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Sample records for type ii diabetic

  1. Case 22:Type II diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes mellitus is characterized by elevated blood glucose levels. It is composed of two types depending on the pathogenesis. Type I diabetes is characterized by insulin deficiency and usually has its onset during childhood or teenage years. This is also called ketosis-prone diabetes. Type II diab...

  2. Peripheral artery disease in type II diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Z.; Ahmed, S.M.; Bhutto, A.R.; Chaudhry, A.; Munir, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in type 2 diabetic patients. Study Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Diabetes Clinic, Medical Unit III, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from January to June 2010. Methodology:Three hundred and eighty seven (387) type II diabetic patients of either gender and any age were included. Patients with a previous history of trauma to the arterial vasculature, pregnancy and those who underwent in the study arterial graft procedures were excluded. Non-purposive convenient sampling technique was used to enroll patients in the study. PAD was diagnosed when ankle-brachial index (ABI) was less than 0.9. Ap-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Out of 387 studied patients, 128 were males (33.1%) and 259 were females (66.9%). Mean age was 52.22 +- 6.39 years. PAD was detected in 152 9.671 (22 - 76) years in the entire cohort. Mean duration of diabetes was 9.38 +- (39.28%) of the total study subjects. Thirty-one of 128 male patients (24.22%) had PAD disease while 121 out of 259 female patients (46.71%) had evidence of PAD (p = 0.001). Hypertension was a significantly associated factor (p = 0.002). Conclusion: A high frequency of PAD was observed in the diabetic population particularly with hypertension and more prevalent in females. (author)

  3. CT appearance of liver and gallbladder in type II diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jingshan; Li Wei; Zhang Yuzhong; Zhao Xiuyi; Zhang Xuelin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate CT findings of liver and gallbladder in type II diabetics and to discuss diabetic, and investigate the correlation between type II diabetics, and investigate the correlation between the diabetes and the lesions found in the liver or gallbladder. Methods: Retrospective analysis was made on the CT findings of hepatic and gallbladder lesions in 586 cases of II diabetes. Results: In total 586 type II diabetics, cholecystitis and/or gallstone were revealed in 33.45% patients; and hepatic alteration was noted in 20.48% cases. Hepatic abnormalities were found in 58.67% cases in the cholecystitis/gallstone group, significantly different from the group with unremarkable gallbladder, in which hepatic lesions were found only in 1.28% cases. Conclusion: The hepatic alteration is secondary to the gallbladder lesions in type II diabetics. (authors)

  4. Serum markers for type II diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Thomas O; Qian, Wei-Jun; Jacobs, Jon M; Polpitiya, Ashoka D; Camp, II, David G; Smith, Richard D

    2014-03-18

    A method for identifying persons with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus utilizing selected biomarkers described hereafter either alone or in combination. The present invention allows for broad based, reliable, screening of large population bases and provides other advantages, including the formulation of effective strategies for characterizing, archiving, and contrasting data from multiple sample types under varying conditions.

  5. Hypertension In Type II Diabetes Mellitus In Jos University Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A cross-sectional study of hypertension in type II diabetic patients in Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria Results: Forty-two of the patients were hypertensive with only 28 (32.9%) previously diagnosed and were on treatment. Age of patient, duration of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy were significantly ...

  6. Cardiovascular risk markers in type II diabetes and hypertension at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cardiovascular risk markers in type II diabetes and hypertension at the Battor Catholic ... either precedes or is a consequence of the development of these diseases. ... The control group consisted of 62 age-matched healthy individuals.

  7. Knowledge Is Power: Teaching Children about Type II Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feild-Berner, Natalie; Balgopal, Meena

    2011-01-01

    World Diabetes Day (November 14) offers a wonderful opportunity to educate elementary children about the power they have to control their health. First lady Michelle Obama has urged Americans to educate themselves about childhood obesity, which is often associated with the onset of type II diabetes (Rabin 2010). The authors developed activities to…

  8. Type II diabetes and personality; a study to explore other psychosomatic aspects of diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Esmaeilinasab, Maryam; Ebrahimi, Mehdi; Mokarrar, Mohsen Heidari; Rahmati, Leila; Mahjouri, Mohammad Yoosef; Arzaghi, Seyed Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background As one of the most common chronic diseases, diabetes and its control are affected by the patients? psychological and spiritual attributes. The present study investigates the relationship between glycemic control in patients with type II diabetes and personality traits, defense mechanisms and spirituality. Method The present cross-sectional study was conducted on 400 Iranian patients with type II diabetes, 64% were men. Participants completed the NEO Personality Inventory, the Defen...

  9. Left Ventricular Geometry In Nigerians With Type II Diabetes Mellitus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Left ventricular hypertrophy is independently associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular and all cause mortality. In a relatively healthy hypertensive adult population, type II diabetes is associated with higher left ventricular mass, concentric left ventricular geometry and lower ...

  10. PREVALENCE OF DIABETIC RETINOPATHY IN PATIENTS WITH NEWLY DIAGNOSED TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS

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    A. Bostak

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of type II diabetes mellitus and carries with it the threat of blindness. Accurate information regarding the incidence of diabetic retinopathy and associated risk factors is important in the prevention of its development and of the visual impairment caused by this complication. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in newly diagnosed patients with type II diabetes mellitus. We have also evaluated the association of diabetic retinopathy with clinical and biochemical variables. In a cross-sectional study, 152 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed type II diabetes mellitus were referred from two outpatient clinics in Tehran for ophthalmologic exam to detect retinopathy. Indirect ophthalmoscopy was performed and data regarding risk factors were extracted from routine medical records. Chi square and Mann Whitney U tests were used to analyze the data. The overall prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 13.8 %( 21 cases: three cases with microaneurysm only, 10 with mild, 5 with moderate and 2 with severe non proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Only one patient had advanced proliferative retinopathy. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was positively associated with age, duration of disease, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, and systolic blood pressure. Diabetic retinopathy is common in newly diagnosed type II diabetes mellitus patients. Ophthalmologic consultation is essential at the time of diagnosis for all patients.

  11. [Rational therapy of Type II diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanefeld, M; Fischer, S

    1996-12-01

    Noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is a genetically determined form of diabetes, due to impaired insulin secretion by the B-cells as well as to insulin resistance of the peripheral tissues. According to the glucose toxicity theory hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia exist in a vicious circle. Therefore, it is a major therapeutical aim to put the B-cell to rest and improve insulin sensitivity by a strict control of fasting blood glucose and of postprandial hyperglycemia. Furthermore, associated abnormalities within the metabolic syndrome, such as hypertension, dyslipoproteinemia and hemostatic disorders should be corrected to avoid vessel complications. Therefore, it should be started with basic measures as body weight reduction, carbohydrate-rich and fat-poor diet and exercise. If these measures fail to achieve acceptable glycemic control, antihyperglycemic drugs (acarbose, metformin) are indicated, eventually in a combination with small doses of short-acting sulfonylureas. Further impairment of insulin secretion is the indication for sulfonylurea and/or insulin application. HbA1c of 7 to 7.5% should be the goal of antidiabetic therapy, also for patients in advanced age. The main criterion for the choice of antidiabetics is the present insulin secretion capacity. Simple indicators in this respect are changes of body weight, plasma triglycerides and C-Peptide after i.v. glucagon stimulation. Application of insulin in combination with other antidiabetics or in the form of intensified insulin therapy should not be too much postponed.

  12. Characterization of hearing loss in aged type II diabetics

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    Frisina, Susan T.; Mapes, Frances; Kim, SungHee; Frisina, D. Robert; Frisina, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Presbycusis – age-related hearing loss – is the number one communicative disorder and a significant chronic medical condition of the aged. Little is known about how type II diabetes, another prevalent age-related medical condition, and presbycusis interact. The present investigation aimed to comprehensively characterize the nature of hearing impairment in aged type II diabetics. Hearing tests measuring both peripheral (cochlea) and central (brainstem and cortex) auditory processing were utilized. The majority of differences between the hearing abilities of the aged diabetics and their age-matched controls were found in measures of inner ear function. For example, large differences were found in pure-tone audiograms, wideband noise and speech reception thresholds, and otoacoustic emissions. The greatest deficits tended to be at low frequencies. In addition, there was a strong tendency for diabetes to affect the right ear more than the left. One possible interpretation is that as one develops presbycusis, the right ear advantage is lost, and this decline is accelerated by diabetes. In contrast, auditory processing tests that measure both peripheral and central processing showed fewer declines between the elderly diabetics and the control group. Consequences of elevated blood sugar levels as possible underlying physiological mechanisms for the hearing loss are discussed. PMID:16309862

  13. Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in type II diabetic patients in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in type II diabetic patients in a health facility in Karachi, Pakistan. ... Conclusion: DR is prevalent in the target population and, therefore, emphasis should be on the education of the local population of New Karachi Township on how to attain euglycemic state with regular medication, diet and ...

  14. Prevalence of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Type II Diabetes Mellitus

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    Huihui Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. Patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM were known to have higher prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in the Western countries, but data on the impact of GERD on DM patients in our country are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of GERD in type II DM patients in Shanghai, China, and to explore its possible risk factors. Methods. 775 type II DM cases were randomly collected. Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ was used to check the presence of GERD. Patients’ characteristics, laboratory data, face-to-face interview, nerve conduction study, and needle electromyogram (EMG test were analyzed. Results. 16% patients were found with typical GERD symptoms. Pathophysiological factors such as peripheral neuropathy, metabolism syndrome, and obesity were found to have no significant differences between GERD and non-GERD type II DM patients in the present study. Conclusion. The prevalence of GERD in type II DM patients is higher than that in adult inhabitants in Shanghai, China. No difference in pathophysiological factors, such as peripheral neuropathy, and metabolism syndrome was found in DM-GERD patients, suggesting that further study and efforts are needed to explore deeper the potential risk factors for the high prevalence rate of GERD in DM patients.

  15. Albuminuria and associated risk factors in type II diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, R.; Ahmed, T.A.; Mushtaq, S.; Zafar, L.; Attique, M.; Khalil-ur-Rehman

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of microalbuminuria (MA) and its associated medical risk factors in type II diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: Study population included 150 type II diabetic patients (70 women, 80 men) attending outpatient department of the hospital. Patients having clinical albuminuria and with other causes of proteinuria were excluded. Results: Women and men were of comparable ages. Women (26.4 kg/m/sup 2/) had higher body mass index (BMI) than men 24.3 kg/m/sup 2/). The frequency of MA was 46.7%, higher in males (50.6%) than females (41.5%). Fasting plasma glucose HbA/sub 1c/ levels were significantly higher in patients with MA compared to those with normo albuminuria (p < 0.001). The microalbuminuria patients had significantly decreased HDL-c levels compared to normoalbuminuric subjects (p< 0.001). However, no relation of MA with age, gender, known duration of diabetes, BMI, history of smoking, hypertension and serum: total cholesterol, LDL-c, triglyceride, urea and creatinine was found. Conclusion: There is a strong association of poor glycaemic control and decreased HDL-c levels with the presence of micro albuminuria. (author)

  16. Creatine Kinase Activity in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Type I and Type II

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    Adlija Jevrić-Čaušević

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus can be looked upon as an array of diseases, all of which exhibit common symptoms. While pathogenesis of IDDM (insulin dependant diabetes mellitus is well understood, the same is not true for diabetes mellitus type II. In the latter case, relative contribution of the two factors (insulin resistance or decreased insulin secretion varies individually, being highly increased in peripheral tissues and strictly dependant on insulin for glucose uptake. Moreover, in patients with diabetes mellitus type II, disbalance at the level of regulation of glucose metabolism as well as lipid metabolism has been noted in skeletal muscles. It is normal to assume that in this type of diabetes, these changes are reflected at the level of total activity of enzyme creatine kinase. This experimental work was performed on a group of 80 regular patients of Sarajevo General Hospital. Forty of those patients were classified as patients with diabetes type I and forty as patients with diabetes type II. Each group of patients was carefully chosen and constituted of equal number of males and females. The same was applied for adequate controls. Concentration of glucose was determined for each patient with GOD method, while activity of creatine kinase was determined with CK-NAC activated kit. Statistical analysis of the results was performed with SPSS software for Windows. Obtained results point out highly expressed differences in enzyme activity between two populations examined. Changes in enzyme activity are more expressed in patients with diabetes type II. Positive correlation between concentration of glucose and serum activity of the enzyme is seen in both categories of diabetic patients which is not the case for the patients in control group. At the same time, correlation between age and type of diabetes does exist . This is not followed at the level of enzyme activity or concentration of glucose.

  17. Frequency of chronic complications of type II diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basit, A.; Hydrie, M.Z.I.; Ahmedani, M.Y.; Masood, Q.; Hakeem, R.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess the frequency of chronic complications of type II diabetes in subjects attending a tertiary care Unit in Karachi, Pakistan. Subjects and Methods: Computerized clinical records of 2199 type II diabetic subjects were analyzed for this study. The clinical and laboratory variables were statistically evaluated with significance at p. Results: Means of glycosylated hemoglobin HbA1c, fasting and random plasma glucose levels, systolic blood pressure, triglycerides and high density lipoproteins (HDL) were higher than the risk indicator value for both genders (p<0.005). Mean body mass index and total blood cholesterol was higher for females only. Hyperglycemia was present in 88%, high HbA1c in 81%, low HDL in 81%, obesity in 66% and hypertriglyceridemia in 54%, neuropathy in 36% proteinuria in 28% and hypertension in 50% of the subjects. Frequency of obesity, low HDL and hypertension was higher among females (p<0.001 in each case). Retinopathy (p<0.05), nephropathy (p<0.005), neuropathy (p<0.005) and foot ulcers (p<0.001) were higher among males. Frequency of obesity was significantly higher among those with shorter duration and in younger group while frequency of other complications was higher among those with longer duration and in the older groups. Conclusion: Higher rates of complications were observed compared to previous studies. Certain variables showed significant association with gender and age as described above. (author)

  18. Role of autogenic relaxation in management of diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in type II diabetes mellitus patients

    OpenAIRE

    Manish K. Verma; D. A. Biswas; Shambhavi Tripathi; N. S. Verma

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a very common complication of Type II diabetes mellitus patients. Early detection and treatment of CAN is necessary for reduction of mortality and morbidity in type II diabetes patients. Methods: The study included 120 diagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus with autonomic neuropathy both male and female, with more than 5 years duration of disease. Age group of the study subjects was between 30 and ndash; 70 years. All the 120 diabet...

  19. Functional assessment of feet of patients with type II diabetes

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    Vinicius Saura Cardoso

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the incidence of functional changes and risk of developing ulcers in type II diabetic patients seen in Primary Healthcare Units (Unidades Básicas de Saúde- UBS. Methods: A cross-sectional, quantitative and descriptive study comprising 80patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM aged between 41 to 85 years and attended inthe UBS in the city of Parnaíba-PI. Volunteers responded to the identification form and theMichigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI, followed by an evaluation of the lowerlimbs, as follows: achilles and patellar reflex, palpation of arterial pulses (dorsalis pedis and posterior tibial, tactile sensitivity (Monofilament 10g and vibration sensitivity (128Hz tuning fork; identification of the presence of changes such as ingrown toenails, calluses,claw toes and hair loss. Finally, using the information acquired from the assessment, subjects were classified according to the risk of developing wounds. Results: The sample consisted of 76 diabetic patients, with average age of 63.8 ± 10.4 years, 63 (82.8% were female, mean diagnostic time 8.8 ± 7.2 years, average body mass index (BMI 28.2 ± 5.4 kg/m2, with 15.7% of the sample being smokers. The myotatic reflexes and arterial pulses were reduced. Tactile sensitivity was identified in 81.5% and 13.1% did not feel the vibration of the tuning fork. The most dominant changes identified were calluses, 76.3% (n = 58. Risk level 2 of developing ulcers stood out, 52.6% (n = 40. Conclusion: Functional changes were detected in the sample and a classification of risk 2 for developing wounds was found in more than 50% of the assessed patients. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5020/18061230.2013.p563

  20. Bauhinia variegata (Caesalpiniaceae) leaf extract: An effective treatment option in type I and type II diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Yogesh A; Garud, Mayuresh S

    2016-10-01

    Among various metabolic disorders, diabetes mellitus is one of the most common disorder. Present study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of aqueous extract of Bauhinia variegata leaves (AE) in animal models of type I and type II diabetes. Type I diabetes was induced by streptozotocin at the dose of 55mg/kg (i.p.) in male Sprague Dawley rats while type II diabetes was induced by high fat diet and streptozotocin at the dose of 35mg/kg (i.p.). Diabetic animals were treated with AE at the dose of 250, 500 and 1000mg/kg. Glipizide (5mg/kg) was used as standard treatment drug. Treatment was given for 28days. Parameters evaluated were body weight, plasma glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, total proteins, albumin, creatinine and bun urea nitrogen. In type II diabetes, high density lipoprotein levels in plasma and plasma insulin level were also evaluated. Histopathological study of pancreases were carried out in type I study. AE showed significant decrease in plasma glucose significantly. AE was also found to decrease cholesterol, triglyceride, creatinine and blood urea nitrogen level in both types of diabetes. AE did not show any significant effect on plasma levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase. AE was found to increase the albumin and total protein levels. Histopathological study showed that AE decreases the necrotic changes in the pancreatic tissue. Aqueous extract of B. variegata leaves was found effective in treatment of both type I and type II diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Balneotherapy and platelet glutathione metabolism in type II diabetic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Yabunaka, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Ichiro; Noro, Hiroshi; Agishi, Yuko

    1996-09-01

    Effects of balneotherapy on platelet glutathione metabolism were investigated in 12 type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients. Levels of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) on admission were well correlated with those of fasting plasma glucose (FPG; r=0.692, Pbalneotherapy, the mean level of GSH showed no changes; however, in well-controlled patients (FPG 150 mg/dl), the value decreased ( Pbalneotherapy, the activity increased in 5 patients, decreased in 3 patients and showed no changes (alteration within ±3%) in all the other patients. From these findings in diabetic patients we concluded: (1) platelet GSH synthesis appeared to be induced in response to oxidative stress; (2) lowered GPX activities indicated that the antioxidative defense system was impaired; and (3) platelet glutathione metabolism was partially improved by 4 weeks balneotherapy, an effect thought to be dependent on the control status of plasma glucose levels. It is suggested that balneotherapy is beneficial for patients whose platelet antioxidative defense system is damaged, such as those with diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease.

  2. Relationship of microalbuminuria with the diabetic foot ulcers in type II diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Romero, F; Rodríguez-Morán, M

    1998-01-01

    Microalbuminuria is a significant risk factor associated with nephropathy, retinopathy, and cardiovascular disease; however, there are no previous reports on the relationship of microalbuminuria with diabetic foot ulcers or stroke, despite the fact that microalbuminuria is a marker of vascular damage. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship of microalbuminuria with diabetic foot ulcers in type II diabetes patients. In this, cross-sectional clinical study, outpatients of the offices at first level medical care in Durango, Mexico, were included in one of two groups; (a) patients with diabetic foot ulcers and (b) control of group patients without diabetic foot ulcers. Diabetic foot diagnosis was established on the basis of clinical criteria and pletismography. Patients diagnosed with renal disease, urinary tract infection, acute febrile illness, or heart failure and those receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors were excluded from the study. Microalbuminuria was measured, on a 24-h urine collection, by precipitation with sulfasalicylic acid, and turbidity was determined by measuring absorbance with a spectrophotometer. The study included 670 diabetic patients. Using both odds ratio and logistic regression analyses, diabetes duration, cigarette smoking, aging, and microalbuminuria showed a strong relationship with diabetic foot ulcers. Microalbuminuria should be considered as an independent risk factor for diabetic foot ulcers.

  3. [Diabetic foot risk in patients with type II diabetes mellitus in a family medicine unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Godínez, S A; Zonana-Nacach, A; Anzaldo-Campos, M C; Muñoz-Martínez, J A

    2014-01-01

    To determine the risk of diabetic foot in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM) seen in a Family Medicine Unit. The study included type II DM patients with a disease duration ≥ 5 years seen in a Family Medicine Unit, Tijuana, Mexico, during September-December 2011. Neuropathy was assessed with the Diabetic Neuropathy Symptom questionnaire, and pressure sensation using a 10-g Semmes-Weinstein monofilament. A patient had a high risk of diabetic foot if there was sensitivity loss, foot deformities, and non-palpable pedal pulses. We studied 205 patients with an average (± SD) age and DM duration of 59 ± 10 years and 10.7 ± 6.7 years, respectively. Ninety one patients (44%) had a high risk of developing diabetic foot, and it was associated with; an education of less than 6 years (OR 2.3; 95%CI: 1-1-4.1), DM disease duration ≥ 10 years (OR 5.1; 95%CI: 2.8-9.4), female gender (OR 2.0; 95%CI: 1.1-3.6), monthly familiar income diabetic neuropathy, since they have a high risk of diabetic foot. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Renoprotective effects of angiotensin II receptor blockade in type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S; Tarnow, L; Rossing, P

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce angiotensin II formation and induce bradykinin accumulation. Animal studies suggest that bradykinin may play a role for the effects of ACE inhibition on blood pressure and kidney function. Therefore, we compared the renal and hem...... inhibition is primarily caused by interference in the renin-angiotensin system. Our study suggest that losartan represents a valuable new drug in the treatment of hypertension and proteinuria in type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy....... and hemodynamic effects of specific intervention in the renin-angiotensin system by blockade of the angiotensin II subtype-1 receptor to the effect of ACE inhibition. METHODS: A randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial was performed in 16 type 1 diabetic patients (10 men), age 42 +/- 2 years (mean +/- SEM...

  5. Ocular surface changes in type II diabetic patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy

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    Yan Gao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To detect and analyze the changes on ocular surface and tear function in type II diabetic patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR, an advanced stage of diabetic retinopathy (DR, using conventional ophthalmic tests and the high-resolution laser scanning confocal microscopy. METHODS: Fifty-eight patients with type II diabetes were selected. Based on the diagnostic criteria and stage classification of DR, the patients were divided into the non-DR (NDR group and the PDR group. Thirty-six patients with cataract but no other ocular and systemic disease were included as non-diabetic controls. All the patients were subjected to the conventional clinical tests of corneal sensitivity, Schirmer I Test, and corneal fluorescein staining. The non-invasive tear film break-up time (NIBUT and tear interferometry were conducted by a Tearscope Plus. The morphology of corneal epithelia and nerve fibers was examined using the high-resolution confocal microscopy. RESULTS: The NDR group exhibited significantly declined corneal sensitivity and Schirmer I test value, as compared to the non-diabetic controls (P< 0.001. The PDR group showed significantly reduced corneal sensitivity, Schirmer I test value, and NIBUT in comparison to the non-diabetic controls (P < 0.001. Corneal fluorescein staining revealed the progressively injured corneal epithelia in the PDR patients. Moreover, significant decrease in the corneal epithelial density and morphological abnormalities in the corneal epithelia and nerve fibers were also observed in the PDR patients. CONCLUSION: Ocular surface changes, including blunted corneal sensitivity, reduced tear secretion, tear film dysfunction, progressive loss of corneal epithelia and degeneration of nerve fibers, are common in type II diabetic patients, particularly in the diabetic patients with PDR. The corneal sensitivity, fluorescein staining scores, and the density of corneal epithelial cells and nerve fibers in the diabetic

  6. Ocular surface changes in type II diabetic patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan; Gao; Yan; Zhang; Yu-Sha; Ru; Xiao-Wu; Wang; Ji-Zhong; Yang; Chun-Hui; Li; Hong-Xing; Wang; Xiao-Rong; Li; Bing; Li

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To detect and analyze the changes on ocular surface and tear function in type II diabetic patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR), an advanced stage of diabetic retinopathy(DR), using conventional ophthalmic tests and the high-resolution laser scanning confocal microscopy.METHODS: Fifty-eight patients with type II diabetes were selected. Based on the diagnostic criteria and stage classification of DR, the patients were divided into the non-DR(NDR) group and the PDR group. Thirty-six patients with cataract but no other ocular and systemic disease were included as non-diabetic controls. All the patients were subjected to the conventional clinical tests of corneal sensitivity, Schirmer I test, and corneal fluorescein staining. The non-invasive tear film break-up time(NIBUT) and tear interferometry were conducted by a Tearscope Plus. The morphology of corneal epithelia and nerve fibers was examined using the high-resolution confocal microscopy.RESULTS: The NDR group exhibited significantly declined corneal sensitivity and Schirmer I test value, as compared to the non-diabetic controls(P <0.001). The PDR group showed significantly reduced corneal sensitivity, Schirmer I test value, and NIBUT in comparison to the non-diabetic controls(P <0.001).Corneal fluorescein staining revealed the progressively injured corneal epithelia in the PDR patients. Moreover,significant decrease in the corneal epithelial density andmorphological abnormalities in the corneal epithelia and nerve fibers were also observed in the PDR patients.CONCLUSION: Ocular surface changes, including blunted corneal sensitivity, reduced tear secretion, tear film dysfunction, progressive loss of corneal epithelia and degeneration of nerve fibers, are common in type II diabetic patients, particularly in the diabetic patients with PDR. The corneal sensitivity, fluorescein staining scores,and the density of corneal epithelial cells and nerve fibers in the diabetic patients correlate with the

  7. Corneal endothelial morphology and central thickness in patients with type II diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storr-Paulsen, Allan; Singh, Amardeep; Jeppesen, Helene

    2014-01-01

    size was based on a power calculation (power = 0.90; p = 0.05). The diabetic patients had on average more than four HbA1c tests performed (mean 4.1; range 2-14) with intervals of at least 3 months as a reflection of the long-term glycaemic status. The controls had no diabetes confirmed by two causal......PURPOSE: To investigate corneal endothelial cell density and morphology in type II diabetic and non-diabetic patients and to relate potential differences to the glycaemic status. METHODS: A prospective clinical study including 107 patients with type II diabetes and 128 non-diabetic patients. Sample...... blood tests. The endothelial cell density, the variation in endothelial cell size (CV), the percentage of hexagonal cells, and the central corneal thickness (CCT) were recorded. RESULTS: Type II diabetic subjects did not differ from the non-diabetic control subjects with regards to endothelial cell...

  8. Mapping the brain in type II diabetes: Voxel-based morphometry using DARTEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhiye; Li, Lin; Sun, Jie; Ma, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the pattern of brain volume changes of the brain in patients with type II diabetes mellitus using voxel-based morphometry. Material and methods: Institutional ethics approval and informed consent were obtained. VBM based on the high resolution three-dimensional T1-weighted fast spoiled gradient recalled echo MRI images was obtained from 16 type II diabetes patients (mean age 61.2 years) and 16 normal controls (mean age 59.6 years). All images were spatially preprocessed using Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration using Exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) algorithm, and the DARTEL templates were made from 100 normal subjects. Statistical parametric mapping was generated using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Results: An atrophy pattern of gray matter was seen in type II diabetes patients compared with controls that involved the right superior, middle, and inferior temporal gyri, right precentral gyrus, and left rolandic operculum region. The loss of white matter volume in type II diabetes mellitus was observed in right temporal lobe and left inferior frontal triangle region. ROI analysis revealed that the gray and white matter volume of right temporal lobe were significant lower in type II diabetes mellitus than that in controls (P < 0.05). Conclusion: This work demonstrated that type II diabetes mellitus patients mainly exhibited gray and white matter atrophy in right temporal lobe, and this finding supported that type II diabetes mellitus could lead to subtle diabetic brain structural changes in patients without dementia or macrovascular complications.

  9. Mapping the brain in type II diabetes: Voxel-based morphometry using DARTEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhiye [Department of Radiology, PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing 100853 (China); Li, Lin [Department of Geriatric Endocrinology, PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Sun, Jie [Department of Endocrinology, PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Ma, Lin, E-mail: cjr.malin@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing 100853 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To investigate the pattern of brain volume changes of the brain in patients with type II diabetes mellitus using voxel-based morphometry. Material and methods: Institutional ethics approval and informed consent were obtained. VBM based on the high resolution three-dimensional T1-weighted fast spoiled gradient recalled echo MRI images was obtained from 16 type II diabetes patients (mean age 61.2 years) and 16 normal controls (mean age 59.6 years). All images were spatially preprocessed using Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration using Exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) algorithm, and the DARTEL templates were made from 100 normal subjects. Statistical parametric mapping was generated using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Results: An atrophy pattern of gray matter was seen in type II diabetes patients compared with controls that involved the right superior, middle, and inferior temporal gyri, right precentral gyrus, and left rolandic operculum region. The loss of white matter volume in type II diabetes mellitus was observed in right temporal lobe and left inferior frontal triangle region. ROI analysis revealed that the gray and white matter volume of right temporal lobe were significant lower in type II diabetes mellitus than that in controls (P < 0.05). Conclusion: This work demonstrated that type II diabetes mellitus patients mainly exhibited gray and white matter atrophy in right temporal lobe, and this finding supported that type II diabetes mellitus could lead to subtle diabetic brain structural changes in patients without dementia or macrovascular complications.

  10. Type II diabetes mellitus and the incidence of epithelial ovarian cancer in the cancer prevention study-II nutrition cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gapstur, Susan M; Patel, Alpa V; Diver, W Ryan; Hildebrand, Janet S; Gaudet, Mia M; Jacobs, Eric J; Campbell, Peter T

    2012-11-01

    Despite consistent associations of type II diabetes mellitus with hormonally related cancers such as breast and endometrium, the relation between type II diabetes mellitus and ovarian cancer risk is unclear. Associations of type II diabetes mellitus status, duration, and insulin use with epithelial ovarian cancer overall, and with serous and nonserous histologic subtypes were examined in the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort, a prospective study of U.S. men and women predominantly aged 50 years and older. Between 1992 and 2007, 524 incident epithelial ovarian cancer cases were identified among 63,440 postmenopausal women. Multivariable-adjusted relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed using extended Cox regression to update diabetes status and bilateral oophorectomy status during follow-up. Type II diabetes mellitus status (RR = 1.05; 95% CI, 0.75-1.46) and duration were not associated with epithelial ovarian cancer risk. Although not statistically significantly different (P(difference) = 0.39), the RR was higher for type II diabetes mellitus with insulin use (RR = 1.28; 95% CI, 0.74-2.24) than for type II diabetes mellitus without insulin use (RR = 0.96; 95% CI, 0.64-1.43). Diabetes seemed to be more strongly associated with nonserous (RR = 1.41; 95% CI, 0.70-2.85) than serous (RR = 0.71; 95% CI, 0.41-1.23) histologic subtypes. Type II diabetes mellitus was not associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer, although higher risks with nonserous subtypes and among insulin users cannot be ruled out. Larger studies are needed to clarify associations of type II diabetes mellitus with or without insulin use with risk of ovarian cancer overall and by histologic subtypes. ©2012 AACR.

  11. Aspartame: should individuals with Type II Diabetes be taking it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Arbind Kumar

    2017-05-31

    Individuals with type II diabetes (T2D) have to manage blood glucose levels to sustain health and longevity. Artificial sweeteners (including aspartame) are suggested sugar alternatives for these individuals. The safety of aspartame in particular, has long been the centre of debate. Although it is such a controversial product, many clinicians recommend its use to T2D patients, during a controlled diet and as part of an intervention strategy. Aspartame is 200 times sweeter than sugar and has a negligible effect on blood glucose levels, and it is suggested for use so that T2D can control carbohydrate intake and blood glucose levels. However, research suggests that aspartame intake may lead to an increased risk of weight gain rather than weight loss, and cause impaired blood glucose tolerance in T2D. This review consolidates knowledge gained from studies that link aspartame consumption to the various mechanisms associated with T2D. We review literature that provides evidence that raise concerns that aspartame may exacerbate T2D and add to the global burden of disease. Aspartame may act as a chemical stressor by increasing cortisol levels, and may induce systemic oxidative stress by producing excess free radicals, and it may also alter gut microbial activity and interfere with the N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, resulting in insulin deficiency or resistance. Aspartame and its metabolites are safe for T2D is still debatable due to a lack of consistent data. More research is required that provides evidence and raise concerns that aspartame may exacerbate prevalence of pathological physiology in the already stressed physiology of T2D. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Lipid Droplet Formation and Type II Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xuebao; Zhang, Kezhong

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM), a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia, is caused by insufficient insulin production due to excessive loss of pancreatic β cells (type I diabetes) or impaired insulin signaling due to peripheral insulin resistance (type II diabetes). Pancreatic β cell is the only insulin-secreting cell type that has highly developed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to cope with high demands of insulin synthesis and secretion. Therefore, ER homeostasis is crucial to the proper fu...

  13. Type II diabetes and personality; a study to explore other psychosomatic aspects of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilinasab, Maryam; Ebrahimi, Mehdi; Mokarrar, Mohsen Heidari; Rahmati, Leila; Mahjouri, Mohammad Yoosef; Arzaghi, Seyed Masoud

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most common chronic diseases, diabetes and its control are affected by the patients' psychological and spiritual attributes. The present study investigates the relationship between glycemic control in patients with type II diabetes and personality traits, defense mechanisms and spirituality. The present cross-sectional study was conducted on 400 Iranian patients with type II diabetes, 64% were men. Participants completed the NEO Personality Inventory, the Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ) and the Spiritual Assessment Inventory (SAI) and then underwent a blood sampling for the assessment of HbA1C levels. Of the five personality traits, extraversion ( r =  -0.13 and P impression management had significant relationship with glycemic control ( r =  0.17 and P <  0.001). According to data, Extraversion and conscientiousness can help control blood sugar while anxiety and negative emotions have detrimental effects on glycemic control. As a result considering psychological counselling beside medical interventions can help to better treatment.

  14. Effects of low-dose rate irradiation on two types of type II diabetes model mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Takaji; Sakai, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    The effects of low-dose rate gamma-irradiation were investigated in two mouse strains - C57BL/KsJ-db/db (db mouse) and AKITA (AKITA mouse)-for type II diabetes mellitus. Both strains develop the developed type II diabetes by about 8 weeks of age due to dysfunction of the insulin/insulin receptor. The db Mouse' shows obese and exhibits hyperinsulinism, and the onset of Type II diabetes like resembles that for Westerners. On the other hand, the AKITA mouse has exhibits disordered insulin secretion, and the diabetes such as resembles that of Asians. Ten-week old female mice, in groups of 8 or 12, were irradiated at 0.65 mGy/hr in the low-dose rate irradiation facility in the Low Dose Radiation Research Center. The level of urine glucose was measured with test slips. The urine glucose levels of all of the mice were highly elevated the beginning of the irradiation. In the irradiated group of db mice, three mice showed decrease in glucose level compare to the level of non-irradiated diabetes mice after 35, 52 or 80 weeks of irradiation. All had maintained a normal level thereafter. No such improvement in diabetes was ever observed in the 12 mice of in the non-irradiated control group. The AKITA mice, however, did not decrease the glucose level regardless of the irradiation. Both the db mice and AKITA mice had their lives prolonged their life by the irradiation. The survival rate of db mice at the age of 90 weeks was 75% in the irradiated group, but 50% in the non-irradiated group. The average life span was 104 weeks in the irradiated group and 87 weeks in the control group. Furthermore, a marked difference was furthermore observed in the appearance of the coat hair, skin, and tail; appearances were well preserved in the irradiated group. The average life span in the irradiated AKITA mice was also longer than that for the non-irradiated mice, 51 weeks and 41 weeks in the irradiated and non-irradiated group respectively. These results suggest that the low-dose irradiation

  15. The imaging manifestations of caseous pulmonary tuberculosis with type-II diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyue Wang

    2015-11-01

    Conclusion: Type-II diabetic patients with caseous tuberculosis mainly showed consolidation and atypical lung field lesions on chest radiographs. Becoming familiar with these features will be helpful to imaging diagnosis of DMTB.

  16. Ceramide content is higher in type I compared to type II fibers in obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ditte Bech; Prats Gavalda, Clara; Larsen, Steen

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated fiber-type-specific muscle ceramide content in obese subjects and type 2 diabetes patients. Two substudies, one which compared type 2 diabetes patients to both lean- and obese BMI-matched subjects and the other study which compared lean body-matched post-obese, obese......, and control subjects, were performed. A fasting blood sample was obtained and plasma insulin and glucose determined. A muscle biopsy was obtained from deltoideus and vastus lateralis, and fiber-type ceramide content was determined by fluorescence immunohistochemistry. Insulin sensitivity estimated by Quicki...... index was higher in lean compared to type 2 diabetes patients and obese controls. Also in control and post-obese subjects, a higher insulin sensitivity was observed compared to obese subjects. Ceramide content was consistently higher in type I than in type II muscle fibers and higher in deltoideus than...

  17. [Family physician attitudes towards insulinization in type II diabetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Rodríguez, M I; Sánchez-Morales, M C; Aceña-Gutiérrez, M T; Carrasco-Flores, J; Villarín-Castro, A

    2014-04-01

    To determine the attitudes of Toledo Health Area family physicians about starting insulinization in type 2 diabetic patients. Descriptive, cross-sectional study. A self-completed questionnaire was given to 353 family physicians of the Toledo Health Area, asking about socio-demographic and occupational data, and including the Spanish version of the Diabetes Attitude Scale (DAS-3sp) questionnaire to evaluate attitudes and motivations related to diabetes. A total of 66 responses were received, of which 50.8% were from females. Mean age (±standard deviation) was 49.97±7.40. Results of the different DAS-3sp subscales (values from 1 to 5) were: S1 (need for special training): 4.52±0.38; S2 (seriousness of type2 diabetes): 4.18±0.42; S3 (value of tight control): 4.15±0.39; S4 (psychosocial impact of diabetes): 3.79±0.48; and S5 (need for patient autonomy): 3.72±0.55. No statistically significant differences were obtained with the four first subscales with sex, specialized training, being a resident tutor, type of contract or clinical setting. There were statistically significant differences in S5 compared with sex (3.90±0,60 in men vs 3.54±0.45 in women; t=2.701; P=.009) and with being a resident tutor (3.99±0.58 vs 3.64±0.52 in non-tutors; t=2.188; P=.033). The attitudes regarding starting insulin treatment in type2 diabetic patients are positives among Toledo Health Area family physicians, specially in the clinical aspects, but they are lower in the psychosocial impact and patient autonomy. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevalence of type-II diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy: the gaddap study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahar, P.S.; Awan, Z.; Manzar, N.; Memon, S.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the frequency of type-II Diabetes mellitus (DM) in the endogenous population of Gaddap town and also to evaluate the status of Diabetic retinopathy (DR) in this group. This community based study of subjects of either gender was carried out in the Gaddap town. Three primary eye care centres were established in the existing primary health care (PHC) facilities, to screen the target Population aged 30 years and above, and who met other inclusion criteria for DM and DR respectively. Patients requiring intervention were managed accordingly. Data was entered and analyzed using Microsoft Visual Basic 6 and Microsoft Access. Out of the cohort of 19211 subjects, 1677 patients were found Diabetic, giving the prevalence of DM in Gaddap town at 8.73%, with 1258 (6.55%) known and 419 (2.18%) newly diagnosed cases. DR was seen in 460 (27.43%) of the Diabetic cases with 126 (7.51%) patients requiring urgent intervention for vision threatening complications. The result validates the importance of early screening of DR in people suffering from DM for possible management and prevention of sight threatening complications in the early stage of the disease and advocates the inclusion of primary eye care as a part of PHC system. (author)

  19. Gestational Age, Infant Birth Weight, and Subsequent Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Mothers: Nurses' Health Study II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Subsequent Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Mothers: Nurses’ Health Study II Navigate This Article Abstract Introduction ... Table 1. Pregnancy Complications and Diabetes Risk Factors, Nurses’ Health Study II, 1989–2005 Characteristic All Births ...

  20. ROLE OF DPP-IV INHIBITORS IN TREATMENT OF TYPE II DIABETES

    OpenAIRE

    Patel Kishan D; Patel Grishma M.

    2010-01-01

    Emerging as an epidemic of the 21st century type II diabetes has become a major health problem throughout the globe. Known treatments of type II diabetes mellitus have limitations such as weight gain and hypoglycaemias. A new perspective is the use of incretin hormones and incretin enhancers. Incretin mimetics are a new class of pharmacological agents with multiple antihyperglycemic actions that mimic the actions of incretin hormones such as glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1. DPP-4, a protease th...

  1. Hypoadiponectinemia in obese subjects with type II diabetes: A close association with central obesity indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorban Mohammadzadeh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adiponectin is an adipocyte secreted protein with important biological functions Hypoadiponectinemia is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and type II diabetes This study aimed to evaluate serum adiponectin level in obese subjects with type II diabetes and its correlation with metabolic parameters Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 40 obese subjects with type II diabetes and 40 non-diabetic obese control subjects Fasting lipid profile was measured by the enzymatic methods The NycoCard HbA1c protocol was used to measure HbAlc The Serum adiponectin, insulin and glucose levels were measured using an enzyme immunoassay and glucose oxidase methods respectively Results: Type II diabetes was associated with hypoadiponectinemia, in both men and women Serum adiponectin level in non-diabetic subjects (6.44 ± 2.47 μg/ml was significantly higher than diabetics (4.55 ± 1.88 μg/ml Furthermore, serum adiponectin concentration in females was significantly higher than males in non-diabetics (7.18 ± 2.68 vs 5.61 ± 0.57 and diabetic groups (5.18 ± 2.08 vs 3.99 ± 1.5 There was a negative and significant correlation between serum adiponectin level with waist (r = -0.451, p = 0.003, waist to hip ratio (r = -0.404, p = 0.01 and BMI (r = - 0.322, p = 0.042 and a positive correlation with HDL (r = 0.337, p = 0.034 in non-diabetic group In diabetic group, there was only found a negative correlation between adiponectin and waist size (r = -0.317, p = 0.046 Conclusions: Obesity and type II diabetes are associated with low serum adiponectin concentration

  2. Angiotensin-II type 1 receptor gene polymorphism and diabetic microangiopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, L; Cambien, Francois; Rossing, P

    1996-01-01

    with proliferative retinopathy and without diabetic retinopathy was found either: 77 (50%) / 66 (42%) / 13 (8%) vs. 42 (63%) / 22 (33%) / 3 (4%) had AA/AC/CC genotypes, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The A1166-->C polymorphism in the angiotensin-II type 1 receptor gene does not contribute to the genetic susceptibility...... is present particularly in vascular smooth muscle cells, myocardium and the kidney. A transversion of adenine to cytosine at nucleotide position 1166 in the gene coding for the angiotensin-II type 1 receptor has been associated with hypertension in the non-diabetic population. METHODS: We studied...... the relationship between the A1166-->C polymorphism in the angiotensin-II type 1 receptor gene in patients with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and diabetic nephropathy (121 men, 77 women, age 41 +/- 10 years, diabetes duration 27 +/- 8 years) and in IDDM patients with normoalbuminuria (116 men, 74...

  3. The burden of suicidal ideation among persons with type II diabetes: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabb, Karen M; Perez-Flores, Nancy; Wang, Yang; Huang, Hsiang

    2017-12-01

    Diabetes is a major global health concern. People with diabetes have worse mental health outcomes than those without diabetes. Researchers have recently sought to examine the relationship between diabetes and suicidal ideation. The aim of this study is to determine the burden of suicidal ideation among adults with type II diabetes from existing literature. We conducted a scoping review of published literature in PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Google Scholar published before March 2017. To identify relevant literature, search terms included suicidal ideation and type II diabetes. The search was limited to English language peer-reviewed journal articles. The main outcome of interest was suicidal ideation captured on a validated scale in a population with type II diabetes. This review resulted in 10 relevant studies, which reported the prevalence of suicidal ideation ranging from 2.5-51.4% with a median prevalence of 18.6% among adults with diabetes. Across the five studies reporting the associated risks, all but one study found a significant risk for persons with diabetes to endorse suicidal ideation and only three studies adjusted for depression. This review demonstrates the need for future studies to investigate potential mechanistic pathways of suicidality among persons with diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Risk factors for periodontal diseases among Yemeni type II diabetic patients. A case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas Shamala

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic periodontal diseases are one of diabetes mellitus complications. The present study aims to compare the periodontal status of type II diabetic patients to a control group and assess the role of risk factors in both groups. Materials and methods: A case-control study was conducted of 270 individuals (132 type II diabetics and 138 non-diabetics. Full mouth periodontal examination including plaque index, gingival bleeding, gingival recession, clinical attachment loss (CAL, tooth mobility, furcation involvement and the number of missing teeth. The case group was subdivided according to glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c status (poorly controlled HbA1c >8 and well controlled HbA1c≤8 Likewise, the duration of diabetes mellitus as short or long duration (DM≤10 or >10. The diabetic group was also subdivided according to smoking and Khat chewing habits. Result: The severity of periodontal disease among type II diabetic patients were significantly higher compared to the control group regarding the plaque index 2.6 (1.6-4.3, bleeding on probing 3.5 (2.3-13.0, gingival recession 2.0 (1.2-3.4, furcation involvement 4.0 (2.3-6.7, clinical attachment loss 5.7 (3.1-10.5, tooth mobility 2.0 (1.2-3.4, and number of missing teeth 4.4 (2.3-8.5. In addition, poorly controlled type II DM and long duration had higher CAL and number of missing teeth than well-controlled DM and short duration. No significant differences were found between smokers/nonsmokers and Khat chewers/non-chewers among the diabetic group. Conclusion: Type II diabetic patients have severe periodontal destruction and tooth loss compared to non-diabetic people and there were no differences within the diabetic group in regards to smoking and Khat chewing habits.

  5. Risk Factors Accompanied with Nephropathy in Patients with Type II Diabetes; Test of the Biopsychosocial Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Rahimian Boogar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The study of biopsychosocial factors influencing nephropathy as a most serious complication of type II diabetes is important. This study aimed to investigate risk factors accompanied with nephropathy in patients with type II diabetes based on the biopsychosocial model. Materials & Methods: In a cross-sectional descriptive study, 295 patients with type II diabetes were selected by convenience sampling in Tehran Shariati hospital outpatient clinics. The data were collected by demographical information questionnaire along with disease characteristics and depression anxiety stress scales (dass, quality of life scale (who- qol- bref, diabetes self-management scale (dsms, and diabetes knowledge scale (dks, then analyzed by chi-square, independent t-test and logistic regression with pasw software. Results: Hypertension (OR=3.841 & P0.05.Conclusion: It is important to pay attention to hypertension, glycated hemoglobin, body mass index, diabetes self-management, depression, quality of life, and diabetes knowledge for therapeutic intervention programming and diabetes complications control protocols for diabetic patients.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;19(2:44-53

  6. An investigation into the effect of type I and type II diabetes duration on employment and wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Travis

    2013-12-01

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, the current study examines the effect of type I and type II diabetes on employment status and wages. The results suggest that both the probability of employment and wages are negatively related to the number of years since the initial diagnosis of diabetes. Moreover, the effect of diabetes duration on the probability of employment appears to be nonlinear, peaking around 16 years for females and 10 years for males. A similar negative effect on wages is found only in male diabetics. Finally, the results suggest that failure to distinguish between type I and type II diabetics may lead to some counterintuitive results. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Salivary flow rate and xerostomia in patients with type I and II diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseini, Amineh; Mirzapour, Ali; Bijani, Ali; Shirzad, Atena

    2017-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most prevalent metabolic diseases, with complications such as decreased salivary flow rate and xerostomia. This study aimed to determine the salivary flow rate and xerostomia in type I and II diabetic patients in comparison with healthy controls. This case-control study was performed on diabetic patients of a private office in Babol, Iran, between May 2015 and October 2016. This study involved two study groups (type I and II diabetes, with 40 in each group) and two control groups (control I and II, with 35 in each group) which were age- and sex-matched with the related study groups. They were all selected through simple sampling. Unstimulated whole saliva was collected through Navazesh method and the salivary flow rate was measured (ml/min). Xerostomia was evaluated via Fox's test. Moreover, the patients' data were recorded including age, sex, disease duration, type of diabetes, fasting blood glucose (FBG) and HbA1C. The obtained data were statistically analyzed by using SPSS version 17. Independent-samples t-test, Chi-square, Pearson correlation and multiple comparison post-hoc tests were employed as appropriated. psalivary flow rate in type I diabetics (0.35±0.11 ml/min) was lower than that in control I (0.50±0.07 ml/min) (p=0.01). The same difference was observed between type II diabetics (0.37±0.13 ml/min) and control II groups (0.47±0.11 ml/min) (p=0.01). No significant difference was observed in the salivary flow rate between type I and II diabetics (p=0.345). Furthermore, xerostomia was higher in type I (2.70±2.50, 1.17±1.60) and II (2.65±2.20-1.62±1.50) diabetics compared with the related control groups (p=0.01), (p=0.02). Type I, II diabetic patients revealed lower salivary flow rate and higher xerostomia compared with healthy controls. The salivary flow rate and xerostomia had inverse correlation.

  8. STUDY ON KAP OF OCULAR COMPLICATIONS DUE TO DIABETES AMONG TYPE II DIABETICS VISITING A TERTIARY TEACHING HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Koshy

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is a major public health problem worldwide. Diabetic patients are at risk of developing blindness from diabetic retinopathy. While occurrence of diabetic retinopathy cannot be prevented, its complications can be minimized. This requires awareness of the sight-threatening potential of diabetes and the need for regular eye examinations. Aim: To study the knowledge of ocular complications of diabetes, among type II diabetics visiting a tertiary level hospital. Settings and Design: This was a prospective study in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Methods and Material: This was a questionnaire based study on 350 type II diabetics. All patients were interviewed by the same investigator. Statistical analysis used: The data was analysed using chi square test. Results: With increase in the duration of illness, the awareness about diabetic retinopathy is more. Even though the awareness of the disease increased with increasing duration of the disease, 51.4% of the diabetics did not know how diabetes can affect the eye, 49.7% of diabetics did not know if diabetic retinopathy can be treated and 67.4% had not heard of any treatment modality for diabetic retinopathy. This shows that lack of knowledge about the disease was significant. Conclusions: Prevention of non-communicable disease through increased awareness needs to be the thrust of the effort in resource poor contexts, where the treatment can be prohibitively costly. These measures would help to bring about more awareness and understanding about the disease among the patients and therefore prevent sight-threatening complications by timely intervention and management.

  9. The drama of the continuous increase in end-stage renal failure in patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychlík, I; Miltenberger-Miltenyi, G; Ritz, E

    1998-01-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus has become the leading cause of end-stage renal failure in many countries of Western Europe. In all European countries, even in those with a relatively low prevalence of diabetic nephropathy, the number of patients with type II diabetes mellitus admitted for renal replacement therapy has recently increased continuously. Survival and medical rehabilitation of patients with type II diabetes on renal replacement therapy is significantly worse than in non-diabetic patients. It is obvious that in order to stem the tide, intense efforts are necessary (i) to inform the medical community about the renal risk of type II diabetes and the striking effectiveness of preventive measures, (ii) to provide better care for diabetic patients, and (iii) to reduce the high prevalence of diabetes in the population by modification of the Western life style.

  10. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Lipid Droplet Formation and Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuebao Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM, a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia, is caused by insufficient insulin production due to excessive loss of pancreatic β cells (type I diabetes or impaired insulin signaling due to peripheral insulin resistance (type II diabetes. Pancreatic β cell is the only insulin-secreting cell type that has highly developed endoplasmic reticulum (ER to cope with high demands of insulin synthesis and secretion. Therefore, ER homeostasis is crucial to the proper function of insulin signaling. Accumulating evidence suggests that deleterious ER stress and excessive intracellular lipids in nonadipose tissues, such as myocyte, cardiomyocyte, and hepatocyte, cause pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and peripheral insulin resistance, leading to type II diabetes. The excessive deposition of lipid droplets (LDs in specialized cell types, such as adipocytes, hepatocytes, and macrophages, has been found as a hallmark in ER stress-associated metabolic diseases, including obesity, diabetes, fatty liver disease, and atherosclerosis. However, much work remains to be done in understanding the mechanism by which ER stress response regulates LD formation and the pathophysiologic role of ER stress-associated LD in metabolic disease. This paper briefly summarizes the recent advances in ER stress-associated LD formation and its involvement in type II diabetes.

  11. Cardiovascular risk markers in type II diabetes and hypertension at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sly

    medical care at the Battor Catholic Hospital in the Volta Region. ... CVD tends to affect people in their prime working years, thus the condition has socio- ... matched healthy individuals in the study area without a history of diabetes, hypertension or any ... activity and family history of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Insulin gene polymorphisms in type 1 diabetes, Addison's disease and the polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahner Stefanie

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphisms within the insulin gene can influence insulin expression in the pancreas and especially in the thymus, where self-antigens are processed, shaping the T cell repertoire into selftolerance, a process that protects from β-cell autoimmunity. Methods We investigated the role of the -2221Msp(C/T and -23HphI(A/T polymorphisms within the insulin gene in patients with a monoglandular autoimmune endocrine disease [patients with isolated type 1 diabetes (T1D, n = 317, Addison's disease (AD, n = 107 or Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, n = 61], those with a polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II (combination of T1D and/or AD with HT or GD, n = 62 as well as in healthy controls (HC, n = 275. Results T1D patients carried significantly more often the homozygous genotype "CC" -2221Msp(C/T and "AA" -23HphI(A/T polymorphisms than the HC (78.5% vs. 66.2%, p = 0.0027 and 75.4% vs. 52.4%, p = 3.7 × 10-8, respectively. The distribution of insulin gene polymorphisms did not show significant differences between patients with AD, HT, or APS-II and HC. Conclusion We demonstrate that the allele "C" of the -2221Msp(C/T and "A" -23HphI(A/T insulin gene polymorphisms confer susceptibility to T1D but not to isolated AD, HT or as a part of the APS-II.

  13. Comparison of Diabetes Type II Patients Life Style Effective Factors With That of Healthy People.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Mostafaei

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Diabetes is a significant and expensive health problem which had influenced all the ages in almost all the countries. Increasing prevalence of this disease has been caused by continued changes in lifestyle such as unsuitable nutrition, lack of physical activities and fatness which is often related to modern city life, mechanization and industrialization. It is an expensive disease, both for patients and the health and hygienic care systems. This research tried to examine the relationship between lifestyle risk factors and type II diabetes. Methods: This research was a case-control type by random sampling and studying140 diabetes type II patients as case group and 140 healthy people accompanying some other patients as the control group at Tonekabon Shahid Rajaei hospital. People were of both sexes, between 30 and 64 years of age and Tonekabon residents. The questionnaire used included demographic, nutritional, physical activities, stress tolerance and smoking status information. The SPSS 11.5 and excel software were used for statistic calculation and for analysis of data, T and Chi-Square tests were applied. Results: By analyzing the data collected, there was a meaningful statistical relationship between physical activities, stress residence, nutrition, smoking and the diabetes type II disease (P-value0.05. Conclusion: Results imply that some risk factors important in diabetes type II include unsuitable nutrition such as having too much of sweets and sugar,lack of fruits, vegetables, fish, proteins and also lack of physical activities, stress tolerance and control.

  14. Analysis of serum from type II diabetes mellitus and diabetic complication using surface-enhanced Raman spectra (SERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, H. W.; Yan, X. L.; Dong, R. X.; Ban, G.; Li, K.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we show surface-enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) of serums from type II diabetes mellitus and diabetic complication (coronary disease, glaucoma and cerebral infarction), and analyze the SERS through the multivariate statistical methods of principal component analysis (PCA). In particular, we find that there exist many adenines in these serums, which maybe come from DNA (RNA) damage. The relative intensity of the band at 725±2 cm-1 assigned to adenine is higher for patients than for the healthy volunteers; therefore, it can be used as an important ‘fingerprint’ in order to diagnose these diseases. It is also shown that serums from type II diabetes mellitus group, diabetic complication group and healthy volunteers group can be discriminated by PCA.

  15. Effects of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker on bones in mice with type 1 diabetes induced by streptozotocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Diao, Teng-Yue; Gu, Sa-Sa; Wu, Shu-Yan; Gebru, Yoseph A; Chen, Xi; Wang, Jing-Yu; Ran, Shu; Wong, Man-Sau

    2014-09-01

    This study was performed to address the pathological roles of the skeletal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in type 1 diabetes-induced osteoporosis and the effects of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker losartan on bones in diabetic mice. Bone histomorphology was detected by H&E staining, Safranin O staining and X-ray radiography. Micro-CT was performed for the analysis of bone parameters. Gene and protein expression were determined by RT-PCR and immunoblotting. Type 1 diabetic mice displayed osteopenia phenotype, and losartan treatment had no osteoprotective effects on diabetic mice as shown by the reduction of bone mineral density and microarchitectural parameters at the proximal metaphysis of the tibia. The mRNA expression of AGT, renin receptor and ACE, and protein expression of renin and AT1R were markedly up-regulated in the bones of vehicle-treated diabetic mice compared to those of non-diabetic mice. The treatment with losartan further significantly increased the expression of AGT, renin, angiotensin II and AT1R, and reduced the expression of AT2R receptor as compared to those of diabetic mice. Local bone RAS functionally played a role in the development of type 1 diabetic osteoporosis, and losartan had no bone-sparing function in diabetes mice because of enhance skeletal RAS activity. © The Author(s) 2013.

  16. Psycho-neuro-endocrine-immune mechanisms of action of yoga in type II diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijay Pratap; Khandelwal, Bidita; Sherpa, Namgyal T

    2015-01-01

    Yoga has been found to benefit all the components of health viz. physical, mental, social and spiritual well being by incorporating a wide variety of practices. Pathophysiology of Type II DM and co-morbidities in Type II DM has been correlated with stress mechanisms. Stress suppresses body's immune system and neuro-humoral actions thereby aff ecting normal psychological state. It would not be wrong to state that correlation of diabetes with stress, anxiety and other psychological factors are bidirectional and lead to difficulty in understanding the interrelated mechanisms. Type II DM cannot be understood in isolation with psychological factors such as stress, anxiety and depression, neuro-endocrine and immunological factors. There is no review which tries to understand these mechanisms exclusively. The present literature review aims to understand interrelated Psycho-Neuro-Endocrine and Immunological mechanisms of action of Yoga in Type II Diabetes Mellitus. Published literature concerning mechanisms of action of Yoga in Type II DM emphasizing psycho-neuro-endocrine or immunological relations was retrieved from Pubmed using key words yoga, Type II diabetes mellitus, psychological, neural, endocrine, immune and mechanism of action. Those studies which explained the psycho-neuroendocrine and immune mechanisms of action of yoga were included and rest were excluded. Although primary aim of this study is to explain these mechanisms in Type II DM, some studies in non-diabetic population which had a similar pathway of stress mechanism was included because many insightful studies were available in that area. Search was conducted using terms yoga OR yogic AND diabetes OR diabetic IN title OR abstract for English articles. Of the 89 articles, we excluded non-English articles (22), editorials (20) and letters to editor (10). 37 studies were considered for this review. The postulated mechanism of action of yoga is through parasympathetic activation and the associated anti

  17. Clinical impact of the temporal relationship between depression and type 2 diabetes: the Fremantle diabetes study phase II.

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    David G Bruce

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The clinical features of type 2 diabetes may differ depending on whether first depression episode precedes or follows the diagnosis of diabetes. METHODS: Type 2 patients from the observational community-based Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase II underwent assessment of lifetime depression using the Brief Lifetime Depression Scale (developed and validated for this study supplemented by information on current depression symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire, 9-item version and use of antidepressants. Patients were categorized as never depressed (Group 1, having had depression before diabetes diagnosis (Group 2, diagnosed with depression and diabetes within 2 years of each other (Group 3 and having depression after diabetes diagnosis (Group 4. RESULTS: Of 1391 patients, 20.8% were assigned to Group 2, 6.0% to Group 3 and 14.5% to Group 4. In Group 2, depression occurred a median 15.6 years before diabetes onset at age 37.2±14.7 years. These patients had similar clinical characteristics to never depressed patients except for reduced self-care behaviours and having more symptomatic peripheral arterial disease. In Group 4, depression occurred a median 9.9 years after diabetes onset at age 59.8±13.0 years. These patients had long duration diabetes, poor glycaemic control, more intensive management and more diabetic complications. Group 4 patients had more current depression than Group 2 but were less likely to be receiving antidepressants. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The clinical features of depression and type 2 diabetes are heterogeneous depending on their temporal relationship. There may be corresponding differences in the pathogenesis of depression in diabetes that have implications for diagnosis and management.

  18. The Relationship Between Self-Efficacy and Sexual Function in Patients with Type II Diabetes

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    Samira Haddadi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes is a common chronic disease that is increasingly observed in almost all countries of the world. The treatment and prevention of diabetes largely depend on patients’ self-efficacy in performing self-care behaviors. Accordingly, the present study was conducted to examine the relationship between self-efficacy and sexual performance in patients with type II diabetes. Methods: In the present correlational study, 200 patients with type II diabetes (based on physicians’ diagnosis participated. Using convenience sampling method, the samples were selected out of the whole population of diabetic patients who referred to Shahid Bahonar and Rajaei Hospitals in the city of Karaj (Iran. The data were collected through a multi-faceted questionnaire covering demographic characteristics of the participants, the Diabetes Management Self-Efficacy Scale (DMSES, the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI and the Male Sexual Function Index (MSFI. Then, the collected data were analyzed through Pearson correlation test, multiple linear regression analysis, independent t-test and ANOVA. Results: The results showed a positive significant relationship between self-efficacy and sexual function (p<0.001; regression coefficient of the predictor variable ‘self-efficacy’ was 0.217 (p<0.017. Conclusion:  Self-efficacy plays an important role in the lives of diabetic patients; it is also important in sexual performance of diabetic patients. Therefore, based on the results of this study, the significant relationship between self-efficacy and sexual function must be considered in the treatment of patients with type II diabetes.

  19. Molecular genetic analysis of Type II diabetes associated m.3243A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Saidul Abrar

    Background: Type II diabetes is the most often considered as maternally inherited disease and A>G tran- sition at position 3243 ... atic B-cells are key player in maintaining normal glucose homeostasis by secretion of insulin. There are number ...

  20. INFLUENCE OF TYPE II DIABETES AND OBESITY ON THE DISPOSITION AND ELIMINATION OF TCDD IN MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    INFLUENCE OF TYPE II DIABETES AND OBESITY ON THE DISPOSTION AND ELIMINATION OF TCDD IN MICE. MJ DeVito', JJ Diliberto', DG Ross', C Emond2, VM Richardson', and LS Birnbaum', 'ETD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, 27711, USA, 2National Research Council.One possible explanation fo...

  1. Effects of traditional Chinese medicine on rats with Type II diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of traditional Chinese medicine on rats with Type II diabetes induced by high-fat diet and streptozotocin: A urine metabonomic study. H Zhao, Z Li, G Tian, K Gao, Li Zhiyong, B Zhao, J Wang, L Luo, Q Pan, W Zhang, Z Wu, J Chen, W Wang ...

  2. Priapism in type II Diabetes Mellitus: A case report | Muthuuri | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Priapism in type II diabetes mellitus is an uncommon event. A case of this condition in an adult male is presented. More common precipitating factors such as use of medications like sildenafil or use of an intracarvenosal vasodilator was absent, although diagnostic investigations postulated the cause as thrombotic factors in ...

  3. Long term low dose rate irradiation causes recovery from type II diabetes and suppression of aging in type II diabetes-prone mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namura, T.; Oda, T.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of low dose rate gamma irradiation on model C57BL/KsJ-db/db mice with Type II diabetes mellitus was investigated. These mice develop Type II diabetes by 10 weeks of age, due to obesity, and are characterized by hyperinsulinemia. A group of 12 female 10-week old mice were irradiated at 0.65 mGy/hr in the low dose rate irradiation facility in the Low Dose Radiation Research Center. The urine glucose levels of all of the mice were strongly positive at the beginning of the irradiation. In the irradiated group, a decrease in the glucose level was observed in three mice, one in the 35th week, another in the 52nd week and the third in the 80th week. No recovery from the diabetes was observed in the 12 mice of non-irradiated control group. There was no systematic change of body weight or consumption of food and drinking water between the irradiated group and the non-irradiated group or between the recovered mice and the non-recovered mice. Survival was better in the irradiated group. The surviving fraction at the age of 90 weeks was 75 % in the irradiated group but only 40 % in the non-irradiated. A marked difference was also observed in the appearance of the coat hair, skin and tail. The irradiated group was in much better condition. Mortality was delayed and the healthy appearance was prolonged in the irradiated mice by about 20-30 weeks compared with the control mice. These results suggest that the low dose irradiation modified the condition of the diabetic mice, leading not only to recovery from diabetes, but also to suppression of the aging process

  4. Health as Submission and Social Responsibilities: Embodied Experiences of Javanese Women With Type II Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitaloka, Dyah; Hsieh, Elaine

    2015-08-01

    By examining women's experiences with type II diabetes, we explore how illness can provide resources to construct meanings of everyday life in Javanese culture. We conducted in-depth interviews with 30 female participants in Central Java, Indonesia, and adopted grounded theory for data analysis. We identified four themes that diabetes serves as resources for women in Indonesia to (a) normalize suffering, (b) resist social control, (c) accept fate, and (d) validate faith. We concluded by noting three unique aspects of Javanese women's illness management. First, through the performance of submission, our participants demonstrated spirituality and religiosity as essential elements of health. Second, diabetes empowers individuals in everyday suffering through two divergent processes: embracing submission and resisting control. Finally, diabetes provides opportunities for individuals within a social network to (re)negotiate social responsibilities. In summary, diabetes provides unique resources to empower our participants to obtain voices that they otherwise would not have had. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. The application and evaluation of insulin release test and quantitative parameter in diabetic type II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Chenggang; Chen Xiaoyan; Guan Xiaofeng

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the curve of Insulin Release Test (IRT) about the patients whit type II diabetes, to evaluate β-cell function and the sensitivity of body to Insulin using Insulin Release Index (IRI) and Insulin Sensitivity Index (ISI), and to probe the value for clinical therapy. Methods: 1) Have a IRT of 396 cases with type II diabetes and 17 normal bodies and acquire the IRT curve, 2) Design the count methods about IRI and ISI, IRI = Ins max/Ins FBI x Δ Ins max/T max (minute), ISI=(Ins max-Ins FBI)/(Ins 180'-Ins FBI), 3) Compare IRI Changes of before and after treatment for 12 cases with no insulin release and 9 cases with less insulin release. Results: IRT curve type (No release type 21.0%, less release type 33.3%, peak delay type 36.9%, high insulin type 6.0%, release delay type 2.8%); respective IRI, ISI compared to normal, P<0.01; IRI of before and after treatment with insulin P<0.01. Conclusions: IRT Curve combining IRI and ISI can reflect accurately β-cell function with type II diabetes and the sensitivity of body to insulin, Also it has some reference value for clinical therapy

  6. Periodontal status among type II diabetic and nondiabetic individuals in Chennai, India: A comparative study

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    R Kesavan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Periodontitis is referred to as the sixth complication of diabetes mellitus. If left untreated, periodontitis can lead to tooth loss, thereby compromising a patient's ability to maintain a proper diet and affecting the quality of life. Aim: To assess the periodontal status among type II diabetic and nondiabetic individuals in Chennai city. Materials and Methods: A hospital based cross-sectional comparative study was conducted among diabetics and nondiabetic population attending a government hospital in Chennai city. The WHO Oral Health Assessment Form (1997 was used to assess the periodontal status. The final sample size of the study was 1000 which included 500 diabetics and 500 nondiabetics. Results: This study showed a significant association between the diabetic status and periodontal disease. The severity of periodontal disease was high among diabetics when compared to nondiabetics. The mean number of sextants with shallow pockets was 0.76 ± 1.20 among diabetics and 0.49 ± 0.86 among nondiabetics (P < 0.0001. The mean number of sextants with Loss of Attachment score of 1 (4–5 mm was 0.67 ± 1.05 among diabetics and 0.32 ± 0.70 among nondiabetics. Conclusion: Periodontal disease was more frequent and severe in diabetic patients as compared to nondiabetics although there are a number of questions need to be answered in future research.

  7. Physical activity in type II Diabetes Mellitus, an effective therapeutic element: review of the clinical impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Iván Arias-Vázquez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A review was conducted in databases (PubMed, PEDro of type studies clinical trial, cohort study, systematic reviews, meta-analysis and clinical practice guidelines based on evidence they have studied the benefits of physical activity in the prevention , treatment and decreased risk of complications and death in patients with Type II Diabetes Mellitus. Realization regular physical activity is associated with a decreased risk of developing Diabetes Mellitus; likewise was associated with decrease in glycated hemoglobin percentage A1C values. Diabetic patients undergoing high levels of physical activity had decreased risk of complications and death from cardiovascular disease and all causes. At present the scientific evidence on the impact of physical activity in the prevention and treatment of Diabetes Mellitus is solid, so it must be emphasized promoting physical activity as a fundamental part of the therapeutic regimens for this disease.

  8. The Intrauterine Device in Women with Diabetes Mellitus Type I and II: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstuck, Norman D; Steyn, Petrus S

    2013-12-11

    Background. Women with diabetes mellitus type I and type II need effective contraception for personal and medical reasons. Long acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods are among the most efficient and cost-effective methods. Study Design. We searched the Popline, PubMed, and clinicaltrials.gov databases from 1961 to March 2013 for studies on the efficacy of the IUD in diabetic women and the possible changes it may produce in laboratory parameters. Studies of at least 30 subjects with DM1 or DM2 who were studied for 6 to 12 months depending on the method of analysis were eligible. Results. The search produced seven articles which gave event rate efficacy evaluable results and three which evaluated the effect of the IUD on laboratory parameters. One of the earlier efficacy studies showed an abnormally high pregnancy rate which sparked a controversy which is discussed in the Introduction section. The remaining 6 studies produced acceptable pregnancy rates. The three laboratory studies showed that the copper and levonorgestrel releasing IUD/IUS do not affect the diabetic state in any way. Conclusions. The copper bearing and levonorgestrel releasing IUDs are safe and effective in women with diabetes type I and diabetes type II although the evidence in the latter is limited.

  9. Comparison of the corneal endothelial cell count in type II diabetic patients with healthy adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizvi, B.Z.; Zafar, O.

    2016-01-01

    To compare the mean corneal endothelial cell count in type II diabetic patients with healthy adults. Study Design: Case control. Place and Duration of Study: Out-patient Department of Armed Forces Institute of Ophthalmology, Rawalpindi from September 10, 2013 to March 25, 2014. Material and Methods: A hospital-based case-control study was carried out at out-patient department of Armed Forces Institute of Ophthalmology in which 130 eyes (65 diabetic eyes and 65 controls) were included. Non-probability consecutive sampling was adopted. Relevant detailed history including information about age, gender, duration of diabetes, any other medical illness and current medical treatment being taken by patient was recorded. Results: Data entry and analysis was done in SPSS version 10. Total 130 eyes (65 diabetic and 65 non-diabetic eyes) were included in our study according to the inclusion criteria. Mean age (years) of patient in both the groups was 59.55 +- 8.01 and 53.85 +- 10.07. Mean corneal endothelial cell count in both the groups was 2368.35 +- 389.58 and 2588.64 +- 269.84 respectively which was statistically significant (p-value=0.001) in both the groups. Conclusion: The conclusion of the study was that the mean corneal endothelial cell count in type II diabetic patients was significantly less as compared to healthy adults. (author)

  10. Achilles tendon and plantar fascia in recently diagnosed type II diabetes: role of body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Michele; Schiavone, Cosima; Di Carlo, Luigi; Salini, Vincenzo

    2012-07-01

    Previous research has shown that plantar fascia and Achilles tendon thickness is increased in diabetes. The aims of present study were to assess whether tendon changes can occur in the early stages of the disease and to evaluate the extent of the influence of body mass index (BMI). The study population included 51 recent-onset type II diabetic subjects, who were free from diabetic complications, divided according to BMI into three groups (normal weight, overweight, and obese). Eighteen non-diabetic, normal-weight subjects served as controls. Plantar fascia and Achilles tendon thickness was measured by means of sonography. The groups were well balanced for age and sex. In all the diabetic subjects, plantar fascia and Achilles tendon thickness was increased compared to the controls (p plantar fascia thickness and BMI values (r = 0.749, p plantar fascia and Achilles tendon thickness is increased in the early stages of type II diabetes and that BMI is related more to plantar fascia than Achilles tendon thickness. Further longitudinal studies are needed to evaluate whether these early changes can overload the metatarsal heads and increase the stress transmitted to plantar soft tissues, thus representing an additional risk factor for foot ulcer development.

  11. Pupil cycle time and contrast sensitivity in type II diabetes mellitus patients: A pilot study

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    Hoyoung Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Pupil cycle time (PCT has been widely used for examination of ocular diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN. Aims: The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the difference of contrast sensitivity according to PCT results, and the secondary aim was to determine the factors associated with PCT difference for type II diabetes patients. Settings and Design: A clinical pilot study that included a total of 60 eyes of 60 type II diabetes patients. Materials and Methods: We divided all patients into three groups according to PCT results. Group A and Group C were composed of patients who had upper one third PCT and lower one third PCT, respectively. We analyzed difference of age, diabetes duration, hypertension duration, mean best corrected visual acuity (BCVA, mean spherical equivalent (SE, HbA1C, glomerular filtration rate (GFR, stage of diabetic retinopathy, and Cardiac Autonomic Function Score (CAFS. Contrast sensitivity and decrease of visual acuity by glare were also estimated and analyzed for 28 eyes of 28 non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR patients. Group [NPDR] A and Group [NPDR] C were defined as those who had lower one third PCT and upper one third PCT, respectively. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 17.0 software. Results and Conclusions: Each group contained 20 eyes. Significant differences between Group A and Group C were observed in duration of diabetes and CAFS (P ≤ 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively. Contrast sensitivity in Group [NPDR] A was significantly more than in Group [NPDR] C at all cpds (all P ≤ 0.001. We found that PCT can influence contrast sensitivity or glare in diabetes patients and also confirmed a significant correlation of PCT with CAFS and duration of diabetes.

  12. Frequency of hypomagnesemia in patients with uncontrolled type II diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, M.U.; Ali, I.; Asghar, S.P.; Ahmed, M.R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of Hypomagnesemia in patients with uncontrolled type II diabetes mellitus. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Medicine, PNS Shifa Naval Hospital Karachi, from Jul 2012 to Dec 2012 over a period of six months. Material and Methods: In this study, three hundred and twenty three patients of uncontrolled diabetes mellitus type-II on oral hypoglycemic agents for more than five years, presenting to medical OPD, were recruited. All patients fulfilled inclusion and exclusion criteria. Blood samples of all patients for serum HbA1c and serum magnesium levels were analyzed at the time of enrollment. Statistical analysis was done on SPSS 20. Results: Out of 323 patients, 243 (75.23 percent) were males and 80 (24.76 percent) were females with the age ranging from 40 - 65 years (mean age and SD 54.76 +- 6.43). Hypomagnesemia was found in 117 patients, without any significant difference in men and women (38.45 percent and 35.39 percent respectively). The mean duration of diabetes was 12.5 years (ranging from 5 to 22 years). By frequency test in SPSS-20, the highest frequency of hypomagnesemia (49.42 percent) is seen in (8.6-9.0) HbA1c group while lowest frequency hypomagnesemia (15.38 percent) is seen in (>10.0) HbA1c level group mean standard deviation and p-value calculated by Pearson correlation statistic in SPSS-20 for quantitative variables (HbA1c, Magnesium level). Conclusion: Hypomagnesemia is frequent in poorly controlled type-II diabetes mellitus having increased level of HbA1c. So it may be prudent in clinical practice to periodically monitor plasma magnesium and HbA1c in type-II diabetes mellitus patients. (author)

  13. Coefficient of Friction at the Fingertips in Type II Diabetics Compared to Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thames, Beatriz H; Gorniak, Stacey L

    2017-07-01

    Clinical observations suggest that type II diabetes patients are more susceptible to skin changes, which may be associated with reduced coefficient of friction at the fingertips. Reduced coefficient of friction may explain recent reports of fine motor dysfunction in diabetic patients. Coefficient of friction was evaluated using slip force evaluation in a cross-sectional cohort of diabetic patients and age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Covariates of tactile sensation, disease duration, glycated hemoglobin, and clinical diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy were also assessed. A significant decrease in fingertip coefficient of friction in the diabetic group was found as compared to controls. Health state covariates did not alter the strength of between-group differences in statistical analyses. This finding of between-group differences for fingertip frictional properties suggests that causative factors of reported manual motor dysfunction lie in both the distal and proximal portions of the nervous system.

  14. Yoga Practice for the Management of Type II Diabetes Mellitus in Adults: A systematic Review

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    Badr Aljasir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of practicing yoga for the management of type II Diabetes was assessed in this systematic review through searching related electronic databases and the grey literature to the end of May 2007 using Ovid. All randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs comparing yoga practice with other type of intervention or with regular practice or both, were included regardless of language or type of publication. Each study was assessed for quality by two independent reviewers. Mean difference was used for summarizing the effect of each study outcomes with 95% confidence intervals. Pooling of the studies did not take place due to the wide clinical variation between the studies. Publication bias was assessed by statistical methods. Five trials with 363 participants met the inclusion criteria with medium to high risk of bias and different intervention characteristics. The studies’ results show improvement in outcomes among patients with diabetes type II. These improvements were mainly among short term or immediate diabetes outcomes and not all were statistically significant. The results were inconclusive and not significant for the long-term outcomes. No adverse effects were reported in any of the included studies. Short-term benefits for patients with diabetes may be achieved from practicing yoga. Further research is needed in this area. Factors like quality of the trials and other methodological issues should be improved by large randomized control trials with allocation concealment to assess the effectiveness of yoga on diabetes type II. A definitive recommendation for physicians to encourage their patients to practice yoga cannot be reached at present.

  15. Clinical evaluation of Dyslipidemia among type II diabetic patients at Public hospital Penang, Malaysia

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    Zaki Nada F

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global views emphasize the need for early; effective intervention against the atherogenic dyslipidemia associated with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome to reduce the risk of premature cardiovascular diseases. Our aim was to determine the clinical practices and compliance among dyslipidemia with type II diabetes and hypertension in multiracial society. Method(s Study was carried out in out-patient department of General hospital Penang over a period of ten months (Jan - Oct 2008. Study reflects the retrospective data collection covering a period of three years from Jan 2005 - Dec 2007. Universal sampling technique was used to select all the patients' undergone treatment for diabetes type II and dyslipidemia. All the concerned approvals were obtained from Clinical research Committee (CRC. Data was analyzed by using SPSS 15®. Result(s A total of 501 diabetes type 2 patients with dyslipidemia were identified in this study. The demographic data showed that 55.9% (n = 280 were female patients and 44.1% (n = 221 were males. Patients on combination therapy of metformin with other antidiabetic agent were 79%, while 21% were on monotherapy. Lovastatin was received as monotherapy in 83% of study population, while only 17% were on combination with gemfibrozil. Means of FPG and lipid profile were reduced from the initial (2005 to the latest level (2007 significantly (p Conclusion Metformin and lovastatin use among patients of type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia is significantly improved the clinical outcomes. No significant association of metformin or lovastatin is found against the hypertension. Metformin and calcium channel blocker combination therapy was found to be the best choice in the co-treatment of diabetes and hypertension.

  16. Hypertension, Diabetes Type II, and Their Association: Role of Arterial Stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smulyan, Harold; Lieber, Ari; Safar, Michel E

    2016-01-01

    In patients with both hypertension and type II diabetes, the systolic blood pressure (SBP) increases linearly with age, while that of diastolic blood pressure (DBP) declines curvilinearly as early as age 45, all suggesting the development of increased arterial stiffness. Increased stiffness is an important, independent, and significant risk predictor in subjects with hypertension and diabetes. In patients with both diseases, stiffness assessed at the same mean arterial pressure (MAP) was significantly higher in diabetic patients. Arterial stiffness is related to age, heart rate (HR), and MAP, but in diabetic patients, it also related to diabetes duration and insulin treatment (IT). In the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn), diabetes also acts on the small arteries through capillary rarefaction to reduce the effective length of the arterial tree, increases the reflected pulse wave and thus the pulse pressure (PP). These studies indicate that diabetes and hypertension additively contribute to increased pulsatility and suggest that any means to reduce stiffness would be beneficial in these conditions. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2015. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Metabolic and clinical effects of Ramadan fasting in patients with type II diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarahmadi, S.; Larijani, B.; Bastanhagh, M.H.; Pajouhi, M.; Bardar, J. R.; Zahedi, F.; Zendehdel, K.; Akrami, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of fasting on anthropometric indices and carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in patients with type II diabetes. Results: Daily cholesterol intake increased in all subjects (p 0.01). Blood pressure, fasting blood glucose and serum fructosamine did not change during the study. Plasma insulin (p < 0.05), C-peptide (p < 0.01) and insulin resistance (p < 0.01) decreased only in men. Total and LDL cholesterol increased significantly in all subjects during the study. Conclusion: Ramadan fasting does not alter carbohydrate metabolism or tissue insulin sensitivity in patients with type II diabetes given appropriate dietary education and rescheduling of oral hypoglycaemic medication. Lipid profile is unfavorably altered due to changes in both diet and biochemical response to starvation. (author)

  18. Lipid profile abnormalities in Type II diabetics with and without microalbuminura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qadoos, A.; Javaid, Q.U.A.; Shahzad, A.; Toor, I.

    2017-01-01

    To find the frequency of microalbuminemia in type II diabetic patients and to determine the frequency of different abnormalities of lipid profile in Type II diabetic patients with and without microalbuminuria. Methodology: Total 344 patients of type-II diabetes mellitus of both genders between the age of 35-70 years were enrolled in the study from Lahore General Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan. Blood sample for lipid profile was collected after 12 hours of fasting and spot mid stream early morning urine sample was collected in laboratory for microalbuminuria detection. Results: Out of 344 cases, 151 (43.90%) were male and 193 (56.10%) were females with male to female ratio of 2:1. 132 (38.37%) cases were between 35-50 years of age while 212 (61.63%) between 51-70 years of age (mean 53.18+9.32). Frequency of microalbuminuria was recorded in 32.56% (n=112) cases. Out of 112 cases of microalbuminuria, Hypertriglyceridemia was seen in 98 (87.5%) cases, increased LDL-C in 102 (91%) while decreased HDL-C was found in 95 (84.8%) cases (p=0.000). Out of 232 cases of without microalbuminuria, hypertriglyceridemia was found in 143 (61%) cases, increased LDL-C in 151 (65%) and decreased HDL-C was seen in 169 (72.8%) cases. Frequency of microalbuminuria was seen more in age group of 51-75 years (n=65) with disease duration of more than 3 years (n=71), HbA1c 6 (n=69) and BMI more than 30. Conclusion: The frequency of hypertriglyceridemia, increased LDL-C and decreased HDL-C is higher in type II diabetic patients with microalbuminuria as compare to patients without microalbuminuria and is dependent on advanced age, duration of disease and BMI. (author)

  19. Dietary Patterns, Insulin Resistance, and Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes in the Whitehall II Study

    OpenAIRE

    McNaughton, Sarah A.; Mishra, Gita D.; Brunner, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE?The aim of this study was to identify a dietary pattern associated with insulin resistance and investigate whether this pattern was prospectively associated with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS?Analysis was based on 7,339 participants of the Whitehall II study. Dietary intake was measured using a 127-item food frequency questionnaire. We used the reduced rank regression method to determine dietary patterns using the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance as ...

  20. Influence of Social Support on Treatment of Type II Diabetes in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Zare Shahabadi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Social support can be defined as the interactive process through which emotional and instrumental support is obtained. Social support has been found to be a relevant factor in diabetes self-management. Diabetes refers to complex chronic metabolic conditions that are characterized by elevated levels of blood glucose if untreated. Diabetes is one of the biggest health care problems facing Yazd with regards to prevalence, cost, and the onus it places on patients and its high morbidity rates. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among social factors on the control and treatment of type II diabetes. Methods: The population under study included 4990 diabetes type II patients referring to Yazd Diabetes Research Center and a sample of 256 cases was selected by simple random sampling method through statistical society. This study was based on survey method and the instrument for collecting data was a questionnaire. Results: About 65.4% of the patients were women and 35.6 were men. The mean age of patients was 56 years. Significant correlations were found between perceived social support (r= 0.193, p= 0.001, positive reinforcing behaviors (r= 0.455, p= 0.000, and adherence to self-care activities. Misguided support behaviors did not show a significant correlation with adherence to self-care activities. A total of 25% of variance in self-care behavior can be explained by positive reinforcing behaviors and misguided support behaviors. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed that by increasing the positive reinforcing behaviors and perceived social support and decreasing the misguided support behaviors, the diabetic patients can adhere better to self-care activities.

  1. Adipokines: Potential Therapeutic Targets for Vascular Dysfunction in Type II Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity

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    Mostafa Wanees Ahmed El husseny

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipokines are bioactive molecules that regulate several physiological functions such as energy balance, insulin sensitization, appetite regulation, inflammatory response, and vascular homeostasis. They include proinflammatory cytokines such as adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP and anti-inflammatory cytokines such as adiponectin, as well as vasodilator and vasoconstrictor molecules. In obesity and type II diabetes mellitus (DM, insulin resistance causes impairment of the endocrine function of the perivascular adipose tissue, an imbalance in the secretion of vasoconstrictor and vasodilator molecules, and an increased production of reactive oxygen species. Recent studies have shown that targeting plasma levels of adipokines or the expression of their receptors can increase insulin sensitivity, improve vascular function, and reduce the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Several reviews have discussed the potential of adipokines as therapeutic targets for type II DM and obesity; however, this review is the first to focus on their therapeutic potential for vascular dysfunction in type II DM and obesity.

  2. Medication Adherence and its Related Factors in Patients with Type II Diabetes

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    Behzad Gholamaliei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Low levels of medication adherence in patients with type 2 diabetes is one of the greatest challenges in the treatment and control of diabetes. This study was designed to determine medication adherence and its related factors in patients with type II diabetes. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a total of 300patients with type 2diabetes records in the health centers of Tuyserkan city were randomly selected in 2015. Data collection instrument was a self-made questionnaire, which consisted of factors related to the medication adherence. Questionnaires were completed after confirmation of validity and reliability, by interviews. To analyze the data, descriptive and inferential statistics (T-test, AnOVA, Simple and multiple linear regression were applied, using SPSS software, version 19. Results: Overall, %26.3 of patients were male and %73.7 were female. Also, %65 of patients were illiterate, %24 had some degree of symptoms, and %59.4 had poor medication adherence. There was a significant relationship between age, education, patient care and treatment expenditure, health care team and health system, therapy-related factors and condition-related factors, beliefs about illness, efficacy, and concerns about drugs and medication adherence (P < 0.05. Conclusions: This study showed that medication adherence in patients with diabetes was not suitable and individual, economical and social factors were influential.Therefore, the role of these factors must be considered when designing intervention programs.

  3. ASSESSMENT OF SERUM LIPIDS IN TYPE II DIABETES MALE AND FEMALE PATIENTS

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    Annapurna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM often have both quantitative and qualitative abnormalities of lipoproteins that are responsible for increased incidence of microvascular and macrovascular complications. Incidence of coronary heart disease is three to four folds higher in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus compared to non - diabetics. It has been proposed that the composition of lipid particles in diabetic dyslipidemia is more atherogenic than other types of dyslipidemia. This study was conducted to asses s serum lipid profile in type diabetes male and female patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study was conducted on 50 T2DM patients with history more than ten yrs diabetes. Diabetic patients with overt complications and patients on drugs like diuretics, s teroids, oral contraceptives and beta blockers etc are excluded from study. 5 ml of whole blood was collected via vena puncture with the help of a disposable syringe in between 7.00am and 8.00am. Fasting plasma glucose and different Lipid fractions were es timated using standard procedure. All values were expressed as mean ± S.D. Statistical significance of differences between control and study groups were evaluated by student’s t test. A p - value less than 0.05 were considered as significant. RESULTS: The se rum total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides were significantly raised in both males and females . CONCLUSION: Hyperlipidaemia is a common finding among DM patients. DM patients should be screened and appropriate management should be instituted to reduce the risk of CHD and atherosclerosis

  4. Effect of emotional intelligence in glycemic control in patients with type II diabetes

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    Monireh Mehdizadeh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes, in addition to adverse physical effects, is associated with many psychological problems. The correlation between physical health and emotional intelligence are acceptable. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of emotional intelligence training in glycemic control in patients with type II diabetes. The present study was a quasi-experimental research, which was conducted in Mashhad city, Iran. The participants included 20 patients referring to the diabetic centers. They were selected through convenience sampling and randomly divided into two groups of experiment (n=10 and control (n=10. To measure blood glucose, the level of HbA1c in patients was measured before and after training. The experimental group attended in a period of emotional intelligence training. The training sessions were held as group discussion during 8 weeks, one session of 120-min per week. The findings suggest that emotional intelligence training significantly reduced the level of blood glucose (HbA1c in the test group compared to the control group. Based on the results, emotional intelligence training, as a psychological intervention, by affecting understanding, interpretation, regulation and efficient use of excitement, is effective along with medication therapy in controlling blood glucose in type II diabetic patients.

  5. Why is coronary collateral growth impaired in type II diabetes and the metabolic syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocic, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Type II diabetes and the metabolic syndrome are strong predictors of severity of occlusive coronary disease and poorer outcomes of coronary revascularization therapies. Coronary collateral growth can provide an alternative or accessory pathway of revascularization. However, collateral growth is impaired in type II diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. Although many factors necessary for collateral growth are known and many interventions have shown promising results in animal studies, not a single attempt to induce coronary collateral growth in human clinical trials has led to satisfactory results. Accordingly, the first part of this review outlines the known deleterious effects of diabetes and the metabolic syndrome on factors necessary for collateral growth, including pro-angiogenic growth factors, endothelial function, the redox state of the coronary circulation, intracellular signaling, leukocytes and bone marrow-derived progenitors cells. The second section highlights the gaps in our current knowledge of how these factors interact with the radically altered environment of the coronary circulation in diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. The interplay between these pathologies and inadequately explored areas related to the temporal regulation of collateral remodeling and the roles of the extracellular matrix, vascular cell phenotype and pro-inflammatory cytokines are emphasized with implications to development of efficient therapies. PMID:22342811

  6. Clinical significance of nuclide renal dynamic imaging and urine microalbumin inspection of type II diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ying; Jin Yaoge; Shi Xueying; Gao Yong

    2011-01-01

    To investigate clinical value of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urine microalbumin in early diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy, GFR in 60 patients with type II diabetes mellitus and a control group of 20 were determined using 99 Tc m DTPA renal dynamic imaging and urine microalbumin. The following results were obtained.Among the 60 patients with diabetes, 5 patients had increased GFRs of, 142.0±13.6 mg/min, which was 35% higher than that of controls and differed significantly from the control (P<0.01); 20 patients had GFRs of 102.2±10.2 mg/min, which differed little from the control; and 35 patients had declined GFRs of 57.2±18.0 mg/min, which was 54.3% lowered than the control and differed significantly from the control (P<0.01). The urine microalbumin in diabetes patients was significantly higher than the control. In conclusion, the GFR is a good index of the early kidney injury in diabetic patients. The combined detection of GFR and urine microalbumin can improve the early diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy, and may help to monitor the treatment response and assess prognosis. (authors)

  7. Detection of cerebral atrophy in type- II diabetes mellitus by magnetic resonance imaging of brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, G.; Khan, N.; Aziz, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that affects many systems in the body. Cerebral atrophy is one of the complications of diabetes and research is on going to find out its aetiopathological factors. The main aim of the study was to determine the frequency of cerebral atrophy in type-II diabetes mellitus using magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. Methods: One hundred diabetic patients (Random blood sugar >126 mg/dl) were recruited in this study after the informed consent from every patient. Duration of diabetes was five years and more in all the patients as determined by their glycosylated haemoglobin which was >6 in all the patients. All the patients were undergone MRI of brain using 1.5 Tesla power magnetic resonance imaging machine of Picker Company. Evan's index, a specific parameter for measurement of cerebral atrophy was calculated on MR images and was used in this study. Results: In male group the frequency of cerebral atrophy was 22 (47%) and in female group it was found to be 23 (43%). When we study the overall population the frequency was found to be 45 (45%). The results are well in concordance with the previous data published on this issue. Conclusions: Cerebral atrophy, a complication of long standing diabetes is quite frequent in our population and is well diagnosed by MRI. (author)

  8. Intracellular insulin processing is altered in monocytes from patients with type II diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trischitta, V.; Benzi, L.; Brunetti, A.; Cecchetti, P.; Marchetti, P.; Vigneri, R.; Navalesi, R.

    1987-01-01

    We studied total cell-associated A14-[ 125 I]insulin radioactivity (including surface-bound and internalized radioactivity), insulin internalization, and its intracellular degradation at 37 C in monocytes from nonobese type II untreated diabetic patients (n = 9) and normal subjects (n = 7). Total cell-associated radioactivity was decreased in diabetic patients [2.65 +/- 1.21% (+/- SD) vs. 4.47 +/- 1.04% of total radioactivity. Insulin internalization was also reduced in diabetic patients (34.0 +/- 6.8% vs. 59.0 +/- 11.3% of cell-associated radioactivity. Using high performance liquid chromatography six intracellular forms of radioactivity derived from A14-[ 125 I] insulin were identified; 10-20% of intracellular radioactivity had approximately 300,000 mol wt and was identified as radioactivity bound to the insulin receptor, and the remaining intracellular radioactivity included intact A14-[ 125 I]insulin, [ 125 I]iodide, or [ 125 I]tyrosine, and three intermediate compounds. A progressive reduction of intact insulin and a corresponding increase in iodine were found when the incubation time was prolonged. Intracellular insulin degradation was reduced in monocytes from diabetic patients; intracellular intact insulin was 65.6 +/- 18.1% vs. 37.4 +/- 18.0% of intracellular radioactivity after 2 min and 23.6 +/- 22.3% vs. 3.9 +/- 2.3% after 60 min in diabetic patients vs. normal subjects, respectively. In conclusion, 1) human monocytes internalize and degrade insulin in the intracellular compartment in a stepwise time-dependent manner; and 2) in monocytes from type II diabetic patients total cell-associated radioactivity, insulin internalization, and insulin degradation are significantly reduced. These defects may be related to the cellular insulin resistance present in these patients

  9. [Increased risk of type II diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease after gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopmans, Tara-Eileen J P; van Houten, Chantal B; Kasius, Annemieke; Kouznetsova, Ouliana I; Nguyen, Ly A; Rooijmans, Sanne V; Voormolen, Daphne N; van Vliet, Elvira O G; Franx, Arie; Koster, M P H Wendy

    2015-01-01

    To determine the long-term risk of developing type II diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) for women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Two search strategies were used in PubMed and Embase to determine the long-term risks of developing T2D and CVD after a pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus. After critical appraisal of the papers found, 11 papers were included, involving a total of 328,423 patients. Absolute and relative risks (RRs) were calculated. Eight studies (n=276,829) reported on the long-term risk of T2D and 4 (n=141,048) on the long-term risk of CVD. Follow-up ranged from 3.5 to 11.5 years for T2D and from 1.2 to 74.0 years for CVD. Women with gestational diabetes had a risk of T2D varying between 9.5% and 37.0% and a risk of CVD of between 0.28% and 15.5%. Women with gestational diabetes were at increased risk of T2D (weighted RR: 13.2; 95% CI: 8.5-20.7) and CVD (weighted RR: 2.0; 95% CI: 1.1-3.7) compared to women without gestational diabetes. Women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus have a significantly increased risk of developing T2D and CVD. It is very important that gestational diabetes is recognised as a cardiovascular risk factor in daily practice. It would be desirable to screen this group of women for the presence of hyperglycaemia and other cardiovascular risk factors. Further research is required to be able to specify the long-term risk of T2D and CVD and to demonstrate whether such screening is cost-effective.

  10. The angiotensin II type 2 receptor agonist Compound 21 is protective in experimental diabetes-associated atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chow, Bryna S M; Koulis, Christine; Krishnaswamy, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Angiotensin II is well-recognised to be a key mediator in driving the pathological events of diabetes-associated atherosclerosis via signalling through its angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) subtype. However, its actions via the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) subtype...... are still poorly understood. This study is the first to investigate the role of the novel selective AT2R agonist, Compound 21 (C21) in an experimental model of diabetes-associated atherosclerosis (DAA). METHODS: Streptozotocin-induced diabetic Apoe-knockout mice were treated with vehicle (0.1 mol/l citrate...

  11. Achilles tendinopathy in elderly subjects with type II diabetes: the role of sport activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Michele; Salini, Vincenzo; Schiavone, Cosima

    2016-04-01

    Exercise is an important therapeutic tool in the management of diabetes in older people. Aim of this study was to assess the relationship among type II diabetes, sport, overweight, and symptomatic Achilles tendinopathy in elderly subjects. Thirty-eight patients suffering from Achilles tendinopathy and thirty-eight controls were enrolled. The prevalence of diabetes and sport practice as well as BMI and Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) values were registered. An ultrasound evaluation of Achilles tendon was performed. Patients showed an increased prevalence of diabetes (42 vs. 13.1 %, p = 0.004), and practice of sport (60.5 vs. 28.9 %, p = 0.0001), and higher BMI values (26.8 ± 3 vs. 24.8 ± 2.3, p = 0.001). Sonographic abnormalities, being diagnostic criteria, were present in all the patients with Achilles tendinopathy, but signs of degeneration were also found in 36.8 % of asymptomatic controls. Symptomatic subjects with diabetes, compared to those without, showed a higher prevalence of severe degeneration (75 vs. 36.3 %, p = 0.01). HbA1c values were significantly lower in sport practitioners, both diabetics and non-diabetics. Moreover, patients practicing sport showed a trend towards lower BMI values, compared to the sedentary counterpart. Sport practice in elderly diabetics provides relevant metabolic advantages, reducing HbA1c and BMI. However, some sport activities (e.g., speed walking, jogging or tennis) can expose to the risk of Achilles tendinopathy. So, sport practice should be encouraged, but practitioners should follow individual training programs and be submitted to periodic sonographic controls.

  12. The Role of Salivary Gland Scintigraphy in the Evaluation of Salivary Gland Dysfunction in Uncontrolled Type II Diabetic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Senthilkumar, B.; Sathasivasubramanian, S.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the salivary gland dysfunction in patients with uncontrolled type II diabetes using salivary gland scintigraphy and then to compare these ratios with quantitative whole salivary secretion rates. Using a gamma camera (siemens-diacam) equipped with a low energy all-purpose collimator, 32 uncontrolled type II diabetic patients and 30 normal healthy patients were studied by injecting a radio isotope (technetium 99m pertechnetate) about 5 mCi was inject...

  13. Applicability of the Existing CVD Risk Assessment Tools to Type II Diabetics in Oman: A Review

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    Abdulhakeem Al-Rawahi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with type II diabetes (T2DM have an elevated risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD, and it is considered to be a leading cause of morbidity and premature mortality in these patients. Many traditional risk factors such as age, male sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, glycemic control, diabetes duration, renal dysfunction, obesity, and smoking have been studied and identified as independent factors for CVD. Quantifying the risk of CVD among diabetics using the common risk factors in order to plan the treatment and preventive measures is important in the management of these patients as recommended by many clinical guidelines. Therefore, several risk assessment tools have been developed in different parts of the world for this purpose. These include the tools that have been developed for general populations and considered T2DM as a risk factor, and the tools that have been developed for T2DM populations specifically. However, due to the differences in sociodemographic factors and lifestyle patterns, as well as the differences in the distribution of various CVD risk factors in different diabetic populations, the external applicability of these tools on different populations is questionable. This review aims to address the applicability of the existing CVD risk models to the Omani diabetic population.

  14. Survey of eight dimensions quality of life for patients with diabetes type II, referred to Sanandaj diabetes center in 2009

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    Shahnaz Khaledi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Diabetes is a chronic disease; the patients suffer from diabetes needs a special care. One of the programs to help these kinds of patients is to analyze their quality of life, which was carried out through a nursing disciplinary program by a cross sectional study during 2009. Materials & Methods: 198 type II diabetic patients who were referred to diabetic center of an educational hospital, affiliated to Sanandaj medical university were selected randomly, they were interviewed and obtained a written permission to join this study, then asked to fill up SF-36 questionnaires, and finally, the data from the questionnaires were analyzed by the SPSS software program. Results: The results showed the quality of life of diabetes patients (55.6% with respect to their physical fitness were acceptable. Whereas, in case of play in the physical role 67.7% were not acceptable but in case of the physical pain 45.3% had physical pain and effects on public health 45.6% were moderately effected, in case of energy and vitality 35.4% were not acceptable, in case of social functioning 38.5% were favorable, in case of emotional role 75.8% were undesirable and finally considering psycho mental health 49.5% were in the desirable limit. Statistical analysis for evaluation of relationship between quality of life and demographic data, were carried out by using "ANOVA” test. Conclusion: This study showed that the quality of life in all the group of study were at moderate level. In order to improve the quality of life in diabetes patients it is suggested that planners and managers should pay enough attention to support the physical, mental and social well being of the diabetes patients.

  15. Downregulation of Type II Diabetes Mellitus and Maturity Onset Diabetes of Young Pathways in Human Pancreatic Islets from Hyperglycemic Donors

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    Jalal Taneera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although several molecular pathways have been linked to type 2 diabetes (T2D pathogenesis, it is uncertain which pathway has the most implication on the disease. Changes in the expression of an entire pathway might be more important for disease pathogenesis than changes in the expression of individual genes. To identify the molecular alterations in T2D, DNA microarrays of human pancreatic islets from donors with hyperglycemia n=20 and normoglycemia n=58 were subjected to Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA. About 178 KEGG pathways were investigated for gene expression changes between hyperglycemic donors compared to normoglycemic. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM and maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY pathways are downregulated in hyperglycemic donors, while proteasome and spliceosome pathways are upregulated. The mean centroid of gene expression of T2DM and MODY pathways was shown to be associated positively with insulin secretion and negatively with HbA1c level. To conclude, downregulation of T2DM and MODY pathways is involved in islet function and might be involved in T2D. Also, the study demonstrates that gene expression profiles from pancreatic islets can reveal some of the biological processes related to regulation of glucose hemostats and diabetes pathogenesis.

  16. Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in type II diabetic patients in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patients in a health facility in Karachi, Pakistan. Humera Ishaq1* ... regular medication, diet and exercise to avoid development and progress of DR. Keywords: Diabetes .... levels for likelihood on participants that they will develop diabetic ...

  17. Observations on the insulin-secretion function in the offsprings of patients with type II diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Shujie; Tian Xiaoping; Wu Yan

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the disturbance of insulin-secretion function in the offsprings of patients with type II diabetes. Methods: Blood sugar (with oxidase method) and insulin (with RIA) levels were measured after overnight fasting and repeatedly measured 2h after 75g glucose per oral in the following subjects: 1) Group A, 23 non-obese offsprings of type II diabetics 2) group B, 18 obese offsprings (BMI ≥25kg/m 2 ) and 3) 27 controls. Homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and β-cell function index (HCI) were calculated from the data (glucose and insulin levels) obtained. Results: For Group A subjects, the fasting blood sugar (FPG) levels were significantly higher and HBCI significantly lower than those in te controls (both P<0.05). For Group B obese subjects, in addition to the above two parameters (with HBCI P<0.01), 2h PG levels as well as HOMA-IR were also significantly higher (both P<0.05). Conclusion: Present study showed that in the offsprings of diabetics, HBCI was already lowered before definite impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) could be demonstrated, especially in the obese ones. (authors)

  18. Observations on the insulin-secretion function in the offsprings of patients with type II diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shujie, Xu; Xiaoping, Tian; Yan, Wu [The First People' s Hospital of Lianyungang (China)

    2004-10-01

    Objective: To investigate the disturbance of insulin-secretion function in the offsprings of patients with type II diabetes. Methods: Blood sugar (with oxidase method) and insulin (with RIA) levels were measured after overnight fasting and repeatedly measured 2h after 75g glucose per oral in the following subjects: 1) Group A, 23 non-obese offsprings of type II diabetics 2) group B, 18 obese offsprings (BMI {>=}25kg/m{sup 2} ) and 3) 27 controls. Homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and {beta}-cell function index (HCI) were calculated from the data (glucose and insulin levels) obtained. Results: For Group A subjects, the fasting blood sugar (FPG) levels were significantly higher and HBCI significantly lower than those in te controls (both P<0.05). For Group B obese subjects, in addition to the above two parameters (with HBCI P<0.01), 2h PG levels as well as HOMA-IR were also significantly higher (both P<0.05). Conclusion: Present study showed that in the offsprings of diabetics, HBCI was already lowered before definite impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) could be demonstrated, especially in the obese ones. (authors)

  19. SVMRFE based approach for prediction of most discriminatory gene target for type II diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Type II diabetes is a chronic condition that affects the way our body metabolizes sugar. The body's important source of fuel is now becoming a chronic disease all over the world. It is now very necessary to identify the new potential targets for the drugs which not only control the disease but also can treat it. Support vector machines are the classifier which has a potential to make a classification of the discriminatory genes and non-discriminatory genes. SVMRFE a modification of SVM ranks the genes based on their discriminatory power and eliminate the genes which are not involved in causing the disease. A gene regulatory network has been formed with the top ranked coding genes to identify their role in causing diabetes. To further validate the results pathway study was performed to identify the involvement of the coding genes in type II diabetes. The genes obtained from this study showed a significant involvement in causing the disease, which may be used as a potential drug target.

  20. Predictors of health-related quality of life in type II diabetic patients in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frydas Aristidis

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes Mellitus (DM is a major cause of morbidity and mortality affecting millions of people worldwide, while placing a noteworthy strain on public health funding. The aim of this study was to assess health-related quality of life (HRQOL of Greek Type II DM patients and to identify significant predictors of the disease in this patient population. Methods The sample (N = 229, 52.8% female, 70.0 years mean age lived in a rural community of Lesvos, an island in the northeast of the Aegean Archipelagos. The generic SF-36 instrument, administered by trainee physicians, was used to measure HRQOL. Scale scores were compared with non-parametric Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests and multivariate stepwise linear regression analyses were used to investigate the effect of sociodemographic and diabetes-related variables on HRQOL. Results The most important predictors of impaired HRQOL were female gender, diabetic complications, non-diabetic comorbidity and years with diabetes. Older age, lower education, being unmarried, obesity, hypertension and hyperlipidaemia were also associated with impaired HRQOL in at least one SF-36 subscale. Multivariate regression analyses produced models explaining significant portions of the variance in SF-36 subscales, especially physical functioning (R2 = 42%, and also showed that diabetes-related indicators were more important disease predictors, compared to sociodemographic variables. Conclusion The findings could have implications for health promotion in rural medical practice in Greece. In order to preserve a good HRQOL, it is obviously important to prevent diabetes complications and properly manage concomitant chronic diseases. Furthermore, the gender difference is interesting and requires further elucidation. Modifying screening methods and medical interventions or formulating educational programs for the local population appear to be steps in the correct direction.

  1. Sildenafil ameliorates long term peripheral neuropathy in type II diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    Full Text Available Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of long-standing diabetes mellitus. To mimic clinical trials in which patients with diabetes enrolled have advanced peripheral neuropathy, we investigated the effect of sildenafil, a specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterase type 5 enzyme, on long term peripheral neuropathy in middle aged male mice with type II diabetes. Treatment of diabetic mice (BKS.Cg-m+/+Leprdb/J, db/db at age 36 weeks with sildenafil significantly increased functional blood vessels and regional blood flow in the sciatic nerve, concurrently with augmentation of intra-epidermal nerve fiber density in the skin and myelinated axons in the sciatic nerve. Functional analysis showed that the sildenafil treatment considerably improved motor and sensory conduction velocities in the sciatic nerve and peripheral thermal stimulus sensitivity compared with the saline treatment. In vitro studies showed that mouse dermal endothelial cells (MDE cultured under high glucose levels exhibited significant down regulation of angiopoietin 1 (Ang1 expression and reduction of capillary-like tube formation, which were completely reversed by sildenafil. In addition, incubation of dorsal root ganglia (DRG neurons with conditioned medium harvested from MDE under high glucose levels suppressed neurite outgrowth, where as conditional medium harvested from MDE treated with sildenafil under high glucose levels did not inhibit neurite outgrowth of DRG neurons. Moreover, blockage of the Ang1 receptor, Tie2, with a neutralized antibody against Tie2 abolished the beneficial effect of sildenafil on tube formation and neurite outgrowth. Collectively, our data indicate that sildenafil has a therapeutic effect on long term peripheral neuropathy of middle aged diabetic mice and that improvement of neurovascular dysfunction by sildenafil likely contributes to the amelioration of nerve function. The Ang1/Tie2 signaling pathway may play an important role in these

  2. Metabolic effects of dietary fructose and surcose in types I and II diabetic subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bantle, J.P.; Laine, D.C.; Thomas, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    To learn more about the metabolic effects of dietary fructose and sucrose, 12 type 1 and 12 type II diabetic subjects were fed three isocaloric (or isoenergic) diets for eight days each according to a randomized, crossover design. The three diets provided, respectively, 21% of the energy as fructose, 23% of the energy as sucrose, and almost all carbohydrate energy as starch. The fructose diet resulted in significantly lower one- and two-hour postprandial plasma glucose levels, overall mean plasma glucose levels, and urinary glucose excretion in both type I and type II subjects than did the starch diet. There were no significant differences between the sucrose and starch diets in any of the measures of glycemic control in either subject group. The fructose and sucrose diets did not significantly increase serum triglyceride values when compared with the starch diet, but both increased postprandial serum lactate levels. The authors conclude that short-term replacement of other carbohydrate sources in the diabetic diet with fructose will improve glycemic control, whereas replacement with sucrose will not aggravate glycemic control

  3. The treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in menopausal women suffering from diabetes mellitus type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semikina Т.М.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to develop criteria for the selection of optimal tactics of supporting treatment of nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux disease with proton pump inhibitors in menopausal women suffering from diabetes mellitus type II. Material and Methods. 186 patients aged 45-59 who suffer from gastroesophageal reflux disease have been followed up, 46 of which suffer from diabetes mellitus type II as well. The climacteric syndrome's morbidity has been assessed in accordance with the modified menopause index; the level of glycated hemoglobin has been measured by the Abbott analyzer produced in the USA. Results. It is established that irrespective of the supporting treatment, the gastroesophageal reflux disease remittance was shorter in direct proportion with increase of the HbA1c level and the value of the modified menopause index in menopausal women suffering from diabetes mellitus type II. Conclusion. When the climacteric syndrome was mild or moderate, taking 20 mg Omeprazole once a day and "on demand" has comparable results, therefore this group of women prefer the "on demand" regimen as it lowers the risk of osteoporosis progression and further bone fracture. Taking 20 mg Omeprazole once a day, every other day, and "on demand" allows the disease remittance to prolong for a year and longer in less than 30% of women suffering from severe climacteric syndrome and having HbA1c>9.0%; however, this number may grow up to 70% of women in case they follow medical advice and reduce their carbohydrate input to 11 carbohydrate units and less.

  4. Effects of structurally stabilized EGF and bFGF on wound healing in type I and type II diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seong Mi; Lee, Kyoung-Mi; Kim, Hyun Jung; Park, Ik Kyu; Kang, Hwi Ju; Shin, Hang-Cheol; Baek, Dawoon; Choi, Yoorim; Park, Kwang Hwan; Lee, Jin Woo

    2018-01-15

    Diabetes mellitus comprises a multiple metabolic disorder that affects millions of people worldwide and consequentially poses challenges for clinical treatment. Among the various complications, diabetic ulcer constitutes the most prevalent associated disorder and leads to delayed wound healing. To enhance wound healing capacity, we developed structurally stabilized epidermal growth factor (ST-EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (ST-bFGF) to overcome limitations of commercially available EGF (CA-EGF) and bFGF (CA-bFGF), such as short half-life and loss of activity after loading onto a matrix. Neither ST-EGF nor ST-bFGF was toxic, and both were more stable at higher temperatures than CA-EGF and CA-bFGF. We loaded ST-EGF and ST-bFGF onto a hyaluronate-collagen dressing (HCD) matrix, a biocompatible carrier, and tested the effectiveness of this system in promoting wound healing in a mouse model of diabetes. Wounds treated with HCD matrix loaded with 0.3 μg/cm 2 ST-EGF or 1 μg/cm 2 ST-bFGF showed a more rapid rate of tissue repair as compared to the control in type I and II diabetes models. Our results indicate that an HDC matrix loaded with 0.3 μg/cm 2 ST-EGF or 1 μg/cm 2 ST-bFGF can promote wound healing in diabetic ulcers and are suitable for use in wound dressings owing to their stability for long periods at room temperature. Various types of dressing materials loaded with growth factors, such as VEGF, EGF, and bFGF, are widely used to effect wound repair. However, such growth factor-loaded materials have several limitations for use as therapeutic agents in healing-impaired diabetic wounds. To overcome these limitations, we have developed new materials containing structurally stabilized EGF (ST-EGF) and bFGF (ST-bFGF). To confirm the wound healing capacity of newly developed materials (ST-EGF and ST-bFGF-loaded hyaluronate-collagen dressing [HCD] matrix), we applied these matrices in type I and type II diabetic wounds. Notably, these matrices were

  5. The Effect of Group Reminiscence Therapy on Depression in Women With Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jooj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of psychological disorders and symptoms. Objectives This research investigated the effect of group reminiscence therapy on depression among women with type II diabetes. Patients and Methods The present study was a clinical trial study. Twenty-four patients referring to the diabetic clinic of Golestan hospital in Ahvaz, Iran were selected through simple random sampling and were divided in two groups. Data were collected through a demographic questionnaire and the Beck Depression Inventory. Group reminiscence therapy was held over eight biweekly sessions, each lasting 90 minutes. Finally, data were analyzed through descriptive statistics and the Mann-Whitney, Friedman, and Chi-Square tests, using SPSS version 20. Results A significant difference was observed between the two groups after the intervention (P = 0.001. The rating for depression decreased significantly in the experimental group. Before the group reminiscence therapy, the highest rating for depression obtained by the experimental group was “need for consultation” (50%, whereas after the intervention, the highest rating was “no depression” (50%. One month after the intervention, the highest rating obtained for depression was “low” (50%. Conclusions Reminiscence therapy decreased depression among diabetic female patients after the intervention and one month after the intervention. It can be said that, through the reminiscence therapy, patients’ past memories were reviewed and emphasis on the positive aspects thereof in the group setting was followed by an increased sense of self-worth and a decrease in depression.

  6. Effect of Blood Glucose Fluctuation on Some Trace Elements and Aldosterone Hormone among Type II Diabetic Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezz El-Arab, A.; El Fouly, A.H.; Mahmoud, H.H.

    2014-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence determine that the metabolism of some trace elements is altered in diabetes mellitus (DM) type II. The current study aimed to evaluate the effect of serum blood glucose fluctuation during (Random, Fasting and Postprandial 2 hours state) on some trace elements such as Cadmium (Cd), Chromium (Cr), Manganese (Mn), Magnesium (Mg), Zinc (Zn), Copper (Cu), Sodium (Na), Potassium (K), and Aldosterone hormone in type II Diabetic patients associated with metabolic syndrome in comparison with healthy volunteers. The International Diabetes Federation (IFD) consensus the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome according to central obesity, lipid profile, blood glucose level and blood pressure. A significant change was observed in trace elements level (Cd, Cr, Mg, Mn, Zn, Cu, Na, and K) and Aldosterone hormone as a result of glucose fluctuation among type II diabetic patients.

  7. Cost effectiveness of liraglutide in type II diabetes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zueger, Patrick M; Schultz, Neil M; Lee, Todd A

    2014-11-01

    As novel treatments for type II diabetes enter the market, there is a need to assess their long-term clinical and economic outcomes against currently available treatment alternatives. Objective compilation and evaluation of current pharmacoeconomic evidence can assist payers and decision makers in determining the appropriate place in therapy of a new medication. Our objective was to review the existing pharmacoeconomic literature evaluating the cost effectiveness and overall costs of treatment associated with liraglutide in type II diabetes. Medical literature indexed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and EconLit through 1 June 2014 was searched. Full-text, English-language cost-effectiveness, cost-utility, and other cost analyses in type II diabetes that compared liraglutide to one or more anti-diabetic agents were included. Initial screening was based on relevance of titles and abstracts followed by examination of the study methods of each remaining manuscript. Studies conducting original pharmacoeconomic analyses were chosen for inclusion. Articles meeting the inclusion criteria were retrieved, and information on the study design and results was abstracted. Abstracted data elements were chosen and assessed based on the authors' experience as well as criteria set forth by the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) Health Economic Evaluation Publication Guidelines Task Force. Additionally, reported incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) and selected sensitivity analysis results were converted to $US, year 2012 values, in order to facilitate comparison across studies. A total of six cost studies and seven cost-utility studies were identified for inclusion. Across cost studies, liraglutide treatment resulted in costs ranging from a loss of $US2,730 (liraglutide 1.8 mg vs. sitagliptin; pharmacy costs only) over a 1-year time horizon to a savings of $US9,367 (liraglutide 1.8 mg vs. glimepiride; diabetes

  8. Myocardial glucose utilisation in type II diabetes mellitus patients treated with sulphonylurea drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Ikuo; Inoue, Yusuke; Moritan, Toshiyuki; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nagai, Ryozo

    2006-01-01

    Chronic sulphonylurea treatment maintains improved glycaemic control through mechanisms other than enhancement of insulin secretion and may act on various organs. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the chronic use of sulphonylurea drugs influences PET measurement of myocardial glucose utilisation (MGU) in type II diabetes mellitus. Forty-two patients with type II diabetes mellitus and 17 control subjects underwent dynamic 18 F-FDG PET to measure MGU during hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamping. Twenty-one patients had been taking sulphonylurea drugs for more than 1 year (SU group), and the other 21 patients were drug naive (non-SU group). The haemoglobin A1c levels in the two patient groups were similar. Glucose disposal rate (GDR) was also determined as a marker of whole-body insulin resistance. GDR in the SU group (9.01±2.53 mg min -1 kg -1 ) was significantly higher than that in the non-SU group (4.10±2.47, p -1 100 g -1 ) was significantly higher than that in the non-SU group (5.53±2.05, p<0.01) and was similar to that in the controls (7.49±2.74). (orig.)

  9. Study of Blood Leptin Levels before and After Treatment with Metformin in Diabetes Type Ii Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Didehdar

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Leptin is a fat tissue hormone that has 176 amino acids with a molecular weight of 16 KD . Leptin has effects on the hypothalamus and peripheral tissues resulting in decreased food absorption and increased energy consumption that finally reduces the body weight and BMI. The aim of this research was to investigate the blood levels of leptin before and after treatment with Metformin in type II diabetic patients. Methods: 25 type II diabetic patients without any previous drug treatment history were investigated. This study was a clinical trail before and after treatment with Metformin. Results: There was no particular difference in BMI, average body weight, fat mass and free fat mass before and after treatment. Similarly, the difference in concentration levels of blood glucose, cholesterol, tri-glycerides and LDL-cholesterol before and after treatment was not statistically significant. Also, there was no difference in the average concentration of leptin and insulin before and after treatment Conclusion: This result showed that although metformin decreased glucose and lipid levels during the treatment period, (1 month it did not have an effect on leptin, Insulin and other related factors during treatment.;

  10. Type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin-dependent diabetes; Juvenile onset diabetes; Diabetes - type 1; High blood sugar - type 1 diabetes ... Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age. It is most often diagnosed in children, adolescents, or young adults. Insulin is ...

  11. Types of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes, Sexual, & Bladder Problems Clinical Trials What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that occurs when your ... is serious. What are the different types of diabetes? The most common types of diabetes are type ...

  12. Acceptance and Commitment Based Therapy on Disease Perception and Psychological Capital in Patients with Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Baghban Baghestan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aims: As a prevalent metabolic disease, diabetes can be followed by severe mental outcomes leading to problems affecting the daily life. The aim of the study was to determine the effects of acceptance and commitment-based intervention on illness perception and psychological capital in persons with type II diabetes. Materials & Methods: In the controlled pretest-posttest semi-experimental study, 34 patients with type II diabetes were studied in the Diabetes Clinic of Chamran Hospital of Ferdows City in 2015. The subjects, selected via available sampling method, were randomly divided into two groups including control (n=17 persons and experimental (n=17 persons groups. Data was collected by short illness perception questionnaire (IPQ and Luthans’ psychological capital questionnaire (PCQ. Eight 60-minute acceptance and commitment-base intervention sessions were weekly conducted in experimental group. Data was analyzed by SPSS 18 software using descriptive statistics and covariance analysis test. Findings: The pretest score having been adjusted, the acceptance and commitment-based intervention significantly increases the scores of illness perception and its sub-scales (p=0.0001 except the personal control sub-scale. In addition, it significantly increases the scores of the psychological capital and its sub-scales (p=0.0001 in patients with type II diabetes. Conclusion: The acceptance and commitment-based intervention can considerably improve the illness perception and the psychological capital in persons with type II diabetes.

  13. Pulp necrosis following luxated injury to teeth in a patient with uncontrolled type II diabetes mellitus: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haneol Shin,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Patients with diabetes mellitus show delayed wound healing and increased susceptibility to infection. Therefore, the effects of diabetes on pulpal and periodontal healing should be taken into consideration when treating diabetic dental traumatized patients. This case presents the treatment for dental traumatized 20 yr old female with uncontrolled type II diabetes. The traumatized upper central incisors had showed pulpal healing in early days. However, 7 mon after the trauma, the teeth had been diagnosed with pulp necrosis with apical abscess. Eventually, non surgical root canal treatment on the teeth had been performed.

  14. Traditional beliefs and practices among Mexican American immigrants with type II diabetes: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemley, Megan; Spies, Lori A

    2015-04-01

    To describe selected common health beliefs and practices among Mexican American immigrants with type II diabetes. Selected clinical trials, qualitative studies, and systematic reviews. The Hispanic folk illness belief susto refers to an episode of severe fright, and Mexican American immigrants hold varying views on its relation to diabetes. Culturally and in the research, susto has also been linked with depression. Sabila (aloe vera) and nopal (prickly pear cactus) are herbal remedies that have had widespread, longstanding use in Mexican culture and while this is not the gold standard of research, it does provide ample evidence and a strong cultural belief that these therapies work. There is some evidence in the literature to support their efficacy as glucose-lowering agents, but lack of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation, potential side effects, and a dearth of rigorous clinical trials preclude aloe vera and nopal from being recommended therapy. Awareness about susto beliefs, commonly used herbal remedies, and development of culturally sensitive communication skills are essential for nurse practitioners to effectively assist patients in this population achieve their glycemic goals. Research on the effects of nopal and aloe vera on diabetes is needed to guide clinical decisions. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  15. ANTIDIABETIC AND ANTIDYSLIPIDEMIC EFFECTS OF HELIOTROPIUM STRIGOSUM IN RAT MODELS OF TYPE I AND TYPE II DIABETES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Shafqat Rasul; Akram, Adnan; Aslam, Naveed; Asif, Muhammad; Wajid, Muhammad; Kinfe, Thomas; Jabeen, Qaiser; Muhammad, Sajjad

    2016-11-01

    Heliotropiumz stnigosum Wilid. (Boraginaceae) is used traditionally as a laxative, diuretic, and as a treatment for snake bites and stings of nettles. Recent investigations have shown anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of H. sorigosum. However, antihyperglycemic and antidyslipidemic activity of H. strigosum has not been investigated to date and we aimed to explore these activities of the crude aqueous methanolic extract of thEaerial parts of H. strigosum (Hs.Cr). Hs.Cr was administered orally at doses of 100, 300, and 500 mg/kg in alloxan-induced diabetic rats (type I diabetes) and fructose-fed rats (type II diabetes). The fasting blood glucose (FBG) concentration was assessed by glucometer, while semum total cholesterol, triglycerides and HDL were estimated by using standard kits. The FBG concentration significantly (p < 0.05) decreased in dose-dependent pattern in both alloxan-induced diabetic and fructose-fed rats on Hs.Cr administration. The percentage glucose reductions in alloxanized rats with glibenclamide, Hs.Cr 100, 300, and 500 mg/kg were obeserved to be 67, 36, 56 and 62%, respectively. In fructose-fed rats, the percentage glucose redutions associated with metformin, Hs.Cr 100, 300, and 500 mg/kg were 23, 5, 11 and 12%, respectively. The extract also corrected the dyslipidemia associated with fructose and alloxan-induced diabetes by significantly (p < 0.00 1) decreasing the concentration of serum total cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL and by increasing HDL concentration. Our data demonstrate that the H. stigosum has antidiabetic and antidyslipidemic effects, thus encouraging further studies.

  16. Assessment of risk factors for development of Type-II diabetes mellitus among working women in Berhampur, Orissa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malini D

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: 1 Assess general health condition and anthropological parameters of the working women. 2 Identify prevalence of Type-II Diabetes among them. 3 Assess risk factors associated with development of diabetes. 4 Educate them about Life Style Modifications. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study was carried out in six educational institutes. A total of 100 working women were selected as study population. During the two-month study period, Fasting Blood Sugar (FBS was estimated to identify the diabetics and the Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT. Information from the study population was collected through pre-tested questionnaire using several anthropometric measurements. Results: Out of 100 women, 24 were having FBS compatible with IGT or diabetes. The incidence was highest in 46 to 55 yr age group. 75% of women with diabetes or IGT were in higher income group. Body Mass Index was more than 25 kg/m 2 in maximum (75% women having diabetes or IGT. 92% women with diabetes or IGT had their Waist Hip Ratio ≥0.85. Moreover, orientation towards healthy life style modification to control diabetes and its prevention was poor among the study population. Conclusion: Prevalence of diabetes and IGT was higher among urban working women and is increasing with increase in age. Obesity plays a major role in development of Type 2 diabetes. Several long- and short-term steps should be taken for promotion of healthy life style modifications to prevent diabetes and emergence of its complications.

  17. At-Risk Variant in TCF7L2 for Type II Diabetes Increases Risk of Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas; Ingason, Andrés; Djurovic, Srdjan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Schizophrenia is associated with increased risk of type II diabetes and metabolic disorders. However, it is unclear whether this comorbidity reflects shared genetic risk factors, at-risk lifestyle, or side effects of antipsychotic medication. METHODS: Eleven known risk variants of type...... (SGENE+) using Mantel-Haenszel test. RESULTS: One type II diabetes at-risk allele located in TCF7L2, rs7903146 [T], was associated with schizophrenia in the discovery sample (p = .0052) and in the replication with an odds ratio of 1.07 (95% confidence interval 1.01-1.14, p = .033). CONCLUSION...... II diabetes were genotyped in patients with schizophrenia in a sample of 410 Danish patients, each matched with two healthy control subjects on sex, birth year, and month. Replication was carried out in a large multinational European sample of 4089 patients with schizophrenia and 17,597 controls...

  18. CD4(+) type II NKT cells mediate ICOS and programmed death-1-dependent regulation of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadri, Nadir; Korpos, Eva; Gupta, Shashank; Briet, Claire; Löfbom, Linda; Yagita, Hideo; Lehuen, Agnes; Boitard, Christian; Holmberg, Dan; Sorokin, Lydia; Cardell, Susanna L

    2012-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease that results from T cell-mediated destruction of pancreatic β cells. CD1d-restricted NKT lymphocytes have the ability to regulate immunity, including autoimmunity. We previously demonstrated that CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells, which carry diverse TCRs, prevented T1D in the NOD mouse model for the human disease. In this study, we show that CD4(+) 24αβ type II NKT cells, but not CD4/CD8 double-negative NKT cells, were sufficient to downregulate diabetogenic CD4(+) BDC2.5 NOD T cells in adoptive transfer experiments. CD4(+) 24αβ NKT cells exhibited a memory phenotype including high ICOS expression, increased cytokine production, and limited display of NK cell markers, compared with double-negative 24αβ NKT cells. Blocking of ICOS or the programmed death-1/programmed death ligand 1 pathway was shown to abolish the regulation that occurred in the pancreas draining lymph nodes. To our knowledge, these results provide for the first time cellular and molecular information on how type II CD1d-restricted NKT cells regulate T1D.

  19. Two approaches, one problem: Cultural constructions of type II diabetes in an indigenous community in Yucatán, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Sarah M; Durden, T Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    The emerging epidemic of obesity and type II diabetes in Mexico has recently propelled the nation into the public health spotlight. In the state of Yucatán, the experience of diabetes is greatly impacted by two cultural constructions of disease. In this setting, elements of Yucatec Mayan health practices as well as the biomedical model affect the approach to type II diabetes. Both frameworks offer unique understandings of the etiology of diabetes and recommend different ways to manage the condition. Based on in-depth and semi-structured interviews with both community members and clinicians, the present study seeks to understand how diabetes is understood and treated in indigenous settings in rural Yucatán. We explore the context in which community members navigate between locally available healthcare options, choose one over the other, or incorporate strategies from both into their diabetes care regimens. The tension between indigenous community members and their biomedical healthcare providers, the changing food environment of this community, and the persistence of traditional gender constructions affect the management of type II diabetes and its associated symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Rural self-reliance: the impact on health experiences of people living with type II diabetes in rural Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page-Carruth, Althea; Windsor, Carol; Clark, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to explore whether and how rural culture influences type II diabetes management and to better understand the social processes that rural people construct in coping with diabetes and its complications. In particular, the study aimed to analyse the interface and interactions between rural people with type II diabetes and the Australian health care system, and to develop a theoretical understanding that reflects constructs that may be more broadly applicable. The study applied constructivist grounded theory methods within an interpretive interactionist framework. Data from 39 semi-structured interviews with rural and urban type II diabetes patients and a mix of rural health care providers were analysed to develop a theoretical understanding of the social processes that define diabetes management in that context. The analysis suggests that although type II diabetes imposes limitations that require adjustment and adaptation, these processes are actively negotiated by rural people within the environmental context to fit the salient social understandings of autonomy and self-reliance. Thus, people normalized self-reliant diabetes management behaviours because this was congruent with the rural culture. Factors that informed the actions of normalization were relationships between participants and health care professionals, support, and access to individual resources. The findings point to ways in which rural self-reliance is conceived as the primary strategy of diabetes management. People face the paradox of engaging with a health care system that at the same time maximizes individual responsibility for health and minimizes the social support by which individuals manage the condition. The emphasis on self-reliance gives some legitimacy to a lack of prevention and chronic care services. Success of diabetes management behaviours is, however, contingent on relative resources. Where there is good primary care, there develops a number of downstream

  1. Rural self-reliance: the impact on health experiences of people living with type II diabetes in rural Queensland, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Althea Page-Carruth

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of the study was to explore whether and how rural culture influences type II diabetes management and to better understand the social processes that rural people construct in coping with diabetes and its complications. In particular, the study aimed to analyse the interface and interactions between rural people with type II diabetes and the Australian health care system, and to develop a theoretical understanding that reflects constructs that may be more broadly applicable. Methods: The study applied constructivist grounded theory methods within an interpretive interactionist framework. Data from 39 semi-structured interviews with rural and urban type II diabetes patients and a mix of rural health care providers were analysed to develop a theoretical understanding of the social processes that define diabetes management in that context. Results: The analysis suggests that although type II diabetes imposes limitations that require adjustment and adaptation, these processes are actively negotiated by rural people within the environmental context to fit the salient social understandings of autonomy and self-reliance. Thus, people normalized self-reliant diabetes management behaviours because this was congruent with the rural culture. Factors that informed the actions of normalization were relationships between participants and health care professionals, support, and access to individual resources. Conclusions: The findings point to ways in which rural self-reliance is conceived as the primary strategy of diabetes management. People face the paradox of engaging with a health care system that at the same time maximizes individual responsibility for health and minimizes the social support by which individuals manage the condition. The emphasis on self-reliance gives some legitimacy to a lack of prevention and chronic care services. Success of diabetes management behaviours is, however, contingent on relative resources. Where

  2. The potential of SGLT2 inhibitors in phase II clinical development for treating type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pafili, K; Maltezos, E; Papanas, N

    2016-10-01

    There is now an abundance of anti-diabetic agents. However, only few patients achieve glycemic targets. Moreover, current glucose-lowering agents mainly depend upon insulin secretion or function. Sodium glucose co-transporter type 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors present a novel glucose-lowering therapy, inducing glycosuria in an insulin-independent fashion. In this review, the authors discuss the key efficacy and safety data from phase II clinical trials in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) of the main SGLT2 inhibitors approved or currently in development, and provide a rationale for their use in T2DM. Despite the very promising characteristics of this new therapeutic class, a number of issues await consideration. One important question is what to expect from head-to-head comparison data. We also need to know if dual inhibition of SGLT1/SGLT2 is more efficacious in reducing HbA1c and how this therapy affects metabolic and cardiovascular parameters. Additionally, several SGLT2 agents that have not yet come to market have hitherto been evaluated in Asian populations, whereas approved SGLT2 inhibitors have been frequently studied in other populations, including Caucasian subjects. Thus, we need more information on the potential role of ethnicity on their efficacy and safety.

  3. [Relationship between blood glucose levels and salivary pH and buffering capacity in type II diabetes patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkafri, I H; Mashlah, A; Shaqifa, A

    2014-03-13

    This study was evaluated the relationship between blood glucose levels and salivary pH and buffering capacity in type II diabetic patients. The sample comprised 210 participants (age ranged 40-60 years). Based on fasting blood glucose levels the participants were divided into 3 groups: controls with normal blood glucose levels; diabetic patients with levels ≤ 200 mg/dL; and diabetic patients with levels > 200 mg/dL. Salivary pH and buffering capacity were determined in a sample of resting (non-stimulated) saliva taken from each participant. Salivary pH levels in diabetic patients with blood glucose levels > 200 mg/dL were lower than in the controls and diabetic patients with levels ≤ 200 mg/dL. Salivary pH levels were comparable in controls and diabetic patients with blood glucose levels ≤ 200 mg/dL. Salivary buffering capacity in the 3 groups was comparable.

  4. Effect of brewer’s yeast supplementation on serum glucose and lipids in type II diabetic patients with dislipidemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sh. Ravanshad; H. Khosvani Borujeni; M. Soveid; B. Zeighami

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose : Chromium deficiency leads to impaired glucose and lipid metabolism. Chromium supplementation in type II diabetic patients improves glucose and lipid profiles. Organic chromium, such as found in brewer’s yeast, is much better absorbed than inorganic chromium. In this study, the effect of chromium supplementation in the form of brewer’s yeast on glucose and lipid profile of diabetic patients were evaluated.Materials and methods : In a clinical trial study (before and af...

  5. Uso de la metformina en la diabetes mellitus tipo II Use of metformin to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohana Salazar ÁLvarez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Metformina es una biguanida eficaz en el control metabólico de la diabetes mellitus tipo II, no insulinodependiente cuando el control dietético falla. Dada su probada eficacia y actual accesibilidad en el mercado de medicamentos en Cuba, para ser utilizada a nivel primario de atención no solo en pacientes sintomáticos sino en la población en riesgo, se presenta este artículo cuyo propósito es actualizar a los especialistas de Medicina General Integral y Medicina Interna acerca de aspectos de interés relacionados con este medicamento, como: interacciones medicamentosas, enfermedades concomitantes, la biotransformación de la droga y los posibles efectos adversos que se pueden asociar a su uso. Se presentan consideraciones finales acerca del uso de esta droga.Metformin is an effective biguanide for the metabolic control of non-insulin dependent type 2 diabetes mellitus when the dietary control fails. Given its proven efficacy and present accessibility in the pharmaceutical market in Cuba -to be used at primary health care not only in symptomatic patients but in the population at risk-this article was presented to update the knowledge of the Family Medicine and Internal Medicine specialists about interesting aspects related to this drug, i.e, drug interactions, concomitant diseases, drug biotransformation and the possible adverse effects associated to its use. Final remarks on the use of this drug were stated.

  6. HABITS OF PATIENTS AND IMPORTANCE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATOR IN THE TREATMENT OF DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE II IN PALMAS, TOCANTINS, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maynard Noleto SALES

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus, a non-communicable disease that can affect men and women, can be classified as type I or type II. This disease is in the 4th position in numbers of deaths in Brazil, and therefore, involves attention, both from the government, as the patients and family. The aims of this study is describe the lifestyle in relation to diet, foot care and proper medication, and the point of view of patients with diabetes mellitus type II, on the importance of the practice of physical exercise, coordinated and programmed. We performed a study using Questionnaire of Self-Care Activities with Diabetes (QAD and a second questionnaire with questions related to the importance of exercise for patients with diabetes mellitus type II. Questionnaires were applied in 20 patients with the disease (08 men and 12 women, living in the city of Palmas, Tocantins, Brazil. Result: We noticed that even with the recommendations of healthcare professionals, most patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 has not adapted verification of blood glucose, proper nutrition and foot care. Moreover, despite the interviewees know the importance of performing regular physical activity, we noticed that these do not know how much of weekly days in which they must get physical exercise in order to control the disease. Most interviewees adopt just walk as the physical activity, and we have not verified from the answers of patients, if they know what the most beneficial exercises to control this disease.

  7. A Systematic Review: Family Support Integrated with Diabetes Self-Management among Uncontrolled Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Pamungkas, Rian Adi; Chamroonsawasdi, Kanittha; Vatanasomboon, Paranee

    2017-01-01

    The rate of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is dramatically increasing worldwide. Continuing diabetes mellitus (DM) care needs effective self-management education and support for both patients and family members. This study aimed to review and describe the impacts of diabetes mellitus self-management education (DSME) that involve family members on patient outcomes related to patient health behaviors and perceived self-efficacy on self-management such as medication adherence, blood glucose moni...

  8. Differential impact of diabetes mellitus type II and arterial hypertension on collateral artery growth and concomitant macrophage accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Wulf D; Lund, Natalie; Sager, Hendrik; Becker, Wiebke; Wenzel, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type II and arterial hypertension are major risk factors for peripheral arterial disease and have been considered to reduce collateral growth (arteriogenesis). Collateral growth proceeds through different stages. Vascular proliferation and macrophage accumulation are hallmarks of early collateral growth. We here compare the impact of arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus type II on collateral proliferation (Brdu incorporation) and macrophage accumulation (ED 2 staining) as well as collateral vessel function (collateral conductance) in a rat model of peripheral vascular disease (femoral artery occlusion), diabetes mellitus type II (Zucker fatty diabetic rats and Zucker lean rat controls) and arterial hypertension (induced via clip placement around the right renal arteriy). We furthermore tested the impact of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP‑1) on collateral proliferation and macrophage accumulation in these models Diabetic animals showed reduced vascular proliferation and macrophage accumulation, which however did not translate into a change of collateral conductance. Hypertensive animals on the contrary had reduced collateral conductances without altered macrophage accumulation and only a marginal reduction in collateral proliferation. Infusion of MCP‑1 only enhanced vascular proliferation in diabetic animals. These findings illustrate that impaired monocyte/macrophage recruitment is responsible for reduced collateral growth under diabetic conditions but not in arterial hypertension suggesting that diabetes mellitus in particular affects early stages of collateral growth whereas hypertension has its impact on later remodeling stages. Successful pro-arteriogenic treatment strategies in a patient population that presents with diabetes mellitus and arterial hypertension need to address different stages of collateral growth and thus different molecular and cellular targets simultaneously.

  9. Effect of 17β-estradiol on plasma lipids and LDL oxidation in postmenopausal women with type II diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brussaard, H.E.; Leuven, J.A.G.; Kluft, C.; Krans, H.M.J.; Duyvenvoorde, W. van; Buytenhek, R.; Laarse, A. van der; Princen, H.M.G.

    1997-01-01

    In type II diabetes mellitus the altered hormonal state after menopause may represent an additional cardiovascular risk factor. Estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) is associated with a decreased cardiovascular risk, at least in nondiabetic post-menopausal women. We studied the effect of ERT on plasma

  10. Fracture risk in women with type II diabetes. Results from a historical cohort with fracture follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jakob Præst; Jensen, Thomas; Hyldstrup, Lars

    2018-01-01

    . Prevalent fractures (43.7 vs. 33.2%, p = 0.0010) and prevalent MOF (26.2 vs. 20.5% p = 0.038) were more common among patients with type II diabetes. The unadjusted incident fracture risk was increased with a higher relative risk of 42%. An elevated MOF hazard ratio was present (HR = 1.726, p = 0.......0006). Adjustment for prevalent osteoporosis and other possible confounders did not change this finding (HR = 1.558, p = 0.0207). CONCLUSIONS: An association between type II diabetes and an increased risk of MOF primarily driven by an increased hip fracture risk was documented. This finding was independent......PURPOSE: To examine the independent association between type II diabetes and fracture risk in a population of predominantly postmenopausal women referred to a specialist clinic for osteoporosis evaluation. METHODS: Type II diabetes associated fracture risk were evaluated among to 229 patients...

  11. Calcified carotid atherosclerotic plaques on digital panoramic radiographs in patients with Type II diabetes mellitus: A case control study

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    Neha Khambete

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Diabetes mellitus is associated with accelerated carotid artery atherosclerosis and increased risk of stroke. This study was conducted with the objective of determining the prevalence of calcified atherosclerotic plaques on panoramic radiographs of patients with Type II diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: Panoramic radiographs of 100 patients (age range 50-84 years with known history of type II diabetes mellitus, visiting the outpatient department were evaluated for the presence of calcified atherosclerotic plaques. Age- and sex-matched controls were evaluated in the same manner. Statistical comparison of prevalence rates was done. Results: The radiographs of diabetics (mean age: 64.45 years revealed that 26% had atheromatous plaques, whereas those of controls (mean age: 65.36 years revealed that 6% had atheromatous plaques. A statistically significant difference (P = 0.01410 was obtained using Yates′ Chi-square test. Conclusion: People with diabetes mellitus had a greater prevalence of calcified atherosclerotic plaques on panoramic radiographs than non-diabetics. Panoramic radiographs of diabetic patients should be screened for the presence of carotid artery atheromatous plaques for timely medical referral of asymptomatic patients and avoiding any further serious consequences like cerebrovascular accidents.

  12. A clinical study of serum phosphate and magnesium in type II diabetes mellitus

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    Revathi.R, Julius Amaldas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available To assess serum phosphate and magnesium level in type-2 diabetic patients in comparison with those of control subjects. Methodology: There were 100 diabetic patients and 100 age matched non-diabetic (control subjects included in this study. Serum phosphate, serum magnesium and fasting and postprandial blood sugar measured among the diabetic and control groups using SPSS version 16.0 for analysis. Results: Serum phosphate level was significantly lower in diabetic patients (2.92 ± 0.75 as compared to control subjects (3.38 ± 0.49. Serum magnesium levels were significantly lower in diabetic patients (0.9 ± 0.15 compared to controls (2.75 ± 0.46 Conclusion: The study reveals that hyperglycemia may reduce serum levels of magnesium and phosphorus.

  13. GPS-MBA: computational analysis of MHC class II epitopes in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ruikun; Liu, Zexian; Ren, Jian; Ma, Chuang; Gao, Tianshun; Zhou, Yanhong; Yang, Qing; Xue, Yu

    2012-01-01

    As a severe chronic metabolic disease and autoimmune disorder, type 1 diabetes (T1D) affects millions of people world-wide. Recent advances in antigen-based immunotherapy have provided a great opportunity for further treating T1D with a high degree of selectivity. It is reported that MHC class II I-A(g7) in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse and human HLA-DQ8 are strongly linked to susceptibility to T1D. Thus, the identification of new I-A(g7) and HLA-DQ8 epitopes would be of great help to further experimental and biomedical manipulation efforts. In this study, a novel GPS-MBA (MHC Binding Analyzer) software package was developed for the prediction of I-A(g7) and HLA-DQ8 epitopes. Using experimentally identified epitopes as the training data sets, a previously developed GPS (Group-based Prediction System) algorithm was adopted and improved. By extensive evaluation and comparison, the GPS-MBA performance was found to be much better than other tools of this type. With this powerful tool, we predicted a number of potentially new I-A(g7) and HLA-DQ8 epitopes. Furthermore, we designed a T1D epitope database (TEDB) for all of the experimentally identified and predicted T1D-associated epitopes. Taken together, this computational prediction result and analysis provides a starting point for further experimental considerations, and GPS-MBA is demonstrated to be a useful tool for generating starting information for experimentalists. The GPS-MBA is freely accessible for academic researchers at: http://mba.biocuckoo.org.

  14. Individual and Environmental determinants of Health Related Quality of Life in Iranian patients with type II diabetes

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    Maryam Hadipour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: In recent two past decades prevalence of Type II diabetes has increased dramatically. Despite its financial costs, one of its consequence outcomes is decreasing quality of life of Diabetic patients. So it seems to be more useful to evaluate the influential personal and also environmental factors on patient’s quality of life. The purpose of this study was to assess effects of personal and environmental factors on Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL of Iranian type II diabetic patients. Material and Methods: We worked on some parts of data form a national cross sectional study conducted in 2006. Sampling technique was random cluster sampling. Data collection method was face to face interview based on EQ-5D questionnaire. Interview form, also measured personal factors include: gender, age, duration of diseases from diagnosis, educational and family economic status. We collected our environmental factors such as literacy rate, urbanization rate, number of medical clinics and endocrinologists from latest national census, 1385. For data analysis we used multilevel regression analysis by Ml-win software. Results: Available data were analyses for 3472 diabetic patients. Gender, age, duration of disease, economic status and educational level in personal level and urbanization rate as an environmental factor were statistically significant factors in relation with health related quality of life. Conclusion: Based on study results, gender, and age, duration of illness, family economic and educational status of patients and the rate of urbanization affect on the HRQoL of type II diabetic patients.

  15. Comparison of the effect of different intensity exercise on a bicycle ergometer on postprandial lipidemia in type II diabetic patients

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    Narges Argani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Postprandial lipid clearance failure and lipoprotein disorders, which are independent risk factors for cardiovascular diseases are well-recognized in type II diabetes. Reduction of fats through exercise has been proved, though the mechanism is not well-defined, and the effects of different intensity exercise on postprandial lipidemia in diabetes type II is unknown. This study aims to find these effects using a cycle ergometer. METHODS: On three different days, 15 type II diabetics (10 women and 5 men, with a mean age 42.07 ± 6.05 years, weight 94.64 ± 4.37 kg, height 159.78 ± 9.09 cm, and body mass index 29.83 ± 3.93 kg/m2, consumed a full fat breakfast (750-800 kcal, 85% fat, and 150 min later, blood samples were taken from them to measure their lipid profile. The 1st day was the control day, without any exercises. Seven days later, 90 min after enriched breakfast, they did 30 min of exercise on the cycle ergometer with intensity of 55-70% of maximum heart rate (HRmax, and 14 days later, 90 min after enriched breakfast, they did 30 min of exercise with intensity of 70-85% of HRmax. RESULTS: According to Friedman non-parametric test, high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol serum level significantly increased after 30 min of moderate intensity exercise (P > 0.05, from 39.4 ± 5.2 to 48.6 ± 9.3, while this increase was insignificant after a higher intensity exercise. Neither intensity levels had any significant effects on triglyceride or on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. CONCLUSION: Results showed that moderate intensity exercise was more effective in increasing HDL cholesterol level in type II diabetics.   Keywords: Postprandial Lipidemia, Resistance Exercise, Bicycle Ergometer, Type II Diabetes 

  16. Musculoskeletal manifestations in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Deepti P. Deshmukh; Asmita G. Akarte

    2017-01-01

    Background: Musculoskeletal complications of diabetes have been generally ignored and poorly treated as compared to other complications. Hence we carried out this study to find the prevalence of musculoskeletal manifestations in type II diabetes mellitus and its correlation with age, BMI, duration of diabetes, and control of diabetes. Methods: 100 consecutive patients of type II diabetes were studied. Duration of diabetes, control of diabetes, and any musculoskeletal complaints were noted....

  17. CD4+ type II NKT cells mediate ICOS and programmed death-1-dependent regulation of type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadri, Nadir; Korpos, Eva; Gupta, Shashank

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease that results from T cell-mediated destruction of pancreatic ß cells. CD1d-restricted NKT lymphocytes have the ability to regulate immunity, including autoimmunity. We previously demonstrated that CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells, which carry ...

  18. Insulin therapy refusal among type II diabetes mellitus patients in Kubang Pasu district, Kedah, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei Leong; Asahar, Siti Fairus; Harun, Noor Liani

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Diabetes mellitus is a rising non-communicable disease in Malaysia. Insulin therapy refusal is a challenge for healthcare providers, as it results in delayed insulin initiation. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of insulin therapy refusal and its associated factors. METHODS This cross-sectional study was conducted at seven public health clinics in Kubang Pasu district of Kedah, Malaysia, from March to October 2012. A newly developed and validated questionnaire was used and participants were selected via systematic random sampling. Only patients diagnosed with type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and under the public health clinic care in Kubang Pasu were included in the study. Multiple logistic regression was used to study the association between insulin therapy refusal and its associated factors. RESULTS There were 461 respondents and the response rate was 100%. Among these 461 patients with T2DM, 74.2% refused insulin therapy. The most common reason given for refusal was a lack of confidence in insulin injection (85.4%). Multiple logistic regression revealed that respondents who had secondary education were 55.0% less likely to refuse insulin therapy than those who had primary education or no formal education (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.25–0.82, p = 0.009). There was also a significant inverse association between glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level and insulin therapy refusal (adjusted OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.76–1.00, p = 0.047). CONCLUSION Insulin therapy refusal is common in Kubang Pasu. Educational status and HbA1c level should be taken into consideration when counselling patients on insulin therapy initiation. PMID:25532511

  19. ORAL HYPOGLYCAEMIC AGENTS IN THE MANAGEMENT OF TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS

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    Durgaprasad M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES Diabetes is fast gaining the status of a potential epidemic globally. The number of people with diabetes has risen from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014, the rise seen more rapidly in developing and under developed countries. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM being the most common type, accounting for an estimated 85-95% of all diabetes cases. Diabetes remains a major cause of blindness, renal failure, and cardiovascular events including heart attacks, stroke and limb amputations. 1 Being an heterogeneous disorder, many adults with T2DM have difficulty controlling their blood sugar levels and associated complications as most of available antidiabetic agents aim to achieve only normoglycaemia and relieve diabetes symptoms, such as polydipsia, polyuria, weight loss, ketoacidosis while the longterm goals to prevent the development of or slow the progression of longterm complications of the disease is often unaddressed, therefore, there remains, a significant unmet demand for new agents that will help diabetic patients achieve treatment targets without increasing the risk for weight gain or hypoglycaemia. Among the new classes of oral agents, SGLT-2 inhibitors and mTOT insulin sensitisers appear to hold some good promise. However, recent articles published describing its adverse effect profile of SGLT-2 inhibitors had put a question mark on its utility. In this article, we have reviewed the plethora of available OHAs along with the newer OHAs for managing T2DM optimally.

  20. Epigenetics and type II diabetes mellitus: underlying mechanisms of prenatal predisposition

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    J. David Sterns

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a widespread metabolic disorder characterized by insulin resistance resulting in abnormally high blood glucose levels. While the onset of T2DM is known to be influenced by a number of genetic factors, emerging research has demonstrated the additional role of a variety of epigenetic mechanisms in the development of this disorder. Epigenetics relates to the heritable changes in gene expression that cannot be explained by simple variations in the primary DNA sequence and includes DNA methylation and histone modification. These changes impact many processes, including stem cell differentiation into pancreatic endocrine cells as well as normal β-cell function. Recent studies focusing on the effects of maternal health, specifically as it is affected by famine and hyperglycemia, have found possible mechanisms to explain the increased likelihood of the fetus developing risk factors such as altered atherogenic lipid profiles, increased obesity and BMI, as well as impaired glucose tolerance (IGT for the development of T2DM later in life. It is suggested that these epigenetic influences happen early during gestation and are less susceptible to the effects of postnatal environmental modification as was previously thought. Regardless, emerging research into epigenetic-based treatment approaches for T2DM are promising and offer yet another means by which to limit the impact of this global epidemic.

  1. Long-term use of metformin and colorectal cancer risk in type II diabetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardel, Majken; Jensen, S. M.; Pottegård, Anton

    2014-01-01

    of prescriptions for a cumulative dose of 2000 g within 5 years prior to the index date. To control for potential confounders, we used unconditional logistic regression. We generated adjusted odds ratios (OR) for the association between metformin and CRC and performed subanalyses for selected subgroups...... and for the dose-response relation. We identified 2088 cases and 9060 controls during the study period. The association between long-term metformin use and CRC gave an adjusted OR at 0.83 (95% CI 0.68-1.00). A protective effect on CRC with long-term use of metformin was only evident for women (OR 0.66 vs. 0.......99 for men). There was a significant dose-response association of metformin use > 250 defined daily dose (DDD) and for the duration of metformin use > 1 year. We found an indication of a protective effect of long-term metformin use against CRC in type II diabetics, although this effect was only seen in women....

  2. QSAR studies in the discovery of novel type-II diabetic therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuhammad, Areej; Taha, Mutasem O

    2016-01-01

    Type-II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a complex chronic disease that represents a major therapeutic challenge. Despite extensive efforts in T2DM drug development, therapies remain unsatisfactory. Currently, there are many novel and important antidiabetic drug targets under investigation by many research groups worldwide. One of the main challenges to develop effective orally active hypoglycemic agents is off-target effects. Computational tools have impacted drug discovery at many levels. One of the earliest methods is quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies. QSAR strategies help medicinal chemists understand the relationship between hypoglycemic activity and molecular properties. Hence, QSAR may hold promise in guiding the synthesis of specifically designed novel ligands that demonstrate high potency and target selectivity. This review aims to provide an overview of the QSAR strategies used to model antidiabetic agents. In particular, this review focuses on drug targets that raised recent scientific interest and/or led to successful antidiabetic agents in the market. Special emphasis has been made on studies that led to the identification of novel antidiabetic scaffolds. Computer-aided molecular design and discovery techniques like QSAR have a great potential in designing leads against complex diseases such as T2DM. Combined with other in silico techniques, QSAR can provide more useful and rational insights to facilitate the discovery of novel compounds. However, since T2DM is a complex disease that includes several faulty biological targets, multi-target QSAR studies are recommended in the future to achieve efficient antidiabetic therapies.

  3. 26. Effectiveness of telephone follow up in managing patients with type II diabetes mellitus

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    Ala Taiyem

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common non-communicable diseases globally, labeled as the greatest healthcare challenge according to the World Health Organization and the International Diabetes Federation. This complex disease requires the involvement of multidisciplinary teams to reduce the risk and impact of long-term diabetes complications through intensive monitoring, education and lifestyle modifications with a great emphasis on promoting self-care. A brief and cost-effective interventions to improve diabetes self care management are needed. This study evaluated the effect of “educational” telephone intervention delivered by nurse specialist on glycemic control “Glyclated hemoglobin A1c”, and diabetes self-care management for patients with type 2 diabetes followed-up by a nurse-led cardiovascular disease management program of a tertiary hospital within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. This quantitative descriptive and qauzi-experimental study was conducted over three months, included 60 adult patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes who were randomly assigned to intervention or control group. Participants within the intervention group received usual care and six educational phone calls promoting them to improve their diabetic self-care activities. Patients within the control arm continued to receive their usual care only. The telephone follow-up intervention increased frequency of exercise and foot care, improved diet and adherence to anti-diabetes medication. Modest improvement was detected on the glycemic control and home glucose monitoring. As a conclusion, the study indicated positive effect of the intervention on glycemic control and self-care management. Multi-centers and longitudinal studies with larger sample size are recommended for future studies.

  4. Type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type 2 diabetes; Oral hypoglycemic - type 2 diabetes; High blood sugar - type 2 diabetes ... your kidneys are working well ( microalbuminuria and serum creatinine ). Visit your eye doctor at least once a ...

  5. The hypolipidemic effects of Afzelia africana in type II diabetic patients in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwosu, M C; Odenigbo, U M; Odenigbo, U C

    2006-01-01

    The projected rise in the world prevalence of diabetes mellitus poses new challenges in poor countries. Soluble fibre incorporation into the diet of diabetic patients has been shown to reduce the glyceamia and lipaemia of diabetes mellitus. The hypolipidemic effect of soluble fibre supplementation using the seed of locally available legume tree plant--Afzelia africana was studied in 13 Nigerian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The subjects were randomly selected from the out patient diabetes mellitus clinic of Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi. They were fed with unsupplemented and supplemented standardized diet for the first 2 days and subsequent 4 days respectively. The fibre supplementation was prepared and incorporated into the meal portions according to previously described technique and acceptability study. The fasting serum levels of TC, TG, HDL-C, LDL-C and HDL/TC ratio were estimated before and after the unsupplemented and fibre supplemented meals. The data obtained were analyzed using paired t-test. The correlation between the total energy requirement and the reduction in TC, pre and post fibre supplemented meals were determined using the linear coefficients. The results showed a significant reduction (P 0.05). The exploitation and incorporation of this source of soluble fibre in diabetic diets reduced the lipaemia of diabetes mellitus.

  6. Treating Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health care team is there for you. Your child's diabetes management plan should be easy to understand, detailed, ... Can Diabetes Be Prevented? Monitoring Blood Sugar Your Child's Diabetes Health Care Team Medicines for Diabetes Type 2 ...

  7. HLA non-class II genes may confer type I diabetes susceptibility in a Mapuche (Amerindian) affected family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Bravo, Francisco; Martinez-Laso, Jorge; Martin-Villa, Jose M; Moscoso, Juan; Moreno, Almudena; Serrano-Vela, Juan I; Zamora, Jorge; Asenjo, Silvia; Gleisner, Andrea; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    A rare case of type I diabetes is studied in an Amerindian (Mapuche) family from Chile, analyzing glutamic acid decarboxylase, islet-cell autoantibodies and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes. The affected sib is the only one that has one specific HLA haplotype combination that differs from the other sibs only in the HLA class I genes. It is concluded that HLA diabetes susceptibility factors may be placed outside the class II region or even that susceptibility factors do not exist in the HLA region in this Amerindian family.

  8. [Prevalence of renal involvement in a population of type Ii diabetics followed up in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, R; Coca, A; Tranche, S; Rodríguez Mañas, L; Abellán, J; Moyá, A

    2002-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes use to be managed in their primary care settings during the early stages of the disease. The main objective of the study was to determine renal impairment prevalence, and to assess its significance, within type 2 diabetics controlled by their family physicians. Transverse observation of patients with type 2 diabetes who were the first 20 unselected cases seen by 183 family physicians from 16 of the 17 Autonomic Communities of our country. The following variables were determined: serum creatinine, glucose, and HbA1c concentrations, proteinuria (dipstick test in a first-voided morning urine sample), blood pressure levels, and associated cardiovascular disease. Data from 3,583 type 2 diabetic subjects were evaluated. Mean age was 64 +/- 10 years and 45% were male. A serum creatinine > or = 1.2 mg/dl was observed in 523 (15.5%) patients. Proteinuria was present in 794 (23.5%) cases, being > or = 2 + in 215 (6.5%) subjects. Patients with a serum creatinine > or = 1.2 mg/dl were older, shower higher blood pressure levels, and suffered from more cardiovascular disease (32.0 vs 19.5%) than those with a serum creatinine or = 2 + proteinuria (p or = 140/90 mmHg in 69% of the cases, being < 130/85 mmHg in only 8% of the subjects. There is a high prevalence of renal impairment, approximately of 25% within type 2 diabetic patients seen at the primary care level. Optimal blood pressure level seems to be extremely infrequent bearing in mind the diagnosis of diabetes and the associated cardiovascular disease.

  9. Prevention of type II diabetes mellitus in Qatar: Who is at risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christos, Paul J; Chemaitelly, Hiam; Abu-Raddad, Laith J; Ali Zirie, Mahmoud; Deleu, Dirk; Mushlin, Alvin I

    2014-01-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the leading chronic diseases in Qatar as well as worldwide. However, the risk factors for DM in Qatar and their prevalence are not well understood. We conducted a case-control study with the specific aim of estimating, based on data from outpatients with DM in Qatar (cases) and outpatient/inpatient controls, the association between demographic/lifestyle factors and DM. A total of 459 patients with DM from Hamad General Hospital (HGH) outpatient adult diabetes clinics, and 342 control patients from various outpatient clinics and inpatient departments within Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC) (years 2006-2008), were recruited. The association between risk factors and DM was evaluated using bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses. In addition to odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI), we estimated the population attributable risk fractions for the DM demographic/lifestyle risk factors. Qatari nationality was the strongest risk factor for DM (adjusted OR = 5.5; 95% CI = 3.5-8.6; p 65 years (adjusted OR = 3.3; 95% CI = 0.9-11.4; p = 0.06), male gender (adjusted OR = 2.9; 95% CI = 1.8-4.8; p nationals, obesity was found to be the main risk factor for DM (unadjusted OR = 3.0; 95% CI = 1.6-5.6; p nationals. Promoting physical activity may reduce the burden of DM by up to 9.4% for the population at large and up to 17.3% for Qatari nationals. Demographic/lifestyle factors appear to be the main risk factors for the high DM levels observed in Qatar, with a contribution that outweighs that of genetic risk factors. While further evaluation of DM risk factors among the Qatari population (as opposed to the resident population) is important and of interest, these findings highlight the need to focus short-term DM interventions on addressing demographic/lifestyle risk factors to achieve substantial and timely declines in DM levels.

  10. Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sexual, & Bladder Problems Clinical Trials Preventing Type 2 Diabetes Perhaps you have learned that you have a ... I lower my chances of developing type 2 diabetes? Research such as the Diabetes Prevention Program shows ...

  11. Brain expansion in patients with type II diabetes following insulin therapy: a preliminary study with longitudinal voxel-based morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiye; Li, Jinfeng; Sun, Jie; Ma, Lin

    2014-01-01

    We performed a longitudinal analysis based on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to investigate the brain structural and perfusion changes caused by insulin therapy in patients with type II diabetes. High resolution three-dimensional T1-weighted fast spoiled gradient recalled echo images and flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) images were obtained from 11 patients with type II diabetes before and 1 year after initiation of insulin therapy and 11 normal controls. Brain volume changes were investigated by a longitudinal voxel-based morphometry (VBM), and perfusion changes were evaluated by FAIR imaging between baseline and follow-up data. Significant regional gray matter (GM) expansion located in bilateral frontal, parietal, and left occipital lobes, and regional white matter (WM) expansion was shown in left precentral subcortical WM and right angular subcortical WM after insulin therapy (P Brain hyperperfusion was detected in bilateral frontal cortex, left occipital cortex, and right temporal cortex after insulin therapy (P brain expansion and hyperperfusion were demonstrated 1 year after initiation of insulin therapy, and insulin therapy could contribute to the brain volume gainment in the patients with type II diabetes. Copyright © 2013 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  12. A Systematic Review: Family Support Integrated with Diabetes Self-Management among Uncontrolled Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rian Adi Pamungkas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The rate of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2D is dramatically increasing worldwide. Continuing diabetes mellitus (DM care needs effective self-management education and support for both patients and family members. This study aimed to review and describe the impacts of diabetes mellitus self-management education (DSME that involve family members on patient outcomes related to patient health behaviors and perceived self-efficacy on self-management such as medication adherence, blood glucose monitoring, diet and exercise changes, health outcomes including psychological well-being and self-efficacy, and physiological markers including body mass index, level of blood pressure, cholesterol level and glycemic control. Three databases, PubMed, CINAHL, and Scopus were reviewed for relevant articles. The search terms were “type 2 diabetes,” “self-management,” “diabetes self-management education (DSME,” “family support,” “social support,” and “uncontrolled glycaemia.” Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI guidelines were used to determine which studies to include in the review. Details of the family support components of DSME intervention and the impacts of these interventions had on improving the health outcomes patients with uncontrolled glycaemia patients. A total of 22 intervention studies were identified. These studies involved different DSME strategies, different components of family support provided, and different health outcomes to be measured among T2D patients. Overall, family support had a positive impact on healthy diet, increased perceived support, higher self-efficacy, improved psychological well-being and better glycemic control. This systematic review found evidence that DSME with family support improved self-management behaviors and health outcomes among uncontrolled glycaemia T2D patients. The findings suggest DSME models that include family engagement can be a useful direction for improving diabetes care.

  13. A Systematic Review: Family Support Integrated with Diabetes Self-Management among Uncontrolled Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamungkas, Rian Adi; Chamroonsawasdi, Kanittha; Vatanasomboon, Paranee

    2017-09-15

    The rate of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is dramatically increasing worldwide. Continuing diabetes mellitus (DM) care needs effective self-management education and support for both patients and family members. This study aimed to review and describe the impacts of diabetes mellitus self-management education (DSME) that involve family members on patient outcomes related to patient health behaviors and perceived self-efficacy on self-management such as medication adherence, blood glucose monitoring, diet and exercise changes, health outcomes including psychological well-being and self-efficacy, and physiological markers including body mass index, level of blood pressure, cholesterol level and glycemic control. Three databases, PubMed, CINAHL, and Scopus were reviewed for relevant articles. The search terms were "type 2 diabetes," "self-management," "diabetes self-management education (DSME)," "family support," "social support," and "uncontrolled glycaemia." Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) guidelines were used to determine which studies to include in the review. Details of the family support components of DSME intervention and the impacts of these interventions had on improving the health outcomes patients with uncontrolled glycaemia patients. A total of 22 intervention studies were identified. These studies involved different DSME strategies, different components of family support provided, and different health outcomes to be measured among T2D patients. Overall, family support had a positive impact on healthy diet, increased perceived support, higher self-efficacy, improved psychological well-being and better glycemic control. This systematic review found evidence that DSME with family support improved self-management behaviors and health outcomes among uncontrolled glycaemia T2D patients. The findings suggest DSME models that include family engagement can be a useful direction for improving diabetes care.

  14. A Review of Fatigue Condition in Patients with Type II Diabetes in Isfahan Endocrine and Metabolism Research Center

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    Nasim Vard

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Complications of Diabetes such as Fatigue is a serious obstacle hindering the enhancement of health behaviors, including participation in Diabetes self-care programs, and is considered as a challenging problem for nurses and health-care providers in the process of diseases’ treatments and therapies. These complications not only influence the patients’ quality of life, but also, increases the risk of complications. Hence, regarding the importance of the role of fatigue and its subsequent effects on Diabetes’ control as well as the paucity of studies carried out in this field, the current research intended to review fatigue condition in patients with type II Diabetes in Isfahan Endocrine and Metabolism Research Center. The nature of this study is a Quantitative-Descriptive research. For the purpose of the present study, 195 patients with type II Diabetes were selected as the target sample population, based on Non-probability Convenience Sampling Method, from Isfahan Endocrine and Metabolism Research Center. To collect the research data, the researcher used a two-part written questionnaire encompassing Personal Information and Multidimensional Fatigue Symptom Inventory- Short Form (MFSI-SF as the data collection tool. Each of the participants in the present research were briefly advised about the nature and objectives of the research and they were interviewed by the researcher to complete the questionnaire after consent reached with the patients. The collected data was analyzed by SPSS16 statistical analysis software; accordingly the significance level of all the tests was estimated as P˂0.05. The results of the data analysis showed that %85.1 of the patients suffered from fatigue. There was a statistically significant difference between the mean of the severity of fatigue condition between female and male patients in the present study, i.e.23.22 ± 17.49 for women and 13.24 ± 17.73 for men, indexing a significance level of P˂0

  15. Education and technology used to improve the quality of life for people with diabetes mellitus type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Brooke; Heiland, Brianne; Kohler-Rausch, Elizabeth; Kovic, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of type II diabetes mellitus (DMT2) is expected to continue to rise. Current research has analyzed various tools, strategies, programs, barriers, and support in regards to the self-management of this condition. However, past researchers have yet to analyze the education process; including the adaptation of specific strategies in activities of daily living and roles, as well as the influence of health care providers in the integration of these strategies. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to identify the strengths and limitations of the current model of diabetes education in the United States and hypothesize how technology can impact quality of life. Key informants on diabetes education were recruited from diabetes education centers through the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants. Health care practitioners convey limited knowledge of DMT2. Individuals with DMT2 often have limited understanding of the implications of poor self-management. There appears to be no consistent standard of care for how to effectively incorporate self-management strategies. There is limited education for the use of technology in self-management. Diabetes educators describe that technology could be beneficial. Findings suggest the importance of the role of care providers in emphasizing the implications of poor self-management strategies; that a multidisciplinary approach may enhance the education process; and a need for further developments in technology to address DMT2 self-management strategies.

  16. PREVALENCE OF MEIBOMIAN GLAND DISEASE IN TYPE II DIABETIC PATIENTS & ITS CLINICAL PRESENTATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshma Pathan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS : To study the prevalence of the meibomian gland disease in typ e 2 diabetic patients and its clinical presentations. SETTING AND DESIGN : A hospital based cross sectional descriptive study of 100 type 2 diabetic patients attending a medical college was conducted. METHODS : Detailed diabetic history was recorded. Assessment of ocular surface i.e. the lid margins , conjunctiva , corneal surface was done via slit lamp biomicroscopy. Meibomian gland disease (MGD severity was assessed by the quality and expressibility of the meibomian secretion. Dry eye tests like schir mer’s test and tear film breakup time were done. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED : SPSS statistical software version 17 was used. RESULTS : 56% of the patients out of 100 diabetic patients had MGD. The most common symptom was burning (46.9% , followed by dryness ( 23.5% , 5.6% had conjunctival injection , 7.14% had corneal erosions , 25% had mucus debris , 53.65% had dry eye which was statistically significant (p=0.001 , 56.25% males and 72.2% females had the disease which was not statistically significant. CONCLUSION : The prevalence of Meibomian gland disease in the diabetic population was 56% which is more than the general population prevalence. Apart from other disorders diabetics are also more prone for ocular surface diseases like Meibomian gland disease. MGD is an important pre disposer for severe diseases like Dry eye in this subgroup of patients which can lead to complications like conjunctival keratinisations , corneal erosions and perforations. Careful examination of these patients for ocular surface disease and prompt treatment is required.

  17. Association of Lifecourse Socioeconomic Status with Chronic Inflammation and Type 2 Diabetes Risk: The Whitehall II Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringhini, Silvia; Batty, G. David; Bovet, Pascal; Shipley, Martin J.; Marmot, Michael G.; Kumari, Meena; Tabak, Adam G.; Kivimäki, Mika

    2013-01-01

    Background Socioeconomic adversity in early life has been hypothesized to “program” a vulnerable phenotype with exaggerated inflammatory responses, so increasing the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in adulthood. The aim of this study is to test this hypothesis by assessing the extent to which the association between lifecourse socioeconomic status and type 2 diabetes incidence is explained by chronic inflammation. Methods and Findings We use data from the British Whitehall II study, a prospective occupational cohort of adults established in 1985. The inflammatory markers C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 were measured repeatedly and type 2 diabetes incidence (new cases) was monitored over an 18-year follow-up (from 1991–1993 until 2007–2009). Our analytical sample consisted of 6,387 non-diabetic participants (1,818 women), of whom 731 (207 women) developed type 2 diabetes over the follow-up. Cumulative exposure to low socioeconomic status from childhood to middle age was associated with an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes in adulthood (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.96, 95% confidence interval: 1.48–2.58 for low cumulative lifecourse socioeconomic score and HR = 1.55, 95% confidence interval: 1.26–1.91 for low-low socioeconomic trajectory). 25% of the excess risk associated with cumulative socioeconomic adversity across the lifecourse and 32% of the excess risk associated with low-low socioeconomic trajectory was attributable to chronically elevated inflammation (95% confidence intervals 16%–58%). Conclusions In the present study, chronic inflammation explained a substantial part of the association between lifecourse socioeconomic disadvantage and type 2 diabetes. Further studies should be performed to confirm these findings in population-based samples, as the Whitehall II cohort is not representative of the general population, and to examine the extent to which social inequalities attributable to chronic inflammation are reversible

  18. Education and technology used to improve the quality of life for people with diabetes mellitus type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudley B

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Brooke Dudley, Brianne Heiland, Elizabeth Kohler-Rausch, Mark Kovic Midwestern University Occupational Therapy Program, Downers Grove, IL, USA Background: The incidence of type II diabetes mellitus (DMT2 is expected to continue to rise. Current research has analyzed various tools, strategies, programs, barriers, and support in regards to the self-management of this condition. However, past researchers have yet to analyze the education process; including the adaptation of specific strategies in activities of daily living and roles, as well as the influence of health care providers in the integration of these strategies. Objectives: The purpose of this qualitative case study was to identify the strengths and limitations of the current model of diabetes education in the United States and hypothesize how technology can impact quality of life. Methods: Key informants on diabetes education were recruited from diabetes education centers through the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants. Results: Health care practitioners convey limited knowledge of DMT2. Individuals with DMT2 often have limited understanding of the implications of poor self-management. There appears to be no consistent standard of care for how to effectively incorporate self-management strategies. There is limited education for the use of technology in self-management. Diabetes educators describe that technology could be beneficial. Conclusion: Findings suggest the importance of the role of care providers in emphasizing the implications of poor self-management strategies; that a multidisciplinary approach may enhance the education process; and a need for further developments in technology to address DMT2 self-management strategies. Keywords: health promotion, quality of life, diabetes mellitus type 2, technology, health education

  19. CLINICAL PROFILE OF PATTERN OF DYSLIPIDAEMIA AND ISCHAEMIC HEART DISEASE IN TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Vijayrao Rajkondawar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The present research was undertaken to study the pattern of dyslipidaemia and varied clinical manifestations of ischaemic heart disease, its risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. Diabetes Mellitus (DM has become major public health problem in India. It is not only increasing in morbidity and mortality, but also decreases the quality of life. Also, disease and its complications are causing heavy economic burden for patients suffering from it.1,2 Diabetes is endemic globally with increasing prevalence in both developing and developed countries. Diabetes is a major cause of mortality, but several studies indicate that it is likely underreported as a cause of death. A recent estimate suggested that diabetes was the fifth leading cause of death worldwide and was responsible for almost 3 million deaths annually (1.7-5.2% of all deaths. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 100 patients attending the outpatient department or admitted to medical wards, ICU of tertiary care centre and fulfilling the inclusion criteria were evaluated clinically. A baseline Electrocardiogram (ECG was taken in all cases irrespective of clinical evidence of cardiac involvement. Patients with normal ECG pattern were further evaluated by Treadmill Testing (TMT or stress test for subclinical cardiac involvement. Risk factor evaluation was done in all cases. RESULTS Prevalence of IHD was found to be 41% with a male predominance (1.067:1. Evaluation of risk factors has shown its strong association with IHD. Incidence of IHD was high when low HDL (P 25 had negatively significant association with IHD in type 2 diabetics (P=0.072. Smoking was not statistically associated (P=0.577 and in male alcoholics, IHD had positive association with alcohol (P=0.193. CONCLUSION The current study points out that there exists an increased incidence of ischaemic heart disease in diabetics with few, but not all risk factors contributing to it. Early detection, optimal glycaemic

  20. Role of major histocompatibility complex class II in the development of autoimmune type 1 diabetes and thyroiditis in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, N; Hidaka, S; Tanabe, S; Ohya, M; Ishima, M; Takagi, Y; Masui, N; Seino, S

    2012-01-01

    Although the MHC class II ‘u' haplotype is strongly associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in rats, the role of MHC class II in the development of tissue-specific autoimmune diseases including T1D and autoimmune thyroiditis remains unclear. To clarify this, we produced a congenic strain carrying MHC class II ‘a' and ‘u' haplotypes on the Komeda diabetes-prone (KDP) genetic background. The u/u homozygous animals developed T1D similar to the original KDP rat; a/u heterozygous animals did develop T1D but with delayed onset and low frequency. In contrast, none of the a/a homozygous animals developed T1D; about half of the animals with a/u heterozygous or a/a homozygous genotypes showed autoimmune thyroiditis. To investigate the role of genetic background in the development of thyroiditis, we also produced a congenic strain carrying Cblb mutation of the KDP rat on the PVG.R23 genetic background (MHC class II ‘a' haplotype). The congenic rats with homozygous Cblb mutation showed autoimmune thyroiditis without T1D and slight to severe alopecia, a clinical symptom of hypothyroidism such as Hashimoto's thyroiditis. These data indicate that MHC class II is involved in the tissue-specific development of autoimmune diseases, including T1D and thyroiditis. PMID:21918539

  1. Mutation analysis of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1 (PGC-1) and relationships of identified amino acid polymorphisms to Type II diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, J; Andersen, G; Urhammer, S A

    2001-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate if variability in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1 (PGC-1) gene is associated with Type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus.......This study aimed to investigate if variability in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1 (PGC-1) gene is associated with Type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus....

  2. Leu7Pro polymorphism of PreproNPY associated with an increased risk for type II diabetes in middle-aged subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukkola, O; Kesäniemi, Y A

    2007-09-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) plays a central in energy homeostasis and potentially in the development of obesity-related comorbidities, like type II diabetes. As the PreproNPY Leu7Pro polymorphism probably changes the intracellular processing of the synthesized preproNPY peptide, we assessed the hypothesis that PreproNPY Leu7Pro polymorphism is a risk factor for type II diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance and hypertension. Blood pressure recordings and oral glucose tolerance test were performed in the hypertensive (n=515) and control cohorts (n=525) of our well-defined Oulu Project Elucidating Risk of Atherosclerosis (OPERA) study. The prevalence of type II diabetes was 9% (n=93). The genotypes, insulin and glucose metabolism indexes and plasma ghrelin of the subjects were determined. Pro7 allele frequencies were 5.9, 5.3 and 11.3% in the total cohort, in subjects without and with type II diabetes, respectively. The PreproNPY Pro7 carrier status was a significant risk factor for type II diabetes, and the effect remained significant after adjustment for age, sex, waist circumference and study group (odds ratio=3.02, confidence interval: 1.67-5.44 and Pghrelin levels compared to non-carriers. The PreproNPY Pro7 allele is associated with an increased risk for type II diabetes. The risk seems to be associated with a higher insulin resistance among Pro7 carriers whereas low ghrelin concentrations in Pro7 carriers are possibly a consequence of high insulin levels.

  3. Recovery Effect and Life Prolong Effect of Long Term Low-Dose Rate Irradiation on Type II Diabetes Model Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, T.; Makino, N.; Oda, T.; Suzuki, I.; Sakai, K

    2004-01-01

    The effects of low-dose rate gamma-irradiation were investigated on model mice for type II diabetes mellitus, C57BL/KsJ-db/db. The mice develop the type II diabetes by 10 weeks of age due to obesity and are characterized by hyperinsulinemia. Female 10-week old mice, a group of 12 mice, were irradiated at 0.65 mGy/hr from 137-Cs (370 GBq). The urine glucose levels of all of the mice were strongly positive at the beginning of the irradiation. In the irradiated group, the decrease in the glucose level was observed in 3 mice. Such recovery from the diabetes was never observed in 12 mice of non-irradiated control group. There is no systematic difference in the change of body weight, food assumption, and amount of drinking water, between the irradiated group and the non-irradiated group or between the recovered mice and the non-recovered mice. The survival was better in the irradiated group: the surviving fraction at the age of 90 weeks was 75% in the irradiated group, while 40% in the non-irradiated. Marked difference was also observed in the appearance of the coat hair, skin, and tail; better condition was kept in the irradiated group. In the irradiated mice mortality was delayed and the healthy appearance was prolonged in the irradiated mice by about 20 ? 30 weeks compared with the non-irradiated mice. These results suggest that the low-dose irradiation modified the condition of the diabetic mice, which lead not only to the recovery of the diabetes, but also to the suppression of the aging process. (Author)

  4. The Effect of Yoga Exercise on Parameters of Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mirhosseini

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Progressive natural history and complications of diabetes emphasize the need to adopt appropriate therapeutic strategies. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of yoga on body composition, blood glucose, HbA1c, Cutaneous fat percentage, and VO2max of type 2 diabetic patients. Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 30 men with mean age of 49/30±5/40 years in Yazd were purposefully selected via a convenience sampling and divided into two groups of experimental and control(15 each. Experimental group began the yoga exercises for 12 weeks and 3 sessions per week for 60 minutes, whereas the control group did not receive any regular physical activity. In this study, several variables were measured before and after 12 weeks in both groups including fasting blood sugar (fbs, 2 hour glucose (IIh.pp, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, aerobic power (VO2max and Cutaneous fat percentage. In order to measure fbs, IIh.pp, HbA1c, 10 cc of fasting blood and 10 cc of blood 2 hours after breakfast were collected from the subjects in Yazd Diabetes Center. Racopurt test was used to measure VO2max and Lange caliper was applied to measure Cutaneous fat percentage. Moreover, in order to compare the changes between the two groups, mean differences were analyzed using T-test. Results: No significant difference was observed in levels of fbs, IIh.pp, HbA1c, VO2max and Cutaneous fat percentage in the experimental group compared with the control group (p< 0/05. Conclusion: Yoga exercises (for 12 weeks can be effective on controlling the blood glucose in type 2 diabetic patients.

  5. Salivary glucose as a diagnostic tool in Type II diabetes mellitus: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-02

    Nov 2, 2015 ... glucose level is the key to both diagnosis and management of ... diagnostic, as well as a monitoring tool to assess the glycemic status of Type II ..... Priya SS, Bharani GO, Nagalingam M, Jayanthi M, Kanagavalli U. Potential of ... Agrawal RP, Sharma N, Rathore MS, Gupta VB, Jain S, Agarwal V, et al.

  6. Effects of Sesame Oil on Blood Glucose and Lipid Profile in Type II Diabetic Patients Referring to The Yazd Diabetes Research Center.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Hoseini

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Type II Diabetes is one of the most prevalent endocrine diseases in the world that results from a combination of insulin resistance and ß-cell failure. Regarding importance of nutritional factors in management of diabetes, this study was designed to explore the effect of sesame oil on blood glucose and lipid profile in type II diabetic patients at Yazd Diabetes Research Center in 2007. Methods: A quasi-experimental study was conducted on 25 patients with type II diabetes mellitus (age: 51.5±6.28y; BMI:27.3±3kg/m2; disease duration:7.08±5.03y; Fasting blood glucose level: 181±51.9mg/dl. Subjects received 30 g/day sesame oil for 6 weeks. Sesame oil was supplied to the patients, who were instructed to use it in place of other cooking oils for 42 days. Plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, lipid profiles [Total cholesterol (TC, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and triglycerides (TG] were measured at baseline and after 45 days of sesame oil substitution. 24 hours dietary recalls were obtained at the start , middle and end of study. Data was analyzed using analysis of variance with repeated measures and paired t-test. Results: Following 42 days intake of sesame oil, there were significant decrease in FBS (181±51.93 vs 154±39.65 mg/dl, HbA1c (9.64 ± 2 vs 8.4 ± 1.74 percent, TC (226.68 ± 31.4 vs 199.8 ± 37.87 mg/dl, LDL-c (123.9 ± 34.56 vs 95.53 ± 32.54 mg/dl compared to pre-treatment values. (P <0.05 . Blood TG level decreased after intake of sesame oil but this difference was not significant (P=0.2.Also, the changes of HDL-c levels were not significant (P=0.1. Conclusion: Sesame oil consumption results in considerable decrease in blood sugar, HbA1c and blood lipid levels (TC and LDL-C in type II diabetics.

  7. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene Polymorphism (G894T and Diabetes Mellitus (Type II among South Indians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Angeline

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to find out whether the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS G894T single-nucleotide polymorphism is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus in South Indian (Tamil population. A total number of 260 subjects comprising 100 type 2 diabetic mellitus patients and 160 healthy individuals with no documented history of diabetes were included for the study. DNA was isolated, and eNOS G894T genotyping was performed using the polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction enzyme analysis using Ban II. The genotype distribution in patients and controls were compatible with the Hardy-Weinberg expectations (P>0.05. Odds ratio indicates that the occurrence of mutant genotype (GT/TT was 7.2 times (95% CI = 4.09–12.71 more frequent in the cases than in controls. Thus, the present study demonstrates that there is an association of endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (G894T polymorphism with diabetes mellitus among South Indians.

  8. Comorbidity of psychiatric disorders and symmetric distal polyneuropathy among type II diabetic outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, R O; Papelbaum, M; Fontenelle, L F; Appolinario, J C; Ellinger, V C M; Coutinho, W F; Zagury, L

    2007-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to establish the frequency of psychiatric comorbidity in a sample of diabetic patients with symmetric distal polyneuropathy (SDPN). Sixty-five patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were selected consecutively to participate in the study at Instituto Estadual de Diabetes e Endocrinologia. All patients were submitted to a complete clinical and psychiatric evaluation, including the Portuguese version of the structured clinical interview for DSM-IV, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Neuropathy Symptom Score, and Neuropathy Disability Score. SDPN was identified in 22 subjects (33.8%). Patients with and without SDPN did not differ significantly regarding sociodemographic characteristics. However, a trend toward a worse glycemic control was found in patients with SDPN in comparison to patients without SDPN (HbA1c = 8.43 +/- 1.97 vs 7.48 +/- 1.95; P = 0.08). Patients with SDPN exhibited axis I psychiatric disorders significantly more often than those without SDPN (especially anxiety disorders, in general (81.8 vs 60.0%; P = 0.01), and major depression--current episode, in particular (18.2 vs 7.7%; P = 0.04)). The severity of the depressive symptoms correlated positively with the severity of SDPN symptoms (r = 0.38; P = 0.006), but not with the severity of SDPN signs (r = 0.07; P = 0.56). In conclusion, the presence of SDPN seems to be associated with a trend toward glycemic control. The diagnosis of SDPN in diabetic subjects seems also to be associated with relevant psychiatric comorbidity, including anxiety and current mood disorders.

  9. The accuracy of polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, and Indian Diabetes Risk Score in adults screened for diabetes mellitus type-II

    OpenAIRE

    Shivshakti D Pawar; Poonam Thakur; B K Radhe; Harshal Jadhav; Vivek Behere; Vikrant Pagar

    2017-01-01

    Context: The World Health Organization report suggests that over 19% of the world's diabetic population currently resides in India. Unfortunately, >50% of the diabetics in India are unaware about their diabetic status. In the poor income country like India, it is essential to use cost-effective methods for screening for diabetes, and traditionally using three classical symptoms and Indian Diabetes Risk Score (IDRS) tool is helpful but, data regarding their diagnostic accuracy is very less. Ob...

  10. Genetic association analysis of 13 nuclear-encoded mitochondrial candidate genes with type II diabetes mellitus: The DAMAGE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiling, Erwin; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; van 't Riet, Esther

    2009-01-01

    ). After a meta-analysis, only one SNP in SIRT4 (rs2522138) remained significant (P=0.01). Extending the second stage with samples from the Danish Steno Study (n=1220 participants) resulted in a common odds ratio (OR) of 0.92 (0.85-1.00), P=0.06. Moreover, in a large meta-analysis of three genome......Mitochondria play an important role in many processes, like glucose metabolism, fatty acid oxidation and ATP synthesis. In this study, we aimed to identify association of common polymorphisms in nuclear-encoded genes involved in mitochondrial protein synthesis and biogenesis with type II diabetes...

  11. Effect of aqueous bark extract of Garuga pinnata Roxb. in streptozotocin-nicotinamide induced type-II diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirwaikar, Annie; Rajendran, K; Barik, Rakesh

    2006-09-19

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the antihyperglycemic activity of aqueous extract of bark of Garuga pinnata Roxb. (Burseraceae). The various parameters studied included fasting blood sugar levels, serum lipid levels, liver glycogen content, serum insulin level and glycated hemoglobin in diabetic and normal rats. Streptozotocin-nicotinamide was used to induce type-II diabetes mellitus. Treatment with the extract at two dose levels showed a significant increase in the liver glycogen and serum insulin level and a significant decrease in fasting blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin levels. The total cholesterol and serum triglycerides levels were also significantly reduced and the HDL cholesterol levels were significantly increased upon treatment with the extract thus proving the potent antidiabetic property of the plant.

  12. [Hypoglycemic action of different doses of nopal (Opuntia streptacantha Lemaire) in patients with type II diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frati-Munari, A C; Del Valle-Martínez, L M; Ariza-Andraca, C R; Islas-Andrade, S; Chávez-Negrete, A

    1989-01-01

    To assess the relationship between the doses of O. streptacantha Lem. and its acute hypoglycemic action in diabetics, eight patients with type II diabetes mellitus were studied. Four test were performed to each patient with the intake of: (a) 400 ml of water, (b) 100 g (c) 300 g and (d) 500 g of broiled stems of O. streptacantha Lem. Serum glucose was measured at 0, 60, 120 and 180 minutes. Maximal decrease of serum glucose was noticed at 180 minutes, with a mean of 2.3, 10, 30.1 and 46.7 mg/dl less than basal value with 0, 100, 300 and 500 g respectively (P = NS, less than 0.05, less than 0.001 and less than 0.001 respectively). A significant direct correlation (r = 0.690, P less than 0.001) was noticed between the doses and the hypoglycemic effect.

  13. Effective lifestyle interventions to improve type II diabetes self-management for those with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cimo Adriana

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of type II diabetes among individuals suffering from schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorders is more than double that of the general population. By 2005, North American professional medical associations of Psychiatry, Diabetes, and Endocrinology responded by recommending continuous metabolic monitoring for this population to control complications from obesity and diabetes. However, these recommendations do not identify the types of effective treatment for people with schizophrenia who have type II diabetes. To fill this gap, this systematic evidence review identifies effective lifestyle interventions that enhance quality care in individuals who are suffering from type II diabetes and schizophrenia or other schizoaffective disorders. Methods A systematic search from Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and ISI Web of Science was conducted. Of the 1810 unique papers that were retrieved, four met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were analyzed. Results The results indicate that diabetes education is effective when it incorporates diet and exercise components, while using a design that addresses challenges such as cognition, motivation, and weight gain that may result from antipsychotics. Conclusions This paper begins to point to effective interventions that will improve type II diabetes management for people with schizophrenia or other schizoaffective disorders.

  14. Chlorogenic Acid and Rutin Play a Major Role in the In Vivo Anti-Diabetic Activity of Morus alba Leaf Extract on Type II Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunyadi, Attila; Martins, Ana; Hsieh, Tusty-Jiuan; Seres, Adrienn; Zupkó, István

    2012-01-01

    The leaves of the white mulberry tree (Morus alba L.) are used worldwide in traditional medicine as anti-diabetics. Various constituents of mulberry leaves, such as iminosugars (i.e. 1-deoxynojirimicin), flavonoids and related compounds, polysaccharides, glycopeptides and ecdysteroids, have been reported to exert anti-diabetic activity, but knowledge about their contribution to the overall activity is limited. The objective of the present work was to determine the in vivo anti-diabetic activity of an extract of mulberry leaves (MA), and to examine to what extent three major constituents, chlorogenic acid, rutin and isoquercitrin, might contribute to the observed activity. Quantities of the three constituents of interest in the extract were determined by using HPLC-DAD. Activity was determined by using a type II diabetic rat model. After 11 days of per os administration of 250 or 750 mg/kg of MA or the corresponding amounts of each individual compound, a dose dependent decrease of non-fasting blood glucose levels were found for MA, chlorogenic acid and rutin, but not for isoquercitrin. Based on our results, chlorogenic acid and rutin might account for as much as half the observed anti-diabetic activity of MA, hence they can be considered as excellent markers for the quality control of mulberry products. PMID:23185641

  15. Trajectories of glycaemia, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion before diagnosis of type 2 diabetes: an analysis from the Whitehall II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabák, A.G.; Jokela, M.; Akbaraly, T.N.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the timing of changes in glucose metabolism before occurrence of type 2 diabetes. We aimed to characterise trajectories of fasting and postload glucose, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion in individuals who develop type 2 diabetes. METHODS: We analysed data...... from our prospective occupational cohort study (Whitehall II study) of 6538 (71% male and 91% white) British civil servants without diabetes mellitus at baseline. During a median follow-up period of 9.7 years, 505 diabetes cases were diagnosed (49.1% on the basis of oral glucose tolerance test). We...... assessed retrospective trajectories of fasting and 2-h postload glucose, homoeostasis model assessment (HOMA) insulin sensitivity, and HOMA beta-cell function from up to 13 years before diabetes diagnosis (diabetic group) or at the end of follow-up (non-diabetics). FINDINGS: Multilevel models adjusted...

  16. Diabetes mellitus type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Desta, Semere Tekeste

    2017-01-01

    Høgskulen på Vestlandet Avdeling for helsefag for sykepleiere Tittel: Diabetes type 1 Bakgrunn for val av tema: I 2000 var det ca. 130 000 personer i Norge med diabetes, av disse hadde ca. 20 000 diabetes type 1. I dag er det ca. 230 000 personer som har diabetes i Norge. Av disse ca. 28 000 type 1 diabetes. Tallet viser hvor alvorlig sykdommen er, fordi det har vært og fortsatt er, en økning av antall diabetikere i Norge. Type 1 diabetes kan komme i alle aldersgrupper, men vanligvis...

  17. Diabetes Type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not ... You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, have obesity, have a ...

  18. Diabetes, Type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Riazi, Afsane; Bradley, Clare

    2007-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the role of psychological stress in Type 1 diabetes. Studies relating to stress and Type 1 diabetes onset and control, as well as the evidence relating to stress management training in people with Type 1 diabetes are discussed.

  19. HLA Class II Allele, Haplotype, and Genotype Associations with Type 1 Diabetes in Benin: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaossarath A. Fagbemi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Several studies have reported the implication of HLA-DR/DQ loci in the susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (T1D. Since no such study has yet been performed in Benin, this pilot one aimed at assessing HLA class II allele, haplotype, and genotype associations with T1D. Material and Methods. Class II HLA genotyping was performed in 51 patients with T1D and 51 healthy unrelated controls by means of the PCR-SSP method. The diagnosis of T1D was set up according to American Diabetes Association criteria. Odds ratio (OR and its 95% confidence interval (95% CI were calculated to assess the associations between T1D and HLA alleles, haplotypes, and genotypes. Results. Participants were aged 1–24 years. T1D was significantly associated with DR3, DQA1∗05:01, DQB1∗02:01, and DR3-DR4. No significant associations were observed with DR4, DQB1∗03:02, and DQB1∗06:02. Conclusion. Certain HLA class II alleles, haplotypes, and genotypes were related to T1D and may be used as genetic susceptibility markers to T1D in Benin.

  20. Significant Deregulated Pathways in Diabetes Type II Complications Identified through Expression Based Network Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukil, Sanchaita; Sinha, Meenakshee; Varshney, Lavneesh; Agrawal, Shipra

    Type 2 Diabetes is a complex multifactorial disease, which alters several signaling cascades giving rise to serious complications. It is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. The present research work describes an integrated functional network biology approach to identify pathways that get transcriptionally altered and lead to complex complications thereby amplifying the phenotypic effect of the impaired disease state. We have identified two sub-network modules, which could be activated under abnormal circumstances in diabetes. Present work describes key proteins such as P85A and SRC serving as important nodes to mediate alternate signaling routes during diseased condition. P85A has been shown to be an important link between stress responsive MAPK and CVD markers involved in fibrosis. MAPK8 has been shown to interact with P85A and further activate CTGF through VEGF signaling. We have traced a novel and unique route correlating inflammation and fibrosis by considering P85A as a key mediator of signals. The next sub-network module shows SRC as a junction for various signaling processes, which results in interaction between NF-kB and beta catenin to cause cell death. The powerful interaction between these important genes in response to transcriptionally altered lipid metabolism and impaired inflammatory response via SRC causes apoptosis of cells. The crosstalk between inflammation, lipid homeostasis and stress, and their serious effects downstream have been explained in the present analyses.

  1. Studies of variability in the PTEN gene among Danish caucasian patients with Type II diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L; Jensen, J N; Ekstrøm, C T

    2001-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted from chromosome ten (PTEN) has recently been characterized as a novel member in the expanding network of proteins regulating the intracellular effects of insulin. By dephosphorylation of phosphatidyl-inositol-(3, 4, 5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) the PTEN protein...... regulates the insulin-dependent phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signalling cassette and accordingly might function as a regulator of insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. In this study we tested PTEN as a candidate gene for insulin resistance and late-onset Type II (non...

  2. Diabetes Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is ... kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young adults ...

  3. Type 1 Diabetes Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Affiliates JDRF Celebrity Ambassadors JDRF Logo Usage Contact Us Donate Events More Type 1 Diabetes Facts Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune ... about Insulin and T1D Learn More What Is Diabetes? Causes of T1D The Complexity of Diagnosing ... US CAREERS NEWSROOM FOR RESEARCHERS © JDRF 2018 • Privacy Policy • ...

  4. AIR POLLUTION INFLUENCES ON EXHALED NITRIC OXIDE AMONG PEOPLE WITH TYPE II DIABETES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng; Luttmann-Gibson, Heike; Zanobetti, Antonella; Cohen, Allison; De Souza, Celine; Coull, Brent A; Horton, Edward S; Schwartz, Joel; Koutrakis, Petros; Gold, Diane R

    2016-04-01

    In a population with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), we examined associations of short-term air pollutant exposures with pulmonary inflammation, measured as fraction of exhaled pulmonary nitric oxide (FeNO). Sixty-nine Boston Metropolitan residents with T2DM completed up to 5 bi-weekly visits with 321 offline FeNO measurements. We measured ambient concentrations of particle mass, number and components at our stationary central site. Ambient concentrations of gaseous air pollutants were obtained from state monitors. We used linear models with fixed effects for participants, adjusting for 24-hour mean temperature, 24-hour mean water vapor pressure, season, and scrubbed room NO the day of the visit, to estimate associations between FeNO and interquartile range increases in exposure. Interquartile increases in the 6-hour averages of black carbon (BC) (0.5 μg/m 3 ) and particle number (PN) (1,000 particles/cm 3 ) were associated with increases in FeNO of 3.84% (95% CI 0.60% to 7.18%) and 9.86 % (95% CI 3.59% to 16.52%), respectively. We also found significant associations of increases in FeNO with increases in 24-hour moving averages of BC, PN and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Recent studies have focused on FeNO as a marker for eosinophilic pulmonary inflammation in asthmatic populations. This study adds support to the relevance of FeNO as a marker for pulmonary inflammation in diabetic populations, whose underlying chronic inflammatory status is likely to be related to innate immunity and proinflammatory adipokines.

  5. Estimation of salivary sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus and urea in type II diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirzaiy, Masoumeh; Heidari, Fatemeh; Dalirsani, Zohreh; Dehghan, Javid

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an endocrine disease due to insufficiency production of insulin that is associated with altered quantity and quality in salivary secretion. Alteration in saliva can reflect the changes in patients' blood. The collection of saliva is easy therefore; the assessment of saliva is suitable for screening tests of large population. The study aimed at evaluate some elements in diabetic patients' saliva. A total of 25 diabetic patients and age-sex matched control group enrolled into the study. Absorbance spectrophotometer technique was used for assessment of some salivary elements. The assessment of saliva showed that diabetics had unstimulated salivary flow rate of 0.18 ± 0.14 mL/min compared to 0.30 ± 0.12 mL/min for healthy individuals (Pdiabetics compared to healthy group (Psalivary urea, potassium and phosphorus was significantly elevated in diabetic males compared to healthy males and the level of salivary calcium in diabetic females was significantly reduced compared to healthy females (Psalivary sodium of healthy and diabetic persons according to gender (P>0.05). The finding showed that there were some alterations in salivary elements in diabetic patients even in well-controlled subjects compared to healthy group. Moreover, some salivary elements concentrations were various in diabetic and healthy subjects regarding to the sex. Assessment of salivary composition could be beneficial in oral health evaluation. Copyright © 2013 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. To determine the patterns of dyslipidaemia amongst the macrovascular complications of type - II diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamgir, M.A.; Fayyaz, M.; Jamil, A.; Sharif, N.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the characteristics of dyslipidaemia amongst the type 2 diabetic patient with macrovascular complications like ischaemic heart disease, cerebrovascular and peripheral vascular disease and to compare the variables of dyslipidemia in male and female subjects under study. Design: A prospective observational analytic study. Setting and place of Study: Study was conducted in medical unit-III of Bahawal Victoria Hospital Bahawalpur, over a period of 6 months from July, 1, 2008 to December 31, 2008. Procedure: A total of hundred patients of type 2 diabetes were randomly selected for study. Those who had hyperlipidaemia due to secondary causes e.x. nephrotic syndrome, drugs, hypothyroidism etc. were excluded. Blood samples were taken for serum sugar fasting and random and fasting lipid profile. For statistical analysis student t.test at 5% level of significance was used. All mean values were presented as mean +- SD (Standard Deviation). Majority of patients presented in middle and old age category, and they had poor glycemic control. The female patients had uncontrolled hyper glycemic and hypertensive (BP = 145 +- 25.72 / 85.6 +- 76 mm/Hg) than males and their mean random serum sugar was 246.64 +- 105 mg% High percentage of complications were observed in patients of middle age group with great frequency of cardiovascular complications like coronary heart diseases and hypertension (52%) followed by cerebrovascular complications (30%) and peripheral vascular disease (18%). The lipid profile was in high risk range in patients with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications. In patients with CHD, the mean +SD concentration of cholesterol was 207.08 +- 27.94 mg/dl, HDL - C was 34.8 +- 6.27 mg/dl and TC : HDLC ratio > 6, (normally TC:HDLC ratio should be 40 mg/dl). In patients with CVA, HDL - C was 35.09 +- 6 mg/dl and triglycerides was 146.9 +- 50.70 mg/dl and these variables meet the definition of isolated low HDL - C (defined as TG < 150 mg% and HDL

  7. To determine the patterns of dyslipidaemia amongst the macrovascular complications of type - II diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alamgir, M A; Fayyaz, M; Jamil, A; Sharif, N [Bahawal Victoria Hospital, Bahawalpur (Pakistan)

    2010-07-15

    Objective: To assess the characteristics of dyslipidaemia amongst the type 2 diabetic patient with macrovascular complications like ischaemic heart disease, cerebrovascular and peripheral vascular disease and to compare the variables of dyslipidemia in male and female subjects under study. Design: A prospective observational analytic study. Setting and place of Study: Study was conducted in medical unit-III of Bahawal Victoria Hospital Bahawalpur, over a period of 6 months from July, 1, 2008 to December 31, 2008. Procedure: A total of hundred patients of type 2 diabetes were randomly selected for study. Those who had hyperlipidaemia due to secondary causes e.x. nephrotic syndrome, drugs, hypothyroidism etc. were excluded. Blood samples were taken for serum sugar fasting and random and fasting lipid profile. For statistical analysis student t.test at 5% level of significance was used. All mean values were presented as mean +- SD (Standard Deviation). Majority of patients presented in middle and old age category, and they had poor glycemic control. The female patients had uncontrolled hyper glycemic and hypertensive (BP = 145 +- 25.72 / 85.6 +- 76 mm/Hg) than males and their mean random serum sugar was 246.64 +- 105 mg% High percentage of complications were observed in patients of middle age group with great frequency of cardiovascular complications like coronary heart diseases and hypertension (52%) followed by cerebrovascular complications (30%) and peripheral vascular disease (18%). The lipid profile was in high risk range in patients with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications. In patients with CHD, the mean +SD concentration of cholesterol was 207.08 +- 27.94 mg/dl, HDL - C was 34.8 +- 6.27 mg/dl and TC : HDLC ratio > 6, (normally TC:HDLC ratio should be < 5 and HDL - C > 40 mg/dl). In patients with CVA, HDL - C was 35.09 +- 6 mg/dl and triglycerides was 146.9 +- 50.70 mg/dl and these variables meet the definition of isolated low HDL - C (defined as TG

  8. Estudo Comparativo dos Resultados Maternos e Perinatais entre Pacientes com Diabetes Pré-gestacional Tipo I e Tipo II Comparative Study of Maternal and Perinatal Outcomes among Patients with Pregestational Type I and Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micheline Monte de Carvalho

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: avaliar a evolução da gestação, controle metabólico e resultados perinatais de pacientes diabéticas pré-gestacionais e fazer um estudo comparativo entre os resultados de pacientes com diabetes insulino-dependente e não-insulino-dependente. Métodos: análise retrospectiva de prontuários de 57 pacientes com diagnóstico de diabetes pré-gestacional que iniciaram pré-natal no Serviço de Medicina Materno-Fetal da Maternidade-Escola Assis Chateaubriand da Universidade Federal do Ceará, no período de janeiro 1995 a dezembro de 1998. As 57 grávidas incluídas no estudo foram divididas em dois grupos: grupo I, composto de 28 pacientes portadoras de diabetes insulino-dependente (tipo I, e grupo II, com 29 gestantes com diabetes não-insulino-dependente (tipo II controladas com dieta ou com hipoglicemiante oral antes da gestação. Resultados: não houve diferença estatisticamente significante entre os dois grupos em relação à necessidade de internamento para controle glicêmico (39,2% x 27,5% e complicações maternas, tais como: hipertensão arterial crônica (14,2% x 27,5%, doença hipertensiva específica da gravidez (14,2% x 17,2%, amniorrexe prematura (3,5% x 10,3%, infecção do trato urinário (10,7% x 6,8% e trabalho de parto prematuro (3,5% x 6,8%. Foi observado, porém, maior número de episódios de hipoglicemia materna entre as pacientes insulino-dependentes (35,7% x 3,4%. Os resultados perinatais foram semelhantes. Observamos elevados índices de malformações e morbimortalidade perinatal. Conclusão: não houve diferença na incidência de intercorrências clínicas e obstétricas entre as pacientes insulino-dependentes e não-insulino-dependentes, excluindo-se hipoglicemia materna.Purpose: to evaluate the evolution of gestation, metabolic control and perinatal outcome of pregestational diabetic patients and to perform a comparative study of the results of patients with insulin-dependent diabetes (type I and

  9. Preventive Effect of Boiogito on Metabolic Disorders in the TSOD Mouse, a Model of Spontaneous Obese Type II Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Shimada

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available “Boiogito” is a Kampo preparation which has been used since ancient times in patients with obesity of the “asthenic constitution” type, so-called “watery obesity”, and its effect has been recognized clinically. In this study, we investigated the anti-obesity effect of Boiogito in the TSOD (Tsumura Suzuki Obese Diabetes mouse, a model of spontaneous obese type II diabetes mellitus. Boiogito showed a significant anti-obesity effect in TSOD mice by suppressing body weight gain in a dosage-dependent manner. In addition, Boiogito showed significant ameliorative effects on features of metabolic syndrome such as hyperinsulinemia, fasting hyperglycemia and abnormal lipid metabolism. Regarding lipid accumulation in TSOD mice, Boiogito showed a significant suppressive effect on accumulation of subcutaneous fat, but the effect on the visceral fat accumulation that constitutes the basis of metabolic syndrome was weak, and the suppressive effect on insulin resistance was also weak. Furthermore, Boiogito did not alleviate the abnormal glucose tolerance, the hypertension or the peripheral neuropathy characteristically developed in the TSOD mice. In contrast, in the TSNO (Tsumura Suzuki Non-Obesity mice used as controls, Boiogito suppressed body weight gain and accumulation of subcutaneous and visceral fat. The above results suggested that Boiogito is effective as an anti-obesity drug against obesity of the “asthenic constitution” type in which subcutaneous fat accumulates, but cannot be expected to exert a preventive effect against various symptoms of metabolic syndrome that are based on visceral fat accumulation.

  10. The accuracy of polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, and Indian Diabetes Risk Score in adults screened for diabetes mellitus type-II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivshakti D Pawar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The World Health Organization report suggests that over 19% of the world's diabetic population currently resides in India. Unfortunately, >50% of the diabetics in India are unaware about their diabetic status. In the poor income country like India, it is essential to use cost-effective methods for screening for diabetes, and traditionally using three classical symptoms and Indian Diabetes Risk Score (IDRS tool is helpful but, data regarding their diagnostic accuracy is very less. Objective: (1 To assess the diagnostic accuracy of polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, and IDRS for detecting diabetes. Settings and Design: Six hundred and seventy-seven adult individuals> 20 years of age were screened for diabetes and assessed polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, and IDRS score. All were subjected for postprandial blood glucose level. Subjects and Methods: For diagnostic accuracy sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, likelihood ratios (LRs, for positive and negative tests, and accuracy was calculated for each symptom. Similarly, by receiver operative curve (ROC curve analysis, we carried out sensitivity and specificity of IDRS. Results: There was statistically significant association between these three classical symptoms and diabetes status of individuals. When present, all these three symptoms carried 7.34% sensitivity and 98.42% specificity with positive predictive value 47.06% and NPV 84.70%, LR+4.36, LR−0.94 with accuracy of 85%. The optimum cutoff value of IDRS score was> 50, which carried sensitivity 73%, specificity 58.7%, and area under curve for ROC was 68% (P < 0.001. Conclusions: This study has shown highest specificity for these three classical symptoms in diagnosing diabetes, but these symptoms were insensitive to detect all diabetic subjects.

  11. The effect of xerostomia and hyposalivation on the quality of life of patients with type II diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Molania, Tahereh; Alimohammadi, Mona; Akha, Ozra; Mousavi, Jaber; Razvini, Ramin; Salehi, Maedeh

    2017-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disease which can have numerous physical effects for patient. Xerostomia is one of these complications. Compared to healthy people, patients with diabetes mellitus, have a worse quality of life, and complications of diabetes are the main determinants of quality of life in these patients. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the effects of xerostomia and hyposalivation on quality of life of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. ...

  12. AR agonist and PPAR agonists a better treatment of type II diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Metabolic syndrome consists of insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia, obesity among other metabolic defects. Treatment of diabetes/obesity goes beyond glycaemic control. Effective management of diabetes involves the improvement of insulin sensitivity, regulation of body weight and improve-ment of lipid profile. However ...

  13. A "Family-Based" Approach to the Treatment of Obese Type II Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Rena R.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Assigned 49 obese diabetic patients with obese spouses (diabetic or nondiabetic) to an alone or together (with spouses) treatment condition of behavioral weight control program. Found no significant differences in weight losses of patients at posttreatment or one-year followup, but did find that women did better when treated with their spouses,…

  14. Relationship between trust in God and self – efficacy With mental health in type II diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Behdani

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: Regarding the increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus, the disease is one of the notorious health problems in the world. Thus, intervention aimed at increasing religious faith and self-efficacy in order to do self-care activities will be useful in decreasing diabetic complications.

  15. Type II diabetes patients in primary care : profiles of healthcare utilization obtained from observational data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C.E.; Hoekstra, T.; Verheij, R.A.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Schellevis, F.G.; et al, [No Value

    2013-01-01

    Background The high burden of diabetes for healthcare costs and their impact on quality of life and management of the disease have triggered the design and introduction of disease management programmes (DMPs) in many countries. The extent to which diabetes patients vary with regard to their

  16. Study on Patients with Poor Control of Type II Diabetes Mellitus at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetes control is elusive so great effort is needed to keep blood glucose normal or near the required level. Various factors are suspected for poor glycemic control. These factors included: aging, sex, duration of diabetes, medication adherence, clinical inertia, physical inactivity, patient knowledge, comorbidity ...

  17. Salivary glucose as a diagnostic tool in Type II diabetes mellitus: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Objectives: The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing steadily in India. Understanding blood glucose level is the key to both diagnosis and management of diabetes mellitus. However, there is an on‑going need for improvements in noninvasive, point‑of‑care tools for the diagnosis and prognosis of ...

  18. Pharmacogenomics in type II diabetes mellitus management: Steps toward personalized medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Avery

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Peter Avery, Shaymaa S Mousa, Shaker A MousaThe Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Albany, NY, USAAbstract: Advances in genotype technology in the last decade have put the pharmacogenomics revolution at the forefront of future medicine in clinical practice. Discovery of novel gene variations in drug transporters, drug targets, effector proteins and metabolizing enzymes in the form of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs continue to provide insight into the biological phenomena that govern drug efficacy and toxicity. To date, novel gene discoveries extracted from genome-wide association scans and candidate gene studies in at least four antidiabetic drug classes have helped illuminate possible causes of interindividual variability in response. Inadequate protocol guidelines for pharmacogenomics studies often leads to poorly designed studies, making it hard to formulate a definitive conclusion regarding the clinical relevance of the information at hand. These issues, along with the ethical, social, political, legislative, technological, and economic challenges associated with pharmacogenomics have only delayed its entry to mainstream clinical practice. On the other hand, these issues are being actively pursued and rapid progress is being made in each area which assures the possibility of gaining widespread acceptance in clinical practice.Keywords: pharmacogenomics, genetics, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, personalized medicine, type 2 diabetes, pharmacotherapy, antidiabetic drugs, efficacy, and safety

  19. Analysis of Urine Composition in Type II Diabetic Mice after Intervention Therapy Using Holothurian Polypeptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyan Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrolysates and peptide fractions (PF obtained from sea cucumber with commercial enzyme were studied on the hyperglycemic and renal protective effects on db/db rats using urine metabolomics. Compared with the control group the polypeptides from the two species could significantly reduce the urine glucose and urea. We also tried to address the compositions of highly expressed urinary proteins using a proteomics approach. They were serum albumins, AMBP proteins, negative trypsin, elastase, and urinary protein, GAPDH, a receptor of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPAR, and Ig kappa chain C region. We used the electronic nose to quickly detect changes in the volatile substances in mice urine after holothurian polypeptides (HPP fed, and the results show it can identify the difference between treatment groups with the control group without overlapping. The protein express mechanism of HPP treating diabetes was discussed, and we suggested these two peptides with the hypoglycemic and renal protective activity might be utilized as nutraceuticals.

  20. Validity of F-wave minimal latency of median and ulnar nerves for diagnosis and severity assessment of carpal tunnel syndrome in type II diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, A.; Habib, S.S.; Omar, S.A.; Drees, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus is a common problem and is sometimes associated with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) due to compression of median nerve at wrist. Electrophysiological tests are frequently used for its diagnosis. In this work, F-wave minimal latency (FWML) difference between median and ulnar nerve and F-ratio is used to facilitate the diagnosis and severity of CTS in type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods: Thirty control cases were selected who were physically fit for normal electrophysiological values. Thirty-two patients with a long history of type II diabetes mellitus were studied for electro-diagnostic tests. All patients had clinical evidence of CTS. Among all diabetics about 20 cases had poor glycaemic control (HbA1c>7.5). F-wave minimal latency (FWML) were measured in median and ulnar nerves and F-ratio of median nerve were also noted. The mean values in different groups were compared using t-test and p greater or equal to 0.05 was considered significant. Results: In control group, the ulnar FWML was either equal or slightly longer that the median FWML value. In CTS group with type II diabetes mellitus the FWML value of median nerve were significantly longer than FWML of the ulnar nerve. Moreover, in uncontrolled diabetic patients the FWML values was very much longer than controlled group. Similarly the F-ratio of median nerve was significantly low. Conclusion: In addition to the specific criteria for CTS diagnosis, the parameters like FWML difference in median and ulnar nerve with reduced F-ratio of median nerve can be useful in establishing the diagnosis and severity of CTS in type II diabetes mellitus. (author)

  1. Association of a microsatellite in FASL to type II diabetes and of the FAS-670G>A genotype to insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolsøe, R L; Hamid, Y H; Pociot, F

    2006-01-01

    -cells, Fas expression and concomitant apoptosis owing to a constitutive expression of FasL. FASL and FAS map to loci linked to type II diabetes and estimates of insulin resistance, respectively. We have tested two functional promoter polymorphisms, FAS-670 G>A and FASL-844C>T as well as a microsatellite...... association to type II diabetes for the allele distribution of the FASL microsatellite (P-value 0.02, Bonferroni corrected). The FAS-670G>A was associated with homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index and body mass index (P-values 0.02 and 0.02). We conclude that polymorphisms of FASL and FAS...

  2. Thermal Imaging of Skin Changes on the Feet of Type II Diabetics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ammer, K

    2001-01-01

    .... Increased temperature of the feet of diabetics is another frequent finding. We investigated the relationship between skin changes and areas of increased skin temperature recorded with an Infrared Scanner ACEMA 870...

  3. Role of blink reflex in diagnosis of subclinical cranial neuropathy in diabetic mellitus type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazem, Shakouri S; Behzad, Davoudi

    2006-05-01

    Peripheral neuropathy (PN) is one of the late complications of diabetes mellitus. Cranial nerves III, VII, and V are among the most commonly affected in diabetic patients. Traditional electrodiagnosis (Edx) studies are a useful method for diagnosis of PN and symptomatic cranial neuropathy, and may not be useful for detecting subclinical involvement of cranial nerves. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the role of blink reflex (BR) for early diagnosis of cranial neuropathy in diabetic patients with PN. A prospective study was performed on NIDDM patients with PN. One hundred eighty-eight subjects were included in our study in which 142 acted as healthy subjects and 46 as diabetic patients. Patients were excluded with prior history of cranial nerve lesions, stroke, or any other disease with polyneuropathy or drug-induced neuropathy. Routine nerve conduction studies were performed, and only patients with PN were included in this study. Abnormalities were found in 54.4% of patients. R1, IR2, and CR2 were prolonged relative to the healthy group. Statistically there was no significant difference in R/D ratio of patients (P=0.201). Also, there was a positive correlation between R1, IR2, and CR2 latencies with duration of diabetes and severity of polyneuropathy, but not for R/D. The greatest correlation was shown in R1 latency (69.9% abnormality). BR is a noninvasive and very useful method for the evaluation and diagnosis of subclinical cranial nerve involvement in diabetic patients.

  4. Vascular endothelial growth factor 121 and 165 in the subacromial bursa are involved in shoulder joint contracture in type II diabetics with rotator cuff disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, Akiyoshi; Gotoh, Masafumi; Hamada, Kazutoshi; Yanagisawa, Kazuhiro; Yamazaki, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Masato; Ueyama, Yoshito; Mochida, Joji; Fukuda, Hiroaki

    2003-11-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a glycoprotein that plays an important role in neovascularization and increases vascular permeability. We reported that VEGF is involved in motion pain of patients with rotator cuff disease by causing synovial proliferation in the subacromial bursa (SAB). The present study investigates whether VEGF is also involved in the development of shoulder contracture in diabetics with rotator cuff disease. We examined 67 patients with rotator cuff disease, including 36 with complete cuff tears, 20 with incomplete tears, and 11 without apparent tears (subacromial bursitis). The patients were into groups according to the presence or absence of diabetes (14 type II diabetics and 53 non-diabetics). Specimens of the synovium of the SAB were obtained from all patients during surgery. Expression of the VEGF gene in the synovium of the subacromial bursa was evaluated by using the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The VEGF protein was localized by immunohistochemistry, and the number of vessels was evaluated based on CD34 immunoreactivity. The results showed that VEGF mRNA was expressed in significantly more diabetics (100%, 14/14) than in non-diabetics (70%, 37/53) (P=0.0159, Fisher's test). Investigation of VEGF isoform expression revealed VEGF121 in all 14 diabetics and in 37 of the 53 non-diabetics, VEGF165 in 12 of the 14 diabetics and in 21 of the 53 non-diabetics, and VEGF189 in 1 of the 14 diabetics and in 2 of the 53 non-diabetics. No VEGF206 was expressed in either group. VEGF protein was localized in both vascular endothelial cells and synovial lining cells. The mean number of VEGF-positive vessels and the vessel area were also significantly greater in the diabetics (pshoulder joint contracture were more common in the diabetics (P=0.0329 and P=0.073, respectively; Fisher's test). The mean preoperative range of shoulder motion significantly differed in terms of elevation between two groups: 103.8 degrees in

  5. Coronary Heart Disease in Postmenopausal Women with Type II Diabetes Mellitus and the Impact of Estrogen Replacement Therapy: A Narrative Review

    OpenAIRE

    Marouane Boukhris; Salvatore Davide Tomasello; Francesco Marzà; Sonia Bregante; Francesca Romana Pluchinotta; Alfredo Ruggero Galassi

    2014-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is the main cause of death in postmenopausal women (PMW); moreover its mortality exceeds those for breast cancer in women at all ages. Type II diabetes mellitus is a major cardiovascular risk factor and there is some evidence that the risk conferred by diabetes is greater in women than in men. It was established that the deficiency of endogenous estrogens promotes the atherosclerosis process. However, the impact of estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) on cardiovascular pr...

  6. Assessment of Candidal carriage in patients with Type II Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RS Lamichhane

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is generally acknowledged that patients with diabetes mellitus are more susceptible to fungal infections, particularly with Candida albicans. Oral infection by Candida can result in a number of clinical lesions, including median rhomboid glossitis (central papillary atrophy, denture stomatitis, squamous cell carcinoma, Radiation therapy, immunocompromised status, etc. Different studies have shown that patients with diabetes mellitus have increased frequency of oral candidal carriage and increased risk of candidiasis, which is related to poor metabolic control, neutrophil dysfunction, reduced salivary flow, high glucose concentration in blood and saliva and in medications.Materials and Methods: Subjects of both the groups were given 10 ml of sterile normal saline and asked to rinse the mouth for one minute. The subjects were then asked to return the oral rinse in a sterile clean, broad-mouthed container which was capped, labelled and taken to the laboratory. The samples were then inoculated onto the culture medium (Sabouraud’s dextrose agar with Chloramphenicol with minimal delay (within 6-8 hours of collection of oral rinse. Candidal colonies were counted and compared with non-diabetics.Results: Statistically significant increase in colony forming units (p=0.0324 were obtainedin patients with diabetes mellitus.Conclusion: The results indicate significant increase in colonization and carriage of candida in the oral cavity among diabetics when compared with non-diabetics. However, further research using larger samples is required which may lend credibility to the suggestion of increased candidal CFUs in diabetics serving as a surrogate marker of serum glucose levels.Journal of Pathology of Nepal (2015 Vol. 5, 733-738

  7. Meglumine Exerts Protective Effects against Features of Metabolic Syndrome and Type II Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Nuevo, Arturo; Marcy, Alice; Huang, Minzhou; Kappler, Frank; Mulgrew, Jennifer; Laury-Kleintop, Lisa; Reichman, Melvin; Tobia, Annette; Prendergast, George C.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome, diabetes and diabetes complications pose a growing medical challenge worldwide, accentuating the need of safe and effective strategies for their clinical management. Here we present preclinical evidence that the sorbitol derivative meglumine (N-methyl-D-glucamine) can safely protect against several features of metabolic syndrome and diabetes, as well as elicit enhancement in muscle stamina. Meglumine is a compound routinely used as an approved excipient to improve drug absorption that has not been ascribed any direct biological effects in vivo. Normal mice (SV129) administered 18 mM meglumine orally for six weeks did not display any gastrointestinal or other observable adverse effects, but had a marked effect on enhancing muscle stamina and at longer times in limiting weight gain. In the established KK.Cg-Ay/J model of non-insulin dependent diabetes, oral administration of meglumine significantly improved glycemic control and significantly lowered levels of plasma and liver triglycerides. Compared to untreated control animals, meglumine reduced apparent diabetic nephropathy. Sorbitol can improve blood glucose uptake by liver and muscle in a manner associated with upregulation of the AMPK-related enzyme SNARK, but with undesirable gastrointestinal side effects not seen with meglumine. In murine myoblasts, we found that meglumine increased steady-state SNARK levels in a dose-dependent manner more potently than sorbitol. Taken together, these findings provide support for the clinical evaluation of meglumine as a low-cost, safe supplement offering the potential to improve muscle function, limit metabolic syndrome and reduce diabetic complications. PMID:24587200

  8. Meglumine exerts protective effects against features of metabolic syndrome and type II diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Bravo-Nuevo

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome, diabetes and diabetes complications pose a growing medical challenge worldwide, accentuating the need of safe and effective strategies for their clinical management. Here we present preclinical evidence that the sorbitol derivative meglumine (N-methyl-D-glucamine can safely protect against several features of metabolic syndrome and diabetes, as well as elicit enhancement in muscle stamina. Meglumine is a compound routinely used as an approved excipient to improve drug absorption that has not been ascribed any direct biological effects in vivo. Normal mice (SV129 administered 18 mM meglumine orally for six weeks did not display any gastrointestinal or other observable adverse effects, but had a marked effect on enhancing muscle stamina and at longer times in limiting weight gain. In the established KK.Cg-Ay/J model of non-insulin dependent diabetes, oral administration of meglumine significantly improved glycemic control and significantly lowered levels of plasma and liver triglycerides. Compared to untreated control animals, meglumine reduced apparent diabetic nephropathy. Sorbitol can improve blood glucose uptake by liver and muscle in a manner associated with upregulation of the AMPK-related enzyme SNARK, but with undesirable gastrointestinal side effects not seen with meglumine. In murine myoblasts, we found that meglumine increased steady-state SNARK levels in a dose-dependent manner more potently than sorbitol. Taken together, these findings provide support for the clinical evaluation of meglumine as a low-cost, safe supplement offering the potential to improve muscle function, limit metabolic syndrome and reduce diabetic complications.

  9. Diabetes mellitus type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Tøraasen, Lisa Vangen; Al-Sultan, Zainab

    2014-01-01

    Bacheloroppgave i sykepleie, 2014 Hvert år blir rundt 600 nordmenn diagnostisert med sykdommen diabetes type 1, og Norge er et av landene i verden med størst andel av barnediabetes. I dag er det 15 000- 20 000 personer i Norge som har diabetes type 1, og antall barn som får diabetes har fordoblet seg de siste 30 årene (Diabetesforbundet, 2014). Problemstillingen vår gikk ut på hvordan sykepleiere kan veilede og undervise ungdom med nyoppdaget diabetes type på sykehus. Ut i fra litteraturst...

  10. Diabetes mellitus type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Tøraasen, Lisa Vangen; Al-Sultan, Zainab

    2014-01-01

    Hvert år blir rundt 600 nordmenn diagnostisert med sykdommen diabetes type 1, og Norge er et av landene i verden med størst andel av barnediabetes. I dag er det 15 000- 20 000 personer i Norge som har diabetes type 1, og antall barn som får diabetes har fordoblet seg de siste 30 årene (Diabetesforbundet, 2014). Problemstillingen vår gikk ut på hvordan sykepleiere kan veilede og undervise ungdom med nyoppdaget diabetes type på sykehus. Ut i fra litteraturstudiet har vi arbeidet oss frem for å ...

  11. Type 2 diabetes models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Dorte Xenia

    2012-01-01

    This chapter deals with type 2 diabetes in vivo models and techniques suitable for testing new anti-diabetic compounds. In particular, the testing of TRP antagonist for beneficial effects against type 2 diabetes is considered. There are many choices of both in vitro techniques and in vivo models......, impaired glucose tolerance, impaired insulin secretion, and insulin resistance in vivo and should, thus, be sufficient to demonstrate preclinical proof of concept of a TRP antagonist in type 2 diabetes in rodents. The experiments are suggestions and could be replaced or supplemented by others....

  12. Investigating the causes for decreased levels of glutathione in individuals with type II diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minette Lagman

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains an eminent global burden with one third of the world's population latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb. Individuals with compromised immune systems are especially vulnerable to M. tb infection. In fact, individuals with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM are two to three times more susceptible to TB than those without T2DM. In this study, we report that individuals with T2DM have lower levels of glutathione (GSH due to compromised levels of GSH synthesis and metabolism enzymes. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β, a cytokine that is known to decrease the expression of the catalytic subunit of glutamine-cysteine ligase (GCLC was found in increased levels in the plasma samples from individuals with T2DM, explaining the possible underlying mechanism that is responsible for decreased levels of GSH in individuals with T2DM. Moreover, increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6 and interleukin-17 (IL-17 were observed in plasma samples isolated from individuals with T2DM. Increased levels of IL-6 and IL-17 was accompanied by enhanced production of free radicals further indicating an alternative mechanism for the decreased levels of GSH in individuals with T2DM. Augmenting the levels of GSH in macrophages isolated from individuals with T2DM resulted in improved control of M. tb infection. Furthermore, cytokines that are responsible for controlling M. tb infection at the cellular and granuloma level such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β, interleukin-2 (IL-2, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, and interleukin-12 (IL-12, were found to be compromised in plasma samples isolated from individuals with T2DM. On the other hand, interleukin-10 (IL-10, an immunosuppressive cytokine was increased in plasma samples isolated from individuals with T2DM. Overall, these findings suggest that lower levels of GSH in individuals with T2DM lead to their increased susceptibility

  13. Type II diabetes and its therapy in clinical practice - results from the standardised non-interventional registry SIRTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallwitz, B; Kusterer, K; Hildemann, S; Fresenius, K

    2014-12-01

    Modern antidiabetic therapies should achieve low HbA1c values and avoid hypoglycaemic complications. The registry SIRTA included 1522 patients with type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) from 306 German medical practices. Patients had an HbA1c > 6.5% under the maximum tolerated metformin dose. If required, they received combination therapy with other antidiabetics according to the guideline of the German Diabetes Society [Deutsche Diabetes Gesellschaft (DDG)] or usual medical practice. Patients were followed up for 6 months. The target criteria included the achievement of HbA1c target values and the emergence of severe hypoglycaemic episodes. Most patients (64.0%) were planned to achieve an HbA1c target < 6.5%, the standard target recommended by the 2009 DDG guideline valid throughout the registry. Primarily to reduce the individual risk for hypoglycaemia, 32.4% of patients had a less strict HbA1c-target of 6.5-7.0%. These targets were achieved by 31.3% and 44.3% of patients, respectively. Combination therapies increased from 45% to 56% over the 6 months registry. Four patients had severe hypoglycaemias (0.26%). The registry confirms results from other epidemiologic studies on the therapy of T2DM in everyday practice. The treatment strategies applied effectively reduced blood glucose and avoided severe hypoglycaemias. An early therapy of insufficiently controlled patients with T2DM is important, as lower baseline values facilitated achieving HbA1c targets. © 2014 The Authors. International Journal of Clinical Practice Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Exercise and other lifestyle habits of patients with type II diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disorder with complications affecting millions of people worldwide. It has been projected that in the near future, it will affect people in the developing countries like Nigeria more than the developed world. Lifestyle modification including exercise is important in the management of this ...

  15. Orosomucoid in urine predicts cardiovascular and over-all mortality in patients with Type II diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Merete S; Hommel, E; Magid, E

    2002-01-01

    urinary orosomucoid excretion rate at baseline (odds ratios adjusted for age, sex, duration of diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, weight, medication, HbA1 c, plasma creatinine and urinary albumin excretion rate). Urinary albumin excretion rate was an independent predictor of all-cause mortality when...

  16. Fluoxetine increases insulin action in obese type II (non-insulin dependent) diabetic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potter van Loon, B. J.; Radder, J. K.; Froelich, M.; Krans, H. Michiel J.; Zwinderman, A. H.; Meinders, A. E.

    1992-01-01

    Insulin resistance contributes to the metabolic defects in non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Anorectic agents have been shown to improve insulin action in NIDDM, irrespective of weight reduction. In a double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over study, we examined hepatic and peripheral

  17. Correlation between glycemic control and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in Saudi type II diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahmy RM

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Rania M Fahmy,1,2 Ramesa S Bhat,3 Manar Al-Mutairi,4 Feda S Aljaser,5 Afaf El-Ansary4 1Department of Optometry, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt; 3Biochemistry Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4Central Laboratory, Female Center for Medical Studies and Scientific Section, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 5Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Objective: To evaluate the effect of diabetes mellitus (DM, diabetic retinopathy, and degree of glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c] on peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT using optical coherence tomography.Methods: The study included 126 eyes of healthy controls (n=32 and diabetics patients (n=31, whose ages ranged from 40 to 70 years. The diabetic group was divided into: Subgroup 1: with HbA1c <7% and Subgroup 2: with HbA1c ≥7%. All patients underwent full ophthalmic examination. HbA1c level was obtained with the A1cNow+ system and the peripapillary RNFLT was measured using 3D-OCT 2000 Topcon (360-degree circular scan with 3.4 mm diameter centered on optic disc.Results: The obtained data demonstrates significant decrease in peripapillary RNFLT in superior and inferior quadrants of the right eye (p=0.000 and p=0.039, respectively, and in superior quadrant of the left eye (p=0.002 with impairment of glycemic control. Pearson’s correlation test showed significant negative correlation of RNFLT with HbA1c in the superior quadrant in both eyes.Conclusion: Impairment of glycemic control affects the peripapillary RNFLT mainly in the superior quadrant. This thickness also tends to decrease with long-standing DM, use of DM medications, and development of diabetic retinopathy. The measurement of peripapillary RNFLT

  18. The Role of Salivary Gland Scintigraphy in the Evaluation of Salivary Gland Dysfunction in Uncontrolled Type II Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumar, B; Sathasivasubramanian, S

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the salivary gland dysfunction in patients with uncontrolled type II diabetes using salivary gland scintigraphy and then to compare these ratios with quantitative whole salivary secretion rates. Using a gamma camera (siemens-diacam) equipped with a low energy all-purpose collimator, 32 uncontrolled type II diabetic patients and 30 normal healthy patients were studied by injecting a radio isotope (technetium 99m pertechnetate) about 5 mCi was injected intravenously in to anticubital vein and the activity was measured for the 1(st), 20(th) and 40(th) min. At 20 min after injection, vitamin C chewable tablet was given to stimulate the secretion and continued until the end of the study period (40 min). Before scintigraphy, salivary sampling was carried out in both diabetic and normal individuals in a quiet room, saliva was allowed to accumulate and was expectorated into the collecting vessel approximately once a minute for 15 min and the volume was recorded as Unstimulated salivary flow rate and after 5 min break vitamin C chewable tablet was given to stimulate the secretion and the patient was asked to expectorate the saliva in the collecting vessel for 5 min. The expectorated volume was recorded as stimulated salivary flow rate. The mean of the measurements of scintigraphic ratio and salivary secretion rates were compared using the paired Student's t-test. The scintigraphic mean uptake and excretory ratio (ER) and the salivary flow rates were correlated. The result shows that there was a significant correlation between salivary flow rate and scintigraphic uptake and ER. However, statistically significant result could not be derived as it may be due to smaller sample size and marginal difference in the scintigraphic values between the groups. Salivary gland scintigraphy plays a significant role in the evaluation of salivary gland dysfunction. However, its role as an independent investigative procedure in the evaluation of

  19. The Role of Salivary Gland Scintigraphy in the Evaluation of Salivary Gland Dysfunction in Uncontrolled Type II Diabetic Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senthilkumar, B.; Sathasivasubramanian, S.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the salivary gland dysfunction in patients with uncontrolled type II diabetes using salivary gland scintigraphy and then to compare these ratios with quantitative whole salivary secretion rates. Using a gamma camera (siemens-diacam) equipped with a low energy all-purpose collimator, 32 uncontrolled type II diabetic patients and 30 normal healthy patients were studied by injecting a radio isotope (technetium 99m pertechnetate) about 5 mCi was injected intravenously in to anticubital vein and the activity was measured for the 1 st , 20 th and 40 th min. At 20 min after injection, vitamin C chewable tablet was given to stimulate the secretion and continued until the end of the study period (40 min). Before scintigraphy, salivary sampling was carried out in both diabetic and normal individuals in a quiet room, saliva was allowed to accumulate and was expectorated into the collecting vessel approximately once a minute for 15 min and the volume was recorded as Unstimulated salivary flow rate and after 5 min break vitamin C chewable tablet was given to stimulate the secretion and the patient was asked to expectorate the saliva in the collecting vessel for 5 min. The expectorated volume was recorded as stimulated salivary flow rate. The mean of the measurements of scintigraphic ratio and salivary secretion rates were compared using the paired Student's t-test. The scintigraphic mean uptake and excretory ratio (ER) and the salivary flow rates were correlated. The result shows that there was a significant correlation between salivary flow rate and scintigraphic uptake and ER. However, statistically significant result could not be derived as it may be due to smaller sample size and marginal difference in the scintigraphic values between the groups. Salivary gland scintigraphy plays a significant role in the evaluation of salivary gland dysfunction. However, its role as an independent investigative procedure in the evaluation

  20. Effects on the glucose metabolism in type II diabetes model mice treated with dose-rates irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Takaharu; Sakai, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    The effects of low-dose rate gamma-irradiation on the type II diabetes mellitus were investigated in C57BL/KsJ-ab/db (db mouse). This mouse develops the type II diabetes within 8 weeks of the birth due to a dysfunction of the insulin receptors. As a result the db mouse shows obese and exhibits hyperinsulinism. Ten-week old female mice (12 mice in each group) were irradiated with gamma-rays at 0.35 mGy/hr, 0.65 mGy/hr or 1.2 mGy/hr in the low-dose rate irradiation facility in the Low Dose Radiation Research Center. The level of plasma glucose and insulin was measured. After 2 weeks irradiation, the glucose level slightly increased, however the difference between the irradiated mice and non-irradiated groups was not significant. The plasma insulin concentration decreased in the non-irradiated group to half of the initial level. In the irradiated group, it also decreased but in the group of 0.65 mGy/hr and 0.35 mGy/hr, it was significantly differed from that in the non-irradiated group. In the glucose tolerance test, plasma glucose level increased shortly after 0.1 mg/head glucose injection by mouth and reached to a peak at 90-120 min after the injection. The glucose level of the non-irradiated mice was slightly higher than that of irradiated mice. The plasma insulin level of non-irradiated group was enhanced after the injection and maintained the level during the test. However the levels of irradiated mice were decreased at 30-60 min after the injection. Both the level of non-irradiated an irradiated was almost same but the non-irradiated one was a little high. In all of mice, the plasma insulin level was highly elevated right after the 0.05 units/head insulin injection by i.p. and the levels were also gradually decreased. The level of the non-irradiated group was slowly decreased and was higher than the irradiated mice. The plasma glucose levels of all mice did not change after the test; however, the levels of irradiated mice were slightly lower than that of non

  1. Acute Ozone (O3) Exposure Accelerates Diet-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Metabolic Alterations in a Rat Model of Type II Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract for Society of Toxicology, March 22-25, 2015, San Diego, CAAcute Ozone (O3) Exposure Accelerates Diet-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Metabolic Alterations in a Rat Model of Type II DiabetesS.J. Snow1,3, D. Miller2, V. Bass2, M. Schladweiler3, A. Ledbetter3, J. Richards3, C...

  2. An elevated serum level of endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide-II in patients with arterial hypertension with and without type 2 diabetes and obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliya Mogylnytska

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: The revealed changes could reflect an endothelial dysfunction mostly pronounced in patients with arterial hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. Hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, obesity appear to be significant contributing factors leading to the elevation of EMAP-II.

  3. Effects of angiotensin II receptor blockade on cerebral, cardiovascular, counter-regulatory, and symptomatic responses during hypoglycaemia in patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færch, Louise H; Thorsteinsson, Birger; Tarnow, Lise

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: High spontaneous activity of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) results in more pronounced cognitive impairment and more prolonged QTc interval during hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetes. We tested whether angiotensin II receptor blockade improves cerebral and cardiovascular function d...

  4. In vivo imaging of oxidative stress in the kidney of diabetic mice and its normalization by angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonta, Toshiyo; Inoguchi, Toyoshi; Matsumoto, Shingo; Yasukawa, Keiji; Inuo, Mieko; Tsubouchi, Hirotaka; Sonoda, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Kunihisa; Utsumi, Hideo; Nawata, Hajime

    2005-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate oxidative stress in the kidney of diabetic mice by electron spin resonance (ESR) imaging technique. Oxidative stress in the kidney was evaluated as organ-specific reducing activity with the signal decay rates of carbamoyl-PROXYL probe using ESR imaging. The signal decay rates were significantly faster in corresponding image pixels of the kidneys of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice than in those of controls. This technique further demonstrated that administration of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker (ARB), olmesartan (5 mg/kg), completely restored the signal decay rates in the diabetic kidneys to control values. In conclusion, this study provided for the first time the in vivo evidence for increased oxidative stress in the kidneys of diabetic mice and its normalization by ARB as evaluated by ESR imaging. This technique would be useful as a means of further elucidating the role of oxidative stress in diabetic nephropathy

  5. Experimental type II diabetes and related models of impaired glucose metabolism differentially regulate glucose transporters at the proximal tubule brush border membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichger, Havovi; Cleasby, Mark E; Srai, Surjit K; Unwin, Robert J; Debnam, Edward S; Marks, Joanne

    2016-06-01

    What is the central question of this study? Although SGLT2 inhibitors represent a promising treatment for patients suffering from diabetic nephropathy, the influence of metabolic disruption on the expression and function of glucose transporters is largely unknown. What is the main finding and its importance? In vivo models of metabolic disruption (Goto-Kakizaki type II diabetic rat and junk-food diet) demonstrate increased expression of SGLT1, SGLT2 and GLUT2 in the proximal tubule brush border. In the type II diabetic model, this is accompanied by increased SGLT- and GLUT-mediated glucose uptake. A fasted model of metabolic disruption (high-fat diet) demonstrated increased GLUT2 expression only. The differential alterations of glucose transporters in response to varying metabolic stress offer insight into the therapeutic value of inhibitors. SGLT2 inhibitors are now in clinical use to reduce hyperglycaemia in type II diabetes. However, renal glucose reabsorption across the brush border membrane (BBM) is not completely understood in diabetes. Increased consumption of a Western diet is strongly linked to type II diabetes. This study aimed to investigate the adaptations that occur in renal glucose transporters in response to experimental models of diet-induced insulin resistance. The study used Goto-Kakizaki type II diabetic rats and normal rats rendered insulin resistant using junk-food or high-fat diets. Levels of protein kinase C-βI (PKC-βI), GLUT2, SGLT1 and SGLT2 were determined by Western blotting of purified renal BBM. GLUT- and SGLT-mediated d-[(3) H]glucose uptake by BBM vesicles was measured in the presence and absence of the SGLT inhibitor phlorizin. GLUT- and SGLT-mediated glucose transport was elevated in type II diabetic rats, accompanied by increased expression of GLUT2, its upstream regulator PKC-βI and SGLT1 protein. Junk-food and high-fat diet feeding also caused higher membrane expression of GLUT2 and its upstream regulator PKC

  6. The Effect of Probiotic Yogurt on Blood Glucose and cardiovascular Biomarkers in Patients with Type II Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahin Rezaei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Given the high prevalence of type II diabetes and its complications, the evidence regarding the beneficial effects of probiotic yogurt on some cardiovascular biomarkers in diabetic patients is worthy of investigation. Aim: To investigate the effect of probiotic yogurt on blood glucose level and cardiovascular biomarkers in patients with type II diabetes. Method:This randomized, clinical trial was conducted on 90 patients with type II diabetes who visited the 5 Azar diabetes clinic in Gorgan, Iran, in 2014. The intervention group consumed three 100 g packages of probiotic yogurt per day for four weeks, while the control group used an equal amount of plain yogurt. Dietary intake, as well as anthropometric and biochemical parameters were measured before and after the trial. To analyze the data, independent t-test, paired t-test, and analysis of covariance were performed, using SPSS version 18. Results: The mean ages of the intervention and control groups were 50.49±10.92 and 50.13±9.20 years, respectively. In the intervention group, paired t-test showed significant differences between mean levels of blood glucose, cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL, triglycerides, diastolic blood pressure, and glycated hemoglobin before and after four weeks of daily intake of probiotic yogurt (P0.05. At the end of trial, the independent t-test showed a significant difference between the two groups in terms of mean levels of blood glucose, LDL, triglycerides, blood pressure, and glycated hemoglobin (P

  7. Relationship between insulin resistance and blood lipid and sport in patients with type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hypertension%2型糖尿病合并高血压患者胰岛素低抗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭丽艳; 杨红玉; 柴国禄; 沈凌元

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study the relationship between insulin resistance and blood pressure and blood lipid in patients with type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hypertension.Methods The serum concentration of fasting glucose,insulin,lipids and the level of blood pressure were measured in 56 patients with type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hypertension.Results The insulin sensitivity index(ISI) decreased in patients with type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hypertension compared with the patients with type II diabetes mellitus with normal blood pressure(P< 0.05).A negative correlation with hypertension was found between ISI and SBP,DBP,TG,ApoB in patients with type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hypertension(P<0.05).There was a positive correlation between ISI and HDL in patients with type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hypertension(P<0.05).Conclusion Insulin resistance presents in patients of type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hypertension.Insulin resistance is the major cause of hypertension and lipid metabolic disturbance in patients with type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hypertension.

  8. Exercise And Other Lifestyle Habits Of Patients With Type Ii Diabetes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Lifestyle modification including exercise is important in the management of this ... Barriers to exercise found include lack of time, pain/swelling in the ..... prevention and the American college of sports .... smoking in youth with type 1 or type 2.

  9. C REACTIVE PROTEIN AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK IN CASES WITH DIABETES MALLITUS TYPE II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munevera Bećarević

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Factors of cardiovascular risk (CVR are often grouped in cases with diabetes mellitus (DM with significant increasment of risk for CV disease . The aim of this research is to determine the frequency of CVR and and total CVR in cases with DM and to investigate connection of CRP of other factors of CVR in total cardiovascular risks. Material and methods: In 92 cases with DM weist values were taken as well as body mass index (BMI, blood pressure, sugar in blood, cholesterol, triglycerides, C reactive protein (CRP and according to SCORE system the 10 year period of CVR were determined. Results: Out of 92 tested cases with age 55,22± 8,3 years, 63,05% were males and 36,95% were women, 81,5% were with values of sugar in blood >7mmol/l, 44,6% were with values of HbA1C>7% and 63,0% >6,5%. The value of cholesterol were >4,5mmol/l in 87%, triglycerides >1,7mmol/l in 78.3% of tested cases. 81,5% of tested cases were overweight and 49% with larger weight values. Average cardiovascular factor according to SCORE system was 3, 92± 3,7% with significant difference among sexes (M-4,86; W-2,32, p3mg/l 52% of tested cases were with high cardiovascular risk. There is significant positive correlation between CRP and cholesterol level (p<0, 01, triglycerides, blood in sugar, HbA1c and upper values of blood pressure (p<0, 05. Significant correlation between CRP and total cardiovascular risk (p=0, 63 was not evident. Conclusion: Cases with diabetes mellitus have high level of non regulated cardiovascular risk factors. Even though there is significant correlation between CRP and and pressure values, sugar in blood, HbA1c, cholesterol, triglycerides, significant correlation between CRP and total cardiovascular risk in cases with diabetes mellitus is not evident.

  10. CREACTIVE PROTEIN AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK IN CASES WITH DIABETES MALLITUS TYPE II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munevera Bećarević

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Factors of cardiovascular risk (CVR are often grouped in cases with diabetes mellitus (DM with significant increasment of risk for CV disease . The aim of this research is to determine the frequency of CVR and and total CVR in cases with DM and to investigate connection of CRP of other factors of CVR in total cardiovascular risks. Material and methods: In 92 cases with DM weist values were taken as well as body mass index (BMI, blood pressure, sugar in blood, cholesterol, triglycerides, C reactive protein (CRP and according to SCORE system the 10 year period of CVR were determined. Results: Out of 92 tested cases with age 55,22± 8,3 years, 63,05% were males and 36,95% were women, 81,5% were with values of sugar in blood >7mmol/l, 44,6% were with values of HbA1C>7% and 63,0% >6,5%. The value of cholesterol were >4,5mmol/l in 87%, triglycerides >1,7mmol/l in 78.3% of tested cases. 81,5% of tested cases were overweight and 49% with larger weight values. Average cardiovascular factor according to SCORE system was 3, 92± 3,7% with significant difference among sexes (M-4,86; W-2,32, p3mg/l 52% of tested cases were with high cardiovascular risk. There is significant positive correlation between CRP and cholesterol level (p<0, 01, triglycerides, blood in sugar, HbA1c and upper values of blood pressure (p<0, 05. Significant correlation between CRP and total cardiovascular risk (p=0, 63 was not evident. Conclusion: Cases with diabetes mellitus have high level of non regulated cardiovascular risk factors. Even though there is significant correlation between CRP and and pressure values, sugar in blood, HbA1c, cholesterol, triglycerides, significant correlation between CRP and total cardiovascular risk in cases with diabetes mellitus is not evident.

  11. Influence of the intervention of exercise on obese type II diabetes mellitus: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhichun; Cai, Wei; Cai, Min; Xiao, Mouyuan; Wang, Zhijie

    2016-06-01

    The study aimed to assess the effect of exercise intervention on the management of obese T2DM patients. The literature retrieval was conducted in relevant databases from their inception to 2015, with predefined searching strategy and selection criteria. The Cochrane Collaboration's tool was utilized to assess the quality of included studies. Weighted mean difference (WMD) with its corresponding 95% CI (confidence interval) was used as the effect size. A subset of 13 eligible studies was selected. Exercise significantly reduced the concentration of high sensitivity C reactive protein (4 months: WMD=-1.03, 95% CI: -1.77 to -0.29, PExercise was beneficial to obese T2DM patients. Copyright © 2015 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Insulin therapy refusal among type II diabetes mellitus patients in Kubang Pasu district, the state of Kedah, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei Leong; Asahar, Siti Fairus; Harun, Noor Liani

    2015-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a rising non-communicable disease in Malaysia. Insulin therapy refusal is a great challenge for healthcare providers, as it results in delayed insulin initiation. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of insulin therapy refusal and its associated factors. This cross sectional study was conducted at seven public health clinics in Kubang Pasu district, Malaysia, from March to October 2012. A newly developed and validated questionnaire was used and participants were selected via systematic random sampling. Only patients diagnosed with type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and under the public health clinic care in Kubang Pasu were included in the study. Multiple logistic regressions were used to study the association between insulin therapy refusal and its associated factors. There were 461 respondents and the response rate was 100%. Among these 461 patients with T2DM, 74.2% refused insulin therapy. The most common reason given for refusal was a lack of confidence in insulin injection (85.4%). Multiple logistic regression revealed that respondents who had secondary education were 55.0% less likely to refuse insulin therapy than those who had primary or no formal education (p = 0.009, adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.25-0.82). There was also a significant inverse association between glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and insulin therapy refusal (p = 0.047, adjusted OR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.76-1.00). Insulin therapy refusal is common in Kubang Pasu. Education status and HbA1c should be taken into consideration when counselling patients on insulin therapy initiation.

  13. The Effect of Group Counseling on Physiological Aspect of Self-care and HbA1C Level of Patients with Diabetes Type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedreza Mazlom

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most important underlying cause of death in diabetic patients is poor self-care. The effect of education on self-care promotion has been widely investigated; however, the advisory role and impact of the treatment team have been scarcely investigated.  Aim: Determining the effect of group counseling on the psychological aspect of self-care and level of glycosylated hemoglobin in the patients with diabetes type II. Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 73 patients with type II diabetes mellitus, who had been referred to Parsian Diabetes clinic of Mashhad in 2014, were divided into two groups of intervention and control. The group counseling program was performed in five 1.5-hour sessions with 3-day intervals, and each groups consisted of 8 to 10 people. The content of the meetings was problems in nutrition, exercise, diabetes mellitus disease, diabetes-related mental health problems, diabetes medications, and self-control of blood glucose. Researcher-made diabetes care questionnaire was filled and HbA1c test was measured before and two months after the intervention. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 11.5 using paired sample and independent t-tests. Results: In this study,27.3 percent of the subjects were male and 72.7 were female with the mean age of 49.1 ± 8.3. The scores of physiological aspect of self-care and HbA1C of the diabetic patients before the intervention was not significantly different between the groups; but in the post-intervention phase, the self-care in intervention group (49.1±5.8 significantly increased compared to the control group (31.8±12.2 (p

  14. Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Anders; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2001-01-01

    Prediction of Type 1 diabetes at individual level is relevant for any possible intervention before clinical disease develops. Currently available markers of Type 1 diabetes include genetic specificities and immune markers, in addition to a positive family history. This chapter reviews the measures...... and methods of importance in predicting Type 1 diabetes. Based on numerical examples it is demonstrated that available markers have a low level of performance, even when combined. Even so, combined marker information may allow for the identification of the large majority of the general population who...... is at very low disease risk. The impact at population level of predicting Type 1 diabetes varies between societies because the performance of markers depends on levels of disease risk and distribution of markers within a population. The incorporation of the influence of non-genetic etiological factors may...

  15. Effectiveness of angiotensin II receptor antagonists in a cohort of Dutch patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (ZODIAC-14).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hateren, Kornelis J J; Landman, Gijs W D; Groenier, Klaas H; Bilo, Henk J G; Kleefstra, Nanne

    2015-04-01

    There is limited evidence with respect to the between-group effects of various angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) on blood pressure and albuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the effects of differing ARBs on systolic blood pressure (SBP) and the albumin-creatinine ratio after 1 year in a large cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. In 2007, 24 940 primary care patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus participated in the Zwolle Outpatient Diabetes project Integrating Available Care (ZODIAC) study, a prospective observational cohort study. Patients were included in the current study if they were prescribed an ARB in 2007 and if 1-year follow-up data were available. The final study population comprised 3610 patients. Multivariate mixed-model analyses were performed to estimate effects of the various ARBs on SBP and albuminuria. Stratified subgroup analyses were performed according to baseline hypertension and albuminuria. SBP decreased in all groups, the largest decrease being observed in the group receiving telmisartan. No significant or relevant changes over time were observed among groups for SBP and albuminuria. In the subgroup (n=1225) of normotensive patients, telmisartan was associated with a larger decrease in SBP after 1 year compared to other ARBs, without different effects on the albumin-creatinine ratio. We observed no differences in effects on SBP and the albumin-creatinine ratio among differing ARBs in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Glomerular filtration and renal volume in type II diabetes (non-insulin-dependent): study in normal and microalbuminuria patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorini, A M; Tanganelli, I; Fondelli, C; Vattimo, A; Ferrari, F; Borgogni, P; Borgogni, L; Gragnoli, G

    1991-08-01

    In type 2 diabetes elevated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and increased renal volume (RV), often accompanied to normo or microalbuminuria, were demonstrated. This condition is considered a pathogenetic factor for clinical nephropathy. As this topic is little studied in type 2 diabetes, we have investigated 73 type 2 diabetic patients (34 normo and 39 microalbuminuric), looking for a correlation between GFR, RV, hypertension, duration of diabetes and indexes of metabolic control. GFR was measured by a scintigraphy, after infusion of 99Tc-DTPA. Renal volume was determined by ultrasound scanning. Between the groups GFR and RV weren't different; elevated GFR was demonstrated in 3 patients; increased RV in 1 patient. In the hypertensive group GFR was lower than in normotensive group and in controls. Multivariate analysis in stepwise demonstrated that GFR presents a negative correlation to systolic blood pressure as in normo as in microalbuminuric patients. In the normotensive group GFR didn't correlate to the other variables. The present data suggest that in type 2 diabetes there is a little prevalence of glomerular hyperfiltration and increased renal volume and that hypertension plays a role on GFR of hypertensive diabetic patients.

  17. Influence of nopal intake upon fasting glycemia in type II diabetics and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frati, A C; Gordillo, B E; Altamirano, P; Ariza, C R; Cortés-Franco, R; Chávez-Negrete, A; Islas-Andrade, S

    1991-01-01

    To assess if the acute hypoglycemic effect of nopal which occurs in diabetic patients also appears in healthy individuals, 500 g of nopal stems (O. streptacantha Lem.) were given orally to 14 healthy volunteers and to 14 patients with NIDDM. Serum glucose and insulin levels were measured at 0, 60, 120 and 180 minutes after nopal ingestion. A control test was performed with the intake of 400 ml of water. The intake of nopal by the NIDDM group was followed by a significant reduction of serum glucose and insulin concentration reaching 40.8 + 4.6 mg/dl (n = 14) (mean+SEM) and 7.8 + 1.5 uU/ml (n = 7) less than basal value, respectively, at 180 minutes. (P less than 0.001 vs control test). No significant changes were noticed in the healthy group as compared with the control test (P greater than 0.05). Acute hypoglycemic effect of nopal was observed in patients with NIDDM but not in healthy subjects, thus the mechanisms of this effect differs from current hypoglycemic agents.

  18. Type 1 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, Mark A; Eisenbarth, George S; Michels, Aaron W

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, knowledge of the pathogenesis and natural history of type 1 diabetes has grown substantially, particularly with regard to disease prediction and heterogeneity, pancreatic pathology, and epidemiology. Technological improvements in insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors help patients with type 1 diabetes manage the challenge of lifelong insulin administration. Agents that show promise for averting debilitating disease-associated complications have also been identifi...

  19. Investigation of the Performance of Foot and Eye Care in Patients with Type II Diabetes in Fasa: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Khani Jeihooni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Diabetic foot ulcers and eye problems are the most frequent complications of patients with diabetes and can be controlled with care. This study aimed at investigating the situation of foot and eye care in patients with type II diabetes based on the Theory of Planned Behavior of Fasa. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, simple randomized sampling was used to select 151 patients with type II diabetes, who had referred to Shariati Teaching Hospital diabetic clinic, during year 2016. Data were gathered using a questionnaire including demographic data and measure theory of planned behavior (attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, and intention and the care of feet and eyes. Next, the data were entered in the SPSS statistical software, version 20 and analyzed using independent t test and descriptive statistical methods. P values of < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: The mean age of participants was 52.17±12.41 and the mean duration of diabetes was 76.62±4.9. Knowledge on the care of feet and eyes was low. Foot and eye care, subjective norm and people are going to be at a moderate level. Among knowledge, attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, and intention, there was a significant correlation with performance (P<0.05. Knowledge, attitudes, perceived behavioral control, subjective norms, and intention were predictors of foot care and eye performance in patients with type 2 diabetes. Overall, variables predicted 31.6% of the performance of foot care and 28.4% of eye care. Conclusions: According to this study, design and implementation of training programs theory centered on promoting foot care and eye performance is recommended for patients with diabetes.

  20. Ectopic expression of the agouti gene in transgenic mice causes obesity, features of type II diabetes, and yellow fur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klebig, M.L.; Woychik, R.P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilkinson, J.E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Geisler, J.G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-05-23

    Mice that carry the lethal yellow (A{sup y}) or viable yellow (A{sup vy}) mutation, two dominant mutations of the agouti (a) gene in mouse chromosome 2, exhibit a phenotype that includes yellow fur, marked obesity, a form of type II diabetes associated with insulin resistance, and an increased susceptibility to tumor development. Molecular analyses of these and several other dominant {open_quotes}obese yellow{close_quotes} a-locus mutations suggested that ectopic expression of the normal agouti protein gives rise to this complex pleiotropic phenotype. We have now tested this hypothesis directly by generating transgenic mice that ectopically express an agouti cDNA clone encoding the normal agouti protein in all tissues examined. Transgenic mice of both sexes have yellow fur, become obese, and develop hyperinsulinemia. In addition, male transgenic mice develop hyperglycemia by 12-20 weeks of age. These results demonstrate conclusively that the ectopic agouti expression is responsible for most, if not all, of the phenotypic traits of the dominant, obese yellow mutants. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of Bariatric Surgery: Increasing the Economic Viability of the Most Effective Treatment for Type II Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jeremy A; Ewing, Joseph A; Hale, Allyson L; Blackhurst, Dawn W; Bour, Eric S; Scott, John D

    2015-08-01

    There has been considerable debate on the cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery within larger population groups. Despite the recognition that morbid obesity and its comorbidities are best treated surgically, insurance coverage is not universally available. One of the more costly comorbidities of obesity is Type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We propose a model that demonstrates the cost-effectiveness of increasing the number of bariatric surgical operations performed on patients with T2DM in the United States. We applied published population cost estimates (2012) for medical care of T2DM to a retrospective cohort of morbidly obese patients in South Carolina. We compared differences in 10-year medical costs between those having bariatric surgery and controls. Resolution of T2DM in the bariatric cohort was assumed to be 40 per cent. Considering only the direct medical costs of T2DM, the 10-year aggregate cost savings compared with a control group is $2.7 million/1000 patients; the total (direct and indirect) cost savings is $5.4 million/1000 patients. When considering resolution of T2DM alone, increasing the number of bariatric operations for a given population leads to a substantial cost savings over a 10-year period. This study adds to the growing body of evidence suggesting that bariatric surgery is a cost-effective means of caring for the obese patient.

  2. An Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blocker Prevents Renal Injury via Inhibition of the Notch Pathway in Ins2 Akita Diabetic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaya Koshizaka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, it has been reported that the Notch pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. In this study, we investigated the activation of the Notch pathway in Ins2 Akita diabetic mouse (Akita mouse and the effects of telmisartan, an angiotensin II type1 receptor blocker, on the Notch pathway. The intracellular domain of Notch1 (ICN1 is proteolytically cleaved from the cell plasma membrane in the course of Notch activation. The expression of ICN1 and its ligand, Jagged1, were increased in the glomeruli of Akita mice, especially in the podocytes. Administration of telmisartan significantly ameliorated the expression of ICN1 and Jagged1. Telmisartan inhibited the angiotensin II-induced increased expression of transforming growth factor β and vascular endothelial growth factor A which could directly activate the Notch signaling pathway in cultured podocytes. Our results indicate that the telmisartan prevents diabetic nephropathy through the inhibition of the Notch pathway.

  3. Clinical significance of measurement of changes of plasma ET-1 and serum TGF-β1, urinary microalbuminuria (MAU) levels in patients with type II diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Liming; Xu Shan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical significance of changes of plasma ET-1 and serum TGF-β 1 , urinary microalbuminuria levels in patients with type II diabetes. Methods: Plasma ET-1 (with RIA) serum TGF-β 1 (with ELISA)microalbuminuria (with immune method) levels were determination in 40 cases of DM2 without nephropathy, 32 cases of DM2 with nephropathy and 35 controls. Results: The plasma ET-1, serum TGF-β 1 , microalbuminuria levels in diabetic patients with nephropathy were significantly higher than those in controls(P 0.05). Conclusion: Plasma ET-1 and serum TGF-β 1 , microalbuminuria levels increased gradually as the diabetic nephropathy got more severe. They could be used as sensitive markers for early diagnosis of development of diabetic nephropathy. (authors)

  4. The Impact of Patient Education on Anthropometric, Lipidemic, and Glycemic Parameters Among Patients With Poorly Controlled Type II Diabetes Mellitus: A 3-Month Prospective Single-Center Turkish Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cander, Soner; Gul, Ozen Oz; Gul, Cuma B; Keles, Saadet B; Yavas, Sibel; Ersoy, Canan

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the impact of patient education on adherence to a diabetes care plan (e.g., anthropometric, lipidemic, and glycemic parameters) among adults with type II diabetes mellitus without adequate glycemic control. A total of 61 ambulatory adults with type II diabetes mellitus (mean age: 53.6 ± 8.2 years, 70.5% female) were evaluated for anthropometrics, duration of diabetes mellitus, type of anti-diabetic treatment, blood biochemistry, and glycemic parameters in this 3-month prospective observational single-center study. During the course of the study, participants demonstrated a significant decrease in body weight and fat percentage and HbA1c (p diabetes mellitus who received education on adherence to routine self-monitoring of blood glucose, standard diabetic diet, and an exercise program delivered by certified diabetes educators had better glycemic control and significant decrease in body weight and fat percentage over a 3-month monitoring period. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Comparative effect of angiotensin II type I receptor blockers and calcium channel blockers on laboratory parameters in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida Yayoi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both angiotensin II type I receptor blockers (ARBs and calcium channel blockers (CCBs are widely used antihypertensive drugs. Many clinical studies have demonstrated and compared the organ-protection effects and adverse events of these drugs. However, few large-scale studies have focused on the effect of these drugs as monotherapy on laboratory parameters. We evaluated and compared the effects of ARB and CCB monotherapy on clinical laboratory parameters in patients with concomitant hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods We used data from the Clinical Data Warehouse of Nihon University School of Medicine obtained between Nov 1, 2004 and July 31, 2011, to identify cohorts of new ARB users (n = 601 and propensity-score matched new CCB users (n = 601, with concomitant mild to moderate hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus. We used a multivariate-adjusted regression model to adjust for differences between ARB and CCB users, and compared laboratory parameters including serum levels of triglyceride (TG, total cholesterol (TC, non-fasting blood glucose, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, sodium, potassium, creatinine, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT, hemoglobin and hematocrit, and white blood cell (WBC, red blood cell (RBC and platelet (PLT counts up to 12 months after the start of ARB or CCB monotherapy. Results We found a significant reduction of serum TC, HbA1c, hemoglobin and hematocrit and RBC count and a significant increase of serum potassium in ARB users, and a reduction of serum TC and hemoglobin in CCB users, from the baseline period to the exposure period. The reductions of RBC count, hemoglobin and hematocrit in ARB users were significantly greater than those in CCB users. The increase of serum potassium in ARB users was significantly greater than that in CCB users. Conclusions Our study suggested that hematological adverse effects and

  6. Conventional and advanced implant treatment in the type II diabetic patient: surgical protocol and long-term clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawil, Georges; Younan, Roland; Azar, Pierre; Sleilati, Ghassan

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the effect of type-2 diabetes on implant survival and complication rate. Prospective study enrolling type-2 diabetic patients suffering from edentulism, having a mean perioperative HbA1c level of 7.2%, and compliant with a maintenance program. All the patients underwent dental and periodontal examinations and had laboratory testing for HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose, blood lipids, and microalbuminuria. Nondiabetic patients matched for implant treatment indication served as controls. The influence of clinical diabetes-related factors and periodontal parameters (Plaque Index, bleeding on probing, probing depth) on implant survival were assessed via univariate then multivariate methods. Forty-five diabetic patients, followed for 1 to 12 years, mean age 64.7 years, received 255 implants: 143 following a classical protocol and 112 in cases of sinus floor elevation, immediate loading, and guided bone regeneration. Forty-five nondiabetic control patients received 244 implants: 142 following a classical protocol and 102 in cases of advanced surgery. Implant survival following conventional or advanced implant therapy was not statistically different between the well-controlled (HbA1c diabetic group was 97.2% (control 98.8%) and was not significantly different for age, gender, diabetes duration, smoking, or type of hypoglycemic therapy. The mean peri-implant bone loss was 0.41 +/- 0.58 mm (control, 0.49 +/- 0.64 mm). PI and BOP fairly correlated with postoperative complications. HbA1c was the only multivariate independent factor affecting the complication rate (P = .04). No statistically significant difference was found for patients (P = .81) or for implants (P = .66) for the advanced surgery cases or the conventional approach in diabetic patients compared to nondiabetic patients.

  7. Factores de riesgo asociados a la retinopatía diabética en pacientes diabéticos tipo II Risk factors associated with diabetic retinopathy in type II diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisis Osorio Illas

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio observacional, analítico, retrospectivo tipo caso-control en el que se estudiaron 40 pacientes diagnosticados como diabéticos tipo II de 30 años o más remitidos a la consulta de Oftalmología de Upata, en el municipio Piar, Estado de Bolívar, en Venezuela, en el período comprendido entre abril y agosto del año 2005. Se establecieron como factores de riesgo entre las diferentes variables analizadas, la obesidad, la hipertensión arterial, el tiempo de evolución de 10 años y más de la diabetes mellitus, los antecedentes patológicos familiares y el perfil lípidico alterado. Se concluyó que un tiempo de evolución de la diabetes de 10 años o más y un perfil lípidico alterado incrementó el riesgo de desarrollar retinopatía diabética en un 5,7 y un 8,5 número de veces respectivamente, demostrándose asociación causal con una probabilidad estadística An observational, analytical, retrospective case-control study was conducted among 40 patients aged 30 or over diagnosed as type II diabetic patients that were referred to the Ophthalmology office of Upata, in Piar municipality, State of Bolivar, in Venezuela, from April to August 2005. Obesity, arterial hypertension, time of evolution of diabetes mellitus of 10 years and more, pathological family history and the altered lipid profile were established as risk factors among the different variables analyzed. It was concluded that a time of evolution of diabetes of 10 years or over and an altered lipid profile increased the risk for developing diabetic retinopathy in 5.7 and 8.5 times, respectively, showing a causal association with a statistical probability < 0.05.

  8. Assessment of the effects of scaling and root planing on blood glucose levels in type II diabetes patients: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzma Rieyazulhuq Shaikh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the effect of the scaling and root planing of some blood glucose levels in Type II Diabetes patients. Study Population and Methods: The clinical study was conducted in 15 Type II diabetic patients of Dr. D Y Patil Dental College and Hospital, Pimpri, Pune. All the participants underwent a baseline examination for periodontal status using the community periodontal index of treatment needs and also estimation of fasting and post-prandial blood sugar levels. The participants received the intervention of scaling and root planing, as also routine oral hygiene instructions, and were recalled after one month for a final periodontal examination and blood sugar level investigation. The significance of difference between the means of the baseline and the final examination was tested using the paired ′t′ test. Results and Conclusion: There was no significant change in the fasting and post-prandial blood glucose levels in patients treated with scaling and root planing.

  9. Quantification of beta-cell function during IVGTT in Type II and non-diabetic subjects: assessment of insulin secretion by mathematical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, L L; Vølund, A; Madsbad, Sten

    2001-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We compared four methods to assess their accuracy in measuring insulin secretion during an intravenous glucose tolerance test in patients with Type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus and with varying beta-cell function and matched control subjects. METHODS: Eight control...... subjects and eight Type II diabetic patients underwent an intravenous glucose tolerance test with tolbutamide and an intravenous bolus injection of C-peptide to assess C-peptide kinetics. Insulin secretion rates were determined by the Eaton deconvolution (reference method), the Insulin SECretion method...... (ISEC) based on population kinetic parameters as well as one-compartment and two-compartment versions of the combined model of insulin and C-peptide kinetics. To allow a comparison of the accuracy of the four methods, fasting rates and amounts of insulin secreted during the first phase (0-10 min...

  10. Pediatric obesity & type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dea, Tara L

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on (a) identifying obesity and other risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes, (b) differentiating between pediatric type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, and (c) treating pediatric type 2 diabetes. Obesity has significant implications on a child's health, including an increased risk for insulin resistance and progression to type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes in children, characterized by insulin resistance and relative pancreatic b-cell failure due to the increased demand for insulin production, has now reached epidemic proportions. Longitudinal research on pediatric type 2 diabetes, however, is lacking because this epidemic is relatively new. Treatment of type 2 diabetes in children is focused on lifestyle modification with weight management/increased physical activity, and pharmacological management through oral medication or insulin therapy. Because children with type 2 diabetes are at risk for developing diabetes-related complications earlier in life, they need to be closely monitored for comorbidities.

  11. [COMPARISON OF INTRAOPERATIVE SCLEROOBLITERATION AND ECHOSCLEROOBLITERATION EFFICIENCY OF VARICOSE DISEASES OF THE LOWER EXTREMITIES C6 CLASS IN PATIENTS BY TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamarchuk, V I; Odnorog, S I; Gvozdyak, M M; Vilgash, A M

    2015-06-01

    The experience of surgical treatment of 50 patients for varicose disease of lower extremities, complicated by trophic ulcers, in the presence of diabetes mellitus type II were analysed. During surgery in patients of the 1st group performed a combined phlebectomy, group 2--scleroobliteration and echoscleroobliteration. Using fleboscleroobliteration method helped reduce the frequency of early postoperative complications in (6.5 +/- 1.3) times.

  12. Potential Contribution of Work-Related Psychosocial Stress to the Development of Cardiovascular Disease and Type II Diabetes: A Brief Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajnak, Kristine M

    2014-01-01

    Two of the major causes of death worldwide are cardiovascular disease and Type II diabetes. Although death due to these diseases is assessed separately, the physiological process that is attributed to the development of cardiovascular disease can be linked to the development of Type II diabetes and the impact that this disease has on the cardiovascular system. Physiological, genetic, and personal factors contribute to the development of both these disorders. It has also been hypothesized that work-related stress may contribute to the development of Type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This review summarizes some of the studies examining the role of work-related stress on the development of these chronic disorders. Because women may be more susceptible to the physiological effects of work-related stress, the papers cited in this review focus on studies that examined the difference in responses of men or women to work-related stress or on studies that focused on the effects of stress on women alone. Based on the papers summarized, it is concluded that (1) work-related stress may directly contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease by inducing increases in blood pressure and changes in heart rate that have negative consequences on functioning of the cardiovascular system; (2) workers reporting increased levels of stress may display an increased risk of Type II diabetes because they adopt poor health habits (ie, increased level of smoking, inactivity etc), which in turn contribute to the development of cardiovascular problems; and (3) women in high demand and low-control occupations report an increased level of stress at work, and thus may be at a greater risk of negative health consequences.

  13. Gambaran Kebiasaan Makan Penderita Diabetes Melitus Type Ii Pada Pasien Rawat Jalan Di Puskesmas Padang Bulan Selayang Ii Medan Tahun 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Sari, Eka Mustika

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a disease characterized by increased levels of blood sugar which is generally caused by a poor diet with the excessive level of glucose. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a type that is most often found in practice. The high increase in DM is correlated with the change in the lifestyle of the community behaviors and environmental circumstances. The most prominent factor is the wrong diet and lack of physical activity. This study aims to reveal the eating habits of patients with type ...

  14. Overweight, insulin resistance and type II diabetes in type I Gaucher disease patients in relation to enzyme replacement therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langeveld, M.; de Fost, M.; Aerts, J. M. F. G.; Sauerwein, H. P.; Hollak, C. E. M.

    2008-01-01

    Type I Gaucher disease, a lysosomal storage disorder is associated with metabolic abnormalities such as high resting energy expenditure, low circulating adiponectin and peripheral insulin resistance. Treatment with enzyme replacement therapy (enzyme therapy) leads to a decrease in resting energy

  15. The effect of xerostomia and hyposalivation on the quality of life of patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molania, Tahereh; Alimohammadi, Mona; Akha, Ozra; Mousavi, Jaber; Razvini, Ramin; Salehi, Maedeh

    2017-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disease which can have numerous physical effects for patient. Xerostomia is one of these complications. Compared to healthy people, patients with diabetes mellitus, have a worse quality of life, and complications of diabetes are the main determinants of quality of life in these patients. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of xerostomia and hyposalivation on quality of life of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This descriptive-analytical epidemiological study was conducted on 200 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus referred to the diabetes clinic of Shahid Mostafavi in Sari city from October 2015 to January in 2016. A questionnaire containing personal characteristics and medical situation was completed by each person. Then, the Persian Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14-PER) questionnaire was completed by the patients. Eventually, with the use of chewable paraffin for 1.5 min by the patient, stimulated salivary flow rate (SSFR) test was performed, and in order to determine hyposalivation, their saliva amount underwent a gravimetric test. Finally, using statistical software SPSS16, the information was statistically analyzed by independent-samples t-test, Mann-Whitney U, Chi-squared and fisher exact tests. The average age of patient was 56.41 years old (43% male and 57% female). Mean SSFR was 0.7 ml/min in patients and xerostomia were confirmed in 112 patients. Difference between age, gender, drug use, years affecting to diabetes and FBS amount in patient with hyposalivation were not statistically meaningful in proportion to patients without it. But difference between HbA1C and SSFR in patients with hyposalivation were statistically meaningful than to patients without it (p=0.03, p=0.001 respectively). The mean patient score to OHIP-14 were obtained as 38.17. The questionnaire score difference in patients with hyposalivation in proportion to patients without it were not statistically meaningful

  16. Stimulation effects of low dose-rate irradiation on pancreatic antioxidant activity in type II diabetes model mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Takaharu; Sakai, Kazuo

    2005-01-01

    The effects of low dose-rate gamma irradiation on the type II diabetes mellitus were investigated in BKS.Cg-+Lepr db /+Lepr db /Jcl (DB mice). Ten-week-old female DB mice (5 mice in each group) were irradiated with gamma ray at 0.35, 0.70, or 1.2 mGy/hr. During the course of the 12 weeks the glucose level slightly increased with little difference between the irradiated and the non-irradiated groups. The plasma insulin concentration decreased within the first 4 weeks in all groups. The level was kept low in the non-irradiated mice; while the insulin level in the irradiated groups showed a tendency to increase. In the 0.70 mGy/hr group the increase was statistically significant after 12 weeks of irradiation. Total activity of SOD, one of antioxidative enzymes, decreased both in non-irradiated and irradiated groups; however the decrease was less in the irradiated groups, especially 0.70 mGy/hr group. In the 0.70 mGy/hr group Mn-SOD activity, one of the components of total SOD activity, increased after 12-week irradiation. A pathological examination of the pancreas revealed that damage to β cells responsible for the secretion of insulin was much less in the 0.70 mGy/hr group compared to that in the non-irradiated group. These results indicated that the low dose-rate irradiation increase the antioxidative capacity in the pancreas to protect β cells from oxidative damage, and the to increase the insulin level. This mechanism would lead the mice to the recovery from the disease and the prolongation of the life span as is demonstrated in our previous report. (author)

  17. Coronary Heart Disease in Postmenopausal Women with Type II Diabetes Mellitus and the Impact of Estrogen Replacement Therapy: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marouane Boukhris

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease is the main cause of death in postmenopausal women (PMW; moreover its mortality exceeds those for breast cancer in women at all ages. Type II diabetes mellitus is a major cardiovascular risk factor and there is some evidence that the risk conferred by diabetes is greater in women than in men. It was established that the deficiency of endogenous estrogens promotes the atherosclerosis process. However, the impact of estrogen replacement therapy (ERT on cardiovascular prevention remains controversial. Some authors strongly recommend it, whereas others revealed a concerning trend toward harm. This review tries to underlines the different components of cardiovascular risk in diabetic PMW and to define the place of ERT.

  18. To determine whether first-degree male relatives of women with polycystic ovary syndrome are at higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, A; Vimplis, S; Sharma, A; Eid, N; Atiomo, W

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether first-degree male relatives of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) were at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes mellitus (type II DM). In a cross-sectional study, 60 women with PCOS and 112 controls were given a questionnaire. The prevalence of heart disease, stroke, diabetes and associated risk factors among fathers and brothers of women with PCOS and controls, were measured. The percentage of women with PCOS with at least one brother with a risk factor for CVD was 47.5%, around twice that seen in control women (24.71%). The prevalence of heart disease, stroke and diabetes were similar in brothers of women with PCOS and controls. In conclusion, brothers of women with PCOS may be at increased risk of CVD. They form an easily identified group, which can be targeted for primary prevention.

  19. A STUDY TO CORRELATE HBA1C LEVELS AND LEFT VENTRICULAR DIASTOLIC DYSFUNCTION IN NEWLY DIAGNOSED TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS

    OpenAIRE

    Vasanthi; Namitha; Jayanthi; Elangumanan; Mohamed; Uma Maheshwari; Pravin Selvam; Santhi

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess the correlation of HBA1C levels with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetic patient. This prospective study was done at Department of General Medicine, OPD, Medical Wards, Stanley Medical College and Hospital, Chennai. RESULT The mean HBA1C levels were meaningfully more in Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction (LVDD) positive group compared to the LVDD negative group by 1.33%. This significant difference of 15% increase in...

  20. Low Intensity Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy Improves Erectile Function in a Model of Type II Diabetes Independently of NO/cGMP Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaly-Kaddoum, Rana; Giuliano, François; Laurin, Miguel; Gorny, Diane; Kergoat, Micheline; Bernabé, Jacques; Vardi, Yoram; Alexandre, Laurent; Behr-Roussel, Delphine

    2016-09-01

    Erectile dysfunction is highly prevalent in type II diabetes mellitus. Low intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy improves erectile function in patients with erectile dysfunction of vasculogenic origin, including diabetes. However, its mode of action remains unknown. We investigated the effects of low intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy compared to or combined with sildenafil on erectile dysfunction in a type II diabetes mellitus model. Our purpose was to test our hypothesis of a mode of action targeting the cavernous nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway. GK rats, a validated model of type II diabetes mellitus, and age matched Wistar rats were treated with low intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy twice weekly for 3 weeks. Treatment was repeated after a 3-week no-treatment interval. The penis was stretched and dipped in a specifically designed water-filled cage. Shock waves were delivered by a calibrated probe yielding a controlled energy flux density (0.09 mJ/mm(2)). The probe was attached to an electrohydraulic unit with a focused shock wave source, allowing for accurate extrapolation to humans. Following a 4-week washout period erectile function was assessed as well as endothelium dependent and independent, and nitrergic relaxations of the corpus cavernosum of GK rats. Low intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy significantly improved erectile function in GK rats to the same extent as sildenafil. Treatment effects were potentiated when combined with sildenafil. Shock wave effects were not associated with improved cavernous endothelium dependent or independent, or nitrergic reactivity. Low intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy improved erectile function in GK rats. Unexpectedly, this was not mediated by a nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate dependent mechanism. Sildenafil increased shock wave efficacy. This preclinical paradigm to deliver low intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy to the rat penis should

  1. Effect of health education in people with type II diabetes from health center of Atotonilco de Tula, Hidalgo, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Hernández

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus faces the task of adapting to discomfort and loss of physical control, as well as changes in appearance. The treatment aims to relieve symptoms, maintain metabolic control, prevent complications and improve quality of life. Goal: to evaluate the effect of a program of health education in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus as part of non-pharmacological treatment. Methodology: a before-after quasi-experimental design was conducted. 13 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were included. Socio-demographic aspects and their level of knowledge about the disease were assessed. They received an educational program regarding nutrition, exercise and stress management. This program consisted of 16 sessions of two hours. Measurements of glycosylated hemoglobin levels (HbA1c were performed before and after the intervention. Results: the educational program had positive effects because the results before the workshop showed that 61.5% of participants had poor-regular knowledge about the disease and its care, plus 84.6% of participants obtained percentages of HbA1c ≥ 6.5%. After the educational program, 100% of patients achieved a good level of knowledge and only 53.8% of the population reached an HbA1c level ≥ 6.5%. Conclusion: the educational program helps the patient cope in a better way their condition.

  2. APOA II genotypes frequency and their interaction with saturated fatty acids consumption on lipid profile of patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorshahi, Neda; Sotoudeh, Gity; Djalali, Mahmoud; Eshraghian, Mohamad Reza; Keramatipour, Mohammad; Basiri, Marjan Ghane; Doostan, Farideh; Koohdani, Fariba

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have suggested that APOA II-265T/C polymorphism affect lipid profile. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of -265T/C APOA II polymorphism and saturated fatty acids (SFA) intake interaction on lipid profile in diabetic population who are at risk for lipid disorders. In this cross sectional study, 697 type 2 diabetic patients participated. Food consumption data were collected using validated semi-quantitative FFQ during the last year. Realtime-PCR was used to determine APOA II-265T/C genotypes. The interaction between the genotypes and SFA intake with lipid profile was tested using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). According to APOA II-265T/C (rs5082) genotype distribution results, CC genotype with a frequency of 12.9% and TC with that of 47.7% showed the lowest and highest frequency in our population, respectively. CC genotype subjects had significantly lower total cholesterol, triglyceride, Cholesterol/HDL-c ratio and non-HDL cholesterol than T allele carriers (p = 0.009, p = 0.02, p = 0.02 and p = 0.002, respectively). The interaction between genotype and SFA intake contributed to significant higher levels of LDL-c and LDL/HDL in CCs (p = 0.05 and p = 0.01), suggesting vulnerability of these individuals to high intake of SFA in the diet. APOA II polymorphism may influence the saturated fatty acid intake required to prevent dyslipidemia in the type 2 diabetic population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  3. Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... En español Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Browse Sections The Basics Overview Types of Diabetes ... 1 of 9 sections The Basics: Types of Diabetes What is diabetes? Diabetes means you have glucose ( ...

  4. HLA Class II Alleles Susceptibility Markers of Type 1 Diabetes Fail to Specify Phenotypes of Ketosis-Prone Diabetes in Adult Tunisian Patients

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    Lilia Laadhar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to characterize the different subgroups of ketosis-prone diabetes (KPD in a sample of Tunisian patients using the Aβ scheme based on the presence or absence of β-cell autoantibodies (A+ or A− and β-cell functional reserve (β+ or β− and we investigated whether HLA class II alleles could contribute to distinct KPD phenotypes. We enrolled 43 adult patients with a first episode of ketosis. For all patients we evaluated clinical parameters, β-cell autoimmunity, β-cell function and HLA class II alleles. Frequency distribution of the 4 subgroups was 23.3% A+β−, 23.3% A−β−, 11.6% A+β+ and 41.9% A−β+. Patients from the group A+β− were significantly younger than those from the group A−β− (P=.002. HLA susceptibility markers were significantly more frequent in patients with autoantibodies (P=.003. These patients also had resistance alleles but they were more frequent in A+β+ than A+β− patients (P=.04. Insulin requirement was not associated to the presence or the absence of HLA susceptibility markers. HLA class II alleles associated with susceptibility to autoimmune diabetes have not allowed us to further define Tunisian KPD groups. However, high prevalence of HLA resistance alleles in our patients may reflect a particular genetic background of Tunisian KPD population.

  5. Obstacles to Self-Care From The Viewpoint of TypeII Diabetic Patients and Guidelines to Remove Them

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    Khalil Zalak

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Little studies using a limited number of questionnaires cannot reflect the depth and complication of diabetic patients about self-care. However, using the qualitative research method, it is possible to find out the depth of patients’ experiences of this illness. The purpose of this study was to find individual and environmental obstacles which affect self-care on these patients and to investigate patients’ viewpoint of this disease.Materials and Methods: In this qualitative study, group interview and case interview have been used. This study was carried out in two phases and at the end of the interview patients were provided with necessary teaching about the principals of self-care.Results: In general, 5 categories of obstacles to self-care in type 2 diabetes were identified which include: physical obstacles, economical obstacles, social obstacles, educational obstacles, and psychic obstacles. Social, educational and psychic obstacles are in latter classes.Conclusion: The results of this study showed that a high percentage of patients with type 2 diabetes face serious obstacles in the way of self-care and the most numerous and important obstacles in their opinion are physical and economical obstacles. Considering that developing countries face a shortage of resources, dealing with physical obstacles can bring satisfaction to patients and on the other hand, dealing with these obstacles requires less cooperation from exterior organizations.

  6. Development and psychometric properties of a new social support scale for self-care in middle-aged patients with type II diabetes (S4-MAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naderimagham Shohreh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Social support has proved to be one of the most effective factors on the success of diabetic self-care. This study aimed to develop a scale for evaluating social support for self-care in middle-aged patients (30–60 years old with type II diabetes. Methods This was a two-phase qualitative and quantitative study. The study was conducted during 2009 to 2011 in Tehran, Iran. In the qualitative part, a sample of diabetic patients participated in four focus group discussions in order to develop a preliminary item pool. Consequently, content and face validity were performed to provide a pre-final version of the questionnaire. Then, in a quantitative study, reliability (internal consistency and test-retest analysis, validity and factor analysis (both exploratory and confirmatory were performed to assess psychometric properties of the scale. Results A 38-item questionnaire was developed through the qualitative phase. It was reduced to a 33-item after content validity. Exploratory factor analysis loaded a 30-item with a five-factor solution (nutrition, physical activity, self monitoring of blood glucose, foot care and smoking that jointly accounted for 72.3% of observed variance. The confirmatory factor analysis indicated a good fit to the data. The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient showed excellent internal consistency (alpha=0.94, and test-retest of the scale with 2-weeks intervals indicated an appropriate stability for the scale (ICC=0.87. Conclusion The findings showed that the designed questionnaire was a valid and reliable instrument for measuring social support for self-care in middle-aged patients with type II diabetes. It is an easy to use questionnaire and contains the most significant diabetes related behaviors that need continuous support for self-care.

  7. THE EFFECT OF TELE-MONITORING ON EXERCISE TRAINING ADHERENCE, FUNCTIONAL CAPACITY, QUALITY OF LIFE AND GLYCEMIC CONTROL IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE II DIABETES

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    Tracy Marios

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We used tele-monitoring to attempt to improve exercise adherence (number of hours of exercise completed, peak VO2, HbA1c% and quality of life in an unsupervised, home based exercise program in people with type II diabetes, a cost analysis was also conducted. Thirty-nine patients with type II diabetes were randomized to tele-monitoring (TELE or control (CON groups. All patients were asked to complete 6 months exercise training and complete an exercise activity diary. The TELE group was instructed to record their exercise heart rates using a monitor and received weekly telephone calls from an exercise physiologist. Six TELE patients and seven CON patients did not complete the 6 month testing. TELE patients completed a mean weekly volume of 138 minutes, moderate intensity exercise, while CON patients completed 58 minutes weekly (p < 0.02. Neither group achieved the American Heart Association statement guideline for weekly exercise volume of 150 minutes. TELE patients improved peak VO2 (5.5 %, but neither group improved HbA1c% or quality of life. The CON group showed a 4.9% reduction in peak VO2. While tele-monitored patients completed more hours of exercise and demonstrated improved peak VO2 compared to controls, the exercise volume completed was insufficient to improve glycemic control. There is the potential via tele-monitoring to enable people with diabetes to meet exercise training guidelines.

  8. Treatments for diabetes mellitus type II: New perspectives regarding the possible role of calcium and cAMP interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Diego Soares; de Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Borges, Aurélio Ferreira; Campos, Vannucci

    2018-07-05

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is among the top ten causes of death worldwide. It is considered to be one of the major global epidemics of the 21st century, with a significant impact on public health budgets. DM is a metabolic disorder with multiple etiologies. Its pathophysiology is marked by dysfunction of pancreatic β-cells which compromises the synthesis and secretion of insulin along with resistance to insulin action in peripheral tissues (muscle and adipose). Subjects presenting insulin resistance in DM type 2 often also exhibit increased insulin secretion and hyperinsulinemia. Insulin secretion is controlled by several factors such as nutrients, hormones, and neural factors. Exocytosis of insulin granules has, as its main stimulus, increased intracellular calcium ([Ca +2 ]i) and it is further amplified by cyclic AMP (cAMP). In the event of this hyperfunction, it is very common for β-cells to go into exhaustion leading to failure or death. Several animal studies have demonstrated pleiotropic effects of L-type Ca 2+ channel blockers (CCBs). In animal models of obesity and diabetes, treatment with CCBs promoted restoration of insulin secretion, glycemic control, and reduction of pancreatic β-cell apoptosis. In addition, hypertensive individuals treated with CCBs presented a lower incidence of DM when compared with other antihypertensive agents. In this review, we propose that pharmacological manipulation of the Ca 2+ /cAMP interaction system could lead to important targets for pharmacological improvement of insulin secretion in DM type 2. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Insulin-induced activation of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase by a chiro-inositol-containing insulin mediator is defective in adipocytes of insulin-resistant, type II diabetic, Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Farese, R V; Standaert, M L; Yamada, K; Huang, L C; Zhang, C; Cooper, D R; Wang, Z; Yang, Y; Suzuki, S; Toyota, T

    1994-01-01

    Type II diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats were insulin-resistant in euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp studies. We therefore examined insulin signaling systems in control Wistar and diabetic GK rats. Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (G3PAT), which is activated by headgroup mediators released from glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI), was activated by insulin in intact and cell-free adipocyte preparations of control, but not diabetic, rats. A specific chiro-inositol-containing inositol phosph...

  10. Type 1 Diabetes and Sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Farabi, Sarah S.

    2016-01-01

    IN BRIEF In people with type 1 diabetes, sleep may be disrupted as a result of both behavioral and physiological aspects of diabetes and its management. This sleep disruption may negatively affect disease progression and development of complications. This review highlights key research findings regarding sleep in people with type 1 diabetes.

  11. Type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeFronzo, Ralph A; Ferrannini, Ele; Groop, Leif

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an expanding global health problem, closely linked to the epidemic of obesity. Individuals with T2DM are at high risk for both microvascular complications (including retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy) and macrovascular complications (such as cardiovascular...... that multiple antidiabetic agents, used in combination, will be required to maintain normoglycaemia. The treatment must not only be effective and safe but also improve the quality of life. Several novel medications are in development, but the greatest need is for agents that enhance insulin sensitivity, halt...

  12. Analysis of Gln223Agr Polymorphism of Leptin Receptor Gene in Type II Diabetic Mellitus Subjects among Malaysians

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    Chong Pei Pei

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Leptin is known as the adipose peptide hormone. It plays an important role in the regulation of body fat and inhibits food intake by its action. Moreover, it is believed that leptin level deductions might be the cause of obesity and may play an important role in the development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM, as well as in cardiovascular diseases (CVD. The Leptin Receptor (LEPR gene and its polymorphisms have not been extensively studied in relation to the T2DM and its complications in various populations. In this study, we have determined the association of Gln223Agr loci of LEPR gene in three ethnic groups of Malaysia, namely: Malays, Chinese and Indians. A total of 284 T2DM subjects and 281 healthy individuals were recruited based on International Diabetes Federation (IDF criteria. Genomic DNA was extracted from the buccal specimens of the subjects. The commercial polymerase chain reaction (PCR method was carried out by proper restriction enzyme MSP I to both amplify and digest the Gln223Agr polymorphism. The p-value among the three studied races was 0.057, 0.011 and 0.095, respectively. The values such as age, WHR, FPG, HbA1C, LDL, HDL, Chol and Family History were significantly different among the subjects with Gln223Agr polymorphism of LEPR (p < 0.05.

  13. Analysis of Gln223Agr polymorphism of Leptin Receptor Gene in type II diabetic mellitus subjects among Malaysians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemad, Ali; Ramachandran, Vasudevan; Pishva, Seyyed Reza; Heidari, Farzad; Aziz, Ahmad Fazli Abdul; Yusof, Ahmad Khairuddin Mohamed; Pei, Chong Pei; Ismail, Patimah

    2013-09-18

    Leptin is known as the adipose peptide hormone. It plays an important role in the regulation of body fat and inhibits food intake by its action. Moreover, it is believed that leptin level deductions might be the cause of obesity and may play an important role in the development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM), as well as in cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The Leptin Receptor (LEPR) gene and its polymorphisms have not been extensively studied in relation to the T2DM and its complications in various populations. In this study, we have determined the association of Gln223Agr loci of LEPR gene in three ethnic groups of Malaysia, namely: Malays, Chinese and Indians. A total of 284 T2DM subjects and 281 healthy individuals were recruited based on International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. Genomic DNA was extracted from the buccal specimens of the subjects. The commercial polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was carried out by proper restriction enzyme MSP I to both amplify and digest the Gln223Agr polymorphism. The p-value among the three studied races was 0.057, 0.011 and 0.095, respectively. The values such as age, WHR, FPG, HbA1C, LDL, HDL, Chol and Family History were significantly different among the subjects with Gln223Agr polymorphism of LEPR (p < 0.05).

  14. Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine Therapy and the Risk of Vascular Complications in Patients With Type II Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ai-Lin; Chen, Bor-Chyuan; Mou, Chih-Hsin; Sun, Mao-Feng; Yen, Hung-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract With an increasing use of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), evidence of long-term benefit with adjunctive TCM treatment is limited. This study investigated whether the concurrent TCM treatment reduces the risk of vascular complications in T2DM patients by using a large population from National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). We identified 33,457 adult patients with newly diagnosed T2DM using anti-diabetic agents from a random sample of one million beneficiaries in the NHIRD between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2011. We recruited 1049 TCM users (received TCM over 30 days with a diagnosis of T2DM) and randomly selected 4092 controls as the non-TCM cohort at a ratio of 1:4 frequency-matched by age, sex, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and index year. We investigated the prescription pattern of TCM and conducted a Cox proportional hazards regression to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs) of stroke, chronic kidney diseases (CKD), and diabetic foot between the 2 cohorts. In the TCM cohort, the prescription pattern of TCM was different between insulin and noninsulin patients. The most common herbs were Dan-Shen (Radix Salviae Miltiorrhizae) in noninsulin group and Da-Huang (Radix et Rhizoma Rhei) in insulin group. The most common formulae were Liu-Wei-Di-Huang-Wan in noninsulin group and Yu-Quan-Wan in insulin group. Although no significant reduction in the hazard ratio of CKD and diabetic foot, the incidence rate of stroke was 7.19 per 1000 person-years in the TCM cohort and 10.66 per 1000 person-years in the control cohort, respectively. After adjustment of age, sex, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and antidiabetes agent use (including sulfonylureas, α-glucosidase, metformin, meglitinide, thiazolidinediones, and insulin), TCM cohorts were found to have a 33% decreased risk of stroke (95% CI = 0.46–0.97; P < 0.05). This population-based retrospective study showed that the complementary TCM therapy might

  15. Development of a web-based liver cancer prediction model for type II diabetes patients by using an artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Hsiao-Hsien; Hsu, Chien-Yeh; Lin, Yu-An; Atique, Suleman; Fuad, Anis; Wei, Li-Ming; Hsu, Ming-Huei

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of liver cancer, and these two diseases are among the most common and important causes of morbidity and mortality in Taiwan. To use data mining techniques to develop a model for predicting the development of liver cancer within 6 years of diagnosis with type II diabetes. Data were obtained from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) of Taiwan, which covers approximately 22 million people. In this study, we selected patients who were newly diagnosed with type II diabetes during the 2000-2003 periods, with no prior cancer diagnosis. We then used encrypted personal ID to perform data linkage with the cancer registry database to identify whether these patients were diagnosed with liver cancer. Finally, we identified 2060 cases and assigned them to a case group (patients diagnosed with liver cancer after diabetes) and a control group (patients with diabetes but no liver cancer). The risk factors were identified from the literature review and physicians' suggestion, then, chi-square test was conducted on each independent variable (or potential risk factor) for a comparison between patients with liver cancer and those without, those found to be significant were selected as the factors. We subsequently performed data training and testing to construct artificial neural network (ANN) and logistic regression (LR) prediction models. The dataset was randomly divided into 2 groups: a training group and a test group. The training group consisted of 1442 cases (70% of the entire dataset), and the prediction model was developed on the basis of the training group. The remaining 30% (618 cases) were assigned to the test group for model validation. The following 10 variables were used to develop the ANN and LR models: sex, age, alcoholic cirrhosis, nonalcoholic cirrhosis, alcoholic hepatitis, viral hepatitis, other types of chronic hepatitis, alcoholic fatty liver disease, other types of fatty liver disease, and

  16. A systematic review of the factors associated with interest in predictive genetic testing for obesity, type II diabetes and heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J; Ryan, L; Truby, H

    2014-10-01

    In the future, it may be possible for individuals to take a genetic test to determine their genetic predisposition towards developing lifestyle-related chronic diseases. A systematic review of the literature was undertaken to identify the factors associated with an interest in having predictive genetic testing for obesity, type II diabetes and heart disease amongst unaffected adults. Ovid Medline, PsycINFO and EMBASE online databases were searched using predefined search terms. Publications meeting the inclusion criteria (English language, free-living adult population not selected as a result of their disease diagnosis, reporting interest as an outcome, not related to a single gene inherited disease) were assessed for quality and content. Narrative synthesis of the results was undertaken. From the 2329 publications retrieved, eight studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Overall, the evidence base was small but of positive quality. Interest was associated with personal attitudes towards disease risk and the provision of information about genetic testing, shaped by perceived risk of disease and expected outcomes of testing. The role of demographic factors was investigated with largely inconclusive findings. Interest in predictive genetic testing for obesity, type II diabetes or heart disease was greatest amongst those who perceived the risk of disease to be high and/or the outcomes of testing to be beneficial. © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  17. SEROLOGICAL MARKERS OF CELIAC DISEASE AND HLA II ANTIGENS IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. O. Hennesy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied incidenceof immunological markers of celiac disease in children with diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1 and their correlation with clinical peculiarities and polymorphous alleles of HLA. It was shown that incidence of celiac markers is higher in DM1 children than in general population and makes up 7.4%. Patients who were seropositive with celiac antigens had gastrointestinal symptoms and iron deficiency more often. The occurrence rate of other autoimmune disorders in seropositive patients was 24%, with high count of autoantibodies towards transglutaminase (AbTT — 50%. More than 78% of seroposetive patients possessed haplotypes DQ2 and|or DQ8 HLA. The occurrence rate was identical. In patients with high AbTT occurrence of HLA genotypes with DQ2 and/or DQ8 rose up to 100%.

  18. Osteogenesis Imperfecta with Celiac Disease and Type II Diabetes Mellitus Associated: Improvement with a Gluten-Free Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Rodrigo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI is a genetic disease, with a connective tissue alteration, consisting in the presence of multiple spontaneous fractures or after minimal traumatism. Its association with other metabolic processes is rarely described. We present the clinical case of a female adult patient of 43 years. From her infancy, she has had multiple fractures, needing several surgical interventions, and she was diagnosed of OI type 2 at adolescence age. Due mainly to difficulties in walking remaining in wheel-chair in the last three years, she was overweight with morbid obesity (BMI=45.4 and had a type-II DM associated. She suffered from recurrent abdominal pain and chronic diarrhea and was diagnosed of celiac disease (CD with increased intraepithelial duodenal infiltration, being classified as lymphocytic enteritis, Marsh I type. She was put on a gluten-free diet (GFD, having lost 6 kg of weight after 6 months, with a good control of DM-II and presenting a significant clinical improvement. It is rewarding to search the presence of two coincidental metabolic diseases associated to OI, specially CD, because of the dramatic clinical benefit in the general found after putting on a GFD.

  19. Osteogenesis Imperfecta with Celiac Disease and Type II Diabetes Mellitus Associated: Improvement with a Gluten-Free Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Luis; Pérez-Martinez, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disease, with a connective tissue alteration, consisting in the presence of multiple spontaneous fractures or after minimal traumatism. Its association with other metabolic processes is rarely described. We present the clinical case of a female adult patient of 43 years. From her infancy, she has had multiple fractures, needing several surgical interventions, and she was diagnosed of OI type 2 at adolescence age. Due mainly to difficulties in walking remaining in wheel-chair in the last three years, she was overweight with morbid obesity (BMI = 45.4) and had a type-II DM associated. She suffered from recurrent abdominal pain and chronic diarrhea and was diagnosed of celiac disease (CD) with increased intraepithelial duodenal infiltration, being classified as lymphocytic enteritis, Marsh I type. She was put on a gluten-free diet (GFD), having lost 6 kg of weight after 6 months, with a good control of DM-II and presenting a significant clinical improvement. It is rewarding to search the presence of two coincidental metabolic diseases associated to OI, specially CD, because of the dramatic clinical benefit in the general found after putting on a GFD. PMID:22481956

  20. The effects of aerobic exercises and 25(OH D supplementation on GLP1 and DPP4 level in Type II diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Rahimi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an 8-week aerobic exercise and supplementation of 25(OHD3 on GLP1 and DDP4 levels in men with type II diabetes. Methods: In this semiexperimental research, among 40–60-year-old men with type II diabetes who were referred to the diabetic center of Isabn-E Maryam hospital in Isfahan; of whom, 48 patients were voluntarily accepted and then were randomly divided into 4 groups: aerobic exercise group, aerobic exercise with 25(OH D supplement group, 25(OH D supplement group, and the control group. An aerobic exercise program was conducted for 8 weeks (3 sessions/week, each session 60 to75 min with 60–80% HRmax. The supplement user group received 50,000 units of oral Vitamin D once weekly for 8 weeks. The GLP1, DPP4, and 25(OH D levels were measured before and after the intervention. At last, the data were statistically analyzed using the ANCOVA and post hoc test of least significant difference. Results: The results of ANCOVA showed a significant difference between the GLP1 and DPP4 levels in aerobic exercise with control group while these changes were not statistically significant between the 25(OH D supplement group with control group (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Aerobic exercises have resulted an increase in GLP1 level and a decrease in DPP4 level. However, consumption of Vitamin D supplement alone did not cause any changes in GLP1and DPP4 levels but led to an increase in 25-hydroxy Vitamin D level.

  1. Validity and reproducibility of HOMA-IR, 1/HOMA-IR, QUICKI and McAuley's indices in patients with hypertension and type II diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafidis, P A; Lasaridis, A N; Nilsson, P M; Pikilidou, M I; Stafilas, P C; Kanaki, A; Kazakos, K; Yovos, J; Bakris, G L

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index, its reciprocal (1/HOMA-IR), quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) and McAuley's index in hypertensive diabetic patients. In 78 patients with hypertension and type II diabetes glucose, insulin and triglyceride levels were determined after a 12-h fast to calculate these indices, and insulin sensitivity (IS) was measured with the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp technique. Two weeks later, subjects had again their glucose, insulin and triglycerides measured. Simple and multiple linear regression analysis were applied to assess the validity of these indices compared to clamp IS and coefficients of variation between the two visits were estimated to assess their reproducibility. HOMA-IR index was strongly and inversely correlated with the basic IS clamp index, the M-value (r=-0.572, PHOMA-IR and QUICKI indices were positively correlated with the M-value (r=0.342, PHOMA-IR was the best fit of clamp-derived IS. Coefficients of variation between the two visits were 23.5% for HOMA-IR, 19.2% for 1/HOMA-IR, 7.8% for QUICKI and 15.1% for McAuley's index. In conclusion, HOMA-IR, 1/HOMA-IR and QUICKI are valid estimates of clamp-derived IS in patients with hypertension and type II diabetes, whereas the validity of McAuley's index needs further evaluation. QUICKI displayed better reproducibility than the other indices.

  2. Sitagliptin reduces cardiac apoptosis, hypertrophy and fibrosis primarily by insulin-dependent mechanisms in experimental type-II diabetes. Potential roles of GLP-1 isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Picatoste

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Myocardial fibrosis is a key process in diabetic cardiomyopathy. However, their underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated, leading to a lack of therapy. The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 enhancer, sitagliptin, reduces hyperglycemia but may also trigger direct effects on the heart. METHODS: Goto-Kakizaki (GK rats developed type-II diabetes and received sitagliptin, an anti-hyperglycemic drug (metformin or vehicle (n=10, each. After cardiac structure and function assessment, plasma and left ventricles were isolated for biochemical studies. Cultured cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts were used for in vitro assays. RESULTS: Untreated GK rats exhibited hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, plasma GLP-1 decrease, and cardiac cell-death, hypertrophy, fibrosis and prolonged deceleration time. Moreover, cardiac pro-apoptotic/necrotic, hypertrophic and fibrotic factors were up-regulated. Importantly, both sitagliptin and metformin lessened all these parameters. In cultured cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibroblasts, high-concentration of palmitate or glucose induced cell-death, hypertrophy and fibrosis. Interestingly, GLP-1 and its insulinotropic-inactive metabolite, GLP-1(9-36, alleviated these responses. In addition, despite a specific GLP-1 receptor was only detected in cardiomyocytes, GLP-1 isoforms attenuated the pro-fibrotic expression in cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts. In addition, GLP-1 receptor signalling may be linked to PPARδ activation, and metformin may also exhibit anti-apoptotic/necrotic and anti-fibrotic direct effects in cardiac cells. CONCLUSIONS: Sitagliptin, via GLP-1 stabilization, promoted cardioprotection in type-II diabetic hearts primarily by limiting hyperglycemia e hyperlipidemia. However, GLP-1 and GLP-1(9-36 promoted survival and anti-hypertrophic/fibrotic effects on cultured cardiac cells, suggesting cell-autonomous cardioprotective actions.

  3. The prevalence of microalbuminuria among patients with type II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This cross-sectional community-based study was carried out to determine the prevalence of microalbuminuria among patients with type II diabetes mellitus in a primary care setting, and to study the association between various risk factors and the presence of microalbuminuria. All patients with type II diabetes mellitus who ...

  4. Factors Associated with Participation in Pulmonary Tuberculosis Screening Using Chest X-Ray among Diabetes Mellitus Type II Patients in Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putra, I Gusti Ngurah Edi; Astuti, Putu Ayu Swandewi; Suarjana, I Ketut; Mulyawan, Ketut Hari; Duana, I Made Kerta; Kurniasari, Ni Made Dian; Putra, I Wayan Gede Artawan Eka

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) increases the risk of developing pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) disease. Therefore, pulmonary TB screening among DM patients is essential. This study aimed to identify factors associated with participation of DM type II patients in pulmonary TB screening using chest X-ray. This was a cross-sectional analytic study and was part of TB-DM screening study in Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia. The sample consisted of 365 DM type II patients selected by quota sampling among DM type II patients joining the screening program from January until March 2016 in 11 public health centres in Denpasar. Data were collected via structured interviews. The contributing factors were determined by modified Poisson regression test for cross-sectional data. From the findings, less than half (45.48%) of DM type II patients participated in chest X-ray examination for TB. Factors associated with participation in pulmonary TB screening were having a higher educational level [APR = 1.34, 95% CI (1.07-1.67)], having family member who developed pulmonary TB disease [APR = 1.47, 95% CI (1.12-1.93)], the travel time to referral hospital for screening being ≤ 15 minutes [APR = 1.6, 95% CI (1.26-2.03)], having health insurance [APR = 2.69, 95% CI (1.10-6.56)], and receiving good support from health provider [APR = 1.35, 95% CI (1.06-1.70)]. Therefore, training for health provider on providing counselling, involvement of family members in screening process, and improving the health insurance coverage and referral system are worth considering.

  5. Factors Associated with Participation in Pulmonary Tuberculosis Screening Using Chest X-Ray among Diabetes Mellitus Type II Patients in Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gusti Ngurah Edi Putra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM increases the risk of developing pulmonary tuberculosis (TB disease. Therefore, pulmonary TB screening among DM patients is essential. This study aimed to identify factors associated with participation of DM type II patients in pulmonary TB screening using chest X-ray. This was a cross-sectional analytic study and was part of TB-DM screening study in Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia. The sample consisted of 365 DM type II patients selected by quota sampling among DM type II patients joining the screening program from January until March 2016 in 11 public health centres in Denpasar. Data were collected via structured interviews. The contributing factors were determined by modified Poisson regression test for cross-sectional data. From the findings, less than half (45.48% of DM type II patients participated in chest X-ray examination for TB. Factors associated with participation in pulmonary TB screening were having a higher educational level [APR = 1.34, 95% CI (1.07–1.67], having family member who developed pulmonary TB disease [APR = 1.47, 95% CI (1.12–1.93], the travel time to referral hospital for screening being ≤ 15 minutes [APR = 1.6, 95% CI (1.26–2.03], having health insurance [APR = 2.69, 95% CI (1.10–6.56], and receiving good support from health provider [APR = 1.35, 95% CI (1.06–1.70]. Therefore, training for health provider on providing counselling, involvement of family members in screening process, and improving the health insurance coverage and referral system are worth considering.

  6. Lipid profiles and serum visfatin concentrations in patients with type II diabetes in comparison with healthy controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Hajianfar

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: This study documented an inverse relationship between circulating level of visfatin and fasting blood glucose. This finding may suggest the role of increased visfatin level and increase in synthesis and secretion of the cytokines from adipocytes. These findings may be useful for primary and secondary preventive issues in diabetic and pre-diabetic individuals.

  7. Transcriptomic profiles of peripheral white blood cells in type II diabetes and racial differences in expression profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Jinghe

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Along with obesity, physical inactivity, and family history of metabolic disorders, African American ethnicity is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes (T2D in the United States. However, little is known about the differences in gene expression and transcriptomic profiles of blood in T2D between African Americans (AA and Caucasians (CAU, and microarray analysis of peripheral white blood cells (WBCs from these two ethnic groups will facilitate our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanism in T2D and identify genetic biomarkers responsible for the disparities. Results A whole human genome oligomicroarray of peripheral WBCs was performed on 144 samples obtained from 84 patients with T2D (44 AA and 40 CAU and 60 healthy controls (28 AA and 32 CAU. The results showed that 30 genes had significant difference in expression between patients and controls (a fold change of 1.4 with a P value Conclusions These newly identified genetic markers in WBCs provide valuable information about the pathophysiology of T2D and can be used for diagnosis and pharmaceutical drug design. Our results also found that AA and CAU patients with T2D express genes and pathways differently.

  8. A mixed-methods needs assessment of adult diabetes mellitus (type II) and hypertension care in Toledo, Belize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Annette M; Amick, Ashley E; Scholcoff, Cecilia; Doobay-Persaud, Ashti

    2017-02-28

    Non-communicable diseases, including diabetes mellitus and hypertension, continue to disproportionately burden low- and middle-income countries. However, little research has been done to establish current practices and management of chronic disease in these settings. The objective of this study was to examine current clinical management and identify potential gaps in care of patients with diabetes mellitus and hypertension in the district of Toledo, Belize. The study used a mixed methodology to assess current practices and identify gaps in diabetes mellitus and hypertension care. One hundred and twenty charts of the general clinic population were reviewed to establish disease epidemiology. One hundred and seventy-eight diabetic and hypertensive charts were reviewed to assess current practices. Twenty providers completed questionnaires regarding diabetes mellitus and hypertension management. Twenty-five individuals with diabetes mellitus and/or hypertension answered a questionnaire and in-depth interview. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus and hypertension was 12%. Approximately 51% (n = 43) of patients with hypertension were at blood pressure goal and 26% (n = 21) diabetic patients were at glycemic goal based on current guidelines. Of the patients with uncontrolled diabetes, 49% (n = 29) were on two oral agents and only 10% (n = 6) were on insulin. Providers stated that barriers to appropriate management include concerns prescribing insulin and patient health literacy. Patients demonstrated a general understanding of the concept of chronic illness, however lacked specific knowledge regarding disease processes and self-management strategies. This study provides an initial overview of diabetes mellitus and hypertension management in a diverse patient population in rural Belize. Results indicate areas for future investigation and possible intervention, including barriers to insulin use and opportunities for lifestyle-specific disease education for

  9. Additive effects of cilnidipine, an L-/N-type calcium channel blocker, and an angiotensin II receptor blocker on reducing cardiorenal damage in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mori Y

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Yutaka Mori,1,2 Shizuka Aritomi,3 Kazumi Niinuma,3 Tarou Nakamura,3 Kenichi Matsuura,1 Junichi Yokoyama,1 Kazunori Utsunomiya1 1Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Minato-ku, Japan; 2Department of Clinical Research, National Hospital Organization, Utsunomiya National Hospital, Utsunomiya, Japan; 3Research Center, Ajinomoto Pharmaceuticals Co, Ltd, Kanagawa, Japan Abstract: Cilnidipine (Cil, which is an L-/N-type calcium channel blocker (CCB, has been known to provide renal protection by decreasing the activity of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS and the renin–angiotensin system. In this study, we compared the effects of the combination of Cil and amlodipine (Aml, which is an L-type CCB, with an angiotensin (Ang II receptor blocker on diabetic cardiorenal damage in spontaneously type 2 diabetic rats. Seventeen-week-old Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats were randomly assigned to receive Cil, Aml, valsartan (Val, Cil + Val, Aml + Val, or a vehicle (eight rats per group for 22 weeks. Antihypertensive potencies were nearly equal among the CCB monotherapy groups and the combination therapy groups. The lowering of blood pressure by either treatment did not significantly affect the glycemic variables. However, exacerbations of renal and heart failure were significantly suppressed in rats administered Cil or Val, and additional suppression was observed in those administered Cil + Val. Although Val increased the renin–Ang system, Aml + Val treatment resulted in additional increases in these parameters, while Cil + Val did not show such effects. Furthermore, Cil increased the ratio of Ang-(1–7 to Ang-I, despite the fact that Val and Aml + Val decreased the Ang-(1–7 levels. These actions of Cil + Val might be due to their synergistic inhibitory effect on the activity of the SNS, and on aldosterone secretion through N-type calcium channel antagonism and Ang II

  10. Guideline treatment results in regression of atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strang, Aart C.; van Wijk, Diederik F.; Mutsaerts, Henri J. M. M.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Rotmans, Joris I.; Rabelink, Ton J.; Box, Frieke M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Efficacy of guideline cardiovascular disease prevention regimens may differ between patients with or without type II diabetes mellitus. We therefore compared change in carotid artery wall dimensions in type II diabetes mellitus and non-type II diabetes mellitus patients with a history of a major

  11. Exercise and cognitive function: a hypothesis for the association of type II diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease from an evolutionary perspective

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    Brito Gilberto NO

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The association of type II diabetes mellitus (DM2 with Alzheimer's disease (AD has received considerable attention in recent years. In the present paper, a hypothesis for this association from an evolutionary perspective, with emphasis on the close interplay between exercise and cognitive function, will be advanced in order to provide a biological rationale for the notion that the fundamental metabolic features of DM2 act in the brain over a protracted time span to induce the neuropathological characteristics of Alzheimer's disease thereby producing cognitive impairment. It is hoped that this hypothesis puts the association of DM2 and AD on firm conceptual grounds from a biological perspective and offers directions for further research.

  12. Association of Barrett's esophagus with type II Diabetes Mellitus: results from a large population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Prasad G; Borah, Bijan J; Heien, Herbert C; Das, Ananya; Cooper, Gregory S; Chak, Amitabh

    2013-09-01

    Central obesity could increase the risk for Barrett's esophagus (BE) and esophageal adenocarcinoma by mechanical and/or metabolic mechanisms, such as hyperinsulinemia. We performed an epidemiologic study to determine whether prior type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) is associated with BE. We performed a population-based case-control study using the General Practice Research Database, a UK primary care database that contains information on more than 8 million subjects, to identify cases of BE (using previously validated codes; n = 14,245) and matched controls without BE (by age, sex, enrollment date, duration of follow-up evaluation, and practice region by incidence density sampling; n = 70,361). We assessed the association of a prior diagnosis of DM2 with BE using conditional univariate and multivariable regression analysis. Confounders assessed included smoking, obesity measured by body mass index (BMI), and gastroesophageal reflux disease. BE cases were more likely than controls to have smoked (52.4% vs 49.9%), have a higher mean BMI (27.2 vs 26.9), and a higher prevalence of DM2 than controls (5.8% vs 5.3%). On multivariable analysis, DM2 was associated with a 49% increase in the risk of BE, independent of other known risk factors (odds ratio, 1.49; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-1.91). This association was stronger in women than men. Results remained stable with sensitivity analyses. In a large population-based case-control study, DM2 was a risk factor for BE, independent of obesity (as measured by BMI) and other risk factors (smoking and gastroesophageal reflux disease). These data suggest that metabolic pathways related to DM2 should be explored in BE pathogenesis and esophageal carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A network meta-analysis for efficacy and safety of seven regimens in the treatment of type II diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Guo; Wang, Hui; Liu, Qin; Hua, Wei-Chang; Li, Chang-Ming

    2017-08-01

    The efficacy and safety of seven regimens based on metformin (placebo plus metformin, dapagliflozin plus metformin, vildagliptin plus metformin, saxagliptin plus metformin, empagliflozin plus metformin, exenatide plus metformin and sitagliptin plus metformin) on type 2 diabetes (T2D) were compared based on network meta-analysis. PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library were applied in the computer-based retrieval process. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) which were related with the above seven regimens based on metformin in the treatment of T2D were included in this study. Network meta-analysis merged the direct and indirect comparison evidence for the estimation of the weighted mean difference (WMD), odd ratios (ORs) and surface under the cumulative sequencing ranking curve (SUCRA) values. Eight eligible RCTs were applied in this network meta-analysis. The results demonstrated that: in terms of efficacy, the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels of T2D patients receiving vildagliptin plus metformin were relatively lower when compared with placebo plus metformin (WMD=-1.95, 95%CI=-3.70--0.23); in comparison with exenatide plus metformin, the triglyceride level in T2D patients taking vildagliptin plus metformin remained relatively lower (WMD=-1.36, 95%CI=-2.64--0.01). In terms of safety, the rate of adverse events in patients with T2D who received empagliflozin plus metformin was relatively lower when compared with saxagliptin plus metformin (OR=0.37, 95%CI=0.14-0.98). Furthermore, the SUCRA value of vildagliptin plus metformin was comparatively higher in efficacy, and that the SUCRA value of saxagliptin plus metformin was relatively lower in safety. The efficacy of vildagliptin plus metformin in patients with T2D is relatively better, while the safety of saxagliptin plus metformin in patients with T2D is relatively poorer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Depression symptoms are persistent in Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitworth, Stephanie; Bruce, David; Starkstein, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Aims To describe the long‐term trajectories of depression symptom severity in people with Type 2 diabetes, and to identify predictors and associates of these trajectories. Methods A community‐dwelling cohort of 1201 individuals with Type 2 diabetes from the Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase II was f...... benefit from early and intensive depression management and ongoing follow‐up as part of routine Type 2 diabetes care.......Aims To describe the long‐term trajectories of depression symptom severity in people with Type 2 diabetes, and to identify predictors and associates of these trajectories. Methods A community‐dwelling cohort of 1201 individuals with Type 2 diabetes from the Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase II...... was followed for 5 years. The nine‐item version of the Patient Health Questionnaire was administered annually to assess depression symptoms, and biomedical and psychosocial measures were assessed at baseline and biennially. Latent class growth analysis was used to identify classes of depression severity...

  15. [Prevalence of the Diabetic Retinopathy and Genetic Factors Significance in the Development of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus type I and II in Slovakia (DIARET SK study). Overview of Actual Findings and Design of the Epidemiological DIARET SK Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krásnik, V; Štefaničková, J; Fabková, J; Bucková, D; Helbich, M

    2015-09-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the second most common microvascular complication and the most common cause of blindness in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Despite the ongoing research, the findings of diabetic retinopathy epidemiological and risk factors are, until now, not consistent. More finding may be revealed by epidemiological studies, consistently mapping DR epidemiology under the current possibilities of investigations and treatment of the DM. DIARET SK Study, with 5 000 enrolled patients with diabetes mellitus in the Slovak Republic, is, until now, the largest epidemiological study to set the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy. The primary aim is to establish the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in patients with diabetes mellitus type I and II, according to the duration of the disease. The secondary aim is to establish prevalence of the different stages of the DR and diabetic macular edema (DME) and analysis of the risk factors influence. Included are patients with DM type I and II regardless to the ocular complications history and the period of DM duration. Each enrolled patient has both complex diabetic and ophthalmic examinations.Projects to establish DR prevalence: Tens of projects concerned with diabetic retinopathy epidemiology with different approaches to establish the prevalence and with different patients population. Results from different studies vary significantly (from 12.3 % to 66.9 %). The results depend on the design of the study and the patients recruitment, used examination methods, specific patients population with regard to the geography, prevalence of risk factors, period of diabetes duration, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) level, blood pressure, and is higher in type I diabetic patients. The most accurate results are from population epidemiological studies with well-controlled patient recruitment and uniform complex examination that are similar to the DIARET SK study. The DIARET SK study represents the largest epidemiological study

  16. The Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial: blood pressure-lowering limb: effects in patients with type II diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergren, Jan; Poulter, Neil R; Sever, Peter S

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of two antihypertensive treatment strategies for the prevention of coronary heart disease and other cardiovascular events in the large subpopulation (n=5137) with diabetes mellitus in the blood pressure-lowering arm of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial...... nonsignificantly by 8% (hazard ratio 0.92, confidence interval 0.74-1.15). CONCLUSION: In the large diabetic subgroup in the blood pressure-lowering arm of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial, the benefits of amlodipine-based treatment, compared with atenolol-based treatment, on the incidence of total...... with addition of thiazide as required (atenolol-based). Therapy was titrated to achieve a target blood pressure of less than 130/80 mmHg. RESULTS: The trial was terminated early due to significant benefits on mortality and stroke associated with the amlodipine-based regimen. In patients with diabetes mellitus...

  17. Effects of Low-Molecular-Weight Fucoidan and High Stability Fucoxanthin on Glucose Homeostasis, Lipid Metabolism, and Liver Function in a Mouse Model of Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Ting Victor Lin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The combined effects of low-molecular-weight fucoidan (LMF and fucoxanthin (Fx in terms of antihyperglycemic, antihyperlipidemic, and hepatoprotective activities were investigated in a mouse model of type II diabetes. The intake of LMF, Fx, and LMF + Fx lowered the blood sugar and fasting blood sugar levels, and increased serum adiponectin levels. The significant decrease in urinary sugar was only observed in LMF + Fx supplementation. LMF and Fx had ameliorating effects on the hepatic tissue of db/db mice by increasing hepatic glycogen and antioxidative enzymes, and LMF was more effective than Fx at improving hepatic glucose metabolism. As for glucose and lipid metabolism in the adipose tissue, the expression of insulin receptor substrate (IRS-1, glucose transporter (GLUT, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, and uncoupling protein (UCP-1 mRNAs in the adipose tissue of diabetic mice was significantly upregulated by Fx and LMF + Fx, and levels of inflammatory adipocytokines, such as adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and interleukin-6 (IL-6, were significantly modulated only by LMF + Fx supplementation. The efficacy of LMF + Fx supplementation on the decrease in urinary sugar and on glucose and lipid metabolism in the white adipose tissue of db/db mice was better than that of Fx or LMF alone, indicating the occurrence of a synergistic effect of LMF and Fx.

  18. The TRPC1 Ca2+-permeable channel inhibits exercise-induced protection against high-fat diet-induced obesity and type II diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krout, Danielle; Schaar, Anne; Sun, Yuyang; Sukumaran, Pramod; Roemmich, James N; Singh, Brij B; Claycombe-Larson, Kate J

    2017-12-15

    The transient receptor potential canonical channel-1 (TRPC1) is a Ca 2+ -permeable channel found in key metabolic organs and tissues, including the hypothalamus, adipose tissue, and skeletal muscle. Loss of TRPC1 may alter the regulation of cellular energy metabolism resulting in insulin resistance thereby leading to diabetes. Exercise reduces insulin resistance, but it is not known whether TRPC1 is involved in exercise-induced insulin sensitivity. The role of TRPC1 in adiposity and obesity-associated metabolic diseases has not yet been determined. Our results show that TRPC1 functions as a major Ca 2+ entry channel in adipocytes. We have also shown that fat mass and fasting glucose concentrations were lower in TRPC1 KO mice that were fed a high-fat (HF) (45% fat) diet and exercised as compared with WT mice fed a HF diet and exercised. Adipocyte numbers were decreased in both subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue of TRPC1 KO mice fed a HF diet and exercised. Finally, autophagy markers were decreased and apoptosis markers increased in TRPC1 KO mice fed a HF diet and exercised. Overall, these findings suggest that TRPC1 plays an important role in the regulation of adiposity via autophagy and apoptosis and that TRPC1 inhibits the positive effect of exercise on type II diabetes risk under a HF diet-induced obesity environment.

  19. Human placental growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor I and -II, and insulin requirements during pregnancy in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Jens; Lauszus, Finn; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2003-01-01

    between hPGH and IGF-I in type 1 diabetes mellitus has not been investigated thoroughly. Furthermore, hPGH may be involved in the development of insulin resistance during pregnancy. In this prospective, longitudinal study, 51 type 1 diabetic subjects were followed with repeated blood sampling during...... pregnancy in type 1 diabetic subjects could not be related to hPGH levels.......Human placental GH (hPGH) replaces pituitary GH during pregnancy. hPGH is correlated to serum IGF-I in normal pregnancies and in pregnancies complicated by fetoplacental disorders. In gestational diabetes and type 2 diabetes no correlation between hPGH and IGF-I has been found. The relationship...

  20. Human leucocyte antigens class II allele and haplotype association with Type 1 Diabetes in Madeira Island (Portugal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spínola, H; Lemos, A; Couto, A R; Parreira, B; Soares, M; Dutra, I; Bruges-Armas, J; Brehm, A; Abreu, S

    2017-12-01

    This study confirms for Madeira Island (Portugal) population the Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) susceptible and protective Human leucocyte antigens (HLA) markers previously reported in other populations and adds some local specificities. Among the strongest T1D HLA associations, stands out, as susceptible, the alleles DRB1*04:05 (OR = 7.3), DQB1*03:02 (OR = 6.1) and DQA1*03:03 (OR = 4.5), as well as the haplotypes DRB1*04:05-DQA1*03:03-DQB1*03:02 (OR = 100.9) and DRB1*04:04-DQA1*03:01-DQB1*03:02 (OR = 22.1), and DQB1*06:02 (OR = 0.07) and DRB1*15:01-DQA1*01:02-DQB1*06:02 (OR = 0.04) as protective. HLA-DQA1 positive for Arginine at position 52 (Arg52) (OR = 15.2) and HLA-DQB1 negative for Aspartic acid at the position 57 (Asp57) (OR = 9.0) alleles appear to be important genetic markers for T1D susceptibility, with higher odds ratio values than any single allele and than most of the haplotypes. Genotypes generated by the association of markers Arg52 DQA1 positive and Asp57 DQB1 negative increase T1D susceptibility much more than one would expected by a simple additive effect of those markers separately (OR = 26.9). This study also confirms an increased risk for DRB1*04/DRB1*03 heterozygote genotypes (OR = 16.8) and also a DRB1*04-DQA1*03:01-DQB1*03:02 haplotype susceptibility dependent on the DRB1*04 allele (DRB1*04:01, OR = 7.9; DRB1*04:02, OR = 3.2; DRB1*04:04, OR = 22.1). © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... esteem. Sometimes medication is an option as well. Metformin (Glucophage, Glumetza, others), an oral diabetes medication, may ... Conditions and Terms Any use of this site constitutes your agreement to the ...

  2. Apical Periodontitis and Endodontic Treatment in Patients with Type II Diabetes Mellitus: Comparative Cross-sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smadi, Leena

    2017-05-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of apical periodontitis (AP) in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients compared with nondiabetic patients and to examine the effect of glycemic control on the prevalence of AP. Radiographs of a group of DM patients were compared with those of a matched nondiabetic group to identify AP. The diabetic group was subdivided according to the level of glycemic control into two subgroups: A well-controlled DM and a poorly controlled DM. The periapical index score was used to assess the periapical status. All groups were compared in regard to the presence of AP lesions, the number of end-odontically treated teeth (ET), and the percentage of failure of endodontically treated teeth (AP/ET ratio). Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 20.0, Chicago, Illinois, USA) was used for all the analyses; p ≤ 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. The prevalence of AP was higher in diabetic group than in the nondiabetic group (13.5 vs 11.9% respectively). Diabetic group had more teeth with endodontic treatment ET compared with nondiabetic group (4.18 vs 1.82% respectively); this difference was statistically significant (p = 0.001) along with higher AP/ET ratio (27.7 vs 19.3 respectively). The poorly controlled DM group had a higher prevalence of AP lesions compared with the well-controlled DM group (18.29 vs 9.21 respectively). This difference was statistically significant (p = 0.001); they also had a higher percentage of ET (5.55 vs 3.13% respectively) and AP/ ET ratio (32.0 vs 21.8% respectively). This survey demonstrates a higher prevalence of AP in DM patients compared with nondiabetic group, with an increased prevalence of persistent chronic AP. Compared with a well-controlled diabetic group, a poor glycemic control may be associated with a higher prevalence of AP and increased rate of endodontic failures. Counseling diabetic patients, particularly those with poor glycemic control, about the risk of

  3. Polymorphism AvaII of the LDL receptor (rs5925 is associated with carotid-intima media thickness in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovana Nikolajević-Starčević

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Increased serum level of low density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol is a well established risk factor for atherosclerosis development and progression. Genetic variation in the LDL receptor gene could modulate serum LDL level and response to statin treatment thus affecting atherosclerosis development and progression. The present study was designed to investigate the association between polymorphism AvaII (rs5925 of the LDL receptor gene with serum lipid levels and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2.Methods 595 patients with DM2 (399 on statin therapy and 196 without were enrolled in the study. The carotid intima-media thickness was assessed ultrasonographically. Biochemical analyses were performed using standard biochemical methods. AvaII (rs5925 genotypes were determined by real-time PCR. Results Genotype distribution and allele frequencies were not statistically significantly different between DM2 patients with regard to statin therapy. In DM2 patients using statins the highest serum levels of total and LDL cholesterol were observed in homozygous carriers of the A+ allele. After adjustment for well established cardiovascular risk factors homozygosity for the A+ allele (β=0.441 and p=0.04, statin treatment as well as serum levels of HDL, triglycerides, hsCRP and fibrinogen were independently associated with CIMT. Interactions of AvaII genotypes A-A+ and A+A+ with statin treatment were not statistically significant.Conclusion Homozigosity for the A+ allele of the AvaII polymorphism is associated with greater CIMT in DM2 patients.

  4. Quality assessment of recent evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in adults using the AGREE II instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwer, Muhammad A; Al-Fahed, Ousama B; Arif, Samir I; Amer, Yasser S; Titi, Maher A; Al-Rukban, Mohammed O

    2018-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a worldwide and national public health problem that has a great impact on the population in Saudi Arabia. High-quality clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are cornerstones in improving the health care provided for patients with diabetes. This study evaluated the methodological rigour, transparency, and applicability of recently published CPGs. Our group conducted a systematic search for recently published CPGs for T2DM. The searching and screening for Source CPGs were guided by tools from the ADAPTE methods with specific inclusion/exclusion criteria. Five reviewers using the second version of the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) Instrument independently assessed the quality of the retrieved Source CPGs. Domains of Scope and purpose and Clarity of presentation received the highest scores in all CPGs. Most of the assessed CPGs (86%) were considered with high overall quality and were recommended for use. Rigour of development and applicability domains were together highest in 3 CPGs (43%). The overall high quality of DM CPGs published in the last 3 years demonstrated the continuous development and improvement in CPG methodologies and standards. Health care professionals should consider the quality of any CPG for T2DM before deciding to use it in their daily clinical practice. Three CPGs have been identified, using the AGREE criteria, as high-quality and trustworthy. Ideally, the resources provided by the AGREE trust including the AGREE II Instrument should be used by a clinician to scan through the large number of published T2DM CPGs to identify the CPGs with high methodological quality and applicability. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Saxagliptin for type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chacra

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Antonio R Chacra, MDDiabetes Center, Federal University of São Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Saxagliptin (Onglyza™ is a potent, selective, once-daily dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitor indicated for improving glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D. By blocking DPP-4, saxagliptin increases and prolongs the effects of incretins, a group of peptide hormones released by intestinal cells after meals, which stimulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion to lower blood glucose. In controlled clinical trials, saxagliptin administered as monotherapy or in combination with metformin, glyburide, or a thiazolidinedione improved glycemic control in a clinically significant manner, reflected by significant decreases in glycated hemoglobin (monotherapy, -0.5%; add-on to metformin, thiazolidinedione, or sulfonylurea, -0.6% to 0.9%; initial combination with metformin, -2.5%, fasting plasma glucose, and postprandial glucose compared with controls. Additionally, saxagliptin improved β-cell function, reflected as increases in homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-2β. Saxagliptin was generally well tolerated; it did not increase hypoglycemia compared with controls, and was weight neutral. A meta-analysis of Phase II and III trials showed that saxagliptin did not increase the risk of major cardiovascular events. Professional organizations have updated their guidelines for T2D to include a DPP-4 inhibitor as an early treatment option—either as initial therapy in combination with metformin, or as add-on therapy for patients whose glycemia is inadequately controlled by a single oral antidiabetic drug.Keywords: saxagliptin, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitor, type 2 diabetes

  6. [Surgery for diabetes type 2?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Markus K; Nocito, A; Schiesser, M

    2010-02-17

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 is a chronic disease with increasing prevalence in western society. Obesity represents a well established risk factor for the development of diabetes mellitus type 2. Several studies on surgical procedures for the treatment of obesity have shown a postoperative reduction of obesity-related co-morbidities. Thus, diabetes mellitus type 2 was shown to resolve or improve in more than 75% of morbidly obese patients (BMI >35) after bariatric surgery. These insights paved the way for the advent of metabolic surgery - a novel field with the goal to improve glucose metabolism in patients with a BMI of less than 35. Encouraging results from mostly observational studies have sparked the interest in the surgical management of diabetes mellitus type 2.

  7. Flavonoid content in ethanolic extracts of selected raw and traditionally processed indigenous foods consumed by vulnerable groups of Kenya: antioxidant and type II diabetes-related functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunyanga, Catherine N; Imungi, Jasper K; Okoth, Michael W; Biesalski, Hans K; Vadivel, Vellingiri

    2011-08-01

    The present study evaluated the flavonoid content, antioxidant as well as type II diabetes-related enzyme inhibition activities of ethanolic extract of certain raw and traditionally processed indigenous food ingredients including cereals, legumes, oil seeds, tubers, vegetables and leafy vegetables, which are commonly consumed by vulnerable groups in Kenya. The vegetables exhibited higher flavonoid content (50-703 mg/100 g) when compared with the grains (47-343 mg/100 g). The ethanolic extract of presently studied food ingredients revealed 33-93% DPPH radical scavenging capacity, 486-6,389 mmol Fe(II)/g reducing power, 19-43% α-amylase inhibition activity and 14-68% α-glucosidase inhibition activity. Among the different food-stuffs, the drumstick and amaranth leaves exhibited significantly higher flavonoid content with excellent functional properties. Roasting of grains and cooking of vegetables were found to be suitable processing methods in preserving the functional properties. Hence, such viable processing techniques for respective food samples will be considered in the formulation of functional supplementary foods for vulnerable groups in Kenya.

  8. Missing in space: an evaluation of imputation methods for missing data in spatial analysis of risk factors for type II diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jannah; White, Nicole; Mengersen, Kerrie

    2014-11-20

    Spatial analysis is increasingly important for identifying modifiable geographic risk factors for disease. However, spatial health data from surveys are often incomplete, ranging from missing data for only a few variables, to missing data for many variables. For spatial analyses of health outcomes, selection of an appropriate imputation method is critical in order to produce the most accurate inferences. We present a cross-validation approach to select between three imputation methods for health survey data with correlated lifestyle covariates, using as a case study, type II diabetes mellitus (DM II) risk across 71 Queensland Local Government Areas (LGAs). We compare the accuracy of mean imputation to imputation using multivariate normal and conditional autoregressive prior distributions. Choice of imputation method depends upon the application and is not necessarily the most complex method. Mean imputation was selected as the most accurate method in this application. Selecting an appropriate imputation method for health survey data, after accounting for spatial correlation and correlation between covariates, allows more complete analysis of geographic risk factors for disease with more confidence in the results to inform public policy decision-making.

  9. Enhanced escape of non-esterified fatty acids from tissue uptake : its role in impaired insulin-induced lowering of total rate of appearance in obesity and Type II diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemens, SC; Sluiter, WJ; Dullaart, RPF

    Aims/hypothesis. To estimate non-esterified fatty acids kinetics in patients with Type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus and obese subjects in the postabsorptive state and during hyperinsulinaemia using non-equlibrium tracer conditions. Methods. We evaluated the effect of

  10. Early onset type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bo, A; Thomsen, R W; Nielsen, J S

    2018-01-01

    was more frequent and meeting physical activity recommendations less likely in persons with early-onset type 2 DM. CONCLUSIONS: We found a clear age-gradient, with increasing prevalence of clinical and behavioural risk factors the younger the onset age of type 2 DM. Younger persons with early-onset type 2......AIM: To examine the association between early onset of type 2 diabetes (DM) and clinical and behavioural risk factors for later diabetes complications. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 5115 persons with incident type 2 DM enrolled during 2010-2015 in the Danish Centre for Strategic...... Research in Type 2 Diabetes-cohort. We compared risk factors at time of diagnosis among those diagnosed at ≤45 years (early-onset) with diagnosis age 46-55, 56-65 (average-onset = reference), 66-75, and >75 years (late-onset). Prevalence ratios (PRs) were computed using Poisson regression. RESULTS: Poor...

  11. Diabetes Type 2 Is Serious But Manageable

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes Type 2 Is Serious But Manageable Past Issues / ... t have to knock yourself out to prevent diabetes. The key is: small steps that lead to ...

  12. Psychosocial Stress at Work Doubles the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Middle-Aged Women Evidence from the Whitehall II Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heraclides, A.; Chandola, T.; Witte, Daniel Rinse

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - To investigate the effect of psychosocial stress at work on risk of type 2 diabetes, adjusting for conventional risk factors, among a sample of British, white-collar, middle-aged men and women. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - This was a prospective analysis (19912004) from the Whitehall...... phases. The job strain and iso-strain models were used to assess psychosocial work stress. RESULTS - iso-strain in the workplace was associated with a twofold higher risk of type 2 diabetes in age-adjusted analysis in women but not in men (hazard ratio 1.94 [95% CI 1.17-3.21]). This effect remained...... robust to adjustment for socioeconomic position and outside work stressors and was only attenuated by 20% after adjustment for health behaviors, obesity, and other type 2 diabetes risk factors. CONCLUSIONS - Psychosocial work stress was an independent predictor of type 2 diabetes among women after a 15...

  13. Human placental growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor I and -II, and insulin requirements during pregnancy in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Jens; Lauszus, Finn; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2003-01-01

    between hPGH and IGF-I in type 1 diabetes mellitus has not been investigated thoroughly. Furthermore, hPGH may be involved in the development of insulin resistance during pregnancy. In this prospective, longitudinal study, 51 type 1 diabetic subjects were followed with repeated blood sampling during......PGH was not correlated to the increase in insulin requirements, nor was any consistent relationship revealed during each gestational period. In conclusion, our study suggests a role for hPGH in the regulation of both IGFs and fetal growth in type 1 diabetes. In contrast, the increase in insulin requirements during...... pregnancy in type 1 diabetic subjects could not be related to hPGH levels....

  14. Sex differences in pain-related behavior and expression of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in dorsal root ganglia of rats with diabetes type 1 and type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferhatovic, Lejla; Banozic, Adriana; Kostic, Sandra; Sapunar, Damir; Puljak, Livia

    2013-06-01

    Sex differences in pain-related behavior and expression of calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in dorsal root ganglia were studied in rat models of Diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1) and type 2 (DM2). DM1 was induced with 55mg/kg streptozotocin, and DM2 with a combination of high-fat diet and 35mg/kg of streptozotocin. Pain-related behavior was analyzed using thermal and mechanical stimuli. The expression of CaMKII was analyzed with immunofluorescence. Sexual dimorphism in glycemia, and expression of CaMKII was observed in the rat model of DM1, but not in DM2 animals. Increased expression of total CaMKII (tCaMKII) in small-diameter dorsal root ganglia neurons, which are associated with nociception, was found only in male DM1 rats. None of the animals showed increased expression of the phosphorylated alpha CaMKII isoform in small-diameter neurons. The expression of gamma and delta isoforms of CaMKII remained unchanged in all analyzed animal groups. Different patterns of glycemia and tCaMKII expression in male and female model of DM1 were not associated with sexual dimorphism in pain-related behavior. The present findings do not suggest sex-related differences in diabetic painful peripheral neuropathy in male and female diabetic rats. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Predictors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    type 2 diabetes and diabetic retinopathy (DR) and nephropathy represent one of the ... control, hypertension, dyslipidemia, age of the patient, duration of diabetes .... thus, the presence of one is believed to predict the development of the other.

  16. Allele variants of HLA II genes DRB1 and DQB1 regarding risk for type 1 diabetes mellitus in population of Bashkortostan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamilevna Avzaletdinova

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To estimate significance of HLA II DRB1 and DRB2 allele variants for development of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM in Bashkortostanpopulation (ethnical Russians, Tatar, Bashkir. Materials and methods. We analyzed DNA of 323 patients with T1DM and 683 healthy controls. DNA was derived from venous bloodsamples by phenol-chloroform extraction. DRB1 and DQB1 gene typing was performed by PCR method. Amplification products wereidentified with electrophoresis on a 1% agarose gel. Statistica for Windows v6.0 and MS Excel 98 software were applied for statisticalprocessing of acquired data. Results. Common markers of high risk for T1DM were found to be DRB1*04, DRB1*17, genotype DRB1*04/*17. On the contrary,lower risk was associated with DRB1*15 allele. In ethnical Russians lower risk of T1DM is also determined by DRB1*11 allele andDRB1*01 in Tatars. Predisposition by DQB1-alleles in Russians and Bashkir realizes only within DRB1*04/*17 genotype. However,in Tatar subpopulation DQB1*0302 is an independent risk marker of T1DM development. Conclusion. Common low risk markers for all three ethnic groups are DQB1*0301, DQB1*0602-08 alleles. Their presence negates riskof disease in all studied subpopulations even within DRB1*04/*17-genotype.

  17. Development and standardization of radioimmunoassay technique for human proinsulin determining and its use in the study of type II diabetes mellitus associated to obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Martha do

    1996-01-01

    The availability of immunoassay methodology for proinsulin is important to define its physiological and pathophysiological significance in humans. Serum concentration of proinsulin are elevated in patients with type II Diabetes Mellitus (NIDDM) and recently diagnosed Type I, so a raised circulating concentration of proinsulin may serve as an early indicator of β cells dysfunction. recently, in NIDDM the serum concentrations of proinsulin and its B-chain-C-peptide junctional split form, des (31-32), were found to correlate with diastolic blood pressure, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The development of a sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) methodology for proinsulin has been difficult due to its low concentration in serum and the presence of proinsulin conversion intermediates in fluids and tissues. Also other potentially cross-reactive peptides, including insulin and C-peptide, can interfere in the assay. This work describe a highly specific human proinsulin RIA developed by using biosynthetic human proinsulin (hPI) as immunogen, standard and tracer. (author)

  18. Type 2 diabetes mortality at Mexican borders

    OpenAIRE

    Manzanares Rivera, José Luis

    2017-01-01

    Abstract:Objective: To analyze type II diabetes mortality rates geographic distribution and evolution in time across both Mexican border regions during the period 1998-2013.Methods: The work is based on exploratory and inferential data analysis conducted using death reports from the national health information system. The analysis considers social determinants of health as a theoretical paradigm and includes microdata on consumption patterns at household level for the US-Mexico and Mexico- Gu...

  19. Secondary metabolites of Cynodon dactylon as an antagonist to angiotensin II type1 receptor: Novel in silico drug targeting approach for diabetic retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jananie, R. K.; Priya, V.; Vijayalakshmi, K.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To study the ability of the secondary metabolites of Cynodon dactylon to serve as an antagonist to angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1); activation of this receptor plays a vital role in diabetic retinopathy (DR). Materials and Methods: In silico methods are mainly harnessed to reduce time, cost and risk associated with drug discovery. Twenty-four compounds were identified as the secondary metabolites of hydroalcoholic extract of C. dactylon using the GCMS technique. These were considered as the ligands or inhibitors that would serve as an antagonist to the AT1. The ACD/Chemsketch tool was used to generate 3D structures of the ligands. A molecular file format converter tool was used to convert the generated data to the PDB format (Protein Data Bank) and was used for docking studies. The AT1 structure was retrieved from the Swissprot data base and PDB and visualized using the Rasmol tool. Domain analysis was carried from the Pfam data base; following this, the active site of the target protein was identified using a Q-site finder tool. The ability of the ligands to bind with the active site of AT1 was studied using the Autodocking tool. The docking results were analyzed using the WebLab viewer tool. Results: Sixteen ligands showed effective binding with the target protein; diazoprogesteron, didodecyl phthalate, and 9,12-octadecadienoyl chloride (z,z) may be considered as compounds that could be used to bind with the active site sequence of AT1. Conclusions: The present study shows that the metabolites of C. dactylon could serve as a natural antagonist to AT1 that could be used to treat diabetic retinopathy. PMID:22368412

  20. Psychosocial determinants of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afzal, S.; Amin, M.K.; Ahmad, I.; Amer, H.; Shoaib, H.; Ibrahim, H.; Tayyab, M.; Hassan, M.; Javaid, M.A.; Rehman, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus type 2 , formerly non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or adult-onset diabetes, is a metabolic disorder that is characterized by high blood glucose in the context of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency1. The development of Diabetes Mellitus type 2 is associated with multiple risk factors, co-morbid medical conditions as well as psychosocial determinants. These psychosocial factors, which differ from population to population, can be identified and controlled to reduce the incidence of type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Objective: To identify various psychosocial factors associated with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Design: Case-control study. Place and Duration: Diabetic clinic and Medical Units Mayo Hospital Lahore . July to December, 2012. Subjects and Methods: A population based case-control study with 1:1 case to control ratio was conducted. A total of 100 subjects (50 cases and 50 controls) having age above 35 years were recruited in the study. Selection was made on laid down criteria from patients coming to Mayo Hospital Lahore after taking consent. Interviews were conducted through a pretested questionnaire. Data was collected, compiled and analyzed through IBM SPSS version 20. Results: Out of 100 study subjects 67% were males and 33% were females. Among cases of Diabetes mellitus type 2, 64% were males, 70% in the age group 35-50 years, 96% were married, 36% were illiterates. Mean age was found 49.24, standard deviation 10.915. In bivariate analysis, Diabetes Mellitus type II was found significantly associated with Anxiety(OR: 5.348, 95% CI: 2.151-13.298) Depression(OR: 5.063, 95% CI: 1.703-15.050), High fat diet, (OR: 2.471, 95% CI: 1.100-5.547) Sedentary Lifestyle(OR: 4.529, 95% CI: 1.952-10.508) and Psychological Stress(OR:4.529, 95% CI: 1.952-10.508). However, in multivariate analysis while controlling all other risk factors, Anxiety(OR: 6.066, 95% CI: 1.918-19.191), High fat diet(OR: 3.648, 95% CI: 1

  1. The P9 pocket of HLA-DQ2 (non-Aspbeta57) has no particular preference for negatively charged anchor residues found in other type 1 diabetes-predisposing non-Aspbeta57 MHC class II molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quarsten, H; Paulsen, G; Johansen, B H

    1998-01-01

    Susceptibility and resistance to type 1 diabetes are associated with MHC class II alleles that carry non-Asp and Asp at residue 57 of their beta chain respectively. The effect of Asp or non-Aspbeta57 may relate to a differential ability of distinct class II molecules to bind specific immuno......-pathogenic peptides. Recent studies in man and mouse have revealed that some type 1 diabetes-predisposing non-Aspbeta57 class II molecules (i.e. DQ8, DR4Dw15 and I-Ag7) preferentially bind peptides with a negatively charged anchor residue at P9. It has been suggested that this is a common feature of type 1 diabetes......-predisposing class II molecules. The molecular explanation for such a phenomenon could be that class II beta chains with Aspbeta57 form a salt bridge between Aspbeta57 and a conserved Arg of the a chain, whereas in non-Aspbeta57 molecules the Arg is unopposed and free to interact with negatively charged P9 peptide...

  2. Electrodiagnostic evaluation of median nerve conduction in Type II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJP

    2015-12-29

    Dec 29, 2015 ... Type II diabetes mellitus patients that were asymptomatic for peripheral neuropathy: a case control study. Owolabi LF 1*, Adebisi S2, ... degree of abnormality and monitoring the clinical course of the disease. Symptoms of DN ...

  3. Increased mean platelet volume in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezgi Coşkun Yenigün

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Platelet functions have important roles in the development of vascular complications in diabetic patients. Platelets with increased volume have increased activity compared to smaller ones; therefore, mean platelet volume (MPV is used as a marker for platelet activity. In the present study, we evaluated MPV in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM and its associations with diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications. Methods: Consecutive type II diabetic patients were screened from outpatient clinic of Internal Medicine Department of Diskapı Yıldırım Beyazıt Education and Researsch Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. A total of 48 patients with type II DM and 30 age and gender matched healthy subjects constituted the study population. For all subjects a complete blood count including MPV, fasting blood glucose level and lipid parameters were studied. In diabetic patients, duration of diabetes and HbA1C level, presence of microvascular and macrovascular complications were noted additively. Mean platelet volume was compared between diabetic patients and healthy counterparents. Then, among diabetic patients, MPV was compared between the ones with and without microvascular and macrovascular complications. Results: Mean platelet volume was found significantly higher in diabetic patients compared to non-diabetic healthy subjects. Diabetic patients with at least one of the microvascular complications had significantly higher MPV than those without microvascular damage.Higher MPV levels have also been shown in diabetics with macrovascular complications compared to the ones without macrovascular disease. Conclusion: Mean platelet volume was found to be higher in type II diabetics and those having any of microvascular or macrovascular diabetic complications.

  4. Solar Type II Radio Bursts and IP Type II Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cane, H. V.; Erickson, W. C.

    2005-01-01

    We have examined radio data from the WAVES experiment on the Wind spacecraft in conjunction with ground-based data in order to investigate the relationship between the shocks responsible for metric type II radio bursts and the shocks in front of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The bow shocks of fast, large CMEs are strong interplanetary (IP) shocks, and the associated radio emissions often consist of single broad bands starting below approx. 4 MHz; such emissions were previously called IP type II events. In contrast, metric type II bursts are usually narrowbanded and display two harmonically related bands. In addition to displaying complete dynamic spectra for a number of events, we also analyze the 135 WAVES 1 - 14 MHz slow-drift time periods in 2001-2003. We find that most of the periods contain multiple phenomena, which we divide into three groups: metric type II extensions, IP type II events, and blobs and bands. About half of the WAVES listings include probable extensions of metric type II radio bursts, but in more than half of these events, there were also other slow-drift features. In the 3 yr study period, there were 31 IP type II events; these were associated with the very fastest CMEs. The most common form of activity in the WAVES events, blobs and bands in the frequency range between 1 and 8 MHz, fall below an envelope consistent with the early signatures of an IP type II event. However, most of this activity lasts only a few tens of minutes, whereas IP type II events last for many hours. In this study we find many examples in the radio data of two shock-like phenomena with different characteristics that occur simultaneously in the metric and decametric/hectometric bands, and no clear example of a metric type II burst that extends continuously down in frequency to become an IP type II event. The simplest interpretation is that metric type II bursts, unlike IP type II events, are not caused by shocks driven in front of CMEs.

  5. Association of Neuropeptide-Y (NPY) and Interleukin-1beta (IL1B), Genotype-Phenotype Correlation and Plasma Lipids with Type-II Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Roma; Dwivedi, Mitesh; Mansuri, Mohmmad Shoab; Ansarullah; Laddha, Naresh C; Thakker, Ami; Ramachandran, A V; Begum, Rasheedunnisa

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is known to play a role in the regulation of satiety, energy balance, body weight, and insulin release. Interleukin-1beta (IL1B) has been associated with loss of beta-cell mass in type-II diabetes (TIID). The present study attempts to investigate the association of NPY exon2 +1128 T/C (Leu7Pro; rs16139), NPY promoter -399 T/C (rs16147) and IL1B -511 C/T (rs16944) polymorphisms with TIID and their correlation with plasma lipid levels, BMI, and IL1B transcript levels. PCR-RFLP was used for genotyping these polymorphisms in a case-control study involving 558 TIID patients and 1085 healthy age-matched controls from Gujarat. Linkage disequilibrium and haplotype analysis of the NPY polymorphic sites were performed to assess their association with TIID. IL1B transcript levels in PBMCs were also assessed in 108 controls and 101 patients using real-time PCR. Our results show significant association of both structural and promoter polymorphisms of NPY (p<0.0001 and p<0.0001 respectively) in patients with TIID. However, the IL1B C/T polymorphism did not show any association (p = 0.3797) with TIID patients. Haplotype analysis revealed more frequent association of CC and CT haplotypes (p = 3.34 x 10-5, p = 6.04 x 10-9) in diabetics compared to controls and increased the risk of diabetes by 3.02 and 2.088 respectively. Transcript levels of IL1B were significantly higher (p<0.0001) in patients as compared to controls. Genotype-phenotype correlation of IL1B polymorphism did not show any association with its higher transcript levels. In addition, NPY +1128 T/C polymorphism was found to be associated with increased plasma LDL levels (p = 0.01). The present study provides an evidence for a strong correlation between structural and promoter polymorphisms of NPY gene and upregulation of IL1B transcript levels with susceptibility to TIID and altering the lipid metabolism in Gujarat population.

  6. Resistance Training in Type II Diabetes Mellitus: Impact on Areas of Metabolic Dysfunction in Skeletal Muscle and Potential Impact on Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Wood

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of Type II Diabetes mellitus (T2DM is increasing rapidly and will continue to be a major healthcare expenditure burden. As such, identification of effective lifestyle treatments is paramount. Skeletal muscle and bone display metabolic and functional disruption in T2DM. Skeletal muscle in T2DM is characterized by insulin resistance, impaired glycogen synthesis, impairments in mitochondria, and lipid accumulation. Bone quality in T2DM is decreased, potentially due to the effects of advanced glycation endproducts on collagen, impaired osteoblast activity, and lipid accumulation. Although exercise is widely recognized as an important component of treatment for T2DM, the focus has largely been on aerobic exercise. Emerging research suggests that resistance training (strength training may impose potent and unique benefits in T2DM. The purpose of this review is to examine the role of resistance training in treating the dysfunction in skeletal muscle and the potential role for resistance training in treating the associated dysfunction in bone.

  7. Coadministration of alloxan and nicotinamide in rats produces biochemical changes in blood and pathological alterations comparable to the changes in type II diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattam, K K; Raghavendran, Hrb; Murali, M R; Savatey, H; Kamarul, T

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, thirty six male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups and were injected with varying doses of alloxan (Ax) and nicotinamide (NA). The serum levels of glucose, insulin, and adiponectin were measured weekly up to 4 weeks. Elevated levels of glucose were observed in all groups on days 7, 14, 21, and 28, except in groups a and f (control). The serum insulin levels were significantly elevated in groups b and c on day 7, when compared with that in group f, whereas a decrease in the serum insulin levels was observed in groups d and e on days 21 and 28. The adiponectin levels showed inconsistencies on days 7 and 14. However, significant decrease in the adiponectin levels was observed on days 21 and 28. Histological section of the pancreas showed mild (group a), moderate (group b) to severe (groups c, d, and e) degenerative changes. Concomitant fatty changes in the liver and inflammatory infiltration of the kidney were markedly observed in all the treated groups, when compared to control. These results suggested that the use of selective combination of Ax120 + NA50 injection demonstrated type II diabetes mellitus in rats. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Building and validating a prediction model for paediatric type 1 diabetes risk using next generation targeted sequencing of class II HLA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lue Ping; Carlsson, Annelie; Larsson, Helena Elding; Forsander, Gun; Ivarsson, Sten A; Kockum, Ingrid; Ludvigsson, Johnny; Marcus, Claude; Persson, Martina; Samuelsson, Ulf; Örtqvist, Eva; Pyo, Chul-Woo; Bolouri, Hamid; Zhao, Michael; Nelson, Wyatt C; Geraghty, Daniel E; Lernmark, Åke

    2017-11-01

    It is of interest to predict possible lifetime risk of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in young children for recruiting high-risk subjects into longitudinal studies of effective prevention strategies. Utilizing a case-control study in Sweden, we applied a recently developed next generation targeted sequencing technology to genotype class II genes and applied an object-oriented regression to build and validate a prediction model for T1D. In the training set, estimated risk scores were significantly different between patients and controls (P = 8.12 × 10 -92 ), and the area under the curve (AUC) from the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was 0.917. Using the validation data set, we validated the result with AUC of 0.886. Combining both training and validation data resulted in a predictive model with AUC of 0.903. Further, we performed a "biological validation" by correlating risk scores with 6 islet autoantibodies, and found that the risk score was significantly correlated with IA-2A (Z-score = 3.628, P < 0.001). When applying this prediction model to the Swedish population, where the lifetime T1D risk ranges from 0.5% to 2%, we anticipate identifying approximately 20 000 high-risk subjects after testing all newborns, and this calculation would identify approximately 80% of all patients expected to develop T1D in their lifetime. Through both empirical and biological validation, we have established a prediction model for estimating lifetime T1D risk, using class II HLA. This prediction model should prove useful for future investigations to identify high-risk subjects for prevention research in high-risk populations. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Glucagon and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Asger; Bagger, Jonatan I; Christensen, Mikkel

    2014-01-01

    In normal physiology, glucagon from pancreatic alpha cells plays an important role in maintaining glucose homeostasis via its regulatory effect on hepatic glucose production. Patients with type 2 diabetes suffer from fasting and postprandial hyperglucagonemia, which stimulate hepatic glucose...... production and, thus, contribute to the hyperglycemia characterizing these patients. Although this has been known for years, research focusing on alpha cell (patho)physiology has historically been dwarfed by research on beta cells and insulin. Today the mechanisms behind type 2 diabetic hyperglucagonemia...... or antagonization of the glucagon receptor constitutes potentially effective treatment strategies for patients with type 2 diabetes. In this review, we focus on the regulation of glucagon secretion by the incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and GIP. Furthermore, potential advantages and limitations...

  10. Insulin-induced activation of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase by a chiro-inositol-containing insulin mediator is defective in adipocytes of insulin-resistant, type II diabetic, Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farese, R V; Standaert, M L; Yamada, K; Huang, L C; Zhang, C; Cooper, D R; Wang, Z; Yang, Y; Suzuki, S; Toyota, T

    1994-11-08

    Type II diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats were insulin-resistant in euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp studies. We therefore examined insulin signaling systems in control Wistar and diabetic GK rats. Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (G3PAT), which is activated by headgroup mediators released from glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI), was activated by insulin in intact and cell-free adipocyte preparations of control, but not diabetic, rats. A specific chiro-inositol-containing inositol phosphoglycan (IPG) mediator, prepared from beef liver, bypassed this defect and comparably activated G3PAT in cell-free adipocyte preparations of both diabetic GK and control rats. A myo-inositol-containing IPG mediator did not activate G3PAT. Relative to control adipocytes, labeling of GPI by [3H]glucosamine was diminished by 50% and insulin failed to stimulate GPI hydrolysis in GK adipocytes. In contrast to GPI-dependent G3PAT activation, insulin-stimulated hexose transport was intact in adipocytes and soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of the GK rat, as was insulin-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and protein kinase C. We conclude that (i) chiro-inositol-containing IPG mediator activates G3PAT during insulin action, (ii) diabetic GK rats have a defect in synthesizing or releasing functional chiro-inositol-containing IPG, and (iii) defective IPG-regulated intracellular glucose metabolism contributes importantly to insulin resistance in diabetic GK rats.

  11. Type 2-diabetes i Danmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Henriksen, Jan Erik

    2012-01-01

    Our vision is that the opportunistic screening system will be improved in order to find patients with occult type 2 diabetes (T2D), since an early treatment based on a correct phenotyping is the goal. Individual goals for HbA1c, blood pressure and lipids must be set up, and the number of drugs used...

  12. Living with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... elements: blood glucose control and insulin management, exercise, nutrition and support. Medication A diagnosis of type 1 diabetes means ... crucial part of your daily routine. Learn more: Nutrition How foods ... meal plans Support Emotional support, while not often initially considered, plays ...

  13. Type 2 Diabetes: What Is It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Type 2 Diabetes: What Is It? KidsHealth / For Parents / Type 2 ... español Diabetes tipo 2: ¿Qué es? What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that affects how the ...

  14. Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It? KidsHealth / For Parents / Type 1 ... español Diabetes tipo 1: ¿Qué es? What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that affects how the ...

  15. Barn og diabetes type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Ramstad, Marte Elise; Sagbakken, Sina Bekkelund

    2017-01-01

    Bacheloroppgave sykepleie, 2017 Bakgrunn: Vi har valgt denne problemstillingen fordi diabetes type 1 er svært utbredt hos barn i Norge. Videre har vi lite erfaringer med barn og ønsket å lære mer om denne pasientgruppen. Vi ønsket videre å se på hvordan vi kan undervise og veilede for å gi god og hensiktsmessig sykepleie til barn og deres familier. Hensikt: Finne ut hvordan sykepleier kan fremme egenomsorg hos barn med diabetes gjennom veiledning og undervisning. Dette er noe som sykepl...

  16. Efficacy and Safety of Multiple Doses of Exenatide Once-Monthly Suspension in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Phase II Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysham, Carol H; MacConell, Leigh; Hardy, Elise

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the efficacy and safety of multiple exenatide once-monthly suspension (QMS) doses of exenatide-containing microspheres in Miglyol referenced against the clinical dose of exenatide once-weekly (QW) microspheres in aqueous solution. In this phase II, randomized, controlled, single-blind study, 121 adults (∼30/arm) with type 2 diabetes and HbA1c 7.1-11.0% (54-97 mmol/mol) were randomized 1:1:1:1 to subcutaneous exenatide QW 2 mg (self-administered) or exenatide QMS 5, 8, or 11 mg (caregiver-administered) for 20 weeks. The primary end point was change in HbA1c. At baseline, mean age was 50 years, HbA1c was 8.5% (69 mmol/mol), fasting plasma glucose (FPG) was 184 mg/dL, and body weight was 98 kg. At week 20, mean ± SD HbA1c reductions were -1.54% ± 1.26% with exenatide QW and -1.29% ± 1.07%, -1.31% ± 1.66%, and -1.45% ± 0.93% with exenatide QMS 5, 8, and 11 mg, respectively (evaluable population: n = 110). There were no significant differences in HbA1c reductions among the exenatide QMS doses. FPG reductions were -34 ± 48 mg/dL with exenatide QW and -25 ± 43, -30 ± 52, and -49 ± 49 mg/dL with exenatide QMS 5, 8, and 11 mg, respectively. Weight decreased with all treatments. For exenatide QMS, nausea (16.7-23.3%) and headache (16.7-26.7%) were the most common adverse events. No major or minor hypoglycemia occurred. All doses of exenatide QMS resulted in efficacy and tolerability profiles consistent with exenatide QW. These results combined with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling could inform dose selection for further development. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  17. Angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin II receptor subtype 2 genotypes in type 1 diabetes and severe hypoglycaemia requiring emergency treatment: a case cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Nielsen, Søren L; Akram, Kamran

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: In type 1 diabetes, individual susceptibility to severe hypoglycaemia is likely to be influenced by genetic factors. We have previously reported an association of the deletion (D-) allele of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism and the A-allele of th...

  18. Quercetin-Rich Guava (Psidium guajava) Juice in Combination with Trehalose Reduces Autophagy, Apoptosis and Pyroptosis Formation in the Kidney and Pancreas of Type II Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Fa; Kuo, Yen-Ting; Chen, Tsung-Ying; Chien, Chiang-Ting

    2016-03-10

    We explored whether the combination of anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory guava (Psidium guajava) and trehalose treatment protects the kidney and pancreas against Type II diabetes (T2DM)-induced injury in rats. We measured the active component of guava juice by HPLC analysis. T2DM was induced in Wistar rats by intraperitoneal administration of nicotinamide and streptozotocin and combination with high fructose diets for 8 weeks. The rats fed with different dosages of guava juice in combination with or without trehalose for 4 weeks were evaluated the parameters including OGTT, plasma insulin, HbA1c, HOMA-IR (insulin resistance) and HOMA-β (β cell function and insulin secretion). We measured oxidative and inflammatory degrees by immunohistochemistry stain, fluorescent stain, and western blot and serum and kidney reactive oxygen species (ROS) by a chemiluminescence analyzer. High content of quercetin in the guava juice scavenged H2O2 and HOCl, whereas trehalose selectively reduced H2O2, not HOCl. T2DM affected the levels in OGTT, plasma insulin, HbA1c, HOMA-IR and HOMA-β, whereas these T2DM-altered parameters, except HbA1c, were significantly improved by guava and trehalose treatment. The levels of T2DM-enhanced renal ROS, 4-hydroxynonenal, caspase-3/apoptosis, LC3-B/autophagy and IL-1β/pyroptosis were significantly decreased by guava juice and trehalose. The combination with trehalose and guava juice protects the pancreas and kidney against T2DM-induced injury.

  19. Diabetes distress among type 2 diabetic patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    Key words: Diabetes mellitus, diabetes distress, HbA1c, glycaemic status ... [3] The management of diabetes mellitus and the ... morbidity and mortality risks associated with ... appropriate policy for prevention, control and ..... Mellitus and its Association Risk Indicators in a ... collaborative Research on Internal Medicine and.

  20. Insulin requirements in type 1 diabetic pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Nicoline; Ringholm, Lene; Stage, Edna

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the insulin requirements in women with type 1 diabetes during twin pregnancy compared with singleton pregnancy.......To evaluate the insulin requirements in women with type 1 diabetes during twin pregnancy compared with singleton pregnancy....

  1. Diabetic Nephropathy and Microalbuminuria in Pregnant Women With Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Julie Agner; Asbjörnsdóttir, Björg; Callesen, Nicoline Foged

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy and microalbuminuria in pregnant women with type 2 diabetes in comparison with type 1 diabetes and to describe pregnancy outcomes in these women following the same antihypertensive protocol....

  2. Diabetes in young: Beyond type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Virmani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although majority of diabetes in children is type1 diabetes, childhood type2 diabetes prevalence is rapidly increasing due to changing lifestyle. Most patients can be definitely grouped into either of the two but some present diagnostic difficulty due to overlapping and non specific clinical features and laboratory findings. MODY and several other diseases affecting the pancreas also result in childhood diabetes. Treatment of diabetes in children presents unique challenges and primary prevention is of prime importance.

  3. Exercise and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstoft, Kristian; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with metabolic dysregulation and chronic inflammation, and regular exercise may provide a strong stimulus for improving both. In this review, we first discuss the link between inflammation and metabolism. Next, we give an update on the clinical metabo...... of long-term randomized clinical training studies with hard end points, it should be emphasized that physical activity represents a natural strong anti-inflammatory and metabolism-improving strategy with minor side effects.......Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with metabolic dysregulation and chronic inflammation, and regular exercise may provide a strong stimulus for improving both. In this review, we first discuss the link between inflammation and metabolism. Next, we give an update on the clinical...

  4. Saxagliptin for type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Chacra,

    2010-01-01

    Antonio R Chacra, MDDiabetes Center, Federal University of São Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Saxagliptin (Onglyza™) is a potent, selective, once-daily dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor indicated for improving glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). By blocking DPP-4, saxagliptin increases and prolongs the effects of incretins, a group of peptide hormones released by intestinal cells after meals, which stimulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion to lower...

  5. Gender differences of dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilani, S.Y.H.; Bibi, S.; Ahmed, N.

    2010-01-01

    Type II diabetic patients are at an increased risk of coronary artery disease and cerebrovascular disease because of deranged lipid metabolism. Female diabetic patients are predominantly at risk. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to determine effects of gender on dyslipidemia of type II diabetic patients. Methods: This study was carried out at Out-Patients Department, Medical A Unit, Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad from May 27, to November 27, 2009. All type II diabetic patients who were above 40 and gave consent were included in the study. Data was collected through a structured proforma. Pattern of dyslipidemia in type II diabetic patients were estimated by computing all the four types of dyslipidemia like hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL, increased serum total cholesterol and increased serum LDL. Results: There were 150 patients with mean age 65.67+- 11.29 years. There were 80 (53.33%) male and 70 (46.7%) female patients. Mean BMI was 28.45 +- 3.30 Kg/m/sup 2/. Mean serum cholesterol level was 3.9 +- 1.31 mmol/L, triglyceride level was 2.98 +- 1.14 mmol/L, LDL level was 3.28 +- 0.85 mmol/L and HDL was 0.95 +- 0.02 mmol/L. Women were more frequent to have low level HDL as compare to men (p 0.05). Conclusion: Female diabetic patients have increased frequency of low level of serum HDL as compared to males. (author)

  6. Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Pregnancy Articles Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes and Pregnancy Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Problems of Diabetes in Pregnancy Blood sugar that is not well ...

  7. Non-diabetic renal disease in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Yaqub

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease in diabetics worldwide, yet most patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus are not formally evaluated with a renal biopsy. The diagnosis is almost always based on clinical grounds. A wide spectrum of non-diabetic renal disease (NDRD is reported to occur in patients with type-2 diabetes. It has been estimated that up to one-third of all diabetic patients who present with proteinuria are suffering from NDRD. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate the prevalence and etiology of NDRD in patients with type-2 diabetes. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with type-2 diabetes who underwent kidney biopsy on clinical suspicion of NDRD (absence of diabetic retinopathy and/or neuropathy; short duration of diabetes, i.e. less than five years from January 2003 through December 2007 at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. Based on the biopsy findings, patients were grouped as Group-I, isolated NDRD; Group-II, NDRD with underlying DN; and Group-III, isolated DN. Of 68 patients studied, 75% were males and the mean age was 56 years. The mean duration of diabetes was nine years. Group-I included 34 patients (52%, Group-II included 11 patients (17% and Group-III included 23 patients (31%. Among the Group-I patients, the mean age was 56 years (41-77 years. The most common NDRDs were acute interstitial nephritis (32%, diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (17%; membranous nephropathy (12% and crescentic glomerulonephritis (12%. Among Group-II, the mean age was 60 years (46-71 years, and the most common lesion was interstitial nephritis superimposed on underlying DN (63% cases. Among Group-III, the mean age was 53 years (42- 80 years. The mean proteinuria was 5, 6.3 and 7.3 g/24 h of urine collection in Groups I, II and III, respectively (P = NS. The mean duration of diabetes was 7.3, 11.7 and 10.7 years in Groups I, II and III, respectively. The duration of

  8. Diabetes - what to ask your doctor - type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the arteries High blood cholesterol levels High blood pressure Type 2 diabetes Patient Instructions ACE inhibitors Diabetes and exercise Diabetes - foot ulcers Diabetes - keeping active Diabetes - low blood sugar - self-care Diabetes - preventing heart attack and ...

  9. Prevenzione e terapia precoce del diabete mellito di tipo II: aspetti farmacoeconomici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Pradelli

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Type II (non-insulin-dependent diabetes is one of the most widespread chronic patologies in the developed countries and its prevalence in Italy is about 2-3% of the population. Type II diabetes is also associated with several other metabolic abnormalities such as central obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, which contributes to the very high rate of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Therefore Type II diabetes involves a significant financial burden on the health care system. The purpose of this paper is to explain the composition of the healthcare costs of managing people with Type II diabetes and the economic repercussions due to the adoption of an aggressive strategy against the pathology. To carry out this evaluation we considered the CODE-2 (The Cost of Diabetes in Europe - Type II Study results, the American Diabetes Association Position Statement, the Diabetes Prevention Program and the UK Prospective Diabetes Study. Evidence exists to show that introducing prevention program or an early therapy can avert or delay significantly the onset of cardiovascular morbidity in Type II diabetes patients. According to the pharmacoeconomical criteria, this very desiderable clinical goal is associated to a little increase of the health expenditures, and sometimes also to a costs saving.

  10. Type-II Weyl semimetals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soluyanov, Alexey A; Gresch, Dominik; Wang, Zhijun; Wu, QuanSheng; Troyer, Matthias; Dai, Xi; Bernevig, B Andrei

    2015-11-26

    Fermions--elementary particles such as electrons--are classified as Dirac, Majorana or Weyl. Majorana and Weyl fermions had not been observed experimentally until the recent discovery of condensed matter systems such as topological superconductors and semimetals, in which they arise as low-energy excitations. Here we propose the existence of a previously overlooked type of Weyl fermion that emerges at the boundary between electron and hole pockets in a new phase of matter. This particle was missed by Weyl because it breaks the stringent Lorentz symmetry in high-energy physics. Lorentz invariance, however, is not present in condensed matter physics, and by generalizing the Dirac equation, we find the new type of Weyl fermion. In particular, whereas Weyl semimetals--materials hosting Weyl fermions--were previously thought to have standard Weyl points with a point-like Fermi surface (which we refer to as type-I), we discover a type-II Weyl point, which is still a protected crossing, but appears at the contact of electron and hole pockets in type-II Weyl semimetals. We predict that WTe2 is an example of a topological semimetal hosting the new particle as a low-energy excitation around such a type-II Weyl point. The existence of type-II Weyl points in WTe2 means that many of its physical properties are very different to those of standard Weyl semimetals with point-like Fermi surfaces.

  11. "The impact of vitamin C and E, Magnesium and Zinc on glycemic control and insulin resistance in type II diabetic patients "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farvid MS

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study designed to assess the effect of Mg+Zn, vitamin C+E, and combination of these micronutrients on glycemic control and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic patients Methods: In a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled clinical trial, 69 type 2 diabetic patients were randomly divided into four groups, each group receiving one of the following daily supplement for 3 months; group M: 200 mg and 30 mg Zn (n=16, group V: 200 mg vitamin C and 150 mg vitamin E (n=18, group MV: minerals plus vitamins (n=17, group P: placebo (n=18.Fasting blood glucose, fructosamine, HbA1c and serum insulin were measured at the beginning and at the end of 3 months supplementation. Insulin resistance was calculated by HOMA score. Treatment effects were analyzed by general linear modeling. Results: After 3 months of supplementation fasting blood glucose decreased in MV group (165±46 vs 177±41 mg/dl, p=0.035. There was no significant change in fructoseamin, HbA1c, serum insulin or insulin resistance in treatment groups. Conclusion: The results of the present study provide evidence for the effects of combination of Mg, Zn and vitamin C and E supplementations on improvement of fasting blood glucose but not fructosamine, HbA1c, serum insulin or insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic patients.

  12. What causes type 1 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buschard, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    To study type 1 diabetes (T1D), excellent animal models exist, both spontaneously diabetic and virus-induced. Based on knowledge from these, this review focuses on the environmental factors leading to T1D, concentrated into four areas which are: (1) The thymus-dependent immune system: T1D is a T...... T cell reaction and less autoimmunity. Glycolipids presented by CD1 molecules are central in this stimulation. (4) Importance of the intestine and gliadin intake: Gluten-free diet dramatically inhibits T1D in animal models, and epidemiological data are supportive of such an effect in humans....... The mechanisms include less subclinical intestinal inflammation and permeability, and changed composition of bacterial flora, which can also be obtained by intake of probiotics. Gluten-free diet is difficult to implement, and short-term intake has no effect. Regarding the onset of the T1D disease process, slow...

  13. Serum C-Reactive Protein in Nigerians With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetics are at increased risk for coronary heart disease, data from the Framingham Study showed a two-to three-fold elevation in the risk of clinically evident atherosclerotic disease in patients with type II diabetes compared to those without diabetes. However, but data regarding CRP in Nigerian diabetic is lacking.

  14. Predictors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Predictors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Who Have Normoalbuminuria. R Karoli, J Fatima, V Shukla, P Garg, A Ali. Abstract. Background: Microalbuminuria is an independent predictor of retinopathy, so absence of microalbuminuria may tend clinician not to screen for diabetic retinopathy (DR).

  15. Effect of NonSurgical Periodontal Therapy on Plasma Levels of IL-17 in Chronic Periodontitis Patients with Well Controlled Type-II Diabetes Mellitus—A Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnu Jayakumar Sunandhakumari

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available For years the pathogenesis of periodontitis was under an immunological Th1/Th2 paradigm. Th1 cells are considered to afford protection against the intracellular pathogens. These cells produce the interferons (IFN that are involved in macrophage activation, which, in turn, plays an important role in phagocytosis, complement fixation, and opsonization. Th2 cells are thought to have evolved as a form of protection against parasitic helminthes. Th17 subset of CD4Not Necessary+ T cells was identified in the year 2005, which added greater complexity to Th function and are pro inflammatory in nature. Interleukins (ILs have the ability to alter immunological changes and they also possess the ability to regulate lymphocyte differentiation and haemopoietic stem cells, cell proliferation, and motility, which are classified as pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory. There are numerous studies that reported IL-17 levels associated with chronic periodontitis (CP development. Type II diabetes mellitus (DM is considered a risk factor for the development of periodontal diseases because the incidence, progression, and severity of periodontal diseases are more common with Type II DM than without DM. This study was aimed at evaluating whether non-surgical periodontal therapy had any effect on plasma concentrations of Interleukin-17 in systemically healthy chronic periodontitis patients and in chronic periodontitis patients with well controlled Type II Diabetes mellitus. Patients were divided into the two groups including the chronic periodontitis group (20 subjects and the chronic periodontitis with well-controlled Type II Diabetes mellitus group (20 subjects. The Gingival Index and Plaque Index as well as the clinical Attachment Level (CAL were taken from all the patients of two groups after evaluating fasting blood sugar, post prandial blood sugar, and the Glycated Hemoglobin Level (HbA1c. Then 5 mL blood samples were collected from each patient and plasma was

  16. DERMATOGLYPHIC PATTERNS IN TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-28

    Feb 28, 2018 ... COMMENTARY. DERMATOGLYPHIC PATTERNS IN TYPE 2 DIABETES. MELLITUS ... contributions in diabetes mellitus and in various medical disorders. Hence dermatoglyphic .... female cases. These findings are similar to ...

  17. Immunogenetics of type 1 diabetes mellitus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    to other autoimmune diseases, the etiology of T1D remains obscure but ..... T1D, type 1 diabetes; AIT, autoimmune thyroiditis; CD, celiac disease; AD, Addison's disease. Table 5. .... (GAD65Ab) in prediabetic adults developing diabetes.

  18. Effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on insulin resistance in patients with type II diabetes mellitus and chronic periodontitis, as assessed by C-peptide and the Homeostasis Assessment Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammen, Jerry; Vadakkekuttical, Rosamma Joseph; George, Joseraj Manaloor; Kaziyarakath, Jaishid Ahadal; Radhakrishnan, Chandni

    2017-08-01

    A bidirectional relationship exists between diabetes and periodontitis. In the present clinical trial, we evaluated the effects of non-surgical periodontal therapy (NSPT) on insulin resistance in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic periodontitis. Forty chronic periodontitis patients with type II DM were selected and equally allocated to case and control groups. All patients were assessed for periodontal parameters and systemic parameters. The case group received NSPT, and both groups were re-evaluated after 3 months. All periodontal parameters were found to be significantly improved in the case group compared to the control group 3 months after NSPT. The mean differences in systemic parameters, such as fasting serum C-peptide, Homeostasis Assessment (HOMA) Index-insulin resistance, and HOMA-insulin sensitivity, from baseline to 3 months for the case group were 0.544 ± 0.73, 0.54 ± 0.63, and -25.44 ± 36.81, respectively; for the control group, they were significant at -1.66 ± 1.89, -1.48 ± 1.86, and 31.42 ± 38.82 respectively (P periodontal inflammation could affect glycemic control and insulin resistance. Effective periodontal therapy reduced insulin resistance and improved periodontal health status and insulin sensitivity in patients with type II DM and chronic periodontitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Other specific types of diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Kadzharyan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade it became obvious that not all cases of diabetes that has developed in childhood and adolescence, as well as at an older age, are diabetes type 1 and 2. Patients often unable to identify MODY and LADA type of diabetes, as well as more rare syndromal form. This article reflects the modern view on etiology, pathogenesis, clinic and diagnostics of MODY and LADA diabetes that allows to precise diagnosis and appointment of a patient pathogenetic therapy.

  20. Type 1 Diabetes and Interferon Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Kan; Kawasaki, Eiji; Imagawa, Akihisa; Awata, Takuya; Ikegami, Hiroshi; Uchigata, Yasuko; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Shimada, Akira; Nakanishi, Koji; Makino, Hideichi; Maruyama, Taro; Hanafusa, Toshiaki

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Interferon therapy can trigger induction of several autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes. To assess the clinical, immunologic, and genetic characteristics of type 1 diabetes induced by interferon therapy, we conducted a nationwide cross-sectional survey. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Clinical characteristics, anti-islet autoantibodies, and HLA-DR typing were examined in 91 patients for whom type 1 diabetes developed during or shortly after interferon therapy. RESULTS Median ...

  1. Evaluation of the effect of self-care education based on Vark learning style on HbA1c and FBS in patients with type II diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Moghadam Amir Reza

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Patients with type two diabetes mostly struggle with increased fasting blood sugar (FBS and glycosylated hemoglobin HbA1c, mainly associated with irrecoverable complications. Self-care education and considering different types of learning among patients are regarded as some of the most important issues in this regard. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of self-care education based on VARK learning style on HbA1c and FBS in patients with type two diabetes. Materials and Method: This clinical trial was conducted on patients with type two diabetes, referring to Parsian Clinic in Mashhad, Iran in 2015. In total, 72 samples were selected through randomized convenience sampling and divided into two control and intervention groups of 36 cases. Subjects of the intervention group were also divided into subgroups of visual, aural, read/write, and kinesthetic based on the results of VARK inventory. Self-care education was carried for the intervention group in two 60-minute session once every two weeks, tailored to learning styles of patients. Meanwhile, traditional lecture method was used for the control group. HbA1c and FBS were evaluated in all the participants before and a month and a half after the intervention to assess the self-care of patients. Data analysis was performed in SPSS version 21 using Mann-Whitney U, Chi-square, independent t-test and Wilcoxon. Results: In this study, mean score of HbA1c was decreased from 7.7±0.8 to 7.0±5.7 (P<0.062, whereas mean score of FBS was alleviated from 176.1±33.5 to 147.7±32.8 (P<0.001, which was only significant regarding FBS levels (P=0.002. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, application of VARK learning style led to a reduction in HbA1c and FBS levels, contributing to improved self-care in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, before initiation of training programs, determining learning style of patients is suggested using VARK learning

  2. Evaluation of the effect of self-care education based on VARK learning style on HbA1c and FBS levels in patients with type II diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Reza Saleh Moghadam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with type II diabetes mostly struggle with increased fasting blood sugar (FBS and glycosylated hemoglobin HbA1c, which are associated with irrecoverable complications. Self-care education and different types of learning among patients are regarded as some of the most important issues in this regard. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of self-care education based on VARK learning style on HbA1c and FBS in patients with type II diabetes. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on patients with type II diabetes referring to Parsian Clinic in Mashhad, Iran in 2015. In total, 72 samples were selected through randomized convenience sampling and divided into two control and intervention groups of 36 cases. Subjects of the intervention group were also divided into subgroups of visual, aural, read/write and kinesthetic based on the results of VARK questionnaire. Self-care education was carried out for the intervention group in two 60-minute sessions once every two weeks, tailored to learning styles of the patients. Meanwhile, routine conferences were held for the control group. HbA1c and FBS levels were evaluated in all the participants before and a month and a half after the intervention to assess the self-care of patients. Data analysis was performed in SPSS version 21 using Mann-Whitney U, Chi-square, independent t-test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: In this study, mean score of HbA1c level was decreased from 7.7±0.8 to 7.0±5.7 (P<0.062, whereas mean score of FBS level was alleviated from 176.1±33.5 to 147.7±32.8 (P<0.001, which was only significant regarding the level of FBS (P=0.002. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, application of VARK learning style led to a reduction in HbA1c and FBS levels, contributing to improved self-care in patients with type II diabetes. Therefore, it is suggested that learning style of patients be determined using VARK questionnaire before their

  3. [Diabetes in Pregnancy - Type 1/Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinwechter, Helmut; Demandt, Norbert

    2016-09-01

    In Germany in 5.5% of all births diabetes is registered. In patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes planning pregnancy, preconception counseling, diabetologic care with optimized periconceptional metabolic control and folic acid supplementation are essential for good pregnancy outcome. Gestational diabetes (GDM) should be diagnosed timely and managed according to existing guidelines. GDM is treated with insulin in approximately 20%. In 1-2% of GDM cases a glucokinase gene mutation is present (MODY 2). Pregnancies after bariatric-metabolic surgery are increasing and show high risks. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Preclinical carotid atherosclerosis in patients with latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA), type 2 diabetes and classical type 1 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Hern?ndez, Marta; L?pez, Carolina; Real, Jordi; Valls, Joan; Ortega-Martinez de Victoria, Emilio; V?zquez, Federico; Rubinat, Esther; Granado-Casas, Minerva; Alonso, Nuria; Mol?, Teresa; Betriu, Angels; Lecube, Albert; Fern?ndez, Elvira; Leslie, Richard David; Mauricio, D?dac

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND LADA is probably the most prevalent form of autoimmune diabetes. Nevertheless, there are few data about cardiovascular disease in this group of patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of carotid atherosclerotic plaques in patients with LADA as compared with patients with classic type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. METHODS Patients with LADA were matched for age and gender in different proportions to patients with type 2 diabetes, and classic type 1 diabete...

  5. Correlation of urinary monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1 with other parameters of renal injury in type-II diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Salwa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease in the western world. Increased number of interstitial macrophages has been observed in biopsies from patients with DN. Monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1 (MCP-1 is the strongest known chemo-tactic factor for monocytes and is upregulated in DN. We examined urinary levels of MCP-1 in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus (DM to assess its possible correlation with other para-meters of renal injury. The urinary MCP-1 level was assessed in 75 patients with type-2 DM (25 patients each with no microalbuminuria, with macroalbuminuria and, with renal impairment and compared them with matched healthy control subjects. The HbA1c and estimated glomerular fil-tration rate (eGFR derived from the abbreviated Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD equation were examined in the study groups in relation to the urinary MCP-1. The urinary MCP-1 level was significantly higher in patients with micro and macroalbuminuria (167.41 ± 50.23 and 630.87 ± 318.10 ng/gm creatinine respectively as compared with normoalbuminuric patients and healthy controls (63.85 ± 21.15 and 61.50 ± 24.81 ng/gm creatinine, p< 0.001. MCP-1 correlated positively with urine albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR (r= 0.75, p< 0.001, HbA1c (r= 0.55, p< 0.001 and inversely with eGFR (r=-0.60, p< 0.001. Our findings suggest that hyperglycemia is associated with increased urinary levels of MCP-1 that is closely linked to renal damage as reflected by proteinuria and eGFR levels. Collectively, these findings suggest that MCP-1 is in-volved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy through its various stages.

  6. Autoimmune Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambigapathy, Jayakumar; Sahoo, Jayaprakash; Kamalanathan, Sadishkumar

    2017-07-15

    Antibodies against exogenous insulin are common in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients. They can cause hypoglycemia, albeit uncommonly. A 14-year-old girl with type 1 diabetes mellitus presented with recurrent hypoglycemia. High insulin, low C-peptide and raised insulin antibody levels documented during hypoglycemia. Plasmapheresis led to remission of hypoglycemia. Antibodies to exogenous insulin should be considered as a cause of recurrent refractory hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients.

  7. Intervening before the onset of Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, Jesper Irving

    2003-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: To set up a clinical trial to establish whether nicotinamide can prevent or delay clinical onset of Type 1 diabetes. METHOD: The European Nicotinamide Diabetes Intervention Trial is a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled intervention trial undertaken in 18 European...... countries, Canada and the USA. Entry criteria were a first-degree family history of Type 1 diabetes, age 3-40 years, confirmed islet cell antibody (ICA) levels greater than or equal to 20 JDF units, and a non-diabetic OGTT; the study group was further characterised by intravenous glucose tolerance testing......) centile in 34%. Additional islet autoantibodies were identified in 354 trial entrants. Diabetes-associated HLA class II haplotypes were found in 84% of the younger age group and 80% of the older group. The protective haplotype HLA-DQA1*0102-DQB1*0602 was found in 10% overall. CONCLUSIONS...

  8. Eating disorders in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nash, J.; Skinner, T. C.

    2005-01-01

    There is some debate in the literature as to whether there is an increased risk of developing eating disorders in individuals with type 1 diabetes. This review located 12 empirical studies of eating pathology in females with type 1 diabetes. Review of these papers indicates...... that there is no evidence for an increase in the rates of anorexia or bulimia, in females with type 1 diabetes. However, the data do suggest that eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS) are more prevalent in individuals with type 1 diabetes. Key features of these articles are reviewed and discussed....

  9. Light echoes - Type II supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, B.E.

    1987-01-01

    Type II supernovae (SNs) light curves show a remarkable range of shapes. Data have been collected for the 12 Type II SNs that have light curve information for more than four months past maximum. Contrary to previous reports, it is found that (1) the decay rate after 100 days past maximum varies by almost an order of magnitude and (2) the light curve shapes are not bimodally distributed, but actually form a continuum. In addition, it is found that the extinctions to the SNs are related to the light curve shapes. This implies that the absorbing dust is local to the SNs. The dust is likely to be part of a circumstellar shell emitted by the SN progenitor that Dwek (1983) has used to explain infrared echoes. The optical depth of the shell can get quite large. In such cases, it is found that the photons scattered and delayed by reflection off dust grains will dominate the light curve several months after peak brightness. This light echo offers a straightforward explanation of the diversity of Type II SN light curves. 22 references

  10. Exploring diabetes type 1-related stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoli, Samereh; Abazari, Parvaneh; Mardanian, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Empowerment of people with diabetes means integrating diabetes with identity. However, others' stigmatization can influence it. Although diabetes is so prevalent among Iranians, there is little knowledge about diabetes-related stigma in Iran. The present study explored diabetes-related stigma in people living with type 1 diabetes in Isfahan. A conventional content analysis was used with in-depth interview with 26 people with and without diabetes from November 2011 to July 2012. A person with type 1 diabetes was stigmatized as a miserable human (always sick and unable, death reminder, and intolerable burden), rejected marriage candidate (busy spouse, high-risk pregnant), and deprived of a normal life [prisoner of (to must), deprived of pleasure]. Although, young adults with diabetes undergo all aspects of the social diabetes-related stigma; in their opinion they were just deprived of a normal life. It seems that in Isfahan, diabetes-related stigma is of great importance. In this way, conducting an appropriate intervention is necessary to improve the empowerment process in people with type 1 diabetes in order to reduce the stigma in the context.

  11. Down-Regulation of Renal Gluconeogenesis in Type II Diabetic Rats Following Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery: A Potential Mechanism in Hypoglycemic Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yi; Lin, Ning; Yan, Hong-Tao; Luo, Hao; Chen, Guang-Yu; Cui, Jian-Feng; Shi, Li; Chen, Tao; Wang, Tao; Tang, Li-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study was initiated to evaluate the effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery on renal gluconeogenesis in type 2 diabetic rats and its relationship with hormonal parameters. Methods Diabetic rats were induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ; 35 mg/kg) combined with a high-fat diet. They were then randomly divided into three groups: diabetes model group (DM group, n = 8), sham Roux-en-Y gastric bypass group (SRYGB group, n = 8), and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass group (RYGB group, n = 14). Another 8 normal rats comprised the normal control group (NC group, n = 8). Body weight, glucose, serum lipid, insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), leptin, and adiponectin were measured pre- and postoperatively. Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), insulin receptor-α (IR-α), insulin receptor-β (IR-β), and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (Gsk3b) were measured in renal cortex by using RT-PCR and Western immune-blot analyses on the 4th week after operation. Results Following RYGB surgery, surgery-treated rats showed significantly improved oral glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance as well as increased post-gavage insulin levels and serum circulating levels of GLP-1 and adiponectin. RT-PCR and Western immune-blot analyses showed PEPCK and G6Pase protein and mRNA to be significantly decreased in the renal cortex in the RYGB group (p insulin signal pathway in the renal cortex and increased circulating adiponectin concentrations may contribute to the decline of renal gluconeogenesis following RYGB surgery. PMID:25832593

  12. An evaluation of US patent 2015065565 (A1) for a new class of SGLT2 inhibitors for treatment 1 of type II diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Meiyan; Steyger, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a growing and serious global health problem. Pharmacological inhibition of the sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2; SLC5A2) increases urinary glucose excretion, decreasing plasma glucose levels in an insulin-independent manner. Agents that inhibit SGLT2 have recently become available for clinical therapy of T2DM. The patent claims a new class of SGLT2 inhibitors: derivatives of dioxa-bicyclo[3.2.1]octane-2,3,4-triol (including ertugliflozin; PF-04971729). The invention describes the design, synthesis and pharmacological tests related to ertugliflozin, which could ultimately lead to efficacious therapy for T2DM alone or in combination with other anti-diabetic agents. Ertugliflozin is likely to be of great clinical significance in the near future. Continued analysis of ertugliflozin derivatives to now validate safe and efficacious treatment of T2DM in a larger number of clinical subjects over an extended period is needed to further support clinical utility. Identification, and discussion, of likely contra-indications is also needed.

  13. Diabetes knowledge among Greek Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulimeneas, Dimitrios; Grammatikopoulou, Maria G; Bougioukli, Vasiliki; Iosifidou, Parthena; Vasiloglou, Maria F; Gerama, Maria-Assimina; Mitsos, Dimitrios; Chrysanthakopoulou, Ioanna; Tsigga, Maria; Kazakos, Kyriakos

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes knowledge has been shown to improve glycemic control and associate with several demographic parameters. In Greece, a country with high obesity rates, disease knowledge has never been evaluated in diabetic patients. This cross sectional study aimed to assess diabetes knowledge and its associations between social and demographic parameters, among Greek type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. One hundred fifty nine patients with T2DM were recruited from an urban and a rural clinic in Greece. Diabetes knowledge was assessed with the Brief Diabetes Knowledge Test (DKT). Basic anthropometry was performed. Data regarding glycemic control and sociodemographic characteristics were collected from the patients' medical files. Greek T2DM patients demonstrated poor disease knowledge (mean DKT score 8.3±2.2/14.0 and mean DKT as a percent of correct answers 59.6±15.8%). No differences were observed between sex, place of residence, or glycemic control, among subjects. Patients with higher education demonstrated greater diabetes knowledge. Simple obesity with concurrent central obesity or suboptimal glycemic control decreased diabetes knowledge among participants. Additionally, waist circumference was inversely correlated to diabetes knowledge. Based on the DKT, Greek patients exhibit poor diabetes knowledge. This study provides evidence for the need for better diabetes education in order to ameliorate disease outcome. Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Diabetes tipo II e resolvinas D1

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Isabel Alexandra Marques Batista da

    2015-01-01

    Dissertação para obtenção do grau de Mestre no Instituto Superior de Ciências da Saúde Egas Moniz A diabetes é um problema de saúde pública crescente com o envelhecimento da população, os maus hábitos alimentares e o sedentarismo. A obesidade poderá ser causa ou consequência da diabetes tipo II, sendo também um problema crescente de saúde pública. Esta monografia tem como objetivo estudar, com base no conhecimento atual, se as resolvinas D1 são uma alternativa viável na terapêutica da diab...

  15. A Practical and Time-Efficient High-Intensity Interval Training Program Modifies Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors in Adults with Risk Factors for Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethan E. Phillips

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionRegular physical activity (PA can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, but adherence to time-orientated (150 min week−1 or more PA guidelines is very poor. A practical and time-efficient PA regime that was equally efficacious at controlling risk factors for cardio-metabolic disease is one solution to this problem. Herein, we evaluate a new time-efficient and genuinely practical high-intensity interval training (HIT protocol in men and women with pre-existing risk factors for type 2 diabetes.Materials and methodsOne hundred eighty-nine sedentary women (n = 101 and men (n = 88 with impaired glucose tolerance and/or a body mass index >27 kg m−2 [mean (range age: 36 (18–53 years] participated in this multi-center study. Each completed a fully supervised 6-week HIT protocol at work-loads equivalent to ~100 or ~125% V˙O2 max. Change in V˙O2 max was used to monitor protocol efficacy, while Actiheart™ monitors were used to determine PA during four, weeklong, periods. Mean arterial (blood pressure (MAP and fasting insulin resistance [homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR] represent key health biomarker outcomes.ResultsThe higher intensity bouts (~125% V˙O2 max used during a 5-by-1 min HIT protocol resulted in a robust increase in V˙O2 max (136 participants, +10.0%, p < 0.001; large size effect. 5-by-1 HIT reduced MAP (~3%; p < 0.001 and HOMA-IR (~16%; p < 0.01. Physiological responses were similar in men and women while a sizeable proportion of the training-induced changes in V˙O2 max, MAP, and HOMA-IR was retained 3 weeks after cessation of training. The supervised HIT sessions accounted for the entire quantifiable increase in PA, and this equated to 400 metabolic equivalent (MET min week−1. Meta-analysis indicated that 5-by-1 HIT matched the efficacy and variability of a time-consuming 30-week PA program on V˙O2 max, MAP, and HOMA-IR.ConclusionWith a total time-commitment of

  16. Care seeking, complementary therapy and herbal medicine use among people with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease CAMELOT phase II: Surveying for diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manderson, Lenore; Oldenburg, Brian; Lin, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    prior to the survey, 43% of all respondents had used CAM products or practitioners, including 11% who used Western herbal medicines. The data offers considerable opportunities to tease out the drivers, costs and benefits of CAM use by people with chronic disease. Although findings will be published...... across a number of articles, here we profile the demographic and health status characteristics of survey respondents and compare the characteristics of users of naturopathy and Western herbal medicine practitioner with this.......Many Australians manage their health through the combined use of conventional medicine and complementary and alternative medicine, with substantial direct and indirect costs to government and consumers. Our interest was in the varied health practices of people with type 2 diabetes...

  17. Relapsing/remitting type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Megen, Kayleigh M.; Spindler, Matthew P.; Keij, Fleur M.; Bosch, Ineke; Sprangers, Fleur; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Nikolic, Tatjana; Roep, Bart O.

    2017-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: Type 1 diabetes is believed to be an autoimmune disease associated with irreversible loss of insulin secretory function that follows a chronic progressive course. However, it has been speculated that relapsing/remitting disease progression may occur in type 1 diabetes. Methods: We

  18. Metallothionein-mediated antioxidant defense system and its response to exercise training are impaired in human type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheede-Bergdahl, Celena; Penkowa, Milena; Hidalgo, Juan

    2005-01-01

    lower levels of MT-I+II were also detected in the plasma of type 2 diabetic subjects compared with control subjects. These results suggest that, in control subjects, the MT-I+II defense system is active and inducible within skeletal muscle tissue and plasma. In type 2 diabetes, reduced levels of MT......Oxidative stress is implicated in diabetes complications, during which endogenous antioxidant defenses have important pathophysiological consequences. To date, the significance of endogenous antioxidants such as metallothioneins I and II (MT-I+II) in type 2 diabetes remains unclear. To examine....... Immunohistochemical analysis revealed reduced MT-I+II levels in the skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic subjects compared with control subjects. Control subjects produced a robust increase of MT-I+II in response to training; however, in type 2 diabetes, MT-I+II levels remained essentially unchanged. Significantly...

  19. Gender differences of dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilani, S Y.H. [Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Pharmacology; Bibi, S [Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Physiology; Ahmed, N [Frontier Medical College, Abbottabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Medicine

    2010-07-15

    Type II diabetic patients are at an increased risk of coronary artery disease and cerebrovascular disease because of deranged lipid metabolism. Female diabetic patients are predominantly at risk. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to determine effects of gender on dyslipidemia of type II diabetic patients. Methods: This study was carried out at Out-Patients Department, Medical A Unit, Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad from May 27, to November 27, 2009. All type II diabetic patients who were above 40 and gave consent were included in the study. Data was collected through a structured proforma. Pattern of dyslipidemia in type II diabetic patients were estimated by computing all the four types of dyslipidemia like hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL, increased serum total cholesterol and increased serum LDL. Results: There were 150 patients with mean age 65.67+- 11.29 years. There were 80 (53.33%) male and 70 (46.7%) female patients. Mean BMI was 28.45 +- 3.30 Kg/m/sup 2/. Mean serum cholesterol level was 3.9 +- 1.31 mmol/L, triglyceride level was 2.98 +- 1.14 mmol/L, LDL level was 3.28 +- 0.85 mmol/L and HDL was 0.95 +- 0.02 mmol/L. Women were more frequent to have low level HDL as compare to men (p<0.05), while no significant difference was found regarding serum cholesterol, serum triglyceride and serum LDL (p>0.05). Conclusion: Female diabetic patients have increased frequency of low level of serum HDL as compared to males. (author)

  20. Progression of diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy in women with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, K.L.; Laugesen, C.S.; Nielsen, Lene Ringholm

    2010-01-01

    We studied the progression of diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy in women with type 2 diabetes.......We studied the progression of diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy in women with type 2 diabetes....

  1. Metformin and aspirin treatment could lead to an improved survival rate for Type 2 diabetic patients with stage II and III colorectal adenocarcinoma relative to non-diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Monte, Ariella; Brunetti, Davide; Cattin, Luigi; Lavanda, Francesca; Naibo, Erica; Malagoli, Maria; Stanta, Giorgio; Bonin, Serena

    2018-03-01

    Metformin, the drug of choice in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2), in addition to aspirin (ASA), the drug prescribed for cardioprotection of diabetic and non-diabetic patients, have an inhibitory effect on cancer cell survival. The present population-based study conducted in the province of Trieste (Italy), aimed to investigate the prevalence of DM2 in patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC) and survival for CRC in diabetic and nondiabetic patients. All permanent residents diagnosed with a CRC between 2004 and 2007 were ascertained through the regional health information system. CRC-specific and relative survival probabilities were computed for each group of patients defined by CRC stage, presence or absence of DM2 treated with metformin, and presence or absence of daily ASA therapy. A total of 515 CRC patients without DM2 and 156 with DM2 treated with metformin were enrolled in the study. At the time of CRC diagnosis, 71 (14%) nondiabetic and 39 (25%) diabetic patients were taking ASA daily. The five-year relative survival for stage III CRC was 101% [95% confidence interval (CI)=76-126] in the 18 patients with DM2 treated with metformin and ASA, 55% (95% CI=31-78) in the 23 without DM2 treated with ASA, 55% (95% CI=45-65) in the 150 without DM2 not taking ASA, and 29% (95% CI=13-45) in the 43 with DM2 treated with metformin, however not with ASA. The findings support the hypothesis of a possible inhibitory effect of metformin and ASA on CRC cells. Randomized controlled trials are required to verify this hypothesis.

  2. Use of a text message program to raise type 2 diabetes risk awareness and promote health behavior change (part II): assessment of participants' perceptions on efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buis, Lorraine R; Hirzel, Lindsey; Turske, Scott A; Des Jardins, Terrisca R; Yarandi, Hossein; Bondurant, Patricia

    2013-12-19

    Although there is great enthusiasm in both the public and private sector for the further development and use of large-scale consumer-facing public health applications for mobile platforms, little is known about user experience and satisfaction with this type of approach. As a part of the Beacon Community Cooperative Agreement Program, txt4health, a public-facing, mobile phone-based health information service targeting type 2 diabetes, was launched in 3 Beacon Communities: the Southeast Michigan Beacon Community in Detroit, MI, the Greater Cincinnati Beacon Community in Cincinnati, OH, and the Crescent City Beacon Community in New Orleans, LA. This program was marketed via large public health campaigns and drew many users within the respective communities. The purpose of this investigation was to use the RE-AIM framework to document txt4health efficacy by focusing on perceptions of satisfaction, usage, and behavior change among individuals who used txt4health in pilot studies in Southeast Michigan and Greater Cincinnati. We conducted a multimodal user survey with txt4health users recruited via text message through the program to understand participant perceptions of program use and satisfaction, as well as self-reported perceptions of behavior change as a result of using txt4health. Txt4health users reported very high levels of program satisfaction, with 67.1% (108/161) reporting satisfaction scores of ≥8 on a 10-point scale, with 10 equivalent to most satisfied (mean 8.2, SD 1.6). All survey participants agreed/strongly agreed that the messages included in txt4health were clear and easy to understand (100.0%, 160/160), and most found txt4health made them knowledgeable about their risk for type 2 diabetes (88.1%, 140/159) and made them conscious of their diet and physical activity (88.8%, 142/160). Most participants reported that txt4health helped them to make behavior changes related to diet; after having completed txt4health, most agreed/strongly agreed that

  3. Knowledge and Lifestyle-Associated Prevalence of Obesity among Newly Diagnosed Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients Attending Diabetic Clinic at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana: A Hospital-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaa Obirikorang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the knowledge and prevalence of obesity among Ghanaian newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics. This cross-sectional study was conducted among diagnosed type 2 diabetics. Structured questionnaire was used to obtain data. Anthropometric measurements and fasting blood sugar levels were also assessed. Participants had adequate knowledge about the general concept of obesity (72.0% and method of weight measurement (98.6% but were less knowledgeable of ideal body weight (4.2%. The commonly known cause, complication, and management of obesity were poor diet (76.9%, hypertension (81.8%, and diet modification (86.7%, respectively. The anthropometric measures were higher among females compared to males. Prevalence of obesity was 61.3% according to WHR classification, 40.8% according to WHtR classification, 26.1% according to WC, and 14.8% according to BMI classification. Being female was significantly associated with high prevalence of obesity irrespective of the anthropometric measure used (p<0.05. Taking of snacks in meals, eating meals late at night, physical inactivity, excessive fast food intake, and alcoholic beverage intake were associated with increased prevalence of obesity (p<0.05. Prevalence of obesity is high among diabetic patient and thus increasing effort towards developing and making education programs by focusing on adjusting to lifestyle modifications is required.

  4. Diabetes and the brain: Cognitive performance in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, A.M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus are associated with altered brain function, a complication referred to as diabetic encephalopathy. The issues surrounding the cognitive and emotional status in chronic, older diabetic patients remain complex. The literature shows contrasting findings and

  5. Diabetes mellitus, maar welk type?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, J. B.; de Koning, E. J.

    2004-01-01

    In three patients with an unusual presentation of diabetes mellitus, the classification of their diabetes was troublesome. An adolescent male with slightly elevated blood-glucose levels turned out to have excellent glycaemic control on sulphonylurea derivatives only. When he was 40 years of age, his

  6. Eye Complications and Markers of Morbidity and Mortality in Long-term Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grauslund, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of type 1 diabetes is rising all over the world. Furthermore, the increased life-expectancy of type 1 diabetic patients is likely to cause a higher number of diabetes-related micro- and macrovascular complications in the years to come. In order to examine the level of long......-term complications in type 1 diabetes as well as potential markers of micro- and macroangiopathy, a population-based cohort of Danish type 1 diabetic patients was examined in order to achieve the following aims: 1  To evaluate diabetic retinopathy as a long-term marker of all-cause mortality in type 1 diabetes...... (Paper I). 2  To estimate the long-term incidence and associated risk factors of blindness (Paper II) and cataract surgery (Paper III) in type 1 diabetes. 3  To use retinal vascular analyses in order to investigate the associations of long-term micro- and macrovascular complications and retinal vascular...

  7. Evidence of gene-gene interaction and age-at-diagnosis effects in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howson, Joanna M M; Cooper, Jason D; Smyth, Deborah J

    2012-01-01

    The common genetic loci that independently influence the risk of type 1 diabetes have largely been determined. Their interactions with age-at-diagnosis of type 1 diabetes, sex, or the major susceptibility locus, HLA class II, remain mostly unexplored. A large collection of more than 14,866 type 1...

  8. 7. Prevalence of CAD in asymptomatic type II diabetics, using MPI as screening tool. Single center cross sectional study from KSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Jelani

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: Despite higher rate of diabetes in Saudi Arabia, asymptomatic Diabetics have a lower than expected incidence of active CAD. There would be a need to test this notion further. This would require more studies to confirm our findings in Saudi population.

  9. Multicomponent Exercise Improves Hemodynamic Parameters and Mobility, but Not Maximal Walking Speed, Transfer Capacity, and Executive Function of Older Type II Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio José Coelho Junior

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the effects of a 6-month multicomponent exercise program (MCEP on functional, cognitive, and hemodynamic parameters of older Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients. Moreover, additional analyses were performed to evaluate if T2DM patients present impaired adaptability in response to physical exercise when compared to nondiabetic volunteers. A total of 72 T2DM patients and 72 age-matched healthy volunteers (CG were recruited and submitted to functional, cognitive, and hemodynamic evaluations before and after six months of a MCEP. The program of exercise was performed twice a week at moderate intensity. Results indicate T2DM and nondiabetic patients present an increase in mobility (i.e., usual walking speed after the MCEP. However, improvements in maximal walking speed, transfer capacity, and executive function were only observed in the CG. On the other hand, only T2DM group reveals a marked decline in blood pressure. In conclusion, data of the current study indicate that a 6-month MCEP improves mobility and reduce blood pressure in T2DM patients. However, maximal walking speed, transfer capacity, and executive function were only improved in CG, indicating that T2DM may present impaired adaptability in response to physical stimulus.

  10. Cost-effectiveness and budget impact of obesity surgery in patients with type 2 diabetes in three European countries(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmino, Marco; Bammer, Tanja; Fernández Cebrián, José Maria; Daoud, Frederic; Romagnoli, Giuliano; Torres, Antonio

    2009-11-01

    This study aimed to establish a payer-perspective cost-effectiveness and budget impact model of adjustable gastric banding (AGB) and gastric bypass (GBP) vs. conventional treatment (CT) in patients with a body mass index (BMI) > or = 35 kg x m(-2) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Austria, Italy, and Spain. A health economics model described in a previous publication was applied to resource utilization and cost data in AGB, GBP, and CT from Austria, Italy, and Spain in 2009. The base case time scope is 5 years; the annual discount rate for utilities and costs is 3.5%. In Austria and Italy, both AGB and GBP are cost-saving and are thus dominant in terms of incremental cost-effectiveness ratio compared to CT. In Spain, AGB and GBP yield a moderate cost increase but are cost-effective, assuming a willingness-to-pay threshold of 30,000 euro per quality adjusted life-year. Under worst-case analysis, AGB and GBP remain cost-saving or around breakeven in Austria and Italy and remain cost-effective in Spain. In patients with T2DM and BMI > or = 35 kg x m(-2) at 5-year follow-up vs. CT, AGB and GBP are not only clinically effective and safe but represent satisfactory value for money from a payer perspective in Austria, Italy, and Spain.

  11. Type 2 Diabetes and Spina Bifida

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may initially appear as “pre-diabetes,” also called metabolic syndrome. What Causes Type 2 Diabetes? Obesity is the ... Sleep disordered breathing -snoring and pauses in breathing • Exercise intolerance. • ... metabolic panel (which includes liver enzymes and electrolytes) • Fasting ...

  12. Diabetic vitrectomy in a large type 1 diabetes patient population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostri, Christoffer; la Cour, Morten; Lund-Andersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    1996 and 2010. Surgical history was obtained from The Danish National Patient Register. RESULTS: The population consisted of 3980 patients with type 1 diabetes. Median follow-up was 10.0 years. In total, 106 patients underwent diabetic vitrectomy in the observation period. Surgery indications were...... nonclearing vitreous haemorrhage (43%) or tractional retinal detachment (57%). The cumulative incidence rates of diabetic vitrectomy were 1.6% after 5 years and 2.9% after 10 years. When excluding patients with no or mild diabetic retinopathy, the corresponding rates were higher; 3.7% and 6.4%, respectively...... (p diabetic vitrectomy increased in patients experiencing glycosylated haemoglobin A1c > 75 mmol/mol in the observation period (p

  13. Association between central diabetes insipidus and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Palumbo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Central diabetes insipidus is a rare disease of the hypothalamus and neurohypophysis. It is very unusually found in the adult with type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is manifested by a polydipsic polyuric syndrome, which must be distinguished from the poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus. Given the similarity of both entities and the unusual nature of their coexistence, their suspicion is difficult. The case of a 72-year-old male with type 2 diabetes mellitus with poor insulin control (fasting hyperglycemia greater than 180 mg/dl who had a long-standing polyuric syndrome is here presented. Hypernatremia and plasma osmolality elevated together with a low urinary osmolality led to the suspicion of diabetes insipidus, which was subsequently confirmed by the dehydration test and the administration of desmopressin sc. With 61% increase in the calculated urinary osmolarity one hour post desmopressin s.c., diabetes insipidus of central type was diagnosed. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance showed a bright spot with normal neurohypophysis, contributing to the diagnosis of the idiopathic form.

  14. [Association between central diabetes insipidus and type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Claudia; Nicolaci, Nora; La Manna, Andrés A; Branek, Natalia; Pissano, María N

    2018-01-01

    Central diabetes insipidus is a rare disease of the hypothalamus and neurohypophysis. It is very unusually found in the adult with type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is manifested by a polydipsic polyuric syndrome, which must be distinguished from the poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus. Given the similarity of both entities and the unusual nature of their coexistence, their suspicion is difficult. The case of a 72-year-old male with type 2 diabetes mellitus with poor insulin control (fasting hyperglycemia greater than 180 mg/dl) who had a long-standing polyuric syndrome is here presented. Hypernatremia and plasma osmolality elevated together with a low urinary osmolality led to the suspicion of diabetes insipidus, which was subsequently confirmed by the dehydration test and the administration of desmopressin sc. With 61% increase in the calculated urinary osmolarity one hour post desmopressin s.c., diabetes insipidus of central type was diagnosed. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance showed a bright spot with normal neurohypophysis, contributing to the diagnosis of the idiopathic form.

  15. Managing hypertension in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horr, Samuel; Nissen, Steven

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension is a common problem in the diabetic population with estimates suggesting a prevalence exceeding 60%. Comorbid hypertension and diabetes mellitus are associated with high rates of macrovascular and microvascular complications. These two pathologies share overlapping risk factors, importantly central obesity. Treatment of hypertension is unequivocally beneficial and improves all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, major cardiovascular events, and microvascular outcomes including nephropathy and retinopathy. Although controversial, current guidelines recommend a target blood pressure in the diabetic population of diabetes. Management of blood pressure in patients with diabetes includes both lifestyle modifications and pharmacological therapies. This article reviews the evidence for management of hypertension in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and provides a recommended treatment strategy based on the available data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Weight and type 2 diabetes: new recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Huelgas, Ricardo

    2016-11-01

    Most patients with type 2 diabetes have excess adiposity. There is wide consensus that adequate treatment of type 2 diabetes requires a simultaneous approach to overweight/obesity and the remaining cardiovascular risk factors. Non-pharmacological interventions (diet, exercise) represent the cornerstone of the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes. Weight loss through lifestyle modification has shown clear benefits in these patients, requiring an individualised and multidisciplinary approach with structured programmes endowed with specific resources. The weight gain associated with some antidiabetic drugs (secretagogues, glitazones, insulin) can hamper glycaemic control, compromising treatment adherence, worsening vascular risk profile, and limiting the benefits of treatment. Therefore, the current tendency is to adopt a weight-centred approach to the treatment of type 2 diabetes, giving priority to those antidiabetic drugs that have a neutral effect on weight or that favour weight loss (metformin, incretin therapies, sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors). Metabolic surgery is an effective alternative for patients with type 2 diabetes and a BMI ≥35 kg/m 2 and allows remission of diabetes in a large proportion of patients, especially if the disease is not very advanced. A consensus document supported by various Spanish scientific societies has recently been published. This document makes a series of specific recommendations on the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to patients with diabetes and obesity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Heterogeneity of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faerch, Kristine; Hulman, Adam; Solomon, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a heterogeneous disease with large variation in the relative contributions of insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction between subtypes and individuals. Some of these differences are reflected in the way people are diagnosed. However, differences in glucose regulation exist...... among individuals even in those with comparable diagnostic glucose levels. In this review we address the heterogeneity of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes with special emphasis on differences in the pathophysiology and treatment responses related to the diagnostic criteria. We also discuss whether novel...... glycaemic markers of diabetes risk can provide additional information to the established diagnostic criteria. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for elevated fasting versus postprandial glucose concentration, as well as knowledge about the expected responsiveness to treatment...

  18. Diabetes Distress Among Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagger, Virginia; Hendrieckx, Christel; Sturt, Jackie

    2016-01-01

    with type 1 diabetes: the prevalence of DD; demographic, clinical, behavioral and psychosocial correlates of DD and interventions that reduce DD. Consistent with adult studies, around one third of adolescents experience elevated DD and this is frequently associated with suboptimal glycemic control, low self......Diabetes distress (DD) refers to the negative emotions arising from living with diabetes and the burden of self-management. Among adults, the prevalence and significance of DD are well established, but this is not the case among adolescents. This systematic review investigated among adolescents...

  19. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and exercise impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusch, Jane E B; Bridenstine, Mark; Regensteiner, Judith G

    2013-03-01

    Limitations in physical fitness, a consistent finding in individuals with both type I and type 2 diabetes mellitus, correlate strongly with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. These limitations may significantly contribute to the persistent excess cardiovascular mortality affecting this group. Exercise impairments in VO2 peak and VO2 kinetics manifest early on in diabetes, even with good glycemic control and in the absence of clinically apparent complications. Subclinical cardiac dysfunction is often present but does not fully explain the observed defect in exercise capacity in persons with diabetes. In part, the cardiac limitations are secondary to decreased perfusion with exercise challenge. This is a reversible defect. Similarly, in the skeletal muscle, impairments in nutritive blood flow correlate with slowed (or inefficient) exercise kinetics and decreased exercise capacity. Several correlations highlight the likelihood of endothelial-specific impairments as mediators of exercise dysfunction in diabetes, including insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, decreased myocardial perfusion, slowed tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation, and impairment in mitochondrial function. Both exercise training and therapies targeted at improving insulin sensitivity and endothelial function improve physical fitness in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Optimization of exercise functions in people with diabetes has implications for diabetes prevention and reductions in mortality risk. Understanding the molecular details of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes may provide specific therapeutic targets for the remediation of this defect. Rat models to test this hypothesis are under study.

  20. Periodontal disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haseeb, M.; Khawaja, K.I.; Ataullah, K.; Munir, M.B.; Fatima, A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the periodontal status in well controlled and poorly controlled type 2 diabetic patients compared with normal healthy individuals. Methodology: Forty well controlled and forty poorly controlled type 2 diabetic subjects having good oral hygiene (scored according to simplified oral hygiene index) were compared with a control group of forty normal healthy individuals. Probing depth (PD), gingival recession (GR), and attachment loss (AL) were recorded to obtain the periodontal status of each tooth, using a Michigan probe '0' with Williams marking. Glycemic control was evaluated by glycated Hb value. Using ANOVA and independent sample t-test, mean probing depth and attachment loss in each tooth type (incisors, canines, premolars and molars) were compared. Results: Mean age of diabetic subjects was 58.86 +- 6.21 years and that of control group was 56.92 +- 6.91 years; 60% were females. Probing depth was greater in patients with poorly controlled diabetes compared to well controlled diabetic patients and non-diabetic controls (4.21 mm vs. 3.72 mm and 2.93 mm respectively, p 0.05). Number of sites and mean percentage of sites with attachment loss of greater or equal to 4 and greater or equal to 6 mm was also significantly higher in poorly controlled diabetes compared to the control group (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001 respectively). Conclusion: Periodontal status as estimated by probing depth and degree of attachment loss deteriorates significantly with poor glycemic control in diabetes. (author)

  1. Exercise therapy in Type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.F.E. Praet (Stephan); L.J.C. van Loon (Luc)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractStructured exercise is considered an important cornerstone to achieve good glycemic control and improve cardiovascular risk profile in Type 2 diabetes. Current clinical guidelines acknowledge the therapeutic strength of exercise intervention. This paper reviews the wide

  2. Genetics Home Reference: type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Jan 4. Review. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central van Belle TL, Coppieters KT, von Herrath MG. Type 1 diabetes: etiology, immunology, and therapeutic strategies. Physiol Rev. 2011 Jan;91( ...

  3. Intensive integrated therapy of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaede, Peter; Pedersen, Oluf

    2004-01-01

    The macro- and microvascular burden of type 2 diabetes is well established. A number of recent single risk factor intervention trials targeting hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, hypertension, procoagulation, microalbumuria, and existing cardiovascular disorders have, however, shown major beneficial...... effects on long-term outcome. The results from these studies are anticipated to change the future management of type 2 diabetes, and most of the updated national guidelines for the treatment of type 2 diabetes recommend a multipronged approach driven by ambitious treatment targets. The outcome...... of this intensive integrated therapy has, however, only been investigated in a few studies of patients with type 2 diabetes. One of these trials, the Steno-2 Study, showed that intensive intervention for an average of 7.8 years cuts cardiovascular events as well as nephropathy, retinopathy, and autonomic neuropathy...

  4. Liraglutide for treating type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgaard, Thomas Fremming; Frandsen, Christian Seerup; Holst, Jens Juul

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Many persons with type 1 diabetes do not achieve glycemic targets, why new treatments, complementary to insulin, are of interest. Liraglutide, a long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist could be a potential pharmacological supplement to insulin. This review discusses...... the mechanism of actions, efficacy and safety of liraglutide as add-on to insulin in persons with type 1 diabetes. AREAS COVERED: Physiological and clinical data on liraglutide in type 1 diabetes were reviewed. We searched the Cochrane library, MEDLINE and EMBASE, with the final search performed February 16...... there was no clinically relevant effect on HbA1c. Adverse events were mostly transient gastrointestinal side effects, primarily nausea. Based on the available data, liraglutide cannot be recommended as add-on therapy to insulin in persons with type 1 diabetes with the aim to improve glycemic control. Ongoing trials...

  5. Intensive integrated therapy of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaede, Peter; Pedersen, Oluf

    2004-01-01

    The macro- and microvascular burden of type 2 diabetes is well established. A number of recent single risk factor intervention trials targeting hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, hypertension, procoagulation, microalbumuria, and existing cardiovascular disorders have, however, shown major beneficial...

  6. Diabetes Distress Among Persons With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Margaret A; Richter, Sara A; Ackard, Diann M; Craft, Cheryl

    2017-02-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to evaluate associations between diabetes distress and a range of psychological health behaviors and concerns among persons with type 1 diabetes for the benefit of enhancing early identification and intervention of at-risk individuals. Methods Persons with type 1 diabetes (n = 268; 57.1% female, 91.0% white, 76.8% satisfaction with life, self-esteem, self-efficacy, depression, perfectionism, body image satisfaction, dietary restraint and eating, and shape and weight concerns. Each subscale score was compared within age groups (depression scores and eating, and shape and weight concerns than those with low or moderate distress. For patients satisfaction with life, self-esteem, and self-efficacy and higher on dietary restraint and several areas of perfectionism than those with low or moderate distress. Conclusions Individuals with type 1 diabetes who have high diabetes distress also report higher A1C values and poorer psychological health concerns. A brief diabetes distress questionnaire can help to identify those who need additional screening, education and support, and treatment for overall health and well-being.

  7. Association of Barrett’s Esophagus With Type II Diabetes Mellitus: Results From a Large Population-based Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    IYER, PRASAD G.; BORAH, BIJAN J.; HEIEN, HERBERT C.; DAS, ANANYA; COOPER, GREGORY S.; CHAK, AMITABH

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Central obesity could increase the risk for Barrett’s esophagus (BE) and esophageal adenocarcinoma by mechanical and/or metabolic mechanisms, such as hyperinsulinemia. We performed an epidemiologic study to determine whether prior type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) is associated with BE. METHODS We performed a population-based case-control study using the General Practice Research Database, a UK primary care database that contains information on more than 8 million subjects, to identify cases of BE (using previously validated codes; n = 14,245) and matched controls without BE (by age, sex, enrollment date, duration of follow-up evaluation, and practice region by incidence density sampling; n = 70,361). We assessed the association of a prior diagnosis of DM2 with BE using conditional univariate and multivariable regression analysis. Confounders assessed included smoking, obesity measured by body mass index (BMI), and gastroesophageal reflux disease. RESULTS BE cases were more likely than controls to have smoked (52.4% vs 49.9%), have a higher mean BMI (27.2 vs 26.9), and a higher prevalence of DM2 than controls (5.8% vs 5.3%). On multivariable analysis, DM2 was associated with a 49% increase in the risk of BE, independent of other known risk factors (odds ratio, 1.49; 95% confidence interval, 1.16–1.91). This association was stronger in women than men. Results remained stable with sensitivity analyses. CONCLUSIONS In a large population-based case-control study, DM2 was a risk factor for BE, independent of obesity (as measured by BMI) and other risk factors (smoking and gastroesophageal reflux disease). These data suggest that metabolic pathways related to DM2 should be explored in BE pathogenesis and esophageal carcinogenesis. PMID:23591277

  8. Diabetes-associated dry eye syndrome in a new humanized transgenic model of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, Shahnawaz; Elagin, Raya B; Jaume, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Patients with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) are at high risk of developing lacrimal gland dysfunction. We have developed a new model of human T1D using double-transgenic mice carrying HLA-DQ8 diabetes-susceptibility haplotype instead of mouse MHC-class II and expressing the human beta cell autoantigen Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase in pancreatic beta cells. We report here the development of dry eye syndrome (DES) after diabetes induction in our humanized transgenic model. Double-transgenic mice were immunized with DNA encoding human GAD65, either naked or in adenoviral vectors, to induce T1D. Mice monitored for development of diabetes developed lacrimal gland dysfunction. Animals developed lacrimal gland disease (classically associated with diabetes in Non Obese Diabetic [NOD] mice and with T1D in humans) as they developed glucose intolerance and diabetes. Animals manifested obvious clinical signs of dry eye syndrome (DES), from corneal erosions to severe keratitis. Histological studies of peri-bulbar areas revealed lymphocytic infiltration of glandular structures. Indeed, infiltrative lesions were observed in lacrimal/Harderian glands within weeks following development of glucose intolerance. Lesions ranged from focal lymphocytic infiltration to complete acinar destruction. We observed a correlation between the severity of the pancreatic infiltration and the severity of the ocular disease. Our results demonstrate development of DES in association with antigen-specific insulitis and diabetes following immunization with clinically relevant human autoantigen concomitantly expressed in pancreatic beta cells of diabetes-susceptible mice. As in the NOD mouse model and as in human T1D, our animals developed diabetes-associated DES. This specific finding stresses the relevance of our model for studying these human diseases. We believe our model will facilitate studies to prevent/treat diabetes-associated DES as well as human diabetes.

  9. Relationship between adiponectin and type 2 diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Cuiying; Wang Qing; Han Yuan; Huang Gang

    2007-01-01

    In order to study the effect of plasma adiponectin on type 2 diabetes patients, the correlation between plasma adiponectin, serum glucose, insulin and plasma lipid of the patients with type 2 diabetes was analyzed. 32 subjects with normal glucose, 105 with type 2 diabetes, including 53 subjects without obesity (BMI 2 ) and 52 with obesity (BMI≥25kg/m 2 ) were involved into this study. The fasting plasma adiponectin, serum glucose, insulin and plasma lipid were measured by RIA. The results showed that the mean plasma adiponectin in normal, non-obesity and obesity group was 9.46±0.89 mg/L, 5.83±1.06mg/L and 3.17± 0.56mg/L, respectively. The plasma adiponectin levels in the type 2 diabetes group were significantly lower than that in normal group (P<0.05), especially in obesity group. The adiponectin level was significantly correlated with serum glucose and triglyceride, r value was -0.59 and -0.76, respectively. Adiponectin may be a kind of protective factor. It takes part in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes, and is close correlated with insulin resistance. The plasma adiponectin might be an effective index in the early diagnosis, prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. (authors)

  10. Diabetic ketoacidosis in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus – clinical and biochemical differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Krdžalić

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this retrospective study was to establish differences in clinical picture, biochemical parametres and precipitating factors in patiens with diabetic ketoacidosis in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. A total number of 25 patients was hospitalised in the Intensive Case Unit of the Department for Internal Diseases of the Cantonal Hospital in Zenica in the period of 14 months. Most patients had type 1 diabetes whose ketoacidosis showed symptoms of vomiting, stomachache and it was most often caused by a discontinued application of insulin or an infection. In patients with type 2 diabetes an inadequate regulation of glycemia had been noticed before hospitalisation and diabetic ketoacidosis was manifested by polyuria, polyphagia, polydipsia and weight loss. Precipitating factor in most patients with type 2 diabetes was an infection. In addition, a significant number of patients were newly discovered diabetics whose precipitating factor in most cases could not be found and the symptoms of the disease correspond to insulin dependent patients. The observed biochemical parameters did not show statistically significant differences between the groups of patients suffering from different types of diabetes. This study has shown that diabetic ketoacidosis can occur in type 2 diabetes. DKA can be prevented by education of patients, improvement of health care as well as improved communication between patients and doctors of family medicine.

  11. Development and standardization of radioimmunoassay technique for human proinsulin determining and its use in the study of type II diabetes mellitus associated to obesity; Desenvolvimento e padronizacao da tecnica de radioimunoensaio para a determinacao de pro-insulina humana e sua aplicacao no estudo do diabetes mellitus tipo II associado a obesidade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Martha do

    1996-12-31

    The availability of immunoassay methodology for proinsulin is important to define its physiological and pathophysiological significance in humans. Serum concentration of proinsulin are elevated in patients with type II Diabetes Mellitus (NIDDM) and recently diagnosed Type I, so a raised circulating concentration of proinsulin may serve as an early indicator of {beta} cells dysfunction. recently, in NIDDM the serum concentrations of proinsulin and its B-chain-C-peptide junctional split form, des (31-32), were found to correlate with diastolic blood pressure, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The development of a sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) methodology for proinsulin has been difficult due to its low concentration in serum and the presence of proinsulin conversion intermediates in fluids and tissues. Also other potentially cross-reactive peptides, including insulin and C-peptide, can interfere in the assay. This work describe a highly specific human proinsulin RIA developed by using biosynthetic human proinsulin (hPI) as immunogen, standard and tracer. (author) 133 refs., 17 figs., 36 tabs.

  12. Development and standardization of radioimmunoassay technique for human proinsulin determining and its use in the study of type II diabetes mellitus associated to obesity; Desenvolvimento e padronizacao da tecnica de radioimunoensaio para a determinacao de pro-insulina humana e sua aplicacao no estudo do diabetes mellitus tipo II associado a obesidade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Martha do

    1997-12-31

    The availability of immunoassay methodology for proinsulin is important to define its physiological and pathophysiological significance in humans. Serum concentration of proinsulin are elevated in patients with type II Diabetes Mellitus (NIDDM) and recently diagnosed Type I, so a raised circulating concentration of proinsulin may serve as an early indicator of {beta} cells dysfunction. recently, in NIDDM the serum concentrations of proinsulin and its B-chain-C-peptide junctional split form, des (31-32), were found to correlate with diastolic blood pressure, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The development of a sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) methodology for proinsulin has been difficult due to its low concentration in serum and the presence of proinsulin conversion intermediates in fluids and tissues. Also other potentially cross-reactive peptides, including insulin and C-peptide, can interfere in the assay. This work describe a highly specific human proinsulin RIA developed by using biosynthetic human proinsulin (hPI) as immunogen, standard and tracer. (author) 133 refs., 17 figs., 36 tabs.

  13. Urinary proteome analysis enables assessment of renoprotective treatment in type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sten Peder; Mischak, Harald; Zürbig, Petra

    2010-01-01

    Previously the angiotensin II receptor blocker Irbesartan has been demonstrated to reduce the risk for progression from microalbuminuria to macroalbuminuria in type 2 diabetic patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of treatment with Irbesartan in type 2 diabetic patients w...

  14. Anti-Glycemic and Anti-Hepatotoxic Effects of Mangosteen Vinegar Rind from Garcinia mangostana Against HFD/STZ-Induced Type II Diabetes in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Naymul

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on anti-glycemic and anti-hepatotoxic effects of mangosteen vinegar rind (MVR on five weeks high-fat diet (HFD / single dose streptozotocin (STZ 30 mg/kg BW induced male ICR diabetic mice. Mice were randomly divided into five groups (n=6, normal control, diabetic control, and diabetic groups treated with MVR 100, 200 mg/kg BW and glibenclamide 60 mg/kg BW for one week. After the treatment, lipid profile, glycogen and bilirubin contents, oxidative damage (malondialdehyde, MDA, aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alanine aminotransferase (ALT activities, antioxidant enzymes: superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT were measured in plasma and/or liver tissues. MVR and glibenclamide treatment to HFD/STZ-induced diabetic mice significantly reduced their plasma glucose, plasma lipid profile, and hepatic lipid profile (P<0.05. Increased hepatic glycogen content indicates improvement of insulin sensitivity. Moreover, oxidative damage markers were ameliorated in MVR- and glibenclamide-treated groups compared to the diabetic control group. MVR with phenolic compounds content of 75 mg GAE/g dry weight and antioxidant potential of 303 mmol/L Trolox/g dry weight acted as a hepatoprotective agent against oxidative damage.

  15. Anti neuroinflammatory effect of Vildagliptin in ischaemia-reperfusion induced cerebral infarction in normal and STZ induced type-II diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaleru Purnachander

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is one of the major risk factor for cerebral ischemic stroke. Increased base line levels of oxidative stress in diabetes will lead to cerebral ischemic damage. In pathological conditions such as cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, free radicals cause oxidative stress and inflammation leading to increased injury of brain. Inflammation is one of the major pathological mechanisms involved in cerebral ischemia and reperfusion injury. Vildagliptin newer anti-diabetic drug of the class DPP-4 inhibitors is reported to have anti-inflammatory properties apart from its antihyperglycemic activity. Therefore the aim of the present study is to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of Vildagliptin against cerebral infarction induced ischemia reperfusion injury in normal and STZ induced diabetic Wistar rats. Cerebral infarction was induced by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion followed by 4 hr reperfusion. Percent infarction, inflammatory markers such as MPO, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 were analysed. Treatment with Vildagliptin for a period of four weeks produced significant reduction in percent cerebral infarct volume. Vildagliptin at 10 mg/kg dose, showed significant reduction in markers like MPO, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β in diabetic group when compared to normal group and in contrast significant increase in anti-inflammatory marker like IL-10 levels. Vildagliptin showed significant cerebroprotective effect by antiinflammatory mechanisms.

  16. The geoepidemiology of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchers, Andrea T; Uibo, Raivo; Gershwin, M E

    2010-03-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by absolute insulin deficiency resulting from the progressive immune-mediated destruction of pancreatic islet beta cells. It is thought to be triggered by as yet unidentified environmental factors in genetically susceptible individuals, the major genetic contribution coming from loci within the HLA complex, in particular HLA class II. The worldwide incidence of T1D varies by at least 100-fold, being highest in Finland and Sardinia (Italy) and lowest in Venezuela and China. The incidence has been increasing worldwide at an annual rate of approximately 3%. While genetic factors are thought to explain some of the geographic variability in T1D occurrence, they cannot account for its rapidly increasing frequency. Instead, the declining proportion of newly diagnosed children with high-risk genotypes suggests that environmental pressures are now able to trigger T1D in genotypes that previously would not have developed the disease during childhood. Although comparisons between countries and regions with low and high-incidence rates have suggested that higher socioeconomic status and degree of urbanization are among the environmental factors that play a role in the rising incidence of T1D, the findings are too inconsistent to allow firm conclusions. Morbidity and mortality as well as causes of death also show considerable geographic variation. While glycemic control has been identified as a major predictor of the micro- and macrovascular complications of T1D and shows considerable geographical variability, it does not appear to be the only factor involved in the regional differences in complication rates. The role of genetics in susceptibility to nephropathy, retinopathy and other diabetic complications largely remains to be explored. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Fruit intake and incident diabetic retinopathy with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shiro; Yoshimura, Yukio; Kawasaki, Ryo; Kamada, Chiemi; Tanaka, Sachiko; Horikawa, Chika; Ohashi, Yasuo; Araki, Atsushi; Ito, Hideki; Akanuma, Yasuo; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Yamashita, Hidetoshi; Sone, Hirohito

    2013-03-01

    Antioxidants and dietary fiber are postulated to have preventive effects on diabetic retinopathy, but evidence is lacking. We investigated this association in a cohort with type 2 diabetes 40-70 years of age with hemoglobin (Hb)A1C ≥6.5%, originally part of the Japan Diabetes Complications Study. After excluding people who did not respond to a dietary survey and patients with diabetic retinopathy or a major ocular disease at baseline, we analyzed 978 patients. Baseline dietary intake was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire based on food groups and 24-hour dietary records. Primary outcome was incident diabetic retinopathy determined using international severity scales. Mean fruit intake in quartiles ranged from 23 to 253 g/day, with increasing trends across quartiles of fruit intake for vitamin C, vitamin E, carotene, retinol equivalent, dietary fiber, potassium, and sodium. Mean energy intake ranged from 1644 to 1863 kcal/day, and fat intake was approximately 25%. HbA1C, body mass index, triglycerides, and systolic blood pressure were well controlled. During the 8-year follow-up, the numbers of incident cases of diabetic retinopathy from the first through the fourth quartiles of fruit intake were 83, 74, 69, and 59. Multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios for the second, third, and fourth quartiles of fruit intake compared with the first quartile were 0.66 (95% confidence interval = 0.46-0.92), 0.59 (0.41-0.85), and 0.48 (0.32-0.71) (test for trend, P diabetes duration, overweight, smoking, and hypertension. Risk for diabetic retinopathy declined with increased intake of fruits and vegetables, vitamin C, and carotene. Increased fruit intake in ranges commonly consumed was associated with reduced incident diabetic retinopathy among patients adhering to a low-fat energy-restricted diet.

  18. Effects of hydroalcoholic extract of Rhus coriaria seed on glucose and insulin related biomarkers, lipid profile, and hepatic enzymes in nicotinamide-streptozotocin-induced type II diabetic male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Heidari, Hamid; Junghani, Majid Salehizade; Absari, Reza; Khoogar, Mehdi; Ghaedi, Ehsan

    2017-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes often leads to dislipidemia and abnormal activity of hepatic enzymes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antidiabetic and hypolipidemic properties of Rhus coriaria ( R. coriaria ) seed extrac on nicotinamide-streptozotocin induced type 2 diabetic mice. In this experimental study, 56 male Naval Medical Research Institute mice (30-35 g) were randomly separated into seven groups: control, diabetic group, diabetic mice treated with glibenclamide (0.25 mg/kg, as standard antidiabetic drug) or R. coriaria seed extract in doses of 200 and 300 mg/kg, and control groups received these two doses of extract orally for 28 days. Induction of diabetes was done by intraperitoneal injection of nicotinamide and streptozotocin. Ultimately, body weight of mice, blood levels of glucose, insulin, hepatic enzymes, leptin, and lipid profile were assayed. After induction of type 2 diabetes, level of glucose, cholesterol, low density lipoprotein, serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, and serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase increased and level of insulin and high density lipoprotein decreased remarkably. Administration of both doses of extract decreased level of glucose and cholesterol significantly in diabetic mice. LDL level decreased in treated group with dose of 300 mg/kg of the extract. Although usage of the extract improved level of other lipid profiles, insulin and hepatic enzymes, changes weren't significant. This study showed R. coriaria seeds administration has a favorable effect in controlling some blood parameters in type 2 diabetes. Therefore it may be beneficial in the treatment of diabetes.

  19. Genetics of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Pedersen, Oluf

    2005-01-01

    Throughout the last decade, molecular genetic studies of non-autoimmune diabetes mellitus have contributed significantly to our present understanding of this disease's complex aetiopathogenesis. Monogenic forms of diabetes (maturity-onset diabetes of the young, MODY) have been identified...... and classified into MODY1-6 according to the mutated genes that by being expressed in the pancreatic beta-cells confirm at the molecular level the clinical presentation of MODY as a predominantly insulin secretory deficient form of diabetes mellitus. Genomewide linkage studies of presumed polygenic type 2...... diabetic populations indicate that loci on chromosomes 1q, 5q, 8p, 10q, 12q and 20q contain susceptibility genes. Yet, so far, the only susceptibility gene, calpain-10 (CAPN10), which has been identified using genomewide linkage studies, is located on chromosome 2q37. Mutation analyses of selected...

  20. Associations of blood pressure variability and retinal arteriolar diameter in participants with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloudi, Panagiota; Blizzard, Leigh; Srikanth, Velandai K; McCartney, Paul; Lukoshkova, Elena V; Hughes, Alun D; Head, Geoffrey A; Sharman, James E

    2016-07-01

    Blood pressure variability is associated with macrovascular complications and stroke, but its association with the microcirculation in type II diabetes has not been assessed. This study aimed to determine the relationship between blood pressure variability indices and retinal arteriolar diameter in non-diabetic and type II diabetes participants. Digitized retinal images were analysed to quantify arteriolar diameters in 35 non-diabetic (aged 52 ± 11 years; 49% male) and 28 type II diabetes (aged 61 ± 9 years; 50% male) participants. Blood pressure variability was derived from 24-h ambulatory blood pressure. Arteriolar diameter was positively associated with daytime rate of systolic blood pressure variation (p = 0.04) among type II diabetes participants and negatively among non-diabetics (p = 0.008; interaction p = 0.001). This finding was maintained after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index and mean daytime systolic blood pressure. These findings suggest that the blood pressure variability-related mechanisms underlying retinal vascular disease may differ between people with and without type II diabetes. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. [Polyneuropathy in diabetes type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczyńska, Małgorzata

    2002-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a clinical state of nerve damage caused by hyperglicaemia, raised activation of polyol pathway, oxydative stress, changes in endoneurial arteries and myelinated fibres. Patient complains of pain and paresthesiae in hands and limbs. The feelings of pain, temperature, touch, vibration are significantly reduced. The changes may also concern cranial nerves (IIII, IV, VI, VII), intracostal nerves, hands and limbs (Garland and Tavemer syndrome). Autonomic neuropathy concerns the impairment of autonomic functions of cardio-vascular, gastro-intestinal, uro-genital and other systems. The treatment concerns the improvement of diabetes metabolic control. Antiinflammatory antisteroid drugs are widely used but their usefulness is limited. Antidepressive drugs are the most often used group. The improvement is observed after 6 months of treatment. The side effects - orthostatic hypotension, heart rhythm disturbation and obstipation are harmful for the patients with coronary heart disease. In the cases of persistent pain the oral antiepileptic drugs may be used or cream with capsaicin for skin surface.

  2. Association of HLA class II markers with autoantibody-negative ketosis-prone atypical diabetes compared to type 2 diabetes in a population of sub-Saharan African patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balti, Eric V; Ngo-Nemb, Marinette C; Lontchi-Yimagou, Eric; Atogho-Tiedeu, Barbara; Effoe, Valery S; Akwo, Elvis A; Dehayem, Mesmin Y; Mbanya, Jean-Claude; Gautier, Jean-François; Sobngwi, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the association of HLA DRB1 and DQB1 alleles, haplotypes and genotypes with unprovoked antibody-negative ketosis-prone atypical diabetes (A(-) KPD) in comparison to type 2 diabetes (T2D). A(-) KPD and T2D sub-Saharan African patients aged 19-63 years were consecutively recruited. Patients positive for cytoplasmic islet cell, insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase or islet antigen-2 autoantibodies were excluded. Odds ratios were obtained via logistic regression after considering alleles with a minimum frequency of 5% in the study population. Bonferroni correction was used in the case of multiple comparisons. Among the 130 participants, 35 (27%) were women and 57 (44%) were A(-) KPD. DRB1 and DQB1 allele frequencies were similar for both A(-) KPD and T2D patients; they did not confer any substantial risk even after considering type 1 diabetes susceptibility and resistance alleles. We found no association between A(-) KPD and the derived DRB1*07-DQB1*02:02 (OR: 0.55 [95%CI: 0.17-1.85], P=0.336); DRB1*11-DQB1*03:01 (OR: 2.42 [95%CI: 0.79-7.42], P=0.123); DRB1*15-DQB1*06:02 (OR: 0.87 [95%CI: 0.39-1.95], P=0.731) and DRB1*03:01-DQB1*02:01 (OR: 1.48 [95%CI: 0.55-3.96], P=0.437) haplotypes. Overall, we did not find any evidence of susceptibility to ketosis associated with DRB1 and DQB1 genotypes (all P>0.05) in A(-) KPD compared to T2D. Similar results were obtained after adjusting the analysis for age and sex. Factors other than DRB1 and DQB1 genotype could explain the propensity to ketosis in A(-) KPD. These results need to be confirmed in a larger population with the perspective of improving the classification and understanding of the pathophysiology of A(-) KPD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A multistep approach to manage Fournier’s gangrene in a patient with unknown type II diabetes: surgery, hyperbaric oxygen, and vacuum-assisted closure therapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastore Antonio Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Fournier’s gangrene is an infectious necrotizing fasciitis of the perineum and genital regions and has a high mortality rate. It is a synergistic infection caused by a mixture of aerobic and anaerobic organisms and predisposing factors, including diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, malnutrition, and low socioeconomic status. We report a case of Fournier’s gangrene in a patient with unknown type II diabetes submitted to 24-hour catheterization 15 days before gangrene onset. Case presentation The patient, a 60-year-old Caucasian man, presented with a swollen, edematous, emphysematous scrotum with a crepitant skin and a small circle of necrosis. A lack of resistance along the dartos fascia of the scrotum and Scarpa’s lower abdominal wall fascia combined with the presence of gas and pus during the first surgical debridement also supported the diagnosis of Fournier’s gangrene. On the basis of the microbiological culture, the patient was given multiple antibiotic therapy, combined hypoglycemic treatment, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and several surgical debridements. After five days the infection was not completely controlled and a vacuum-assisted closure device therapy was started. Conclusions This report describes the successful multistep approach of an immediate surgical debridement combined with hyperbaric oxygen and negative pressure wound therapy. The vacuum-assisted closure is a well-known method used to treat complex wounds. In this case study, vacuum-assisted closure treatment was effective and the patient did not require reconstructive surgery. Our report shows that bladder catheterization, a minimally invasive maneuver, may also cause severe infective consequences in high-risk patients, such as patients with diabetes.

  4. The relationship between vegetables and fruits intake and glycosylated hemoglobin values, lipids profiles and nitrogen status in type II inactive diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Tabesh

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions : Intake of vegetables and fruits may reduce the glycosylated hemoglobin, therefore choosing the appropriate diet with high fruits and vegetables may help to develop antioxidant defense and reduce the HbA1C in diabetic patients but it did not have any impact on lipids profiles, BUN/creatinine and urine protein 24 h.

  5. Effective lifestyle interventions to improve type II diabetes self-management for those with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder: : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    prof Berno van Meijel

    2012-01-01

    Patiënten met schizofrenie of een schizo-affectieve stoornis hebben een verhoogde kans op diverse somatische ziektes, zoals cardiovasculaire aandoeningen, virale ziektes, diabetes, respiratoire aandoeningen en seksuele stoornissen. Deze ziektes dragen ertoe bij dat de levensverwachting van deze

  6. Type 1 diabetes: The Bangladesh perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishwar Azad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a common endocrine disorder among children and adolescents in Bangladesh. The latest International Diabetes Federation atlas estimated the incidence of type 1 DM (T1DM in Bangladesh as 4.2 new cases of T1DM/100,000 children (0-14 years/year, in 2013. Diabetes, being a lifelong disease, places a huge burden on the economy of the most densely populated, and resource-poor country of the world. The Diabetic Association of Bangladesh (BADAS, the largest of its kind in the world, provides comprehensive care to the biggest number of diabetics at any one centre and is engaged in advocacy. Although sounding grandiose, it′s aims that ′no diabetic shall die untreated, unfed or unemployed, even if poor′ is pursued with a passion. Recently BADAS has been supported in its endeavor for children and adolescents by two programmes; viz the Changing Diabetes in Children program (a joint initiative of BADAS, the World Diabetes Foundation and Novo Nordisk, and the Life for a Child Programme (LFAC supported by the IDF. Numerous studies from the prosperous countries have demonstrated the incidence of T1DM is increasing. Data from the CDiC clinic at BIRDEM shows a rising trend in patients presenting with classical T1DM. In addition, the pattern of DM is changing.

  7. Psoriasis er associeret med type 2-diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyldenløve, Mette; Knop, Filip Krag; Vilsbøll, Tina

    2013-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a global prevalence of 2-3%. In recent years it has been established that patients with psoriasis carry an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, but the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain unclear. The association is most likely due...... to a combination of shared genes, immunoinflammatory mechanisms and a number of diabetes risk factors in patients with psoriasis. The current review summarises the evidence in the field and calls for attention on diabetes risk assessment, preventive measures and treatment in patients with psoriasis....

  8. Birth Weight in Type 1 Diabetic Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquemyn Yves

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to investigate whether birth weight in mothers with diabetes mellitus type 1 is higher as compared to nondiabetic controls. Methods. A retrospective study was performed using an existing database covering the region of Flanders, Belgium. Data included the presence of diabetes type 1, hypertension, parity, maternal age, the use artificial reproductive technology, fetal- neonatal death, congenital anomalies, admission to a neonatal intensive care unit, and delivery by Caesarean section or vaginally. Results. In the period studied, 354 women with diabetes type 1 gave birth and were compared with 177.471 controls. Women with type 1 diabetes more often had a maternal age of over 35 years (16.7% versus 12.0%, P=.008, OR 1.46; 95% CI 1.09–1.95. They more frequently suffered hypertension in pregnancy (19.5% versus 4.7%, P<.0001, OR 4.91; 95% CI 3.73–6.44. Perinatal death was significantly higher in the diabetes mellitus group (3.05% versus 0.73%, P<.0001, OR 4.28; 95% CI 2.22–8.01. Caesarean section was performed almost 5 times as frequently in the diabetes versus the control group (OR 4.57; 95% CI 3.70–5.65. Birth weight was significantly higher in diabetic pregnant women from 33 until 38 weeks included, but those reaching 39 weeks and later were not different with control groups. Conclusion. In Belgium, diabetic pregnancy still carries a high risk for fetal and maternal complications; in general birth weight is significantly higher but for those reaching term there is no significant difference in birth weight.

  9. Blood pressure control among type 2 diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shehri, Ahmed M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to assess blood pressure BP control in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 DM type treated in primary health care. A cross-sectional study was conducted in primary health care at King Fahd Military Complex Hospital in Dhahran, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, between August 2003 and February 2004, to assess blood control in type 2 diabetics. A sample of 403 medical records of type 2 diabetic patients was selected using systematic random sampling after ordering the medical record numbers. The data were collected through the pre-coded checklist. Hypertension was found in 57.8% of diabetic patients with no statistically significant difference between males and females. The mean age of diabetic patients was significantly highly in hypertensive than non-hypertensive p=0.001. The mean duration of hypertension was significantly higher in females p=0.02. There were only 14.2% of hypertensive diabetic patients in whom blood pressure was controlled. Poor control was significantly associated with obesity and a high rate of complications. Blood pressure control correlated positively and significantly with the age of patients and negatively with duration of diabetes and hypertension. The most commonly prescribed antihypertensive were angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors in 29.3%, followed by angiotensin receptors blockers in 24.1%, and the least prescribed drug was thiazide diuretic. Blood pressure in diabetic patients needs to be given particular attention from all health care professionals, especially primary care family physicians, who should follow the new guideline for better control of blood pressure, and fewer complications. Patient's awareness should be increased, through continuous health education with different modalities. (author)

  10. Improved prognosis of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrésdóttir, Gudbjörg; Jensen, Majken L; Carstensen, Bendix

    2015-01-01

    previously 4.0 to 3.3 ml/min per 1.73 m2/year. During a median follow-up of 9.1 years, 29% of participants doubled their plasma creatinine or developed end-stage renal disease. Mortality risk was similar to our prior study (hazard ratio 1.05 (0.76-1.43). However, after age adjustment, as both diabetes......-term renin-angiotensin system inhibition), lipids, and glycemia, along with less smoking and other lifestyle and treatment advancements, is inadequately analyzed. To clarify this, we studied 497 patients with type 1 diabetes and diabetic nephropathy at the Steno Diabetes Center and compared them...... and nephropathy onset occurred later in life, mortality was reduced by 30%. Risk factors for decline in glomerular filtration rate, death, and other renal end points were generally in agreement with prior studies. Thus, with current treatment of nephropathy in type 1 diabetes, the prognosis and loss of renal...

  11. Effect of individualized diabetes education for type 2 diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: To evaluate the effect of individualized education for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods: A total of 280 patients (158 males, mean age 63 ± 10 years) with T2DM were randomly divided into study and control group. Eysenck Personality questionnaire was used to assess the personality of the ...

  12. Streptozotocin, Type I Diabetes Severity and Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motyl Katherine

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As many as 50% of adults with type I (T1 diabetes exhibit bone loss and are at increased risk for fractures. Therapeutic development to prevent bone loss and/or restore lost bone in T1 diabetic patients requires knowledge of the molecular mechanisms accounting for the bone pathology. Because cell culture models alone cannot fully address the systemic/metabolic complexity of T1 diabetes, animal models are critical. A variety of models exist including spontaneous and pharmacologically induced T1 diabetic rodents. In this paper, we discuss the streptozotocin (STZ-induced T1 diabetic mouse model and examine dose-dependent effects on disease severity and bone. Five daily injections of either 40 or 60 mg/kg STZ induce bone pathologies similar to spontaneously diabetic mouse and rat models and to human T1 diabetic bone pathology. Specifically, bone volume, mineral apposition rate, and osteocalcin serum and tibia messenger RNA levels are decreased. In contrast, bone marrow adiposity and aP2 expression are increased with either dose. However, high-dose STZ caused a more rapid elevation of blood glucose levels and a greater magnitude of change in body mass, fat pad mass, and bone gene expression (osteocalcin, aP2. An increase in cathepsin K and in the ratio of RANKL/OPG was noted in high-dose STZ mice, suggesting the possibility that severe diabetes could increase osteoclast activity, something not seen with lower doses. This may contribute to some of the disparity between existing studies regarding the role of osteoclasts in diabetic bone pathology. Examination of kidney and liver toxicity indicate that the high STZ dose causes some liver inflammation. In summary, the multiple low-dose STZ mouse model exhibits a similar bone phenotype to spontaneous models, has low toxicity, and serves as a useful tool for examining mechanisms of T1 diabetic bone loss.

  13. Streptozotocin, Type I Diabetes Severity and Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motyl Katherine

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As many as 50% of adults with type I (T1 diabetes exhibit bone loss and are at increased risk for fractures. Therapeutic development to prevent bone loss and/or restore lost bone in T1 diabetic patients requires knowledge of the molecular mechanisms accounting for the bone pathology. Because cell culture models alone cannot fully address the systemic/metabolic complexity of T1 diabetes, animal models are critical. A variety of models exist including spontaneous and pharmacologically induced T1 diabetic rodents. In this paper, we discuss the streptozotocin (STZ-induced T1 diabetic mouse model and examine dose-dependent effects on disease severity and bone. Five daily injections of either 40 or 60 mg/kg STZ induce bone pathologies similar to spontaneously diabetic mouse and rat models and to human T1 diabetic bone pathology. Specifically, bone volume, mineral apposition rate, and osteocalcin serum and tibia messenger RNA levels are decreased. In contrast, bone marrow adiposity and aP2 expression are increased with either dose. However, high-dose STZ caused a more rapid elevation of blood glucose levels and a greater magnitude of change in body mass, fat pad mass, and bone gene expression (osteocalcin, aP2. An increase in cathepsin K and in the ratio of RANKL/OPG was noted in high-dose STZ mice, suggesting the possibility that severe diabetes could increase osteoclast activity, something not seen with lower doses. This may contribute to some of the disparity between existing studies regarding the role of osteoclasts in diabetic bone pathology. Examination of kidney and liver toxicity indicate that the high STZ dose causes some liver inflammation. In summary, the multiple low-dose STZ mouse model exhibits a similar bone phenotype to spontaneous models, has low toxicity, and serves as a useful tool for examining mechanisms of T1 diabetic bone loss.

  14. R(+-Thioctic Acid Effects on Oxidative Stress and Peripheral Neuropathy in Type II Diabetic Patients: Preliminary Results by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Electroneurography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Mrakic-Sposta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Diabetic neuropathy is the most common complication of diabetes. The idea of alterations in energy metabolism in diabetes is emerging. The biogenic antioxidant R(+-thioctic acid has been successfully used in the treatment of diabetic polyneuropathic (DPN patients. Methods. The effects of R(+-thioctic acid (1 tablet, 1.6 g administration were evaluated in 12 DPN patients at baseline and at 15, 30, 60, and 120 administration days throughout the assessment of oxidative stress (OxS; ROS production rate by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR technique; and oxidative damage biomarkers (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS and protein carbonyls (PC, electroneurography (ENG and visual analogue scale. Results. Supplementation induced significant changes (p<0.05 at 30 and 60 days. ROS production rate up to −16%; TBARS (−31%, PC (−38%, and TAC up to +48%. Motor nerve conduction velocity in SPE and ulnar nerves (+22% and +16% and sensor conduction velocity in sural and median nerves (+22% and +5%. Patients reported a general wellness sensation improvement (+35% at 30 days: lower limb pain sensation (−40% and upper limbs (−23%. Conclusion. The results strongly indicate that an increased antioxidant capacity plays an important role in OxS, nerve conduction velocity, pain, and general wellness improvement. Nevertheless, the effects of the antioxidant compound were found positive up to 60 days. Then, a hormesis effect was observed. Novelty of the research would be a challenge for investigators to carefully address issues, including dose range factors, appropriate administration time, and targeting population to counteract possible “boomerang effects.” The great number of monitored parameters would firmly stress these conclusions.

  15. Pathophysiology of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus: a 90-year perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccardi, Francesco; Webb, David R; Yates, Thomas; Davies, Melanie J

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a complex metabolic disorder associated with an increased risk of microvascular and macrovascular disease; its main clinical characteristic is hyperglycaemia. The last century has been characterised by remarkable advances in our understanding of the mechanisms leading to hyperglycaemia. The central role of insulin in glucose metabolism regulation was clearly demonstrated during the early 1920s, when Banting, Best, Collip and Macleod successfully reduced blood glucose levels and glycosuria in a patient treated with a substance purified from bovine pancreata. Later, during the mid-1930s, clinical observations suggested a possible distinction between 'insulin-sensitive' and 'insulin-insensitive' diabetes. Only during the 1950s, when a reliable measure of circulating insulin was available, was it possible to translate these clinical observations into pathophysiological and biochemical differences, and the terms 'insulin-dependent' (indicating undetectable insulin levels) and 'non-insulin-dependent' (normal or high insulin levels) started to emerge. The next 30 years were characterised by pivotal progress in the field of immunology that were instrumental in demonstrating an immune-mediated loss of insulin-secreting β-cells in subjects with 'insulin-dependent' diabetes. At the same time, new experimental techniques allowing measurement of insulin 'impedance' showed a reduced peripheral effect of insulin in subjects with 'non-insulin-dependent' diabetes (insulin resistance). The difference between the two types of diabetes emerging from decades of observations and experiments was further formally recognised in 1979, when the definitions 'type I' and 'type II' diabetes were introduced to replace the former 'insulin-dependent' and 'non-insulin-dependent' terms. In the following years, many studies elucidated the natural history and temporal contribution of insulin resistance and β-cell insulin secretion in 'type II' diabetes. Furthermore, a central

  16. Management of cataract with macular oedema due to diabetes mellitus Type-II and hypertension with grid laser prior to surgery and intra-vitreal bevacizumab (avastin) peroperatively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahab, S.; Ahmed, J.

    2010-01-01

    To study the visual outcome in patients subjected to cataract extraction with prior grid laser and intraoperative intravitreal bevacizumab injection. Methods: This prospective case series comprised of 38 patients subjected to phacoemulsification and in the bag intraocular lens implantation at Al-Noor Eye Hospital and Sindh Govt Lyari General Hospital Karachi from January 2007 to December 2008. All the patients had prior macular grid treatment and intra-operative injection of intra-vitreal Avastin. Diabetes mellitus duration, preoperative glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level and other systemic and local complications of diabetes were recorded. The patients were clinically assessed with bio microscopic examination preoperatively, and postoperatively on day 1, week 1, and in months 1, 2, 3 and 6 respectively. Visual acuity and state of macular oedema was clinically assessed and documented. Results: Out of thirty-eight patients, eighteen were males and 20 were females. Mean duration of diabetes was 9.92 +- 5.5 years (Range 4-16) while that of hypertension was 7.87 +- 3.66 years (Range = 2-15). HbA1c level was 8.36% +- 1.93% (range 6.3 - 12.3). Thirty-one (81.5%) patients had HbA1c level 8.0% or above indicating a poor control. At 6 months of follow up best corrected distant visual acuity of 6/6 to 6/9 was achieved in 23(60.5 %), 6/12 in 11(28.9%) and 6/24 in 4(10.5%) cases while best corrected near acuity of N/6 was achieved in 22(57.8%) N/8 in 12(31.4%) and N/12 in 4(10.5%) cases. At 6 months follow up visual acuity declined in two cases because of uncontrolled diabetes and hypertension. Conclusion: Cataract surgery in diabetic patients with macular oedema and hypertension has a good visual outcome if prior macular grid laser is performed and intra-vitreal anti VEGF is injected during surgery. (author)

  17. Blood metals concentration in type 1 and type 2 diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Giovanni; Bocca, Beatrice; Peruzzu, Angela; Tolu, Francesco; Asara, Yolande; Farace, Cristiano; Oggiano, Riccardo; Madeddu, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    Mechanisms for the onset of diabetes and the development of diabetic complications remain under extensive investigations. One of these mechanisms is abnormal homeostasis of metals, as either deficiency or excess of metals, can contribute to certain diabetic outcomes. Therefore, this paper will report the blood levels of chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), mercury (Hg), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn) in subjects with type 1 diabetes (n = 192, mean age 48.8 years, mean disease duration 20.6 years), type 2 diabetes (n = 68, mean age 68.4 years, mean disease duration 10.2 years), and in control subjects (n = 59, mean age 57.2 years), and discuss the results indicating their possible role in diabetes. The metal concentrations were measured by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after microwave-induced acid digestion of blood samples. The accuracy was checked using a blood-based certified reference material, and recoveries of all elements were in the range of 92-101 % of certified values. Type 1 diabetes was found to be associated with Cr (p = 0.02), Mn (p < 0.001), Ni (p < 0.001), Pb (p = 0.02), and Zn (p < 0.001) deficiency, and type 2 diabetes with Cr (p = 0.014), Mn (p < 0.001), and Ni (p < 0.001) deficiency. These deficiencies were appreciated also subdividing the understudied patients for gender and age groups. Furthermore, in type 1 diabetes, there was a positive correlation between Pb and age (p < 0.001, ρ = 0.400) and Pb and BMI (p < 0.001, ρ = 0.309), while a negative correlation between Fe and age (p = 0.002, ρ = -0.218). In type 2 diabetes, there was a negative correlation between Fe and age (p = 0.017, ρ = -0.294) and Fe and BMI (p = 0.026, ρ = -0.301). Thus, these elements may play a role in both forms of diabetes and combined mineral supplementations could have beneficial effects.

  18. Ideal versus real conditions for type 2 diabetes care : diabetes specialty nurses’ perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Jutterström, Lena; Hällgren Graneheim, Ulla; Isaksson, Ulf; Hörnsten, Åsa

    2012-01-01

    Background: Since diabetes specialty nurses are the professionals who spend the most time with patients living with diabetes, they probably have the greatest influence on the quality of diabetes care. Therefore, their personal perceptions about what constitutes “good care” in type 2 diabetes care are important to explore. Aim: The aim of this study was to describe conditions for “good care” in type 2-diabetes as perceived by diabetes specialty nurses. Method: Twenty-one experienced diabetes s...

  19. Type 1 diabetes guidelines: Are they enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Abdul Zargar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of insulin by Banting and Best in 1922 changed the landscape of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. Guidelines on T1DM should be evidence based and should emphasize comprehensive risk management. Guidelines would improve awareness amongst governments, state health care providers and the general public about the serious long-term implications of poorly managed diabetes and of the essential resources needed for optimal care. T1DM requires lifelong daily medication, regular control as well as access to facilities to manage acute and chronic complications. American Diabetes Association 2014 guidelines recommends annual nephropathy screening for albumin levels; random spot urine sample for albumin-to-creatinine ratio at start of puberty or age ≥10 years, whichever is earlier, once the child has had diabetes for 5 years. Hypertension should be screened for in T1DM patients by measuring blood pressure at each routine visit. Dyslipidemia in T1DM patients is important and patients should be screened if there is a family history of hypercholesterolemia or a cardiovascular event before the age of 55 years exists or if family history is unknown. Retinopathy is another important complication of diabetes and patients should be subjected to an initial dilated and comprehensive eye examination. Basic diabetes training should be provided for school staff, and they should be assigned with responsibilities for the care of diabetic children. Self-management should be allowed at all school settings for students.

  20. Should Type 1 diabetics fast in Ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsin, Fauzia; Azad, Kishwar; Zabeen, Bedowra; Tayyeb, Samin; Baki, Abdul; Nahar, Nazmun

    2015-05-01

    Fasting during the holy month of Ramadan is obligatory for all healthy adult and adolescent Muslims from the age of 12 years. This involves abstaining from eating or drinking from early dawn (Suhur/Sehri) till sunset (Iftar).Fasting is not meant to create excessive hardships or impart any adverse effect to the Muslim individual. As such, Islam has exempted certain categories of people from fasting including young children, travelers, the sick, the elderly,and pregnant and lactating women. According to expert opinion, people with type 1 diabetes who fast during Ramadan are at very high risk of metabolic deterioration. However, some recent studies have demonstrated that individuals with type 1 diabetes who are otherwise healthy and stable, can fast during Ramadan provided they comply with the Ramadan focused management plan and are under close professional supervision. This article discusses how to assess, counsel, monitor and manage people with type 1 diabetes who wish to fast during Ramadan.

  1. Distal technologies and type 1 diabetes management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Danny C; Barry, Samantha; Wagner, David V; Speight, Jane; Choudhary, Pratik; Harris, Michael A

    2018-02-01

    Type 1 diabetes requires intensive self-management to avoid acute and long-term health complications. In the past two decades, substantial advances in technology have enabled more effective and convenient self-management of type 1 diabetes. Although proximal technologies (eg, insulin pumps, continuous glucose monitors, closed-loop and artificial pancreas systems) have been the subject of frequent systematic and narrative reviews, distal technologies have received scant attention. Distal technologies refer to electronic systems designed to provide a service remotely and include heterogeneous systems such as telehealth, mobile health applications, game-based support, social platforms, and patient portals. In this Review, we summarise the empirical literature to provide current information about the effectiveness of available distal technologies to improve type 1 diabetes management. We also discuss privacy, ethics, and regulatory considerations, issues of global adoption, knowledge gaps in distal technology, and recommendations for future directions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. PCOS in adolescence and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreau, Anne-Marie; Baillargeon, Jean-Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is a frequent disorder in women of reproductive age that consists of a heterogeneous combination of hyperandrogenism, chronic anovulation, and polycystic ovaries. Hyperandrogenism and anovulation are clearly linked to insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinism, with an ovarian androgenic hyperresponsiveness to circulating insulin. Evidence is increasing that suggests that lipotoxicity, which is a key mechanism in the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, could also explain the androgen overproduction. During adolescence, diagnosis of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) may be difficult but is of importance because PCOS increases future risk of type 2 diabetes and metabolic complications. Metabolic perturbations begin early in adolescence and also exist in adolescent relatives of women with PCOS, even before clinical signs of PCOS. Screening for impaired glucose tolerance or type 2 diabetes is also important in this population, and treatment should focus on PCOS clinical manifestations as well as long-term metabolic risk.

  3. Type 2-diabetes. Sociale relationer og sundhedsadfaerd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Astrid Ledgaard; Andersen, Anne Friis; Avlund, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease that challenges the Danish health care system and health behaviour is important in connection with rehabilitation. Foreign research shows that social relations are associated with a healthy lifestyle, but this effect has not yet been examined...... to the recommendations for physical activity and diet. Only the association between functional network and diet remains significant when adjusted for the effects of co-variates. CONCLUSION: The study shows a need for the promotion of health behaviour among adult Danes with type 2 diabetes, and indicates that social...... thoroughly based on Danish data. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between social relations and health behaviour among adult Danes with type 2 diabetes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study design was cross-sectional and based on data from the report ''Sundheds- og Sygelighedsundersøgelsen...

  4. Vitamins and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Ramos, Roxana; Ana Laura, Guadarrama-López; Elina, Martínez-Carrillo Beatriz; Donají, Benítez-Arciniega Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    The present review evaluates the relationship between type 2 diabetes mellitus and individual or combined vitamins. Antioxidant vitamins A, C and E are found decreased in diabetic subjects, possibly due to an increased need to control the excessive oxidative stress produced by abnormalities in glucose metabolism. On the other hand, retinol binding protein exerts a modulating effect, as it has adipokine functions. With respect to the B group vitamins, thiamin, pyridoxine and biotin have been found decreased but the mechanisms are not clear, however supplementation has shown some improvement of the metabolic control in diabetic patients. The absorption of folic acid and vitamin B12 is importantly decreased by the prolongued use of metformin, which is the first choice drug in uncomplicated diabetes, thus these two nutrients have been found deficient in the disease and most probably need to be supplemented regularly. On the other hand, vitamin D is considered a risk factor for the development of diabetes as well as its complications, particularly cardiovascular ones. Although some studies have found an association of vitamin K intake with glucose metabolism further research is needed. Studies on the use of multivitamin supplements have shown unconclusive results. After reviewing the evidence, no real recommendation on the use of vitamin supplements in type 2 diabetes mellitus can be issued, however patients using metformin during prolongued periods may need folic acid and vitamin B12. PMID:25388747

  5. Preliminary study of urine metabolism in type two diabetic patients based on GC-MS

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ning; Geng, Fang; Hu, Zhong-Hua; Liu, Bin; Wang, Ye-Qiu; Liu, Jun-Cen; Qi, Yong-Hua; Li, Li-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Comparative study of type 2 diabetes and healthy controls by metabolomics methods to explore the pathogenesis of Type II diabetes. Methods: Gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with a variety of multivariate statistical analysis methods to the healthy control group 58 cases, 68 cases of Type II diabetes group were analyzed. Chromatographic conditions: DB-5MS column; the carrier gas He; flow rate of 1 mL·min-1, the injection volume 1 uL; split ratio is 100: 1. MS condition...

  6. Predictors of undiagnosed prevalent type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heltberg, Andreas Søndergaard; Andersen, John Sahl; Sandholdt, Håkon

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate how self-reported risk factors (including socioeconomic status) predict undiagnosed, prevalent type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). To externally validate Leicester Risk Assessment Score (LRAS), Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC) and Danish Diabetes Risk Score (DDRS......), and to investigate how these predict a European Heart SCORE≥5% in a Danish population study. METHODS: We included 21,205 adults from the Danish General Suburban Population Study. We used relative importance calculations of self-reported variables in prediction of undiagnosed T2DM. We externally validated established...... prediction models reporting ROC-curves for undiagnosed T2DM, pre-diabetes and SCORE. RESULTS: More than 20% of people with T2DM were undiagnosed. The 7 most important self-rated predictors in sequential order were high BMI, antihypertensive-therapy, age, cardiovascular disease, waist-circumference, fitness...

  7. Diabetes-Related Distress Assessment among Type 2 Diabetes Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljuaid, Majed O; Almutairi, Abdulmajeed M; Assiri, Mohammed A; Almalki, Dhifallah M; Alswat, Khaled

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases; it is a debilitating and hard to live with. Diabetes-related distress (DRD) refers to the emotional and behavioral changes caused by diabetes. Our study aims to assess the prevalence of DRD among type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients using Diabetes Distress Scale-17 items (DDS-17) and its relation to complications and treatment modalities. A cross-sectional study of adult T2D patients with follow-up visits at the Diabetes and Endocrinology Center in Taif, Saudi Arabia, between January and July 2017. We excluded patients with other forms of diabetes, untreated hypothyroidism, and psychiatric illness. The total score of DDS-17 was calculated by summing the 17 items' results and then dividing the total by 17. If the total score was >2, then it was considered as clinically significant results (moderate distress), but if it is ≥3, then it is classified as a high distress. A total of 509 T2D patients with a mean age of 58 ± 14 years were included. The majority of participants were male, married, not college educated, and reported a sedentary lifestyle. We found 25% of the screened T2D patients have moderate to high DRD. Regarding the DRD components, emotional distress was the most prevalent followed by physician-related distress. HabA1c was significantly higher in those with high combined distress and high emotional distress compared to those with mild/moderate distress ( p = 0.015 and 0.030, resp.). Our study shows that DRD is a medically relevant issue that clinicians need to address. Despite observing a low prevalence of DRD compared to other studies, we found significant correlations between DRD scores and HabA1c, triglyceride levels, BMI, T2D duration, and interval between visits.

  8. Type 2 diabetes mortality at Mexican borders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Manzanares Rivera

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Analizar la distribución geográfica y evolución temporal de las tasas de mortalidad por diabetes tipo II en el periodo 1998-2013 para las regiones frontera sur y norte de México. Métodos: el trabajo se basa en el análisis exploratorio e inferencial de datos a partir de los registros de mortalidad reportados por el sistema nacional de información en salud SINAIS. El análisis retoma el paradigma teórico sobre determinantes sociales de salud por lo que se consideran microdatos sobre los patrones de consumo a nivel hogar en el contexto de la frontera México-Estados Unidos y México-Guatemala. Resultados: Se encuentra una trayectoria de convergencia durante los últimos 15 años en las tasas de mortalidad por diabetes tipo II entre las dos regiones fronterizas estudiadas. Conclusiones: La evidencia presentada indica que los estados de la frontera sur han experimentado en la última década una transición epidemiológica hacia causas de mortalidad como la diabetes tipo II, una trayectoria que muestra un patrón de convergencia con la población en la frontera norte.

  9. Nocturnal Hypoglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clus Simona

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: It is known that the majority of critical unacknowledged hypoglycemia has an increased incidence in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1DM with a long evolution. The aim of this research is to evaluate the variability of glucose level and hypoglycemic events in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM having pharmacological interventions with hypoglycemic risk. These events are sometimes asymptomatic also in T2DM: frequently in elderly, patients with autonomic neuropathy, or having a long evolution of disease.

  10. Mortality patterns among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Ilorin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-15

    Jan 15, 2010 ... Keywords: causes of death; longevity; type 2 diabetes; Nigeria. Introduction. The incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) has continued ... accounted for the majority of deaths from diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA).

  11. Medication adherence in type 2 diabetes patients: study of patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diabetes mellitus over the years, diabetes places an immense burden on the individuals living ... Key words: Diabetes type 2, adherence, glycemic level, health education and counselling. ... modifying dietary choices, implementing exercise re-.

  12. SOMATOSENSORY EVOKED POTENTIALS IN DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE - 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is the most common metabolic disorder affecting majority of population. It is estimated that over 400 million people throughout the world have diabetes. It has progressed to be a pandemic from an epidemic causing morbidity and mortality in the population. Among the many complications of diabetes, diabetic neuropathies contribute majorly to the morbidity associated with the disease. Axonal conduction is affected by elevated levels of protein kinase c causing neuronal ischemia; decreased ce llular myoinositol affecting sodium potassium ATPase pump leads to decreased nerve conduction; Somatosensory E voked P otentials (SSEPs reflect the activity of somatosensory pathways mediated through the dorsal columns of the spinal cord and the specific so matosensory cortex. Recording of Somatosensory Evoked Potentials in diabetics is done to assess the sensory involvement of spinal cord. Presence of SEPs provides clear evidence for axonal continuity and by using different stimulation sites, the rate of reg eneration can be determined. Both onset and peak latencies of all SEP components are prolonged in patients with diabetes. Present study is done to compare somatosensory evoked potentials in diabetics and normal subjects. MATERIALS AND METHOD S: The present study was undertaken at the Upgraded Department of Physiology, Osmania Medical College, Koti, Hyderabad. The study was conducted on subjects, both male and female in the age group of 45 to 55 years, suffering from type II diabetes excluding other neurologi cal disorders. Non - invasive method of estimation of nerve conduction studies using SFEMG/EP — Electromyography or evoked potential system (Nicolet systems — USA using surface electrodes with automated computerized monitor attached with printer is used. RESUL TS : ANOVA showed statistically significant N9 latency (right & left sides. Latencies of all the components of SSEPs were more significant than amplitudes in Diabetic

  13. Dapagliflozin (Forxiga) for type 2 diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    In the UK, diabetes mellitus affects around 3 million people, of whom over 90% have type 2 diabetes. Aims of treatment include minimising long-term complications (e.g. cardiovascular disease, blindness, chronic kidney disease, premature mortality) and avoiding unwanted effects of treatment (e.g. severe hypoglycaemia, weight gain). Management of diabetes includes patient support and education; addressing symptoms; lifestyle modification; targeting associated risk factors for cardiovascular disease; and surveillance for, and management of, complications including treatment-related hypoglycaemia. Dapagliflozin (Forxiga) belongs to a new class of oral glucose-lowering drugs that inhibit renal glucose reabsorption and promote glycosuria. It is licensed in the UK in adults with type 2 diabetes as monotherapy when diet and exercise alone do not provide adequate glycaemic control and who are unable to tolerate metformin; or, as add-on therapy, with other glucose-lowering agents including insulin, when these, with diet and exercise, do not provide adequate glycaemic control. The company's advertising materials claim that dapagliflozin provides a "novel method of controlling excess glucose" with "secondary benefit of weight loss". Here, we review the evidence for the use of dapagliflozin in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  14. Nephrin expression is reduced in human diabetic nephropathy: evidence for a distinct role for glycated albumin and angiotensin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doublier, Sophie; Salvidio, Gennaro; Lupia, Enrico; Ruotsalainen, Vesa; Verzola, Daniela; Deferrari, Giacomo; Camussi, Giovanni

    2003-04-01

    We studied the distribution of nephrin in renal biopsies from 17 patients with diabetes and nephrotic syndrome (7 type 1 and 10 type 2 diabetes), 6 patients with diabetes and microalbuminuria (1 type 1 and 5 type 2 diabetes), and 10 normal subjects. Nephrin expression was semiquantitatively evaluated by measuring immunofluorescence intensity by digital image analysis. We found an extensive reduction of nephrin staining in both type 1 (67 +/- 9%; P < 0.001) and type 2 (65 +/- 10%; P < 0.001) diabetic patients with diabetes and nephrotic syndrome when compared with control subjects. The pattern of staining shifted from punctate/linear distribution to granular. In patients with microalbuminuria, the staining pattern of nephrin also showed granular distribution and reduction intensity of 69% in the patient with type 1 diabetes and of 62 +/- 4% (P < 0.001) in the patients with type 2 diabetes. In vitro studies on human cultured podocytes demonstrated that glycated albumin and angiotensin II reduced nephrin expression. Glycated albumin inhibited nephrin synthesis through the engagement of receptor for advanced glycation end products, whereas angiotensin II acted on cytoskeleton redistribution, inducing the shedding of nephrin. This study indicates that the alteration in nephrin expression is an early event in proteinuric patients with diabetes and suggests that glycated albumin and angiotensin II contribute to nephrin downregulation.

  15. Vitamin D and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lips, Paul; Eekhoff, Marelise; van Schoor, Natasja; Oosterwerff, Mirjam; de Jongh, Renate; Krul-Poel, Yvonne; Simsek, Suat

    2017-10-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a decreased insulin release, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in experimental and epidemiological studies. Animal studies show that 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 (1,25(OH) 2 D 3 ) stimulates the pancreatic β-cell to secrete insulin. The relationship between vitamin D deficiency and insulin resistance could develop through inflammation, as vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased inflammatory markers. In addition, genetic polymorphisms of vitamin D -related genes may predispose to impaired glycemic control and type 2 diabetes. Epidemiologic studies showed an association between low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D 3 (25(OH)D 3 ) concentration and an increased risk for the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. This may be partly explained by an increased fat mass. A possible causal relationship between vitamin D deficiency and type 2 diabetes should be proven by randomized clinical trials showing that either type 2 diabetes can be prevented or insulin release and insulin sensitivity can be improved by vitamin D supplements. The results of randomized clinical trials on the effect of vitamin D versus placebo, sometimes combined with calcium, in patients with impaired glucose tolerance ("prediabetes") or type 2 diabetes are inconsistent. Some studies showed a slight decrease of fasting plasma glucose or improvement of insulin resistance, but often only in posthoc analyses. These effects are mainly visible in patients with vitamin D deficiency and impaired glucose tolerance at baseline. Meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials in general did not show significant effects of vitamin D supplementation on glycemic control. Currently, several large scale randomized clinical trials with vitamin D supplementation in doses of 1600-4000IU/d are ongoing with glycemic control or incidence of diabetes mellitus as outcome. Vitamin D deficiency needs to be prevented or cured, but until the results of these trials are published, high

  16. An immune origin of type 2 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolb, H; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Subclinical, low-grade systemic inflammation has been observed in patients with type 2 diabetes and in those at increased risk of the disease. This may be more than an epiphenomenon. Alleles of genes encoding immune/inflammatory mediators are associated with the disease, and the two major...... environmental factors the contribute to the risk of type 2 diabetes-diet and physical activity-have a direct impact on levels of systemic immune mediators. In animal models, targeting of immune genes enhanced or suppressed the development of obesity or diabetes. Obesity is associated with the infiltration...... and proinflammatory activity of macrophages in adipose tissue, and immune mediators may be important regulators of insulin resistance, mitochondrial function, ectopic lipid storage and beta cell dysfunction or death. Intervention studies targeting these pathways would help to determine the contribution...

  17. Premarriage counseling in Type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagan Priya

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes is a challenging illness and needs lifelong diabetes self-care. At the same time, there is a significant stigma associated with it, especially with relation to marriage. There are concerns related to premarriage disclosure, marital relationship, ability to procreate, risk during pregnancy in women, and the risk of disease in children. In this document, we discuss the issue of disease-related stigma which may become a significant challenge for a prospective spouse and the impact of type 1 diabetes on marital relationships and procreation. We also highlight the need for premarriage counseling to ensure long-term success in achieving both individual and interpersonal well-being.

  18. Genetic risk factors for type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pociot, Flemming; Lernmark, Åke

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is diagnosed at the end of a prodrome of β-cell autoimmunity. The disease is most likely triggered at an early age by autoantibodies primarily directed against insulin or glutamic acid decarboxylase, or both, but rarely against islet antigen-2. After the initial appearance of one...... is generally needed. The pathogenesis can be divided into three stages: 1, appearance of β-cell autoimmunity, normoglycaemia, and no symptoms; 2, β-cell autoimmunity, dysglycaemia, and no symptoms; and 3, β-cell autoimmunity, dysglycaemia, and symptoms of diabetes. The genetic association with each one...... of the three stages can differ. Type 1 diabetes could serve as a disease model for organ-specific autoimmune disorders such as coeliac disease, thyroiditis, and Addison's disease, which show similar early markers of a prolonged disease process before clinical diagnosis....

  19. Validation of BP devices QardioArm® in the general population and Omron M6 Comfort® in type II diabetic patients according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol (ESH-IP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahine, Mirna N; Topouchian, Jirar; Zelveian, Parounak; Hakobyan, Zoya; Melkonyan, Arevik; Azaki, Alaa; Diab, Reem; Harb, Aya; Asmar, Roland

    2018-01-01

    Following the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol (ESH-IP) Revision 2010, QardioArm ® and Omron M6 Comfort IT ® oscillometric devices were evaluated in the general population and in patients with type II diabetes, respectively, for self-blood pressure (BP) measurement. Both devices, QardioArm ® and Omron M6 Comfort ® , measure BP at the brachial level. The ESH-IP Revision 2010 includes a total number of 33 subjects. For each measure, the difference between observer and device BP values was calculated. In all, 99 pairs of BP differences are classified into three categories (≤5, ≤10, and ≤15 mmHg). The protocol procedures were followed precisely. QardioArm ® and Omron M6 Comfort ® fulfilled the requirements of the ESH-IP and passed the validation process successfully. For QardioArm ® , a total of 69 out of 99 comparisons for systolic blood pressure (SBP) showed an absolute difference within 5 mmHg and 82 out of 99 for diastolic blood pressure (DBP). As for Omron M6 Comfort ® , a total of 83 out of 99 comparisons for SBP showed an absolute difference within 5 mmHg and 77 out of 99 for DBP. The mean differences between the device and mercury readings were 0.7±5.9 mmHg for SBP and 0.3±4.1 mmHg for DBP for QardioArm ® and -1.4±4.7 mmHg for SBP and -2.1±4.3 mmHg for DBP for Omron M6 Comfort ® . With regard to part 2 of ESH-IP 2010, 27 out of 33 subjects had a minimum of two out of three measurements within 5 mmHg difference for SBP and 31 out of 33 subjects for DBP for the QardioArm ® , and 29 out of 33 patients had a minimum of two out of three measurements within 5 mmHg difference for SBP and 26 out of 33 patients for DBP for Omron M6 Comfort ® . QardioArm ® and Omron M6 Comfort ® readings differing from the mercury standard by <5, 10, and 15 mmHg fulfill the ESH-IP Revision 2010 requirements. Consequently, these two devices are suitable for use in the general population and non-insulin-dependent type II diabetic patients

  20. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rights Employment Discrimination Health Care Professionals Law Enforcement Driver's License For Lawyers Food & Fitness Home Food MyFoodAdvisor ... Fit Types of Activity Weight Loss Assess Your Lifestyle Getting Started Food Choices In My Community Home ...

  1. Hand functions in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akpinar Pinar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Objective. Hand functions have an enormous impact on activities of daily living in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM, such as self-care, administering insulin injections, and preparing and eating meals. The aim of the study was to evaluate hand functions and grip strength in patients with type 1 and type 2 DM. Methods. This was an observational case-control study investigating the hand functions and grip strength in patients with type 1 and type 2 DM. The study comprised 41 patients with type 1 DM aged 25–50 years sex- and age-matched, 40 non-diabetic controls, and 91 patients with type 2 DM aged 40–65 years sex- and age-matched 60 non-diabetic controls. Patients with documented history of diabetic sensorimotor neuropathy and adhesive capsulitis were excluded. The Duruoz Hand Index was used to assess the functional hand disability. Grip strength was tested with a calibrated Jamar dynamometer. Results. The Duruoz Hand Index scores in patients with type 2 DM were significantly higher than in persons in the control group (p 0.05. Grip strength values of patients with type 1 DM were significantly lower compared to those in the control group (p < 0.05, whereas there was no significant difference between patients with type 2 DM and their control group. There was a negatively significant correlation between grip strength and the Duruoz Hand Index scores in patients with both type 1 and type 2 DM (p < 0.05. Conclusion. Patients with type 1 DM and type 2 DM have different degrees of hand disability as compared to healthy control groups.

  2. Risk factors of diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Xiao-ling; WANG Fang; JI Li-nong

    2006-01-01

    Background Advances in treatment have greatly reduced the risk of blindness from this disease, but because diabetes is so common, diabetic retinopathy remains an important problem. The purpose of this study is to investigate the risk factors of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients.Methods Totally 746 type 2 diabetic patients were selected for biochemical and clinical characteristics test and examined by the retina-camera for diabetic retinopathy and the average age was 55.9 years old.Results A total of 526 patients was classified as non-DR, 159 patients as non-proliferative-DR and 61 patients as proliferative-DR. Duration of diabetes [(66.09±72.51) months vs (143.71 ±93.27) months vs (174.30±81.91)months, P=0.00], systolic blood pressure [(131.95±47.20) mmHg vs (138.71 ±21.36) mmHg vs (147.58±24.10)mmHg, P=0.01], urine albumin [(32.79± 122.29) mg/L vs (190.96±455.65) mg/L vs (362.00±552.51) mg/L,P=0.00], glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) [(8.68 ± 2.26)% vs (9.42±1.84)% vs (9.42±1.96)%, P=0.04],C-reactive protein (CRP) [(3.19±7.37) mg/L vs (6.36± 23.59) mg/L vs (3.02±4.34) mg/L, P=0.03],high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) [(1.23±0.37) mmol/L vs (1.33±0.35) mmol/L vs (1.24±0.33)mmol/L, P=0.01], uric acid (UA) [(288.51 ±90.85) mmol/L vs (300.29±101.98) mmol/L vs (337.57±115.09)mmol/L, P=0.00], creatinine (CREA) [(84.22±16.31) μmol/L vs (89.35±27.45) μmol/L vs (103.28±48.64)μmol/L, P=0.00], blood urine nitrogen (BUN) [(5.62± 1.62) mmol/L vs (6.55±2.74) mmol/L vs (8.11±3.60)mmol/L, P=0.00] were statistically different among the three groups. Logistic regression analysis showed that diabetic duration and urine albumin were two independent risk factors of DR (the OR values were 1.010 and 1.003 respectively).Conclusions Diabetic duration and urine albumin are two independent risk factors of diabetic retinopathy in elderly type 2 diabetic patients.

  3. Progression to type 1 diabetes in islet cell antibody-positive relatives in the European Nicotinamide Diabetes Intervention Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingley, P J; Gale, E A M; Reimers, Jesper Irving

    2006-01-01

    of development of diabetes within 5 years varied according to age, relationship to the proband, positivity for IAA, IA-2A and GADA, number and combination of islet antibodies, HLA class II genotype, baseline glucose tolerance, and first-phase insulin secretion, but not gender or incidence of childhood type 1...... of additional antibody markers, but not antibody type or genotype. Individuals diabetes within 5 years and these combined criteria identified 81% of the cases in the whole cohort. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: We suggest that screening......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: To examine the role of additional immune, genetic and metabolic risk markers in determining risk of diabetes in islet cell antibody (ICA)-positive individuals with a family history of type 1 diabetes recruited into the European Nicotinamide Diabetes Intervention Trial. METHODS...

  4. Bartter's Syndrome with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ting See

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of Bartter's syndrome in a 35-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The patient presented with leg weakness, fatigue, polyuria and polydipsia. Hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, and high renin and aldosterone concentrations were present, but the patient was normotensive. Gitelman's syndrome was excluded because of the presence of hypercalciuria, secondary hyperparathyroidism and bilateral nephrocalcinosis. The patient's condition improved upon administration of a prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor (acemetacin, oral potassium chloride and potassium-sparing diuretics. Five months later, the patient discontinued acemetacin because of epigastric discomfort; at the same time, severe hypokalemia and hyperglycemia developed. Glucagon stimulation and water deprivation tests were performed. Type 2 diabetes mellitus with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was diagnosed. To avoid further gastrointestinal complications, the patient was treated with celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor. This case serves as a reminder that Bartter's syndrome is associated with various metabolic derangements including nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, nephrocalcinosis and diabetes mellitus. When treating Bartter's syndrome, it is also prudent to remember that the long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and potassium-sparing diuretics may result in serious adverse reactions.

  5. Albiglutide for treating type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønden, Andreas; Naver, Signe V.; Knop, Filip K.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Albiglutide is a once-weekly, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist approved during 2014 in both the US and Europe for the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes. The recommended dose is 30 mg with the possibility of uptitration to 50 mg based on individual glycemic response...

  6. The genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Flannick, Jason; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Mahajan, Anubha; Agarwala, Vineeta; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Ma, Clement; Fontanillas, Pierre; Moutsianas, Loukas; McCarthy, Davis J.; Rivas, Manuel A.; Perry, John R. B.; Sim, Xueling; Blackwell, Thomas W.; Robertson, Neil R.; Rayner, N. William; Cingolani, Pablo; Locke, Adam E.; Fernandez Tajes, Juan; Highland, Heather M.; Dupuis, Josee; Chines, Peter S.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Hartl, Christopher; Jackson, Anne U.; Chen, Han; Huyghe, Jeroen R.; van de Bunt, Martijn; Pearson, Richard D.; Kumar, Ashish; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Grarup, Niels; Stringham, Heather M.; Gamazon, Eric R.; Lee, Jaehoon; Chen, Yuhui; Scott, Robert A.; Below, Jennifer E.; Chen, Peng; Huang, Jinyan; Go, Min Jin; Stitzel, Michael L.; Pasko, Dorota; Parker, Stephen C. J.; Varga, Tibor V.; Green, Todd; Beer, Nicola L.; Day-Williams, Aaron G.; Ferreira, Teresa; Fingerlin, Tasha; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hu, Cheng; Huh, Iksoo; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Kim, Bong-Jo; Kim, Yongkang; Kim, Young Jin; Kwon, Min-Seok; Lee, Juyoung; Lee, Selyeong; Lin, Keng-Han; Maxwell, Taylor J.; Nagai, Yoshihiko; Wang, Xu; Welch, Ryan P.; Yoon, Joon; Zhang, Weihua; Barzilai, Nir; Voight, Benjamin F.; Han, Bok-Ghee; Jenkinson, Christopher P.; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Manning, Alisa; Ng, Maggie C. Y.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Balkau, Beverley; Stancáková, Alena; Abboud, Hanna E.; Boeing, Heiner; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Gottesman, Omri; Scott, James; Carey, Jason; Kwan, Phoenix; Grant, George; Smith, Joshua D.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Purcell, Shaun; Butterworth, Adam S.; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Lee, Heung Man; Lu, Yingchang; Kwak, Soo-Heon; Zhao, Wei; Danesh, John; Lam, Vincent K. L.; Park, Kyong Soo; Saleheen, Danish; So, Wing Yee; Tam, Claudia H. T.; Afzal, Uzma; Aguilar, David; Arya, Rector; Aung, Tin; Chan, Edmund; Navarro, Carmen; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Palli, Domenico; Correa, Adolfo; Curran, Joanne E.; Rybin, Denis; Farook, Vidya S.; Fowler, Sharon P.; Freedman, Barry I.; Griswold, Michael; Hale, Daniel Esten; Hicks, Pamela J.; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kumar, Satish; Lehne, Benjamin; Thuillier, Dorothée; Lim, Wei Yen; Liu, Jianjun; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Loh, Marie; Musani, Solomon K.; Puppala, Sobha; Scott, William R.; Yengo, Loïc; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Taylor, Herman A.; Thameem, Farook; Wilson, Gregory; Wong, Tien Yin; Njølstad, Pål Rasmus; Levy, Jonathan C.; Mangino, Massimo; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Fadista, João; Surdulescu, Gabriela L.; Herder, Christian; Groves, Christopher J.; Wieland, Thomas; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Koistinen, Heikki A.; Doney, Alex S. F.; Kinnunen, Leena; Esko, Tõnu; Farmer, Andrew J.; Hakaste, Liisa; Hodgkiss, Dylan; Kravic, Jasmina; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Hollensted, Mette; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Jørgensen, Torben; Ladenvall, Claes; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Käräjämäki, Annemari; Kriebel, Jennifer; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Lannfelt, Lars; Lauritzen, Torsten; Narisu, Narisu; Linneberg, Allan; Melander, Olle; Milani, Lili; Neville, Matt; Orho-Melander, Marju; Qi, Lu; Qi, Qibin; Roden, Michael; Rolandsson, Olov; Swift, Amy; Rosengren, Anders H.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Wood, Andrew R.; Mihailov, Evelin; Blancher, Christine; Carneiro, Mauricio O.; Maguire, Jared; Poplin, Ryan; Shakir, Khalid; Fennell, Timothy; DePristo, Mark; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin; Deloukas, Panos; Gjesing, Anette P.; Jun, Goo; Nilsson, Peter; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Onofrio, Robert; Thorand, Barbara; Hansen, Torben; Meisinger, Christa; Hu, Frank B.; Isomaa, Bo; Karpe, Fredrik; Liang, Liming; Peters, Annette; Huth, Cornelia; O'Rahilly, Stephen P.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Pedersen, Oluf; Rauramaa, Rainer; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Salomaa, Veikko; Watanabe, Richard M.; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Bergman, Richard N.; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Cho, Yoon Shin; Chandak, Giriraj R.; Chan, Juliana C. N.; Chia, Kee Seng; Daly, Mark J.; Ebrahim, Shah B.; Langenberg, Claudia; Elliott, Paul; Jablonski, Kathleen A.; Lehman, Donna M.; Jia, Weiping; Ma, Ronald C. W.; Pollin, Toni I.; Sandhu, Manjinder; Tandon, Nikhil; Froguel, Philippe; Barroso, Inês; teo, Yik Ying; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Small, Kerrin S.; Ried, Janina S.; DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Grallert, Harald; Glaser, Benjamin; Metspalu, Andres; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Walker, Mark; Banks, Eric; Gieger, Christian; Ingelsson, Erik; Im, Hae Kyung; Illig, Thomas; Franks, Paul W.; Buck, Gemma; Trakalo, Joseph; Buck, David; Prokopenko, Inga; Mägi, Reedik; Lind, Lars; Farjoun, Yossi; Owen, Katharine R.; Gloyn, Anna L.; Strauch, Konstantin; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Kooner, Jaspal Singh; Lee, Jong-Young; Park, Taesung; Donnelly, Peter; Morris, Andrew D.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Bowden, Donald W.; Collins, Francis S.; Atzmon, Gil; Chambers, John C.; Spector, Timothy D.; Laakso, Markku; Strom, Tim M.; Bell, Graeme I.; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Tai, E. Shyong; McVean, Gilean; Hanis, Craig L.; Wilson, James G.; Seielstad, Mark; Frayling, Timothy M.; Meigs, James B.; Cox, Nancy J.; Sladek, Rob; Lander, Eric S.; Gabriel, Stacey; Burtt, Noël P.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Meitinger, Thomas; Groop, Leif; Abecasis, Goncalo; Florez, Jose C.; Scott, Laura J.; Morris, Andrew P.; Kang, Hyun Min; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David; McCarthy, Mark I.

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of common traits, including the number, frequency, and effect sizes of inherited variants that contribute to individual risk, has been long debated. Genome-wide association studies have identified scores of common variants associated with type 2 diabetes, but in aggregate,

  7. Outcomes in type 1 diabetic pregnancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorte Møller; Damm, Peter; Moelsted-Pedersen, Lars

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare pregnancy outcomes in type 1 diabetic pregnancies with the background population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This nationwide prospective multicenter study took place in eight Danish centers treating pregnant women with type 1 diabetes during 1993...... mortality rate was 3.1% in type 1 diabetic pregnancies compared with 0.75% in the background population (RR 4.1 [95% CI 2.9-5.6]), and the stillbirth rate was 2.1% compared with 0.45 (4.7 [3.2-7.0]). The congenital malformation rate was 5.0% in the study population and 2.8% (1.7 [1.3-2.2]) in the background......, daily self-monitoring was associated with a reduction in serious adverse outcomes. The caesarean section rate was 55.9 and 12.6%, respectively, and the risk of preterm delivery was 41.7 and 6.0%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Type 1 diabetic pregnancies are still complicated by considerably higher rates...

  8. The genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Flannick, Jason; Teslovich, Tanya M

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of common traits, including the number, frequency, and effect sizes of inherited variants that contribute to individual risk, has been long debated. Genome-wide association studies have identified scores of common variants associated with type 2 diabetes, but in aggregate...

  9. Insulin and Alzheimer disease: type 3 diabetes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Jagua Gualdrón

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer Disease is a neurodegenerative disease of central nervous system whose incidence will increase in next years. Recent investigations relate alzheimer with insulin signaling defects in neurons. Is alzheimer Disease a type 3 diabetes? In this communication write a brief article about evidences from this alzheimer‘s disease model.

  10. Diabetic ketoacidosis characteristics and differences in type 1 versus type 2 diabetes patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, M.O.; Sheikh, A.; Salam, A.; Farooq, S.; Kiran, Z.; Islam, N.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is undoubtedly one of the most challenging health problems of the 21st century. It is well known that diabetes once develop can lead to several complications. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is one of the life-threatening complications of diabetes. This study was designed to determine the frequency of DKA in diabetes patients and find out the clinical and biochemical determinants of DKA. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted at Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH) Karachi, Pakistan from January 2010 to February 2016. All known or newly diagnosed diabetic patients of >16 years of age irrespective of gender and type of diabetes were included. Information regarding patient’s demographics, presenting symptoms, precipitating causes of DKA, biochemical profiles and outcome at the time of discharge was collected. Results: Majority (54.7%) had moderate and 12.4% had severe DKA at presentation. Previous history of DKA was found higher in type 1 diabetes patients (T1DM) (14%) as compare to (4%) type 2 diabetes patients (T2DM) (p<0.05). DKA severity was observed more (12%) in newly diagnosed (T1DM) (p<0.05). Comorbidities were found more (81%) in (T2DM) (p<0.05) Mortality was also observed higher in Type 2 diabetes patients (p<0.05). Conclusion: Majority of the diabetics had moderate to severe DKA at presentation. Mortality and morbidity related with DKA was found considerably higher among patients with T2DM while infection, myocardial infarction and stroke found as triggering factors in these patients. (author)

  11. Association Between Maternal Diabetes in Utero and Age at Offspring's Diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Pettitt, David J.; Lawrence, Jean M.; Beyer, Jennifer; Hillier, Teresa A.; Liese, Angela D.; Mayer-Davis, Beth; Loots, Beth; Imperatore, Giuseppina; Liu, Lenna; Dolan, Lawrence M.; Linder, Barbara; Dabelea, Dana

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE?The purpose of this study was to examine age of diabetes diagnosis in youth who have a parent with diabetes by diabetes type and whether the parent's diabetes was diagnosed before or after the youth's birth. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS?The cohort comprised SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study participants (diabetes diagnosis 2001?2005) with a diabetic parent. SEARCH is a multicenter survey of youth with diabetes diagnosed before age 20 years. RESULTS?Youth with type 2 diabetes were mo...

  12. Detection of diabetic retinopathy and other microvascular complications in patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Malin Lundberg

    fotografering af nethinden i forhold til guldstandarden med syv sammensatte felter defineret i studiet: Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) (Artikel II). Derudover har vi brugt en nyere metode til at undersøge kargeometrien i nethinden for at se om en suboptimal konfiguration i nethindens kar er......Forekomsten af type 1 diabetes er stigende og diabetisk retinopati er fortsat en af de primære årsager til nedsat syn blandt personer i den arbejdsdygtige alder. Derudover er andre mikrovaskulære komplikationer som diabetisk nefropati og neuropati blandt de primære årsager til nedsat nyrefunktion......, dialysebehandling, fodsår og amputationer. Optimal kontrol af blodsukker og blodtryk kan nedsætte risikoen for eller forsinke udviklingen af sene mikrovaskulære komplikationer. Derudover har sen debut alder og kortere varighed af diabetes vist sig at være beskyttende for udviklingen af mikrovaskulære komplikationer...

  13. Efficacy of Turmeric as Adjuvant Therapy in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Maithili Karpaga Selvi, N.; Sridhar, M. G.; Swaminathan, R. P.; Sripradha, R.

    2014-01-01

    It is known that there is a significant interplay of insulin resistance, oxidative stress, dyslipidemia, and inflammation in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The study was undertaken to investigate the effect of turmeric as an adjuvant to anti-diabetic therapy. Sixty diabetic subjects on metformin therapy were recruited and randomized into two groups (30 each). Group I received standard metformin treatment while group II was on standard metformin therapy with turmeric (2 g) supplements for 4 ...

  14. Teleconsultation in type 1 diabetes mellitus (TELEDIABE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzi, Federico; Stefani, Ilario; Rivolta, Benedetta; Pintaudi, Basilio; Meneghini, Elena; Luzi, Livio; Mazzone, Antonino

    2018-02-01

    The growing incidence of diabetes and the need to contain healthcare costs empower the necessity to identify new models of care. Telemedicine offers an acknowledged instrument to provide clinical health care at a distance, increasing patient compliance and the achievement of therapeutical goals. The objective was to test the feasibility and the efficacy in the improvement of the glycemic control of the teleconsultation for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. A randomized open-label, parallel arms, controlled trial was conducted in two diabetes centers in Italy. Participants affected by type 1 diabetes mellitus have been randomly (1:1) assigned to receive their visits as standard or a web-based care. Patients in the teleconsultation group can arrange their appointments on a Web site and can also have access to web educational courses or to nutritional and psychological counseling. The primary outcome was the assessment of glycemic control by HbA1c measurement after a 12-month follow-up. Overall 74 participants were followed for 1 year. HbA1c changes were not statistically different within (p = 0.56 for standard care group; p = 0.45 for telemedicine group) and between (p = 0.60) groups when considering differences from baseline to the end of the study. Patients randomized to teleconsultation reported reduced severe hypoglycemic episodes (p = 0.03). In addition, they were largely satisfied with the activities, perceived a good improvement in the self-management of the diabetes, and reported to have a time saving and a cost reduction. In conclusion, TELEDIABE proposes a new system for the management of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  15. Setting research priorities for Type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadsby, R; Snow, R; Daly, A C; Crowe, S; Matyka, K; Hall, B; Petrie, J

    2012-10-01

    Research priorities are often set by academic researchers or the pharmaceutical industry. The interests of patients, carers and clinicians may therefore be overlooked and research questions that matter may be neglected. The aims of this study were to collect uncertainties about the treatment of Type 1 diabetes from patients, carers and health professionals, and to collate and prioritize these uncertainties to develop a top 10 list of research priorities, using a structured priority-setting partnership of patients, carers, health professionals and diabetes organizations, as described by the James Lind Alliance. A partnership of interested organizations was set up, and from this a steering committee of 10 individuals was formed. An online and paper survey was used to identify uncertainties. These were collated, and the steering group carried out an interim priority-setting exercise with partner organizations. This group of uncertainties was then voted on to give a smaller list that went forward to the final priority-setting workshop. At this meeting, a final list of the top 10 research priorities was agreed. An initial 1141 uncertainties were described. These were reduced to 88 indicative questions, 47 of which went out for voting. Twenty-four were then taken forward to a final priority-setting workshop. This workshop resulted in a list of top 10 research priorities in Type 1 diabetes. We have shown that it is possible using the James Lind Alliance process to develop an agreed top 10 list of research priorities for Type 1 diabetes from health professionals, patients and carers. © 2012 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2012 Diabetes UK.

  16. High prevalence of type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetes in adult offspring of women with gestational diabetes mellitus or type 1 diabetes: the role of intrauterine hyperglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Tine D; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Hansen, Torben

    2008-01-01

    the background population (O-BP). RESULTS: The prevalence of type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose) in the four groups was 21, 12, 11, and 4%, respectively. In multiple logistic regression analysis, the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for type 2 diabetes...

  17. GLP-1 agonists for type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Maria J; Knop, Filip K; Christensen, Mikkel

    2013-01-01

    and legal documents in the form of assessment reports from the European Medicines Agency and the United States Food and Drug Administration. EXPERT OPINION: GLP-1-based therapy combines several unique mechanisms of action and have the potential to gain widespread use in the fight against diabetes......Within recent years, glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists (GLP-1-RA) have emerged as a new treatment option for type 2 diabetes. The GLP-1-RA are administered subcutaneously and differ substantially in pharmacokinetic profiles. AREAS COVERED: This review describes the pharmacokinetics...

  18. Management of Type 1 Diabetes in Schools: Whose Responsibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandali, Swarna L.; Gordon, Theresa A.

    2009-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2008) reports that approximately 0.2% of all persons under the age of 20 have been diagnosed with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. This represents 186,300 children and young adults. Type 1 diabetes has traditionally been a disease of children and adolescents. Although type 2 diabetes has in the past…

  19. Genetics Home Reference: mucopolysaccharidosis type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... but they typically live into adulthood and their intelligence is not affected. Heart disease and airway obstruction are major causes of death in people with both types of MPS II. Related Information What does it ...

  20. Achalasia in a Patient with Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome Type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashar S. Amr

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Achalasia is a rare disease characterized by aperistalsis of the esophageal body and failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax. The etiology of this disease remains unknown. Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II is a well-identified disease characterized by the occurrence of autoimmune Addison's disease in combination with autoimmune thyroid disease and/or type 1 diabetes mellitus. We report a case that suggests autoimmunity and immunogenicity as a probable contributing factor for association of these two rare disorders.

  1. The genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Flannick, Jason; Teslovich, Tanya M; Mahajan, Anubha; Agarwala, Vineeta; Gaulton, Kyle J; Ma, Clement; Fontanillas, Pierre; Moutsianas, Loukas; McCarthy, Davis J; Rivas, Manuel A; Perry, John R B; Sim, Xueling; Blackwell, Thomas W; Robertson, Neil R; Rayner, N William; Cingolani, Pablo; Locke, Adam E; Tajes, Juan Fernandez; Highland, Heather M; Dupuis, Josee; Chines, Peter S; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Hartl, Christopher; Jackson, Anne U; Chen, Han; Huyghe, Jeroen R; van de Bunt, Martijn; Pearson, Richard D; Kumar, Ashish; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Grarup, Niels; Stringham, Heather M; Gamazon, Eric R; Lee, Jaehoon; Chen, Yuhui; Scott, Robert A; Below, Jennifer E; Chen, Peng; Huang, Jinyan; Go, Min Jin; Stitzel, Michael L; Pasko, Dorota; Parker, Stephen C J; Varga, Tibor V; Green, Todd; Beer, Nicola L; Day-Williams, Aaron G; Ferreira, Teresa; Fingerlin, Tasha; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hu, Cheng; Huh, Iksoo; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Kim, Bong-Jo; Kim, Yongkang; Kim, Young Jin; Kwon, Min-Seok; Lee, Juyoung; Lee, Selyeong; Lin, Keng-Han; Maxwell, Taylor J; Nagai, Yoshihiko; Wang, Xu; Welch, Ryan P; Yoon, Joon; Zhang, Weihua; Barzilai, Nir; Voight, Benjamin F; Han, Bok-Ghee; Jenkinson, Christopher P; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Manning, Alisa; Ng, Maggie C Y; Palmer, Nicholette D; Balkau, Beverley; Stančáková, Alena; Abboud, Hanna E; Boeing, Heiner; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Gottesman, Omri; Scott, James; Carey, Jason; Kwan, Phoenix; Grant, George; Smith, Joshua D; Neale, Benjamin M; Purcell, Shaun; Butterworth, Adam S; Howson, Joanna M M; Lee, Heung Man; Lu, Yingchang; Kwak, Soo-Heon; Zhao, Wei; Danesh, John; Lam, Vincent K L; Park, Kyong Soo; Saleheen, Danish; So, Wing Yee; Tam, Claudia H T; Afzal, Uzma; Aguilar, David; Arya, Rector; Aung, Tin; Chan, Edmund; Navarro, Carmen; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Palli, Domenico; Correa, Adolfo; Curran, Joanne E; Rybin, Denis; Farook, Vidya S; Fowler, Sharon P; Freedman, Barry I; Griswold, Michael; Hale, Daniel Esten; Hicks, Pamela J; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kumar, Satish; Lehne, Benjamin; Thuillier, Dorothée; Lim, Wei Yen; Liu, Jianjun; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Loh, Marie; Musani, Solomon K; Puppala, Sobha; Scott, William R; Yengo, Loïc; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Taylor, Herman A; Thameem, Farook; Wilson, Gregory; Wong, Tien Yin; Njølstad, Pål Rasmus; Levy, Jonathan C; Mangino, Massimo; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Fadista, João; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; Herder, Christian; Groves, Christopher J; Wieland, Thomas; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Koistinen, Heikki A; Doney, Alex S F; Kinnunen, Leena; Esko, Tõnu; Farmer, Andrew J; Hakaste, Liisa; Hodgkiss, Dylan; Kravic, Jasmina; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Hollensted, Mette; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jørgensen, Torben; Ladenvall, Claes; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Käräjämäki, Annemari; Kriebel, Jennifer; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Lannfelt, Lars; Lauritzen, Torsten; Narisu, Narisu; Linneberg, Allan; Melander, Olle; Milani, Lili; Neville, Matt; Orho-Melander, Marju; Qi, Lu; Qi, Qibin; Roden, Michael; Rolandsson, Olov; Swift, Amy; Rosengren, Anders H; Stirrups, Kathleen; Wood, Andrew R; Mihailov, Evelin; Blancher, Christine; Carneiro, Mauricio O; Maguire, Jared; Poplin, Ryan; Shakir, Khalid; Fennell, Timothy; DePristo, Mark; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Deloukas, Panos; Gjesing, Anette P; Jun, Goo; Nilsson, Peter; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Onofrio, Robert; Thorand, Barbara; Hansen, Torben; Meisinger, Christa; Hu, Frank B; Isomaa, Bo; Karpe, Fredrik; Liang, Liming; Peters, Annette; Huth, Cornelia; O'Rahilly, Stephen P; Palmer, Colin N A; Pedersen, Oluf; Rauramaa, Rainer; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Salomaa, Veikko; Watanabe, Richard M; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Bergman, Richard N; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan; Bottinger, Erwin P; Cho, Yoon Shin; Chandak, Giriraj R; Chan, Juliana C N; Chia, Kee Seng; Daly, Mark J; Ebrahim, Shah B; Langenberg, Claudia; Elliott, Paul; Jablonski, Kathleen A; Lehman, Donna M; Jia, Weiping; Ma, Ronald C W; Pollin, Toni I; Sandhu, Manjinder; Tandon, Nikhil; Froguel, Philippe; Barroso, Inês; Teo, Yik Ying; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Loos, Ruth J F; Small, Kerrin S; Ried, Janina S; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Grallert, Harald; Glaser, Benjamin; Metspalu, Andres; Wareham, Nicholas J; Walker, Mark; Banks, Eric; Gieger, Christian; Ingelsson, Erik; Im,