: physics@execulink.com [LaFontaine Consulting, Kitchener, Ontario (Canada); Zeller, M.B. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Nielsen, K. [Royal Military College of Canada, SLOWPOKE-2 Reactor, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Cadmium-emitter self-powered thermal neutron flux detectors (SPDs), are typically used for flux monitoring and control applications in low temperature, test reactors such as the SLOWPOKE-2. A collaborative program between Atomic Energy of Canada, academia (Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC)) and industry (LaFontaine Consulting) was initiated to characterize the incore performance of a typical Cd-emitter SPD; and to obtain a definitive measure of the capability of the detector to track changes in reactor power in real time. Prior to starting the experiment proper, Chalk River Laboratories' ZED-2 was operated at low power (5 watts nominal) to verify the predicted moderator critical height. Test measurements were then performed with the vertical center of the SPD emitter positioned at the vertical mid-plane of the ZED-2 reactor core. Measurements were taken with the SPD located at lattice position L0 (near center), and repeated at lattice position P0 (in D{sub 2}O reflector). An ionization chamber (part of the ZED-2 control instrumentation) monitored reactor power at a position located on the south side of the outside wall of the reactor's calandria. These experiments facilitated measurement of the absolute thermal neutron sensitivity of the subject Cd-emitter SPD, and validated the power tracking capability of said SPD. Procedural details of the experiments, data, calculations and associated graphs, are presented and discussed. (author)

  10. Feedback from dismantling operations (level 2) on EDF's first generation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, J P.; Dionisio-Gomes, A.; Kus, J P.; Mervaux, P.; Bernet, P.; Dalmas, R.

    2003-01-01

    EDF's policy as regards the dismantling of the reactors that have ceased commercial operation, namely the eight power plants of the first generation and the Creys-Malville power plant, is explained. Generally speaking, prior to the year 2001, EDF had opted for the de-construction of these power plants to comply with a 'long wait' scenario, which consisted of waiting for a period of 5 to 10 years to achieve IAEA level 2 (partial release of the site), then postponing the total de-construction of the facilities for 25 to 50 years. Today, EDF has decided to undertake the total de-construction of these reactors, which have ceased commercial operation, over a period of 25 years. The purpose of this document is to present: - The reactors concerned, their background and their 'regulatory' situation, - The main operations performed and/or currently in progress, - The main elements of feedback from such operations, shedding light on the approach adopted in 2001. The installations concerned by the de-construction programme are as follows: - The 8 power plants of the first generation, which were built during the fifties and sixties and ceased commercial operation between 1973 and 1994, namely: Brennilis (industrial prototype using heavy water technology, jointly operated by EDF and CEA), the 6 power units of the NUGG type (natural uranium gas graphite) at Chinon, Saint-Laurent des Eaux and Bugey and the PWR reactor at Chooz A, - The storage silos at Saint-Laurent, where the sleeves for the fuel assemblies of reactors SLA1 and SLA2 are stored, corresponding to approximately 2000 tonnes of graphite, - The Creys-Malville reactor, FBR (fast breeder reactor) shut down in accordance with a government decision, which is currently undergoing decommissioning. At the current stage, our feedback from the dismantling operations carried out on nuclear facilities is based on (i) the work carried out or in progress that will make it possible to achieve the equivalent of IAEA level 2 in the

  11. Current status of restoration work for obstacle and upper core structure in reactor vessel of experimental fast reactor 'JOYO'. Recovery of MARICO-2 sample part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashida, Takashi; Ito, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    At Joyo reactor MK-III core in May 2007, due to the design deficiencies of the disconnect mechanism of the holding part and the sample part of the experimental apparatus with instrumentation lines (MARICO-2), a disconnect failure incident occurred in the sample part after irradiation test. The deformation of the sample part due to this failure incurred its interference with the lower surface of reactor core upper structure and the holddown axis body. By this, the operating range of the rotary plug was restricted, leading to the partial inhibition of the fuel exchange function that precluded the access to 1/4 of the assemblies of the reactor core. In face of restoration work, the preparation for restoration such the exchange of upper core structure, and the recovery of MARICO-2 sample part are under way. The following items are introduced here: (1) summary of restoration work and overall process of restoration work, (2) recovery operation of MARICO-2 sample part, (3) exchange of the upper core structure that was conducted this year, and (4) results of recovery of MARIKO-2 sample part. (A.O.)

  12. A thermal hydraulic analysis in PWR reactors with UO2 or (U-Th)O2 fuel rods employing a simplified code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Thiago A. dos; Maiorino, José R.; Stefanni, Giovanni L. de

    2017-01-01

    In order to project a nuclear reactor, the neutronic calculus must be validated, so that its thermal limits and safety parameters are respected. Considering this issue, this research aims to evaluate the APTh-100 reactor thermal limits. This PWR is a project developed in Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC) using fuel composed of Uranium and Thorium oxide mixed (U,Th)O 2 . For this purpose, a simplified, although conservative, code was developed in a MATLAB environment named STC-MOX-Th 'Simplified Thermal-hydraulics Code-Mixed Oxide Thorium'. This code provides axial and radial temperature distribution, as well as DNBR distribution over the hottest channel of the reactor core. Moreover, it brings other hydraulic quantities, such as pressure drop over the fuel rod, considering any fuel proportion of (U,Th)O 2 .The software uses basic laws of conservation of mass, momentum and energy, it also calculates the thermal conduction equation, considering the thermal conductive coefficient as a temperature function. In order to solve this equation, the finite elements method was used. Furthermore, the proportion of 36% of UO 2 was used to evaluate the temperature over the fuel rod and DNBR minimum in three burn conditions: beginning, middle and ending. The program has proven to be efficient in every condition and the results evidenced that the APTh-1000 reactor, in an initial analysis, has its thermal limits within the recommended security parameters. (author)

  13. Nuclear reactor physics course for reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeten, P.

    2006-01-01

    The education and training of nuclear reactor operators is important to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. Therefore, a course on basic 'Nuclear reactor physics' in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The aim of the basic course on 'Nuclear Reactor Physics for reactor operators' is to provide the reactor operators with a basic understanding of the main concepts relevant to nuclear reactors. Seen the education level of the participants, mathematical derivations are simplified and reduced to a minimum, but not completely eliminated

  14. Reactor core of FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Hideyuki; Ichimiya, Masakazu.

    1994-01-01

    A reactor core is a homogeneous reactor core divided into two regions of an inner reactor core region at the center and an outer reactor core region surrounding the outside of the inner reactor core region. In this case, the inner reactor core region has a lower plutonium enrichment degree and less amount of neutron leakage in the radial direction, and the outer reactor core region has higher plutonium enrichment degree and greater amount of neutron leakage in the radial direction. Moderator materials containing hydrogen are added only to the inner reactor core fuels in the inner reactor core region. Pins loaded with the fuels with addition of the moderator materials are inserted at a ratio of from 3 to 10% of the total number of the fuel pins. The moderator materials containing hydrogen comprise zirconium hydride, titanium hydride, or calcium hydride. With such a constitution, fluctuation of the power distribution in the radial direction along with burning is suppressed. In addition, an absolute value of the Doppler coefficient can be increased, and a temperature coefficient of coolants can be reduced. (I.N.)

  15. Criticality analysis for mixed thorium-uranium fuel in the Angra-2 PWR reactor using KENO-VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichrowski, Caio C.; Gonçalves, Isadora C.; Oliveira, Claudio L.; Vellozo, Sergio O.; Baptista, Camila O., E-mail: wichrowski@ime.eb.br, E-mail: isadora.goncalves@ime.eb.br, E-mail: d7luiz@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: vellozo@ime.eb.br, E-mail: camila.oliv.baptista@gmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Seção de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    The increasing energy demand associated to the current sustainability challenges have given the thorium nuclear fuel cycle renewed interest in the scientific community. Studies have focused on energy production in different reactor designs through the fission of uranium 233, the product of thorium fertilization by neutrons. In order to make it possible for near future applications a strategy based on the adaptation of current nuclear reactors for the use of thorium fuels is being considered. In this work, bearing in mind these limitations, a code was used to evaluate the effect on criticality (k{sub inf}) of the mixing of thorium and uranium in different proportions in the fuel of a PWR, the German designed Angra-2 Brazilian reactor in order to scrutinise its behaviour and determine the feasibility of an adapted ThO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} mixed fuel cycle using current PWR technology. The analysis is performed using the KENO-VI module in the SCALE 6.1 nuclear safety analysis simulation code and the information is taken from the Angra-2 FSAR (Final Security Analysis Report). (author)

  16. Application of CO{sub 2} selective membrane reactors in pre-combustion decarbonisation systems for power production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven C.A. Kluiters; Virginie C. Feuillade; Jan Wilco Dijkstra; Daniel Jansen; Wim G. Haije [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Petten (Netherlands)

    2006-07-01

    For pre-combustion decarbonisation of fuels for large-scale power production or H{sub 2} generation both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} selective membranes are viable candidates for use in steam reforming and water gas shift membrane reactors. It will be shown that the choice between either option is not a matter of taste, but dictated by the fuel used and, to a lesser extent, the total system layout. Hydrotalcites, clay-like materials, are shown to be promising candidates as membrane material for low temperature, below 400{sup o}C, membrane shift reactors. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Experimental studies of U-Pu-Zr fast reactor fuel pins in the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Lahm, C.E.; Hofman, G.L.

    1990-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory's Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept has been under demonstration in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) since February 1985. Irradiation tests of U-Zr and U-Pu-Zr fuel pins to >15 at. pct burnup have demonstrated their viability as driver fuel prototypes in innovative design liquid metal reactors. A number of technically challenging irradiation effects have been observed and are now under study. Microstructural changes in the fuel are dominated early in exposure by grain boundary cavitation and fission gas bubble growth, producing large amounts of swelling. Irradiation creep and swelling of the austenitic (D9) and martensitic (HT-9) candidate cladding alloys have been measured and correlate well with property modeling efforts. Chemical interaction between the fuel and cladding alloys has been characterized to assess the magnitude of cladding wastage during steady-state irradiation. Significant interdiffusion of the uranium and zirconium occurs producing metallurgically distinct zones in the fuel

  18. CO2 Reduction Assembly Prototype Using Microlith-Based Sabatier Reactor for Ground Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junaedi, Christian; Hawley, Kyle; Walsh, Dennis; Roychoudhury, Subir; Abney, Morgan B.; Perry, Jay L.

    2014-01-01

    The utilization of CO2 to produce life support consumables, such as O2 and H2O, via the Sabatier reaction is an important aspect of NASA's cabin Atmosphere Revitalization System (ARS) and In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) architectures for both low-earth orbit and long-term manned space missions. Carbon dioxide can be reacted with H2, obtained from the electrolysis of water, via Sabatier reaction to produce methane and H2O. Methane can be stored and utilized as propellant while H2O can be either stored or electrolyzed to produce oxygen and regain the hydrogen atoms. Depending on the application, O2 can be used to replenish the atmosphere in human-crewed missions or as an oxidant for robotic and return missions. Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI), with support from NASA, has previously developed an efficient and compact Sabatier reactor based on its Microlith® catalytic technology and demonstrated the capability to achieve high CO2 conversion and CH4 selectivity (i.e., =90% of the thermodynamic equilibrium values) at high space velocities and low operating temperatures. This was made possible through the use of high-heat-transfer and high-surface-area Microlith catalytic substrates. Using this Sabatier reactor, PCI designed, developed, and demonstrated a stand-alone CO2 Reduction Assembly (CRA) test system for ground demonstration and performance validation. The Sabatier reactor was integrated with the necessary balance-of-plant components and controls system, allowing an automated, single "push-button" start-up and shutdown. Additionally, the versatility of the test system prototype was demonstrated by operating it under H2-rich (H2/CO2 of >4), stoichiometric (ratio of 4), and CO2-rich conditions (ratio of <4) without affecting its performance and meeting the equilibrium-predicted water recovery rates. In this paper, the development of the CRA test system for ground demonstration will be discussed. Additionally, the performance results from testing the system at

  19. Sophistication of burnup analysis system for fast reactor (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Kenji; Hirai, Yasushi; Tatsumi, Masahiro

    2010-10-01

    Improvement on prediction accuracy for neutronics characteristics of fast reactor cores is one of the most important study domains in terms of both achievement of high economical plant efficiency based on reasonably advanced designs and increased reliability and safety margins. In former study, considerable improvement on prediction accuracy in neutronics design has been achieved in the development of the unified cross-section set as a fruit of a series of critical experiments such as JUPITER in application of the reactor constant adjustments. For design of fast reactor cores improvement of not only static characteristics but also burnup characteristics is very important. For such purpose, it is necessary to improve the prediction accuracy on burnup characteristics using actual burnup data of 'JOYO' and 'MONJU', experimental and prototype fast reactors. Recently, study on effective burnup method for minor actinides becomes important theme. However, there is a problem that analysis work tends to become inefficient for lack of functionality suitable for analysis of composition change due to burnup since the conventional analysis system is targeted to critical assembly systems. Therefore development of burnup analysis system for fast reactors with modularity and flexibility is being done that would contribute to actual core design work and improvement of prediction accuracy. In the previous study, we have developed a prototype system which has functions of performing core and burnup calculations using given constant files (PDS files) and information based on simple and easy user input data. It has also functions of fuel shuffling which is indispensable for power reactor analysis systems. In the present study, by extending the prototype system, features for handling of control rods and energy collapse of group constants have been designed and implemented. Computational results from the present analysis system are stored into restart files which can be accessible by

  20. Modernization of turbine control system and reactor control system in Almaraz 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulido, C.; Diez, J.; Carrasco, J. A.; Lopez, L.

    2005-01-01

    The replacement of the Turbine Control System and Reactor Control System are part of the Almaraz modernization program for the Instrumentation and Control. For these upgrades Almaraz has selected the Ovation Platform that provides open architecture and easy expansion to other systems, these platforms is highly used in many nuclear and thermal plants around the world. One of the main objective for this project were to minimize the impact on the installation and operation of the plant, for that reason the project is implemented in two phases, Turbine Control upgrade and Reactor Control upgrade. Another important objective was to increase the reliability of the control system making them fully fault tolerant to single failures. The turbine Control System has been installed in Units 1 and 2 while the Reactor Control System will be installed in 2006 and 2007 outages. (Author)

  1. Outline of construction planning on No. 2 Reactor of the Shika Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Tetsuro; Kadoki, Shuichi; Kubo, Tetsuji

    1999-01-01

    The Hokuriku Electric Co., Ltd. carries out the expansion of the Shika Nuclear Power Plant No.2 (ABWR) to start its in March 2006. It is situated in north neighboring side of No. 1 reactor under operation at present, and its main buildings are planned to position a reactor building at mountain side and a turbine building at sea side as well as those in the No. 1 reactor. And, cooling water for steam condenser was taken in from an intake opening built at north side of the lifting space situated at the front of the power plant, and discharged into seawater from a flashing opening positioned about 600 m offing. Here were described on outline of main civil engineering such as base excavation engineering, concrete caisson production, oceanic establishment engineering, and facility for steam condenser, and characteristics of the engineering. (G.K.)

  2. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    After some remarks on the nuclear fuel, on the chain reaction control, on fuel loading and unloading, this article proposes descriptions of the design, principles and operations of different types of nuclear reactors as well as comments on their presence and use in different countries: pressurized water reactors (design of the primary and secondary circuits, volume and chemistry control, backup injection circuits), boiling water reactors, heavy water reactors, graphite and boiling water reactors, graphite-gas reactors, fast breeder reactors, and fourth generation reactors (definition, fast breeding). For these last ones, six concepts are presented: sodium-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, gas-cooled fast reactor, high temperature gas-cooled reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and molten salt reactor

  3. ENSI's view on technical safety for the long term operation of reactors 1 and 2 in the Beznau nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    The reactors 1 and 2 of the Beznau nuclear power plant (KKB) are operated since about 40 years. For an operation beyond the design period of 40 years the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) demands the evidence to be brought that the design limits of the safety relevant components will not be reached during the extended operation period. In 2008 the license holder of KKB delivered the requested documentation on material ageing on the basis of deterministic as well as probabilistic safety analyses and concluded that both reactors can be safely operated beyond 40 years. Thanks to continuous additional outfits, both reactors are in good condition from the point of view of technical safety. With a view to the extension of operation beyond 40 years, KKB already applied the necessary measures regarding technics, finances and personnel in order to keep the present technical level. Since 1991 KKB has analysed and checked components that are difficult to replace. From the evidence presented, ENSI concluded that both reactors are able to be operated up to 60 years long, however with two restrictions for reactor 1 because there the material used for the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) suffered more neutron brittleness than in reactor 2. In addition, reactor 1 is much more affected by ageing phenomena than reactor 2, but, according to neutron fluence calculations, the limiting criteria will not be reached even after 60 years of operation. Some corrosion damages were noted at the lower part of the RPV due to water containing boron acid; they are more pronounced in reactor 1 than in reactor 2. Even though the calculations done by KKB are very conservative, they show that also in the long term the operation limiting criteria about the mechanical resistance of the RPV are never reached. ENSI concludes that the safety design of both KKB reactors ensures safe control of the design basis accidents. Both reactors were continuously fitted with new equipment. With the planed

  4. Ceramics as nuclear reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeve, K.D.

    1975-01-01

    Ceramics are widely accepted as nuclear reactor fuel materials, for both metal clad ceramic and all-ceramic fuel designs. Metal clad UO 2 is used commercially in large tonnages in five different power reactor designs. UO 2 pellets are made by familiar ceramic techniques but in a reactor they undergo complex thermal and chemical changes which must be thoroughly understood. Metal clad uranium-plutonium dioxide is used in present day fast breeder reactors, but may eventually be replaced by uranium-plutonium carbide or nitride. All-ceramic fuels, which are necessary for reactors operating above about 750 0 C, must incorporate one or more fission product retentive ceramic coatings. BeO-coated BeO matrix dispersion fuels and silicate glaze coated UO 2 -SiO 2 have been studied for specialised applications, but the only commercial high temperature fuel is based on graphite in which small fuel particles, each coated with vapour deposited carbon and silicon carbide, are dispersed. Ceramists have much to contribute to many aspects of fuel science and technology. (author)

  5. Novel, Regenerable Microlith Catalytic Reactor for CO2 Reduction via Bosch Process, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI) proposes to develop an extremely compact, lightweight and regenerable MicrolithREG catalytic CO2 reduction reactor, capable of...

  6. Advanced reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.E.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to what the aims of advanced reactor development have to be, if a new generation of nuclear power is really to play an important role in man's energy generation activities in a fragile environment. The background given briefly covers present atmospheric evidence, the current situation in nuclear power, how reactors work and what can go wrong with them, and the present magnitudes of world energy generation. The central part of the paper describes what is currently being done in advanced reactor development and what can be expected from various systems and various elements of it. A vigorous case is made that three elements must be present in any advanced reactor development: (1) breeding; (2) passive safety; and (3) shorter-live nuclear waste. All three are possible. In the right advanced reactor systems the ways of achieving them are known. But R and D is necessary. That is the central argument made in the paper. Not advanced reactor prototype construction at this point, but R and D itself. (author)

  7. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Yoshihiko; Arita, Setsuo; Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Fukazawa, Yukihisa; Ishii, Kazuhiko

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a reactor power control device capable of enhancing an operation efficiency while keeping high reliability and safety in a BWR type nuclear power plant. Namely, the device of the present invention comprises (1) a means for inputting a set value of a generator power and a set value of a reactor power, (2) a means for controlling the reactor power to either smaller one of the reactor power corresponding to the set value of the generator power and the set value of the reactor power. With such procedures, even if the nuclear power plant is set so as to operate it to make the reactor power 100%, when the generator power reaches the upper limit, the reactor power is controlled with a preference given to the upper limit value of the generator power. Accordingly, safety and reliability are not deteriorated. The operation efficiency of the plant can be improved. (I.S.)

  8. Final report on in-reactor creep-fatigue deformation behaviour of a CuCrZr alloy: COFAT 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.N.; Johansen, B.S.; Taehtinen, S.; Moilanen, P.; Saarela, S.; Jacquet, P.; Dekeyser, J.; Stubbins, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    The main objective of the present work was to determine experimentally the mechanical response and resulting microstructural changes in CuCrZr (HT1) alloy exposed concurrently to flux of neutrons and creep-fatigue cyclic loading directly in a fission reactor. Using specially designed test facilities for this purpose, in-reactor creep-fatigue tests have been performed at strain amplitudes of 0.25 and 0.35 % with a holdtime of 10s in the BR-2 reactor at Mol (Belgium). These tests were performed at the ambient temperatures of 326K and 323K. For comparison purposes corresponding out-of-reactor creep-fatigue tests were also carried out. In the following we first describe the details of the creep-fatigue experiments. We then present the main results on the mechanical response of the material in the form of hysteresis loops and the maximum stress amplitude as a function of the number of creep-fatigue cycles during the out-of-reactor and the in-reactor tests carried out at different strain amplitudes. Finally, the dependence of the number of cycles to failure (i.e. creep-fatigue lifetime) on the strain amplitudes is shown. The details of microstructure of the specimens tested out-of-reactor as well as in the reactor were investigated using transmission electron microscopy. The main results on the mechanical response as well as changes in the microstructure are briefly discussed. The main conclusion emerging from the present work is that the lifetime of the in-reactor tested specimens is by a factor of about two longer than in the case of corresponding out-of-reactor tests. (au)

  9. Propagation of negative electrical discharges through 2-dimensional packed bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruszelnicki, Juliusz; Engeling, Kenneth W; Foster, John E; Xiong, Zhongmin; Kushner, Mark J

    2017-01-01

    Plasma-based pollutant remediation and value-added gas production have recently gained increased attention as possible alternatives to the currently-deployed chemical reactor systems. Electrical discharges in packed bed reactors (PBRs) are of interest, due to their ability to synergistically combine catalytic and plasma chemical processes. In principle, these systems could be tuned to produce specific products, based on their application by combinations of power formats, materials, geometries and working gases. Negative voltage, atmospheric-pressure plasma discharges sustained in humid air in a PBR-like geometry were experimentally characterized using ICCD imaging and simulated in 2-dimensions (2D) to provide insights into possible routes to this tunability. Surface ionization waves (SIWs) and positive restrikes through the lattice of dielectric rods were shown to be the principal means of producing reactive species. The number and intensity of SIWs and restrikes are sensitive functions of the alignment of the lattice of dielectric beads (or rods in 2D) with respect to the applied electric field. Decreased spacing between the dielectric elements leads to an increased electric field enhancement in the gas, and therefore locally higher plasma densities, but does not necessarily impact the types of discharges that occur through the lattice. (paper)

  10. Propagation of negative electrical discharges through 2-dimensional packed bed reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruszelnicki, Juliusz; Engeling, Kenneth W.; Foster, John E.; Xiong, Zhongmin; Kushner, Mark J.

    2017-01-01

    Plasma-based pollutant remediation and value-added gas production have recently gained increased attention as possible alternatives to the currently-deployed chemical reactor systems. Electrical discharges in packed bed reactors (PBRs) are of interest, due to their ability to synergistically combine catalytic and plasma chemical processes. In principle, these systems could be tuned to produce specific products, based on their application by combinations of power formats, materials, geometries and working gases. Negative voltage, atmospheric-pressure plasma discharges sustained in humid air in a PBR-like geometry were experimentally characterized using ICCD imaging and simulated in 2-dimensions (2D) to provide insights into possible routes to this tunability. Surface ionization waves (SIWs) and positive restrikes through the lattice of dielectric rods were shown to be the principal means of producing reactive species. The number and intensity of SIWs and restrikes are sensitive functions of the alignment of the lattice of dielectric beads (or rods in 2D) with respect to the applied electric field. Decreased spacing between the dielectric elements leads to an increased electric field enhancement in the gas, and therefore locally higher plasma densities, but does not necessarily impact the types of discharges that occur through the lattice.

  11. Turning points in reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckjord, E.S.

    1995-01-01

    This article provides some historical aspects on nuclear reactor design, beginning with PWR development for Naval Propulsion and the first commercial application at Yankee Rowe. Five turning points in reactor design and some safety problems associated with them are reviewed: (1) stability of Dresden-1, (2) ECCS, (3) PRA, (4) TMI-2, and (5) advanced passive LWR designs. While the emphasis is on the thermal-hydraulic aspects, the discussion is also about reactor systems

  12. Turning points in reactor design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckjord, E.S.

    1995-09-01

    This article provides some historical aspects on nuclear reactor design, beginning with PWR development for Naval Propulsion and the first commercial application at Yankee Rowe. Five turning points in reactor design and some safety problems associated with them are reviewed: (1) stability of Dresden-1, (2) ECCS, (3) PRA, (4) TMI-2, and (5) advanced passive LWR designs. While the emphasis is on the thermal-hydraulic aspects, the discussion is also about reactor systems.

  13. Mimic of OSU research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Hong; Miller, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Ohio State University research reactor (OSURR) is undergoing improvements in its research and educational capabilities. A computer-based digital data acquisition system, including a reactor system mimic, will be installed as part of these improvements. The system will monitor the reactor system parameters available to the reactor operator either in digital parameters available to the reactor operator either in digital or analog form. The system includes two computers. All the signals are sent to computer 1, which processes the data and sends the data through a serial port to computer 2 with a video graphics array VGA monitor, which is utilized to display the mimic system of the reactor

  14. Evaluation on activation activity of reactor in JRR-2 applied 3 dimensional model to neutron flux calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Katsumi; Arigane, Kenji

    2005-03-01

    Revaluation to activation activity of reactor evaluated at the notification of dismantling submitted in 1997 was carried out in JRR-2 where decommissioning was advanced now. In the revaluation, estimation accuracy on neutron streaming at various horizontal experimental tubes was improved by applying 3 dimensional model to neutron transport calculation that had been carried out by 2 dimensional model, and calculating with TORT. As the result, excessive overestimations on horizontal experimental tubes and biological shield that had greatly contributed to total activation activity in evaluation at the notification of dismantling was revised, sum of their activation activities in the revaluation decreased to 1/18 (case after 1 year from the permanent shutdown of reactor) of evaluation at the notification of dismantling, and the structural materials that had large activation activity were changed. By the above, it was shown that introducing 3 dimensional model was effective in evaluation on activation activity of the research reactor that had a lot of various experimental tubes. Total activation activity of reactor by the revaluation depended on control rods, thermal shield plates and horizontal experimental tubes, and the value after 1 year from the permanent shutdown of reactor was 1.9x10 14 Bq. (author)

  15. In-pile modelling of nuclear fuel element for the MTR type reactors. Pt. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhadi, Kazem [AEOI, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiations Application Research School

    2014-06-15

    In part two of the present paper, neutronic properties of the pool-type research reactor core are used to assess the similitude laws derived for out-of-pile modelling of the fuel element. The benchmark reactor used for this purpose is an IAEA 5 MW thermal pool-type research reactor currently in operation. The neutronic properties analysis are based on typical 2 200 m/sec and neutrons having 0.025 eV energy. The non-leakage capability of the system is estimated in terms of diffusion length. Also the slowing down power and the moderating ratio of the modelled methanol coolant are calculated in terms of lethargy of the diffusing medium. It is shown that the Iron which is substituted for Aluminium cladding is a relatively low absorber of neutrons but has a high neutron leakage. Methanol which replaced ordinary water as coolant is not a suitable coolant due to high neutrons absorbing substance. It is concluded that although Iron as a cladding material and methanol as a coolant meet the modelling out-of-pile criteria but are not satisfying neutronic properties. Therefore, use of them as a model clad and coolant are not suggested for research reactors. (orig.)

  16. Tritium release from lithium silicate and lithium aluminate, in-reactor and out-of-reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1976-09-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the generation and evolution of tritium and helium in lithium aluminate (LiAlO 2 ) and lithium silicate (Li 2 SiO 3 ) by the reaction: Li 6 + n → 4 He + T. Targets were irradiated 4.4 days in the K-West Reactor snout facility. (Silicate GVR* approximately 2.0 cc/cc; aluminate GVR approximately 1.4 cc/cc.) Gas release in-reactor was determined by post-irradiation drilling experiments on aluminum ampoules containing silicate and aluminate targets. In-reactor tritium release (at approximately 100 0 C) was found to decrease linearly with increasing target density. Tritium released in-reactor was primarily in the noncondensible form (HT and T 2 ), while in laboratory extractions (300-1300 0 C), the tritium appeared primarily in the condensible form (HTO and T 2 O). Concentrations of HT (and presumably HTO) were relatively high, indicating moisture pickup in canning operations or by inleakage of moisture after the capsule was welded. Impurities in extracted gases included H 2 O, CO 2 , CO, O 2 , H 2 , NO, SO 2 , SiF 4 and traces of hydrocarbons

  17. A KINETIC MODEL FOR H2O2/UV PROCESS IN A COMPLETELY MIXED BATCH REACTOR. (R825370C076)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A dynamic kinetic model for the advanced oxidation process (AOP) using hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet irradiation (H2O2/UV) in a completely mixed batch reactor (CMBR) is developed. The model includes the known elementary chemical and photochemical reac...

  18. Installation modification of the reactor No.2 of Ikata nuclear power plant of Shikoku Electric Power Company, Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The application was made on August 25, 1979, from the president of the Shikoku Electric Power Company, Inc., to the Minister of International Trade and Industry, relating to the installation modification of the reactor No. 2 in the Ikata nuclear power plant. The inquiry was submitted on September 28, 1979, from the Minister of International Trade and Industry to the Nuclear Safety Commission, after the safety evaluation in the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, and the investigation and deliberation were started on October 1, 1979, in the Nuclear Safety Commission. The content of the modification is to add the circuit actuated by the abnormal low pressure signal of the reactor to the actuating circuit of the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) and to increase the new fuel storage capacity from about 1/3 core to about 2/3 core. The additional signal circuit is composed of the logic circuit of ''2 out of 4'' and is multichannel design. The circuit is independent from the reactor control system and the conventional signal circuit of the concurrence of low pressure in the reactor and low level in the pressurizer. With the addition of the circuit of abnormal low pressure signal of the reactor, the countermeasures for preventing ECCS start by mistake are also added. These modifications give no influence to the functions of the reactor control system and reactor protection system. The function and the performance of ECCS were analyzed and evaluated accompanying these modifications assuming the loss of coolant accident. Concerning the new fuel storage capacity, the type of racks is modified from angle type to can type, and the subcriticality is kept even at the time of water flood. (Nakai, Y.)

  19. Reactor Structure Materials: Corrosion of Reactor Core Internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dyck, S.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on the corrosion of reactor core internals are: (1) to gain mechanistic insight into the Irradition Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) phenomenon by studying the influence of separate parameters in well controlled experiments; (2) to develop and validate a predictive capability on IASCC by model description and (3) to define and validate countermeasures and monitoring techniques for application in reactors. Progress and achievements in 1999 are described

  20. Uranium redistribution under oxidizing conditions in Oklo natural reactor zone 2, Gabon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, H.; Ohnuki, T.; Murakami, T.; Gauthier-Lafaye, F.

    1995-01-01

    This mineralogical study was completed to elucidate the relationships between uranium distribution and alteration products of the host rock of natural reactor zone clays just below the reactor core. Uraninite is preserved without any alteration in the reactor core. Uranium minerals are found to be present in the fractures in the reactor zone clays associated with iron-mineral veins, galena and Ti-bearing minerals. Uranium, for which the phases could not be identified, occurs in iron-mineral veins and the iron-mineral rim of pyrite grains in the reactor zone clays. Uranium is not associated with granular iron minerals occurring in the illite matrix of the reactor zone clays. The degree of crystallinity and uranium content of the three iron-bearing alteration products suggest that they formed under different conditions; the granular iron minerals, under alteration conditions where uranium was not mobilized while the iron-mineral veins and the iron-mineral rim of pyrite, under conditions in which uranium is mobilized after the formation of the granular iron minerals

  1. Current status of restoration work for obstacle and upper core structure in reactor vessel of experimental fast reactor 'Joyo'. 1. MARICO-2 subassembly retrieval work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Hiroyuki; Ashida, Takashi; Ito, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    At Joyo reactor MK-III core in May 2007, due to the design deficiencies of the disconnect mechanism of the holding part and the sample part of the experimental apparatus with instrumentation lines (MARICO-2), a disconnect failure incident occurred in the sample part after irradiation test. The deformation of the sample part due to this failure incurred its interference with the lower surface of reactor core upper structure and the holddown axis body. By this, the operating range of the rotary plug was restricted, leading to the partial inhibition of the fuel exchange function that precluded the access to 1/4 of the assemblies of the reactor core. In face of restoration work, the preparation for restoration such the exchange of upper core structure, and the recovery of MARICO-2 sample part are under way. This paper introduces the progress of restoration work and the future work plan, with a focus on the outline of overall restoration work, the method / problems / measures for MARICO-2 sample part recovery operations, and fabrication of sample part recovery device. (A.O.)

  2. Calculation of photon dose for Dalat research reactor in case of loss of reactor tank water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Vinh Vinh; Huynh Ton Nghiem; Nguyen Kien Cuong

    2007-01-01

    Photon sources of actinides and fission products were estimated by ORIGEN2 code with the modified cross-section library for Dalat research reactor (DRR) using new cross-section generated by WIMS-ANL code. Photon sources of reactor tank water calculated from the experimental data. MCNP4C2 with available non-analog Monte Carlo model and ANSI/ANL-6.1.1-1977 flux-to-dose factors were used for dose estimation. The agreement between calculation results and those of measurements showed that the methods and models used to get photon sources and dose were acceptable. In case the reactor water totally leaks out from the reactor tank, the calculated dose is very high at the top of reactor tank while still low in control room. In the reactor hall, the operation staffs can access for emergency works but with time limits. (author)

  3. Review of mirror fusion reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    Three magnetic confinement concepts, based on the mirror principle, are described. These mirror concepts are summarized as follows: (1) fusion-fission hybrid reactor, (2) tandem mirror reactor, and (3) reversed field mirror reactor

  4. Visible-Light-Responsive Photocatalysis: Ag-Doped TiO2 Catalyst Development and Reactor Design Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, Janelle L.; Hintze, Paul E.; Meier, Anne; Shah, Malay G.; Devor, Robert W.; Surma, Jan M.; Maloney, Phillip R.; Bauer, Brint M.; Mazyck, David W.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the alteration of titanium dioxide to become visible-light-responsive (VLR) has been a major focus in the field of photocatalysis. Currently, bare titanium dioxide requires ultraviolet light for activation due to its band gap energy of 3.2 eV. Hg-vapor fluorescent light sources are used in photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) reactors to provide adequate levels of ultraviolet light for catalyst activation; these mercury-containing lamps, however, hinder the use of this PCO technology in a spaceflight environment due to concerns over crew Hg exposure. VLR-TiO2 would allow for use of ambient visible solar radiation or highly efficient visible wavelength LEDs, both of which would make PCO approaches more efficient, flexible, economical, and safe. Over the past three years, Kennedy Space Center has developed a VLR Ag-doped TiO2 catalyst with a band gap of 2.72 eV and promising photocatalytic activity. Catalyst immobilization techniques, including incorporation of the catalyst into a sorbent material, were examined. Extensive modeling of a reactor test bed mimicking air duct work with throughput similar to that seen on the International Space Station was completed to determine optimal reactor design. A bench-scale reactor with the novel catalyst and high-efficiency blue LEDs was challenged with several common volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in ISS cabin air to evaluate the system's ability to perform high-throughput trace contaminant removal. The ultimate goal for this testing was to determine if the unit would be useful in pre-heat exchanger operations to lessen condensed VOCs in recovered water thus lowering the burden of VOC removal for water purification systems.

  5. On the anisotropy of in-reactor creep of Zr-2.5Nb tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causey, A.R.; Holt, R.A.

    1993-06-01

    Creep specimens made from cold-worked Zr-2.5Nb tubes, fabricated with two different microstructures and crystallographic textures, were irradiated in the Osiris reactor in France in a fast-neutron flux of about 1.8 x 10 18 n.m -2 .s -1 , E > MeV, at 553 and 585 K. The hoop stresses from internal Fluences, up to 4 x 10 25 n.m -2 , more than double those achieved an any other creep test on cold-worked Zr-2.5Nb in which both axial and transverse strain were measured. Creep rates were obtained from strain versus fluence plots, and creep compliances were obtained from plots of the strain rates against hoop stress for each material at each temperature. The ratio of creep rates at 583 K to those at 553 K was ∼ 1.36, a little higher than that extrapolated from stress relaxation results at temperatures between 523 and 568 K. The ratio of the biaxial creep compliance in the axial direction to that in the transverse directions is different for the two test materials: 0.0 to -0.1 for the fuel sheathing texture and 0.5 to 0.6 for the pressure tube texture. The results were analysed using a self-consistent model developed to account for the contributions to the creep anisotropy of the three microstructure parameters involved and to account for the grain interaction effects. The model, which was normalized to test reactor and power reactor creep data for cold-worked Zr-2.5Nb tubes, predicted the ratio of the creep compliancies to be -0.26 and 0.63, respectively. Thus the creep anisotropy of Zr-2.5Nb tubes with pressure-tube-like crystallographic texture can be adequately predicted. (author). 18 refs., 4 tabs., 13 figs

  6. COSTANZA, 1-D 2 Group Space-Dependent Reactor Dynamics of Spatial Reactor with 1 Group Delayed Neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agazzi, A.; Gavazzi, C.; Vincenti, E.; Monterosso, R.

    1964-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: The programme studies the spatial dynamics of reactor TESI, in the two group and one space dimension approximation. Only one group of delayed neutrons is considered. The programme simulates the vertical movement of the control rods according to any given movement law. The programme calculates the evolution of the fluxes and temperature and precursor concentration in space and time during the power excursion. 2 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The maximum number of lattice points is 100

  7. Present status of reactor physics in the United States and Japan-IV. 2. Micro-Reactor Physics of MOX-Fueled Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Toshikazu

    2001-01-01

    Recently, fuel assemblies of light water reactors have become complicated because of the extension of fuel burnup and the use of high-enriched Gd and mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel, etc. In conventional assembly calculations, the detailed flux distribution, spectrum distribution, and space dependence of self-shielding within a fuel pellet are not directly taken into account. The experimental and theoretical study of investigating these microscopic properties is named micro-reactor physics. The purpose of this work is to show the importance of micro-reactor physics in the analysis of MOX fuel assemblies. Several authors have done related studies; however, their studies are limited to fuel pin cells, and they are never mentioned with regard to burnup effect, which is important for actual core design. We used the subgroup method to treat the space dependence of the self-shielding effect of heavy nuclides, and we used the characteristics method to treat the angular dependence of neutron flux in a fuel pellet. Figure 1 compares the power distributions in MOX and UO 2 fuel cells at the beginning of burnup. The power is calculated with and without considering the space dependence of the self-shielding effect of the cross sections. For the MOX cell, the power distribution has a peak at the cell edge because of large Pu absorption especially when considering the spatial self-shielding effect. When a MOX rod is adjacent to UO 2 fuel rods, the flux distribution has an azimuthal dependence in addition to the radial dependence within a rod. For example, consider a 2x2 fuel assembly composed of three UO 2 rods and one MOX rod, with the mirror reflection boundary condition. A burnup calculation was done with the condition; the radius of the MOX pellet is divided into two regions, and the azimuthal angle is divided into eight. The number density of 239 Pu at 44 000 MWd/t for the MOX rod shows azimuthal dependence by 20%. The maximum burnup occurs in the direction of the UO 2 rods. This is

  8. Verification of spectral burn-up codes on 2D fuel assemblies of the GFR demonstrator ALLEGRO reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Čerba, Štefan; Vrban, Branislav; Lüley, Jakub; Dařílek, Petr; Zajac, Radoslav; Nečas, Vladimír; Haščik, Ján

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Verification of the MCNPX, HELIOS and SCALE codes. • MOX and ceramic fuel assembly. • Gas-cooled fast reactor. • Burnup calculation. - Abstract: The gas-cooled fast reactor, which is one of the six GEN IV reactor concepts, is characterized by high operational temperatures and a hard neutron spectrum. The utilization of commonly used spectral codes, developed mainly for LWR reactors operated in the thermal/epithermal neutron spectrum, may be connected with systematic deviations since the main development effort of these codes has been focused on the thermal part of the neutron spectrum. To be able to carry out proper calculations for fast systems the used codes have to account for neutron resonances including the self-shielding effect. The presented study aims at verifying the spectral HELIOS, MCNPX and SCALE codes on the basis of depletion calculations of 2D MOX and ceramic fuel assemblies of the ALLEGRO gas-cooled fast reactor demonstrator in infinite lattice

  9. A new MTR fuel for a new MTR reactor: UMo for the Jules Horowitz reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guigon, B. [CEA Cadarache, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire DEN, Reacteur Jules Horowitz, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Vacelet, H. [Compagnie pour l' Etude et la Realisation de Combustibles Atomiques, CERCA, Etablissement de Romans, 26 (France); Dornbusch, D. [Technicatome, Service d' Architecture Generale, 13 - Aix-en-Provence (France)

    2003-07-01

    Within some years, the Jules Horowitz Reactor will be the only working experimental reactor (material and fuel testing reactor) in France. It will have to provide facilities for a wide range of needs: from activation analysis to power reactor fuel qualification. In this paper will be presented the main characteristics of the Jules Horowitz Reactor: its total power, neutron flux, fuel element... Safety criteria will be explained. Finally merits and disadvantages of UMo compared to the standard U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel will be discussed. (authors)

  10. Reactor Materials Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Walle, E.

    2001-01-01

    The activities of the Reactor Materials Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) fusion, in particular mechanical testing; (2) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (3) nuclear fuel; and (4) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (RPVS)

  11. Reactor Materials Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walle, E

    2001-04-01

    The activities of the Reactor Materials Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) fusion, in particular mechanical testing; (2) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (3) nuclear fuel; and (4) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (RPVS)

  12. Final report on in-reactor creep-fatigue deformation behaviour of a CuCrZr alloy: COFAT 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Bachu Narain; Johansen, Bjørn Sejr; Tähtinen, S.

    facilities for this purpose, in-reactor creep-fatigue tests have been performed at strain amplitudes of 0.25 and 0.35 % with a holdtime of 10s in the BR-2 reactor at Mol (Belgium). These tests were performed at the ambient temperatures of 326K and 323K. For comparison purposes corresponding out...

  13. Investigation of tritium and 233U breeding in a fission-fusion hybrid reactor fuelling with ThO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildiz, K.; Sahin, S.; Sahin, H. M.; Acir, A.; Yalcin, S.; Altinok, T.; Bayrak, M.; Alkan, M.; Durukan, O.

    2007-01-01

    In the world, thorium reserves are three times more than natural Uranium reserves. It is planned in the near future that nuclear reactors will use thorium as a fuel. Thorium is not a fissile isotope because it doesn't make fission with thermal neutrons so it could be converted to 2 33U isotope which has very high quality fission cross-section with thermal neutrons. 2 33U isotope can be used in present LWRs as an enrichment fuel. In the fusion reactors, tritium is the most important fossil fuel. Because tritium is not natural isotope, it has to be produced in the reactor. The purpose of this work is to investigate the tritium and 2 33U breeding in a fission-fusion hybrid reactor fuelling with ThO 2 for Δt=10 days during a reactor operation period in five years. The neutronic analysis is performed on an experimental hybrid blanket geometry. In the center of the hybrid blanket, there is a line neutron source in a cylindrical cavity, which simulates the fusion plasma chamber where high energy neutrons (14.1 MeV) are produced. The conventional fusion reaction delivers the external neutron source for blankets following, 2 D + 3 T →? 4 He (3.5 MeV) + n (14.1 MeV). (1) The fuel zone made up of natural-ThO 2 fuel and it is cooled with different coolants. In this work, five different moderator materials, which are Li 2 BeF 4 , LiF-NaF-BeF 2 , Li 2 0Sn 8 0, natural Lithium and Li 1 7Pb 8 3, are used as coolants. The radial reflector, called tritium breeding zones, is made of different Lithium compounds and graphite in sandwich structure. In the work, eight different Lithium compounds were used as tritium breeders in the tritium breeding zones, which are Li 3 N, Li 2 O, Li 2 O 2 , Li 2 TiO 3 , Li 4 SiO 3 , Li 2 ZrO 3 , LiBr and LiH. Neutron transport calculations are conducted in spherical geometry with the help of SCALE4.4A SYSTEM by solving the Boltzmann transport equation with code CSAS and XSDRNPM, under consideration of unresolved and resolved resonances, in S 8 -P 3

  14. Nuclear reactors situation in Japan after the major earthquake of March 11, 2011. March 16, 2011, 2:00 PM status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This situation note is established according to the information gained on March 16, 2011, at 2:00 PM, by the crisis centre of the French institute of radiation protection and nuclear safety (IRSN). The situation of the reactors No. 1, 2, 3 and 4 and of the spent fuel pools of all 6 reactors of the Fukushima I site (Dai-ichi), of the reactors No. 1, 2, 3 and 4 of the Fukushima II site (Daini), and of the Onagawa and Tokai power plants is briefly presented with the progress of the accident management actions. (J.S.)

  15. RB research reactor safety report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotic, O.; Pesic, M.; Vranic, S.

    1979-04-01

    This new version of the safety report is a revision of the safety report written in 1962 when the RB reactor started operation after reconstruction. The new safety report was needed because reactor systems and components have been improved and the administrative procedures were changed. the most important improvements and changes were concerned with the use of highly enriched fuel (80% enriched), construction of reactor converter outside the reactor vessel, improved control system by two measuring start-up channels, construction of system for heavy water leak detection, new inter phone connection between control room and other reactor rooms. This report includes description of reactor building with installations, rector vessel, reactor core, heavy water system, control system, safety system, dosimetry and alarm systems, experimental channels, neutron converter, reactor operation. Safety aspects contain analyses of accident reasons, method for preventing reactivity insertions, analyses of maximum hypothetical accidents for cores with natural uranium, 2% enriched and 80% enriched fuel elements. Influence of seismic events on the reactor safety and well as coupling between reactor and the converter are parts of this document

  16. Generation IV reactors: international projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.; Fiorini, G.L.; Kupitz, J.; Depisch, F.; Hittner, D.

    2003-01-01

    Generation IV international forum (GIF) was initiated in 2000 by DOE (American department of energy) in order to promote nuclear energy in a long term view (2030). GIF has selected 6 concepts of reactors: 1) VHTR (very high temperature reactor system, 2) GHR (gas-cooled fast reactor system), 3) SFR (sodium-cooled fast reactor system, 4) SCWR (super-critical water-cooled reactor system), 5) LFR (lead-cooled fast reactor system), and 6) MFR (molten-salt reactor system). All these 6 reactor systems have been selected on criteria based on: - a better contribution to sustainable development (through their aptitude to produce hydrogen or other clean fuels, or to have a high energy conversion ratio...) - economic profitability, - safety and reliability, and - proliferation resistance. The 6 concepts of reactors are examined in the first article, the second article presents an overview of the results of the international project on innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles (INPRO) within IAEA. The project finished its first phase, called phase-IA. It has produced an outlook into the future role of nuclear energy and defined the need for innovation. The third article is dedicated to 2 international cooperations: MICANET and HTR-TN. The purpose of MICANET is to propose to the European Commission a research and development strategy in order to develop the assets of nuclear energy for the future. Future reactors are expected to be more multiple-purposes, more adaptable, safer than today, all these developments require funded and coordinated research programs. The aim of HTR-TN cooperation is to promote high temperature reactor systems, to develop them in a long term perspective and to define their limits in terms of burn-up and operating temperature. (A.C.)

  17. Updated Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan, Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corwin, William R [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Halsey, William [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Hayner, George [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Klett, James William [ORNL; McGreevy, Timothy E [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

    2005-12-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Program will address the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. Such R&D will be guided by the technology roadmap developed for the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) over two years with the participation of over 100 experts from the GIF countries. The roadmap evaluated over 100 future systems proposed by researchers around the world. The scope of the R&D described in the roadmap covers the six most promising Generation IV systems. The effort ended in December 2002 with the issue of the final Generation IV Technology Roadmap [1.1]. The six most promising systems identified for next generation nuclear energy are described within the roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor - SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor - VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor - GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor - LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor - SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides, and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of the structural materials needed to ensure their safe and reliable operation. Accordingly, DOE has identified materials as one of the focus areas for Gen IV technology development.

  18. Farewell to a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skanborg, P.

    1976-01-01

    Denmark's second reactor, DR 2, whose first criticality took place the night of 18/19 December 1958 was shut down for the last time on 31 October 1975. It was a light-water moderrated and cooled reactor of swimming-pool type with a thermal power of 5 MW, using 90% enriched uranium. The operation is described. The reactor and auxiliary equipment are now being put 'in store' - all fuel elements sent for reprocessing, the reactor tank and cooling circuits emptied, and a lead shielding placed over the tank opening. The rest of the equipment will remain in place. (B.P.)

  19. Reactor feedwater device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Noboru.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To suppress soluble radioactive corrosion products in a feedwater device. Method: In a light water cooled nuclear reactor, an iron injection system is connected to feedwater pipeways and the iron concentration in the feedwater or reactor coolant is adjusted between twice and ten times of the nickel concentration. When the nickel/iron ratio in the reactor coolant or feedwater goes nearer to 1/2, iron ions are injected together with iron particles to the reactor coolant to suppress the leaching of stainless steels, decrease the nickel in water and increase the iron concentration. As a result, it is possible to suppress the intrusion of nickel as one of parent nuclide of radioactive nuclides. Further, since the iron particles intruded into the reactor constitute nuclei for capturing the radioactive nuclides to reduce the soluble radioactive corrosion products, the radioactive nuclides deposited uniformly to the inside of the pipeways in each of the coolant circuits can be reduced. (Kawakami, Y.)

  20. Preliminary LOCA analysis of the westinghouse small modular reactor using the WCOBRA/TRAC-TF2 thermal-hydraulics code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, J.; Kucukboyaci, V. N.; Nguyen, L.; Frepoli, C. [Westinghouse Electric Company, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (> 225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR) with all primary components, including the steam generator and the pressurizer located inside the reactor vessel. The reactor core is based on a partial-height 17x17 fuel assembly design used in the AP1000{sup R} reactor core. The Westinghouse SMR utilizes passive safety systems and proven components from the AP1000 plant design with a compact containment that houses the integral reactor vessel and the passive safety systems. A preliminary loss of coolant accident (LOCA) analysis of the Westinghouse SMR has been performed using the WCOBRA/TRAC-TF2 code, simulating a transient caused by a double ended guillotine (DEG) break in the direct vessel injection (DVI) line. WCOBRA/TRAC-TF2 is a new generation Westinghouse LOCA thermal-hydraulics code evolving from the US NRC licensed WCOBRA/TRAC code. It is designed to simulate PWR LOCA events from the smallest break size to the largest break size (DEG cold leg). A significant number of fluid dynamics models and heat transfer models were developed or improved in WCOBRA/TRAC-TF2. A large number of separate effects and integral effects tests were performed for a rigorous code assessment and validation. WCOBRA/TRAC-TF2 was introduced into the Westinghouse SMR design phase to assist a quick and robust passive cooling system design and to identify thermal-hydraulic phenomena for the development of the SMR Phenomena Identification Ranking Table (PIRT). The LOCA analysis of the Westinghouse SMR demonstrates that the DEG DVI break LOCA is mitigated by the injection and venting from the Westinghouse SMR passive safety systems without core heat up, achieving long term core cooling. (authors)

  1. Reactor calculations for improving utilization of TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravnik, M.

    1986-01-01

    A brief review of our work on reactor calculations of 250 kW TRIGA with mixed core (standard + FLIP fuel) will be presented. The following aspects will be treated: - development of computer programs; - optimization of in-core fuel management with respect to fuel costs and irradiation channels utilization. TRIGAP programme package will be presented as an example of computer programs. It is based on 2-group 1-D diffusion approximation and besides calculations offers possibilities for operational data logging and fuel inventory book-keeping as well. It is developed primarily for the research reactor operators as a tool for analysing reactor operation and fuel management. For this reason it is arranged for a small (PC) computer. Second part will be devoted to reactor physics properties of the mixed cores. Results of depletion calculations will be presented together with measured data to confirm some general guidelines for optimal mixed core fuel management. As the results are obtained using TRIGAP program package results can be also considered as an illustration and qualification for its application. (author)

  2. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, I.; Gutscher, E.

    1980-01-01

    The core contains a critical mass of UN or U 2 N 3 in the form of a noncritical solution with melted Sn being kept below a N atmosphere. The lining of the reactor core consists of graphite. If fission progresses part of the melted metal solution is removed and cleaned from fission products. The reactor temperatures lie in the range of 300 to 2000 0 C. (Examples and tables). (RW) [de

  3. Jules Horowitz reactor (RJH): its design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuy, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    This article presents the design of the new irradiation facility (Jules Horowitz reactor) that is planned to be built on the Cadarache site of Cea. 2 principles have been followed. The first one is based on a physical separation between the systems and activities related to the reactor and the experiments from one hand and the other systems and means dedicated to the treatment of the experimental devices before and after irradiation on the other hand. This first principle implies to build 2 buildings: the reactor building and the nuclear auxiliaries building. Inside the reactor building activities from the reactor itself are separated from those dedicated to experimentation. In order to maximize the efficiency of such a reactor, an important number of simultaneous experiments is expected, which will generate an endless flux of incoming and out-going experiments and as a consequence an important handling work between the different work posts. The second principle aims at easing any handling work without breaking the rules of confinement. The different storing pools, the water pits that lead to the 5 hot cells and the reactor tank will communicate through a water-filled canal that will link the 2 buildings. (A.C.)

  4. Molten salt reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sood, D.D.

    1980-01-01

    Molten salt reactor is an advanced breeder concept which is suited for the utilization of thorium for nuclear power production. This reactor is based on the use of solutions of uranium or plutonium fluorides in LiF-BeF 2 -ThF 4 as fuel. Unlike the conventional reactors, no external coolant is used in the reactor core and the fuel salt itself is circulated through heat exchangers to transfer the fission produced heat to a secondary salt (NaF-NaBF 4 ) for steam generation. A part of the fuel stream is continuously processed to isolate 233 Pa, so that it can decay to fissile 233 U without getting converted to 234 Pa, and for the removal of neutron absorbing fission products. This on-line processing scheme makes this reactor concept to achieve a breeding ratio of 1.07 which is the highest for any thermal breeder reactor. Experimental studies at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, have established the use of plutonium as fuel for this reactor. This molten salt reactor concept is described and the work conducted at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre is summarised. (auth.)

  5. Experience with the RE fuel transition at the Studsvik R2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazsit, I.; Saltvedt, K.

    1991-01-01

    Irradiation of 7 LEU fuel elements is underway in the Studsvik R2 reactor. Four of these have 490 g U-235, and three 320 g U-235 loading, and the enrichment is 19.7% for all of them. The irradiation of LEU fuel started in 1987. The heavier elements have burnup figures 67% (CERCA), 50% (B and W), 47% (NUKEM) and 19% (B and W). One of the lighter elements has reached a burnup of 65%. To support the whole-core conversion process, reactor physical calculations were performed to see if a one-step conversion is possible with a suitable fuel management strategy such that all HEU fuel is burned up. The calculations show that it is possible to perform such a conversion with fuel elements containing 400 g U-235. (orig.)

  6. Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharbaugh, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes an improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction comprising: (a) a nuclear reactor core having a bottom platform support structure; (b) a reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core; (c) a containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and having a sidewall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and having a base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall; (d) a central small diameter post anchored to the containment structure base mat and extending upwardly to the reactor vessel to axially fix the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and provide a center column support for the lower end of the reactor core; (e) annular support structure disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall and extending about the lower end of the core; (f) structural support means disposed between the containment structure base mat and bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and cooperating for supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment structure base mat to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event; (g) a bed of insulating material disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall; freely expand radially from the central post as it heats up while providing continuous support thereof; (h) a deck supported upon the wall of the containment vessel above the top open end of the reactor vessel; and (i) extendible and retractable coupling means extending between the deck and the top open end of the reactor vessel and flexibly and sealably interconnecting the reactor vessel at its top end to the deck

  7. Update on reactors and reactor instruments in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K. R.

    1991-10-01

    The 1980s have seen the commissioning of several medium flux (∼10 14 neutrons/cm 2s) research reactors in Asia. The reactors are based on indigenous design and development in India and China. At Dhruva reactor (India), a variety of neutron spectrometers have been established that have provided useful data related to the structure of high- Tc materials, phonon density of states, magnetic moment distributions and micellar aggregation during the last couple of years. Polarised neutron analysis, neutron interferometry and neutron spin echo methods are some of the new techniques under development. The spectrometers and associated automaton, detectors and neutron guides have all been indigenously developed. This paper summarises the developments and on-going activities in Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand.

  8. Update on reactors and reactor instruments in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, K.R.

    1991-01-01

    The 1980s have seen the commissioning of several medium flux (∝10 14 neutrons/cm 2 s) research reactors in Asia. The reactors are based on indigenous design and development in India and China. At Dhruva reactor (India), a variety of neutron spectrometers have been established that have provided useful data related to the structure of high-Tc materials, phonon density of states, magnetic moment distributions and micellar aggregation during the last couple of years. Polarised neutron analysis, neutron interferometry and neutron spin echo methods are some of the new techniques under development. The spectrometers and associated automaton, detectors and neutron guides have all been indigenously developed. This paper summarises the developments and on-going activities in Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand. (orig.)

  9. Reactor physics innovations of the advanced CANDU reactor core: adaptable and efficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, P.S.W.; Hopwood, J.M.; Bonechi, M.

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) is designed to have a benign, operator-friendly core physics characteristic, including a slightly negative coolant-void reactivity and a moderately negative power coefficient. The discharge fuel burnup is about three times that of natural uranium fuel in current CANDU reactors. Key features of the reactor physics innovations in the ACR core include the use of H 2 O coolant, slightly enriched uranium (SEU) fuel, and D 2 O moderator in a reduced lattice pitch. These innovations result in substantial improvements in economics, as well as significant enhancements in reactor performance and waste reduction over the current reactor design. The ACR can be readily adapted to different power outputs by increasing or decreasing the number of fuel channels, while maintaining identical fuel and fuel-channel characteristics. The flexibility provided by on-power refuelling and simple fuel bundle design enables the ACR to easily adapt to the use of plutonium and thorium fuel cycles. No major modifications to the basic ACR design are required because the benign neutronic characteristics of the SEU fuel cycle are also inherent in these advanced fuel cycles. (author)

  10. Computational analysis of supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halimi, Burhanuddin; Suh, Kune Y.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Computational analysis of S-CO 2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. ► Validation of numerical model with literature data. ► Recompression S-CO 2 Brayton cycle thermal efficiency of 42.44%. ► Reheating concept to enhance the cycle thermal efficiency. ► Higher efficiency achieved by the proposed concept. - Abstract: The Optimized Supercritical Cycle Analysis (OSCA) code is being developed to analyze the design of a supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO 2 ) driven Brayton cycle for a fusion reactor as part of the Modular Optimal Balance Integral System (MOBIS). This system is based on a recompression Brayton cycle. S-CO 2 is adopted as the working fluid for MOBIS because of its easy availability, high density and low chemical reactivity. The reheating concept is introduced to enhance the cycle thermal efficiency. The helium-cooled lithium lead model AB of DEMO fusion reactor is used as reference in this paper.

  11. Reactor core structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashinakagawa, Emiko; Sato, Kanemitsu.

    1992-01-01

    Taking notice on the fact that Fe based alloys and Ni based alloys are corrosion resistant in a special atmosphere of a nuclear reactor, Fe or Ni based alloys are applied to reactor core structural components such as fuel cladding tubes, fuel channels, spacers, etc. On the other hand, the neutron absorption cross section of zirconium is 0.18 barn while that of iron is 2.52 barn and that of nickel is 4.6 barn, which amounts to 14 to 25 times compared with that of zirconium. Accordingly, if the reactor core structural components are constituted by the Fe or Ni based alloys, neutron economy is lowered. Since it is desirable that neutrons contribute to uranium fission with least absorption to the reactor core structural components, the reactor core structural components are constituted with the Fe or Ni based alloys of good corrosion resistance only at a portion in contact with reactor water, that is, at a surface portion, while the main body is constituted with zircalloy in the present invention. Accordingly, corrosion resistnace can be kept while keeping small neutron absorption cross section. (T.M.)

  12. Research and development of a super fast reactor (12). Considerations for the reactor characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Shoji; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2008-01-01

    A research program aimed at developing the Super Fast Reactor (Super FR) has been entrusted by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of Japan since December 2005. It includes the following three projects. (A) Development of the Super Fast Reactor concept. (B)Thermal-hydraulic experiments. (C) Materials development. Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) has joined this program and works on part (A) together with the University of Tokyo. From the utility's viewpoint, it is important to consider the most desirable characteristics for Super FR to have. Four issues were identified in project (A), (1) Fuel design, (2) Reactor core design, (3) Safety, and (4) Plant characteristics of Super FR. This report describes the desired characteristics of Super FR with respect to item (1) fuel design and item (2) Reactor core design, as compared with a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant. The other two issues will be discussed in this project, and will also be considered in the design process of Super FR. (author)

  13. Mirror reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Barr, W.L.; Bender, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    Design studies of a fusion mirror reactor, a fusion-fission mirror reactor, and two small mirror reactors are summarized. The fusion reactor uses 150-keV neutral-beam injectors based on the acceleration of negative ions. The injectors provide over 1 GW of continuous power at an efficiency greater than 80%. The fusion reactor has three-stage, modularized, Venetian blind, plasma direct converter with a predicted efficiency of 59% and a new concept for removal of the lune-shaped blanket: a crane is brought between the two halves of the Yin-Yang magnet, which are separated by a float. The design has desirable features such as steady-state operation, minimal impurity problems, and low first-wall thermal stress. The major disadvantage is low Q resulting in high re-circulating power and hence high cost of electrical power. However, the direct capital cost per unit of gross electrical power is reasonable [$1000/kW(e)]. By contrast, the fusion-fission reactor design is not penalized by re-circulating power and uses relatively near-term fusion technology being developed for the fusion power program. New results are presented on the Th- 233 U and the U- 239 Pu fuel cycles. The purpose of this hybrid is fuel production, with projected costs at $55/g of Pu or $127/g of 233 U. Blanket and cooling system designs, including an emergency cooling system, by General Atomic Company, lead us to the opinion that the reactor can meet expected safety standards for licensing. The smallest mirror reactor having only a shield between the plasma and the coil is the 4.2-m long fusion engineering research facility (FERF) designed for material irradiation. The smallest mirror reactor having both a blanket and shield is the 7.5-m long experimental power reactor (EPR), which has both a fusion and a fusion-fission version. (author)

  14. The aqueous homogeneous suspension reactor project. Report over the 2nd quarter 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-07-01

    Operation experiences, the behaviour of the reactor at 1000 KW, and the performance of reactor instruments are reported. Due to the rise in costs of the primary materials, the costs of the uranium consumption and the fuel cycle costs of the KSTR reactor are recalculated. Experiments done during the reporting period are described. Work carried out by the Health Physics Department and work carried out in connection with reactor safety is described.

  15. Studies of conceptual spheromak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsurai, M.; Yamada, M.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary design studies are carried out for a spheromak fusion reactor. Simplified circuit theory is applied to obtain the characteristic relations among various parameters of the spheromak configuration for an aspect ratio of A >or approx. 1.6. These relations are used to calculate the parameters for the conceptual designs of three types of fusion reactor: (1) the DT reactor with two-component-type operation, (2) the ignited DT reactor, and (3) the ignited catalysed-type DD reactor. With a total wall loading of approx. 4 MW.m -2 , it is found that edge magnetic fields of only approx. 4 T (DT) and approx. 9 T (Cat. DD) are required for ignited reactors of 1 m plasma (minor) radius with output powers in the gigawatt range. An assessment of various schemes of generation, compression and translation of spheromak plasmas is presented. (author)

  16. High temperature CO2 capture using calcium oxide sorbent in a fixed-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou Binlin; Song Yongchen; Liu Yingguang; Feng Cong

    2010-01-01

    The gas-solid reaction and breakthrough curve of CO 2 capture using calcium oxide sorbent at high temperature in a fixed-bed reactor are of great importance, and being influenced by a number of factors makes the characterization and prediction of these a difficult problem. In this study, the operating parameters on reaction between solid sorbent and CO 2 gas at high temperature were investigated. The results of the breakthrough curves showed that calcium oxide sorbent in the fixed-bed reactor was capable of reducing the CO 2 level to near zero level with the steam of 10 vol%, and the sorbent in CaO mixed with MgO of 40 wt% had extremely low capacity for CO 2 capture at 550 deg. C. Calcium oxide sorbent after reaction can be easily regenerated at 900 deg. C by pure N 2 flow. The experimental data were analyzed by shrinking core model, and the results showed reaction rates of both fresh and regeneration sorbents with CO 2 were controlled by a combination of the surface chemical reaction and diffusion of product layer.

  17. Backfitting swimming pool reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roebert, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    Calculations based on measurements in a critical assembly, and experiments to disclose fuel element surface temperatures in case of accidents like stopping of primary coolant flow during full power operation, have shown that the power of the swimming pool type research reactor FRG-2 (15 MW, operating since 1967) might be raised to 21 MW within the present rules of science and technology, without major alterations of the pool buildings and the cooling systems. A backfitting program is carried through to adjust the reactor control systems of FRG-2 and FRG-1 (5 MW, housed in the same reactor hall) to the present safety rules and recommendations, to ensure FRG-2 operation at 21 MW for the next decade. (author)

  18. Research reactors in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos Ruben Calabrese

    1999-01-01

    Argentine Nuclear Development started in early fifties. In 1957, it was decided to built the first a research reactor. RA-1 reactor (120 kw, today licensed to work at 40 kW) started operation in January 1958. Originally RA-1 was an Argonaut (American design) reactor. In early sixties, the RA-1 core was changed. Fuel rods (20% enrichment) was introduced instead the old Argonaut core design. For that reason, a critical facility named RA-0 was built. After that, the RA-3 project started, to build a multipurpose 5 MW nuclear reactor MTR pool type, to produce radioisotopes and research. For that reason and to define the characteristics of the RA-3 core, another critical facility was built, RA-2. Initially RA-3 was a 90 % enriched fuel reactor, and started operation in 1967. When Atucha I NPP project started, a German design Power Reactor, a small homogeneous reactor was donated by the German Government to Argentina (1969). This was RA-4 reactor (20% enrichment, 1W). In 1982, RA-6 pool reactor achieved criticality. This is a 500 kW reactor with 90% enriched MTR fuel elements. In 1990, RA-3 started to operate fueled by 20% enriched fuel. In 1997, the RA-8 (multipurpose critical facility located at Pilcaniyeu) started to operate. RA-3 reactor is the most important CNEA reactor for Argentine Research Reactors development. It is the first in a succession of Argentine MTR reactors built by CNEA (and INVAP SE ) in Argentina and other countries: RA-6 (500 kW, Bariloche-Argentina), RP-10 (10MW, Peru), NUR (500 kW, Algeria), MPR (22 MW, Egypt). The experience of Argentinian industry permits to compete with foreign developed countries as supplier of research reactors. Today, CNEA has six research reactors whose activities have a range from education and promotion of nuclear activity, to radioisotope production. For more than forty years, Argentine Research Reactors are working. The experience of Argentine is important, and argentine firms are able to compete in the design and

  19. Tritium release from lithium silicate and lithium aluminate, in-reactor and out-of-reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1976-09-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the generation and evolution of tritium and helium in lithium aluminate (LiAlO/sub 2/) and lithium silicate (Li/sub 2/SiO/sub 3/) by the reaction: Li/sup 6/ + n ..-->.. /sup 4/He + T. Targets were irradiated 4.4 days in the K-West Reactor snout facility. (Silicate GVR* approximately 2.0 cc/cc; aluminate GVR approximately 1.4 cc/cc.) Gas release in-reactor was determined by post-irradiation drilling experiments on aluminum ampoules containing silicate and aluminate targets. In-reactor tritium release (at approximately 100/sup 0/C) was found to decrease linearly with increasing target density. Tritium released in-reactor was primarily in the noncondensible form (HT and T/sub 2/), while in laboratory extractions (300-1300/sup 0/C), the tritium appeared primarily in the condensible form (HTO and T/sub 2/O). Concentrations of HT (and presumably HTO) were relatively high, indicating moisture pickup in canning operations or by inleakage of moisture after the capsule was welded. Impurities in extracted gases included H/sub 2/O, CO/sub 2/, CO, O/sub 2/, H/sub 2/, NO, SO/sub 2/, SiF/sub 4/ and traces of hydrocarbons.

  20. Dose assessment around TR-2 reactor due to maximum credible accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turgut, M. H.; Adalioglu, U.; Aytekin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The revision of safety analysis report of TR-2 research reactor had been initiated in 1995. The whole accident analysis and accepted scenario for maximum credible accident has been revised according to the new safety concepts and the impact to be given to the environment due to this scenario has been assessed. This paper comprises all results of these calculations. The accepted maximum credible accident scenario is the partial blockage of the whole reactor core which resulted in the release of 25% of the core inventory. The DOSER code which uses very conservative modelling of atmospheric distributions were modified for the assessment calculations. Pasquill conditions based on the local weather observations, topography, and building affects were considered. The thyroid and whole body doses for 16 sectors and up to 10 km of distance around CNAEM were obtained. Release models were puff and a prolonged one of two hours of duration. Release fractions for the active isotopes were chosen from literature which were realistic

  1. Application of carbon-coated TiO2 for decomposition of methylene blue in a photocatalytic membrane reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozia, Sylwia; Toyoda, Masahiro; Inagaki, Michio; Tryba, Beata; Morawski, Antoni W.

    2007-01-01

    An application of carbon-coated TiO 2 for decomposition of methylene blue (MB) in a photocatalytic membrane reactor (PMR), coupling photocatalysis and direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) was investigated. Moreover, photodegradation of a model pollutant in a batch reactor without membrane distillation (MD) was also examined. Carbon-modified TiO 2 catalysts containing different amount of carbon and commercially available TiO 2 (ST-01) were used in this study. The carbon-coated catalyst prepared from a mixture of ST-01 and polyvinyl alcohol in the mass ratio of 70/30 was the most effective in degradation of MB from all of the photocatalysts applied. Photodecomposition of MB on the recovered photocatalysts was lower than on the fresh ones. The photodegradation of MB in the PMR was slower than in the batch reactor, what probably resulted from shorter time of exposure of the catalyst particles to UV irradiation. The MD process could be successfully applied for separation of photocatalyst and by-products from the feed solution

  2. Shipment of Taiwanese research reactor spent nuclear fuel (Phase 2): Environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    The proposed action is to transport approximately 1100 spent fuel rods from a foreign research reactor in Taiwan by sea to Hampton Roads, Virginia, and then overland by truck to the receiving basin for offsite fuels at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) for reprocessing to recover uranium and plutonium. The analysis of the impacts of the proposed action have been evaluated and shown to have negligible impact on the local environments. The calculations have been completed using the RADTRAN III code. PWR spent fuel was analyzed as a benchmark to link the calculations in this analysis to those in earlier environmental documentation. Cumulative total, maximum annual, and per shipment risks were calculated. The results indicate that the PWR spent fuel shipment risks are somewhat lower than those previously estimated. The cumulative and maximum annual normal, or incident-free, risks associated with the shipment of Taiwanese research reactor spent fuel is a factor of 10 lower than that for PWR fuel, and the cumulative and maximum annual accident radiological risks are a factor of about 2.2 lower than that for PWR spent fuel. As a result, the port risks are about a factor of 10 larger than the risk of overland transport. All of the risks calculated are small. The PWR risk values are similar to those judged by the NRC to be small enough not to warrant increased stringency in regulations. The Taiwanese research reactor spent fuel shipment risk values are smaller yet. 51 refs., 22 tabs

  3. Experimental Irradiations of Materials and Fuels in the BR2 Reactor: An Overview of Current Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dyck, S.; Koonen, E.; Verwerft, M.; Wéber, M.

    2013-01-01

    The BR2 material test reactor offers a variety of experimental irradiation possibilities for testing of materials, fuels and instruments. The current paper gives an overview of the recent and ongoing programmes in order to illustrate the experimental potential of the reactor. Three domains of applications are reviewed: Irradiation of materials and fuels for pressurised water reactors (PWR); irradiation of materials for accelerator driven systems (ADS), cooled by liquid lead alloys; and irradiation of fuel for Material Test Reactors (MTR). For PWR relevant tests, a dedicated loop is available, providing a full simulation of the thermo hydraulic conditions of a PWR. ADS related tests require particular control of the irradiation environment and the necessary safety precautions in order to avoid 210 Po contamination. In-core mechanical testing of materials is done in comparison and complimentarily to post-irradiation examinations in order to assess flux related effects on the deformation behaviour of materials. (author)

  4. Mirror hybrid reactor optimization studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    A system model of the mirror hybrid reactor has been developed. The major components of the model include (1) the reactor description, (2) a capital cost analysis, (3) various fuel management schemes, and (4) an economic analysis that includes the hybrid plus its associated fission burner reactors. The results presented describe the optimization of the mirror hybrid reactor, the objective being to minimize the cost of electricity from the hybrid fission-burner reactor complex. We have examined hybrid reactors with two types of blankets, one containing natural uranium, the other thorium. The major difference between the two optimized reactors is that the uranium hybrid is a significant net electrical power producer, whereas the thorium hybrid just about breaks even on electrical power. Our projected costs for fissile fuel production are approximately 50 $/g for 239 Pu and approximately 125 $/g for 233 U

  5. Results of the mid-term assessment of the 'High Performance Light Water Reactor Phase 2' project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starflinger, J.; Schulenberg, T.; Marsault, P.

    2009-01-01

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is a Light Water Reactor (LWR) operating at supercritical pressure (p>22.1 MPa). In Europe, investigations on the HPLWR have been integrated into a joint research project, called High Performance Light Water Reactor Phase 2 (HPLWR Phase 2), which is co-funded by the European Commission. Within the second year of the project, the design of the reactor core, the pressure vessel and its internals have been analysed in detail by means of advanced codes and methods. The mechanical design has been assessed and shows that stresses inside components and possible deformations keep within acceptable limits. The neutronics and the flow inside the core have been investigated. The addition of a water layer in the reflector helps to flatten the radial power profile. The moderator flow path must be changed because of possible reverse flow in the gaps between the assemblies (downward flow). First calculations of transients showed an acceptable behaviour of the cladding temperatures. Material oxidation experiments were successfully performed. The auxiliary loop of the Supercritical Water Loop has been constructed. Heat transfer has been investigated numerically analysing heat transfer deterioration (HTD) and flow around fuel pins with wire wrap spacers. (author)

  6. Validation of the Serpent 2-DYNSUB code sequence using the Special Power Excursion Reactor Test III (SPERT III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knebel, Miriam; Mercatali, Luigi; Sanchez, Victor; Stieglitz, Robert; Macian-Juan, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Full few-group cross section tables created by Monte Carlo lattice code Serpent 2. • Serpent 2 group constant methodology verified for HFP static and transient cases. • Serpent 2-DYNSUB tool chainvalidated using SPERT III REA experiments. • Serpent 2-DYNSUB tool chain suitable to model RIAs in PWRs. - Abstract: The Special Power Excursion Reactor Test III (SPERT III) is studied using the Serpent 2-DYNSUB code sequence in order to validate it for modeling reactivity insertion accidents (RIA) in PWRs. The SPERT III E-core was a thermal research reactor constructed to analyze reactor dynamics. Its configuration resembles a commercial PWR on terms of fuel type, choice of moderator, coolant flow and system pressure. The initial conditions of the rod ejection accident experiments (REA) performed cover cold startup, hot startup, hot standby and operating power scenarios. Eight of these experiments were analyzed in detail. Firstly, multi-dimensional nodal diffusion cross section tables were created for the three-dimensional reactor simulator DYNSUB employing the Monte Carlo neutron transport code Serpent 2. In a second step, DYNSUB stationary simulations were compared to Monte Carlo reference three-dimensional full scale solutions obtained with Serpent 2 (cold startup conditions) and Serpent 2/SUBCHANFLOW (operating power conditions) with a good agreement being observed. The latter tool is an internal coupling of Serpent 2 and the sub-channel thermal-hydraulics code SUBCHANFLOW. Finally, DYNSUB was utilized to study the eight selected transient experiments. Results were found to match measurements well. As the selected experiments cover much of the possible transient (delayed super-critical, prompt super-critical and super-prompt critical excursion) and initial conditions (cold and hot as well as zero, little and full power reactor states) one expects in commercial PWRs, the obtained results give confidence that the Serpent 2-DYNSUB tool chain is

  7. Recent Development of Radioanalytical Methods at the IBR-2 Pulsed Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarov, V.M.; Peresedov, V.F.

    1994-01-01

    Experience in the application of radioanalytical methods, including NAA, at the IBR-2 pulsed fast reactor is reviewed. Details of the instruments dedicated to neutron activation analysis and radiography studies are reported. Applications of resonance neutrons to environmental monitoring and to the investigation of high-purity materials, are examplified. 15 refs. 9 figs., 9 tabs

  8. Neutronic modeling of pebble bed reactors in APOLLO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimod, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis we develop a new iterative homogenization technique for pebble bed reactors, based on a 'macro-stochastic' transport approximation in the collision probability method. A model has been developed to deal with the stochastic distribution of pebbles with different burnup in the core, considering spectral differences in homogenization and depletion calculations. This is generally not done in the codes presently used for pebble bed analyses, where a pebble with average isotopic composition is considered to perform the cell calculation. Also an iterative core calculation scheme has been set up, where the low-order RZ S N full-core calculation computes the entering currents in the spectrum zones subdividing the core. These currents, together with the core k eff , are then used as surface source in the fine-group heterogeneous calculation of the multi-pebble geometries. The developed method has been verified using reference Monte Carlo simulations of a simplified PBMR- 400 model. The pebbles in this model are individually positioned and have different randomly assigned burnup values. The APOLLO2 developed method matches the reference core k eff within ± 100 pcm, with relative differences on the production shape factors within ± 4%, and maximum discrepancy of 3% at the hotspot. Moreover, the first criticality experiment of the HTR-10 reactor was used to perform a first validation of the developed model. The computed critical number of pebbles to be loaded in the core is very close to the experimental value of 16890, only 77 pebbles less. A method to calculate the equilibrium reactor state was also developed and applied to analyze the simplified PBMR-400 model loaded with different fuel types (UO 2 , Pu, Pu + MA). The potential of the APOLLO2 method to compute different fluxes for the different pebble types of a multi-pebble geometry was used to evaluate the bias committed by the average composition pebble approximation. Thanks to a 'compensation of error

  9. Kinetics of Ar+*(2G9/2) metastable ions and transport of argon ions in ICP reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadeghi, N.; Derouard, J.; Grift, van de M.; Kroesen, G.M.W.; Hoog, de F.J.; Tachibana, K.; Watanabe, Y.

    1997-01-01

    The decay time of the argon Ar~~(2G912) metastable ions was measured in the afterglow of a low pressure pulsed helicon reactor. From the argon pressure and electron density dependence of this decay time, rate coefficients for quenching of these ions by argon atoms and by plasma electrons have been

  10. In-reactor creep of zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium at 570 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.E.; Causey, A.R.; Fidleris, V.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of fast neutron flux at 570 K on the creep rate of specimens of zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium alloy taken from tubes in various metallurgical conditions has been measured using both constant load tensile creep machines and bent-beam stress relaxation. Creep rates calculated from stress relaxation fit on the trend line for the constant load creep data. Between 114 MPa and 450 MPa the creep rate is proportional to neutron flux. The creep rate of specimens from the longitudinal direction is about twice that of specimens from the circumferential direction of a tube. This anisotropy in creep strength is attributed partly to crystallographic texture and partly to deformation substructure. Cold-work is detrimental to in-reactor creep strength; as-extruded material has higher creep strength. In cold-worked material at stresses below 100 MPa the stress exponent, n, is about 1; n gradually increases with stress being about 10 at 525 MPa and about 100 at 660 MPa. In laboratory tests, rupture ductility correlates inversely with n; the lower n the higher the ductility. In-reactor tests support this correlation thus pressure tubes in CANDU reactors, operating at 117 MPa where n approximately 1, should have good ductility. (Auth.)

  11. Summary of IEA-R1 research a reactor licensing related to its power increase from 2 to 10 MW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    This work is a summary of IEA-R1 research reactor licensing related to its power increase from 2 to 10 MW. It reports also safety requirements, fuel elements, and reactor control modifications inherent to power increase. (A.C.A.S.)

  12. An analysis of postulated accident for 49-2 Swimming Pool Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongqing; Cu Shaochu; Wang Liugui; Zhang Zengqing

    1990-01-01

    The thermal hydrodynamic code RETRAN-02 is used for safety analysis of Swimming Pool Reactor. Accident of partial-loss of flow, loss of offsite electric power and unexpected reactivity insertion are analysed and discussed. These results will be helpful for operation safety of the reactor

  13. Addition of soluble and insoluble neutron absorbers to the reactor coolant system of TMI-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, R.F.; Silverman, J.; Queen, S.P.; Ryan, R.F.; Austin, W.E.

    1984-07-01

    The physical and chemical properties of six elements were studied and combined with cost estimates to determine the feasibility of adding them to the TMI-2 reactor coolant to depress k/sub eff/ to less than or equal to 0.95. Both soluble and insoluble forms of the elements B, Cd, Gd, Li, Sm, and Eu were examined. Criticality calculations were performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the absorber concentration required to meet the 0.95 k/sub eff/ criterion. The conclusion reached is that all elements with the exception of boron have overriding disadvantages which preclude their use in this reactor. Solubility experiments in the reactor coolant show that boron solubility is the same as that of boron in pure aqueous solutions of sodium hydroxide and boric acid; consequently, solubility is not a limiting factor in reaching the k/sub eff/ criterion. Examination of the effect of pH on sodium requirements and costs for processing to remove radionuclides revealed a sharp dependence; small decreases in pH lead to a large decrease in both sodium requirements and processing costs. Boron addition to meet any contemplated reactor safety requirements can be accomplished with existing equipment; however, this addition must be made with the reactor coolant system filled and pressurized to ensure uniform boron concentration

  14. Organization of remote control of spectrometers at the IBR-2M reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirilov, A.S.; Murashkevich, S.M.; Okulov, R.Yu.; Petukhova, T.B.

    2008-01-01

    The development of network infrastructure in Dubna creates conditions for the remote supervision/control of experiment at the IBR-2M reactor beyond the JINR local network. The opportunity of observing an experiment from outside makes it possible to respond to errors or unforeseen, to save the reactor time. The principles of organization and peculiarities of implementation of the WebSonix system consisting of the central web-site and communication facilities for spectrometers are considered in the paper. The system allows one to reflect the actual condition of all the components of the instrument, survey log files, visualize the accumulated spectra and to control the experimental procedure on the instruments controlled by the software complex Sonix+ (OS Windows XP). The system is an independent instrument, it is easy to extend or change and easy to adapt to the instrument data specifics. The system is implemented using the PHP and Python scripts. The OS GNU/Linux Debian and web-server Apache 2 are installed on the web-site computer

  15. Mathematical Modelling of Catalytic Fixed-Bed Reactor for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane over Rh/Al2O3 Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    New Pei Yee

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional mathematical model was developed to simulate the performance of catalytic fixed bedreactor for carbon dioxide reforming of methane over Rh/Al2O3 catalyst at atmospheric pressure. The reactionsinvolved in the system are carbon dioxide reforming of methane (CORM and reverse water gas shiftreaction (RWGS. The profiles of CH4 and CO2 conversions, CO and H2 yields, molar flow rate and molefraction of all species as well as reactor temperature along the axial bed of catalyst were simulated. In addition,the effects of different reactor temperature on the reactor performance were also studied. The modelscan also be applied to analyze the performances of lab-scale micro reactor as well as pilot-plant scale reactorwith certain modifications and model verification with experimental data. © 2008 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Received: 20 August 2008; Accepted: 25 September 2008][How to Cite: N.A.S. Amin, I. Istadi, N.P. Yee. (2008. Mathematical Modelling of Catalytic Fixed-Bed Reactor for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane over Rh/Al2O3 Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 3 (1-3: 21-29. doi:10.9767/bcrec.3.1-3.19.21-29

  16. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Michiko.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain an optimum structural arrangement of IRM having a satisfactory responsibility to the inoperable state of a nuclear reactor and capable of detecting the reactor power in an averaged manner. Constitution: As the structural arrangement of IRM, from 6 to 16 even number of IRM are bisected into equial number so as to belong two trip systems respectively, in which all of the detectors are arranged at an equal pitch along a circumference of a circle with a radius rl having the center at the position of the central control rod in one trip system, while one detector is disposed near the central control rod and other detectors are arranged substantially at an equal pitch along the circumference of a circle with a radius r2 having the center at the position for the central control rod in another trip system. Furthermore, the radius r1 and r2 are set such that r1 = 0.3 R, r2 = 0.5 R in the case where there are 6 IRM and r1 = 0.4 R and R2 = 0.8 R where there are eight IRM where R represents the radius of the reactor core. (Kawakami, Y.)

  17. Advanced nuclear reactor types and technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatiev, V.; Devell, L.

    1995-01-01

    The document is a comprehensive world-wide catalogue of concepts and designs of advanced fission reactor types and fuel cycle technologies. Two parts have been prepared: Part 1 Reactors for Power Production and Part 2 Heating and Other Reactor Applications. Part 3, which will cover advanced waste management technology, reprocessing and disposal for different nuclear fission options is planned for compilation during 1995. The catalogue was prepared according to a special format which briefly presents the project title, technical approach, development status, application of the technology, reactor type, power output, and organization which developed these designs. Part 1 and 2 cover water cooled reactors, liquid metal fast reactors, gas-cooled reactors and molten salt reactors. Subcritical accelerator-driven systems are also considered. Various reactor applications as power production, heat generation, ship propulsion, space power sources and transmutation of such waste are included. Each project is described within a few pages with the main features of an actual design using a table with main technical data and figure as well as references for additional information. Each chapter starts with an introduction which briefly describes main trends and approaches in this field. Explanations of terms and abbreviations are provided in a glossary

  18. Advanced nuclear reactor types and technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignatiev, V [ed.; Feinberg, O; Morozov, A [Russian Research Centre ` Kurchatov Institute` , Moscow (Russian Federation); Devell, L [Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1995-07-01

    The document is a comprehensive world-wide catalogue of concepts and designs of advanced fission reactor types and fuel cycle technologies. Two parts have been prepared: Part 1 Reactors for Power Production and Part 2 Heating and Other Reactor Applications. Part 3, which will cover advanced waste management technology, reprocessing and disposal for different nuclear fission options is planned for compilation during 1995. The catalogue was prepared according to a special format which briefly presents the project title, technical approach, development status, application of the technology, reactor type, power output, and organization which developed these designs. Part 1 and 2 cover water cooled reactors, liquid metal fast reactors, gas-cooled reactors and molten salt reactors. Subcritical accelerator-driven systems are also considered. Various reactor applications as power production, heat generation, ship propulsion, space power sources and transmutation of such waste are included. Each project is described within a few pages with the main features of an actual design using a table with main technical data and figure as well as references for additional information. Each chapter starts with an introduction which briefly describes main trends and approaches in this field. Explanations of terms and abbreviations are provided in a glossary.

  19. The SPHINX reactor for engineering tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamov, E.O.; Artamkin, K.N.; Bovin, A.P.; Bulkin, Y.M.; Kartashev, E.F.; Korneev, A.A.; Stenbok, I.A.; Terekhov, A.S.; Khmel'Shehikov, V.V.; Cherkashov, Y.M.

    1990-01-01

    A research reactor known as SPHINX is under development in the USSR. The reactor will be used mainly to carry out tests on mock-up power reactor fuel assemblies under close-to-normal parameters in experimental loop channels installed in the core and reflector of the reactor, as well as to test samples of structural materials in ampoule and loop channels. The SPHINX reactor is a channel-type reactor with light-water coolant and moderator. Maximum achievable neutron flux density in the experimental channels (cell composition 50% Fe, 50% H 2 O) is 1.1 X 10 15 neutrons/cm 2 · s for fast neutrons (E > 0.1 MeV) and 1.7 X 10 15 for thermal neutrons at a reactor power of 200 MW. The design concepts used represent a further development of the technical features which have met with approval in the MR and MIR channel-type engineering test reactors currently in use in the USSR. The 'in-pond channel' construction makes the facility flexible and eases the carrying out of experimental work while keeping discharges of radioactivity into the environment to a low level. The reactor and all associated buildings and constructions conform to modern radiation safety and environmental protection requirements

  20. Neutronic simulation of a research reactor core of (232Th, 235U)O2 fuel using MCNPX2.6 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feghhi, Seyed Amir Hossein; Rezazadeh, Marzieh; Kadi, Yacine; ); Tenreiro, Claudio; Aref, Morteza; Gholamzadeh, Zohreh

    2013-01-01

    The small reactor design for the remote and less developed areas of the user countries should have simple features in view of the lack of infra-structure and resources. Many researchers consider long core life with no on-site refuelling activity as a primary feature for the small reactor design. Long core life can be achieved by enhancing internal conversion rate of fertile to fissile materials. For that purpose, thorium cycle can he adopted because a high fissile production rate of 233 U converted from 232 Th can be expected in the thermal energy region. A simple nuclear reactor core arranged 19 assemblies in hexagonal structure, using thorium-based fuel and heavy water as coolant and moderator was simulated using MCNPX2.6 code, aiming an optimized critical assembly. Optimized reflector thickness and gap between assemblies were determined to achieve minimum neutron leakage and void reactivity. The result was a more compact core, where assemblies were designed having 19-fuel pins in 1.25 pitch-to-diameter ratio. Optimum reflector thickness of 15 cm resulted in minimal neutron leakage in view of economic limitations. A 0.5 cm gap between assembles achieved more safety and 2.2 % enrichment requirements. The present feasibility study suggests a thermal core of acceptable neutronic parameters to achieve a simple and safe core. (author)

  1. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1986, Part -2, Annex 2a, Radioactivity control of the RA reactor environment (atmospheric precipitations, dust, water, soil, plants, fruit...)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajdacic, N.; Martic, M.; Jovanovic, J.

    1986-01-01

    Control of radioactivity in the biosphere in the vicinity of the RA reactor is part of the radioactivity control done regularly for the whole territory of the Vinca institute (report by the same authors included in this Annex). During 1986 control was conducted according to the plan until May 1, 1986 when a dramatic increase of the precipitations and all other samples from the biosphere was recorded. According to the measured data no significant changes have been found in the surroundings of the RA reactor, until April 29 1986. Since then more detailed control was conducted, the number of samples was increased, apart from standard measuring procedure of total beta activity measurements, gamma spectrometry of all samples was applied. High activity level of the following nuclides was found: Iodine, cerium,cesium, tellurium, ruthenium, barium, lanthanum, etc. As an example activity of ?1?3?1 I in one sample was 564±5 kBq/m 2 [sr

  2. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1993, RA research reactor, Part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, M.; Pavlovic, R.; Mandic, M.; Sipka, V.; Grsic, Z.

    1993-01-01

    Radiation protection tasks which enable safe operation of the RA reactor, and are defined according the the legal regulations and IAEA safety recommendations are sorted into four categories in this report: (1) Control of the working environment, dosimetry and radiation protection at the RA reactor; (2) decontamination, collecting and treatment of fluid effluents and solid wastes; (3) Radioactivity control in the vicinity of the reactor and (4)meteorology measurements; (3). Each of the category is described as a separate annex of this report [sr

  3. Research reactor`s role in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, C-O [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    After a TRIGA MARK-II was constructed in 1962, new research activity of a general nature, utilizing neutrons, prevailed in Korea. Radioisotopes produced from the MARK-II played a good role in the 1960`s in educating people as to what could be achieved by a neutron source. Because the research reactor had implanted neutron science in the country, another TRIGA MARK-III had to be constructed within 10 years after importing the first reactor, due to increased neutron demand from the nuclear community. With the sudden growth of nuclear power, however, the emphasis of research changed. For a while research activities were almost all oriented to nuclear power plant technology. However, the specifics of nuclear power plant technology created a need for a more highly capable research reactor like HANARO 30MWt. HANARO will perform well with irradiation testing and other nuclear programs in the future, including: production of key radioisotopes, doping of silicon by transmutation, neutron activation analysis, neutron beam experiments, cold neutron source. 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  4. Environmental impact assessment of Ar-41 released by the normal operation of TRIGA-Mark 2 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qassoud, D.; Soufi, I.; Ziagos, J.; Demir, Z

    2007-01-01

    Full text: In accordance with the international regulation of nuclear safety and radiological protection of the environment applicable to the basic nuclear installations, category in which the Triga-Mark 2 research reactor is considered, an assesment of the impact in to the environment of the Ar-41 radioelement is accomplished. This radioelement is released by the normal operation of this reactor. The assessment is based on the characteristics of a Moroccan site (where the reactor is installed). It is carried out using CEA Gaussian models and mathematical models developed in LLNL. Considering the assumptions of impact assessments of the radioactivity in the atmosphere, the most important exposure is relatively corresponding to 1 Km from the reactor. This exposure is approximately 0,07% of the lawful limit. Beyond this locality, the exposure becomes lower than 0,02% of this limit. Beyond 5 Km, it becomes lower than ten nono-Sivert. In the basis of the site radiological baseline, the environmental impact of Ar-41 released in normal operation of the reactor is negligible in the studied case. [fr

  5. Chemistry in water reactors: operating experience and new developments. 2 volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    These proceedings of the International conference on chemistry in water reactors (Operating experience and new developments), Volume 1, are divided into 8 sessions bearing on: (session 1) Primary coolant activity, corrosion products (5 conferences), (session 2) Dose reduction (4 conferences), (session 3) New developments (4 conferences), poster session: Primary coolant chemistry (16 posters), (session 4) Decontamination (5 conferences), poster session (2 posters), (session 5) BWR-Operating experience (3 conferences), (session 6) BWR-Modelling of operating experience (4 conferences), (session 7) BWR-Basic studies (4 conferences), (session 8) BWR-New technologies (3 conferences)

  6. The integral fast reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yoon I.; Marchaterre, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system. The IFR concept consists of four technical features: (1) liquid sodium cooling, (2) pool-type reactor configuration, (3) metallic fuel, and (4) an integral fuel cycle, based on pyrometallurgical processing and injection-cast fuel fabrication, with the fuel cycle facility collocated with the reactor, if so desired. This paper gives a review of the IFR concept

  7. Generation IV reactors: reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardonnier, J.L.; Dumaz, P.; Antoni, O.; Arnoux, P.; Bergeron, A.; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.; Delpech, M.; Garnier, J.C.; Anzieu, P.; Francois, G.; Lecomte, M.

    2003-01-01

    Liquid metal reactor concept looks promising because of its hard neutron spectrum. Sodium reactors benefit a large feedback experience in Japan and in France. Lead reactors have serious assets concerning safety but they require a great effort in technological research to overcome the corrosion issue and they lack a leader country to develop this innovative technology. In molten salt reactor concept, salt is both the nuclear fuel and the coolant fluid. The high exit temperature of the primary salt (700 Celsius degrees) allows a high energy efficiency (44%). Furthermore molten salts have interesting specificities concerning the transmutation of actinides: they are almost insensitive to irradiation damage, some salts can dissolve large quantities of actinides and they are compatible with most reprocessing processes based on pyro-chemistry. Supercritical water reactor concept is based on operating temperature and pressure conditions that infers water to be beyond its critical point. In this range water gets some useful characteristics: - boiling crisis is no more possible because liquid and vapour phase can not coexist, - a high heat transfer coefficient due to the low thermal conductivity of supercritical water, and - a high global energy efficiency due to the high temperature of water. Gas-cooled fast reactors combining hard neutron spectrum and closed fuel cycle open the way to a high valorization of natural uranium while minimizing ultimate radioactive wastes and proliferation risks. Very high temperature gas-cooled reactor concept is developed in the prospect of producing hydrogen from no-fossil fuels in large scale. This use implies a reactor producing helium over 1000 Celsius degrees. (A.C.)

  8. Factors affecting biological reduction of CO{sub 2} into CH{sub 4} using a hydrogenotrophic methanogen in a fixed bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hyung; Pak, Daewon [Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Won Seok [Korea District Heating Corp, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Biological conversion of CO{sub 2} was examined in a fixed bed reactor inoculated with anaerobic mixed culture to investigate influencing factors, the type of packing material and the composition of the feeding gas mixture. During the operation of the fixed bed reactor by feeding the gas mixture (80% H{sub 2} and 20% CO{sub 2} based on volume basis), the volumetric CO{sub 2} conversion rate was higher in the fixed bed reactor packed with sponge due to its large surface area and high mass transfer from gas to liquid phase compared with PS ball. Carbon dioxide loaded into the fixed bed reactor was not completely converted because some of H{sub 2} was used for biomass growth. When a mole ratio of H{sub 2} to CO{sub 2} in the feeding gas mixture increased from 4 to 5, CO{sub 2} was completely converted into CH{sub 4}. The packing material with large surface area is effective in treating gaseous substrate such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. H{sub 2}, electron donor, should be providing more than required according to stoichiometry because some of it is used for biomass growth.

  9. Review of the accident source terms for aluminide fuel: Application to the BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joppen, F.

    2005-01-01

    A major safety review of the BR2, a material test reactor, is to be conducted for the year 2006. One of the subjects selected for the safety review is the definition of source terms for emergency planning and in particular the development of accident scenarios. For nuclear power plants the behaviour of fuel under accident conditions is a well studied object. In case of non-power reactors this basic knowledge is rather scarce. The usefulness of information from power plant fuels is limited due to the differences in fuel type, power level and thermohydraulical conditions. First investigation indicates that using data from power plant fuel leads to an overestimation of the source terms. Further research on this subject could be very useful for the research reactor community, in order to define more realistic source terms and to improve the emergency preparedness. (author)

  10. Use of highly enriched uranium in the material testing reactor BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeckmans de West-Meerbeeck, A.

    1979-05-01

    In the material testing reactor BR2, the use of highly enriched uranium is determined by the consideration of the fast, epithermal and thermal neutron flux effectively available for the experimental devices. The choice of the core configuration is defined by combining the localisation of the experimental devices and of fuel elements of various burnup, such as to satisfy the irradiation conditions of the experimental load, compatible with an economic use of the fuel elements and safe operation of the reactor. Taking into account the present manufacturing technology for MTR fuels (37 Wt % uranium density in the fuel meat) the highly enriched uranium cannot be avoided; if higher concentration of uranium could be realised by some new manufacturing technology, the 235 U density of fuel elements at elimination should be kept at the required level and the enrichment could be reduced accordingly

  11. Use of highly enriched uranium in the material testing reactor BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeckmans de West-Meerbeeck, A.

    1979-05-01

    In the material testing reactor BR2, the use of highly enriched uranium is determined by the consideration of the fast, epithermal and thermal neutron flux effectively available for the experimental devices. The choice of the core configuration is defined by combining the localisation of the experimental devices and of fuel elements of various burnup, such as to satisfy the irradiation conditions of the experimental load, compatible with an economic use of the fuel elements and safe operation of the reactor. Taking into account the present manufacturing technology for MTR fuels (37 Wt % uranium density in the fuel meat) the highly enriched uranium cannot be avoided: if higher concentration of uranium could be realised by some new manufacturing technology, the 235 U density of fuel elements at elimination should be kept at the required level and the enrichment could be reduced accordingly. (author)

  12. Nuclear reactor built, being built, or planned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1990. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE, from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations, from US and foreign embassies, and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book is divided into three major sections: Section 1 consists of a reactor locator map and reactor tables; Section 2 includes nuclear reactors that are operating, being built, or planned; and Section 3 includes reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. Sections 2 and 3 contain the following classification of reactors: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly

  13. Results of Koo measurements of HTGR lattice by oscillated zero reactivity technique using the AGIP-NUCLEARE RB-2 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetti, F; Brighenti, G.; Chiodi, P. L.; Ghilardotti, G.; Giuliani, C.

    1974-10-15

    This paper describes k-infinity measurements conducted using an assembly of loose HTGR coated particles in the BR-2 reactor by means of null reactivity oscillating method comparing the effect of poisoned and unpoisoned lattices like tests performed in the Physical Constants Test Reactor (PCTR) at Hanford. The RB-2 reactor was the property of the Italian firm AGIP NUCLEARE and operated at the Montecuccolino Center in Bologna.

  14. Nuclear reactors to come

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung, M.

    2002-01-01

    The demand for nuclear energy will continue to grow at least till 2050 because of mainly 6 reasons: 1) the steady increase of the world population, 2) China, India and Indonesia will reach higher social standard and their energy consumption will consequently grow, 3) fossil energy resources are dwindling, 4) coal will be little by little banned because of its major contribution to the emission of green house effect gas, 5) renewable energies need important technological jumps to be really efficient and to take the lead, and 6) fusion energy is not yet ready to take over. All these reasons draw a promising future for nuclear energy. Today 450 nuclear reactors are operating throughout the world producing 17% of the total electrical power demand. In order to benefit fully of this future, nuclear industry has to improve some characteristics of reactors: 1) a more efficient use of uranium (it means higher burnups), 2) a simplification and automation of reprocessing-recycling chain of processes, 3) efficient measures against proliferation and against any misuse for terrorist purposes, and 4) an enhancement of safety for the next generation of reactors. The characteristics of fast reactors and of high-temperature reactors will likely make these kinds of reactors the best tools for energy production in the second half of this century. (A.C.)

  15. Formation of the high-spin Hf-179m2 isomer in reactor irradiations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karamian, S. A.; Carroll, J. J.; Adam, Jindřich; Kulagin, EN.; Shabalin, EP.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 4 (2004), s. 438-441 ISSN 1054-660X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME 134 Keywords : reactor irradiation * high-spin Hf-179m2 Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.836, year: 2004

  16. Micro-scale H2-CO2 dynamics in a hydrogenotrophic methanogenic membrane reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; Ottosen, Lars Ditlev Mørck; Voigt, Niels Vinther

    2016-01-01

    Biogas production is a key factor in a sustainable energy supply. It is possible to get biogas with very high methane content if the biogas reactors are supplied with exogenous hydrogen, and one of the technologies for supplying hydrogen is through gas permeable membranes. In this study the activ......Biogas production is a key factor in a sustainable energy supply. It is possible to get biogas with very high methane content if the biogas reactors are supplied with exogenous hydrogen, and one of the technologies for supplying hydrogen is through gas permeable membranes. In this study...

  17. Fusion reactor problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carruthers, R.

    It is pointed out that plasma parameters for a fusion reactor have been fairly accurately defined for many years, and the real plasma physics objective must be to find the means of achieving and maintaining these specifiable parameters. There is good understanding of the generic technological problems: breading blankets and shields, radiation damage, heat transfer and methods of magnet design. The required plasma parameters for fusion self-heated reactors are established at ntausub(E) approximately 2.10 14 cm -3 sec, plasma radius 1.5 to 3 m, wall loading 5 to 10 MW cm -2 , temperature 15 keV. Within this model plasma control by quasi-steady burn as a key problem is studied. It is emphasized that the future programme must interact more closely with engineering studies and should concentrate upon research which is relevant to reactor plasmas. (V.P.)

  18. Proceedings of 2. Yugoslav symposium on reactor physics, Part 3, Herceg Novi (Yugoslavia), 27-29 Sep 1966; 2. Jugoslovenski simpozijum iz reaktorske fizike, Deo 3, Herceg Novi (Yugoslavia), 27-29 Sep 1966

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1966-07-01

    This Volume 3 of the Proceedings of 2. Yugoslav symposium on reactor physics includes three papers describing the following: model for spatial synthesis of automated control system of the GCR type reactor; model for analysis of hydrodynamic processes at the BHWR type reactors; mathematical model for safety analysis of heavy water power reactor.

  19. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Sadao; Sato, Morihiko.

    1994-01-01

    Liquid metals such as liquid metal sodium are filled in a reactor container as primary coolants. A plurality of reactor core containers are disposed in a row in the circumferential direction along with the inner circumferential wall of the reactor container. One or a plurality of intermediate coolers are disposed at the inside of an annular row of the reactor core containers. A reactor core constituted with fuel rods and control rods (module reactor core) is contained at the inside of each of the reactor core containers. Each of the intermediate coolers comprises a cylindrical intermediate cooling vessels. The intermediate cooling vessel comprises an intermediate heat exchanger for heat exchange of primary coolants and secondary coolants and recycling pumps for compulsorily recycling primary coolants at the inside thereof. Since a plurality of reactor core containers are thus assembled, a great reactor power can be attained. Further, the module reactor core contained in one reactor core vessel may be small sized, to facilitate the control for the reactor core operation. (I.N.)

  20. The CAREM reactor and present currents in reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    INVAP has been working on the CAREM project since 1983. It concerns a very low power reactor for electrical energy generation. The design of the reactor and the basic criteria used were described in 1984. Since then, a series of designs have been presented for reactors which are similar to CAREM regarding the solutions presented to reduce the chance of major nuclear accidents. These designs have been grouped under different names: Advanced Reactors, Second Generation Reactors, Inherently Safe Reactors, or even, Revolutionary Reactors. Every reactor fabrication firm has, at least, one project which can be placed in this category. Presently, there are two main currents of Reactor Design; Evolutionary and Revolutionary. The present work discusses characteristics of these two types of reactors, some revolutionary designs and common criteria to both types. After, these criteria are compared with CAREM reactor design. (Author) [es

  1. Microspheres of UO2, ThO2 and PuO2 for the high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandau, E.

    2002-01-01

    The production of high temperature reactor fuel, so called pebble fuel, was done in the eighties by a special vibrational dropping process to obtain as sintered UO 2 - or ThO 2 -microspheres, so called 'Kernels', with a diameter size of about 300 μm. These microspheres have been coated and embedded in carbon balls to get the pebble fuel. Since the early nineties BRACE is developing the processings of microspheres starting with sols and suspensions to produce Al 2 O 3 , ZrO 2 , HfO 2 and Actinide oxide microspheres. Two main developments have been made: 1) the preparation of the feed solution (sol, suspension) and the solidification processing, and 2) the equipment, design, and electronic control have been completely changed. A newly developed suspension process for actinide oxides and for metal oxides e.g. Al 2 O 3 , TiO 2 , SiO 2 , ZrO 2 , HfO 2 , CeO 2 , ThO 2 , UO 2 , PuO 2 leads to cheaper production of as sintered microspheres. The processing and the installations will be described and the experience of production will be shown. (author)

  2. Reactor container cooling device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Koji; Kinoshita, Shoichiro

    1995-11-10

    The device of the present invention efficiently lowers pressure and temperature in a reactor container upon occurrence of a severe accident in a BWR-type reactor and can cool the inside of the container for a long period of time. That is, (1) pipelines on the side of an exhaustion tower of a filter portion in a filter bent device of the reactor container are in communication with pipelines on the side of a steam inlet of a static container cooling device by way of horizontal pipelines, (2) a back flow check valve is disposed to horizontal pipelines, (3) a steam discharge valve for a pressure vessel is disposed closer to the reactor container than the joint portion between the pipelines on the side of the steam inlet and the horizontal pipelines. Upon occurrence of a severe accident, when the pressure vessel should be ruptured and steams containing aerosol in the reactor core should be filled in the reactor container, the inlet valve of the static container cooling device is closed. Steams are flown into the filter bent device of the reactor container, where the aerosols can be removed. (I.S.).

  3. MLR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryazantsev, E.P.; Egorenkov, P.M.; Nasonov, V.A.; Smimov, A.M.; Taliev, A.V.; Gromov, B.F.; Kousin, V.V.; Lantsov, M.N.; Radchenko, V.P.; Sharapov, V.N.

    1998-01-01

    The Material Testing Loop Reactor (MLR) development was commenced in 1991 with the aim of updating and widening Russia's experimental base to validate the selected directions of further progress of the nuclear power industry in Russia and to enhance its reliability and safety. The MLR reactor is the pool-type one. As coolant it applies light water and as side reflector beryllium. The direction of water circulation in the core is upward. The core comprises 30 FA arranged as hexagonal lattice with the 90-95 mm pitch. The central materials channel and six loop channels are sited in the core. The reflector includes up to 11 loop channels. The reactor power is 100 MW. The average power density of the core is 0.4 MW/I (maximal value 1.0 MW/l). The maximum neutron flux density is 7.10 14 n/cm 2 s in the core (E>0.1 MeV), and 5.10 14 n/cm 2 s in the reflector (E<0.625 eV). In 1995 due to the lack of funding the MLR designing was suspended. (author)

  4. Effect of increasing nitrobenzene loading rates on the performance of anaerobic migrating blanket reactor and sequential anaerobic migrating blanket reactor/completely stirred tank reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuscu, Ozlem Selcuk; Sponza, Delia Teresa

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory scale anaerobic migrating blanket reactor (AMBR) reactor was operated at nitrobenzene (NB) loading rates increasing from 3.33 to 66.67 g NB/m 3 day and at a constant hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 6 days to observe the effects of increasing NB concentrations on chemical oxygen demand (COD), NB removal efficiencies, bicarbonate alkalinity, volatile fatty acid (VFA) accumulation and methane gas percentage. Moreover, the effect of an aerobic completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) reactor, following the anaerobic reactor, on treatment efficiencies was also investigated. Approximately 91-94% COD removal efficiencies were observed up to a NB loading rate of 30.00 g/m 3 day in the AMBR reactor. The COD removal efficiencies decreased from 91% to 85% at a NB loading rate of 66.67 g/m 3 day. NB removal efficiencies were approximately 100% at all NB loading rates. The maximum total gas, methane gas productions and methane percentage were found to be 4.1, 2.6 l/day and 59%, respectively, at a NB loading rate of 30.00 g/m 3 day. The optimum pH values were found to be between 7.2 and 8.4 for maximum methanogenesis. The total volatile fatty acid (TVFA) concentrations in the effluent were 110 and 70 mg/l in the first and second compartments at NB loading rates as high as 66.67 and 6.67 g/m 3 day, respectively, while they were measured as zero in the effluent of the AMBR reactor. In this study, from 180 mg/l NB 66 mg/l aniline was produced in the anaerobic reactor while aniline was completely removed and transformed to 2 mg/l of cathechol in the aerobic CSTR reactor. Overall COD removal efficiencies were found to be 95% and 99% for NB loading rates of 3.33 and 66.67 g/m 3 day in the sequential anaerobic AMBR/aerobic CSTR reactor system, respectively. The toxicity tests performed with Photobacterium phosphoreum (LCK 480, LUMIStox) and Daphnia magna showed that the toxicity decreased with anaerobic/aerobic sequential reactor system from the influent, anaerobic and to

  5. Stage 2: dismantling of reactor case of the experimental F.B.R. Rapsodie

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roger, J.

    1994-01-01

    This document defines the main objectives of stage 2 dismantling of the Rapsodie experimental fast neutron reactor and specifies its time schedule. The work already in progress consists in containing the reactor vessel and its internal equipment, as well as the neutron protection concrete, inside the two leak-tight barriers, and in dismantling all the systems and equipment systems contaminated by sodium. This work, which includes the destruction of 37 metric tons of contaminated sodium from the primary system, was begun in 1987 and will be completed in 1994. The duration of the waiting period for complete dismantling (stage 3) has not been defined. However, the containment and monitoring means implemented should allow a safe waiting period of several decades. (author). 4 figs

  6. Preparation of covariance data for the fast reactor. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Keiichi; Hasagawa, Akira

    1998-03-01

    For some isotopes important for core analysis of the fast reactor, covariance data of neutron nuclear data in the evaluated nuclear data library (JENDL-3.2) were presumed to file. Objected isotopes were 10-B, 11-B, 55-Mn, 240-Pu and 241-Pu. Physical amounts presumed on covariance were cross section, isolated and unisolated resonance parameters and first order Legendre coefficient of elastic scattering angle distribution. Presumption of the covariance was conducted in accordance with the data estimation method of JENDL-3.2 as possible. In other ward, when the estimated value was based on the experimental one, error of the experimental value was calculated, and when based on the calculated value, error of the calculated one was obtained. Their estimated results were prepared with ENDF-6 format. (G.K.)

  7. Cermet fuel reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, C.L.; Palmer, R.S.; Van Hoomissen, J.E.; Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Barner, J.O.

    1987-09-01

    Cermet fueled nuclear reactors are attractive candidates for high performance space power systems. The cermet fuel consists of tungsten-urania hexagonal fuel blocks characterized by high strength at elevated temperatures, a high thermal conductivity and resultant high thermal shock resistance. Key features of the cermet fueled reactor design are (1) the ability to achieve very high coolant exit temperatures, and (2) thermal shock resistance during rapid power changes, and (3) two barriers to fission product release - the cermet matrix and the fuel element cladding. Additionally, thre is a potential for achieving a long operating life because of (1) the neutronic insensitivity of the fast-spectrum core to the buildup of fission products and (2) the utilization of a high strength refractory metal matrix and structural materials. These materials also provide resistance against compression forces that potentially might compact and/or reconfigure the core. In addition, the neutronic properties of the refractory materials assure that the reactor remains substantially subcritical under conditions of water immersion. It is concluded that cermet fueled reactors can be utilized to meet the power requirements for a broad range of advanced space applications. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS). Final report. Volume 2. Commercial fusion synfuels plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donohue, M.L.; Price, M.E.

    1984-07-01

    Volume 2 contains the following chapters: (1) synfuels; (2) physics base and parameters for TMR; (3) high-temperature two-temperature-zone blanket system for synfuel application; (4) thermochemical hydrogen processes; (5) interfacing the sulfur-iodine cycle; (6) interfacing the reactor with the thermochemical process; (7) tritium control in the blanket system; (8) the sulfur trioxide fluidized-bed composer; (9) preliminary cost estimates; and (10) fuels beyond hydrogen

  9. reactor power control using fuzzy logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.E.E.

    2001-01-01

    power stabilization is a critical issue in nuclear reactors. convention pd- controller is currently used in egypt second testing research reactor (ETRR-2). two fuzzy controllers are proposed to control the reactor power of ETRR-2 reactor. the design of the first one is based on a set of linguistic rules that were adopted from the human operators experience. after off-line fuzzy computations, the controller is a lookup table, and thus, real time controller is achieved. comparing this f lc response with the pd-controller response, which already exists in the system, through studying the expected transients during the normal operation of ETRR-2 reactor, the simulation results show that, fl s has the better response, the second controller is adaptive fuzzy controller, which is proposed to deal with system non-linearity . The simulation results show that the proposed adaptive fuzzy controller gives a better integral square error (i se) index than the existing conventional od controller

  10. Utilization of research reactors - A global perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muranaka, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents 1) a worldwide picture of research reactors, operable, shutdown, under construction and planned, 2) statistics on utilization of research reactors including TRIGA reactors, and 3) some results of a survey conducted during 1988 on the utilization of research reactors in developing Member States in the Asia-Pacific Region

  11. CYLFUX, Fast Reactor Reactivity Transients Simulation in LWR by 2-D 2 Group Diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, A.

    1973-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: A 2-dimensional calculation of the 2-group, space-dependent neutron diffusion equations is performed in r-z geometry using an arbitrary number of groups of delayed neutron precursors. The program is designed to simulate fast reactivity excursions in light water reactors taking into account Doppler feedback via adiabatic heatup of fuel. Axial motions of control rods may be considered including scram action on option. 2 - Method of solution: The differential equations are solved at each time step by an explicit finite difference method using two time levels. The stationary distributions are obtained by using the same algorithm. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: No restriction to the number of space points and delayed neutron energy groups besides the computer size

  12. Neutron behavior, reactor control, and reactor heat transfer. Volume four

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Volume four covers neutron behavior (neutron absorption, how big are nuclei, neutron slowing down, neutron losses, the self-sustaining reactor), reactor control (what is controlled in a reactor, controlling neutron population, is it easy to control a reactor, range of reactor control, what happens when the fuel burns up, controlling a PWR, controlling a BWR, inherent safety of reactors), and reactor heat transfer (heat generation in a nuclear reactor, how is heat removed from a reactor core, heat transfer rate, heat transfer properties of the reactor coolant)

  13. A thermal hydraulic analysis in PWR reactors with UO{sub 2} or (U-Th)O{sub 2} fuel rods employing a simplified code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Thiago A. dos; Maiorino, José R., E-mail: thiago.santos@ufabc.edu.br, E-mail: joserubens.maiorino@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo André, SP (Brazil); Stefanni, Giovanni L. de, E-mail: giovanni.stefanni@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    In order to project a nuclear reactor, the neutronic calculus must be validated, so that its thermal limits and safety parameters are respected. Considering this issue, this research aims to evaluate the APTh-100 reactor thermal limits. This PWR is a project developed in Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC) using fuel composed of Uranium and Thorium oxide mixed (U,Th)O{sub 2}. For this purpose, a simplified, although conservative, code was developed in a MATLAB environment named STC-MOX-Th 'Simplified Thermal-hydraulics Code-Mixed Oxide Thorium'. This code provides axial and radial temperature distribution, as well as DNBR distribution over the hottest channel of the reactor core. Moreover, it brings other hydraulic quantities, such as pressure drop over the fuel rod, considering any fuel proportion of (U,Th)O{sub 2}.The software uses basic laws of conservation of mass, momentum and energy, it also calculates the thermal conduction equation, considering the thermal conductive coefficient as a temperature function. In order to solve this equation, the finite elements method was used. Furthermore, the proportion of 36% of UO{sub 2} was used to evaluate the temperature over the fuel rod and DNBR minimum in three burn conditions: beginning, middle and ending. The program has proven to be efficient in every condition and the results evidenced that the APTh-1000 reactor, in an initial analysis, has its thermal limits within the recommended security parameters. (author)

  14. The advanced MAPLE reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidstone, R.F.; Lee, A.G.; Gillespie, G.E.; Smith, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    High-flux neutron sources are continuing to be of interest both in Canada and internationally to support materials testing for advanced power reactors, new developments in extracted-neutron-beam applications, and commercial production of selected radioisotopes. The advanced MAPLE reactor concept has been developed to meet these needs. The advanced MAPLE reactor is a new tank-type D 2 O reactor that uses rodded low-enrichment uranium fuel in a compact annular core to generate peak thermal-neutron fluxes of 1 x 10 19 n·s -1 in a central irradiation rig with a thermal power output of 50 MW. Capital and incremental development costs are minimized by using MAPLE reactor technology to the greatest extent practicable

  15. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The following topics are briefly discussed: (1) surface blistering studies on fusion reactor materials, (2) TFTR design support activities, (3) analysis of samples bombarded in-situ in PLT, (4) chemical sputtering effects, (5) modeling of surface behavior, (6) ion migration in glow discharge tube cathodes, (7) alloy development for irradiation performance, (8) dosimetry and damage analysis, and (9) development of tritium migration in fusion devices and reactors

  16. FBR and RBR particle bed space reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.; Botts, T.E.

    1983-01-01

    Compact, high-performance nuclear reactor designs based on High-Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGRs) particulate fuel are investigated. The large surface area available with the small-diameter (approx. 500 microns) particulate fuel allows very high power densities (MW's/liter), small temperature differences between fuel and coolant (approx. 10 0 K), high coolant-outlet temperatures (1500 to 3000 0 K, depending on design), and fast reactor startup (approx. 2 to 3 seconds). Two reactor concepts are developed - the Fixed Bed Reactor (FBR), where the fuel particles are packed into a thin annular bed between two porous cylindrical drums, and the Rotating Bed Reactor (RBR), where the fuel particles are held inside a cold rotating (typically approx. 500 rpm) porous cylindrical drum. The FBR can operate steady-state in the closed-cycle He-cooled mode or in the open-cycle H 2 -cooled mode. The RBR will operate only in the open-cycle H 2 -cooled mode

  17. Nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    After an introduction and general explanation of nuclear power the following reactor types are described: magnox thermal reactor; advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR); pressurised water reactor (PWR); fast reactors (sodium cooled); boiling water reactor (BWR); CANDU thermal reactor; steam generating heavy water reactor (SGHWR); high temperature reactor (HTR); Leningrad (RMBK) type water-cooled graphite moderated reactor. (U.K.)

  18. Technical evolution and operation of French CO2 cooled reactors (UNGG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthion, Y.

    1986-10-01

    The technical evolution of the five French CO 2 cooled reactors (UNGG) from 1981 to 1986 needs to be outlined. These technical evolutions concerned the fuel element of Bugey 1 which is now slightly enriched, as well as the load reduction operation required by the grid. In addition work in underway to increase the safety at the two St Laurent units, or to repair the hot steel upper-structures of Chinon-3 unit

  19. Experimental studies of U-Pu-Zr fast reactor fuel pins in EBR-II [Experimental Breeder Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Lahm, C.E.; Hofman, G.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is a generic reactor concept under development by Argonne National Laboratory. Much of the technology for the IFR is being demonstrated at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) on the Department of Energy site near Idaho Falls, Idaho. The IFR concept relies on four technical features to achieve breakthroughs in nuclear power economics and safety: (1) a pool-type reactor configuration, (2) liquid sodium cooling, (3) metallic fuel, and (4) an integral fuel cycle with on-site reprocessing. The purpose of this paper will be to summarize our latest results of irradiation testing uranium-plutonium-zirconium (U-Pu-Zr) fuel in the EBR-II. 10 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Fast breeder reactor at Kalkar. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degen, G.

    1979-02-01

    After a brief description of the previous development of the case the legal decisions are documented and commented on. The concept of the then FDP-Minister of Economy of North Rhine Westphalia (Riemer, Pu-combustion plant) is presented and the prospects and risk for the fast breeder reactor after the 3. partial construction license are discussed. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchie, Francois

    2015-10-01

    This article proposes an overview of research reactors, i.e. nuclear reactors of less than 100 MW. Generally, these reactors are used as neutron generators for basic research in matter sciences and for technological research as a support to power reactors. The author proposes an overview of the general design of research reactors in terms of core size, of number of fissions, of neutron flow, of neutron space distribution. He outlines that this design is a compromise between a compact enough core, a sufficient experiment volume, and high enough power densities without affecting neutron performance or its experimental use. The author evokes the safety framework (same regulations as for power reactors, more constraining measures after Fukushima, international bodies). He presents the main characteristics and operation of the two families which represent almost all research reactors; firstly, heavy water reactors (photos, drawings and figures illustrate different examples); and secondly light water moderated and cooled reactors with a distinction between open core pool reactors like Melusine and Triton, pool reactors with containment, experimental fast breeder reactors (Rapsodie, the Russian BOR 60, the Chinese CEFR). The author describes the main uses of research reactors: basic research, applied and technological research, safety tests, production of radio-isotopes for medicine and industry, analysis of elements present under the form of traces at very low concentrations, non destructive testing, doping of silicon mono-crystalline ingots. The author then discusses the relationship between research reactors and non proliferation, and finally evokes perspectives (decrease of the number of research reactors in the world, the Jules Horowitz project)

  2. RESI-1 and RESI-2: pPrototypes of an information system on reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultheiss, G.F.; Eglin, W.; Katz, F.W.; Krings, T.; Pee, A.; Schlechtendahl, E.G.

    1975-04-01

    To demonstrate by practical experience the feasibility of the information system elaborated in the 'Study of an Information System on Reactor Safety RESI' (KFK 1900), the prototype systems RESI-1 and RESI-2 were developed and tested in operation. The two systems have been considerably reduced both in extent and contents as compared to the information system described in the study. The RESI-1 prototype system is a paper version established for verification of all the individual functions before passing over to the computer-aided interactive version RESI-2. RESI-2 is based on the GOLEM system of Siemens. Both protoype systems have proved that the essential features: 1) documentation, 2) formulation of and answering to safety questions, which are relevant with respect to particular licensing cases, 3) formulation of safety questions related to individual reactor types can be managed satisfactorily. All the functions of information retrieval have been tested carefully over several months. Particularities of project development and of the methods elaborated are described in detail and presented in this report. (orig.) [de

  3. Operation and maintenance of the RA Reactor in 1985, Part 1, Annex A - Reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinc, R.; Stanic, A.

    1985-01-01

    This document describes reactor operation from 1981 to 1985, including data about short term (shorter than 24 hours) and long term operation interruptions, as well as safety shutdown and reactor applications. During 1982, 1983 until July 1984 reactor was operated at 2 MW power according to the plan. Plan was not fulfilled in 1983 because deposits were noticed again, at the end of 1982, on the surface of fuel elements. Reactor was mainly used for neutron activation purposes and isotope production as source of neutrons for experimental purposes [sr

  4. The reactor antineutrino anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haser, Julia; Buck, Christian; Lindner, Manfred [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Major discoveries were made in the past few years in the field of neutrino flavour oscillation. Nuclear reactors produce a clean and intense flux of electron antineutrinos and are thus an essential neutrino source for the determination of oscillation parameters. Most currently the reactor antineutrino experiments Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO have accomplished to measure θ{sub 13}, the smallest of the three-flavour mixing angles. In the course of these experiments two anomalies emerged: (1) the reanalysis of the reactor predictions revealed a deficit in experimentally observed antineutrino flux, known as the ''reactor antineutrino anomaly''. (2) The high precision of the latest generation of neutrino experiments resolved a spectral shape distortion relative to the expected energy spectra. Both puzzles are yet to be solved and triggered new experimental as well as theoretical studies, with the search for light sterile neutrinos as most popular explanation for the flux anomaly. This talk outlines the two reactor antineutrino anomalies. Discussing possible explanations for their occurrence, recent and upcoming efforts to solve the reactor puzzles are highlighted.

  5. RA Research nuclear reactor, Part II: radiation protection at the RA reactor in 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, M.; Ajdacic, N.; Zaric, M.; Vukovic, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation protection tasks which enable safe operation of the RA reactor, and are defined according the the legal regulations and IAEA safety recommendations are sorted into four categories in this report: (1) Control of the working environment, dosimetry at the RA reactor and radiation protection; (2) Radioactivity control in the vicinity of the reactor and meteorology measurements; (3) Decontamination and relevant actions, collecting and treatment of fluid effluents; and and solid radioactive wastes [sr

  6. Roles of plasma neutron source reactor in development of fusion reactor engineering: Comparison with fission reactor engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Shoichi; Kawabe, Takaya

    1995-01-01

    The history of development of fusion power reactor has come to a turning point, where the main research target is now shifting from the plasma heating and confinement physics toward the burning plasma physics and reactor engineering. Although the development of fusion reactor system is the first time for human beings, engineers have experience of development of fission power reactor. The common feature between them is that both are plants used for the generation of nuclear reactions for the production of energy, nucleon, and radiation on an industrial scale. By studying the history of the development of the fission reactor, one can find the existence of experimental neutron reactors including irradiation facilities for fission reactor materials. These research neutron reactors played very important roles in the development of fission power reactors. When one considers the strategy of development of fusion power reactors from the points of fusion reactor engineering, one finds that the fusion neutron source corresponds to the neutron reactor in fission reactor development. In this paper, the authors discuss the roles of the plasma-based neutron source reactors in the development of fusion reactor engineering, by comparing it with the neutron reactors in the history of fission power development, and make proposals for the strategy of the fusion reactor development. 21 refs., 6 figs

  7. Thorium utilisation in thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishnan, K.

    1997-01-01

    It is now more or less accepted that the best way to use thorium is in thermal reactors. This is due to the fact that U233 is a good material in the thermal spectrum. Studies of different thorium cycles in various reactor concepts had been carried out in the early days of nuclear power. After three decades of neglect, the world is once again looking at thorium with some interest. We in India have been studying thorium cycles in most of the existing thermal reactor concepts, with greater emphasis on heavy water reactors. In this paper, we report some of the work done in India on different thorium cycles in the Indian pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR), and also give a description of the design of the advanced heavy water reactor (AHWR). (author). 1 ref., 2 tabs., 5 figs

  8. Role of irradiation reactor mock-ups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casali, F.; Cerles, J.M.; Debrue, J.

    1977-01-01

    A survey is given of the utilization of low power facilities in support to irradiation reactor experiments. The BRO2, ISIS and RB3 facilities are described as neutronic mock-ups of the BR2, OSIRIS and ESSOR reactors respectively

  9. A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1991-04-01

    Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed

  10. A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1991-04-01

    Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed.

  11. Water and Regolith Shielding for Surface Reactor Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poston, David I.; Ade, Brian J.; Sadasivan, Pratap; Leichliter, Katrina J.; Dixon, David D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates potential shielding options for surface power fission reactors. The majority of work is focused on a lunar shield that uses a combination of water in stainless-steel cans and lunar regolith. The major advantage of a water-based shield is that development, testing, and deployment should be relatively inexpensive. This shielding approach is used for three surface reactor concepts: (1) a moderated spectrum, NaK cooled, Hastalloy/UZrH reactor, (2) a fast-spectrum, NaK-cooled, SS/UO2 reactor, and (3) a fast-spectrum, K-heat-pipe-cooled, SS/UO2 reactor. For this study, each of these reactors is coupled to a 25-kWt Stirling power system, designed for 5 year life. The shields are designed to limit the dose both to the Stirling alternators and potential astronauts on the surface. The general configuration used is to bury the reactor, but several other options exist as well. Dose calculations are presented as a function of distance from reactor, depth of buried hole, water boron concentration (if any), and regolith repacked density.

  12. Water and Regolith Shielding for Surface Reactor Missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poston, David I.; Sadasivan, Pratap; Dixon, David D.; Ade, Brian J.; Leichliter, Katrina J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates potential shielding options for surface power fission reactors. The majority of work is focused on a lunar shield that uses a combination of water in stainless-steel cans and lunar regolith. The major advantage of a water-based shield is that development, testing, and deployment should be relatively inexpensive. This shielding approach is used for three surface reactor concepts: (1) a moderated spectrum, NaK cooled, Hastalloy/UZrH reactor, (2) a fast-spectrum, NaK-cooled, SS/UO2 reactor, and (3) a fast-spectrum, K-heat-pipe-cooled, SS/UO2 reactor. For this study, each of these reactors is coupled to a 25-kWt Stirling power system, designed for 5 year life. The shields are designed to limit the dose both to the Stirling alternators and potential astronauts on the surface. The general configuration used is to bury the reactor, but several other options exist as well. Dose calculations are presented as a function of distance from reactor, depth of buried hole, water boron concentration (if any), and regolith repacked density

  13. Processing requirements for property optimization of Eu2O3-W cermets for fast reactor neutron absorber applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasto, A.E.; Tennery, V.J.

    1977-01-01

    Europium sesquioxide is a candidate fast reactor neutron absorber material. It possesses several desirable characteristics for this application, but has a low thermal conductivity. This gives rise to pellet cracking during reactor operation. To increase the thermal conductivity without great sacrifice in nuclear worth, addition of tungsten to Eu 2 O 3 has been evaluated. Synthesis and fabrication techniques described allow preparation of high density compacts of Eu 2 O 3 -15 vol. percent tungsten, possessing favorable thermal conductivity and thermal expansion characteristics

  14. Reactor physics aspects of CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Critoph, E.

    1980-01-01

    These four lectures are being given at the Winter Course on Nuclear Physics at Trieste during 1978 February. They constitute part of the third week's lectures in Part II: Reactor Theory and Power Reactors. A physical description of CANDU reactors is given, followed by an overview of CANDU characteristics and some of the design options. Basic lattice physics is discussed in terms of zero energy lattice experiments, irradiation effects and analytical methods. Start-up and commissioning experiments in CANDU reactors are reviewed, and some of the more interesting aspects of operation discussed - fuel management, flux mapping and control of the power distribution. Finally, some of the characteristics of advanced fuel cycles that have been proposed for CANDU reactors are summarized. (author)

  15. Thermal-hydraulics of actinide burner reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizuka, Takakazu; Mukaiyama, Takehiko; Takano, Hideki; Ogawa, Toru; Osakabe, Masahiro.

    1989-07-01

    As a part of conceptual study of actinide burner reactors, core thermal-hydraulic analyses were conducted for two types of reactor concepts, namely (1) sodium-cooled actinide alloy fuel reactor, and (2) helium-cooled particle-bed reactor, to examine the feasibility of high power-density cores for efficient transmutation of actinides within the maximum allowable temperature limits of fuel and cladding. In addition, calculations were made on cooling of actinide fuel assembly. (author)

  16. RIA Analysis of Unprotected TRIGA Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Altaf

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available An RIA (reactivity initiated accident analysis has been carried out for the TRIGA Mark II research reactor considering both step and ramp reactivity ranges within 0.5 % dk/k (< $1 to 2.0 % dk/k (>$2. The insertion time was set at 10 s. Based on the fact that a reactor becomes unprotected if scram does not work at the event of danger, to define unprotected conditions, the time to actuate scram (trip was taken as close to total simulation time. In this long duration of scram inactivity, it is obtained from the present analysis that the reactor remained safe to up to 1.8 % dk/k ($2.57 for step reactivity and 1.99 % dk/k ($2.84 for ramp reactivity. In addition to negative temperature coefficient of reativity, probably the longer time of reactivity insertion keeps TRIGA safe even at larger magnitudes of reactivity during unprotected reactor transients. Coupled point kinetics, neutronics, and thermal hydraulics code EUREKA-2/R has been utilized for this work. It appears that EUREKA-2/RR predicts the sequence of unprotected transient scenario of TRIGA core with good approximation and the results will definitely be helpful for the reactor operators.

  17. Fast breeder reactors: Experience and trends. V. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The IAEA Symposium on ''Fast Breeder Reactors: Experience and Future Trends'' was held, at the invitation of the Government of France, in Lyons, France, on 22-26 July 1985. It was hosted by the French Commissariat a l'energie atomique and Electricite de France. The purpose of the Symposium was to review the experience gained so far in the field of LMFBRs, taking into account the constructional, operational, technological, economic and fuel cycle aspects, and to consider the developmental trends as well as the international co-operation in fast breeder reactor design and utilization. The Symposium was attended by almost 400 participants (340 participants, 35 observers and 20 journalists) from 25 countries and five international organizations. More than 80 papers were presented and discussed during six regular sessions and four poster sessions. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  18. Experimental determination of lattice parameters for 2% enriched uranium heavy water reactor cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raisic, N; Takac, S; Markovic, H; Bosevski, T [Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1963-04-15

    Systematic measurements of the buckling, infinite multiplication factor and the thermal utilization factor were made on a series of lattices for 2% enriched uranium tubular fuel elements in heavy water. This work represents the first phase of experimental verification of standard theoretical methods used for the determination of reactor parameters.

  19. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowarski, L.

    1955-01-01

    It brings together the techniques data which are involved in the discussion about the utility for a research institute to acquire an atomic reactor for research purposes. This type of decision are often taken by non-specialist people who can need a brief presentation of a research reactor and its possibilities in term of research before asking advises to experts. In a first part, it draws up a list of the different research programs which can be studied by getting a research reactor. First of all is the reactor behaviour and kinetics studies (reproducibility factor, exploration of neutron density, effect of reactor structure, effect of material irradiation...). Physical studies includes study of the behaviour of the control system, studies of neutron resonance phenomena and study of the fission process for example. Chemical studies involves the study of manipulation and control of hot material, characterisation of nuclear species produced in the reactor and chemical effects of irradiation on chemical properties and reactions. Biology and medicine research involves studies of irradiation on man and animals, genetics research, food or medical tools sterilization and neutron beams effect on tumour for example. A large number of other subjects can be studied in a reactor research as reactor construction material research, fabrication of radioactive sources for radiographic techniques or applied research as in agriculture or electronic. The second part discussed the technological considerations when choosing the reactor type. The technological factors, which are considered for its choice, are the power of the reactor, the nature of the fuel which is used, the type of moderator (water, heavy water, graphite or BeO) and the reflector, the type of coolants, the protection shield and the control systems. In the third part, it described the characteristics (place of installation, type of combustible and comments) and performance (power, neutron flux ) of already existing

  20. Spirit's Winter Work Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Version This portion of an image acquired by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera shows the Spirit rover's winter campaign site. Spirit was parked on a slope tilted 11 degrees to the north to maximize sunlight during the southern winter season. 'Tyrone' is an area where the rover's wheels disturbed light-toned soils. Remote sensing and in-situ analyses found the light-toned soil at Tyrone to be sulfate rich and hydrated. The original picture is catalogued as PSP_001513_1655_red and was taken on Sept. 29, 2006. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project and built the spacecraft. The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment is operated by the University of Arizona, Tucson, and the instrument was built by Ball Aerospace and Technology Corp., Boulder, Colo.