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  1. Comprehensive identification of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium genes required for infection of BALB/c mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy R Chaudhuri

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Genes required for infection of mice by Salmonella Typhimurium can be identified by the interrogation of random transposon mutant libraries for mutants that cannot survive in vivo. Inactivation of such genes produces attenuated S. Typhimurium strains that have potential for use as live attenuated vaccines. A quantitative screen, Transposon Mediated Differential Hybridisation (TMDH, has been developed that identifies those members of a large library of transposon mutants that are attenuated. TMDH employs custom transposons with outward-facing T7 and SP6 promoters. Fluorescently-labelled transcripts from the promoters are hybridised to whole-genome tiling microarrays, to allow the position of the transposon insertions to be determined. Comparison of microarray data from the mutant library grown in vitro (input with equivalent data produced after passage of the library through mice (output enables an attenuation score to be determined for each transposon mutant. These scores are significantly correlated with bacterial counts obtained during infection of mice using mutants with individual defined deletions of the same genes. Defined deletion mutants of several novel targets identified in the TMDH screen are effective live vaccines.

  2. Identification of Salmonella typhimurium genes required for colonization of the chicken alimentary tract and for virulence in newly hatched chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, A K; Lovell, M A; Hulme, S D; Zhang-Barber, L; Barrow, P A

    1998-05-01

    From a collection of 2,800 Tn5-TC1 transposon mutants of Salmonella typhimurium F98, 18 that showed reduced intestinal colonization of 3-week-old chicks were identified. The sites of transposon insertion were determined for most of the mutants and included insertions in the lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis genes rfaK, rfaY, rfbK, and rfbB and the genes dksA, clpB, hupA, and sipC. In addition, identification was made of an insertion into a novel gene that encodes a protein showing similarity to the IIC component of the mannose class of phosphoenolpyruvate-carbohydrate phosphotransferase systems, which we putatively called ptsC. Transduction of most of the transposon mutations to a fresh S. typhimurium F98 genetic background and construction of defined mutations in the rfbK, dksA, hupA, sipC, and ptsC genes of S. typhimurium F98 supported the role in colonization of all but the pts locus. The virulence of the rfbK, dksA, hupA, sipC, and ptsC defined mutants and clpB and rfaY transductants in 1-day-old chicks was tested. All but the ptsC and rfaY mutants were attenuated for virulence. A number of other phenotypes associated with some of the mutations are described.

  3. Identification of Salmonella typhimurium Genes Required for Colonization of the Chicken Alimentary Tract and for Virulence in Newly Hatched Chicks

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Arthur K.; Lovell, Margaret A.; Hulme, Scott D.; Zhang-Barber, Li; Barrow, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    From a collection of 2,800 Tn5-TC1 transposon mutants of Salmonella typhimurium F98, 18 that showed reduced intestinal colonization of 3-week-old chicks were identified. The sites of transposon insertion were determined for most of the mutants and included insertions in the lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis genes rfaK, rfaY, rfbK, and rfbB and the genes dksA, clpB, hupA, and sipC. In addition, identification was made of an insertion into a novel gene that encodes a protein showing similarity to...

  4. A functional cra gene is required for Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium virulence in BALB/c mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allen, J. H.; Utley, M.; Van den Bosch, H.

    2000-01-01

    A minitransposon mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SR-11, SR-11 Fad(-), is unable to utilize gluconeogenic substrates as carbon sources and is avirulent and immunogenic when administered perorally to BALB/c mice (M. J. Utley et al., FEMS Microbiol. Lett., 163:129-134, 1998). Here...

  5. Inducible pathway is required for mutagenesis in Salmonella typhimurium LT2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orrego, C.; Eisenstadt, E.

    1987-01-01

    UV mutability of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 was eliminated in the presence of a multicopy plasmid carrying the Escherichia coli lexA + gene. This result suggests that inducible, SOS-like functions are required for UV mutagenesis in S. typhimurium. S. typhimurium strains carrying either point or deletion mutations in topA had previously been shown to lose their mutability by UV or methyl methanesulfonate. Mitomycin C induction of the Phi(mucB'-lacZ') fusion (a DNA damage-inducible locus carried on plasmid pSE205) in S. typhimurium topA was normal, suggesting that RecA is activated in topA mutants. These observations lead the authors deduce that S. typhimurium has at least one DNA damage-inducible locus in addition to recA that is required for UV mutability

  6. Isolation of OmpA gene from Salmonella typhimurium and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolation of OmpA gene from Salmonella typhimurium and transformation into alfalfa in order to develop an edible plant based vaccine. ... The recombinant OmpA was expressed in Escherichia coli TG1. The new construct was used to transform the Agrobacterium tumefaciens Strain LBA4404 before plant transformation.

  7. Requirement for cobalamin by Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium, Pullorum, Gallinarum and Enteritidis during infection in chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Boldrin de Paiva

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium synthesizes cobalamin (vitamin B12 only during anaerobiosis. Two percent of the S. Typhimurium genome is devoted to the synthesis and uptake of vitamin B12 and to B12-dependent reactions. To understand the requirement for cobalamin synthesis better, we constructed mutants of Salmonella serovars Enteritidis and Pullorum that are double-defective in cobalamin biosynthesis (ΔcobSΔcbiA. We compared the virulence of these mutants to that of their respective wild type strains and found no impairment in their ability to cause disease in chickens. We then assessed B12 production in these mutants and their respective wild type strains, as well as in S. Typhimurium ΔcobSΔcbiA, Salmonella Gallinarum ΔcobSΔcbiA, and their respective wild type strains. None of the mutants was able to produce detectable B12. B12 was detectable in S. Enteritidis, S. Pullorum and S. Typhimurium wild type strains but not in S. Gallinarum. In conclusion, the production of vitamin B12 in vitro differed across the tested Salmonella serotypes and the deletion of the cbiA and cobS genes resulted in different levels of alteration in the host parasite interaction according to Salmonella serotype tested.

  8. Two alanine racemase genes in Salmonella typhimurium that differ in structure and function.

    OpenAIRE

    Wasserman, S A; Walsh, C T; Botstein, D

    1983-01-01

    Mutations were isolated in a previously undescribed Salmonella typhimurium gene encoding an alanine racemase essential for utilization of L-alanine as a source of carbon, energy, and nitrogen. This new locus, designated dadB, lies within one kilobase of the D-alanine dehydrogenase locus (dadA), which is also required for alanine catabolism. The dadA and dadB genes are coregulated. Mutants (including insertions) lacking the dadB alanine racemase do not require D-alanine for growth unless a mut...

  9. The architecture and ppGpp-dependent expression of the primary transcriptome of Salmonella Typhimurium during invasion gene expression

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    Ramachandran Vinoy K

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invasion of intestinal epithelial cells by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium requires expression of the extracellular virulence gene expression programme (STEX, activation of which is dependent on the signalling molecule guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp. Recently, next-generation transcriptomics (RNA-seq has revealed the unexpected complexity of bacterial transcriptomes and in this report we use differential RNA sequencing (dRNA-seq to define the high-resolution transcriptomic architecture of wild-type S. Typhimurium and a ppGpp null strain under growth conditions which model STEX. In doing so we show that ppGpp plays a much wider role in regulating the S. Typhimurium STEX primary transcriptome than previously recognised. Results Here we report the precise mapping of transcriptional start sites (TSSs for 78% of the S. Typhimurium open reading frames (ORFs. The TSS mapping enabled a genome-wide promoter analysis resulting in the prediction of 169 alternative sigma factor binding sites, and the prediction of the structure of 625 operons. We also report the discovery of 55 new candidate small RNAs (sRNAs and 302 candidate antisense RNAs (asRNAs. We discovered 32 ppGpp-dependent alternative TSSs and determined the extent and level of ppGpp-dependent coding and non-coding transcription. We found that 34% and 20% of coding and non-coding RNA transcription respectively was ppGpp-dependent under these growth conditions, adding a further dimension to the role of this remarkable small regulatory molecule in enabling rapid adaptation to the infective environment. Conclusions The transcriptional architecture of S. Typhimurium and finer definition of the key role ppGpp plays in regulating Salmonella coding and non-coding transcription should promote the understanding of gene regulation in this important food borne pathogen and act as a resource for future research.

  10. Control of virulence gene transcription by indirect readout in Vibrio cholerae and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Charles J; Dorman, Matthew J

    2017-10-01

    Indirect readout mechanisms of transcription control rely on the recognition of DNA shape by transcription factors (TFs). TFs may also employ a direct readout mechanism that involves the reading of the base sequence in the DNA major groove at the binding site. TFs with winged helix-turn-helix (wHTH) motifs use an alpha helix to read the base sequence in the major groove while inserting a beta sheet 'wing' into the adjacent minor groove. Such wHTH proteins are important regulators of virulence gene transcription in many pathogens; they also control housekeeping genes. This article considers the cases of the non-invasive Gram-negative pathogen Vibrio cholerae and the invasive pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Both possess clusters of A + T-rich horizontally acquired virulence genes that are silenced by the nucleoid-associated protein H-NS and regulated positively or negatively by wHTH TFs: for example, ToxR and LeuO in V. cholerae; HilA, LeuO, SlyA and OmpR in S. Typhimurium. Because of their relatively relaxed base sequence requirements for target recognition, indirect readout mechanisms have the potential to engage regulatory proteins with many more targets than might be the case using direct readout, making indirect readout an important, yet often ignored, contributor to the expression of pathogenic phenotypes. © 2017 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Polyamines Are Required for Virulence in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lotte; Thomsen, Line Elnif; Wallrodt, Inke

    2012-01-01

    Sensing and responding to environmental cues is a fundamental characteristic of bacterial physiology and virulence. Here we identify polyamines as novel environmental signals essential for virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a major intracellular pathogen and a model organism......, we show that an S. Typhimurium polyamine mutant is defective for invasion, intracellular survival, killing of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and systemic infection of the mouse model of typhoid fever. Virulence of the mutant could be restored by genetic complementation, and invasion...... and intracellular survival could, as well, be complemented by the addition of exogenous putrescine and spermidine to the bacterial cultures prior to infection. Interestingly, intracellular survival of the polyamine mutant was significantly enhanced above the wild type level by the addition of exogenous putrescine...

  12. Lack of specific hybridization between the lep genes of Salmonella typhimurium and Bacillus licheniformis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijl, J M; Jong, de Anne; Smith, H; Bron, Sierd; Venema, G

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an attempt to clone the Bacillus licheniformis lep gene, encoding signal peptidase, using the Salmonella typhimurium lep gene as a hybridization probe. Although a hybridizing fragment was obtained, DNA sequence analysis indicated that it did not contain the lep gene. Instead,

  13. Immunogenicity of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) M gene delivered by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Ying; Liu, Jiawen; Huang, Xiaobo; Li, Yaqing; Zhang, Yudi; Chen, Jie; Wen, Xintian; Cao, Sanjie; Wen, Yiping; Wu, Rui; Yan, Qigui; Ma, Xiaoping

    2016-04-01

    Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) was selected as a transgenic vehicle for the development of live mucosal vaccines against transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) based on the M gene. An approximate 1.0 kb DNA fragment, encoding for glycoprotein M, was amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1. The recombinant plasmid pVAX-M was transformed by electroporation into attenuated S. typhimurium SL7207, and the expression and translation of the pVAX-M delivered by recombinant S. typhimurium SL7207 (pVAX-M) was detected both in vitro and in vivo. BALB/c mice were inoculated orally with SL7207 (pVAX-M) at different dosages to evaluate safety of the vaccines. The bacterium was safe to mice at a dosage of 2 × 10(9) CFU, almost eliminated from the spleen and liver at week 4 post-immunization and eventually cleared at week 6. Mice immunized with 1 × 10(9) CFU of SL7207 (pVAX-M) elicited specific anti-TGEV local mucosal and humoral responses including levels of IgA, IgG, IL-4, and IFN-γ as measured by indirect ELISA assay. Moreover, the control groups (pVAX group, PBS group) maintained at a normal level during week 4-8 post-immunization. The results indicated that attenuated S. typhimurium could be used as a delivery vector for oral immunization of TGEV M gene vaccine.

  14. The Tricarballylate Utilization (tcuRABC) Genes of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium LT2

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Jeffrey A.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Schwem, Brian E.; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.

    2004-01-01

    The genes of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 encoding functions needed for the utilization of tricarballylate as a carbon and energy source were identified and their locations in the chromosome were established. Three of the tricarballylate utilization (tcu) genes, tcuABC, are organized as an operon; a fourth gene, tcuR, is located immediately 5′ to the tcuABC operon. The tcuABC operon and tcuR gene share the same direction of transcription but are independently transcribed. The t...

  15. Co-ordinate regulation of Salmonella typhimurium invasion genes by environmental and regulatory factors is mediated by control of hilA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, V; Lucas, R L; Hwang, C; Lee, C A

    1996-11-01

    During infection of their hosts, salmonellae enter intestinal epithelial cells. It has been proposed that when Salmonella typhimurium is present in the intestinal lumen, several environmental and regulatory conditions modulate the expression of invasion factors required for bacterial entry into host cells. We report here that the expression of six different S. typhimurium invasion genes encoded on SPI1 (Salmonella pathogenicity island 1) is co-ordinately regulated by oxygen, osmolarity, pH, PhoPQ, and HilA. HilA is a transcriptional activator of the OmpR/ToxR family that is also encoded on SPI1. We have found that HilA plays a central role in the co-ordinated regulation of invasion genes by environmental and regulatory conditions. HilA can activate the expression of two invasion gene-lacZY fusions on reporter plasmids in Escherichia coll, suggesting that HilA acts directly at invasion-gene promoters in S. typhimurium. We have found that the regulation of invasion genes by oxygen, osmolarity, pH, and PhoPQ is indirect and is mediated by regulation of hilA expression by these environmental and regulatory factors. We hypothesize that the complex and co-ordinate regulation of Invasion genes by HilA is an important feature of salmonella pathogenesis and allows salmonellae to enter intestinal epithelial cells.

  16. Isolation of OmpA gene from Salmonella typhimurium and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-01-31

    Jan 31, 2011 ... into a plant expression vector PBI121.The recombinant OmpA was expressed in Escherichia coli TG1. The new construct was used to transform the Agrobacterium tumefaciens Strain LBA4404 before plant transformation. Transgenic alfalfa plants were then developed by introducing OmpA gene in the plant.

  17. Regulation of Salmonella typhimurium pyr Gene Expression: Effect of Changing Both Purine and Pyrimidine Nucleotide Pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1989-01-01

    The synthesis of the pyrimidine biosynthetic enzymes is repressed by the pyrimidine nucleotide end-products of the pathway. However, purine nucleotides also play a role. In this study, I have measured expression of the pyr genes (pyrA-E) in Salmonella typhimurium strains harbouring mutations...... that permit manipulation of the intracellular pools of both pyrimidine and purine nucleotides. The results identify the effectory purine compound as being a guanine nucleotide; it is probably GTP, but it may be GDP or GMP. The synthesis of carbamoylphosphate synthase, encoded by pyrA, and particularly...

  18. Characterisation of integrons and antibiotic resistance genes in Danish multiresistant Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvang, Dorthe; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    1997-01-01

    The presence and genetic content of integrons was investigated in eight Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104 isolates from different pig herds in Denmark. Two different integrons were identified using PCR and sequencing. Each of the integrons carried a single resistance cassette in addition...... to the sul1 and qacE Delta 1 genes characteristic of integrons. The first integron encoded the ant (3 ")-Ia gene that specified resistance to spectinomycin and streptomycin. The second contained the pse-l beta-lactamase gene. All the multiresistant strains contained both integrons. The presence of these two...... integrons did not account for the total phenotypic resistance of all the isolates and does not exclude the presence of other mobile DNA elements....

  19. Characterisation of integrons and antibiotic resistance genes in Danish multiresistant Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvang, Dorthe; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    1998-01-01

    The presence and genetic content of integrons was investigated in eight Salmonella enteritica Typhimurium DT104 isolates from different pig herds in Denmark. Two different integrons were identified using PCR and sequencing. Each of the integrons carried a single resistance cassette in addition...... to the sul1 and qacE Delta 1 genes characteristic of integrons. The first integron encoded the ant (3")-Ia gene that specified resistance to spectinomycin and streptomycin. The second contained the pse-1 beta-lactamase gene. All the multiresistant strains contained both integrons. The presence of these two...... integrons did not account for the total phenotypic resistance of all the isolates and does not exclude the presence of other mobile DNA elements....

  20. Functional and crystallographic characterization of Salmonella typhimurium Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase coded by the sodCI virulence gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pesce, A; Battistoni, A; Stroppolo, ME; Polizio, F; Nardini, M; Kroll, JS; Langford, PR; O'Neill, P; Sette, M; Desideri, A; Bolognesi, M

    2000-01-01

    The functional and three-dimensional structural features of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase coded by the Salmonella typhimurium sodCI gene, have been characterized. Measurements of the catalytic rate indicate that this enzyme is the most efficient superoxide dismutase analyzed so far, a feature that may

  1. PMQR genes oqxAB and aac(6')Ib-cr accelerate the development of fluoroquinolone resistance in Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Marcus H; Chan, Edward W; Liu, Li Z; Chen, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Emergence of multidrug-resistant Salmonella typhimurium strains, especially the ACSSuT and nalidixic acid R types, has significantly compromised the effectiveness of current strategies to control Salmonella infections, resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. Clinical S. typhimurium isolates recovered in Hong Kong during the period of 2005-2011 were increasingly resistant to ciprofloxacin (CIP) and antibiotics of the ACSSuT group. Our data revealed that oqxAB and aac(6')Ib-cr were encoded on plasmids of various sizes and the presence of these two elements together with a single gyrA mutation in S. typhimurium were sufficient to mediate resistance to CIP. Acquisition of the oqxAB and aac(6')Ib-cr encoding plasmids by S. typhimurium caused a fourfold increase in CIP minimal inhibitory concentration. Furthermore, the presence of oqxAB and aac(6')Ib-cr in Salmonella dramatically increased the mutation prevention concentration of CIP which may due to mutational changes in the drug target genes. In conclusion, possession of oqxAB and aac(6')Ib-cr encoding plasmid facilitate the selection of CIP resistant S. typhimurium, thereby causing a remarkable increase of CIP resistance among clinical Salmonella strains in Hong Kong.

  2. Chlortetracycline and florfenicol induce expression of genes associated with pathogenicity in multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Devin B; Bearson, Shawn M D; Bearson, Bradley L; Brunelle, Brian W

    2018-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ( S . Typhimurium) is a serious public health threat as infections caused by these strains are more difficult and expensive to treat. Livestock serve as a reservoir for MDR Salmonella , and the antibiotics chlortetracycline and florfenicol are frequently administrated to food-producing animals to treat and prevent various diseases. Therefore, we evaluated the response of MDR S . Typhimurium after exposure to these two antibiotics. We exposed four MDR S . Typhimurium isolates to sub-inhibitory concentrations of chlortetracycline (16 and 32 µg/ml) or florfenicol (16 µg/ml) for 30 min during early-log phase. Differentially expressed genes following antibiotic treatment were identified using RNA-seq, and genes associated with attachment and those located within the Salmonella pathogenicity islands were significantly up-regulated following exposure to either antibiotic. The effect of antibiotic exposure on cellular invasion and motility was also assessed. Swimming and swarming motility were decreased due to antibiotic exposure. However, we observed chlortetracycline enhanced cellular invasion in two strains and florfenicol enhanced invasion in a third isolate. Chlortetracycline and florfenicol exposure during early-log growth altered the expression of nearly half of the genes in the S . Typhimurium genome, including a large number of genes associated with virulence and pathogenesis; this transcriptional alteration was not due to the SOS response. The results suggest that exposure to either of these two antibiotics may lead to the expression of virulence genes that are typically only transcribed in vivo, as well as only during late-log or stationary phase in vitro.

  3. Regulation of flavin dehydrogenase compartmentalization: requirements for PutA-membrane association in Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surber, M W; Maloy, S

    1999-09-21

    PutA is a multifunctional, peripheral membrane protein which functions both as an autogenous transcriptional repressor and the enzyme which catalyzes the two-step conversion of proline to glutamate in Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli. To understand how PutA associates with the membrane, we determined the role of FAD redox and membrane components in PutA-membrane association. Reduction of the tightly bound FAD is required for both derepression of the put operon and membrane association of PutA. FADH(2) alters the conformation of PutA, resulting in an increased hydrophobicity. Previous studies used enzymatic activity as an assay for membrane association and concluded that electron transfer from the reduced FAD in PutA to the membrane is required for the PutA-membrane interaction. However, direct physical assays of PutA association with membrane vesicles from quinone deficient mutants demonstrated that although electron transfer is essential for proline dehydrogenase activity, it is not required for PutA-membrane association per se. Furthermore, PutA efficiently associated with liposomes, indicating that PutA-membrane association does not require interactions with other membrane proteins. PutA enzymatic activity can be efficiently reconstituted with liposomes containing ubiquinone and cytochrome bo, confirming that proline dehydrogenase can pass electrons directly to the quinone pool. These results indicate that PutA-membrane association is due strictly to a protein-lipid interaction initiated by reduction of FAD.

  4. Characterization and differential gene expression between two phenotypic phase variants in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila K Patterson

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain 798 has previously been shown to undergo phenotypic phase variation. One of the phenotypes expresses virulence traits such as adhesion, while the other phenotype does not. Phenotypic phase variation appears to correlate with the ability of this strain to cause persistent, asymptomatic infections of swine. A new method to detect cells in either phenotypic phase was developed using Evans Blue-Uranine agar plates. Using this new assay, rates of phenotypic phase variation were obtained. The rate of phase variation from non-adhesive to adhesive phenotype was approximately 10(-4 per cell per generation while phase variation from the adhesive to the non-adhesive phenotype was approximately 10(-6 per cell per generation. Two highly virulent S. Typhimurium strains, SL1344 and ATCC 14028, were also shown to undergo phase variation. However, while the rate from adhesive to non-adhesive phenotype was approximately the same as for strain 798, the non-adhesive to adhesive phenotype shift was 37-fold higher. Differential gene expression was measured using RNA-Seq. Eighty-three genes were more highly expressed by 798 cells in the adhesive phenotype compared to the non-adhesive cells. Most of the up-regulated genes were in virulence genes and in particular all genes in the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 were up-regulated. When compared to the virulent strain SL1344, expression of the virulence genes was approximately equal to those up-regulated in the adhesive phenotype of strain 798. A comparison of invasive ability demonstrated that strain SL1344 was the most invasive followed by the adhesive phenotype of strain 798, then the non-adhesive phenotype of strain 798. The least invasive strain was ATCC 14028. The genome of strain 798 was sequenced and compared to SL1344. Both strains had very similar genome sequences and gene deletions could not readily explain differences in the rates of phase variation from non

  5. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium lacking hfq gene confers protective immunity against murine typhoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday Shankar Allam

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is an important enteric pathogen and its various serovars are involved in causing both systemic and intestinal diseases in humans and domestic animals. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Salmonella leading to increased morbidity and mortality has further complicated its management. Live attenuated vaccines have been proven superior over killed or subunit vaccines due to their ability to induce protective immunity. Of the various strategies used for the generation of live attenuated vaccine strains, focus has gradually shifted towards manipulation of virulence regulator genes. Hfq is a RNA chaperon which mediates the binding of small RNAs to the mRNA and assists in post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacteria. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of the Salmonella Typhimurium Δhfq strain as a candidate for live oral vaccine in murine model of typhoid fever. Salmonella hfq deletion mutant is highly attenuated in cell culture and animal model implying a significant role of Hfq in bacterial virulence. Oral immunization with the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant efficiently protects mice against subsequent oral challenge with virulent strain of Salmonella Typhimurium. Moreover, protection was induced upon both multiple as well as single dose of immunizations. The vaccine strain appears to be safe for use in pregnant mice and the protection is mediated by the increase in the number of CD4(+ T lymphocytes upon vaccination. The levels of serum IgG and secretory-IgA in intestinal washes specific to lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane protein were significantly increased upon vaccination. Furthermore, hfq deletion mutant showed enhanced antigen presentation by dendritic cells compared to the wild type strain. Taken together, the studies in murine immunization model suggest that the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant can be a novel live oral vaccine candidate.

  6. Detection of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serotype typhimurium DT104 Based on a Gene Which Confers Cross-Resistance to Florfenicol and Chloramphenicol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Lance F.; Kelley, Lynda C.; Lee, Margie D.; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J.; Maurer, John J.

    1999-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium (S. typhimurium) DT104 (DT104) first emerged as a major pathogen in Europe and is characterized by its pentadrug-resistant pattern. It has also been associated with outbreaks in the United States. The organism typically carries resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamides, and tetracycline. The mechanism of chloramphenicol resistance in DT104 was determined by producing antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli host strain clones from DT104 DNA. DNA from chloramphenicol-resistant clones was sequenced, and probes specific for the genes floS. typhimurium (floSt), int, invA, and spvC were produced for colony blot hybridizations. One hundred nine Salmonella isolates, including 44 multidrug-resistant DT104 isolates, were tested to evaluate the specificities of the probes. The gene floSt, reported in this study, confers chloramphenicol and florfenicol resistance on S. typhimurium DT104. Florfenicol resistance is unique to S. typhimurium DT104 and multidrug-resistant S. typhimurium isolates with the same drug resistance profile among all isolates evaluated. Of 44 DT104 isolates tested, 98% were detected based on phenotypic florfenicol resistance and 100% had the floSt-positive genotype. Resistances to florfenicol and chloramphenicol are conferred by the gene floSt, described in this paper. Presumptive identification of S. typhimurium DT104 can be made rapidly based on the presence of the floSt gene or its resulting phenotype. PMID:10203484

  7. Identification of a umuDC locus in Salmonella typhimurium LT2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.M.; Eisenstadt, E.

    1989-01-01

    The umuDC operon of Escherichia coli is required for efficient mutagenesis by UV light and many other DNA-damaging agents. The existence of a umuDC analog in Salmonella typhimurium has been questioned. With DNA probes to the E. coli umuD and umuC genes, we detected, by Southern blot hybridization, sequences similar to both of these genes in S. typhimurium LT2. We also confirmed that the presence of cloned E. coli umuD enhances the UV mutability and resistance of S. typhimurium. Our data strongly suggest that S. typhimurium contains a functional umuDC operon

  8. Contribution of Target Gene Mutations and Efflux to Decreased Susceptibility of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium to Fluoroquinolones and Other Antimicrobials▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng; Cui, Shenghui; McDermott, Patrick F.; Zhao, Shaohua; White, David G.; Paulsen, Ian; Meng, Jianghong

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in fluoroquinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica include target alterations and overexpression of efflux pumps. The present study evaluated the role of known and putative multidrug resistance efflux pumps and mutations in topoisomerase genes among laboratory-selected and naturally occurring fluoroquinolone-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains. Strains with ciprofloxacin MICs of 0.25, 4, 32, and 256 μg/ml were derived in vitro using serovar Typhimurium S21. These mutants also showed decreased susceptibility or resistance to many nonfluoroquinolone antimicrobials, including tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and several β-lactams. The expression of efflux pump genes acrA, acrB, acrE, acrF, emrB, emrD, and mdlB were substantially increased (≥2-fold) among the fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants. Increased expression was also observed, but to a lesser extent, with three other putative efflux pumps: mdtB (yegN), mdtC (yegO), and emrA among mutants with ciprofloxacin MICs of ≥32 μg/ml. Deletion of acrAB or tolC in S21 and its fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants resulted in increased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and other tested antimicrobials. In naturally occurring fluoroquinolone-resistant serovar Typhimurium strains, deletion of acrAB or tolC increased fluoroquinolone susceptibility 4-fold, whereas replacement of gyrA double mutations (S83F D87N) with wild-type gyrA increased susceptibility >500-fold. These results indicate that a combination of topoisomerase gene mutations, as well as enhanced antimicrobial efflux, plays a critical role in the development of fluoroquinolone resistance in both laboratory-derived and naturally occurring quinolone-resistant serovar Typhimurium strains. PMID:17043131

  9. Motility, biofilm formation, apoptotic effect and virulence gene expression of atypical Salmonella Typhimurium outside and inside Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakroun, Ibtissem; Mahdhi, Abdelkarim; Morcillo, Patricia; Cordero, Hector; Cuesta, Alberto; Bakhrouf, Amina; Mahdouani, Kacem; Esteban, Maria Ángeles

    2018-01-01

    Disease outbreaks related to waterborne pathogen contamination throughout the world as well as challenges that lie ahead for addressing persistent infection are of renewed interest. In this research, we studied the effects of prolonged exposure of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to the cues encountered in the extracellular environment particularly in seawater microcosm on bacterial virulence and subsequent infection in Caco-2 cells. Our data show a significant difference in biofilm formation, swimming and swarming motilities between normal and stressed cells of S. Typhimurium under differing NaCl conditions (P Caco-2 epithelial cells were determined during infection with normal and stressed Salmonella. Furthermore, we compared the expression of SPI-1 virulence genes (sopA, sopB, sopD, sopE2 and hilA) of normal and stressed S. Typhimurium in response to salt conditions encountered in the extracellular environment in LB broth and after epithelial cell exposure. The interest of the present study is due to the fact that to investigate the bacterial survival strategies during its movement from the natural surroundings to the host cell is fundamental to our understanding of the infection process during the host-pathogen interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium lpf, bcf, stb, stc, std, and sth fimbrial operons are required for intestinal persistence in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weening, Eric H; Barker, Jared D; Laarakker, Marijke C; Humphries, Andrea D; Tsolis, Renée M; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2005-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium causes human infections that can frequently be traced back through the food chain to healthy livestock whose intestine is colonized by the pathogen. Little is known about the genes important for intestinal carriage of S. enterica serotype Typhimurium in vertebrate animals. Here we characterized the role of 10 fimbrial operons, agf, fim, lpf, pef, bcf, stb, stc, std, stf, and sth, using competitive infection experiments performed in genetically susceptible (BALB/c) and resistant (CBA) mice. Deletion of agfAB, fimAICDHF, lpfABCDE, pefABCDI, bcfABCDEFG, stbABCD, stcABCD, stdAB, stfACDEFG, or sthABCDE did not reduce the ability of S. enterica serotype Typhimurium to colonize the spleen and cecum of BALB/c mice 5 days after infection. Similarly, deletion of agfAB, fimAICDHF, pefABCDI, and stfACDEFG did not result in reduced recovery of S. enterica serotype Typhimurium from fecal samples collected from infected CBA mice over a 30-day time period. However, S. enterica serotype Typhimurium strains carrying deletions in lpfABCDE, bcfABCDEFG, stbABCD, stcABCD, stdAB, or sthABCDE were recovered at significantly reduced numbers from the feces of CBA mice. There was a good correlation (R(2) = 0.9626) between competitive indices in the cecum and fecal samples of CBA mice at 30 days after infection, suggesting that the recovery of S. enterica serotype Typhimurium from fecal samples closely reflected its ability to colonize the cecum. Collectively, these data show that six fimbrial operons (lpf, bcf, stb, stc, std, and sth) contribute to long-term intestinal carriage of S. enterica serotype Typhimurium in genetically resistant mice.

  11. The Role of the st313-td Gene in Virulence of Salmonella Typhimurium ST313

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Wallrodt, Inke; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ST313 has emerged in sub-Saharan Africa causing severe infections in humans. Therefore, it has been speculated that this specific sequence type, ST313, carries factors associated with increased pathogenicity. We assessed the role...

  12. Characterisation of integrons and antibiotic resistance genes in Danish multiresistant Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvang, Dorthe; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    1997-01-01

    The presence and genetic content of integrons was investigated in eight Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104 isolates from different pig herds in Denmark. Two different integrons were identified using PCR and sequencing. Each of the integrons carried a single resistance cassette in addition to t...

  13. Characterisation of integrons and antibiotic resistance genes in Danish multiresistant Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvang, Dorthe; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    1998-01-01

    The presence and genetic content of integrons was investigated in eight Salmonella enteritica Typhimurium DT104 isolates from different pig herds in Denmark. Two different integrons were identified using PCR and sequencing. Each of the integrons carried a single resistance cassette in addition to...

  14. Salmonella gene rma (ramA) and multiple-drug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straaten, van T.; Janssen, R.; Mevius, D.J.; Dissel, van J.T.

    2004-01-01

    MarA and its homologue, RamA, have been implicated in multidrug resistance (MDR). RamA overexpression in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli conferred MDR independently of marA. Inactivation of ramA did not affect the antibiotic susceptibilities of wild-type S. enterica

  15. Salmonella Typhimurium strain ATCC14028 requires H2-hydrogenases for growth in the gut, but not at systemic sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Maier

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is a common cause of diarrhea. For eliciting disease, the pathogen has to colonize the gut lumen, a site colonized by the microbiota. This process/initial stage is incompletely understood. Recent work established that one particular strain, Salmonella enterica subspecies 1 serovar Typhimurium strain SL1344, employs the hyb H2-hydrogenase for consuming microbiota-derived H2 to support gut luminal pathogen growth: Protons from the H2-splitting reaction contribute to the proton gradient across the outer bacterial membrane which can be harvested for ATP production or for import of carbon sources. However, it remained unclear, if other Salmonella strains would use the same strategy. In particular, earlier work had left unanswered if strain ATCC14028 might use H2 for growth at systemic sites. To clarify the role of the hydrogenases, it seems important to establish if H2 is used at systemic sites or in the gut and if Salmonella strains may differ with respect to the host sites where they require H2 in vivo. In order to resolve this, we constructed a strain lacking all three H2-hydrogenases of ATCC14028 (14028hyd3 and performed competitive infection experiments. Upon intragastric inoculation, 14028hyd3 was present at 100-fold lower numbers than 14028WT in the stool and at systemic sites. In contrast, i.v. inoculation led to equivalent systemic loads of 14028hyd3 and the wild type strain. However, the pathogen population spreading to the gut lumen featured again up to 100-fold attenuation of 14028hyd3. Therefore, ATCC14028 requires H2-hydrogenases for growth in the gut lumen and not at systemic sites. This extends previous work on ATCC14028 and supports the notion that H2-utilization might be a general feature of S. Typhimurium gut colonization.

  16. The effect of γ radiation on the expression of the virulence genes of Salmonella typhimurium and Vibrio spp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sangyong; Jung, Jinwoo; Kim, Dongho

    2007-01-01

    The principle benefit of food irradiation is the reduction of food-borne bacteria in food products. However, the microbiological safety with respect to increased virulence of surviving pathogens after irradiation remains an important issue with regard to the effectiveness of food irradiation. In this study, the transcriptional changes of virulence genes of Salmonella and Vibrio spp. after γ radiation were investigated by real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Samonella typhimurium is dependent upon the products of a large number of genes located within Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPI) on the chromosome. The expressions of seven genes including four SPI genes, hilD, ssrB, pipB, and sopD, were measured at 1 h after 1 kGy irradiation. Compared with non-irradiated controls, the expression of hilD encoded within SPI1 and sopD encoding SPI1-related effector proteins was reduced about 4- and 16-fold, respectively. The expressions of Vibrio toxin genes, vvhA, ctxA, and tdh, were also monitored during the course of a growth cycle after re-inoculation of irradiated Vibrio spp. (0.5 and 1.0 kGy). The expressions of Vibrio toxin genes tested did not increase compared with non-irradiated counterparts. Results from this study indicate that γ radiation is much more likely to reduce the virulence gene expression of surviving pathogens

  17. The effect of {gamma} radiation on the expression of the virulence genes of Salmonella typhimurium and Vibrio spp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sangyong; Jung, Jinwoo [Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology Team, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dongho [Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology Team, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: fungikim@kaeri.re.kr

    2007-11-15

    The principle benefit of food irradiation is the reduction of food-borne bacteria in food products. However, the microbiological safety with respect to increased virulence of surviving pathogens after irradiation remains an important issue with regard to the effectiveness of food irradiation. In this study, the transcriptional changes of virulence genes of Salmonella and Vibrio spp. after {gamma} radiation were investigated by real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Samonella typhimurium is dependent upon the products of a large number of genes located within Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPI) on the chromosome. The expressions of seven genes including four SPI genes, hilD, ssrB, pipB, and sopD, were measured at 1 h after 1 kGy irradiation. Compared with non-irradiated controls, the expression of hilD encoded within SPI1 and sopD encoding SPI1-related effector proteins was reduced about 4- and 16-fold, respectively. The expressions of Vibrio toxin genes, vvhA, ctxA, and tdh, were also monitored during the course of a growth cycle after re-inoculation of irradiated Vibrio spp. (0.5 and 1.0 kGy). The expressions of Vibrio toxin genes tested did not increase compared with non-irradiated counterparts. Results from this study indicate that {gamma} radiation is much more likely to reduce the virulence gene expression of surviving pathogens.

  18. Apparent involvement of purines in the control of expression of Salmonella typhimurium pyr genes: analysis of a leaky guaB mutant resistant to pyrimidine analogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1979-01-01

    A leaky guaB mutant of Salmonella typhimurium LT-2 was obtained during a selection for mutants resistant to a combination of the two pyrimidine analogs, 5-fluorouracil and 5-fluorouridine. In the absence of exogenous guanine compounds, the growth rate of this mutant is limited by the endogenous s......%, respectively. The pyrimidine metabolism of the guaB mutant is restored completely by addition of guanine (or xanthine) to the growth medium. The data indicate purine nucleotide involvement in the regulation of expression of the pyr genes of S. typhimurium....

  19. Construction and characterization of recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium expressing the babA2/ureI fusion gene of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong-sheng; Hu, Si-jun; Zhou, Nan-jin; Xie, Yong; Cao, Jun

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to construct a live attenuated Salmonella typhimurium strain harbouring the Helicobacter pylori babA2 and ureI fusion gene, and to evaluate its immunogenicity. The babA2 and ureI fusion gene were cloned on an asd+ vector pYA3342 and expressed in attenuated S. typhimurium strain x8501 (Δasd). The level of babA2 and ureI fusion protein expression in S. typhimurium x8501 was examined by RT-PCR and Western blot tests. Stability of the recombinant x8501 (pYA3342/babA2/ureI) was determined after incubation for five days in vitro. The fusion gene, composed of 2860 base pairs, was inserted into the recombinant vector, as indicated by PCR amplification, endonuclease digestion and sequencing. Compared with the GenBank database, homologies of amino-acid sequences of the cloned babA2 and ureI were 100% and 97%, respectively. Recombinant fusion protein was recognized by commercial antibodies for whole-cell lysate of H. pylori. Furthermore, plasmids were able to stably reside in host bacteria. A prokaryotic expression system, recombinant live attenuated S. typhimurium expressing the H. pylori babA2 and ureI fusion gene, was successfully constructed, and the expressed fusion protein showed satisfactory immunoreactivity, thus offering a new candidate for prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against H. pylori. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. PMQR genes oqxAB and aac(6′)Ib-cr accelerate the development of fluoroquinolone resistance in Salmonella typhimurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Marcus H.; Chan, Edward W.; Liu, Li Z.; Chen, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Emergence of multidrug-resistant Salmonella typhimurium strains, especially the ACSSuT and nalidixic acid R types, has significantly compromised the effectiveness of current strategies to control Salmonella infections, resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. Clinical S. typhimurium isolates recovered in Hong Kong during the period of 2005–2011 were increasingly resistant to ciprofloxacin (CIP) and antibiotics of the ACSSuT group. Our data revealed that oqxAB and aac(6′)Ib-cr were encoded on plasmids of various sizes and the presence of these two elements together with a single gyrA mutation in S. typhimurium were sufficient to mediate resistance to CIP. Acquisition of the oqxAB and aac(6′)Ib-cr encoding plasmids by S. typhimurium caused a fourfold increase in CIP minimal inhibitory concentration. Furthermore, the presence of oqxAB and aac(6′)Ib-cr in Salmonella dramatically increased the mutation prevention concentration of CIP which may due to mutational changes in the drug target genes. In conclusion, possession of oqxAB and aac(6′)Ib-cr encoding plasmid facilitate the selection of CIP resistant S. typhimurium, thereby causing a remarkable increase of CIP resistance among clinical Salmonella strains in Hong Kong. PMID:25324840

  1. Visualization of specific gene expression in individual Salmonella typhimurium cells by in situ PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Holmstrøm, Kim; Molin, Søren

    1997-01-01

    lac mRNA in suboptimally isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside-induced cells was investigated. By use of a single-cell beta-galactosidase assay, it was confirmed that homogeneous suboptimally induced cultures of S. typhimurium F' lacY cells could be established, and the number of functional lac m......RNAs in individual cells was estimated from standard population level beta-galactosidase assays, Cells estimated to contain a single lac mRNA were detected as containing lac mRNA by the in situ PCR method. Conclusively, we demonstrate the potential of in situ PCR for detection of even poorly expressed m...

  2. Structural characterization of the Salmonella typhimurium LT2 umu operon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.M.; Crowne, H.M.; Pidsley, S.C.; Sedgwick, S.G.

    1990-01-01

    The umuDC operon of Escherichia coli encodes functions required for mutagenesis induced by radiation and a wide variety of chemicals. The closely related organism Salmonella typhimurium is markedly less mutable than E. coli, but a umu homolog has recently been identified and cloned from the LT2 subline. In this study the nucleotide sequence and structure of the S. typhimurium LT2 umu operon have been determined and its gene products have been identified so that the molecular basis of umu activity might be understood more fully. S. typhimurium LT2 umu consists of a smaller 417-base-pair (bp) umuD gene ending 2 bp upstream of a larger 1,266-bp umuC gene. The only apparent structural difference between the two operons is the lack of gene overlap. An SOS box identical to that found in E. coli is present in the promoter region upstream of umuD. The calculated molecular masses of the umuD and umuC gene products were 15.3 and 47.8 kilodaltons, respectively, which agree with figures determined by transpositional disruption and maxicell analysis. The S. typhimurium and E. coli umuD sequences were 68% homologous and encoded products with 71% amino acid identity; the umuC sequences were 71% homologous and encoded products with 83% amino acid identity. Furthermore, the potential UmuD cleavage site and associated catalytic sites could be identified. Thus the very different mutagenic responses of S. typhimurium LT2 and E. coli cannot be accounted for by gross differences in operon structure or gene products. Rather, the ability of the cloned S. typhimurium umuD gene to give stronger complementation of E. coli umuD77 mutants in the absence of a functional umuC gene suggests that Salmonella UmuC protein normally constrains UmuD protein activity

  3. 9 CFR 113.120 - Salmonella Typhimurium Bacterin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Salmonella Typhimurium Bacterin. 113... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.120 Salmonella Typhimurium Bacterin. Salmonella Typhimurium Bacterin shall be prepared from a culture of Salmonella typhimurium which has been inactivated and is...

  4. Non-essential genes form the hubs of genome scale protein function and environmental gene expression networks in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkrantz, Jesper T.; Aarts, Henk; Abee, Tjakko

    2013-01-01

    Background: Salmonella Typhimurium is an important pathogen of human and animals. It shows a broad growth range and survives in harsh conditions. The aim of this study was to analyze transcriptional responses to a number of growth and stress conditions as well as the relationship of metabolic...... genes under a number of growth and stress conditions were used to construct a bipartite network connecting culture conditions and significantly regulated genes (transcriptional network). Also, a genome scale network was constructed for strain LT2. The latter connected genes with metabolic pathways...... pathways and/or cell functions at the genome-scale-level by network analysis, and further to explore whether highly connected genes ( hubs) in these networks were essential for growth, stress adaptation and virulence. Results: De novo generated as well as published transcriptional data for 425 selected...

  5. Impacts of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Its speG Gene on the Transcriptomes of In Vitro M Cells and Caco-2 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke-Chuan; Huang, Chih-Hung; Huang, Ching-Jou

    2016-01-01

    Microfold or membranous (M) cells are specialized intestinal epithelial cells responsible for host immunity. The speG mutant of Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a nonreplicating strain within human cells to be a candidate vaccine vector for interacting with M cells. We conducted this study to identify the genes are differently expressed between in vitro M cells and Caco-2 cells, and to determine whether S. Typhimurium and speG affect the transcriptomes of both cell types. In vitro M cells and Caco-2 cells were infected with wild-type (WT) S. Typhimurium, its ΔspeG mutant, or none for 1 h for RNA microarrays; the transcriptomes among the 6 pools were pairwisely compared. Genetic loci encoding scaffold (e.g., HSCHR7_CTG4_4, HSCHR9_CTG9_35), long noncoding RNA, membrane-associated protein (PITPNB), neuron-related proteins (OR8D1, OR10G9, and NTNG2), and transporter proteins (MICU2 and SLC28A1) were significantly upregulated in uninfected M cells compared with uninfected Caco-2 cells; and their encoding proteins are promising M-cell markers. Significantly upregulated HSCHR7_CTG4_4 of uninfected in vitro M cells were speG-independently downregulated by S. Typhimurium infection that is a remarkable change representing an important but unreported characteristic of M cells. The immune responses of in vitro M cells and Caco-2 cells can differ and reply on speG or not, with speG-dependent regulation of KYL4, SCTR, IL6, TNF, and CELF4 in Caco-2 cells, JUN, KLF6, and KCTD11 in M cells, or speG-independent modulation of ZFP36 in both cells. This study facilitates understanding of the immune responses of in vitro M cells after administering the S. Typhimurium ΔspeG mutant as a future vaccine vector. PMID:27064787

  6. Virulence Characterization of Salmonella enterica by a New Microarray: Detection and Evaluation of the Cytolethal Distending Toxin Gene Activity in the Unusual Host S. Typhimurium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Figueiredo

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is a zoonotic foodborne pathogen that causes acute gastroenteritis in humans. We assessed the virulence potential of one-hundred and six Salmonella strains isolated from food animals and products. A high through-put virulence genes microarray demonstrated Salmonella Pathogenicity Islands (SPI and adherence genes were highly conserved, while prophages and virulence plasmid genes were variably present. Isolates were grouped by serotype, and virulence plasmids separated S. Typhimurium in two clusters. Atypical microarray results lead to whole genome sequencing (WGS of S. Infantis Sal147, which identified deletion of thirty-eight SPI-1 genes. Sal147 was unable to invade HeLa cells and showed reduced mortality in Galleria mellonella infection model, in comparison to a SPI-1 harbouring S. Infantis. Microarray and WGS of S. Typhimurium Sal199, established for the first time in S. Typhimurium presence of cdtB and other Typhi-related genes. Characterization of Sal199 showed cdtB genes were upstream of transposase IS911, and co-expressed with other Typhi-related genes. Cell cycle arrest, cytoplasmic distension, and nuclear enlargement were detected in HeLa cells infected by Sal199, but not with S. Typhimurium LT2. Increased mortality of Galleria was detected on infection with Sal199 compared to LT2. Thus, Salmonella isolates were rapidly characterized using a high through-put microarray; helping to identify unusual virulence features which were corroborated by further characterisation. This work demonstrates that the use of suitable screening methods for Salmonella virulence can help assess the potential risk associated with certain Salmonella to humans. Incorporation of such methodology into surveillance could help reduce the risk of emergence of epidemic Salmonella strains.

  7. Chlortetracycline and florfenicol induce expression of genes associated with pathogenicity in multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a serious public health threat as infections caused by these strains are more difficult and expensive to treat. Livestock serve as a reservoir for MDR Salmonella, and the antibiotics chlortetracycline an...

  8. Host specific differences alter the requirement for certain Salmonella genes during swine colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearson, Bradley L; Bearson, Shawn M D

    2011-06-02

    The pathogenic potential of Salmonella is determined during the complex interaction between pathogen and host, requiring optimal regulation of multiple bacterial genetic systems within variable in vivo environments. The mouse model of systemic disease has been an extremely productive model to investigate the pathogenesis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium). Although the mouse model is a widely used paradigm for studying the pathogenesis of systemic disease caused by Salmonella, investigations concerning food safety interventions should employ natural hosts to examine gastrointestinal colonization by Salmonella. Recent research has demonstrated specific differences in the attenuation of certain S. Typhimurium mutants in mice compared to swine. This variation in pathogenesis between the mouse model and pigs for the S. Typhimurium mutants is presumably dependent upon either the requirements for specific gene products during systemic disease (mouse) versus gastrointestinal colonization (pig) or host specific differences. In addition, host specific diversity in Salmonella colonization of swine has also been described in comparison to other food-producing animals, including cattle and chickens. Differences in Salmonella colonization and pathogenesis across diverse animal species highlight the importance of species-specific studies of gastrointestinal colonization for the development of Salmonella interventions to enhance pork safety. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Detection of Quinolone Resistance in Salmonella typhimurium Pig Isolates Determined by gyrA Gene Mutation Using PCR- and Sequence-Based Techniques within the gyrA Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías Farrera, Guadalupe Patricia; Borroto, Esvieta Tenorio; Ramírez, Fabiola Rivera; Vázquez Chagoyán, Juan Carlos; Rojas, Martín Talavera; Angel, Gilberto Yong; de Oca Jimenez, Roberto Montes

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones among Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium isolates leading to clinical failure of treatment poses a great therapeutic challenge. The current study is focused on the evaluation of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of quinolones in 29 Salmonella typhimurium of 86 Salmonella spp. strains, obtained from pigs from the State of Mexico. The MIC was performed with the Kirby-Bauer method. On the other hand, the GyrA gene was sequenced. The present study was undertaken to describe the resistance profiles and fluoroquinolone resistance mechanism of Salmonella Typhimurium. The DNA sequence of the gyrA genes from Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium revealed strong similarity between gyrA and its counterpart in Escherichia coli. The sequencing of quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of the gyrA gene showed the presence of mutation at either S83 or at D87 in almost all the Salmonella typhimurium isolates. This mutation, although phenotypically expressed as decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones goes undetected by the disk diffusion method using the present method of Kirby-Bauer. Hence, it can increase morbidity and mortality due to delay in appropriate antibiotic treatment.

  10. Genes ycfR, sirA and yigG contribute to the surface attachment of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium and Saintpaul to fresh produce.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joelle K Salazar

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is a frequent contaminant of minimally-processed fresh produce linked to major foodborne disease outbreaks. The molecular mechanisms underlying the association of this enteric pathogen with fresh produce remain largely unexplored. In our recent study, we showed that the expression of a putative stress regulatory gene, ycfR, was significantly induced in S. enterica upon exposure to chlorine treatment, a common industrial practice for washing and decontaminating fresh produce during minimal processing. Two additional genes, sirA involved in S. enterica biofilm formation and yigG of unknown function, were also found to be differentially regulated under chlorine stress. To further characterize the roles of ycfR, sirA, and yigG in S. enterica attachment and survival on fresh produce, we constructed in-frame deletions of all three genes in two different S. enterica serovars, Typhimurium and Saintpaul, which have been implicated in previous disease outbreaks linked to fresh produce. Bacterial attachment to glass and polystyrene microtiter plates, cell aggregation and hydrophobicity, chlorine resistance, and surface attachment to intact spinach leaf and grape tomato were compared among wild-type strains, single-gene deletion mutants, and their respective complementation mutants. The results showed that deletions of ycfR, sirA, and yigG reduced bacterial attachment to glass and polystyrene as well as fresh produce surface with or without chlorine treatment in both Typhimurium and Saintpaul. Deletion of ycfR in Typhimurium significantly reduced bacterial chlorine resistance and the attachment to the plant surfaces after chlorinated water washes. Deletions of ycfR in Typhimurium and yigG in Saintpaul resulted in significant increase in cell aggregation. Our findings suggest that ycfR, sirA, and yigG collectively contribute to S. enterica surface attachment and survival during post-harvest minimal processing of fresh produce.

  11. Non-essential genes form the hubs of genome scale protein function and environmental gene expression networks in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Jesper T; Aarts, Henk; Abee, Tjakko; Rolfe, Matthew D; Knudsen, Gitte M; Nielsen, Maj-Britt; Thomsen, Line E; Zwietering, Marcel H; Olsen, John E; Pin, Carmen

    2013-12-17

    Salmonella Typhimurium is an important pathogen of human and animals. It shows a broad growth range and survives in harsh conditions. The aim of this study was to analyze transcriptional responses to a number of growth and stress conditions as well as the relationship of metabolic pathways and/or cell functions at the genome-scale-level by network analysis, and further to explore whether highly connected genes (hubs) in these networks were essential for growth, stress adaptation and virulence. De novo generated as well as published transcriptional data for 425 selected genes under a number of growth and stress conditions were used to construct a bipartite network connecting culture conditions and significantly regulated genes (transcriptional network). Also, a genome scale network was constructed for strain LT2. The latter connected genes with metabolic pathways and cellular functions. Both networks were shown to belong to the family of scale-free networks characterized by the presence of highly connected nodes or hubs which are genes whose transcription is regulated when responding to many of the assayed culture conditions or genes encoding products involved in a high number of metabolic pathways and cell functions.The five genes with most connections in the transcriptional network (wraB, ygaU, uspA, cbpA and osmC) and in the genome scale network (ychN, siiF (STM4262), yajD, ybeB and dcoC) were selected for mutations, however mutagenesis of ygaU and ybeB proved unsuccessful. No difference between mutants and the wild type strain was observed during growth at unfavorable temperatures, pH values, NaCl concentrations and in the presence of H2O2. Eight mutants were evaluated for virulence in C57/BL6 mice and none differed from the wild type strain. Notably, however, deviations of phenotypes with respect to the wild type were observed when combinations of these genes were deleted. Network analysis revealed the presence of hubs in both transcriptional and functional

  12. Gene expression profiles following high-dose exposure to gamma radiation in salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Yong; Jung, Sun Wook; Joe, Min Ho; Kim, Dong Ho [Radiation Research Division for Biotechnology, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    Microarrays can measure the expression of thousands of genes to identify the changes in expression between different biological states. To survey the change of whole Salmonella genes after a relatively high dose of gamma radiation (1 kGy), transcriptome dynamics were examined in the cells by using DNA microarrays. At least 75 genes were induced and 89 genes were reduced two-fold or more after irradiation. Several genes located in pSLT plasmid, cyo operon, and Gifsy prophage were induced along with many genes encoding uncharacterized proteins.While, the expression of genes involved in the virulence of Salmonella as well as metabolic functions were decreased. Although the radiation response as a whole could not be illustrated by using DNA microarrays, the data suggest that the response to high dose of irradiation might be more complex than the SOS response.

  13. Gene expression profiles following high-dose exposure to gamma radiation in salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sang Yong; Jung, Sun Wook; Joe, Min Ho; Kim, Dong Ho

    2008-01-01

    Microarrays can measure the expression of thousands of genes to identify the changes in expression between different biological states. To survey the change of whole Salmonella genes after a relatively high dose of gamma radiation (1 kGy), transcriptome dynamics were examined in the cells by using DNA microarrays. At least 75 genes were induced and 89 genes were reduced two-fold or more after irradiation. Several genes located in pSLT plasmid, cyo operon, and Gifsy prophage were induced along with many genes encoding uncharacterized proteins.While, the expression of genes involved in the virulence of Salmonella as well as metabolic functions were decreased. Although the radiation response as a whole could not be illustrated by using DNA microarrays, the data suggest that the response to high dose of irradiation might be more complex than the SOS response

  14. Role of the supX gene in sensitizing Salmonella typhimurium cells to respiration shutoff induced by far ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenson, P.A.; Riester, L.; Palmer, T.V.

    1983-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium strains with supX mutations are known to be sensitive to UV (254 nm) irradiation and to be protected by plasmid pKM101. Wild type (supX + ) cells shut off their respiration after UV and are protected against their shutoff by pKM101. Respiration and survival studies were carried out on several supX strains. The supX strains shut off their respiration after low fluences of UV. Plasmid pKM101 protected a supX83 (nonsense mutation) strain against respiration shutoff and killing but did not protect a supX35 (deletion mutation) strain. When each of the two supX genes were in the genetic backgrounds of the other, however, full protection was provided by pKM101. The supX35 strain not protected by pKM101 may have accumulated a modifying mutation. The supX locus is identical with one specifying topoisomerase I which removes negative superhelical turns from DNA. In the absence of this enzyme, transcription of the DNA is increased. It is proposed that the exaggerated shutoff of respiration and increased killing of supX cells occurs because of the greater ease of transcription of an operon involved in UV-induced respiration shutoff. (author)

  15. LeuO is a global regulator of gene expression in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dillon, Shane C.; Espinosa, Elena; Hokamp, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    were distributed across both the core and the horizontally acquired genome, and included housekeeping genes and genes known to contribute to virulence. Sixty‐eight LeuO targets were co‐bound by the global repressor protein, H‐NS. Thus, while LeuO may function as an H‐NS antagonist, these functions...

  16. A previously uncharacterized gene stm0551 plays a repressive role in the regulation of type 1 fimbriae in Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ke-Chuan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium produces surface-associated fimbriae that facilitate adherence of the bacteria to a variety of cells and tissues. Type 1 fimbriae with binding specificity to mannose residues are the most commonly found fimbrial type. In vitro, static-broth culture favors the growth of S. Typhimurium with type 1 fimbriae, whereas non-type 1 fimbriate bacteria are obtained by culture on solid-agar media. Previous studies demonstrated that the phenotypic expression of type 1 fimbriae is the result of the interaction and cooperation of the regulatory genes fimZ, fimY, fimW, and fimU within the fim gene cluster. Genome sequencing revealed a novel gene, stm0551, located between fimY and fimW that encodes an 11.4-kDa putative phosphodiesterase specific for the bacterial second messenger cyclic-diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP. The role of stm0551 in the regulation of type 1 fimbriae in S. Typhimurium remains unclear. Results A stm0551-deleted stain constructed by allelic exchange constitutively produced type 1 fimbriae in both static-broth and solid-agar medium conditions. Quantative RT-PCR revealed that expression of the fimbrial major subunit gene, fimA, and one of the regulatory genes, fimZ, were comparably increased in the stm0551-deleted strain compared with those of the parental strain when grown on the solid-agar medium, a condition that normally inhibits expression of type 1 fimbriae. Following transformation with a plasmid possessing the coding sequence of stm0551, expression of fimA and fimZ decreased in the stm0551 mutant strain in both culture conditions, whereas transformation with the control vector pACYC184 relieved this repression. A purified STM0551 protein exhibited a phosphodiesterase activity in vitro while a point mutation in the putative EAL domain, substituting glutamic acid (E with alanine (A, of STM0551 or a FimY protein abolished this activity. Conclusions The finding that the

  17. Mathematical model of flagella gene expression dynamics in Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Kirti; Pradhan, Amit; Mokashi, Chaitanya; Saini, Supreet

    2015-01-01

    Flagellar assembly in Salmonella is controlled by an intricate genetic and biochemical network. This network comprises of a number of inter-connected feedback loops, which control the assembly process dynamically. Critical among these are the FliA–FlgM feedback, FliZ-mediated positive feedback, and FliT-mediated negative feedback. In this work, we develop a mathematical model to track the dynamics of flagellar gene expression in Salmonella. Analysis of our model demonstrates that the network ...

  18. Virulence-associated genes, antimicrobial resistance and molecular typing of Salmonella Typhimurium strains isolated from swine from 2000 to 2012 in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, F; Medeiros, M I C; Kich, J D; Falcão, J P

    2016-06-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the pathogenic potential, antimicrobial resistance and genotypic diversity of Salmonella Typhimurium strains isolated in Brazil from swine (22) and the surrounding swine environment (5) from 2000 to 2012 and compare them to the profiles of 43 human strains isolated from 1983 to 2010, which had been previously studied. The presence of 12 SPI-1, SPI-2 and plasmid genes was assessed by PCR, the antimicrobial susceptibility to 13 antimicrobials was determined by the disc diffusion assay and genotyping was performed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multiple-locus variable-number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA) and ERIC-PCR. More than 77·8% of the swine strains carried 10 or more of the virulence markers. Ten (37%) strains isolated from swine were multi-drug resistant (MDR). All the molecular typing techniques grouped the strains in two main clusters. Some strains isolated from swine and humans were allocated together in the PFGE-B2, MLVA-A1, MLVA-B and ERIC-A1 clusters. The genotyping results suggest that some strains isolated from swine and humans may descend from a common subtype and may indicate a possible risk of MDR S. Typhimurium with high frequency of virulence genes isolated from swine to contaminate humans in Brazil. This study provided new information about the pathogenic potential, antimicrobial resistance and genotypic diversity of S. Typhimurium isolates from swine origin in Brazil, the fourth largest producer of pigs worldwide. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Antimicrobial resistance and class 1 integron-associated gene cassettes in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolated from pigs at slaughter and abattoir environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Graciela Volz; Michael, Geovana Brenner; Cardoso, Marisa; Schwarz, Stefan

    2016-10-15

    Forty-five multi-resistant Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar (S.) Typhimurium isolates obtained at five pig abattoirs in Southern Brazil were characterized. Their relatedness was determined by XbaI-macrorestriction analysis. Resistance genes, integrons and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes (PMQR) were investigated by PCR. Amplicons for the variable part of class 1 integrons and the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDR) were sequenced. Plasmids were characterized by conjugation assays and replicon typing. Eighteen XbaI-macrorestriction patterns and 19 plasmid profiles were seen. Resistance to ampicillin (bla TEM ), chloramphenicol (catA1 and floR), streptomycin (strA-strB), streptomycin/spectinomycin (aadA variants), sulphonamides (sul1, sul2, sul3) and tetracyclines [tet(A) and tet(B)] were commonly found. A trimethoprim resistance gene, dfrA8, was identified on a 100-kb plasmid. Single substitutions in the QRDR of GyrA but no PMQR genes were found. Twenty-five isolates carried class 1 integrons with an aadA23 gene cassette or unusual class 1 integrons with a dfrA12-orfF-aadA27 gene cassette array. Both integrons were found on large conjugative plasmids. Salmonella plasmid-located virulence genes spvR, spvA, spvB, rck and pefA were found on an IncFIB resistance plasmid. Hybrid virulence-resistance plasmids or plasmids harbouring class 1 integrons may play a role in the maintenance and dissemination of antimicrobial resistance among S. Typhimurium in this pig production system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Dam methylation regulates the expression of SPI-5-encoded sopB gene in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomodonato, Mónica N; Llana, Mariángeles Noto; Castañeda, María del Rosario Aya; Buzzola, Fernanda; García, Mauro D; Calderón, Marina Gallo; Sarnacki, Sebastián H; Cerquetti, María C

    2014-08-01

    DNA adenine methylation is an essential factor in Salmonella virulence. Here, we investigate the involvement of DNA adenine methylase (Dam) in the expression and translocation of a SPI-5-encoded effector of S. Typhimurium. SopB expression and secretion were determined using SopB-FLAG-tagged wild type and dam strains of S. Typhimurium. Western blot and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analysis showed that the dam mutant expresses lower levels of SopB protein and sopB mRNA than the wild type strain under SPI-1 and SPI-2 inducing conditions in vitro. SopB secretion was also considerably impaired in the absence of dam. In agreement with in vitro experiments, SopB synthesis in dam mutants recovered from infected epithelial cells and from murine mesenteric lymph nodes was reduced by 40% respect to the wild type strain (p dam mutant. Taken together, our results demonstrate that, in S. Typhimurium, Dam methylation modulates the expression and translocation of SPI-5-encoded SopB effector. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Genome-wide screen for salmonella genes required for long-term systemic infection of the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available A microarray-based negative selection screen was performed to identify Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (serovar Typhimurium genes that contribute to long-term systemic infection in 129X1/SvJ (Nramp1(r mice. A high-complexity transposon-mutagenized library was used to infect mice intraperitoneally, and the selective disappearance of mutants was monitored after 7, 14, 21, and 28 d postinfection. One hundred and eighteen genes were identified to contribute to serovar Typhimurium infection of the spleens of mice by 28 d postinfection. The negatively selected mutants represent many known aspects of Salmonella physiology and pathogenesis, although the majority of the identified genes are of putative or unknown function. Approximately 30% of the negatively selected genes correspond to horizontally acquired regions such as those within Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPI 1-5, prophages (Gifsy-1 and -2 and remnant, and the pSLT virulence plasmid. In addition, mutations in genes responsible for outer membrane structure and remodeling, such as LPS- and PhoP-regulated and fimbrial genes, were also selected against. Competitive index experiments demonstrated that the secreted SPI2 effectors SseK2 and SseJ as well as the SPI4 locus are attenuated relative to wild-type bacteria during systemic infection. Interestingly, several SPI1-encoded type III secretion system effectors/translocases are required by serovar Typhimurium to establish and, unexpectedly, to persist systemically, challenging the present description of Salmonella pathogenesis. Moreover, we observed a progressive selection against serovar Typhimurium mutants based upon the duration of the infection, suggesting that different classes of genes may be required at distinct stages of infection. Overall, these data indicate that Salmonella long-term systemic infection in the mouse requires a diverse repertoire of virulence factors. This diversity of genes presumably reflects the fact that

  2. Poultry body temperature contributes to invasion control through reduced expression of Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 genes in Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troxell, Bryan; Petri, Nicholas; Daron, Caitlyn; Pereira, Rafaela; Mendoza, Mary; Hassan, Hosni M; Koci, Matthew D

    2015-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) and Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) are foodborne pathogens, and outbreaks are often associated with poultry products. Chickens are typically asymptomatic when colonized by these serovars; however, the factors contributing to this observation are uncharacterized. Whereas symptomatic mammals have a body temperature between 37°C and 39°C, chickens have a body temperature of 41°C to 42°C. Here, in vivo experiments using chicks demonstrated that numbers of viable S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis bacteria within the liver and spleen organ sites were ≥4 orders of magnitude lower than those within the ceca. When similar doses of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis were given to C3H/HeN mice, the ratio of the intestinal concentration to the liver/spleen concentration was 1:1. In the avian host, this suggested poor survival within these tissues or a reduced capacity to traverse the host epithelial layer and reach liver/spleen sites or both. Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) promotes localization to liver/spleen tissues through invasion of the epithelial cell layer. Following in vitro growth at 42°C, SPI-1 genes sipC, invF, and hilA and the SPI-1 rtsA activator were downregulated compared to expression at 37°C. Overexpression of the hilA activators fur, fliZ, and hilD was capable of inducing hilA-lacZ at 37°C but not at 42°C despite the presence of similar levels of protein at the two temperatures. In contrast, overexpression of either hilC or rtsA was capable of inducing hilA and sipC at 42°C. These data indicate that physiological parameters of the poultry host, such as body temperature, have a role in modulating expression of virulence. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Analysis of the ArcA regulon in anaerobically grown Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porwollik Steffen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium is a Gram-negative pathogen that must successfully adapt to the broad fluctuations in the concentration of dissolved dioxygen encountered in the host. In Escherichia coli, ArcA (Aerobic Respiratory Control helps the cells to sense and respond to the presence of dioxygen. The global role of ArcA in E. coli is well characterized; however, little is known about its role in anaerobically grown S. Typhimurium. Results We compared the transcriptional profiles of the virulent wild-type (WT strain (ATCC 14028s and its isogenic arcA mutant grown under anaerobic conditions. We found that ArcA directly or indirectly regulates 392 genes (8.5% of the genome; of these, 138 genes are poorly characterized. Regulation by ArcA in S. Typhimurium is similar, but distinct from that in E. coli. Thus, genes/operons involved in core metabolic pathways (e.g., succinyl-CoA, fatty acid degradation, cytochrome oxidase complexes, flagellar biosynthesis, motility, and chemotaxis were regulated similarly in the two organisms. However, genes/operons present in both organisms, but regulated differently by ArcA in S. Typhimurium included those coding for ethanolamine utilization, lactate transport and metabolism, and succinate dehydrogenases. Salmonella-specific genes/operons regulated by ArcA included those required for propanediol utilization, flagellar genes (mcpAC, cheV, Gifsy-1 prophage genes, and three SPI-3 genes (mgtBC, slsA, STM3784. In agreement with our microarray data, the arcA mutant was non-motile, lacked flagella, and was as virulent in mice as the WT. Additionally, we identified a set of 120 genes whose regulation was shared with the anaerobic redox regulator, Fnr. Conclusion(s We have identified the ArcA regulon in anaerobically grown S. Typhimurium. Our results demonstrated that in S. Typhimurium, ArcA serves as a transcriptional regulator coordinating cellular metabolism, flagella

  4. In vivo IFN-γ secretion by NK cells in response to Salmonella typhimurium requires NLRC4 inflammasomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Kupz

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are a critical part of the innate immune defense against viral infections and for the control of tumors. Much less is known about how NK cells contribute to anti-bacterial immunity. NK cell-produced interferon gamma (IFN-γ contributes to the control of early exponential replication of bacterial pathogens, however the regulation of these events remains poorly resolved. Using a mouse model of invasive Salmonellosis, here we report that the activation of the intracellular danger sensor NLRC4 by Salmonella-derived flagellin within CD11c+ cells regulates early IFN-γ secretion by NK cells through the provision of interleukin 18 (IL-18, independently of Toll-like receptor (TLR-signaling. Although IL18-signalling deficient NK cells improved host protection during S. Typhimurium infection, this increased resistance was inferior to that provided by wild-type NK cells. These findings suggest that although NLRC4 inflammasome-driven secretion of IL18 serves as a potent activator of NK cell mediated IFN-γ secretion, IL18-independent NK cell-mediated mechanisms of IFN-γ secretion contribute to in vivo control of Salmonella replication.

  5. Non-essential genes from the hubs of genome scale protein function and environmental gene expression networks in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenkrantz, J.T.; Aarts, H.; Abee, T.; Rolfe, M.D.; Knudsen, G.M.; Nielsen, M.B.; Thomsen, L.E.; Zwietering, M.H.; Olsen, J.E.; Pin, C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Salmonella Typhimurium is an important pathogen of human and animals. It shows a broad growth range and survives in harsh conditions. The aim of this study was to analyze transcriptional responses to a number of growth and stress conditions as well as the relationship of metabolic

  6. The Homolog of the GenebstAof the BTP1 Phage from Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium ST313 Is an Antivirulence Gene in Salmonella enterica Serovar Dublin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Espinel, Irene Cartas; Spiegelhauer, Malene Roed; Guerra, Priscila Regina; Andersen, Karsten Wiber; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2018-01-01

    In a previous study, a novel virulence gene, bstA , identified in a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium sequence type 313 (ST313) strain was found to be conserved in all published Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin genomes. In order to analyze the role of this gene in the host-pathogen interaction in S Dublin, a mutant where this gene was deleted ( S Dublin Δ bstA ) and a mutant which was further genetically complemented with bstA ( S Dublin 3246-C) were constructed and tested in models of in vitro and in vivo infection as well as during growth competition assays in M9 medium, Luria-Bertani broth, and cattle blood. In contrast to the results obtained for a strain of S Typhimurium ST313, the lack of bstA was found to be associated with increased virulence in S Dublin. Thus, S Dublin Δ bstA showed higher levels of uptake than the wild-type strain during infection of mouse and cattle macrophages and higher net replication within human THP-1 cells. Furthermore, during mouse infections, S Dublin Δ bstA was more virulent than the wild type following a single intraperitoneal infection and showed an increased competitive index during competitive infection assays. Deletion of bstA did not affect either the amount of cytokines released by THP-1 macrophages or the cytotoxicity toward these cells. The histology of the livers and spleens of mice infected with the wild-type strain and the S Dublin Δ bstA mutant revealed similar levels of inflammation between the two groups. The gene was not important for adherence to or invasion of human epithelial cells and did not influence bacterial growth in rich medium, minimal medium, or cattle blood. In conclusion, a lack of bstA affects the pathogenicity of S Dublin by decreasing its virulence. Therefore, it might be regarded as an antivirulence gene in this serovar. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Construction of an oral vaccine for transmissible gastroenteritis virus based on the TGEV N gene expressed in an attenuated Salmonella typhimurium vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dan; Huang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiaohui; Cao, Sanjie; Wen, Xintian; Wen, Yiping; Wu, Rui; Liang, Entao

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to develop an oral vaccine for transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) based on the TGEV N gene expressed in an attenuated Salmonella typhimurium vector and aimed to evaluate the vaccine's immune response in piglets. Recombinant plasmid pVAX-N was transformed into competent cells of attenuated S. typhimurium SL7207 via electroporation. After it was identified via RT-PCR and double digestion, the screened recombinant bacteria presenting pVAX-N were named SL7207 (pVAX-N). To evaluate the safety and stability of the developed vaccine, different dosages (5 × 10(8), 1 × 10(9), and 2 × 10(9) CFU/mice) of SL7207 (pVAX-N) were inoculated to 6-week-old mice. Piglets below 20 days of age were dosed with 1 × 10(12) CFU. Humoral (neutralization titer and specific IgG), cellular (interleukin-4, γ-interferon, and peripheral lymphocyte proliferation), and mucosal (sIgA) immune responses were detected and evaluated. The three immunizing dosages were determined to be safe for mice and were completely eliminated 8 weeks after the first inoculation. Results of antibody and cytokine detection indicated that SL7207 (pVAX-N) could significantly induce antibody-IgG, antibody-IgA, interleukin-4, and γ-interferon, whose value was maximized on the 6th week. Results confirmed that the recombinant vaccine increased the proliferation of peripheral T lymphocyte. In conclusion, the oral vaccine was developed successfully, and the vaccine could significantly induce humoral, cellular, and mucosal immune responses in piglets. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Structural requirements for the formation of 1-methylguanosine in vivo in tRNA(Pro)GGG of Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Q; Björk, G R

    1997-02-21

    Maturation of tRNA and rRNA and the assembly of the ribosome in all organisms occurs in vivo in a complex pathway in which various proteins such as endo- and exonucleases, tRNA and rRNA modifying enzymes and ribosomal proteins, act concomitantly and temporarily during the maturation process. One class of RNA binding proteins are the tRNA modifying enzymes, which catalyse the formation of various modified nucleosides present in tRNA. Here we analyse the consequences of various alterations in a tRNA on the formation of modified nucleosides in the tRNA and the aminoacylation of it under true in vivo conditions, i.e. in a cell with normal amounts of the tRNA substrate and the tRNA binding protein. We have devised a selection method to obtain mutants of tRNA(Pro)GGG in Salmonella typhimurium that may no longer be a substrate inl vivo for the tRNA(m1G37)methyltransferase. These mutant tRNAs were purified from cells in balanced growth by a solid phase hybridisation technique and the presence of 1-methylguanosine (m1G) in position 37 next to the anticodon was monitored. Of 13 different mutant tRNA(Pro)GGG species analysed, eight of them had a drastically reduced level of m1G. Some of these mutant tRNA species had alterations far from the nucleotide G37 modified by the enzyme; e.g. base-pair disruptions in the first, fourth and eighth (last) base-pair of the acceptor stem, in the D-stem, and in the top of the anticodon stem. The structure of all the mutant tRNA(Pro)GGG species must deviate from the wild-type form, since they all induced +1 frameshifting. Still, tRNA(Pro)GGG from five of the mutants had normal levels of m1G. Thus, only a subset of mutations, all inducing an altered tRNA structure, resulted in m1G deficiency. However, those alterations in tRNA(Pro)GGG, which influenced the tRNA(m1G37)methyltransferase activity, did not affect in vivo the formation of four other modified nucleosides and the aminoacylation of tRNA(Pro)GGG, demonstrating the extreme dependence

  9. Regulation of the put Operon in SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM: Characterization of Promoter and Operator Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, Donald R.; Maloy, Stanley R.

    1986-01-01

    The two genes required for proline utilization by S. typhimurium form a divergent operon. Expression of the put operon is induced by proline and subject to catabolite repression. Genetic evidence suggests that putA protein autogenously represses transcription of the putA and putP genes. In order to establish the molecular mechanism of put operon regulation we isolated regulatory mutations in the put control region. These mutants were selected using two phenotypes: (1) the ability to degrad...

  10. A Constitutively Mannose-Sensitive Agglutinating Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strain, Carrying a Transposon in the Fimbrial Usher Gene stbC, Exhibits Multidrug Resistance and Flagellated Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Hsun Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Static broth culture favors Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium to produce type 1 fimbriae, while solid agar inhibits its expression. A transposon inserted in stbC, which would encode an usher for Stb fimbriae of a non-flagellar Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium LB5010 strain, conferred it to agglutinate yeast cells on both cultures. RT-PCR revealed that the expression of the fimbrial subunit gene fimA, and fimZ, a regulatory gene of fimA, were both increased in the stbC mutant when grown on LB agar; fimW, a repressor gene of fimA, exhibited lower expression. Flagella were observed in the stbC mutant and this phenotype was correlated with the motile phenotype. Microarray data and RT-PCR indicated that the expression of three genes, motA, motB, and cheM, was enhanced in the stbC mutant. The stbC mutant was resistant to several antibiotics, consistent with the finding that expression of yhcQ and ramA was enhanced. A complementation test revealed that transforming a recombinant plasmid possessing the stbC restored the mannose-sensitive agglutination phenotype to the stbC mutant much as that in the parental Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium LB5010 strain, indicating the possibility of an interplay of different fimbrial systems in coordinating their expression.

  11. Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus paracasei Attenuate Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Heidelberg and Salmonella Typhimurium Colonization and Virulence Gene Expression In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyyarikkandy, Muhammed Shafeekh; Amalaradjou, Mary Anne

    2017-11-09

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE), Salmonella Typhimurium (ST), and Salmonella Heidelberg (SH) have been responsible for numerous outbreaks associated with the consumption of poultry meat and eggs. Salmonella colonization in chicken is characterized by initial attachment to the cecal epithelial cells (CEC) followed by dissemination to the liver, spleen, and oviduct. Since cecal colonization is critical to Salmonella transmission along the food chain continuum, reducing this intestinal association could potentially decrease poultry meat and egg contamination. Hence, this study investigated the efficacy of Lactobacillus delbreuckii sub species bulgaricus (NRRL B548; LD), Lactobacillus paracasei (DUP-13076; LP), and Lactobacillus rhamnosus (NRRL B442; LR) in reducing SE, ST, and SH colonization in CEC and survival in chicken macrophages. Additionally, their effect on expression of Salmonella virulence genes essential for cecal colonization and survival in macrophages was evaluated. All three probiotics significantly reduced Salmonella adhesion and invasion in CEC and survival in chicken macrophages ( p < 0.05). Further, the probiotic treatment led to a significant reduction in Salmonella virulence gene expression ( p < 0.05). Results of the study indicate that LD, LP, and LR could potentially be used to control SE, ST, and SH colonization in chicken. However, these observations warrant further in vivo validation.

  12. Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus paracasei Attenuate Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Heidelberg and Salmonella Typhimurium Colonization and Virulence Gene Expression In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Shafeekh Muyyarikkandy

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella Enteritidis (SE, Salmonella Typhimurium (ST, and Salmonella Heidelberg (SH have been responsible for numerous outbreaks associated with the consumption of poultry meat and eggs. Salmonella colonization in chicken is characterized by initial attachment to the cecal epithelial cells (CEC followed by dissemination to the liver, spleen, and oviduct. Since cecal colonization is critical to Salmonella transmission along the food chain continuum, reducing this intestinal association could potentially decrease poultry meat and egg contamination. Hence, this study investigated the efficacy of Lactobacillus delbreuckii sub species bulgaricus (NRRL B548; LD, Lactobacillus paracasei (DUP-13076; LP, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus (NRRL B442; LR in reducing SE, ST, and SH colonization in CEC and survival in chicken macrophages. Additionally, their effect on expression of Salmonella virulence genes essential for cecal colonization and survival in macrophages was evaluated. All three probiotics significantly reduced Salmonella adhesion and invasion in CEC and survival in chicken macrophages (p < 0.05. Further, the probiotic treatment led to a significant reduction in Salmonella virulence gene expression (p < 0.05. Results of the study indicate that LD, LP, and LR could potentially be used to control SE, ST, and SH colonization in chicken. However, these observations warrant further in vivo validation.

  13. Role of anionic charges of osmoregulated periplasmic glucans of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium SL1344 in mice virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmoregulated periplasmic glucans (OPGs) are important periplasmic constituents of Salmonella spp. and are required for optimal growth in hypoosmotic environments such as irrigation and vegetable wash waters as well as for mice virulence. opgB gene of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was ide...

  14. Association of RNA polymerase having increased Km for ATP and UTP with hyperexpression of the pyrB and pyrE genes of Salmonella typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Fast, Robert; Karlström, Olle

    1986-01-01

    mutant RNA polymerase elongated transcripts of both T7 DNA and synthetic templates more slowly than the parental enzyme at a given concentration of nucleoside triphosphates. This defect was found to result from four- to sixfold-higher Km values for the saturation of the elongation site by ATP and......We investigated the transcription kinetics of RNA polymerase from an rpoBC mutant of Salmonella typhimurium which showed highly elevated, constitutive expression of the pyrB and pyrE genes as well as an increased cellular pool of UTP. When bacterial cultures containing an F' lac+ episome were...... UTP. The saturation kinetics of the RNA chain initiation step also seemed to be affected. The maximal elongation rate and Km for GTP and CTP were less influenced by the rpoBC mutation. Open complex formation at the promoters of T7 DNA and terminationof the 7,100-nucleotide transcript showed no significant difference...

  15. The Base Excision Repair system of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium counteracts DNA damage by host nitric oxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R Richardson

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular pathogens must withstand nitric oxide (NO. generated by host phagocytes. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium interferes with intracellular trafficking of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and possesses multiple systems to detoxify NO.. Consequently, the level of NO. stress encountered by S. Typhimurium during infection in vivo has been unknown. The Base Excision Repair (BER system recognizes and repairs damaged DNA bases including cytosine and guanine residues modified by reactive nitrogen species. Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP sites generated by BER glycosylases require subsequent processing by AP endonucleases. S. Typhimurium xth nfo mutants lacking AP endonuclease activity exhibit increased NO. sensitivity resulting from chromosomal fragmentation at unprocessed AP sites. BER mutant strains were thus used to probe the nature and extent of nitrosative damage sustained by intracellular bacteria during infection. Here we show that an xth nfo S. Typhimurium mutant is attenuated for virulence in C3H/HeN mice, and virulence can be completely restored by the iNOS inhibitor L-NIL. Inactivation of the ung or fpg glycosylase genes partially restores virulence to xth nfo mutant S. Typhimurium, demonstrating that NO. fluxes in vivo are sufficient to modify cytosine and guanine bases, respectively. Mutants lacking ung or fpg exhibit NO.-dependent hypermutability during infection, underscoring the importance of BER in protecting Salmonella from the genotoxic effects of host NO.. These observations demonstrate that host-derived NO. damages Salmonella DNA in vivo, and the BER system is required to maintain bacterial genomic integrity.

  16. Early in vivo cytokine genes expression in chickens after challenge with Salmonella typhimurium lipopolysaccharide and modulation by dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijben, J.W.C.; Klasing, K.C.; Schrama, J.W.; Parmentier, H.K.; Poel, van der J.J.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Kaiser, P.

    2003-01-01

    We studied the effects of Salmonella typhimurium lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on in vivo cytokine mRNA levels in chickens, and investigated whether these levels could be altered by different nutrients. Two hundred and forty chicks were assigned in a 2 X 4 factorial design of treatments. Factors were

  17. Signal transduction pathway mediated by the novel regulator LoiA for low oxygen tension induced Salmonella Typhimurium invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lingyan; Feng, Lu; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Wenwen; Wang, Peisheng; Jiang, Xiaohan; Wang, Lei

    2017-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a major intestinal pathogen of both humans and animals. Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1)-encoded virulence genes are required for S. Typhimurium invasion. While oxygen (O2) limitation is an important signal for SPI-1 induction under host conditions, how the signal is received and integrated to the central SPI-1 regulatory system in S. Typhimurium is not clear. Here, we report a signal transduction pathway that activates SPI-1 expression in response to low O2. A novel regulator encoded within SPI-14 (STM14_1008), named LoiA (low oxygen induced factor A), directly binds to the promoter and activates transcription of hilD, leading to the activation of hilA (the master activator of SPI-1). Deletion of loiA significantly decreased the transcription of hilA, hilD and other representative SPI-1 genes (sipB, spaO, invH, prgH and invF) under low O2 conditions. The response of LoiA to the low O2 signal is mediated by the ArcB/ArcA two-component system. Deletion of either arcA or arcB significantly decreased transcription of loiA under low O2 conditions. We also confirmed that SPI-14 contributes to S. Typhimurium virulence by affecting invasion, and that loiA is the virulence determinant of SPI-14. Mice infection assays showed that S. Typhimurium virulence was severely attenuated by deletion of either the entire SPI-14 region or the single loiA gene after oral infection, while the virulence was not affected by either deletion after intraperitoneal infection. The signal transduction pathway described represents an important mechanism for S. Typhimurium to sense and respond to low O2 conditions of the host intestinal tract for invasion. SPI-14-encoded loiA is an essential element of this pathway that integrates the low O2 signal into the SPI-1 regulatory system. Acquisition of SPI-14 is therefore crucial for the evolution of S. Typhimurium as an intestinal pathogen.

  18. Signal transduction pathway mediated by the novel regulator LoiA for low oxygen tension induced Salmonella Typhimurium invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyan Jiang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium is a major intestinal pathogen of both humans and animals. Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1-encoded virulence genes are required for S. Typhimurium invasion. While oxygen (O2 limitation is an important signal for SPI-1 induction under host conditions, how the signal is received and integrated to the central SPI-1 regulatory system in S. Typhimurium is not clear. Here, we report a signal transduction pathway that activates SPI-1 expression in response to low O2. A novel regulator encoded within SPI-14 (STM14_1008, named LoiA (low oxygen induced factor A, directly binds to the promoter and activates transcription of hilD, leading to the activation of hilA (the master activator of SPI-1. Deletion of loiA significantly decreased the transcription of hilA, hilD and other representative SPI-1 genes (sipB, spaO, invH, prgH and invF under low O2 conditions. The response of LoiA to the low O2 signal is mediated by the ArcB/ArcA two-component system. Deletion of either arcA or arcB significantly decreased transcription of loiA under low O2 conditions. We also confirmed that SPI-14 contributes to S. Typhimurium virulence by affecting invasion, and that loiA is the virulence determinant of SPI-14. Mice infection assays showed that S. Typhimurium virulence was severely attenuated by deletion of either the entire SPI-14 region or the single loiA gene after oral infection, while the virulence was not affected by either deletion after intraperitoneal infection. The signal transduction pathway described represents an important mechanism for S. Typhimurium to sense and respond to low O2 conditions of the host intestinal tract for invasion. SPI-14-encoded loiA is an essential element of this pathway that integrates the low O2 signal into the SPI-1 regulatory system. Acquisition of SPI-14 is therefore crucial for the evolution of S. Typhimurium as an intestinal pathogen.

  19. Nucleotide sequence of the hexA gene for DNA mismatch repair in Streptococcus pneumoniae and homology of hexA to mutS of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priebe, S.D.; Hadi, S.M.; Greenberg, B.; Lacks, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    The Hex system of heteroduplex DNA base mismatch repair operates in Streptococcus pneumoniae after transformation and replication to correct donor and nascent DNA strands, respectively. A functionally similar system, called Mut, operates in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. The nucleotide sequence of a 3.8-kilobase segment from the S. pneumoniae chromosome that includes the 2.7-kilobase hexA gene was determined. Chromosomal DNA used as donor to measure Hex phenotype was irradiated with UV light. An open reading frame that could encode a 17-kilodalton polypeptide (OrfC) was located just upstream of the gene encoding a polypeptide of 95 kilodaltons corresponding to HexA. Shine-Dalgarno sequences and putative promoters were identified upstream of each protein start site. Insertion mutations showed that only HexA functioned in mismatch repair and that the promoter for hexA transcription was located within the OrfC-coding region. The HexA polypeptide contains a consensus sequence for ATP- or GTP-binding sites in proteins. Comparison of the entire HexA protein sequence to that of MutS of S. typhimurium, showed the proteins to be homologous, inasmuch as 36% of their amino acid residues were identical. This homology indicates that the Hex and Mut systems of mismatch repair evolved from an ancestor common to the gram-positive streptococci and the gram-negative enterobacteria. It is the first direct evidence linking the two systems

  20. A liquid bead array for the identification and characterization of fljB-positive and fljB-negative monophasic variants of Salmonella Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Cécile; Van Hessche, Mieke; Mahillon, Jacques; Wattiau, Pierre

    2018-05-01

    Salmonella1,4,[5],12:i:- accounts currently for one of the most common serotypes observed worldwide. These isolates do not express the FljB flagellin and mostly derive from Salmonella Typhimurium. They are therefore termed Salmonella Typhimurium monophasic variants (STMV) and are considered of comparable public health risk. Since serological identification of the somatic and flagellar antigens of STMV is not sufficient to demonstrate relatedness with Salmonella Typhimurium, additional assays detecting genetic markers unique to Salmonella Typhimurium are required. In addition, identification of the mutations affecting expression of the flagellar gene fljB can be useful to support the monophasic character observed phenotypically. Finally, genetic subtyping of the various mono- and biphasic Salmonella Typhimurium clonal groups can facilitate their epidemiological follow-up. Here, we present a home-made liquid bead array able to fulfill these requirements. This array confirmed the monophasic character of 240 STMV isolates collected in Belgium during 2014-2015 and identified 10 genetic subtypes. Microevolution in and around the fljB locus linked to IS26 insertions is probably one of the driven force accounting for STMV population diversity. Thanks to its open design, other genetic signatures could later be merged to the assay to subtype additional STMV clonal groups and to detect rare mutations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The transcriptional programme of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium reveals a key role for tryptophan metabolism in biofilms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hamilton, Shea

    2009-12-11

    Abstract Background Biofilm formation enhances the capacity of pathogenic Salmonella bacteria to survive stresses that are commonly encountered within food processing and during host infection. The persistence of Salmonella within the food chain has become a major health concern, as biofilms can serve as a reservoir for the contamination of food products. While the molecular mechanisms required for the survival of bacteria on surfaces are not fully understood, transcriptional studies of other bacteria have demonstrated that biofilm growth triggers the expression of specific sets of genes, compared with planktonic cells. Until now, most gene expression studies of Salmonella have focused on the effect of infection-relevant stressors on virulence or the comparison of mutant and wild-type bacteria. However little is known about the physiological responses taking place inside a Salmonella biofilm. Results We have determined the transcriptomic and proteomic profiles of biofilms of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. We discovered that 124 detectable proteins were differentially expressed in the biofilm compared with planktonic cells, and that 10% of the S. Typhimurium genome (433 genes) showed a 2-fold or more change in the biofilm compared with planktonic cells. The genes that were significantly up-regulated implicated certain cellular processes in biofilm development including amino acid metabolism, cell motility, global regulation and tolerance to stress. We found that the most highly down-regulated genes in the biofilm were located on Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 (SPI2), and that a functional SPI2 secretion system regulator (ssrA) was required for S. Typhimurium biofilm formation. We identified STM0341 as a gene of unknown function that was needed for biofilm growth. Genes involved in tryptophan (trp) biosynthesis and transport were up-regulated in the biofilm. Deletion of trpE led to decreased bacterial attachment and this biofilm defect was restored by

  2. InduciblespyTranscription Acts as a Sensor for Envelope Stress ofSalmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seon Mi; Lee, Hwa Jeong; Park, Yoon Mee; Kim, Jin Seok; Lee, Sang Dae; Bang, Iel Soo

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella enterica infects a broad range of host animals, and zoonostic infection threatens both public health and the livestock and meat processing industries. Many antimicrobials have been developed to target Salmonella envelope that performs essential bacterial functions; however, there are very few analytical methods that can be used to validate the efficacy of these antimicrobials. In this study, to develop a potential biosensor for Salmonella envelope stress, we examined the transcription of the S. enterica serovar typhimurium spy gene, the ortholog of which in Escherichia coli encodes Spy (spheroplast protein y). Spy is a chaperone protein expressed and localized in the periplasm of E. coli during spheroplast formation, or by exposure to protein denaturing conditions. spy expression in S. typhimurium was examined by constructing a spy-gfp transcriptional fusion. S. typhimurium spy transcription was strongly induced during spheroplast formation, and also when exposed to membrane-disrupting agents, including ethanol and the antimicrobial peptide polymyxin B. Moreover, spy induction required the activity of regulator proteins BaeR and CpxR, which are part of the major envelope stress response systems BaeS/BaeR and CpxA/CpxR, respectively. Results suggest that monitoring spy transcription may be useful to determine whether a molecule particularly cause envelope stress in Salmonella .

  3. InvS Coordinates Expression of PrgH and FimZ and Is Required for Invasion of Epithelial Cells by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lu; Cai, Xia; Wu, Shuyan; Bomjan, Rajdeep; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Händler, Kristian; Hinton, Jay C. D.; Zhou, Daoguo; DiRita, Victor J.

    2017-04-24

    ABSTRACT

    Deep sequencing has revolutionized our understanding of the bacterial RNA world and has facilitated the identification of 280 small RNAs (sRNAs) inSalmonella. Despite the suspicions that sRNAs may play important roles inSalmonellapathogenesis, the functions of most sRNAs remain unknown. To advance our understanding of RNA biology inSalmonellavirulence, we searched for sRNAs required for bacterial invasion into nonphagocytic cells. After screening 75 sRNAs, we discovered that the ablation of InvS caused a significant decrease ofSalmonellainvasion into epithelial cells. A proteomic analysis showed that InvS modulated the levels of several type III secretedSalmonellaproteins. The level of PrgH, a type III secretion apparatus protein, was significantly lower in the absence of InvS, consistent with the known roles of PrgH in effector secretion and bacterial invasion. We discovered that InvS modulatesfimZexpression and hence flagellar gene expression and motility. We propose that InvS coordinates the increase of PrgH and decrease in FimZ that promote efficientSalmonellainvasion into nonphagocytic cells.

    IMPORTANCESalmonellosis continues to be the most common foodborne infection reported by the CDC in the United States. Central toSalmonellapathogenesis is the ability to invade nonphagocytic cells and to replicate inside host cells. Invasion genes are known to be regulated by protein transcriptional networks, but little is known

  4. Salmonella Typhimurium and multidirectional communication in the gut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V. Gart

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian digestive tract is home to trillions of microbes, including bacteria, archaea, protozoa, fungi and viruses. In monogastric mammals the stomach and small intestine harbor diverse bacterial populations but are typically less populated than the colon. The gut bacterial community (microbiota hereafter varies widely among different host species and individuals within a species. It is influenced by season of the year, age of the host, stress and disease. Ideally, the host and microbiota benefit each other. The host provides nutrients to the microbiota and the microbiota assists the host with digestion and nutrient metabolism. The resident microbiota competes with pathogens for space and nutrients and, through this competition, protects the host in a phenomenon called colonization resistance. The microbiota participates in development of the host immune system, particularly regulation of autoimmunity and mucosal immune response. The microbiota also shapes gut-brain communication and host responses to stress; and, indeed, the microbiota is a newly recognized endocrine organ within mammalian hosts.Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium hereafter is a food-borne pathogen which adapts to and alters the gastrointestinal (GI environment. In the GI tract, S. Typhimurium competes with the microbiota for nutrients and overcomes colonization resistance to establish infection. To do this, S. Typhimurium uses multiple defense mechanisms to resist environmental stressors, like the acidic pH of the stomach, and virulence mechanisms which allow it to invade the intestinal epithelium and disseminate throughout the host. To coordinate gene expression and disrupt signaling within the microbiota and between host and microbiota, S. Typhimurium employs its own chemical signaling and may regulate host hormone metabolism.This review will discuss the multidirectional interaction between S. Typhimurium, host and microbiota as well as mechanisms

  5. Thermosensing coordinates a cis-regulatory module for transcriptional activation of the intracellular virulence system in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Nancy; Osborne, Suzanne; Bustamante, Víctor H; Tomljenovic, Ana M; Puente, José L; Coombes, Brian K

    2007-11-23

    The expression of bacterial virulence genes is tightly controlled by the convergence of multiple extracellular signals. As a zoonotic pathogen, virulence gene regulation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium must be responsive to multiple cues from the general environment as well as from multiple niches within animal and human hosts. Previous work has identified combined magnesium and phosphate limitation as an environmental cue that activates genes required for intracellular virulence. One unanswered question is how virulence genes that are expressed within the host are inhibited in non-host environments that satisfy the phosphate and magnesium limitation cues. We report here that thermosensing is the major mechanism controlling incongruous activation of the intracellular virulence phenotype. Bacteria grown at 30 degrees C or lower were unable to activate the intracellular type III secretion system even under strong inducing signals such as synthetic medium, contact with macrophages, and exposure to the murine gut. Thermoregulation was fully recapitulated in a Salmonella bongori strain engineered to contain the intracellular virulence genes of S. enterica sv. Typhimurium, suggesting that orthologous thermoregulators were available. Accordingly, virulence gene repression at the nonpermissive temperature required Hha and H-NS, two nucleoid-like proteins involved in virulence gene control. The use of combined environmental cues to control transcriptional "logic gates" allows for transcriptional selectivity of virulence genes that would otherwise be superfluous if activated in the non-host environment. Thus, thermosensing by Salmonella provides integrated control of host niche-specific virulence factors.

  6. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Virulence-Resistance Plasmids Derived from the pSLT Carrying Nonconventional Class 1 Integrons with dfrA12 Gene in Their Variable Region and sul3 in the 3' Conserved Segment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beutlich, J.; Rodicio, M.R.; Mendoza, M.C.; Garcia, P.; Kirchner, M.; Luzzi, I.; Mevius, D.J.; Threllfall, J.; Helmuth, R.; Guerra, B.

    2013-01-01

    Drug-resistant derivatives of serovar-specific virulence plasmids, such as pSLT, in clinically-relevant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains, represent a threat for human health. We have analysed 14 S. Typhimurium isolates recovered in Italy and the United Kingdom from swine and from

  7. Construction of a bivalent DNA vaccine co-expressing S genes of transmissible gastroenteritis virus and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus delivered by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yudi; Zhang, Xiaohui; Liao, Xiaodan; Huang, Xiaobo; Cao, Sanjie; Wen, Xintian; Wen, Yiping; Wu, Rui; Liu, Wumei

    2016-06-01

    Porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) can cause severe diarrhea in newborn piglets and led to significant economic losses. The S proteins are the main structural proteins of PEDV and TGEV capable of inducing neutralizing antibodies in vivo. In this study, a DNA vaccine SL7207 (pVAXD-PS1-TS) co-expressing S proteins of TGEV and PEDV delivered by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium was constructed and its immunogenicity in piglets was investigated. Twenty-day-old piglets were orally immunized with SL7207 (pVAXD-PS1-TS) at a dosage of 1.6 × 10(11) CFU per piglet and then booster immunized with 2.0 × 10(11) CFU after 2 weeks. Humoral immune responses, as reflected by virus neutralizing antibodies and specific IgG and sIgA, and cellular immune responses, as reflected by IFN-γ, IL-4, and lymphocyte proliferation, were evaluated. SL7207 (pVAXD-PS1-TS) simultaneously elicited immune responses against TGEV and PEDV after oral immunization. The immune levels started to increase at 2 weeks after immunization and increased to levels statistically significantly different than controls at 4 weeks post-immunization, peaking at 6 weeks and declined at 8 weeks. The humoral, mucosal, and cellular immune responses induced by SL7207 (pAXD-PS1-TS) were significantly higher than those of the PBS and SL7207 (pVAXD) (p TGEV and PEDV, indicating that SL7207 (pVAXD-PS1-TS) is a candidate oral vaccine for TGE and PED.

  8. Drosophila Myc is required for normal DREF gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Thi Phuong Thao; Seto, Hirokazu; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2008-01-01

    The Drosophila DNA replication-related element-binding factor (dDREF) is required for the expression of many proliferation-related genes carrying the DRE sequence, 5'-TATCGATA. Finding a canonical E-box, 5'-CACGTG, in the dDREF gene promoter prompted us to explore the possibility that the dDREF gene is a target of Drosophila Myc (dMyc). Luciferase transient expression assays combined with RNA interference in Drosophila S2 cells revealed that knockdown of dmyc reduced dDREF gene promoter activity by 35% to 82%, an effect at least partly mediated by the E-box in the promoter. dm 4 /Y hemizygous mutant larvae demonstrated no maternal dMyc and severe impairment of dDREF mRNA transcription. dMyc loss of function in dm 2 /dm 2 homozygous mutant follicle cell clones also resulted in loss of anti-dDREF immunostaining in nuclei. In contrast, co-expression of dMyc-dMax up-regulated dDREF promoter activity in S2 cells. Furthermore, dMyc over-expressing clones exhibited a high level of dDREF gene expression in wing and eye discs. These results taken together indicate that dMyc is indeed required for dDREF gene expression

  9. A novel imageable therapeutic probe for cancer; cytolysin a expressing attenuated salmonella typhimurium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Vu Hong; Tae, Seong Ho; Piao, Hong Hua; Hong, Yeoung Jin; Choy, Hyon E.; Bom, Hee Seung; Min, Jung Joon [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Oncolytic strategy using bacteria has a long history. With the discovery of fluorescent and luminescent reporter genes, bacteria can be easily monitored continuously in treatment process. Salmonella typhimurium ppGpp mutant, one of the prominent attenuated bacteria, has just reported recently, Therefore, in this study, we established strain Cytolysin A (Cly A) expressing light-emitting S. typhimurium ppGpp mutant. S. typhimurium ppGpp mutant was transducted by lux gene for in vivo imaging (S. typhimurium ppGpp/lux) and then, plasmid containing ClyA gene, which is encoded for a pore-forming protein toxin, was transformed to create the strain expressing haemolytic activity (S. typhimurium ppGpp/lux/ClyA). The toxicity of ClyA was evaluated in vitro by inoculating the bacteria with various cultured cancer cell lines. On the other hand, to test the therapeutic effect, the bacteria were injected intermittently, intraperitoneal y or intravenously into CT26-bearing Balb/c mice. The sizes of tumors were measured and in vivo imaging was taken everyday by IVIS machine (Xenogen). The in vitro result showed the number of death cells were significantly higher in the samples containing S. typhimurium ppGpp/lux/ClyA compared with the samples containing S. typhimurium ppGpp/lux. After two days injection, the growth of tumors were repressed in mice injected with either S. typhimurium ppGpp/lux/ClyA or S. typhimurium ppGpp/lux, while tumors in control group still grew fast. In day 3, the tumors inoculated with S. typhimurium ppGpp/lux/ClyA became necrosis and regressed in the following days but not in other groups. In addition, in vivo imaging data showed that the Salmonella strains selectively located in the tumor. By in vivo imaging technique, the light-emitting bacteria can be easily monitored and quantified non-invasively and repeatedly. And ClyA expressing light-emitting S. typhimurium ppGpp mutant can become an effective and safely candidate for cancer treatment.

  10. 2D proteome analysis initiates new Insights on the Salmonella Typhimurium LuxS protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderleyden Jos

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quorum sensing is a term describing a bacterial communication system mediated by the production and recognition of small signaling molecules. The LuxS enzyme, catalyzing the synthesis of AI-2, is conserved in a wide diversity of bacteria. AI-2 has therefore been suggested as an interspecies quorum sensing signal. To investigate the role of endogenous AI-2 in protein expression of the Gram-negative pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium, we performed a 2D-DIGE proteomics experiment comparing total protein extract of wildtype S. Typhimurium with that of a luxS mutant, unable to produce AI-2. Results Differential proteome analysis of wildtype S. Typhimurium versus a luxS mutant revealed relatively few changes beyond the known effect on phase 2 flagellin. However, two highly differentially expressed protein spots with similar molecular weight but differing isoelectric point, were identified as LuxS whereas the S. Typhimurium genome contains only one luxS gene. This observation was further explored and we show that the S. Typhimurium LuxS protein can undergo posttranslational modification at a catalytic cysteine residue. Additionally, by constructing LuxS-βla and LuxS-PhoA fusion proteins, we demonstrate that S. Typhimurium LuxS can substitute the cognate signal peptide sequences of β-lactamase and alkaline phosphatase for translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane in S. Typhimurium. This was further confirmed by fractionation of S. Typhimurium protein extracts, followed by Western blot analysis. Conclusion 2D-DIGE analysis of a luxS mutant vs. wildtype Salmonella Typhimurium did not reveal new insights into the role of AI-2/LuxS in Salmonella as only a small amount of proteins were differentially expressed. However, subsequent in depth analysis of the LuxS protein itself revealed two interesting features: posttranslational modification and potential translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane. As

  11. Positive selection of mutants with cell envelope defects of a Salmonella typhimurium strain hypersensitive to the products of genes hisF and hisH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, D.N.

    1979-01-01

    Strain SB564 and its derivative DA78 are hypersensitive to the inhibitory action of the proteins coded for by genes hisF and hisH on cell division. Transduction of hisO1242, a regulatory mutation that elicits a very high level of expression of the histidine operon, into these strains resulted in the production of long filamentous cells carrying large balloons and in growth failure. Forty-one hisO1242 derivatives that escaped inhibition were isolated. These strains showed a large variety of alterations, many of which were related to the cell envelope. The more-frequent alterations included: changes in cell shape, increased sensitivity to one or more of several drugs (deoxycholate, cycloserine, penicillin, novobiocin, acridine orange), increased autolytic activity in alkaline buffer, anomalous fermentation of maltose on eosin--methylene blue plates, and temperature-conditional cell division. The alterations are produced, in some of the strains, by pleiotropic mutations in gene envB. Strains affected in divC, divD, and rodA loci have also been identified. Genetic analaysis has shown that several strains carry more than one envelope mutation. It is assumed that envelope mutations are positively selected because they somehow alleviate the particularly severe inhibition of cell division caused, in strains SB564 and DA78, by the excessive synthesis of hisF and hisH gene products

  12. Stress induced Salmonella Typhimurium recrudescence in pigs coincides with cortisol induced increased intracellular proliferation in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verbrugghe Elin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Salmonella Typhimurium infections in pigs often result in the development of carriers that intermittently excrete Salmonella in very low numbers. During periods of stress, for example transport to the slaughterhouse, recrudescence of Salmonella may occur, but the mechanism of this stress related recrudescence is poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the role of the stress hormone cortisol in Salmonella recrudescence by pigs. We showed that a 24 h feed withdrawal increases the intestinal Salmonella Typhimurium load in pigs, which is correlated with increased serum cortisol levels. A second in vivo trial demonstrated that stress related recrudescence of Salmonella Typhimurium in pigs can be induced by intramuscular injection of dexamethasone. Furthermore, we found that cortisol, but not epinephrine, norepinephrine and dopamine, promotes intracellular proliferation of Salmonella Typhimurium in primary porcine alveolar macrophages, but not in intestinal epithelial cells and a transformed cell line of porcine alveolar macrophages. A microarray based transcriptomic analysis revealed that cortisol did not directly affect the growth or the gene expression or Salmonella Typhimurium in a rich medium, which implies that the enhanced intracellular proliferation of the bacterium is probably caused by an indirect effect through the cell. These results highlight the role of cortisol in the recrudescence of Salmonella Typhimurium by pigs and they provide new evidence for the role of microbial endocrinology in host-pathogen interactions.

  13. Molecular characterization of "inconsistent" variants of Salmonella Typhimurium isolated in Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barco, Lisa; Longo, Alessandra; Lettini, Antonia Anna

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:- is a variant of Salmonella Typhimurium, which lacks the expression of phase-2 flagellar antigen, generally associated with the deletion of the fljB gene. Additional mechanisms involving the fljAB operon ( fljA, fljB, and hin genes) lead to the lack of expression of phase-2...

  14. Genome expression analysis of nonproliferating intracellular Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium unravels an acid pH-dependent PhoP-PhoQ response essential for dormancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Hernández, Cristina; Tierrez, Alberto; Ortega, Alvaro D; Pucciarelli, M Graciela; Godoy, Marta; Eisman, Blanca; Casadesús, Josep; García-del Portillo, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide expression analyses have provided clues on how Salmonella proliferates inside cultured macrophages and epithelial cells. However, in vivo studies show that Salmonella does not replicate massively within host cells, leaving the underlying mechanisms of such growth control largely undefined. In vitro infection models based on fibroblasts or dendritic cells reveal limited proliferation of the pathogen, but it is presently unknown whether these phenomena reflect events occurring in vivo. Fibroblasts are distinctive, since they represent a nonphagocytic cell type in which S. enterica serovar Typhimurium actively attenuates intracellular growth. Here, we show in the mouse model that S. Typhimurium restrains intracellular growth within nonphagocytic cells positioned in the intestinal lamina propria. This response requires a functional PhoP-PhoQ system and is reproduced in primary fibroblasts isolated from the mouse intestine. The fibroblast infection model was exploited to generate transcriptome data, which revealed that ∼2% (98 genes) of the S. Typhimurium genome is differentially expressed in nongrowing intracellular bacteria. Changes include metabolic reprogramming to microaerophilic conditions, induction of virulence plasmid genes, upregulation of the pathogenicity islands SPI-1 and SPI-2, and shutdown of flagella production and chemotaxis. Comparison of relative protein levels of several PhoP-PhoQ-regulated functions (PagN, PagP, and VirK) in nongrowing intracellular bacteria and extracellular bacteria exposed to diverse PhoP-PhoQ-inducing signals denoted a regulation responding to acidic pH. These data demonstrate that S. Typhimurium restrains intracellular growth in vivo and support a model in which dormant intracellular bacteria could sense vacuolar acidification to stimulate the PhoP-PhoQ system for preventing intracellular overgrowth.

  15. Genome Expression Analysis of Nonproliferating Intracellular Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Unravels an Acid pH-Dependent PhoP-PhoQ Response Essential for Dormancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Hernández, Cristina; Tierrez, Alberto; Ortega, Álvaro D.; Pucciarelli, M. Graciela; Godoy, Marta; Eisman, Blanca; Casadesús, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide expression analyses have provided clues on how Salmonella proliferates inside cultured macrophages and epithelial cells. However, in vivo studies show that Salmonella does not replicate massively within host cells, leaving the underlying mechanisms of such growth control largely undefined. In vitro infection models based on fibroblasts or dendritic cells reveal limited proliferation of the pathogen, but it is presently unknown whether these phenomena reflect events occurring in vivo. Fibroblasts are distinctive, since they represent a nonphagocytic cell type in which S. enterica serovar Typhimurium actively attenuates intracellular growth. Here, we show in the mouse model that S. Typhimurium restrains intracellular growth within nonphagocytic cells positioned in the intestinal lamina propria. This response requires a functional PhoP-PhoQ system and is reproduced in primary fibroblasts isolated from the mouse intestine. The fibroblast infection model was exploited to generate transcriptome data, which revealed that ∼2% (98 genes) of the S. Typhimurium genome is differentially expressed in nongrowing intracellular bacteria. Changes include metabolic reprogramming to microaerophilic conditions, induction of virulence plasmid genes, upregulation of the pathogenicity islands SPI-1 and SPI-2, and shutdown of flagella production and chemotaxis. Comparison of relative protein levels of several PhoP-PhoQ-regulated functions (PagN, PagP, and VirK) in nongrowing intracellular bacteria and extracellular bacteria exposed to diverse PhoP-PhoQ-inducing signals denoted a regulation responding to acidic pH. These data demonstrate that S. Typhimurium restrains intracellular growth in vivo and support a model in which dormant intracellular bacteria could sense vacuolar acidification to stimulate the PhoP-PhoQ system for preventing intracellular overgrowth. PMID:23090959

  16. Characterization and Antimicrobial Resistance of Salmonella Typhimurium Isolates from Clinically Diseased Pigs in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sang-Ik; Kim, Jong Wan; Chae, Myeongju; Jung, Ji-A; So, Byungjae; Kim, Bumseok; Kim, Ha-Young

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of Salmonella enterica serovar and antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella Typhimurium isolates from clinically diseased pigs collected from 2008 to 2014 in Korea. Isolates were also characterized according to the presence of antimicrobial resistance genes and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns. Among 94 Salmonella isolates, 81 (86.2%) were identified as being of the Salmonella Typhimurium serotype, followed by Salmonella Derby (6 of 94, 6.4%), Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:- (4 of 94, 4.3%), Salmonella Enteritidis (2 of 94, 2.1%), and Salmonella Brandenburg (1 of 94, 1.1%). The majority of Salmonella Typhimurium isolates were resistant to tetracycline (92.6%), followed by streptomycin (88.9%) and ampicillin (80.2%). Overall, 96.3% of Salmonella Typhimurium isolates showed multidrug-resistant phenotypes and commonly harbored the resistance genes bla TEM (64.9%), flo (32.8%), aadA (55.3%), strA (58.5%), strB (58.5%), sulII (53.2%), and tetA (61.7%). The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of 45 Salmonella Typhimurium isolates from individual farms revealed 27 distinct patterns that formed one major and two minor clusters in the dendrogram analysis, suggesting that most of the isolates (91.1%) from diseased pigs were genetically related. These findings can assist veterinarians in the selection of appropriate antimicrobial agents to combat Salmonella Typhimurium infections in pigs. Furthermore, they highlight the importance of continuous surveillance of antimicrobial resistance and genetic status in Salmonella Typhimurium for the detection of emerging resistance trends.

  17. Two dynamin-2 genes are required for normal zebrafish development.

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    Elizabeth M Gibbs

    Full Text Available Dynamin-2 (DNM2 is a large GTPase involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and related trafficking pathways. Mutations in human DNM2 cause two distinct neuromuscular disorders: centronuclear myopathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Zebrafish have been shown to be an excellent animal model for many neurologic disorders, and this system has the potential to inform our understanding of DNM2-related disease. Currently, little is known about the endogenous zebrafish orthologs to human DNM2. In this study, we characterize two zebrafish dynamin-2 genes, dnm2 and dnm2-like. Both orthologs are structurally similar to human DNM2 at the gene and protein levels. They are expressed throughout early development and in all adult tissues examined. Knockdown of dnm2 and dnm2-like gene products resulted in extensive morphological abnormalities during development, and expression of human DNM2 RNA rescued these phenotypes. Our findings suggest that dnm2 and dnm2-like are orthologs to human DNM2, and that they are required for normal zebrafish development.

  18. The type VI secretion system encoded in SPI-6 plays a role in gastrointestinal colonization and systemic spread of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the chicken.

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    David Pezoa

    Full Text Available The role of the Salmonella Pathogenicity Islands (SPIs in pathogenesis of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium infection in the chicken is poorly studied, while many studies have been completed in murine models. The Type VI Secretion System (T6SS is a recently described protein secretion system in Gram-negative bacteria. The genus Salmonella contains five phylogenetically distinct T6SS encoded in differentially distributed genomic islands. S. Typhimurium harbors a T6SS encoded in SPI-6 (T6SSSPI-6, which contributes to the ability of Salmonella to colonize mice. On the other hand, serotype Gallinarum harbors a T6SS encoded in SPI-19 (T6SSSPI-19 that is required for colonization of chicks. In this work, we investigated the role of T6SSSPI-6 in infection of chicks by S. Typhimurium. Oral infection of White Leghorn chicks showed that a ΔT6SSSPI-6 mutant had reduced colonization of the gut and internal organs, compared with the wild-type strain. Transfer of the intact T6SSSPI-6 gene cluster into the T6SS mutant restored bacterial colonization. In addition, our results showed that transfer of T6SSSPI-19 from S. Gallinarum to the ΔT6SSSPI-6 mutant of S. Typhimurium not only complemented the colonization defect but also resulted in a transient increase in the colonization of the cecum and ileum of chicks at days 1 and 3 post-infection. Our data indicates that T6SSSPI-6 contributes to chicken colonization and suggests that both T6SSSPI-6 and T6SSSPI-19 perform similar functions in vivo despite belonging to different phylogenetic families.

  19. Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis causing mixed infections in febrile children in Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García V

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Vanesa García,1 Inácio Mandomando,2,3 Joaquim Ruiz,4 Silvia Herrera-León,5 Pedro L Alonso,3,4 M Rosario Rodicio1 1Departamento de Biología Funcional, Área de Microbiología, Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain; 2Centro de Investigação em Saúde de Manhiça, 3Instituto Nacional de Saúde, Ministério da Saúde, Maputo, Mozambique; 4ISGlobal, Barcelona Centre for International Health Research, Hospital Clínic, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, 5Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda, Madrid, Spain Background and purpose: Invasive nontyphoidal salmonellosis, mostly caused by serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis of Salmonella enterica, has emerged as a major public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of this study was the clinical and microbiological characterization of nontyphoidal salmonellosis episodes affecting febrile children in Mozambique. Patients and methods: The clinical records of the patients were evaluated, and S. enterica isolates were characterized with regard to serovar, phage type, antimicrobial resistance (phenotype/responsible genes, plasmid content, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and multilocus sequence typing. Results: Fifteen S. Typhimurium and 21 S. Enteritidis isolates were recovered from blood samples of 25 children, the majority with underlying risk factors. With regard to phage typing, most isolates were either untypeable or reacted but did not conform, revealing that a number of previously unrecognized patterns are circulating in Mozambique. Most isolates were multidrug-resistant, with nearly all of the responsible genes located on derivatives of serovar-specific virulence plasmids. ST313 and ST11 were the predominant sequence types associated with S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis, respectively, and the uncommon ST1479 was also detected in S. Enteritidis. A distinct XbaI fragment of ~350 kb was associated with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns of

  20. Comparative genome analysis of the high pathogenicity Salmonella Typhimurium strain UK-1.

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    Yingqin Luo

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a gram-negative facultative rod-shaped bacterium causing salmonellosis and foodborne disease, is one of the most common isolated Salmonella serovars in both developed and developing nations. Several S. Typhimurium genomes have been completed and many more genome-sequencing projects are underway. Comparative genome analysis of the multiple strains leads to a better understanding of the evolution of S. Typhimurium and its pathogenesis. S. Typhimurium strain UK-1 (belongs to phage type 1 is highly virulent when orally administered to mice and chickens and efficiently colonizes lymphoid tissues of these species. These characteristics make this strain a good choice for use in vaccine development. In fact, UK-1 has been used as the parent strain for a number of nonrecombinant and recombinant vaccine strains, including several commercial vaccines for poultry. In this study, we conducted a thorough comparative genome analysis of the UK-1 strain with other S. Typhimurium strains and examined the phenotypic impact of several genomic differences. Whole genomic comparison highlights an extremely close relationship between the UK-1 strain and other S. Typhimurium strains; however, many interesting genetic and genomic variations specific to UK-1 were explored. In particular, the deletion of a UK-1-specific gene that is highly similar to the gene encoding the T3SS effector protein NleC exhibited a significant decrease in oral virulence in BALB/c mice. The complete genetic complements in UK-1, especially those elements that contribute to virulence or aid in determining the diversity within bacterial species, provide key information in evaluating the functional characterization of important genetic determinants and for development of vaccines.

  1. Nociceptor-Enriched Genes Required for Normal Thermal Nociception

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    Ken Honjo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Here, we describe a targeted reverse genetic screen for thermal nociception genes in Drosophila larvae. Using laser capture microdissection and microarray analyses of nociceptive and non-nociceptive neurons, we identified 275 nociceptor-enriched genes. We then tested the function of the enriched genes with nociceptor-specific RNAi and thermal nociception assays. Tissue-specific RNAi targeted against 14 genes caused insensitive thermal nociception while targeting of 22 genes caused hypersensitive thermal nociception. Previously uncategorized genes were named for heat resistance (i.e., boilerman, fire dancer, oven mitt, trivet, thawb, and bunker gear or heat sensitivity (firelighter, black match, eucalyptus, primacord, jet fuel, detonator, gasoline, smoke alarm, and jetboil. Insensitive nociception phenotypes were often associated with severely reduced branching of nociceptor neurites and hyperbranched dendrites were seen in two of the hypersensitive cases. Many genes that we identified are conserved in mammals.

  2. Multiple roles of putrescine and spermidine in stress resistance and virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinel, Irene Cartas; Guerra, Priscila Regina; Jelsbak, Lotte

    2016-06-01

    Polyamines (putrescine and spermidine) are small-cationic amines ubiquitous in nature and present in most living cells. In recent years they have been linked to virulence of several human pathogens including Shigella spp and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium). Central to S. Typhimurium virulence is the ability to survive and replicate inside macrophages and resisting the antimicrobial attacks in the form of oxidative and nitrosative stress elicited from these cells. In the present study, we have investigated the role of polyamines in intracellular survival and systemic infections of mice. Using a S. Typhimurium mutant defective for putrescine and spermidine biosynthesis, we show that polyamines are essential for coping with reactive nitrogen species, possibly linking polyamines to increased intracellular stress resistance. However, using a mouse model defective for nitric oxide production, we find that polyamines are required for systemic infections independently of host-produced reactive nitrogen species. To distinguish between the physiological roles of putrescine and spermidine, we constructed a strain deficient for spermidine biosynthesis and uptake, but with retained ability to produce and import putrescine. Interestingly, in this mutant we observe a strong attenuation of virulence during infection of mice proficient and deficient for nitric oxide production suggesting that spermidine, specifically, is essential for virulence of S. Typhimurium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Homolog of the Gene bstA of the BTP1 Phage from Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium ST313 Is an Antivirulence Gene in Salmonella enterica Serovar Dublin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Espinel, Irene Cartas; Spiegelhauer, Malene Roed

    2018-01-01

    was not important for adherence to or invasion of human epithelial cells and did not influence bacterial growth in rich medium, minimal medium, or cattle blood. In conclusion, a lack of bstA affects the pathogenicity of S. Dublin by decreasing its virulence. Therefore, it might be regarded as an antivirulence gene...

  4. Identification of metabolic pathways essential for fitness of Salmonella Typhimurium in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotte Jelsbak

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections remain a threat to human and animal health worldwide, and there is an urgent need to find novel targets for intervention. In the current study we used a computer model of the metabolic network of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and identified pairs of reactions (cut sets predicted to be required for growth in vivo. We termed such cut sets synthetic auxotrophic pairs. We tested whether these would reveal possible combined targets for new antibiotics by analyzing the performance of selected single and double mutants in systemic mouse infections. One hundred and two cut sets were identified. Sixty-three of these included only pathways encoded by fully annotated genes, and from this sub-set we selected five cut sets involved in amino acid or polyamine biosynthesis. One cut set (asnA/asnB demonstrated redundancy in vitro and in vivo and showed that asparagine is essential for S. Typhimurium during infection. trpB/trpA as well as single mutants were attenuated for growth in vitro, while only the double mutant was a cut set in vivo, underlining previous observations that tryptophan is essential for successful outcome of infection. speB/speF,speC was not affected in vitro but was attenuated during infection showing that polyamines are essential for virulence apparently in a growth independent manner. The serA/glyA cut-set was found to be growth attenuated as predicted by the model. However, not only the double mutant, but also the glyA mutant, were found to be attenuated for virulence. This adds glycine production or conversion of glycine to THF to the list of essential reactions during infection. One pair (thrC/kbl showed true redundancy in vitro but not in vivo demonstrating that threonine is available to the bacterium during infection. These data add to the existing knowledge of available nutrients in the intra-host environment, and have identified possible new targets for antibiotics.

  5. Seaweed extracts and galacto-oligosaccharides improve intestinal health in pigs following Salmonella Typhimurium challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwhuis, M A; McDonnell, M J; Sweeney, T; Mukhopadhya, A; O'Shea, C J; O'Doherty, J V

    2017-09-01

    Pork and pork products are recognised as vehicles of Salmonella Typhimurium infection in humans. Seaweed-derived polysaccharides (SWE) and galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) have shown to exhibit antimicrobial, prebiotic and immunomodulatory activity. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of dietary GOS and SWE supplementation on reducing S. Typhimurium numbers and intestinal inflammation in vivo. In total, 30 pigs (n=10/treatment, BW 30.9 kg) were randomly assigned to three dietary treatments: (1) basal diet; (2) basal diet+2.5 g GOS/kg diet; (3) basal diet+SWE (containing 180 mg laminarin/kg diet+340 mg fucoidan/kg diet). Following an 11-day dietary adaptation period, pigs were orally challenged with 108 colony-forming units/ml S. Typhimurium (day 0). Pigs remained on their diets for a further 17 days and were then sacrificed for sample collection. The SWE supplementation did not affect S. Typhimurium numbers on days 2 and 4 post-challenge but reduced S. Typhimurium numbers in faecal samples collected day 7 post-challenge (-0.80 log gene copy numbers (GCN)/g faeces) and in caecal and colonic digesta (-0.62 and -0.98 log GCN/g digesta, respectively; P<0.05) compared with the control treatment. Lactobacillus numbers were increased in caecal and colonic digesta after GOS supplementation (+0.70 and +0.35 log GCN/g digesta, respectively; P<0.05). In colonic tissue, both GOS and SWE supplementation resulted in reduced messenger RNA expression levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-22, tumour necrosis factor-α and regenerating islet-derived protein 3-γ (P<0.05). It can be concluded that dietary supplementation of SWE reduced faecal and intestinal S. Typhimurium numbers compared with the basal diet, whereas dietary GOS supplementation increased Lactobacillus numbers in caecal and colonic digesta but did not affect S. Typhimurium numbers. Supplementation of GOS and SWE reduced the gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in colonic tissue of pigs after the

  6. Cantaloupe facilitates transmission of Salmonella typhimurium between adult house flies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella enterica ser. Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a pathogen harbored by livestock that can contaminate fresh produce, such as cantaloupe, and cause food-borne illnesses. We previously demonstrated that house flies acquire and harbor S. Typhimurium after exposure to inoculated cattle manure. ...

  7. Periplasmic Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase and cytoplasmic Dps concur in protecting Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium from extracellular reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacello, Francesca; Ceci, Pierpaolo; Ammendola, Serena; Pasquali, Paolo; Chiancone, Emilia; Battistoni, Andrea

    2008-02-01

    Several bacteria possess periplasmic Cu,Zn superoxide dismutases which can confer protection from extracellular reactive oxygen species. Thus, deletion of the sodC1 gene reduces Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ability to colonize the spleens of wild type mice, but enhances virulence in p47phox mutant mice. To look into the role of periplamic Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase and into possible additive effects of the ferritin-like Dps protein involved in hydrogen peroxide detoxification, we have analyzed bacterial survival in response to extracellular sources of superoxide and/or hydrogen peroxide. Exposure to extracellular superoxide of Salmonella Typhimurium mutant strains lacking the sodC1 and sodC2 genes and/or the dps gene does not cause direct killing of bacteria, indicating that extracellular superoxide is poorly bactericidal. In contrast, all mutant strains display a sharp hydrogen peroxide-dependent loss of viability, the dps,sodC1,sodC2 mutant being less resistant than the dps or the sodC1,sodC2 mutants. These findings suggest that the role of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase in bacteria is to remove rapidly superoxide from the periplasm to prevent its reaction with other reactive molecules. Moreover, the nearly additive effect of the sodC and dps mutations suggests that localization of antioxidant enzymes in different cellular compartments is required for bacterial resistance to extracytoplasmic oxidative attack.

  8. Cloning and sequencing of protein L-isoaspartyl O-methyl transferase of Salmonella Typhimurium isolated from poultry

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    S. K. Dixit

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To clone the Salmonella Typhimurium protein L-isoaspartyl O-methyl transferase (PIMT enzyme and to analyze the sequence with PIMT gene of other pathogenic serovars of Salmonella. Materials and Methods: Salmonella Typhimurium strain E-2375 was procured from the National Salmonella Center, IVRI. The genomic DNA was isolated from Salmonella Typhimurium. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR was carried out to amplify PIMT gene using the designed primers. The PCR product was cloned into pET28c plasmid vector and transformed into Escherichia coli DH5α cells. The plasmid was isolated from E. coli and was sequenced. The sequence was analyzed and submitted in Genbank. Results: The PCR product revealed a distinct amplicon of 627 bp. The clone was confirmed by PCR. Sequencing data revealed 100% homology between PIMT sequences from Salmonella Typhimurium strain E-2375 (used in the current study and PIMT sequences of standard reported strain (Salmonella Typhimurium str. LT2 in NCBI data base. This submitted sequence in Genbank having accession no. KJ575536. Conclusions: PIMT gene of Salmonella is highly conserved in most of the pathogenic Salmonella serovars. The PIMT clone can be used to isolate PIMT protein. This PIMT protein will be helpful to identify isoaspartate containing proteins thus can help in study Salmonella virulence.

  9. YUCCA auxin biosynthetic genes are required for Arabidopsis shade avoidance

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    Patricia Müller-Moulé

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants respond to neighbor shade by increasing stem and petiole elongation. Shade, sensed by phytochrome photoreceptors, causes stabilization of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR proteins and subsequent induction of YUCCA auxin biosynthetic genes. To investigate the role of YUCCA genes in phytochrome-mediated elongation, we examined auxin signaling kinetics after an end-of-day far-red (EOD-FR light treatment, and found that an auxin responsive reporter is rapidly induced within 2 hours of far-red exposure. YUCCA2, 5, 8, and 9 are all induced with similar kinetics suggesting that they could act redundantly to control shade-mediated elongation. To test this hypothesis we constructed a yucca2, 5, 8, 9 quadruple mutant and found that the hypocotyl and petiole EOD-FR and shade avoidance responses are completely disrupted. This work shows that YUCCA auxin biosynthetic genes are essential for detectable shade avoidance and that YUCCA genes are important for petiole shade avoidance.

  10. Identification of Metabolic Pathways Essential for Fitness of Salmonella Typhimurium In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lotte; Hartman, Hassan; Schroll, Casper

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections remain a threat to human and animal health worldwide, and there is an urgent need to find novel targets for intervention. In the current study we used a computer model of the metabolic network of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and identified pairs of reactions (cut...... sets) predicted to be required for growth in vivo. We termed such cut sets synthetic auxotrophic pairs. We tested whether these would reveal possible combined targets for new antibiotics by analyzing the performance of selected single and double mutants in systemic mouse infections. One hundred and two...... cut sets were identified. Sixty-three of these included only pathways encoded by fully annotated genes, and from this sub-set we selected five cut sets involved in amino acid or polyamine biosynthesis. One cut set (asnA/asnB) demonstrated redundancy in vitro and in vivo and showed that asparagine...

  11. An incomplete TCA cycle increases survival of Salmonella Typhimurium during infection of resting and activated murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Steven D; Ramachandran, Vinoy K; Knudsen, Gitte M; Hinton, Jay C D; Thompson, Arthur

    2010-11-08

    In comparison to the comprehensive analyses performed on virulence gene expression, regulation and action, the intracellular metabolism of Salmonella during infection is a relatively under-studied area. We investigated the role of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in the intracellular replication of Salmonella Typhimurium in resting and activated macrophages, epithelial cells, and during infection of mice. We constructed deletion mutations of 5 TCA cycle genes in S. Typhimurium including gltA, mdh, sdhCDAB, sucAB, and sucCD. We found that the mutants exhibited increased net intracellular replication in resting and activated murine macrophages compared to the wild-type. In contrast, an epithelial cell infection model showed that the S. Typhimurium ΔsucCD and ΔgltA strains had reduced net intracellular replication compared to the wild-type. The glyoxylate shunt was not responsible for the net increased replication of the TCA cycle mutants within resting macrophages. We also confirmed that, in a murine infection model, the S. Typhimurium ΔsucAB and ΔsucCD strains are attenuated for virulence. Our results suggest that disruption of the TCA cycle increases the ability of S. Typhimurium to survive within resting and activated murine macrophages. In contrast, epithelial cells are non-phagocytic cells and unlike macrophages cannot mount an oxidative and nitrosative defence response against pathogens; our results show that in HeLa cells the S. Typhimurium TCA cycle mutant strains show reduced or no change in intracellular levels compared to the wild-type. The attenuation of the S. Typhimurium ΔsucAB and ΔsucCD mutants in mice, compared to their increased net intracellular replication in resting and activated macrophages suggest that Salmonella may encounter environments within the host where a complete TCA cycle is advantageous.

  12. Experimental Salmonella typhimurium infections in rats. I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougen, H P; Jensen, E T; Klausen, B

    1989-01-01

    The course of experimentally induced Salmonella typhimurium infection was studied in three groups of inbred LEW rats: homozygous +/+, athymic rnu/rnu and isogeneic thymus-grafted rnu/rnu rats. In the first experiment the animals were inoculated intraperitoneally with 10(8) bacteria and all animals...

  13. Oxidoreductases that act as conditional virulence suppressors in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

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    Naeem Anwar

    Full Text Available In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, oxidoreductases of the thioredoxin superfamily contribute to bacterial invasiveness, intracellular replication and to the virulence in BALB/c mice as well as in the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The scsABCD gene cluster, present in many but not all enteric bacteria, codes for four putative oxidoreductases of the thioredoxin superfamily. Here we have analyzed the potential role of the scs genes in oxidative stress tolerance and virulence in S. Typhimurium. An scsABCD deletion mutant showed moderate sensitization to the redox-active transition metal ion copper and increased protein carbonylation upon exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Still, the scsABCD mutant was not significantly affected for invasiveness or intracellular replication in respectively cultured epithelial or macrophage-like cells. However, we noted a significant copper chloride sensitivity of SPI1 T3SS mediated invasiveness that strongly depended on the presence of the scs genes. The scsABCD deletion mutant was not attenuated in animal infection models. In contrast, the mutant showed a moderate increase in its competitive index upon intraperitoneal challenge and enhanced invasiveness in small intestinal ileal loops of BALB/c mice. Moreover, deletion of the scsABCD genes restored the invasiveness of a trxA mutant in epithelial cells and its virulence in C. elegans. Our findings thus demonstrate that the scs gene cluster conditionally affects virulence and underscore the complex interactions between oxidoreductases of the thioredoxin superfamily in maintaining host adaptation of S. Typhimurium.

  14. speG Is Required for Intracellular Replication of Salmonella in Various Human Cells and Affects Its Polyamine Metabolism and Global Transcriptomes

    OpenAIRE

    Shiuh-Bin Fang; Shiuh-Bin Fang; Shiuh-Bin Fang; Ching-Jou Huang; Ching-Jou Huang; Chih-Hung Huang; Chih-Hung Huang; Ke-Chuan Wang; Ke-Chuan Wang; Nai-Wen Chang; Nai-Wen Chang; Hung-Yin Pan; Hsu-Wei Fang; Hsu-Wei Fang; Ming-Te Huang

    2017-01-01

    The speG gene has been reported to regulate polyamine metabolism in Escherichia coli and Shigella, but its role in Salmonella remains unknown. Our preliminary studies have revealed that speG widely affects the transcriptomes of infected in vitro M and Caco-2 cells and that it is required for the intracellular replication of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) in HeLa cells. In this study, we demonstrated that speG plays a time-dependent and cell type-independent role in t...

  15. Search for missing schizophrenia genes will require a new ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-08-06

    Aug 6, 2013 ... And finally, what is needed to make progress? What do we know? Over 40 years of research has established that a number of genomic regions and genes ... who isolated and identified human endogenous retrovirus. (HERV) sequences ... W family of endogenous retroviruses in the cerebrospinal fluid from ...

  16. L-asparaginase II produced by Salmonella typhimurium inhibits T cell responses and mediates virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullas, Amy L; McClelland, Michael; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Tam, Jason W; Torres, AnnMarie; Porwollik, Steffen; Mena, Patricio; McPhee, Joseph B; Bogomolnaya, Lydia; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene; van der Velden, Adrianus W M

    2012-12-13

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium avoids clearance by the host immune system by suppressing T cell responses; however, the mechanisms that mediate this immunosuppression remain unknown. We show that S. Typhimurium inhibit T cell responses by producing L-Asparaginase II, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-asparagine to aspartic acid and ammonia. L-Asparaginase II is necessary and sufficient to suppress T cell blastogenesis, cytokine production, and proliferation and to downmodulate expression of the T cell receptor. Furthermore, S. Typhimurium-induced inhibition of T cells in vitro is prevented upon addition of L-asparagine. S. Typhimurium lacking the L-Asparaginase II gene (STM3106) are unable to inhibit T cell responses and exhibit attenuated virulence in vivo. L-Asparaginases are used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia through mechanisms that likely involve amino acid starvation of leukemic cells, and these findings indicate that pathogens similarly use L-asparagine deprivation to limit T cell responses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cloning and properties of the Salmonella typhimurium tricarboxylate transport operon in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widenhorn, K.A.; Boos, W.; Somers, J.M.; Kay, W.W.

    1988-01-01

    The tricarboxylate transport operon (tctI) was cloned in Escherichia coli as a 12-kilobase (kb) fragment from an EcoRI library of the Salmonella typhimurium chromosome in λgtWES. It was further subcloned as a 12-kb fragment into pACYC184 and as an 8-kb fragment into pBR322. By insertional mutagenesis mediated by λTn5, restriction mapping, and phenotypic testing, the tctI operon was localized to a 4.5-kb region. The tctC gene which encodes a periplasmic binding protein (C-protein) was located near the center of the insert. E. coli/tctI clones on either multicopy or single-copy vectors grew on the same tricarboxylates as S. typhimurium, although unusually long growth lags were observed. E. coli/tctI clones exhibited similar [ 14 C] fluorocitrate transport kinetics to those of S. typhimurium, whereas E. coli alone was virtually impermeable to [ 14 C] fluorocitrate. The periplasmic C proteins (C1 and C2 isoelectric forms) were produced in prodigious quantities from the cloned strains. Motile E. coli/tctI clones were not chemotactic toward citrate, whereas tctI deletion mutants of S. typhimurium were. Taken together, these observations indicate that tctI is not an operon involved in chemotaxis

  18. The effect of nitric oxide combined with fluoroquinolones against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coban AY

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Two regulons, soxRS and marRAB, are associated with resistance to quinolones or multiple antibiotic in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. These regulons are activated by nitric oxide and redox-cycling drugs, such as paraquat and cause on activation of the acrAB-encoded efflux pump. In this study, we investigated the effect of nitric oxide (NO alone and in combination with ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and pefloxacin against S. typhimurium clinical isolates and mutant strains in vitro. We did not observe synergistic effect against clinical isolates and SH5014 (parent strain of acr mutant, while we found synergistic effect against PP120 (soxRS mutant and SH7616 (an acr mutant S. typhimurium for all quinolones. Our results suggest that the efficiencies of some antibiotics, including ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and pefloxacin are decreased via activation of soxRS and marRAB regulons by NO in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Further studies are warranted to establish the interaction of NO with the genes of Salmonella and, with multiple antibiotic resistance.

  19. Cloning and properties of the Salmonella typhimurium tricarboxylate transport operon in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widenhorn, K.A.; Boos, W.; Somers, J.M.; Kay, W.W.

    1988-02-01

    The tricarboxylate transport operon (tctI) was cloned in Escherichia coli as a 12-kilobase (kb) fragment from an EcoRI library of the Salmonella typhimurium chromosome in lambdagtWES. It was further subcloned as a 12-kb fragment into pACYC184 and as an 8-kb fragment into pBR322. By insertional mutagenesis mediated by lambdaTn5, restriction mapping, and phenotypic testing, the tctI operon was localized to a 4.5-kb region. The tctC gene which encodes a periplasmic binding protein (C-protein) was located near the center of the insert. E. coli/tctI clones on either multicopy or single-copy vectors grew on the same tricarboxylates as S. typhimurium, although unusually long growth lags were observed. E. coli/tctI clones exhibited similar (/sup 14/C) fluorocitrate transport kinetics to those of S. typhimurium, whereas E. coli alone was virtually impermeable to (/sup 14/C) fluorocitrate. The periplasmic C proteins (C1 and C2 isoelectric forms) were produced in prodigious quantities from the cloned strains. Motile E. coli/tctI clones were not chemotactic toward citrate, whereas tctI deletion mutants of S. typhimurium were. Taken together, these observations indicate that tctI is not an operon involved in chemotaxis.

  20. Genes required for Lactococcus garvieae survival in a fish host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, Aurora; Fernández, Lucia; Reimundo, Pilar; Guijarro, José A

    2007-10-01

    Lactococcus garvieae is considered an emergent pathogen in aquaculture and it is also associated with mastitis in domestic animals as well as human endocarditis and septicaemia. In spite of this, the pathogenic mechanisms of this bacterium are poorly understood. Signature-tagged mutagenesis was used to identify virulence factors and to establish the basis of pathogen-host interactions. A library of 1250 L. garvieae UNIUD074-tagged Tn917 mutants in 25 pools was screened for the ability to grow in fish. Among them, 29 mutants (approx. 2.4 %) were identified which could not be recovered from rainbow trout following infection. Sequence analysis of the tagged Tn917-interrupted genes in these mutants indicated the participation in pathogenesis of the transcriptional regulatory proteins homologous to GidA and MerR; the metabolic enzymes asparagine synthetase A and alpha-acetolactate synthase; the ABC transport system of glutamine and a calcium-transporting ATPase; the dltA locus involved in alanylation of teichoic acids; and hypothetical proteins containing EAL and Eis domains, among others. Competence index experiments in several of the selected mutants confirmed the relevance of the Tn917-interrupted genes in the development of the infection process. The results suggested some of the metabolic routes and enzymic systems necessary for the complete virulence of this bacterium. This work is believed to represent the first report of a genome-wide scan for virulence factors in L. garvieae. The identified genes will further our understanding of the pathogenesis of L. garvieae infections and may provide targets for intervention or lead to the development of novel therapies.

  1. Interleukin-10 Production by T and B Cells Is a Key Factor to Promote Systemic Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Infection in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldyne A. Salazar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium is a Gram-negative bacterium that produces disease in numerous hosts. In mice, oral inoculation is followed by intestinal colonization and subsequent systemic dissemination, which leads to severe pathogenesis without the activation of an efficient anti-Salmonella immune response. This feature suggests that the infection caused by S. Typhimurium may promote the production of anti-inflammatory molecules by the host that prevent efficient T cell activation and bacterial clearance. In this study, we describe the contribution of immune cells producing the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10 to the systemic infection caused by S. Typhimurium in mice. We observed that the production of IL-10 was required by S. Typhimurium to cause a systemic disease, since mice lacking IL-10 (IL-10−/− were significantly more resistant to die after an infection as compared to wild-type (WT mice. IL-10−/− mice had reduced bacterial loads in internal organs and increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in serum at 5 days of infection. Importantly, WT mice showed high bacterial loads in tissues and no increase of cytokines in serum after 5 days of S. Typhimurium infection, except for IL-10. In WT mice, we observed a peak of il-10 messenger RNA production in ileum, spleen, and liver after 5 days of infection. Importantly, the adoptive transfer of T or B cells from WT mice restored the susceptibility of IL-10−/− mice to systemic S. Typhimurium infection, suggesting that the generation of regulatory cells in vivo is required to sustain a systemic infection by S. Typhimurium. These findings support the notion that IL-10 production from lymphoid cells is a key process in the infective cycle of S. Typhimurium in mice due to generation of a tolerogenic immune response that prevents bacterial clearance and supports systemic dissemination.

  2. PMR6, a Pectate Lyase–Like Gene Required for Powdery Mildew Susceptibility in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, John P.; Raab, Theodore K.; Schiff, Celine; Somerville, Shauna C.

    2002-01-01

    The plant genes required for the growth and reproduction of plant pathogens are largely unknown. In an effort to identify these genes, we isolated Arabidopsis mutants that do not support the normal growth of the powdery mildew pathogen Erysiphe cichoracearum. Here, we report on the cloning and characterization of one of these genes, PMR6. PMR6 encodes a pectate lyase–like protein with a novel C-terminal domain. Consistent with its predicted gene function, mutations in PMR6 alter the composition of the plant cell wall, as shown by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. pmr6-mediated resistance requires neither salicylic acid nor the ability to perceive jasmonic acid or ethylene, indicating that the resistance mechanism does not require the activation of well-described defense pathways. Thus, pmr6 resistance represents a novel form of disease resistance based on the loss of a gene required during a compatible interaction rather than the activation of known host defense pathways. PMID:12215508

  3. PMR6, a pectate lyase-like gene required for powdery mildew susceptibility in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, John P; Raab, Theodore K; Schiff, Celine; Somerville, Shauna C

    2002-09-01

    The plant genes required for the growth and reproduction of plant pathogens are largely unknown. In an effort to identify these genes, we isolated Arabidopsis mutants that do not support the normal growth of the powdery mildew pathogen Erysiphe cichoracearum. Here, we report on the cloning and characterization of one of these genes, PMR6. PMR6 encodes a pectate lyase-like protein with a novel C-terminal domain. Consistent with its predicted gene function, mutations in PMR6 alter the composition of the plant cell wall, as shown by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. pmr6-mediated resistance requires neither salicylic acid nor the ability to perceive jasmonic acid or ethylene, indicating that the resistance mechanism does not require the activation of well-described defense pathways. Thus, pmr6 resistance represents a novel form of disease resistance based on the loss of a gene required during a compatible interaction rather than the activation of known host defense pathways.

  4. Molecular characterization, spread and evolution of multidrug resistance in Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104

    OpenAIRE

    Cloeckaert, Axel; Schwarz, Stefan

    2001-01-01

    International audience; Multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium phage type DT104 has emerged during the last decade as a global health problem because of its involvement in diseases in animals and humans. Multidrug-resistant DT104 strains are mostly resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamides and tetracyclines (ACSSuT resistance type). The genes coding for such resistances are clustered on the chromosome. This paper reviews new developments in the ...

  5. Contribution of oqxAB and aac(6’Ib-cr to fluoroquinolone resistance in Salmonella Typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Ho-yin eWong

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Emergence of multidrug-resistant S. Typhimurium strains, especially the ACSSuT and nalidixic acid R types, has significantly compromised the effectiveness of current strategies to control Salmonella infections, resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. Clinical S. Typhimurium isolates recovered in Hong Kong during the period of 2005-2011 were increasingly resistant to ciprofloxacin and antibiotics of the ACSSuT group. Our data revealed that oqxAB and aac(6’Ib-cr were encoded on plasmids of various sizes and the presence of these two elements together with a single gyrA mutation in S. Typhimurium were sufficient to mediate resistance to ciprofloxacin. Acquisition of the oqxAB and aac(6'Ib-cr encoding plasmids by S. Typhimurium caused a 4-fold increase in CIP MIC. Furthermore, the presence of oqxAB and aac(6'Ib-cr in Salmonella dramatically increased the mutation prevention concentration (MPC of ciprofloxacin which may due to mutational changes in the drug target genes. In conclusion, possession of oqxAB and aac(6’Ib-cr encoding plasmid facilitate the selection of ciprofloxacin resistant S. Typhimurium, thereby causing a remarkable increase of ciprofloxacin resistance among clinical Salmonella strains in Hong Kong.

  6. SopB-Mediated Recruitment of SNX18 Facilitates Salmonella Typhimurium Internalization by the Host Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebl, David; Qi, Xiaying; Zhe, Yang; Barnett, Timothy C.; Teasdale, Rohan D.

    2017-01-01

    To invade epithelial cells, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) induces macropinocytosis through the action of virulence proteins delivered across the host cell membrane via a type III secretion system. We show that after docking at the plasma membrane S. Typhimurium triggers rapid recruitment of cytosolic SNX18, a SH3-PX-BAR domain sorting nexin protein, to the bacteria-induced membrane ruffles and to the nascent Salmonella-containing vacuole. SNX18 recruitment required the inositol-phosphatase activity of the Salmonella effector SopB and an intact phosphoinositide-binding site within the PX domain of SNX18, but occurred independently of Rho-GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42 activation. SNX18 promotes formation of the SCV from the plasma membrane by acting as a scaffold to recruit Dynamin-2 and N-WASP in a process dependent on the SH3 domain of SNX18. Quantification of bacteria uptake revealed that overexpression of SNX18 increased bacteria internalization, whereas a decrease was detected in cells overexpressing the phosphoinositide-binding mutant R303Q, the ΔSH3 mutant, and in cells where endogenous levels of SNX18 were knocked-down. This study identifies SNX18 as a novel target of SopB and suggests a mechanism where S. Typhimurium engages host factors via local manipulation of phosphoinositide composition at the site of invasion to orchestrate the internalization process. PMID:28664153

  7. Involvement of SPI-2-encoded SpiC in flagellum synthesis in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugita Asami

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SpiC encoded within Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 on the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium chromosome is required for survival within macrophages and systemic infection in mice. Additionally, SpiC contributes to Salmonella-induced activation of the signal transduction pathways in macrophages by affecting the expression of FliC, a component of flagella filaments. Here, we show the contribution of SpiC in flagellum synthesis. Results Quantitative RT-PCR shows that the expression levels of the class 3 fliD and motA genes that encode for the flagella cap and motor torque proteins, respectively, were lower for a spiC mutant strain than for the wild-type Salmonella. Further, this mutant had lower expression levels of the class 2 genes including the fliA gene encoding the flagellar-specific alternative sigma factor. We also found differences in flagella assembly between the wild-type strain and the spiC mutant. Many flagella filaments were observed on the bacterial surface of the wild-type strain, whereas the spiC mutant had only few flagella. The absence of spiC led to reduced expression of the FlhD protein, which functions as the master regulator in flagella gene expression, although no significant difference at the transcription level of the flhDC operon was observed between the wild-type strain and the spiC mutant. Conclusion The data show that SpiC is involved in flagella assembly by affecting the post-transcription expression of flhDC.

  8. Coordinated Regulation of Virulence during Systemic Infection of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyunjin; McDermott, Jason E.; Porwollik, Steffen; Mcclelland, Michael; Heffron, Fred

    2009-02-20

    Salmonella must respond to a myriad of environmental cues during infection of a mouse and express specific subsets of genes in a temporal and spatial manner to subvert the host defense mechanisms but these regulatory pathways are poorly established. To unravel how micro-environmental signals are processed and integrated into coordinated action, we constructed in-frame non-polar deletions of 84 regulators inferred to play a role in Salmonella typhimurium virulence and tested them in three virulence assays (intraperitoneal (i.p.), and intragastric (i.g.) infection in BALB/c mice, and persistence in SvJ129 mice). Overall 36 regulators were identified that were less virulent in at least one assay, and of those, 15 regulators were required for systemic mouse infection in an acute infection model. As a first step towards understanding the interplay between a pathogen and its host from a systems biology standpoint we focused on these 15 genes. Transcriptional profiles were obtained for each of these 15 regulators from strains grown under four different environmental conditions. These results as well as publicly available transcriptional profiles were analyzed using both network inference and cluster analysis algorithms. The analysis predicts a regulatory network in which all 15 regulators control a specific set of genes necessary for Salmonella to cause systemic infection. We tested the regulatory model by expressing a subset of the regulators in trans and monitoring transcription of 7 known virulence factors located within Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2). These experiments validated the regulatory model and showed that, for these 7 genes, the response regulator SsrB and the marR type regulator SlyA co-regulate in a regulatory cascade by integrating multiple signals.

  9. Experimental Adaptation of Salmonella typhimurium to Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Annika I.; Kugelberg, Elisabeth; Berg, Otto G.; Andersson, Dan I.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental evolution is a powerful approach to study the dynamics and mechanisms of bacterial niche specialization. By serial passage in mice, we evolved 18 independent lineages of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 and examined the rate and extent of adaptation to a mainly reticuloendothelial host environment. Bacterial mutation rates and population sizes were varied by using wild-type and DNA repair-defective mutator (mutS) strains with normal and high mutation rates, respectively, and by varying...

  10. Salmonella Typhimurium infection in the porcine intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schauser, Kirsten; Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Larsson, Lars-Inge

    2005-01-01

    The normal intestinal epithelium is renewed with a turnover rate of 3-5 days. During Salmonella infection increased cell loss is observed, possibly as a result of programmed cell death (PCD). We have, therefore, studied the effects of Salmonella Typhimurium infection on three elements involved...... in scattered epithelial cells and the number of positive cells increased with increasing times of exposure to Salmonella (P

  11. Whole genome sequencing of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolated from humans and poultry in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagambèga, Assèta; Lienemann, Taru; Frye, Jonathan G; Barro, Nicolas; Haukka, Kaisa

    2018-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Salmonella is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. The aim of this study was to characterize and compare multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates from patients and poultry feces. Salmonella strains were isolated from poultry and patients using standard bacteriological methods described in previous studies. The strains were serotype according to Kaufmann-White scheme and tested for antibiotic susceptibility to 12 different antimicrobial agents using the disk diffusion method. The whole genome of the S. Typhimurium isolates was analyzed using Illumina technology and compared with 20 isolates of S. Typhimurium for which the ST has been deposited in a global MLST database.The ResFinder Web server was used to find the antibiotic resistance genes from whole genome sequencing (WGS) data. For comparative genomics, publicly available complete and draft genomes of different S. Typhimurium laboratory-adapted strains were downloaded from GenBank. All the tested Salmonella serotype Typhimurium were multiresistant to five commonly used antibiotics (ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamide, and trimethoprim). The multilocus sequence type ST313 was detected from all the strains. Our sequences were very similar to S. Typhimurium ST313 strain D23580 isolated from a patient with invasive non-typhoid Salmonella (NTS) infection in Malawi, also located in sub-Saharan Africa. The use of ResFinder web server on the whole genome of the strains showed a resistance to aminoglycoside associated with carriage of the following resistances genes: strA , strB , and aadA1 ; resistance to β-lactams associated with carriage of a bla TEM-1B genes; resistance to phenicol associated with carriage of catA1 gene; resistance to sulfonamide associated with carriage of sul1 and sul2 genes; resistance to tetracycline associated with carriage of tet B gene; and resistance to trimethoprim associated to dfrA1 gene

  12. Effect of irradiation on kinetic behavior of Salmonella Typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus in lettuce and damage of bacterial cell envelope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Won-Bo; Je, Gil-Soo; Kim, Kyeongyeol; Mtenga, Adelard B.; Lee, Won-Gyeong; Song, Jeong-Un; Chung, Duck-Hwa; Yoon, Yohan

    2012-05-01

    This study evaluated effect of gamma irradiation on survival of Salmonella Typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus on lettuce and damage of cell envelope. S. Typhimurium and S. aureus were inoculated on red leaf lettuce, and they were irradiated at 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, and 3 kGy, and the samples were then stored at 7 and 25 °C for 7 days. Survival of S. Typhimurium and S. aureus were enumerated on xylose lysine deoxycholate agar and Baird-Parker agar, respectively. D10 value (dose required to reduce 1 log CFU/leaf) was calculated, and kinetic parameters (maximum specific growth rate; μmax and lag phase duration; LPD) were calculated by the modified Gompertz model. In addition, cell envelope damage of the pathogens was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). D10 values were 0.35 and 0.33 kGy for S. Typhimurium and S. aureus, respectively. During storage at 7 °C, S. Typhimurium and S. aureus had significant (Pirradiated samples up to about 2.5 and 4 log CFU/leaf at 0.42 and 1.28 log CFU/leaf/day of μmax, respectively. At 25 °C, cell counts of S. Typhimurium and S. aureus on the samples irradiated at 0 and 0.5 kGy increased (Pirradiated at 1.5 and 3 kGy showed disrupted cell membrane. These results indicate that gamma irradiation could be a useful decontamination technology to improve food safety of lettuce by destroying cells of S. Typhimurium and S. aureus.

  13. Removal of the phage-shock protein PspB causes reduction of virulence in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium independently of NRAMP1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallrodt, Inke; Jelsbak, Lotte; Thomsen, Line E.

    2014-01-01

    , we investigated the contribution of individual psp genes to virulence of S. Typhimurium. Interestingly, deletion of the whole pspA-D set of genes caused attenuation in both NRAMP1(+) and NRAMP1(-) mice, indicating that one or more of the psp genes contribute to virulence independently of NRAMP1......IV-induced secretin stress. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that removal of PspB reduces virulence in S. Typhimurium independently of host NRAMP1 expression, demonstrating that PspB has roles in intra-host survival distinct from the reported contributions of PspA....

  14. CHD5 is required for neurogenesis and has a dual role in facilitating gene expression and polycomb gene repression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egan, Chris M; Nyman, Ulrika; Skotte, Julie

    2013-01-01

    , the chromodomains of CHD5 directly bind H3K27me3 and are required for neuronal differentiation. In the absence of CHD5, a subgroup of Polycomb-repressed genes becomes aberrantly expressed. These findings provide insights into the regulatory role of CHD5 during neurogenesis and suggest how inactivation...

  15. Arginine-dependent acid resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieboom, J.; Abee, T.

    2006-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium does not survive a pH 2.5 acid challenge under conditions similar to those used for Escherichia coli (J. W. Foster, Nat. Rev. Microbiol. 2:898-907, 2004). Here, we provide evidence that S. enterica serovar Typhimurium can display arginine-dependent acid

  16. Reduction of Salmonella Typhimurium by Fermentation Metabolites of Diamond V Original XPC in an in vitro Anaerobic Mixed Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Rubinelli1

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fermentation metabolites of Diamond V Original XPCTM (XPC, a biological product derived from yeast fermentation, were evaluated for their ability to reduce the Salmonella Typhimurium population using an in vitro mixed anaerobic culture system containing cecal microbiota to simulate chicken hindgut conditions. Four different samples were prepared: anaerobic mixed culture containing 1 feed only, 2 cecal only (ceca were harvested from 42 days old broiler chickens, 3 feed and cecal contents, and 4 feed, cecal contents, and 1% XPC. Two experimental conditions were investigated: Group 1, in which the cecal content was added at the same time as a S. Typhimurium marker strain and Group 2, in which the cecal content was pre-incubated for 24 h prior to the inoculation with the S. Typhimurium marker strain. The mixed cultures were incubated anaerobically at 37°C and the S. Typhimurium marker strain was enumerated at 0, 24, and 48 h. Analysis of short chain fatty acids was also conducted for 24 h. In the Group 1 experiment, adding XPC did not exhibit significant reduction of S. Typhimurium. However, the presence of XPC resulted in rapid reduction of S. Typhimurium in Group 2. S. Typhimurium was reduced from 6.81 log10 CFU/ml (0 h to 3.73 log10 CFU/ml and 1.19 log10 CFU/ml after 24 and 48 h, respectively. These levels were also 2.47 log10 and 2.72 log10 lower than the S. Typhimurium level recovered from the control culture with feed and cecal contents but without XPC. Based on these results, it appears that the ability of XPC to reduce S. Typhimurium requires the presence of the cecal microbiota. Short chain fatty acid analysis indicated acetate and butyrate concentrations of cultures containing XPC were 2 fold greater than the control cultures by 24 h of anaerobic growth. Results from the present study suggest that dietary inclusion of XPC may influence cecal microbiota fermentation, and has the potential to reduce Salmonella in the cecum. Implications of

  17. Characterization of a novel Salmonella typhimurium chitinase which hydrolyzes chitin, chitooligosaccharides and an N-acetyllactosamine conjugate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tanja; Petersen, Bent O.; Storgaard, Birgit Groth

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella contain genes annotated as chitinases; however, their chitinolytic activities have never been verified. We now demonstrate such an activity for a chitinase assigned to glycoside hydrolase family 18 encoded by the SL0018 (chiA) gene in Salmonella enterica Typhimurium SL1344. A C...

  18. Expression of the putA gene encoding proline dehydrogenase from Rhodobacter capsulatus is independent of NtrC regulation but requires an Lrp-like activator protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuntje, B; Masepohl, B; Klipp, W

    1995-11-01

    Four Rhodobacter capsulatus mutants unable to grow with proline as the sole nitrogen source were isolated by random Tn5 mutagenesis. The Tn5 insertions were mapped within two adjacent chromosomal EcoRI fragments. DNA sequence analysis of this region revealed three open reading frames designated selD, putR, and putA. The putA gene codes for a protein of 1,127 amino acid residues which is homologous to PutA of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli. The central part of R. capsulatus PutA showed homology to proline dehydrogenase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Put1) and Drosophila melanogaster (SlgA). The C-terminal part of PutA exhibited homology to Put2 (pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase) of S. cerevisiae and to aldehyde dehydrogenases from different organisms. Therefore, it seems likely that in R. capsulatus, as in enteric bacteria, both enzymatic steps for proline degradation are catalyzed by a single polypeptide (PutA). The deduced amino acid sequence of PutR (154 amino acid residues) showed homology to the small regulatory proteins Lrp, BkdR, and AsnC. The putR gene, which is divergently transcribed from putA, is essential for proline utilization and codes for an activator of putA expression. The expression of putA was induced by proline and was not affected by ammonia or other amino acids. In addition, putA expression was autoregulated by PutA itself. Mutations in glnB, nifR1 (ntrC), and NifR4 (ntrA encoding sigma 54) had no influence on put gene expression. The open reading frame located downstream of R. capsulatus putR exhibited strong homology to the E. coli selD gene, which is involved in selenium metabolism. R. capsulatus selD mutants exhibited a Put+ phenotype, demonstrating that selD is required neither for viability nor for proline utilization.

  19. An Outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium infections in Denmark, Norway and Sweden, 2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, T; Sørensen, Gitte; Forshell, L P

    2009-01-01

    In November-December 2008, Norway and Denmark independently identified outbreaks of Salmonella Typhimurium infections characterised in the multiple-locus variable number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA) by a distinct profile. Outbreak investigations were initiated independently in the two countr......-border outbreaks. Differences in legal requirements for food safety in neighbouring countries may be a challenge in terms of communication with consumers in areas where cross-border shopping is common....

  20. Determination method of inactivating minimal dose of gama radiation for Salmonella typhimurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, E.S.; Campos, H. de; Silva, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    A method for determination of minimal inactivating dose (MID) with Salmonella typhimurium is presented. This is a more efficient way to improve the irradiated vaccines. The MID found for S. thyphimurium 6.616 by binomial test was 0.55 MR. The method used allows to get a definite value for MID and requires less consumption of material, work and time in comparison with the usual procedure [pt

  1. Gene Regulation and Survival under Hypoxia Requires Starch Availability and Metabolism1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Plants respond to hypoxia, often caused by submergence, by expressing a specific set of genes that contribute to acclimation to this unfavorable environmental condition. Genes induced by low oxygen include those encoding enzymes for carbohydrate metabolism and fermentation, pathways that are required for survival. Sugar availability is therefore of crucial importance for energy production under hypoxia. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants require starch for surviving submergence as well as for ensuring the rapid induction of genes encoding enzymes required for anaerobic metabolism. The starchless pgm mutant is highly susceptible to submergence and also fails to induce anaerobic genes at the level of the wild type. Treating wild-type plants under conditions inducing sugar starvation results in a weak induction of alcohol dehydrogenase and other anaerobic genes. Induction of gene expression under hypoxia requires transcription factors belonging to group VII ethylene response factors (ERF-VII) that, together with plant Cys oxidases, act as an oxygen-sensing mechanism. We show that repression of this pathway by sugar starvation occurs downstream of the hypoxia-dependent stabilization of ERF-VII proteins and independently of the energy sensor protein kinases SnRK1.1 (SNF1-related kinase 1.1). PMID:29084901

  2. Gene Regulation and Survival under Hypoxia Requires Starch Availability and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loreti, Elena; Valeri, Maria Cristina; Novi, Giacomo; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2018-02-01

    Plants respond to hypoxia, often caused by submergence, by expressing a specific set of genes that contribute to acclimation to this unfavorable environmental condition. Genes induced by low oxygen include those encoding enzymes for carbohydrate metabolism and fermentation, pathways that are required for survival. Sugar availability is therefore of crucial importance for energy production under hypoxia. Here, we show that Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) plants require starch for surviving submergence as well as for ensuring the rapid induction of genes encoding enzymes required for anaerobic metabolism. The starchless pgm mutant is highly susceptible to submergence and also fails to induce anaerobic genes at the level of the wild type. Treating wild-type plants under conditions inducing sugar starvation results in a weak induction of alcohol dehydrogenase and other anaerobic genes. Induction of gene expression under hypoxia requires transcription factors belonging to group VII ethylene response factors (ERF-VII) that, together with plant Cys oxidases, act as an oxygen-sensing mechanism. We show that repression of this pathway by sugar starvation occurs downstream of the hypoxia-dependent stabilization of ERF-VII proteins and independently of the energy sensor protein kinases SnRK1.1 (SNF1-related kinase 1.1). © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Identification of potential drug targets in Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium using metabolic modelling and experimental validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartman, Hassan B.; Fell, David A.; Rossell, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium is an established model organism for Gram-negative, intracellular pathogens. Owing to the rapid spread of resistance to antibiotics among this group of pathogens, new approaches to identify suitable target proteins are required. Based on the genome sequence of ...

  4. Rpr1, a gene required for Rpg1-dependent resistance to stem rust in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Fetch, T; Nirmala, J; Schmierer, D; Brueggeman, R; Steffenson, B; Kleinhofs, A

    2006-09-01

    Rpg1 is a stem rust resistance gene that has protected barley from severe losses for over 60 years in the US and Canada. It confers resistance to many, but not all, pathotypes of the stem rust fungus Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici. A fast neutron induced deletion mutant, showing susceptibility to stem rust pathotype Pgt-MCC, was identified in barley cv. Morex, which carries Rpg1. Genetic and Rpg1 mRNA and protein expression level analyses showed that the mutation was a suppressor of Rpg1 and was designated Rpr1 (Required for P. graminis resistance). Genome-wide expression profiling, using the Affymetrix Barley1 GeneChip containing approximately 22,840 probe sets, was conducted with Morex and the rpr1 mutant. Of the genes represented on the Barley1 microarray, 20 were up-regulated and 33 were down-regulated by greater than twofold in the mutant, while the Rpg1 mRNA level remained constant. Among the highly down-regulated genes (greater than fourfold), genomic PCR, RT-PCR and Southern analyses identified that three genes (Contig4901_s_at, HU03D17U_s_at, and Contig7061_s_at), were deleted in the rpr1 mutant. These three genes mapped to chromosome 4(4H) bin 5 and co-segregated with the rpr1-mediated susceptible phenotype. The loss of resistance was presumed to be due to a mutation in one or more of these genes. However, the possibility exists that there are other genes within the deletions, which are not represented on the Barley1 GeneChip. The Rpr1 gene was not required for Rpg5- and rpg4-mediated stem rust resistance, indicating that it shows specificity to the Rpg1-mediated resistance pathway.

  5. Complex regulatory network encompassing the Csr, c-di-GMP and motility systems of Salmonella Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Kristina; Edwards, Adrianne N; Ahmad, Irfan; Romeo, Tony; Römling, Ute; Melefors, Ojar

    2010-02-01

    Bacterial survival depends on the ability to switch between sessile and motile lifestyles in response to changing environmental conditions. In many species, this switch is governed by (3'-5')-cyclic-diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), a signalling molecule, which is metabolized by proteins containing GGDEF and/or EAL domains. Salmonella Typhimurium contains 20 such proteins. Here, we show that the RNA-binding protein CsrA regulates the expression of eight genes encoding GGDEF, GGDEF-EAL and EAL domain proteins. CsrA bound directly to the mRNA leaders of five of these genes, suggesting that it may regulate these genes post-transcriptionally. The c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterase STM3611, which reciprocally controls flagella function and production of biofilm matrix components, was regulated by CsrA binding to the mRNA, but was also indirectly regulated by CsrA through the FlhDC/FliA flagella cascade and STM1344. STM1344 is an unconventional (c-di-GMP-inactive) EAL domain protein, recently identified as a negative regulator of flagella gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that CsrA directly downregulates expression of STM1344, which in turn regulates STM3611 through fliA and thus reciprocally controls motility and biofilm factors. Altogether, our data reveal that the concerted and complex regulation of several genes encoding GGDEF/EAL domain proteins allows CsrA to control the motility-sessility switch in S. Typhimurium at multiple levels.

  6. The Aspergillus flavus Homeobox Gene, hbx1, Is Required for Development and Aflatoxin Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W. Cary

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Homeobox proteins, a class of well conserved transcription factors, regulate the expression of targeted genes, especially those involved in development. In filamentous fungi, homeobox genes are required for normal conidiogenesis and fruiting body formation. In the present study, we identified eight homeobox (hbx genes in the aflatoxin-producing ascomycete, Aspergillus flavus, and determined their respective role in growth, conidiation and sclerotial production. Disruption of seven of the eight genes had little to no effect on fungal growth and development. However, disruption of the homeobox gene AFLA_069100, designated as hbx1, in two morphologically different A. flavus strains, CA14 and AF70, resulted in complete loss of production of conidia and sclerotia as well as aflatoxins B1 and B2, cyclopiazonic acid and aflatrem. Microscopic examination showed that the Δhbx1 mutants did not produce conidiophores. The inability of Δhbx1 mutants to produce conidia was related to downregulation of brlA (bristle and abaA (abacus, regulatory genes for conidiophore development. These mutants also had significant downregulation of the aflatoxin pathway biosynthetic genes aflC, aflD, aflM and the cluster-specific regulatory gene, aflR. Our results demonstrate that hbx1 not only plays a significant role in controlling A. flavus development but is also critical for the production of secondary metabolites, such as aflatoxins.

  7. A regulatory gene (ECO-orf4) required for ECO-0501 biosynthesis in Amycolatopsis orientalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yang; Huang, He; Zhu, Li; Luo, Minyu; Chen, Daijie

    2014-02-01

    ECO-0501 is a novel linear polyene antibiotic, which was discovered from Amycolatopsis orientalis. Recent study of ECO-0501 biosynthesis pathway revealed the presence of regulatory gene: ECO-orf4. The A. orientalis ECO-orf4 gene from the ECO-0501 biosynthesis cluster was analyzed, and its deduced protein (ECO-orf4) was found to have amino acid sequence homology with large ATP-binding regulators of the LuxR (LAL) family regulators. Database comparison revealed two hypothetical domains, a LuxR-type helix-turn-helix (HTH) DNA binding motif near the C-terminal and an N-terminal nucleotide triphosphate (NTP) binding motif included. Deletion of the corresponding gene (ECO-orf4) resulted in complete loss of ECO-0501 production. Complementation by one copy of intact ECO-orf4 restored the polyene biosynthesis demonstrating that ECO-orf4 is required for ECO-0501 biosynthesis. The results of overexpression ECO-orf4 on ECO-0501 production indicated that it is a positive regulatory gene. Gene expression analysis by reverse transcription PCR of the ECO-0501 gene cluster showed that the transcription of ECO-orf4 correlates with that of genes involved in polyketide biosynthesis. These results demonstrated that ECO-orf4 is a pathway-specific positive regulatory gene that is essential for ECO-0501 biosynthesis. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. The Aspergillus flavus Homeobox Gene, hbx1, is Required for Development and Aflatoxin Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Jeffrey W; Harris-Coward, Pamela; Scharfenstein, Leslie; Mack, Brian M; Chang, Perng-Kuang; Wei, Qijian; Lebar, Matthew; Carter-Wientjes, Carol; Majumdar, Rajtilak; Mitra, Chandrani; Banerjee, Sourav; Chanda, Anindya

    2017-10-12

    Homeobox proteins, a class of well conserved transcription factors, regulate the expression of targeted genes, especially those involved in development. In filamentous fungi, homeobox genes are required for normal conidiogenesis and fruiting body formation. In the present study, we identified eight homeobox ( hbx ) genes in the aflatoxin-producing ascomycete, Aspergillus flavus , and determined their respective role in growth, conidiation and sclerotial production. Disruption of seven of the eight genes had little to no effect on fungal growth and development. However, disruption of the homeobox gene AFLA_069100, designated as hbx1 , in two morphologically different A. flavus strains, CA14 and AF70, resulted in complete loss of production of conidia and sclerotia as well as aflatoxins B₁ and B₂, cyclopiazonic acid and aflatrem. Microscopic examination showed that the Δ hbx1 mutants did not produce conidiophores. The inability of Δ hbx1 mutants to produce conidia was related to downregulation of brlA (bristle) and abaA (abacus), regulatory genes for conidiophore development. These mutants also had significant downregulation of the aflatoxin pathway biosynthetic genes aflC , aflD , aflM and the cluster-specific regulatory gene, aflR . Our results demonstrate that hbx1 not only plays a significant role in controlling A. flavus development but is also critical for the production of secondary metabolites, such as aflatoxins.

  9. NHR-23 dependent collagen and hedgehog-related genes required for molting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouns, Nathaniel A.; Nakielna, Johana; Behensky, Frantisek; Krause, Michael W.; Kostrouch, Zdenek; Kostrouchova, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → NHR-23 is a critical regulator of nematode development and molting. → The manuscript characterizes the loss-of-function phenotype of an nhr-23 mutant. → Whole genome expression analysis identifies new potential targets of NHR-23. → Hedgehog-related genes are identified as NHR-23 dependent genes. → New link between sterol mediated signaling and regulation by NHR-23 is found. -- Abstract: NHR-23, a conserved member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors, is required for normal development in Caenorhabditis elegans where it plays a critical role in growth and molting. In a search for NHR-23 dependent genes, we performed whole genome comparative expression microarrays on both control and nhr-23 inhibited synchronized larvae. Genes that decreased in response to nhr-23 RNAi included several collagen genes. Unexpectedly, several hedgehog-related genes were also down-regulated after nhr-23 RNAi. A homozygous nhr-23 deletion allele was used to confirm the RNAi knockdown phenotypes and the changes in gene expression. Our results indicate that NHR-23 is a critical co-regulator of functionally linked genes involved in growth and molting and reveal evolutionary parallels among the ecdysozoa.

  10. NHR-23 dependent collagen and hedgehog-related genes required for molting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouns, Nathaniel A.; Nakielna, Johana; Behensky, Frantisek [Laboratory of Model Systems, Institute of Inherited Metabolic Disorders, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Krause, Michael W. [Laboratory of Molecular Biology, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kostrouch, Zdenek [Laboratory of Model Systems, Institute of Inherited Metabolic Disorders, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Kostrouchova, Marta, E-mail: marta.kostrouchova@lf1.cuni.cz [Laboratory of Model Systems, Institute of Inherited Metabolic Disorders, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} NHR-23 is a critical regulator of nematode development and molting. {yields} The manuscript characterizes the loss-of-function phenotype of an nhr-23 mutant. {yields} Whole genome expression analysis identifies new potential targets of NHR-23. {yields} Hedgehog-related genes are identified as NHR-23 dependent genes. {yields} New link between sterol mediated signaling and regulation by NHR-23 is found. -- Abstract: NHR-23, a conserved member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors, is required for normal development in Caenorhabditis elegans where it plays a critical role in growth and molting. In a search for NHR-23 dependent genes, we performed whole genome comparative expression microarrays on both control and nhr-23 inhibited synchronized larvae. Genes that decreased in response to nhr-23 RNAi included several collagen genes. Unexpectedly, several hedgehog-related genes were also down-regulated after nhr-23 RNAi. A homozygous nhr-23 deletion allele was used to confirm the RNAi knockdown phenotypes and the changes in gene expression. Our results indicate that NHR-23 is a critical co-regulator of functionally linked genes involved in growth and molting and reveal evolutionary parallels among the ecdysozoa.

  11. ClpP deletion causes attenuation of Salmonella Typhimurium virulence through mis-regulation of RpoS and indirect control of CsrA and the SPI genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gitte Maegaard; Olsen, John E.; Aabo, Søren

    2013-01-01

    the proteolytic component ClpP, the stationary phase regulator RpoS and the carbon-storage regulator CsrA. However, the mechanism behind the ClpP regulation is not fully understood. To elucidate this we examined differentially expressed genes in a ΔclpP mutant compared with WT using global transcriptomic analysis...

  12. [Epidemiologic study of 2 S. typhimurium outbreaks using plasmid fingerprints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, A; Breer, C; Schopfer, K

    1989-04-05

    An outbreak of salmonellosis in an old people's home is reported. The infectious agent, S. typhi-murium, was isolated not only from several inmates but also from sick cows of the farm belonging to the home, in animal feed, from employees of the local butcher's shop, and finally in sludge from the local sewage plant. Plasmid analysis provided evidence of a common origin for the isolated S. typhi-murium strains. The incriminated strains harboured, together with two low-molecular-weight plasmids, a plasmid of approximately 50 Mdal, which was also demonstrated in some other S. typhi-murium strains isolated from clinical cases in the area around St. Gallen.

  13. eRNAs are required for p53-dependent enhancer activity and gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Carlos A; Drost, Jarno; Wijchers, Patrick J; van de Werken, Harmen; de Wit, Elzo; Oude Vrielink, Joachim A F; Elkon, Ran; Melo, Sónia A; Léveillé, Nicolas; Kalluri, Raghu; de Laat, Wouter; Agami, Reuven

    2013-02-07

    Binding within or nearby target genes involved in cell proliferation and survival enables the p53 tumor suppressor gene to regulate their transcription and cell-cycle progression. Using genome-wide chromatin-binding profiles, we describe binding of p53 also to regions located distantly from any known p53 target gene. Interestingly, many of these regions possess conserved p53-binding sites and all known hallmarks of enhancer regions. We demonstrate that these p53-bound enhancer regions (p53BERs) indeed contain enhancer activity and interact intrachromosomally with multiple neighboring genes to convey long-distance p53-dependent transcription regulation. Furthermore, p53BERs produce, in a p53-dependent manner, enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) that are required for efficient transcriptional enhancement of interacting target genes and induction of a p53-dependent cell-cycle arrest. Thus, our results ascribe transcription enhancement activity to p53 with the capacity to regulate multiple genes from a single genomic binding site. Moreover, eRNA production from p53BERs is required for efficient p53 transcription enhancement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A genetic screen identifies interferon-α effector genes required to suppress hepatitis C virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Dahlene N; Brisac, Cynthia; John, Sinu P; Huang, Yi-Wen; Chin, Christopher R; Xie, Tiao; Zhao, Hong; Jilg, Nikolaus; Zhang, Leiliang; Chevaliez, Stephane; Wambua, Daniel; Lin, Wenyu; Peng, Lee; Chung, Raymond T; Brass, Abraham L

    2013-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of end-stage liver disease. Interferon-α (IFNα) is an important component of anti-HCV therapy; it up-regulates transcription of IFN-stimulated genes, many of which have been investigated for their antiviral effects. However, all of the genes required for the antiviral function of IFNα (IFN effector genes [IEGs]) are not known. IEGs include not only IFN-stimulated genes, but other nontranscriptionally induced genes that are required for the antiviral effect of IFNα. In contrast to candidate approaches based on analyses of messenger RNA (mRNA) expression, identification of IEGs requires a broad functional approach. We performed an unbiased genome-wide small interfering RNA screen to identify IEGs that inhibit HCV. Huh7.5.1 hepatoma cells were transfected with small interfering RNAs incubated with IFNα and then infected with JFH1 HCV. Cells were stained using HCV core antibody, imaged, and analyzed to determine the percent infection. Candidate IEGs detected in the screen were validated and analyzed further. The screen identified 120 previously unreported IEGs. From these, we more fully evaluated the following: asparagine-linked glycosylation 10 homolog (yeast, α-1,2-glucosyltransferase); butyrylcholinesterase; dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 (CD26, adenosine deaminase complexing protein 2); glucokinase (hexokinase 4) regulator; guanylate cyclase 1, soluble, β 3; MYST histone acetyltransferase 1; protein phosphatase 3 (formerly 2B), catalytic subunit, β isoform; peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-γ-DBD-interacting protein 1; and solute carrier family 27 (fatty acid transporter), member 2; and demonstrated that they enabled IFNα-mediated suppression of HCV at multiple steps of its life cycle. Expression of these genes had more potent effects against flaviviridae because a subset was required for IFNα to suppress dengue virus but not influenza A virus. In addition, many of the host genes detected in this

  15. Sequence analysis of putative swrW gene required for surfactant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2012-07-17

    Jul 17, 2012 ... Sequence analysis of putative swrW gene required for surfactant serrawettin W1 production from Serratia marcescens. Monabel May N. Apao*, Franco G. Teves and Ma. Reina Suzette B. Madamba. Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science and Mathematics, MSU-Iligan Institute of Technology, ...

  16. Commentary: When does understanding phenotypic evolution require identification of the underlying genes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausher, Mark D; Delph, Lynda F

    2015-07-01

    Adaptive evolution is fundamentally a genetic process. Over the past three decades, characterizing the genes underlying adaptive phenotypic change has revealed many important aspects of evolutionary change. At the same time, natural selection is often fundamentally an ecological process that can often be studied without identifying the genes underlying the variation on which it acts. This duality has given rise to disagreement about whether, and under what circumstances, it is necessary to identify specific genes associated with phenotypic change. This issue is of practical concern, especially for researchers who study nonmodel organisms, because of the often enormous cost and labor required to "go for the genes." We here consider a number of situations and questions commonly addressed by researchers. Our conclusion is that although gene identification can be crucial for answering some questions, there are others for which definitive answers can be obtained without finding underlying genes. It should thus not be assumed that considerations of "empirical completeness" dictate that gene identification is always desirable. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  17. Experimental Salmonella typhimurium infections in rats. I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougen, H P; Jensen, E T; Klausen, B

    1989-01-01

    The course of experimentally induced Salmonella typhimurium infection was studied in three groups of inbred LEW rats: homozygous +/+, athymic rnu/rnu and isogeneic thymus-grafted rnu/rnu rats. In the first experiment the animals were inoculated intraperitoneally with 10(8) bacteria and all animals...... became severely septicemic and died within a week of inoculation, irrespective of presence or absence of thymus. In the second experiment the animals were inoculated with 10(6) bacteria, and both euthymic and thymus-grafted animals responded with high titres of anti bacterial antibodies while these were...... very low in the athymic nude animals. Polyclonal antibody production was only observed in the euthymic animals and only regarding IgG. Athymic rats were not able to clear the infection, while the thymus-grafted animals reacted like euthymic rats: Very few animals housed the bacteria four weeks after...

  18. Effect of Pulsed Electric Field on Membrane Lipids and Oxidative Injury of Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Ou; Zeng, Xin-An; Brennan, Charles S; Han, Zhong

    2016-08-22

    Salmonella typhimurium cells were subjected to pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment at 25 kV/cm for 0-4 ms to investigate the effect of PEF on the cytoplasmic membrane lipids and oxidative injury of cells. Results indicated that PEF treatment induced a decrease of membrane fluidity of Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimuriumi), possibly due to the alterations of fatty acid biosynthesis-associated gene expressions (down-regulation of cfa and fabA gene expressions and the up-regulation of fabD gene expression), which, in turn, modified the composition of membrane lipid (decrease in the content ratio of unsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids). In addition, oxidative injury induced by PEF treatment was associated with an increase in the content of malondialdehyde. The up-regulation of cytochrome bo oxidase gene expressions (cyoA, cyoB, and cyoC) indicated that membrane damage was induced by PEF treatment, which was related to the repairing mechanism of alleviating the oxidative injury caused by PEF treatment. Based on these results, we achieved better understanding of microbial injury induced by PEF, suggesting that micro-organisms tend to decrease membrane fluidity in response to PEF treatment and, thus, a greater membrane fluidity might improve the efficiency of PEF treatment to inactivate micro-organisms.

  19. Study of Salmonella typhimurium mutagenicity assay of (E ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Study of Salmonella typhimurium mutagenicity assay of (E)-piplartine by the Ames test. AA Morandim-Giannetti, F Cotinguiba, LO Regasini, MC Frigieri, EA Varanda, A Coqueiro, MJ Kato, VS Bolzani, M Furlan ...

  20. Phenotypic and molecular detection of multi-drug resistant S a l m o n e l l a Enteritidis, S a l m o n e l l a Typhimurium and Salmonella species in retail raw beef and chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseline Ekiomado Uzeh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To detect Salmonella species and its’ serovars, Salmonella Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium in retail raw beef and chicken in Nigerian markets. Methods: A total of 100 samples, including 50 beef and 50 chicken were purchased from retailers in Lagos, Nigeria. Presence of Salmonella species and its’ serovars, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium in the beef and chicken were assessed phenotypically and by PCR assay. Antibiotic susceptibility test of the isolates was done. Primers were from fliC and sefA genes of Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis, respectively. Results: From PCR analysis, fliC gene (559 bp was amplified in one beef sample and was positive for S. Typhimurium while sefA gene (312 bp was amplified in one chicken and three beef samples and were positive for S. Enteritidis. In all, 1% of total meat had S. Typhimurium while 4% and 18% were contaminated with S. Enteritidis and Salmonella spp., respectively. For beef, 2% was contaminated with S. Typhimurium, 6% with S. Enteritidis and 26% with Salmonella spp. In chicken 2% was contaminated with S. Enteritidis, 12% with Salmonella spp. A total of 23 isolates were obtained by ERIC-PCR. All Salmonella spp. were 100% resistant to amoxicillin and amoxicillin-clavulanate. Strains of S. Enteritidis were also resistant to cotrimoxazole, nitrofurantoin, nalidixic acid, gentamycin and tetracycline. Conclusions: The presence of S. Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis and Salmonella spp. in retail raw beef and chicken and their multi-drug resistance is of health significance and great concern because the two serovars are commonly implicated in human salmonellosis.

  1. Study of Salmonella Typhimurium infection in laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil eChousalkar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Members of Salmonella enterica are frequently involved in egg and egg product related human food poisoning outbreaks worldwide. In Australia, Salmonella Typhimurium is frequently involved in egg and egg product related foodborne illness and Salmonella Mbandaka has also been found to be a contaminant of the layer farm environment. The ability possessed by Salmonella Enteritidis to colonise reproductive organs and contaminate developing eggs has been well described. However, there are few studies investigating this ability for Salmonella Typhimurium. The hypothesis of this study was that the Salmonella Typhimurium can colonise the gut for a prolonged period of time and that horizontal infection through feces is the main route of egg contamination. At 14 weeks of age hens were orally infected with either S. Typhimurium PT 9 or S. Typhimurium PT 9 and Salmonella Mbandaka. Salmonella shedding in feces and eggs was monitored for 15 weeks post infection. Egg shell surface and internal contents of eggs laid by infected hens were cultured independently for detection of Salmonella spp. The mean Salmonella load in feces ranged from 1.54 to 63.35 and 0.31 to 98.38 most probable number/g (MPN/g in the S. Typhimurium and S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka group respectively. No correlation was found between mean fecal Salmonella load and frequency of egg shell contamination. Egg shell contamination was higher in S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka infected group (7.2% Typhimurium, 14.1% Mbandaka compared to birds infected with S. Typhimurium (5.66% however, co-infection had no significant impact on egg contamination by S. Typhimurium. Throughout the study Salmonella was not recovered from internal contents of eggs laid by hens. Salmonella was isolated from different segments of oviduct of hens from both the groups, however pathology was not observed on microscopic examination. This study investigated Salmonella shedding for up to 15 weeks p.i which is a longer period of

  2. Variation in genes required for normal mitosis and risk of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, J E; Wang, X; Goode, E L; Pankratz, V S; Fredericksen, Z S; Vierkant, R A; Pharoah, P D P; Cerhan, J R; Couch, F J

    2010-01-01

    The down-regulation of genes involved in normal cell division can cause aberrant mitoses and increased cell death. Surviving cells exhibit aneuploidy and/or polyploidy. Since mitotic disruption has been linked with tumor development and progression, alterations in the expression or activity of these mitotic regulators may contribute to breast tumor formation. We evaluated associations between common inherited variation in these genes and breast cancer risk. Two hundred and five tagging and candidate functional single nucleotide polymorphisms in 30 genes required for normal cell division were genotyped in 798 breast cancer cases and 843 controls from the Mayo Clinic breast cancer study. Two variants in EIF3A (rs10787899 and rs3824830; P cancer along with single variants in RRM2, PSCD3, C11orf51, CDC16, SNW1, MFAP1, and CDC2 (P cancer. The observed associations between breast cancer risk and genetic variation in the SART1 and EIF3A genes that are required for maintenance of normal mitosis suggest a direct role for these genes in the development of breast cancer.

  3. tlpA gene expression is required for arginine and bicarbonate chemotaxis in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerda, Oscar A; Núñez-Villena, Felipe; Soto, Sarita E; Ugalde, José Manuel; López-Solís, Remigio; Toledo, Héctor

    2011-01-01

    About half of the human population is infected with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium causing gastritis, peptic ulcer and progression to gastric cancer. Chemotaxis and flagellar motility are required for colonization and persistence of H. pylori in the gastric mucus layer. It is not completely clear which chemical gradients are used by H. pylori to maintain its position. TlpA, a chemotaxis receptor for arginine/ bicarbonate, has been identified. This study aimed to find out whether tlpA gene expression is required for the chemotactic response to arginine/bicarbonate. Wild-type motile H. pylori ATCC 700392 and H. pylori ATCC 43504, a strain having an interrupted tlpA gene, were used. Also, a tlpA-knockout mutant of H. pylori 700392 (H. pylori 700-tlpA::cat) was produced by homologous recombination. Expression of tlpA was assessed by a Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) assay. Chemotaxis was measured as a Relative Chemotaxis Response (RCR) by a modified capillary assay. H. pylori 700392 presented chemotaxis to arginine and sodium bicarbonate. H. pylori 700-tlpA::cat showed neither tlpA gene expression nor chemotaxis towards arginine and bicarbonate. Besides confirming that TlpA is a chemotactic receptor for arginine/bicarbonate in H. pylori, this study showed that tlpA gene expression is required for arginine/bicarbonate chemotaxis.

  4. tlpA gene expression is required for arginine and bicarbonate chemotaxis in Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar A Cerda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available About half of the human population is infected with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium causing gastritis, peptic ulcer and progression to gastric cancer. Chemotaxis and flagellar motility are required for colonization and persistence of H. pylori in the gastric mucus layer. It is not completely clear which chemical gradients are used by H. pylori to maintain its position. TlpA, a chemotaxis receptor for arginine/ bicarbonate, has been identified. This study aimed to find out whether tlpA gene expression is required for the chemotactic response to arginine/bicarbonate. Wild-type motile H. pylori ATCC 700392 and H. pylori ATCC 43504, a strain having an interrupted tlpA gene, were used. Also, a tlpA-knockout mutant of H. pylori 700392 (H. pylori 700-tlpA::cat was produced by homologous recombination. Expression of tlpA was assessed by a Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR assay. Chemotaxis was measured as a Relative Chemotaxis Response (RCR by a modified capillary assay. H. pylori 700392 presented chemotaxis to arginine and sodium bicarbonate. H. pylori 700-tlpA::cat showed neither tlpA gene expression nor chemotaxis towards arginine and bicarbonate. Besides confirming that TlpA is a chemotactic receptor for arginine/bicarbonate in H. pylori, this study showed that tlpA gene expression is required for arginine/bicarbonate chemotaxis.

  5. Bromodomain Protein BRD4 Is Required for Estrogen Receptor-Dependent Enhancer Activation and Gene Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankari Nagarajan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The estrogen receptor α (ERα controls cell proliferation and tumorigenesis by recruiting various cofactors to estrogen response elements (EREs to control gene transcription. A deeper understanding of these transcriptional mechanisms may uncover therapeutic targets for ERα-dependent cancers. We show that BRD4 regulates ERα-induced gene expression by affecting elongation-associated phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII and histone H2B monoubiquitination. Consistently, BRD4 activity is required for proliferation of ER+ breast and endometrial cancer cells and uterine growth in mice. Genome-wide studies revealed an enrichment of BRD4 on transcriptional start sites of active genes and a requirement of BRD4 for H2B monoubiquitination in the transcribed region of estrogen-responsive genes. Importantly, we demonstrate that BRD4 occupancy on distal EREs enriched for H3K27ac is required for recruitment and elongation of RNAPII on EREs and the production of ERα-dependent enhancer RNAs. These results uncover BRD4 as a central regulator of ERα function and potential therapeutic target.

  6. Cloning and properties of the Salmonella typhimurium tricarboxylate transport operon in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Widenhorn, K A; Boos, W; Somers, J M; Kay, W W

    1988-01-01

    The tricarboxylate transport operon (tctI) was cloned in Escherichia coli as a 12-kilobase (kb) fragment from an EcoRI library of the Salmonella typhimurium chromosome in lambda gtWES. It was further subcloned as a 12-kb fragment into pACYC184 and as an 8-kb fragment into pBR322. By insertional mutagenesis mediated by lambda Tn5, restriction mapping, and phenotypic testing, the tctI operon was localized to a 4.5-kb region. The tctC gene which encodes a periplasmic binding protein (C protein) ...

  7. Characterisation of streptomycin resistance determinants in Danish isolates of Salmonella typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lissi; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2000-01-01

    Fifty six Danish streptomycin (Sm) resistant isolates of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium from pigs (n=34), calves (n=3) and humans (n=19) were characterised with respect to co-resistances (14 drugs), transferability of Sm-resistance by conjugation, genetic determinants encoding Sm-resistance...... and diversity with respect to localisation of genes in the genome and DNA-sequences. Forty-six strains carried resistance(s) other than Sm-resistance. Nineteen different coresistance patterns were observed and tetracycline was the most commonly observed resistance in these patterns. In 22 of the strains, Sm-resistance...

  8. The Arabidopsis histone chaperone FACT is required for stress-induced expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfab, Alexander; Breindl, Matthias; Grasser, Klaus D

    2018-03-01

    The histone chaperone FACT is involved in the expression of genes encoding anthocyanin biosynthetic enzymes also upon induction by moderate high-light and therefore contributes to the stress-induced plant pigmentation. The histone chaperone FACT consists of the SSRP1 and SPT16 proteins and associates with transcribing RNAPII (RNAPII) along the transcribed region of genes. FACT can promote transcriptional elongation by destabilising nucleosomes in the path of RNA polymerase II, thereby facilitating efficient transcription of chromatin templates. Transcript profiling of Arabidopsis plants depleted in SSRP1 or SPT16 demonstrates that only a small subset of genes is differentially expressed relative to wild type. The majority of these genes is either up- or down-regulated in both the ssrp1 and spt16 plants. Among the down-regulated genes, those encoding enzymes of the biosynthetic pathway of the plant secondary metabolites termed anthocyanins (but not regulators of the pathway) are overrepresented. Upon exposure to moderate high-light stress several of these genes are up-regulated to a lesser extent in ssrp1/spt16 compared to wild type plants, and accordingly the mutant plants accumulate lower amounts of anthocyanin pigments. Moreover, the expression of SSRP1 and SPT16 is induced under these conditions. Therefore, our findings indicate that FACT is a novel factor required for the accumulation of anthocyanins in response to light-induction.

  9. Systematic Identification of Genes Required for Expression of Androgen Receptor Splice Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    It has several advantages over the existing ones and one of them is the ability to make a very large number (tenth of thousands) of gene knockouts...each of reporters in LNCaP and CWR22Rv1 cells, respectively. See Task 2 To identify genes required for the full length AR or AR3, we took advantage of...splicing, and are important determinants of mRNA export , localization, translation, and stability [28]. Several members of this family have been

  10. Low-Shear modeled microgravity alters the Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium stress response in an RpoS-independent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, James W.; Ott, C. Mark; Ramamurthy, Rajee; Porwollik, Steffen; McClelland, Michael; Pierson, Duane L.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2002-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that low-shear modeled microgravity (low-shear MMG) serves to enhance the virulence of a bacterial pathogen, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The Salmonella response to low-shear MMG involves a signaling pathway that we have termed the low-shear MMG stimulon, though the identities of the low-shear MMG stimulon genes and regulatory factors are not known. RpoS is the primary sigma factor required for the expression of genes that are induced upon exposure to different environmental-stress signals and is essential for virulence in mice. Since low-shear MMG induces a Salmonella acid stress response and enhances Salmonella virulence, we reasoned that RpoS would be a likely regulator of the Salmonella low-shear MMG response. Our results demonstrate that low-shear MMG provides cross-resistance to several environmental stresses in both wild-type and isogenic rpoS mutant strains. Growth under low-shear MMG decreased the generation time of both strains in minimal medium and increased the ability of both strains to survive in J774 macrophages. Using DNA microarray analysis, we found no evidence of induction of the RpoS regulon by low-shear MMG but did find that other genes were altered in expression under these conditions in both the wild-type and rpoS mutant strains. Our results indicate that, under the conditions of these studies, RpoS is not required for transmission of the signal that induces the low-shear MMG stimulon. Moreover, our studies also indicate that low-shear MMG can be added to a short list of growth conditions that can serve to preadapt an rpoS mutant for resistance to multiple environmental stresses.

  11. Allele characterization of genes required for rpg4-mediated wheat stem rust resistance identifies Rpg5 as the R gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, D; Gross, T; Brueggeman, R

    2013-11-01

    A highly virulent form of the wheat stem rust pathogen Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici race TTKSK is virulent on both wheat and barley, presenting a major threat to world food security. The recessive and temperature-sensitive rpg4 gene is the only effective source of resistance identified in barley (Hordeum vulgare) against P. graminis f. sp. tritici race TTKSK. Efforts to position clone rpg4 localized resistance to a small interval on barley chromosome 5HL, tightly linked to the rye stem rust (P. graminis f. sp. secalis) resistance (R) gene Rpg5. High-resolution genetic analysis and post-transcriptional gene silencing of the genes at the rpg4/Rpg5 locus determined that three tightly linked genes (Rpg5, HvRga1, and HvAdf3) are required together for rpg4-mediated wheat stem rust resistance. Alleles of the three genes were analyzed from a diverse set of 14 domesticated barley lines (H. vulgare) and 8 wild barley accessions (H. vulgare subsp. spontaneum) to characterize diversity that may determine incompatibility (resistance). The analysis determined that HvAdf3 and HvRga1 code for predicted functional proteins that do not appear to contain polymorphisms determining the compatible (susceptible) interactions with the wheat stem rust pathogen and were expressed at the transcriptional level from both resistant and susceptible barley lines. The HvAdf3 alleles shared 100% amino acid identity among all 22 genotypes examined. The P. graminis f. sp. tritici race QCCJ-susceptible barley lines with HvRga1 alleles containing the limited amino acid substitutions unique to the susceptible varieties also contained predicted nonfunctional rpg5 alleles. Thus, susceptibility in these lines is likely due to the nonfunctional RPG5 proteins. The Rpg5 allele analysis determined that 9 of the 13 P. graminis f. sp. tritici race QCCJ-susceptible barley lines contain alleles that either code for predicted truncated proteins as the result of a single nucleotide substitution, resulting in a

  12. Assessment of altered binding specificity of bacteriophage for ciprofloxacin-induced antibiotic-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongjin; Jo, Ara; Ding, Tian; Lee, Hyeon-Yong; Ahn, Juhee

    2016-08-01

    This study describes a new effort toward understanding the interaction mechanisms between antibiotic-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium and phages. The antibiotic susceptibility, β-lactamase activity, bacterial motility, gene expression, and lytic activity were evaluated in ciprofloxacin-induced antibiotic-sensitive Salmonella Typhimurium (ASST(CIP)) and ciprofloxacin-induced antibiotic-resistant S. Typhimurium (ARST(CIP)), which were compared to the wild-type strains (ASST(WT) and ARST(WT)). The MIC values of ampicillin, norfloxacin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline were significantly increased to > 512, 16, 16, and 256 μg/ml, respectively, in the ARST(CIP). The lowest and highest extracellular lactamase activities were observed in ASST(WT) (6.85 μmol/min/ml) and ARST(CIP) (48.83 μmol/min/ml), respectively. The acrA, lpfE, and hilA genes were significantly upregulated by more than tenfold in both ASST(CIP) and ARST(CIP). The induction of multiple antibiotic resistance resulted from the increased efflux pump activity (AcrAB-TolC). The highest phage adsorption rates were more than 95 % for ASST(WT), ASST(CIP), and ARST(WT), while the lowest adsorption rate was 52 % for ARST(CIP) at 15 min of infection. The least lytic activity of phage was 20 % against the ARST(CIP), followed by ASST(CIP) (30 %). The adsorption rate of phage against ARST(CIP) was 52 % at 15 min of infection, which resulted in the decrease in lytic activity (12 %). Understanding the interaction of phage and bacteria is essential for the practical application of phage to control and detect antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The results provide useful information for understanding the binding specificity of phages for multiple antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  13. Extracellular Matrix-Regulated Gene Expression RequiresCooperation of SWI/SNF and Transcription Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ren; Spencer, Virginia A.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-05-25

    Extracellular cues play crucial roles in the transcriptional regulation of tissue-specific genes, but whether and how these signals lead to chromatin remodeling is not understood and subject to debate. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and mammary-specific genes as models, we show here that extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and prolactin cooperate to induce histone acetylation and binding of transcription factors and the SWI/SNF complex to the {beta}- and ?-casein promoters. Introduction of a dominant negative Brg1, an ATPase subunit of SWI/SNF complex, significantly reduced both {beta}- and ?-casein expression, suggesting that SWI/SNF-dependent chromatin remodeling is required for transcription of mammary-specific genes. ChIP analyses demonstrated that the ATPase activity of SWI/SNF is necessary for recruitment of RNA transcriptional machinery, but not for binding of transcription factors or for histone acetylation. Coimmunoprecipitation analyses showed that the SWI/SNF complex is associated with STAT5, C/EBP{beta}, and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Thus, ECM- and prolactin-regulated transcription of the mammary-specific casein genes requires the concerted action of chromatin remodeling enzymes and transcription factors.

  14. CSL protein regulates transcription of genes required to prevent catastrophic mitosis in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Převorovský, Martin; Oravcová, Martina; Zach, Róbert; Jordáková, Anna; Bähler, Jürg; Půta, František; Folk, Petr

    2016-11-16

    For every eukaryotic cell to grow and divide, intricately coordinated action of numerous proteins is required to ensure proper cell-cycle progression. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been instrumental in elucidating the fundamental principles of cell-cycle control. Mutations in S. pombe 'cut' (cell untimely torn) genes cause failed coordination between cell and nuclear division, resulting in catastrophic mitosis. Deletion of cbf11, a fission yeast CSL transcription factor gene, triggers a 'cut' phenotype, but the precise role of Cbf11 in promoting mitotic fidelity is not known. We report that Cbf11 directly activates the transcription of the acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase gene cut6, and the biotin uptake/biosynthesis genes vht1 and bio2, with the former 2 implicated in mitotic fidelity. Cbf11 binds to a canonical, metazoan-like CSL response element (GTGGGAA) in the cut6 promoter. Expression of Cbf11 target genes shows apparent oscillations during the cell cycle using temperature-sensitive cdc25-22 and cdc10-M17 block-release experiments, but not with other synchronization methods. The penetrance of catastrophic mitosis in cbf11 and cut6 mutants is nutrient-dependent. We also show that drastic decrease in biotin availability arrests cell proliferation but does not cause mitotic defects. Taken together, our results raise the possibility that CSL proteins play conserved roles in regulating cell-cycle progression, and they could guide experiments into mitotic CSL functions in mammals.

  15. U2 snRNP is required for expression of the 3' end of genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsunori Koga

    Full Text Available Pre-mRNA in eukaryotes is subjected to mRNA processing, which includes capping, polyadenylation, and splicing. Transcription and mRNA processing are coupled, and this coupling stimulates mRNA processing; however, the effects of mRNA processing on transcription are not fully understood. In this study, we found that inhibition of U2 snRNP by a splicing inhibitor, spliceostatin A (SSA, or by an antisense oligonucleotide to U2 snRNA, caused gene-specific 3'-end down-regulation. Removal of SSA from the culture media restored expression of the 3' ends of genes, suggesting that U2 snRNP is required for expression of the 3' end of genes. Finally, we found that SSA treatment caused accumulation of Pol II near the 5' end of 3'-end down regulated genes, such as CDK6, SMEK2 and EGFR, indicating that SSA treatment led to transcription elongation arrest on these genes. These findings suggest that U2 snRNP is important for production of full length mRNA probably through regulation of transcription elongation, and that a novel checkpoint mechanism prevents pre-mRNA from accumulating as a result of splicing deficiencies, and thereby prevents production of aberrant proteins that might be translated from pre-mRNAs through the arrest of transcription elongation.

  16. Evaluation of a Multiplex PCR Assay for the Identification of Salmonella Serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium Using Retail and Abattoir Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunremi, Dele; Nadin-Davis, Susan; Dupras, Andrée Ann; Márquez, Imelda Gálvan; Omidi, Katayoun; Pope, Louise; Devenish, John; Burke, Teresa; Allain, Ray; Leclair, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    A multiplex PCR was developed to identify the two most common serovars of Salmonella causing foodborne illness in Canada, namely, serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium. The PCR was designed to amplify DNA fragments from four Salmonella genes, namely, invA gene (211-bp fragment), iroB gene (309-bp fragment), Typhimurium STM 4497 (523-bp fragment), and Enteritidis SE147228 (612-bp fragment). In addition, a 1,026-bp ribosomal DNA (rDNA) fragment universally present in bacterial species was included in the assay as an internal control fragment. The detection rate of the PCR was 100% among Salmonella Enteritidis (n = 92) and Salmonella Typhimurium (n = 33) isolates. All tested Salmonella isolates (n = 194) were successfully identified based on the amplification of at least one Salmonella -specific DNA fragment. None of the four Salmonella DNA amplicons were detected in any of the non- Salmonella isolates (n = 126), indicating an exclusivity rate of 100%. When applied to crude extracts of 2,001 field isolates of Salmonella obtained during the course of a national microbiological baseline study in broiler chickens and chicken products sampled from abattoir and retail outlets, 163 isolates, or 8.1%, tested positive for Salmonella Enteritidis and another 80 isolates, or 4.0%, tested as Salmonella Typhimurium. All isolates identified by serological testing as Salmonella Enteritidis in the microbiological study were also identified by using the multiplex PCR. The new test can be used to identify or confirm pure isolates of the two serovars and is also amenable for integration into existing culture procedures for accurate detection of Salmonella colonies.

  17. Pyridine nucleotide cycle of Salmonella typhimurium: isolation and characterization of pncA, pncB, and pncC mutants and utilization of exogenous nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J W; Kinney, D M; Moat, A G

    1979-03-01

    Mutants of Salmonella typhimurium LT-2 deficient in nicotinamidase activity (pncA) or nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase activity (pncB) were isolated as resistant to analogs of nicotinic acid and nicotinamide. Information obtained from interrupted mating experiments placed the pncA gene at 27 units and the pncB gene at 25 units on the S. typhimurium LT-2 linkage map. A major difference in the location of the pncA gene was found between the S. typhimurium and Escherichia coli linkage maps. The pncA gene is located in a region in which there is a major inversion of the gene order in S. typhimurium as compared to that in E. coli. Growth experiments using double mutants blocked in the de novo pathway to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) (nad) and in the pyridine nucleotide cycle (pnc) at either the pncA or pncB locus, or both, have provided evidence for the existence of an alternate recycling pathway in this organism. Mutants lacking this alternate cycle, pncC, have been isolated and mapped via cotransduction at 0 units. Utilization of exogenous NAD was examined through the use of [14C]carbonyl-labeled NAD and [14C]adenine-labeled NAD. The results of these experiments suggest that NAD is degraded to nicotinamide mononucleotide at the cell surface. A portion of this extracellular nicotinamide mononucleotide is then transported across the cell membrane by nicotinamide mononucleotide glycohydrolase and degraded to nicotinamide in the process. The remaining nicotinamide mononucleotide accumulates extracellularly and will support the growth of nadA pncB mutants which cannot utilize the nicotinamide resulting from the major pathway of NAD degradation. A model is presented for the utilization of exogenous NAD by S. typhimurium LT-2.

  18. Removal of the phage-shock protein PspB causes reduction of virulence in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium independently of NRAMP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallrodt, Inke; Jelsbak, Lotte; Thomsen, Line E; Brix, Lena; Lemire, Sébastien; Gautier, Laurent; Nielsen, Dennis S; Jovanovic, Goran; Buck, Martin; Olsen, John E

    2014-06-01

    The phage-shock protein (Psp) system is believed to manage membrane stress in all Enterobacteriaceae and has recently emerged as being important for virulence in several pathogenic species of this phylum. The core of the Psp system consists of the pspA-D operon and the distantly located pspG gene. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), it has recently been reported that PspA is essential for systemic infection of mice, but only in NRAMP1(+) mice, signifying that attenuation is related to coping with divalent cation starvation in the intracellular environment. In the present study, we investigated the contribution of individual psp genes to virulence of S. Typhimurium. Interestingly, deletion of the whole pspA-D set of genes caused attenuation in both NRAMP1(+) and NRAMP1(-) mice, indicating that one or more of the psp genes contribute to virulence independently of NRAMP1 expression in the host. Investigations of single gene mutants showed that knock out of pspB reduced virulence in both types of mice, while deletion of pspA only caused attenuation in NRAMP1(+) mice, and deletion of pspD had a minor effect in NRAMP1(-) mice, while deletions of either pspC or pspG did not affect virulence. Experiments addressed at elucidating the role of PspB in virulence revealed that PspB is dispensable for uptake to and intracellular replication in cultured macrophages and resistance to complement-induced killing. Furthermore, the Psp system of S. Typhimurium was dispensable during pIV-induced secretin stress. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that removal of PspB reduces virulence in S. Typhimurium independently of host NRAMP1 expression, demonstrating that PspB has roles in intra-host survival distinct from the reported contributions of PspA. © 2014 The Authors.

  19. The two umuDC-like operons, samAB and umuDCST, in Salmonella typhimurium: The umuDCST operon may reduce UV-mutagenesis-promoting ability of the samAB operon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohmi, Takehiko; Hakura, Atsushi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Yamada, Masami; Sofuni, Toshio; Nakai, Yasuharu; Murayama, Somay Y.

    1993-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium, especially its derivatives containing pKM101 plasmid, has been widely used in the Ames test for the detection of environmental mutagens and carcinogens. It is known, however, that if the pKM101 plasmid is eliminated, S. typhimurium itself shows a much weaker mutagenic response to UV and some chemical mutagens than does Escherichia coli. In fact, certain potent base-change type mutagens, such as furylfuramide and aflatoxin B 1 , are nonmutagenic to S. typhimurium in the absence of pKM101, whereas they are strongly mutagenic to S. typhimurium in the presence of pKM101 plasmid as well as to E. coli. The low mutability can be restored to levels comparable to E. coli by introducing the plasmid carrying the E. coli umuDC operon or the pKM101 plasmid carrying mucAB operon. Salmonella typhimurium has an SOS regulatory system which resembles that of E. coli. Thus, it was suggested that S. typhimurium is deficient in the function of umuDC operon, which plays an essential role in UV and most chemical mutagenesis in E. coli. In order to clarify the implications of umuDC genes in mutagenesis and antimutagenesis in typhimurium, we have independently screened the umuDC-like genes of S. typhimurium TA1538. Consequently, we have cloned another umuDC-like operon which is 40% diverged from the aforementioned umuDC operon of S. typhimurium LT2 at the nucleotide level (16). We have termed the cloned DNA the samAB (Salmonella; mutagenesis) operon, and tentatively referred to the umuDC operon cloned from S. typhimurium LT2 (27,31) as the umuDC ST operon. Based on the results of the Southern hybridization experiment, we concluded that the two sets of umuDC-like operons reside in the same cells of S. typhimurium LT2 and TA1538. Our results also suggested that the umuDC ST operon reduces the UV-mutagenesis promoting ability of the samAB operon when the two operons are present on the same multi-copy number plasmid

  20. Salmonella DIVA vaccine reduces disease, colonization and shedding due to virulent S. Typhimurium infection in swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-host adapted Salmonella serovars are opportunistic pathogens that can colonize food-producing animals without causing overt disease, including the frequent foodborne pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium). Interventions against Salmonella need to both enhance food safe...

  1. An Arabidopsis NPR1-like gene, NPR4, is required for disease resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guosheng; Holub, Eric B; Alonso, Jose M; Ecker, Joseph R; Fobert, Pierre R

    2005-01-01

    The Arabidopsis genome contains six NPR1-related genes. Given the pivotal role played by NPR1 in controlling salicylic acid (SA)-mediated gene expression and disease resistance, functional characterization of other family members appears to be justified. Reverse genetics was used to analyze the role of one NPR1-like gene, which we called NPR4. The NPR4 protein shares 36% identity with NPR1 and interacts with the same spectrum of TGA transcription factors in yeast two-hybrid assays. Plants with T-DNA insertions in NPR4 are more susceptible to the virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringe pv. tomato DC3000. This phenotype is complemented by expression of the wild type NPR4 coding region. As determined by the parasite reproduction, the npr4-1 mutant is more susceptible to the fungal pathogen Erysiphe cichoracearum, but does not differ markedly from wild type in its interaction with virulent and avirulent strains of the oomycete Peronospora parasitica. In leaves of wild-type plants, NPR4 mRNA levels increase following pathogen challenge or SA treatment, and decrease rapidly following methyl jasmonic acid (MeJA) treatment. Transcripts of the pathogenesis-related (PR) genes PR-1, PR-2, and PR-5 are only marginally reduced in the npr4-1 mutant following pathogen challenge or SA treatment. This reduction of PR gene expression is more pronounced when leaves are challenged with the bacterial pathogen following SA treatment. Expression of the jasmonic acid-dependent pathway marker gene PDF1.2 is compromised in npr4-1 leaves following application of MeJA or a combination of SA and MeJA. These results indicate that NPR4 is required for basal defense against pathogens, and that it may be implicated in the cross-talk between the SA- and JA-dependent signaling pathways.

  2. Salmonella Typhimurium exploits inflammation to its own advantage in piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirullo, Barbara; Pesciaroli, Michele; Drumo, Rosanna; Ruggeri, Jessica; Razzuoli, Elisabetta; Pistoia, Claudia; Petrucci, Paola; Martinelli, Nicola; Cucco, Lucilla; Moscati, Livia; Amadori, Massimo; Magistrali, Chiara F; Alborali, Giovanni L; Pasquali, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is responsible for foodborne zoonotic infections that, in humans, induce self-limiting gastroenteritis. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the wild-type strain S. Typhimurium (STM14028) is able to exploit inflammation fostering an active infection. Due to the similarity between human and porcine diseases induced by S. Typhimurium, we used piglets as a model for salmonellosis and gastrointestinal research. This study showed that STM14028 is able to efficiently colonize in vitro porcine mono-macrophages and intestinal columnar epithelial (IPEC-J2) cells, and that the colonization significantly increases with LPS pre-treatment. This increase was then reversed by inhibiting the LPS stimulation through LPS antagonist, confirming an active role of LPS stimulation in STM14028-intracellular colonization. Moreover, LPS in vivo treatment increased cytokines blood level and body temperature at 4 h post infection, which is consistent with an acute inflammatory stimulus, capable to influence the colonization of STM14028 in different organs and tissues. The present study proves for the first time that in acute enteric salmonellosis, S. Typhimurium exploits inflammation for its benefit in piglets.

  3. Structure Prediction of Outer Membrane Protease Protein of Salmonella typhimurium Using Computational Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozina Tabassum

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella typhimurium, a facultative gram-negative intracellular pathogen belonging to family Enterobacteriaceae, is the most frequent cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. PgtE gene product, outer membrane protease emerges important in the intracellular phases of salmonellosis. The pgtE gene product of S. typhimurium was predicted to be capable of proteolyzing T7 RNA polymerase and localize in the outer membrane of these gram negative bacteria. PgtE product of S. enterica and OmpT of E. coli, having high sequence similarity have been revealed to degrade macrophages, causing salmonellosis and other diseases. The three-dimensional structure of the protein was not available through Protein Data Bank (PDB creating lack of structural information about E protein. In our study, by performing Comparative model building, the three dimensional structure of outer membrane protease protein was generated using the backbone of the crystal structure of Pla of Yersinia pestis, retrieved from PDB, with MODELLER (9v8. Quality of the model was assessed by validation tool PROCHECK, web servers like ERRAT and ProSA are used to certify the reliability of the predicted model. This information might offer clues for better understanding of E protein and consequently for developmet of better therapeutic treatment against pathogenic role of this protein in salmonellosis and other diseases.

  4. Isolation and Characterization of Salmonella Enterica Serovar Typhimurium Circulating Among Healthy Chickens of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Shafiullah Parvej

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella is considered as a global problem ranking first among food borne diseases. All motile Salmonella of poultry origin are zoonotic and readily transmit to human via meat and eggs but reports on non - typhoidal Salmonella serovars circulating in layer chickens is very limited in South-East Asian countries including Bangladesh. Salmonella serovars isolated from apparently healthy chickens were characterized in the present study. Of 170 samples (cloacal swab 150 and feed 20 collected from commercial layer farms, motile Salmonella was isolated 4% (6/150 and 50% (10/20 respectively by cultural, biochemical, motility test and by detection of hisJ gene. About 5% (8/170 samples possessed serovar-specific gene fimA, suggesting that isolates were Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing demonstrated that the isolated serovars were multidrug resistant. Therefore apparently healthy layer chickens harbour and transmit S. Typhimurium to the environment, although little is alarming since it has zoonotic significance and the isolates were resistant to commonly used first line of antibiotic in Salmonella infection.

  5. A Network Inference Workflow Applied to Virulence-Related Processes in Salmonella typhimurium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Ronald C.; Singhal, Mudita; Weller, Jennifer B.; Khoshnevis, Saeed; Shi, Liang; McDermott, Jason E.

    2009-04-20

    Inference of the structure of mRNA transcriptional regulatory networks, protein regulatory or interaction networks, and protein activation/inactivation-based signal transduction networks are critical tasks in systems biology. In this article we discuss a workflow for the reconstruction of parts of the transcriptional regulatory network of the pathogenic bacterium Salmonella typhimurium based on the information contained in sets of microarray gene expression data now available for that organism, and describe our results obtained by following this workflow. The primary tool is one of the network inference algorithms deployed in the Software Environment for BIological Network Inference (SEBINI). Specifically, we selected the algorithm called Context Likelihood of Relatedness (CLR), which uses the mutual information contained in the gene expression data to infer regulatory connections. The associated analysis pipeline automatically stores the inferred edges from the CLR runs within SEBINI and, upon request, transfers the inferred edges into either Cytoscape or the plug-in Collective Analysis of Biological of Biological Interaction Networks (CABIN) tool for further post-analysis of the inferred regulatory edges. The following article presents the outcome of this workflow, as well as the protocols followed for microarray data collection, data cleansing, and network inference. Our analysis revealed several interesting interactions, functional groups, metabolic pathways, and regulons in S. typhimurium.

  6. Genome-Wide Discovery of Genes Required for Capsule Production by UropathogenicEscherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Kelvin G K; Phan, Minh-Duy; Forde, Brian M; Chong, Teik Min; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan; Ulett, Glen C; Sweet, Matthew J; Beatson, Scott A; Schembri, Mark A

    2017-10-24

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is a major cause of urinary tract and bloodstream infections and possesses an array of virulence factors for colonization, survival, and persistence. One such factor is the polysaccharide K capsule. Among the different K capsule types, the K1 serotype is strongly associated with UPEC infection. In this study, we completely sequenced the K1 UPEC urosepsis strain PA45B and employed a novel combination of a lytic K1 capsule-specific phage, saturated Tn 5 transposon mutagenesis, and high-throughput transposon-directed insertion site sequencing (TraDIS) to identify the complement of genes required for capsule production. Our analysis identified known genes involved in capsule biosynthesis, as well as two additional regulatory genes ( mprA and lrhA ) that we characterized at the molecular level. Mutation of mprA resulted in protection against K1 phage-mediated killing, a phenotype restored by complementation. We also identified a significantly increased unidirectional Tn 5 insertion frequency upstream of the lrhA gene and showed that strong expression of LrhA induced by a constitutive Pcl promoter led to loss of capsule production. Further analysis revealed loss of MprA or overexpression of LrhA affected the transcription of capsule biosynthesis genes in PA45B and increased sensitivity to killing in whole blood. Similar phenotypes were also observed in UPEC strains UTI89 (K1) and CFT073 (K2), demonstrating that the effects were neither strain nor capsule type specific. Overall, this study defined the genome of a UPEC urosepsis isolate and identified and characterized two new regulatory factors that affect UPEC capsule production. IMPORTANCE Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections in humans and are primarily caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). Many UPEC strains express a polysaccharide K capsule that provides protection against host innate immune factors and contributes to survival

  7. Buffer capacity of food components influences the acid tolerance response in Salmonella Typhimurium during simulated gastric passage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Sidsel; Buschhardt, Tasja; Hansen, Tina Beck

    2014-01-01

    phase Salmonella Typhimurium during simulated gastric acid passage. We used a computer-controlled fermentor to employ pH changes in synthetic gastric fluid, mimicking the dynamic pH during gastric passage. In order to minimise variation, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was contained in dialysis......Food composition, buffer capacity, and fat and protein content have been shown to effect the gastric acid survival of pathogens (Waterman & Small 1998). In this study, simple food-model substances with different buffer capacities were investigated for their ability to support survival of stationary...... major stationary phase ATR regulators, we found an approx. four-fold increase in expression of ompR and an approx. three-fold increase of rpoS in saline and buffered saline, respectively, after 15 min of gastric acid challenge. The relative expression of these genes, were significantly lower in Brain...

  8. p73 Is Required for Multiciliogenesis and Regulates the Foxj1-Associated Gene Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton B. Marshall

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We report that p73 is expressed in multiciliated cells (MCCs, is required for MCC differentiation, and directly regulates transcriptional modulators of multiciliogenesis. Loss of ciliary biogenesis provides a unifying mechanism for many phenotypes observed in p73 knockout mice including hydrocephalus; hippocampal dysgenesis; sterility; and chronic inflammation/infection of lung, middle ear, and sinus. Through p73 and p63 ChIP-seq using murine tracheal cells, we identified over 100 putative p73 target genes that regulate MCC differentiation and homeostasis. We validated Foxj1, a transcriptional regulator of multiciliogenesis, and many other cilia-associated genes as direct target genes of p73 and p63. We show p73 and p63 are co-expressed in a subset of basal cells and suggest that p73 marks these cells for MCC differentiation. In summary, p73 is essential for MCC differentiation, functions as a critical regulator of a transcriptome required for MCC differentiation, and, like p63, has an essential role in development of tissues.

  9. NuMA is required for the selective induction of p53 target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohata, Hirokazu; Miyazaki, Makoto; Otomo, Ryo; Matsushima-Hibiya, Yuko; Otsubo, Chihiro; Nagase, Takahiro; Arakawa, Hirofumi; Yokota, Jun; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Taya, Yoichi; Enari, Masato

    2013-06-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein is a transcription factor controlling various outcomes, such as growth arrest and apoptosis, through the regulation of different sets of target genes. The nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA) plays important roles in spindle pole organization during mitosis and in chromatin regulation in the nucleus during interphase. Although NuMA has been shown to colocalize with several nuclear proteins, including high-mobility-group proteins I and Y and GAS41, the role of NuMA during interphase remains unclear. Here we report that NuMA binds to p53 to modulate p53-mediated transcription. Acute and partial ablation of NuMA attenuates the induction of the proarrested p21 gene following DNA damage, subsequently causing impaired cell cycle arrest. Interestingly, NuMA knockdown had little effect on the induction of the p53-dependent proapoptotic PUMA gene. Furthermore, NuMA is required for the recruitment of cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (Cdk8), a component of the Mediator complex and a promoter of p53-mediated p21 gene function. These data demonstrate that NuMA is critical for the target selectivity of p53-mediated transcription.

  10. Elimination of persistent vaccine bacteria of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the guts of immunized mice by inducible expression of truncated YncE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiran; Li, Jianhua; Xiong, Kun; Chen, Zhijin; Zheng, Chunping; Tan, Yong; Cong, Yanguang

    2017-01-01

    Orally administered vaccine bacteria usually persist for a period of time in the intestinal tracts of immunized individuals, and are excreted in feces to the environment resulting in a potential biosafety issue. The releasing risk can be minimized by immediate elimination of the persistent vaccine bacteria once adequate protective immune responses have been elicited by the vaccine bacteria. In a previous study, inducible expression of truncated yncE gene (yncE*) was found lethal to host bacteria. This feature has an application potential in biosafety control. Here, we assessed the efficacy of YncE* in eliminating an attenuated strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in a mouse model. To this end, a pBAD-derived plasmid containing yncE* under the control of the Ara promoter was transformed into a ΔphoPQ mutant of S. Typhimurium. Our data show that the induced expression of yncE* in the presence of arabinose eliminated the vaccine bacteria both in vitro and in vivo. BALB/c mice with or without streptomycin-pretreatment were used to assess the efficacy of YncE* in vivo. Oral administration of 500 μl of 20% arabinose at 24 h postvaccination removed the vaccine bacteria from the guts of the tested mice without streptomycin-pretreatment. For streptomycin-pretreated mice, which were colonized with higher levels of Salmonella, an additional gavage of arabinose was required to completely eliminate the vaccine bacteria in the guts of the tested mice. The orally administered arabinose did not affect the persistence of bacteria that had penetrated the intestinal mucosa of the immunized mice. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in the protection rate between the routine immunization and the immunization with the arabinose treatment. The results indicate that the yncE* element improves the biosafety of the bacterial vaccine, and can be taken in consideration in future design of live bacterial vaccines.

  11. Elimination of persistent vaccine bacteria of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the guts of immunized mice by inducible expression of truncated YncE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiran Wang

    Full Text Available Orally administered vaccine bacteria usually persist for a period of time in the intestinal tracts of immunized individuals, and are excreted in feces to the environment resulting in a potential biosafety issue. The releasing risk can be minimized by immediate elimination of the persistent vaccine bacteria once adequate protective immune responses have been elicited by the vaccine bacteria. In a previous study, inducible expression of truncated yncE gene (yncE* was found lethal to host bacteria. This feature has an application potential in biosafety control. Here, we assessed the efficacy of YncE* in eliminating an attenuated strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in a mouse model. To this end, a pBAD-derived plasmid containing yncE* under the control of the Ara promoter was transformed into a ΔphoPQ mutant of S. Typhimurium. Our data show that the induced expression of yncE* in the presence of arabinose eliminated the vaccine bacteria both in vitro and in vivo. BALB/c mice with or without streptomycin-pretreatment were used to assess the efficacy of YncE* in vivo. Oral administration of 500 μl of 20% arabinose at 24 h postvaccination removed the vaccine bacteria from the guts of the tested mice without streptomycin-pretreatment. For streptomycin-pretreated mice, which were colonized with higher levels of Salmonella, an additional gavage of arabinose was required to completely eliminate the vaccine bacteria in the guts of the tested mice. The orally administered arabinose did not affect the persistence of bacteria that had penetrated the intestinal mucosa of the immunized mice. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in the protection rate between the routine immunization and the immunization with the arabinose treatment. The results indicate that the yncE* element improves the biosafety of the bacterial vaccine, and can be taken in consideration in future design of live bacterial vaccines.

  12. CysB-dependent upregulation of the Salmonella Typhimurium cysJIH operon in response to antimicrobial compounds that induce oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Ricardo; Neumann, German; Frávega, Jorge; Díaz, Fernando; Tejías, Cristóbal; Collao, Bernardo; Fuentes, Juan A; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Calderón, Iván L; Gil, Fernando

    2015-02-27

    It has been proposed that some antibiotics exert additional damage through reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Since H₂S protects neurons and cardiac muscle from oxidative stress, it has been hypothesized that bacterial H₂S might, similarly, be a cellular protector against antibiotics. In Enterobacteriaceae, H₂S can be produced by the cysJIH pathway, which uses sulfate as the sulfur source. CysB, in turn, is a positive regulator of cysJIH. At present, the role of S. Typhimurium cysJIH operon in the protection to reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by antimicrobial compounds remains to be elucidated. In this work, we evaluated the role of cysJIH and cysB in ROS accumulation, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, reduced thiol accumulation, and H₂S accumulation in S. Typhimurium, cultured in either sulfate or cysteine as the sole sulfur source. Furthermore, we assessed the effects of the addition of ceftriaxone (CEF) and menadione (MEN) in these same parameters. In sulfate as the sole sulfur source, we found that the cysJIH operon and the cysB gene were required to full growth in minimal media, independently on the addition of CEF or MEN. Most importantly, both cysJIH and cysB contributed to diminish ROS levels, increase the SOD activity, increase the reduced thiols, and increase the H₂S levels in presence of CEF or MEN. Moreover, the cysJIH operon exhibited a CysB-dependent upregulation in presence of these two antimicrobials compounds. On the other hand, when cysteine was used as the sole sulfur source, we found that cysJIH operon was completely negligible, were only cysB exhibited similar phenotypes than the described for sulfate as sulfur source. Unexpectedly, CysB downregulated cysJIH operon when cysteine was used instead of sulfate, suggesting a complex regulation of this system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Biofilm formation by Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium isolated from avian sources is partially related with their in vivo pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Karen Apellanis; Furian, Thales Quedi; de Souza, Sara Neves; Menezes, Rafaela; de Lima, Diane Alves; Fortes, Flávia Bornancini Borges; Salle, Carlos Tadeu Pippi; Moraes, Hamilton Luiz Souza; Nascimento, Vladimir Pinheiro

    2018-03-22

    Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium are among the most prevalent serotypes isolated from salmonellosis outbreaks and poultry. Salmonella spp. have the capacity to form biofilms on several surfaces, which can favour survival in hostile environments, such as slaughterhouses. Salmonella strains present differences in pathogenicity. However, there is little information regarding the pathogenicity of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium isolated from avian sources and their relationship to biofilm production. The aim of this study was to use a novel pathogenicity index and a biofilm production assay to evaluate their relationships within these serotypes. In addition, we detected the presence of the spiA and agfA genes in these strains. Biofilm formation was investigated at two temperatures (37 °C and 28 °C) using microtiter plate assay, and the results were compared with the individual pathogenicity index of each strain. PCR was used to detect spiA and agfA, virulence genes associated with biofilm production. S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium strains were capable of producing biofilm at 37 °C and 28 °C. Sixty-two percent and 59.5% of S. Enteritidis and 73.8% and 46.2% of S. Typhimurium produced biofilm at 37 °C and 28 °C, respectively. Biofilm production at 37 °C was significantly higher in both serotypes. Only S. Enteritidis was capable of adhering strongly at both temperatures. Biofilm production was related to pathogenicity index only at 28 °C for S. Enteritidis. spiA and agfA were found in almost all strains and were not statistically associated with biofilm production. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Persistence of Salmonella Typhimurium LT2 in Soil Enhanced after Growth in Lettuce Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornelia Smalla

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The persistence of Salmonella in the environment is influenced by a multitude of biotic and abiotic factors. In addition, its persistence can be influenced by preadaptation before the introduction into the environment. In order to study how preadaptation changes the survival of Salmonella in soil and therefore its potential to colonize the phytosphere, we developed a new medium based on lettuce material [lettuce medium (LM]. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain LT2 was used as a model for Salmonella in this study. LT2 was inoculated into soil microcosms after pregrowth in Luria Bertani (LB broth or in LM. Survival of LT2 in soil was monitored over 56 days by plate counts and quantification of the Typhimurium-specific gene STM4497 using qPCR in total community DNA for which primers and TaqMan probe were designed in this study. Significantly enhanced persistence was observed for LT2 pregrown in LM compared to LT2 pregrown in LB, indicating a preadaptation effect. Surprisingly, no improved survival could be observed for S. Typhimurium strain 14028s and S. enterica serovar Senftenberg after pregrowth on LM. This indicates a high strain specificity of preadaptation. Results from previous studies suggested that biofilm formation could enhance the survival of human pathogens in various environments and might contribute to enhanced survival on plants. In vitro biofilm assays with several Salmonella strains revealed a strain-specific effect of LM on the biofilm formation. While LM significantly improved the biofilm formation of S. Senftenberg, the biofilm formation of LT2 was better in LB. This indicates that the better survival of LM-pregrown LT2 in soil was not linked to an improved ability to form biofilms but was likely due to other factors. Most importantly, this study showed that the medium used to pregrow Salmonella can influence its survival in soil and its biofilm formation which might influence the fate of Salmonella in soil.

  15. Reactivation of methionine synthase from Thermotoga maritima (TM0268) requires the downstream gene product TM0269.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sha; Romanchuk, Gail; Pattridge, Katherine; Lesley, Scott A; Wilson, Ian A; Matthews, Rowena G; Ludwig, Martha

    2007-08-01

    The crystal structure of the Thermotoga maritima gene product TM0269, determined as part of genome-wide structural coverage of T. maritima by the Joint Center for Structural Genomics, revealed structural homology with the fourth module of the cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase (MetH) from Escherichia coli, despite the lack of significant sequence homology. The gene specifying TM0269 lies in close proximity to another gene, TM0268, which shows sequence homology with the first three modules of E. coli MetH. The fourth module of E. coli MetH is required for reductive remethylation of the cob(II)alamin form of the cofactor and binds the methyl donor for this reactivation, S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet). Measurements of the rates of methionine formation in the presence and absence of TM0269 and AdoMet demonstrate that both TM0269 and AdoMet are required for reactivation of the inactive cob(II)alamin form of TM0268. These activity measurements confirm the structure-based assignment of the function of the TM0269 gene product. In the presence of TM0269, AdoMet, and reductants, the measured activity of T. maritima MetH is maximal near 80 degrees C, where the specific activity of the purified protein is approximately 15% of that of E. coli methionine synthase (MetH) at 37 degrees C. Comparisons of the structures and sequences of TM0269 and the reactivation domain of E. coli MetH suggest that AdoMet may be bound somewhat differently by the homologous proteins. However, the conformation of a hairpin that is critical for cobalamin binding in E. coli MetH, which constitutes an essential structural element, is retained in the T. maritima reactivation protein despite striking divergence of the sequences.

  16. Cloning of Salmonella typhimurium DNA encoding mutagenic DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.M.; Sedgwick, S.G.

    1989-01-01

    Mutagenic DNA repair in Escherichia coli is encoded by the umuDC operon. Salmonella typhimurium DNA which has homology with E. coli umuC and is able to complement E. coli umuC122::Tn5 and umuC36 mutations has been cloned. Complementation of umuD44 mutants and hybridization with E. coli umuD also occurred, but these activities were much weaker than with umuC. Restriction enzyme mapping indicated that the composition of the cloned fragment is different from the E. coli umuDC operon. Therefore, a umu-like function of S. typhimurium has been found; the phenotype of this function is weaker than that of its E. coli counterpart, which is consistent with the weak mutagenic response of S. typhimurium to UV compared with the response in E. coli

  17. Geminin is required for zygotic gene expression at the Xenopus mid-blastula transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L Kerns

    Full Text Available In many organisms early development is under control of the maternal genome and zygotic gene expression is delayed until the mid-blastula transition (MBT. As zygotic transcription initiates, cell cycle checkpoints become activated and the tempo of cell division slows. The mechanisms that activate zygotic transcription at the MBT are incompletely understood, but they are of interest because they may resemble mechanisms that cause stem cells to stop dividing and terminally differentiate. The unstable regulatory protein Geminin is thought to coordinate cell division with cell differentiation. Geminin is a bi-functional protein. It prevents a second round of DNA replication during S and G2 phase by binding and inhibiting the essential replication factor Cdt1. Geminin also binds and inhibits a number of transcription factors and chromatin remodeling proteins and is thought to keep dividing cells in an undifferentiated state. We previously found that the cells of Geminin-deficient Xenopus embryos arrest in G2 phase just after the MBT then disintegrate at the onset of gastrulation. Here we report that they also fail to express most zygotic genes. The gene expression defect is cell-autonomous and is reproduced by over-expressing Cdt1 or by incubating the embryos in hydroxyurea. Geminin deficient and hydroxyurea-treated blastomeres accumulate DNA damage in the form of double stranded breaks. Bypassing the Chk1 pathway overcomes the cell cycle arrest caused by Geminin depletion but does not restore zygotic gene expression. In fact, bypassing the Chk1 pathway by itself induces double stranded breaks and abolishes zygotic transcription. We did not find evidence that Geminin has a replication-independent effect on transcription. We conclude that Geminin is required to maintain genome integrity during the rapid cleavage divisions, and that DNA damage disrupts zygotic gene transcription at the MBT, probably through activation of DNA damage checkpoint pathways.

  18. Plasmid-Mediated Florfenicol Resistance Encoded by the floR Gene in Escherichia coli Isolated from Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloeckaert, Axel; Baucheron, Sylvie; Flaujac, Geraldine; Schwarz, Stefan; Kehrenberg, Corinna; Martel, Jean-Louis; Chaslus-Dancla, Elisabeth

    2000-01-01

    A florfenicol resistance gene almost identical to floR of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 was detected on 110- to 125-kb plasmids in Escherichia coli isolates of animal origin. Analysis of the floR gene flanking regions of one of the plasmids showed that they were different from those encountered in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104. PMID:10991873

  19. Genome-Wide Functional Profiling Reveals Genes Required for Tolerance to Benzene Metabolites in Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Matthew; Tandon, Vickram J.; Thomas, Reuben; Loguinov, Alex; Gerlovina, Inna; Hubbard, Alan E.; Zhang, Luoping; Smith, Martyn T.; Vulpe, Chris D.

    2011-01-01

    Benzene is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant and is widely used in industry. Exposure to benzene causes a number of serious health problems, including blood disorders and leukemia. Benzene undergoes complex metabolism in humans, making mechanistic determination of benzene toxicity difficult. We used a functional genomics approach to identify the genes that modulate the cellular toxicity of three of the phenolic metabolites of benzene, hydroquinone (HQ), catechol (CAT) and 1,2,4-benzenetriol (BT), in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Benzene metabolites generate oxidative and cytoskeletal stress, and tolerance requires correct regulation of iron homeostasis and the vacuolar ATPase. We have identified a conserved bZIP transcription factor, Yap3p, as important for a HQ-specific response pathway, as well as two genes that encode putative NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductases, PST2 and YCP4. Many of the yeast genes identified have human orthologs that may modulate human benzene toxicity in a similar manner and could play a role in benzene exposure-related disease. PMID:21912624

  20. Neutral Competition forDrosophilaFollicle and Cyst Stem Cell Niches Requires Vesicle Trafficking Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Matthew S; Cazin, Coralie; Amoyel, Marc; Yamamoto, Shinya; Bach, Erika; Nystul, Todd

    2017-07-01

    The process of selecting for cellular fitness through competition plays a critical role in both development and disease. The germarium, a structure at the tip of the ovariole of a Drosophila ovary, contains two follicle stem cells (FSCs) that undergo neutral competition for the stem cell niche. Using the FSCs as a model, we performed a genetic screen through a collection of 126 mutants in essential genes on the X chromosome to identify candidates that increase or decrease competition for the FSC niche. We identified ∼55 and 6% of the mutations screened as putative FSC hypo- or hyper-competitors, respectively. We found that a large majority of mutations in vesicle trafficking genes (11 out of the 13 in the collection of mutants) are candidate hypo-competition alleles, and we confirmed the hypo-competition phenotype for four of these alleles. We also show that Sec16 and another COPII vesicle trafficking component, Sar1, are required for follicle cell differentiation. Lastly, we demonstrate that, although some components of vesicle trafficking are also required for neutral competition in the cyst stem cells of the testis, there are important tissue-specific differences. Our results demonstrate a critical role for vesicle trafficking in stem cell niche competition and differentiation, and we identify a number of putative candidates for further exploration. Copyright © 2017 Cook et al.

  1. Drosophila Dynein intermediate chain gene, Dic61B, is required for spermatogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Fatima

    Full Text Available This study reports the identification and characterization of a novel gene, Dic61B, required for male fertility in Drosophila. Complementation mapping of a novel male sterile mutation, ms21, isolated in our lab revealed it to be allelic to CG7051 at 61B1 cytogenetic region, since two piggyBac insertion alleles, CG7051(c05439 and CG7051(f07138 failed to complement. CG7051 putatively encodes a Dynein intermediate chain. All three mutants, ms21, CG7051(c05439 and CG7051(f07138, exhibited absolute recessive male sterility with abnormally coiled sperm axonemes causing faulty sperm individualization as revealed by Phalloidin staining in Don Juan-GFP background. Sequencing of PCR amplicons uncovered two point mutations in ms21 allele and confirmed the piggyBac insertions in CG7051(c05439 and CG7051(f07138 alleles to be in 5'UTR and 4(th exon of CG7051 respectively, excision of which reverted the male sterility. In situ hybridization to polytene chromosomes demonstrated CG7051 to be a single copy gene. RT-PCR of testis RNA revealed defective splicing of the CG7051 transcripts in mutants. Interestingly, expression of cytoplasmic dynein intermediate chain, α, β, γ tubulins and α-spectrin was normal in mutants while ultra structural studies revealed defects in the assembly of sperm axonemes. Bioinformatics further highlighted the homology of CG7051 to axonemal dynein intermediate chain of various organisms, including DNAI1 of humans, mutations in which lead to male sterility due to immotile sperms. Based on these observations we conclude that CG7051 encodes a novel axonemal dynein intermediate chain essential for male fertility in Drosophila and rename it as Dic61B. This is the first axonemal Dic gene of Drosophila to be characterized at molecular level and shown to be required for spermatogenesis.

  2. [Construction, safety and immunogenicity analysis of attenuated salmonella typhimurium harbouring TGEV DNA vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Heng; Liu, Jiawen; Cao, Sanjie; Huang, Xiaobo; Wen, Xintian

    2009-01-01

    To study the feasibility of using attenuated Salmonella typhimurium as carrier for oral immunization of TGEV DNA vaccine. The 2.1 Kb fragments of the TGVE SC-H strain S gene that encompasses all the four major antigenic domains were amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1. The recombinant plasmid pVAX-S was transfected into COS7 cellsand the expression of recombinant plasmids was identified by indirect immunofluorscence assay. Then pVAX-S was transformed by electroporation into attenuated Salmonella typhimurium SL7207. The recombinant was screened and designated as SL7207 (pVAX-S). Mouse peritoneal macrophages were infected with SL7207 (pVAX-S), the transcription and expression of S gene were detected by RT-PCR and indirect immunofluorscence. BALB/c mouse were inoculated orally with SL7207(pVAX-S) at dosage of 5 x 10(8), 1 x 10(9) and 2 x 10(9) CFU for safety analysis. In a vaccination test, BALB/c mouse were immunized orally with recombinant bacterium at dosage of 1 x 10(9) CFU, for 3 times and specific serum IgG and intestinal mucosal IgA antibody were detected by indirect ELISA. Recombinant plasmid pVAX-S was constructed correctly and expressed in COS7 cells. The transcription and expression of S gene were detected after mouse peritoneal macrophages were infected with SL7207 (pVAX-S). The recombinant bacterium was safe to mouse at dosage of 2 x 10(9) CFU. Specific serum IgG and intestinal mucosal IgA antibody against TGEV S protein were detected in SL7207 (pVAX-S) immunized group at 2 weeks post-boosting,and there were significant difference (P TGEV S gene DNA vaccines had good immunogenicity and safety in mouse.

  3. Isolation and plasmid characterization of carbapenemase (IMP-4) producing Salmonella enterica Typhimurium from cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Sam; O’Dea, Mark; Trott, Darren J.; Abraham, Rebecca J.; Hughes, David; Pang, Stanley; McKew, Genevieve; Cheong, Elaine Y. L.; Merlino, John; Saputra, Sugiyono; Malik, Richard; Gottlieb, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are a pressing public health issue due to limited therapeutic options to treat such infections. CREs have been predominantly isolated from humans and environmental samples and they are rarely reported among companion animals. In this study we report on the isolation and plasmid characterization of carbapenemase (IMP-4) producing Salmonella enterica Typhimurium from a companion animal. Carbapenemase-producing S. enterica Typhimurium carrying blaIMP-4 was identified from a systemically unwell (index) cat and three additional cats at an animal shelter. All isolates were identical and belonged to ST19. Genome sequencing revealed the acquisition of a multidrug-resistant IncHI2 plasmid (pIMP4-SEM1) that encoded resistance to nine antimicrobial classes including carbapenems and carried the blaIMP-4-qacG-aacA4-catB3 cassette array. The plasmid also encoded resistance to arsenic (MIC-150 mM). Comparative analysis revealed that the plasmid pIMP4-SEM1 showed greatest similarity to two blaIMP-8 carrying IncHI2 plasmids from Enterobacter spp. isolated from humans in China. This is the first report of CRE carrying a blaIMP-4 gene causing a clinical infection in a companion animal, with presumed nosocomial spread. This study illustrates the broader community risk entailed in escalating CRE transmission within a zoonotic species such as Salmonella, and in a cycle that encompasses humans, animals and the environment. PMID:27767038

  4. Change in antimicrobial resistance pattern in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates detected in a beef cattle farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Masaru; Shahada, Francis; Izumiya, Hidemasa; Watanabe, Haruo; Uchida, Ikuo; Tamamura, Yukino; Kusumoto, Masahiro; Iwata, Taketoshi; Akiba, Masato

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) isolates with four different antimicrobial resistance patterns obtained from a beef cattle farm were characterized to determine their clonality. Macrorestriction analysis of genomic DNA revealed that these four isolates are closely related to each other and can be classified as a newly emerged pulsed-field gel electrophoresis type among cattle: cluster VII. Three of the four isolates showed resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs), and this resistance was mediated by AmpC β-lactamase encoded by the bla(CMY-2) gene in a 190-kbp IncA/C plasmid. Results of restriction analysis and IncA/C backbone PCR suggest that the three 190-kbp plasmids are identical and that a 70-kbp IncA/C plasmid of the ESC-susceptible isolate is derived from the 190-kbp plasmid by a deletion event. Three isolates harboured a virulence-resistance plasmid (165 or 180 kbp), and restriction analysis revealed that these plasmids were identical or closely related to each other. These results suggest that the four S. Typhimurium cluster VII isolates originate from a common ancestor that probably invaded the farm prior to the salmonellosis outbreak. Antimicrobial resistance patterns may not necessarily reflect the relationships of the isolates.

  5. rFTR1 is Required for Pathogenesis, and appears to be an Essential Gene, of Rhizopus oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Rhizopus oryzae is a multinucleated fungus responsible for the majority of cases of mucormycosis. The high affinity iron permease gene (rFTR1) is required for R. oryzae iron transport in iron-limited environments. We sought to disrupt the gene to define its role in virulence. METHODS: ...

  6. Microarray Analysis of Transposon Insertion Mutants in Bacillus Anthracis: Global Identification of Genes Required for Sporulation and Germination

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Day , Jr., William A; Rasmussen, Suzanne L; Carpenter, Beth M; Peterson, Scott N; Friedlander, Arthur M

    2007-01-01

    .... The system, used to identify genes required for generation of the infectious anthrax spore, spore germination and optimal growth on rich medium, was predictive of the contribution of two conserved...

  7. DNA sequences required for regulated expresson of the β-globin genes in murine erythroleukaemia cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Wright; E. de Boer (Ernie); A. Rosenthal; R.A. Flavell (Richard); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractWe have introduced into murine erythroleukaemia (MEL) cells a series of human globin gene cosmids and two sets of hybrid genes constructed from the human beta-globin gene and the human gamma-globin or murine H-2Kbm1 genes. S1-nuclease analysis of the mRNA products from these genes before

  8. Amperometric biosensor for Salmonella typhimurium detection in milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper reports an amperometric biosensor for rapid and sensitive Salmonella Typhimurium detection in milk. The biosensor was assembled from the self-assembled monolayers technique on a gold surface. In this device, polyclonal antibodies were oriented by protein A. The biosensor structure was cha...

  9. Large outbreaks of Salmonella Typhimurium infection in Denmark in 2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ethelberg, S.; Wingstrand, Anne; Jensen, T.

    2008-01-01

    An outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium phage type U292 has been ongoing in Denmark since 1 April, with 1,054 cases registered until 23 October 2008. Extensive investigations including hypothesis-generating interviews, matched case-control studies, cohort studies in embedded outbreaks, shopping list...

  10. Chasing Salmonella Typhimurium in free range egg production system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chousalkar, Kapil; Gole, Vaibhav; Caraguel, Charles; Rault, Jean-Loup

    2016-08-30

    Free range production systems are becoming a major source of egg production in Australia and worldwide. This study investigated shedding and ecology of Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella species in a free range layer flock, wild birds and foxes in the vicinity of the free range farm in different seasons. Shedding of Salmonella was significantly higher in summer. Within the shed, overall, Salmonella prevalence was highest in dust. Corticosterone level in faeces was highest in spring and lowest in winter. There was no direct association between the Salmonella shedding (MPN/gm) and corticosterone levels in faeces. Salmonella Typhimurium MLVA types isolated from fox and wild birds were similar to MLVA types isolated from layer flock and reported during human food borne illness. Wild birds and foxes appear to play an important role in S. Typhimurium ecology and food safety. Environmental factors could play a role in evolution of S. Typhimurium in free range environment. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Stress response and virulence in Salmonella Typhimurium: a genomics approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, A.P.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1995 the number of human infections with Salmonella serovar Typhimurium DT104 increased in The Netherlands and abroad. The multi antibiotic resistance of this strain has been often proposed as plausible reason for this increase. Within his PhD research, Armand Hermans found novel DT104

  12. QCM-based aptamer selection and detection of Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijun; Wang, Ronghui; Chen, Fang; Jiang, Tieshan; Wang, Hong; Slavik, Michael; Wei, Hua; Li, Yanbin

    2017-04-15

    In this study, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) was used to select aptamers against Salmonella typhimurium. To increase the success rate of Systematic Evolution of Ligands Exponential Enrichment (SELEX), the affinity of DNA pool in each round was simultaneously tracked using QCM in order to avoid the loss of high-quality aptamers. When the frequency change reached a maximum value after several rounds of selection and counter-selection, the candidate pool was cloned and sequenced. Out of three aptamer candidates, aptamer B5 showed high specificity and binding affinity with dissociation constant (K d value) of 58.5nM, and was chosen for further studies. Subsequently, a QCM-based aptasensor was developed to detect S. typhimurium. This aptasensor was able to detect 10 3 CFU/mL of S. typhimurium with less than 1h. This study demonstrated QCM-based selection could be more effective selection of aptamers and QCM-based aptasensor could be more sensitive in detecting S. typhimurium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mms Sensitivity of All Amino Acid-Requiring Mutants in Aspergillus and Its Suppression by Mutations in a Single Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Käfer, Etta

    1987-01-01

    All available amino acid-requiring mutants of Aspergillus nidulans were found to be hypersensitive to MMS (methyl methanesulfonate) to various degrees. On MMS media, secondary mutations could be selected which suppress this MMS sensitivity but do not affect the requirement. Many such mutations were analyzed and found to be alleles of one gene, smsA (= suppressor of MMS sensitivity), which mapped distal on the right arm of chromosome V. This gene is more likely to be involved in general regula...

  14. Activation of germline-specific genes is required for limb regeneration in the Mexican axolotl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Pao, Gerald M; Satoh, Akira; Cummings, Gillian; Monaghan, James R; Harkins, Timothy T; Bryant, Susan V; Voss, S Randal; Gardiner, David M; Hunter, Tony

    2013-01-01

    The capacity for tissue and organ regeneration in humans is dwarfed by comparison to that of salamanders. Emerging evidence suggests that mechanisms learned from the early phase of salamander limb regeneration – wound healing, cellular dedifferentiation and blastemal formation – will reveal therapeutic approaches for tissue regeneration in humans. Here we describe a unique transcriptional fingerprint of regenerating limb tissue in the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) that is indicative of cellular reprogramming of differentiated cells to a germline-like state. Two genes that are required for self-renewal of germ cells in mice and flies, Piwi-like 1 (PL1) and Piwi-like 2 (PL2), are expressed in limb blastemal cells, the basal layer keratinocytes and the thickened apical epithelial cap in the wound epidermis in the regenerating limb. Depletion of PL1 and PL2 by morpholino oligonucleotides decreased cell proliferation and increased cell death in the blastema leading to a significant retardation of regeneration. Examination of key molecules that are known to be required for limb development or regeneration further revealed that FGF8 is transcriptionally downregulated in the presence of the morpholino oligos, indicating PL1 and PL2 might participate in FGF signaling during limb regeneration. Given the requirement for FGF signaling in limb development and regeneration, the results suggest that PL1 and PL2 function to establish a unique germline-like state that is associated with successful regeneration. PMID:22841627

  15. Suppressive components in rice husk against mutagens-induced SOS response using Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002 umu test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Yoshiharu; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2007-07-20

    The EtOAc extract from rice (Oriza sativa cv. Hinohikari) husk showed a suppressive effect on umu gene expression of the SOS response in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002 against the mutagen, Trp-P-1, which requires liver metabolizing enzyme. To obtain the suppressive compound, the EtOAc extract was fractionated by SiO(2) column chromatography using umu test as a bioassay guide. Suppressive compound was isolated and identified as momilactone A (1) by EIMS, IR, (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy. Compound 1 inhibited of the SOS-inducing activity of Trp-P-1 in the umu test. Gene expression was suppressed by 32.6% at less than 0.60 mM. Compound 1 was assayed with activated Trp-P-1. The suppressive effect of Compound 1 was decreased compared with that of Trp-P-1. Furthermore, 1 was assayed with another mutagens, such as MeIQ, activated MeIQ, furylfuramide (AF-2), MNNG, and UV-irradiation. Compound 1 showed greater suppressive effect on AF-2-inducing SOS response than other mutagens.

  16. PRMT1 mediated methylation of TAF15 is required for its positive gene regulatory function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobert, Laure; Argentini, Manuela [Institut de Genetique et de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), CNRS UMR 7104, INSERM U 596, Universite Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg, BP 10142 - 67404 Illkirch Cedex, CU de Strasbourg (France); Tora, Laszlo, E-mail: laszlo@igbmc.u-strasbg.fr [Institut de Genetique et de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), CNRS UMR 7104, INSERM U 596, Universite Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg, BP 10142 - 67404 Illkirch Cedex, CU de Strasbourg (France)

    2009-04-15

    TAF15 (formerly TAF{sub II}68) is a nuclear RNA-binding protein that is associated with a distinct population of TFIID and RNA polymerase II complexes. TAF15 harbours an N-terminal activation domain, an RNA recognition motif (RRM) and many Arg-Gly-Gly (RGG) repeats at its C-terminal end. The N-terminus of TAF15 serves as an essential transforming domain in the fusion oncoprotein created by chromosomal translocation in certain human chondrosarcomas. Post-transcriptional modifications (PTMs) of proteins are known to regulate their activity, however, nothing is known on how PTMs affect TAF15 function. Here we demonstrate that endogenous human TAF15 is methylated in vivo at its numerous RGG repeats. Furthermore, we identify protein arginine N-methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) as a TAF15 interactor and the major PRMT responsible for its methylation. In addition, the RGG repeat-containing C-terminus of TAF15 is responsible for the shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and the methylation of RGG repeats affects the subcellular localization of TAF15. The methylation of TAF15 by PRMT1 is required for the ability of TAF15 to positively regulate the expression of the studied endogenous TAF15-target genes. Our findings demonstrate that arginine methylation of TAF15 by PRMT1 is a crucial event determining its proper localization and gene regulatory function.

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene ISW2 encodes a microtubule-interacting protein required for premeiotic DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachtulcová, P; Janatová, I; Kohlwein, S D; Hasek, J

    2000-01-15

    A molecular genetic characterization of the ORF YOR304W (ISW2), identified in a screen of a yeast lambdagt11 library using a monoclonal antibody that reacts with a 210 kDa mammalian microtubule-interacting protein, is presented in this paper. The protein encoded by the ORF YOR304W is 50% identical to the Drosophila nucleosome remodelling factor ISWI and is therefore a new member of the SNF2 protein family and has been recently entered into SDG as ISW2. Although not essential for vegetative growth, we found that the ISW2 gene is required for early stages in sporulation. The isw2 homozygous deletant diploid strain was blocked in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, unable to execute the premeiotic DNA replication and progress through the nuclear meiotic division cycle. ISW2 expression from a multicopy plasmid had the same effect as deletion, but ISW2 expression from a centromeric plasmid rescued the deletion phenotype. In vegetatively growing diploid cells, the Isw2 protein was preferentially found in the cytoplasm, co-localizing with microtubules. An accumulation of the Isw2 protein within the nucleus was observed in cells entering sporulation. Together with data published very recently by Tsukiyama et al. (1999), we propose a role for the Isw2 protein in facilitating chromatin accessibility for transcriptional factor(s) that positively regulate meiosis/sporulation-specific genes. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. gld-1, a tumor suppressor gene required for oocyte development in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, R.; Schedl, T. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Barton, M.K.; Kimble, J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1995-02-01

    We have characterized 31 mutations in the gld-1 (defective in germline development) gene of Caenorhabditis elegans. In gld-1 (null) hermaphrodites, oogenesis is abolished and a germline tumor forms where oocyte development would normally occur. By contrast, gld-1 (null) males are unaffected. The hermaphrodite germline tumor appears to derive from germ cells that enter the meiotic pathway normally but then exit pachytene and return to the mitotic cycle. Certain gld-1 partial loss-of-function mutations also abolish oogenesis, but germ cells arrest in pachytene rather than returning to mitosis. Our results indicate that gld-1 is a tumor suppressor gene required for oocyte development. The tumorous phenotype suggests that gld-1(+) may function to negatively regulate proliferation during meiotic prophase and/or act to direct progression through meiotic prophase. We also show that gld-1(+) has an additional nonessential role in germline sex determination: promotion of hermaphrodite spermatogenesis. This function of gld-1 is inferred from a haplo-insufficient phenotype and from the properties of gain-of-function gld-1 mutations that cause alterations in the sexual identity of germ cells. 69 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. Salmonella Typhimurium ST213 is associated with two types of IncA/C plasmids carrying multiple resistance determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesner, Magdalena; Calva, Edmundo; Fernández-Mora, Marcos; Cevallos, Miguel A; Campos, Freddy; Zaidi, Mussaret B; Silva, Claudia

    2011-01-11

    Salmonella Typhimurium ST213 was first detected in the Mexican Typhimurium population in 2001. It is associated with a multi-drug resistance phenotype and a plasmid-borne blaCMY-2 gene conferring resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins. The objective of the current study was to examine the association between the ST213 genotype and blaCMY-2 plasmids. The blaCMY-2 gene was carried by an IncA/C plasmid. ST213 strains lacking the blaCMY-2 gene carried a different IncA/C plasmid. PCR analysis of seven DNA regions distributed throughout the plasmids showed that these IncA/C plasmids were related, but the presence and absence of DNA stretches produced two divergent types I and II. A class 1 integron (dfrA12, orfF and aadA2) was detected in most of the type I plasmids. Type I contained all the plasmids carrying the blaCMY-2 gene and a subset of plasmids lacking blaCMY-2. Type II included all of the remaining blaCMY-2-negative plasmids. A sequence comparison of the seven DNA regions showed that both types were closely related to IncA/C plasmids found in Escherichia, Salmonella, Yersinia, Photobacterium, Vibrio and Aeromonas. Analysis of our Typhimurium strains showed that the region containing the blaCMY-2 gene is inserted between traA and traC as a single copy, like in the E. coli plasmid pAR060302. The floR allele was identical to that of Newport pSN254, suggesting a mosaic pattern of ancestry with plasmids from other Salmonella serovars and E. coli. Only one of the tested strains was able to conjugate the IncA/C plasmid at very low frequencies (10-7 to 10-9). The lack of conjugation ability of our IncA/C plasmids agrees with the clonal dissemination trend suggested by the chromosomal backgrounds and plasmid pattern associations. The ecological success of the newly emerging Typhimurium ST213 genotype in Mexico may be related to the carriage of IncA/C plasmids. We conclude that types I and II of IncA/C plasmids originated from a common ancestor and that the

  20. Novel ribosomal mutations affecting translational accuracy, antibiotic resistance and virulence of Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkman, J; Samuelsson, P; Andersson, D I; Hughes, D

    1999-01-01

    Many mutations in rpsL cause resistance to, or dependence on, streptomycin and are restrictive (hyperaccurate) in translation. Dependence on streptomycin and hyperaccuracy can each be reversed phenotypically by mutations in either rpsD or rpsE. Such compensatory mutations have been shown to have a ram phenotype (ribosomal ambiguity), increasing the level of translational errors. We have shown recently that restrictive rpsL alleles are also associated with a loss of virulence in Salmonella typhimurium. To test whether ram mutants could reverse this loss of virulence, we have isolated a set of rpsD alleles in Salmonella typhimurium. We found that the rpsD alleles restore the virulence of strains carrying restrictive rpsL alleles to a level close to that of the wild type. Unexpectedly, three out of seven mutant rpsD alleles tested have phenotypes typical of restrictive alleles of rpsL, being resistant to streptomycin and restrictive (hyperaccurate) in translation. These phenotypes have not been previously associated with the ribosomal protein S4. Furthermore, all seven rpsD alleles (four ram and three restrictive) can phenotypically reverse the hyperaccuracy associated with restrictive alleles of rpsL. This is the first demonstration that such compensations do not require that the compensating rpsD allele has a ribosomal ambiguity (ram) phenotype.

  1. Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium Std fimbriae bind terminal alpha(1,2)fucose residues in the cecal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chessa, Daniela; Winter, Maria G; Jakomin, Marcello; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2009-02-01

    The std operon encodes a fimbrial adhesin of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium that is required for attachment to intestinal epithelial cells and for cecal colonization in the mouse. To study the mechanism by which this virulence factor contributes to colonization we characterized its binding specificity. Std-mediated binding to human colonic epithelial (Caco-2) cells could be abrogated by removing N-linked glycans. Adherence of Std fimbriated S. Typhimurium to Caco-2 cells could be blocked by co-incubation with H type 2 oligosaccharide (Fucalpha1-2Galbeta1-4GlcNAc) or by pretreatment of cells with alpha1-2 fucosidase. In contrast, pretreatment of Caco-2 cells with neuraminidase or co-incubation with the type 2 disaccharide precursor (Galbeta1-4GlcNAc) did not reduce adherence of Std fimbriated S. Typhimurium. Binding of purified Std fimbriae to Fucalpha1-2Galbeta1-4GlcNAc in a solid phase binding assay was competitively inhibited by Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I), a lectin specific for Fucalpha1-2 moieties. Purified Std fimbriae and UEA both bound to a receptor localized in the mucus layer of the murine cecum. These data suggest that the std operon encodes an adhesin that binds an alpha1-2 fucosylated receptor(s) present in the cecal mucosa.

  2. A zebrafish screen for craniofacial mutants identifies wdr68 as a highly conserved gene required for endothelin-1 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amsterdam Adam

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Craniofacial birth defects result from defects in cranial neural crest (NC patterning and morphogenesis. The vertebrate craniofacial skeleton is derived from cranial NC cells and the patterning of these cells occurs within the pharyngeal arches. Substantial efforts have led to the identification of several genes required for craniofacial skeletal development such as the endothelin-1 (edn1 signaling pathway that is required for lower jaw formation. However, many essential genes required for craniofacial development remain to be identified. Results Through screening a collection of insertional zebrafish mutants containing approximately 25% of the genes essential for embryonic development, we present the identification of 15 essential genes that are required for craniofacial development. We identified 3 genes required for hyomandibular development. We also identified zebrafish models for Campomelic Dysplasia and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. To further demonstrate the utility of this method, we include a characterization of the wdr68 gene. We show that wdr68 acts upstream of the edn1 pathway and is also required for formation of the upper jaw equivalent, the palatoquadrate. We also present evidence that the level of wdr68 activity required for edn1 pathway function differs between the 1st and 2nd arches. Wdr68 interacts with two minibrain-related kinases, Dyrk1a and Dyrk1b, required for embryonic growth and myotube differentiation, respectively. We show that a GFP-Wdr68 fusion protein localizes to the nucleus with Dyrk1a in contrast to an engineered loss of function mutation Wdr68-T284F that no longer accumulated in the cell nucleus and failed to rescue wdr68 mutant animals. Wdr68 homologs appear to exist in all eukaryotic genomes. Notably, we found that the Drosophila wdr68 homolog CG14614 could substitute for the vertebrate wdr68 gene even though insects lack the NC cell lineage. Conclusion This work represents a systematic

  3. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of multidrug resistant Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Kentucky strains recovered from chicken carcasses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizwana Tasmin

    Full Text Available Salmonella Typhimurium is the leading cause of human non-typhoidal gastroenteritis in the US. S. Kentucky is one the most commonly recovered serovars from commercially processed poultry carcasses. This study compared the genotypic and phenotypic properties of two Salmonella enterica strains Typhimurium (ST221_31B and Kentucky (SK222_32B recovered from commercially processed chicken carcasses using whole genome sequencing, phenotype characterizations and an intracellular killing assay. Illumina MiSeq platform was used for sequencing of two Salmonella genomes. Phylogenetic analysis employing homologous alignment of a 1,185 non-duplicated protein-coding gene in the Salmonella core genome demonstrated fully resolved bifurcating patterns with varying levels of diversity that separated ST221_31B and SK222_32B genomes into distinct monophyletic serovar clades. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP analysis identified 2,432 (ST19 SNPs within 13 Typhimurium genomes including ST221_31B representing Sequence Type ST19 and 650 (ST152 SNPs were detected within 13 Kentucky genomes including SK222_32B representing Sequence Type ST152. In addition to serovar-specific conserved coding sequences, the genomes of ST221_31B and SK222_32B harbor several genomic regions with significant genetic differences. These included phage and phage-like elements, carbon utilization or transport operons, fimbriae operons, putative membrane associated protein-encoding genes, antibiotic resistance genes, siderophore operons, and numerous hypothetical protein-encoding genes. Phenotype microarray results demonstrated that ST221_31B is capable of utilizing certain carbon compounds more efficiently as compared to SK222_3B; namely, 1,2-propanediol, M-inositol, L-threonine, α-D-lactose, D-tagatose, adonitol, formic acid, acetoacetic acid, and L-tartaric acid. ST221_31B survived for 48 h in macrophages, while SK222_32B was mostly eliminated. Further, a 3-fold growth of ST221_31B was

  4. Choice of bacterial growth medium alters the transcriptome and phenotype of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Jessica M A; Richmond, Grace E; Bailey, Andrew M; Ivens, Al; Piddock, Laura J V

    2013-01-01

    The type of bacterial culture medium is an important consideration during design of any experimental protocol. The aim of this study was to understand the impact of medium choice on bacterial gene expression and physiology by comparing the transcriptome of Salmonella enterica SL1344 after growth in the widely used LB broth or the rationally designed MOPS minimal medium. Transcriptomics showed that after growth in MOPS minimal media, compared to LB, there was increased expression of 42 genes involved in amino acid synthesis and 23 genes coding for ABC transporters. Seven flagellar genes had decreased expression after growth in MOPS minimal medium and this correlated with a decreased motility. In both MOPS minimal medium and MEM expression of genes from SPI-2 was increased and the adhesion of S. Typhimurium to intestinal epithelial cells was higher compared to the levels after growth in LB. However, SL1344 invasion was not significantly altered by growth in either MOPs minimal media or MEM. Expression of SPI-2 was also measured using chromosomal GFP reporter fusions followed by flow cytometry which showed, for the first time, that the reduction in SPI-2 transcript after growth in different media related to a reduction in the proportion of the bacterial population expressing SPI-2. These data highlight the profound differences in the global transcriptome after in vitro growth in different media and show that choice of medium should be considered carefully during experimental design, particularly when virulence related phenotypes are being measured.

  5. Expression of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli flagellin protein and its functional characterization as an adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makvandi, Manoochehr; Teimoori, Ali; Parsa Nahad, Mehdi; Khodadadi, Ali; Cheshmeh, Mohammad Ghasemi Deh; Zandi, Milad

    2018-03-09

    Flagellin is the major structural protein monomer of bacterial flagella. Flagellin through binding to its receptor and activation of antigen presenting cells stimulates the innate and adaptive immune responses. Flagellin is used as an effective systemic or mucosal adjuvant to stimulate the immune system. Recently, the therapeutic and protective role of flagellin in some infectious diseases and cancers has been investigated. In this study, we cloned the fliC genes from Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli into pET-28a vector and investigated their expression in the prokaryotic system. The fliC genes of S. typhimurium and E. coli were amplified by PCR with a specific oligonucleotide primer set. thse were cloned into the pET-28a vector and the recombinant pET-28a-fliC plasmids were successfully transformed into the E. coli strain BL-21(DE3). The expression of flagellin proteins in the prokaryotic cells were evaluated. Finally, Transcription of TNF-α mRNA was confirmed using Real-time PCR. The expression of proteins in the prokaryotic cells were approved by SDS-PAGE and western blotting method. Further, the functional characterization of flagellin proteins were evaluated using their ability to induce increased m-RNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine. The flagellin proteins were expressed in the prokaryotic system. These proteins can be used to link target antigens as an effective adjuvant for future DNA vaccine studies. Purified recombinant proteins in this study can also be used for therapeutic and prophylactic purposes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Transfer of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium from contaminated irrigation water to parsley is dependent on curli and cellulose, the biofilm matrix components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapidot, Anat; Yaron, Sima

    2009-03-01

    Enteric pathogens can contaminate fresh produce, and this contaminated produce can be a significant potential source of human illness. The objective of this study was to determine a possible mode of transfer of Salmonella Typhimurium from contaminated irrigation water to mature parsley plants and to investigate the role of bacterial cellulose and curli. Parsley plants were drip irrigated with water containing green fluorescent protein-labeled Salmonella Typhimurium. Stems and leaves were harvested 1 day after the third irrigation and examined for the presence of Salmonella Typhimurium. Three weeks after harvesting, the presence of Salmonella was again confirmed in the regrown plants. During this period, bacterial numbers on leaves declined from 4.1 (+/- 0.3) to 2.3 (+/- 0.1) log CFU g(-1) (P edible parts of the plants. Confocal laser scanning microscopic images revealed that Salmonella Typhimurium formed aggregates at a depth of 8 to 32 microm beneath the leaf surface. Penetration might be achieved through the roots or the phyllosphere. The importance of the bacterial cellulose and curli was determined by comparing the wild-type strain with its mutants, which lack the ability to synthesize cellulose and curli. Counts of the double mutant were 2-log higher in the soil but 1-log lower in the leaves (P < 0.05). Deletion of the agfBA gene (for curli) was more effective than deletion of bcsA (for cellulose). Thus, curli and cellulose play a role in the transfer or survival of Salmonella Typhimurium in the plant, as they do for plant pathogens.

  7. An altered immune response, but not individual cationic antimicrobial peptides, is associated with the oral attenuation of Ara4N-deficient Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi L Strandberg

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium uses two-component regulatory systems (TCRS to respond to stimuli in the local microenvironment. Upon infection, the Salmonella TCRSs PhoP-PhoQ (PhoPQ and PmrA-PmrB (PmrAB are activated by environmental signals in the intestinal lumen and within host cells. TCRS-mediated gene expression results in lipopolysaccharide (LPS modification and cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance. The PmrA-regulated pmrHFIJKLM operon mediates 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose (Ara4N production and attachment to the lipid A of LPS. A ΔpmrF S. Typhimurium strain cannot produce Ara4N, exhibits increased sensitivity to cationic antimicrobial peptide (CAMP-mediated killing, and attenuated virulence in mice upon oral infection. CAMPs are predicted to play a role in elimination of Salmonella, and may activate PhoPQ and PmrAB in vivo, which could increase bacterial resistance to host defenses. Competition experiments between wild type (WT and ΔpmrF mutant strains of S. Typhimurium indicated that selection against this mutant first occurs within the intestinal lumen early during infection. However, CRAMP and active cryptdins alone are not responsible for elimination of Ara4N-deficient bacteria in vivo. Investigation into the early immune response to ΔpmrF showed that it differed slightly from the early immune response to WT S. Typhimurium. Further investigation into the early immune response to infection of Peyer's patches suggests a role for IL-13 in the attenution of the ΔpmrF mutant strain. Thus, prominent CAMPs present in the mouse intestine are not responsible for the selection against the ΔpmrF strain in this location, but limited alterations in innate immune induction were observed that affect bacterial survival and virulence.

  8. Targeted deletion of the ara operon of Salmonella typhimurium enhances L-arabinose accumulation and drives PBAD-promoted expression of anti-cancer toxins and imaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyun; Lim, Daejin; Kim, Geun-Joong; Park, Seung-Hwan; Sik Kim, Hyeon; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E; Min, Jung-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-specific expression of antitumor drugs can be achieved using attenuated Salmonella typhimurium harboring the PBAD promoter, which is induced by L-arabinose. However, L-arabinose does not accumulate because it is metabolized to D-xylulose-5-P by enzymes encoded by the ara operon in Salmonellae. To address this problem, we developed an engineered strain of S. typhimurium in which the ara operon is deleted. Linear DNA transformation was performed using λ red recombinase to exchange the ara operon with linear DNA carrying an antibiotic-resistance gene with homology to regions adjacent to the ara operon. The ara operon-deleted strain and its parental strain were transformed with a plasmid encoding Renilla luciferase variant 8 (RLuc8) or cytolysin A (clyA) under the control of the PBAD promoter. Luciferase assays demonstrated that RLuc8 expression was 49-fold higher in the ara operon-deleted S. typhimurium than in the parental strain after the addition of L-arabinose. In vivo bioluminescence imaging showed that the tumor tissue targeted by the ara operon-deleted Salmonella had a stronger imaging signal (~30-fold) than that targeted by the parental strain. Mice with murine colon cancer (CT26) that had been injected with the ara operon-deleted S. typhimurium expressing clyA showed significant tumor suppression. The present report demonstrates that deletion of the ara operon of S. typhimurium enhances L-arabinose accumulation and thereby drives PBAD-promoted expression of cytotoxic agents and imaging agents. This is a promising approach for tumor therapy and imaging.

  9. Correlation between ceftriaxone resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and expression of outer membrane proteins OmpW and Ail/OmpX-like protein, which are regulated by BaeR of a two-component system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wensi S; Li, Pei-Chuan; Cheng, Chao-Yin

    2005-09-01

    Mutant 7F2 of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium has a transposon inserted in the regulator gene baeR of a two-component system and showed a more-than-fourfold reduction in resistance to ceftriaxone. Complementation analysis suggested an association among the outer membrane proteins OmpW and STM3031, ceftriaxone resistance, and baeR.

  10. Evolution of New cis-Regulatory Motifs Required for Cell-Specific Gene Expression in Caenorhabditis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalis Barkoulas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Patterning of C. elegans vulval cell fates relies on inductive signaling. In this induction event, a single cell, the gonadal anchor cell, secretes LIN-3/EGF and induces three out of six competent precursor cells to acquire a vulval fate. We previously showed that this developmental system is robust to a four-fold variation in lin-3/EGF genetic dose. Here using single-molecule FISH, we find that the mean level of expression of lin-3 in the anchor cell is remarkably conserved. No change in lin-3 expression level could be detected among C. elegans wild isolates and only a low level of change-less than 30%-in the Caenorhabditis genus and in Oscheius tipulae. In C. elegans, lin-3 expression in the anchor cell is known to require three transcription factor binding sites, specifically two E-boxes and a nuclear-hormone-receptor (NHR binding site. Mutation of any of these three elements in C. elegans results in a dramatic decrease in lin-3 expression. Yet only a single E-box is found in the Drosophilae supergroup of Caenorhabditis species, including C. angaria, while the NHR-binding site likely only evolved at the base of the Elegans group. We find that a transgene from C. angaria bearing a single E-box is sufficient for normal expression in C. elegans. Even a short 58 bp cis-regulatory fragment from C. angaria with this single E-box is able to replace the three transcription factor binding sites at the endogenous C. elegans lin-3 locus, resulting in the wild-type expression level. Thus, regulatory evolution occurring in cis within a 58 bp lin-3 fragment, results in a strict requirement for the NHR binding site and a second E-box in C. elegans. This single-cell, single-molecule, quantitative and functional evo-devo study demonstrates that conserved expression levels can hide extensive change in cis-regulatory site requirements and highlights the evolution of new cis-regulatory elements required for cell-specific gene expression.

  11. ATG genes involved in non-selective autophagy are conserved from yeast to man, but the selective Cvt and pexophagy pathways also require organism-specific genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Wiebe H.; Klei, Ida J. van der; Veenhuis, Marten; Kiel, Jan A.K.W.

    2007-01-01

    ATG genes encode proteins that are required for macroautophagy, the Cvt pathway and/or pexophagy. Using the published Atg protein sequences, we have screened protein and DNA databases to identify putative functional homologs (orthologs) in 21 fungal species (yeast and filamentous fungi) of which the

  12. General response of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to desiccation: A new role for the virulence factors sopD and sseD in survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Maserati

    Full Text Available Salmonella can survive for long periods under extreme desiccation conditions. This stress tolerance poses a risk for food safety, but relatively little is known about the molecular and cellular regulation of this adaptation mechanism. To determine the genetic components involved in Salmonella's cellular response to desiccation, we performed a global transcriptomic analysis comparing S. enterica serovar Typhimurium cells equilibrated to low water activity (aw 0.11 and cells equilibrated to high water activity (aw 1.0. The analysis revealed that 719 genes were differentially regulated between the two conditions, of which 290 genes were up-regulated at aw 0.11. Most of these genes were involved in metabolic pathways, transporter regulation, DNA replication/repair, transcription and translation, and, more importantly, virulence genes. Among these, we decided to focus on the role of sopD and sseD. Deletion mutants were created and their ability to survive desiccation and exposure to aw 0.11 was compared to the wild-type strain and to an E. coli O157:H7 strain. The sopD and sseD mutants exhibited significant cell viability reductions of 2.5 and 1.3 Log (CFU/g, respectively, compared to the wild-type after desiccation for 4 days on glass beads. Additional viability differences of the mutants were observed after exposure to aw 0.11 for 7 days. E. coli O157:H7 lost viability similarly to the mutants. Scanning electron microscopy showed that both mutants displayed a different morphology compared to the wild-type and differences in production of the extracellular matrix under the same conditions. These findings suggested that sopD and sseD are required for Salmonella's survival during desiccation.

  13. Temperature-sensitive glutamate dehydrogenase mutants of Salmonella typhimurium.

    OpenAIRE

    Dendinger, S M; Brenchley, J E

    1980-01-01

    Mutants of Salmonella typhimurium defective in glutamate dehydrogenase activity were isolated in parent strains lacking glutamate synthase activity by localizcd mutagenesis or by a general mutagenesis combined with a cycloserine enrichment for glutamate auxotrophs. Two mutants with temperature-sensitive phenotypes had glutamate dehydrogenase activities that were more thermolabile than that of an isogenic control strain. Eight other mutants had less than 10% of the wild-type glutamate dehydrog...

  14. Internal Colonization of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Tomato Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ganyu; Hu, Jiahuai; Cevallos-Cevallos, Juan M.; Richardson, Susanna M.; Bartz, Jerry A.; van Bruggen, Ariena H. C.

    2011-01-01

    Several Salmonella enterica outbreaks have been traced back to contaminated tomatoes. In this study, the internalization of S. enterica Typhimurium via tomato leaves was investigated as affected by surfactants and bacterial rdar morphotype, which was reported to be important for the environmental persistence and attachment of Salmonella to plants. Surfactants, especially Silwet L-77, promoted ingress and survival of S. enterica Typhimurium in tomato leaves. In each of two experiments, 84 tomato plants were inoculated two to four times before fruiting with GFP-labeled S. enterica Typhimurium strain MAE110 (with rdar morphotype) or MAE119 (without rdar). For each inoculation, single leaflets were dipped in 109 CFU/ml Salmonella suspension with Silwet L-77. Inoculated and adjacent leaflets were tested for Salmonella survival for 3 weeks after each inoculation. The surface and pulp of ripe fruits produced on these plants were also examined for Salmonella. Populations of both Salmonella strains in inoculated leaflets decreased during 2 weeks after inoculation but remained unchanged (at about 104 CFU/g) in week 3. Populations of MAE110 were significantly higher (Penterica Typhimurium. In the second year, Salmonella was detected in adjacent non-inoculated leaves of eight tomato plants (five inoculated with strain MAE110). The pulp of 12 fruits from two plants inoculated with MAE110 was Salmonella positive (about 106 CFU/g). Internalization was confirmed by fluorescence and confocal laser microscopy. For the first time, convincing evidence is presented that S. enterica can move inside tomato plants grown in natural field soil and colonize fruits at high levels without inducing any symptoms, except for a slight reduction in plant growth. PMID:22096553

  15. Effect of microwave irradiation on Salmonella typhimurium cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilenko, I.I.; Mirutenko, V.I.; Sopil', A.V.; Koval'chuk, V.K.; Lyakhovchuk, N.N.; Popovich, G.G.; Bondarenko, V.I.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that effect of electromagnetic energy of SHF-frequency, 8 mm wavelength and integral output power of 1MWt during 5.20 and 30 min results in negligible variations of Salmonella typhimurium cell ultrastructure. Increase of lipid peroxide amount determined according to malonic dialdehyde is observed in treated cells; it constitutes 10.23x10 -9 nm of malonic dialdehyde as compared to 3.20x10 -9 nm in control (untreated) cells

  16. Xenopus Nanos1 is required to prevent endoderm gene expression and apoptosis in primordial germ cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Fangfang; Singh, Amar; King, Mary Lou

    2012-01-01

    Nanos is expressed in multipotent cells, stem cells and primordial germ cells (PGCs) of organisms as diverse as jellyfish and humans. It functions together with Pumilio to translationally repress targeted mRNAs. Here we show by loss-of-function experiments that Xenopus Nanos1 is required to preserve PGC fate. Morpholino knockdown of maternal Nanos1 resulted in a striking decrease in PGCs and a loss of germ cells from the gonads. Lineage tracing and TUNEL staining reveal that Nanos1-deficient PGCs fail to migrate out of the endoderm. They appear to undergo apoptosis rather than convert to normal endoderm. Whereas normal PGCs do not become transcriptionally active until neurula, Nanos1-depleted PGCs prematurely exhibit a hyperphosphorylated RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain at the midblastula transition. Furthermore, they inappropriately express somatic genes characteristic of endoderm regulated by maternal VegT, including Xsox17α, Bix4, Mixer, GATA4 and Edd. We further demonstrate that Pumilio specifically binds VegT RNA in vitro and represses, along with Nanos1, VegT translation within PGCs. Repressed VegT RNA in wild-type PGCs is significantly less stable than VegT in Nanos1-depleted PGCs. Our data indicate that maternal VegT RNA is an authentic target of Nanos1/Pumilio translational repression. We propose that Nanos1 functions to translationally repress RNAs that normally specify endoderm and promote apoptosis, thus preserving the germline. PMID:22399685

  17. Resistance of Salmonella enteritidis variety typhimurium to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norberg, A.N.; Maliska, C.

    1988-01-01

    The use of ionizing radiations to kill microrganisms responsible for food deterioration, and toxinfections is an example of peaceful use of nuclear energy. Food toxinfections are, amongus, produced mostly by Salmonella enteritidis var. typhimurium. Due to the pauncity of information on the resistance to gamma radiation of Salmonella enteritidis var. typhimurium this paper has the aim to define the 60-Cobalt gamma radiation lethal dose to these bacteria, in experimentally contaminated milk by samples recovered from our geographycal area. One hundred nineteen samples of milk containing about 150.000 bacteria per ml were irradiated with doses ranging from 100 to 1.100 Gy. Two samples of surving bacteria were again irradiated by doses up to 2.500 Gy. The bacteria not previously irradiated were killed by doses of 1.100 Gy. It was concluded that the 60-Cobalt gamma radiation minimal lethal dose to Salmonella enteritidis var. typhimurium is 1.200 Gy. The surviving strains to smaller doses than 1.200 Gy when re-irradiated prompt the forthcoming of more radio-resistant germs. (author) [pt

  18. Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles of the Two Porcine Salmonella Typhimurium Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal METİNER

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to detect the presence of the Salmonella species in swine with diarrhea, and to investigate their antimicrobial resistance and extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL and/or AmpC β-lactamase production. For this purpose, stool samples from three commercial pig farms in Istanbul and Tekirdag were collected and processed for Salmonella isolation by culture and isolates were identified by biochemical activity tests. Salmonella isolates were confirmed by PCR then serotyped. Antimicrobial resistance and ESBL and AmpC production of the isolates were determined according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI standard. In the study, two hundred and thirty eight stool samples were examined. Salmonella spp. were obtained from 2 samples, and the isolation rate was determined as 0.8%. Both of the isolates were defined as Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (serotype 1, 4, [5], 12: I: 1, 2 by serotyping. Both of them were resistant to cefaclor, cloxacillin and lincomycin (100%. Multidrug resistance (resistance ≥3 antimicrobials observed in all isolates. ESBL and AmpC production were not detected in any of the isolates. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the isolation of S. Typhimurium in pigs with diarrhea in Turkey. This study also represents the first report of multi-drug resistant S. Typhimurium isolates from pig stools in Turkey.

  19. MMS sensitivity of all amino acid-requiring mutants in aspergillus and its suppression by mutations in a single gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käfer, E

    1987-04-01

    All available amino acid-requiring mutants of Aspergillus nidulans were found to be hypersensitive to MMS (methyl methanesulfonate) to various degrees. On MMS media, secondary mutations could be selected which suppress this MMS sensitivity but do not affect the requirement. Many such mutations were analyzed and found to be alleles of one gene, smsA (= suppressor of MMS sensitivity), which mapped distal on the right arm of chromosome V. This gene is more likely to be involved in general regulation of amino acid biosynthesis than MMS uptake, since a variety of pathway interactions were clearly modified by smsA suppressors in the absence of MMS.

  20. SHC1, a high pH inducible gene required for growth at alkaline pH in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, S K; Han, S B; Snyder, M; Choi, E Y

    1999-02-05

    In this study, we carried out a large-scale transposon tagging screening to identify genes whose expression is regulated by ambient pH. Of 35,000 transformants, two strains carrying the genes whose expression is strictly dependent on pH of growth medium were identified. One of the genes with 20-fold induction by alkali pH was identified as SHC1 gene in the Yeast Genome Directory and its expression was the highest at alkaline pH and moderately induced by osmotic stress. However, the gene was expressed neither at acidic pH nor by other stress conditions. The haploid mutant with truncated shc1 gene showed growth retardation and an abnormal morphology at alkaline pH. On the other hand, the mutant strain carrying the wild-type SHC1 gene reverted to the mutant phenotype. To confirm that Shc1p is an alkali-inducible protein, a monoclonal antibody to Shc1p was produced. While a 55-kDa protein band appeared on the Western blot of cells grown at alkaline pH, Shc1p was barely detectable on the blots of cells grown in YPD. Our results indicate that yeast cells have an efficient system adapting to large variations in ambient pH and SHC1 is one of the genes required for the growth at alkaline pH. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  1. The ligand binding domain of GCNF is not required for repression of pluripotency genes in mouse fetal ovarian germ cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah M Okumura

    Full Text Available In mice, successful development and reproduction require that all cells, including germ cells, transition from a pluripotent to a differentiated state. This transition is associated with silencing of the pluripotency genes Oct4 and Nanog. Interestingly, these genes are repressed at different developmental timepoints in germ and somatic cells. Ovarian germ cells maintain their expression until about embryonic day (E 14.5, whereas somatic cells silence them much earlier, at about E8.0. In both somatic cells and embryonic stem cells, silencing of Oct4 and Nanog requires the nuclear receptor GCNF. However, expression of the Gcnf gene has not been investigated in fetal ovarian germ cells, and whether it is required for silencing Oct4 and Nanog in that context is not known. Here we demonstrate that Gcnf is expressed in fetal ovarian germ cells, peaking at E14.5, when Oct4 and Nanog are silenced. However, conditional ablation of the ligand-binding domain of Gcnf using a ubiquitous, tamoxifen-inducible Cre indicates that Gcnf is not required for the down-regulation of pluripotency genes in fetal ovarian germ cells, nor is it required for initiation of meiosis and oogenesis. These results suggest that the silencing of Oct4 and Nanog in germ cells occurs via a different mechanism from that operating in somatic cells during gastrulation.

  2. Identification and localization of a gene that specifies production of Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trucksis, M.; Depew, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    A gene that specifies production of Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I (ω protein) was identified with the aid of a radioimmunoassay for this protein. E. coli DNA topoisomerase I was produced by Salmonella typhimurium merodiploids that harbored E. coli plasmid F' 123, but not by strains that lost this plasmid. Analysis of strains with spontaneous deletions of F' 123 showed that the gene, topA, required for production of the E. coli ω protein was between the trp operon and the cysB gene. Deletions that eliminated topA also eliminated the supX gene. We suggest that topA is the structural gene of E. coli DNA topoisomerase I and that topA is identical to supX

  3. Elucidation of the outer membrane proteome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium utilising a lipid-based protein immobilization technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appleton Hazel

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium is a major cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. The outer membrane proteins expressed by S. Typhimurium mediate the process of adhesion and internalisation within the intestinal epithelium of the host thus influencing the progression of disease. Since the outer membrane proteins are surface-exposed, they provide attractive targets for the development of improved antimicrobial agents and vaccines. Various techniques have been developed for their characterisation, but issues such as carryover of cytosolic proteins still remain a problem. In this study we attempted to characterise the surface proteome of S. Typhimurium using Lipid-based Protein Immobilisation technology in the form of LPI™ FlowCells. No detergents are required and no sample clean up is needed prior to downstream analysis. The immobilised proteins can be digested with proteases in multiple steps to increase sequence coverage, and the peptides eluted can be characterised directly by liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS and identified from mass spectral database searches. Results In this study, 54 outer membrane proteins, were identified with two or more peptide hits using a multi-step digest approach. Out of these 28 were lipoproteins, nine were involved in transport and three with enzyme activity These included the transporters BtuB which is responsible for the uptake of vitamin B12, LamB which is involved in the uptake of maltose and maltodextrins and LolB which is involved in the incorporation of lipoproteins in the outer membrane. Other proteins identified included the enzymes MltC which may play a role in cell elongation and division and NlpD which is involved in catabolic processes in cell wall formation as well as proteins involved in virulence such as Lpp1, Lpp2 and OmpX. Conclusion Using a multi-step digest approach the LPI™ technique enables the incorporation of a

  4. A CHROMATIN MODIFYING ENZYME, SDG8, IS REQUIRED FOR MORPHOLOGICAL, GENE EXPRESSION, AND EPIGENETIC RESPONSES TO MECHANICAL STIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Ian Cazzonelli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Thigmomorphogenesis is viewed as being a response process of acclimation to short repetitive bursts of mechanical stimulation or touch. The underlying molecular mechanisms that coordinate changes in how touch signals lead to long-term morphological changes are enigmatic. Touch responsive gene expression is rapid and transient, and no transcription factor or DNA regulatory motif has been reported that could confer a genome wide mechanical stimulus. We report here on a chromatin modifying enzyme, SDG8/ASHH2, which can regulate the expression of many touch responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis. SDG8 is required for the permissive expression of touch induced genes; and the loss of function of sdg8 perturbs the maximum levels of induction on selected touch gene targets. SDG8 is required to maintain permissive H3K4 trimethylation marks surrounding the Arabidopsis touch-inducible gene TOUCH 3 (TCH3, which encodes a calmodulin-like protein (CML12. The gene neighbouring was also slightly down regulated, revealing a new target for SDG8 mediated chromatin modification. Finally, sdg8 mutants show perturbed morphological response to wind-agitated mechanical stimuli, implicating an epigenetic memory-forming process in the acclimation response of thigmomorphogenesis.

  5. A low-pH medium in vitro or the environment within a macrophage decreases the transcriptional levels of fimA, fimZ and lrp in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke-Chuan; Hsu, Yuan-Hsun; Huang, Yi-Ning; Chen, Ter-Hsin; Lin, Jiunn-Horng; Hsuan, Shih-Ling; Chien, Maw-Sheng; Lee, Wei-Cheng; Yeh, Kuang-Sheng

    2013-09-01

    Many Salmonella Typhimurium isolates produce type 1 fimbriae and exhibit fimbrial phase variation in vitro. Static broth culture favours the production of fimbriae, while solid agar medium inhibits the generation of these appendages. Little information is available regarding whether S. Typhimurium continues to produce type 1 fimbriae during in vivo growth. We used a type 1 fimbrial phase-variable strain S. Typhimurium LB5010 and its derivatives to infect RAW 264.7 macrophages. Following entry into macrophages, S. Typhimurium LB5010 gradually decreased the transcript levels of fimbrial subunit gene fimA, positive regulatory gene fimZ, and global regulatory gene lrp. A similar decrease in transcript levels was detected by RT-PCRwhen the pH of static brothmediumwas shifted frompH 7 to amore acidic pH 4. A fimA-deleted strain continued to multiply within macrophages as did the parental strain. An lrp deletion strain was unimpaired for in vitro growth at pH 7 or pH 4, while a strain harboring an lrp-containing plasmid exhibited impaired in vitro growth at pH 4. We propose that acidic medium, which resembles one aspect of the intracellular environment in a macrophage, inhibits type 1 fimbrial production by down-regulation of the expression of lrp, fimZ and fimA.

  6. Complete auxotrophy for unsaturated fatty acids requires deletion of two sets of genes in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Capua, Cecilia B; Doprado, Mariana; Belardinelli, Juan Manuel; Morbidoni, Héctor R

    2017-10-01

    The synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids in Mycobacterium smegmatis is poorly characterized. Bioinformatic analysis revealed four putative fatty acid desaturases in its genome, one of which, MSMEG_1886, is highly homologous to desA3, the only palmitoyl/stearoyl desaturase present in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome. A MSMEG_1886 deletion mutant was partially auxotrophic for oleic acid and viable at 37°C and 25°C, although with a long lag phase in liquid medium. Fatty acid analysis suggested that MSMEG_1886 is a palmitoyl/stearoyl desaturase, as the synthesis of palmitoleic acid was abrogated, while oleic acid contents dropped by half in the mutant. Deletion of the operon MSMEG_1741-1743 (highly homologous to a Pseudomonas aeruginosa acyl-CoA desaturase) had little effect on growth of the parental strain; however the double mutant MSMEG_1886-MSMEG_1741-1743 strictly required oleic acid for growth. The ΔMSMEG_1886-ΔMSMEG_1741 double mutant was able to grow (poorly but better than the ΔMSMEG_1886 single mutant) in solid and liquid media devoid of oleic acid, suggesting a repressor role for ΔMSMEG_1741. Fatty acid analysis of the described mutants suggested that MSMEG_1742-43 desaturates C18:0 and C24:0 fatty acids. Thus, although the M. smegmatis desA3 homologue is the major player in unsaturated fatty acid synthesis, a second set of genes is also involved. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Genome-wide analysis of CREB target genes reveals a core promoter requirement for cAMP responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkright, Michael D; Guzmán, Ernesto; Flechner, Lawrence; Su, Andrew I; Hogenesch, John B; Montminy, Marc

    2003-04-01

    We have employed a hidden Markov model (HMM) based on known cAMP responsive elements to search for putative CREB target genes. The best scoring sites were positionally conserved between mouse and human orthologs, suggesting that this parameter can be used to enrich for true CREB targets. Target validation experiments revealed a core promoter requirement for transcriptional induction via CREB; TATA-less promoters were unresponsive to cAMP compared to TATA-containing genes, despite comparable binding of CREB to both sets of genes in vivo. Indeed, insertion of a TATA box motif rescued cAMP responsiveness on a TATA-less promoter. These results illustrate a mechanism by which subsets of target genes for a transcription factor are differentially regulated depending on core promoter configuration.

  8. Identification of pif-2, a third conserved baculovirus gene required for per os infection of insect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijlman, G.P.; Pruijssers, A.; Vlak, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Infection of cultured insect cells with Spodoptera exigua multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV) resulted in the generation of mutants with major genomic deletions. Some of the mutants lacked the ability to infect S. exigua larvae per os. The gene(s) responsible for this phenotype in SeMNPV was

  9. Determination of variants in the 3'-region of the Tyrosinase gene requires locus specific amplification.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaki, M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Ray, K.

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the Tyrosinase gene (TYR, 11q14-q21) cause oculocutaneous albinism type 1 (OCA1). The 3'-region of the TYR shows 98.55% sequence identity with a pseudogene, known as Tyrosinase-Like Gene (TYRL, 11p11.2-cen). A large number of publicly available nucleotide variants of TYR in this region

  10. eRNAs are required for p53-dependent enhancer activity and gene transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melo, C.A.; Drost, J.; Wijchers, P.J.; van de Werken, H.; de Wit, E.; Oude Vrielink, J.A.; Elkon, R.; Melo, S.A.; Leveille, N.; Kalluri, R.; de Laat, W.; Agami, R.

    2013-01-01

    Binding within or nearby target genes involved in cell proliferation and survival enables the p53 tumor suppressor gene to regulate their transcription and cell-cycle progression. Using genome-wide chromatin-binding profiles, we describe binding of p53 also to regions located distantly from any

  11. Deep Conservation of Genes Required for Both Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans Sleep Includes a Role for Dopaminergic Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Komudi; Ju, Jennifer Y.; Walsh, Melissa B.; DiIorio, Michael A.; Hart, Anne C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Cross-species conservation of sleep-like behaviors predicts the presence of conserved molecular mechanisms underlying sleep. However, limited experimental evidence of conservation exists. Here, this prediction is tested directly. Measurements and Results: During lethargus, Caenorhabditis elegans spontaneously sleep in short bouts that are interspersed with bouts of spontaneous locomotion. We identified 26 genes required for Drosophila melanogaster sleep. Twenty orthologous C. elegans genes were selected based on similarity. Their effect on C. elegans sleep and arousal during the last larval lethargus was assessed. The 20 most similar genes altered both the quantity of sleep and arousal thresholds. In 18 cases, the direction of change was concordant with Drosophila studies published previously. Additionally, we delineated a conserved genetic pathway by which dopamine regulates sleep and arousal. In C. elegans neurons, G-alpha S, adenylyl cyclase, and protein kinase A act downstream of D1 dopamine receptors to regulate these behaviors. Finally, a quantitative analysis of genes examined herein revealed that C. elegans arousal thresholds were directly correlated with amount of sleep during lethargus. However, bout duration varies little and was not correlated with arousal thresholds. Conclusions: The comprehensive analysis presented here suggests that conserved genes and pathways are required for sleep in invertebrates and, likely, across the entire animal kingdom. The genetic pathway delineated in this study implicates G-alpha S and previously known genes downstream of dopamine signaling in sleep. Quantitative analysis of various components of quiescence suggests that interdependent or identical cellular and molecular mechanisms are likely to regulate both arousal and sleep entry. Citation: Singh K, Ju JY, Walsh MB, Dilorio MA, Hart AC. Deep conservation of genes required for both Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans sleep includes a role for

  12. Cloning and Expression of the Lactococcus lactis purDEK Genes, Required for Growth in Milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Dan; Kilstrup, Mogens

    1998-01-01

    An operon containing the genes purD and purE and part of the purK gene was cloned from the facultative anaerobic gram positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis by complementation of the purD mutation in Escherichia coli SO609. The genes encode enzymes in the de novo pathway of purine nucleotides....... The expression of the genes was regulated approximately 35-fold at the transcription level by the availability of purines in the growth medium. Deletion analysis of the nucleotide region upstream of purD indicated that a region of 145 bp is enough to give regulated expression of the reporter lacLM genes, which...... encode beta-galactosidase. Deletion of a region 79 bp upstream of the transcription start point reduced the promoter activity 33-fold when incubated in a purine-free medium and to values below the detection limit when incubated in a purine-containing medium. No secondary transcription start points were...

  13. Experimental annotation of post-translational features and translated coding regions in the pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansong, Charles; Tolic, Nikola; Purvine, Samuel O.; Porwollik, Steffen; Jones, Marcus B.; Yoon, Hyunjin; Payne, Samuel H.; Martin, Jessica L.; Burnet, Meagan C.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Venepally, Pratap; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott; Heffron, Fred; Mcclelland, Michael; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2011-08-25

    Complete and accurate genome annotation is crucial for comprehensive and systematic studies of biological systems. For example systems biology-oriented genome scale modeling efforts greatly benefit from accurate annotation of protein-coding genes to develop proper functioning models. However, determining protein-coding genes for most new genomes is almost completely performed by inference, using computational predictions with significant documented error rates (> 15%). Furthermore, gene prediction programs provide no information on biologically important post-translational processing events critical for protein function. With the ability to directly measure peptides arising from expressed proteins, mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches can be used to augment and verify coding regions of a genomic sequence and importantly detect post-translational processing events. In this study we utilized “shotgun” proteomics to guide accurate primary genome annotation of the bacterial pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium 14028 to facilitate a systems-level understanding of Salmonella biology. The data provides protein-level experimental confirmation for 44% of predicted protein-coding genes, suggests revisions to 48 genes assigned incorrect translational start sites, and uncovers 13 non-annotated genes missed by gene prediction programs. We also present a comprehensive analysis of post-translational processing events in Salmonella, revealing a wide range of complex chemical modifications (70 distinct modifications) and confirming more than 130 signal peptide and N-terminal methionine cleavage events in Salmonella. This study highlights several ways in which proteomics data applied during the primary stages of annotation can improve the quality of genome annotations, especially with regards to the annotation of mature protein products.

  14. DNA polymerases ν and θ are required for efficient immunoglobulin V gene diversification in chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohzaki, Masaoki; Nishihara, Kana; Hirota, Kouji; Sonoda, Eiichiro; Yoshimura, Michio; Ekino, Shigeo; Butler, John E.; Watanabe, Masami; Halazonetis, Thanos D.

    2010-01-01

    The chicken DT40 B lymphocyte line diversifies its immunoglobulin (Ig) V genes through translesion DNA synthesis–dependent point mutations (Ig hypermutation) and homologous recombination (HR)–dependent Ig gene conversion. The error-prone biochemical characteristic of the A family DNA polymerases Polν and Polθ led us to explore the role of these polymerases in Ig gene diversification in DT40 cells. Disruption of both polymerases causes a significant decrease in Ig gene conversion events, although POLN−/−/POLQ−/− cells exhibit no prominent defect in HR-mediated DNA repair, as indicated by no increase in sensitivity to camptothecin. Polη has also been previously implicated in Ig gene conversion. We show that a POLH−/−/POLN−/−/POLQ−/− triple mutant displays no Ig gene conversion and reduced Ig hypermutation. Together, these data define a role for Polν and Polθ in recombination and suggest that the DNA synthesis associated with Ig gene conversion is accounted for by three specialized DNA polymerases. PMID:20584917

  15. Analysis of an ordered, comprehensive STM mutant library in infectious Borrelia burgdorferi: insights into the genes required for mouse infectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Lin

    Full Text Available The identification of genes important in the pathogenesis of Lyme disease Borrelia has been hampered by exceedingly low transformation rates in low-passage, infectious organisms. Using the infectious, moderately transformable B. burgdorferi derivative 5A18NP1 and signature-tagged versions of the Himar1 transposon vector pGKT, we have constructed a defined transposon library for the efficient genome-wide investigation of genes required for wild-type pathogenesis, in vitro growth, physiology, morphology, and plasmid replication. To facilitate analysis, the insertion sites of 4,479 transposon mutants were determined by sequencing. The transposon insertions were widely distributed across the entire B. burgdorferi genome, with an average of 2.68 unique insertion sites per kb DNA. The 10 linear plasmids and 9 circular plasmids had insertions in 33 to 100 percent of their predicted genes. In contrast, only 35% of genes in the 910 kb linear chromosome had incapacitating insertions; therefore, the remaining 601 chromosomal genes may represent essential gene candidates. In initial signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM analyses, 434 mutants were examined at multiple tissue sites for infectivity in mice using a semi-quantitative, Luminex-based DNA detection method. Examples of genes found to be important in mouse infectivity included those involved in motility, chemotaxis, the phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system, and other transporters, as well as putative plasmid maintenance genes. Availability of this ordered STM library and a high-throughput screening method is expected to lead to efficient assessment of the roles of B. burgdorferi genes in the infectious cycle and pathogenesis of Lyme disease.

  16. Phenotype microarray analysis of the drug efflux systems in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Seiji; Fujioka, Takuma; Hayashi, Katsuhiko; Yamasaki, Suguru; Hayashi-Nishino, Mitsuko; Nishino, Kunihiko

    2016-11-01

    A large number of drug efflux transporters have been identified in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and increased expression of these transporters confers drug resistance in this organism. Here we compared the respiration activities of the wild-type strain and a mutant with nine deleted transporters by phenotype microarray analysis. The mutant was susceptible to 66 structurally unrelated compounds including many antibiotics, dyes, detergents, antihistamine agents, plant alkaloids, antidepressants, antipsychotic drugs, and antiprotozoal drugs. To investigate the effect of each transporter on the susceptibilities to these drugs, we used the single transporter mutants, several multiple deletion mutants, and the transporter overexpressor strains to determine minimum inhibitory concentrations of ampicillin, erythromycin, minocycline, ciprofloxacin, orphenadrine, amitriptyline, thioridazine, and chlorpromazine. The data indicate that the increased susceptibilities of the mutant lacking nine transporter genes are mainly dependent on the absence of the acrAB efflux genes as well as the tolC gene. In addition to the AcrAB-TolC efflux system, the results from the overexpressor strains show that AcrEF confers resistance to these compounds as well as AcrAB of Escherichia coli, MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The results highlight the importance of the efflux systems not only for resistance to antibiotics but also for resistance to antihistamine agents, plant alkaloids, antidepressants, antipsychotic drugs, and antiprotozoal drugs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Multiple roles of putrescine and spermidine in stress resistance and virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cartas Espinel, Irene; Guerra, Priscila Regina; Jelsbak, Lotte

    2016-01-01

    Polyamines (putrescine and spermidine) are small-cationic amines ubiquitous in nature and present in most living cells. In recent years they have been linked to virulence of several human pathogens including Shigella spp and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium). Central to S...

  18. Natural surface coating to inactivate Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and maintain quality of cherry tomatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate the effectiveness of zein-based coatings in reducing populations of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and preserving quality of cherry tomatoes. Tomatoes were inoculated with a cocktail of S. Typhimurium LT2 plus three mutants on the smoo...

  19. Factors affecting the excretion of GFP Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium by adult house flies (Diptera: Muscidae; Musca domestica L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    House flies harbor and disseminate food-borne pathogens. Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a zoonotic pathogen shed by livestock that causes gastroenteritis in humans. We previously demonstrated that GFP-S. Typhimurium fed to house flies persist in the digestive for 24h. The excretion dynam...

  20. The ROOT HAIRLESS 1 gene encodes a nuclear protein required for root hair initiation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, K; Mathur, J; Boudonck, K; Wells, B; Dolan, L; Roberts, K

    1998-07-01

    The epidermis of Arabidopsis wild-type primary roots, in which some cells grow hairs and others remain hairless in a position-dependent manner, has become an established model system to study cell differentiation. Here we present a molecular analysis of the RHL1 (ROOT HAIRLESS 1) gene that, if mutated, prevents the formation of hairs on primary roots and causes a seedling lethal phenotype. We have cloned the RHL1 gene by use of a T-DNA-tagged mutant and found that it encodes a protein that appears to be plant specific. The predicted RHL1 gene product is a small hydrophilic protein (38.9 kD) containing putative nuclear localization signals and shows no significant homology to any known amino acid sequence. We demonstrate that a 78-amino-acid sequence at its amino terminus is capable of directing an RHL1-GFP fusion protein to the nucleus. The RHL1 transcript is present throughout the wild-type plant and in suspension culture cells, but in very low amounts, suggesting a regulatory function for the RHL1 protein. Structural evidence suggests a role for the RHL1 gene product in the nucleolus. We have examined the genetic relationship between RHL1 and GL2, an inhibitor of root hair initiation in non-hair cells. Our molecular and genetic data with double mutants, together with the expression analysis of a GL2 promoter-GUS reporter gene construct, indicate that the RHL1 gene acts independently of GL2.

  1. Cloning and characterization of a gene (UVR3) required for photorepair of 6-4 photoproducts in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, S.; Sugiyama, M.; Iwai, S.; Hitomi, K.; Otoshi, E.; Kim SangTae; Jiang CaiZhong; Todo, T.; Britt, A.B.; Yamamoto, K.

    1998-01-01

    UV radiation induces two major classes of pyrimidine dimers: the pyrimidine [6-4] pyrimidone photoproduct (6-4 product) and the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD). Many organisms produce enzymes, termed photolyases, that specifically bind to these damage products and split them via a UV-A/blue light-dependent mechanism, thereby reversing the damage. These photolyases are specific for either CPDs or 6-4 products. A gene that expresses a protein with 6-4 photolyase activity in vitro was recently cloned from Drosophila melanogaster and Xenopus laevis. We report here the isolation of a homolog of this gene, cloned on the basis of sequence similarity, from the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana. This cloned gene produces a protein with 6-4 photolyase activity when expressed in Escherichia coli. We also find that a previously described mutant of Arabidopsis (uvr3) that is defective in photoreactivation of 6-4 products carries a nonsense mutation in this 6-4 photolyase homolog. We have therefore termed this gene UVR3. Although homologs of this gene have previously been shown to produce a functional 6-4 photolyase when expressed in heterologous systems, this is the first demonstration of a requirement for this gene for photoreactivation of 6-4 products in vivo

  2. Risk factors associated with Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium infection in Danish broiler flocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, M. N.; Angen, Øystein; Chriel, M.

    1999-01-01

    A retrospective longitudinal study was conducted to identify risk factors associated with Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) infection in Danish broiler flocks. The data included all broiler flocks slaughtered in 1995, and the epidemiological unit was the individual broiler...... for analysis. Five factors and an interaction term were found significant by multivariate logistic regression analysis. An increased risk for S, typhimurium infection was associated with two parent flocks, one confirmed infected and one suspected of being infected with S. typhimurium, with two...... of the hatcheries, and with five houses on the farm. An interaction between season anal the previously mentioned hatcheries, and a random effect at farm level was also found to be statistically significant. Twelve variables were not found to be associated with S, typhimurium infection: medication, growth promoters...

  3. Risk factors associated with Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium infection in Danish broiler flocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, M. N.; Angen, Øystein; Chriel, M.

    1999-01-01

    A retrospective longitudinal study was conducted to identify risk factors associated with Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) infection in Danish broiler flocks. The data included all broiler flocks slaughtered in 1995, and the epidemiological unit was the individual broiler...... flock. The S. typhimurium status was determined by microbiological examination of 60 fresh fecal samples. This procedure should detect an infected flock with a probability above 95%, if the prevalence is above 5%, and given that the sensitivity of the test is 100%. Nineteen variables were selected...... for analysis. Five factors and an interaction term were found significant by multivariate logistic regression analysis. An increased risk for S, typhimurium infection was associated with two parent flocks, one confirmed infected and one suspected of being infected with S. typhimurium, with two...

  4. Outbreak of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium phage type DT41 in Danish poultry production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löfström, Charlotta; Hintzmann, Ann-Sofie; Sørensen, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is one of the most prevalent serovars in Europe - where both poultry and poultry related products are common sources of human salmonellosis. Due to efficient control programs, the prevalence of S. Typhimurium in Danish...... poultry production is very low. Despite this, during the past decades there has been a reoccurring problem with infections with S. Typhimurium phage type DT41 in the Danish poultry production without identifying a clear source. In the end of 2013 and beginning of 2014 an increased isolation of S....... Typhimurium DT41 was noted mainly in this production, but also in other samples. To investigate this is in more detail, 47 isolates from egg layers (n = 5, 1 flock), broilers (n = 33, 13 flocks), broiler breeding flocks and hatches (n = 5; 2 flocks and 1 environmental hatchery sample), feed (n = 1), poultry...

  5. A functional genomic screen for evolutionarily conserved genes required for lifespan and immunity in germline-deficient C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Sinha

    Full Text Available The reproductive system regulates lifespan in insects, nematodes and vertebrates. In Caenorhabditis elegans removal of germline increases lifespan by 60% which is dependent upon insulin signaling, nuclear hormone signaling, autophagy and fat metabolism and their microRNA-regulators. Germline-deficient C. elegans are also more resistant to various bacterial pathogens but the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Firstly, we demonstrate that previously identified genes that regulate the extended lifespan of germline-deficient C. elegans (daf-2, daf-16, daf-12, tcer-1, mir-7.1 and nhr-80 are also essential for resistance to the pathogenic bacterium Xenorhabdus nematophila. We then use a novel unbiased approach combining laser cell ablation, whole genome microarrays, RNAi screening and exposure to X. nematophila to generate a comprehensive genome-wide catalog of genes potentially required for increased lifespan and innate immunity in germline-deficient C. elegans. We find 3,440 genes to be upregulated in C. elegans germline-deficient animals in a gonad dependent manner, which are significantly enriched for genes involved in insulin signaling, fatty acid desaturation, translation elongation and proteasome complex function. Using RNAi against a subset of 150 candidate genes selected from the microarray results, we show that the upregulated genes such as transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO, the PTEN homolog lipid phosphatase DAF-18 and several components of the proteasome complex (rpn-6.1, rpn-7, rpn-9, rpn-10, rpt-6, pbs-3 and pbs-6 are essential for both lifespan and immunity of germline deficient animals. We also identify a novel role for genes including par-5 and T12G3.6 in both lifespan-extension and increased survival on X. nematophila. From an evolutionary perspective, most of the genes differentially expressed in germline deficient C. elegans also show a conserved expression pattern in germline deficient Pristionchus pacificus, a

  6. Characterization of a Monoclonal Antibody Directed against Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Serovar [4,5,12:i:−] ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rementeria, A.; Vivanco, A. B.; Ramirez, A.; Hernando, F. L.; Bikandi, J.; Herrera-León, S.; Echeita, A.; Garaizar, J.

    2009-01-01

    Flagellar extracts of Salmonella enterica serovars expressing phase 2 H1 antigenic complex (H:1,2, H:1,5, H:1,6, and H:1,7) and a mutant flagellin obtained by site-directed mutagenesis of the fljB gene from serovar Typhimurium at codon 218, transforming threonine to alanine, expressed in Escherichia coli (fljB218A) were used to analyze the H1 antigenic complex. Cross-reactions were detected by Western blotting and dot blotting using commercial polyclonal antibodies against the different wild-type extracts and mutant FljB218A. Therefore, we produced a monoclonal antibody (MAb), 23D4, isotyped as immunoglobulin M, against H:1,2 S. enterica serovar Typhimurium flagellin. The mutant flagellin was not recognized by this MAb. When a large number of phase 1 and phase 2 flagellin antigens of different serovars were used to characterize the 23D4 MAb, only extracts of serovars Typhimurium and [4,5,12:i:−] reacted. The protein composition of phase 1 and phase 2 extracts and highly purified H:1,2 flagellin from serovar Typhimurium strain LT2 and extract of strain 286 (serovar [4,5,12:i:−]), which reacted with the MAb, was studied. Phase 2 flagellin (FljBH:1,2) was detected in phase 1 and phase 2 flagellar heat extracts of serovar Typhimurium and was the single protein identified in all spots of purified H:1,2 flagellin. FliC, FlgK, and other proteins were detected in some immunoreactive spots and in the flagellar extract of serovar [4,5,12:i:−]. Immunoelectron microscopy of complete bacteria with 23D4 showed MAb attachment at the base of flagella, although the MAb failed to recognize the filament of flagella. Nevertheless, the results obtained by the other immunological tests (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blotting, and dot blotting) indicate a reaction against flagellins. The epitopes could also be shared by other proteins on spots where FljB is not present, such as aminopeptidase B, isocitrate lyase, InvE, EF-TuA, enolase, DnaK, and others. In conclusion

  7. MCTP2 is a dosage-sensitive gene required for cardiac outflow tract development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalani, Seema R.; Ware, Stephanie M.; Wang, Xueqing; Zapata, Gladys; Tian, Qi; Franco, Luis M.; Jiang, Zhengxin; Bucasas, Kristine; Scott, Daryl A.; Campeau, Philippe M.; Hanchard, Neil; Umaña, Luis; Cast, Ashley; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau W.; McBride, Kim L.; Bray, Molly; Craig Chinault, A.; Boggs, Barbara A.; Huang, Miao; Baker, Mariah R.; Hamilton, Susan; Towbin, Jeff; Jefferies, John L.; Fernbach, Susan D.; Potocki, Lorraine; Belmont, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta (CoA) and hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) have been reported in rare individuals with large terminal deletions of chromosome 15q26. However, no single gene important for left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) development has been identified in this region. Using array-comparative genomic hybridization, we identified two half-siblings with CoA with a 2.2 Mb deletion on 15q26.2, inherited from their mother, who was mosaic for this deletion. This interval contains an evolutionary conserved, protein-coding gene, MCTP2 (multiple C2-domains with two transmembrane regions 2). Using gene-specific array screening in 146 individuals with non-syndromic LVOT obstructive defects, another individual with HLHS and CoA was found to have a de novo 41 kb intragenic duplication within MCTP2, predicted to result in premature truncation, p.F697X. Alteration of Mctp2 gene expression in Xenopus laevis embryos by morpholino knockdown and mRNA overexpression resulted in the failure of proper OT development, confirming the functional importance of this dosage-sensitive gene for cardiogenesis. Our results identify MCTP2 as a novel genetic cause of CoA and related cardiac malformations. PMID:23773997

  8. Multiple BiP genes of Arabidopsis thaliana are required for male gametogenesis and pollen competitiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Tomoyuki; Endo, Toshiya; Nishikawa, Shuh-Ichi

    2014-04-01

    Immunoglobulin-binding protein (BiP) is a molecular chaperone of the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) family. BiP is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and plays key roles in protein translocation, protein folding and quality control in the ER. The genomes of flowering plants contain multiple BiP genes. Arabidopsis thaliana has three BiP genes. BIP1 and BIP2 are ubiquitously expressed. BIP3 encodes a less well conserved BiP paralog, and it is expressed only under ER stress conditions in the majority of organs. Here, we report that all BiP genes are expressed and functional in pollen and pollen tubes. Although the bip1 bip2 double mutation does not affect pollen viability, the bip1 bip2 bip3 triple mutation is lethal in pollen. This result indicates that lethality of the bip1 bip2 double mutation is rescued by BiP3 expression. A decrease in the copy number of the ubiquitously expressed BiP genes correlates well with a decrease in pollen tube growth, which leads to reduced fitness of mutant pollen during fertilization. Because an increased protein secretion activity is expected to increase the protein folding demand in the ER, the multiple BiP genes probably cooperate with each other to ensure ER homeostasis in cells with active secretion such as rapidly growing pollen tubes.

  9. Emdogain-regulated gene expression in palatal fibroblasts requires TGF-βRI kinase signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Stähli

    Full Text Available Genome-wide microarrays have suggested that Emdogain regulates TGF-β target genes in gingival and palatal fibroblasts. However, definitive support for this contention and the extent to which TGF-β signaling contributes to the effects of Emdogain has remained elusive. We therefore studied the role of the TGF-β receptor I (TGF-βRI kinase to mediate the effect of Emdogain on palatal fibroblasts. Palatal fibroblasts were exposed to Emdogain with and without the inhibitor for TGF-βRI kinase, SB431542. Emdogain caused 39 coding genes to be differentially expressed in palatal fibroblasts by microarray analysis (p10-fold. Importantly, in the presence of the TGF-βRI kinase inhibitor SB431542, Emdogain failed to cause any significant changes in gene expression. Consistent with this mechanism, three independent TGF-βRI kinase inhibitors and a TGF-β neutralizing antibody abrogated the increased expression of IL-11, a selected Emdogain target gene. The MAPK inhibitors SB203580 and U0126 lowered the impact of Emdogain on IL-11 expression. The data support that TGF-βRI kinase activity is necessary to mediate the effects of Emdogain on gene expression in vitro.

  10. Emdogain-regulated gene expression in palatal fibroblasts requires TGF-βRI kinase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stähli, Alexandra; Bosshardt, Dieter; Sculean, Anton; Gruber, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide microarrays have suggested that Emdogain regulates TGF-β target genes in gingival and palatal fibroblasts. However, definitive support for this contention and the extent to which TGF-β signaling contributes to the effects of Emdogain has remained elusive. We therefore studied the role of the TGF-β receptor I (TGF-βRI) kinase to mediate the effect of Emdogain on palatal fibroblasts. Palatal fibroblasts were exposed to Emdogain with and without the inhibitor for TGF-βRI kinase, SB431542. Emdogain caused 39 coding genes to be differentially expressed in palatal fibroblasts by microarray analysis (p10-fold). Importantly, in the presence of the TGF-βRI kinase inhibitor SB431542, Emdogain failed to cause any significant changes in gene expression. Consistent with this mechanism, three independent TGF-βRI kinase inhibitors and a TGF-β neutralizing antibody abrogated the increased expression of IL-11, a selected Emdogain target gene. The MAPK inhibitors SB203580 and U0126 lowered the impact of Emdogain on IL-11 expression. The data support that TGF-βRI kinase activity is necessary to mediate the effects of Emdogain on gene expression in vitro.

  11. Homologues of Genetic Transformation DNA Import Genes Are Required for Rhodobacter capsulatus Gene Transfer Agent Recipient Capability Regulated by the Response Regulator CtrA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimacombe, Cedric A; Ding, Hao; Johnson, Jeanette A; Beatty, J Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Gene transfer agents (GTAs) morphologically resemble small, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) bacteriophages; however, their only known role is to package and transfer random pieces of the producing cell genome to recipient cells. The best understood GTA is that of Rhodobacter capsulatus, termed RcGTA. We discovered that homologues of three genes involved in natural transformation in other bacteria, comEC, comF, and comM, are essential for RcGTA-mediated gene acquisition. This paper gives genetic and biochemical evidence that RcGTA-borne DNA entry into cells requires the ComEC and ComF putative DNA transport proteins and genetic evidence that putative cytoplasmic ComM protein of unknown function is required for recipient capability. Furthermore, the master regulator of RcGTA production in bacterial horizontal gene transfer mechanisms, where donor DNA is packaged in transducing phage-like particles and recipient cells take up DNA using natural transformation-related machinery. Both of these differentiated subsets of a culture population, donors and recipients, are dependent on the same response regulator, CtrA. Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a major driver of bacterial evolution and adaptation to environmental stresses. Traits such as antibiotic resistance or metabolic properties can be transferred between bacteria via HGT; thus, HGT can have a tremendous effect on the fitness of a bacterial population. The three classically described HGT mechanisms are conjugation, transformation, and phage-mediated transduction. More recently, the HGT factor GTA was described, where random pieces of producing cell genome are packaged into phage-like particles that deliver DNA to recipient cells. In this report, we show that transport of DNA borne by the R. capsulatus RcGTA into recipient cells requires key genes previously thought to be specific to natural transformation pathways. These findings indicate that RcGTA combines central aspects of phage-mediated transduction and natural

  12. Requirements for Clinical Trials with Gene Therapy and Transplant Products in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    This chapter aims to describe and summarize the regulation of gene and cell therapy products in Switzerland and its legal basis. Product types are briefly described, as are Swiss-specific terminologies such as the term "transplant product," which means products manufactured from cells, tissues, or even whole organs. Although some parts of this chapter may show a guideline character, they are not legally binding, but represent the current thinking of Swissmedic, the Swiss Agency for Therapeutic Products. As so far the experience with marketing approval of gene therapy and cell therapy products in Switzerland is limited, this chapter focuses on the regulation of clinical trials conducted with these products. Quality, nonclinical, and clinical aspects are summarized separately for gene therapy products and transplant products.

  13. Identification of genes specifically required for the anaerobic metabolism of benzene in Geobacter metallireducens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Tian; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Chaurasia, Akhilesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Although the biochemical pathways for the anaerobic degradation of many of the hydrocarbon constituents in petroleum reservoirs have been elucidated, the mechanisms for anaerobic activation of benzene, a very stable molecule, are not known. Previous studies have demonstrated that Geobacter...... metallireducens can anaerobically oxidize benzene to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor and that phenol is an intermediate in benzene oxidation. In an attempt to identify enzymes that might be involved in the conversion of benzene to phenol, whole-genome gene transcript abundance...... was compared in cells metabolizing benzene and cells metabolizing phenol. Eleven genes had significantly higher transcript abundance in benzene-metabolizing cells. Five of these genes had annotations suggesting that they did not encode proteins that could be involved in benzene metabolism and were not further...

  14. No control genes required: Bayesian analysis of qRT-PCR data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail V Matz

    Full Text Available Model-based analysis of data from quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR is potentially more powerful and versatile than traditional methods. Yet existing model-based approaches cannot properly deal with the higher sampling variances associated with low-abundant targets, nor do they provide a natural way to incorporate assumptions about the stability of control genes directly into the model-fitting process.In our method, raw qPCR data are represented as molecule counts, and described using generalized linear mixed models under Poisson-lognormal error. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC algorithm is used to sample from the joint posterior distribution over all model parameters, thereby estimating the effects of all experimental factors on the expression of every gene. The Poisson-based model allows for the correct specification of the mean-variance relationship of the PCR amplification process, and can also glean information from instances of no amplification (zero counts. Our method is very flexible with respect to control genes: any prior knowledge about the expected degree of their stability can be directly incorporated into the model. Yet the method provides sensible answers without such assumptions, or even in the complete absence of control genes. We also present a natural Bayesian analogue of the "classic" analysis, which uses standard data pre-processing steps (logarithmic transformation and multi-gene normalization but estimates all gene expression changes jointly within a single model. The new methods are considerably more flexible and powerful than the standard delta-delta Ct analysis based on pairwise t-tests.Our methodology expands the applicability of the relative-quantification analysis protocol all the way to the lowest-abundance targets, and provides a novel opportunity to analyze qRT-PCR data without making any assumptions concerning target stability. These procedures have been implemented as the MCMC.qpcr package in R.

  15. No control genes required: Bayesian analysis of qRT-PCR data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matz, Mikhail V; Wright, Rachel M; Scott, James G

    2013-01-01

    Model-based analysis of data from quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is potentially more powerful and versatile than traditional methods. Yet existing model-based approaches cannot properly deal with the higher sampling variances associated with low-abundant targets, nor do they provide a natural way to incorporate assumptions about the stability of control genes directly into the model-fitting process. In our method, raw qPCR data are represented as molecule counts, and described using generalized linear mixed models under Poisson-lognormal error. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm is used to sample from the joint posterior distribution over all model parameters, thereby estimating the effects of all experimental factors on the expression of every gene. The Poisson-based model allows for the correct specification of the mean-variance relationship of the PCR amplification process, and can also glean information from instances of no amplification (zero counts). Our method is very flexible with respect to control genes: any prior knowledge about the expected degree of their stability can be directly incorporated into the model. Yet the method provides sensible answers without such assumptions, or even in the complete absence of control genes. We also present a natural Bayesian analogue of the "classic" analysis, which uses standard data pre-processing steps (logarithmic transformation and multi-gene normalization) but estimates all gene expression changes jointly within a single model. The new methods are considerably more flexible and powerful than the standard delta-delta Ct analysis based on pairwise t-tests. Our methodology expands the applicability of the relative-quantification analysis protocol all the way to the lowest-abundance targets, and provides a novel opportunity to analyze qRT-PCR data without making any assumptions concerning target stability. These procedures have been implemented as the MCMC.qpcr package in R.

  16. Disabled-2 is a FOXP3 target gene required for regulatory T cell function

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, N; Nguyen, H; Friedline, RH; Malhotra, N; Brehm, M; Koyonagi, M; Bix, M; Cooper, JA; Chambers, CA; Kang, J

    2009-01-01

    FOXP3 expressing regulatory T cells are vital for maintaining peripheral T cell tolerance and homeostasis. The mechanisms by which FOXP3 target genes orchestrate context-dependent Treg cell function are largely unknown. Here we show that in mouse peripheral lymphocytes, the Drosophila Disabled-2 (Dab2) homolog, a gene that is involved in enhancing TGFβ responses, is exclusively expressed in FOXP3+ regulatory T cells. Dab2 is a direct target of FOXP3 and regulatory T cells lacking DAB2 are fun...

  17. Epstein-Barr Virus BKRF4 Gene Product Is Required for Efficient Progeny Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masud, H M Abdullah Al; Watanabe, Takahiro; Yoshida, Masahiro; Sato, Yoshitaka; Goshima, Fumi; Kimura, Hiroshi; Murata, Takayuki

    2017-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a member of human gammaherpesvirus, infects mainly B cells. EBV has two alternative life cycles, latent and lytic, and is reactivated occasionally from the latent stage to the lytic cycle. To combat EBV-associated disorders, understanding the molecular mechanisms of the EBV lytic replication cycle is also important. Here, we focused on an EBV lytic gene, BKRF4. Using our anti-BKRF4 antibody, we revealed that the BKRF4 gene product is expressed during the lytic cycle with late kinetics. To characterize the role of BKRF4, we constructed BKRF4-knockout mutants using the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) and CRISPR/Cas9 systems. Although disruption of the BKRF4 gene had almost no effect on viral protein expression and DNA synthesis, it significantly decreased progeny virion levels in HEK293 and Akata cells. Furthermore, we show that BKRF4 is involved not only in production of progeny virions but also in increasing the infectivity of the virus particles. Immunoprecipitation assays revealed that BKRF4 interacted with a virion protein, BGLF2. We showed that the C-terminal region of BKRF4 was critical for this interaction and for efficient progeny production. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that BKRF4 partially colocalized with BGLF2 in the nucleus and perinuclear region. Finally, we showed that BKRF4 is a phosphorylated, possible tegument protein and that the EBV protein kinase BGLF4 may be important for this phosphorylation. Taken together, our data suggest that BKRF4 is involved in the production of infectious virions. IMPORTANCE Although the latent genes of EBV have been studied extensively, the lytic genes are less well characterized. This study focused on one such lytic gene, BKRF4, which is conserved only among gammaherpesviruses (ORF45 of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus or murine herpesvirus 68). After preparing the BKRF4 knockout virus using B95-8 EBV-BAC, we demonstrated that the BKRF4 gene was involved in infectious

  18. Plastid gene expression and plant development require a plastidic protein of the mitochondrial transcription termination factor family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiychuk, Elena; Vandepoele, Klaas; Wissing, Josef; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel; De Rycke, Riet; Akbari, Hana; Joubès, Jérôme; Beeckman, Tom; Jänsch, Lothar; Frentzen, Margrit; Van Montagu, Marc C. E.; Kushnir, Sergei

    2011-01-01

    Plastids are DNA-containing organelles unique to plant cells. In Arabidopsis, one-third of the genes required for embryo development encode plastid-localized proteins. To help understand the role of plastids in embryogenesis and postembryonic development, we characterized proteins of the mitochondrial transcription termination factor (mTERF) family, which in animal models, comprises DNA-binding regulators of mitochondrial transcription. Of 35 Arabidopsis mTERF proteins, 11 are plastid-localized. Genetic complementation shows that at least one plastidic mTERF, BELAYA SMERT' (BSM), is required for embryogenesis. The main postembryonic phenotypes of genetic mosaics with the bsm mutation are severe abnormalities in leaf development. Mutant bsm cells are albino, are compromised in growth, and suffer defects in global plastidic gene expression. The bsm phenotype could be phenocopied by inhibition of plastid translation with spectinomycin. Plastid translation is essential for cell viability in dicotyledonous species such as tobacco but not in monocotyledonous maize. Here, genetic interactions between BSM and the gene encoding plastid homomeric acetyl-CoA carboxylase ACC2 suggest that there is a functional redundancy in malonyl-CoA biosynthesis that permits bsm cell survival in Arabidopsis. Overall, our results indicate that biosynthesis of malonyl-CoA and plastid-derived systemic growth-promoting compounds are the processes that link plant development and plastid gene expression. PMID:21464319

  19. [Molecular typing and surveillance on Salmonella typhimurium strain in Guangdong province, 2009-2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanhui; Ke, Bixia; Sun, Jiufeng; He, Dongmei; Chen, Qing; Ke, Changwen; Yu, Shouyi

    2014-08-01

    To understand the distribution and the characteristics on molecular typing of Salmonella (S.) typhimurium isolates gathered from the surveillance program and to construct the standard S. typhimurium databank in the laboratory through surveillance network PulseNet, in Guangdong province to improve the capability of detection on laboratory-based foodborne outbreaks. With the application of standard pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multiple loci VNTR analysis (MLVA) including seven VNTRs loci protocols on PulseNet International Network, 275 isolates of S. typhimurium from ten cities in Guangdong province were typed and their patterns analyzed. The molecular typing databank was constructed by BioNumerics. With S. typhimurium the most common serotypes, the average annual positive rate of Salmonella strains and S. typhimurium were 4.03% and 1.38% respectively. The positive rate and proportion presented a double-peak trend, appearing in May and September. The chromosomal DNA of S. typhimurium was digested with Xba I restricted endo-nucleotidase and 124 PFGE patterns were observed after pulse-field gel electrophoresis, with the discrimination index (D) as 0.928 6. The patterns including more than three S. typhimurium isolates and were further digested with the second enzyme Bln I to achieve 174 patterns, with the D value as 0.989 1. Under MLVA method, 143 variant patterns were obtained, with the D value reaching 0.966 5. Data showed that the discriminatory ability of the MLVA typing method in S. typhimurium was superior to PFGE-Xba I but equal to PFGE-Xba I-Bln I. In addition, when S. typhimurium strains were respectively analyzed by PFGE under double enzymes digestion and MLVA, the results appeared coincident and relative. The variant patterns showed by the two molecular typing methods indicating a genetic diversity existed among the clinical S. typhimurium isolates in Guangdong province. Databank of S. typhimurium was constructed and could be used in laboratory

  20. Plastid gene expression and plant development require a plastidic protein of the mitochondrial transcription termination factor family.

    OpenAIRE

    Babiychuk, Elena; Vandepoele, Klaas; Wissing, Josef; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel; De Rycke, Riet; Akbari, Hana; Joubès, Jérôme; Beeckman, Tom; Jänsch, Lothar; Frentzen, Margrit; Van Montagu, Marc C E; Kushnir, Sergei

    2011-01-01

    Plastids are DNA-containing organelles unique to plant cells. In Arabidopsis, one-third of the genes required for embryo development encode plastid-localized proteins. To help understand the role of plastids in embryogenesis and postembryonic development, we characterized proteins of the mitochondrial transcription termination factor (mTERF) family, which in animal models, comprises DNA-binding regulators of mitochondrial transcription. Of 35 Arabidopsis mTERF proteins, 11 are plastid-localiz...

  1. Identification of Rad23-4 gene required for pollen development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    雨林木风

    2012-05-31

    May 31, 2012 ... number of highly conserved DNA repair systems to maintain the integrity of the genome, such as ... then transferred to a phytotron kept under a regime of a 16 h photoperiod (22°C; 70% humidity). Isolation .... the rad23-4 gene, RNA was isolated from roots, mature leaves, floral buds and developing siliques.

  2. The noncoding RNA taurine upregulated gene 1 is required for differentiation of the murine retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, T L; Matsuda, T; Cepko, C L

    2005-03-29

    With the advent of genome-wide analyses, it is becoming evident that a large number of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) are expressed in vertebrates. However, of the thousands of ncRNAs identified, the functions of relatively few have been established. In a screen for genes upregulated by taurine in developing retinal cells, we identified a gene that appears to be a ncRNA. Taurine Upregulated Gene 1 (TUG1) is a spliced, polyadenylated RNA that does not encode any open reading frame greater than 82 amino acids in its full-length, 6.7 kilobase (kb) RNA sequence. Analyses of Northern blots and in situ hybridization revealed that TUG1 is expressed in the developing retina and brain, as well as in adult tissues. In the newborn retina, knockdown of TUG1 with RNA interference (RNAi) resulted in malformed or nonexistent outer segments of transfected photoreceptors. Immunofluorescent staining and microarray analyses suggested that this loss of proper photoreceptor differentiation is a result of the disregulation of photoreceptor gene expression. A function for a newly identified ncRNA, TUG1, has been established. TUG1 is necessary for the proper formation of photoreceptors in the developing rodent retina.

  3. Requirements for chromatin reassembly during transcriptional downregulation of a heat shock gene in S. cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mette Moesgaard; Christensen, Marianne Skovgaard; Bonven, Bjarne Juul

    2008-01-01

    Heat shock genes respond to moderate heat stress by a wave of transcription. The induction phase is accompanied by massive eviction of histones, which later reassemble with DNA during the ensuing phase of transcription downregulation. Here, we identify determinants of this reassembly throughout...

  4. GmSGT1 is differently required for soybean Rps genes-mediated and basal resistance to Phytophthora sojae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qiang; Cui, Xiaoxia; Su, Liming; Xu, Na; Guo, Na; Xing, Han; Dou, Daolong

    2014-08-01

    Using RNAi approach, we demonstrate that GmSGT1 is an essential component in soybean against Phytophthora sojae, but not required for Rps 2 or Rps 3a-mediated resistance. Utilization of disease resistance in soybean is a major approach to combat root and stem rot disease, which is caused by Phytophthora sojae and poses a growing threat to soybean safety production. The SGT1 protein is essential for disease resistance in many plant species. Here, we analyzed and characterized functions of GmSGT1 gene family in R protein-mediated resistance and basal defense in this important crop. Five candidate genes of GmSGT1 were identified and they were grouped into three clades. Transcriptional levels of all the tested genes were highly induced upon P. sojae infection in four soybean cultivars that confer different resistant levels. Using a gene silencing system in soybean cotyledons, we demonstrated that silencing GmSGT1 genes comprised race-specific resistance in soybean lines carrying genes at the following loci for race-specific resistance to P. sojae: Rps1a, Rps1c, Rps1d, Rps1k, and Rps8. In contrast, the resistance mediated by Rps2 or Rps3a was not affected. Silencing GmSGT1 genes in cotyledons also reduced resistance to this pathogen in a moderately partial resistant cultivar. We further showed that transient overexpression of GmSGT1-1 in Nicotiana benthamiana could enhance the resistance to P. capsici. These results suggest that GmSGT1 is an essential component for soybean in resisting the pathogen and pathways of Rps-mediated disease resistance are diverse in soybean.

  5. Characterization of Salmonella Typhimurium isolates associated with septicemia in swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Nadia; Corriveau, Jonathan; Letellier, Ann; Daigle, France; Quessy, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium is frequently isolated from pigs and may also cause enteric disease in humans. In this study, 33 isolates of S. Typhimurium associated with septicemia in swine (CS) were compared to 33 isolates recovered from healthy animals at slaughter (WCS). The isolates were characterized using phenotyping and genotyping methods. For each isolate, the phage type, antimicrobial resistance, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) DNA profiles were determined. In addition, the protein profiles of each isolate grown in different conditions were studied by Coomassie Blue-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblot. Various phage types were identified. The phage type PT 104 represented 36.4% of all isolates from septicemic pigs. Resistance to as many as 12 antimicrobial agents, including some natural resistances, was found in isolates from CS and WCS. Many genetic profiles were identified among the PT 104 phage types. Although it was not possible to associate one particular protein with septicemic isolates, several highly immunogenic proteins, present in all virulent isolates and in most isolates from clinically healthy animals, were identified. These results indicated that strains associated with septicemia belong to various genetic lineages that can also be recovered from asymptomatic animals at the time of slaughter. PMID:20357952

  6. Protein turnover analysis in Salmonella Typhimurium during infection by dynamic SILAC, Topograph, and quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Han, Qiang-Qiang; Zhou, Mao-Tian; Chen, Xi; Guo, Lin

    2016-07-01

    Protein turnover affects protein abundance and phenotypes. Comprehensive investigation of protein turnover dynamics has the potential to provide substantial information about gene expression. Here we report a large-scale protein turnover study in Salmonella Typhimurium during infection by quantitative proteomics. Murine macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells were infected with SILAC labeled Salmonella. Bacterial cells were extracted after 0, 30, 60, 120, and 240 min. Mass spectrometry analyses yielded information about Salmonella protein turnover dynamics and a software program named Topograph was used for the calculation of protein half lives. The half lives of 311 proteins from intracellular Salmonella were obtained. For bacteria cultured in control medium (DMEM), the half lives for 870 proteins were obtained. The calculated median of protein half lives was 69.13 and 99.30 min for the infection group and the DMEM group, respectively, indicating an elevated protein turnover at the initial stage of infection. Gene ontology analyses revealed that a number of protein functional groups were significantly regulated by infection, including proteins involved in ribosome, periplasmic space, cellular amino acid metabolic process, ion binding, and catalytic activity. The half lives of proteins involved in purine metabolism pathway were found to be significantly shortened during infection. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Racemization of alanine by the alanine racemases from Salmonella typhimurium and Bacillus stearothermophilus: energetic reaction profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraci, W.S.; Walsh, C.T.

    1988-01-01

    Alanine racemases are bacterial pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes providing D-alanine as an essential building block for biosynthesis of the peptidoglycan layer of the cell wall. Two isozymic alanine racemases, encoded by the dadB gene and the alr gene, from the Gram-negative mesophilic Salmonella typhimurium and one from the Gram-positive thermophilic Bacillus stearothermophilus have been examined for the racemization mechanism. Substrate deuterium isotope effects and solvent deuterium isotope effects have been measured in both L → D and D→ L directions for all three enzymes to assess the degree to which abstraction of the α-proton or protonation of substrate PLP carbanion is limiting in catalysis. Additionally, experiments measuring internal return of α- 3 H from substrate to product and solvent exchange/substrate conversion experiments in 3 H 2 O have been used with each enzyme to examine the partitioning of substrate PLP carbanion intermediates and to obtain the relative heights of kinetically significant energy barriers in alanine racemase catalysis

  8. aroA-Deficient Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Is More Than a Metabolically Attenuated Mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, Michael; Kocijancic, Dino; Rohde, Manfred; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Bielecka, Agata; Bueno, Emilio; Cava, Felipe; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer; Curtiss, Roy; Häussler, Susanne; Erhardt, Marc; Weiss, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recombinant attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains are believed to act as powerful live vaccine carriers that are able to elicit protection against various pathogens. Auxotrophic mutations, such as a deletion of aroA, are commonly introduced into such bacteria for attenuation without incapacitating immunostimulation. In this study, we describe the surprising finding that deletion of aroA dramatically increased the virulence of attenuated Salmonella in mouse models. Mutant bacteria lacking aroA elicited increased levels of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) after systemic application. A detailed genetic and phenotypic characterization in combination with transcriptomic and metabolic profiling demonstrated that ΔaroA mutants display pleiotropic alterations in cellular physiology and lipid and amino acid metabolism, as well as increased sensitivity to penicillin, complement, and phagocytic uptake. In concert with other immunomodulating mutations, deletion of aroA affected flagellin phase variation and gene expression of the virulence-associated genes arnT and ansB. Finally, ΔaroA strains displayed significantly improved tumor therapeutic activity. These results highlight the importance of a functional shikimate pathway to control homeostatic bacterial physiology. They further highlight the great potential of ΔaroA-attenuated Salmonella for the development of vaccines and cancer therapies with important implications for host-pathogen interactions and translational medicine. PMID:27601574

  9. Genome-wide identification of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes required for tolerance to acetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sá-Correia Isabel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acetic acid is a byproduct of Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcoholic fermentation. Together with high concentrations of ethanol and other toxic metabolites, acetic acid may contribute to fermentation arrest and reduced ethanol productivity. This weak acid is also a present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, a highly interesting non-feedstock substrate in industrial biotechnology. Therefore, the better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying S. cerevisiae tolerance to acetic acid is essential for the rational selection of optimal fermentation conditions and the engineering of more robust industrial strains to be used in processes in which yeast is explored as cell factory. Results The yeast genes conferring protection against acetic acid were identified in this study at a genome-wide scale, based on the screening of the EUROSCARF haploid mutant collection for susceptibility phenotypes to this weak acid (concentrations in the range 70-110 mM, at pH 4.5. Approximately 650 determinants of tolerance to acetic acid were identified. Clustering of these acetic acid-resistance genes based on their biological function indicated an enrichment of genes involved in transcription, internal pH homeostasis, carbohydrate metabolism, cell wall assembly, biogenesis of mitochondria, ribosome and vacuole, and in the sensing, signalling and uptake of various nutrients in particular iron, potassium, glucose and amino acids. A correlation between increased resistance to acetic acid and the level of potassium in the growth medium was found. The activation of the Snf1p signalling pathway, involved in yeast response to glucose starvation, is demonstrated to occur in response to acetic acid stress but no evidence was obtained supporting the acetic acid-induced inhibition of glucose uptake. Conclusions Approximately 490 of the 650 determinants of tolerance to acetic acid identified in this work are implicated, for the first time, in tolerance to

  10. Structural Insight inot the low Affinity Between Thermotoga maritima CheA and CheB Compared to their Escherichia coli/Salmonella typhimurium Counterparts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Park; B Crane

    2011-12-31

    CheA-mediated CheB phosphorylation and the subsequent CheB-mediated demethylation of the chemoreceptors are important steps required for the bacterial chemotactic adaptation response. Although Escherichia coli CheB has been reported to interact with CheA competitively against CheY, we have observed that Thermotoga maritima CheB has no detectable CheA-binding. By determining the CheY-like domain crystal structure of T. maritima CheB, and comparing against the T. maritima CheY and Salmonella typhimurium CheB structures, we propose that the two consecutive glutamates in the {beta}4/{alpha}4 loop of T. maritima CheB that is absent in T. maritima CheY and in E. coli/S. typhimurium CheB may be one factor contributing to the low CheA affinity.

  11. Effect of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection on Plasma Bactericidal Activity against Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebicka, Estela; Shanmugam, Nanda Kumar N.; Mikhailova, Anastassia; Alter, Galit

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have increased susceptibility to invasive disease caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Studies from Africa have suggested that this susceptibility is related in part to the development of a high level of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-specific IgG that is able to inhibit the killing of S. Typhimurium by bactericidal antibodies in healthy individuals. To explore this issue further, we examined the bactericidal activity against S. Typhimurium using serum and plasma samples from healthy controls and various clinical subgroups of HIV-infected adults in the United States. We found that the bactericidal activity in the samples from HIV-positive elite controllers was comparable to that from healthy individuals, whereas it was significantly reduced in HIV-positive viremic controllers and untreated chronic progressors. As demonstrated previously for healthy controls, the bactericidal activity of the plasma from the elite controllers was inhibited by preincubation with S. Typhimurium LPS, suggesting that it was mediated by anti-LPS antibodies. S. Typhimurium LPS-specific IgG was significantly reduced in all subgroups of HIV-infected individuals. Interestingly, and in contrast to the healthy controls, plasma from all HIV-positive subgroups inhibited in vitro killing of S. Typhimurium by plasma from a healthy individual. Our results, together with the findings from Africa, suggest that multiple mechanisms may be involved in the HIV-induced dysregulation of humoral immunity to S. Typhimurium. PMID:25121777

  12. Ethylene-induced senescence-related gene expression requires protein synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, K.A.; Raghothama, K.G.; Woodson, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of inhibiting protein synthesis on the ethylene-induced expression of 3 carnation senescence-related genes, pSR5, pSR8, and pSR12. Treatment of preclimacteric carnation petal discs with 1μg/ml of cycloheximide, a cytoplasmic protein synthesis inhibitor, for 3h inhibited protein synthesis by >80% as quantitated by the incorporation of [35S]methionine into protein. Pre-treatment of petal discs with cycloheximide prevented ethylene-induced SR transcript accumulation. Cycloheximide treatment of petal discs held in air did not result in increased levels of SR mRNA. These results indicate that ethylene does not interact with pre-formed factors but rather that the activation of SR gene expression by ethylene is mediated by labile protein factor(s) synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes. Experiments are currently underway to determine if cycloheximide exerts its effect at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level

  13. Cutting edge: Dab2 is a FOXP3 target gene required for regulatory T cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Nitya; Nguyen, Hai; Friedline, Randall H; Malhotra, Nidhi; Brehm, Michael; Koyanagi, Madoka; Bix, Mark; Cooper, Jonathan A; Chambers, Cynthia A; Kang, Joonsoo

    2009-10-01

    FOXP3-expressing regulatory T (Treg) cells are vital for maintaining peripheral T cell tolerance and homeostasis. The mechanisms by which FOXP3 target genes orchestrate context-dependent Treg cell function are largely unknown. In this study we show that in mouse peripheral lymphocytes the Drosophila Disabled-2 (Dab2) homolog, a gene that is involved in enhancing TGFbeta responses, is exclusively expressed in FOXP3+ regulatory T cells. Dab2 is a direct target of FOXP3, and regulatory T cells lacking DAB2 are functionally impaired in vitro and in vivo. However, not all aspects of Treg cell function are perturbed, and DAB2 appears to be dispensable for Treg cell function in maintaining naive T cell homeostasis.

  14. Disabled-2 is a FOXP3 target gene required for regulatory T cell function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, N; Nguyen, H; Friedline, RH; Malhotra, N; Brehm, M; Koyonagi, M; Bix, M; Cooper, JA; Chambers, CA; Kang, J

    2010-01-01

    FOXP3 expressing regulatory T cells are vital for maintaining peripheral T cell tolerance and homeostasis. The mechanisms by which FOXP3 target genes orchestrate context-dependent Treg cell function are largely unknown. Here we show that in mouse peripheral lymphocytes, the Drosophila Disabled-2 (Dab2) homolog, a gene that is involved in enhancing TGFβ responses, is exclusively expressed in FOXP3+ regulatory T cells. Dab2 is a direct target of FOXP3 and regulatory T cells lacking DAB2 are functionally impaired in vitro and in vivo. However, not all aspects of Treg cell function are perturbed and DAB2 appears dispensable for Treg cell function in maintaining naïve T cell homeostasis. PMID:19767570

  15. Saccharomyces boulardii Modifies Salmonella Typhimurium Traffic and Host Immune Responses along the Intestinal Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontier-Bres, Rodolphe; Munro, Patrick; Boyer, Laurent; Anty, Rodolphe; Imbert, Véronique; Terciolo, Chloé; André, Fréderic; Rampal, Patrick; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Peyron, Jean-François; Czerucka, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST) is an enteropathogenic Gram-negative bacterium that causes infection following oral ingestion. ST spreads rapidly along the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and invades the intestinal epithelium to ultimately reach internal body organs. The probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii BIOCODEX (S.b-B) is prescribed for prophylaxis of diarrheal infectious diseases. We previously showed that S.b-B prevents weight loss in ST-infected mice and significantly decreases bacterial translocation to the spleen and liver. This study was designed to investigate the effect of S.b-B on ST migration along the GIT and the impact of the yeast on the host's early innate immune responses. Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) was used to evaluate the effect of S.b-B on the progression of luminescent Salmonella Typhimurium (ST-lux) in the GIT of mice pretreated with streptomycin. Photonic emission (PE) was measured in GIT extracts (stomach, small intestine, cecum and colon) at various time periods post-infection (PI). PE analysis revealed that, 45 min PI, ST-lux had migrated slightly faster in the mice treated with S.b-B than in the untreated infected animals. At 90 min PI, ST-lux had reached the cecum in both groups of mice. Adhesion of ST to S.b-B was visualized in the intestines of the mice and probably accounts for (1) the faster elimination of ST-lux in the feces, and (2) reduced translocation of ST to the spleen and liver. In the early phase of infection, S.b-B also modifies the host's immune responses by (1) increasing IFN-γ gene expression and decreasing IL-10 gene expression in the small intestine, and (2) elevating both IFN-γ, and IL-10 mRNA levels in the cecum. BLI revealed that S.b-B modifies ST migration and the host immune response along the GIT. Study findings shed new light on the protective mechanisms of S.b-B during the early phase of Salmonella pathogenesis. PMID:25118595

  16. Saccharomyces boulardii modifies Salmonella typhimurium traffic and host immune responses along the intestinal tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolphe Pontier-Bres

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST is an enteropathogenic Gram-negative bacterium that causes infection following oral ingestion. ST spreads rapidly along the gastrointestinal tract (GIT and invades the intestinal epithelium to ultimately reach internal body organs. The probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii BIOCODEX (S.b-B is prescribed for prophylaxis of diarrheal infectious diseases. We previously showed that S.b-B prevents weight loss in ST-infected mice and significantly decreases bacterial translocation to the spleen and liver. This study was designed to investigate the effect of S.b-B on ST migration along the GIT and the impact of the yeast on the host's early innate immune responses. Bioluminescent imaging (BLI was used to evaluate the effect of S.b-B on the progression of luminescent Salmonella Typhimurium (ST-lux in the GIT of mice pretreated with streptomycin. Photonic emission (PE was measured in GIT extracts (stomach, small intestine, cecum and colon at various time periods post-infection (PI. PE analysis revealed that, 45 min PI, ST-lux had migrated slightly faster in the mice treated with S.b-B than in the untreated infected animals. At 90 min PI, ST-lux had reached the cecum in both groups of mice. Adhesion of ST to S.b-B was visualized in the intestines of the mice and probably accounts for (1 the faster elimination of ST-lux in the feces, and (2 reduced translocation of ST to the spleen and liver. In the early phase of infection, S.b-B also modifies the host's immune responses by (1 increasing IFN-γ gene expression and decreasing IL-10 gene expression in the small intestine, and (2 elevating both IFN-γ, and IL-10 mRNA levels in the cecum. BLI revealed that S.b-B modifies ST migration and the host immune response along the GIT. Study findings shed new light on the protective mechanisms of S.b-B during the early phase of Salmonella pathogenesis.

  17. Association of virulence plasmid and antibiotic resistance determinants with chromosomal multilocus genotypes in Mexican Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Claudia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial genomes are mosaic structures composed of genes present in every strain of the same species (core genome, and genes present in some but not all strains of a species (accessory genome. The aim of this study was to compare the genetic diversity of core and accessory genes of a Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium (Typhimurium population isolated from food-animal and human sources in four regions of Mexico. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST and macrorestriction fingerprints by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE were used to address the core genetic variation, and genes involved in pathogenesis and antibiotic resistance were selected to evaluate the accessory genome. Results We found a low genetic diversity for both housekeeping and accessory genes. Sequence type 19 (ST19 was supported as the founder genotype of STs 213, 302 and 429. We found a temporal pattern in which the derived ST213 is replacing the founder ST19 in the four geographic regions analyzed and a geographic trend in the number of resistance determinants. The distribution of the accessory genes was not random among chromosomal genotypes. We detected strong associations among the different accessory genes and the multilocus chromosomal genotypes (STs. First, the Salmonella virulence plasmid (pSTV was found mostly in ST19 isolates. Second, the plasmid-borne betalactamase cmy-2 was found only in ST213 isolates. Third, the most abundant integron, IP-1 (dfrA12, orfF and aadA2, was found only in ST213 isolates. Fourth, the Salmonella genomic island (SGI1 was found mainly in a subgroup of ST19 isolates carrying pSTV. The mapping of accessory genes and multilocus genotypes on the dendrogram derived from macrorestiction fingerprints allowed the establishment of genetic subgroups within the population. Conclusion Despite the low levels of genetic diversity of core and accessory genes, the non-random distribution of the accessory genes

  18. The Popeye domain containing 2 (popdc2) gene in zebrafish is required for heart and skeletal muscle development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchmaier, Bettina C.; Poon, Kar Lai; Schwerte, Thorsten; Huisken, Jan; Winkler, Christoph; Jungblut, Benno; Stainier, Didier Y.; Brand, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The Popeye domain containing (Popdc) genes encode a family of transmembrane proteins with an evolutionary conserved Popeye domain. These genes are abundantly expressed in striated muscle tissue, however their function is not well understood. In this study we have investigated the role of the popdc2 gene in zebrafish. Popdc2 transcripts were detected in the embryonic myocardium and transiently in the craniofacial and tail musculature. Morpholino oligonucleotide-mediated knockdown of popdc2 resulted in aberrant development of skeletal muscle and heart. Muscle segments in the trunk were irregularly shaped and craniofacial muscles were severely reduced or even missing. In the heart, pericardial edema was prevalent in the morphants and heart chambers were elongated and looping was abnormal. These pathologies in muscle and heart were alleviated after reducing the morpholino concentration. However the heart still was abnormal displaying cardiac arrhythmia at later stages of development. Optical recordings of cardiac contractility revealed irregular ventricular contractions with a 2:1, or 3:1 atrial/ventricular conduction ratio, which caused a significant reduction in heart frequency. Recordings of calcium transients with high spatiotemporal resolution using a transgenic calcium indicator line (Tg(cmlc2:gCaMP)s878) and SPIM microscopy confirmed the presence of a severe arrhythmia phenotype. Our results identify popdc2 as a gene important for striated muscle differentiation and cardiac morphogenesis. In addition it is required for the development of the cardiac conduction system. PMID:22290329

  19. Laf4/Aff3, a Gene Involved in Intellectual Disability, Is Required for Cellular Migration in the Mouse Cerebral Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sheena; Lickiss, Tom; Molnár, Zoltán; Davies, Kay E.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the AFF (AF4/FMR2) family of putative transcription factors are involved in infant acute leukaemia and intellectual disability (ID), although very little is known about their transcriptional targets. For example, deletion of human lymphoid nuclear protein related to AF4/AFF member 3 (LAF4/AFF3) is known to cause severe neurodevelopmental defects, and silencing of the gene is also associated with ID at the folate-sensitive fragile site (FSFS) FRA2A; yet the normal function of this gene in the nervous system is unclear. The aim of this study was to further investigate the function of Laf4 in the brain by focusing on its role in the cortex. By manipulating expression levels in organotypic slices, we demonstrate here that Laf4 is required for normal cellular migration in the developing cortex and have subsequently identified Mdga2, an important structural protein in neurodevelopment, as a target of Laf4 transcriptional activity. Furthermore, we show that the migration deficit caused by loss of Laf4 can be partially rescued by Mdga2 over-expression, revealing an important functional relationship between these genes. Our study demonstrates the key transcriptional role of Laf4 during early brain development and reveals a novel function for the gene in the process of cortical cell migration relevant to the haploinsufficiency and silencing observed in human neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:25162227

  20. Resistant mechanism study of benzalkonium chloride selected Salmonella Typhimurium mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Cui, Shenghui; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Haoyan

    2014-02-01

    Benzalkonium chloride is one of the invaluable biocides that is extensively used in healthcare settings as well as in the food processing industry. After exposing wild-type Salmonella Typhimurium 14028s or its AcrAB inactivation mutant to gradually increasing levels of benzalkonium chloride, resistance mutants S-41, S-150, S-AB-23, S-AB-38, and S-AB-73 were selected and these mutants also showed a 2-64-fold stable minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) increase to chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid, and tetracycline. In S-41 and S-150, the expression of acrB was increased 2.7- and 7.6-fold, and ΔtolC or ΔacrAB mutants of S-41 and S-150 showed the same MICs to all tested antimicrobials as the equivalent Salmonella Typhimurium 14028s mutants. However, in S-AB-23, S-AB-38, and S-AB-73, the expression of acrF was increased 96-, 230-, and 267-fold, respectively, and ΔtolC or ΔacrEF mutants of S-AB-23, S-AB-38, and S-AB-73 showed the similar MICs to all tested antimicrobials as the ΔtolC mutant of Salmonella Typhimurium 14028s. Our data showed that constitutively over-expressed AcrAB working through TolC was the main resistance mechanism in ST14028s benzalkonium chloride resistance mutants. However, after AcrAB had been inactivated, benzalkonium chloride-resistant mutants could still be selected and constitutively over-expressed, AcrEF became the dominant efflux pump working through TolC and being responsible for the increasing antimicrobial resistance. These data indicated that different mechanisms existed for acrB and acrF constitutive over-expression. Since exposure to benzalkonium chloride may lead to Salmonella mutants with a decreased susceptibility to quinolones, which is currently one of the drugs of choice for the treatment of life-threatening salmonelosis, research into the pathogenesis and epidemiology of the benzalkonium chloride resistance mutants will be of increasing importance.

  1. The Transcriptional Heat Shock Response of Salmonella Typhimurium Shows Hysteresis and Heated Cells Show Increased Resistance to Heat and Acid Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pin, C.; Hansen, Trine; Munoz-Cuevas, M.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated if the transcriptional response of Salmonella Typhimurium to temperature and acid variations was hysteretic, i.e. whether the transcriptional regulation caused by environmental stimuli showed memory and remained after the stimuli ceased. The transcriptional activity of non.......e., they remained up-regulated after the environmental stress ceased. At 25uC the transcriptional regulation of genes encoding for heat shock proteins was determined by the previous environment. Gene networks constructed with up-regulated genes were significantly more modular than those of down-regulated genes......H 4.5 were not affected. The exposure to pH 5 only caused up-regulation of 12 genes and this response was neither hysteretic nor accompanied of increased resistance to inactivation conditions. Cellular memory at the transcriptional level may represent a mechanism of adaptation to the environment...

  2. Emdogain-regulated gene expression in palatal fibroblasts requires TGF-βRI kinase signaling.

    OpenAIRE

    Stähli, Alexandra Beatrice; Bosshardt, Dieter; Sculean, Anton; Gruber, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide microarrays have suggested that Emdogain regulates TGF-β target genes in gingival and palatal fibroblasts. However, definitive support for this contention and the extent to which TGF-β signaling contributes to the effects of Emdogain has remained elusive. We therefore studied the role of the TGF-β receptor I (TGF-βRI) kinase to mediate the effect of Emdogain on palatal fibroblasts. Palatal fibroblasts were exposed to Emdogain with and without the inhibitor for TGF-βRI kinase, SB43...

  3. A comparative study of low pH stress in E. coli and S. typhimurium, and a comparative study of the inducibility of lysyl-tRNA synthetase in the enterobacteriaceae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickey, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    Lysyl-tRNA synthetase (LRS) in Escherichia coli is coded by two genes, one constitutive, and the other inducible. The commonness of inducibility of this enzyme in prokaryotes was first tested in eight members of the Enterobacteriaceae using culture conditions known to induce it in E. coli. LRS was found to be inducible in Salmonella Typhimurium, Citrobacter freundii, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter aerogenes, but not in Serratia marcescens, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris or Morganella morganii. The results also indicated that LRS was not induced in E. coli grown in defined medium (SMM) at an external pH (pH 0 ) of 5.0, whereas, it was induced in S. typhimurium under this condition. Further investigation of low pH 0 induced behavior in E. coli and S. typhimurium by quantitation of H 2 35 SO 4 labeled proteins from two dimensional polyacrylamide gels of whole cell sonic extracts showed that at least twenty proteins were induced from 2- to 16-fold in S. typhimurium grown at pH 0 5.0 or shifted from growth at pH 0 7.0 to 5.0. Internal pH (pH i ) changes occurring during steady state growth at low pH 0 , and on shifting from pH 0 7.0 to 5.0, were measured using 14 C-benzoic acid uptake

  4. A Critical Dose of Doxorubicin Is Required to Alter the Gene Expression Profiles in MCF-7 Cells Acquiring Multidrug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, Shang-Hsun; Chen, Tzer-Ming; Hsiao, Hui-Ting; Chen, Yen-Hui

    2015-01-01

    . Model 1: Selection for CSC-like cells. Model 2: Mutations for gain-of resistance. Either model 1 or model 2 requires doxorubicin dose approaching 1 μM to alter gene regulation. PMID:25635866

  5. Dissection of the beta-globin replication-initiation region reveals specific requirements for replicator elements during gene amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Okada

    Full Text Available Gene amplification plays a pivotal role in malignant transformation of human cells. A plasmid with both a mammalian replication-initiation region (IR/origin/replicator and a nuclear matrix-attachment region (MAR is spontaneously amplified in transfected cells by a mechanism that involves amplification at the extrachromosomal site, followed by amplification at the chromosomal arm, ultimately generating a long homogeneously staining region (HSR. Several observations suggest that replication initiation from IR sequences might mediate amplification. To test this idea, we previously dissected c-myc and DHFR IRs to identify the minimum sequence required to support amplification. In this study, we applied an improved analysis that discriminates between two amplification steps to the ß-globin RepP IR, which contains separate elements already known to be essential for initiation on the chromosome arm. The IR sequence was required at least for the extrachromosomal amplification step. In addition to the vector-encoded MAR, amplification also required an AT-rich region and a MAR-like element, consistent with the results regarding replicator activity on the chromosome. However, amplification did not require the AG-rich tract necessary for replicator activity, but instead required a novel sequence containing another AG-rich tract. The differential sequence requirement might be a consequence of extrachromosomal replication.

  6. glpx Gene in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Is Required for In Vitro Gluconeogenic Growth and In Vivo Survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiten J Gutka

    Full Text Available Several enzymes involved in central carbon metabolism and gluconeogenesis play a critical role in survival and pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb. The only known functional fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase in Mtb is encoded by the glpX gene and belongs to the Class II sub-family of FBPase. We describe herein the generation of a ΔglpX strain using homologous recombination. Although the growth profile of ΔglpX is comparable to that of wild type Mtb when grown on the standard enrichment media, its growth is dysgonic with individual gluconeogenic substrates such as oleic acid, glycerol and acetate. In mice lung CFU titers of ΔglpX were 2-3 log10 lower than the wild-type Mtb strain. The results indicate that glpX gene encodes a functional FBPase and is essential for both in vitro and in vivo growth and survival of Mtb. Loss of glpX results in significant reduction of FBPase activity but not complete abolition. These findings verify that the glpX encoded FBPase II in Mtb can be a potential target for drug discovery.

  7. Genome-wide identification of genes required for growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under ethanol stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Voorst, Frank; Houghton-Larsen, Jens; Jønson, Lars; Kielland-Brandt, Morten C; Brandt, Anders

    2006-04-15

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion collection was screened for impaired growth on glucose-based complex medium containing 6% ethanol. Forty-six mutants were found. Genes encoding proteins involved in vacuolar function, the cell integrity pathway, mitochondrial function, subunits of the co-chaperone complex GimC and components of the SAGA transcription factor complex were in this way found to be important for the growth of wild-type Saccharomyces yeast in the presence of ethanol. Several mutants were also sensitive to Calcofluor white (14 mutants), sorbic acid (9), increased temperature (5) and NaCl (3). The transcription factors Msn2p and Ars1p, tagged with green fluorescent protein, were translocated to the nucleus upon ethanol stress. Only one of the genes that contain STRE elements in the promoter was important under ethanol stress; this was TPS1, encoding trehalose 6-phosphate synthase. The map kinase of the cell integrity pathway, Slt2p, was phosphorylated when cells were treated with 6% ethanol. Two out of three mutants tested fermented 20% glucose more slowly than the wild-type. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Genome-wide analysis of the PreA/PreB (QseB/QseC regulon of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatiya Aditi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Salmonella PreA/PreB two-component system (TCS is an ortholog of the QseBC TCS of Escherichia coli. In both Salmonella and E. coli, this system has been shown to affect motility and virulence in response to quorum-sensing and hormonal signals, and to affect the transcription of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium pmrAB operon, which encodes an important virulence-associated TCS. Results To determine the PreA/PreB regulon in S. Typhimurium, we performed DNA microarrays comparing the wild type strain and various preA and/or preB mutants in the presence of ectopically expressed preA (qseB. These data confirmed our previous findings of the negative effect of PreB on PreA gene regulation and identified candidate PreA-regulated genes. A proportion of the activated loci were previously identified as PmrA-activated genes (yibD, pmrAB, cptA, etc. or were genes located in the local region around preA, including the preAB operon. The transcriptional units were defined in this local region by RT-PCR, suggesting three PreA activated operons composed of preA-preB, mdaB-ygiN, and ygiW-STM3175. Several putative virulence-related phenotypes were examined for preAB mutants, resulting in the observation of a host cell invasion and slight virulence defect of a preAB mutant. Contrary to previous reports on this TCS, we were unable to show a PreA/PreB-dependent effect of the quorum-sensing signal AI-2 or of epinephrine on S. Typhimurium with regard to bacterial motility. Conclusion This work further characterizes this unorthadox OmpR/EnvZ class TCS and provides novel candidate regulated genes for further study. This first in-depth study of the PreA/PreB regulatory system phenotypes and regulation suggests significant comparative differences to the reported function of the orthologous QseB/QseC in E. coli.

  9. B-lineage transcription factors and cooperating gene lesions required for leukemia development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijchon, E.J.H.; Havinga, J.; Leeuwen, F.N. van; Scheijen, B.

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells into B lymphocytes requires the concerted action of specific transcription factors, such as RUNX1, IKZF1, E2A, EBF1 and PAX5. As key determinants of normal B-cell development, B-lineage transcription factors are frequently deregulated in hematological

  10. Radiation-induced mutagenicity and lethality in Salmonella typhimurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isildar, M.; Bakale, G.

    1983-01-01

    The mutagenic and lethal effects of ionizing radiation on histidine-deficient auxotrophs of Salmonella typhimurium were studied to improve the understanding of radiation damage to DNA. The auxotrophs were divided into two groups - one which is sensitive to base-pair substitutions and another sensitive to frameshifts. These groups were composed of parent-daughter pairs in which the chemical mutagenicity enhancing plasmid, pKM101, is absent in the parent strain and present in the daughter. Co-60 #betta#-radiation and 250 kV x-rays were used to irradiate the bacteria. Irradiation of the frameshift - sensitive strains which carry the pKm101 plasmid doubled the absolute number of induced revertants whereas irradiation of the base-pair substitution sensitive strain which also carries the pKm101 plasmid produced nearly no change in the number of induced revertants. A nearly negligible effect on the mutation rate was observed for all parent strains

  11. Foxp1 in Forebrain Pyramidal Neurons Controls Gene Expression Required for Spatial Learning and Synaptic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Daniel J; Toriumi, Kazuya; Escamilla, Christine O; Kulkarni, Ashwinikumar; Anderson, Ashley G; Harper, Matthew; Usui, Noriyoshi; Ellegood, Jacob; Lerch, Jason P; Birnbaum, Shari G; Tucker, Haley O; Powell, Craig M; Konopka, Genevieve

    2017-11-08

    Genetic perturbations of the transcription factor Forkhead Box P1 ( FOXP1 ) are causative for severe forms of autism spectrum disorder that are often comorbid with intellectual disability. Recent work has begun to reveal an important role for FoxP1 in brain development, but the brain-region-specific contributions of Foxp1 to autism and intellectual disability phenotypes have yet to be determined fully. Here, we describe Foxp1 conditional knock-out ( Foxp1 cKO ) male and female mice with loss of Foxp1 in the pyramidal neurons of the neocortex and the CA1/CA2 subfields of the hippocampus. Foxp1 cKO mice exhibit behavioral phenotypes that are of potential relevance to autism spectrum disorder, including hyperactivity, increased anxiety, communication impairments, and decreased sociability. In addition, Foxp1 cKO mice have gross deficits in learning and memory tasks of relevance to intellectual disability. Using a genome-wide approach, we identified differentially expressed genes in the hippocampus of Foxp1 cKO mice associated with synaptic function and development. Furthermore, using magnetic resonance imaging, we uncovered a significant reduction in the volumes of both the entire hippocampus as well as individual hippocampal subfields of Foxp1 cKO mice. Finally, we observed reduced maintenance of LTP in area CA1 of the hippocampus in these mutant mice. Together, these data suggest that proper expression of Foxp1 in the pyramidal neurons of the forebrain is important for regulating gene expression pathways that contribute to specific behaviors reminiscent of those seen in autism and intellectual disability. In particular, Foxp1 regulation of gene expression appears to be crucial for normal hippocampal development, CA1 plasticity, and spatial learning. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Loss-of-function mutations in the transcription factor Forkhead Box P1 ( FOXP1 ) lead to autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability. Understanding the potential brain

  12. Sequence analysis and molecular characterization of genes required for the biosynthesis of type 1 capsular polysaccharide in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, W S; Cunneen, T; Lee, C Y

    1994-11-01

    We previously cloned a 19.4-kb DNA region containing a cluster of genes affecting type 1 capsule production from Staphylococcus aureus M. Subcloning experiments showed that these capsule (cap) genes are localized in a 14.6-kb region. Sequencing analysis of the 14.6-kb fragment revealed 13 open reading frames (ORFs). Using complementation tests, we have mapped a collection of Cap- mutations in 10 of the 13 ORFs, indicating that these 10 genes are involved in capsule biosynthesis. The requirement for the remaining three ORFs in the synthesis of the capsule was demonstrated by constructing site-specific mutations corresponding to each of the three ORFs. Using an Escherichia coli S30 in vitro transcription-translation system, we clearly identified 7 of the 13 proteins predicted from the ORFs. Homology search between the predicted proteins and those in the data bank showed very high homology (52.3% identity) between capL and vipA, moderate homology (29% identity) between capI and vipB, and limited homology (21.8% identity) between capM and vipC. The vipA, vipB, and vipC genes have been shown to be involved in the biosynthesis of Salmonella typhi Vi antigen, a homopolymer polysaccharide consisting of N-acetylgalactosamino uronic acid, which is also one of the components of the staphylococcal type 1 capsule. The homology between these sets of genes therefore suggests that capL, capI, and capM may be involved in the biosynthesis of amino sugar, N-acetylgalactosamino uronic acid. In addition, the search showed that CapG aligned well with the consensus sequence of a family of acetyltransferases from various prokaryotic organisms, suggesting that CapG may be an acetyltransferase. Using the isogenic Cap- and Cap+ strains constructed in this study, we have confirmed that type 1 capsule is an important virulence factor in a mouse lethality test.

  13. Developmentally-regulated excision of the SPβ prophage reconstitutes a gene required for spore envelope maturation in Bacillus subtilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimihiro Abe

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Temperate phages infect bacteria by injecting their DNA into bacterial cells, where it becomes incorporated into the host genome as a prophage. In the genome of Bacillus subtilis 168, an active prophage, SPβ, is inserted into a polysaccharide synthesis gene, spsM. Here, we show that a rearrangement occurs during sporulation to reconstitute a functional composite spsM gene by precise excision of SPβ from the chromosome. SPβ excision requires a putative site-specific recombinase, SprA, and an accessory protein, SprB. A minimized SPβ, where all the SPβ genes were deleted, except sprA and sprB, retained the SPβ excision activity during sporulation, demonstrating that sprA and sprB are necessary and sufficient for the excision. While expression of sprA was observed during vegetative growth, sprB was induced during sporulation and upon mitomycin C treatment, which triggers the phage lytic cycle. We also demonstrated that overexpression of sprB (but not of sprA resulted in SPβ prophage excision without triggering the lytic cycle. These results suggest that sprB is the factor that controls the timing of phage excision. Furthermore, we provide evidence that spsM is essential for the addition of polysaccharides to the spore envelope. The presence of polysaccharides on the spore surface renders the spore hydrophilic in water. This property may be beneficial in allowing spores to disperse in natural environments via water flow. A similar rearrangement occurs in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42, where a SPβ-like element is excised during sporulation to reconstitute a polysaccharide synthesis gene, suggesting that this type of gene rearrangement is common in spore-forming bacteria because it can be spread by phage infection.

  14. Bioenergetics-based modeling of Plasmodium falciparum metabolism reveals its essential genes, nutritional requirements, and thermodynamic bottlenecks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anush Chiappino-Pepe

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Novel antimalarial therapies are urgently needed for the fight against drug-resistant parasites. The metabolism of malaria parasites in infected cells is an attractive source of drug targets but is rather complex. Computational methods can handle this complexity and allow integrative analyses of cell metabolism. In this study, we present a genome-scale metabolic model (iPfa of the deadliest malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, and its thermodynamics-based flux analysis (TFA. Using previous absolute concentration data of the intraerythrocytic parasite, we applied TFA to iPfa and predicted up to 63 essential genes and 26 essential pairs of genes. Of the 63 genes, 35 have been experimentally validated and reported in the literature, and 28 have not been experimentally tested and include previously hypothesized or novel predictions of essential metabolic capabilities. Without metabolomics data, four of the genes would have been incorrectly predicted to be non-essential. TFA also indicated that substrate channeling should exist in two metabolic pathways to ensure the thermodynamic feasibility of the flux. Finally, analysis of the metabolic capabilities of P. falciparum led to the identification of both the minimal nutritional requirements and the genes that can become indispensable upon substrate inaccessibility. This model provides novel insight into the metabolic needs and capabilities of the malaria parasite and highlights metabolites and pathways that should be measured and characterized to identify potential thermodynamic bottlenecks and substrate channeling. The hypotheses presented seek to guide experimental studies to facilitate a better understanding of the parasite metabolism and the identification of targets for more efficient intervention.

  15. Bioenergetics-based modeling of Plasmodium falciparum metabolism reveals its essential genes, nutritional requirements, and thermodynamic bottlenecks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappino-Pepe, Anush; Ataman, Meriç

    2017-01-01

    Novel antimalarial therapies are urgently needed for the fight against drug-resistant parasites. The metabolism of malaria parasites in infected cells is an attractive source of drug targets but is rather complex. Computational methods can handle this complexity and allow integrative analyses of cell metabolism. In this study, we present a genome-scale metabolic model (iPfa) of the deadliest malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, and its thermodynamics-based flux analysis (TFA). Using previous absolute concentration data of the intraerythrocytic parasite, we applied TFA to iPfa and predicted up to 63 essential genes and 26 essential pairs of genes. Of the 63 genes, 35 have been experimentally validated and reported in the literature, and 28 have not been experimentally tested and include previously hypothesized or novel predictions of essential metabolic capabilities. Without metabolomics data, four of the genes would have been incorrectly predicted to be non-essential. TFA also indicated that substrate channeling should exist in two metabolic pathways to ensure the thermodynamic feasibility of the flux. Finally, analysis of the metabolic capabilities of P. falciparum led to the identification of both the minimal nutritional requirements and the genes that can become indispensable upon substrate inaccessibility. This model provides novel insight into the metabolic needs and capabilities of the malaria parasite and highlights metabolites and pathways that should be measured and characterized to identify potential thermodynamic bottlenecks and substrate channeling. The hypotheses presented seek to guide experimental studies to facilitate a better understanding of the parasite metabolism and the identification of targets for more efficient intervention. PMID:28333921

  16. Developmentally-Regulated Excision of the SPβ Prophage Reconstitutes a Gene Required for Spore Envelope Maturation in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Kimihiro; Kawano, Yuta; Iwamoto, Keito; Arai, Kenji; Maruyama, Yuki; Eichenberger, Patrick; Sato, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Temperate phages infect bacteria by injecting their DNA into bacterial cells, where it becomes incorporated into the host genome as a prophage. In the genome of Bacillus subtilis 168, an active prophage, SPβ, is inserted into a polysaccharide synthesis gene, spsM. Here, we show that a rearrangement occurs during sporulation to reconstitute a functional composite spsM gene by precise excision of SPβ from the chromosome. SPβ excision requires a putative site-specific recombinase, SprA, and an accessory protein, SprB. A minimized SPβ, where all the SPβ genes were deleted, except sprA and sprB, retained the SPβ excision activity during sporulation, demonstrating that sprA and sprB are necessary and sufficient for the excision. While expression of sprA was observed during vegetative growth, sprB was induced during sporulation and upon mitomycin C treatment, which triggers the phage lytic cycle. We also demonstrated that overexpression of sprB (but not of sprA) resulted in SPβ prophage excision without triggering the lytic cycle. These results suggest that sprB is the factor that controls the timing of phage excision. Furthermore, we provide evidence that spsM is essential for the addition of polysaccharides to the spore envelope. The presence of polysaccharides on the spore surface renders the spore hydrophilic in water. This property may be beneficial in allowing spores to disperse in natural environments via water flow. A similar rearrangement occurs in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42, where a SPβ-like element is excised during sporulation to reconstitute a polysaccharide synthesis gene, suggesting that this type of gene rearrangement is common in spore-forming bacteria because it can be spread by phage infection. PMID:25299644

  17. Successful Reconstruction of Tooth Germ with Cell Lines Requires Coordinated Gene Expressions from the Initiation Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Tomooka

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Tooth morphogenesis is carried out by a series of reciprocal interactions between the epithelium and mesenchyme in embryonic germs. Previously clonal dental epithelial cell (epithelium of molar tooth germ (emtg lines were established from an embryonic germ. They were odontogenic when combined with a dental mesenchymal tissue, although the odontogenesis was quantitatively imperfect. To improve the microenvironment in the germs, freshly isolated dental epithelial cells were mixed with cells of lines, and germs were reconstructed in various combinations. The results demonstrated that successful tooth construction depends on the mixing ratio, the age of dental epithelial cells and the combination with cell lines. Analyses of gene expression in these germs suggest that some signal(s from dental epithelial cells makes emtg cells competent to communicate with mesenchymal cells and the epithelial and mesenchymal compartments are able to progress  odontogenesis from the initiation stage.

  18. Competitive Survival of Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae, Salmonella typhimurium and Shigella dysenteriae in Riverbed Sediments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Abia, AL

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available investigated the survival of Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica ser. Typhimurium, Vibrio cholerae and Shigella dysenteriae in riverbed sediments of the Apies River. Experiments were performed in flow chambers containing three sediment types and connected...

  19. Fate of Salmonella Typhimurium in laboratory-scale drinking water biofilms

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schaefer, Lisa M

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Investigations were carried out to evaluate and quantify colonization of laboratory-scale drinking water biofilms by a chromosomally green fluorescent protein (gfp)-tagged strain of Salmonella Typhimurium. Gfp encodes the green fluorescent protein...

  20. Molecular characterisation of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates from Gomel region, Belarus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tapalski, D.; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Hasman, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the characterisation by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) typing and antimicrobial resistance profiles of 35 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates, mostly from infections in children who acquired...

  1. Affinity-Selected Filamentous Bacteriophage as a Probe for Acoustic Wave Biodetectors of Salmonella typhimurium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olsen, Eric V; Sorokulova, Iryna B; Petrenko, Valery A; Chen, I-Hsuan; Barbaree, James M; Vodyanoy, Vitaly J

    2005-01-01

    Proof-in-concept biosensors were prepared for the rapid detection of Salmonella typhimurium in solution, based on affinity-selected filamentous phage prepared as probes physically adsorbed to piezoelectric transducers...

  2. An outbreak of multidrug-resistant, quinolone-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium DT104

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molbak, K.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    1999-01-01

    Background Food-borne salmonella infections have become a major problem in industrialized countries. The strain of Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium known as definitive phage type 104 (DT104) is usually resistant to five drugs: ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamides......, and tetracycline. An increasing proportion of DT104 isolates also have reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. Methods The Danish salmonella surveillance program determines the phage types of all typhimurium strains from the food chain, and in the case of suspected outbreaks, five-drug-resistant strains...... are characterized by molecular methods. All patients infected with five-drug-resistant typhimurium are interviewed to obtain clinical and epidemiologic data. In 1998, an outbreak of salmonella occurred, in which the strain of typhimurium DT104 was new to Denmark. We investigated this outbreak and report our...

  3. Salmonella enterica Typhimurium fljBA operon stability: implications regarding the origin of Salmonella enterica I 4,[5],12:i:.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiyama, M P O; Werle, C H; Milanez, G P; Nóbrega, D B; Pereira, J P; Calarga, A P; Flores, F; Brocchi, M

    2015-12-29

    Salmonella enterica subsp enterica serovar 4,5,12:i:- has been responsible for many recent Salmonella outbreaks worldwide. Several studies indicate that this serovar originated from S. enterica subsp enterica serovar Typhimurium, by the loss of the flagellar phase II gene (fljB) and adjacent sequences. However, at least two different clones of S. enterica 4,5,12:i:- exist that differs in the molecular events responsible for fljB deletion. The aim of this study was to test the stability of the fljBA operon responsible for the flagellar phase variation under different growth conditions in order to verify if its deletion is a frequent event that could explain the origin and dissemination of this serovar. In fact, coding sequences for transposons are present near this operon and in some strains, such as S. enterica Typhimurium LT2, the Fels-2 prophage gene is inserted near this operon. The presence of mobile DNA could confer instability to this region. In order to examine this, the cat (chloramphenicol acetyltransferase) gene was inserted adjacent to the fljBA operon so that deletions involving this genomic region could be identified. After growing S. enterica chloramphenicol-resistant strains under different conditions, more than 104 colonies were tested for the loss of chloramphenicol resistance. However, none of the colonies were sensitive to chloramphenicol. These data suggest that the origin of S. enterica serovar 4,5,12:i:- from Typhimurium by fljBA deletion is not a frequent event. The origin and dissemination of 4,5,12:i:- raise several questions about the role of flagellar phase variation in virulence.

  4. Bottlenecks and Hubs in Inferred Networks Are Important for Virulence in Salmonella typhimurium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDermott, Jason E.; Taylor, Ronald C.; Yoon, Hyunjin; Heffron, Fred

    2009-02-01

    Recent advances in experimental methods have provided sufficient data to consider systems as large networks of interconnected components. High-throughput determination of protein-protein interaction networks has led to the observation that topological bottlenecks, that is proteins defined by high centrality in the network, are enriched in proteins with systems-level phenotypes such as essentiality. Global transcriptional profiling by microarray analysis has been used extensively to characterize systems, for example, cellular response to environmental conditions and genetic mutations. These transcriptomic datasets have been used to infer regulatory and functional relationship networks based on co-regulation. We use the context likelihood of relatedness (CLR) method to infer networks from two datasets gathered from the pathogen Salmonella typhimurium; one under a range of environmental culture conditions and the other from deletions of 15 regulators found to be essential in virulence. Bottleneck nodes were identified from these inferred networks and we show that these nodes are significantly more likely to be essential for virulence than their non-bottleneck counterparts. A network generated using Pearson correlation did not display this behavior. Overall this study demonstrates that topology of networks inferred from global transcriptional profiles provides information about the systems-level roles of bottleneck genes. Analysis of the differences between the two CLR-derived networks suggests that the bottleneck nodes are either mediators of transitions between system states or sentinels that reflect the dynamics of these transitions.

  5. Salmonella Enterica Serovar Typhimurium BipA Exhibits Two Distinct Ribosome Binding Modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    deLivron, M.; Robinson, V

    2008-01-01

    BipA is a highly conserved prokaryotic GTPase that functions to influence numerous cellular processes in bacteria. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, BipA has been implicated in controlling bacterial motility, modulating attachment and effacement processes, and upregulating the expression of virulence genes and is also responsible for avoidance of host defense mechanisms. In addition, BipA is thought to be involved in bacterial stress responses, such as those associated with virulence, temperature, and symbiosis. Thus, BipA is necessary for securing bacterial survival and successful invasion of the host. Steady-state kinetic analysis and pelleting assays were used to assess the GTPase and ribosome-binding properties of S. enterica BipA. Under normal bacterial growth, BipA associates with the ribosome in the GTP-bound state. However, using sucrose density gradients, we demonstrate that the association of BipA and the ribosome is altered under stress conditions in bacteria similar to those experienced during virulence. The data show that this differential binding is brought about by the presence of ppGpp, an alarmone that signals the onset of stress-related events in bacteria.

  6. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Skills To Succeed in the Host: Virulence and Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fàbrega, Anna

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a primary enteric pathogen infecting both humans and animals. Infection begins with the ingestion of contaminated food or water so that salmonellae reach the intestinal epithelium and trigger gastrointestinal disease. In some patients the infection spreads upon invasion of the intestinal epithelium, internalization within phagocytes, and subsequent dissemination. In that case, antimicrobial therapy, based on fluoroquinolones and expanded-spectrum cephalosporins as the current drugs of choice, is indicated. To accomplish the pathogenic process, the Salmonella chromosome comprises several virulence mechanisms. The most important virulence genes are those located within the so-called Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs). Thus far, five SPIs have been reported to have a major contribution to pathogenesis. Nonetheless, further virulence traits, such as the pSLT virulence plasmid, adhesins, flagella, and biofilm-related proteins, also contribute to success within the host. Several regulatory mechanisms which synchronize all these elements in order to guarantee bacterial survival have been described. These mechanisms govern the transitions from the different pathogenic stages and drive the pathogen to achieve maximal efficiency inside the host. This review focuses primarily on the virulence armamentarium of this pathogen and the extremely complicated regulatory network controlling its success. PMID:23554419

  7. Antioxidant oils and Salmonella enterica Typhimurium reduce tumor in an experimental model of hepatic metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorenson BS

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Brent S Sorenson, Kaysie L Banton, Lance B Augustin, Arnold S Leonard, Daniel A SaltzmanDepartment of Surgery, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, USAAbstract: Fruit seeds high in antioxidants have been shown to have anticancer properties and enhance host protection against microbial infection. Recently we showed that a single oral dose of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing a truncated human interleukin-2 gene (SalpIL2 is avirulent, immunogenic, and reduces hepatic metastases through increased natural killer cell populations in mice. To determine whether antioxidant compounds enhance the antitumor effect seen in SalpIL2-treated animals, we assayed black cumin (BC, black raspberry (BR, and milk thistle (MT seed oils for the ability to reduce experimental hepatic metastases in mice. In animals without tumor, BC and BR oil diets altered the kinetics of the splenic lymphocyte response to SalpIL2. Consistent with previous reports, BR and BC seed oils demonstrated independent antitumor properties and moderate adjuvant potential with SalpIL2. MT oil, however, inhibited the efficacy of SalpIL2 in our model. Based on these data, we conclude that a diet high in antioxidant oils promoted a more robust immune response to SalpIL2, thus enhancing its antitumor efficacy.Keywords: antioxidants, colorectal cancer, tumor models, metastasis

  8. Comparison of Salmonella typhimurium TA102 with Escherichia coli WP2 tester strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, P; Naidoo, A; Wedd, D J; Gatehouse, D G

    1990-05-01

    In 1982, Levin et al. published a paper describing a new Salmonella typhimurium strain, TA102, for detecting mutagenic agents that react preferentially with AT base pairs. This strain has an AT base pair at the critical mutation site within the hisG gene, which is located on a multicopy plasmid, pAQ1; the chromosomal copy of the hisG gene has been deleted. It also has an intact excision repair system, thus facilitating the detection of cross-linking agents, and carries the mutator plasmid, pKM101. Although TA102 has been shown to be reverted by certain mutagenic agents that are not detected in the usual battery of strains (TA1535, TA1537, TA1538, TA98 and TA100), there has been a general reluctance within the field to include TA102 as one of the standard screening strains. This may in part result from the difficulties which have been experienced in many laboratories in maintaining the strain, and in obtaining reproducible spontaneous and induced revertant counts. At Glaxo we routinely include certain Escherichia coli strains in our microbial test battery, and were aware that some of the genetic features offered by TA102 were already being covered by these strains. For example, E.coli WP2 (pKM101) has an AT base pair at the critical mutation site within the trpE gene, is excision proficient (and thus will detect cross-linking agents) and carries the pKM101 plasmid to enhance error-prone repair. From the published literature it was apparent that a number of the 'TA102 specific' mutagens could be detected in E.coli e.g. neocarzinostatin, UV and 8-MOP plus UV.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Molecular Characterization of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Typhimurium Isolates from Swine

    OpenAIRE

    Gebreyes, Wondwossen Abebe; Altier, Craig

    2002-01-01

    As part of a longitudinal study of antimicrobial resistance among salmonellae isolated from swine, we studied 484 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (including serovar Typhimurium var. Copenhagen) isolates. We found two common pentaresistant phenotypes. The first was resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline (the AmCmStSuTe phenotype; 36.2% of all isolates), mainly of the definitive type 104 (DT104) phage type (180 of 187 ...

  10. Ultraviolet (UV-C) inactivation of Enterococcus faecium, Salmonella choleraesuis and Salmonella typhimurium in porcine plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Bl?zquez, Elena; Rodr?guez, Carmen; R?denas, Jes?s; P?rez de Rozas, Ana; Segal?s, Joaquim; Pujols, Joan; Polo, Javier

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of an ultraviolet (UV-C, 254 nm) irradiation system on reducing the load of Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium), Salmonella choleraesuis (S. choleraesuis) resistant to streptomycin and Enterococcus faecium (E. faecium) inoculated in sterile porcine plasma and then subjected to different UV-C irradiation doses (750, 1500, 3000, 6000 and 9000 J/L) using a pilot plant UV-C device working under turbulent flow. Results indicated that ...

  11. LIM-domain proteins, LIMD1, Ajuba, and WTIP are required for microRNA-mediated gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Victoria; Zhang, Yining; Foxler, Daniel E; de Moor, Cornelia H; Kong, Yi Wen; Webb, Thomas M; Self, Tim J; Feng, Yungfeng; Lagos, Dimitrios; Chu, Chia-Ying; Rana, Tariq M; Morley, Simon J; Longmore, Gregory D; Bushell, Martin; Sharp, Tyson V

    2010-07-13

    In recent years there have been major advances with respect to the identification of the protein components and mechanisms of microRNA (miRNA) mediated silencing. However, the complete and precise repertoire of components and mechanism(s) of action remain to be fully elucidated. Herein we reveal the identification of a family of three LIM domain-containing proteins, LIMD1, Ajuba and WTIP (Ajuba LIM proteins) as novel mammalian processing body (P-body) components, which highlight a novel mechanism of miRNA-mediated gene silencing. Furthermore, we reveal that LIMD1, Ajuba, and WTIP bind to Ago1/2, RCK, Dcp2, and eIF4E in vivo, that they are required for miRNA-mediated, but not siRNA-mediated gene silencing and that all three proteins bind to the mRNA 5' m(7)GTP cap-protein complex. Mechanistically, we propose the Ajuba LIM proteins interact with the m(7)GTP cap structure via a specific interaction with eIF4E that prevents 4EBP1 and eIF4G interaction. In addition, these LIM-domain proteins facilitate miRNA-mediated gene silencing by acting as an essential molecular link between the translationally inhibited eIF4E-m(7)GTP-5(')cap and Ago1/2 within the miRISC complex attached to the 3'-UTR of mRNA, creating an inhibitory closed-loop complex.

  12. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1alpha is an accessory factor required for activation of glucose-6-phosphatase gene transcription by glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, B; Morris, D W; Chou, J Y

    1998-11-01

    Deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), a key enzyme in glucose homeostasis, causes glycogen storage disease type 1a (GSD-1a), also know as von Gierke disease. Expression of the G6Pase gene is regulated by multiple hormones, including glucocorticoids. The synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone increased G6Pase mRNA abundance and gene transcription in H4-IIE hepatoma cells. Transient transfection assays demonstrated that the G6Pase promoter was active in H4-IIE cells only in the presence of dexamethasone. The minimal G6Pase promoter was contained within nucleotides -234/+3, which has two putative glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) at nucleotides -178/-164 (site 1) and -154/-140 (site 2). Electromobility shift and transient transfection assays showed that only GRE site 1 was required for glucocorticoid-activated transcription from the G6Pase promoter. Deletion analysis demonstrated that the DNA elements absolutely essential for glucocorticoid-stimulated transcription from the G6Pase promoter were contained within nucleotides -234/-212, encompassing binding motifs for hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNFs) 1 (-226/-212) and 4 (-231/-220). Electromobility shift and cotransfection assays showed that HNF1alpha bound to its cognate site and mediated transcription activation of the G6Pase gene by glucocorticoids.

  13. Behaviour of Salmonella Typhimurium during production and storage of artisan water buffalo mozzarella cheese

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    Roberto Rosmini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Water buffalo mozzarella cheese (WBMC is a fresh pasta filata cheese produced from whole chilled buffalo milk. Although pasteurization of milk and the use of defined starter cultures are recommended, traditional technology involving the use of unpasteurized milk and natural whey cultures is still employed for WBMC production in Italy. The aim of this study were to assess the behaviour of Salmonella Typhimurium during the production of artisan water buffalo mozzarella cheese and during its shelf life under different temperature conditions. Raw milk was inoculated with S. Typhimurium and the evolution of S. Typhimurium count during production and shelf life was monitored. In artisan WBMC production technology S. Typhimurium multiplied in the curd during ripening, but its growth rate expressed in log CFU/g/h was lower than the growth rate reported by theoretical predictions. Stretching proved to be a process with good repeatability and able to reduce S. Typhimurium contamination by 5.5 Log CFU/g. The intrinsic characteristics of traditional WBMC proved to be unable to obstacolate the growth of S. Typhimurium during storage in the case of thermal abuse. Control of raw milk contamination and a proper refrigeration temperature are key factors in reducing the risk for consumers.

  14. Subversion of innate and adaptive immune activation induced by structurally modified lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Pérez-Shibayama, Christian I; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; Cervantes-Barragán, Luisa; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ludewig, Burkhard; Cunningham, Adam F; García-Zepeda, Eduardo A; Becker, Ingeborg; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura; Gunn, John S; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2011-08-01

    Salmonella are successful pathogens that infect millions of people every year. During infection, Salmonella typhimurium changes the structure of its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in response to the host environment, rendering bacteria resistant to cationic peptide lysis in vitro. However, the role of these structural changes in LPS as in vivo virulence factors and their effects on immune responses and the generation of immunity are largely unknown. We report that modified LPS are less efficient than wild-type LPS at inducing pro-inflammatory responses. The impact of this LPS-mediated subversion of innate immune responses was demonstrated by increased mortality in mice infected with a non-lethal dose of an attenuated S. typhimurium strain mixed with the modified LPS moieties. Up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules on antigen-presenting cells and CD4(+) T-cell activation were affected by these modified LPS. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing specific antibody responses. Immunization with modified LPS moiety preparations combined with experimental antigens, induced an impaired Toll-like receptor 4-mediated adjuvant effect. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing immunity against challenge with virulent S. typhimurium. Hence, changes in S. typhimurium LPS structure impact not only on innate immune responses but also on both humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses. © 2011 The Authors. Immunology © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Asymmetric division and differential gene expression during a bacterial developmental program requires DivIVA.

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    Prahathees Eswaramoorthy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Sporulation in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis is a developmental program in which a progenitor cell differentiates into two different cell types, the smaller of which eventually becomes a dormant cell called a spore. The process begins with an asymmetric cell division event, followed by the activation of a transcription factor, σF, specifically in the smaller cell. Here, we show that the structural protein DivIVA localizes to the polar septum during sporulation and is required for asymmetric division and the compartment-specific activation of σF. Both events are known to require a protein called SpoIIE, which also localizes to the polar septum. We show that DivIVA copurifies with SpoIIE and that DivIVA may anchor SpoIIE briefly to the assembling polar septum before SpoIIE is subsequently released into the forespore membrane and recaptured at the polar septum. Finally, using super-resolution microscopy, we demonstrate that DivIVA and SpoIIE ultimately display a biased localization on the side of the polar septum that faces the smaller compartment in which σF is activated.

  16. The Additional sex combs gene of Drosophila is required for activation and repression of homeotic loci, and interacts specifically with Polycomb and super sex combs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, T A; Sinclair, D A; Brock, H W

    1999-06-01

    The protein products of Polycomb group (PcG) and trithorax group (trxG) genes are required for the maintenance of the transcriptionally repressed and active states, respectively, of the homeotic genes. Mutations in PcG genes produce gain-of-function (posterior) homeotic transformations, while mutations in trxG genes produce loss-of-function (anterior) homeotic transformations. Double mutant combinations between a PcG gene and a trxG gene suppress the homeotic transformations seen with either mutation alone, suggesting that PcG and trxG genes act antagonistically. The PcG gene Additional sex combs (Asx) is interesting because one mutant allele, AsxP1, causes both anterior and posterior homeotic transformations. AsxP1 and other Asx mutations were crossed to mutations in the PcG gene Polycomb (Pc) and the trxG gene trithorax (trx). Asx alleles enhance both PcG and trxG homeotic transformations, showing that Asx is required for both the activation and the repression of homeotic loci. Asx also shows strong allele-specific interactions with the PcG genes Pc and super sex combs (sxc). Together, these data indicate that there are functional interactions between Asx, Pc and sxc in vivo. ASX may interact with a PcG complex containing PC and SXC and mediate activation versus repression at target loci, perhaps by interacting directly with the TRX protein.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of a Human-Invasive Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strain of the Emerging Sequence Type 213 Harboring a Multidrug Resistance IncA/C Plasmid and a blaCMY-2-Carrying IncF Plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Claudia; Calva, Edmundo; Calva, Juan J; Wiesner, Magdalena; Fernández-Mora, Marcos; Puente, José L; Vinuesa, Pablo

    2015-11-12

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain 33676 was isolated in Mexico City, Mexico, from a patient with a systemic infection, and its complete genome sequence was determined using PacBio single-molecule real-time technology. Strain 33676 harbors an IncF plasmid carrying the extended-spectrum cephalosporin gene blaCMY-2 and a multidrug resistance IncA/C plasmid. Copyright © 2015 Silva et al.

  18. The milkweed pod1 gene encodes a KANADI protein that is required for abaxial/adaxial patterning in maize leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Héctor; Johnston, Robyn; Gerhold, Abigail; Foster, Toshi; Hake, Sarah

    2008-08-01

    Leaf primordia initiate from the shoot apical meristem with inherent polarity; the adaxial side faces the meristem, while the abaxial side faces away from the meristem. Adaxial/abaxial polarity is thought to be necessary for laminar growth of leaves, as mutants lacking either adaxial or abaxial cell types often develop radially symmetric lateral organs. The milkweed pod1 (mwp1) mutant of maize (Zea mays) has adaxialized sectors in the sheath, the proximal part of the leaf. Ectopic leaf flaps develop where adaxial and abaxial cell types juxtapose. Ectopic expression of the HD-ZIPIII gene rolled leaf1 (rld1) correlates with the adaxialized regions. Cloning of mwp1 showed that it encodes a KANADI transcription factor. Double mutants of mwp1-R with a microRNA-resistant allele of rld1, Rld1-N1990, show a synergistic phenotype with polarity defects in sheath and blade and a failure to differentiate vascular and photosynthetic cell types in the adaxialized sectors. The sectored phenotype and timing of the defect suggest that mwp1 is required late in leaf development to maintain abaxial cell fate. The phenotype of mwp1; Rld1 double mutants shows that both genes are also required early in leaf development to delineate leaf margins as well as to initiate vascular and photosynthetic tissues.

  19. Sample size requirements to detect gene-environment interactions in genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murcray, Cassandra E; Lewinger, Juan Pablo; Conti, David V; Thomas, Duncan C; Gauderman, W James

    2011-04-01

    Many complex diseases are likely to be a result of the interplay of genes and environmental exposures. The standard analysis in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) scans for main effects and ignores the potentially useful information in the available exposure data. Two recently proposed methods that exploit environmental exposure information involve a two-step analysis aimed at prioritizing the large number of SNPs tested to highlight those most likely to be involved in a GE interaction. For example, Murcray et al. ([2009] Am J Epidemiol 169:219–226) proposed screening on a test that models the G-E association induced by an interaction in the combined case-control sample. Alternatively, Kooperberg and LeBlanc ([2008] Genet Epidemiol 32:255–263) suggested screening on genetic marginal effects. In both methods, SNPs that pass the respective screening step at a pre-specified significance threshold are followed up with a formal test of interaction in the second step. We propose a hybrid method that combines these two screening approaches by allocating a proportion of the overall genomewide significance level to each test. We show that the Murcray et al. approach is often the most efficient method, but that the hybrid approach is a powerful and robust method for nearly any underlying model. As an example, for a GWAS of 1 million markers including a single true disease SNP with minor allele frequency of 0.15, and a binary exposure with prevalence 0.3, the Murcray, Kooperberg and hybrid methods are 1.90, 1.27, and 1.87 times as efficient, respectively, as the traditional case-control analysis to detect an interaction effect size of 2.0.

  20. VID22 is required for transcriptional activation of the PSD2 gene in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Non; Miyoshi, Takuya; Yamaguchi, Takanori; Nakazono, Toshimitsu; Tani, Motohiro; Kuge, Osamu

    2015-12-15

    Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is synthesized through decarboxylation of phosphatidylserine (PS), catalysed by PS decarboxylase 1 (Psd1p) and 2 (Psd2p) and the cytidine 5'-diphosphate (CDP)-ethanolamine (CDP-Etn) pathway. PSD1 null (psd1Δ) and PSD2 null (psd2Δ) mutants are viable in a synthetic minimal medium, but a psd1Δ psd2Δ double mutant exhibits Etn auxotrophy, which is incorporated into PE through the CDP-Etn pathway. We have previously shown that psd1Δ is synthetic lethal with deletion of VID22 (vid22Δ) [Kuroda et al. (2011) Mol. Microbiol. 80: , 248-265]. In the present study, we found that vid22Δ mutant exhibits Etn auxotrophy under PSD1-depressed conditions. Deletion of VID22 in wild-type and PSD1-depressed cells caused partial defects in PE formation through decarboxylation of PS. The enzyme activity of PS decarboxylase in an extract of vid22Δ cells was ∼70% of that in wild-type cells and similar to that in psd2Δ cells and the PS decarboxylase activity remaining in the PSD1-depressed cells became almost negligible with deletion of VID22. Thus, the vid22Δ mutation was suggested to cause a defect in the Psd2p activity. Furthermore, vid22Δ cells were shown to be defective in expression of the PSD2 gene tagged with 6×HA, the defect being ameliorated by replacement of the native promoter of the PSD2 gene with a CYC1 promoter. In addition, an α-galactosidase reporter assay revealed that the activity of the promoter of the PSD2 gene in vid22Δ cells was ∼5% of that in wild-type cells. These results showed that VID22 is required for transcriptional activation of the PSD2 gene. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  1. Nuclear localization domains of GATA activator Gln3 are required for transcription of target genes through dephosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numamoto, Minori; Tagami, Shota; Ueda, Yusuke; Imabeppu, Yusuke; Sasano, Yu; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Maekawa, Hiromi; Harashima, Satoshi

    2015-08-01

    The GATA transcription activator Gln3 in the budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) activates transcription of nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR)-sensitive genes. In cells grown in the presence of preferred nitrogen sources, Gln3 is phosphorylated in a TOR-dependent manner and localizes in the cytoplasm. In cells grown in non-preferred nitrogen medium or treated with rapamycin, Gln3 is dephosphorylated and is transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, thereby activating the transcription of NCR-sensitive genes. Caffeine treatment also induces dephosphorylation of Gln3 and its translocation to the nucleus and transcription of NCR-sensitive genes. However, the details of the mechanism by which phosphorylation controls Gln3 localization and transcriptional activity are unknown. Here, we focused on two regions of Gln3 with nuclear localization signal properties (NLS-K, and NLS-C) and one with nuclear export signal (NES). We constructed various mutants for our analyses: gln3 containing point mutations in all potential phosphoacceptor sites (Thr-339, Ser-344, Ser-347, Ser-355, Ser-391) in the NLS and NES regions to produce non-phosphorylatable (alanine) or mimic-phosphorylatable (aspartic acid) residues; and deletion mutants. We found that phosphorylation of Gln3 was impaired in all of these mutations and that the aspartic acid substitution mutants showed drastic reduction of Gln3-mediated transcriptional activity despite the fact that the mutations had no effect on nuclear localization of Gln3. Our observations suggest that these regions are required for transcription of target genes presumably through dephosphorylation. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Systematic analysis of Zn2Cys6 transcription factors required for development and pathogenicity by high-throughput gene knockout in the rice blast fungus.

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    Jianping Lu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Because of great challenges and workload in deleting genes on a large scale, the functions of most genes in pathogenic fungi are still unclear. In this study, we developed a high-throughput gene knockout system using a novel yeast-Escherichia-Agrobacterium shuttle vector, pKO1B, in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. Using this method, we deleted 104 fungal-specific Zn(2Cys(6 transcription factor (TF genes in M. oryzae. We then analyzed the phenotypes of these mutants with regard to growth, asexual and infection-related development, pathogenesis, and 9 abiotic stresses. The resulting data provide new insights into how this rice pathogen of global significance regulates important traits in the infection cycle through Zn(2Cys(6TF genes. A large variation in biological functions of Zn(2Cys(6TF genes was observed under the conditions tested. Sixty-one of 104 Zn(2Cys(6 TF genes were found to be required for fungal development. In-depth analysis of TF genes revealed that TF genes involved in pathogenicity frequently tend to function in multiple development stages, and disclosed many highly conserved but unidentified functional TF genes of importance in the fungal kingdom. We further found that the virulence-required TF genes GPF1 and CNF2 have similar regulation mechanisms in the gene expression involved in pathogenicity. These experimental validations clearly demonstrated the value of a high-throughput gene knockout system in understanding the biological functions of genes on a genome scale in fungi, and provided a solid foundation for elucidating the gene expression network that regulates the development and pathogenicity of M. oryzae.

  3. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ΔmsbB Triggers Exacerbated Inflammation in Nod2 Deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Anne-Kathrin; Steck, Natalie; Schultz, Dorothee; Zähringer, Ulrich; Lipinski, Simone; Rosenstiel, Philip; Geddes, Kaoru; Philpott, Dana J.; Heine, Holger; Grassl, Guntram A.

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium causes intestinal inflammation characterized by edema, neutrophil influx and increased pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. A major bacterial factor inducing pro-inflammatory host responses is lipopolysaccharide (LPS). S. Typhimurium ΔmsbB possesses a modified lipid A, has reduced virulence in mice, and is being considered as a potential anti-cancer vaccine strain. The lack of a late myristoyl transferase, encoded by MsbB leads to attenuated TLR4 stimulation. However, whether other host receptor pathways are also altered remains unclear. Nod1 and Nod2 are cytosolic pattern recognition receptors recognizing bacterial peptidoglycan. They play important roles in the host's immune response to enteric pathogens and in immune homeostasis. Here, we investigated how deletion of msbB affects Salmonella's interaction with Nod1 and Nod2. S. Typhimurium Δ msbB-induced inflammation was significantly exacerbated in Nod2−/− mice compared to C57Bl/6 mice. In addition, S. Typhimurium ΔmsbB maintained robust intestinal colonization in Nod2−/− mice from day 2 to day 7 p.i., whereas colonization levels significantly decreased in C57Bl/6 mice during this time. Similarly, infection of Nod1−/− and Nod1/Nod2 double-knockout mice revealed that both Nod1 and Nod2 play a protective role in S. Typhimurium ΔmsbB-induced colitis. To elucidate why S. Typhimurium ΔmsbB, but not wild-type S. Typhimurium, induced an exacerbated inflammatory response in Nod2−/− mice, we used HEK293 cells which were transiently transfected with pathogen recognition receptors. Stimulation of TLR2-transfected cells with S. Typhimurium ΔmsbB resulted in increased IL-8 production compared to wild-type S. Typhimurium. Our results indicate that S. Typhimurium ΔmsbB triggers exacerbated colitis in the absence of Nod1 and/or Nod2, which is likely due to increased TLR2 stimulation. How bacteria with “genetically detoxified” LPS

  4. Arabidopsis PAD3, a gene required for camalexin biosynthesis, encodes a putative cytochrome P450 monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, N; Tootle, T L; Glazebrook, J

    1999-12-01

    Phytoalexins are low molecular weight antimicrobial compounds that are synthesized in response to pathogen attack. The phytoalexin camalexin, an indole derivative, is produced by Arabidopsis in response to infection with the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. The phytoalexin deficient 3 (pad3) mutation, which causes a defect in camalexin production, has no effect on resistance to P. syringae but compromises resistance to the fungal pathogen Alternaria brassicicola. We have now isolated PAD3 by map-based cloning. The predicted PAD3 protein appears to be a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, similar to those from maize that catalyze synthesis of the indole-derived secondary metabolite 2,4-dihydroxy-1, 4-benzoxazin-3-one. The expression of PAD3 is tightly correlated with camalexin synthesis and is regulated by PAD4 and PAD1. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that PAD3 almost certainly encodes an enzyme required for camalexin biosynthesis. Moreover, these results strongly support the idea that camalexin does not play a major role in plant resistance to P. syringae infection, although it is involved in resistance to a fungal pathogen.

  5. DRH1, a p68-related RNA helicase gene, is required for chromosome breakage in Tetrahymena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen L. McDaniel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The p68 DEAD box helicases comprise a widely conserved protein family involved in a large range of biological processes including transcription, splicing and translation. The genome of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophile encodes two p68-like helicases, Drh1p and Lia2p. We show that DRH1 is essential for growth and completion of development. In growing cells, Drh1p is excluded from the nucleus and accumulates near cortical basal bodies. In contrast, during sexual reproduction, this protein localizes to meiotic micronuclei, initially in punctate foci in regions where centromeres and telomeres are known to reside and later in post-zygotic differentiating somatic macronuclei. Differentiation of the macronuclear genome involves extensive DNA rearrangements including fragmentation of the five pairs of germline-derived chromosomes into 180 chromosomal sub-fragments that are stabilized by de novo telomere deletion. In addition, thousands of internal eliminated sequences (IESs are excised from loci dispersed throughout the genome. Strains with DRH1 deleted from the germline nuclei, which do not express the protein during post-zygotic development, fail to fragment the developing macronuclear chromosomes. IES excision still occurs in the absence of DRH1 zygotic expression; thus, Drh1p is the first protein found to be specifically required for chromosome breakage but not DNA elimination.

  6. Comparison of genes required for H2O2 resistance in Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yifan; Itzek, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is produced by several members of the genus Streptococcus mainly through the pyruvate oxidase SpxB under aerobic growth conditions. The acute toxic nature of H2O2 raises the interesting question of how streptococci cope with intrinsically produced H2O2, which subsequently accumulates in the microenvironment and threatens the closely surrounding population. Here, we investigate the H2O2 susceptibility of oral Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis and elucidate potential mechanisms of how they protect themselves from the deleterious effect of H2O2. Both organisms are considered primary colonizers and occupy the same intraoral niche making them potential targets for H2O2 produced by other species. We demonstrate that S. gordonii produces relatively more H2O2 and has a greater ability for resistance to H2O2 stress. Functional studies show that, unlike in Streptococcus pneumoniae, H2O2 resistance is not dependent on a functional SpxB and confirms the important role of the ferritin-like DNA-binding protein Dps. However, the observed increased H2O2 resistance of S. gordonii over S. sanguinis is likely to be caused by an oxidative stress protection machinery present even under anaerobic conditions, while S. sanguinis requires a longer period of time for adaptation. The ability to produce more H2O2 and be more resistant to H2O2 might aid S. gordonii in the competitive oral biofilm environment, since it is lower in abundance yet manages to survive quite efficiently in the oral biofilm. PMID:25280752

  7. Characterization of the hemA-prs region of the Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Post, David A.; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Switzer, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    The prs gene, encoding phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase, is preceded by a leader, which is 302 bp long in Escherichia coli and 417 bp in Salmonella typhimurium. A potential open reading frame (ORF) extends across the prs promoter and into the leader. The region between the prs coding region...... two promoters, the first promoter (P1) originating upstream of ORF 1, and expressing the prs gene in a tricistronic operon and a second promoter (P2), located within the ORF 2 coding frame, which transcribes the prs gene only. The transcripts encoding prs only were 20 times as abundant...... in the amount of message originating from the promoter P2....

  8. The Mi-2-like Smed-CHD4 gene is required for stem cell differentiation in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scimone, M Lucila; Meisel, Joshua; Reddien, Peter W

    2010-04-01

    Freshwater planarians are able to regenerate any missing part of their body and have extensive tissue turnover because of the action of dividing cells called neoblasts. Neoblasts provide an excellent system for in vivo study of adult stem cell biology. We identified the Smed-CHD4 gene, which is predicted to encode a chromatin-remodeling protein similar to CHD4/Mi-2 proteins, as required for planarian regeneration and tissue homeostasis. Following inhibition of Smed-CHD4 with RNA interference (RNAi), neoblast numbers were initially normal, despite an inability of the animals to regenerate. However, the proliferative response of neoblasts to amputation or growth stimulation in Smed-CHD4(RNAi) animals was diminished. Smed-CHD4(RNAi) animals displayed a dramatic reduction in the numbers of certain neoblast progeny cells. Smed-CHD4 was required for the formation of these neoblast progeny cells. Together, these results indicate that Smed-CHD4 is required for neoblasts to produce progeny cells committed to differentiation in order to control tissue turnover and regeneration and suggest a crucial role for CHD4 proteins in stem cell differentiation.

  9. Identification of the enzymatic reactions encoded by the purG and purI genes of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlberg, U.; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Jochimsen, B.

    1983-01-01

    The chromosomal locations of the genes purG and purI on the Escherichia coli linkage map are the opposites of those of Salmonella typhimurium. By methods which permit the identification of lesions in any of the five early enzymes of the purine de novo pathway, the gene-enzyme relationships...... of the purG and purI loci have been reevaluated in these two organisms. The results demonstrate that the relative locations of the genes encoding the two enzymes (phosphoribosylformylglycinamidine synthetase and phosphoribosylaminoimidazole synthetase) are similar in the two organisms. The gene products have...... been correctly determined in S. typhimurium. The gene products currently listed for the loci in E. coli are incorrect. The E. coli purG locus is equivalent to the S. typhimurium purI locus, and the E. coli purI locus is equivalent to the S. typhimurium purG locus....

  10. Cloning and characterization of pvdS, a gene required for pyoverdine synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: PvdS is probably an alternative sigma factor.

    OpenAIRE

    Cunliffe, H E; Merriman, T R; Lamont, I L

    1995-01-01

    Cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa secrete a fluorescent yellow-green siderophore, pyoverdine, when grown under iron-deficient conditions. We describe here the cloning and characterization of a gene, pvdS, which is required for this process. The pvdS gene is required for expression from promoters of at least two pyoverdine synthesis genes and can cause expression from these promoters in Escherichia coli, where they are otherwise inactive. Sequencing of pvdS revealed that it is a member of a subf...

  11. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  12. Allocation of distinct organ fates from a precursor field requires a shift in expression and function of gene regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sneha Palliyil

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A common occurrence in metazoan development is the rise of multiple tissues/organs from a single uniform precursor field. One example is the anterior forebrain of vertebrates, which produces the eyes, hypothalamus, diencephalon, and telencephalon. Another instance is the Drosophila wing disc, which generates the adult wing blade, the hinge, and the thorax. Gene regulatory networks (GRNs that are comprised of signaling pathways and batteries of transcription factors parcel the undifferentiated field into discrete territories. This simple model is challenged by two observations. First, many GRN members that are thought to control the fate of one organ are actually expressed throughout the entire precursor field at earlier points in development. Second, each GRN can simultaneously promote one of the possible fates choices while repressing the other alternatives. It is therefore unclear how GRNs function to allocate tissue fates if their members are uniformly expressed and competing with each other within the same populations of cells. We address this paradigm by studying fate specification in the Drosophila eye-antennal disc. The disc, which begins its development as a homogeneous precursor field, produces a number of adult structures including the compound eyes, the ocelli, the antennae, the maxillary palps, and the surrounding head epidermis. Several selector genes that control the fates of the eye and antenna, respectively, are first expressed throughout the entire eye-antennal disc. We show that during early stages, these genes are tasked with promoting the growth of the entire field. Upon segregation to distinct territories within the disc, each GRN continues to promote growth while taking on the additional roles of promoting distinct primary fates and repressing alternate fates. The timing of both expression pattern restriction and expansion of functional duties is an elemental requirement for allocating fates within a single field.

  13. The GCR2 gene family is not required for ABA control of seed germination and early seedling development in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Guo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA regulates diverse processes of plant growth and development. It has recently been proposed that GCR2 functions as a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR for ABA. However, the structural relationships and functionality of GCR2 have been challenged by several independent studies. A central question in this controversy is whether gcr2 mutants are insensitive to ABA, because gcr2 mutants were shown to display reduced sensitivity to ABA under one experimental condition (e.g. 22 degrees C, continuous white light with 150 micromol m(-2 s(-1 but were shown to display wild-type sensitivity under another slightly different condition (e.g. 23 degrees C, 14/10 hr photoperiod with 120 micromol m(-2 s(-1. It has been hypothesized that gcr2 appears only weakly insensitive to ABA because two other GCR2-like genes in Arabidopsis, GCL1 and GCL2, compensate for the loss of function of GCR2. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to test this hypothesis, we isolated a putative loss-of-function allele of GCL2, and then generated all possible combinations of mutations in each member of the GCR2 gene family. We found that all double mutants, including gcr2 gcl1, gcr2 gcl2, gcl1 gcl2, as well as the gcr2 gcl1 gcl2 triple mutant displayed wild-type sensitivity to ABA in seed germination and early seedling development assays, demonstrating that the GCR2 gene family is not required for ABA responses in these processes. CONCLUSION: These results provide compelling genetic evidence that GCR2 is unlikely to act as a receptor for ABA in the context of either seed germination or early seedling development.

  14. Dynein Heavy Chain, Encoded by Two Genes in Agaricomycetes, Is Required for Nuclear Migration in Schizophyllum commune.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Brunsch

    Full Text Available The white-rot fungus Schizophyllum commune (Agaricomycetes was used to study the cell biology of microtubular trafficking during mating interactions, when the two partners exchange nuclei, which are transported along microtubule tracks. For this transport activity, the motor protein dynein is required. In S. commune, the dynein heavy chain is encoded in two parts by two separate genes, dhc1 and dhc2. The N-terminal protein Dhc1 supplies the dimerization domain, while Dhc2 encodes the motor machinery and the microtubule binding domain. This split motor protein is unique to Basidiomycota, where three different sequence patterns suggest independent split events during evolution. To investigate the function of the dynein heavy chain, the gene dhc1 and the motor domain in dhc2 were deleted. Both resulting mutants were viable, but revealed phenotypes in hyphal growth morphology and mating behavior as well as in sexual development. Viability of strain Δdhc2 is due to the higher expression of kinesin-2 and kinesin-14, which was proven via RNA sequencing.

  15. Nodal signaling from the visceral endoderm is required to maintain Nodal gene expression in the epiblast and drive AVE migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Lualdi, Margaret; Lyozin, George T.; Sharma, Prashant; Loncarek, Jadranka; Fu, Xin-Yuan; Kuehn, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    In the early mouse embryo, a specialized population of extraembryonic visceral endoderm (VE) cells called the anterior VE (AVE) establishes the anterior posterior (AP) axis by restricting gastrulation-inducing signals to the opposite pole. These cells arise at the distal tip of the egg cylinder stage embryo and then asymmetrically migrate to the prospective anterior following the path of an earlier arising and migrating population called the distal VE (DVE). The Nodal-signaling pathway has been shown to have a critical role in the generation of the DVE and AVE and in their migration. The Nodal gene is expressed in both the VE and in the pluripotent epiblast, which gives rise to the germ layers. Previous findings have provided conflicting evidence as to the relative importance of Nodal signaling from the epiblast vs. VE for AP patterning. Here we show that conditional mutagenesis of the Nodal gene specifically within the VE leads to reduced Nodal expression levels in the epiblast and incomplete or failed AVE migration. These results support a required role for VE Nodal to maintain normal levels of expression in the epiblast, and suggest signaling from both VE and epiblast is important for AVE migration. PMID:25536399

  16. Translational control of the antibiotic inducibility of the PA5471 gene required for mexXY multidrug efflux gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Yuji; Gilmour, Christie; Metcalf, Devon; Poole, Keith

    2009-08-01

    The PA5471 gene required for induction of the MexXY multidrug efflux system in response to ribosome-targeting antimicrobials was itself shown to be inducible by ribosome-targeting antimicrobials (Y. Morita, M. L. Sobel, and K. Poole, J. Bacteriol. 188:1847-1855, 2006). Using a lacZ transcriptional reporter, drug inducibility of PA5471 was shown to require the entirety of the 367-bp PA5472-PA5471 intergenic region. A constitutive promoter activity was, however, localized to the first 75 bp of this region, within which a single PA5471 transcription initiation site was mapped. That 3' sequences of the intergenic region blocked PA5471 expression and made it antibiotic dependent was suggestive of an attenuation mechanism of control. A 13-amino-acid leader peptide (LP)-encoding open reading frame preceded by a Shine-Dalgarno sequence was identified ca. 250 bp upstream of the PA5471 coding sequence, and its expression and translation were confirmed using a lacZ translational reporter. Alteration of the initiation codon (M1T) or introduction of translational stop signals at codons 3 (Q3Am) and 8 (C8Op) of this LP sequence (PA5471.1) yielded high-level constitutive expression of PA5471, suggesting that interference with LP translation was linked to PA5471 gene expression. Consistent with this, a Q3K mutation in the LP sequence maintained the drug inducibility of PA5471 expression. Introduction of the LP Q3Am mutation into the chromosome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa yielded stronger expression of PA5471 than did antibiotic (chloramphenicol) exposure of wild-type P. aeruginosa, in agreement with lacZ transcriptional fusion data. Still, the Q3Am mutation yielded modest expression of mexXY, less than that seen for antibiotic-treated wild-type P. aeruginosa. These data suggest that PA5471 is not sufficient for MexXY recruitment in response to antibiotic exposure and that additional antibiotic-dependent effects are needed.

  17. Association of the multidrug resistance-1 gene single-nucleotide polymorphisms with the tacrolimus dose requirements in renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglicheau, Dany; Verstuyft, Céline; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Becquemont, Laurent; Schlageter, Marie-Hélène; Cassinat, Bruno; Beaune, Philippe; Legendre, Christophe; Thervet, Eric

    2003-07-01

    The immunosuppressive drug tacrolimus, whose pharmacokinetic characteristics display large interindividual variations, is a substrate for P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the product of the multidrug resistance-1 (MDR1) gene. Some of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of MDR1 reported correlated with the in vivo activity of P-gp. Because P-gp is known to control tacrolimus intestinal absorption, it was postulated that these polymorphisms are associated with tacrolimus pharmacokinetic variations in renal transplant recipients. The objective of this study was to evaluate in a retrospective study of 81 renal transplant recipients the effect on tacrolimus dosages and concentration/dose ratio of four frequent MDR1 SNP possibly associated with P-gp function (T-129C in exon 1b, 1236C>T in exon 12, 2677G>T,A in exon 21, and 3435C>T in exon 26). As in the general population, the SNP in exons 12, 21, and 26 were frequent (16, 17.3, and 22.2% for the variant homozygous genotype, respectively) and exhibited incomplete linkage disequilibrium. One month after tacrolimus introduction, exon 21 SNP correlated significantly with the daily tacrolimus dose (P < or = 0.05) and the concentration/dose ratio (P < or = 0.02). Tacrolimus dose requirements were 40% higher in homozygous than wild-type patients for this SNP. The concentration/dose ratio was 36% lower in the wild-type patients, suggesting that, for a given dose, their tacrolimus blood concentration is lower. Haplotype analysis substantiated these results and suggested that exons 26 and 21 SNP may be associated with tacrolimus dose requirements. Genotype monitoring of the MDR1 gene reliably predicts the optimal dose of tacrolimus in renal transplant recipients and may predict the initial daily dose needed by individual patients to obtain adequate immunosuppression.

  18. Identifying essential genes in bacterial metabolic networks with machine learning methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Identifying essential genes in bacteria supports to identify potential drug targets and an understanding of minimal requirements for a synthetic cell. However, experimentally assaying the essentiality of their coding genes is resource intensive and not feasible for all bacterial organisms, in particular if they are infective. Results We developed a machine learning technique to identify essential genes using the experimental data of genome-wide knock-out screens from one bacterial organism to infer essential genes of another related bacterial organism. We used a broad variety of topological features, sequence characteristics and co-expression properties potentially associated with essentiality, such as flux deviations, centrality, codon frequencies of the sequences, co-regulation and phyletic retention. An organism-wise cross-validation on bacterial species yielded reliable results with good accuracies (area under the receiver-operator-curve of 75% - 81%). Finally, it was applied to drug target predictions for Salmonella typhimurium. We compared our predictions to the viability of experimental knock-outs of S. typhimurium and identified 35 enzymes, which are highly relevant to be considered as potential drug targets. Specifically, we detected promising drug targets in the non-mevalonate pathway. Conclusions Using elaborated features characterizing network topology, sequence information and microarray data enables to predict essential genes from a bacterial reference organism to a related query organism without any knowledge about the essentiality of genes of the query organism. In general, such a method is beneficial for inferring drug targets when experimental data about genome-wide knockout screens is not available for the investigated organism. PMID:20438628

  19. Identifying essential genes in bacterial metabolic networks with machine learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaimas, Kitiporn; Eils, Roland; König, Rainer

    2010-05-03

    Identifying essential genes in bacteria supports to identify potential drug targets and an understanding of minimal requirements for a synthetic cell. However, experimentally assaying the essentiality of their coding genes is resource intensive and not feasible for all bacterial organisms, in particular if they are infective. We developed a machine learning technique to identify essential genes using the experimental data of genome-wide knock-out screens from one bacterial organism to infer essential genes of another related bacterial organism. We used a broad variety of topological features, sequence characteristics and co-expression properties potentially associated with essentiality, such as flux deviations, centrality, codon frequencies of the sequences, co-regulation and phyletic retention. An organism-wise cross-validation on bacterial species yielded reliable results with good accuracies (area under the receiver-operator-curve of 75% - 81%). Finally, it was applied to drug target predictions for Salmonella typhimurium. We compared our predictions to the viability of experimental knock-outs of S. typhimurium and identified 35 enzymes, which are highly relevant to be considered as potential drug targets. Specifically, we detected promising drug targets in the non-mevalonate pathway. Using elaborated features characterizing network topology, sequence information and microarray data enables to predict essential genes from a bacterial reference organism to a related query organism without any knowledge about the essentiality of genes of the query organism. In general, such a method is beneficial for inferring drug targets when experimental data about genome-wide knockout screens is not available for the investigated organism.

  20. SopB of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a potential DNA vaccine candidate in conjugation with live attenuated bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Arvindhan G; Balasundaram, Sudhagar V; Janice, Jessin; Karnam, Guruswamy; Eswarappa, Sandeepa M; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2009-05-11

    The immune response against Salmonella is multi-faceted involving both the innate and the adaptive immune system. The characterization of specific Salmonella antigens inducing immune response could critically contribute to the development of epitope based vaccines for Salmonella. We have tried to identify a protective T cell epitope(s) of Salmonella, as cell mediated immunity conferred by CD8+ T cells is the most crucial subset conferring protective immunity against Salmonella. It being a proven fact that secreted proteins are better in inducing cell mediated immunity than cell surface and cytosolic antigens, we have analyzed all the genbank annotated Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 and 2 secreted proteins of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) and S. enterica serovar Typhi (S. typhi). They were subjected to BIMAS and SYFPEITHI analysis to map MHC-I and MHC-II binding epitopes. The huge profile of possible T cell epitopes obtained from the two classes of secreted proteins were tabulated and using a scoring system that considers the binding affinity and promiscuity of binding to more than one allele, SopB and SifB were chosen for experimental confirmation in murine immunization model. The entire SopB and SifB genes were cloned into DNA vaccine vectors and were administered along with live attenuated Salmonella and it was found that SopB vaccination reduced the bacterial burden of organs by about 5-fold on day 4 and day 8 after challenge with virulent Salmonella and proved to be a more efficient vaccination strategy than live attenuated bacteria alone.

  1. Effect Of Spaceflight On Microbial Gene Expression And Virulence: Preliminary Results From Microbe Payload Flown On-Board STS-115

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; HonerzuBentrup, K,; Schurr, M. J.; Buchanan, K.; Morici, L.; Hammond, T.; Allen, P.; Baker, C.; Ott, C. M.; Nelman-Gonzalez M.; hide

    2007-01-01

    Human presence in space, whether permanent or temporary, is accompanied by the presence of microbes. However, the extent of microbial changes in response to spaceflight conditions and the corresponding changes to infectious disease risk is unclear. Previous studies have indicated that spaceflight weakens the immune system in humans and animals. In addition, preflight and in-flight monitoring of the International Space Station (ISS) and other spacecraft indicates the presence of opportunistic pathogens and the potential of obligate pathogens. Altered antibiotic resistance of microbes in flight has also been shown. As astronauts and cosmonauts live for longer periods in a closed environment, especially one using recycled water and air, there is an increased risk to crewmembers of infectious disease events occurring in-flight. Therefore, understanding how the space environment affects microorganisms and their disease potential is critically important for spaceflight missions and requires further study. The goal of this flight experiment, operationally called MICROBE, is to utilize three model microbial pathogens, Salmonella typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans to examine the global effects of spaceflight on microbial gene expression and virulence attributes. Specifically, the aims are (1) to perform microarray-mediated gene expression profiling of S. typhimurium, P. aeruginosa, and C. albicans, in response to spaceflight in comparison to ground controls and (2) to determine the effect of spaceflight on the virulence potential of these microorganisms immediately following their return from spaceflight using murine models. The model microorganisms were selected as they have been isolated from preflight or in-flight monitoring, represent different degrees of pathogenic behavior, are well characterized, and have sequenced genomes with available microarrays. In particular, extensive studies of S. typhimurium by the Principal Investigator, Dr. Nickerson

  2. EVALUATION OF AN O-ANTIGEN ELISA FOR SCREENING CATTLE HERDS FOR SALMONELLA-TYPHIMURIUM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoorfar, Jeffrey; Bitsch, V.

    1995-01-01

    A total of 2585 serum samples from 62 dairy herds located in four different regions of Denmark were tested in an O-antigen (0:1,4,5,12)-based ELISA for the detection of antibodies against Salmonella typhimurium. Ten closed herds from an island with no reported occurrence of salmonellosis for seve......A total of 2585 serum samples from 62 dairy herds located in four different regions of Denmark were tested in an O-antigen (0:1,4,5,12)-based ELISA for the detection of antibodies against Salmonella typhimurium. Ten closed herds from an island with no reported occurrence of salmonellosis...... for several years, and 12 herds from a salmonella enzootic area which had had clinical outbreaks of S typhimurium were used to define a herd ELISA cut-off value. When herds with at least 5 per cent of the serum samples having an optical density of >0.5 were considered ELISA-positive, all 10 herds from...... the salmonellosis-free island were ELISA-negative, and all but one of the 12 S typhimurium-infected herds were ELISA-positive, which resulted in a herd test sensitivity of 0.92 and herd test specificity of 1.0. Eleven of the 12 S typhimurium-infected herds were negative in a blocking ELISA based on a monoclonal...

  3. Metabolic profiling of meat: assessment of pork hygiene and contamination with Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yun; Cheung, William; Winder, Catherine L; Dunn, Warwick B; Goodacre, Royston

    2011-02-07

    Spoilage in meat is the result of the action of microorganisms and results in changes of meat and microbial metabolism. This process may include pathogenic food poisoning bacteria such as Salmonella typhimurium, and it is important that these are differentiated from the natural spoilage process caused by non-pathogenic microorganisms. In this study we investigated the application of metabolic profiling using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, to assess the microbial contamination of pork. Metabolite profiles were generated from microorganisms, originating from the natural spoilage process and from the artificial contamination with S. typhimurium. In an initial experiment, we investigated changes in the metabolic profiles over a 72 hour time course at 25 °C and established time points indicative of the spoilage process. A further experiment was performed to provide in-depth analysis of the metabolites characteristic of contamination by S. typhimurium. We applied a three-way PARAllel FACtor analysis 2 (PARAFAC2) multivariate algorithm to model the metabolic profiles. In addition, two univariate statistical tests, two-sample Wilcoxon signed rank test and Friedman test, were employed to identify metabolites which showed significant difference between natural spoiled and S. typhimurium contaminated samples. Consistent results from the two independent experiments were obtained showing the discrimination of the metabolic profiles of the natural spoiled pork chops and those contaminated with S. typhimurium. The analysis identified 17 metabolites of significant interest (including various types of amino acid and fatty acid) in the discrimination of pork contaminated with the pathogenic microorganism.

  4. Sequential acquisition of R-plasmids in vivo by Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, D J; Sommerville, J S; Gribben, J

    1984-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium, resistant only to trimethoprim and sulphamethoxazole, was isolated from the faeces and blood of a chronic alcoholic patient in acute renal failure. The isolates harboured an 18 Md non-conjugative plasmid. He was dialysed peritoneally and treated with ampicillin; four days later there was no clinical improvement and his peritoneal dialysis fluid (PDF) had become infected. Salm. typhimurium was isolated from faeces and PDF. Both isolates were additionally resistant to ampicillin and contained two plasmids (55 Md and 18 Md). Therapy was changed to chloramphenicol and gentamicin was added to the PDF. Two weeks later Salm. typhimurium was again isolated from PDF and faeces. The PDF isolate was unchanged but 4% of the colonies isolated from this faecal specimen were resistant to chloramphenicol and had acquired an additional 62 Md plasmid. From all PDF and faecal specimens two different strains of Escherichia coli and one strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae were isolated which contained plasmids indistinguishable, on the basis of molecular weight and transferable resistance markers, from those acquired by Salm. typhimurium. The transferability of these plasmids in vitro to E. coli K12 and to the patient's initial Salm. typhimurium was studied and the results discussed.

  5. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium exploits inflammation to modify swine intestinal microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna eDrumo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is an important zoonotic gastrointestinal pathogen responsible for foodborne disease worldwide. It is a successful enteric pathogen because it has developed virulence strategies allowing it to survive in a highly inflamed intestinal environment exploiting inflammation to overcome colonization resistance provided by intestinal microbiota. In this study, we used piglets featuring an intact microbiota, which naturally develop gastroenteritis, as model for salmonellosis. We compared the effects on the intestinal microbiota induced by a wild type and an attenuated S. Typhimurium in order to evaluate whether the modifications are correlated with the virulence of the strain. This study showed that Salmonella alters microbiota in a virulence-dependent manner. We found that the wild type S. Typhimurium induced inflammation and a reduction of specific protecting microbiota species (SCFA-producing bacteria normally involved in providing a barrier against pathogens. Both these effects could contribute to impair colonization resistance, increasing the host susceptibility to wild type S. Typhimurium colonization. In contrast, the attenuated S. Typhimurium, which is characterized by a reduced ability to colonize the intestine, and by a very mild inflammatory response, was unable to successfully sustain competition with the microbiota.

  6. Experimental Salmonella typhimurium infections in rats. III. Transfer of immunity with primed lymphocyte subpopulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougen, H P; Jensen, E T

    1990-01-01

    The protective effect of primed lymphocytes against a lethal dose of Salmonella typhimurium was studied in athymic and euthymic LEW rats. Primed lymphocytes were obtained by inoculating euthymic and thymus-grafted animals with a non-lethal dose of Salmonella typhimurium. Four weeks after the infe...... and lymph node CD4+ cells in the athymic rats were comparable to those found in the euthymic animals. The study shows that primed CD4+ lymphocytes even in very low doses are able to induce immunity against a Salmonella typhimurium infection.......The protective effect of primed lymphocytes against a lethal dose of Salmonella typhimurium was studied in athymic and euthymic LEW rats. Primed lymphocytes were obtained by inoculating euthymic and thymus-grafted animals with a non-lethal dose of Salmonella typhimurium. Four weeks after...... and athymic rats were injected with different doses of primed pan B, pan T, CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes before inoculation with a lethal bacterial dose. Most of the animals treated with pan B, pan T or CD8+ cells died within two weeks. After treatment with primed CD4+ cells, only six of 39 animals died. Doses...

  7. A new wireless detection device for the in-situ identification of Salmonella Typhimurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Yating; Wikle, Howard C.; Park, Mi-kyung; Horikawa, Shin; Hong, Xie; Chin, Bryan A.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a new device and method for the in-situ detection of Salmonella Typhimurium on tomato surfaces. This real-time in-situ detection was accomplished with phage-based magnetoelastic (ME) biosensors on fresh food surfaces. The E2 phage from a landscape phage library serves as the bio-recognition element that has the capability of binding specifically with S. Typhimurium. This mass-sensitive ME biosensor is wirelessly actuated into mechanical resonance by an externally applied time-varying magnetic field. When the biosensor binds with S. Typhimurium, the mass of the sensor increases, resulting in a decrease in the sensor's resonant frequency. Until now, ME sensors had to be collected from the tomato surface where they are exposed to S. Typhimurium and inserted into a measurement coil for the detection of the bacterium. In contrast, the newly designed test device allows the whole detection process to take place directly on the tomato. Changes in resonant frequency over time due to the accumulation of S. Typhimurium on the sensor were measured and are presented. Real-time in-situ detection of 20 minutes was achieved. In addition, this new methodology effectively decreases the measurement error and enables the simultaneous detection of multiple pathogens.

  8. Analysis of the Salmonella typhimurium Proteome through Environmental Response toward Infectious Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adkins, Joshua N.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Gustin, Jean K.; Rue, Joanne; Clauss, Therese RW; Purvine, Samuel O.; Rodland, Karin D.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (aka, S. typhimurium) is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes ~40,000 reported cases of acute gastroenteritis and diarrhea a year in the United States. To develop a deeper understanding of the infectious state of S. typhimurium, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based “bottom-up” proteomics was used to globally analyze the proteins present under specific growth conditions. Salmonella typhimurium LT2 strain cells were grown in contrasting culture conditions that mimicked both natural free-living conditions and an infectious state, i.e., logarithm phase, stationary phase and Mg-depleted medium growth. Initial comparisons of the LT2 strain protein abundances among cell culture conditions indicate that the majority of proteins do not change significantly. Not unexpectedly, cells grown in Mg-depleted medium conditions had a higher abundance of Mg2+ transport proteins than found in other growth conditions. A second more virulent Salmonella typhimurium strain (14028) was also studied with these growth conditions and used to directly compare to the LT2 strain. The strain comparison offers a unique opportunity to compare and contrast observations in these closely related bacteria. One particular protein family, propanediol utilization proteins, was drastically more abundant in the 14028 strain than in the LT2 strain, and may be a contributor to increased pathogenicity in the 14028 strain.

  9. Comparative genome analysis and characterization of the Salmonella Typhimurium strain CCRJ_26 isolated from swine carcasses using whole-genome sequencing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzenhagen, P H N; Cabral, C C; Suffys, P N; Franco, R M; Rodrigues, D P; Conte-Junior, C A

    2018-04-01

    Salmonella pathogenicity relies on virulence factors many of which are clustered within the Salmonella pathogenicity islands. Salmonella also harbours mobile genetic elements such as virulence plasmids, prophage-like elements and antimicrobial resistance genes which can contribute to increase its pathogenicity. Here, we have genetically characterized a selected S. Typhimurium strain (CCRJ_26) from our previous study with Multiple Drugs Resistant profile and high-frequency PFGE clonal profile which apparently persists in the pork production centre of Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. By whole-genome sequencing, we described the strain's genome virulent content and characterized the repertoire of bacterial plasmids, antibiotic resistance genes and prophage-like elements. Here, we have shown evidence that strain CCRJ_26 genome possible represent a virulence-associated phenotype which may be potentially virulent in human infection. Whole-genome sequencing technologies are still costly and remain underexplored for applied microbiology in Brazil. Hence, this genomic description of S. Typhimurium strain CCRJ_26 will provide help in future molecular epidemiological studies. The analysis described here reveals a quick and useful pipeline for bacterial virulence characterization using whole-genome sequencing approach. © 2018 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. The putative thiosulfate sulfurtransferases PspE and GlpE contribute to virulence of Salmonella Typhimurium in the mouse model of systemic disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inke Wallrodt

    Full Text Available The phage-shock protein PspE and GlpE of the glycerol 3-phosphate regulon of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium are predicted to belong to the class of thiosulfate sulfurtransferases, enzymes that traffic sulfur between molecules. In the present study we demonstrated that the two genes contribute to S. Typhimurium virulence, as a glpE and pspE double deletion strain showed significantly decreased virulence in a mouse model of systemic infection. However, challenge of cultured epithelial cells and macrophages did not reveal any virulence-associated phenotypes. We hypothesized that their contribution to virulence could be in sulfur metabolism or by contributing to resistance to nitric oxide, oxidative stress, or cyanide detoxification. In vitro studies demonstrated that glpE but not pspE was important for resistance to H2O2. Since the double mutant, which was the one affected in virulence, was not affected in this assay, we concluded that resistance to oxidative stress and the virulence phenotype was most likely not linked. The two genes did not contribute to nitric oxid stress, to synthesis of essential sulfur containing amino acids, nor to detoxification of cyanide. Currently, the precise mechanism by which they contribute to virulence remains elusive.

  11. The familial dysautonomia disease gene IKBKAP is required in the developing and adult mouse central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Chaverra

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSANs are a genetically and clinically diverse group of disorders defined by peripheral nervous system (PNS dysfunction. HSAN type III, known as familial dysautonomia (FD, results from a single base mutation in the gene IKBKAP that encodes a scaffolding unit (ELP1 for a multi-subunit complex known as Elongator. Since mutations in other Elongator subunits (ELP2 to ELP4 are associated with central nervous system (CNS disorders, the goal of this study was to investigate a potential requirement for Ikbkap in the CNS of mice. The sensory and autonomic pathophysiology of FD is fatal, with the majority of patients dying by age 40. While signs and pathology of FD have been noted in the CNS, the clinical and research focus has been on the sensory and autonomic dysfunction, and no genetic model studies have investigated the requirement for Ikbkap in the CNS. Here, we report, using a novel mouse line in which Ikbkap is deleted solely in the nervous system, that not only is Ikbkap widely expressed in the embryonic and adult CNS, but its deletion perturbs both the development of cortical neurons and their survival in adulthood. Primary cilia in embryonic cortical apical progenitors and motile cilia in adult ependymal cells are reduced in number and disorganized. Furthermore, we report that, in the adult CNS, both autonomic and non-autonomic neuronal populations require Ikbkap for survival, including spinal motor and cortical neurons. In addition, the mice developed kyphoscoliosis, an FD hallmark, indicating its neuropathic etiology. Ultimately, these perturbations manifest in a developmental and progressive neurodegenerative condition that includes impairments in learning and memory. Collectively, these data reveal an essential function for Ikbkap that extends beyond the peripheral nervous system to CNS development and function. With the identification of discrete CNS cell types and structures that depend on

  12. In Vitro Assembly of the Outer Core of the Lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli K-12 and Salmonella typhimurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    There are five distinct core structures in the lipopolysaccharides of Escherichia coli and at least two in Salmonella isolates, which vary principally in the outer core oligosaccharide. Six outer core glycosyltransferases, E. coli K-12 WaaG, WaaB, and WaaO and Salmonella typhimurium WaaI, WaaJ, and WaaK, were cloned, overexpressed, and purified. A novel substrate for WaaG was isolated from ΔwaaG E. coli overexpressing the lipid A phosphatase lpxE and the lipid A late acyltransferase lpxM. The action of lpxE and lpxM in the ΔwaaG background yielded heptose2-1-dephospho Kdo2-lipid A, a 1-dephosphorylated hexa-acylated lipid A with the inner core sugars that is easily isolated by organic extraction. Using this structurally defined acceptor and commercially available sugar nucleotides, each outer core glycosyltransferases was assayed in vitro. We show that WaaG and WaaB add a glucose and galactose sequentially to heptose2-1-dephospho Kdo2-lipid A. E. coli K-12 WaaO and S. typhimurium WaaI add a galactose to the WaaG/WaaB product but can also add a galactose to the WaaG product directly without the branched core sugar added by WaaB. Both WaaI and WaaO require divalent metal ions for optimal activity; however, WaaO, unlike WaaI, can add several glucose residues to its lipid acceptor. Using the product of WaaG, WaaB, and WaaI, we show that S. typhimurium WaaJ and WaaK transfer a glucose and N-acetylglucosamine, respectively, to yield the full outer core. This is the first demonstration of the in vitro assembly of the outer core of the lipopolysaccharide using defined lipid A-oligosaccharide acceptors and sugar donors. PMID:24479701

  13. Quantification of contamination of lettuce by GFP-expressing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franz, Eelco; Visser, Anna A; Van Diepeningen, Anne D; Klerks, Michel M; Termorshuizen, Aad J; van Bruggen, Ariena H C

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the possibility of internalization of GFP-expressing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) strains MAE 110 (multi-cellular morphology) and 119 (wild type morphology) into lettuce seedlings (Lactuca

  14. Acid adaptation affects the viability of Salmonella typhimurium during the lactic fermentation of skim milk and product storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hsuan-Wen; Yu, Roch-Chui; Chou, Cheng-Chun

    2007-03-20

    In this study, Salmonella typhimurium was acid adapted at pH 5.5 for 4 h. The viability of the acid-adapted and non-adapted cells of S. typhimurium was investigated both during the lactic fermentation of skim milk with Streptococcus thermophilus or Lactobacillus bulgaricus, and during the storage of lactic fermented milk products at 5 degrees C. It was found that the viable population of S. typhimurium, regardless of acid adaptation, increased in skim milk during the initial 24 h of lactic fermentation and then declined. However, the viable population of acid-adapted S. typhimurium was significantly higher (Pfermentation. Acid-adapted cells of S. typhimurium were also found to have survived better than non-adapted cells in the S. thermophilus-prepared fermented milk and two commercial lactic fermented milk products. The viability of the acid-adapted and non-adapted S. typhimurium at 5 and 37 degrees C in cell-free fermented milks that had their pHs adjusted to 6.4 and skim milk (pH 6.4) was further investigated. Results revealed that acid adaptation, in addition to enhancing acid tolerance, reduced the susceptibility of S. typhimurium to refrigerated temperature and other detrimental factors which might be present in lactic fermented milk products. These responses all contribute to the enhanced survival of acid-adapted S. typhimurium in the lactic fermented milk products observed in the present study.

  15. Quantification of contamination of lettuce by GFP-expressing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franz, E.; Visser, A.A.; Diepeningen, van A.D.; Klerks, M.M.; Termorshuizen, A.J.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.

    2007-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the possibility of internalization of GFP-expressing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) strains MAE 110 (multi-cellular morphology) and 119 (wild type morphology) into lettuce seedlings (Lactuca

  16. Genome Sequences of Three Highly Copper-Resistant Salmonella enterica subsp. I Serovar Typhimurium Strains Isolated from Pigs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Yanan; Hasman, Henrik; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium is the causative agent of typhoid fever, which causes nearly 21.7 million illnesses and 217,000 deaths around the world each year. Here, we describe the draft genome sequences of the Salmonella typhimurium strains S7, S15, and S23, isolated from copper-fed pigs in Denmark...

  17. Transfer of primed CD4+OX40- T lymphocytes induces increased immunity to experimental Salmonella typhimurium infections in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, P; Christensen, H B; Hougen, H P

    1997-01-01

    The protective effect of primed CD4 T cells against a lethal dose of Salmonella typhimurium was studied in Lewis rats. Primed CD4 T cells were obtained by inoculating Lewis rats with a non-lethal dose of S. typhimurium. Four weeks after the infection, spleen non-adherent mononuclear cells were...

  18. Analysis of the contribution of bacteriophage ST64B to in vitro virulence traits of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fresno, Ana Herrero; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Hendriksen, Rene S.

    2014-01-01

    Comparison of the publicly available genomes of the virulent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) strains SL1344, 14028s and D23580 to that of the virulence-attenuated isolate LT2 revealed the absence of a full sequence of bacteriophage ST64B in the latter. Four selected ST64B...

  19. Molecular epidemiology of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium isolates from cattle in hokkaido, Japan: evidence of clonal replacement and characterization of the disseminated clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamamura, Yukino; Uchida, Ikuo; Tanaka, Kiyoshi; Okazaki, Hizuru; Tezuka, Satoru; Hanyu, Hideki; Kataoka, Natsumi; Makino, Sou-Ichi; Kishima, Masato; Kubota, Takayuki; Kanno, Toru; Hatama, Shinichi; Ishihara, Ryoko; Hata, Eiji; Yamada, Hironari; Nakaoka, Yuuji; Akiba, Masato

    2011-03-01

    The molecular epidemiology of 545 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates collected between 1977 and 2009 from cattle in Hokkaido, Japan, was investigated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Nine main clusters were identified from 116 PFGE patterns. Cluster I comprised 248 isolates, 243 of which possessed a sequence specific to definitive phage type 104 (DT104) or U302. The cluster I isolates were dominant in 1993 to 2003, but their numbers declined beginning in 2004. Beginning in 2002, an increase was observed in the number of cluster VII isolates, consisting of 21 PFGE patterns comprising 165 isolates. A total of 116 isolates representative of the 116 PFGE profiles were analyzed by multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA). Other than two drug-sensitive isolates, 19 isolates within cluster VII were classified in the same cluster by MLVA. Among the cluster VII isolates, an antibiotic resistance type showing resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamides, tetracycline, kanamycin, cefazolin, and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim and a resistance type showing resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, sulfonamides, tetracycline, and kanamycin were found in 23 and 125 isolates, respectively. In the 19 isolates representative of cluster VII, the bla(TEM-1) gene was found on a Salmonella serotype Typhimurium virulence plasmid, which was transferred to Escherichia coli by electroporation along with resistance to two to four other antimicrobials. Genomic analysis by subtractive hybridization and plasmid analysis suggested that the bla(TEM-1)-carrying virulence plasmid has a mosaic structure composed of elements of different origin. These results indicate an emerging multidrug-resistant S. Typhimurium clone carrying a virulence-resistance plasmid among cattle in Hokkaido, Japan.

  20. Molecular Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Isolates from Cattle in Hokkaido, Japan: Evidence of Clonal Replacement and Characterization of the Disseminated Clone▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamamura, Yukino; Uchida, Ikuo; Tanaka, Kiyoshi; Okazaki, Hizuru; Tezuka, Satoru; Hanyu, Hideki; Kataoka, Natsumi; Makino, Sou-ichi; Kishima, Masato; Kubota, Takayuki; Kanno, Toru; Hatama, Shinichi; Ishihara, Ryoko; Hata, Eiji; Yamada, Hironari; Nakaoka, Yuuji; Akiba, Masato

    2011-01-01

    The molecular epidemiology of 545 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates collected between 1977 and 2009 from cattle in Hokkaido, Japan, was investigated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Nine main clusters were identified from 116 PFGE patterns. Cluster I comprised 248 isolates, 243 of which possessed a sequence specific to definitive phage type 104 (DT104) or U302. The cluster I isolates were dominant in 1993 to 2003, but their numbers declined beginning in 2004. Beginning in 2002, an increase was observed in the number of cluster VII isolates, consisting of 21 PFGE patterns comprising 165 isolates. A total of 116 isolates representative of the 116 PFGE profiles were analyzed by multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA). Other than two drug-sensitive isolates, 19 isolates within cluster VII were classified in the same cluster by MLVA. Among the cluster VII isolates, an antibiotic resistance type showing resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamides, tetracycline, kanamycin, cefazolin, and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim and a resistance type showing resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, sulfonamides, tetracycline, and kanamycin were found in 23 and 125 isolates, respectively. In the 19 isolates representative of cluster VII, the blaTEM-1 gene was found on a Salmonella serotype Typhimurium virulence plasmid, which was transferred to Escherichia coli by electroporation along with resistance to two to four other antimicrobials. Genomic analysis by subtractive hybridization and plasmid analysis suggested that the blaTEM-1-carrying virulence plasmid has a mosaic structure composed of elements of different origin. These results indicate an emerging multidrug-resistant S. Typhimurium clone carrying a virulence-resistance plasmid among cattle in Hokkaido, Japan. PMID:21239560

  1. Schizophrenia risk gene CAV1 is both pro-psychotic and required for atypical antipsychotic drug actions in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J A; Yadav, P N; Setola, V; Farrell, M; Roth, B L

    2011-08-16

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a scaffolding protein important for regulating receptor signaling cascades by partitioning signaling molecules into membrane microdomains. Disruption of the CAV1 gene has recently been identified as a rare structural variant associated with schizophrenia. Although Cav-1 knockout (KO) mice displayed no baseline behavioral disruptions, Cav-1 KO mice, similar to schizophrenic individuals, exhibited increased sensitivity to the psychotomimetic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist phencyclidine (PCP). Thus, PCP disruption of prepulse inhibition (PPI) and PCP-induced mouse locomotor activity were both enhanced by genetic deletion of Cav-1. Interestingly, genetic deletion of Cav-1 rendered the atypical antipsychotics clozapine and olanzapine and the 5-HT(2A)-selective antagonist M100907 ineffective at normalizing PCP-induced disruption of PPI. We also discovered that genetic deletion of Cav-1 attenuated 5-HT(2A)-induced c-Fos and egr-1 expression in mouse frontal cortex and also reduced 5-HT(2A)-mediated Ca(2+) mobilization in primary cortical neuronal cultures. The behavioral effects of the 5-HT(2A) agonist (2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine) including head twitch responses and disruption of PPI were also attenuated by genetic deletion of Cav-1, indicating that Cav-1 is required for both inverse agonist (that is, atypical antipsychotic drug) and agonist actions at 5-HT(2A) receptors. This study demonstrates that disruption of the CAV1 gene--a rare structural variant associated with schizophrenia--is not only pro-psychotic but also attenuates atypical antipsychotic drug actions.

  2. The metabolic pathways utilized by Salmonella Typhimurium during infection of host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Arthur; Fulde, Marcus; Tedin, Karsten

    2018-04-01

    Only relatively recently has research on the metabolism of intracellular bacterial pathogens within their host cells begun to appear in the published literature. This reflects in part the experimental difficulties encountered in separating host metabolic processes from those of the resident pathogen. One of the most genetically tractable and thoroughly studied intracellular bacterial pathogens, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), has been at the forefront of metabolic studies within eukaryotic host cells. In this review, we offer a synthesis of what has been discovered to date regarding the metabolic adaptation of S. Typhimurium to survival and growth within the infected host. We discuss many studies in the context of techniques used, types of host cells, how host metabolites contribute to intracellular survival and proliferation of the pathogen and how bacterial metabolism affects the virulence and persistence of the pathogen. © 2018 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of amoxicillin in healthy and Salmonella Typhimurium-inoculated pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerso, H.; Friis, C.; Nielsen, Jens

    2000-01-01

    Objective--To determine pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of amoxicillin in healthy and Salmonella Typhimurium-inoculated pigs. Animals--12 healthy pigs and 12 S Typhimurium-inoculated pigs. Procedure-Concentration of amoxicillin in tissue was measured by use of high-performance liquid...... chromatography 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours after IM administration. Pharmacokinetic values of amoxicillin in plasma were assessed by use of a l-compartment model with first-order absorption. Results--Inoculation caused diarrhea and increased rectal temperature and WBC count. Absorption half-life was shorter...... pigs and from 0.22 to 0.36 in inoculated pigs. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Salmonella Typhimurium inoculation altered absorption of amoxicillin from the injection sire and prolonged elimination half-life. However, distribution of amoxicillin to intestinal tract tissue was only affected...

  4. Studies on the interaction between Salmonella enterica ser. Typhimurium and intestinal helminths in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenhard, N.R.; Roepstorff, A.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau

    2006-01-01

    Concomitant infections with helminths and bacteria may affect the course and the resulting disease outcome of the individual infections. Salmonella, Oesophagostomum, Trichuris and Ascaris coexist naturally in pig herds in Denmark, and possible interactions were studied. Pigs in one experiment were...... trickle infected with low or moderate dose levels of Oesophagostomum spp. and challenge infected with S. Typhimurium. In another experiment, pigs were inoculated with S. Typhimurium followed by a challenge exposure to either Oesophagostomum, Trichuris or Ascaris. Enhancement of the Salmonella infection...... was not demonstrated in either experiment. The helminth effect on the pigs was modest and may explain the lack of influence on the Salmonella infection. A previous experiment with a larger Oesophagostomum infection level resulted in enhancement of the S. Typhimurium infection. A dose dependency of the interaction...

  5. The detection of Salmonella typhimurium on shell eggs using a phage-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Yating; Li, Suiqiong; Horikawa, Shin; Shen, Wen; Park, Mi-Kyung; Vodyanoy, Vitaly J.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents the direct detection of Salmonella typhimurium on shell eggs using a phage-based magnetoelastic (ME) biosensor. The ME biosensor consists of a ME resonator as the sensor platform and E2 phage as the biorecognition element that is genetically engineered to specifically bind with Salmonella typhimurium. The ME biosensor, which is a wireless sensor, vibrates with a characteristic resonant frequency under an externally applied magnetic field. Multiple sensors can easily be remotely monitored. Multiple measurement and control sensors were placed on the shell eggs contaminated by Salmonella typhimurium solutions with different known concentrations. The resonant frequency of sensors before and after the exposure to the spiked shell eggs was measured. The frequency shift of the measurement sensors was significantly different than the control sensors indicating Salmonella contamination. Scanning electron microscopy was used to confirm binding of Salmonella to the sensor surface and the resulting frequency shift results.

  6. Tetracycline consumption and occurrence of tetracycline resistance in Salmonella typhimurium phage types from Danish pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emborg, Hanne-Dorthe; Vigre, Håkan; Jensen, Vibeke Frøkjær

    2007-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate at the farm-owner level the effect of prescribed tetracycline consumption in pigs and different Salmonella Typhimurium phage types on the probability that the S. Typhimurium was resistant to tetracycline. In this study, 1,307 isolates were included...... was strongly associated with tetracycline resistance. A further analysis of data from the Danish Integrated Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Programme (DANMAP) indicates that the tetracycline-susceptible phage types only slowly become tetracycline resistant, although tetracycline consumption......, originating from 877 farm owners, and data were analyzed using logistic regression. The analysis showed that both the S. Typhimurium phage type (p resistance. In particular, the phage type...

  7. Grr1p is required for transcriptional induction of amino acid permease genes and proper transcriptional regulation of genes in carbon metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine; Regenberg, Birgitte; Nielsen, Jens

    2005-01-01

    dependent on Grr1p. Comparison of the grr1 Delta strain with the reference strain in the absence of citrulline revealed that GRR1 disruption leads to increased transcription of numerous genes. These encode enzymes in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the pentose-phosphate pathway and both glucose and starch...... metabolism. Promoter analysis showed that many of the genes with increased transcription display Mig1p- and/or Msn2p/Msn4p-binding sites. Increased expression of glucose-repressed genes in the grr1 strain may be explained by the reduced expression of the hexose transporter genes HXT1, HXT2, HXT3 and HXT4...

  8. Phytogenic feed additives in piglets challenged with Salmonella Typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Gonçalves Bruno

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of phytogenic feed additives on piglet performance and fecal score (FDD, as well as on lipid oxidation of pork meat were evaluated. One hundred and twenty crossbred weaned piglets were randomly assigned to six treatments according to a 2 × 3 factorial design with five replicates per treatment. Factors were: challenge with Salmonella Typhimurium at 35 days of age or no challenge, and three different additives (control (CTR, basal diet; phytogenic feed additives (PHY, basal diet plus 2000 ppm of phytogenic feed additives - Rosmarinus officinalis, Mentha piperita, Lippia sidoides and Porophyllum ruderale; and antimicrobial agent (ATB, basal diet plus 100 ppm of tylosin, 2000 ppm of zinc and colistin sulfate, 30 ppm in the pre-starter basal diet, 10 ppm in the starter basal diet I and II, and 5 ppm in growth and finishing basal diet. Body weight (BW of the piglets of ATB was greater throughout the experimental period, without any differences detected between CTR and PHY. Nevertheless, from 96 to 106 days of age, the BW of the CTR group was greater than PHY. From 21 to 34 days of age, feed conversion of ATB was lower than CTR; however, PHY showed an intermediate result, which did not differ from either ATB or CTR. Challenged animals reduced feed intake from day 35 to 48 compared with unchallenged animals. Piglet performance and fecal score from 21 to 48 days of age were lower in piglets that received ATB compared with the other treatments. However, from 35 to 48 days of age, the FDD of PHY was lower than CTR. Lipid oxidation was not reduced in treated animals. Antimicrobial agent improved the growth performance of piglets until 63 days of age, and no difference was observed between the treatments from 64 to 131 days of age. Antimicrobial agent reduced FDD; the FDD of PHY was similar to that of ATB after 48 days. None of the treatments affected lipid oxidation of pork meat.

  9. Impact of phytopathogen infection and extreme weather stress on internalization of Salmonella Typhimurium in lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Chongtao; Lee, Cheonghoon; Nangle, Ed; Li, Jianrong; Gardner, David; Kleinhenz, Matthew; Lee, Jiyoung

    2014-01-03

    Internalization of human pathogens, common in many types of fresh produce, is a threat to human health since the internalized pathogens cannot be fully inactivated/removed by washing with water or sanitizers. Given that pathogen internalization can be affected by many environmental factors, this study was conducted to investigate the influence of two types of plant stress on the internalization of Salmonella Typhimurium in iceberg lettuce during pre-harvest. The stresses were: abiotic (water stress induced by extreme weather events) and biotic (phytopathogen infection by lettuce mosaic virus [LMV]). Lettuce with and without LMV infection were purposefully contaminated with green fluorescence protein-labeled S. Typhimurium on the leaf surfaces. Lettuce was also subjected to water stress conditions (drought and storm) which were simulated by irrigating with different amounts of water. The internalized S. Typhimurium in the different parts of the lettuce were quantified by plate count and real-time quantitative PCR and confirmed with a laser scanning confocal microscope. Salmonella internalization occurred under the conditions outlined above; however internalization levels were not significantly affected by water stress alone. In contrast, the extent of culturable S. Typhimurium internalized in the leafy part of the lettuce decreased when infected with LMV under water stress conditions and contaminated with high levels of S. Typhimurium. On the other hand, LMV-infected lettuce showed a significant increase in the levels of culturable bacteria in the roots. In conclusion, internalization was observed under all experimental conditions when the lettuce surface was contaminated with S. Typhimurium. However, the extent of internalization was only affected by water stress when lettuce was infected with LMV. © 2013.

  10. Plasma-treated polyethylene film: A smart material applied for Salmonella Typhimurium detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng-Ubol, Triranat [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Rama 6 Rd, Phayathai, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Phinyocheep, Pranee, E-mail: scppo@mahidol.ac.th [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Rama 6 Rd, Phayathai, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Daniel, Philippe [Laboratoire de Physique de l' Etat Condense (LPEC-UMR CNRS 6087), Universite du Maine, Avenue Olivier Messiaen, 72085, Le Mans Cedex 9 (France); Panbangred, Watanalai [Department of Biotechnology and Mahidol University-Osaka University Collaborative Research Center for Bioscience and Biotechnology (MU-OU: CRC), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Rama 6 Rd, Phayathai, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Pilard, Jean-Francois [Unite de Chimie Organique Moleculaire et Macromoleculaire (UCO2M-UMR CNRS 6011), Universite du Maine, Avenue Olivier Messiaen, 72085 Le Mans Cedex 9 (France); Thouand, Gerald; Durand-Thouand, Marie-Jose [Genie des Procedes Environnement et Agroalimentaire (GEPEA UMR CNRS 6144), Departement Genie Biologique, IUT de la Roche/Yon, Universite de Nantes, 18 Bd G. Defferre, 85035 La Roche sur Yon (France)

    2012-12-01

    Salmonella is a major cause of foodborne illness worldwide and is not allowed to be present in any food in all countries. The purpose of this study is to develop a simple alternative method for the detection of Salmonella based on functionalized polyethylene (PE) surfaces. Salmonella Typhimurium was used as a model bacterium. PE film was treated using dielectric plasma in order to alter the wettability of the PE surface and consequently introduce functionality on the surface. The PE film characterized by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy revealed the presence of C=O stretching of ketones, aldehydes and carboxylic acids. The antibodies against O or H antigens of Salmonella and S. Typhimurium were then respectively immobilized on the PE surface after activation of the carboxylic group using NHS/EDC followed by protein A. The evidences from ATR-FTIR, scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy showed the presence of S. Typhimurium attached to the plasma treated PE surfaces via the two types of anti-Salmonella antibody. The plasma treated PE film developed is simple and allows efficient association of bacterial cells on the treated surfaces without the necessity of time-consuming centrifugation and washing steps for isolation of the cells. This material is considered to be a smart material applicable for S. Typhimurium detection. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We developed a functionalized polyethylene film for bacterial detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We modified the surface of polyethylene film by plasma treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATR-FTIR spectroscopy was used to analyze the functionality on the PE surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We introduced Salmonella Typhimurium on the modified PE film. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEM revealed the presence of S. Typhimurium on the plasma treated PE film.

  11. Epidemiology of a Salmonella enterica subsp. Enterica serovar Typhimurium strain associated with a songbird outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blehert, David S.; Hernandez, Sonia M.; Keel, Kevin; Sanchez, Susan; Trees, Eija; ,

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium is responsible for the majority of salmonellosis cases worldwide. This Salmonella serovar is also responsible for die-offs in songbird populations. In 2009, there was an S. Typhimurium epizootic reported in pine siskins in the eastern United States. At the time, there was also a human outbreak with this serovar that was associated with contaminated peanuts. As peanuts are also used in wild-bird food, it was hypothesized that the pine siskin epizootic was related to this human outbreak. A comparison of songbird and human S. Typhimurium pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns revealed that the epizootic was attributed not to the peanut-associated strain but, rather, to a songbird strain first characterized from an American goldfinch in 1998. This same S. Typhimurium strain (PFGE type A3) was also identified in the PulseNet USA database, accounting for 137 of 77,941 total S. Typhimurium PFGE entries. A second molecular typing method, multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), confirmed that the same strain was responsible for the pine siskin epizootic in the eastern United States but was distinct from a genetically related strain isolated from pine siskins in Minnesota. The pine siskin A3 strain was first encountered in May 2008 in an American goldfinch and later in a northern cardinal at the start of the pine siskin epizootic. MLVA also confirmed the clonal nature of S. Typhimurium in songbirds and established that the pine siskin epizootic strain was unique to the finch family. For 2009, the distribution of PFGE type A3 in passerines and humans mirrored the highest population density of pine siskins for the East Coast.

  12. Use of acetic and citric acids to control Salmonella Typhimurium in tahini (sesame paste).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nabulsi, Anas A; Olaimat, Amin N; Osaili, Tareq M; Shaker, Reyad R; Zein Elabedeen, Noor; Jaradat, Ziad W; Abushelaibi, Aisha; Holley, Richard A

    2014-09-01

    Since tahini and its products have been linked to Salmonella illness outbreaks and product recalls in recent years, this study assessed the ability of Salmonella Typhimurium to survive or grow in commercial tahini and when hydrated (10% w/v in water), treated with 0.1%-0.5% acetic or citric acids, and stored at 37, 21 and 10 °C for 28 d. S. Typhimurium survived in commercial tahini up to 28 d but was reduced in numbers from 1.7 to 3.3 log10 CFU/ml. However, in the moist or hydrated tahini, significant growth of S. Typhimurium occurred at the tested temperatures. Acetic and citric acids at ≤0.5% reduced S. Typhimurium by 2.7-4.8 log10 CFU/ml and 2.5-3.8 log10 CFU/ml, respectively, in commercial tahini at 28 d. In hydrated tahini the organic acids were more effective. S. Typhimurium cells were not detected in the presence of 0.5% acetic acid after 7 d or with 0.5% citric acid after 21 d at the tested temperatures. The ability of S. Typhimurium to grow or survive in commercial tahini and products containing hydrated tahini may contribute to salmonellosis outbreaks; however, use of acetic and citric acids in ready-to-eat foods prepared from tahini can significantly minimize the risk associated with this pathogen. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Plasma-treated polyethylene film: A smart material applied for Salmonella Typhimurium detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng-Ubol, Triranat; Phinyocheep, Pranee; Daniel, Philippe; Panbangred, Watanalai; Pilard, Jean-François; Thouand, Gerald; Durand-Thouand, Marie-José

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella is a major cause of foodborne illness worldwide and is not allowed to be present in any food in all countries. The purpose of this study is to develop a simple alternative method for the detection of Salmonella based on functionalized polyethylene (PE) surfaces. Salmonella Typhimurium was used as a model bacterium. PE film was treated using dielectric plasma in order to alter the wettability of the PE surface and consequently introduce functionality on the surface. The PE film characterized by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy revealed the presence of C=O stretching of ketones, aldehydes and carboxylic acids. The antibodies against O or H antigens of Salmonella and S. Typhimurium were then respectively immobilized on the PE surface after activation of the carboxylic group using NHS/EDC followed by protein A. The evidences from ATR-FTIR, scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy showed the presence of S. Typhimurium attached to the plasma treated PE surfaces via the two types of anti-Salmonella antibody. The plasma treated PE film developed is simple and allows efficient association of bacterial cells on the treated surfaces without the necessity of time-consuming centrifugation and washing steps for isolation of the cells. This material is considered to be a smart material applicable for S. Typhimurium detection. Highlights: ► We developed a functionalized polyethylene film for bacterial detection. ► We modified the surface of polyethylene film by plasma treatment. ► ATR-FTIR spectroscopy was used to analyze the functionality on the PE surface. ► We introduced Salmonella Typhimurium on the modified PE film. ► SEM revealed the presence of S. Typhimurium on the plasma treated PE film.

  14. E2A proteins are required for proper B cell development and initiation of immunoglobulin gene rearrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bain, G.; Maandag, E. C.; Izon, D. J.; Amsen, D.; Kruisbeek, A. M.; Weintraub, B. C.; Krop, I.; Schlissel, M. S.; Feeney, A. J.; van Roon, M.

    1994-01-01

    E12 and E47 are two helix-loop-helix transcription factors that arise by alternative splicing of the E2A gene. Both have been implicated in the regulation of immunoglobulin gene expression. We have now generated E2A (-/-) mice by gene targeting. E2A-null mutant mice fail to generate mature B cells.

  15. Mutagenicity of irradiated solutions of nuclei acid bases and nucleosides in Salmonella typhimurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmer, J.; Schubert, J.

    1981-01-01

    Solutions of nucleic acid bases, nucleosides and a nucleotide, saturated with either N 2 , N 2 O or O 2 , were irradiated and tested for mutagenicity towards Salmonella typhimurium, with and without pre-incubation. Irradiated solutions of the nuclei acid bases were all non-mutagenic. Irradiated solutions of the nucleosides showed mutagenicity in S. typhimurium TA100 (pre-incubation assay). Generally, the mutagenicity followed the order: N 2 O > N 2 > O 2 . The results show that the formation of mutagenic radiolytic products is initiated by attack of mainly solutions of the nucleotide thymidine-5'-monophosphate, no mutagenicity could be detected. (orig.)

  16. Immuno-capture and in situ detection of Salmonella typhimurium on a novel microfluidic chip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Renjie, E-mail: 1058464972@qq.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, No. 174, St. Shazheng, Shapingba District, Chongqing (China); Ni, Yanan, E-mail: 468885029@qq.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, No. 174, St. Shazheng, Shapingba District, Chongqing (China); Xu, Yi, E-mail: xuyibbd@sina.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, No. 174, St. Shazheng, Shapingba District, Chongqing (China); National Center for International Research of Micro/Nano-System and New Material Technology, No. 174, St. Shazhengjie, Shapingba District, Chongqing (China); Key Laboratory of Fundamental Science of Micro/Nano-Device and System Technology for National Defense, Chongqing (China); Jiang, Yan, E-mail: 919865356@qq.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, No. 174, St. Shazheng, Shapingba District, Chongqing (China); Dong, Chunyan, E-mail: 774176325@qq.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, No. 174, St. Shazheng, Shapingba District, Chongqing (China); Chuan, Na, E-mail: 814859441@qq.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, No. 174, St. Shazheng, Shapingba District, Chongqing (China)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel microfluidic chip and a LIF microsystem were designed and fabricated. • Salmonella typhimurium was captured and labeled by specific immuno-capture on chip. • CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled bacteria were detected by in situ analysis using LIF microsystem. • The proposed method has potential application in practice. - Abstract: The new method presented in this article achieved the goal of capturing Salmonella typhimurium via immunoreaction and rapid in situ detection of the CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) labeled S. typhimurium by self-assembly light-emitting diode-induced fluorescence detection (LIF) microsystem on a specially designed multichannel microfluidic chip. CdSe/ZnS QDs were used as fluorescent markers improving detection sensitivity. The microfluidic chip developed in this study was composed of 12 sample channels, 3 mixing zones, and 6 immune reaction zones, which also acted as fluorescence detection zones. QDs–IgG–primary antibody complexes were generated by mixing CdSe/ZnS QDs conjugated secondary antibody (QDs–IgG) and S. typhimurium antibody (primary antibody) in mixing zones. Then, the complexes went into immune reaction zones to label previously captured S. typhimurium in the sandwich mode. The capture rate of S. typhimurium in each detection zone was up to 70%. The enriched QDs-labeled S. typhimurium was detected using a self-assembly LIF microsystem. A good linear relationship was obtained in the range from 3.7 × 10 to 3.7 × 10{sup 5} cfu mL{sup −1} using the equation I = 0.1739 log (C) − 0.1889 with R{sup 2} = 0.9907, and the detection limit was down to 37 cfu mL{sup −1}. The proposed method of online immunolabeling with QDs for in situ fluorescence detection on the designed multichannel microfluidic chip had been successfully used to detect S. typhimurium in pork sample, and it has shown potential advantages in practice.

  17. Decrease of Salmonella typhimurium in skim milk and egg by heat and ultrasonic wave treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrigley, D.M.; Llorca, N.G.

    1992-01-01

    Ultrasonic waves induce cavitation which is lethal for many bacteria. When Salmonella typhimurium was suspended in skim milk or brain heart infusion broth and placed in an ultrasonicating water bath, the number of bacteria decreased by 2 to 3 log CFU in a time dependent manner. The killing by ultrasonic waves was enhanced if the menstruum was simultaneously maintained at 50 degrees C. Ultrasonic reduction in S. typhimurium numbers in liquid whole egg ranged from 1-3 log CFU at 50 degrees C. The results indicate that indirect ultrasonic wave treatment is effective in killing Salmonella in some foods

  18. Role of RecA protein in untargeted UV mutagenesis of bacteriophage lambda: evidence for the requirement for the dinB gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brotcorne-Lannoye, A.; Maenhaut-Michel, G.

    1986-01-01

    Untargeted UV mutagenesis of bacteriophage lambda--i.e., the increased recovery of lambda mutants when unirradiated lambda infects UV-irradiated Escherichia coli--is thought to be mediated by a transient decrease in DNA replication fidelity, generating mutations in the newly synthesized strands. Using the bacteriophage lambda cI857----lambda c mutation system, we provide evidence that the RecA protein, shown previously to be required for this mutagenic pathway, is no longer needed when the LexA protein is inactivated by mutation. We suggest that the error-prone DNA replication responsible for UV-induced untargeted mutagenesis is turned on by the presence of replication-blocking lesions in the host cell DNA and that the RecA protein is required only to derepress the relevant din gene(s). This is in contrast to mutagenesis of irradiated bacteria or irradiated phage lambda, in which activated RecA protein has a second role in mutagenesis in addition to the cleavage of the LexA protein. Among the tested din genes, the dinB gene product (in addition to the uvrA and uvrB gene products) was found to be required for untargeted mutagenesis of bacteriophage lambda. To our knowledge, a phenotype associated with the dinB gene has not been reported previously

  19. Turning off flagellum rotation requires the pleiotropic gene pleD: pleA, pleC, and pleD define two morphogenic pathways in Caulobacter crescentus.

    OpenAIRE

    Sommer, J M; Newton, A

    1989-01-01

    We have identified mutations in three pleiotropic genes, pleA, pleC, and pleD, that are required for differentiation in Caulobacter crescentus. pleA and pleC mutants were isolated in an extensive screen for strains defective in both motility and adsorption of polar bacteriophage phi CbK; using temperature-sensitive alleles, we determined the time at which the two genes act. pleA was required for a short period at 0.7 of the swarmer cell cycle for flagellum biosynthesis, whereas pleC was requi...

  20. The putative thiosulfate sulfurtransferases PspE and GlpE contribute to virulence of Salmonella Typhimurium in the mouse model of systemic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallrodt, Inke; Jelsbak, Lotte; Thorndahl, Lotte

    2013-01-01

    , was not affected in this assay, we concluded that resistance tooxidative stress and the virulence phenotype was most likely not linked. The two genes did not contribute to nitric oxide stress, to synthesis of essential sulfur containing amino acids, nor to detoxification of cyanide. Currently, the precise......The phage-shock protein PspE and GlpE of the glycerol 3-phosphate regulon of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium are predicted to belong to the class of thiosulfate sulfurtransferases, enzymes that traffic sulfur between molecules. In the present study we demonstrated that the two genes...... that their contribution to virulence could be in sulfur metabolism or by contributing to resistance to nitric oxide, oxidative stress, or cyanide detoxification. In vitro studies demonstrated that glpE but not pspE was important for resistance to H2O2. Since the double mutant, which was the one affected in virulence...

  1. Putative alternative polyadenylation (APA) events in the early interaction of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium and human host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso-Grunz, Fabian

    2015-12-01

    The immune response of epithelial cells upon infection is mediated by changing activity levels of a variety of proteins along with changes in mRNA, and also ncRNA abundance. Alternative polyadenylation (APA) represents a mechanism that diversifies gene expression similar to alternative splicing. T-cell activation, neuronal activity, development and several human diseases including viral infections involve APA, but at present it remains unclear if this mechanism is also implicated in the response to bacterial infections. Our recently published study of interacting Salmonella enterica Typhimurium and human host cells includes genome-wide expression profiles of human epithelial cells prior and subsequent to infection with the invasive pathogen. The generated dataset (GEO accession number: GSE61730) covers several points of time post infection, and one of these interaction stages was additionally profiled with MACE-based dual 3'Seq, which allows for identification of polyadenylation (PA) sites. The present study features the polyadenylation landscape in early interacting cells based on this data, and provides a comparison of the identified PA sites with those of a corresponding 3P-Seq dataset of non-interacting cells. Differential PA site usage of FTL , PRDX1 and VAPA results in transcription of mRNA isoforms with distinct sets of miRNA and protein binding sites that influence processing, localization, stability, and translation of the respective mRNA. APA of these candidate genes consequently harbors the potential to modulate the host cell response to bacterial infection.

  2. A novel insight on signal transduction mechanism of RcsCDB system in Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de Las Mercedes Pescaretti

    Full Text Available The RcsCDB system of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is implicated in the control of capsule and flagella synthesis. The hybrid sensor RcsC, the phosphotransferase RcsD and the RcsB regulator, constitute the main components of the RcsCDB system. The proposed Rcs signaling cascade involves the autophosphorylation of RcsC and the transfer of the phosphate group to RcsB, mediated by RcsD. We previously reported that the overexpression of rcsB repress the transcription of rcsD by an autoregulation mechanism. Moreover, we demonstrated that during the rcsD repression, the RcsB-dependent flagellar modulation remained active. These results suggest that the Rcs phosphorelay mechanism occurs even in the absence of RcsD. In this work, we established the existence of two alternative phosphorelay pathways driving activation of this system. We demonstrated that RcsC and RcsD can act as histidine kinase proteins which, after autophosphorylated, are able to independently transfer the phosphate to RcsB. Our results suggest that these pathways could be activated by different environmental signals, leading different levels of RcsB-phosphorylated to produce a differential gene modulation. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the complexity and importance of the Rcs system activation, where more than one phosphate flow pathway increases the possibilities to exert gene regulation for a quick environmental changes response.

  3. Anti-tumoral effect of the mitochondrial target domain of Noxa delivered by an engineered Salmonella typhimurium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Ho Jeong

    Full Text Available Bacterial cancer therapy relies on the fact that several bacterial species are capable of targeting tumor tissue and that bacteria can be genetically engineered to selectively deliver therapeutic proteins of interest to the targeted tumors. However, the challenge of bacterial cancer therapy is the release of the therapeutic proteins from the bacteria and entry of the proteins into tumor cells. This study employed an attenuated Salmonella typhimurium to selectively deliver the mitochondrial targeting domain of Noxa (MTD as a potential therapeutic cargo protein, and examined its anti-cancer effect. To release MTD from the bacteria, a novel bacterial lysis system of phage origin was deployed. To facilitate the entry of MTD into the tumor cells, the MTD was fused to DS4.3, a novel cell-penetrating peptide (CPP derived from a voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv2.1. The gene encoding DS4.3-MTD and the phage lysis genes were placed under the control of PBAD , a promoter activated by L-arabinose. We demonstrated that DS4.3-MTD chimeric molecules expressed by the Salmonellae were anti-tumoral in cultured tumor cells and in mice with CT26 colon carcinoma.

  4. The bacterial two-hybrid system uncovers the involvement of acetylation in regulating of Lrp activity in Salmonella Typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Qin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nε-lysine acetylation is an abundant and important Post-translational modification in bacteria. We used the bacterial two-hybrid system to screen the genome library of the Salmonella Typhimurium to identify potential proteins involved in acetyltransferase Pat - or deacetylase CobB-mediated acetylation. Then, the in vitro (deacetylation assays were used to validate the potential targets, such as STM14_1074, NrdF, RhaR. Lrp, a leucine-responsive regulatory protein and global regulator, was shown to interact with Pat. We further demonstrate that Lrp could be acetylated by Pat and deacetylated by NAD+-dependent CobB in vitro. Specifically, the conserved lysine residue 36 (K36 in helix-turn-helix (HTH DNA-binding domain of Lrp was acetylated. Acetylation of K36 impaired the function of Lrp through altering the affinity with the target promoter. The mutation of K36 in chromosome mimicking acetylation enhanced the transcriptional level of itself and attenuated the mRNA levels of Lrp-regulated genes including fimA, which was confirmed by yeast agglutination assay. These findings demonstrate that the acetylation regulates the DNA-binding activity of Lrp, suggesting that acetylation modification of transcription factors is a conserved regulatory manner to modulate gene expression in bacteria and eukaryotes.

  5. Innate immune activation of swine intestinal epithelial cell lines (IPEC-J2 and IPI-2I) in response to LPS from Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce, C; Ramírez-Boo, M; Lucena, C; Garrido, J J

    2010-03-01

    The innate immune system has the basic function of identifying and eradicating microbial invaders and alerting the adaptative immune system to their presence. In this study, the porcine intestinal innate immune response was evaluated by analysing the expression of TLRs, cytokines and chemokines in two porcine epithelial cell lines from different regions: IPEC-J2 (jejunum) and IPI-2I (ileum). Both cells lines were stimulated with 1microg of LPS from Salmonella typhimurium. RNA was collected at 30min, 1, 2, 3 and 4h after treatment. Expression of TLR-1, -2, -3, -4, -6, -8, -9, -10, TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, -8 and MCP-1 was quantified relative to the quantity of Cyclophilin-A mRNA using real-time quantitative PCR (RTQ-PCR). The results obtained show up differences in the gene expression between both cell lines IPEC-J2 and IPI-2I as response to LPS from S. typhimurium during the activation time, which may suggest an in vivo variability in the innate immune response against pathogens in different regions of the host's gut. 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes, Yersinia enterocolitica, Staphylococcus aureus, and Salmonella enterica Typhimurium in meat and meat products using multiplex polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Latha

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of the study was to investigate the occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes, Yersinia enterocolitica, Staphylococcus aureus, and Salmonella enterica Typhimurium in meat and meat products using the multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR method. Materials and Methods: The assay combined an enrichment step in tryptic soy broth with yeast extract formulated for the simultaneous growth of target pathogens, DNA isolation and multiplex PCR. A total of 1134 samples including beef (n=349, chicken (n=325, pork (n=310, chevon (n=50, and meat products (n=100 were collected from different parts of Kerala, India. All the samples were subjected to multiplex PCR analysis and culture-based detection for the four pathogens in parallel. Results: Overall occurrence of L. monocytogenes was 0.08 % by cultural method. However, no L. monocytogenes was obtained by multiplex PCR method. Yersinia enterocolitica was obtained from beef and pork samples. A high prevalence of S. aureus (46.7% was found in all types of meat samples tested. None of the samples was positive for S. Typhimurium. Conclusion: Multiplex PCR assay used in this study can detect more than one pathogen simultaneously by amplifying more than one target gene in a single reaction, which can save time and labor cost.

  7. Salmonella Typhimurium induces SPI-1 and SPI-2 regulated and strain dependent downregulation of MHC II expression on porcine alveolar macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Parys Alexander

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Foodborne salmonellosis is one of the most important bacterial zoonotic diseases worldwide. Salmonella Typhimurium is the serovar most frequently isolated from persistently infected slaughter pigs in Europe. Circumvention of the host’s immune system by Salmonella might contribute to persistent infection of pigs. In the present study, we found that Salmonella Typhimurium strain 112910a specifically downregulated MHC II, but not MHC I, expression on porcine alveolar macrophages in a Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI-1 and SPI-2 dependent way. Salmonella induced downregulation of MHC II expression and intracellular proliferation of Salmonella in macrophages were significantly impaired after opsonization with Salmonella specific antibodies prior to inoculation. Furthermore, the capacity to downregulate MHC II expression on macrophages differed significantly among Salmonella strains, independently of strain specific differences in invasion capacity, Salmonella induced cytotoxicity and altered macrophage activation status. The fact that strain specific differences in MHC II downregulation did not correlate with the extent of in vitro SPI-1 or SPI-2 gene expression indicates that other factors are involved in MHC II downregulation as well. Since Salmonella strain dependent interference with the pig’s immune response through downregulation of MHC II expression might indicate that certain Salmonella strains are more likely to escape serological detection, our findings are of major interest for Salmonella monitoring programs primarily based on serology.

  8. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of universal stress protein F (YnaF) from Salmonella typhimurium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagurthi, Someswar Rao; Panigrahi, Rashmi Rekha; Gowda, Giri [Molecular Biophysics Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Savithri, H. S. [Department of Biochemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Murthy, M. R. N., E-mail: mrn@mbu.iisc.ernet.in [Molecular Biophysics Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2007-11-01

    The cloning, purification and crystallization of YnaF from S. typhimurium are reported along with preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies. The universal stress protein UspF (YnaF) is a small cytoplasmic bacterial protein. The expression of stress proteins is enhanced when cells are exposed to heat shock, nutrition starvation and certain other stress-inducing agents. YnaF promotes cell survival during prolonged exposure to stress and may activate a general mechanism for stress endurance. This manuscript reports preliminary crystallographic studies on YnaF from Salmonella typhimurium. The gene coding for YnaF was cloned and overexpressed and the protein was purified by Ni–NTA affinity chromatography. Purified YnaF was crystallized using vapour-diffusion and microbatch methods. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 37.51, b = 77.18, c = 56.34 Å, β = 101.8°. A data set was collected to 2.5 Å resolution with 94.6% completeness using an image-plate detector system mounted on a rotating-anode X-ray generator. Attempts to determine the structure are in progress.

  9. Salmonella typhimurium strain SL7207 induces apoptosis and inhibits the growth of HepG2 hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baowei Li

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella typhimurium is probably most extensively studied tumor-targeting bacteria and SL7207 is one of its attenuated strains. SL7207 was first made for bacterial vaccine development and its therapeutic efficacy and safety for hepatocellular carcinoma has not been characterized. In this study, the inhibitory ability of SL7207-lux on human hepatoma HepG2 cells was tested in vitro and in vivo. A bacterial luminescent gene cluster (lux CDABE was transfected into SL7207 to better monitor the invasion of the bacteria. The results show that SL7207-lux can rapidly enter HepG2 cells and localize in the cytoplasm. This invasion represses cell proliferation and induces apoptosis. In vivo real-time invasion studies showed that the bacteria gradually accumulate in the tumor. This enrichment was confirmed by anatomic observation at 5 days after inoculation. About 40% of tumor growth was inhibited by SL7207-lux at 34 days post-treatment without significant loss of body weight. The area of necrosis of tumor tissue was clearly increased in the treated group. Bacterial quantification showed that the number of colony-forming units per gram of bacteria within tumor tissue was approximately 1000-fold higher than that of liver and spleen. These data suggest that attenuated S. typhimurium strain SL7207 has potential for the treatment of cancers.

  10. Granulocytes impose a tight bottleneck upon the gut luminal pathogen population during Salmonella typhimurium colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Maier

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Topological, chemical and immunological barriers are thought to limit infection by enteropathogenic bacteria. However, in many cases these barriers and their consequences for the infection process remain incompletely understood. Here, we employed a mouse model for Salmonella colitis and a mixed inoculum approach to identify barriers limiting the gut luminal pathogen population. Mice were infected via the oral route with wild type S. Typhimurium (S. Tm and/or mixtures of phenotypically identical but differentially tagged S. Tm strains ("WITS", wild-type isogenic tagged strains, which can be individually tracked by quantitative real-time PCR. WITS dilution experiments identified a substantial loss in tag/genetic diversity within the gut luminal S. Tm population by days 2-4 post infection. The diversity-loss was not attributable to overgrowth by S. Tm mutants, but required inflammation, Gr-1+ cells (mainly neutrophilic granulocytes and most likely NADPH-oxidase-mediated defense, but not iNOS. Mathematical modelling indicated that inflammation inflicts a bottleneck transiently restricting the gut luminal S. Tm population to approximately 6000 cells and plating experiments verified a transient, inflammation- and Gr-1+ cell-dependent dip in the gut luminal S. Tm population at day 2 post infection. We conclude that granulocytes, an important clinical hallmark of S. Tm-induced inflammation, impose a drastic bottleneck upon the pathogen population. This extends the current view of inflammation-fuelled gut-luminal Salmonella growth by establishing the host response in the intestinal lumen as a double-edged sword, fostering and diminishing colonization in a dynamic equilibrium. Our work identifies a potent immune defense against gut infection and reveals a potential Achilles' heel of the infection process which might be targeted for therapy.

  11. Interactions of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Pectobacterium carotovorum within a Tomato Soft Rot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Andrée S; Cox, Clayton E; Desai, Prerak; Porwolik, Steffen; Chu, Weiping; de Moraes, Marcos H; McClelland, Michael; Brandl, Maria T; Teplitski, Max

    2018-03-01

    Salmonella spp. are remarkably adaptable pathogens, and this adaptability allows these bacteria to thrive in a variety of environments and hosts. The mechanisms with which these pathogens establish within a niche amid the native microbiota remain poorly understood. Here, we aimed to uncover the mechanisms that enable Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain ATCC 14028 to benefit from the degradation of plant tissue by a soft rot plant pathogen, Pectobacterium carotovorum The hypothesis that in the soft rot, the liberation of starch (not utilized by P. carotovorum ) makes this polymer available to Salmonella spp., thus allowing it to colonize soft rots, was tested first and proven null. To identify the functions involved in Salmonella soft rot colonization, we carried out transposon insertion sequencing coupled with the phenotypic characterization of the mutants. The data indicate that Salmonella spp. experience a metabolic shift in response to the changes in the environment brought on by Pectobacterium spp. and likely coordinated by the csrBC small regulatory RNA. While csrBC and flhD appear to be of importance in the soft rot, the global two-component system encoded by barA sirA (which controls csrBC and flhDC under laboratory conditions) does not appear to be necessary for the observed phenotype. Motility and the synthesis of nucleotides and amino acids play critical roles in the growth of Salmonella spp. in the soft rot. IMPORTANCE Outbreaks of produce-associated illness continue to be a food safety concern. Earlier studies demonstrated that the presence of phytopathogens on produce was a significant risk factor associated with increased Salmonella carriage on fruits and vegetables. Here, we genetically characterize some of the requirements for interactions between Salmonella and phytobacteria that allow Salmonella spp. to establish a niche within an alternate host (tomato). Pathways necessary for nucleotide synthesis, amino acid synthesis, and motility

  12. Nucleolin is required for DNA methylation state and the expression of rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Pontvianne

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, 45S rRNA genes are arranged in tandem arrays in copy numbers ranging from several hundred to several thousand in plants. Although it is clear that not all copies are transcribed under normal growth conditions, the molecular basis controlling the expression of specific sets of rRNA genes remains unclear. Here, we report four major rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Interestingly, while transcription of one of these rRNA variants is induced, the others are either repressed or remain unaltered in A. thaliana plants with a disrupted nucleolin-like protein gene (Atnuc-L1. Remarkably, the most highly represented rRNA gene variant, which is inactive in WT plants, is reactivated in Atnuc-L1 mutants. We show that accumulated pre-rRNAs originate from RNA Pol I transcription and are processed accurately. Moreover, we show that disruption of the AtNUC-L1 gene induces loss of symmetrical DNA methylation without affecting histone epigenetic marks at rRNA genes. Collectively, these data reveal a novel mechanism for rRNA gene transcriptional regulation in which the nucleolin protein plays a major role in controlling active and repressed rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis.

  13. The CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON3 gene is required for boundary and shoot meristem formation in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vroemen, Casper W; Mordhorst, Andreas P; Albrecht, Cathy

    2003-01-01

    From an enhancer trap screen for genes expressed in Arabidopsis embryos, we identified a gene expressed from the octant stage onward in the boundary between the two presumptive cotyledons and in a variety of postembryonic organ and meristem boundaries. This gene, CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON3 (CUC3...... revealing an even higher degree of redundancy in this class of genes than was thought previously. The CUC3 expression pattern, the cuc3 phenotypes, and CUC3 expression in a series of shoot meristem mutants and transgenes suggest a primary role for CUC3 in the establishment of boundaries that contain cells...

  14. RNA interference and retinoblastoma-related genes are required for repression of endogenous siRNA targets in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishok, Alla; Hoersch, Sebastian; Sharp, Phillip A

    2008-12-23

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, a vast number of endogenous short RNAs corresponding to thousands of genes have been discovered recently. This finding suggests that these short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) may contribute to regulation of many developmental and other signaling pathways in addition to silencing viruses and transposons. Here, we present a microarray analysis of gene expression in RNA interference (RNAi)-related mutants rde-4, zfp-1, and alg-1 and the retinoblastoma (Rb) mutant lin-35. We found that a component of Dicer complex RDE-4 and a chromatin-related zinc finger protein ZFP-1, not implicated in endogenous RNAi, regulate overlapping sets of genes. Notably, genes a) up-regulated in the rde-4 and zfp-1 mutants and b) up-regulated in the lin-35(Rb) mutant, but not the down-regulated genes are highly represented in the set of genes with corresponding endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs). Our study suggests that endogenous siRNAs cooperate with chromatin factors, either C. elegans ortholog of acute lymphoblastic leukemia-1 (ALL-1)-fused gene from chromosome 10 (AF10), ZFP-1, or tumor suppressor Rb, to regulate overlapping sets of genes and predicts a large role for RNAi-based chromatin silencing in control of gene expression in C. elegans.

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility and internalization of Salmonella Typhimurium in vacuum-tumbled marinated beef products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, S; Brooks, J C; Martin, J N; Brashears, M M

    2016-12-01

    As the incidence of multidrug resistance (MDR) Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium is increasing, data regarding the antimicrobial interventions and pathogen internalization in marinated meat products are important. This study evaluated the antimicrobial intervention and internalization of Salm. Typhimurium in marinated beef sirloin steaks. Beef bottom sirloin flaps (IMPS #185A; USDA Select) inoculated (10 8  log 10  CFU ml -1 ) with Salm. Typhimurium were sprayed (lactic acid (4%) and buffered vinegar (2%)) prior to vacuum-tumbled marination (0·35% sodium chloride and 0·45% sodium tripolyphosphate) for 30 min. Pathogen presence after antimicrobial spray, vacuum-tumbled marination, and translocation was determined by direct plating on Xylose Lysine Deoxycholate (XLD) agar with tryptic soy agar (TSA) overlay. The data imply varied internalization and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Salm. Typhimurium in marinated meat. Lactic acid (4%) spray (P internalization and potential survival of Salmonella spp. in marinated beef products is a major concern. These results highlight the internalization of pathogens in vacuum-tumbled meat products and emphasize the importance of considering these products as nonintact. Similarly, these data confirm the efficacy and utility of interventions prior to vacuum-tumbled marination. Further research is needed to identify additional strategies to mitigate internalization and translocation of pathogens into vacuum-marinated meat products. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Practical considerations on surveillance of Salmonella serovars other than Enteritidis and Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagenaar, J. A.; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Carrigue-Mas, J.

    2013-01-01

    Non-typhoid Salmonella serovars other than Salmonella enterica serovars S. Enteritidis (SE) and S. Typhimurium (ST) are isolated throughout the world with huge variations in prevalence. Besides the more generally occurring serovars, such as S. Infantis and S. Hadar, there are many examples of ser...

  17. Structure of Salmonella typhimurium OMP Synthase in a Complete Substrate Complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grubmeyer, Charles; Hansen, Michael Riis; Fedorov, Alexander A.

    2012-01-01

    Dimeric Salmonella typhimurium orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OMP synthase, EC 2.4.2.10), a key enzyme in de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis, has been cocrystallized in a complete substrate E·MgPRPP·orotate complex and the structure determined to 2.2 Å resolution. This structure resem...

  18. Isolation and Evaluation Virulence Factors of Salmonella typhimurium and Salmonella enteritidis in Milk and Dairy Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Shaigan nia

    2014-06-01

    Conclusions: To our best knowledge the present study is the first prevalence report of Salmonella spp., Salmonella enteritidis and Salmonella typhimurium in raw sheep and goat samples in Iran. Consumption of pasteurized milk and dairy products can reduce the risk of salmonellosis.

  19. Comparison between digital PCR and real-time PCR in detection of Salmonella typhimurium in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Yang, Junjie; Gai, Zhongtao; Huo, Shengnan; Zhu, Jianhua; Li, Jun; Wang, Ranran; Xing, Sheng; Shi, Guosheng; Shi, Feng; Zhang, Lei

    2018-02-02

    As a kind of zero-tolerance foodborne pathogens, Salmonella typhimurium poses a great threat to quality of food products and public health. Hence, rapid and efficient approaches to identify Salmonella typhimurium are urgently needed. Combined with PCR and fluorescence technique, real-time PCR (qPCR) and digital PCR (ddPCR) are regarded as suitable tools for detecting foodborne pathogens. To compare the effect between qPCR and ddPCR in detecting Salmonella typhimurium, a series of nucleic acid, pure strain culture and spiking milk samples were applied and the resistance to inhibitors referred in this article as well. Compared with qPCR, ddPCR exhibited more sensitive (10 -4 ng/μl or 10 2 cfu/ml) and less pre-culturing time (saving 2h). Moreover, ddPCR had stronger resistance to inhibitors than qPCR, yet absolute quantification hardly performed when target's concentration over 1ng/μl or 10 6 cfu/ml. This study provides an alternative strategy in detecting foodborne Salmonella typhimurium. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Efficacy of solar disinfection of Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella Typhimurium and Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berney, M; Weilenmann, H-U; Simonetti, A; Egli, T

    2006-10-01

    To determine the efficacy of solar disinfection (SODIS) for enteric pathogens and to test applicability of the reciprocity law. Resistance to sunlight at 37 degrees C based on F99 values was in the following order: Salmonella Typhimurium>Escherichia coli>Shigella flexneri>Vibrio cholerae. While F90 values of Salm. Typhimurium and E. coli were similar, F99 values differed by 60% due to different inactivation curve shapes. Efficacy seemed not to be dependent on fluence rate for E. coli stationary cells. Sensitivity to mild heat was observed above a temperature of 45 degrees C for E. coli, Salm. Typhimurium and Sh. flexneri, while V. cholerae was already susceptible above 40 degrees C. Salmonella Typhimurium was the most resistant and V. cholerae the least resistant enteric strain. The reciprocity law is applicable for stationary E. coli cells irradiated with sunlight or artificial sunlight. Escherichia coli might not be the appropriate indicator bacterium to test the efficacy of SODIS on enteric bacteria and the physiological response to SODIS might be different among enteric bacteria. The applicability of the reciprocity law indicates that fluence rate plays a secondary role in SODIS efficacy. Stating inactivation efficacy with T90 or F90 values without showing original data is inadequate for SODIS studies.

  1. Detection of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium from Avians Using Multiplex-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Talebi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and S.enterica serovar Enteritidis are the most frequently isolated serovars from food-borne diseases throughout the world. According to their antigenic profiles, salmonella shows different disease syndromes and host specificities. It is necessary and important to discriminate salmonella serovars from each other in order to ensure that each pathogen and its epidemiology are correctly recognized. Many PCR-based methods have been developed to identify salmonella serovars. The objective of present study was to identify S. Typhimurium in avians from different regions including: North, Northwest and capital city (Tehran of Iran. Also in this research, the quality of CHROMagar™ Salmonella medium (CAS medium in veterinary medicine was evaluated. The results of present study showed that out of 1870 intestine samples, fifty two S. Typhimurium including broiler (n=13, layer (n=12, duck (n=5, goose (n=5, sparrow (n=8, canary (n=3, pigeon (n=5 and African grey parrot (n=1 were identified using serotyping as well as multiplex-PCR. In conclusion, important measures must be taken on prevention and propagation of S. Typhimurium among avians. CHROMagar™ Salmonella medium has high levels of sensitivity and specificity and reduced the time to final identification of salmonella spp. in comparison with biochemical tests.

  2. Cloning, sequencing and in silico analysis of omp C of salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Richa; Kumar, Anil; Saxena, Anjani; Tamuly, Shantanu; Saxena, M K

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium is an important pathogen having a broad host range. In human population it causes mostly gastroenteritis but there are reports in which it was found to be responsible to cause several lethal diseases like endocarditis and meningitis. Poultry products are the major sources of this organism in India as these are consumed at various stages of cooking. The available vaccines have their own limitations such as short-term immunity. Outer membrane proteins have shown some promising potential, so in the present study Omp C of Salmonella Typhimurium was cloned and sequenced to explore the possibility of development of r-DNA vaccine against Salmonella Typhimurium for poultry. The sequence of Omp C was studied for antigenic indexing, epitope mapping, and MHC mapping using various bioinformatic tools. The ORF analysis revealed a complete coding region of approximately 1000 bp. Five major and 13 minor B-cell epitopes were identified having an antigenic index of 1.7. The sequences also showed major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II binding region indicating a potential of eliciting cell-mediated immune response. The findings indicate that Omp C may be proven as promising candidate for development of r-DNA vaccine against Salmonella Typhimurium.

  3. Elimination of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in artificially contaminated eggs through correct cooking and frying procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geovana Dagostim Savi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Salmonellosis is a serious foodborne disease associated with the presence of bacteria in eggs or foods containing raw eggs. However, the use of appropriate procedures of cooking and frying can eliminate this contamination. There are few studies on the elimination of contamination of Salmonella in hens' eggs through typical frying procedures, especially for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (or S. typhimurium. The aim of this study was to determine the appropriate conditions for cooking and frying hens' eggs artificially contaminated with S. typhimurium, making them free of bacterial contamination. Hens' eggs were artificially contaminated with S. typhimurium and subjected to various processes of cooking, frying and food preparation. It was observed that the minimum time necessary to eliminate contamination through cooking procedures is 5 minutes after the water starts boiling, and also that, cooking in the microwave oven complete eliminates the bacterial contamination. When the eggs were fried on both sides, keeping the yolk hard, a complete bacterial elimination was observed. Mayonnaise prepared with vinegar presented a decrease in bacterial colonies when compared mayonese prepared with lemon.

  4. Early cytokine response of gnotobiotic piglets to Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šplíchal, Igor; Trebichavský, Ilja; Muneta, Y.; Mori, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 33, - (2002), s. 291-297 ISSN 0928-4249 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/01/0917 Grant - others:Ministry of Agriculture Forestry and Fisheries(JP) RCP3260 Keywords : typhimurium * gnotobiotic piglet Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.031, year: 2002

  5. Global Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Le Hello, Simon

    2016-01-01

    structured sequence analysis within a Bayesian framework to reconstruct temporal and spatial phylogenetic trees and estimate the rates of mutation and divergence times of 315S Typhimurium DT104 isolates sampled from 1969 to 2012 from 21 countries on six continents. DT104 was estimated to have emerged...

  6. Tetracycline promotes the expression of ten fimbrial operons in specific Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella is associated with increased morbidity in humans and presents an important food safety concern. Antibiotic resistance among isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium has become especially prevalent as over 27 per cent of isolates from humans in the Unit...

  7. Thioridazine protects the mouse from a virulent infection by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium 74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasgupta, Asish; Mukherjee, Sayanti; Chaki, Shaswati

    2010-01-01

    When administered to mice at doses of 100microg/mouse and 200microg/mouse, thioridazine (TDZ) significantly protected animals from the lethality produced by a virulent strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and reduced the number of bacteria retrieved from the spleen, liver and heart...

  8. Polisakarida Mengandung Mannan dari Bungkil Inti Sawit Sebagai Antimikroba Salmonella typhimurium pada Ayam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tafsin

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Mannan containing polysaccharides could be used as an alternative to replace antibiotics due to their capacity to block the colonization of pathogenic bacteria in the intestine of poultry. The aim of this study was to investigate mannan containing polysaccharides from palm kernel meal (PKM and its inhibitory effect against Salmonella typhimurium. Hot water extractions were used to isolate mannan containing polysaccharides from cell wall of PKM. In vivo studies were conducted using broiler and layer chicks that were challenged orally with 104 cfu Salmonella typhimurium on third day. Split plot design was used as experimental design with strain as main plot and level of mannan polysaccharides as sub plot. The levels of mannan containing polysaccharides that were used consisted of 0 (R0; 1000 (R1; 2000 (R2; 3000 (R3; 4000 (R4 ppm, in term of total sugar. The results indicated that compared to the control group, feeding PKM containing mannan 4000 ppm decreased (P<0.01 Salmonella typhimurium incidence. The addition of mannan did not affect feed consumption. On the contrary, the addition of 4000 ppm mannan gave significantly higher feed/weight gain ratio of the chicks (P<0.05. The administration of feed supplemented with mannan from PKM did not influence weight gain of poultry. It is concluded that mannan from PKM can prevent the colonization of Salmonella typhimurium in poultry.

  9. Antibiotic Resistance Pattern and Biofilm Formation Ability of Clinically Isolates of Salmonella enterica Serotype typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Ghasemmahdi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The emergence of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria with biofilm formation ability may be a major threat to public health and food safety and sanitation. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine antibiotic resistance patterns and biofilm production characteristics of Salmonella typhimurium isolated from different species of birds. Materials and Methods: The antibiotic resistance patterns of 38 pre-identified isolates were screened by standard Kirby-Bauer disc-diffusion method performed on Mueller–Hinton agar to a panel of 17 antibiotics. The extent of biofilm formation was measured by Microtiter plate (MTP-based systems. Results: The highest antimicrobial resistance was detected against nalidixic acid (97%, followed by doxycycline (86%, colistin (84%, streptomycin (84% and tetracycline (84%. All isolates were sensitive to amikacin (100% and 97% and 95% of the isolates were sensitive to ceftazidime and ceftriaxone, respectively. Twenty one different antibiotic resistance patterns were observed among S. typhimurium isolates. According to the results of the microtitre plate biofilm assay, there was a wide variation in biofilm forming ability among S. typhimurium isolates. Most of the isolates (60.52% were not capable of producing biofilm, while 26.31%, 7.89%, and 5.26% isolates were weak, strong and moderate biofilm producers, respectively. Conclusions: It was concluded that nearly all S. typhimurium isolates revealed a high multiple antibiotic resistant with low biofilm forming capabilities which proposed low association between biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance of a major food important pathogen.

  10. Rapid detection of Salmonella typhimurium on fresh spinach leaves using phage-immobilized magnetoelastic biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, Shin; Li, Suiqiong; Chai, Yating; Park, Mi-Kyung; Shen, Wen; Barbaree, James M.; Vodyanoy, Vitaly J.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents an investigation into the use of magnetoelastic biosensors for the rapid detection of Salmonella typhimurium on fresh spinach leaves. The biosensors used in this investigation were comprised of a strip-shaped, goldcoated sensor platform (2 mm-long) diced from a ferromagnetic, amorphous alloy and a filamentous fd-tet phage which specifically binds with S. typhimurium. After surface blocking with bovine serum albumin, these biosensors were, without any preceding sample preparation, directly placed on wet spinach leaves inoculated with various concentrations of S. typhimurium. Upon contact with cells, the phage binds S. typhimurium to the sensor thereby increasing the total mass of the sensor. This change in mass causes a corresponding decrease in the sensor's resonant frequency. After 25 min, the sensors were collected from the leaf surface and measurements of the resonant frequency were performed immediately. The total assay time was less than 30 min. The frequency changes for measurement sensors (i.e., phageimmobilized) were found to be statistically different from those for control sensors (sensors without phage), down to 5 × 106 cells/ml. The detection limit may be improved by using smaller, micron-sized sensors that will have a higher probability of contacting Salmonella on the rough surfaces of spinach leaves.

  11. Acid resistance variability among isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berk, P.A.; Jonge, de R.; Zwietering, M.H.; Abee, T.; Kieboom, J.

    2005-01-01

    Aims: Acid resistance could be an indicator of virulence since acid resistant strains are able to better survive the human stomach passage and in macrophages. We studied the acid resistance of several Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 strains isolated from food and humans and identified cellular

  12. The transcriptional landscape and small RNAs of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kröger, Carsten; Dillon, Shane C.; Cameron, Andrew D. S.

    2012-01-01

    for Salmonella infection, but basic genetic information such as the global locations of transcription start sites (TSSs) has been lacking. We combined three RNA-sequencing techniques and two sequencing platforms to generate a robust picture of transcription in S. Typhimurium. Differential RNA sequencing...

  13. Bioprobes Based on Aptamer and Silica Fluorescent Nanoparticles for Bacteria Salmonella typhimurium Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiu-Yue; Kang, Yan-Jun

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we have developed an efficient method based on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamers along with silica fluorescence nanoparticles for bacteria Salmonella typhimurium detection. Carboxyl-modified Tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)dichlororuthenium(II) hexahydrate (RuBPY)-doped silica nanoparticles (COOH-FSiNPs) were prepared using reverse microemulsion method, and the streptavidin was conjugated to the surface of the prepared COOH-FSiNPs. The bacteria S. typhimurium was incubated with a specific ssDNA biotin-labeled aptamer, and then the aptamer-bacteria conjugates were treated with the synthetic streptavidin-conjugated silica fluorescence nanoprobes (SA-FSiNPs). The results under fluorescence microscopy show that SA-FSiNPs can be applied effectively for the labeling of bacteria S. typhimurium with great photostable property. To further verify the specificity of SA-FSiNPs out of multiple bacterial conditions, variant concentrations of bacteria mixtures composed of bacteria S. typhimurium, Escherichia coli, and Bacillus subtilis were treated with SA-FSiNPs.

  14. Virulence of invasive Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 in animal models of infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Ramachandran

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella Typhimurium sequence type (ST 313 produces septicemia in infants in sub-Saharan Africa. Although there are known genetic and phenotypic differences between ST313 strains and gastroenteritis-associated ST19 strains, conflicting data about the in vivo virulence of ST313 strains have been reported. To resolve these differences, we tested clinical Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 and ST19 strains in murine and rhesus macaque infection models. The 50% lethal dose (LD50 was determined for three Salmonella Typhimurium ST19 and ST313 strains in mice. For dissemination studies, bacterial burden in organs was determined at various time-points post-challenge. Indian rhesus macaques were infected with one ST19 and one ST313 strain. Animals were monitored for clinical signs and bacterial burden and pathology were determined. The LD50 values for ST19 and ST313 infected mice were not significantly different. However, ST313-infected BALB/c mice had significantly higher bacterial numbers in blood at 24 h than ST19-infected mice. ST19-infected rhesus macaques exhibited moderate-to-severe diarrhea while ST313-infected monkeys showed no-to-mild diarrhea. ST19-infected monkeys had higher bacterial burden and increased inflammation in tissues. Our data suggest that Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 invasiveness may be investigated using mice. The non-human primate results are consistent with clinical data, suggesting that ST313 strains do not cause diarrhea.

  15. Plasma lipopolysaccharide level and enterocyte brush border enzymes in gnotobiotic piglets infected with Salmonella typhimurium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trebichavský, Ilja; Kozáková, Hana; Šplíchal, Igor

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 47, - (2002), s. 289-294 ISSN 8750-7943 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/01/0917; GA AV ČR IAA5020101 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : swine * gnotobiotic piglet * salmonella typhimurium Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.107, year: 2002

  16. Characterization of a Salmonella typhimurium mutant defective in phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochimsen, Bjarne U.; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Garber, Bruce B.

    1985-01-01

    This study describes the isolation and characterization of a mutant (strain GP122) of Salmonella typhimurium with a partial deficiency of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) synthetase activity. This strain was isolated in a purE deoD gpt purine auxotroph by a procedure designed to select guanosine...

  17. Activation of Bvg-Repressed Genes in Bordetella pertussis by RisA Requires Cross Talk from Noncooperonic Histidine Kinase RisK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Ng, Victoria; Warfel, Jason M; Merkel, Tod J; Stibitz, Scott

    2017-11-15

    The two-component response regulator RisA, encoded by open reading frame BP3554 in the Bordetella pertussis Tohama I genomic sequence, is a known activator of vrg genes, a set of genes whose expression is increased under the same environmental conditions (known as modulation) that result in repression of the bvgAS virulence regulon. Here we demonstrate that RisA is phosphorylated in vivo and that RisA phosphorylation is required for activation of vrg genes. An adjacent histidine kinase gene, risS , is truncated by frameshift mutation in B. pertussis but not in Bordetella bronchiseptica or Bordetella parapertussis Neither deletion of risS ' or bvgAS nor phenotypic modulation with MgSO 4 affected levels of phosphorylated RisA (RisA∼P) in B. pertussis However, RisA phosphorylation did require the histidine kinase encoded by BP3223, here named RisK (cognate histidine kinase of RisA). RisK was also required for expression of the vrg genes. This requirement could be obviated by the introduction of the phosphorylation-mimicking RisA D60E mutant, indicating that an active conformation of RisA, but not phosphorylation per se , is crucial for vrg activation. Interestingly, expression of vrg genes is still modulated by MgSO 4 in cells harboring the RisA D60E mutation, suggesting that the activated RisA senses additional signals to control vrg expression in response to environmental stimuli. IMPORTANCE In B. pertussis , the BvgAS two-component system activates the expression of virulence genes by binding of BvgA∼P to their promoters. Expression of the reciprocally regulated vrg genes requires RisA and is also repressed by the Bvg-activated BvgR. RisA is an OmpR-like response regulator, but RisA phosphorylation was not expected because the gene for its presumed, cooperonic, histidine kinase is inactivated by mutation. In this study, we demonstrate phosphorylation of RisA in vivo by a noncooperonic histidine kinase. We also show that RisA phosphorylation is necessary but not

  18. Pollen Killer Gene S35 Function Requires Interaction with an Activator That Maps Close to S24, Another Pollen Killer Gene in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiko Kubo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pollen killer genes disable noncarrier pollens, and are responsible for male sterility and segregation distortion in hybrid populations of distantly related plant species. The genetic networks and the molecular mechanisms underlying the pollen killer system remain largely unknown. Two pollen killer genes, S24 and S35, have been found in an intersubspecific cross of Oryza sativa ssp. indica and japonica. The effect of S24 is counteracted by an unlinked locus EFS. Additionally, S35 has been proposed to interact with S24 to induce pollen sterility. These genetic interactions are suggestive of a single S24-centric genetic pathway (EFS–S24–S35 for the pollen killer system. To examine this hypothetical genetic pathway, the S35 and the S24 regions were further characterized and genetically dissected in this study. Our results indicated that S35 causes pollen sterility independently of both the EFS and S24 genes, but is dependent on a novel gene close to the S24 locus, named incentive for killing pollen (INK. We confirmed the phenotypic effect of the INK gene separately from the S24 gene, and identified the INK locus within an interval of less than 0.6 Mb on rice chromosome 5. This study characterized the genetic effect of the two independent genetic pathways of INK–S35 and EFS–S24 in indica–japonica hybrid progeny. Our results provide clear evidence that hybrid male sterility in rice is caused by several pollen killer networks with multiple factors positively and negatively regulating pollen killer genes.

  19. Toxicology and efficacy of tumor-targetingSalmonella typhimuriumA1-R compared to VNP 20009 in a syngeneic mouse tumor model in immunocompetent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Cao, Wenluo; Toneri, Makoto; Zhang, Nan; Kiyuna, Tasuku; Murakami, Takashi; Nelson, Scott D; Dry, Sarah M; Li, Yunfeng; Li, Shukuan; Wang, Xiaoen; Ma, Huaiyu; Singh, Arun S; Eilber, Fritz C; Hoffman, Robert M; Zhao, Ming

    2017-08-15

    Salmonella typhimurium A1-R ( S. typhimurium A1-R) attenuated by leu and arg auxotrophy has been shown to target multiple types of cancer in mouse models. In the present study, toxicologic and biodistribution studies of tumor-targeting S. typhimurium A1-R and S. typhimurium VNP20009 (VNP 20009) were performed in a syngeneic tumor model growing in immunocompetent BALB/c mice. Single or multiple doses of S. typhimurium A1-R of 2.5 × 10 5 and 5 × 10 5 were tolerated. A single dose of 1 × 10 6 resulted in mouse death. S. typhimurium A1-R (5 × 10 5 CFU) was eliminated from the circulation, liver and spleen approximately 3-5 days after bacterial administration via the tail vein, but remained in the tumor in high amounts. S. typhimurium A1-R was cleared from other organs much more rapidly. S. typhimurium A1-R and VNP 20009 toxicity to the spleen and liver was minimal. S. typhimurium A1-R showed higher selective targeting to the necrotic areas of the tumors than VNP20009. S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of CT26 colon carcinoma to a greater extent at the same dose of VNP20009. In conclusion, we have determined a safe dose and schedule of S. typhimurium A1-R administration in BALB/c mice, which is also efficacious against tumor growth. The results of the present report indicate similar toxicity of S. typhimurium A1-R and VNP20009, but greater antitumor efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R in an immunocompetent animal. Since VNP2009 has already proven safe in a Phase I clinical trial, the present results indicate the high clinical potential of S. typhimurium A1-R.

  20. ZC4H2, an XLID gene, is required for the generation of a specific subset of CNS interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Melanie; Hwang, Kyu-Seok; Miles, Judith; Williams, Charlie; Niranjan, Tejasvi; Kahler, Stephen G; Chiurazzi, Pietro; Steindl, Katharina; Van Der Spek, Peter J; Swagemakers, Sigrid; Mueller, Jennifer; Stefl, Shannon; Alexov, Emil; Ryu, Jeong-Im; Choi, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Hyun-Taek; Tarpey, Patrick; Neri, Giovanni; Holloway, Lynda; Skinner, Cindy; Stevenson, Roger E; Dorsky, Richard I; Wang, Tao; Schwartz, Charles E; Kim, Cheol-Hee

    2015-09-01

    Miles-Carpenter syndrome (MCS) was described in 1991 as an XLID syndrome with fingertip arches and contractures and mapped to proximal Xq. Patients had microcephaly, short stature, mild spasticity, thoracic scoliosis, hyperextendable MCP joints, rocker-bottom feet, hyperextended elbows and knees. A mutation, p.L66H, in ZC4H2, was identified in a XLID re-sequencing project. Additional screening of linked families and next generation sequencing of XLID families identified three ZC4H2 mutations: p.R18K, p.R213W and p.V75in15aa. The families shared some relevant clinical features. In silico modeling of the mutant proteins indicated all alterations would destabilize the protein. Knockout mutations in zc4h2 were created in zebrafish and homozygous mutant larvae exhibited abnormal swimming, increased twitching, defective eye movement and pectoral fin contractures. Because several of the behavioral defects were consistent with hyperactivity, we examined the underlying neuronal defects and found that sensory neurons and motoneurons appeared normal. However, we observed a striking reduction in GABAergic interneurons. Analysis of cell-type-specific markers showed a specific loss of V2 interneurons in the brain and spinal cord, likely arising from mis-specification of neural progenitors. Injected human wt ZC4H2 rescued the mutant phenotype. Mutant zebrafish injected with human p.L66H or p.R213W mRNA failed to be rescued, while the p.R18K mRNA was able to rescue the interneuron defect. Our findings clearly support ZC4H2 as a novel XLID gene with a required function in interneuron development. Loss of function of ZC4H2 thus likely results in altered connectivity of many brain and spinal circuits. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  1. The sp7 gene is required for maturation of osteoblast-lineage cells in medaka (Oryzias latipes) vertebral column development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azetsu, Yuki; Inohaya, Keiji; Takano, Yoshiro; Kinoshita, Masato; Tasaki, Mai; Kudo, Akira

    2017-11-15

    Sp7 is a zinc finger transcription factor that is essential for osteoblast differentiation in mammals. To verify the characteristic features of osteoblast-lineage cells in teleosts, we established medaka sp7 mutants using a transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) genome editing system. These mutants showed severe defects in the formation of skeletal structures. In particular, the neural and the hemal arches were not formed, although the chordal centra were formed. Analysis of the transgenic medaka revealed that sp7 mutant had normal distribution of type X collagen a1 a (col10a1a)-positive osteoblast-like cells around the centrum and at the proximal region of the vertebral arch. The sp7 mutant phenotype could be rescued by exogenous sp7 expression in col10a1a-positive cells, as well as in sp7-positive osteoblast cells. Furthermore, runx2-positive osteoblast progenitors were observed on the vertebral arches, but not on the centrum, during vertebral column development. In addition, these osteoblast progenitors differentiated into the col10a1a-positive cells. In sp7 mutant, the runx2-positive cells were normally distributed at the region of unformed vertebral arch but failed to differentiate into col10a1a-positive cells. These results indicate that osteoblast-lineage cells undergo two distinct differentiation processes during development of the vertebral arch and the centrum. Nevertheless, our results verified that sp7 gene expression in osteoblast-lineage cells is required for differentiation into mature osteoblasts to form the vertebral column and other skeletal structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Requirement of a novel splicing variant of human histone deacetylase 6 for TGF-{beta}1-mediated gene activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Yan [Department of Medicine, Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States); Nguyen, Hong T. [Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences, Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States); Lasky, Joseph A. [Department of Medicine, Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States); Cao, Subing [Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences, Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States); Li, Cui [Department of Medicine, Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States); Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Hunan 41008 (China); Hu, Jiyao; Guo, Xinyue; Burow, Matthew E. [Department of Medicine, Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States); Shan, Bin, E-mail: bshan@tulane.edu [Department of Medicine, Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States)

    2010-02-19

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) belongs to the family of class IIb HDACs and predominantly deacetylates non-histone proteins in the cytoplasm via the C-terminal deacetylase domain of its two tandem deacetylase domains. HDAC6 modulates fundamental cellular processes via deacetylation of {alpha}-tubulin, cortactin, molecular chaperones, and other peptides. Our previous study indicates that HDAC6 mediates TGF-{beta}1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in A549 cells. In the current study, we identify a novel splicing variant of human HDAC6, hHDAC6p114. The hHDAC6p114 mRNA arises from incomplete splicing and encodes a truncated isoform of the hHDAC6p114 protein of 114 kDa when compared to the major isoform hHDAC6p131. The hHDAC6p114 protein lacks the first 152 amino acids from N-terminus in the hHDAC6p131 protein, which harbors a nuclear export signal peptide and 76 amino acids of the N-terminal deacetylase domain. hHDAC6p114 is intact in its deacetylase activity against {alpha}-tubulin. The expression hHDAC6p114 is elevated in a MCF-7 derivative that exhibits an EMT-like phenotype. Moreover, hHDAC6p114 is required for TGF-{beta}1-activated gene expression associated with EMT in A549 cells. Taken together, our results implicate that expression and function of hHDAC6p114 is differentially regulated when compared to hHDAC6p131.

  3. An Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded Protein Complex Requires an Origin of Lytic Replication In Cis to Mediate Late Gene Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djavadian, Reza; Chiu, Ya-Fang; Johannsen, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus lytic replication is accomplished by an intricate cascade of gene expression that integrates viral DNA replication and structural protein synthesis. Most genes encoding structural proteins exhibit “true” late kinetics–their expression is strictly dependent on lytic DNA replication. Recently, the EBV BcRF1 gene was reported to encode a TATA box binding protein homolog, which preferentially recognizes the TATT sequence found in true late gene promoters. BcRF1 is one of seven EBV genes with homologs found in other β- and γ-, but not in α-herpesviruses. Using EBV BACmids, we systematically disrupted each of these “βγ” genes. We found that six of them, including BcRF1, exhibited an identical phenotype: intact viral DNA replication with loss of late gene expression. The proteins encoded by these six genes have been found by other investigators to form a viral protein complex that is essential for activation of TATT-containing reporters in EBV-negative 293 cells. Unexpectedly, in EBV infected 293 cells, we found that TATT reporter activation was weak and non-specific unless an EBV origin of lytic replication (OriLyt) was present in cis. Using two different replication-defective EBV genomes, we demonstrated that OriLyt-mediated DNA replication is required in cis for TATT reporter activation and for late gene expression from the EBV genome. We further demonstrate by fluorescence in situ hybridization that the late BcLF1 mRNA localizes to EBV DNA replication factories. These findings support a model in which EBV true late genes are only transcribed from newly replicated viral genomes. PMID:27348612

  4. Identification of New X-Chromosomal Genes Required for Drosophila Oogenesis and Novel Roles for fs(1)Yb, brainiac and dunce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Andrew; Hijal, Sirine; Hilfiker, Andres; Suter, Beat

    2001-01-01

    We performed a screen for female sterile mutations on the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster and identified new loci required for developmental events in oogenesis as well as new alleles of previously described genes. We present mapping and phenotypic characterization data for many of these genes and discuss their significance in understanding fundamental developmental and cell biological processes. Our screen has identified genes that are involved in cell cycle control, intracellular transport, cell migration, maintenance of cell membranes, epithelial monolayer integrity and cell survival or apoptosis. We also describe new roles for the genes dunce (dnc), brainiac (brn) and fs(1)Yb, and we identify new alleles of Sex lethal (Sxl), ovarian tumor (otu), sans filles (snf), fs(1)K10, singed (sn), and defective chorion-1 (dec-1). PMID:11156616

  5. A Portable Impedance Immunosensing System for Rapid Detection of Salmonella Typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella Typhimurium is one of the most dangerous foodborne pathogens and poses a significant threat to human health. The objective of this study was to develop a portable impedance immunosensing system for rapid and sensitive detection of S. Typhimurium in poultry. The developed portable impedance immunosensing system consisted of a gold interdigitated array microelectrode (IDAM, a signal acquisitive interface and a laptop computer with LabVIEW software. The IDAM was first functionalized with 16-Mercaptohexadecanoic acid, and streptavidin was immobilized onto the electrode surface through covalent bonding. Then, biotin-labelled S. Typhimurium-antibody was immobilized onto the IDAM surface. Samples were dropped on the surface of the IDAM and the S. Typhimurium cells in the samples were captured by the antibody on the IDAM. This resulted in impedance changes that were measured and displayed with the LabVIEW software. An equivalent circuit of the immunosensor demonstrated that the largest change in impedance was due to the electron-transfer resistance. The equivalent circuit showed an increase of 35% for the electron-transfer resistance value compared to the negative control. The calibration result indicated that the portable impedance immunosensing system could be used to measure the standard impedance elements, and it had a maximum error of measurement of approximately 13%. For pure culture detection, the system had a linear relationship between the impedance change and the logarithmic value of S. Typhimurium cells ranging from 76 to 7.6 × 106 CFU (colony-forming unit (50 μL−1. The immunosensor also had a correlation coefficient of 0.98, and a high specificity for detection of S. Typhimurium cells with a limit of detection (LOD of 102 CFU (50 μL−1. The detection time from the moment a sample was introduced to the display of the results was 1 h. To conclude, the portable impedance immunosensing system for detection of S. Typhimurium

  6. A Portable Impedance Immunosensing System for Rapid Detection of Salmonella Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Tao; Wang, Ronghui; Sotero, America; Li, Yanbin

    2017-08-28

    Salmonella Typhimurium is one of the most dangerous foodborne pathogens and poses a significant threat to human health. The objective of this study was to develop a portable impedance immunosensing system for rapid and sensitive detection of S . Typhimurium in poultry. The developed portable impedance immunosensing system consisted of a gold interdigitated array microelectrode (IDAM), a signal acquisitive interface and a laptop computer with LabVIEW software. The IDAM was first functionalized with 16-Mercaptohexadecanoic acid, and streptavidin was immobilized onto the electrode surface through covalent bonding. Then, biotin-labelled S . Typhimurium -antibody was immobilized onto the IDAM surface. Samples were dropped on the surface of the IDAM and the S . Typhimurium cells in the samples were captured by the antibody on the IDAM. This resulted in impedance changes that were measured and displayed with the LabVIEW software. An equivalent circuit of the immunosensor demonstrated that the largest change in impedance was due to the electron-transfer resistance. The equivalent circuit showed an increase of 35% for the electron-transfer resistance value compared to the negative control. The calibration result indicated that the portable impedance immunosensing system could be used to measure the standard impedance elements, and it had a maximum error of measurement of approximately 13%. For pure culture detection, the system had a linear relationship between the impedance change and the logarithmic value of S . Typhimurium cells ranging from 76 to 7.6 × 10⁶ CFU (colony-forming unit) (50 μL) -1 . The immunosensor also had a correlation coefficient of 0.98, and a high specificity for detection of S . Typhimurium cells with a limit of detection (LOD) of 10² CFU (50 μL) -1 . The detection time from the moment a sample was introduced to the display of the results was 1 h. To conclude, the portable impedance immunosensing system for detection of S . Typhimurium achieved

  7. Heterologous expression of the pneumococcal serotype 14 polysaccharide in Lactococcus lactis requires lactococcal epsABC regulatory genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nierop Groot, M.N.; Godefrooij, J.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2008-01-01

    The pneumococcal serotype 14 polysaccharide was produced in Lactococcus lactis by coexpressing pneumococcal polysaccharide type 14-specific genes (cpsFGHIJKL(14)) with the lactococcal regulatory and priming glucosyltransferase-encoding genes specific for B40 polysaccharide (epsABCD(B40)). The

  8. The fruitless gene is required for the proper formation of axonal tracts in the embryonic central nervous system of Drosophila

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Ho-Juhn; Billeter, Jean-Christophe; Reynaud, Enrique; Carlo, Troy; Spana, Eric P; Perrimon, Norbert; Goodwin, Stephen F; Baker, Bruce S; Taylor, Barbara J

    2002-01-01

    The fruitless (fru) gene in Drosophila melanogaster is a multifunctional gene that has sex-specific functions in the regulation of male sexual behavior and sex-nonspecific functions affecting adult viability and external morphology. While much attention has focused on fru's sex-specific roles, less

  9. Phenotypic evidence that the function of the [Fe]-hydrogenase Hmd in Methanococcus maripaludis requires seven hcg (hmd co-occurring genes) but not hmdII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, Thomas J; Costa, Kyle C; Pak, Daniel; Sakesan, Varun; Leigh, John A

    2013-06-01

    The H2 -dependent methylene-tetrahydromethanopterin dehydrogenase (Hmd), also known as the [Fe]-hydrogenase, is found only in methanogens without cytochromes. In contrast to the binuclear metal centers of the [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-hydrogenases, the [Fe]-hydrogenase contains only a single Fe atom, which is coordinated by a novel guanylylpyridinol cofactor in the active site. The biosynthesis of the cofactor is not well understood and the responsible genes are unknown. However, seven genes (hmd co-occurring genes, hcg) encoding proteins of unknown function are always associated with the hmd gene. In the model methanogen Methanococcus maripaludis, we used a genetic background in which a deletion of hmd had a distinct growth phenotype, and made null-mutations in each hcg gene as well as in a gene encoding the Hmd paralog HmdII, which is hypothesized to function as a scaffold for cofactor synthesis. Deletions in all seven hcg genes resulted in the same growth phenotype as a deletion in hmd, suggesting they are required for Hmd function. In all cases, genetic complementation of the mutation restored the wild-type phenotype. A deletion in hmdII had no effect. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Inactivation of Enterobacter sakazakii, Bacillus cereus, and Salmonella typhimurium in powdered weaning food by electron-beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yun-Hee; Park, Ji-Yong; Park, Jong-Hyun; Chung, Myong-Soo; Kwon, Ki-Sung; Chung, Kyungsook; Won, Misun; Song, Kyung-Bin

    2008-09-01

    Inactivation of Enterobacter sakazakii, Bacillus cereus, and Salmonella typhimurium were evaluated in powdered weaning food using electron-beam irradiation. E. sakazakii, B. cereus, and S. typhimurium were eliminated by irradiation at 16, 8, and 8 kGy, respectively. The D10-vlaues of E. sakazakii, B. cereus, and S. typhimurium inoculated on powdered weaning food were 4.83, 1.22, and 0.98 kGy, respectively. The results suggest that electron-beam irradiation should inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria on baby food without impairing qualities.

  11. Inactivation of Enterobacter sakazakii, Bacillus cereus, and Salmonella typhimurium in powdered weaning food by electron-beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Yun-Hee [Department of Food Science and Technology, College of Agriculture and Life Science, Chungnam National University, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji-Yong [Department of Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong-Hyun [Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, Kyungwon University, Sungnam 461-701 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Myong-Soo [Department of Food Science, Ehwa Women' s University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Ki-Sung [Center for Food safety Evaluation, Korea Food and Drug Administration, Seoul 122-704 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Kyungsook; Won, Misun [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Kyung-Bin [Department of Food Science and Technology, College of Agriculture and Life Science, Chungnam National University, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kbsong@cnu.ac.kr

    2008-09-15

    Inactivation of Enterobacter sakazakii, Bacillus cereus, and Salmonella typhimurium were evaluated in powdered weaning food using electron-beam irradiation. E. sakazakii, B. cereus, and S. typhimurium were eliminated by irradiation at 16, 8, and 8 kGy, respectively. The D{sub 10}-vlaues of E. sakazakii, B. cereus, and S. typhimurium inoculated on powdered weaning food were 4.83, 1.22, and 0.98 kGy, respectively. The results suggest that electron-beam irradiation should inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria on baby food without impairing qualities.

  12. Inactivation of Enterobacter sakazakii, Bacillus cereus, and Salmonella typhimurium in powdered weaning food by electron-beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Yun-Hee; Park, Ji-Yong; Park, Jong-Hyun; Chung, Myong-Soo; Kwon, Ki-Sung; Chung, Kyungsook; Won, Misun; Song, Kyung-Bin

    2008-01-01

    Inactivation of Enterobacter sakazakii, Bacillus cereus, and Salmonella typhimurium were evaluated in powdered weaning food using electron-beam irradiation. E. sakazakii, B. cereus, and S. typhimurium were eliminated by irradiation at 16, 8, and 8 kGy, respectively. The D 10 -vlaues of E. sakazakii, B. cereus, and S. typhimurium inoculated on powdered weaning food were 4.83, 1.22, and 0.98 kGy, respectively. The results suggest that electron-beam irradiation should inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria on baby food without impairing qualities

  13. The naked endosperm genes encode duplicate INDETERMINATE domain transcription factors required for maize endosperm cell patterning and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Gibum; Neelakandan, Anjanasree K; Gontarek, Bryan C; Vollbrecht, Erik; Becraft, Philip W

    2015-02-01

    The aleurone is the outermost layer of cereal endosperm and functions to digest storage products accumulated in starchy endosperm cells as well as to confer important dietary health benefits. Whereas normal maize (Zea mays [Zm]) has a single aleurone layer, naked endosperm (nkd) mutants produce multiple outer cell layers of partially differentiated cells that show sporadic expression of aleurone identity markers such as a viviparous1 promoter-β-glucuronidase transgene. The 15:1 F2 segregation ratio suggested that two recessive genes were involved, and map-based cloning identified two homologous genes in duplicated regions of the genome. The nkd1 and nkd2 genes encode the INDETERMINATE1 domain (IDD) containing transcription factors ZmIDDveg9 and ZmIDD9 on chromosomes 2 and 10, respectively. Independent mutant alleles of nkd1 and nkd2, as well as nkd2-RNA interference lines in which both nkd genes were knocked down, also showed the nkd mutant phenotype, confirming the gene identities. In wild-type kernels, the nkd transcripts were most abundant around 11 to 16 d after pollination. The NKD proteins have putative nuclear localization signals, and green fluorescent protein fusion proteins showed nuclear localization. The mutant phenotype and gene identities suggest that NKD controls a gene regulatory network involved in aleurone cell fate specification and cell differentiation. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Cationic antimicrobial peptides serve as activation signals for the Salmonella Typhimurium PhoPQ and PmrAB regulons in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M Richards

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium uses two-component regulatory systems (TCRSs to respond to environmental stimuli. Upon infection, the TCRSs PhoP-PhoQ (PhoPQ and PmrA-PmrB (PmrAB are activated by environmental signals detected in the lumen of the intestine and within host cells. TCRS-mediated gene expression leads to upregulation of genes involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS modification and cationic antimicrobial peptide (CAMP resistance. This research expands on previous studies which have shown that CAMPs can activate Salmonella TCRSs in vitro. The focus of this work was to determine if CAMPs can act as environmental signals for PhoPQ- and PmrAB-mediated gene expression in vitro, during infection of macrophages and in a mouse model of infection. Monitoring of PhoPQ and PmrAB activation using RIVET, alkaline phosphtase and β-galactosidase reporter fusion constructs demonstrated that S. Typhimurium PhoQ can sense CAMPs in vitro. In mouse macrophages, the cathelecidin CRAMP does not activate the PhoPQ regulon. Acidification of the Salmonella-containing vacuole activates PhoP- and PmrA-regulated loci but blocking acidification still does not reveal a role for CRAMP in TCRS activation in mouse macrophages. However, assays performed in susceptible wild type (WT, CRAMP knockout (KO and matrilysin (a metalloproteinase necessary for activating murine α-defensins KO mice suggest CRAMP, but not α-defensins, serve as a putative direct TCRS activation signal in the mouse intestine. These studies provide a better understanding of the in vivo environments that result in activation of these virulence-associated TCRSs.

  15. Regulated expression of the human cytomegalovirus pp65 gene: Octamer sequence in the promoter is required for activation by viral gene products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depto, A.S.; Stenberg, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    To better understand the regulation of late gene expression in human cytomegalovirus (CMV)-infected cells, the authors examined expression of the gene that codes for the 65-kilodalton lower-matrix phosphoprotein (pp65). Analysis of RNA isolated at 72 h from cells infected with CMV Towne or ts66, a DNA-negative temperature-sensitive mutant, supported the fact that pp65 is expressed at low levels prior to viral DNA replication but maximally expressed after the initiation of viral DNA replication. To investigate promoter activation in a transient expression assay, the pp65 promoter was cloned into the indicator plasmid containing the gene for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). Transfection of the promoter-CAT construct and subsequent superinfection with CMV resulted in activation of the promoter at early times after infection. Cotransfection with plasmids capable of expressing immediate-early (IE) proteins demonstrated that the promoter was activated by IE proteins and that both IE regions 1 and 2 were necessary. These studies suggest that interactions between IE proteins and this octamer sequence may be important for the regulation and expression of this CMV gene

  16. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe map1 gene encodes an SRF/MCM1-related protein required for P-cell specific gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O; Friis, T; Kjaerulff, S

    1996-01-01

    Cells of Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergo mating and meiosis when starved for a nitrogen source. In this process a P and and M cell first mate to generate a diploid zygote, which subsequently enters meiosis and sporulates. The P mating type is controlled by the mat1-Pc gene at the mating type...

  17. Rice Snl6, a cinnamoyl-CoA reductase-like gene family member, is required for NH1-mediated immunity to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca S Bart

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Rice NH1 (NPR1 homolog 1 is a key mediator of innate immunity. In both plants and animals, the innate immune response is often accompanied by rapid cell death at the site of pathogen infection. Over-expression of NH1 in rice results in resistance to the bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo, constitutive expression of defense related genes and enhanced benzothiadiazole (BTH- mediated cell death. Here we describe a forward genetic screen that identified a suppressor of NH1-mediated lesion formation and resistance, snl6. Comparative genome hybridization and fine mapping rapidly identified the genomic location of the Snl6 gene. Snl6 is a member of the cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR-like gene family. We show that Snl6 is required for NH1-mediated resistance to Xoo. Further, we show that Snl6 is required for pathogenesis-related gene expression. In contrast to previously described CCR family members, disruption of Snl6 does not result in an obvious morphologic phenotype. Snl6 mutants have reduced lignin content and increased sugar extractability, an important trait for the production of cellulosic biofuels. These results suggest the existence of a conserved group of CCR-like genes involved in the defense response, and with the potential to alter lignin content without affecting development.

  18. Cloning and characterization of pvdS, a gene required for pyoverdine synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: PvdS is probably an alternative sigma factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunliffe, H E; Merriman, T R; Lamont, I L

    1995-05-01

    Cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa secrete a fluorescent yellow-green siderophore, pyoverdine, when grown under iron-deficient conditions. We describe here the cloning and characterization of a gene, pvdS, which is required for this process. The pvdS gene is required for expression from promoters of at least two pyoverdine synthesis genes and can cause expression from these promoters in Escherichia coli, where they are otherwise inactive. Sequencing of pvdS revealed that it is a member of a subfamily of RNA polymerase sigma factors which direct the synthesis of extracellular products by bacteria. The pvdS gene is expressed only in iron-starved bacteria, and in E. coli cells at least, expression is regulated by the Fur repressor protein. We propose that in iron-rich cells of P. aeruginosa, Fur binds to the pvdS promoter and prevents expression of the gene; under conditions of iron starvation, repression is relieved and PvdS is made, reprogramming the cells for pyoverdine synthesis.

  19. New sub-family of lysozyme-like proteins shows no catalytic activity: crystallographic and biochemical study of STM3605 protein from Salmonella Typhimurium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalska, Karolina; Brown, Roslyn N.; Li, Hui; Jedrzejczak, Robert; Niemann, George; Heffron, Fred; Cort, John R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2013-03-01

    Phage viruses that infect prokaryotes integrate their genome into the host chromosome; thus, microbial genomes typically contain genetic remnants of both recent and ancient phage infections. Often phage genes occur in clusters of atypical G+C content that reflect integration of the foreign DNA. However, some phage genes occur in isolation without other phage gene neighbors, probably resulting from horizontal gene transfer. In these cases, the phage gene product is unlikely to function as a component of a mature phage particle, and instead may have been co-opted by the host for its own benefit. The product of one such gene from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, STM3605, encodes a protein with modest sequence similarity to phage-like lysozyme (N-acetylmuramidase) but appears to lack essential catalytic residues that are strictly conserved in all lysozymes. Close homologs in other bacteria share this characteristic. The structure of the STM3605 protein was characterized by X-ray crystallography, and functional assays showed that it is a stable, folded protein whose structure closely resembles lysozyme. However, this protein is unlikely to hydrolyze peptidoglycan. Instead, STM3605 is presumed to have evolved an alternative function because it shows some lytic activity and partitions to micelles.

  20. New sub-family of lysozyme-like proteins shows no catalytic activity: crystallographic and biochemical study of STM3605 protein from Salmonella Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalska, Karolina; Brown, Roslyn N; Li, Hui; Jedrzejczak, Robert; Niemann, George S; Heffron, Fred; Cort, John R; Adkins, Joshua N; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2013-03-01

    Phage viruses that infect prokaryotes integrate their genome into the host chromosome; thus, microbial genomes typically contain genetic remnants of both recent and ancient phage infections. Often phage genes occur in clusters of atypical G+C content that reflect integration of the foreign DNA. However, some phage genes occur in isolation without other phage gene neighbors, probably resulting from horizontal gene transfer. In these cases, the phage gene product is unlikely to function as a component of a mature phage particle, and instead may have been co-opted by the host for its own benefit. The product of one such gene from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, STM3605, encodes a protein with modest sequence similarity to phage-like lysozyme (N-acetylmuramidase) but appears to lack essential catalytic residues that are strictly conserved in all lysozymes. Close homologs in other bacteria share this characteristic. The structure of the STM3605 protein was characterized by X-ray crystallography, and functional assays showed that it is a stable, folded protein whose structure closely resembles lysozyme. However, this protein is unlikely to hydrolyze peptidoglycan. Instead, STM3605 is presumed to have evolved an alternative function because it shows some lytic activity and partitions to micelles.

  1. Induction and requirement of gene expression in the anterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex for the consolidation of inhibitory avoidance memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yue

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Memory consolidation is a process to stabilize short-term memory, generating long-term memory. A critical biochemical feature of memory consolidation is a requirement for gene expression. Previous studies have shown that fear memories are consolidated through the activation of gene expression in the amygdala and hippocampus, indicating essential roles of these brain regions in memory formation. However, it is still poorly understood whether gene expression in brain regions other than the amygdala/hippocampus is required for the consolidation of fear memory; however, several brain regions are known to play modulatory roles in fear memory formation. Results To further understand the mechanisms underlying the formation of fear memory, we first identified brain regions where gene expression is activated after learning inhibitory avoidance (IA by analyzing the expression of the immediately early genes c-fos and Arc as markers. Similarly with previous findings, the induction of c-fos and Arc expression was observed in the amygdala and hippocampus. Interestingly, we also observed the induction of c-fos and Arc expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC: prelimbic (PL and infralimbic (IL regions and Arc expression in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC. We next examined the roles of these brain regions in the consolidation of IA memory. Consistent with previous findings, inhibiting protein synthesis in the hippocampus blocked the consolidation of IA memory. More importantly, inhibition in the mPFC or ACC also blocked the formation of IA memory. Conclusion Our observations indicated that the formation of IA memory requires gene expression in the ACC and mPFC as well as in the amygdala and hippocampus, suggesting essential roles of the ACC and mPFC in IA memory formation.

  2. Adenosine-uridine-rich element is one of the required cis-elements for epimastigote form stage-specific gene expression of the congolense epimastigote specific protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganuma, Keisuke; Mochabo, Kennedy Miyoro; Hakimi, Hassan; Yamasaki, Shino; Yamagishi, Junya; Asada, Masahito; Kawazu, Shin-Ichiro; Inoue, Noboru

    2013-09-01

    It is known that gene expression in kinetoplastida is regulated post-transcriptionally. Several previous studies have shown that stage-specific gene expression in trypanosomes is regulated by cis-elements located in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of each mRNA and also by RNA binding proteins. Our previous study revealed that gene expression of congolense epimastigote specific protein (cesp) was regulated by cis-elements located in the 3'UTR. In the present study, we identified the adenosine and uridine rich region in the cesp 3'UTR. Using transgenic trypanosome cell lines with different egfp expression cassettes, we showed that this adenosine and uridine rich region is one of the regulatory elements for epimastigote form (EMF) stage-specific gene expression via the regulatory cis-element of the eukaryotic AU rich element (ARE). Therefore this required element within the cesp 3'UTR was designated as T. congolense ARE. This required cis-element might selectively stabilize mRNA in the EMF stage and destabilize mRNA in other stages. By RNA electro mobility shift assay, unknown stage-specific RNA binding proteins (RBPs) whose sequences specifically interacted with the required cis-element were found. These results indicate that EMF stage specific cis-element and RBP complexes might specifically stabilize cesp mRNA in EMF. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Extreme Mutation Tolerance: Nearly Half of the Archaeal Fusellovirus Sulfolobus Spindle-Shaped Virus 1 Genes Are Not Required for Virus Function, Including the Minor Capsid Protein Gene vp3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Eric A; Goodman, David A; Gorchels, Madeline E; Stedman, Kenneth M

    2017-05-15

    Viruses infecting the Archaea harbor a tremendous amount of genetic diversity. This is especially true for the spindle-shaped viruses of the family Fuselloviridae , where >90% of the viral genes do not have detectable homologs in public databases. This significantly limits our ability to elucidate the role of viral proteins in the infection cycle. To address this, we have developed genetic techniques to study the well-characterized fusellovirus Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus 1 (SSV1), which infects Sulfolobus solfataricus in volcanic hot springs at 80°C and pH 3. Here, we present a new comparative genome analysis and a thorough genetic analysis of SSV1 using both specific and random mutagenesis and thereby generate mutations in all open reading frames. We demonstrate that almost half of the SSV1 genes are not essential for infectivity, and the requirement for a particular gene correlates well with its degree of conservation within the Fuselloviridae The major capsid gene vp1 is essential for SSV1 infectivity. However, the universally conserved minor capsid gene vp3 could be deleted without a loss in infectivity and results in virions with abnormal morphology. IMPORTANCE Most of the putative genes in the spindle-shaped archaeal hyperthermophile fuselloviruses have no sequences that are clearly similar to characterized genes. In order to determine which of these SSV genes are important for function, we disrupted all of the putative genes in the prototypical fusellovirus, SSV1. Surprisingly, about half of the genes could be disrupted without destroying virus function. Even deletions of one of the known structural protein genes that is present in all known fuselloviruses, vp3 , allows the production of infectious viruses. However, viruses lacking vp3 have abnormal shapes, indicating that the vp3 gene is important for virus structure. Identification of essential genes will allow focused research on minimal SSV genomes and further understanding of the structure of

  4. Genomic Comparison of Non-Typhoidal Salmonella enterica Serovars Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Heidelberg, Hadar and Kentucky Isolates from Broiler Chickens.

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    Dhanani, Akhilesh S; Block, Glenn; Dewar, Ken; Forgetta, Vincenzo; Topp, Edward; Beiko, Robert G; Diarra, Moussa S

    2015-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars, associated with different foods including poultry products, are important causes of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. The colonization of the chicken gut by S. enterica could result in the contamination of the environment and food chain. The aim of this study was to compare the genomes of 25 S. enterica serovars isolated from broiler chicken farms to assess their intra- and inter-genetic variability, with a focus on virulence and antibiotic resistance characteristics. The genomes of 25 S. enterica isolates covering five serovars (ten Typhimurium including three monophasic 4,[5],12:i:, four Enteritidis, three Hadar, four Heidelberg and four Kentucky) were sequenced. Most serovars were clustered in strongly supported phylogenetic clades, except for isolates of serovar Enteritidis that were scattered throughout the tree. Plasmids of varying sizes were detected in several isolates independently of serovars. Genes associated with the IncF plasmid and the IncI1 plasmid were identified in twelve and four isolates, respectively, while genes associated with the IncQ plasmid were found in one isolate. The presence of numerous genes associated with Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs) was also confirmed. Components of the type III and IV secretion systems (T3SS and T4SS) varied in different isolates, which could explain in part, differences of their pathogenicity in humans and/or persistence in broilers. Conserved clusters of genes in the T3SS were detected that could be used in designing effective strategies (diagnostic, vaccination or treatments) to combat Salmonella. Antibiotic resistance genes (CMY, aadA, ampC, florR, sul1, sulI, tetAB, and srtA) and class I integrons were detected in resistant isolates while all isolates carried multidrug efflux pump systems regardless of their antibiotic susceptibility profile. This study showed that the predominant Salmonella serovars in broiler chickens harbor genes encoding adhesins

  5. In vivo repressed genes ofVibrio choleraereveal inverse requirements of an H+/Cl-transporter along the gastrointestinal passage.

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    Cakar, Fatih; Zingl, Franz G; Moisi, Manuel; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2018-03-06

    The facultative human pathogen Vibrio cholerae changes its transcriptional profile upon oral ingestion by the host to facilitate survival and colonization fitness. Here, we used a modified version of recombination-based in vivo expression technology to investigate gene silencing during the in vivo passage, which has been understudied. Using a murine model of cholera, we screened a V. cholerae transposon library composed of 10,000 randomly generated reporter fusions and identified 101 in vivo repressed ( ivr ) genes. Our data indicate that constitutive expression of ivr genes reduces colonization fitness, highlighting the necessity to down-regulate these genes in vivo. For example, the ivr gene clcA , encoding an H + /Cl - transporter, could be linked to the acid tolerance response against hydrochloric acid. In a chloride-dependent manner, ClcA facilitates survival under low pH (e.g., the stomach), but its presence becomes detrimental under alkaline conditions (e.g., lower gastrointestinal tract). This pH-dependent clcA expression is controlled by the LysR-type activator AphB, which acts in concert with AphA to initiate the virulence cascade in V. cholerae after oral ingestion. Thus, transcriptional networks dictating induction of virulence factors and the repression of ivr genes overlap to regulate in vivo colonization dynamics. Overall, the results presented herein highlight the impact of spatiotemporal gene silencing in vivo. The molecular characterization of the underlying mechanisms can provide important insights into in vivo physiology and virulence network regulation. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  6. In vivo repressed genes of Vibrio cholerae reveal inverse requirements of an H+/Cl− transporter along the gastrointestinal passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakar, Fatih; Zingl, Franz G.; Moisi, Manuel; Reidl, Joachim

    2018-01-01

    The facultative human pathogen Vibrio cholerae changes its transcriptional profile upon oral ingestion by the host to facilitate survival and colonization fitness. Here, we used a modified version of recombination-based in vivo expression technology to investigate gene silencing during the in vivo passage, which has been understudied. Using a murine model of cholera, we screened a V. cholerae transposon library composed of 10,000 randomly generated reporter fusions and identified 101 in vivo repressed (ivr) genes. Our data indicate that constitutive expression of ivr genes reduces colonization fitness, highlighting the necessity to down-regulate these genes in vivo. For example, the ivr gene clcA, encoding an H+/Cl− transporter, could be linked to the acid tolerance response against hydrochloric acid. In a chloride-dependent manner, ClcA facilitates survival under low pH (e.g., the stomach), but its presence becomes detrimental under alkaline conditions (e.g., lower gastrointestinal tract). This pH-dependent clcA expression is controlled by the LysR-type activator AphB, which acts in concert with AphA to initiate the virulence cascade in V. cholerae after oral ingestion. Thus, transcriptional networks dictating induction of virulence factors and the repression of ivr genes overlap to regulate in vivo colonization dynamics. Overall, the results presented herein highlight the impact of spatiotemporal gene silencing in vivo. The molecular characterization of the underlying mechanisms can provide important insights into in vivo physiology and virulence network regulation. PMID:29463743

  7. Activation of type III interferon genes by pathogenic bacteria in infected epithelial cells and mouse placenta.

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    Hélène Bierne

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections trigger the expression of type I and II interferon genes but little is known about their effect on type III interferon (IFN-λ genes, whose products play important roles in epithelial innate immunity against viruses. Here, we studied the expression of IFN-λ genes in cultured human epithelial cells infected with different pathogenic bacteria and in the mouse placenta infected with Listeria monocytogenes. We first showed that in intestinal LoVo cells, induction of IFN-λ genes by L. monocytogenes required bacterial entry and increased further during the bacterial intracellular phase of infection. Other Gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Enterococcus faecalis, also induced IFN-λ genes when internalized by LoVo cells. In contrast, Gram-negative bacteria Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Shigella flexneri and Chlamydia trachomatis did not substantially induce IFN-λ. We also found that IFN-λ genes were up-regulated in A549 lung epithelial cells infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and in HepG2 hepatocytes and BeWo trophoblastic cells infected with L. monocytogenes. In a humanized mouse line permissive to fetoplacental listeriosis, IFN-λ2/λ3 mRNA levels were enhanced in placentas infected with L. monocytogenes. In addition, the feto-placental tissue was responsive to IFN-λ2. Together, these results suggest that IFN-λ may be an important modulator of the immune response to Gram-positive intracellular bacteria in epithelial tissues.

  8. Enhanced immune response to a dual-promoter anti-caries DNA vaccine orally delivered by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium.

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    Jiang, Hao; Hu, Yijun; Yang, Mei; Liu, Hao; Jiang, Guangshui

    2017-05-01

    The strength of immune responses induced by DNA vaccine is closely associated with the expression level of cloned antigens available to the antigen presenting cells (APCs). To acquire a larger and more persistent amount of antigen, a dual-promoter, which could double the target antigen output through its expression both in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, was employed in the constructed anti-caries DNA vaccine with attenuated Salmonella as mucosal delivery vector in this study. Here, both CMV and nirB promoters were included in the plasmid that harbors the genes encoding the functional epitopes of two virulence factors of S. mutans, i.e. the saliva-binding region (SBR) of PAc and the glucan-binding region (GBR) of glucosyltransferase-I (GTF-I). Delivered by attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium strain SL3261, the anti-caries vaccine was administered intragastrointestinally to BALB/c mice for evaluation of the effectiveness of this immune regime. Specific anti-SBR and anti-GBR antibodies were detected in the serum and saliva of experimental animals by week 3 after immunization. These immune responses were further enhanced after a booster vaccination at week 16. However, in mice receiving Salmonella expressing SBR and GBR under the control of nirB alone these antibody responses were significantly (Panti-caries DNA vaccine when employing attenuated Salmonella as delivering vehicle for mucosal immunization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Exposure of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to high level biocide challenge can select multidrug resistant mutants in a single step.

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    Rebekah N Whitehead

    Full Text Available Biocides are crucial to the prevention of infection by bacteria, particularly with the global emergence of multiply antibiotic resistant strains of many species. Concern has been raised regarding the potential for biocide exposure to select for antibiotic resistance due to common mechanisms of resistance, notably efflux.Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was challenged with 4 biocides of differing modes of action at both low and recommended-use concentration. Flow cytometry was used to investigate the physiological state of the cells after biocide challenge. After 5 hours exposure to biocide, live cells were sorted by FACS and recovered. Cells recovered after an exposure to low concentrations of biocide had antibiotic resistance profiles similar to wild-type cells. Live cells were recovered after exposure to two of the biocides at in-use concentration for 5 hours. These cells were multi-drug resistant and accumulation assays demonstrated an efflux phenotype of these mutants. Gene expression analysis showed that the AcrEF multidrug efflux pump was de-repressed in mutants isolated from high-levels of biocide.These data show that a single exposure to the working concentration of certain biocides can select for mutant Salmonella with efflux mediated multidrug resistance and that flow cytometry is a sensitive tool for identifying biocide tolerant mutants. The propensity for biocides to select for MDR mutants varies and this should be a consideration when designing new biocidal formulations.

  10. Dysregulation of JAK/STAT genes by vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in Salmonella-infected monocytes may inhibit its therapeutic potential in human sepsis.

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    Ibrahim, Hiba; Askar, Basim; Barrow, Paul; Foster, Neil

    2018-05-01

    Murine/LPS models of Gram negative sepsis indicate that vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) has therapeutic potential. We investigated the unknown effect of VIP on JAK/STAT proteins and genes in human monocytes infected with Salmonella Typhimurium 14028. S. Typhimurium 14028 increased expression of both IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) and interferon gamma receptor 1 (IFNγR1) on monocytes but co-culture of infected monocytes with VIP (10 -7  M) only decreased expression of IFNγR1 (P < 0.05). In contrast, S. Typhimurium 14028 infection or co-culture with VIP had no effect on IL-10 receptor expression on the monocyte surface. However, S. Typhimurium 14028 down regulated IFNGR1 gene expression and this was not altered by co-culture with VIP, suggesting that changes in IFNγR1 protein may be due to an effect on cytoplasmic transport. 15 JAK/STAT genes, out of 84 studied, were up-regulated by S. Typhimurium 14028 infection and five were down-regulated. Co-culture with VIP significantly decreased expression of two genes (IFNG and IL-20) and increased expression of three genes (SOCS1, SOCS3 and STAT4) (P < 0.05). S. Typhimurium 14028 also increased expression of PTPN1, which dephosphorylates JAK2 and TYK2. This was unaltered by co-culture with VIP but S. Typhimurium 14028-induced expression of ISG15, associated with susceptibility to Gram negative infection, was further increased by VIP. We conclude that the effect of VIP on JAK/STAT genes may preclude its therapeutic use in human Gram negative sepsis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bordetella pertussis risA, but not risS, is required for maximal expression of Bvg-repressed genes.

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    Stenson, Trevor H; Allen, Andrew G; Al-Meer, Jehan A; Maskell, Duncan; Peppler, Mark S

    2005-09-01

    Expression of virulence determinants by Bordetella pertussis, the primary etiological agent of whooping cough, is regulated by the BvgAS two-component regulatory system. The role of a second two-component regulatory system, encoded by risAS, in this process is not defined. Here, we show that mutation of B. pertussis risA does not affect Bvg-activated genes or proteins. However, mutation of risA resulted in greatly diminished expression of Bvg-repressed antigens and decreased transcription of Bvg-repressed genes. In contrast, mutation of risS had no effect on the expression of Bvg-regulated molecules. Mutation of risA also resulted in decreased bacterial invasion in a HeLa cell model. However, decreased invasion could not be attributed to the decreased expression of Bvg-repressed products, suggesting that mutation of risA may affect the expression of a variety of genes. Unlike the risAS operons in B. parapertussis and B. bronchiseptica, B. pertussis risS is a pseudogene that encodes a truncated RisS sensor. Deletion of the intact part of the B. pertussis risS gene does not affect the expression of risA-dependent, Bvg-repressed genes. These observations suggest that RisA activation occurs through cross-regulation by a heterologous system.

  12. Some putative prebiotics increase the severity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection in mice

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    Lahtinen Sampo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prebiotics are non-digestible food ingredients believed to beneficially affect host health by selectively stimulating the growth of the beneficial bacteria residing in the gut. Such beneficial bacteria have been reported to protect against pathogenic infections. However, contradicting results on prevention of Salmonella infections with prebiotics have been published. The aim of the present study was to examine whether S. Typhimurium SL1344 infection in mice could be prevented by administration of dietary carbohydrates with different structures and digestibility profiles. BALB/c mice were fed a diet containing 10% of either of the following carbohydrates: inulin, fructo-oligosaccharide, xylo-oligosaccharide, galacto-oligosaccharide, apple pectin, polydextrose or beta-glucan for three weeks prior to oral Salmonella challenge (107 CFU and compared to mice fed a cornstarch-based control diet. Results The mice fed with diets containing fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS or xylo-oligosaccharide (XOS had significantly higher (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05 numbers of S. Typhimurium SL1344 in liver, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes when compared to the mice fed with the cornstarch-based control diet. Significantly increased amounts (P < 0.01 of Salmonella were detected in ileal and fecal contents of mice fed with diets supplemented with apple pectin, however these mice did not show significantly higher numbers of S. Typhimyrium in liver, spleen and lymph nodes than animals from the control group (P < 0.20. The acute-phase protein haptoglobin was a good marker for translocation of S. Typhimurium in mice. In accordance with the increased counts of Salmonella in the organs, serum concentrations of haptoglobin were significantly increased in the mice fed with FOS or XOS (P < 0.001. Caecum weight was increased in the mice fed with FOS (P < 0.01, XOS (P < 0.01, or polydextrose (P < 0.001, and caecal pH was reduced in the mice fed with polydextrose (P < 0

  13. Model-driven discovery of synergistic inhibitors against E. coli and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium targeting a novel synthetic lethal pair, aldA and prpC

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    Ramy Karam Aziz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical models of biochemical networks form a cornerstone of bacterial systems biology. Inconsistencies between simulation output and experimental data point to gaps in knowledge about the fundamental biology of the organism. One such inconsistency centers on the gene aldA in Escherichia coli: it is essential in a computational model of E. coli metabolism, but experimentally it is not. Here we reconcile this disparity by providing evidence that aldA and prpC form a synthetic lethal pair, as the double knockout could only be created through complementation with a plasmid-borne copy of aldA. Moreover, virtual and biological screening against the two proteins led to a set of compounds that inhibited the growth of E. coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium synergistically at 100 – 200 μM individual concentrations. These results highlight the power of metabolic models to drive basic biological discovery and their potential use to discover new combination antibiotics.

  14. Genome-wide identification of the Fermentome; genes required for successful and timely completion of wine-like fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Walker, Michelle E; Nguyen, Trung D; Liccioli, Tommaso; Schmid, Frank; Kalatzis, Nicholas; Sundstrom, Joanna F; Gardner, Jennifer M; Jiranek, Vladimir

    2014-07-03

    Wine fermentation is a harsh ecological niche to which wine yeast are well adapted. The initial high osmotic pressure and acidity of grape juice is followed by nutrient depletion and increasing concentrations of ethanol as the fermentation progresses. Yeast's adaptation to these and many other environmental stresses, enables successful completion of high-sugar fermentations. Earlier transcriptomic and growth studies have tentatively identified genes important for high-sugar fermentation. Whilst useful, such studies did not consider extended growth (>5 days) in a temporally dynamic multi-stressor environment such as that found in many industrial fermentation processes. Here, we identify genes whose deletion has minimal or no effect on growth, but results in failure to achieve timely completion of the fermentation of a chemically defined grape juice with 200 g L-1 total sugar. Micro- and laboratory-scale experimental fermentations were conducted to identify 72 clones from ~5,100 homozygous diploid single-gene yeast deletants, which exhibited protracted fermentation in a high-sugar medium. Another 21 clones (related by gene function, but initially eliminated from the screen because of possible growth defects) were also included. Clustering and numerical enrichment of genes annotated to specific Gene Ontology (GO) terms highlighted the vacuole's role in ion homeostasis and pH regulation, through vacuole acidification. We have identified 93 genes whose deletion resulted in the duration of fermentation being at least 20% longer than the wild type. An extreme phenotype, 'stuck' fermentation, was also observed when DOA4, NPT1, PLC1, PTK2, SIN3, SSQ1, TPS1, TPS2 or ZAP1 were deleted. These 93 Fermentation Essential Genes (FEG) are required to complete an extended high-sugar (wine-like) fermentation. Their importance is highlighted in our Fermentation Relevant Yeast Genes (FRYG) database, generated from literature and the fermentation-relevant phenotypic characteristics of

  15. Sexual and asexual oogenesis require the expression of unique and shared sets of genes in the insect Acyrthosiphon pisum.

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    Gallot, Aurore; Shigenobu, Shuji; Hashiyama, Tomomi; Jaubert-Possamai, Stéphanie; Tagu, Denis

    2012-02-15

    Although sexual reproduction is dominant within eukaryotes, asexual reproduction is widespread and has evolved independently as a derived trait in almost all major taxa. How asexuality evolved in sexual organisms is unclear. Aphids, such as Acyrthosiphon pisum, alternate between asexual and sexual reproductive means, as the production of parthenogenetic viviparous females or sexual oviparous females and males varies in response to seasonal photoperiodism. Consequently, sexual and asexual development in aphids can be analyzed simultaneously in genetically identical individuals. We compared the transcriptomes of aphid embryos in the stages of development during which the trajectory of oogenesis is determined for producing sexual or asexual gametes. This study design aimed at identifying genes involved in the onset of the divergent mechanisms that result in the sexual or asexual phenotype. We detected 33 genes that were differentially transcribed in sexual and asexual embryos. Functional annotation by gene ontology (GO) showed a biological signature of oogenesis, cell cycle regulation, epigenetic regulation and RNA maturation. In situ hybridizations demonstrated that 16 of the differentially-transcribed genes were specifically expressed in germ cells and/or oocytes of asexual and/or sexual ovaries, and therefore may contribute to aphid oogenesis. We categorized these 16 genes by their transcription patterns in the two types of ovaries; they were: i) expressed during sexual and asexual oogenesis; ii) expressed during sexual and asexual oogenesis but with different localizations; or iii) expressed only during sexual or asexual oogenesis. Our results show that asexual and sexual oogenesis in aphids share common genetic programs but diverge by adapting specificities in their respective gene expression profiles in germ cells and oocytes.

  16. Sexual and asexual oogenesis require the expression of unique and shared sets of genes in the insect Acyrthosiphon pisum

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    Gallot Aurore

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although sexual reproduction is dominant within eukaryotes, asexual reproduction is widespread and has evolved independently as a derived trait in almost all major taxa. How asexuality evolved in sexual organisms is unclear. Aphids, such as Acyrthosiphon pisum, alternate between asexual and sexual reproductive means, as the production of parthenogenetic viviparous females or sexual oviparous females and males varies in response to seasonal photoperiodism. Consequently, sexual and asexual development in aphids can be analyzed simultaneously in genetically identical individuals. Results We compared the transcriptomes of aphid embryos in the stages of development during which the trajectory of oogenesis is determined for producing sexual or asexual gametes. This study design aimed at identifying genes involved in the onset of the divergent mechanisms that result in the sexual or asexual phenotype. We detected 33 genes that were differentially transcribed in sexual and asexual embryos. Functional annotation by gene ontology (GO showed a biological signature of oogenesis, cell cycle regulation, epigenetic regulation and RNA maturation. In situ hybridizations demonstrated that 16 of the differentially-transcribed genes were specifically expressed in germ cells and/or oocytes of asexual and/or sexual ovaries, and therefore may contribute to aphid oogenesis. We categorized these 16 genes by their transcription patterns in the two types of ovaries; they were: i expressed during sexual and asexual oogenesis; ii expressed during sexual and asexual oogenesis but with different localizations; or iii expressed only during sexual or asexual oogenesis. Conclusions Our results show that asexual and sexual oogenesis in aphids share common genetic programs but diverge by adapting specificities in their respective gene expression profiles in germ cells and oocytes.

  17. Immunochromatographic strip assay for the rapid and sensitive detection of Salmonella Typhimurium in artificially contaminated tomato samples.

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    Shukla, Shruti; Leem, Hyerim; Lee, Jong-Suk; Kim, Myunghee

    2014-06-01

    This study was designed to confirm the applicability of a liposome-based immunochromatographic assay for the rapid detection of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella Typhimurium) in artificially contaminated tomato samples. To determine the detection limit and pre-enrichment incubation time (10, 12, and 18 h pre-enrichment in 1% buffered peptone water), the tests were performed with different cell numbers of Salmonella Typhimurium (3 × 10(0), 3 × 10(1), 3 × 10(2), and 3 × 10(3) CFU·mL(-1)) inoculated into 25 g of crushed tomato samples. The assay was able to detect as few as 30 Salmonella